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Sample records for agonist binding domain

  1. Agonist binding to the NMDA receptor drives movement of its cytoplasmic domain without ion flow

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Kim; Aow, Jonathan; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (R) plays important roles in brain physiology and pathology as an ion channel. Here we examine the ion flow-independent coupling of agonist to the NMDAR cytoplasmic domain (cd). We measure FRET between fluorescently tagged cytoplasmic domains of GluN1 subunits of NMDARs expressed in neurons. Different neuronal compartments display varying levels of FRET, consistent with different NMDARcd conformations. Agonist binding drives a rapid and transient ion flow-independent reduction in FRET between GluN1 subunits within individual NMDARs. Intracellular infusion of an antibody targeting the GluN1 cytoplasmic domain blocks agonist-driven FRET changes in the absence of ion flow, supporting agonist-driven movement of the NMDARcd. These studies indicate that extracellular ligand binding to the NMDAR can transmit conformational information into the cell in the absence of ion flow. PMID:26553997

  2. A GLP-1 receptor agonist conjugated to an albumin-binding domain for extended half-life.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Joel; Refai, Essam; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Abrahmsén, Lars; Berggren, Per-Olof; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson

    2014-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and related peptide agonists have been extensively investigated for glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetes, and may also have therapeutic applications for other diseases. Due to the short half-life (t1/2  < 2 min) of the endogenous peptide, caused by proteolytic degradation and renal clearance, different strategies for half-life extension and sustained release have been explored. In the present study, conjugates between a GLP-1 analogue and a 5 kDa albumin-binding domain (ABD) derived from streptococcal protein G have been chemically synthesized and evaluated. ABD binds with high affinity to human serum albumin, which is highly abundant in plasma and functions as a drug carrier in the circulation. Three different GLP-1-ABD conjugates, with the two peptides connected by linkers of two, four, and six PEG units, respectively, were synthesized and tested in mouse pancreatic islets at high (11 mM) and low (3 mM) glucose concentration. Insulin release upon stimulation was shown to be glucose-dependent, showing no significant difference between the three different GLP-1-ABD conjugates and unconjugated GLP-1 analogue. The biological activity, in combination with the high affinity binding to albumin, make the GLP-1-ABD conjugates promising GLP-1 receptor agonists expected to show extended in vivo half-life.

  3. Molecular blueprint of allosteric binding sites in a homologue of the agonist-binding domain of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Spurny, Radovan; Debaveye, Sarah; Farinha, Ana; Veys, Ken; Vos, Ann M.; Gossas, Thomas; Atack, John; Bertrand, Sonia; Bertrand, Daniel; Danielson, U. Helena; Tresadern, Gary; Ulens, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) belongs to the family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels and is involved in fast synaptic signaling. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified chimera of the extracellular domain of the native α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and acetylcholine binding protein, termed α7-AChBP. This chimeric receptor was used to conduct an innovative fragment-library screening in combination with X-ray crystallography to identify allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site is surface-exposed and is located near the N-terminal α-helix of the extracellular domain. Ligand binding at this site causes a conformational change of the α-helix as the fragment wedges between the α-helix and a loop homologous to the main immunogenic region of the muscle α1 subunit. A second site is located in the vestibule of the receptor, in a preexisting intrasubunit pocket opposite the agonist binding site and corresponds to a previously identified site involved in positive allosteric modulation of the bacterial homolog ELIC. A third site is located at a pocket right below the agonist binding site. Using electrophysiological recordings on the human α7 nAChR we demonstrate that the identified fragments, which bind at these sites, can modulate receptor activation. This work presents a structural framework for different allosteric binding sites in the α7 nAChR and paves the way for future development of novel allosteric modulators with therapeutic potential. PMID:25918415

  4. Molecular blueprint of allosteric binding sites in a homologue of the agonist-binding domain of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Spurny, Radovan; Debaveye, Sarah; Farinha, Ana; Veys, Ken; Vos, Ann M; Gossas, Thomas; Atack, John; Bertrand, Sonia; Bertrand, Daniel; Danielson, U Helena; Tresadern, Gary; Ulens, Chris

    2015-05-12

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) belongs to the family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels and is involved in fast synaptic signaling. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified chimera of the extracellular domain of the native α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and acetylcholine binding protein, termed α7-AChBP. This chimeric receptor was used to conduct an innovative fragment-library screening in combination with X-ray crystallography to identify allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site is surface-exposed and is located near the N-terminal α-helix of the extracellular domain. Ligand binding at this site causes a conformational change of the α-helix as the fragment wedges between the α-helix and a loop homologous to the main immunogenic region of the muscle α1 subunit. A second site is located in the vestibule of the receptor, in a preexisting intrasubunit pocket opposite the agonist binding site and corresponds to a previously identified site involved in positive allosteric modulation of the bacterial homolog ELIC. A third site is located at a pocket right below the agonist binding site. Using electrophysiological recordings on the human α7 nAChR we demonstrate that the identified fragments, which bind at these sites, can modulate receptor activation. This work presents a structural framework for different allosteric binding sites in the α7 nAChR and paves the way for future development of novel allosteric modulators with therapeutic potential. PMID:25918415

  5. A Structural Switch between Agonist and Antagonist Bound Conformations for a Ligand-Optimized Model of the Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Arden; Phillips, Jessica L.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Perdew, Gary H.; Kolluri, Siva K.; Bisson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse group of genes. Exogenous AHR ligands include the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which is a potent agonist, and the synthetic AHR antagonist N-2-(1H-indol-3yl)ethyl)-9-isopropyl-2-(5-methylpyridin-3-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351). As no experimentally determined structure of the ligand binding domain exists, homology models have been utilized for virtual ligand screening (VLS) to search for novel ligands. Here, we have developed an “agonist-optimized” homology model of the human AHR ligand binding domain, and this model aided in the discovery of two human AHR agonists by VLS. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of an agonist TCDD-bound and antagonist GNF351-bound version of this model in order to gain insights into the mechanics of the AHR ligand-binding pocket. These simulations identified residues 307–329 as a flexible segment of the AHR ligand pocket that adopts discrete conformations upon agonist or antagonist binding. This flexible segment of the AHR may act as a structural switch that determines the agonist or antagonist activity of a given AHR ligand. PMID:25329374

  6. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L.

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  7. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  8. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  9. Open tubular columns containing the immobilized ligand binding domain of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and γ for dual agonists characterization by frontal affinity chromatography with MS detection

    PubMed Central

    Temporini, C.; Pochetti, G.; Fracchiolla, G.; Piemontese, L.; Montanari, R.; Moaddel, R.; Laghezza, A.; Altieri, F.; Cervoni, L.; Ubiali, D.; Prada, E.; Loiodice, F.; Massolini, G.; Calleri, E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily. In the last years novel PPARs ligands have been identified and these include PPARα/γ dual agonists. To rapidly identify novel PPARs dual ligands, a robust binding assay amenable to high-throughput screening towards PPAR isoforms would be desirable. In this work we describe a parallel assay based on the principles of Frontal Affinity Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (FAC-MS) that can be used to characterize dual agonists. For this purpose the ligand binding domain of PPARα receptor was immobilized onto the surface of open tubular capillaries to create new PPAR-alpha-OT columns to be used in parallel with PPAR-gamma-OT columns. The two biochromatographic systems were used in both ranking and Kd experiments towards new ureidofibrate-like dual agonists for subtype selectivity ratio determination. In order to validate the system, the Kd values determined by frontal analysis chromatography were compared to the affinity constants obtained by ITC experiments. The results of this study strongly demonstrate the specific nature of the interaction of the ligands with the two immobilized receptor subtypes. PMID:23466198

  10. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    PubMed

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  11. Defining Nicotinic Agonist Binding Surfaces through Photoaffinity Labeling†

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Maltby, David; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Zhang, Nanjing; Durkin, Kathleen A.; Presley, Jack; Talley, Todd T.; Taylor, Palmer; Burlingame, Alma L.; Casida, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChR) agonists are potential therapeutic agents for neurological dysfunction. In the present study, the homopentameric mollusk ACh binding protein (AChBP), used as a surrogate for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the nAChR, was specifically derivatized by the highly potent agonist azidoepibatidine (AzEPI) prepared as a photoaffinity probe and radioligand. One EPI-nitrene photoactivated molecule was incorporated in each subunit interface binding site based on analysis of the intact derivatized protein. Tryptic fragments of the modified AChBP were analyzed by collision-induced dissociation and Edman sequencing of radiolabeled peptides. Each specific EPI-nitrene-modified site involved either Tyr195 of loop C on the principal or (+)-face or Met116 of loop E on the complementary or (−)-face. The two derivatization sites were observed in similar frequency, providing evidence of the reactivity of the azido/nitrene probe substituent and close proximity to both residues. [3H]AzEPI binds to the α4β2 nAChR at a single high-affinity site and photoaffinity-labels only the α4 subunit, presumably modifying Tyr225 spatially corresponding to Tyr195 of AChBP. Phe137 of the β2 nAChR subunit, equivalent to Met116 of AChBP, conceivably lacks sufficient reactivity with the nitrene generated from the probe. The present photoaffinity labeling in a physiologically relevant condition combined with the crystal structure of AChBP allows development of precise structural models for the AzEPI interactions with AChBP and α4β2 nAChR. These findings enabled us to use AChBP as a structural surrogate to define the nAChR agonist site. PMID:17614369

  12. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  13. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  14. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  15. Binding mode prediction of aplysiatoxin, a potent agonist of protein kinase C, through molecular simulation and structure-activity study on simplified analogs of the receptor-recognition domain.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Yoshiki; Yanagita, Ryo C; Takahashi, Chise; Kawanami, Yasuhiro; Irie, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-15

    Aplysiatoxin (ATX) is a naturally occurring tumor promoter isolated from a sea hare and cyanobacteria. ATX binds to, and activates, protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes and shows anti-proliferative activity against human cancer cell lines. Recently, ATX has attracted attention as a lead compound for the development of novel anticancer drugs. In order to predict the binding mode between ATX and protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) C1B domain, we carried out molecular docking simulation, atomistic molecular dynamics simulation in phospholipid membrane environment, and structure-activity study on a simple acyclic analog of ATX. These studies provided the binding model where the carbonyl group at position 27, the hydroxyl group at position 30, and the phenolic hydroxyl group at position 20 of ATX were involved in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the PKCδ C1B domain, which would be useful for the rational design of ATX derivatives as anticancer lead compounds. PMID:27436807

  16. Binding mode prediction of aplysiatoxin, a potent agonist of protein kinase C, through molecular simulation and structure-activity study on simplified analogs of the receptor-recognition domain.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Yoshiki; Yanagita, Ryo C; Takahashi, Chise; Kawanami, Yasuhiro; Irie, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-15

    Aplysiatoxin (ATX) is a naturally occurring tumor promoter isolated from a sea hare and cyanobacteria. ATX binds to, and activates, protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes and shows anti-proliferative activity against human cancer cell lines. Recently, ATX has attracted attention as a lead compound for the development of novel anticancer drugs. In order to predict the binding mode between ATX and protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) C1B domain, we carried out molecular docking simulation, atomistic molecular dynamics simulation in phospholipid membrane environment, and structure-activity study on a simple acyclic analog of ATX. These studies provided the binding model where the carbonyl group at position 27, the hydroxyl group at position 30, and the phenolic hydroxyl group at position 20 of ATX were involved in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the PKCδ C1B domain, which would be useful for the rational design of ATX derivatives as anticancer lead compounds.

  17. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site.

  18. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site. PMID:27298318

  19. In silico analysis of the binding of agonists and blockers to the β2-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Karpiak, Joel; Berk, Barkin; Costanzi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a complex phenomenon. Here, we applied Induced Fit docking (IFD) in tandem with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to generate hypotheses on the conformational changes induced to the β2-adrenergic receptor by agonist binding, preliminary to the sequence of events that characterize activation of the receptor. This analysis, corroborated by a follow-up molecular dynamics study, suggested that agonists induce subtle movements to the fifth transmembrane domain (TM5) of the receptor. Furthermore, molecular dynamics also highlighted a correlation between movements of TM5 and the second extracellular loop (EL2), suggesting that freedom of motion of EL2 is required for the agonist-induced TM5 displacement. Importantly, we also showed that the IFD/LDA procedure can be used as a computational means to distinguish agonists from blockers on the basis of the differential conformational changes induced to the receptor. In particular, the two most predictive models obtained are based on the RMSD induced to Ser207 and on the counterclockwise rotation induced to TM5. PMID:21334234

  20. Functional map of arrestin binding to phosphorylated opsin, with and without agonist

    PubMed Central

    Peterhans, Christian; Lally, Ciara C. M.; Ostermaier, Martin K.; Sommer, Martha E.; Standfuss, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Arrestins desensitize G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and act as mediators of signalling. Here we investigated the interactions of arrestin-1 with two functionally distinct forms of the dim-light photoreceptor rhodopsin. Using unbiased scanning mutagenesis we probed the individual contribution of each arrestin residue to the interaction with the phosphorylated apo-receptor (Ops-P) and the agonist-bound form (Meta II-P). Disruption of the polar core or displacement of the C-tail strengthened binding to both receptor forms. In contrast, mutations of phosphate-binding residues (phosphosensors) suggest the phosphorylated receptor C-terminus binds arrestin differently for Meta II-P and Ops-P. Likewise, mutations within the inter-domain interface, variations in the receptor-binding loops and the C-edge of arrestin reveal different binding modes. In summary, our results indicate that arrestin-1 binding to Meta II-P and Ops-P is similarly dependent on arrestin activation, although the complexes formed with these two receptor forms are structurally distinct. PMID:27350090

  1. Direct measurement of agonist binding to genetically engineered peptides of the acetylcholine receptor by selective T sub 1 NMR relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Y.; Navon, G. ); Aronheim, A.; Gershoni, J.M. )

    1990-03-13

    Interactions of four ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with genetically engineered peptides have been studied by NMR. A recombinant cholinergic binding site was prepared as a fusion protein between a truncated form of the bacterial protein trpE and a peptide corresponding to the sequence {alpha}184-200 from the Torpedo californica receptor. This construct binds {alpha}-bungarotoxin while the trpE protein alone does not, and thus serves as a negative control. In this study agonist binding to {alpha}184-200 is demonstrated by monitoring the T{sub 1} relaxation of the ligand's protons in the presence and absence of the recombinant binding site. This binding is specific as it can be competed with {alpha}-bungarotoxin. Quantitative analyses of such competitions yielded the concentration of binding sites, which corresponded to 3.3% and 16.5% of the total protein, for partially purified and affinity-purified {alpha}184-200 constructs, respectively. The K{sub D} values for the binding of acetylcholine, nicotine, d-tubocurarine, and gallamine to the affinity-purified construct were 1.4, 1.4, 0.20, and 0.21 mM, respectively, while K{sub D}'s with the nontoxin binding protein were all above 10 mM. Thus, this is a direct demonstration that the toxin binding domain {alpha}184-200 may comprise a major component of the cholinergic agonist site.

  2. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  3. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  4. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  5. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  6. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na+ in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na+-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na+ sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na+ increased cell surface [3H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na+ by Cs+ or NH4+ inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na+ over Cs+. Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  7. A bacterial collagen-binding domain with novel calcium-binding motif controls domain orientation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jeffrey J.; Matsushita, Osamu; Okabe, Akinobu; Sakon, Joshua

    2003-01-01

    The crystal structure of a collagen-binding domain (CBD) with an N-terminal domain linker from Clostridium histolyticum class I collagenase was determined at 1.00 Å resolution in the absence of calcium (1NQJ) and at 1.65 Å resolution in the presence of calcium (1NQD). The mature enzyme is composed of four domains: a metalloprotease domain, a spacing domain and two CBDs. A 12-residue-long linker is found at the N-terminus of each CBD. In the absence of calcium, the CBD reveals a β-sheet sandwich fold with the linker adopting an α-helix. The addition of calcium unwinds the linker and anchors it to the distal side of the sandwich as a new β-strand. The conformational change of the linker upon calcium binding is confirmed by changes in the Stokes and hydrodynamic radii as measured by size exclusion chromatography and by dynamic light scattering with and without calcium. Furthermore, extensive mutagenesis of conserved surface residues and collagen-binding studies allow us to identify the collagen-binding surface of the protein and propose likely collagen–protein binding models. PMID:12682007

  8. Steroid binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, S.; Nii, A.; Sakai, M.; Muramatsu, M.

    1987-05-05

    For the purpose of characterizing the estrogen binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor (ER), the authors have made use of affinity labeling of partially purified ER with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine. The labeling is very efficient and selective particularly after partial purification of ER. A 65,000-dalton (65-kDa) band was detected on the fluorogram of a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel, together with a 50-kDa band and a few more smaller bands. The 50-kDa protein appears to be a degradation product of the 65-kDa protein in view of the similar peptide map. ER was affinity labeled before or after controlled limited proteolysis with either trypsin, papain, or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. The labeling patterns of limited digests indicate that a fragment of about 30 kDa is relatively resistant to proteases and has a full and specific binding activity to estrogen, whereas smaller fragments have lost much of the binding activity. This fragment is very hydrophobic and probably corresponds to the carboxy half of ER.

  9. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-05-29

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets.

  10. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  11. Conformational variability of the glycine receptor M2 domain in response to activation by different agonists.

    PubMed

    Pless, Stephan A; Dibas, Mohammed I; Lester, Henry A; Lynch, Joseph W

    2007-12-01

    Models describing the structural changes mediating Cys loop receptor activation generally give little attention to the possibility that different agonists may promote activation via distinct M2 pore-lining domain structural rearrangements. We investigated this question by comparing the effects of different ligands on the conformation of the external portion of the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor M2 domain. Conformational flexibility was assessed by tethering a rhodamine fluorophore to cysteines introduced at the 19' or 22' positions and monitoring fluorescence and current changes during channel activation. During glycine activation, fluorescence of the label attached to R19'C increased by approximately 20%, and the emission peak shifted to lower wavelengths, consistent with a more hydrophobic fluorophore environment. In contrast, ivermectin activated the receptors without producing a fluorescence change. Although taurine and beta-alanine were weak partial agonists at the alpha1R19'C glycine receptor, they induced large fluorescence changes. Propofol, which drastically enhanced these currents, did not induce a glycine-like blue shift in the spectral emission peak. The inhibitors strychnine and picrotoxin elicited fluorescence and current changes as expected for a competitive antagonist and an open channel blocker, respectively. Glycine and taurine (or beta-alanine) also produced an increase and a decrease, respectively, in the fluorescence of a label attached to the nearby L22'C residue. Thus, results from two separate labeled residues support the conclusion that the glycine receptor M2 domain responds with distinct conformational changes to activation by different agonists. PMID:17911099

  12. Interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with dopaminergic D3 binding sites in rat striatum. Evidence that (/sup 3/H)dopamine can label a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.E.; Creese, I.

    1985-02-01

    The interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with /sup 3/H-agonist labeled D3 dopaminergic binding sites of rat striatum have been characterized by radioligand-binding techniques. When the binding of (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)apomorphine to D2 dopamine receptors is blocked by the inclusion of D2 selective concentrations of unlabeled spiroperidol or domperidone, these ligands appear to label selectively the previously termed D3 binding site. Antagonist/(/sup 3/H)dopamine competition curves are of uniformly steep slope (nH . 1.0), suggesting the presence of a single D3 binding site. The relative potencies of antagonists to inhibit D3 specific (/sup 3/H)dopamine binding are significantly correlated with their potencies to block D1 dopamine receptors as measured by the inhibition of both dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase and (/sup 3/H)flupentixol-binding activities. The affinities of agonists to inhibit D3 specific (/sup 3/H)dopamine binding are also correlated with estimates of these agonists affinities for the high affinity binding component of agonist/(/sup 3/H)flupentixol competition curves. Both D3 specific (/sup 3/H) dopamine binding and the high affinity agonist-binding component of dopamine/(/sup 3/H)flupentixol competition curves show a similar sensitivity to guanine nucleotides. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the D3 binding site is related to a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor.

  13. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    PubMed Central

    Ettrup, Anders; da Cunha-Bang, Sophie; McMahon, Brenda; Lehel, Szabolcs; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Skibsted, Anine W; Jørgensen, Louise M; Hansen, Martin; Baandrup, Anders O; Bache, Søren; Svarer, Claus; Kristensen, Jesper L; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2014-01-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [11C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT2A receptors with [11C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input measurements provided the most optimal quantification of cerebral [11C]Cimbi-36 binding. Reference tissue modeling was feasible as it induced a negative but predictable bias in [11C]Cimbi-36 PET outcome measures. In five subjects, pretreatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin before a second PET scan significantly decreased [11C]Cimbi-36 binding in all cortical regions with no effects in cerebellum. These results confirm that [11C]Cimbi-36 binding is selective for 5-HT2A receptors in the cerebral cortex and that cerebellum is an appropriate reference tissue for quantification of 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. Thus, we here describe [11C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. PMID:24780897

  14. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-02-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouse(TM) platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  15. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N.; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E.; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouseTM platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  16. Measuring relative acetylcholine receptor agonist binding by selective proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Behling, R W; Yamane, T; Navon, G; Sammon, M J; Jelinski, L W

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented that uses selective proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements of nicotine in the presence of the acetylcholine receptor to obtain relative binding constants for acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and muscarine. For receptors from Torpedo californica the results show that (a) the binding constants are in the order acetylcholine greater than nicotine greater than carbamylcholine greater than muscarine; (b) selective NMR measurements provide a rapid and direct method for monitoring both the specific and nonspecific binding of agonists to these receptors and to the lipid; (c) alpha-bungarotoxin can be used to distinguish between specific and nonspecific binding to the receptor; (d) the receptor--substrate interaction causes a large change in the selective relaxation time of the agonists even at concentrations 100x greater than that of the receptor. This last observation means that these measurements provide a rapid method to monitor drug binding when only small amounts of receptor are available. Furthermore, the binding strategies presented here may be useful for the NMR determination of the conformation of the ligand in its bound state. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3395661

  17. Modulation of agonist binding to human dopamine receptor subtypes by L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide and a peptidomimetic analog.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vaneeta; Mann, Amandeep; Costain, Willard; Pontoriero, Giuseppe; Castellano, Jessica M; Skoblenick, Kevin; Gupta, Suresh K; Pristupa, Zdenek; Niznik, Hyman B; Johnson, Rodney L; Nair, Venugopalan D; Mishra, Ram K

    2005-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the hypothalamic tripeptide L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG) and its conformationally constrained analog 3(R)-[(2(S)-pyrrolidinylcarbonyl)amino]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide (PAOPA) in modulating agonist binding to human dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected with respective cDNAs. Both PLG and PAOPA enhanced agonist [3H]N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) and [3H]quinpirole binding in a dose-dependent manner to the DA D2L,D2S, and D4 receptors. However, agonist binding to the D1 and D3 receptors and antagonist binding to the D2L receptors by PLG were not significantly affected. Scatchard analysis of [3H]NPA binding to membranes in the presence of PLG revealed a significant increase in affinity of the agonist binding sites for the D2L, D2S, and D4 receptors. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition curves revealed that PLG and PAOPA increased the population and affinity of the high-affinity form of the D2L receptor and attenuated guanosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imido)-triphosphate-induced inhibition of high-affinity agonist binding sites for the DA D2L receptor. Furthermore, direct NPA binding with D2L cell membranes pretreated with suramin, a compound that can uncouple receptor/G protein complexes, and incubated with and without DA showed that both PLG and PAOPA had only increased agonist binding in membranes pretreated with both suramin and DA, suggesting that PLG requires the D2L receptor/G protein complex to increase agonist binding. These results suggest that PLG possibly modulates DA D2S, D2L, and D4 receptors in an allosteric manner and that the coupling of D2 receptors to the G protein is essential for this modulation to occur. PMID:16126839

  18. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  19. Solubilization and characterization of guanine nucleotide-sensitive muscarinic agonist binding sites from rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Berrie, C. P.; Birdsall, N. J.; Hulme, E. C.; Keen, M.; Stockton, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors from rat myocardial membranes may be solubilized by digitonin in good yield at low temperatures in the presence of Mg2+. Under these conditions, up to 60% of the soluble receptors show high affinity binding for the potent agonist [3H]-oxotremorine-M (KA = 10(9)M-1), which is inhibited by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate. The muscarinic binding site labelled with [3H]-oxotremorine-M has a higher sedimentation coefficient (13.4 s) than sites labelled with a 3H antagonist in the presence of guanylylimidodiphosphate (11.6 s) and probably represents a complex between the ligand binding subunit of the receptor and a guanine nucleotide binding protein. PMID:6478115

  20. Thermogenesis and mitochondrial GDP binding with age in response to the novel agonist CGP-12177A.

    PubMed

    Scarpace, P J; Matheny, M; Borst, S E

    1992-02-01

    The ability to regulate body temperature diminishes with age in both humans and rodents. To investigate whether attenuation of sympathetically activated thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) may account for the loss of thermoregulation with age, we assessed O2 consumption and body temperature in response to norepinephrine and the specific BAT beta-adrenergic agonist CGP-12177A in 6-, 18-, and 24-mo-old rats. In addition, the effects of this agonist on interscapular BAT mitochondrial GDP binding in young and senescent rats were determined. CGP-12177A rapidly induced an elevation in O2 consumption, which peaked at 25 min, followed by a decline over 4 h. The peak increase in O2 consumption over baseline and the cumulative 4-h response were decreased with age [P less than 0.02, analysis of variance (ANOVA)]. CGP-12177A induced an increase in body temperature that paralleled but appropriately lagged behind the increase in O2 consumption and that was decreased with age (P less than 0.02, ANOVA). The norepinephrine-induced increase in O2 consumption was also reduced with age but was not paralleled by a change in body temperature and was associated with a four- to fivefold increase in physical activity. In young rats CGP-12177A increased the number of available BAT mitochondrial GDP binding sites at 20 and 60 min post-injection, but in senescent rats GCP-12177A was unable to increase GDP binding. These data indicate that CGP-12177A is a novel agonist for BAT thermogenesis. With age there is a reduced capacity for thermogenesis that involves a failure to increase GDP binding, either due to a diminished amount of uncoupling protein with age or a failure to unmask reserve GDP binding sites.

  1. Inhibitory GTP binding protein G/sub i/ regulates US -adrenoceptor affinity towards US -agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, I.; Levitzki, A.

    1987-05-01

    Treatment of S-49 lymphoma cell membranes with pertussis toxin (PT) causes a three-fold reduction of US -adrenoceptor (US AR) affinity towards isoproterenol. A similar treatment with cholera toxin (CT) does not cause such a modulation. The effects were studied by the detailed analysis of SVI-cyanopindolol (CYP) binding curves in the absence and presence of increasing agonist concentrations. Thus, the authors were able to compare in detail the effects of G/sub s/ and G/sub i/ on the agonist-associated state of the US AR. In contrast to these findings, PT treatment does not have any effect on the displacement of SVI-CYP by (-)isoproterenol. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory GTP protein G/sub i/ modulates the US AR affinity towards US -agonists. This might be due to the association of G/sub i/ with the agonist-bound US AR x G/sub s/ x C complex within the membrane. This hypothesis, as well as others, is under investigation.

  2. Binding of chara Myosin globular tail domain to phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Nunokawa, Shun-Ya; Anan, Hiromi; Shimada, Kiyo; Hachikubo, You; Kashiyama, Taku; Ito, Kohji; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2007-11-01

    Binding of Chara myosin globular tail domain to phospholipid vesicles was investigated quantitatively. It was found that the globular tail domain binds to vesicles made from acidic phospholipids but not to those made from neutral phospholipids. This binding was weakened at high KCl concentration, suggesting that the binding is electrostatic by nature. The dissociation constant for the binding of the globular tail domain to 20% phosphatidylserine vesicles (similar to endoplasmic reticulum in acidic phospholipid contents) at 150 mM KCl was 273 nM. The free energy change due to this binding calculated from the dissociation constant was -37.3 kJ mol(-1). Thus the bond between the globular tail domain and membrane phospholipids would not be broken when the motor domain of Chara myosin moves along the actin filament using the energy of ATP hydrolysis (DeltaG degrees ' = -30.5 kJ mol(-1)). Our results suggested that direct binding of Chara myosin to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane through the globular tail domain could work satisfactorily in Chara cytoplasmic streaming. We also suggest a possible regulatory mechanism of cytoplasmic streaming including phosphorylation-dependent dissociation of the globular tail domain from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

  3. GABAA receptor partial agonists and antagonists: structure, binding mode, and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Krall, Jacob; Balle, Thomas; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels; Sørensen, Troels E; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl; Kristiansen, Uffe; Frølund, Bente

    2015-01-01

    A high degree of structural heterogeneity of the GABAA receptors (GABAARs) has been revealed and is reflected in multiple receptor subtypes. The subunit composition of GABAAR subtypes is believed to determine their localization relative to the synapses and adapt their functional properties to the local temporal pattern of GABA impact, enabling phasic or tonic inhibition. Specific GABAAR antagonists are essential tools for physiological and pharmacological elucidation of the different type of GABAAR inhibition. However, distinct selectivity among the receptor subtypes (populations) has been shown for only a few orthosteric ligands. Still, these examples show that it is indeed possible to obtain orthosteric subtype selectivity and they serve as models for further development in the orthosteric GABAAR ligand area. This review presents the very few existing structural classes of orthosteric GABAAR antagonists and describes the development of potent antagonists from partial agonists originally derived from the potent GABAAR agonist muscimol. In this process, several heterocyclic aromatic systems have been used in combination with structural models in order to map the orthosteric binding site and to reveal structural details to be used for obtaining potency and subtype selectivity. The challenges connected to functional characterization of orthosteric GABAAR partial agonists and antagonists, especially with regard to GABAAR stoichiometry and alternative binding sites are discussed. GABAAR antagonists have been essential in defining the tonic current but both remaining issues concerning the GABAARs involved and the therapeutic possibilities of modulating tonic inhibition underline the need for GABAAR antagonists with improved selectivity.

  4. Selective opioid agonist and antagonist competition for [3H]-naloxone binding in amphibian spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Leslie C.; Wallace, David R.; Stevens, Craig W.

    2011-01-01

    Opioids elicit antinociception in mammals through three distinct types of receptors designated as μ, κ and δ. However, it is not clear what type of opioid receptor mediates antinociception in non-mammalian vertebrates. Radioligand binding techniques were employed to characterize the site(s) of opioid action in the amphibian, Rana pipiens. Naloxone is a general opioid antagonist that has not been characterized in Rana pipiens. Using the non-selective opioid antagonist, [3H]-naloxone, opioid binding sites were characterized in amphibian spinal cord. Competitive binding assays were done using selective opioid agonists and highly-selective opioid antagonists. Naloxone bound to a single-site with an affinity of 11.3 nM and 18.7 nM for kinetic and saturation studies, respectively. A Bmax value of 2725 fmol/mg protein in spinal cord was observed. The competition constants (Ki) of unlabeled μ, κ and δ ranged from 2.58 nM to 84 μM. The highly-selective opioid antagonists yielded similar Ki values ranging from 5.37 to 31.1 nM. These studies are the first to examine opioid binding in amphibian spinal cord. In conjunction with previous behavioral data, these results suggest that non-mammalian vertebrates express a unique opioid receptor which mediates the action of selective μ, κ and δ opioid agonists. PMID:11082500

  5. Insight into the Binding Mode of Agonists of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor from Calculated Electron Densities

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Michael E; Gutbrod, Oliver; Matthiesen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are among the most prominent and most economically important insecticide targets. Thus, an understanding of the modes of binding of respective agonists is important for the design of specific compounds with favorable vertebrate profiles. In the case of nAChRs, the lack of available high-resolution X-ray structures leaves theoretical considerations as the only viable option. Starting from classical homology and docking approaches, binding mode hypotheses are created for five agonists of the nAChR, covering insecticides in the main group 4 of the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC) mode of action (MoA) classification, namely, neonicotinoids, nicotine, sulfoxaflor, and butenolides. To better understand these binding modes, the topologies of calculated electron densities of small-model systems are analyzed in the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The theoretically obtained modes of binding are very much in line with the biology-driven IRAC MoA classification of the investigated ligands. PMID:26175091

  6. Binding affinity and agonist activity of putative endogenous cannabinoids at the human neocortical CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Marc; Zentner, Josef; Honegger, Jürgen; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the affinity of putative endocannabinoids (2-arachidonylglycerol, 2-AG; noladin ether, virodhamine) for the human neocortical CB1 receptor. Functional activity of these compounds (including anandamide, AEA) was determined by examining basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation. Assays were performed with synaptosomes, prepared from fresh human neocortical tissue. Receptor affinity was assessed from competition binding experiments with the CB1/2 agonist [3H]-CP55.940 in absence or presence of a protease inhibitor to assess enzymatic stability. Noladin ether and virodhamine inhibited [3H]-CP55.940 binding (Ki: 98, 1740 nM, respectively). Protease inhibition decreased the Ki value of virodhamine (Ki: 912 nM), but left that of noladin ether unchanged. 2-AG almost lacked affinity (Ki lymphoblasic )10 microM). Basal cAMP formation was unaffected by AEA and noladin ether, but strongly enhanced by 2-AG and virodhamine. Forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation was inhibited by AEA and noladin ether (IC50: 69, 427 nM, respectively) to the same extent as by CP55.940 (Imax each approximately 30%). Inhibitions by AEA or noladin ether were blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. Virodhamine increased forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation, also in presence of AM251, by approximately 20%. 2-AG had no effect; in presence of AM251, however, 10 microM 2-AG stimulated cAMP formation by approximately 15%. Our results suggest, that AEA and noladin ether are full CB1 receptor agonists in human neocortex, whereas virodhamine may act as a CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Particularly the (patho)physiological role of 2-AG should be further investigated, since its CB1 receptor affinity and agonist activity especially in humans might be lower than generally assumed. PMID:15588725

  7. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of the ligand-binding domain of the ionotropic glutamate receptor GluR2.

    PubMed Central

    Arinaminpathy, Yalini; Sansom, Mark S P; Biggin, Philip C

    2002-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are essential for fast synaptic nerve transmission. Recent x-ray structures for the ligand-binding (S1S2) region of the GluR2 alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)-sensitive receptor have suggested how differences in protein/ligand interactions may determine whether a ligand will behave as a full agonist. We have used multiple molecular dynamics simulations of 2-5 ns duration to explore the structural dynamics of GluR2 S1S2 in the presence and absence of glutamate and in a complex with kainate. Our studies indicate that not only is the degree of domain closure dependent upon interactions with the ligand, but also that protein/ligand interactions influence the motion of the S2 domain with respect to S1. Differences in domain mobility between the three states (apo-S1S2, glutamate-bound, and kainate-bound) are surprisingly clear-cut. We discuss how these changes in dynamics may provide an explanation relating the mechanism of transmission of the agonist-binding event to channel opening. We also show here how the glutamate may adopt an alternative mode of binding not seen in the x-ray structure, which involves a key threonine (T480) side chain flipping into a new conformation. This new conformation results in an altered pattern of hydrogen bonding at the agonist-binding site. PMID:11806910

  9. Structural Determinants for the Binding of Morphinan Agonists to the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaojing; Campomanes, Pablo; Kless, Achim; Schapitz, Inga; Wagener, Markus; Koch, Thomas; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic descriptions of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) noncovalently binding with two of its prototypical morphinan agonists, morphine (MOP) and hydromorphone (HMP), are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Subtle differences between the binding modes and hydration properties of MOP and HMP emerge from the calculations. Alchemical free energy perturbation calculations show qualitative agreement with in vitro experiments performed in this work: indeed, the binding free energy difference between MOP and HMP computed by forward and backward alchemical transformation is 1.2±1.1 and 0.8±0.8 kcal/mol, respectively, to be compared with 0.4±0.3 kcal/mol from experiment. Comparison with an MD simulation of μOR covalently bound with the antagonist β-funaltrexamine hints to agonist-induced conformational changes associated with an early event of the receptor's activation: a shift of the transmembrane helix 6 relative to the transmembrane helix 3 and a consequent loss of the key R165-T279 interhelical hydrogen bond. This finding is consistent with a previous proposal suggesting that the R165-T279 hydrogen bond between these two helices indicates an inactive receptor conformation. PMID:26280453

  10. Structural Determinants for the Binding of Morphinan Agonists to the μ-Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kless, Achim; Schapitz, Inga; Wagener, Markus; Koch, Thomas; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic descriptions of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) noncovalently binding with two of its prototypical morphinan agonists, morphine (MOP) and hydromorphone (HMP), are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Subtle differences between the binding modes and hydration properties of MOP and HMP emerge from the calculations. Alchemical free energy perturbation calculations show qualitative agreement with in vitro experiments performed in this work: indeed, the binding free energy difference between MOP and HMP computed by forward and backward alchemical transformation is 1.2±1.1 and 0.8±0.8 kcal/mol, respectively, to be compared with 0.4±0.3 kcal/mol from experiment. Comparison with an MD simulation of μOR covalently bound with the antagonist β-funaltrexamine hints to agonist-induced conformational changes associated with an early event of the receptor’s activation: a shift of the transmembrane helix 6 relative to the transmembrane helix 3 and a consequent loss of the key R165-T279 interhelical hydrogen bond. This finding is consistent with a previous proposal suggesting that the R165-T279 hydrogen bond between these two helices indicates an inactive receptor conformation. PMID:26280453

  11. Homology modeling, agonist binding site identification, and docking in octopamine receptor of Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Akinori; Huang, Hongwei

    2008-06-01

    AY333178 (from Periplaneta americana, 628 AAs) was selected as a target octopamine receptor (OAR) class OAR2 for this study using Discovery Studio (DS Modeling1.1/1.2, Accelrys Inc.). Blast similarity search was performed and identified that AY333178 contains N-terminal domain of GPCR. Based upon Blast and Pfam results, Rhodopsin 1U19 (protein data bank) was considered as an ideal homologue and used as a template for homology modeling due to its higher X-ray resolution at 2.2A. Sequence alignment between AY333178 and 1U19 was done using Align123 followed by a manual modification. The final alignment was carefully evaluated and evidenced to be matching the conserved residue data for class A GPCR fairly well. The 3D model of AY333178 was generated with MODELER, and further refined using CHARMm. Superimposition of the model was done over the template 1U19. Two fairly consistent profiles were observed demonstrating AY333178 model was reasonable and could be employed for the further docking study. Agonist docking into OAR2 model was done using LigandFit. The superimposition of two top poses of representative agonists was performed with a soft surface generated. Those models are considered to be used in designing new leads for hopefully more active compounds. Further research on the comparison of models for the agonists may elucidate the mechanisms of OAR2-ligand interactions.

  12. Snooker Structure-Based Pharmacophore Model Explains Differences in Agonist and Blocker Binding to Bitter Receptor hTAS2R39

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Wibke S. U.; Sanders, Marijn P. A.; van Buren, Leo; Gouka, Robin J.; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Ritschel, Tina

    2015-01-01

    The human bitter taste receptor hTAS2R39 can be activated by many dietary (iso)flavonoids. Furthermore, hTAS2R39 activity can be blocked by 6-methoxyflavanones, 4’-fluoro-6-methoxyflavanone in particular. A structure-based pharmacophore model of the hTAS2R39 binding pocket was built using Snooker software, which has been used successfully before for drug design of GPCRs of the rhodopsin subfamily. For the validation of the model, two sets of compounds, both of which contained actives and inactives, were used: (i) an (iso)flavonoid-dedicated set, and (ii) a more generic, structurally diverse set. Agonists were characterized by their linear binding geometry and the fact that they bound deeply in the hTAS2R39 pocket, mapping the hydrogen donor feature based on T5.45 and N3.36, analogues of which have been proposed to play a key role in activation of GPCRs. Blockers lack hydrogen-bond donors enabling contact to the receptor. Furthermore, they had a crooked geometry, which could sterically hinder movement of the TM domains upon receptor activation. Our results reveal characteristics of hTAS2R39 agonist and bitter blocker binding, which might facilitate the development of blockers suitable to counter the bitterness of dietary hTAS2R39 agonists in food applications. PMID:25729848

  13. The MLLE Domain of the Ubiquitin Ligase UBR5 Binds to Its Catalytic Domain to Regulate Substrate Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity. PMID:26224628

  14. The MLLE domain of the ubiquitin ligase UBR5 binds to its catalytic domain to regulate substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-09-11

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity.

  15. Computational Analysis of the Binding Specificities of PH Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi; Liang, Zhongjie; Shen, Bairong; Hu, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains share low sequence identities but extremely conserved structures. They have been found in many proteins for cellular signal-dependent membrane targeting by binding inositol phosphates to perform different physiological functions. In order to understand the sequence-structure relationship and binding specificities of PH domains, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and sequence-based combined with structure-based binding analysis were employed in our research. In the structural aspect, the binding specificities were shown to correlate with the hydropathy characteristics of PH domains and electrostatic properties of the bound inositol phosphates. By comparing these structure properties with sequence-based profiles of physicochemical properties, PH domains can be classified into four functional subgroups according to their binding specificities and affinities to inositol phosphates. The method not only provides a simple and practical paradigm to predict binding specificities for functional genomic research but also gives new insight into the understanding of the basis of diseases with respect to PH domain structures. PMID:26881206

  16. Identification of a potent synthetic FXR agonist with an unexpected mode of binding and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Soisson, Stephen M.; Parthasarathy, Gopalakrishnan; Adams, Alan D.; Sahoo, Soumya; Sitlani, Ayesha; Sparrow, Carl; Cui, Jisong; Becker, Joseph W.

    2008-07-08

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, plays important roles in the regulation of bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and insulin sensitivity. There is intense interest in understanding the mechanisms of FXR regulation and in developing pharmaceutically suitable synthetic FXR ligands that might be used to treat metabolic syndrome. We report here the identification of a potent FXR agonist (MFA-1) and the elucidation of the structure of this ligand in ternary complex with the human receptor and a coactivator peptide fragment using x-ray crystallography at 1.9-{angstrom} resolution. The steroid ring system of MFA-1 binds with its D ring-facing helix 12 (AF-2) in a manner reminiscent of hormone binding to classical steroid hormone receptors and the reverse of the pose adopted by naturally occurring bile acids when bound to FXR. This binding mode appears to be driven by the presence of a carboxylate on MFA-1 that is situated to make a salt-bridge interaction with an arginine residue in the FXR-binding pocket that is normally used to neutralize bound bile acids. Receptor activation by MFA-1 differs from that by bile acids in that it relies on direct interactions between the ligand and residues in helices 11 and 12 and only indirectly involves a protonated histidine that is part of the activation trigger. The structure of the FXR:MFA-1 complex differs significantly from that of the complex with a structurally distinct agonist, fexaramine, highlighting the inherent plasticity of the receptor.

  17. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  18. Molecular Evolution of the Oxygen-Binding Hemerythrin Domain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis during Precambrian times entailed the diversification of strategies minimizing reactive oxygen species-associated damage. Four families of oxygen-carrier proteins (hemoglobin, hemerythrin and the two non-homologous families of arthropodan and molluscan hemocyanins) are known to have evolved independently the capacity to bind oxygen reversibly, providing cells with strategies to cope with the evolutionary pressure of oxygen accumulation. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin was first studied in marine invertebrates but further research has made it clear that it is present in the three domains of life, strongly suggesting that its origin predated the emergence of eukaryotes. Results Oxygen-binding hemerythrins are a monophyletic sub-group of the hemerythrin/HHE (histidine, histidine, glutamic acid) cation-binding domain. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologs were unambiguously identified in 367/2236 bacterial, 21/150 archaeal and 4/135 eukaryotic genomes. Overall, oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues were found in the same proportion as single-domain and as long protein sequences. The associated functions of protein domains in long hemerythrin sequences can be classified in three major groups: signal transduction, phosphorelay response regulation, and protein binding. This suggests that in many organisms the reversible oxygen-binding capacity was incorporated in signaling pathways. A maximum-likelihood tree of oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues revealed a complex evolutionary history in which lateral gene transfer, duplications and gene losses appear to have played an important role. Conclusions Hemerythrin is an ancient protein domain with a complex evolutionary history. The distinctive iron-binding coordination site of oxygen-binding hemerythrins evolved first in prokaryotes, very likely prior to the divergence of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and spread into many bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic species. The later

  19. Peptides identify multiple hotspots within the ligand binding domain of the TNF receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Ku-chuan; Brissette, Renee E; Wang, Pinger; Fletcher, Paul W; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Lennick, Michael; Blume, Arthur J; Goldstein, Neil I

    2003-01-01

    Background Hotspots are defined as the minimal functional domains involved in protein:protein interactions and sufficient to induce a biological response. Results Here we describe the use of complex and high diversity phage display libraries to isolate peptides (called Hotspot Ligands or HSPLs) which sub-divide the ligand binding domain of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2; p75) into multiple hotspots. We have shown that these libraries could generate HSPLs which not only subdivide hotspots on protein and non-protein targets but act as agonists or antagonists. Using this approach, we generated peptides which were specific for human TNFR2, could be competed by the natural ligands, TNFα and TNFβ and induced an unexpected biological response in a TNFR2-specific manner. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the dissection of the TNFR2 into biologically active hotspots with the concomitant identification of a novel and unexpected biological activity. PMID:12646066

  20. Detection of novel intracellular agonist responsive pools of phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate using the TAPP1 pleckstrin homology domain in immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Watt, Stephen A; Kimber, Wendy A; Fleming, Ian N; Leslie, Nick R; Downes, C Peter; Lucocq, John M

    2004-02-01

    PtdIns(3,4) P (2), a breakdown product of the lipid second messenger PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3), is a key signalling molecule in pathways controlling various cellular events. Cellular levels of PtdIns(3,4) P (2) are elevated upon agonist stimulation, mediating downstream signalling pathways by recruiting proteins containing specialized lipid-binding modules, such as the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. A recently identified protein, TAPP1 (tandem-PH-domain-containing protein 1), has been shown to interact in vitro with high affinity and specificity with PtdIns(3,4) P (2) through its C-terminal PH domain. In the present study, we have utilized this PH domain tagged with glutathione S-transferase (GST-TAPP1-PH) as a probe in an on-section immunoelectron microscopy labelling procedure, mapping the subcellular distribution of PtdIns(3,4) P (2). As expected, we found accumulation of PtdIns(3,4) P (2) at the plasma membrane in response to the agonists platelet-derived growth factor and hydrogen peroxide. Importantly, however, we also found agonist stimulated PtdIns(3,4) P (2) labelling of intracellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and multivesicular endosomes. Expression of the 3-phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) in PTEN-null U87MG cells revealed differential sensitivity of these lipid pools to the enzyme. These data suggest a role for PtdIns(3,4) P (2) in endomembrane function.

  1. A novel p53-binding domain in CUL7

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, Jocelyn S.; Arai, Takehiro; De Caprio, James A. . E-mail: james_decaprio@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-09-15

    CUL7 is a member of the cullin RING ligase family and forms an SCF-like complex with SKP1 and FBXW8. CUL7 is required for normal mouse embryonic development and cellular proliferation, and is highly homologous to PARC, a p53-associated, parkin-like cytoplasmic protein. We determined that CUL7, in a manner similar to PARC, can bind directly to p53 but does not affect p53 expression. We identified a discrete, co-linear domain in CUL7 that is conserved in PARC and HERC2, and is necessary and sufficient for p53-binding. The presence of p53 stabilized expression of this domain and we demonstrate that this p53-binding domain of CUL7 contributes to the cytoplasmic localization of CUL7. The results support the model that p53 plays a role in regulation of CUL7 activity.

  2. Membrane binding of human phospholipid scramblase 1 cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Posada, Itziar M D; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Hervás, Javier H; Alonso, Alicia; Monaco, Hugo L; Goñi, Félix M

    2014-07-01

    Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) consists of a large cytoplasmic domain and a small presumed transmembrane domain near the C-terminal end of the protein. Previous studies with the SCRΔ mutant lacking the C-terminal portion (last 28 aa) revealed the importance of this C-terminal moiety for protein function and calcium-binding affinity. The present contribution is intended to elucidate the effect of the transmembrane domain suppression on SCRΔ binding to model membranes (lipid monolayers and bilayers) and on SCRΔ reconstitution in proteoliposomes. In all cases the protein cytoplasmic domain showed a great affinity for lipid membranes, and behaved in most aspects as an intrinsic membrane protein. Assays have been performed in the presence of phosphatidylserine, presumably important for the SCR cytoplasmic domain to be electrostatically anchored to the plasma membrane inner surface. The fusion protein maltose binding protein-SCR has also been studied as an intermediate case of a molecule that can insert into the bilayer hydrophobic core, yet it is stable in detergent-free buffers. Although the intracellular location of SCR has been the object of debate, the present data support the view of SCR as an integral membrane protein, in which not only the transmembrane domain but also the cytoplasmic moiety play a role in membrane docking of the protein.

  3. Enhancement of agonist binding to 5-HT1A receptors in rat brain membranes by millimolar Mn2+.

    PubMed

    Parkel, Sven; Näsman, Johnny; Rinken, Ago

    2009-06-19

    Manganese in millimolar concentration caused increase in specific binding of [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT to rat hippocampal membranes up to 44% in comparison with experiments in the presence of Mg(2+), while no significant differences were found in rat cortical membranes. Similar increase in high-affinity agonist binding sites by Mn(2+) was found in displacement curves of 8-OH-DPAT, where antagonist [(3)H]WAY100635 was used as reporter ligand. The removal of bivalent ions with EDTA caused full loss of high-affinity binding of agonists, but not for antagonists. Therefore it was hypothesized, that the effect of Mn(2+)- and Mg(2+)-ions was modulated through their action on different G-proteins. Results showed that efficient coupling of G-protein and 5-HT(1A) receptors is crucial to modify Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) effects, whereas Mn(2+) is more potent stabilizer of agonist high-affinity binding, especially when GTPgammaS is present. Using Sf9 cells as model system, we have shown that G(i1) proteins are required to modulate Mn(2+)-dependent high-affinity agonist binding to 5-HT(1A) receptors, but further studies are necessary to find the cofactors of Mn(2+) modulation to signal transduction.

  4. Autoradiographical imaging of PPARgamma agonist effects on PBR/TSPO binding in TASTPM mice.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer C; Friel, Sarah L; Roman, Shilina; Perren, Marion; Harper, Alex; Davis, John B; Richardson, Jill C; Virley, David; Medhurst, Andrew D

    2009-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is known to occur in the brains of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients, including the presence of activated microglia close to amyloid plaques. We utilised real time autoradiography and immunohistochemistry to investigate microglial activation and the potential anti-inflammatory effects of PPARgamma agonists in the Thy-1 APP695swe/Thy-1 PS-1.M146V (TASTPM) overexpressing transgenic mouse model of AD. An age dependent increase in specific [3H](R)-PK11195 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR)/translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) was observed in the cortex of TASTPM mice compared to wild type mice, indicative of microglial activation. This was consistent with immunohistochemical data showing age-dependent increases in CD68 immunoreactivity co-localised with amyloid beta (Abeta) deposits. In 10 month old TASTPM mice, pioglitazone (20 mg/kg) and ciglitazone (50 mg/kg) significantly reduced [3H](R)-PK11195 and [3H]DPA-713 binding in cortex and hippocampus, indicative of reduced microglial activation. In AD brain, significant [3H](R)-PK11195 and [3H]DPA-713 binding was observed across all stages of the disease. These results support the use of PBR/TSPO autoradiography in TASTPM mice as a functional readout of microglial activation to assess anti-inflammatory drugs prior to evaluation in AD patients.

  5. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis.

  6. Principal pathway coupling agonist binding to channel gating in nicotinic receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won Yong; Sine, Steven M.

    2005-11-01

    Synaptic receptors respond to neurotransmitters by opening an intrinsic ion channel in the final step in synaptic transmission. How binding of the neurotransmitter is conveyed over the long distance to the channel remains a central question in neurobiology. Here we delineate a principal pathway that links neurotransmitter binding to channel gating by using a structural model of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor at 4-Å resolution, recordings of currents through single receptor channels and determinations of energetic coupling between pairs of residues. We show that a pair of invariant arginine and glutamate residues in each receptor α-subunit electrostatically links peripheral and inner β-sheets from the binding domain and positions them to engage with the channel. The key glutamate and flanking valine residues energetically couple to conserved proline and serine residues emerging from the top of the channel-forming α-helix, suggesting that this is the point at which the binding domain triggers opening of the channel. The series of interresidue couplings identified here constitutes a primary allosteric pathway that links neurotransmitter binding to channel gating.

  7. A hypothetical model for the peptide binding domain of hsp70 based on the peptide binding domain of HLA.

    PubMed Central

    Rippmann, F; Taylor, W R; Rothbard, J B; Green, N M

    1991-01-01

    The sequences of the peptide binding domains of 33 70 kd heat shock proteins (hsp70) have been aligned and a consensus secondary structure has been deduced. Individual members showed no significant deviation from the consensus, which showed a beta 4 alpha motif repeated twice, followed by two further helices and a terminus rich in Pro and Gly. The repeated motif could be aligned with the secondary structure of the functionally equivalent peptide binding domain of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I maintaining equivalent residues in structurally important positions in the two families and a model was built based on this alignment. The interaction of this domain with the ATP domain is considered. The overall model is shown to be consistent with the properties of products of chymotryptic cleavage. PMID:2022182

  8. Ligand binding pocket of the human somatostatin receptor 5: mutational analysis of the extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, M T; Hukovic, N; Kumar, U; Panetta, R; Hjorth, S A; Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1997-11-01

    The ligand binding domain of G protein-coupled receptors for peptide ligands consists of a pocket formed by extracellular and transmembrane domain (TM) residues. In the case of somatostatin (SRIF), however, previous studies have suggested that the binding cavity of the octapeptide analog SMS201-995 (SMS) is lined by residues in TMs III-VII. The additional involvement of the extracellular domains for binding SMS or the natural SRIF ligands (SRIF-14, SRIF-28) has not been clarified. Using a cassette construct cDNA for the human somatostatin 5 receptor (sst5R), we systematically examined the role of exofacial structures in ligand binding by creating a series of mutants in which the extracellular portions have been altered by conservative segment exchange (CSE) mutagenesis for the extracellular loops (ECLs) and by deletion (for the NH2-terminal segment) or truncation analysis (ECL3). CHO-K1 cells were stably transfected with wild type or mutant human sst5R constructs, and agonist binding was assessed using membrane binding assays with 125I-LTT SRIF-28 ligand. Deletion of the NH2 terminus or CSE mutagenesis of ECL1 and ECL3 produced minor 2-8-fold decreases in affinity for SRIF-14, SRIF-28, and SMS ligands. Truncation of ECL3 to mimic the size of this loop in sst1R and sst4R (the two subtypes that do not bind SMS) did not interfere with the binding of SMS, SRIF-14, or SRIF-28. In contrast, both ECL2 mutants failed to bind 125I-LTT SRIF-28. Immunocytochemical analysis of nonpermeabilized cells with a human sst5R antibody revealed that the mutant receptors were targeted to the plasma membrane. Labeled SMS (125I-Tyr3 SMS) also failed to bind to the mutant ECL2 receptors. These results suggest a potential contribution of ECL2 (in addition to the previously identified residues in TMs III-VII) to the SRIF ligand binding pocket.

  9. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  10. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  11. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  12. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  13. Structural Basis for Viral Late-Domain Binding to Alix

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,S.; Joshi, A.; Nagashima, K.; Freed, E.; Hurley, J.

    2007-01-01

    The modular protein Alix is a central node in endosomal-lysosomal trafficking and the budding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. The Gag p6 protein of HIV-1 contains a LYPx{sub n}LxxL motif that is required for Alix-mediated budding and binds a region of Alix spanning residues 360-702. The structure of this fragment of Alix has the shape of the letter 'V' and is termed the V domain. The V domain has a topologically complex arrangement of 11 {alpha}-helices, with connecting loops that cross three times between the two arms of the V. The conserved residue Phe676 is at the center of a large hydrophobic pocket and is crucial for binding to a peptide model of HIV-1 p6. Overexpression of the V domain inhibits HIV-1 release from cells. This inhibition of release is reversed by mutations that block binding of the Alix V domain to p6.

  14. Identification of a calmodulin-binding domain in Sema4D that regulates its exodomain shedding in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Peipei; Zeng, Zhao; Li, Qiang; Liu, Xiaohui; Xin, Xiaoran; Wannemacher, Kenneth M.; Ruan, Changgeng; Li, Renhao; Brass, Lawrence F.

    2013-01-01

    Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is a transmembrane protein that supports contact-dependent amplification of platelet activation by collagen before being gradually cleaved by the metalloprotease ADAM17, as we have previously shown. Cleavage releases a soluble 120-kDa exodomain fragment for which receptors exist on platelets and endothelial cells. Here we have examined the mechanism that regulates Sema4D exodomain cleavage. The results show that the membrane-proximal cytoplasmic domain of Sema4D contains a binding site for calmodulin within the polybasic region Arg762-Lys779. Coprecipitation studies show that Sema4D and calmodulin are associated in resting platelets, forming a complex that dissociates upon platelet activation by the agonists that trigger Sema4D cleavage. Inhibiting calmodulin with W7 or introducing a membrane-permeable peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding site is sufficient to trigger the dissociation of Sema4D from calmodulin and initiate cleavage. Conversely, deletion of the calmodulin-binding site causes constitutive shedding of Sema4D. These results show that (1) Sema4D is a calmodulin-binding protein with a site of interaction in its membrane-proximal cytoplasmic domain, (2) platelet agonists cause dissociation of the calmodulin–Sema4D complex, and (3) dissociation of the complex is sufficient to trigger ADAM17-dependent cleavage of Sema4D, releasing a bioactive fragment. PMID:23564909

  15. Structural and Single-Channel Results Indicate that the Rates of Ligand Binding Domain Closing and Opening Directly Impact AMPA Receptor Gating

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,W.; Cho, Y.; Lolis, E.; Howe, J.

    2008-01-01

    At most excitatory central synapses, glutamate is released from presynaptic terminals and binds to postsynaptic AMPA receptors, initiating a series of conformational changes that result in ion channel opening. Efficient transmission at these synapses requires that glutamate binding to AMPA receptors results in rapid and near-synchronous opening of postsynaptic receptor channels. In addition, if the information encoded in the frequency of action potential discharge is to be transmitted faithfully, glutamate must dissociate from the receptor quickly, enabling the synapse to discriminate presynaptic action potentials that are spaced closely in time. The current view is that the efficacy of agonists is directly related to the extent to which ligand binding results in closure of the binding domain. For glutamate to dissociate from the receptor, however, the binding domain must open. Previously, we showed that mutations in glutamate receptor subunit 2 that should destabilize the closed conformation not only sped deactivation but also altered the relative efficacy of glutamate and quisqualate. Here we present x-ray crystallographic and single-channel data that support the conclusions that binding domain closing necessarily precedes channel opening and that the kinetics of conformational changes at the level of the binding domain importantly influence ion channel gating. Our findings suggest that the stability of the closed-cleft conformation has been tuned during evolution so that glutamate dissociates from the receptor as rapidly as possible but remains an efficacious agonist.

  16. Engineering Bispecificity into a Single Albumin-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Alm, Tove; Hober, Sophia; Löfblom, John

    2011-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies as well as non-immunoglobulin based bispecific affinity proteins are considered to have a very high potential in future biotherapeutic applications. In this study, we report on a novel approach for generation of extremely small bispecific proteins comprised of only a single structural domain. Binding to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was engineered into an albumin-binding domain while still retaining the original affinity for albumin, resulting in a bispecific protein composed of merely 46 amino acids. By diversification of the non albumin-binding side of the three-helix bundle domain, followed by display of the resulting library on phage particles, bispecific single-domain proteins were isolated using selections with TNF-α as target. Moreover, based on the obtained sequences from the phage selection, a second-generation library was designed in order to further increase the affinity of the bispecific candidates. Staphylococcal surface display was employed for the affinity maturation, enabling efficient isolation of improved binders as well as multiparameter-based sortings with both TNF-α and albumin as targets in the same selection cycle. Isolated variants were sequenced and the binding to albumin and TNF-α was analyzed. This analysis revealed an affinity for TNF-α below 5 nM for the strongest binders. From the multiparameter sorting that simultaneously targeted TNF-α and albumin, several bispecific candidates were isolated with high affinity to both antigens, suggesting that cell display in combination with fluorescence activated cell sorting is a suitable technology for engineering of bispecificity. To our knowledge, the new binders represent the smallest engineered bispecific proteins reported so far. Possibilities and challenges as well as potential future applications of this novel strategy are discussed. PMID:21991353

  17. Structure of the RNA-Binding Domain of Telomerase: Implications For RNA Recognition and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Rouda,S.; Skordalakes, E.

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex, replicates the linear ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, thus taking care of the 'end of replication problem.' TERT contains an essential and universally conserved domain (TRBD) that makes extensive contacts with the RNA (TER) component of the holoenzyme, and this interaction is thought to facilitate TERT/TER assembly and repeat-addition processivity. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of TRBD from Tetrahymena thermophila. The nearly all-helical structure comprises a nucleic acid-binding fold suitable for TER binding. An extended pocket on the surface of the protein, formed by two conserved motifs (CP and T motifs) comprises TRBD's RNA-binding pocket. The width and the chemical nature of this pocket suggest that it binds both single- and double-stranded RNA, possibly stem I, and the template boundary element (TBE). Moreover, the structure provides clues into the role of this domain in TERT/TER stabilization and telomerase repeat-addition processivity.

  18. mu-Opioid receptor-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate binding in rat thalamus and cultured cell lines: signal transduction mechanisms underlying agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Selley, D E; Sim, L J; Xiao, R; Liu, Q; Childers, S R

    1997-01-01

    G protein activation by different mu-selective opioid agonists was examined in rat thalamus, SK-N-SH cells, and mu-opioid receptor-transfected mMOR-CHO cells using agonist-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTP gamma S) binding to membranes in the presence of excess GDP. [D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly5-ol]Enkephalin (DAMGO) was the most efficacious agonist in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells, followed by (in rank order) fentanyl = morphine > > buprenorphine. In mMOR-CHO cells expressing a high density of mu receptors, no differences were observed among DAMGO, morphine or fentanyl, but these agonists were more efficacious than buprenorphine, which was more efficacious than levallorphan. In all three systems, efficacy differences were magnified by increasing GDP concentrations, indicating that the activity state of G proteins can affect agonist efficacy. Scatchard analysis of net agon stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding revealed two major components responsible for agonist efficacy differences. First, differences in the KD values of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding between high efficacy agonists (DAMGO, fentanyl, and morphine) and classic partial agonists (buprenorphine and levallorphan) were observed in all three systems. Second, differences in the Bmax value of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding were observed between DAMGO and morphine or fentanyl in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells and between the high efficacy agonists and buprenorphine or levallorphan in all three systems. These results suggest that mu-opioid agonist efficacy is determined by the magnitude of the receptor-mediated affinity shift in the binding of GTP (or[35S]GTP gamma S) versus GDP to the G protein and by the number of G proteins activated per occupied receptor.

  19. Structure of the microtubule-binding domain of flagellar dynein.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yusuke S; Yagi, Toshiki; Harris, Sarah A; Ohki, Shin-ya; Yura, Kei; Shimizu, Youské; Honda, Shinya; Kamiya, Ritsu; Burgess, Stan A; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-11-01

    Flagellar dyneins are essential microtubule motors in eukaryotes, as they drive the beating motions of cilia and flagella. Unlike myosin and kinesin motors, the track binding mechanism of dyneins and the regulation between the strong and weak binding states remain obscure. Here we report the solution structure of the microtubule-binding domain of flagellar dynein-c/DHC9 (dynein-c MTBD). The structure reveals a similar overall helix-rich fold to that of the MTBD of cytoplasmic dynein (cytoplasmic MTBD), but dynein-c MTBD has an additional flap, consisting of an antiparallel b sheet. The flap is positively charged and highly flexible. Despite the structural similarity to cytoplasmic MTBD, dynein-c MTBD shows only a small change in the microtubule- binding affinity depending on the registry change of coiled coil-sliding, whereby lacks the apparent strong binding state. The surface charge distribution of dynein-c MTBD also differs from that of cytoplasmic MTBD, which suggests a difference in the microtubule-binding mechanism.

  20. Insights into how nucleotide-binding domains power ABC transport.

    PubMed

    Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W; Bilton, Paul; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Sadler, Peter J; Campopiano, Dominic J; Sansom, Mark S P; Iwata, So

    2009-09-01

    The mechanism by which nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of ABC transporters power the transport of substrates across cell membranes is currently unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of an NBD, FbpC, from the Neisseria gonorrhoeae ferric iron uptake transporter with an unusual and substantial domain swap in the C-terminal regulatory domain. This entanglement suggests that FbpC is unable to open to the same extent as the homologous protein MalK. Using molecular dynamics we demonstrate that this is not the case: both NBDs open rapidly once ATP is removed. We conclude from this result that the closed structures of FbpC and MalK have higher free energies than their respective open states. This result has important implications for our understanding of the mechanism of power generation in ABC transporters, because the unwinding of this free energy ensures that the opening of these two NBDs is also powered. PMID:19748342

  1. Opioid agonists binding and responses in SH-SY5Y cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, E. M.; Hoffmann, B. B.; Loew, G. H.

    1992-01-01

    SH-SY5Y (human neuroblastoma) cultured cells, known to have mu-opioid receptors, have been used to assess and compare the ability of eight representative mu-selective compounds from diverse opioid families to recognize and activate these receptors. A wide range of receptor affinities spanning a factor of 10,000 was found between the highest affinity fentanyl analogs (Ki = 0.1nM) and the lowest affinity analog, meperidine (Ki = 1 microM). A similar range was found for inhibition of PGE1-stimulated cAMP accumulation with a rank order of activities that closely paralleled binding affinities. Maximum inhibition of cAMP accumulation by each compound was about 80%. Maximum stimulation of GTPase activity (approximately 50%) was also similar for all compounds except the lowest affinity meperidine. Both effects were naloxone reversible. These results provide further evidence that mu-receptors are coupled to inhibition of adenylate cyclase and that the SH-SY5Y cell line is a good system for assessment of mu-agonists functional responses.

  2. An Unexpected Mode Of Binding Defines BMS948 as A Full Retinoic Acid Receptor β (RARβ, NR1B2) Selective Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Vivat, Valérie; Krishnasamy, Gunasekaran; Gronemeyer, Hinrich; Bourguet, William; Germain, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid is an important regulator of cell differentiation which plays major roles in embryonic development and tissue remodeling. The biological action of retinoic acid is mediated by three nuclear receptors denoted RARα, β and γ. Multiple studies support that RARβ possesses functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor and indeed, its expression is frequently lost in neoplastic tissues. However, it has been recently reported that RARβ could also play a role in mammary gland tumorigenesis, thus demonstrating the important but yet incompletely understood function of this receptor in cancer development. As a consequence, there is a great need for RARβ-selective agonists and antagonists as tools to facilitate the pharmacological analysis of this protein in vitro and in vivo as well as for potential therapeutic interventions. Here we provide experimental evidences that the novel synthetic retinoid BMS948 is an RARβ-selective ligand exhibiting a full transcriptional agonistic activity and activating RARβ as efficiently as the reference agonist TTNPB. In addition, we solved the crystal structures of the RARβ ligand-binding domain in complex with BMS948 and two related compounds, BMS641 and BMS411. These structures provided a rationale to explain how a single retinoid can be at the same time an RARα antagonist and an RARβ full agonist, and revealed the structural basis of partial agonism. Finally, in addition to revealing that a flip by 180° of the amide linker, that usually confers RARα selectivity, accounts for the RARβ selectivity of BMS948, the structural analysis uncovers guidelines for the rational design of RARβ-selective antagonists. PMID:25933005

  3. The Relationship between Albumin-Binding Capacity of Recombinant Polypeptide and Changes in the Structure of Albumin-Binding Domain.

    PubMed

    Bormotova, E A; Gupalova, T V

    2015-07-01

    Many bacteria express surface proteins interacting with human serum albumin (HSA). One of these proteins, PAB from anaerobic bacteria, contains an albumin-binding domain consisting of 45 amino acid residues known as GA domain. GA domains are also found in G proteins isolated from human streptococcal strains (groups C and G) and of albumin-binding protein isolated from group G streptococcal strains of animal origin. The GA domain is a left-handed three-helix bundle structure in which amino acid residues of the second and third helixes are involved in albumin binding. We studied the relationship between HSA-binding activity of the recombinant polypeptide isolated from group G streptococcus of animal origin and structure of the GA domain is studied. Structural changes in GA domain significantly attenuated HAS-binding capacity of the recombinant polypeptide. Hence, affinity HSA-binding polypeptide depends on stability of GA domain structure.

  4. Ubiquitin binds to and regulates a subset of SH3 domains

    PubMed Central

    Stamenova, Svetoslava D.; French, Michael E.; He, Yuan; Francis, Smitha A.; Kramer, Zachary B.; Hicke, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Summary SH3 domains are modules of 50-70 amino acids that promote interactions among proteins, often participating in the assembly of large dynamic complexes. These domains bind to peptide ligands, which usually contain a core Pro-X-X-Pro (PXXP) sequence. Here we identify a class of SH3 domains that binds to ubiquitin. The yeast endocytic protein Sla1, as well as the mammalian proteins CIN85 and amphiphysin, carry ubiquitin-binding SH3 domains. Ubiquitin and peptide ligands bind to the same hydrophobic groove on the SH3 domain surface, and ubiquitin and a PXXP-containing protein fragment compete for binding to SH3 domains. We conclude that a subset of SH3 domains constitutes a distinct type of ubiquitin-binding domain, and that ubiquitin-binding can negatively regulate interaction of SH3 domains with canonical proline-rich ligands. PMID:17244534

  5. Complex between α-bungarotoxin and an α7 nicotinic receptor ligand-binding domain chimaera.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sun; Li, Shu-Xing; Bren, Nina; Cheng, Kevin; Gomoto, Ryan; Chen, Lin; Sine, Steven M

    2013-09-01

    To identify high-affinity interactions between long-chain α-neurotoxins and nicotinic receptors, we determined the crystal structure of the complex between α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) and a pentameric ligand-binding domain constructed from the human α7 AChR (acetylcholine receptor) and AChBP (acetylcholine-binding protein). The complex buries ~2000 Ų (1 Å=0.1 nm) of surface area, within which Arg³⁶ and Phe³² from finger II of α-btx form a π-cation stack that aligns edge-to-face with the conserved Tyr¹⁸⁴ from loop-C of α7, while Asp³⁰ of α-btx forms a hydrogen bond with the hydroxy group of Tyr¹⁸⁴. These inter-residue interactions diverge from those in a 4.2 Å structure of α-ctx (α-cobratoxin) bound to AChBP, but are similar to those in a 1.94 Å structure of α-btx bound to the monomeric α1 extracellular domain, although compared with the monomer-bound complex, the α-btx backbone exhibits a large shift relative to the protein surface. Mutational analyses show that replacing Tyr¹⁸⁴ with a threonine residue abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, whereas replacing with a phenylalanine residue maintains high affinity. Comparison of the α-btx complex with that coupled to the agonist epibatidine reveals structural rearrangements within the binding pocket and throughout each subunit. The overall findings highlight structural principles by which α-neurotoxins interact with nicotinic receptors.

  6. Sequential coagulation factor VIIa domain binding to tissue factor

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterlund, Maria; Persson, Egon; Freskgard, Per-Ola . E-mail: msv@ifm.liu.se

    2005-12-02

    Vessel wall tissue factor (TF) is exposed to blood upon vascular damage which enables association with factor VIIa (FVIIa). This leads to initiation of the blood coagulation cascade through localization and allosteric induction of FVIIa procoagulant activity. To examine the docking pathway of the FVIIa-TF complex, various residues in the extracellular part of TF (sTF) that are known to interact with FVIIa were replaced with cysteines labelled with a fluorescent probe. By using stopped-flow fluorescence kinetic measurements in combination with surface plasmon resonance analysis, we studied the association of the resulting sTF variants with FVIIa. We found the docking trajectory to be a sequence of events in which the protease domain of FVIIa initiates contact with sTF. Thereafter, the two proteins are tethered via the first epidermal growth factor-like and finally the {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. The two labelled sTF residues interacting with the protease domain of FVIIa bind or become eventually ordered at different rates, revealing kinetic details pertinent to the allosteric activation of FVIIa by sTF. Moreover, when the Gla domain of FVIIa is removed the difference in the rate of association for the remaining domains is much more pronounced.

  7. Control of domain swapping in bovine odorant-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Roberto; Vincent, Florence; Ashcroft, Alison E; Accornero, Paolo; Grolli, Stefano; Valencia, Christel; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2002-01-01

    As revealed by the X-ray structure, bovine odorant-binding protein (OBPb) is a domain swapped dimer [Tegoni, Ramoni, Bignetti, Spinelli and Cambillau (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 863-867; Bianchet, Bains, Petosi, Pevsner, Snyder, Monaco and Amzel (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 934-939]. This contrasts with all known mammalian OBPs, which are monomers, and in particular with porcine OBP (OBPp), sharing 42.3% identity with OBPb. By the mechanism of domain swapping, monomers are proposed to evolve into dimers and oligomers, as observed in human prion. Comparison of bovine and porcine OBP sequences pointed at OBPp glycine 121, in the hinge linking the beta-barrel to the alpha-helix. The absence of this residue in OBPb might explain why the normal lipocalin beta-turn is not formed. In order to decipher the domain swapping determinants we have produced a mutant of OBPb in which a glycine residue was inserted after position 121, and a mutant of OBPp in which glycine 121 was deleted. The latter mutation did not result in dimerization, while OBPb-121Gly+ became monomeric, suggesting that domain swapping was reversed. Careful structural analysis revealed that besides the presence of a glycine in the hinge, the dimer interface formed by the C-termini and by the presence of the lipocalins conserved disulphide bridge may also control domain swapping. PMID:11931632

  8. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tammy; Gaultney, Robert A.; Floden, Angela M.; Brissette, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp) is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysinses in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen (Plg), a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to Plg, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp–Plg interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound Plg to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds Plg via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that Plg bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding Plg are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:26500634

  9. Autoantibodies enhance agonist action and binding to cardiac muscarinic receptors in chronic Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ciria C; Nascimento, Jose H; Chaves, Elen A; Costa, Patricia C; Masuda, Masako O; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos DE Carvalho, Antonio C; Gimenez, Luis E

    2008-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M(2)-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M(2)AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M(2)AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M(2)AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [(3)H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([(3)H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M(2)AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [(3)H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [(3)H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC(50) of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 x 10(- 8), 1.33 x 10(- 7), and 2.0 x 10(- 7) mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M(2)AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  10. Autoantibodies Enhance Agonist Action and Binding to Cardiac Muscarinic Receptors in Chronic Chagas’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Ciria C.; Nascimento, José H.; Chaves, Elen A.; Costa, Patrícia C.; Masuda, Masako O.; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos de Carvalho, Antônio C.; Giménez, Luis E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M2AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M2AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M2AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M2AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [3H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [3H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC50 of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 × 10−8, 1.33 × 10−7, and 2.0 × 10−7 mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M2AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  11. Role of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in high affinity. cap alpha. /sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether regulatory protein, N/sub i/ was required for high affinity agonist binding to the a/sub 2/ adrenergic receptor in human platelet membranes. Human platelet membranes treated under alkaline conditions (pH 11.5) exhibited a selective and complete loss of high affinity agonist binding as measured by the parital agonist (/sup 3/H)-p-aminoclonidine and full agonist (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 in direct binding studies. The binding parameters for (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 are as follows: for control platelet membranes, the K/sub d/ was 0.88 +/- 0.17 and nM and the B/sub max/ was 280 +/- 20 fmol/mg compared to 1.89 +/- 0.34 nM and 75 fmol/mg for pH 11.5 treated membranes. For (/sup 3/H)p-aminoclonidine, the data for pH 11.5 treated membranes is as follows: B/sub max/ = 100 +/- 20 fmol/mg, K/sub d/ = 3.4 +/- 0.1 nM, compared to control membranes: (best fit with a two site fit) K/sub d1/ = 0.7 nM, K/sub d2/ = 8 nM, B/sub max1/ = 76 fmol/mg, B/sub max2/ = 198 fmol/mg. The ..cap alpha../sub 2/ antagonists, (/sup 3/H)yohimbine, was used to assess the presence of the receptor.

  12. The cytoplasmic domain close to the transmembrane region of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor contains sequence elements that regulate agonist-dependent internalisation.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Patricia; Roncero, Isabel; Blázquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2005-07-01

    In order to gain better insight into the molecular events involved in the signal transduction generated through glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors, we tested the effect of deletions and point mutations within the cytoplasmic tail of this receptor with a view to establishing relationships between signal transduction desensitisation and receptor internalisation. Wild-type and truncated (deletion of the last 27 amino acids (GLPR 435R) and deletion of 44 amino acids (GLPR 418R)) GLP-1 receptors bound the agonist with similar affinity. Deletion of the last 27 amino acids decreased the internalisation rate by 78%, while deletion of 44 amino acids containing all the phosphorylation sites hitherto described in this receptor decreased the internalisation rate by only 47%. Binding of the ligand to both receptors stimulated adenylyl cyclase. In contrast, deletion of the region containing amino acids 419 to 435 (GLPR 419delta435) increased the internalisation rate by 268%, and the replacement of EVQ(408-410) by alanine (GLPR A(408-410)) increased this process to 296%. In both receptors, the efficacy in stimulating adenylate cyclase was decreased. All the receptors studied were internalised by coated pits, except for the receptor with a deletion of the last 44 amino acids, which also had a faster resensitisation rate. Our findings indicate that the neighbouring trans-membrane domain of the carboxyl-terminal tail of the GLP-1 receptor contains sequence elements that regulate agonist-dependent internalisation and transmembrane signalling.

  13. Immunochemical analysis of the glucocorticoid receptor: identification of a third domain separate from the steroid-binding and DNA-binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Carlstedt-Duke, J; Okret, S; Wrange, O; Gustafsson, J A

    1982-01-01

    The glucocorticoid-receptor complex can be subdivided into three separate domains by limited proteolysis with trypsin or alpha-chymotrypsin. The following characteristics can be separated: steroid-binding activity (domain A), DNA-binding activity (domain B), and immunoactivity (domain C). We have previously reported the separation of the steroid-binding domain from the DNA-binding domain by limited proteolysis of the receptor with trypsin. In this paper, we report the detection by immunochemical analysis of a third domain of the glucocorticoid receptor, which does not bind hormone. Immunoactivity was detected by using specific antiglucocorticoid receptor antibodies raised in rabbits against purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor and the assay used was an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After digestion with alpha-chymotrypsin, the immunoactive region of the receptor (domain C) was separated from the other two domains (A and B). The immunoactive fragment was found to have a Stokes radius of 2.6 nm. Further digestion with alpha-chymotrypsin resulted in separation of the immunoactive fragment to give a fragment having a Stokes radius of 1.4 nm. The immunoactive domain could be separated from the half of the glucocorticoid receptor containing the steroid-binding and the DNA-binding domains (Stokes radius, 3.3 nm), by limited proteolysis of the receptor by alpha-chymotrypsin followed by gel filtration or chromatography on DNA-cellulose. PMID:6181503

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor ligand binding domain is sufficient for the modulation of glucocorticoid induction properties by homologous receptors, coactivator transcription intermediary factor 2, and Ubc9.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sehyung; Kagan, Benjamin L; Blackford, John A; Szapary, Daniele; Simons, S Stoney

    2005-02-01

    Several factors modulate the position of the dose-response curve of steroid receptor-agonist complexes and the partial agonist activity of antagonist complexes, thereby causing differential gene activation by circulating hormones and unequal gene repression during endocrine therapies with antisteroids. We now ask whether the modulatory activity of three factors (homologous receptor, coactivator transcription intermediary factor 2, and Ubc9) requires the same or different domains of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). In all cases, we find that neither the amino terminal half of the receptor, which contains the activation function-1 activation domain, nor the DNA binding domain is required. This contrasts with the major role of activation function-1 in determining the amount of gene expression and partial agonist activity of antisteroids with most steroid receptors. However, the situation is more complicated with Ubc9, where GR N-terminal sequences prevent the actions of Ubc9, but not added GR or transcription intermediary factor 2, at low GR concentrations. Inhibition is relieved by deletion of these sequences or by replacement with the comparable region of progesterone receptors but not by overexpression of the repressive sequences. These results plus the binding of C-terminal GR sequences to the suppressive N-terminal domain implicate an intramolecular mechanism for the inhibition of Ubc9 actions at low GR concentrations. A shift from noncooperative to cooperative steroid binding at high GR concentrations suggests that conformational changes reposition the inhibitory N-terminal sequence to allow Ubc9 interaction with elements of the ligand binding domain. Collectively, these results indicate a dominant role of GR C-terminal sequences in the modulation of the dose-response curve and partial agonist activity of GR complexes. They also reveal mechanistic differences both among individual modulators and between the ability of the same factors to regulate the total amount

  15. Retinoic acid receptor agonists regulate expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ayaori, Makoto; Yakushiji, Emi; Ogura, Masatsune; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Terao, Yoshio; Sasaki, Makoto; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Iizuka, Maki; Yogo, Makiko; Uehara, Yoshinari; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2012-04-01

    ABC transporter G1 (ABCG1) plays a pivotal role in HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux and atherogenesis. We investigated whether, and how, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) regulate ABCG1 expression in macrophages. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), an RAR ligand, increased ABCG1 protein levels and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages. Both ATRA and other RAR agonists, TTNPB and Am580, increased major transcripts driven by promoter B upstream of exon 5, though minor transcripts driven by promoter A upstream of exon 1 were only increased by ATRA. The stimulatory effects of ATRA on ABCG1 expression were completely abolished in the presence of RAR/RXR antagonists but were only partially canceled in the presence of an LXR antagonist. Adenovirus with overexpressed oxysterol sulfotransferase abolished the LXR pathway, as previously reported, and ATRA-responsiveness in ABCA1/ABCG1 expressions were respectively attenuated by 38 and 22% compared to the control virus. Promoter assays revealed that ABCG1 levels were regulated more by promoter B than promoter A, and ATRA activated promoter B in a liver X receptor-responsive element (LXRE)-dependent manner. Further, LXRE-B in intron 7, but not LXRE-A in intron 5, enhanced ATRA responsiveness under overexpression of all RAR isoforms-RARα/β/γ. In contrast, the activation of promoter B by TTNPB depended on LXRE-B and RARα, but not on RARβ/γ. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel-shift assays revealed a specific and direct repeat 4-dependent binding of RARα to LXRE-B. In conclusion, RAR ligands increase ABCA1/G1 expression and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages, and modulate ABCG1 promoter activity via LXRE-dependent mechanisms.

  16. Extended HSR/CARD domain mediates AIRE binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Maslovskaja, Julia; Saare, Mario; Liiv, Ingrid; Rebane, Ana; Peterson, Pärt

    2015-12-25

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) activates the transcription of many genes in an unusual promiscuous and stochastic manner. The mechanism by which AIRE binds to the chromatin and DNA is not fully understood, and the regulatory elements that AIRE target genes possess are not delineated. In the current study, we demonstrate that AIRE activates the expression of transiently transfected luciferase reporters that lack defined promoter regions, as well as intron and poly(A) signal sequences. Our protein-DNA interaction experiments with mutated AIRE reveal that the intact homogeneously staining region/caspase recruitment domain (HSR/CARD) and amino acids R113 and K114 are key elements involved in AIRE binding to DNA.

  17. Spatial Approximation between Secretin Residue Five and the Third Extracellular Loop of Its Receptor Provides New Insight into the Molecular Basis of Natural Agonist Binding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Pinon, Delia I.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Abagyan, Ruben; Miller, Laurence J.

    2013-01-01

    The amino terminus of class II G protein-coupled receptors plays an important role in ligand binding and receptor activation. Understanding of the conformation of the amino-terminal domain of these receptors has been substantially advanced with the solution of nuclear magnetic resonance and crystal structures of this region of receptors for corticotrophin-releasing factor, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, and gastric inhibitory polypeptide. However, the orientation of the amino terminus relative to the receptor core and how the receptor gets activated upon ligand binding remain unclear. In this work, we have used photoaffinity labeling to identify a critical spatial approximation between residue five of secretin and a residue within the proposed third extracellular loop of the secretin receptor. This was achieved by purification, deglycosylation, cyanogen bromide cleavage, and sequencing of labeled wild-type and mutant secretin receptors. This constraint has been used to refine our evolving molecular model of secretin docked at the intact receptor, which for the first time includes refined helical bundle and loop regions and reflects a peptide-binding groove within the receptor amino terminus that directs the amino terminus of the peptide toward the receptor body. This model is fully consistent with the endogenous agonist mechanism for class II G protein-coupled receptor activation, where ligand binding promotes the interaction of a portion of the receptor amino terminus with the receptor body to activate it. PMID:18467541

  18. Prebending the estrogen response element destabilizes binding of the estrogen receptor DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; de Haan, G; Nardulli, A M; Shapiro, D J

    1997-01-01

    Binding of many eukaryotic transcription regulatory proteins to their DNA recognition sequences results in conformational changes in DNA. To test the effect of altering DNA topology by prebending a transcription factor binding site, we examined the interaction of the estrogen receptor (ER) DNA binding domain (DBD) with prebent estrogen response elements (EREs). When the ERE in minicircle DNA was prebent toward the major groove, which is in the same direction as the ER-induced DNA bend, there was no significant effect on ER DBD binding relative to the linear counterparts. However, when the ERE was bent toward the minor groove, in a direction that opposes the ER-induced DNA bend, there was a four- to eightfold reduction in ER DBD binding. Since reduced binding was also observed with the ERE in nicked circles, the reduction in binding was not due to torsional force induced by binding of ER DBD to the prebent ERE in covalently closed minicircles. To determine the mechanism responsible for reduced binding to the prebent ERE, we examined the effect of prebending the ERE on the association and dissociation of the ER DBD. Binding of the ER DBD to ERE-containing minicircles was rapid when the EREs were prebent toward either the major or minor groove of the DNA (k(on) of 9.9 x 10(6) to 1.7 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Prebending the ERE toward the minor groove resulted in an increase in k(off) of four- to fivefold. Increased dissociation of the ER DBD from the ERE is, therefore, the major factor responsible for reduced binding of the ER DBD to an ERE prebent toward the minor groove. These data provide the first direct demonstration that the interaction of a eukaryotic transcription factor with its recognition sequence can be strongly influenced by altering DNA topology through prebending the DNA. PMID:9154816

  19. Targeting the inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein BIR3 binding domains.

    PubMed

    Jaquith, James B

    2014-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular apoptosis and cytokine signaling. IAP family members include XIAP, cIAP1, cIAP2, NAIP, survivin, Apollon/Bruce, ML-IAP/livin and TIAP. The IAPs have been targeted using both antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors. Several research teams have advanced compounds that bind the highly conserved BIR3 domains of the IAPs into clinical trials, as single agents and in combination with standard of care. This patent review highlights the medicinal chemistry strategies that have been applied to the development of clinical compounds. PMID:24998289

  20. Phosphorylation of the chromatin binding domain of KSHV LANA.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Crystal; Shamay, Meir; Liao, Gangling; Zhu, Jian; Ng, Ai Na; Li, Renfeng; Newman, Rob; Rho, Hee-Sool; Hu, Jianfei; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng; Hayward, S Diane

    2012-01-01

    The Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is expressed in all KSHV associated malignancies and is essential for maintenance of KSHV genomes in infected cells. To identify kinases that are potentially capable of modifying LANA, in vitro phosphorylation assays were performed using an Epstein Barr virus plus LANA protein microarray and 268 human kinases purified in active form from yeast. Interestingly, of the Epstein-Barr virus proteins on the array, the EBNA1 protein had the most similar kinase profile to LANA. We focused on nuclear kinases and on the N-terminus of LANA (amino acids 1-329) that contains the LANA chromatin binding domain. Sixty-three nuclear kinases phosphorylated the LANA N-terminus. Twenty-four nuclear kinases phosphorylated a peptide covering the LANA chromatin binding domain (amino acids 3-21). Alanine mutations of serine 10 and threonine 14 abolish or severely diminish chromatin and histone binding by LANA. However, conversion of these residues to the phosphomimetic glutamic acid restored histone binding suggesting that phosphorylation of serine 10 and threonine 14 may modulate LANA function. Serine 10 and threonine 14 were validated as substrates of casein kinase 1, PIM1, GSK-3 and RSK3 kinases. Short-term treatment of transfected cells with inhibitors of these kinases found that only RSK inhibition reduced LANA interaction with endogenous histone H2B. Extended treatment of PEL cell cultures with RSK inhibitor caused a decrease in LANA protein levels associated with p21 induction and a loss of PEL cell viability. The data indicate that RSK phosphorylation affects both LANA accumulation and function. PMID:23093938

  1. MODELING THE BINDING OF THE METABOLITES OF SOME POLYCYCLIC AROMTIC HYDROCARBONS TO THE LIGAND BINDING DOMAIN OF THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the binding of the metabolites of some Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor
    James Rabinowitz, Stephen Little, Katrina Brown, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC; Un...

  2. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  3. MgATP binding to the nucleotide-binding domains of the eukaryotic cytoplasmic chaperonin induces conformational changes in the putative substrate-binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Szpikowska, B. K.; Swiderek, K. M.; Sherman, M. A.; Mas, M. T.

    1998-01-01

    The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonins are large heterooligomeric complexes with a cylindrical shape, resembling that of the homooligomeric bacterial counterpart, GroEL. In analogy to GroEL, changes in shape of the cytosolic chaperonin have been detected in the presence of MgATP using electron microscopy but, in contrast to the nucleotide-induced conformational changes in GroEL, no details are available about the specific nature of these changes. The present study identifies the structural regions of the cytosolic chaperonin that undergo conformational changes when MgATP binds to the nucleotide binding domains. It is shown that limited proteolysis with trypsin in the absence of MgATP cleaves each of the eight subunits approximately in half, generating two fragments of approximately 30 kDa. Using mass spectrometry (MS) and N-terminal sequence analysis, the cleavage is found to occur in a narrow span of the amino acid sequence, corresponding to the peptide binding regions of GroEL and to the helical protrusion, recently identified in the structure of the substrate binding domain of the archeal group II chaperonin. This proteolytic cleavage is prevented by MgATP but not by ATP in the absence of magnesium, ATP analogs (MgATPyS and MgAMP-PNP) or MgADP. These results suggest that, in analogy to GroEL, binding of MgATP to the nucleotide binding domains of the cytosolic chaperonin induces long range conformational changes in the polypeptide binding domains. It is postulated that despite their different subunit composition and substrate specificity, group I and group II chaperonins may share similar, functionally-important, conformational changes. Additional conformational changes are likely to involve a flexible helix-loop-helix motif, which is characteristic for all group II chaperonins. PMID:9684884

  4. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  5. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  6. Evidence for a requirement for both phospholipid and phosphotyrosine binding via the Shc phosphotyrosine-binding domain in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, K S; Zhou, M M; Pratt, J C; Harlan, J E; Walk, S F; Fesik, S W; Burakoff, S J

    1997-01-01

    The adapter protein Shc is a critical component of mitogenic signaling pathways initiated by a number of receptors. Shc can directly bind to several tyrosine-phosphorylated receptors through its phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and a role for the PTB domain in phosphotyrosine-mediated signaling has been well documented. The structure of the Shc PTB domain demonstrated a striking homology to the structures of pleckstrin homology domains, which suggested acidic phospholipids as a second ligand for the Shc PTB domain. Here we demonstrate that Shc binding via its PTB domain to acidic phospholipids is as critical as binding to phosphotyrosine for leading to Shc phosphorylation. Through structure-based, targeted mutagenesis of the Shc PTB domain, we first identified the residues within the PTB domain critical for phospholipid binding in vitro. In vivo, the PTB domain was essential for localization of Shc to the membrane, as mutant Shc proteins that failed to interact with phospholipids in vitro also failed to localize to the membrane. We also observed that PTB domain-dependent targeting to the membrane preceded the PTB domain's interaction with the tyrosine-phosphorylated receptor and that both events were essential for tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc following receptor activation. Thus, Shc, through its interaction with two different ligands, is able to accomplish both membrane localization and binding to the activated receptor via a single PTB domain. PMID:9271429

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein LprG (Rv1411c) binds triacylated glycolipid agonists of Toll-like receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drage, Michael G.; Tsai, Han-Chun; Pecora, Nicole D.; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Arida, Ahmad R.; Shukla, Supriya; Rojas, Roxana E.; Seshadri, Chetan; Moody, D. Branch; Boom, W. Henry; Sacchettini, James C.; Harding, Clifford V.

    2010-09-27

    Knockout of lprG results in decreased virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in mice. MTB lipoprotein LprG has TLR2 agonist activity, which is thought to be dependent on its N-terminal triacylation. Unexpectedly, here we find that nonacylated LprG retains TLR2 activity. Moreover, we show LprG association with triacylated glycolipid TLR2 agonists lipoarabinomannan, lipomannan and phosphatidylinositol mannosides (which share core structures). Binding of triacylated species was specific to LprG (not LprA) and increased LprG TLR2 agonist activity; conversely, association of glycolipids with LprG enhanced their recognition by TLR2. The crystal structure of LprG in complex with phosphatidylinositol mannoside revealed a hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the three alkyl chains of the ligand. In conclusion, we demonstrate a glycolipid binding function of LprG that enhances recognition of triacylated MTB glycolipids by TLR2 and may affect glycolipid assembly or transport for bacterial cell wall biogenesis.

  8. Structure and association of ATP-binding cassette transporter nucleotide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ian D

    2002-03-19

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are responsible for the uptake and efflux of a multitude of substances across both eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes. Members of this family of proteins are involved in diverse physiological processes including antigen presentation, drug efflux from cancer cells, bacterial nutrient uptake and cystic fibrosis. In order to understand more completely the role of these multidomain transporters an integrated approach combining structural, pharmacological and biochemical methods is being adopted. Recent structural data have been obtained on the cytoplasmic, nucleotide-binding domains of prokaryotic ABC transporters. This review evaluates both these data and the conflicting implications they have for domain communication in ABC transporters. Areas of biochemical research that attempt to resolve these conflicts will be discussed.

  9. Characterization of the cellulose-binding domain of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose-binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, M A; Takagi, M; Hashida, S; Shoseyov, O; Doi, R H; Segel, I H

    1993-01-01

    Cellulose-binding protein A (CbpA), a component of the cellulase complex of Clostridium cellulovorans, contains a unique sequence which has been demonstrated to be a cellulose-binding domain (CBD). The DNA coding for this putative CBD was subcloned into pET-8c, an Escherichia coli expression vector. The protein produced under the direction of the recombinant plasmid, pET-CBD, had a high affinity for crystalline cellulose. Affinity-purified CBD protein was used in equilibrium binding experiments to characterize the interaction of the protein with various polysaccharides. It was found that the binding capacity of highly crystalline cellulose samples (e.g., cotton) was greater than that of samples of low crystallinity (e.g., fibrous cellulose). At saturating CBD concentration, about 6.4 mumol of protein was bound by 1 g of cotton. Under the same conditions, fibrous cellulose bound only 0.2 mumol of CBD per g. The measured dissociation constant was in the 1 microM range for all cellulose samples. The results suggest that the CBD binds specifically to crystalline cellulose. Chitin, which has a crystal structure similar to that of cellulose, also was bound by the CBD. The presence of high levels of cellobiose or carboxymethyl cellulose in the assay mixture had no effect on the binding of CBD protein to crystalline cellulose. This result suggests that the CBD recognition site is larger than a simple cellobiose unit or more complex than a repeating cellobiose moiety. This CBD is of particular interest because it is the first CBD from a completely sequenced nonenzymatic protein shown to be an independently functional domain. Images PMID:8376323

  10. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  11. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  12. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel indazolyl glucocorticoid receptor partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, John L; Sheppeck, James E; Wang, Jim; Dhar, T G Murali; Cavallaro, Cullen; Doweyko, Arthur M; Mckay, Lorraine; Cunningham, Mark D; Habte, Sium F; Nadler, Steven G; Dodd, John H; Somerville, John E; Barrish, Joel C

    2013-10-01

    SAR was used to further develop an indazole class of non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor agonists aided by a GR LBD (ligand-binding domain)-agonist co-crystal structure described in the accompanying paper. Progress towards discovering a dissociated GR agonist guided by human in vitro assays biased the optimization of this compound series towards partial agonists that possessed excellent selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors. PMID:23916594

  13. Conformational Selection and Submillisecond Dynamics of the Ligand-binding Domain of the N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Dolino, Drew M.; Rezaei Adariani, Soheila; Shaikh, Sana A.; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Sanabria, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are heteromeric non-selective cation channels that require the binding of glycine and glutamate for gating. Based on crystal structures, the mechanism of partial agonism at the glycine-binding site is thought to be mediated by a shift in the conformational equilibrium between an open clamshell and a closed clamshell-like structure of the bilobed ligand-binding domain (LBD). Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and multiparameter fluorescence detection, which allows us to study the conformational states and dynamics in the submillisecond time scale, we show that there are at least three conformational states explored by the LBD: the low FRET, medium FRET, and high FRET states. The distance of the medium and low FRET states corresponds to what has been observed in crystallography structures. We show that the high FRET state, which would represent a more closed clamshell conformation than that observed in the crystal structure, is most likely the state initiating activation, as evidenced by the fact that the fraction of the protein in this state correlates well with the extent of activation. Furthermore, full agonist bound LBDs show faster dynamic motions between the medium and high FRET states, whereas they show slower dynamics when bound to weaker agonists or to antagonists. PMID:27226581

  14. Structural heterogeneity of the alpha subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in relation to agonist affinity alkylation and antagonist binding.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, M; Gullick, W; Spiess, J; Wan, K; Criado, M; Lindstrom, J

    1986-07-29

    The structural basis for the heterogeneity of the two agonist binding sites of the Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor with respect to antagonist binding and reactivity toward affinity alkylating reagents was investigated. There is one agonist binding site on each of the two alpha subunits in a receptor monomer. One of these sites is easily affinity labeled with bromoacetylcholine, while more extreme conditions are required to label the other. Evidence is presented that the site which is easily labeled with bromoacetylcholine is the site with higher affinity for the antagonist d-tubocurarine. Digestion of purified alpha subunits with staphylococcal V8 protease gave two limit fragments with apparent molecular weights of 17K and 19K. Both of these fragments began at residue 46 of the alpha sequence, and both reacted with monoclonal antibodies specific for the sequence alpha 152-159 but not with antibodies specific for alpha 235-242. Their tryptic peptide maps and reactivity with a number of monoclonal antibodies were virtually identical. Only the 17-kilodalton (17-kDa) fragments stained heavily for sugars with Schiff's reagent. However, both fragments bound 125I-labeled concanavalin A. Complete removal of carbohydrate detectable with concanavalin A from V8 protease digests of alpha subunits resulted in two fragments of lower apparent molecular weights, indicating that these fragments differed not only in carbohydrate content but also in their C-termini or by another covalent modification. Covalent labeling of one of the two agonist sites of the intact receptor with bromo[3H]acetylcholine followed by digestion with V8 protease resulted in labeling of only the 19-kDa fragment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. The Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Stereotype C Binds Phosphoinositides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD50 of {approx} 1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a 'dual receptor' mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Here, using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides. Additional interactions to phosphoinositides may help BoNT/C bind membrane more tightly and transduct signals for subsequent steps of intoxication. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of host cell membrane recognition by BoNTs.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα agonists differentially regulate inhibitor of DNA binding expression in rodents and human cells.

    PubMed

    González, María Del Carmen; Corton, J Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Alvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans.

  17. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptorα Agonists Differentially Regulate Inhibitor of DNA Binding Expression in Rodents and Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, María del Carmen; Corton, J. Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Álvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans. PMID:22701468

  18. Significance of absorption, oxidation, and binding to toxicity of four ecdysone agonists in multi-resistant cotton leafworm.

    PubMed

    Smagghe, G; Carton, B; Decombel, L; Tirry, L

    2001-03-01

    Treatment of last-instar larvae of multi-resistant cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis with four dibenzoylhydrazines, methoxyfenozide (RH-2485), tebufenozide (RH-5992), halofenozide (RH-0345), and RH-5849, resulted in premature molting leading to death. Methoxyfenozide was the most toxic followed by tebufenozide, halofenozide, and RH-5849. To explain differences in toxicity, especially between multi-resistant and laboratory strains, absorption in the body tissues and oxidative metabolism were tested with 14C-labeled ecdysone agonist and a Lineweaver-Burk assay, respectively. Then to address different compound potencies in multi-resistant strains, the potency of the four ecdysone agonists was measured based on their ability to mimic the natural insect molting hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) by inducing evagination in isolated imaginal wing discs. Using monoclonal antibody 9B9, the presence of ecdysteroid receptors in imaginal discs in vitro was confirmed. In parallel, Scatchard plot analysis with whole imaginal wing discs cultured with different concentrations of 3H-labeled ponasterone A indicated no significant difference in affinity and in number of target sites for binding between multi-resistant and susceptible laboratory strains. The four compounds tested caused the effect as agonists of 20E in vitro, and typically the order of their toxicities (LC50s) corresponded with that for evagination-induction with whole imaginal discs.

  19. Direct DNA Methylation Profiling Using Methyl Binding Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yinni; Blair, Steve; Gillespie, David; Jensen, Randy; Myszka, David G.; Badran, Ahmed H.; Ghosh, Indraneel; Chagovetz, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Methylation of DNA is responsible for gene silencing by establishing heterochromatin structure that represses transcription, and studies have shown that cytosine methylation of CpG islands in promoter regions acts as a precursor to early cancer development. The naturally occurring methyl binding domain (MBD) proteins from mammals are known to bind to the methylated CpG dinucleotide (mCpG), and subsequently recruit other chromatin-modifying proteins to suppress transcription. Conventional methods of detection for methylated DNA involve bisulfite treatment or immunoprecipitation prior to performing an assay. We focus on proof-of-concept studies for a direct microarray-based assay using surface-bound methylated probes. The recombinant protein 1xMBD-GFP recognizes hemi-methylation and symmetric methylation of the CpG sequence of hybridized dsDNA, while displaying greater affinity for the symmetric methylation motif, as evaluated by SPR. From these studies, for symmetric mCpG, the KD for 1xMBD-GFP ranged from 106 nM to 870 nM, depending upon the proximity of the methylation site to the sensor surface. The KD values for non-symmetrical methylation motifs were consistently greater (> 2 µM), but the binding selectivity between symmetric and hemi-methylation motifs ranged from 4 to 30, with reduced selectivity for sites close to the surface or multiple sites in proximity, which we attribute to steric effects. Fitting skew normal probability density functions to our data, we estimate an accuracy of 97.5% for our method in identifying methylated CpG loci, which can be improved through optimization of probe design and surface density. PMID:20507169

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of p53 DNA-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiang; Tan, Yu-Hong; Luo, Ray

    2008-01-01

    We have studied room-temperature structural and dynamic properties of the p53 DNA-binding domain in both DNA-bound and DNA-free states. A cumulative 55ns of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations with the Particle Mesh Ewald treatment of electrostatics were performed. It is found that the mean structures in the production portions of the trajectories agree well with the crystal structure: backbone root-mean squared deviations are in the range of 1.6Å and 2.0Å. In both simulations, noticeable backbone deviations from the crystal structure are observed only in loop L6, due to the lack of crystal packing in the simulations. More deviations are observed in the DNA-free simulation, apparently due to the absence of DNA. Computed backbone B-factor is also in qualitative agreement with the crystal structure. Interestingly little backbone structural change was observed between the mean simulated DNA-bound and DNA-free structures. Notable difference is only observed at the DNA-binding interface. The correlation between native contacts and inactivation mechanisms of tumor mutations is also discussed. In the H2 region, tumor mutations at sites D281, R282, E285, and E286 may weaken five key interactions that stabilize H2, indicating that their inactivation mechanisms may be related to the loss of local structure around H2, which in turn may reduce the overall stability to a measurable amount. In the L2 region, tumor mutations at sites Y163, K164, E171, V173, L194, R249, I251 and E271 are likely to be responsible for the loss of stability in the protein. In addition to apparent DNA contacts that are related to DNA binding, interactions R175/S183, S183/R196, and E198/N235 are highly occupied only in the DNA-bound form, indicating that they are more likely to be responsible for DNA binding. PMID:17824689

  1. Binding of an ( sup 125 I) labelled thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor agonist to baboon platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, G.W. II; De Jesus, A. )

    1989-12-01

    To characterize the thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) receptor on baboon platelets the binding of (125I)BOP was studied. (125I)BOP bound to washed baboon platelets in a saturable manner. Scatchard analysis of binding isotherms revealed a Kd of 1.12 +/- 0.08 nM and a binding capacity of 54 +/- 5 fmoles/10(8) platelets (326 sites/platelet). Several TXA2/PGH2 agonists and antagonists displaced (125I)BOP from its baboon platelet binding site with a rank order of potency similar to human platelets: I-BOP greater than SQ29548 greater than U46619 = I-PTA-OH greater than PTA-OH. I-BOP aggregated washed baboon platelets with an EC50 of 10 +/- 4 nM. The results indicate that (125I)BOP binds to the TXA2/PGH2 receptor on baboon platelets and that this receptor is similar to its human counterpart.

  2. Cystosolic chaperonin subunits have a conserved ATPase domain but diverged polypeptide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Willison, K R; Horwich, A L

    1994-12-01

    CCT (also called the TCP-1 complex or TriC) is a chaperonin found in the eukaryotic cytosol, and has unique structural and functional features. Unlike homo-oligomeric chaperonins, CCT comprises at least eight different subunits, and appears to have a limited range of physiological substrates. We have analysed CCT sequences in light of the recent determination of the crystal structure and mutational identification of the functional domains of the bacterial chaperonin GroEL. A high level of identity among all chaperonin subunits is observed in those regions that correspond to the ATP-binding site of GroEL. By contrast, no significant identity is shared in the region corresponding to the polypeptide-binding region of GroEL, either between CCT subunits or between CCT subunits and GroEL. This suggests that the polypeptide-binding sites of CCT subunits have diverged both from each other and from GroEL, which may explain the apparently different range of substrates recognized by CCT.

  3. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of the octopamine receptor using GPUs: discovery of an alternate agonist-binding position.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Kevin W; Izaguirre, Jesús A

    2016-10-01

    Octopamine receptors (OARs) perform key biological functions in invertebrates, making this class of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) worth considering for insecticide development. However, no crystal structures and very little research exists for OARs. Furthermore, GPCRs are large proteins, are suspended in a lipid bilayer, and are activated on the millisecond timescale, all of which make conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations infeasible, even if run on large supercomputers. However, accelerated Molecular Dynamics (aMD) simulations can reduce this timescale to even hundreds of nanoseconds, while running the simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs) would enable even small clusters of GPUs to have processing power equivalent to hundreds of CPUs. Our results show that aMD simulations run on GPUs can successfully obtain the active and inactive state conformations of a GPCR on this reduced timescale. Furthermore, we discovered a potential alternate active-state agonist-binding position in the octopamine receptor which has yet to be observed and may be a novel GPCR agonist-binding position. These results demonstrate that a complex biological system with an activation process on the millisecond timescale can be successfully simulated on the nanosecond timescale using a simple computing system consisting of a small number of GPUs. Proteins 2016; 84:1480-1489. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27318014

  4. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of the octopamine receptor using GPUs: discovery of an alternate agonist-binding position.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Kevin W; Izaguirre, Jesús A

    2016-10-01

    Octopamine receptors (OARs) perform key biological functions in invertebrates, making this class of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) worth considering for insecticide development. However, no crystal structures and very little research exists for OARs. Furthermore, GPCRs are large proteins, are suspended in a lipid bilayer, and are activated on the millisecond timescale, all of which make conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations infeasible, even if run on large supercomputers. However, accelerated Molecular Dynamics (aMD) simulations can reduce this timescale to even hundreds of nanoseconds, while running the simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs) would enable even small clusters of GPUs to have processing power equivalent to hundreds of CPUs. Our results show that aMD simulations run on GPUs can successfully obtain the active and inactive state conformations of a GPCR on this reduced timescale. Furthermore, we discovered a potential alternate active-state agonist-binding position in the octopamine receptor which has yet to be observed and may be a novel GPCR agonist-binding position. These results demonstrate that a complex biological system with an activation process on the millisecond timescale can be successfully simulated on the nanosecond timescale using a simple computing system consisting of a small number of GPUs. Proteins 2016; 84:1480-1489. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Candida glabrata binds to glycosylated and lectinic receptors on the coronary endothelial luminal membrane and inhibits flow sense and cardiac responses to agonists.

    PubMed

    Torres-Tirado, David; Knabb, Maureen; Castaño, Irene; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Rubio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata (CG) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that initiates infection by binding to host cells via specific lectin-like adhesin proteins. We have previously shown the importance of lectin-oligosaccharide binding in cardiac responses to flow and agonists. Because of the lectinic-oligosaccharide nature of CG binding, we tested the ability of CG to alter the agonist- and flow-induced changes in cardiac function in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed strong attachment of CG to the coronary endothelium, even after extensive washing. CG shifted the coronary flow vs. auricular-ventricular (AV) delay relationship upward, indicating that greater flow was required to achieve the same AV delay. This effect was completely reversed with mannose, partially reversed with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, but hyaluronan had no effect. Western blot analysis was used to determine binding of CG to isolated coronary endothelial luminal membrane (CELM) receptors, and the results indicate that flow-sensitive CELM receptors, ANG II type I, α-adrenergic 1A receptor, endothelin-2, and VCAM-1 bind to CG. In addition, CG inhibited agonist-induced effects of bradykinin, angiotensin, and phenylephrine on AV delay, coronary perfusion pressure, and left ventricular pressure. Mannose reversed the inhibitory effects of CG on the agonist responses. These results suggest that CG directly binds to flow-sensitive CELM receptors via lectinic-oligosaccharide interactions with mannose and disrupts the lectin-oligosaccharide binding necessary for flow-induced cardiac responses.

  6. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-04-11

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein-albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug.

  7. Calcium-dependent properties of CIB binding to the integrin alphaIIb cytoplasmic domain and translocation to the platelet cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Shock, D D; Naik, U P; Brittain, J E; Alahari, S K; Sondek, J; Parise, L V

    1999-01-01

    The alphaIIbbeta3 integrin receives signals in agonist-activated platelets, resulting in its conversion to an active conformation that binds fibrinogen, thereby mediating platelet aggregation. Fibrinogen binding to alphaIIbbeta3 subsequently induces a cascade of intracellular signalling events. The molecular mechanisms of this bi-directional alphaIIbbeta3-mediated signalling are unknown but may involve the binding of proteins to the integrin cytoplasmic domains. We reported previously the sequence of a novel 22-kDa, EF-hand-containing, protein termed CIB (calcium- and integrin-binding protein) that interacts specifically with the alphaIIb cytoplasmic domain in the yeast two-hybrid system. Further analysis of numerous tissues and cell lines indicated that CIB mRNA and protein are widely expressed. In addition, isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that CIB binds to an alphaIIb cytoplasmic-domain peptide in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, with moderate affinity (K(d), 700 nM) and 1:1 stoichiometry. In aggregated platelets, endogenous CIB and alphaIIbbeta3 translocate to the Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeleton in a parallel manner, demonstrating that the cellular localization of CIB is regulated, potentially by alphaIIbbeta3. Thus CIB may contribute to integrin-related functions by mechanisms involving Ca(2+)-modulated binding to the alphaIIb cytoplasmic domain and changes in intracellular distribution. PMID:10477286

  8. Cooperative DNA Binding and Sequence-Selective Recognition Conferred by the STAT Amino-Terminal Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Sun, Ya-Lin; Hoey, Timothy

    1996-08-01

    STAT proteins (signal transducers and activators of transcription) activate distinct target genes despite having similar DNA binding preferences. The transcriptional specificity of STAT proteins was investigated on natural STAT binding sites near the interferon-gamma gene. These sites are arranged in multiple copies and required cooperative interactions for STAT binding. The conserved amino-terminal domain of STAT proteins was required for cooperative DNA binding, although this domain was not essential for dimerization or binding to a single site. Cooperative binding interactions enabled the STAT proteins to recognize variations of the consensus site. These sites can be specific for the different STAT proteins and may function to direct selective transcriptional activation.

  9. Structural Basis of Rnd1 Binding to Plexin Rho GTPase Binding Domains (RBDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Hota, Prasanta K.; Tong, Yufeng; Li, Buren; Shen, Limin; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Borthakur, Susmita; Kim, SoonJeung; Tempel, Wolfram; Buck, Matthias; Park, Hee-Won

    2011-09-20

    Plexin receptors regulate cell adhesion, migration, and guidance. The Rho GTPase binding domain (RBD) of plexin-A1 and -B1 can bind GTPases, including Rnd1. By contrast, plexin-C1 and -D1 reportedly bind Rnd2 but associate with Rnd1 only weakly. The structural basis of this differential Rnd1 GTPase binding to plexin RBDs remains unclear. Here, we solved the structure of the plexin-A2 RBD in complex with Rnd1 and the structures of the plexin-C1 and plexin-D1 RBDs alone, also compared with the previously determined plexin-B1 RBD.Rnd1 complex structure. The plexin-A2 RBD {center_dot} Rnd1 complex is a heterodimer, whereas plexin-B1 and -A2 RBDs homodimerize at high concentration in solution, consistent with a proposed model for plexin activation. Plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs are monomeric, consistent with major residue changes in the homodimerization loop. In plexin-A2 and -B1, the RBD {beta}3-{beta}4 loop adjusts its conformation to allow Rnd1 binding, whereas minimal structural changes occur in Rnd1. The plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs lack several key non-polar residues at the corresponding GTPase binding surface and do not significantly interact with Rnd1. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements on plexin-C1 and -D1 mutants reveal that the introduction of non-polar residues in this loop generates affinity for Rnd1. Structure and sequence comparisons suggest a similar mode of Rnd1 binding to the RBDs, whereas mutagenesis suggests that the interface with the highly homologous Rnd2 GTPase is different in detail. Our results confirm, from a structural perspective, that Rnd1 does not play a role in the activation of plexin-C1 and -D1. Plexin functions appear to be regulated by subfamily-specific mechanisms, some of which involve different Rho family GTPases.

  10. Mapping of the acetylcholine binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: ( sup 3 H)nicotine as an agonist photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, R.E.; Cohen, J.B. )

    1991-07-16

    The agonist ({sup 3}H)nicotine was used as a photoaffinity label for the acetylcholine binding sties on the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). ({sup 3}H)Nicotine binds at equilibrium with K{sub eq} = 0.6 {mu}M to the agonist binding sites. Irradiation with 254-nm light of AChR-rich membranes equilibrated with ({sup 3}H)nicotine resulted in covalent incorporation into the {alpha}- and {gamma}-subunits, which was inhibited by agonists and competitive antagonists but not by noncompetitive antagonists. Inhibition of labeling by d-tubocurarine demonstrated that the {alpha}-subunit was labeled via both agonist sites but the {gamma}-subunit was labeled only via the site that binds d-tubocurarine with high affinity. Chymotryptic digestion of the {alpha}-subunit confirmed that Try-198 was the principal amino acid labeled by ({sup 3}H)nicotine. This confirmation required a novel radiosequencing strategy employing o-phthalaldehyde ({sup 3}H)Nicotine, which is the first photoaffinity agonist used, labels primarily Tyr-198 in contrast to competitive antagonist affinity labels, which label primarily Tyr-190 and Cys-192/Cys-193.

  11. Identification of Important Regions for Ethylene Binding and Signaling in the Transmembrane Domain of the ETR1 Ethylene Receptor of Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuyi; Esch, Jeff J.; Shiu, Shin-Han; Agula, Hasi; Binder, Brad M.; Chang, Caren; Patterson, Sara E.; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2006-01-01

    The ethylene binding domain (EBD) of the Arabidopsis thaliana ETR1 receptor is modeled as three membrane-spanning helices. We surveyed ethylene binding activity in different kingdoms and performed a bioinformatic analysis of the EBD. Ethylene binding is confined to land plants, Chara, and a group of cyanobacteria but is largely absent in other organisms, consistent with our finding that EBD-like sequences are overrepresented among plant and cyanobacterial species. We made amino acid substitutions in 37 partially or completely conserved residues of the EBD and assayed their effects on ethylene binding and signaling. Mutations primarily in residues in Helices I and II midregions eliminated ethylene binding and conferred constitutive signaling, consistent with the inverse-agonist model of ethylene receptor signaling and indicating that these residues define the ethylene binding pocket. The largest class of mutations, clustered near the cytoplasmic ends of Helices I and III, gave normal ethylene binding activity yet still conferred constitutive signaling. Therefore, these residues may play a role in turning off the signal transmitter domain of the receptor. By contrast, only two mutations were loss of function with respect to signaling. These findings yield insight into the structure and function of the EBD and suggest a conserved role of the EBD as a negative regulator of the signal transmitter domain. PMID:17189345

  12. Quantitation of the Calcium and Membrane Binding Properties of the C2 Domains of Dysferlin

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Nazish; Padmanarayana, Murugesh; Marty, Naomi J.; Johnson, Colin P.

    2014-01-01

    Dysferlin is a large membrane protein involved in calcium-triggered resealing of the sarcolemma after injury. Although it is generally accepted that dysferlin is Ca2+ sensitive, the Ca2+ binding properties of dysferlin have not been characterized. In this study, we report an analysis of the Ca2+ and membrane binding properties of all seven C2 domains of dysferlin as well as a multi-C2 domain construct. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that all seven dysferlin C2 domains interact with Ca2+ with a wide range of binding affinities. The C2A and C2C domains were determined to be the most sensitive, with Kd values in the tens of micromolar, whereas the C2D domain was least sensitive, with a near millimolar Kd value. Mutagenesis of C2A demonstrates the requirement for negatively charged residues in the loop regions for divalent ion binding. Furthermore, dysferlin displayed significantly lower binding affinity for the divalent cations magnesium and strontium. Measurement of a multidomain construct indicates that the solution binding affinity does not change when C2 domains are linked. Finally, sedimentation assays suggest all seven C2 domains bind lipid membranes, and that Ca2+ enhances but is not required for interaction. This report reveals for the first time, to our knowledge, that all dysferlin domains bind Ca2+ albeit with varying affinity and stoichiometry. PMID:24461013

  13. Proline-rich sequences that bind to Src homology 3 domains with individual specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandropoulos, K; Cheng, G; Baltimore, D

    1995-01-01

    To study the binding specificity of Src homology 3 (SH3) domains, we have screened a mouse embryonic expression library for peptide fragments that interact with them. Several clones were identified that express fragments of proteins which, through proline-rich binding sites, exhibit differential binding specificity to various SH3 domains. Src-SH3-specific binding uses a sequence of 7 aa of the consensus RPLPXXP, in which the N-terminal arginine is very important. The SH3 domains of the Src-related kinases Fyn, Lyn, and Hck bind to this sequence with the same affinity as that of the Src SH3. In contrast, a quite different proline-rich sequence from the Btk protein kinase binds to the Fyn, Lyn, and Hck SH3 domains, but not to the Src SH3. Specific binding of the Abl SH3 requires a longer, more proline-rich sequence but no arginine. One clone that binds to both Src and Abl SH3 domains through a common site exhibits reversed binding orientation, in that an arginine indispensable for binding to all tested SH3 domains occurs at the C terminus. Another clone contains overlapping yet distinct Src and Abl SH3 binding sites. Binding to the SH3 domains is mediated by a common PXXP amino acid sequence motif present on all ligands, and specificity comes about from other interactions, often ones involving arginine. The rules governing in vivo usage of particular sites by particular SH3 domains are not clear, but one binding orientation may be more specific than another. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7536925

  14. Crystal structure of human GGA1 GAT domain complexed with the GAT-binding domain of Rabaptin5

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guangyu; Zhai, Peng; He, Xiangyuan; Wakeham, Nancy; Rodgers, Karla; Li, Guangpu; Tang, Jordan; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2004-01-01

    GGA proteins coordinate the intracellular trafficking of clathrin-coated vesicles through their interaction with several other proteins. The GAT domain of GGA proteins interacts with ARF, ubiquitin, and Rabaptin5. The GGA–Rabaptin5 interaction is believed to function in the fusion of trans-Golgi-derived vesicles to endosomes. We determined the crystal structure of a human GGA1 GAT domain fragment in complex with the Rabaptin5 GAT-binding domain. In this structure, the Rabaptin5 domain is a 90-residue-long helix. At the N-terminal end, it forms a parallel coiled-coil homodimer, which binds one GAT domain of GGA1. In the C-terminal region, it further assembles into a four-helix bundle tetramer. The Rabaptin5-binding motif of the GGA1 GAT domain consists of a three-helix bundle. Thus, the binding between Rabaptin5 and GGA1 GAT domain is based on a helix bundle–helix bundle interaction. The current structural observation is consistent with previously reported mutagenesis data, and its biological relevance is further confirmed by new mutagenesis studies and affinity analysis. The four-helix bundle structure of Rabaptin5 suggests a functional role in tethering organelles. PMID:15457209

  15. The BEN domain is a novel sequence-specific DNA-binding domain conserved in neural transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Serganov, Artem A.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Lai, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that Drosophila Insensitive (Insv) promotes sensory organ development and has activity as a nuclear corepressor for the Notch transcription factor Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)]. Insv lacks domains of known biochemical function but contains a single BEN domain (i.e., a “BEN-solo” protein). Our chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis confirmed binding of Insensitive to Su(H) target genes in the Enhancer of split gene complex [E(spl)-C]; however, de novo motif analysis revealed a novel site strongly enriched in Insv peaks (TCYAATHRGAA). We validate binding of endogenous Insv to genomic regions bearing such sites, whose associated genes are enriched for neural functions and are functionally repressed by Insv. Unexpectedly, we found that the Insv BEN domain binds specifically to this sequence motif and that Insv directly regulates transcription via this motif. We determined the crystal structure of the BEN–DNA target complex, revealing homodimeric binding of the BEN domain and extensive nucleotide contacts via α helices and a C-terminal loop. Point mutations in key DNA-contacting residues severely impair DNA binding in vitro and capacity for transcriptional regulation in vivo. We further demonstrate DNA-binding and repression activities by the mammalian neural BEN-solo protein BEND5. Altogether, we define novel DNA-binding activity in a conserved family of transcriptional repressors, opening a molecular window on this extensive gene family. PMID:23468431

  16. Bacteriophage endolysin Lyt μ1/6: characterization of the C-terminal binding domain.

    PubMed

    Tišáková, Lenka; Vidová, Barbora; Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The gene product of orf50 from actinophage μ1/6 of Streptomyces aureofaciens is a putative endolysin, Lyt μ1/6. It has a two-domain modular structure, consisting of an N-terminal catalytic and a C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). Comparative analysis of Streptomyces phage endolysins revealed that they all have a modular structure and contain functional C-terminal domains with conserved amino acids, probably associated with their binding function. A blast analysis of Lyt μ1/6 in conjunction with secondary and tertiary structure prediction disclosed the presence of a PG_binding_1 domain within the CBD. The sequence of the C-terminal domain of lyt μ1/6 and truncated forms of it were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The ability of these CBD variants fused to GFP to bind to the surface of S. aureofaciens NMU was shown by specific binding assays.

  17. A SAM oligomerization domain shapes the genomic binding landscape of the LEAFY transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Sayou, Camille; Nanao, Max H; Jamin, Marc; Posé, David; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Grégoire, Laura; Tichtinsky, Gabrielle; Denay, Grégoire; Ott, Felix; Peirats Llobet, Marta; Schmid, Markus; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François

    2016-04-21

    Deciphering the mechanisms directing transcription factors (TFs) to specific genome regions is essential to understand and predict transcriptional regulation. TFs recognize short DNA motifs primarily through their DNA-binding domain. Some TFs also possess an oligomerization domain suspected to potentiate DNA binding but for which the genome-wide influence remains poorly understood. Here we focus on the LEAFY transcription factor, a master regulator of flower development in angiosperms. We have determined the crystal structure of its conserved amino-terminal domain, revealing an unanticipated Sterile Alpha Motif oligomerization domain. We show that this domain is essential to LEAFY floral function. Moreover, combined biochemical and genome-wide assays suggest that oligomerization is required for LEAFY to access regions with low-affinity binding sites or closed chromatin. This finding shows that domains that do not directly contact DNA can nevertheless have a profound impact on the DNA binding landscape of a TF.

  18. A SAM oligomerization domain shapes the genomic binding landscape of the LEAFY transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Sayou, Camille; Nanao, Max H.; Jamin, Marc; Posé, David; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Grégoire, Laura; Tichtinsky, Gabrielle; Denay, Grégoire; Ott, Felix; Peirats Llobet, Marta; Schmid, Markus; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms directing transcription factors (TFs) to specific genome regions is essential to understand and predict transcriptional regulation. TFs recognize short DNA motifs primarily through their DNA-binding domain. Some TFs also possess an oligomerization domain suspected to potentiate DNA binding but for which the genome-wide influence remains poorly understood. Here we focus on the LEAFY transcription factor, a master regulator of flower development in angiosperms. We have determined the crystal structure of its conserved amino-terminal domain, revealing an unanticipated Sterile Alpha Motif oligomerization domain. We show that this domain is essential to LEAFY floral function. Moreover, combined biochemical and genome-wide assays suggest that oligomerization is required for LEAFY to access regions with low-affinity binding sites or closed chromatin. This finding shows that domains that do not directly contact DNA can nevertheless have a profound impact on the DNA binding landscape of a TF. PMID:27097556

  19. SDP1 is a peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 co-activator that binds through its SCAN domain.

    PubMed Central

    Babb, Robert; Bowen, Benjamin R

    2003-01-01

    Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, play an important role in the regulation of lipid metabolism and energy homoeostasis. In a yeast two-hybrid experiment using the zinc-finger transcription factor ZNF202 as bait, we previously identified the SCAN-domain-containing protein SDP1. SDP1 shares a high degree of amino acid sequence identity with PGC-2, a previously identified PPAR gamma 2 co-activator from the mouse. Here we show that SDP1 and PGC-2 interact with PPAR gamma 2 through their SCAN domains, even though PPAR gamma 2 does not contain a SCAN domain. Similar to PGC-2, SDP1 enhanced PPAR gamma 2-dependent gene transcription in transiently transfected cells but did not alter the affinity of PPAR gamma 2 for agonists. Although the SCAN domain was necessary for binding to PPAR gamma 2, it was not sufficient for co-activation in cells, suggesting that other features of SDP1 are responsible for transcriptional co-activation. The ability of SDP1 to interact with two different transcription factors that regulate genes involved in lipid metabolism, ZNF202 and PPAR gamma 2, suggests that SDP1 may be an important co-regulator of such genes. PMID:12444922

  20. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency

    PubMed Central

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M.; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G.; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G.; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3–4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [3H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [35S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [35S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  1. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency.

    PubMed

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-07-14

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3-4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [(3)H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [(35)S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [(35)S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  2. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency.

    PubMed

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-07-14

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3-4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [(3)H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [(35)S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [(35)S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes.

  3. Binding ability of impromidine, a potent H2 agonist of histamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anouar, A.; Lhadi, E.; Decock, P.; Kozlowskyinst4, H.

    1999-09-01

    Impromidine (fig.1) is a potent and selective histamine H2 receptor agonist and its structure comprises a strongly basic guanidine group containing two different imidazole-containing side chains. The present work deals with the study of coordination equilibria between impromidine and Cu(II) and Ni(II) in aqueous solution at 25 circC. Potentiometric, UV-Visible and EPR studies on Cu(II) complexes with impromidine have shown that this anti-ulcerogenic drug is a very potent chelating agent. This drug is found to be a very effective ligand for Ni(II) ions also. The effective coordination of impromidine to metal ions may have significant biological implications. L'impromidine est un agoniste H2 de l'histamine, sa structure possède un groupement guanidinique de forte basicité et dont l'environne ment des deux groupements imidazoliques est différent. Le présent travail consiste en l'étude de la coordination de l'impromidine avec le Cu(II) et le Ni(II) en milieu aqueux à 25 circC. La potentiométrie, LíUV-Visible et la RPE montrent que le cuivre se coordine très fortement avec l'impromidine. Nous avons trouvé que ce médicament se coordine aussi fortement avec le nickel(II). La coordination de l'impromidine avec les métaux pourrait avoir des applications importantes en médecine.

  4. Differential Effects of D-Cycloserine and ACBC at NMDA Receptors in the Rat Entorhinal Cortex Are Related to Efficacy at the Co-Agonist Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Lench, Alex M; Robson, Emma; Jones, Roland S G

    2015-01-01

    Partial agonists at the NMDA receptor co-agonist binding site may have potential therapeutic efficacy in a number of cognitive and neurological conditions. The entorhinal cortex is a key brain area in spatial memory and cognitive processing. At synapses in the entorhinal cortex, NMDA receptors not only mediate postsynaptic excitation but are expressed in presynaptic terminals where they tonically facilitate glutamate release. In a previous study we showed that the co-agonist binding site of the presynaptic NMDA receptor is endogenously and tonically activated by D-serine released from astrocytes. In this study we determined the effects of two co-agonist site partial agonists on both presynaptic and postsynaptic NMDA receptors in layer II of the entorhinal cortex. The high efficacy partial agonist, D-cycloserine, decreased the decay time of postsynaptic NMDA receptor mediated currents evoked by electrical stimulation, but had no effect on amplitude or other kinetic parameters. In contrast, a lower efficacy partial agonist, 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid, decreased decay time to a greater extent than D-cycloserine, and also reduced the peak amplitude of the evoked NMDA receptor mediated postsynaptic responses. Presynaptic NMDA receptors, (monitored indirectly by effects on the frequency of AMPA receptor mediated spontaneous excitatory currents) were unaffected by D-cycloserine, but were reduced in effectiveness by 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid. We discuss these results in the context of the effect of endogenous regulation of the NMDA receptor co-agonist site on receptor gating and the potential therapeutic implications for cognitive disorders.

  5. Solution structure of telomere binding domain of AtTRB2 derived from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Won Kyung; Kim, Heeyoun; Kim, Eunhee; Cheong, Chaejoon; Cho, Myeon Haeng; Lee, Weontae

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • We have determined solution structure of Myb domain of AtTRB2. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 is located in the N-terminal region. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 binds to plant telomeric DNA without fourth helix. • Helix 2 and 3 of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 are involved in DNA recognition. • AtTRB2 is a novel protein distinguished from other known plant TBP. - Abstract: Telomere homeostasis is regulated by telomere-associated proteins, and the Myb domain is well conserved for telomere binding. AtTRB2 is a member of the SMH (Single-Myb-Histone)-like family in Arabidopsis thaliana, having an N-terminal Myb domain, which is responsible for DNA binding. The Myb domain of AtTRB2 contains three α-helices and loops for DNA binding, which is unusual given that other plant telomere-binding proteins have an additional fourth helix that is essential for DNA binding. To understand the structural role for telomeric DNA binding of AtTRB2, we determined the solution structure of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 (AtTRB2{sub 1–64}) using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In addition, the inter-molecular interaction between AtTRB2{sub 1–64} and telomeric DNA has been characterized by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and NMR titration analyses for both plant (TTTAGGG)n and human (TTAGGG)n telomere sequences. Data revealed that Trp28, Arg29, and Val47 residues located in Helix 2 and Helix 3 are crucial for DNA binding, which are well conserved among other plant telomere binding proteins. We concluded that although AtTRB2 is devoid of the additional fourth helix in the Myb-extension domain, it is able to bind to plant telomeric repeat sequences as well as human telomeric repeat sequences.

  6. The p53 activation domain binds the TATA box-binding polypeptide in Holo-TFIID, and a neighboring p53 domain inhibits transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X; Miller, C W; Koeffler, P H; Berk, A J

    1993-01-01

    Antioncogene product p53 is a transcriptional transactivator. To investigate how p53 stimulates transcription, we examined the interaction of p53 with general transcription factors in vitro. We found that p53 binds directly to the human TATA box-binding polypeptide (TBP). We also observed a direct interaction between p53 and purified holo-TFIID, a complex composed of TBP and a group of TBP-associated polypeptides known as TAFs. The p53 binding domain on TBP was mapped to the conserved region of TBP, including residues 220 to 271. The TBP binding domain on p53 was mapped to the p53 activation domain between residues 20 and 57. To analyze the significance of the p53-TBP interaction in p53 transactivation, we compared the ability of Gal4-p53 fusion proteins to bind to TBP in vitro and to activate transcription in transient transfection assays. Fusion proteins which bound to TBP activated transcription, and those that did not bind to TBP did not activate transcription to a detectable level, suggesting that a direct interaction between TBP and p53 is required for p53 transactivation. We also found that inclusion of residues 93 to 160 of p53 in a Gal4-p53 fusion repressed transcriptional activation 100-fold. Consequently, this region of p53 inhibits transcriptional activation by the minimal p53 activation domain. Highest levels of activation were observed with sequences 1 to 92 of p53 fused to Gal4, even though this construct bound to TBP in vitro with an affinity similar to that of other Gal4-p53 fusion proteins. We conclude that TBP binding is necessary for p53 transcriptional activation and that p53 sequences outside the TBP binding domain modulate the level of activation. Images PMID:8497252

  7. Functional domains of the floral regulator AGAMOUS: characterization of the DNA binding domain and analysis of dominant negative mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Y; Huang, H; Tudor, M; Hu, Y; Ma, H

    1996-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MADS box gene AGAMOUS (AG) controls reproductive organ identity and floral meristem determinacy. The AG protein binds in vitro to DNA sequences similar to the targets of known MADS domain transcription factors. Whereas most plant MADS domain proteins begin with the MADS domain, AG and its orthologs contain a region N-terminal to the MADS domain. All plant MADS domain proteins share another region with moderate sequence similarity called the K domain. Neither the region (I region) that lies between the MADS and K domains nor the C-terminal region is conserved. We show here that the AG MADS domain and the I region are necessary and sufficient for DNA binding in vitro and that AG binds to DNA as a dimer. To investigate the in vivo function of the regions of AG not required for in vitro DNA binding, we introduced several AG constructs into wild-type plants and characterized their floral phenotypes. We show that transgenic Arabidopsis plants with a 35S-AG construct encoding an AG protein lacking the N-terminal region produced apetala 2 (ap2)-like flowers similar to those ectopically expressing AG proteins retaining the N-terminal region. This result suggests that the N-terminal region is not required to produce the ap2-like phenotype. In addition, transformants with a 35S-AG construct encoding an AG protein lacking the C-terminal region produced ag-like flowers, indicating that this truncated AG protein inhibits normal AG function. Finally, transformants with a 35S-AG construct encoding an AG protein lacking both K and C regions produced flowers with more stamens and carpels. The phenotypes of the AG transformants demonstrate that both the K domain and the C-terminal region have important and distinct in vivo functions. We discuss possible mechanisms through which AG may regulate downstream genes. PMID:8672883

  8. In vivo treatment with mu and delta, but not kappa-selective opioid agonists reduces [3H]spiperone binding to the guinea-pig striatum: autoradiographic evidence.

    PubMed

    Brent, P J; Bunn, S J

    1994-08-22

    In guinea-pigs, acute treatment with mu and delta receptor opioid agonists induces sedation and immobility [1,5], and attenuates the behavioural activation produced by the dopamine D2 agonist quinpirole [5]. In contrast, kappa-selective opioid agonists induce dystonic-like movements [4,5,8]. This has led us to investigate the possibility of an interaction between acute opioid treatment and the dopamine D2 system. The effect of acute treatment with mu, delta and kappa opioid agonists on [3H]spiperone binding sites (dopamine D2) in guinea-pig brain was studied using receptor autoradiography. The mu preferring agonist morphine (15 mg/kg subcutaneously, SC) given for 2 h, and the delta receptor selective agonist DPDPE (Tyr-D-Pen-Gly-Phe-D-Pen) (20 nM, intracerebroventricularly, ICV) given for 0.5 h, both decreased the density of specific (butaclamol displaceable) [3H]spiperone binding in the caudate putamen by 23.8 +/- 1.7% and 24.2 +/- 2.7% respectively, and in nucleus accumbens by 26.1 +/- 2.7% and 21.9 +/- 4.6% respectively compared to saline treated animals. There were no significant changes in the level of [3H]spiperone binding to other brain regions examined including frontal cortex, hippocampus, substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, amygdala, hypothalamic nuclei and cerebellum. In other experiments, incubation of coronal slices from various brain regions with [3H]spiperone, in the presence of a high concentration of morphine (20 microM) or DPDPE (10 microM) did not affect the level of binding, thus precluding effects due to residual tissue levels of drugs after in vivo treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Design and x-ray crystal structures of high-potency nonsteroidal glucocorticoid agonists exploiting a novel binding site on the receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Coe, Diane M.; Cooper, Tony W.J.; House, David; Iannone, Marie A.; Macdonald, Simon J.F.; Madauss, Kevin P.; McLay, Iain M.; Shipley, Tracy J.; Taylor, Simon J.; Tran, Thuy B.; Uings, Iain J.; Weller, Victoria; Williams, Shawn P.

    2010-09-17

    Crystallography and computer modeling have been used to exploit a previously unexplored channel in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Highly potent, nonsteroidal indazole amides showing excellent complementarity to the channel were designed with the assistance of the computational technique AlleGrow. The accuracy of the design process was demonstrated through crystallographic structural determination of the GR ligand-binding domain-agonist complex of the D-prolinamide derivative 11. The utility of the channel was further exemplified through the design of a potent phenylindazole in which structural motifs, seen to interact with the traditional GR ligand pocket, were abandoned and replaced by interactions within the new channel. Occupation of the channel was confirmed with a second GR crystal structure of this truncated D-alaninamide derivative 13. Compound 11 displays properties compatible with development as an intranasal solution formulation, whereas oral bioavailability has been demonstrated with a related truncated exemplar 14. Data with the pyrrolidinone amide 12 demonstrate the potential for further elaboration within the 'meta' channel to deliver compounds with selectivity for the desired transrepressive activity of glucocorticoids. The discovery of these interactions with this important receptor offers significant opportunities for the design of novel GR modulators.

  10. A Novel Approach to Predict Core Residues on Cancer-Related DNA-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in different cancer pathways. In particular, the DNA-binding domains of proteins can determine where and how gene regulatory regions are bound in different cell lines at different stages. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method to predict and locate the core residues on cancer-related DNA-binding domains. In this study, we propose a computational method to predict and locate core residues on DNA-binding domains. In particular, we have selected the cancer-related DNA-binding domains for in-depth studies, namely, winged Helix Turn Helix family, homeodomain family, and basic Helix-Loop-Helix family. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the core residues involved in protein-DNA interactions, as verified by the existing structural data. Given its good performance, various aspects of the method are discussed and explored: for instance, different uses of prediction algorithm, different protein domains, and hotspot threshold setting.

  11. Cross-talk among structural domains of human DBP upon binding 25-hydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arjun; Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    Serum vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is structurally very similar to serum albumin (ALB); both have three distinct structural domains and high cysteine-content. Yet, functionally they are very different. DBP possesses high affinity for vitamin D metabolites and G-actin, but ALB does not. It has been suggested that there may be cross-talk among the domains so that binding of one ligand may influence the binding of others. In this study we have employed 2-p-toluidinyl-6-sulphonate (TNS), a reporter molecule that fluoresces upon binding to hydrophobic pockets of DBP. We observed that recombinant domain III possesses strong binding for TNS, which is not influenced by 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D3), yet TNS-fluorescence of the whole protein is quenched by 25-OH-D3. These results provide a direct evidence of cross-talk among the structural domains of DBP. PMID:18035050

  12. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  13. Binding of thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 agonists to human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Halushka, P. V.; Kochel, P. J.; Mais, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The competition of [125I]-9, 11 dimethylmethano-11, 12 methano-16-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)-13, 14-dihydro-13-aza 15 alpha beta-omega-tetranor-thromboxane A2 ([125I]-PTA-OH), a thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist, with a series of thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) mimetics for binding to the putative TXA2/PGH2 receptor in washed human platelets was studied. The rank order potency for the series of mimetics to compete with [125I]-PTA-OH for binding was compared with their rank order potency for induction of platelet aggregation. The rank order potency for the mimetics to compete with [125I]-PTA-OH for binding was ONO-11113 greater than SQ-26655 greater than U44069 greater than U46619 = 9, 11-azo PGH2 greater than MB28767. This rank order potency was highly correlated with their rank order potency for inducing platelet aggregation (r = 0.992). Changes in the intra or extracellular concentrations of Na+ did not have a significant effect on the competition between U46619 and [125I]-PTA-OH for binding to the putative receptor. In summary, it appears that these TXA2/PGH2 mimetics activate human platelets through the putative TXA2/PGH2 receptor. PMID:3594077

  14. The RNA-binding properties and domain of Rice stripe virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuling; Xue, Yanan; Hao, Jiahui; Liang, Changyong

    2015-10-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NP) of rice stripe virus (RSV) encapsidates viral genomic RNAs to form virion. The binding of NP with RNA is essential for the formation of virus particle. In this study, the binding specificity of RSV NP to RNA and the domains within the NP that mediate this interaction were investigated by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays and Northwestern blot analysis. The results demonstrated that RSV NP was able to bind to all synthetic RNAs and DNAs without sequence specificity. Using a series of truncated NPs expressed in E. coli and synthetic peptides, we mapped the RNA-binding domain of NP to the central region from amino acid residues 201-232. Further alanine substitution analysis revealed that Lys(206), Lys(207), Lys(220), and Tyr(221) in the RNA-binding domain were essential for NP to bind with RNA.

  15. Altered Specificity of DNA-Binding Proteins with Transition Metal Dimerization Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenoud, Bernard; Schepartz, Alanna

    1993-01-01

    The bZIP motif is characterized by a leucine zipper domain that mediates dimerization and a basic domain that contacts DNA. A series of transition metal dimerization domains were used to alter systematically the relative orientation of basic domain peptides. Both the affinity and the specificity of the peptide-DNA interaction depend on domain orientation. These results indicate that the precise configuration linking the domains is important; dimerization is not always sufficient for DNA binding. This approach to studying the effect of orientation on protein function complements mutagenesis and could be used in many systems.

  16. Vertebrate DM domain proteins bind similar DNA sequences and can heterodimerize on DNA

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Mark W; Zarkower, David; Bardwell, Vivian J

    2007-01-01

    Background: The DM domain is a zinc finger-like DNA binding motif first identified in the sexual regulatory proteins Doublesex (DSX) and MAB-3, and is widely conserved among metazoans. DM domain proteins regulate sexual differentiation in at least three phyla and also control other aspects of development, including vertebrate segmentation. Most DM domain proteins share little similarity outside the DM domain. DSX and MAB-3 bind partially overlapping DNA sequences, and DSX has been shown to interact with DNA via the minor groove without inducing DNA bending. DSX and MAB-3 exhibit unusually high DNA sequence specificity relative to other minor groove binding proteins. No detailed analysis of DNA binding by the seven vertebrate DM domain proteins, DMRT1-DMRT7 has been reported, and thus it is unknown whether they recognize similar or diverse DNA sequences. Results: We used a random oligonucleotide in vitro selection method to determine DNA binding sites for six of the seven proteins. These proteins selected sites resembling that of DSX despite differences in the sequence of the DM domain recognition helix, but they varied in binding efficiency and in preferences for particular nucleotides, and some behaved anomalously in gel mobility shift assays. DMRT1 protein from mouse testis extracts binds the sequence we determined, and the DMRT proteins can bind their in vitro-defined sites in transfected cells. We also find that some DMRT proteins can bind DNA as heterodimers. Conclusion: Our results suggest that target gene specificity of the DMRT proteins does not derive exclusively from major differences in DNA binding specificity. Instead target specificity may come from more subtle differences in DNA binding preference between different homodimers, together with differences in binding specificity between homodimers versus heterodimers. PMID:17605809

  17. Calcium-dependent and -independent binding of soybean calmodulin isoforms to the calmodulin binding domain of tobacco MAPK phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Rainaldi, Mario; Yamniuk, Aaron P; Murase, Tomohiko; Vogel, Hans J

    2007-03-01

    The recent finding of an interaction between calmodulin (CaM) and the tobacco mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (NtMKP1) establishes an important connection between Ca(2+) signaling and the MAPK cascade, two of the most important signaling pathways in plant cells. Here we have used different biophysical techniques, including fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy as well as microcalorimetry, to characterize the binding of soybean CaM isoforms, SCaM-1 and -4, to synthetic peptides derived from the CaM binding domain of NtMKP1. We find that the actual CaM binding region is shorter than what had previously been suggested. Moreover, the peptide binds to the SCaM C-terminal domain even in the absence of free Ca(2+) with the single Trp residue of the NtMKP1 peptides buried in a solvent-inaccessible hydrophobic region. In the presence of Ca(2+), the peptides bind first to the C-terminal lobe of the SCaMs with a nanomolar affinity, and at higher peptide concentrations, a second peptide binds to the N-terminal domain with lower affinity. Thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that the formation of the peptide-bound complex with the Ca(2+)-loaded SCaMs is driven by favorable binding enthalpy due to a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Experiments with CaM proteolytic fragments showed that the two domains bind the peptide in an independent manner. To our knowledge, this is the first report providing direct evidence for sequential binding of two identical peptides of a target protein to CaM. Discussion of the potential biological role of this interaction motif is also provided.

  18. Solution Structure of the PhoP DNA-Binding Domain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Ramsay; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Amer, Brendan R.; Clubb, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a leading cause of death world-wide. The PhoP protein is required for virulence and is part of the PhoPR two-component system that regulates gene expression. The NMR-derived solution structure of the PhoP C-terminal DNA-binding domain is reported. Residues 150 to 246 form a structured domain that contains a winged helix-turn-helix motif. We provide evidence that the transactivation loop postulated to contact RNA polymerase is partially disordered in solution, and that the polypeptide that connects the DNA-binding domain to the regulatory domain is unstructured. PMID:26209027

  19. Homology-modeled ligand-binding domains of medaka estrogen receptors and androgen receptors: A model system for the study of reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Jianzhou Shen Xueyan; Yan Zuowei; Zhao Haobin; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2009-02-27

    Estrogen and androgen and their receptors play critical roles in physiological processes such as sexual differentiation and development. Using the available structural models for the human estrogen receptors alpha and beta and androgen receptor as templates, we designed in silico agonist and antagonist models of medaka estrogen receptor (meER) alpha, beta-1, and beta-2, and androgen receptor (meAR) alpha and beta. Using these models, we studied (1) the structural relationship between the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of ERs and ARs of human and medaka, and (2) whether medaka ER and AR can be potential models for studying the ligand-binding activities of various agonists and antagonists of these receptors by docking analysis. A high level of conservation was observed between the sequences of the ligand-binding domains of meER{alpha} and huER{alpha}, meER{beta}1 and huER{beta}, meER{beta}2, and huER{beta} with 62.8%, 66.4%, and 65.1% identity, respectively. The sequence conservation between meAR{alpha} and huAR, meAR{beta}, and huAR was found with 70.1% and 61.0% of identity, respectively. Thirty-three selected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including both agonists and antagonists, were docked into the LBD of ER and AR, and the corresponding docking score for medaka models and human templates were calculated. In order to confirm the conservation of the overall geometry and the binding pocket, the backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) for C{alpha} atoms was derived from the structure superposition of all 10 medaka homology models to the six human templates. Our results suggested conformational conservation between the ERs and ARs of medaka and human, Thus, medaka could be highly useful as a model system for studies involving estrogen and androgen interaction with their receptors.

  20. The patterns of binding of RAR, RXR and TR homo- and heterodimers to direct repeats are dictated by the binding specificites of the DNA binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Mader, S; Chen, J Y; Chen, Z; White, J; Chambon, P; Gronemeyer, H

    1993-01-01

    We show here that, in addition to generating an increase in DNA binding efficiency, heterodimerization of retinoid X receptor (RXR) with either retinoic acid receptor (RAR) or thyroid hormone receptor (TR) alters the binding site repertoires of RAR, RXR and TR homodimers. The binding site specificities of both homo- and heterodimers appear to be largely determined by their DNA binding domains (DBDs), and are dictated by (i) homocooperative DNA binding of the RXR DBD, (ii) heterocooperative DNA binding of RXR/RAR and RXR/TR DBDs, and (iii) steric hindrance. No homodimerization domain exists in the DBDs of TR and RAR. The dimerization function which is located in the ligand binding domain further stabilizes, but in general does not change, the repertoire dictated by the corresponding DBD(s). The binding repertoire can be further modified by the actual sequence of the binding site. We also provide evidence supporting the view that the cooperative binding of the RXR/RAR and RXR/TR DBDs to directly repeated elements is anisotropic, with interactions between the dimerization interfaces occurring only with RXR bound to the 5' located motif. This polarity, which appears to be maintained in the full-length receptor heterodimers, may constitute a novel parameter in promoter-specific transactivation. Images PMID:8262045

  1. Recognition of the disordered p53 transactivation domain by the transcriptional adapter zinc finger domains of CREB-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Krois, Alexander S; Ferreon, Josephine C; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2016-03-29

    An important component of the activity of p53 as a tumor suppressor is its interaction with the transcriptional coactivators cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300, which activate transcription of p53-regulated stress response genes and stabilize p53 against ubiquitin-mediated degradation. The highest affinity interactions are between the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of p53 and the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains of CBP/p300. The NMR spectra of simple binary complexes of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains with the p53TAD suffer from exchange broadening, but innovations in construct design and isotopic labeling have enabled us to obtain high-resolution structures using fusion proteins, uniformly labeled in the case of the TAZ2-p53TAD fusion and segmentally labeled through transintein splicing for the TAZ1-p53TAD fusion. The p53TAD is bipartite, with two interaction motifs, termed AD1 and AD2, which fold to form short amphipathic helices upon binding to TAZ1 and TAZ2 whereas intervening regions of the p53TAD remain flexible. Both the AD1 and AD2 motifs bind to hydrophobic surfaces of the TAZ domains, with AD2 making more extensive hydrophobic contacts consistent with its greater contribution to the binding affinity. Binding of AD1 and AD2 is synergistic, and structural studies performed with isolated motifs can be misleading. The present structures of the full-length p53TAD complexes demonstrate the versatility of the interactions available to an intrinsically disordered domain containing bipartite interaction motifs and provide valuable insights into the structural basis of the affinity changes that occur upon stress-related posttranslational modification. PMID:26976603

  2. Recognition of the disordered p53 transactivation domain by the transcriptional adapter zinc finger domains of CREB-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Krois, Alexander S.; Ferreon, Josephine C.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A.; Wright, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    An important component of the activity of p53 as a tumor suppressor is its interaction with the transcriptional coactivators cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300, which activate transcription of p53-regulated stress response genes and stabilize p53 against ubiquitin-mediated degradation. The highest affinity interactions are between the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of p53 and the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains of CBP/p300. The NMR spectra of simple binary complexes of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains with the p53TAD suffer from exchange broadening, but innovations in construct design and isotopic labeling have enabled us to obtain high-resolution structures using fusion proteins, uniformly labeled in the case of the TAZ2–p53TAD fusion and segmentally labeled through transintein splicing for the TAZ1–p53TAD fusion. The p53TAD is bipartite, with two interaction motifs, termed AD1 and AD2, which fold to form short amphipathic helices upon binding to TAZ1 and TAZ2 whereas intervening regions of the p53TAD remain flexible. Both the AD1 and AD2 motifs bind to hydrophobic surfaces of the TAZ domains, with AD2 making more extensive hydrophobic contacts consistent with its greater contribution to the binding affinity. Binding of AD1 and AD2 is synergistic, and structural studies performed with isolated motifs can be misleading. The present structures of the full-length p53TAD complexes demonstrate the versatility of the interactions available to an intrinsically disordered domain containing bipartite interaction motifs and provide valuable insights into the structural basis of the affinity changes that occur upon stress-related posttranslational modification. PMID:26976603

  3. Synthesis of GABAA Receptor Agonists and Evaluation of their α-Subunit Selectivity and Orientation in the GABA Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Michaela; Rabe, Holger; Strehle, Axelle; Dieler, Sandra; Debus, Fabian; Dannhardt, Gerd; Akabas, Myles H.; Lüddens, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Drugs used to treat various disorders target GABAA receptors. To develop α subunit selective compounds, we synthesized 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol (4-PIOL) derivatives. The 3-isoxazolol moiety was substituted by 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-one, 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-thione, and substituted 1,2,4-triazol-3-ol heterocycles with modifications to the basic piperidine substituent as well as substituents without basic nitrogen. Compounds were screened by [3H]muscimol binding and in patch-clamp experiments with heterologously expressed GABAA αiβ3γ2 receptors (i = 1–6). The effects of 5-aminomethyl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5d were comparable to GABA for all α subunit isoforms. 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5a and 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H- [1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-thione 6a were weak agonists at α3–, α3–, and α5–containing receptors. When coapplied with GABA they were antagonistic inα2–, α4–, and α6–containing receptors and potentiated α3-containing receptors. 6a protected GABA binding site cysteine-substitution mutants α1F64C and α1S68C from reacting with methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate. 6a specifically covalently modified the α1R66C thiol, in the GABA binding site, through its oxadiazolethione sulfur. These results demonstrate the feasibility of synthesizing α subtype selective GABA mimetic drugs. PMID:18651727

  4. Probing the Binding Pocket of the Broadly Tuned Human Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R14 by Chemical Modification of Cognate Agonists.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Rafik; Nowak, Stefanie; Di Pizio, Antonella; Kitaneh, Hothaifa; Abu-Jaish, Alaa; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Niv, Masha Y; Behrens, Maik

    2016-07-01

    Sensing potentially harmful bitter substances in the oral cavity is achieved by a group of (˜) 25 receptors, named TAS2Rs, which are expressed in specialized sensory cells and recognize individual but overlapping sets of bitter compounds. The receptors differ in their tuning breadths ranging from narrowly to broadly tuned receptors. One of the most broadly tuned human bitter taste receptors is the TAS2R14 recognizing an enormous variety of chemically diverse synthetic and natural bitter compounds, including numerous medicinal drugs. This suggests that this receptor possesses a large readily accessible ligand binding pocket. To allow probing the accessibility and size of the ligand binding pocket, we chemically modified cognate agonists and tested receptor responses in functional assays. The addition of large functional groups to agonists was usually possible without abolishing agonistic activity. The newly synthesized agonist derivatives were modeled in the binding site of the receptor, providing comparison to the mother substances and rationalization of the in vitro activities of this series of compounds. PMID:26825540

  5. Crystallization and data collection of the nucleotide-binding domain of Mg-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Håkansson, Kjell O.; Ćurović, Aida

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of how P-type ATPases work would greatly benefit from the elucidation of more high-resolution structures. The nucleotide-binding domain of Mg-ATPase was selected for structural studies because Mg-ATPase is closely related to eukaryotic Ca-ATPase and Na,K-ATPase while the nucleotide-binding domain itself has diverged substantially. Two fragments of Mg-ATPase were cloned in Escherichia coli and purified. The entire cytoplasmic loop (residues 367–673), consisting of the phosphorylation and nucleotide-binding domains, expressed well and was purified in large quantities. The smaller 19.5 kDa nucleotide-binding domain (residues 383–545) expressed less well but formed crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 1.53 Å which will be used for molecular replacement. PMID:19255470

  6. ATP binding to two sites is necessary for dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains of ABC proteins.

    PubMed

    Zoghbi, Maria E; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2014-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters have a functional unit formed by two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). ATP-bound NBDs dimerize in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides sandwiched at the dimer interface. Both NBDs contribute residues to each of the two nucleotide-binding sites (NBSs) in the dimer. In previous studies, we showed that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii forms ATP-bound dimers that dissociate completely following hydrolysis of one of the two bound ATP molecules. Since hydrolysis of ATP at one NBS is sufficient to drive dimer dissociation, it is unclear why all ABC proteins contain two NBSs. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) to study ATP-induced formation of NBD homodimers containing two NBSs competent for ATP binding, and NBD heterodimers with one active NBS and one binding-defective NBS. The results showed that binding of two ATP molecules is necessary for NBD dimerization. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dissociation, but two binding sites are required to form the ATP-sandwich NBD dimer necessary for hydrolysis.

  7. Defining a minimal estrogen receptor DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Mader, S; Chambon, P; White, J H

    1993-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a transcriptional regulator which binds to cognate palindromic DNA sequences known as estrogen response elements (EREs). A 66 amino acid core region which contains two zinc fingers and is highly conserved among the nuclear receptors is essential for site specific DNA recognition. However, it remains unclear how many flanking amino acids in addition to the zinc finger core are required for DNA binding. Here, we have characterized the minimal DNA binding region of the human ER by analysing the DNA binding properties of a series of deletion mutants expressed in bacteria. We find that the 66 amino acid zinc finger core of the DBD fails to bind DNA, and that the C-terminal end of the minimal ER DBD required for binding to perfectly palindromic EREs corresponds to the limit of 100% amino acid homology between the chicken and human receptors, which represents the boundary between regions C and D in the ER. Moreover, amino acids of region D up to 30 residues C-terminal to the zinc fingers greatly stabilize DNA binding by the DBD to perfectly palindromic EREs and are absolutely required for formation of gel retardation complexes by the DBD on certain physiological imperfectly palindromic EREs. These results indicate that in addition to the zinc finger core, amino acids C-terminal to the core in regions C and D play a key role in DNA binding by the ER, particularly to imperfectly palindromic response elements. The ER DBD expressed in E. coli binds as a dimer to ERE palindromes in a highly cooperative manner and forms only low levels of monomeric protein-DNA complexes on either palindromic or half-palindromic response elements. Conversion of ER amino acids 222 to 226, which lie within region C, to the corresponding residues of the human RAR alpha abolishes formation of dimeric protein-DNA complexes. Conversely, replacement of the same region of RAR alpha with ER residues 222 to 226 creates a derivative that, unlike the RAR alpha DBD, binds

  8. Molecular basis for histone acetyltransferase regulation by binding partners, associated domains, and autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Cheryl E.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation is a post-translational modification (PTM) that regulates chromatin dynamics and function. Dysregulation of acetylation or acetyltransferase activity has been correlated with several human diseases. Many, if not all histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are regulated in part through tethered domains, association with binding partners or post-translational modification, including predominantly acetylation. This review focuses on what is currently understood at the molecular level of HAT regulation as it occurs via binding partners, associated domains, and autoacetylation. PMID:26555232

  9. Family-wide Characterization of Histone Binding Abilities of Human CW Domain-containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Tempel, Wolfram; Zhang, Qi; Liang, Xiao; Loppnau, Peter; Qin, Su; Min, Jinrong

    2016-04-22

    Covalent modifications of histone N-terminal tails play a critical role in regulating chromatin structure and controlling gene expression. These modifications are controlled by histone-modifying enzymes and read out by histone-binding proteins. Numerous proteins have been identified as histone modification readers. Here we report the family-wide characterization of histone binding abilities of human CW domain-containing proteins. We demonstrate that the CW domains in ZCWPW2 and MORC3/4 selectively recognize histone H3 trimethylated at Lys-4, similar to ZCWPW1 reported previously, while the MORC1/2 and LSD2 lack histone H3 Lys-4 binding ability. Our crystal structures of the CW domains of ZCWPW2 and MORC3 in complex with the histone H3 trimethylated at Lys-4 peptide reveal the molecular basis of this interaction. In each complex, two tryptophan residues in the CW domain form the "floor" and "right wall," respectively, of the methyllysine recognition cage. Our mutation results based on ZCWPW2 reveal that the right wall tryptophan residue is essential for binding, and the floor tryptophan residue enhances binding affinity. Our structural and mutational analysis highlights the conserved roles of the cage residues of CW domain across the histone methyllysine binders but also suggests why some CW domains lack histone binding ability. PMID:26933034

  10. DNA-binding specificity of the Lon protease alpha-domain from Brevibacillus thermoruber WR-249.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Lee, Huai-Cheng; Wang, Iren; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Chen, Chinpan; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2009-10-01

    Lon protease has been well studied in many aspects; however, the DNA-binding specificity of Lon in prokaryotes has not been clearly identified. Here we examined the DNA-binding activity of Lon protease alpha-domains from Brevibacillus thermoruber (Bt), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Escherichia coli (Ec). MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy showed that the alpha-domain from Bt-Lon binds to the duplex nucleotide sequence 5'-CTGTTAGCGGGC-3' (ms1) and protected it from DNase I digestion. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the Bt-Lon alpha-domain binds with ms1 double-stranded DNA tighter than Bs- and Ec-Lon alpha-domains, whereas the Bt-Lon alpha-domain has dramatically lower affinity for double-stranded DNA with 0 and 50% identity to the ms1 binding sequence. Our results indicated that Bt-Lon alpha-domain plays a critical role with ms1 sequence in the DNA-binding specificity.

  11. Evaluation of Selected Binding Domains for the Analysis of Ubiquitinated Proteomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ansong, Charles; Brown, Joseph N.; Yang, Feng; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-08-01

    Ubiquitination is an abundant post-translational modification that consists of covalent attachment of ubiquitin to lysine residues or the N-terminus of proteins. Mono- and polyubiquitination have been shown to be involved in many critical eukaryotic cellular functions and are often disrupted by intracellular bacterial pathogens. Affinity enrichment of ubiquitinated proteins enables global analysis of this key modification. In this context, the use of ubiquitin-binding domains is a promising but relatively unexplored alternative to more broadly used immunoaffinity or tagged affinity enrichment methods. In this study, we evaluated the application of eight ubiquitin-binding domains that have differing affinities for ubiquitination states. Small-scale proteomics analysis identified ~200 ubiquitinated protein candidates per ubiquitin-binding domain pull-down experiment. Results from subsequent Western blot analyses that employed anti-ubiquitin or monoclonal antibodies against polyubiquitination at lysine 48 and 63 suggest that ubiquitin-binding domains from Dsk2 and ubiquilin-1 have the broadest specificity in that they captured most types of ubiquitination, whereas the binding domain from NBR1 was more selective to polyubiquitination. These data demonstrate that with optimized purification conditions, ubiquitin-binding domains can be an alternative tool for proteomic applications. This approach is especially promising for the analysis of tissues or cells resistant to transfection, of which the overexpression of tagged ubiquitin is a major hurdle.

  12. Functional interactions between nucleotide binding domains and leukotriene C4 binding sites of multidrug resistance protein 1 (ABCC1).

    PubMed

    Payen, Lea; Gao, Mian; Westlake, Christopher; Theis, Ashley; Cole, Susan P C; Deeley, Roger G

    2005-06-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) is a member of the "C" branch of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. The NH(2)-proximal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of MRP1 differs functionally from its COOH-proximal domain (NBD2). NBD1 displays intrinsic high-affinity ATP binding and little ATPase activity. In contrast, ATP binding to NBD2 is strongly dependent on nucleotide binding by NBD1, and NBD2 is more hydrolytically active. We have demonstrated that occupancy of NBD2 by ATP or ADP markedly decreased substrate binding by MRP1. We have further explored the relationship between nucleotide and substrate binding by examining the effects of various ATP analogs and ADP trapping, as well as mutations in conserved functional elements in the NBDs, on the ability of MRP1 to bind the photoactivatable, high-affinity substrate cysteinyl leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4))(.) Overall, the results support a model in which occupancy of both NBD1 and NBD2 by ATP results in the formation of a low-affinity conformation of the protein. However, nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs (beta,gamma-imidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate and adenylylmethylene diphosphonate) failed to substitute for ATP or adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATPgammaS) in decreasing LTC(4) photolabeling. Furthermore, mutations of the signature sequence in either NBD that had no apparent effect on azido-ATP binding abrogated the formation of a low-affinity substrate binding state in the presence of ATP or ATPgammaS. We suggest that the effect of these mutations, and possibly the failure of some ATP analogs to decrease LTC(4) binding, may be attributable to an inability to elicit a conformational change in the NBDs that involves interactions between the signature sequence and the gamma-phosphate of the bound nucleotide.

  13. Ligand binding to the PDZ domains of postsynaptic density protein 95.

    PubMed

    Toto, Angelo; Pedersen, Søren W; Karlsson, O Andreas; Moran, Griffin E; Andersson, Eva; Chi, Celestine N; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2016-05-01

    Cellular scaffolding and signalling is generally governed by multidomain proteins, where each domain has a particular function. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) is involved in synapse formation and is a typical example of such a multidomain protein. Protein-protein interactions of PSD-95 are well studied and include the following three protein ligands: (i)N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluN2B, (ii) neuronal nitric oxide synthase and (iii) cysteine-rich protein (CRIPT), all of which bind to one or more of the three PDZ domains in PSD-95. While interactions for individual PDZ domains of PSD-95 have been well studied, less is known about the influence of neighbouring domains on the function of the respective individual domain. We therefore performed a systematic study on the ligand-binding kinetics of PSD-95 using constructs of different size for PSD-95 and its ligands. Regarding the canonical peptide-binding pocket and relatively short peptides (up to 15-mer), the PDZ domains in PSD-95 by and large work as individual binding modules. However, in agreement with previous studies, residues outside of the canonical binding pocket modulate the affinity of the ligands. In particular, the dissociation of the 101 amino acid CRIPT from PSD-95 is slowed down at least 10-fold for full-length PSD-95 when compared with the individual PDZ3 domain. PMID:26941280

  14. Functional characterization of the Cdc42p binding domain of yeast Ste20p protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Wu, C; Leeuw, T; Fourest-Lieuvin, A; Segall, J E; Thomas, D Y

    1997-01-01

    Ste20p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the Ste20p/p65PAK family of protein kinases which are highly conserved from yeast to man and regulate conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Ste20p fulfills multiple roles in pheromone signaling, morphological switching and vegetative growth and binds Cdc42p, a Rho-like small GTP binding protein required for polarized morphogenesis. We have analyzed the functional consequences of mutations that prevent binding of Cdc42p to Ste20p. The complete amino-terminal, non-catalytic half of Ste20p, including the conserved Cdc42p binding domain, was dispensable for heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated pheromone signaling. However, the Cdc42p binding domain was necessary for filamentous growth in response to nitrogen starvation and for an essential function that Ste20p shares with its isoform Cla4p during vegetative growth. Moreover, the Cdc42p binding domain was required for cell-cell adhesion during conjugation. Subcellular localization of wild-type and mutant Ste20p fused to green fluorescent protein showed that the Cdc42p binding domain is needed to direct localization of Ste20p to regions of polarized growth. These results suggest that Ste20p is regulated in different developmental pathways by different mechanisms which involve heterotrimeric and small GTP binding proteins. PMID:9009270

  15. Chemical Shift Assignments of Mouse HOXD13 DNA Binding Domain Bound to Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Matthew; Zhang, Yonghong; Carlson, Hanqian L.; Stadler, H. Scott; Ames, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The homeobox gene (Hoxd13) codes for a transcription factor protein that binds to AT-rich DNA sequences and controls expression of proteins that control embryonic morphogenesis. We report NMR chemical shift assignments of mouse Hoxd13 DNA binding domain bound to an 11-residue DNA duplex (BMRB no. 25133). PMID:25491407

  16. Characterization of ERM transactivation domain binding to the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator subunit MED25.

    PubMed

    Landrieu, Isabelle; Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Rucktooa, Prakash; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2015-08-18

    The N-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD) of ERM/ETV5 (ERM38-68), a PEA3 group member of Ets-related transcription factors, directly interacts with the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. Molecular details of this interaction were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The TAD is disordered in solution but has a propensity to adopt local transient secondary structure. We show that it folds upon binding to MED25 and that the resulting ERM-MED25 complex displays characteristics of a fuzzy complex. Mutational analysis further reveals that two aromatic residues in the ERM TAD (F47 and W57) are involved in the binding to MED25 and participate in the ability of ERM TAD to activate transcription. Mutation of a key residue Q451 in the VP16 H1 binding pocket of MED25 affects the binding of ERM. Furthermore, competition experiments show that ERM and VP16 H1 share a common binding interface on MED25. NMR data confirms the occupancy of this binding pocket by ERM TAD. Based on these experimental data, a structural model of a functional interaction is proposed. This study provides mechanistic insights into the Mediator-transactivator interactions. PMID:26130716

  17. Characterization of ERM transactivation domain binding to the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator subunit MED25

    PubMed Central

    Landrieu, Isabelle; Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Rucktooa, Prakash; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD) of ERM/ETV5 (ERM38–68), a PEA3 group member of Ets-related transcription factors, directly interacts with the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. Molecular details of this interaction were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The TAD is disordered in solution but has a propensity to adopt local transient secondary structure. We show that it folds upon binding to MED25 and that the resulting ERM–MED25 complex displays characteristics of a fuzzy complex. Mutational analysis further reveals that two aromatic residues in the ERM TAD (F47 and W57) are involved in the binding to MED25 and participate in the ability of ERM TAD to activate transcription. Mutation of a key residue Q451 in the VP16 H1 binding pocket of MED25 affects the binding of ERM. Furthermore, competition experiments show that ERM and VP16 H1 share a common binding interface on MED25. NMR data confirms the occupancy of this binding pocket by ERM TAD. Based on these experimental data, a structural model of a functional interaction is proposed. This study provides mechanistic insights into the Mediator–transactivator interactions. PMID:26130716

  18. Conformational flexibility of the agonist binding jaw of the human P2X3 receptor is a prerequisite for channel opening

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, M; Hausmann, R; Dopychai, A; Grohmann, M; Franke, H; Nieber, K; Schmalzing, G; Illes, P; Riedel, T

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is assumed that ATP induces closure of the binding jaw of ligand-gated P2X receptors, which eventually results in the opening of the membrane channel and the flux of cations. Immobilization by cysteine mutagenesis of the binding jaw inhibited ATP-induced current responses, but did not allow discrimination between disturbances of binding, gating, subunit assembly or trafficking to the plasma membrane. Experimental Approach A molecular model of the pain-relevant human (h)P2X3 receptor was used to identify amino acid pairs, which were located at the lips of the binding jaw and did not participate in agonist binding but strongly approached each other even in the absence of ATP. Key Results A series of cysteine double mutant hP2X3 receptors, expressed in HEK293 cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes, exhibited depressed current responses to α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP) due to the formation of spontaneous inter-subunit disulfide bonds. Reducing these bonds with dithiothreitol reversed the blockade of the α,β-meATP transmembrane current. Amino-reactive fluorescence labelling of the His-tagged hP2X3 receptor and its mutants expressed in HEK293 or X. laevis oocytes demonstrated the formation of inter-subunit cross links in cysteine double mutants and, in addition, confirmed their correct trimeric assembly and cell surface expression. Conclusions and Implications In conclusion, spontaneous tightening of the binding jaw of the hP2X3 receptor by inter-subunit cross-linking of cysteine residues substituted at positions not directly involved in agonist binding inhibited agonist-evoked currents without interfering with binding, subunit assembly or trafficking. PMID:24989924

  19. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  20. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-01

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  1. Agonist and antagonist bind differently to 5-HT1A receptors during Alzheimer's disease: A post-mortem study with PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benjamin; Sebti, Johan; Verdurand, Mathieu; Fieux, Sylvain; Billard, Thierry; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Troakes, Claire; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Zimmer, Luc

    2016-10-01

    PET imaging studies using 5-HT1A receptor radiotracers show a decreased density of this receptor in hippocampi of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) at advanced stages. However, current 5-HT1A receptor radiopharmaceuticals used in neuroimaging are antagonists, thought to bind to 5-HT1A receptors in different functional states (i.e., both the one which displays high affinity for agonists and is thought to mediate receptor activation, as well as the state which has low affinity for agonists). Comparing the PET imaging obtained using an agonist radiotracer, which binds selectively to functional receptors, with the PET imaging obtained using an antagonist radiotracer would therefore provide original information on 5-HT1A receptor impairment during AD. Quantitative autoradiography using [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF, a 5-HT1A agonist and antagonist, respectively, was measured in hippocampi of patients with AD (n = 25, at different Braak stages) and control subjects (n = 9). The neuronal density was measured in the same tissues by NeuN immunohistochemistry. The specific binding of both radiotracers was determined by addition of WAY-100635, a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. The autoradiography distribution of both 5-HT1A PET radiotracers varied across hippocampus regions. The highest binding density was in the pyramidal layer of CA1. Incubation with Gpp(NH)p, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, reduced significantly [(18)F]F13640 binding in hippocampal regions, confirming its preferential interaction with G-coupled receptors, and slightly increased [(18)F]MPPF binding. In the CA1 subfield, [(18)F]F13640 binding was significantly decreased at Braak stages I/II (-19%), Braak stages III/IV (-23%), and Braak stages V/VI (-36%) versus control. In contrast, [(18)F]MPPF binding was statistically reduced only at the most advanced Braak stages V/VI compared to control (-33%). Since [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF can be used in vivo in humans, this

  2. Stimulation of cholesterol excretion by the liver X receptor agonist requires ATP-binding cassette transporters G5 and G8.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liqing; York, Jennifer; von Bergmann, Klaus; Lutjohann, Dieter; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H

    2003-05-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR) is a nuclear receptor that plays a crucial role in orchestrating the trafficking of sterols between tissues. Treatment of mice with a potent and specific LXR agonist, T0901317, is associated with increased biliary cholesterol secretion, decreased fractional cholesterol absorption, and increased fecal neutral sterol excretion. Here we show that expression of two target genes of LXRalpha, the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters Abcg5 and Abcg8, is required for both the increase in sterol excretion and the decrease in fractional cholesterol absorption associated with LXR agonist treatment. Mice expressing no ABCG5 and ABCG8 (G5G8(-/-) mice) and their littermate controls were treated for 7 days with T0901317. In wild type animals, treatment with the LXR agonist resulted in a 3-fold increase in biliary cholesterol concentrations, a 25% reduction in fractional cholesterol absorption, and a 4-fold elevation in fecal neutral sterol excretion. In contrast, the LXR agonist did not significantly affect biliary cholesterol levels, fractional cholesterol absorption, or neutral fecal sterol excretion in the G5G8(-/-) mice. Thus Abcg5 and Abcg8 are required for LXR agonist-associated changes in dietary and biliary sterol trafficking. These results establish a central role for ABCG5 and ABCG8 in promoting cholesterol excretion in vivo. PMID:12601003

  3. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  4. Zn2+ Mediates High Affinity Binding of Heparin to the αC Domain of Fibrinogen*

    PubMed Central

    Fredenburgh, James C.; Leslie, Beverly A.; Stafford, Alan R.; Lim, Teresa; Chan, Howard H.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    The nonspecific binding of heparin to plasma proteins compromises its anticoagulant activity by reducing the amount of heparin available to bind antithrombin. In addition, interaction of heparin with fibrin promotes formation of a ternary heparin-thrombin-fibrin complex that protects fibrin-bound thrombin from inhibition by the heparin-antithrombin complex. Previous studies have shown that heparin binds the E domain of fibrinogen. The current investigation examines the role of Zn2+ in this interaction because Zn2+ is released locally by platelets and both heparin and fibrinogen bind the cation, resulting in greater protection from inhibition by antithrombin. Zn2+ promotes heparin binding to fibrinogen, as determined by chromatography, fluorescence, and surface plasmon resonance. Compared with intact fibrinogen, there is reduced heparin binding to fragment X, a clottable plasmin degradation product of fibrinogen. A monoclonal antibody directed against a portion of the fibrinogen αC domain removed by plasmin attenuates binding of heparin to fibrinogen and a peptide analog of this region binds heparin in a Zn2+-dependent fashion. These results indicate that the αC domain of fibrinogen harbors a Zn2+-dependent heparin binding site. As a consequence, heparin-catalyzed inhibition of factor Xa by antithrombin is compromised by fibrinogen to a greater extent when Zn2+ is present. These results reveal the mechanism by which Zn2+ augments the capacity of fibrinogen to impair the anticoagulant activity of heparin. PMID:23990470

  5. Zinc-binding Domain of the Bacteriophage T7 DNA Primase Modulates Binding to the DNA Template*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Joo; Zhu, Bin; Akabayov, Barak; Richardson, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    The zinc-binding domain (ZBD) of prokaryotic DNA primases has been postulated to be crucial for recognition of specific sequences in the single-stranded DNA template. To determine the molecular basis for this role in recognition, we carried out homolog-scanning mutagenesis of the zinc-binding domain of DNA primase of bacteriophage T7 using a bacterial homolog from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. The ability of T7 DNA primase to catalyze template-directed oligoribonucleotide synthesis is eliminated by substitution of any five-amino acid residue-long segment within the ZBD. The most significant defect occurs upon substitution of a region (Pro-16 to Cys-20) spanning two cysteines that coordinate the zinc ion. The role of this region in primase function was further investigated by generating a protein library composed of multiple amino acid substitutions for Pro-16, Asp-18, and Asn-19 followed by genetic screening for functional proteins. Examination of proteins selected from the screening reveals no change in sequence-specific recognition. However, the more positively charged residues in the region facilitate DNA binding, leading to more efficient oligoribonucleotide synthesis on short templates. The results suggest that the zinc-binding mode alone is not responsible for sequence recognition, but rather its interaction with the RNA polymerase domain is critical for DNA binding and for sequence recognition. Consequently, any alteration in the ZBD that disturbs its conformation leads to loss of DNA-dependent oligoribonucleotide synthesis. PMID:23024359

  6. Benzodiazepine receptor agonists affect both binding and gating of recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors.

    PubMed

    Mercik, Katarzyna; Piast, Michał; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2007-05-28

    Benzodiazepines are known to act by enhancing the effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor agonists. Positive modulation by benzodiazepines is typically ascribed to upregulation of agonist binding affinity but their effect on gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor gating remain unclear. In this work, we have used the ultrafast application system to examine the impact of flurazepam and zolpidem on recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors. As expected, both drugs strongly enhanced currents evoked by low [gamma-aminobutyric acid]. These compounds, however, also affected currents elicited by saturating agonist concentration. In particular, flurazepam and zolpidem reduced current amplitudes and slowed down the recovery process in paired-pulse experiments. Moreover, flurazepam accelerated the current rise time and zolpidem enhanced the rate and extent of desensitization. We propose that flurazepam and zolpidem modulate gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors by strong enhancement of agonist binding with a superimposed limited effect on the receptor gating.

  7. Flexible DNA binding of the BTB/POZ-domain protein FBI-1.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-08-01

    POZ-domain transcription factors are characterized by the presence of a protein-protein interaction domain called the POZ or BTB domain at their N terminus and zinc fingers at their C terminus. Despite the large number of POZ-domain transcription factors that have been identified to date and the significant insights that have been gained into their cellular functions, relatively little is known about their DNA binding properties. FBI-1 is a BTB/POZ-domain protein that has been shown to modulate HIV-1 Tat trans-activation and to repress transcription of some cellular genes. We have used various viral and cellular FBI-1 binding sites to characterize the interaction of a POZ-domain protein with DNA in detail. We find that FBI-1 binds to inverted sequence repeats downstream of the HIV-1 transcription start site. Remarkably, it binds efficiently to probes carrying these repeats in various orientations and spacings with no particular rotational alignment, indicating that its interaction with DNA is highly flexible. Indeed, FBI-1 binding sites in the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, the c-fos gene, and the c-myc P1 and P2 promoters reveal variously spaced direct, inverted, and everted sequence repeats with the consensus sequence G(A/G)GGG(T/C)(C/T)(T/C)(C/T) for each repeat.

  8. Simultaneous Binding of Two Peptidyl Ligands by a Src Homology 2 Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Jinjin; Yuan, Chunhua; Hard, Ryan L.; Park, In-Hee; Li, Chenglong; Bell, Charles; Pei, Dehua

    2012-03-15

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains mediate protein-protein interactions by recognizing phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing sequences of target proteins. In all of the SH2 domain-pY peptide interactions described to date, the SH2 domain binds to a single pY peptide. Here, determination of the cocrystal structure of the N-terminal SH2 domain of phosphatase SHP-2 bound to a class IV peptide (VIpYFVP) revealed a noncanonical 1:2 (protein-peptide) complex. The first peptide binds in a canonical manner with its pY side chain inserted in the usual binding pocket, while the second pairs up with the first to form two antiparallel {beta}-strands that extend the central {beta}-sheet of the SH2 domain. This unprecedented binding mode was confirmed in the solution phase by NMR experiments and shown to be adopted by pY peptides derived from cellular proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance studies revealed that the binding of the first peptide is pY-dependent, but phosphorylation is not required for the second peptide. Our findings suggest a potential new function for the SH2 domain as a molecular clamp to promote dimerization of signaling proteins.

  9. Activation Domain-Mediated Enhancement of Activator Binding to Chromatin in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Christopher A.; Kingston, Robert E.

    1996-10-01

    DNA binding by transcriptional activators is typically an obligatory step in the activation of gene expression. Activator binding and subsequent steps in transcription are repressed by genomic chromatin. Studies in vitro have suggested that overcoming this repression is an important function of some activation domains. Here we provide quantitative in vivo evidence that the activation domain of GAL4-VP16 can increase the affinity of GAL4 for its binding site on genomic DNA in mammalian cells. Moreover, the VP16 activation domain has a much greater stimulatory effect on expression from a genomic reporter gene than on a transiently transfected reporter gene, where factor binding is more permissive. We found that not all activation domains showed a greater activation potential in a genomic context, suggesting that only some activation domains can function in vivo to alleviate the repressive effects of chromatin. These data demonstrate the importance of activation domains in relieving chromatin-mediated repression in vivo and suggest that one way they function is to increase binding of the activator itself.

  10. Functional Equivalence of Retroviral MA Domains in Facilitating Psi RNA Binding Specificity by Gag

    PubMed Central

    Rye-McCurdy, Tiffiny; Olson, Erik D.; Liu, Shuohui; Binkley, Christiana; Reyes, Joshua-Paolo; Thompson, Brian R.; Flanagan, John M.; Parent, Leslie J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses specifically package full-length, dimeric genomic RNA (gRNA) even in the presence of a vast excess of cellular RNA. The “psi” (Ψ) element within the 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR) of gRNA is critical for packaging through interaction with the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag. However, in vitro Gag binding affinity for Ψ versus non-Ψ RNAs is not significantly different. Previous salt-titration binding assays revealed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag bound to Ψ RNA with high specificity and relatively few charge interactions, whereas binding to non-Ψ RNA was less specific and involved more electrostatic interactions. The NC domain was critical for specific Ψ binding, but surprisingly, a Gag mutant lacking the matrix (MA) domain was less effective at discriminating Ψ from non-Ψ RNA. We now find that Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag also effectively discriminates RSV Ψ from non-Ψ RNA in a MA-dependent manner. Interestingly, Gag chimeras, wherein the HIV-1 and RSV MA domains were swapped, maintained high binding specificity to cognate Ψ RNAs. Using Ψ RNA mutant constructs, determinants responsible for promoting high Gag binding specificity were identified in both systems. Taken together, these studies reveal the functional equivalence of HIV-1 and RSV MA domains in facilitating Ψ RNA selectivity by Gag, as well as Ψ elements that promote this selectivity. PMID:27657107

  11. Novel predicted RNA-binding domains associated with the translation machinery.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Koonin, E V

    1999-03-01

    Two previously undetected domains were identified in a variety of RNA-binding proteins, particularly RNA-modifying enzymes, using methods for sequence profile analysis. A small domain consisting of 60-65 amino acid residues was detected in the ribosomal protein S4, two families of pseudouridine synthases, a novel family of predicted RNA methylases, a yeast protein containing a pseudouridine synthetase and a deaminase domain, bacterial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases, and a number of uncharacterized, small proteins that may be involved in translation regulation. Another novel domain, designated PUA domain, after PseudoUridine synthase and Archaeosine transglycosylase, was detected in archaeal and eukaryotic pseudouridine synthases, archaeal archaeosine synthases, a family of predicted ATPases that may be involved in RNA modification, a family of predicted archaeal and bacterial rRNA methylases. Additionally, the PUA domain was detected in a family of eukaryotic proteins that also contain a domain homologous to the translation initiation factor eIF1/SUI1; these proteins may comprise a novel type of translation factors. Unexpectedly, the PUA domain was detected also in bacterial and yeast glutamate kinases; this is compatible with the demonstrated role of these enzymes in the regulation of the expression of other genes. We propose that the S4 domain and the PUA domain bind RNA molecules with complex folded structures, adding to the growing collection of nucleic acid-binding domains associated with DNA and RNA modification enzymes. The evolution of the translation machinery components containing the S4, PUA, and SUI1 domains must have included several events of lateral gene transfer and gene loss as well as lineage-specific domain fusions.

  12. Understanding the molecular basis of substrate binding specificity of PTB domains

    PubMed Central

    Sain, Neetu; Tiwari, Garima; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions mediated by phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains play a crucial role in various cellular processes. In order to understand the structural basis of substrate recognition by PTB domains, multiple explicit solvent atomistic simulations of 100ns duration have been carried out on 6 PTB-peptide complexes with known binding affinities. MM/PBSA binding energy values calculated from these MD trajectories and residue based statistical pair potential score show good correlation with the experimental dissociation constants. Our analysis also shows that the modeled structures of PTB domains can be used to develop less compute intensive residue level statistical pair potential based approaches for predicting interaction partners of PTB domains. PMID:27526776

  13. Calmodulin-binding domains in Alzheimer's disease proteins: extending the calcium hypothesis.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Myre, Michael A

    2004-08-01

    The calcium hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) invokes the disruption of calcium signaling as the underlying cause of neuronal dysfunction and ultimately apoptosis. As a primary calcium signal transducer, calmodulin (CaM) responds to cytosolic calcium fluxes by binding to and regulating the activity of target CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Ca(2+)-dependent CaMBPs primarily contain domains (CaMBDs) that can be classified into motifs based upon variations on the basic amphiphilic alpha-helix domain involving conserved hydrophobic residues at positions 1-10, 1-14 or 1-16. In contrast, an IQ or IQ-like domain often mediates Ca(2+)-independent CaM-binding. Based on these attributes, a search for CaMBDs reveals that many of the proteins intimately linked to AD may be calmodulin-binding proteins, opening new avenues for research on this devastating disease. PMID:15249195

  14. Biological effects of individually synthesized TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Tsyrendorzhiev, D D; Orlovskaya, I A; Sennikov, S V; Tregubchak, T V; Gileva, I P; Tsyrendorzhieva, M D; Shchelkunov, S N

    2014-06-01

    The biological characteristics of a 17-kDa protein synthesized in bacterial cells, a TNF-binding domain (VARV-TNF-BP) of a 47-kDa variola virus CrmB protein (VARV-CrmB) consisting of TNF-binding and chemokine-binding domains, were studied. Removal of the C-terminal chemokine-binding domain from VARV-CrmB protein was inessential for the efficiency of its inhibition of TNF cytotoxicity towards L929 mouse fibroblast culture and for TNF-induced oxidative metabolic activity of mouse blood leukocytes. The results of this study could form the basis for further studies of VARV-TNF-BP mechanisms of activity for prospective use in practical medicine.

  15. High throughput strategy to identify inhibitors of histone-binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Elise K.; Albaugh, Brittany N.; Denu, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Many epigenetic proteins recognize the posttranslational modification state of chromatin through their histone binding domains, and thereby recruit nuclear complexes to specific loci within the genome. A number of these domains have been implicated in cancer and other diseases through aberrant binding of chromatin; therefore, identifying small molecules that disrupt histone binding could be a powerful mechanism for disease therapy. We have developed a high throughput assay for the detection of histone peptide:domain interactions utilizing AlphaScreen technology. Here, we describe how the assay can be first optimized and then performed for high throughput screening of small molecule binding inhibitors. We also describe strategies for biochemical validation of small molecules identified. PMID:22910207

  16. A new mechanism in the binding between Homer3 EVH1 domain and inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptor suppressor domain.

    PubMed

    Wen, He; Kwon, Hyuk Nam; Park, Sunghyouk

    2014-06-01

    The suppressor domain of inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) has critical roles in regulating the calcium channel by interacting with many binding partners. The residue 49-53 (PPKKF) of the suppressor domain was suggested to be a canonical Homer EVH1 domain binding site and is also the first a part of calmodulin (CaM) binding site. As CaM-binding of the suppressor domain has been shown to involve large-scale conformational changes, we studied the binding characteristics of the Homer EVH1-suppressor domain with NMR spectroscopy and biochemical pull-down assays for mutants. Our data show that the suppressor domain employs the PPKKF motif in a similar but subtly different way compared to previously characterized interactions, and that the suppressor domain does not undergo large-scale conformational changes. Chemical shift assignments of the Homer3 EVH1 domain found that a new set of residues, located at the opposite side of the previously reported binding site, is also involved in binding, which was confirmed by mutant binding assays. Further analysis suggests that F40 in the new binding sites may have a critical role as a conformational lock-switch in Homer-target binding. The proposed mechanism is implicated in the signaling network involving calcium channels.

  17. Identification of two independent nucleosome-binding domains in the transcriptional co-activator SPBP.

    PubMed

    Darvekar, Sagar; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Eriksen, Agnete Bratsberg; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2012-02-15

    Transcriptional regulation requires co-ordinated action of transcription factors, co-activator complexes and general transcription factors to access specific loci in the dense chromatin structure. In the present study we demonstrate that the transcriptional co-regulator SPBP [stromelysin-1 PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor)-responsive element binding protein] contains two independent chromatin-binding domains, the SPBP-(1551-1666) region and the C-terminal extended PHD [ePHD/ADD (extended plant homeodomain/ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L)] domain. The region 1551-1666 is a novel core nucleosome-interaction domain located adjacent to the AT-hook motif in the DNA-binding domain. This novel nucleosome-binding region is critically important for proper localization of SPBP in the cell nucleus. The ePHD/ADD domain associates with nucleosomes in a histone tail-dependent manner, and has significant impact on the dynamic interaction between SPBP and chromatin. Furthermore, SPBP and its homologue RAI1 (retinoic-acid-inducible protein 1), are strongly enriched on chromatin in interphase HeLa cells, and both proteins display low nuclear mobility. RAI1 contains a region with homology to the novel nucleosome-binding region SPBP-(1551-1666) and an ePHD/ADD domain with ability to bind nucleosomes. These results indicate that the transcriptional co-regulator SPBP and its homologue RAI1 implicated in Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome both belong to the expanding family of chromatin-binding proteins containing several domains involved in specific chromatin interactions. PMID:22081970

  18. Structural and evolutionary divergence of cyclic nucleotide binding domains in eukaryotic pathogens: Implications for drug design☆

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Smita; Kennedy, Eileen J.; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Hui, Raymond; Taylor, Susan S.; Langsley, Gordon; Kannan, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular functions in eukaryotic pathogens are mediated by the cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domain, which senses second messengers such as cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. Although CNB domain-containing proteins have been identified in many pathogenic organisms, an incomplete understanding of how CNB domains in pathogens differ from other eukaryotic hosts has hindered the development of selective inhibitors for CNB domains associated with infectious diseases. Here, we identify and classify CNB domain-containing proteins in eukaryotic genomes to understand the evolutionary basis for CNB domain functional divergence in pathogens. We identify 359 CNB domain-containing proteins in 31 pathogenic organisms and classify them into distinct subfamilies based on sequence similarity within the CNB domain as well as functional domains associated with the CNB domain. Our study reveals novel subfamilies with pathogen-specific variations in the phosphate-binding cassette. Analyzing these variations in light of existing structural and functional data provides new insights into ligand specificity and promiscuity and clues for drug design. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25847873

  19. Mutation analysis of the cellulose-binding domain of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose-binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, M A; Doi, R H

    1994-01-01

    Cellulose-binding protein A (CbpA) has been previously shown to mediate the interaction between crystalline cellulose substrates and the cellulase enzyme complex of Clostridium cellulovorans. CbpA contains a family III cellulose-binding domain (CBD) which, when expressed independently, binds specifically to crystalline cellulose. A series of N- and C-terminal deletions and a series of small internal deletions of the CBD were created to determine whether the entire region previously described as a CBD is required for the cellulose-binding function. The N- and C-terminal deletions reduced binding affinity by 10- to 100-fold. Small internal deletions of the CBD resulted in substantial reduction of CBD function. Some, but not all, point mutations throughout the sequence had significant disruptive effects on the binding ability of the CBD. Thus, mutations in any region of the CBD had effects on the binding of the fragment to cellulose. The results indicate that the entire 163-amino-acid region of the CBD is required for maximal binding to crystalline cellulose. Images PMID:7961505

  20. A Key Evolutionary Mutation Enhances DNA Binding of the FOXP2 Forkhead Domain.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gavin; Fanucchi, Sylvia

    2016-04-01

    Forkhead box (FOX) transcription factors share a conserved forkhead DNA binding domain (FHD) and are key role players in the development of many eukaryotic species. Their involvement in various congenital disorders and cancers makes them clinically relevant targets for novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, the FOXP subfamily of multidomain transcriptional repressors is unique in its ability to form DNA binding homo and heterodimers. The truncated FOXP2 FHD, in the absence of the leucine zipper, exists in equilibrium between monomeric and domain-swapped dimeric states in vitro. As a consequence, determining the DNA binding properties of the FOXP2 FHD becomes inherently difficult. In this work, two FOXP2 FHD hinge loop mutants have been generated to successfully prevent both the formation (A539P) and the dissociation (F541C) of the homodimers. This allows for the separation of the two species for downstream DNA binding studies. Comparison of DNA binding of the different species using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, fluorescence anisotropy and isothermal titration calorimetry indicates that the wild-type FOXP2 FHD binds DNA as a monomer. However, comparison of the DNA-binding energetics of the monomer and wild-type FHD, reveals that there is a difference in the mechanism of binding between the two species. We conclude that the naturally occurring reverse mutation (P539A) seen in the FOXP subfamily increases DNA binding affinity and may increase the potential for nonspecific binding compared to other FOX family members.

  1. FF domains of CA150 bind transcription and splicing factors through multiple weak interactions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew J; Kulkarni, Sarang; Pawson, Tony

    2004-11-01

    The human transcription factor CA150 modulates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene transcription and contains numerous signaling elements, including six FF domains. Repeated FF domains are present in several transcription and splicing factors and can recognize phosphoserine motifs in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Using mass spectrometry, we identify a number of nuclear binding partners for the CA150 FF domains and demonstrate a direct interaction between CA150 and Tat-SF1, a protein involved in the coupling of splicing and transcription. CA150 FF domains recognize multiple sites within the Tat-SF1 protein conforming to the consensus motif (D/E)(2/5)-F/W/Y-(D/E)(2/5). Individual FF domains are capable of interacting with Tat-SF1 peptide ligands in an equivalent and noncooperative manner, with affinities ranging from 150 to 500 microM. Repeated FF domains therefore appear to bind their targets through multiple weak interactions with motifs comprised of negatively charged residues flanking aromatic amino acids. The RNAPII CTD represents a consensus FF domain-binding site, contingent on generation of the requisite negative charges by phosphorylation of serines 2 and 5. We propose that CA150, through the dual recognition of acidic motifs in proteins such as Tat-SF1 and the phosphorylated CTD, could mediate the recruitment of transcription and splicing factors to actively transcribing RNAPII.

  2. Stability and Sugar Recognition Ability of Ricin-Like Carbohydrate Binding Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Nellas, Ricky B; Glover, Mary M; Shen, Tongye

    2011-01-01

    Lectins are a class of proteins known for their novel binding to saccharides. Understanding this sugar recognition process can be crucial in creating structure-based designs of proteins with various biological roles. We focus on the sugar binding of a particular lectin, ricin, which has two -trefoil carbohydrate-binding domains (CRDs) found in several plant protein toxins. The binding ability of possible sites of ricin-like CRD has been puzzling. The apo and various (multiple) ligand-bound forms of the sugar-binding domains of ricin were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. By evaluating structural stability, hydrogen bond dynamics, flexibility, and binding energy, we obtained a detailed picture of the sugar recognition of the ricin-like CRD. Unlike what was previously believed, we found that the binding abilities of the two known sites are not independent of each other. The binding ability of one site is positively affected by the other site. While the mean positions of different binding scenarios are not altered significantly, the flexibility of the binding pockets visibly decreases upon multiple ligand binding. This change in flexibility seems to be the origin of the binding cooperativity. All the hydrogen bonds that are strong in the monoligand state are also strong in the double-ligand complex, although the stability is much higher in the latter form due to cooperativity. These strong hydrogen bonds in a monoligand state are deemed to be the essential hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, by examining the structural correlation matrix, the two domains are structurally one entity. Galactose hydroxyl groups, OH4 and OH3, are the most critical parts in both site 1 and site 2 recognition.

  3. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, {Delta}N-hH1.4, were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both histones bind to chromatin, however, {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of {Delta}N-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain ({Delta}N-hH1.4). The {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that {Delta}N-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  4. Functional analyses of the chitin-binding domains and the catalytic domain of Brassica juncea chitinase BjCHI1.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ce Mun; Chye, Mee-Len; Ramalingam, Sathishkumar; Ouyang, Shi-Wen; Zhao, Kai-Jun; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Mowbray, Sherry L

    2004-09-01

    We previously isolated a Brassica juncea cDNA encoding BjCHI1, a novel chitinase with two chitin-binding domains. Synthesis of its mRNA is induced by wounding, methyl jasmonate treatment, Aspergillus niger infection and caterpillar (Pieris rapae) feeding, suggesting that the protein has a role in defense. In that it possesses two chitin-binding domains, BjCHI1 resembles the precursor of Urtica dioica agglutinin but unlike that protein, BjCHI1 retains its chitinase catalytic domain after post-translational processing. To explore the properties of multi-domain BjCHI1, we have expressed recombinant BjCHI1 and two derivatives, which lack one (BjCHI2) or both (BjCHI3) chitin-binding domains, as secreted proteins in Pichia pastoris. Recombinant BjCHI1 and BjCHI2, showed apparent molecular masses on SDS-PAGE larger than calculated, and could be deglycosylated using alpha-mannosidase. Recombinant BjCHI3, without the proline/threonine-rich linker region containing predicted O-glycosylation sites, did not appear to be processed by alpha-mannosidase. BjCHI1's ability to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes is unique among known chitinases. Both chitin-binding domains are essential for agglutination; this property is absent in recombinant BjCHI2 and BjCHI3. To identify potential catalytic residues, we generated site-directed mutations in recombinant BjCHI3. Mutation E212A showed the largest effect, exhibiting 0% of wild-type specific activity. H211N and R361A resulted in considerable (>91%) activity loss, implying these charged residues are also important in catalysis. E234A showed 36% retention of activity and substitution Y269D, 50%. The least affected mutants were E349A and D360A, with 73% and 68% retention, respectively. Like Y269, E349 and D360 are possibly involved in substrate binding rather than catalysis. PMID:15604744

  5. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  6. Crystal Structure of the Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 1 (Chd1) DNA-binding Domain in Complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma A.; Heroux A.; Jenkins K. R.; Bowman G. D.

    2011-12-09

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-dependent machines that dynamically alter the chromatin packaging of eukaryotic genomes by assembling, sliding, and displacing nucleosomes. The Chd1 chromatin remodeler possesses a C-terminal DNA-binding domain that is required for efficient nucleosome sliding and believed to be essential for sensing the length of DNA flanking the nucleosome core. The structure of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain was recently shown to consist of a SANT and SLIDE domain, analogous to the DNA-binding domain of the ISWI family, yet the details of how Chd1 recognized DNA were not known. Here we present the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chd1 DNA-binding domain in complex with a DNA duplex. The bound DNA duplex is straight, consistent with the preference exhibited by the Chd1 DNA-binding domain for extranucleosomal DNA. Comparison of this structure with the recently solved ISW1a DNA-binding domain bound to DNA reveals that DNA lays across each protein at a distinct angle, yet contacts similar surfaces on the SANT and SLIDE domains. In contrast to the minor groove binding seen for Isw1 and predicted for Chd1, the SLIDE domain of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain contacts the DNA major groove. The majority of direct contacts with the phosphate backbone occur only on one DNA strand, suggesting that Chd1 may not strongly discriminate between major and minor grooves.

  7. The role of the ADAMTS13 cysteine-rich domain in VWF binding and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, David A.; Crawley, James T. B.

    2015-01-01

    ADAMTS13 proteolytically regulates the platelet-tethering function of von Willebrand factor (VWF). ADAMTS13 function is dependent upon multiple exosites that specifically bind the unraveled VWF A2 domain and enable proteolysis. We carried out a comprehensive functional analysis of the ADAMTS13 cysteine-rich (Cys-rich) domain using engineered glycans, sequence swaps, and single point mutations in this domain. Mutagenesis of Cys-rich domain–charged residues had no major effect on ADAMTS13 function, and 5 out of 6 engineered glycans on the Cys-rich domain also had no effect on ADAMTS13 function. However, a glycan attached at position 476 appreciably reduced both VWF binding and proteolysis. Substitution of Cys-rich sequences for the corresponding regions in ADAMTS1 identified a hydrophobic pocket involving residues Gly471-Val474 as being of critical importance for both VWF binding and proteolysis. Substitution of hydrophobic VWF A2 domain residues to serine in a region (residues 1642-1659) previously postulated to interact with the Cys-rich domain revealed the functional importance of VWF residues Ile1642, Trp1644, Ile1649, Leu1650, and Ile1651. Furthermore, the functional deficit of the ADAMTS13 Cys-rich Gly471-Val474 variant was dependent on these same hydrophobic VWF residues, suggesting that these regions form complementary binding sites that directly interact to enhance the efficiency of the proteolytic reaction. PMID:25564400

  8. Rolling adhesion of alphaL I domain mutants decorrelated from binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Lauren R; Hammer, Daniel A; Boder, Eric T

    2006-06-30

    Activated lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1, alphaLbeta2 integrin) found on leukocytes facilitates firm adhesion to endothelial cell layers by binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is up-regulated on endothelial cells at sites of inflammation. Recent work has shown that LFA-1 in a pre-activation, low-affinity state may also be involved in the initial tethering and rolling phase of the adhesion cascade. The inserted (I) domain of LFA-1 contains the ligand-binding epitope of the molecule, and a conformational change in this region during activation increases ligand affinity. We have displayed wild-type I domain on the surface of yeast and validated expression using I domain specific antibodies and flow cytometry. Surface display of I domain supports yeast rolling on ICAM-1-coated surfaces under shear flow. Expression of a locked open, high-affinity I domain mutant supports firm adhesion of yeast, while yeast displaying intermediate-affinity I domain mutants exhibit a range of rolling phenotypes. We find that rolling behavior for these mutants fails to correlate with ligand binding affinity. These results indicate that unstressed binding affinity is not the only molecular property that determines adhesive behavior under shear flow.

  9. Crucial role for the VWF A1 domain in binding to type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Flood, Veronica H; Schlauderaff, Abraham C; Haberichter, Sandra L; Slobodianuk, Tricia L; Jacobi, Paula M; Bellissimo, Daniel B; Christopherson, Pamela A; Friedman, Kenneth D; Gill, Joan Cox; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Montgomery, Robert R

    2015-04-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) contains binding sites for platelets and for vascular collagens to facilitate clot formation at sites of injury. Although previous work has shown that VWF can bind type IV collagen (collagen 4), little characterization of this interaction has been performed. We examined the binding of VWF to collagen 4 in vitro and extended this characterization to a murine model of defective VWF-collagen 4 interactions. The interactions of VWF and collagen 4 were further studied using plasma samples from a large study of both healthy controls and subjects with different types of von Willebrand disease (VWD). Our results show that collagen 4 appears to bind VWF exclusively via the VWF A1 domain, and that specific sequence variations identified through VWF patient samples and through site-directed mutagenesis in the VWF A1 domain can decrease or abrogate this interaction. In addition, VWF-dependent platelet binding to collagen 4 under flow conditions requires an intact VWF A1 domain. We observed that decreased binding to collagen 4 was associated with select VWF A1 domain sequence variations in type 1 and type 2M VWD. This suggests an additional mechanism through which VWF variants may alter hemostasis. PMID:25662333

  10. Biochemical Identification of a Linear Cholesterol-Binding Domain within Alzheimer’s β Amyloid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides can self-organize into amyloid pores that may induce acute neurotoxic effects in brain cells. Membrane cholesterol, which regulates Aβ production and oligomerization, plays a key role in this process. Although several data suggested that cholesterol could bind to Aβ peptides, the molecular mechanisms underlying cholesterol/Aβ interactions are mostly unknown. On the basis of docking studies, we identified the linear fragment 22–35 of Aβ as a potential cholesterol-binding domain. This domain consists of an atypical concatenation of polar/apolar amino acid residues that was not previously found in cholesterol-binding motifs. Using the Langmuir film balance technique, we showed that synthetic peptides Aβ17–40 and Aβ22–35, but not Aβ1–16, could efficiently penetrate into cholesterol monolayers. The interaction between Aβ22–35 and cholesterol was fully saturable and lipid-specific. Single-point mutations of Val-24 and Lys-28 in Aβ22–35 prevented cholesterol binding, whereas mutations at residues 29, 33, and 34 had little to no effect. These data were consistent with the in silico identification of Val-24 and Lys-28 as critical residues for cholesterol binding. We conclude that the linear fragment 22–35 of Aβ is a functional cholesterol-binding domain that could promote the insertion of β-amyloid peptides or amyloid pore formation in cholesterol-rich membrane domains. PMID:23509984

  11. The cell-binding domain of intimin from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli binds to beta1 integrins.

    PubMed

    Frankel, G; Lider, O; Hershkoviz, R; Mould, A P; Kachalsky, S G; Candy, D C; Cahalon, L; Humphries, M J; Dougan, G

    1996-08-23

    Bacteria interact with mammalian cells surface molecules, such as integrins, to colonize tissues and evade immunological detection. Herein, the ability of intimin, an outer membrane protein from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, to bind beta1 integrins was investigated. Solid-phase binding assays revealed binding of the carboxyl-terminal 280 amino acids of intimin (Int280) to alpha4beta1 and alpha5beta1 integrins. The binding required divalent ions (in particular, it was enhanced by Mn2+) and was inhibited by an RGD-containing peptide. Nonderivatized Int280, but not Int280CS (like Int280 but with Cys-937 replaced by Ser) blocked the binding of biotinylated Int280 to integrins. Int280 did not efficiently inhibit beta1 integrin binding of invasin from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Both intimin and invasin, immobilized on plastic surfaces, mediated adherence of resting or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-activated human CD4(+) T cells, whereas fibronectin mediated the adherence of only activated T cells. T cell binding to intimin and invasin was integrin mediated because it was specifically blocked by an RGD-containing peptide and by antibodies directed against the integrin subunits beta1, alpha4, and alpha5. These results demonstrate a specific integrin binding activity for intimin that is related to, but distinct from, that of invasin. PMID:8702771

  12. Polyelectrolyte Complex for Heparin Binding Domain Osteogenic Growth Factor Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wing Moon Lam, Raymond; Abbah, Sunny Akogwu; Ming, Wang; Naidu, Mathanapriya; Ng, Felly; Tao, Hu; Goh Cho Hong, James; Ting, Kang; Hee Kit, Wong

    2016-01-01

    During reconstructive bone surgeries, supraphysiological amounts of growth factors are empirically loaded onto scaffolds to promote successful bone fusion. Large doses of highly potent biological agents are required due to growth factor instability as a result of rapid enzymatic degradation as well as carrier inefficiencies in localizing sufficient amounts of growth factor at implant sites. Hence, strategies that prolong the stability of growth factors such as BMP-2/NELL-1, and control their release could actually lower their efficacious dose and thus reduce the need for larger doses during future bone regeneration surgeries. This in turn will reduce side effects and growth factor costs. Self-assembled PECs have been fabricated to provide better control of BMP-2/NELL-1 delivery via heparin binding and further potentiate growth factor bioactivity by enhancing in vivo stability. Here we illustrate the simplicity of PEC fabrication which aids in the delivery of a variety of growth factors during reconstructive bone surgeries. PMID:27585207

  13. Cellular effects of phosphotyrosine-binding domain inhibitors on insulin receptor signaling and trafficking.

    PubMed Central

    Giorgetti-Peraldi, S; Ottinger, E; Wolf, G; Ye, B; Burke, T R; Shoelson, S E

    1997-01-01

    Shc and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) are cytoplasmic substrates of tyrosine kinase receptors that engage, localize, and activate downstream SH2 enzymes. Each contains a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain that is structurally unrelated to SH2 domains. We have designed high-affinity, cellular inhibitors of the Shc PTB domain by incorporating nonnatural, phosphatase-resistant amino acids into short peptides. None of the inhibitors bind the IRS-1 PTB domain, consistent with distinct specificities for domains. The best inhibitor of the Shc domain was introduced by electroporation into Rat1 fibroblasts that express human insulin receptors. Insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Shc was inhibited, with no effect on IRS-1, and downstream effects on mitogen-activated protein kinase and DNA synthesis were both inhibited. The PTB domain inhibitor had less influence on epidermal growth factor-induced effects and essentially no impact on serum- or phorbol ester-induced effects. The inhibitor did not affect insulin internalization and its degradation. We conclude that the PTB domain of Shc is critical for its phosphorylation by the insulin receptor, that Shc is an important mediator of insulin's mitogenic effects, and that Shc is not central to insulin receptor cycling in these cells. PTB domains can be inhibited selectively in cells and represent potential targets for drug discovery. PMID:9032245

  14. Different Binding Properties and Function of CXXC Zinc Finger Domains in Dnmt1 and Tet1

    PubMed Central

    Meilinger, Daniela; Bultmann, Sebastian; Fellinger, Karin; Hasenöder, Stefan; Wang, Mengxi; Qin, Weihua; Söding, Johannes; Spada, Fabio; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    Several mammalian proteins involved in chromatin and DNA modification contain CXXC zinc finger domains. We compared the structure and function of the CXXC domains in the DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1 and the methylcytosine dioxygenase Tet1. Sequence alignment showed that both CXXC domains have a very similar framework but differ in the central tip region. Based on the known structure of a similar MLL1 domain we developed homology models and designed expression constructs for the isolated CXXC domains of Dnmt1 and Tet1 accordingly. We show that the CXXC domain of Tet1 has no DNA binding activity and is dispensable for catalytic activity in vivo. In contrast, the CXXC domain of Dnmt1 selectively binds DNA substrates containing unmethylated CpG sites. Surprisingly, a Dnmt1 mutant construct lacking the CXXC domain formed covalent complexes with cytosine bases both in vitro and in vivo and rescued DNA methylation patterns in dnmt1−/− embryonic stem cells (ESCs) just as efficiently as wild type Dnmt1. Interestingly, neither wild type nor ΔCXXC Dnmt1 re-methylated imprinted CpG sites of the H19a promoter in dnmt1−/− ESCs, arguing against a role of the CXXC domain in restraining Dnmt1 methyltransferase activity on unmethylated CpG sites. PMID:21311766

  15. Autoradiography of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor-activated G proteins in guinea pig brain sections by agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, D S; Palmier, C; Colpaert, F C; Pauwels, P J

    1998-03-01

    G protein activation mediated by serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT(1B/D) receptors in guinea pig brain was investigated by using quantitative autoradiography of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding to brain sections. [35S]GTPgammaS binding was stimulated by the mixed 5-HT1A/5-HT(1B/D) agonist L694247 in brain structures enriched in 5-HT1A binding sites, i.e., hippocampus (+140 +/- 14%), dorsal raphe (+70 +/- 8%), lateral septum (+52 +/- 12%), cingulate (+36 +/- 8%), and entorhinal cortex (+34 +/- 5%). L694247 caused little or no stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding in brain regions with high densities of 5-HT(1B/D) binding sites (e.g., substantia nigra, striatum, central gray, and dorsal subiculum). The [35S]GTPgammaS binding response was antagonized by WAY100635 (10 microM) and methiothepin (10 microM). In contrast, the 5-HT1B inverse agonist SB224289 (10 microM) did not affect the L694247-mediated [35S]GTPgammaS binding response, and the mixed 5-HT(1B/D) antagonist GR127935 (10 microM) yielded a partial blockade. The distribution pattern of the [35S]GTPgammaS binding response and the antagonist profile suggest the L694247-mediated response in guinea pig brain to be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition to L694247, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin, and flesinoxan also stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding; their maximal responses varied between 46 and 52% compared with L694247, irrespective of the brain structure being considered. Sumatriptan, rizatriptan, and zolmitriptan (10 microM) stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in the hippocampus by 20-50%. Naratriptan, CP122638, and dihydroergotamine stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding to a similar level as L694247 in hippocampus, lateral septum, and dorsal raphe. It appears that under the present experimental conditions, G protein activation through 5-HT1A but not 5-HT(1B/D) receptors can be measured in guinea pig brain sections. PMID:9489749

  16. Four p53 DNA-binding domain peptides bind natural p53-response elements and bend the DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Balagurumoorthy, P; Sakamoto, H; Lewis, M S; Zambrano, N; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M; Appella, E; Harrington, R E

    1995-01-01

    Recent structural studies of the minimal core DNA-binding domain of p53 (p53DBD) complexed to a single consensus pentamer sequence and of the isolated p53 tetramerization domain have provided valuable insights into their functions, but many questions about their interacting roles and synergism remain unanswered. To better understand these relationships, we have examined the binding of the p53DBD to two biologically important full-response elements (the WAF1 and ribosomal gene cluster sites) by using DNA circularization and analytical ultracentrifugation. We show that the p53DBD binds DNA strongly and cooperatively with p53DBD to DNA binding stoichiometries of 4:1. For the WAF1 element, the mean apparent Kd is (8.3 +/- 1.4) x 10(-8) M, and no intermediate species of lower stoichiometries can be detected. We show further that complex formation induces an axial bend of at least 60 degrees in both response elements. These results, taken collectively, demonstrate that p53DBD possesses the ability to direct the formation of a tight nucleoprotein complex having the same 4:1 DNA-binding stoichiometry as wild-type p53 which is accompanied by a substantial conformational change in the response-element DNA. This suggests that the p53DBD may play a role in the tetramerization function of p53. A possible role in this regard is proposed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7567980

  17. Domain Interactions in the Yeast ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Ycf1p: Intragenic Suppressor Analysis of Mutations in the Nucleotide Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Falcón-Pérez, Juan M.; Martínez-Burgos, Mónica; Molano, Jesús; Mazón, María J.; Eraso, Pilar

    2001-01-01

    The yeast cadmium factor (Ycf1p) is a vacuolar ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter required for heavy metal and drug detoxification. Cluster analysis shows that Ycf1p is strongly related to the human multidrug-associated protein (MRP1) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and therefore may serve as an excellent model for the study of eukaryotic ABC transporter structure and function. Identifying intramolecular interactions in these transporters may help to elucidate energy transfer mechanisms during transport. To identify regions in Ycf1p that may interact to couple ATPase activity to substrate binding and/or movement across the membrane, we sought intragenic suppressors of ycf1 mutations that affect highly conserved residues presumably involved in ATP binding and/or hydrolysis. Thirteen intragenic second-site suppressors were identified for the D777N mutation which affects the invariant Asp residue in the Walker B motif of the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1). Two of the suppressor mutations (V543I and F565L) are located in the first transmembrane domain (TMD1), nine (A1003V, A1021T, A1021V, N1027D, Q1107R, G1207D, G1207S, S1212L, and W1225C) are found within TMD2, one (S674L) is in NBD1, and another one (R1415G) is in NBD2, indicating either physical proximity or functional interactions between NBD1 and the other three domains. The original D777N mutant protein exhibits a strong defect in the apparent affinity for ATP and Vmax of transport. The phenotypic characterization of the suppressor mutants shows that suppression does not result from restoring these alterations but rather from a change in substrate specificity. We discuss the possible involvement of Asp777 in coupling ATPase activity to substrate binding and/or transport across the membrane. PMID:11466279

  18. Inhibition of αIIbβ3 Ligand Binding by an αIIb Peptide that Clasps the Hybrid Domain to the βI Domain of β3

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen Hwa; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Tsoukatos, Demokritos C.; Aylward, Kelly; Moussis, Vassilios; Tsikaris, Vassilios; Trypou, Paraskevi; Egot, Marion; Baruch, Dominique; Kieffer, Nelly; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla

    2015-01-01

    Agonist-stimulated platelet activation triggers conformational changes of integrin αIIbβ3, allowing fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation. We have previously shown that an octapeptide, p1YMESRADR8, corresponding to amino acids 313–320 of the β-ribbon extending from the β-propeller domain of αIIb, acts as a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. Here we have performed in silico modelling analysis of the interaction of this peptide with αIIbβ3 in its bent and closed (not swing-out) conformation and show that the peptide is able to act as a substitute for the β-ribbon by forming a clasp restraining the β3 hybrid and βI domains in a closed conformation. The involvement of species-specific residues of the β3 hybrid domain (E356 and K384) and the β1 domain (E297) as well as an intrapeptide bond (pE315-pR317) were confirmed as important for this interaction by mutagenesis studies of αIIbβ3 expressed in CHO cells and native or substituted peptide inhibitory studies on platelet functions. Furthermore, NMR data corroborate the above results. Our findings provide insight into the important functional role of the αIIb β-ribbon in preventing integrin αIIbβ3 head piece opening, and highlight a potential new therapeutic approach to prevent integrin ligand binding. PMID:26332040

  19. Detection of persistent organic pollutants binding modes with androgen receptor ligand binding domain by docking and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are persistent in the environment after release from industrial compounds, combustion productions or pesticides. The exposure of POPs has been related to various reproductive disturbances, such as reduced semen quality, testicular cancer, and imbalanced sex ratio. Among POPs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4’-DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the most widespread and well-studied compounds. Recent studies have revealed that 4,4’-DDE is an antagonist of androgen receptor (AR). However, the mechanism of the inhibition remains elusive. CB-153 is the most common congener of PCBs, while the action of CB-153 on AR is still under debate. Results Molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches have been employed to study binding modes and inhibition mechanism of 4,4’-DDE and CB-153 against AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Several potential binding sites have been detected and analyzed. One possible binding site is the same binding site of AR natural ligand androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Another one is on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function (AF2) region, which is crucial for the co-activators recruitment. Besides, a novel possible binding site was observed for POPs with low binding free energy with the receptor. Detailed interactions between ligands and the receptor have been represented. The disrupting mechanism of POPs against AR has also been discussed. Conclusions POPs disrupt the function of AR through binding to three possible biding sites on AR/LBD. One of them shares the same binding site of natural ligand of AR. Another one is on AF2 region. The third one is in a cleft near N-terminal of the receptor. Significantly, values of binding free energy of POPs with AR/LBD are comparable to that of natural ligand androgen DHT. PMID:24053684

  20. The myosin-binding UCS domain but not the Hsp90-binding TPR domain of the UNC-45 chaperone is essential for function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ni, Weiming; Hutagalung, Alex H; Li, Shumin; Epstein, Henry F

    2011-09-15

    The UNC-45 family of molecular chaperones is expressed in metazoan organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. The UNC-45 protein is essential in C. elegans for early body-wall muscle cell development and A-band assembly. We show that the myosin-binding UCS domain of UNC-45 alone is sufficient to rescue lethal unc-45 null mutants arrested in embryonic muscle development and temperature-sensitive loss-of-function unc-45 mutants defective in worm A-band assembly. Removal of the Hsp90-binding TPR domain of UNC-45 does not affect rescue. Similar results were obtained with overexpression of the same fragments in wild-type nematodes when assayed for diminution of myosin accumulation and assembly. Titration experiments show that, on a per molecule basis, UCS has greater activity in C. elegans muscle in vivo than full-length UNC-45 protein, suggesting that UNC-45 is inhibited by either the TPR domain or its interaction with the general chaperone Hsp90. In vitro experiments with purified recombinant C. elegans Hsp90 and UNC-45 proteins show that they compete for binding to C. elegans myosin. Our in vivo genetic and in vitro biochemical experiments are consistent with a novel inhibitory role for Hsp90 with respect to UNC-45 action.

  1. Allosteric role of the large-scale domain opening in biological catch-binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2009-05-01

    The proposed model demonstrates the allosteric role of the two-domain region of the receptor protein in the increased lifetimes of biological receptor/ligand bonds subjected to an external force. The interaction between the domains is represented by a bounded potential, containing two minima corresponding to the attached and separated conformations of the two protein domains. The dissociative potential with a single minimum describing receptor/ligand binding fluctuates between deep and shallow states, depending on whether the domains are attached or separated. A number of valuable analytic expressions are derived and are used to interpret experimental data for two catch bonds. The P-selectin/P-selectin-glycoprotein-ligand-1 (PSGL-1) bond is controlled by the interface between the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and lectin domains of P-selectin, and the type 1 fimbrial adhesive protein (FimH)/mannose bond is governed by the interface between the lectin and pilin domains of FimH. Catch-binding occurs in these systems when the external force stretches the receptor proteins and increases the interdomain distance. The allosteric effect is supported by independent measurements, in which the domains are kept separated by attachment of another ligand. The proposed model accurately describes the experimentally observed anomalous behavior of the lifetimes of the P-selectin/PSGL-1 and FimH/mannose complexes as a function of applied force and provides valuable insights into the mechanism of catch-binding.

  2. The calmodulin-binding domain of the mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Minami, Y; Kawasaki, H; Suzuki, K; Yahara, I

    1993-05-01

    The mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) and Ca(2+)-calmodulin were cross-linked at an equimolar ratio using a carbodiimide zero-length cross-linker. To identify the calmodulin-binding domain(s) of HSP90, CNBr-cleaved peptide fragments of HSP90 were mixed with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and cross-linked. Amino acid sequence determination revealed that an HSP90 alpha-derived peptide starting at the 486th amino acid residue was contained in the cross-linked products, which contains a calmodulin-binding motif (from Lys500 to Ile520). A similar motif is present also in HSP90 beta (from Lys491 to Val511). The synthetic peptides corresponding to these putative calmodulin-binding sequences were found to be cross-linked with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and to prevent the cross-linking of HSP90 and Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Both HSP90 alpha and HSP90 beta bind Ca2+. The HSP90 peptides bind HSP90 and thereby inhibit the binding of Ca2+. In addition, the HSP90 peptides augment the self-oligomerization of HSP90 induced at elevated temperatures. These results suggest that the calmodulin-binding domain of HSP90 might interact with another part of the same molecule and that Ca(2+)-calmodulin might modulate the structure and function of HSP90 through abolishing the intramolecular interaction. PMID:8486648

  3. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji )

    1991-07-02

    A {sup 13}C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V{sub H}, V{sub L}, and C{sub L} domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with {sup 13}C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with (1-{sup 13}C)Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule.

  4. Tetrameric ZBRK1 DNA binding domain has affinity towards cognate DNA in absence of zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Lumbini R; Biswal, Mahamaya N; Vikrant; Hosur, M V; Varma, Ashok K

    2014-07-18

    Zinc finger transcription regulatory proteins play crucial roles in cell-cycle regulation, DNA damage response and tumor genesis. Human ZBRK1 is a zinc-finger transcription repressor protein, which recognizes double helical DNA containing consensus sequences of 5'GGGXXXCAGXXXTTT3'. In the present study, we have purified recombinant DNA binding domain of ZBRK1, and studied binding with zinc ions and DNA, using biophysical techniques. The elution profile of the purified protein suggests that this ZBRK1 forms a homotetramer in solution. Dissociation and pull down assays also suggest that this domain forms a higher order oligomer. The ZBRK1-DNA binding domain acquires higher stability in the presence of zinc ions and DNA. The secondary structure of the ZBRK1-DNA complex is found to be significantly altered from the standard B-DNA conformation.

  5. Localization of the fourth membrane spanning domain as a ligand binding site in the human platelet. alpha. sub 2 -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hiroaki; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Caron, M.G.; Regan, J.W. )

    1989-05-02

    The human platelet {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor is an integral membrane protein which binds epinephrine. The gene for this receptor has been cloned, and the primary structure is thus known. A model of its secondary structure predicts that the receptor has seven transmembrane spanning domains. By covalent labeling and peptide mapping, the authors have identified a region of the receptor that is directly involved with ligand binding. Partially purified preparations of the receptor were covalently radiolabeled with either of two specific photoaffinity ligands: ({sup 3}H)SKF 102229 (an antagonist) or p-azido({sup 3}H)clonidine (an agonist). The radiolabeled receptors were then digested with specific endopeptidases, and peptides containing the covalently bound radioligands were identified. Lysylendopeptidase treatment of ({sup 3}H)SKF 102229 labeled receptor yielded one peptide of M{sub r} 2400 as the product of a complete digest. Endopeptidase Arg-C gave a labeled peptide of M{sub r} 4000, which was further digested to the M{sub r} 2400 peptide by additional treatment with lysylendopeptidase. Using p-azido({sup 3}H)clonidine-labeled receptor, a similar M{sub r} 2400 peptide was obtained by lysylendopeptidase cleavage. This M{sub r} 2400 peptide corresponds to the fourth transmembrane spanning domain of the receptor. These data suggest that this region forms part of the ligand binding domain of the human platelet {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor.

  6. Indole Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonists Active in a Model of Dyslipidemia Act via a Unique Association with an Agonist Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Luz, John G; Carson, Matthew W; Condon, Bradley; Clawson, David; Pustilnik, Anna; Kohlman, Daniel T; Barr, Robert J; Bean, James S; Dill, M Joelle; Sindelar, Dana K; Maletic, Milan; Coghlan, Michael J

    2015-08-27

    To further elucidate the structural activity correlation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonism, the crystal structure of the GR ligand-binding domain (GR LBD) complex with a nonsteroidal antagonist, compound 8, was determined. This novel indole sulfonamide shows in vitro activity comparable to known GR antagonists such as mifepristone, and notably, this molecule lowers LDL (-74%) and raises HDL (+73%) in a hamster model of dyslipidemia. This is the first reported crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to a nonsteroidal antagonist, and this article provides additional elements for the design and pharmacology of clinically relevant nonsteroidal GR antagonists that may have greater selectivity and fewer side effects than their steroidal counterparts. PMID:26218343

  7. The host-binding domain of the P2 phage tail spike reveals a trimeric iron-binding structure

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Eiki; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Takahashi, Junichi; Tsunoda, Kin-ichi; Yamada, Seiko; Takeda, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption and infection of bacteriophage P2 is mediated by tail fibres and tail spikes. The tail spikes on the tail baseplate are used to irreversibly adsorb to the host cells. Recently, a P2 phage tail-spike protein, gpV, was purified and it was shown that a C-terminal domain, Ser87–Leu211, is sufficient for the binding of gpV to host Escherichia coli membranes [Kageyama et al. (2009 ▶), Biochemistry, 48, 10129–10135]. In this paper, the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of P2 gpV is reported. The structure is a triangular pyramid and looks like a spearhead composed of an intertwined β-­sheet, a triple β-helix and a metal-binding region containing iron, calcium and chloride ions. PMID:21821878

  8. Evidence for a role for the phosphotyrosine-binding domain of Shc in interleukin 2 signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, K S; Igras, V; Shoelson, S E; Fesik, S W; Burakoff, S J

    1996-01-01

    Stimulation via the T-cell growth factor interleukin 2 (IL-2) leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc, the interaction of Shc with Grb2, and the Ras GTP/GDP exchange factor, mSOS. Shc also coprecipitates with the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), and therefore, may link IL-2R to Ras activation. We have further characterized the Shc-IL-2R interaction and have made the following observations. (i) Among the two phosphotyrosine-interaction domains present in Shc, the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, rather than its SH2 domain, interacts with the tyrosine-phosphorylated IL-2R beta chain. Moreover, the Shc-PTB domain binds a phosphopeptide derived from the IL-2R beta chain (corresponding to residues surrounding Y338, SCFTNQGpYFF) with high affinity. (ii) In vivo, mutant IL-2R beta chains lacking the acidic region of IL-2Rbeta (which contains Y338) fail to phosphorylate Shc. Furthermore, when wild type or mutant Shc proteins that lack the PTB domain were expressed in the IL-2-dependent CTLL-20 cell line, an intact Shc-PTB domain was required for Shc phosphorylation by the IL-2R, which provides further support for a Shc-PTB-IL-2R interaction in vivo. (iii) PTB and SH2 domains of Shc associate with different proteins in IL-2- and T-cell-receptor-stimulated lysates, suggesting that Shc, through the concurrent use of its two different phosphotyrosine-binding domains, could assemble multiple protein complexes. Taken together, our in vivo and in vitro observations suggest that the PTB domain of Shc interacts with Y338 of the IL-2R and provide evidence for a functional role for the Shc-PTB domain in IL-2 signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643566

  9. Conformational states of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica induced by the binding of agonists, antagonists, and local anesthetics. Equilibrium measurements using tritium-hydrogen exchange

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M.P.; Stroud, R.M.

    1989-01-10

    The tritium-hydrogen exchange kinetics of Torpedo californica AChR, in native membrane vesicles at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, have been analyzed in the presence of agonists, partial agonists, local anesthetics, and competitive antagonists. The agonists carbamylcholine (10 microM-1 mM) and suberyldicholine (10 microM) and the partial agonists decamethonium (25 microM and 1 mM) and hexamethonium (1 mM) have no effect on the exchange kinetics, although at lower concentration carbamylcholine may slightly accelerate exchange. Nondesensitizing local anesthetics do affect the exchange behavior, dependent on concentration. Procaine at 500 microM moderately retards exchange while procaine at 10 mM and tetracaine at 5 mM slightly accelerate exchange. The competitive antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin retards exchange significantly, as does d-tubocurarine although to a lesser extent. These results suggest that the resting and desensitized conformations of the AChR are very similar in overall solvent accessibility and that at lower concentrations noncompetitive blockers such as procaine may stabilize a less solvent-accessible state of the AChR. The competitive antagonists alpha-bungarotoxin and d-tubocurare also stabilize a dynamically restricted, less solvent-accessible conformation of the acetylcholine receptor, demonstrating that a large conformational change accompanies binding of these toxins. Any change in conformation which may accompany desensitization is very different from these effects.

  10. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers*

    PubMed Central

    Zoghbi, Maria E.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides “sandwiched” at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation. PMID:24129575

  11. Structure and ligand binding of the extended Tudor domain of D. melanogaster Tudor-SN.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Anders; Corsini, Lorenzo; Mourão, André; Sattler, Michael

    2009-04-10

    The Tudor-SN protein (p100, SND1) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes, such as transcription, processing of edited double-stranded RNA, and splicing regulation. Molecular details of these functions are not yet understood. Tudor domains have previously been shown to bind methylated ligands, such as methylated lysines and arginines. It has been suggested that the role of Tudor-SN in splicing may involve binding to such methylated ligands or to the methylated 5' cap of spliceosomal snRNAs. Here, we report the crystal structure of the extended Tudor domain of Tudor-SN from Drosophila melanogaster to a resolution of 2.1 A. NMR secondary chemical shifts, relaxation data, and residual dipolar couplings indicate that the solution and crystal structures are similar. Binding of various ligands was investigated by NMR. Binding sites and affinities were characterized by chemical shift perturbations. We show that the aromatic cage of the Tudor domain specifically binds a peptide containing symmetrically dimethylated arginines (sDMA) with micromolar affinity, while the same peptide comprising nonmethylated arginines does not show significant chemical shift perturbations. Tudor-SN preferentially recognizes sDMA over asymmetrically dimethylated arginine (aDMA). In contrast, two 5' cap analogues with different methylation patterns, as well as mono-, di-, and trimethyllysines, show no binding. Our data demonstrate that the Tudor domain of Tudor-SN specifically recognizes sDMA-containing ligands. The aromatic cage of Tudor-SN is very similar to the one in the Tudor domain of the survival of motor neuron protein, which also recognizes sDMA peptides, indicating a conserved binding motif for this methylation mark. Recognition of sDMA in the C-terminal tails of spliceosomal Sm proteins suggests how Tudor-SN may interact with small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles during the regulation of splicing. PMID:19232356

  12. Probing the Determinants of Diacylglycerol Binding Affinity in C1B domain of Protein Kinase Cα

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mikaela D.; Morgan, Brittany; Massi, Francesca; Igumenova, Tatyana I.

    2012-01-01

    C1 domains are independently folded modules that are responsible for targeting their parent proteins to lipid membranes containing diacylglycerol (DAG), a ubiquitous second messenger. The DAG-binding affinities of C1 domains determine the threshold concentration of DAG required for the propagation of the signaling response and the selectivity of this response among the DAG receptors in the cell. The structural information currently available for C1 domains offers little insight into the molecular basis of their differential DAG-binding affinities. In this work, we characterized the C1B domain of Protein Kinase Cα (C1Bα) and its diagnostic mutant, Y123W, using solution NMR methods and molecular dynamics simulations. The mutation did not perturb the C1Bα structure or sub-nanosecond dynamics of the protein backbone, but resulted in a >100-fold increase of DAG binding affinity and substantial change in μs-timescale conformational dynamics, as quantified by NMR rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion methods. The differences in the conformational exchange behavior between the wild-type and Y123W C1Bα were localized to the hinge regions of ligand-binding loops. Molecular dynamics simulations provided insight into the identity of the exchanging conformers and revealed the significance of a particular residue, Gln128, in modulating the geometry of the ligand-binding site. Taken together with the results of binding studies, our findings suggest that the conformational dynamics and preferential partitioning of the tryptophan sidechain into the water-lipid interface are important factors that modulate the DAG-binding properties of C1 domains. PMID:21419781

  13. Structural Basis for Binding Specificity between Subclasses of Modular Polyketide Synthase Docking Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Bartley, III, Frank E.; Reynolds, Kevin A.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2009-04-02

    Bacterial type I polyketide synthases (PKSs) assemble structurally diverse natural products of significant clinical value from simple metabolic building blocks. The synthesis of these compounds occurs in a processive fashion along a large multiprotein complex. Transfer of the acyl intermediate across interpolypeptide junctions is mediated, at least in large part, by N- and C-terminal docking domains. We report here a comprehensive analysis of the binding affinity and selectivity for the complete set of discrete docking domain pairs in the pikromycin and erythromycin PKS systems. Despite disconnection from their parent module, each cognate pair of docking domains retained exquisite binding selectivity. Further insights were obtained by X-ray crystallographic analysis of the PikAIII/PikAIV docking domain interface. This new information revealed a series of key interacting residues that enabled development of a structural model for the recently proposed H2-T2 class of polypeptides involved in PKS intermodular molecular recognition.

  14. Sequence Discrimination by Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of a DNA Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogos, Joseph A.; Hsu, Tien; Bolton, Jesse; Kafatos, Fotis C.

    1992-09-01

    Two major developmentally regulated isoforms of the Drosophila chorion transcription factor CF2 differ by an extra zinc finger within the DNA binding domain. The preferred DNA binding sites were determined and are distinguished by an internal duplication of TAT in the site recognized by the isoform with the extra finger. The results are consistent with modular interactions between zinc fingers and trinucleotides and also suggest rules for recognition of AT-rich DNA sites by zinc finger proteins. The results show how modular finger interactions with trinucleotides can be used, in conjunction with alternative splicing, to alter the binding specificity and increase the spectrum of sites recognized by a DNA binding domain. Thus, CF2 may potentially regulate distinct sets of target genes during development.

  15. [The dynamics of the domains of the IP3-binding site of the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate-sensitive calcium channel, induced by inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate and calcium].

    PubMed

    Veresov, V G; Konev, S V

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate-sensitive calcium channel after binding of inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate and Ca2+ was analyzed by the Monte Carlo minimization technique. It was shown that the binding of Ca2+ with the unliganded receptor (channel) leads to a turning of the beta-sheet domain relative to the alpha-helical domain with the formation of the receptor conformation that is open for the entry of ions into the cytoplasmic channel vestibule, sterically closed for their passage through the vestibule in the part adjacent to the alpha-helical domains, and unfavourable for subsequent binding of inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate with the receptor. When both co-agonists bind to the receptor, the structure rearrangements induced eliminate both these steric obstacles for the passage of ions through the IP3-binding domain: one at the entrance of the channel cytoplasmic vestibule and the other that is placed deeper in the vestibule near the alpha-domains. The role of the dynamics of the receptor binding core in the IP3-sensitive channel gating is discussed.

  16. Crystal Structure of a Bacterial Albumin-Binding Domain at 1.4 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, J.F.; Nordberg, P.A.; Hajdu, J.; Lejon, S.; /Uppsala U. /Aalborg U. /Astra Tech, Molndal /SLAC

    2007-11-26

    The albumin-binding domain, or GA module, of the peptostreptococcal albumin-binding protein expressed in pathogenic strains of Finegoldia magna is believed to be responsible for the virulence and increased growth rate of these strains. Here we present the 1.4 Angstrom crystal structure of this domain, and compare it with the crystal structure of the GA-albumin complex. An analysis of protein-protein interactions in the two crystals, and the presence of multimeric GA species in solution, indicate the GA module is 'sticky', and is capable of forming contacts with a range of protein surfaces. This might lead to interactions with different host proteins.

  17. An orphan nuclear hormone receptor that lacks a DNA binding domain and heterodimerizes with other receptors.

    PubMed

    Seol, W; Choi, H S; Moore, D D

    1996-05-31

    SHP is an orphan member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that contains the dimerization and ligand-binding domain found in other family members but lacks the conserved DNA binding domain. In the yeast two-hybrid system, SHP interacted with several conventional and orphan members of the receptor superfamily, including retinoid receptors, the thyroid hormone receptor, and the orphan receptor MB67. SHP also interacted directly with these receptors in vitro. In mammalian cells, SHP specifically inhibited transactivation by the superfamily members with which it interacted. These results suggest that SHP functions as a negative regulator of receptor-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:8650544

  18. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    SciTech Connect

    Briers, Yves; Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J.; Hendrix, Jelle; Engelborghs, Yves; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2009-05-29

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBD{sub KZ}), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage {phi}KZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBD{sub KZ} and green fluorescent protein (PBD{sub KZ}-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBD{sub KZ}-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} for the PBD{sub KZ}-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBD{sub KZ}-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  19. A Novel Approach to Predict Core Residues on Cancer-Related DNA-Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Protein–DNA interactions are involved in different cancer pathways. In particular, the DNA-binding domains of proteins can determine where and how gene regulatory regions are bound in different cell lines at different stages. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method to predict and locate the core residues on cancer-related DNA-binding domains. In this study, we propose a computational method to predict and locate core residues on DNA-binding domains. In particular, we have selected the cancer-related DNA-binding domains for in-depth studies, namely, winged Helix Turn Helix family, homeodomain family, and basic Helix-Loop-Helix family. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the core residues involved in protein–DNA interactions, as verified by the existing structural data. Given its good performance, various aspects of the method are discussed and explored: for instance, different uses of prediction algorithm, different protein domains, and hotspot threshold setting. PMID:27279732

  20. Enzymatic regulation of pattern: BMP4 binds CUB domains of Tolloids and inhibits proteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojoon X.; Mendes, Fabio A.; Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    In Xenopus embryos, a dorsal–ventral patterning gradient is generated by diffusing Chordin/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) complexes cleaved by BMP1/Tolloid metalloproteinases in the ventral side. We developed a new BMP1/Tolloid assay using a fluorogenic Chordin peptide substrate and identified an unexpected negative feedback loop for BMP4, in which BMP4 inhibits Tolloid enzyme activity noncompetitively. BMP4 binds directly to the CUB (Complement 1r/s, Uegf [a sea urchin embryonic protein] and BMP1) domains of BMP1 and Drosophila Tolloid with high affinity. Binding to CUB domains inhibits BMP4 signaling. These findings provide a molecular explanation for a long-standing genetical puzzle in which antimorphic Drosophila tolloid mutant alleles displayed anti-BMP effects. The extensive Drosophila genetics available supports the relevance of the interaction described here at endogenous physiological levels. Many extracellular proteins contain CUB domains; the binding of CUB domains to BMP4 suggests a possible general function in binding transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members. Mathematical modeling indicates that feedback inhibition by BMP ligands acts on the ventral side, while on the dorsal side the main regulator of BMP1/Tolloid enzymatic activity is the binding to its substrate, Chordin. PMID:19884260

  1. An Alix fragment potently inhibits HIV-1 budding: characterization of binding to retroviral YPXL late domains.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Utpal M; Kim, Jaewon; Nagashima, Kunio; Hurley, James H; Freed, Eric O

    2007-02-01

    The retroviral structural protein, Gag, contains small peptide motifs known as late domains that promote efficient virus release from the infected cell. In addition to the well characterized PTAP late domain, the p6 region of HIV-1 Gag contains a binding site for the host cell protein Alix. To better understand the functional role of the Gag/Alix interaction, we overexpressed an Alix fragment composed of residues 364-716 (Alix 364-716) and examined the effect on release of wild type (WT) and Alix binding site mutant HIV-1. We observed that Alix 364-716 expression significantly inhibited WT virus release and Gag processing and that mutation of the Alix binding site largely relieved this inhibition. Furthermore, Alix 364-716 expression induced a severe defect on WT but not mutant particle morphology. Intriguingly, the impact of Alix 364-716 expression on HIV-1 release and Gag processing was markedly different from that induced by mutation of the Alix binding site in p6. The association of Alix 364-716 with HIV-1 and equine infectious anemia virus late domains was quantitatively evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance techniques, and the effects of mutations in these viral sequences on Alix 364-716 binding was determined. This study identifies a novel Alix-derived dominant negative inhibitor of HIV-1 release and Gag processing and provides quantitative information on the interaction between Alix and viral late domains.

  2. IcmQ in the Type 4b secretion system contains a novel NAD+ binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Farelli, Jeremiah D.; Gumbart, James C.; Akey, Ildiko V.; Hempstead, Andrew; Amyot, Whitney; Head, James F.; McKnight, C. James; Isberg, Ralph R.; Akey, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    A Type4b secretion system (T4bSS) is required for Legionella growth in alveolar macrophages. IcmQ associates with IcmR, binds to membranes and has a critical role in the T4bSS. We have now solved a crystal structure of IcmR-IcmQ to further our understanding of this complex. This structure revealed an amphipathic four-helix bundle, formed by IcmR and the N-terminal domain of IcmQ, which is linked to a novel C-terminal domain of IcmQ (Qc) by a linker helix. The Qc domain has structural homology with ADP ribosyltransferase domains in certain bacterial toxins and binds NAD+ with a Kd in the physiological range. Structural homology and molecular dynamics were used to identify an extended NAD+ binding site on Qc and the resulting model was tested by mutagenesis and binding assays. Based on the data, we suggest that IcmR-IcmQ binds to membranes where it may interact with or perhaps modify a protein in the T4bSS when NAD+ is bound. PMID:23850453

  3. Cell Migration and Invadopodia Formation Require a Membrane-binding Domain of CARMIL2.

    PubMed

    Lanier, M Hunter; McConnell, Patrick; Cooper, John A

    2016-01-15

    CARMILs regulate capping protein (CP), a critical determinant of actin assembly and actin-based cell motility. Vertebrates have three conserved CARMIL genes with distinct functions. In migrating cells, CARMIL2 is important for cell polarity, lamellipodial assembly, ruffling, and macropinocytosis. In cells, CARMIL2 localizes with a distinctive dual pattern to vimentin intermediate filaments and to membranes at leading edges and macropinosomes. The mechanism by which CARMIL2 localizes to membranes has not been defined. Here, we report that CARMIL2 has a conserved membrane-binding domain composed of basic and hydrophobic residues, which is necessary and sufficient for membrane localization, based on expression studies in cells and on direct binding of purified protein to lipids. Most important, we find that the membrane-binding domain is necessary for CARMIL2 to function in cells, based on rescue expression with a set of biochemically defined mutants. CARMIL1 and CARMIL3 contain similar membrane-binding domains, based on sequence analysis and on experiments, but other CPI motif proteins, such as CD2AP, do not. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the membrane-binding domain of CARMIL2 tethers this multidomain protein to the membrane, where it links dynamic vimentin filaments with regulation of actin assembly via CP.

  4. Glucoamylase starch-binding domain of Aspergillus niger B1: molecular cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Paldi, Tzur; Levy, Ilan; Shoseyov, Oded

    2003-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are protein domains located within a carbohydrate-active enzyme, with a discrete fold that can be separated from the catalytic domain. Starch-binding domains (SBDs) are CBMs that are usually found at the C-terminus in many amylolytic enzymes. The SBD from Aspergillus niger B1 (CMI CC 324262) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as an independent domain and the recombinant protein was purified on starch. The A. niger B1 SBD was found to be similar to SBD from A. kawachii, A. niger var. awamori and A. shirusami (95-96% identity) and was classified as a member of the CBM family 20. Characterization of SBD binding to starch indicated that it is essentially irreversible and that its affinity to cationic or anionic starch, as well as to potato or corn starch, does not differ significantly. These observations indicate that the fundamental binding area on these starches is essentially the same. Natural and chemically modified starches are among the most useful biopolymers employed in the industry. Our study demonstrates that SBD binds effectively to both anionic and cationic starch. PMID:12646045

  5. Structurally homologous binding of plant calmodulin isoforms to the calmodulin-binding domain of vacuolar calcium-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Vogel, Hans J

    2004-02-27

    The discovery that plants contain multiple calmodulin (CaM) isoforms having variable sequence identity to mammalian CaM has sparked a flurry of new questions regarding the intracellular role of Ca(2+) regulation in plants. To date, the majority of research in this field has focused on the differential enzymatic regulation of various mammalian CaM-dependent enzymes by the different plant CaM isoforms. However, there is comparatively little information on the structural recognition of target enzymes found exclusively in plant cells. Here we have used a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopy, to study the interactions of the most conserved and most divergent CaM isoforms from soybean, SCaM-1, and SCaM-4, respectively, with a synthetic peptide derived from the CaM-binding domain of cauliflower vacuolar calcium-ATPase. Despite their sequence divergence, both SCaM-1 and SCaM-4 interact with the calcium-ATPase peptide in a similar calcium-dependent, stoichiometric manner, adopting an antiparallel binding orientation with an alpha-helical peptide. The single Trp residue is bound in a solvent-inaccessible hydrophobic pocket on the C-terminal domain of either protein. Thermodynamic analysis of these interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that the formation of each calcium-SCaM-calcium-ATPase peptide complex is driven by favorable binding enthalpy and is very similar to the binding of mammalian CaM to the CaM-binding domains of myosin light chain kinases and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I.

  6. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  7. Binding of Y-box proteins to RNA: involvement of different protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Ladomery, M; Sommerville, J

    1994-01-01

    Eukaryotic Y-box proteins are reported to interact with a wide variety of nucleic acid structures to act as transcription factors and mRNA masking proteins. The modular structure of Y-box proteins includes a highly conserved N-terminal cold-shock domain (CSD, equivalent to the bacterial cold-shock proteins) plus four basic C-terminal domains containing arginine clusters and aromatic residues. In addition, the basic domains are separated by acidic regions which contain several potential sites for serine/threonine phosphorylation. The interaction of Y-box proteins, isolated from Xenopus oocytes (FRGY2 type), with RNA molecules has been studied by UV crosslinking and protein fragmentation. We have identified two distinct binding activities. The CSD interacts preferentially with the polypurines poly(A,G) and poly(G) but not poly(A), this activity being sensitive to 5 mM MgCl2 but not to 5 mM spermidine. In the presence of 1 mM MgCl2 or 1 mM spermidine, the basic domains interact preferentially with poly(C,U), this activity being sensitive to 0.5 M NaCl. Binding of the basic domains is also sensitive to low concentrations of heparin. The basic domains can be crosslinked individually to labelled RNA. These results are discussed with reference to the various specificities noted in the binding of Y-box proteins to RNA and DNA. Images PMID:7530842

  8. Structural and energetic analysis of activation by a cyclic nucleotide binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, Stephen L.; Clayton, Gina M.; Silverman, William R.; Olivares, Adrian O.; De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Thomas, Lise R.; Morais-Cabral, João H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary MlotiK1 is a prokaryotic homolog of cyclic nucleotide-dependent ion channels which contains an intracellular C-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNB domain). X-ray structures have been solved of the CNB domain in the absence of ligand and bound to cAMP. Both the full-length channel and CNB domain fragment are easily expressed and purified, making MlotiK1 a useful model system for dissecting activation by ligand binding. We have used X-ray crystallography to determine three new MlotiK1 CNB domain structures: a second apo configuration, a cGMP-bound structure, and a second cAMP-bound structure. In combination, the five MlotiK1 CNB domain structures provide a unique opportunity for analyzing, within a single protein, the structural differences between the apo and bound states and the structural variability within each state. With this analysis as a guide, we have probed the nucleotide selectivity and importance of specific residue side chains in ligand binding and channel activation. These data help to identify ligand-protein interactions that are important for ligand-dependence in MlotiK1 and more globally in the class of nucleotide-dependent proteins. PMID:18619611

  9. Alternative conformations of the Tau repeat domain in complex with an engineered binding protein.

    PubMed

    Grüning, Clara S R; Mirecka, Ewa A; Klein, Antonia N; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Willbold, Dieter; Marino, Stephen F; Stoldt, Matthias; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2014-08-15

    The aggregation of Tau into paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease. The aggregation reaction is characterized by conformational conversion of the repeat domain, which partially adopts a cross-β-structure in the resulting amyloid-like fibrils. Here, we report the selection and characterization of an engineered binding protein, β-wrapin TP4, targeting the Tau repeat domain. TP4 was obtained by phage display using the four-repeat Tau construct K18ΔK280 as a target. TP4 binds K18ΔK280 as well as the longest isoform of human Tau, hTau40, with nanomolar affinity. NMR spectroscopy identified two alternative TP4-binding sites in the four-repeat domain, with each including two hexapeptide motifs with high β-sheet propensity. Both binding sites contain the aggregation-determining PHF6 hexapeptide within repeat 3. In addition, one binding site includes the PHF6* hexapeptide within repeat 2, whereas the other includes the corresponding hexapeptide Tau(337-342) within repeat 4, denoted PHF6**. Comparison of TP4-binding with Tau aggregation reveals that the same regions of Tau are involved in both processes. TP4 inhibits Tau aggregation at substoichiometric concentration, demonstrating that it interferes with aggregation nucleation. This study provides residue-level insight into the interaction of Tau with an aggregation inhibitor and highlights the structural flexibility of Tau.

  10. Characterization of the minimal DNA-binding domain of the HIV integrase protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lutzke, R A; Vink, C; Plasterk, R H

    1994-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN) protein mediates an essential step in the retroviral lifecycle, the integration of viral DNA into human DNA. A DNA-binding domain of HIV IN has previously been identified in the C-terminal part of the protein. We tested truncated proteins of the C-terminal region of HIV-1 IN for DNA binding activity in two different assays: UV-crosslinking and southwestern blot analysis. We found that a polypeptide fragment of 50 amino acids (IN220-270) is sufficient for DNA binding. In contrast to full-length IN protein, this domain is soluble under low salt conditions. DNA binding of IN220-270 to both viral DNA and non-specific DNA occurs in an ion-independent fashion. Point mutations were introduced in 10 different amino acid residues of the DNA-binding domain of HIV-2 IN. Mutation of basic amino acid K264 results in strong reduction of DNA binding and of integrase activity. Images PMID:7937137

  11. Putative binding modes of Ku70-SAP domain with double strand DNA: a molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen; Pluth, Janice M; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-05-01

    The channel structure of the Ku protein elegantly reveals the mechanistic basis of sequence-independent DNA-end binding, which is essential to genome integrity after exposure to ionizing radiation or in V(D)J recombination. However, contradicting evidence indicates that this protein is also involved in the regulation of gene expression and in other regulatory processes with intact chromosomes. This computational study predicts that a putative DNA binding domain of this protein, the SAP domain, can form DNA-bound complexes with relatively high affinities (ΔG ≈ -20 kcal mol(-1)). The binding modes are searched by low frequency vibration modes driven by the fully flexible docking method while binding affinities are calculated by the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. We find this well defined 5 kDa domain with a helix-extended loop-helix structure is suitable to form favorable electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with either the major groove or the minor groove of DNA. The calculation also reveals the sequence specified binding preference which may relate to the observed pause sites when Ku translocates along DNA and the perplex binding of Ku with circular DNA. PMID:21947447

  12. A DNA-binding protein factor recognizes two binding domains within the octopine synthase enhancer element.

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhisa, J G; Singh, K; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    1990-01-01

    A protein that binds to the enhancing element of the octopine synthase gene has been identified in nuclear extracts from maize cell suspension cultures. Two protein-DNA complexes are distinguishable by electrophoretic mobility in gel retardation assays. Footprint analyses of these low and high molecular weight complexes show, respectively, half and complete protection of the ocs-element DNA from cleavage by methidiumpropyl-EDTA.FE(II). Two lines of evidence indicate that the element has two recognition sites, each of which can bind identical protein units. Elements that are mutated in one or the other half and form only the low molecular weight complex interfere with the formation of both the low and high molecular weight complexes by the wild-type element. Protein isolated from a complex with only one binding site occupied can bind to the wild-type ocs-element and generate complexes with protein occupying one or both binding sites. Occupation of both sites of the ocs-element is a prerequisite for transcriptional enhancement. PMID:2152113

  13. Analysis of the Nse3/MAGE-Binding Domain of the Nse4/EID Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guerineau, Marc; Kriz, Zdenek; Kozakova, Lucie; Bednarova, Katerina; Janos, Pavel; Palecek, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background The Nse1, Nse3 and Nse4 proteins form a tight sub-complex of the large SMC5-6 protein complex. hNSE3/MAGEG1, the mammalian ortholog of Nse3, is the founding member of the MAGE (melanoma-associated antigen) protein family and the Nse4 kleisin subunit is related to the EID (E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation) family of proteins. We have recently shown that human MAGE proteins can interact with NSE4/EID proteins through their characteristic conserved hydrophobic pocket. Methodology/Principal Findings Using mutagenesis and protein-protein interaction analyses, we have identified a new Nse3/MAGE-binding domain (NMBD) of the Nse4/EID proteins. This short domain is located next to the Nse4 N-terminal kleisin motif and is conserved in all NSE4/EID proteins. The central amino acid residues of the human NSE4b/EID3 domain were essential for its binding to hNSE3/MAGEG1 in yeast two-hybrid assays suggesting they form the core of the binding domain. PEPSCAN ELISA measurements of the MAGEC2 binding affinity to EID2 mutant peptides showed that similar core residues contribute to the EID2-MAGEC2 interaction. In addition, the N-terminal extension of the EID2 binding domain took part in the EID2-MAGEC2 interaction. Finally, docking and molecular dynamic simulations enabled us to generate a structure model for EID2-MAGEC2. Combination of our experimental data and the structure modeling showed how the core helical region of the NSE4/EID domain binds into the conserved pocket characteristic of the MAGE protein family. Conclusions/Significance We have identified a new Nse4/EID conserved domain and characterized its binding to Nse3/MAGE proteins. The conservation and binding of the interacting surfaces suggest tight co-evolution of both Nse4/EID and Nse3/MAGE protein families. PMID:22536443

  14. Cross-talk between the ligand- and DNA-binding domains of estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Greene, Geoffrey L; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar M; Yang, Sichun

    2013-11-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a hormone-responsive transcription factor that contains several discrete functional domains, including a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a DNA-binding domain (DBD). Despite a wealth of knowledge about the behaviors of individual domains, the molecular mechanisms of cross-talk between LBD and DBD during signal transduction from hormone to DNA-binding of ERα remain elusive. Here, we apply a multiscale approach combining coarse-grained (CG) and atomistically detailed simulations to characterize this cross-talk mechanism via an investigation of the ERα conformational landscape. First, a CG model of ERα is built based on crystal structures of individual LBDs and DBDs, with more emphasis on their interdomain interactions. Second, molecular dynamics simulations are implemented and enhanced sampling is achieved via the "push-pull-release" strategy in the search for different LBD-DBD orientations. Third, multiple energetically stable ERα conformations are identified on the landscape. A key finding is that estradiol-bound LBDs utilize the well-described activation helix H12 to pack and stabilize LBD-DBD interactions. Our results suggest that the estradiol-bound LBDs can serve as a scaffold to position and stabilize the DBD-DNA complex, consistent with experimental observations of enhanced DNA binding with the LBD. Final assessment using atomic-level simulations shows that these CG-predicted models are significantly stable within a 15-ns simulation window and that specific pairs of lysine residues in close proximity at the domain interfaces could serve as candidate sites for chemical cross-linking studies. Together, these simulation results provide a molecular view of the role of ERα domain interactions in response to hormone binding.

  15. Matrix Domain Modulates HIV-1 Gag's Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity via Inositol Phosphate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher P.; Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Rein, Alan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Retroviruses replicate by reverse transcribing their single-stranded RNA genomes into double-stranded DNA using specific cellular tRNAs to prime cDNA synthesis. In HIV-1, human tRNA3Lys serves as the primer and is packaged into virions during assembly. The viral Gag protein is believed to chaperone tRNA3Lys placement onto the genomic RNA primer binding site; however, the timing and possible regulation of this event are currently unknown. Composed of the matrix (MA), capsid (CA), nucleocapsid (NC), and p6 domains, the multifunctional HIV-1 Gag polyprotein orchestrates the highly coordinated process of virion assembly, but the contribution of these domains to tRNA3Lys annealing is unclear. Here, we show that NC is absolutely essential for annealing and that the MA domain inhibits Gag's tRNA annealing capability. During assembly, MA specifically interacts with inositol phosphate (IP)-containing lipids in the plasma membrane (PM). Surprisingly, we find that IPs stimulate Gag-facilitated tRNA annealing but do not stimulate annealing in Gag variants lacking the MA domain or containing point mutations involved in PM binding. Moreover, we find that IPs prevent MA from binding to nucleic acids but have little effect on NC or Gag. We propose that Gag binds to RNA either with both NC and MA domains or with NC alone and that MA-IP interactions alter Gag's binding mode. We propose that MA's interactions with the PM trigger the switch between these two binding modes and stimulate Gag's chaperone function, which may be important for the regulation of events such as tRNA primer annealing. PMID:21123373

  16. Extensive Rigid Analogue Design Maps the Binding Conformation of Potent N-Benzylphenethylamine 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Agonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on the structure of the superpotent 5-HT2A agonist 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine, which consists of a ring-substituted phenethylamine skeleton modified with an N-benzyl group, we designed and synthesized a small library of constrained analogues to identify the optimal arrangement of the pharmacophoric elements of the ligand. Structures consisted of diversely substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines, piperidines, and one benzazepine. Based on the structure of (S,S)-9b, which showed the highest affinity of the series, we propose an optimal binding conformation. (S,S)-9b also displayed 124-fold selectivity for the 5-HT2A over the 5-HT2C receptor, making it the most selective 5-HT2A receptor agonist ligand currently known. PMID:23336049

  17. Conserved SMP domains of the ERMES complex bind phospholipids and mediate tether assembly.

    PubMed

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Jiang, Jiansen; Zhang, Jiang; Khoi Dang, Xuan; Loo, Joseph A; Zhou, Z Hong; Egea, Pascal F

    2015-06-23

    Membrane contact sites (MCS) between organelles are proposed as nexuses for the exchange of lipids, small molecules, and other signals crucial to cellular function and homeostasis. Various protein complexes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial encounter structure (ERMES), function as dynamic molecular tethers between organelles. Here, we report the reconstitution and characterization of subcomplexes formed by the cytoplasm-exposed synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid-binding protein (SMP) domains present in three of the five ERMES subunits--the soluble protein Mdm12, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident membrane protein Mmm1, and the mitochondrial membrane protein Mdm34. SMP domains are conserved lipid-binding domains found exclusively in proteins at MCS. We show that the SMP domains of Mdm12 and Mmm1 associate into a tight heterotetramer with equimolecular stoichiometry. Our 17-Å-resolution EM structure of the complex reveals an elongated crescent-shaped particle in which two Mdm12 subunits occupy symmetric but distal positions at the opposite ends of a central ER-anchored Mmm1 homodimer. Rigid body fitting of homology models of these SMP domains in the density maps reveals a distinctive extended tubular structure likely traversed by a hydrophobic tunnel. Furthermore, these two SMP domains bind phospholipids and display a strong preference for phosphatidylcholines, a class of phospholipids whose exchange between the ER and mitochondria is essential. Last, we show that the three SMP-containing ERMES subunits form a ternary complex in which Mdm12 bridges Mmm1 to Mdm34. Our findings highlight roles for SMP domains in ERMES assembly and phospholipid binding and suggest a structure-based mechanism for the facilitated transport of phospholipids between organelles. PMID:26056272

  18. The Gla domain of factor IXa binds to factor VIIIa in the tenase complex.

    PubMed

    Blostein, Mark D; Furie, Barbara C; Rajotte, Isabelle; Furie, Bruce

    2003-08-15

    During blood coagulation factor IXa binds to factor VIIIa on phospholipid membranes to form an enzymatic complex, the tenase complex. To test whether there is a protein-protein contact site between the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of factor IXa and factor VIIIa, we demonstrated that an antibody to the Gla domain of factor IXa inhibited factor VIIIa-dependent factor IXa activity, suggesting an interaction of the factor IXa Gla domain with factor VIIIa. To study this interaction, we synthesized three analogs of the factor IXa Gla domain (FIX1-47) with Phe-9, Phe-25, or Val-46 replaced, respectively, with benzoylphenylalanine (BPA), a photoactivatable cross-linking reagent. These factor IX Gla domain analogs maintain native tertiary structure, as demonstrated by calcium-induced fluorescence quenching and phospholipid binding studies. In the absence of phospholipid membranes, FIX1-47 was able to inhibit factor IXa activity. This inhibition is dependent on the presence of factor VIIIa, suggesting a contact site between the factor IXa Gla domain and factor VIIIa. To demonstrate a direct interaction we did cross-linking experiments with FIX1-479BPA, FIX1-4725BPA, and FIX1-4746BPA. Covalent cross-linking to factor VIIIa was observed primarily with FIX1-4725BPA and to a much lesser degree with FIX1-4746BPA. Immunoprecipitation experiments with an antibody to the C2 domain of factor VIIIa indicate that the factor IX Gla domain cross-links to the A3-C1-C2 domain of factor VIIIa. These results suggest that the factor IXa Gla domain contacts factor VIIIa in the tenase complex through a contact site that includes phenylalanine 25 and perhaps valine 46.

  19. A structure-specific nucleic acid-binding domain conserved among DNA repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Aaron C.; Rambo, Robert P.; Greer, Briana; Pritchett, Michael; Tainer, John A.; Cortez, David; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2014-01-01

    SMARCAL1, a DNA remodeling protein fundamental to genome integrity during replication, is the only gene associated with the developmental disorder Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD). SMARCAL1-deficient cells show collapsed replication forks, S-phase cell cycle arrest, increased chromosomal breaks, hypersensitivity to genotoxic agents, and chromosomal instability. The SMARCAL1 catalytic domain (SMARCAL1CD) is composed of an SNF2-type double-stranded DNA motor ATPase fused to a HARP domain of unknown function. The mechanisms by which SMARCAL1 and other DNA translocases repair replication forks are poorly understood, in part because of a lack of structural information on the domains outside of the common ATPase motor. In the present work, we determined the crystal structure of the SMARCAL1 HARP domain and examined its conformation and assembly in solution by small angle X-ray scattering. We report that this domain is conserved with the DNA mismatch and damage recognition domains of MutS/MSH and NER helicase XPB, respectively, as well as with the putative DNA specificity motif of the T4 phage fork regression protein UvsW. Loss of UvsW fork regression activity by deletion of this domain was rescued by its replacement with HARP, establishing the importance of this domain in UvsW and demonstrating a functional complementarity between these structurally homologous domains. Mutation of predicted DNA-binding residues in HARP dramatically reduced fork binding and regression activities of SMARCAL1CD. Thus, this work has uncovered a conserved substrate recognition domain in DNA repair enzymes that couples ATP-hydrolysis to remodeling of a variety of DNA structures, and provides insight into this domain’s role in replication fork stability and genome integrity. PMID:24821763

  20. Characterization of the fibrinogen binding domain of bacteriophage lysin from Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ho Seong; Sullam, Paul M

    2011-09-01

    The binding of bacteria to human platelets is a likely central mechanism in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. Platelet binding by Streptococcus mitis SF100 is mediated in part by a lysin encoded by the lysogenic bacteriophage SM1. In addition to its role in the phage life cycle, lysin mediates the binding of S. mitis to human platelets via its interaction with fibrinogen on the platelet surface. To better define the region of lysin mediating fibrinogen binding, we tested a series of purified lysin truncation variants for their abilities to bind this protein. These studies revealed that the fibrinogen binding domain of lysin is contained within the region spanned by amino acid residues 102 to 198 (lysin(102-198)). This region has no sequence homology to other known fibrinogen binding proteins. Lysin(102-198) bound fibrinogen comparably to full-length lysin and with the same selectivity for the fibrinogen Aα and Bβ chains. Lysin(102-198) also inhibited the binding in vitro of S. mitis to human fibrinogen and platelets. When assessed by platelet aggregometry, the disruption of the lysin gene in SF100 resulted in a significantly longer time to the onset of aggregation of human platelets than that of the parent strain. The preincubation of platelets with purified lysin(102-198) also delayed the onset of aggregation by SF100. These results indicate that the binding of lysin to fibrinogen is mediated by a specific domain of the phage protein and that this interaction is important for both platelet binding and aggregation by S. mitis. PMID:21690235

  1. A Conserved Myc Protein Domain, MBIV, Regulates DNA Binding, Apoptosis, Transformation, and G2 Arrest†

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Chandriani, Sanjay; Whitfield, Michael L.; Cole, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    The myc family of oncogenes is well conserved throughout evolution. Here we present the characterization of a domain conserved in c-, N-, and L-Myc from fish to humans, N-Myc317-337, designated Myc box IV (MBIV). A deletion of this domain leads to a defect in Myc-induced apoptosis and in some transformation assays but not in cell proliferation. Unlike other Myc mutants, MycΔMBIV is not a simple loss-of-function mutant because it is hyperactive for G2 arrest in primary cells. Microarray analysis of genes regulated by N-MycΔMBIV reveals that it is weakened for transactivation and repression but not nearly as defective as N-MycΔMBII. Although the mutated region is not part of the previously defined DNA binding domain, we find that N-MycΔMBIV has a significantly lower affinity for DNA than the wild-type protein in vitro. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation shows reduced binding of N-MycΔMBIV to some target genes in vivo, which correlates with the defect in transactivation. Thus, this conserved domain has an unexpected role in Myc DNA binding activity. These data also provide a novel separation of Myc functions linked to the modulation of DNA binding activity. PMID:16705173

  2. Identificaiton of Shc Src Homology 2 Domain-Binding Peptoid – Peptide Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Sung Eun; Stephen, Andrew G.; Weidlich, Iwona; Giubellino, Alessio; Liu, Fa; Worthy, Karen M.; Bindu, Lakshman; Fivash, Matthew J.; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Bottaro, Donald P.; Fisher, Robert J.; Burke, Terrence R.

    2009-01-01

    A fluorescence anisotropy (FA) competition – based Shc Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-binding was established using the high affinity fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-containing peptide, FITC-NH-(CH2)4-CO-pY-Q-G-L-S-amide (8; Kd = 0.35 μM). Examination of a series of open – chain bis-alkenylamide containing peptides, prepared as ring – closing metathesis precursors, showed that the highest affinities were obtained by replacement of the original Gly residue with Nα-substituted Gly (NSG) “peptoid” residues. This provided peptoid-peptide hybrids of the form, “Ac-pY-Q-[NSG]-L-amide.” Depending on the NSG substituent, certain of these hybrids exhibited up to 40 – fold higher Shc SH2 domain binding affinity than the parent Gly-containing peptide (IC50 = 248 μM), (for example, N-homo-allyl analogue 50; IC50 = 6 μM). To our knowledge, this work represents the first successful example of the application of peptoid-peptide hybrids in the design of SH2 domain-binding antagonists. These results could provide a foundation for further structural optimization of Shc SH2 domain-binding peptide mimetics. PMID:19226165

  3. Identification of Shc Src homology 2 domain-binding peptoid-peptide hybrids.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Sung-Eun; Stephen, Andrew G; Weidlich, Iwona; Giubellino, Alessio; Liu, Fa; Worthy, Karen M; Bindu, Lakshman; Fivash, Matthew J; Nicklaus, Marc C; Bottaro, Donald P; Fisher, Robert J; Burke, Terrence R

    2009-03-26

    A fluorescence anisotropy (FA) competition-based Shc Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-binding was established using the high affinity fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) containing peptide, FITC-NH-(CH2)4-CO-pY-Q-G-L-S-amide (8; Kd = 0.35 microM). Examination of a series of open-chain bis-alkenylamide containing peptides, prepared as ring-closing metathesis precursors, showed that the highest affinities were obtained by replacement of the original Gly residue with N alpha-substituted Gly (NSG) "peptoid" residues. This provided peptoid-peptide hybrids of the form "Ac-pY-Q-[NSG]-L-amide." Depending on the NSG substituent, certain of these hybrids exhibited up to 40-fold higher Shc SH2 domain-binding affinity than the parent Gly-containing peptide (IC50 = 248 microM) (for example, for N-homoallyl analogue 50, IC50 = 6 microM). To our knowledge, this work represents the first successful example of the application of peptoid-peptide hybrids in the design of SH2 domain-binding antagonists. These results could provide a foundation for further structural optimization of Shc SH2 domain-binding peptide mimetics. PMID:19226165

  4. A small cellulose binding domain protein in Phytophtora is cell wall localized

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose binding domains (CBD) are structurally conserved regions linked to catalytic regions of cellulolytic enzymes. While widespread amongst saprophytic fungi that subsist on plant cell wall polysaccharides, they are not generally present in plant pathogenic fungi. A genome wide survey of CBDs w...

  5. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  6. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  7. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange.

    PubMed

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H; Gittens, William H; Townsend, Philip D; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2016-01-15

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA.

  8. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange.

    PubMed

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H; Gittens, William H; Townsend, Philip D; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2016-01-15

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  9. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H.; Gittens, William H.; Townsend, Philip D.; Sharples, Gary J.; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  10. 1918 Influenza receptor binding domain variants bind and replicate in primary human airway cells regardless of receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Davis, A Sally; Chertow, Daniel S; Kindrachuk, Jason; Qi, Li; Schwartzman, Louis M; Suzich, Jon; Alsaaty, Sara; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2016-06-01

    The 1918 influenza pandemic caused ~50 million deaths. Many questions remain regarding the origin, pathogenicity, and mechanisms of human adaptation of this virus. Avian-adapted influenza A viruses preferentially bind α2,3-linked sialic acids (Sia) while human-adapted viruses preferentially bind α2,6-linked Sia. A change in Sia preference from α2,3 to α2,6 is thought to be a requirement for human adaptation of avian influenza viruses. Autopsy data from 1918 cases, however, suggest that factors other than Sia preference played a role in viral binding and entry to human airway cells. Here, we evaluated binding and entry of five 1918 influenza receptor binding domain variants in a primary human airway cell model along with control avian and human influenza viruses. We observed that all five variants bound and entered cells efficiently and that Sia preference did not predict entry of influenza A virus to primary human airway cells evaluated in this model. PMID:27062579

  11. 1918 Influenza receptor binding domain variants bind and replicate in primary human airway cells regardless of receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Davis, A Sally; Chertow, Daniel S; Kindrachuk, Jason; Qi, Li; Schwartzman, Louis M; Suzich, Jon; Alsaaty, Sara; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2016-06-01

    The 1918 influenza pandemic caused ~50 million deaths. Many questions remain regarding the origin, pathogenicity, and mechanisms of human adaptation of this virus. Avian-adapted influenza A viruses preferentially bind α2,3-linked sialic acids (Sia) while human-adapted viruses preferentially bind α2,6-linked Sia. A change in Sia preference from α2,3 to α2,6 is thought to be a requirement for human adaptation of avian influenza viruses. Autopsy data from 1918 cases, however, suggest that factors other than Sia preference played a role in viral binding and entry to human airway cells. Here, we evaluated binding and entry of five 1918 influenza receptor binding domain variants in a primary human airway cell model along with control avian and human influenza viruses. We observed that all five variants bound and entered cells efficiently and that Sia preference did not predict entry of influenza A virus to primary human airway cells evaluated in this model.

  12. Host cell proteins binding to domain IV of the 5' noncoding region of poliovirus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Blyn, L B; Chen, R; Semler, B L; Ehrenfeld, E

    1995-01-01

    Translation of poliovirus RNA occurs by the binding of ribosomes to an internal segment of RNA sequence within the 5' untranslated region of the viral RNA. This region is predicted to consist of six domains (I to VI) that possess complex secondary and tertiary structures. Domain IV is a large region in which alterations in the sequence or structure markedly reduce translational efficiency. In this study, we employed RNA mobility shift assays to demonstrate that a protein(s) from uninfected HeLa cell extracts, as well as from neuroblastoma extracts, interacts with the domain IV structure. A mutation in domain IV caused reduced binding of HeLa cell proteins and reduced translation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that the binding of at least one of these proteins plays a role in the mechanism of viral translation. UV cross-linking indicated that a protein(s) with a size of approximately 40 kDa interacted directly with the RNA. Using streptavidin beads to capture biotinylated RNA bound to proteins, we were able to visualize a number of HeLa and neuroblastoma cell proteins that interact with domain IV. These proteins have molecular masses of approximately 39, approximately 40, and approximately 42 kDa. PMID:7769700

  13. VHS domains of ESCRT-0 cooperate in high-avidity binding to polyubiquitinated cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xuefeng; Hurley, James H.

    2010-03-30

    VHS (Vps27, Hrs, and STAM) domains occur in ESCRT-0 subunits Hrs and STAM, GGA adapters, and other trafficking proteins. The structure of the STAM VHS domain-ubiquitin complex was solved at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, revealing that determinants for ubiquitin recognition are conserved in nearly all VHS domains. VHS domains from all classes of VHS-domain containing proteins in yeast and humans, including both subunits of ESCRT-0, bound ubiquitin in vitro. ESCRTs have been implicated in the sorting of Lys63-linked polyubiquitinated cargo. Intact human ESCRT-0 binds Lys63-linked tetraubiquitin 50-fold more tightly than monoubiquitin, though only 2-fold more tightly than Lys48-linked tetraubiquitin. The gain in affinity is attributed to the cooperation of flexibly connected VHS and UIM motifs of ESCRT-0 in avid binding to the polyubiquitin chain. Mutational analysis of all the five ubiquitin-binding sites in yeast ESCRT-0 shows that cooperation between them is required for the sorting of the Lys63-linked polyubiquitinated cargo Cps1 to the vacuole.

  14. The neurofibromin recruitment factor Spred1 binds to the GAP related domain without affecting Ras inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Mercado, Ellen L.; Maly, Karl; McCormick, Frank; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Legius syndrome are related diseases with partially overlapping symptoms caused by alterations of the tumor suppressor genes NF1 (encoding the protein neurofibromin) and SPRED1 (encoding sprouty-related, EVH1 domain-containing protein 1, Spred1), respectively. Both proteins are negative regulators of Ras/MAPK signaling with neurofibromin functioning as a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (GAP) and Spred1 acting on hitherto undefined components of the pathway. Importantly, neurofibromin has been identified as a key protein in the development of cancer, as it is genetically altered in a large number of sporadic human malignancies unrelated to NF1. Spred1 has previously been demonstrated to interact with neurofibromin via its N-terminal Ena/VASP Homology 1 (EVH1) domain and to mediate membrane translocation of its target dependent on its C-terminal Sprouty domain. However, the region of neurofibromin required for the interaction with Spred1 has remained unclear. Here we show that the EVH1 domain of Spred1 binds to the noncatalytic (GAPex) portion of the GAP-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin. Binding is compatible with simultaneous binding of Ras and does not interfere with GAP activity. Our study points to a potential targeting function of the GAPex subdomain of neurofibromin that is present in all known canonical RasGAPs. PMID:27313208

  15. Nerve growth factor binding domain of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Welcher, A.A.; Bitler, C.M.; Radeke, M.J.; Shooter, E.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A structural analysis of the rat low-affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor was undertaken to define the NGF binding domain. Mutant NGF receptor DNA constructs were expressed in mouse fibroblasts or COS cells, and the ability of the mutant receptors to bind NGF was assayed. In the first mutant, all but 16 amino acid residues of the intracellular domain of the receptor were removed. This receptor bound NGF with a K{sub d} comparable to that of the wild-type receptor. A second mutant contained only the four cysteine-rich sequences from the extracellular portion of the protein. This mutant was expressed in COS cells and the resultant protein was a secreted soluble form of the receptor that was able to bind NGF. Two N-terminal deletions, in which either the first cystein-rich sequence or the first and part of the second cystein-rich sequences were removed, bound NGF. However, a mutant lacking all four cysteine-rich sequences was unable to bind NGF. These results show that the four cysteine-rich sequences of the NGF receptor contain the NGF binding domain.

  16. A Prevalent Peptide-Binding Domain Guides Ribosomal Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Brandon J.; Hudson, Graham A.; Dunbar, Kyle L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a rapidly growing natural product class. RiPP precursor peptides can undergo extensive enzymatic tailoring, yielding structurally and functionally diverse products, and their biosynthetic logic makes them attractive bioengineering targets. Recent work suggests that unrelated RiPP modifying enzymes contain structurally similar precursor peptide-binding domains. Using profile hidden Markov model comparisons, we discovered related and previously unrecognized peptide-binding domains in proteins spanning the majority of known prokaryotic RiPP classes; thus, we named this conserved domain the RiPP precursor peptide recognition element (RRE). Through binding studies, we verify the role of the RRE for three distinct RiPP classes: linear azole-containing peptides, thiopeptides, and lasso peptides. Because numerous RiPP biosynthetic enzymes act on peptide substrates, our findings have powerful predictive value as to which protein(s) drive substrate binding, laying a foundation for further characterization of RiPP biosynthetic pathways and the rational engineering of new peptide-binding activities. PMID:26167873

  17. Analysis of the hormone-binding domain of steroid receptors using chimeras generated by homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Danielsen, Mark . E-mail: dan@bc.georgetown.edu

    2005-08-15

    The glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor are members of the steroid receptor family that exhibit ligand cross-reactivity. Specificity of steroid receptor action is investigated in the present work by the construction and characterization of chimeras between the glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor. We used an innovative approach to make novel steroid receptor proteins in vivo that in general, contrary to our expectations, show increased ligand specificity compared to the parental receptors. We describe a receptor that is specific for the potent synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide and does not bind aldosterone. A further set of chimeras has an increased ability to discriminate between ligands, responding potently to mineralocorticoids and only very weakly to synthetic glucocorticoids. A chimera with the fusion site in the hinge highlights the importance of the region between the DNA-binding and the hormone-binding domains since, unlike both the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, it only responds to mineralocorticoids. One chimera has reduced specificity in that it acts as a general corticoid receptor, responding to glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids with similar potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that regions of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domains are functionally non-reciprocal. We present transcriptional, hormone-binding, and structure-modeling evidence that suggests that receptor-specific interactions within and across domains mediate aspects of specificity in transcriptional responses to steroids.

  18. The Smc5-Smc6 heterodimer associates with DNA through several independent binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Marc-André; Dhanaraman, Thillaivillalan; D’Amours, Damien

    2015-01-01

    The Smc5-6 complex is required for the maintenance of genome integrity through its functions in DNA repair and chromosome biogenesis. However, the specific mode of action of Smc5 and Smc6 in these processes remains largely unknown. We previously showed that individual components of the Smc5-Smc6 complex bind strongly to DNA as monomers, despite the absence of a canonical DNA-binding domain (DBD) in these proteins. How heterodimerization of Smc5-6 affects its binding to DNA, and which parts of the SMC molecules confer DNA-binding activity is not known at present. To address this knowledge gap, we characterized the functional domains of the Smc5-6 heterodimer and identify two DBDs in each SMC molecule. The first DBD is located within the SMC hinge region and its adjacent coiled-coil arms, while the second is found in the conserved ATPase head domain. These DBDs can independently recapitulate the substrate preference of the full-length Smc5 and Smc6 proteins. We also show that heterodimerization of full-length proteins specifically increases the affinity of the resulting complex for double-stranded DNA substrates. Collectively, our findings provide critical insights into the structural requirements for effective binding of the Smc5-6 complex to DNA repair substrates in vitro and in live cells. PMID:25984708

  19. Optimal fusion of antibody binding domains resulted in higher affinity and wider specificity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinhua; Kojima, Tomoki; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Antibody is a very important protein in biotechnological and biomedical fields because of its high affinity and specificity to various antigens. Due to the rise of human antibody therapeutics, its cost-effective purification is an urgent issue for bio-industry. In this study, we made novel fusion proteins PAxPG with a flexible (DDAKK)n linker between the two Ig binding domains derived from Staphylococcus protein A and Streptococcus protein G. The fusion proteins bound human and mouse IgGs and their fragments with up to 58-times higher affinity and wider specificity than the parental binding domains. Interestingly, the optimal linker for human Fab fragment was n = 4, which was close to the modeled distance between the termini of domains bound to heavy chain, implying increased avidity as a possible mechanism. For binding to Fc, the longest n=6 linker gave the highest affinity, implying longer interchain distance between the two binding sites. The novel fusion protein with optimized interdomain linker length will be a useful tool for the purification and detection of various IgGs including mouse IgG1 that binds only weakly to natural protein A. PMID:25910963

  20. Ezrin self-association involves binding of an N-terminal domain to a normally masked C-terminal domain that includes the F-actin binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Gary, R; Bretscher, A

    1995-01-01

    Ezrin is a membrane-cytoskeletal linking protein that is concentrated in actin-rich surface structures. It is closely related to the microvillar proteins radixin and moesin and to the tumor suppressor merlin/schwannomin. Cell extracts contain ezrin dimers and ezrin-moesin heterodimers in addition to monomers. Truncated ezrin fusion proteins were assayed by blot overlay to determine which regions mediate self-association. Here we report that ezrin self-association occurs by head-to-tail joining of distinct N-terminal and C-terminal domains. It is likely that these domains, termed N- and C-ERMADs (ezrin-radixin-moesin association domain), are responsible for homotypic and heterotypic associations among ERM family members. The N-ERMAD of ezrin resided within amino acids 1-296; deletion of 10 additional residues resulted in loss of activity. The C-ERMAD was mapped to the last 107 amino acids of ezrin, residues 479-585. The two residues at the C-terminus were required for activity, and the region from 530-585 was insufficient. The C-ERMAD was masked in the native monomer. Exposure of this domain required unfolding ezrin with sodium dodecyl sulfate or expressing the domain as part of a truncated protein. Intermolecular association could not occur unless the C-ERMAD had been made accessible to its N-terminal partner. It can be inferred that dimerization in vivo requires an activation step that exposes this masked domain. The conformationally inaccessible C-terminal region included the F-actin binding site, suggesting that this activity is likewise regulated by masking. Images PMID:7579708

  1. Structural basis for selective binding of m6A RNA by the YTHDC1 YTH domain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Ke; Roundtree, Ian A; Tempel, Wolfram; Li, Yanjun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Min, Jinrong

    2014-11-01

    N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is the most abundant internal modification of nearly all eukaryotic mRNAs and has recently been reported to be recognized by the YTH domain family proteins. Here we present the crystal structures of the YTH domain of YTHDC1, a member of the YTH domain family, and its complex with an m(6)A-containing RNA. Our structural studies, together with transcriptome-wide identification of YTHDC1-binding sites and biochemical experiments, not only reveal the specific mode of m(6)A-YTH binding but also explain the preferential recognition of the GG(m(6)A)C sequences by YTHDC1. PMID:25242552

  2. The extended arms of DNA-binding domains: a tale of tails.

    PubMed

    Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Dragan, Anatoly I; Privalov, Peter L

    2006-10-01

    DNA-binding domains (DBDs) frequently have N- or C-terminal tails, rich in lysine and/or arginine and disordered in free solution, that bind the DNA separately from and in the opposite groove to the folded domain. Is their role simply to increase affinity for DNA or do they have a role in specificity, that is, sequence recognition? One approach to answering this question is to analyze the contribution of such tails to the overall energetics of binding. It turns out that, despite similarities of amino acid sequence, three distinct categories of DBD extension exist: (i) those that are purely electrostatic and lack specificity, (ii) those that are largely non-electrostatic with a high contribution to specificity and (iii) those of mixed character that show sequence preference. Because in all cases the tails also increase the affinity for target DNA, they represent a crucial component of the machinery for selective gene activation or repression. PMID:16920361

  3. Proteolytic dissection of Zab, the Z-DNA-binding domain of human ADAR1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, T.; Lowenhaupt, K.; Kim, Y. G.; Li, L.; Brown, B. A. 2nd; Herbert, A.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Zalpha is a peptide motif that binds to Z-DNA with high affinity. This motif binds to alternating dC-dG sequences stabilized in the Z-conformation by means of bromination or supercoiling, but not to B-DNA. Zalpha is part of the N-terminal region of double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase (ADAR1), a candidate enzyme for nuclear pre-mRNA editing in mammals. Zalpha is conserved in ADAR1 from many species; in each case, there is a second similar motif, Zbeta, separated from Zalpha by a more divergent linker. To investigate the structure-function relationship of Zalpha, its domain structure was studied by limited proteolysis. Proteolytic profiles indicated that Zalpha is part of a domain, Zab, of 229 amino acids (residues 133-361 in human ADAR1). This domain contains both Zalpha and Zbeta as well as a tandem repeat of a 49-amino acid linker module. Prolonged proteolysis revealed a minimal core domain of 77 amino acids (positions 133-209), containing only Zalpha, which is sufficient to bind left-handed Z-DNA; however, the substrate binding is strikingly different from that of Zab. The second motif, Zbeta, retains its structural integrity only in the context of Zab and does not bind Z-DNA as a separate entity. These results suggest that Zalpha and Zbeta act as a single bipartite domain. In the presence of substrate DNA, Zab becomes more resistant to proteases, suggesting that it adopts a more rigid structure when bound to its substrate, possibly with conformational changes in parts of the protein.

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis of the GTP-binding domain of beta-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Farr, G W; Sternlicht, H

    1992-09-01

    Tubulin binds guanine nucleotides with high affinity and specificity. GTP, an allosteric effector of microtubule assembly, requires Mg2+ for its interaction with beta-tubulin and binds as the MgGTP complex. In contrast, GDP binding does not require Mg2+. The structural basis for this difference is not understood but may be of fundamental importance for microtubule assembly. We investigated the interaction of beta-tubulin with guanine nucleotides using site-directed mutagenesis. Acidic amino acid residues have been shown to interact with nucleotide in numerous nucleotide-binding proteins. In this study, we mutated seven highly conserved aspartic acid residues and one highly conserved glutamic acid residue in the putative GTP-binding domain of beta-tubulin (N-terminal 300 amino acids) to asparagine and glutamine, respectively. The mutants were synthesized in vitro using rabbit reticulocyte lysates, and their affinities for nucleotide determined by an h.p.l.c.-based assay. Our results indicate that the mutations can be placed in six separate categories on the basis of their effects on nucleotide binding. These categories range from having no effect on nucleotide binding to a mutation that apparently abolishes nucleotide binding. One mutation at Asp224 reduced the affinity of beta-tubulin for GTP in the presence but not in the absence of Mg2+. The specific effect of this mutation on nucleotide binding is consistent with an interaction of this amino acid with the Mg2+ moiety of MgGTP. This residue is in a region sharing sequence homology with the putative Mg2+ site in myosin and other ATP-binding proteins. As a result, tubulin belongs to a distinct class of GTP-binding proteins which may be evolutionarily related to the ATP-binding proteins.

  5. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J.; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  6. The exomer cargo adaptor structure reveals a novel GTPase-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Jon E; Richardson, Brian C; Strassner, Amanda M; Fromme, J Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Cargo adaptors control intracellular trafficking of transmembrane proteins by sorting them into membrane transport carriers. The COPI, COPII, and clathrin cargo adaptors are structurally well characterized, but other cargo adaptors remain poorly understood. Exomer is a specialized cargo adaptor that sorts specific proteins into trans-Golgi network (TGN)-derived vesicles in response to cellular signals. Exomer is recruited to the TGN by the Arf1 GTPase, a universally conserved trafficking regulator. Here, we report the crystal structure of a tetrameric exomer complex composed of two copies each of the Chs5 and Chs6 subunits. The structure reveals the FN3 and BRCT domains of Chs5, which together we refer to as the FBE domain (FN3–BRCT of exomer), project from the exomer core complex. The overall architecture of the FBE domain is reminiscent of the appendage domains of other cargo adaptors, although it exhibits a distinct topology. In contrast to appendage domains, which bind accessory factors, we show that the primary role of the FBE domain is to bind Arf1 for recruitment of exomer to membranes. PMID:23000721

  7. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  8. Assembly of custom TALE-type DNA binding domains by modular cloning.

    PubMed

    Morbitzer, Robert; Elsaesser, Janett; Hausner, Jens; Lahaye, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding proteins show tremendous potential as molecular tools for targeted binding to any desired DNA sequence. Their DNA binding domain consists of tandem arranged repeats, and due to this repetitive structure it is challenging to generate designer TALEs (dTALEs) with user-defined specificity. We present a cloning approach that facilitates the assembly of multiple repeat-encoding DNA fragments that translate into dTALEs with pre-defined DNA binding specificity. This method makes use of type IIS restriction enzymes in two sequential cut-ligase reactions to build dTALE repeat arrays. We employed this modular approach for generation of a dTALE that differentiates between two highly similar DNA sequences that are both targeted by the Xanthomonas TALE, AvrBs3. These data show that this modular assembly system allows rapid generation of highly specific TALE-type DNA binding domains that target binding sites of predefined length and sequence. This approach enables the rapid and flexible production of dTALEs for gene regulation and genome editing in routine and high-throughput applications.

  9. Transcriptional activation through ETS domain binding sites in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV gene

    SciTech Connect

    Virbasius, J.V.; Scarpulla, R.C. )

    1991-11-01

    A mutational analysis of the rat cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (RCO4) promoter region revealed the presence of a major control element consisting of a tandemly repeated pair of binding sites for a nuclear factor from HeLa cells. This factor was designated NRF-2 (nuclear respiratory factor 2) because a functional recognition site was also found in the human ATP synthase {beta}-subunit gene. Deletion or site-directed point mutations of the NRF-2 binding sites in the RCO4 promoter resulted in substantial loss of transcriptional activity, and synthetic oligomers of the NRF-2 binding sites from both genes stimulated a heterologous promoter when cloned in cis. NRF-2 binding a transcriptional activation required a purine-rich core sequence, GGAA. This motif is characteristic of the recognition site for a family of activators referred to as ETS domain proteins because of the similarity within their DNA-binding domains to the ets-1 proto-oncogene product. NRF-2 recognized an authentic Ets-1 site within the Moloney murine sarcoma virus long terminal repeat, and this site was able to compete for NRF-2 binding to the RCO4 promoter sequence. However, in contrast to Ets-1, which appears to be exclusive to lymphoid tissues, NRF-2 has the broad tissue distribution expected of a regulator of respiratory chain expression.

  10. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Kaplan, David L; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-26

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities.

  11. Structural Analysis of the Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known. The mechanism for entry into neuronal cells for serotypes A, B, E, F, and G involves a well understood dual receptor (protein and ganglioside) process, however, the mechanism of entry for serotypes C and D remains unclear. To provide structural insights into how BoNT/D enters neuronal cells, the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain (S863-E1276) for this serotype (BoNT/D-HCR) was determined at 1.65{angstrom} resolution. While BoNT/D-HCR adopts an overall fold similar to that observed in other known BoNT HCRs, several major structural differences are present. These structural differences are located at, or near, putative receptor binding sites and may be responsible for BoNT/D host preferences. Two loops, S1195-I1204 and K1236-N1244, located on both sides of the putative protein receptor binding pocket, are displaced >10{angstrom} relative to the corresponding residues in the crystal structures of BoNT/B and G. Obvious clashes were observed in the putative protein receptor binding site when the BoNT/B protein receptor synaptotagmin II was modeled into the BoNT/D-HCR structure. Although a ganglioside binding site has never been unambiguously identified in BoNT/D-HCR, a shallow cavity in an analogous location to the other BoNT serotypes HCR domains is observed in BoNT/D-HCR that has features compatible with membrane binding. A portion of a loop near the putative receptor binding site, K1236-N1244, is hydrophobic and solvent-exposed and may directly bind membrane lipids. Liposome-binding experiments with BoNT/D-HCR demonstrate that this membrane lipid may be phosphatidylethanolamine.

  12. Structural analysis of the receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Lin; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2010-10-28

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known. The mechanism for entry into neuronal cells for serotypes A, B, E, F, and G involves a well understood dual receptor (protein and ganglioside) process, however, the mechanism of entry for serotypes C and D remains unclear. To provide structural insights into how BoNT/D enters neuronal cells, the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain (S863-E1276) for this serotype (BoNT/D-HCR) was determined at 1.65 Å resolution. While BoNT/D-HCR adopts an overall fold similar to that observed in other known BoNT HCRs, several major structural differences are present. These structural differences are located at, or near, putative receptor binding sites and may be responsible for BoNT/D host preferences. Two loops, S1195-I1204 and K1236-N1244, located on both sides of the putative protein receptor binding pocket, are displaced >10 Å relative to the corresponding residues in the crystal structures of BoNT/B and G. Obvious clashes were observed in the putative protein receptor binding site when the BoNT/B protein receptor synaptotagmin II was modeled into the BoNT/D-HCR structure. Although a ganglioside binding site has never been unambiguously identified in BoNT/D-HCR, a shallow cavity in an analogous location to the other BoNT serotypes HCR domains is observed in BoNT/D-HCR that has features compatible with membrane binding. A portion of a loop near the putative receptor binding site, K1236-N1244, is hydrophobic and solvent-exposed and may directly bind membrane lipids. Liposome-binding experiments with BoNT/D-HCR demonstrate that this membrane lipid may be phosphatidylethanolamine.

  13. Lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc transferases exhibit glycopeptide binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G; Meldal, Morten; Holmér, Andreas P; Blixt, Ola; Cló, Emiliano; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H

    2011-09-16

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide α-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection of glycosylation sites by GalNAc-Ts: confined sequence recognition by the catalytic domain alone, and concerted recognition of acceptor sites and adjacent GalNAc-glycosylated sites by the catalytic and lectin domains, respectively. Thus far, only the catalytic domain has been shown to have peptide sequence specificity, whereas the primary function of the lectin domain is to increase affinity to previously glycosylated substrates. Whether the lectin domain also has peptide sequence selectivity has remained unclear. Using a glycopeptide array with a library of synthetic and recombinant glycopeptides based on sequences of mucins MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6, and MUC7 as well as a random glycopeptide bead library, we examined the binding properties of four different lectin domains. The lectin domains of GalNAc-T1, -T2, -T3, and -T4 bound different subsets of small glycopeptides. These results indicate an additional level of complexity in the initiation step of O-glycosylation by GalNAc-Ts.

  14. Conformational States and Kinetics of the Calcium Binding Domain of NADPH Oxidase 5

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Motl, Nicole; Levek, Kelli; Chen, Liu Qi; Yang, Ya-Ping; Johnson, Tremylla; Hamilton, Lindsey; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2010-01-01

    Superoxide generated by human NADPH oxidase 5 (NOX5) is of growing importance for various physiological and pathological processes. The activity of NOX5 appears to be regulated by a self-contained Ca2+ binding domain (CaBD). Recently Bánfi et al. suggest that the conformational change of CaBD upon Ca2+ binding is essential for domain-domain interaction and superoxide production. The authors studied its structural change using intrinsic Trp fluorescence and hydrophobic dye binding; however, their conformational study was not thorough and the kinetics of metal binding was not demonstrated. Here we generated the recombinant CaBD and an E99Q/E143Q mutant to characterize them using fluorescence spectroscopy. Ca2+ binding to CaBD induces a conformational change that exposes hydrophobic patches and increases the quenching accessibilities of its Trp residues and AEDANS at Cys107. The circular dichroism spectra indicated no significant changes in the secondary structures of CaBD upon metal binding. Stopped-flow spectrometry revealed a fast Ca2+ dissociation from the N-terminal half, followed by a slow Ca2+ dissociation from the C-terminal half. Combined with a chemical stability study, we concluded that the C-terminal half of CaBD has a higher Ca2+ binding affinity, a higher chemical stability, and a slow Ca2+ dissociation. The Mg2+-bound CaBD was also investigated and the results indicate that its structure is similar to the apo form. The rate of Mg2+ dissociation was close to that of Ca2+ dissociation. Our data suggest that the N- and C-terminal halves of CaBD are not completely structurally independent. PMID:20648216

  15. A Low Affinity Ground State Conformation for the Dynein Microtubule Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Lynn; Tikhonenko, Irina; Banavali, Nilesh K.; LeMaster, David M.; Koonce, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Dynein interacts with microtubules through a dedicated binding domain that is dynamically controlled to achieve high or low affinity, depending on the state of nucleotide bound in a distant catalytic pocket. The active sites for microtubule binding and ATP hydrolysis communicate via conformational changes transduced through a ∼10-nm length antiparallel coiled-coil stalk, which connects the binding domain to the roughly 300-kDa motor core. Recently, an x-ray structure of the murine cytoplasmic dynein microtubule binding domain (MTBD) in a weak affinity conformation was published, containing a covalently constrained β+ registry for the coiled-coil stalk segment (Carter, A. P., Garbarino, J. E., Wilson-Kubalek, E. M., Shipley, W. E., Cho, C., Milligan, R. A., Vale, R. D., and Gibbons, I. R. (2008) Science 322, 1691–1695). We here present an NMR analysis of the isolated MTBD from Dictyostelium discoideum that demonstrates the coiled-coil β+ registry corresponds to the low energy conformation for this functional region of dynein. Addition of sequence encoding roughly half of the coiled-coil stalk proximal to the binding tip results in a decreased affinity of the MTBD for microtubules. In contrast, addition of the complete coiled-coil sequence drives the MTBD to the conformationally unstable, high affinity binding state. These results suggest a thermodynamic coupling between conformational free energy differences in the α and β+ registries of the coiled-coil stalk that acts as a switch between high and low affinity conformations of the MTBD. A balancing of opposing conformations in the stalk and MTBD enables potentially modest long-range interactions arising from ATP binding in the motor core to induce a relaxation of the MTBD into the stable low affinity state. PMID:20351100

  16. In silico identification and pharmacological evaluation of novel endocrine disrupting chemicals that act via the ligand-binding domain of the estrogen receptor α.

    PubMed

    McRobb, Fiona M; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-09-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) pose a significant threat to human health, society, and the environment. Many EDCs elicit their toxic effects through nuclear hormone receptors, like the estrogen receptor α (ERα). In silico models can be used to prioritize chemicals for toxicological evaluation to reduce the amount of costly pharmacological testing and enable early alerts for newly designed compounds. However, many of the current computational models are overly dependent on the chemistry of known modulators and perform poorly for novel chemical scaffolds. Herein we describe the development of computational, three-dimensional multi-conformational pocket-field docking, and chemical-field docking models for the identification of novel EDCs that act via the ligand-binding domain of ERα. These models were highly accurate in the retrospective task of distinguishing known high-affinity ERα modulators from inactive or decoy molecules, with minimal training. To illustrate the utility of the models in prospective in silico compound screening, we screened a database of over 6000 environmental chemicals and evaluated the 24 top-ranked hits in an ERα transcriptional activation assay and a differential scanning fluorimetry-based ERα binding assay. Promisingly, six chemicals displayed ERα agonist activity (32nM-3.98μM) and two chemicals had moderately stabilizing effects on ERα. Two newly identified active compounds were chemically related β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists, dobutamine, and ractopamine (a feed additive that promotes leanness in cattle and poultry), which are the first βAR agonists identified as activators of ERα-mediated gene transcription. This approach can be applied to other receptors implicated in endocrine disruption.

  17. In Silico Identification and Pharmacological Evaluation of Novel Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals That Act via the Ligand-Binding Domain of the Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) pose a significant threat to human health, society, and the environment. Many EDCs elicit their toxic effects through nuclear hormone receptors, like the estrogen receptor α (ERα). In silico models can be used to prioritize chemicals for toxicological evaluation to reduce the amount of costly pharmacological testing and enable early alerts for newly designed compounds. However, many of the current computational models are overly dependent on the chemistry of known modulators and perform poorly for novel chemical scaffolds. Herein we describe the development of computational, three-dimensional multi-conformational pocket-field docking, and chemical-field docking models for the identification of novel EDCs that act via the ligand-binding domain of ERα. These models were highly accurate in the retrospective task of distinguishing known high-affinity ERα modulators from inactive or decoy molecules, with minimal training. To illustrate the utility of the models in prospective in silico compound screening, we screened a database of over 6000 environmental chemicals and evaluated the 24 top-ranked hits in an ERα transcriptional activation assay and a differential scanning fluorimetry-based ERα binding assay. Promisingly, six chemicals displayed ERα agonist activity (32nM–3.98μM) and two chemicals had moderately stabilizing effects on ERα. Two newly identified active compounds were chemically related β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists, dobutamine, and ractopamine (a feed additive that promotes leanness in cattle and poultry), which are the first βAR agonists identified as activators of ERα-mediated gene transcription. This approach can be applied to other receptors implicated in endocrine disruption. PMID:24928891

  18. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  19. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  20. Potential DNA binding and nuclease functions of ComEC domains characterized in silico

    PubMed Central

    Baker, James A.; Simkovic, Felix; Taylor, Helen M.C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial competence, which can be natural or induced, allows the uptake of exogenous double stranded DNA (dsDNA) into a competent bacterium. This process is known as transformation. A multiprotein assembly binds and processes the dsDNA to import one strand and degrade another yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are relatively poorly understood. Here distant relationships of domains in Competence protein EC (ComEC) of Bacillus subtilis (Uniprot: P39695) were characterized. DNA‐protein interactions were investigated in silico by analyzing models for structural conservation, surface electrostatics and structure‐based DNA binding propensity; and by data‐driven macromolecular docking of DNA to models. Our findings suggest that the DUF4131 domain contains a cryptic DNA‐binding OB fold domain and that the β‐lactamase‐like domain is the hitherto cryptic competence nuclease. Proteins 2016; 84:1431–1442. © 2016 The Authors Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27318187

  1. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus.

    PubMed

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-04-11

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis.

  2. Evolutionary history of redox metal-binding domains across the tree of life.

    PubMed

    Harel, Arye; Bromberg, Yana; Falkowski, Paul G; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2014-05-13

    Oxidoreductases mediate electron transfer (i.e., redox) reactions across the tree of life and ultimately facilitate the biologically driven fluxes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur on Earth. The core enzymes responsible for these reactions are ancient, often small in size, and highly diverse in amino acid sequence, and many require specific transition metals in their active sites. Here we reconstruct the evolution of metal-binding domains in extant oxidoreductases using a flexible network approach and permissive profile alignments based on available microbial genome data. Our results suggest there were at least 10 independent origins of redox domain families. However, we also identified multiple ancient connections between Fe2S2- (adrenodoxin-like) and heme- (cytochrome c) binding domains. Our results suggest that these two iron-containing redox families had a single common ancestor that underwent duplication and divergence. The iron-containing protein family constitutes ∼50% of all metal-containing oxidoreductases and potentially catalyzed redox reactions in the Archean oceans. Heme-binding domains seem to be derived via modular evolutionary processes that ultimately form the backbone of redox reactions in both anaerobic and aerobic respiration and photosynthesis. The empirically discovered network allows us to peer into the ancient history of microbial metabolism on our planet.

  3. Evolutionary history of redox metal-binding domains across the tree of life.

    PubMed

    Harel, Arye; Bromberg, Yana; Falkowski, Paul G; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2014-05-13

    Oxidoreductases mediate electron transfer (i.e., redox) reactions across the tree of life and ultimately facilitate the biologically driven fluxes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur on Earth. The core enzymes responsible for these reactions are ancient, often small in size, and highly diverse in amino acid sequence, and many require specific transition metals in their active sites. Here we reconstruct the evolution of metal-binding domains in extant oxidoreductases using a flexible network approach and permissive profile alignments based on available microbial genome data. Our results suggest there were at least 10 independent origins of redox domain families. However, we also identified multiple ancient connections between Fe2S2- (adrenodoxin-like) and heme- (cytochrome c) binding domains. Our results suggest that these two iron-containing redox families had a single common ancestor that underwent duplication and divergence. The iron-containing protein family constitutes ∼50% of all metal-containing oxidoreductases and potentially catalyzed redox reactions in the Archean oceans. Heme-binding domains seem to be derived via modular evolutionary processes that ultimately form the backbone of redox reactions in both anaerobic and aerobic respiration and photosynthesis. The empirically discovered network allows us to peer into the ancient history of microbial metabolism on our planet. PMID:24778258

  4. Bacterially expressed and refolded envelope protein (domain III) of dengue virus type-4 binds heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Pattnaik, Priyabrata; Babu, J Pradeep; Verma, Shailendra Kumar; Tak, Vijay; Rao, P V Lakshmana

    2007-02-01

    An arboviral infection like dengue fever/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with high morbidity and mortality rate are extensively prevalent in several parts of the world. Global efforts have been directed towards development of vaccine for prevention of dengue. However, lack of thorough understanding about biology and pathogenesis of dengue virus restricts us from development of an effective vaccine. Here we report molecular interaction of domain III of envelope protein of dengue virus type-4 with heparan sulfate. A codon optimized synthetic gene encoding domain III of dengue virus type-4 envelope protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified under denaturing conditions, refolded and purified to homogeneity. Refolded Den4-DIII was characterized using biochemical and biophysical methods and shown to be pure and homogeneous. The purified protein was recognized in Western analyses by monoclonal antibody specific for the 6x His tag as well as the H241 monoclonal antibody. The in vitro refolded recombinant protein preparation was biologically functional and found to bind cell free heparan sulfate. This is the first report providing molecular evidence on binding of dengue-4 envelope protein to heparan sulfate. We developed a homology model of dengue-4 envelope protein (domain III) and mapped the possible amino acid residues critical for binding to heparan sulfate. Domain III envelope protein of dengue virus is a lead vaccine candidate. Our findings further the understanding on biology of dengue virus and will help in development of bioassay for the proposed vaccine candidate.

  5. Agonist binding to β-adrenergic receptors on human airway epithelial cells inhibits migration and wound repair.

    PubMed

    Peitzman, Elizabeth R; Zaidman, Nathan A; Maniak, Peter J; O'Grady, Scott M

    2015-12-15

    Human airway epithelial cells express β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs), which regulate mucociliary clearance by stimulating transepithelial anion transport and ciliary beat frequency. Previous studies using airway epithelial cells showed that stimulation with isoproterenol increased cell migration and wound repair by a cAMP-dependent mechanism. In the present study, impedance-sensing arrays were used to measure cell migration and epithelial restitution following wounding of confluent normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and Calu-3 cells by electroporation. Stimulation with epinephrine or the β2-AR-selective agonist salbutamol significantly delayed wound closure and reduced the mean surface area of lamellipodia protruding into the wound. Treatment with the β-AR bias agonist carvedilol or isoetharine also produced a delay in epithelial restitution similar in magnitude to epinephrine and salbutamol. Measurements of extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation following salbutamol or carvedilol stimulation showed no significant change in the level of phosphorylation compared with untreated control cells. However, inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A activity completely blocked the delay in wound closure produced by β-AR agonists. In Calu-3 cells, where CFTR expression was inhibited by RNAi, salbutamol did not inhibit wound repair, suggesting that β-AR agonist stimulation and loss of CFTR function share a common pathway leading to inhibition of epithelial repair. Confocal images of the basal membrane of Calu-3 cells labeled with anti-β1-integrin (clone HUTS-4) antibody showed that treatment with epinephrine or carvedilol reduced the level of activated integrin in the membrane. These findings suggest that treatment with β-AR agonists delays airway epithelial repair by a G protein- and cAMP-independent mechanism involving protein phosphatase 2A and a reduction in β1-integrin activation in the basal membrane. PMID:26491049

  6. Elucidation of different inhibition mechanism of small chemicals on PtdInsP-binding domains using in silico docking experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghwan; Yoon, Youngdae

    2014-05-15

    Phosphatidylinositides, most negatively charged lipids in cellular membranes, regulate diverse effector proteins through the interaction with their lipid binding domains. We have previously reported inhibitory effect of small chemicals on the interaction between PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and Btk PH domain. Here, we report that the inhibitory effects of same sets of chemicals on Grp1 PH domain and epsin1 ENTH domain to elucidate diversity of inhibitory mechanisms upon different lipid binding domains. Among the chemicals, chemical 8 showed best inhibition in vitro assay for Grp1 PH domain and epsin1 ENTH domain, and then the interaction between small chemicals and lipid binding domains was further investigated by in silico docking experiments. As a result, it was concluded that the diverse inhibitory effects on different lipid binding domains were dependent on not only the number of interactions between small chemical and domain, but also additional interaction with positively charged surfaces as the secondary binding sites. This finding will help to develop lipid binding inhibitors as antagonists for lipid-protein interactions, and these inhibitors would be novel therapeutic drug candidates via regulating effector proteins involved in severe human diseases.

  7. Solution Structure of Calmodulin Bound to the Binding Domain of the HIV-1 Matrix Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Vlach, Jiri; Samal, Alexandra B.; Saad, Jamil S.

    2014-01-01

    Subcellular distribution of calmodulin (CaM) in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-infected cells is distinct from that observed in uninfected cells. CaM co-localizes and interacts with the HIV-1 Gag protein in the cytosol of infected cells. Although it has been shown that binding of Gag to CaM is mediated by the matrix (MA) domain, the structural details of this interaction are not known. We have recently shown that binding of CaM to MA induces a conformational change that triggers myristate exposure, and that the CaM-binding domain of MA is confined to a region spanning residues 8–43 (MA-(8–43)). Here, we present the NMR structure of CaM bound to MA-(8–43). Our data revealed that MA-(8–43), which contains a novel CaM-binding motif, binds to CaM in an antiparallel mode with the N-terminal helix (α1) anchored to the CaM C-terminal lobe, and the C-terminal helix (α2) of MA-(8–43) bound to the N-terminal lobe of CaM. The CaM protein preserves a semiextended conformation. Binding of MA-(8–43) to CaM is mediated by numerous hydrophobic interactions and stabilized by favorable electrostatic contacts. Our structural data are consistent with the findings that CaM induces unfolding of the MA protein to have access to helices α1 and α2. It is noteworthy that several MA residues involved in CaM binding have been previously implicated in membrane binding, envelope incorporation, and particle production. The present findings may ultimately help in identification of the functional role of CaM in HIV-1 replication. PMID:24500712

  8. A Novel Kinesin-Like Protein with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse developmental processes in plants through the action of calmodulin. A cDNA expression library from developing anthers of tobacco was screened with S-35-labeled calmodulin to isolate cDNAs encoding calmodulin-binding proteins. Among several clones isolated, a kinesin-like gene (TCK1) that encodes a calmodulin-binding kinesin-like protein was obtained. The TCK1 cDNA encodes a protein with 1265 amino acid residues. Its structural features are very similar to those of known kinesin heavy chains and kinesin-like proteins from plants and animals, with one distinct exception. Unlike other known kinesin-like proteins, TCK1 contains a calmodulin-binding domain which distinguishes it from all other known kinesin genes. Escherichia coli-expressed TCK1 binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In addition to the presence of a calmodulin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal, it also has a leucine zipper motif in the stalk region. The amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminal of TCK1 has striking homology with the mechanochemical motor domain of kinesins. The motor domain has ATPase activity that is stimulated by microtubules. Southern blot analysis revealed that TCK1 is coded by a single gene. Expression studies indicated that TCKI is expressed in all of the tissues tested. Its expression is highest in the stigma and anther, especially during the early stages of anther development. Our results suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin may play an important role in the function of this microtubule-associated motor protein and may be involved in the regulation of microtubule-based intracellular transport.

  9. Deciphering the unconventional peptide binding to the PDZ domain of MAST2.

    PubMed

    Delhommel, Florent; Chaffotte, Alain; Terrien, Elouan; Raynal, Bertrand; Buc, Henri; Delepierre, Muriel; Cordier, Florence; Wolff, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and microtubule-associated serine threonine kinase 2 (MAST2) are key negative regulators of survival pathways in neuronal cells. The two proteins interact via the PDZ (PSD-95, Dlg1, Zo-1) domain of MAST2 (MAST2-PDZ). During infection by rabies virus, the viral glycoprotein competes with PTEN for interaction with MAST2-PDZ and promotes neuronal survival. The C-terminal PDZ-binding motifs (PBMs) of the two proteins bind similarly to MAST2-PDZ through an unconventional network of connectivity involving two anchor points. Combining stopped-flow fluorescence, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), microcalorimetry and NMR, we document the kinetics of interaction between endogenous and viral ligands to MAST2-PDZ as well as the dynamic and structural effects of these interactions. Viral and PTEN peptide interactions to MAST2-PDZ occur via a unique kinetic step which involves both canonical C-terminal PBM binding and N-terminal anchoring. Indirect effects induced by the PBM binding include modifications to the structure and dynamics of the PDZ dimerization surface which prevent MAST2-PDZ auto-association. Such an energetic communication between binding sites and distal surfaces in PDZ domains provides interesting clues for protein regulation overall. PMID:25942057

  10. Polycomb group targeting through different binding partners of RING1B C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renjing; Taylor, Alexander B; Leal, Belinda Z; Chadwell, Linda V; Ilangovan, Udayar; Robinson, Angela K; Schirf, Virgil; Hart, P John; Lafer, Eileen M; Demeler, Borries; Hinck, Andrew P; McEwen, Donald G; Kim, Chongwoo A

    2010-08-11

    RING1B, a Polycomb Group (PcG) protein, binds methylated chromatin through its association with another PcG protein called Polycomb (Pc). However, RING1B can associate with nonmethylated chromatin suggesting an alternate mechanism for RING1B interaction with chromatin. Here, we demonstrate that two proteins with little sequence identity between them, the Pc cbox domain and RYBP, bind the same surface on the C-terminal domain of RING1B (C-RING1B). Pc cbox and RYBP each fold into a nearly identical, intermolecular beta sheet with C-RING1B and a loop structure which are completely different in the two proteins. Both the beta sheet and loop are required for stable binding and transcription repression. Further, a mutation engineered to disrupt binding on the Drosophila dRING1 protein prevents chromatin association and PcG function in vivo. These results suggest that PcG targeting to different chromatin locations relies, in part, on binding partners of C-RING1B that are diverse in sequence and structure.

  11. Cold shock domain protein from Philosamia ricini prefers single-stranded nucleic acids binding.

    PubMed

    Mani, Ashutosh; Yadava, P K; Gupta, Dwijendra K

    2012-01-01

    The cold shock proteins are evolutionarily conserved nucleic acid-binding proteins. Their eukaryotic homologs are present as cold shock domain (CSD) in Y-box proteins. CSDs too share striking similarity among different organisms and show nucleic acid binding properties. The purpose of the study was to investigate the preferential binding affinity of CSD protein for nucleic acids in Philosamia ricini. We have cloned and sequenced the first cDNA coding for Y-box protein in P. ricini; the sequence has been deposited in GenBank. Comparative genomics and phylogenetic analytics further confirmed that the deduced amino acid sequence belongs to the CSD protein family. A comparative study employing molecular docking was performed with P. ricini CSD, human CSD, and bacterial cold shock protein with a range of nucleic acid entities. The results indicate that CSD per se exhibits preferential binding affinity for single-stranded RNA and DNA. Possibly, the flanking N- and C-terminal domains are additionally involved in interactions with dsDNA or in conferring extra stability to CSD for improved binding.

  12. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains

    PubMed Central

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states. PMID:27160511

  13. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states. PMID:27160511

  14. Structural Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Domain of the Aspartate Receptor Tar from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mise, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    The Escherichia coli cell-surface aspartate receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni(2+). These signals are transmitted from the extracellular region of Tar to the cytoplasmic region via the transmembrane domain. The mechanism by which extracellular signals are transmitted into the cell through conformational changes in Tar is predicted to involve a piston displacement of one of the α4 helices of the homodimer. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by an attractant, the three-dimensional structures of the E. coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate, Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively, were determined. Of the two ligand-binding sites, only one site was occupied, and it clearly showed the electron density of an aspartate. The slight changes in conformation and the electrostatic surface potential around the aspartate-binding site were observed. In addition, the presence of an aspartate stabilized residues Phe-150' and Arg-73. A pistonlike displacement of helix α4b' was also induced by aspartate binding as predicted by the piston model. Taken together, these small changes might be related to the induction of Tar activity and might disturb binding of the second aspartate to the second binding site in E. coli. PMID:27292793

  15. Structure of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein copper-binding domain at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Geoffrey Kwai-Wai; Adams, Julian J.; Cappai, Roberto; Parker, Michael W.

    2007-10-01

    An atomic resolution structure of the copper-binding domain of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein is presented. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, as its cleavage generates the Aβ peptide that is toxic to cells. APP is able to bind Cu{sup 2+} and reduce it to Cu{sup +} through its copper-binding domain (CuBD). The interaction between Cu{sup 2+} and APP leads to a decrease in Aβ production and to alleviation of the symptoms of the disease in mouse models. Structural studies of CuBD have been undertaken in order to better understand the mechanism behind the process. Here, the crystal structure of CuBD in the metal-free form determined to ultrahigh resolution (0.85 Å) is reported. The structure shows that the copper-binding residues of CuBD are rather rigid but that Met170, which is thought to be the electron source for Cu{sup 2+} reduction, adopts two different side-chain conformations. These observations shed light on the copper-binding and redox mechanisms of CuBD. The structure of CuBD at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of molecules that will deplete Aβ production.

  16. Cone outer segment and Müller microvilli pericellular matrices provide binding domains for interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP).

    PubMed

    Garlipp, Mary Alice; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Federico

    2013-08-01

    The close packing of vertebrate photoreceptors presents a challenge to the exchange of molecules between the outer segments, retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), and Müller glia. An extracellular hyaluronan scaffold separates these cells while soluble interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM) proteins traffic visual cycle retinoids, fatty acids, and other molecules between them. In the IPM, retinoids and fatty acids are carried by interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP). The fact that much of the retina's IRBP can be extracted by saline wash has led to the notion that IRBP does not bind to the retina, but freely distributes itself within the subretinal space. In this study, we challenge this idea by asking if there are specialized IPM domains that bind IRBP, perhaps facilitating its ability to target delivery/uptake of its ligands. Xenopus is an ideal animal model to study the role of the IPM in RPE-photoreceptor interactions. Here, we took advantage of the large size of its photoreceptors, ability to detach the retina in light, sustainability of the retina in short term organ culture, and the availability of recombinant full-length Xenopus IRBP and antisera directed against Xenopus IRBP. We compared the distribution of wash resistant native IRBP, and that of IRBP-Alexa 647 binding in Xenopus retina. IRBP and cone opsin were localized using anti-Xenopus IRBP serum, and monoclonal COS-1 respectively. Cone matrix sheath proteoglycans were localized with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and diffuse IPM proteoglycans with peanut agglutinin (PNA). Wholemounts and frozen sections were compared by immunofluorescence from retinas detached under Ringer's followed by additional washes, or detached directly under 4% paraformaldehyde without Ringer's wash. Undetached Lowicryl embedded retinas were subjected to IRBP immunogold electron microscopy (EM). Immunogold labeled a diffuse network of filamentous structures, and a separate distinct flocculant material directly coating the

  17. Engineered staphylococcal protein A's IgG-binding domain with cathepsin L inhibitory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovic, Tomaz . E-mail: tomaz.bratkovic@ffa.uni-lj.si; Berlec, Ales; Popovic, Tatjana; Lunder, Mojca; Kreft, Samo; Urleb, Uros; Strukelj, Borut

    2006-10-13

    Inhibitory peptide of papain-like cysteine proteases, affinity selected from a random disulfide constrained phage-displayed peptide library, was grafted to staphylococcal protein A's B domain. Scaffold protein was additionally modified in order to allow solvent exposed display of peptide loop. Correct folding of fusion proteins was confirmed by CD-spectroscopy and by the ability to bind the Fc-region of rabbit IgG, a characteristic of parent domain. The recombinant constructs inhibited cathepsin L with inhibitory constants in the low-micromolar range.

  18. Phenylalanine binding is linked to dimerization of the regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengnan; Roberts, Kenneth M; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-10-28

    Analytical ultracentrifugation has been used to analyze the oligomeric structure of the isolated regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase. The protein exhibits a monomer-dimer equilibrium with a dissociation constant of ~46 μM; this value is unaffected by the removal of the 24 N-terminal residues or by phosphorylation of Ser16. In contrast, phenylalanine binding (Kd = 8 μM) stabilizes the dimer. These results suggest that dimerization of the regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase is linked to allosteric activation of the enzyme.

  19. Isolation of peptides from phage-displayed random peptide libraries that interact with the talin-binding domain of vinculin.

    PubMed Central

    Adey, N B; Kay, B K

    1997-01-01

    Peptides isolated from combinatorial libraries typically interact with, and thus help to characterize, biologically relevant binding domains of target proteins. To characterize the binding domains of the focal adhesion protein vinculin, vinculin-binding peptides were isolated from two phage-displayed random peptide libraries. Altogether, five non-similar vinculin-binding peptides were identified. Despite the lack of obvious sequence similarity between the peptides, binding and competition studies indicated that all five interact with the talin-binding domain of vinculin and do not disrupt the binding of alpha-actinin or paxillin to vinculin. The identified peptides and talin bind to vinculin in a comparable manner; both bind to immobilized vinculin, but neither binds to soluble vinculin unless the C-terminus of vinculin has been deleted. An analysis of amino acid variants of one of the peptides has revealed three non-contiguous motifs that also occur in the region of talin previously demonstrated to bind vinculin. Amino acid substitutions within a 127-residue segment of talin capable of binding vinculin confirmed the importance of two of the motifs and suggest that residues critical for binding are within a 16-residue region. This study demonstrates that the vinculin-binding peptides interact with vinculin in a biologically relevant manner and represent an excellent tool for further study of the biochemistry of vinculin. PMID:9182713

  20. Binding of a sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding factor to the simian virus 40 core origin inverted repeat domain is cell cycle regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, E P; Roome, J M; Wahl, A F

    1993-01-01

    The inverted repeat domain (IR domain) within the simian virus 40 origin of replication is the site of initial DNA melting prior to the onset of DNA synthesis. The domain had previously been shown to be bound by a cellular factor in response to DNA damage. We demonstrate that two distinct cellular components bind opposite strands of the IR domain. Replication protein A (RPA), previously identified as a single-stranded DNA binding protein required for origin-specific DNA replication in vitro, is shown to have a preference for the pyrimidine-rich strand. A newly described component, IR factor B (IRF-B), specifically recognizes the opposite strand. IRF-B binding activity in nuclear extract varies significantly with cell proliferation and the cell cycle, so that binding of IRF-B to the IR domain is negatively correlated with the onset of DNA synthesis. Loss of IRF-B binding from the nucleus also occurs in response to cellular DNA damage. UV cross-linking indicates that the core binding component of IRF-B is a protein of ca. 34 kDa. We propose that RPA and IRF-B bind opposite strands of the IR domain and together may function in the regulation of origin activation. Images PMID:8380226

  1. Structural fold, conservation and Fe(II) binding of the intracellular domain of prokaryote FeoB

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-09-17

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain's two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide-binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function.

  2. Common functionally-important motions of the nucleotide-binding domain of Hsp70

    PubMed Central

    Gołaś, Ewa I.; Czaplewski, Cezary; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The 70 kDa Heat Shock Proteins (Hsp70) are a family of molecular chaperones involved in protein folding, aggregate prevention, and protein disaggregation. They consist of the substrate binding domain (SBD) that binds client substrates, and the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD), whose cycles of nucleotide hydrolysis and exchange underpin the activity of the chaperone. To characterize the structure-function relationships that link the binding state of the NBD to its conformational behavior, we analyzed the dynamics of the NBD of the Hsp70 chaperone from Bos taurus (pdb 3C7N:B) by all-atom canonical molecular dynamics simulations. It was found that essential motions within the NBD fall into three major classes: the mutual class, reflecting tendencies common to all binding states, and the ADP- and ATP-unique classes, which reflect conformational trends that are unique to either the ADP- or ATP-bound states, respectively. ‘Mutual’ class motions generally describe ‘in-plane’ and/or ‘out-of-plane’ (‘scissor-like’) rotation of the subdomains within the NBD. This result is consistent with experimental nuclear magnetic resonance data on the NBD. The ‘Unique’ class motions target specific regions on the NBD, usually surface loops or sites involved in nucleotide-binding and are, therefore, expected to be involved in allostery and signal transmission. For all classes, and especially for those of the ‘Unique’ type, regions of enhanced mobility can be identified; these are termed ‘hot-spots,’ and their locations generally parallel those found by NMR spectroscopy. The presence of magnesium and potassium cations in the nucleotide-binding pocket was also found to influence the dynamics of the NBD significantly. PMID:25412765

  3. Membrane binding properties of IRSp53-missing in metastasis domain (IMD) protein.

    PubMed

    Futó, Kinga; Bódis, Emőke; Machesky, Laura M; Nyitrai, Miklós; Visegrády, Balázs

    2013-11-01

    The 53-kDa insulin receptor substrate protein (IRSp53) organizes the actin cytoskeleton in response to stimulation of small GTPases, promoting the formation of cell protrusions such as filopodia and lamellipodia. IMD is the N-terminal 250 amino acid domain (IRSp53/MIM Homology Domain) of IRSp53 (also called I-BAR), which can bind to negatively charged lipid molecules. Overexpression of IMD induces filopodia formation in cells and purified IMD assembles finger-like protrusions in reconstituted lipid membranes. IMD was shown by several groups to bundle actin filaments, but other groups showed that it also binds to membranes. IMD binds to negatively charged lipid molecules with preference to clusters of PI(4,5)P2. Here, we performed a range of different in vitro fluorescence experiments to determine the binding properties of the IMD to phospholipids. We used different constructs of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVETs), containing neutral or negatively charged phospholipids. We found that IMD has a stronger binding interaction with negatively charged PI(4,5)P2 or PS lipids than PS/PC or neutral PC lipids. The equilibrium dissociation constant for the IMD-lipid interaction falls into the 78-170μM range for all the lipids tested. The solvent accessibility of the fluorescence labels on the IMD during its binding to lipids is also reduced as the lipids become more negatively charged. Actin affects the IMD-lipid interaction, depending on its polymerization state. Monomeric actin partially disrupts the binding, while filamentous actin can further stabilize the IMD-lipid interaction. PMID:23872532

  4. Acute repeated intracerebroventricular injections of angiotensin II reduce agonist and antagonist radioligand binding in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and median preoptic nucleus in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Speth, Robert C; Vento, Peter J; Carrera, Eduardo J; Gonzalez-Reily, Luz; Linares, Andrea; Santos, Kira; Swindle, Jamala D; Daniels, Derek

    2014-10-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates water and saline intakes when injected into the brain of rats. This arises from activation of the AT1 Ang II receptor subtype. Acute repeated injections, however, decrease the water intake response to Ang II without affecting saline intake. Previous studies provide evidence that Ang II-induced water intake is mediated via the classical G protein coupling pathway, whereas the saline intake caused by Ang II is mediated by an ERK 1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway. Accordingly, the different behavioral response to repeated injections of Ang II may reflect a selective effect on G protein coupling. To test this hypothesis, we examined the binding of a radiolabeled agonist ((125)I-sarcosine(1) Ang II) and a radiolabeled antagonist ((125)I-sarcosine(1), isoleucine(8) Ang II) in brain homogenates and tissue sections prepared from rats given repeated injections of Ang II or vehicle. Although no treatment-related differences were found in hypothalamic homogenates, a focus on specific brain structures using receptor autoradiography, found that the desensitization treatment reduced binding of both radioligands in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and median preoptic nucleus (MnPO), but not in the subfornical organ (SFO). Because G protein coupling is reported to have a selective effect on agonist binding without affecting antagonist binding, these findings do not support a G protein uncoupling treatment effect. This suggests that receptor number is more critical to the water intake response than the saline intake response, or that pathways downstream from the G protein mediate desensitization of the water intake response.

  5. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  6. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  7. Ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors facilitate tight control of split CRISPR activity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duy P.; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Gilbert, Luke A.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Lee, Brian H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cas9-based RNA-guided nuclease (RGN) has emerged to be a versatile method for genome editing due to the ease of construction of RGN reagents to target specific genomic sequences. The ability to control the activity of Cas9 with a high temporal resolution will facilitate tight regulation of genome editing processes for studying the dynamics of transcriptional regulation or epigenetic modifications in complex biological systems. Here we show that fusing ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors to split Cas9 protein fragments can provide chemical control over split Cas9 activity. The method has allowed us to control Cas9 activity in a tunable manner with no significant background, which has been challenging for other inducible Cas9 constructs. We anticipate that our design will provide opportunities through the use of different ligand-binding domains to enable multiplexed genome regulation of endogenous genes in distinct loci through simultaneous chemical regulation of orthogonal Cas9 variants. PMID:27363581

  8. Differential function of the two nucleotide binding domains on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Nagel, G

    1999-12-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the chloride channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR belongs to the family of ABC transporters. In contrast to most other members of this family which transport substrates actively across a membrane, the main function of CFTR is to regulate passive flux of substrates across the plasma membrane. Chloride channel activity of CFTR is dependent on protein phosphorylation and presence of nucleoside triphosphates. From electrophysiological studies of CFTR detailed models of its regulation by phosphorylation and nucleotide interaction have evolved. These investigations provide ample evidence that ATP hydrolysis is crucial for CFTR gating. It becomes apparent that the two nucleotide binding domains on CFTR not only diverge strongly in sequence, but also in function. Based on previous models and taking into account new data from pre-steady-state experiments, a refined model for the action of nucleotides at two nucleotide binding domains was recently proposed.

  9. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  10. A novel 4 S [3H]beta-naphthoflavone-binding protein in liver cytosol of female Sprague-Dawley rats treated with aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Brauze, D; Malejka-Giganti, D

    2000-01-01

    beta-Naphthoflavone (beta-NF) is a widely used inducer of phase-I and phase-II enzymes controlled by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Studies of competitive binding with (3)H-labelled 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have shown that beta-NF is a high-affinity ligand for AhR and also for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-binding protein, both soluble proteins of rat liver in 8 S and 4 S fractions, respectively, of sucrose gradients. This study examined binding of [(3)H]beta-NF to liver cytosolic proteins of female Sprague-Dawley rats. Treatment of rats with beta-NF, 3-MC, TCDD or alpha-naphthoflavone (alpha-NF) increased the specific [(3)H]beta-NF binding to liver cytosol up to 125-fold that of vehicle (corn oil)-treated rats (<100 fmol/mg of protein). Sucrose gradients revealed a large 4 S and a small 8 S peak of radioactivity from [(3)H]beta-NF binding to cytosols of beta-NF-, 3-MC-, TCDD- or alpha-NF-treated rats. Whereas co-incubation with the unlabelled beta-NF eliminated both peaks, co-incubation with 2,3, 7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) eliminated only the 8 S peak. The sucrose density gradient from [(3)H]TCDD binding to cytosol of beta-NF- or TCDD-treated rats yielded a small 4 S and a larger 8 S peak; only the latter was abolished by co-incubation with TCDF. Thus, the patterns of sedimentation, distribution and elimination of radioactivity from the 8 S fraction of the liver cytosols from beta-NF-, 3-MC-, TCDD- or alpha-NF-treated rats were characteristic for the AhR, whereas those from the 4 S fraction appeared specific for [(3)H]beta-NF binding. The data indicate that potent AhR agonists, TCDD, 3-MC and beta-NF, and to a lesser extent alpha-NF, a weak AhR agonist, induce a 4 S [(3)H]beta-NF-binding protein in liver cytosol of female rats. alpha-NF, beta-NF and 3-MC were effective competitors (80-85% inhibition) of the [(3)H]beta-NF-specific binding to the beta-NF-, 3 MC- or TCDD

  11. Predicted structure of the extracellular region of ligand-gated ion-channel receptors shows SH2-like and SH3-like domains forming the ligand-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Gready, J. E.; Ranganathan, S.; Schofield, P. R.; Matsuo, Y.; Nishikawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    Fast synaptic neurotransmission is mediated by ligand-gated ion-channel (LGIC) receptors, which include receptors for acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, glycine, and glutamate. LGICs are pentamers with extracellular ligand-binding domains and form integral membrane ion channels that are selective for cations (acetylcholine and serotonin 5HT3 receptors) or anions (GABAA and glycine receptors and the invertebrate glutamate-binding chloride channel). They form a protein superfamily with no sequence similarity to any protein of known structure. Using a 1D-3D structure mapping approach, we have modeled the extracellular ligand-binding domain based on a significant match with the SH2 and SH3 domains of the biotin repressor structure. Refinement of the model based on knowledge of the large family of SH2 and SH3 structures, sequence alignments, and use of structure templates for loop building, allows the prediction of both monomer and pentamer models. These are consistent with medium-resolution electron microscopy structures and with experimental structure/function data from ligand-binding, antibody-binding, mutagenesis, protein-labeling and subunit-linking studies, and glycosylation sites. Also, the predicted polarity of the channel pore calculated from electrostatic potential maps of pentamer models of superfamily members is consistent with known ion selectivities. Using the glycine receptor alpha 1 subunit, which forms homopentamers, the monomeric and pentameric models define the agonist and antagonist (strychnine) binding sites to a deep crevice formed by an extended loop, which includes the invariant disulfide bridge, between the SH2 and SH3 domains. A detailed binding site for strychnine is reported that is in strong agreement with known structure/function data. A site for interaction of the extracellular ligand-binding domain with the activation of the M2 transmembrane helix is also suggested. PMID:9144769

  12. Methyl jasmonate induces expression of a novel Brassica juncea chitinase with two chitin-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, K J; Chye, M L

    1999-08-01

    We have cloned a 1.3 kb Brassica juncea cDNA encoding BjCHI1, a novel acidic chitinase with two chitin-binding domains that shows 62% identity to Nicotiana tabacum Chia1 chitinase. BjCHI1 is structurally unlike Chia1 that has one chitin-binding domain, but resembles Chia5 chitinase UDA1, the precursor of Urtica dioica agglutinin: however there is only 36.9% identity between them. We propose that BjCHI1 should be classified under a new class, Chia7. The spacer and the hinge region of BjCHI1 are proline-rich, like that of Beta vulgaris Ch1, a Chia6 chitinase with half a chitin-binding domain. Northern blot analysis showed that the 1.3 kb BjCHI1 mRNA is induced by wounding and methyljasmonate (MeJA) treatment but is unaffected by ethylene, salicylic acid (SA) or abscisic acid (ABA). This is the first report on MeJA induction of chitinase gene expression and further suggests that wound-related JA-mediated signal transduction is independent of that involving SA. Western blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies against BjCHI1 showed a cross-reacting band with an apparent molecular mass of 37 kDa in wounded tissues of B. juncea, revealing that, unlike UDA1, BjCHI1 is not cleaved post-translationally at the hinge. Expression of recombinant BjCHI1 in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) inhibited its growth while crude extracts from E. coli JM109 expressing recombinant BjCHI1 showed chitinase activity. Results from polymerase chain reaction (PCR) suggest that genes encoding chitinases with single or double chitin-binding domains exist in B. juncea. PMID:10527425

  13. A flexible docking scheme to explore the binding selectivity of PDZ domains

    PubMed Central

    Gerek, Z Nevin; Ozkan, S Banu

    2010-01-01

    Modeling of protein binding site flexibility in molecular docking is still a challenging problem due to the large conformational space that needs sampling. Here, we propose a flexible receptor docking scheme: A dihedral restrained replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), where we incorporate the normal modes obtained by the Elastic Network Model (ENM) as dihedral restraints to speed up the search towards correct binding site conformations. To our knowledge, this is the first approach that uses ENM modes to bias REMD simulations towards binding induced fluctuations in docking studies. In our docking scheme, we first obtain the deformed structures of the unbound protein as initial conformations by moving along the binding fluctuation mode, and perform REMD using the ENM modes as dihedral restraints. Then, we generate an ensemble of multiple receptor conformations (MRCs) by clustering the lowest replica trajectory. Using RosettaLigand, we dock ligands to the clustered conformations to predict the binding pose and affinity. We apply this method to postsynaptic density-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ) domains; whose dynamics govern their binding specificity. Our approach produces the lowest energy bound complexes with an average ligand root mean square deviation of 0.36 Å. We further test our method on (i) homologs and (ii) mutant structures of PDZ where mutations alter the binding selectivity. In both cases, our approach succeeds to predict the correct pose and the affinity of binding peptides. Overall, with this approach, we generate an ensemble of MRCs that leads to predict the binding poses and specificities of a protein complex accurately. PMID:20196074

  14. Kinetics of the Association/Dissociation Cycle of an ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Zoghbi, Maria E.; Fuson, Kerry L.; Sutton, Roger B.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2012-01-01

    Most ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins are pumps that transport substrates across biological membranes using the energy of ATP hydrolysis. Functional ABC proteins have two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) that bind and hydrolyze ATP, but the molecular mechanism of nucleotide hydrolysis is unresolved. This is due in part to the limited kinetic information on NBD association and dissociation. Here, we show dimerization of a catalytically active NBD and follow in real time the association and dissociation of NBDs from the changes in fluorescence emission of a tryptophan strategically located at the center of the dimer interface. Spectroscopic and structural studies demonstrated that the tryptophan can be used as dimerization probe, and we showed that under hydrolysis conditions (millimolar MgATP), not only the dimer dissociation rate increases, but also the dimerization rate. Neither dimer formation or dissociation are clearly favored, and the end result is a dynamic equilibrium where the concentrations of monomer and dimer are very similar. We proposed that based on their variable rates of hydrolysis, the rate-limiting step of the hydrolysis cycle may differ among full-length ABC proteins. PMID:22158619

  15. Structural Studies of the Alzheimer's Amyloid Precursor Protein Copper-Binding Domain Reveal How It Binds Copper Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, G.K.-W.; Adams, J.J.; Harris, H.H.; Boas, J.F.; Curtain, C.C.; Galatis, D.; Master, C.L.; Barnham, K.J.; McKinstry, W.J.; Cappai, R.; Parker, M.W.; /Sydney U. /Monash U. /Melbourne U.

    2007-07-09

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia. Amyloid {beta} peptide (A {beta}), generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is central to AD pathogenesis. APP can function as a metalloprotein and modulate copper (Cu) transport, presumably via its extracellular Cu-binding domain (CuBD). Cu binding to the CuBD reduces A{beta} levels, suggesting that a Cu mimetic may have therapeutic potential. We describe here the atomic structures of apo CuBD from three crystal forms and found they have identical Cu-binding sites despite the different crystal lattices. The structure of Cu[2+]-bound CuBD reveals that the metal ligands are His147, His151, Tyrl68 and two water molecules, which are arranged in a square pyramidal geometry. The site resembles a Type 2 non-blue Cu center and is supported by electron paramagnetic resonance and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies. A previous study suggested that Met170 might be a ligand but we suggest that this residue plays a critical role as an electron donor in CuBDs ability to reduce Cu ions. The structure of Cu[+]-bound CuBD is almost identical to the Cu[2+]-bound structure except for the loss of one of the water ligands. The geometry of the site is unfavorable for Cu[+], thus providing a mechanism by which CuBD could readily transfer Cu ions to other proteins.

  16. Modulating LOV domain photodynamics with a residue alteration outside the chromophore binding site.

    PubMed

    Song, Sang-Hun; Freddolino, Peter L; Nash, Abigail I; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Schulten, Klaus; Gardner, Kevin H; Larsen, Delmar S

    2011-04-01

    Phototropins, a class of light-activated protein kinases, are essential for several blue light responses in plants and algae, including phototropism. These proteins contain two internal light, oxygen, and voltage sensitive (LOV) domains, which bind flavin chromophores and undergo a reversible photochemical formation of a cysteinyl-flavin adduct as part of the light sensing process. While the photodynamic properties of such photosensory domains are dictated by interactions between the chromophore and surrounding protein, more distant residues can play a significant role as well. Here we explore the role of the Phe434 residue in the photosensory response of the second LOV domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2), a model photochemical system for these LOV domains. Phe434 is more than 6 Å from the FMN chromophore in AsLOV2; nevertheless, an F434Y point mutation is likely to change several structural features of the chromophore binding site, as we demonstrate using molecular dynamics simulations. Transient absorption signals spanning 15 decades in time were compared for wild-type AsLOV2 and the F434Y mutant, showing that the latter has significantly altered photodynamics, including (i) a faster intersystem crossing leading to triplet formation on a nanosecond time scale, (ii) biphasic formation of adduct-state kinetics on the microsecond time scale, and (iii) greatly accelerated ground-state recovery kinetics on a second time scale. We present mechanistic models that link these spectroscopic differences to changes in the configuration of the critical cysteine residue and in the chromophore's accessibility to solvent and oxygen according to MD trajectories and purging experiments. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of residues outside the chromophore-binding pocket in modulating LOV domain photodynamics.

  17. In Silico Screening for Inhibitors of P-Glycoprotein That Target the Nucleotide Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Frances K.; Follit, Courtney A.; Vogel, Pia D.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistances and the failure of chemotherapies are often caused by the expression or overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins such as the multidrug resistance protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp is expressed in the plasma membrane of many cell types and protects cells from accumulation of toxins. P-gp uses ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the transport of a broad range of mostly hydrophobic compounds across the plasma membrane and out of the cell. During cancer chemotherapy, the administration of therapeutics often selects for cells which overexpress P-gp, thereby creating populations of cancer cells resistant to a variety of chemically unrelated chemotherapeutics. The present study describes extremely high-throughput, massively parallel in silico ligand docking studies aimed at identifying reversible inhibitors of ATP hydrolysis that target the nucleotide-binding domains of P-gp. We used a structural model of human P-gp that we obtained from molecular dynamics experiments as the protein target for ligand docking. We employed a novel approach of subtractive docking experiments that identified ligands that bound predominantly to the nucleotide-binding domains but not the drug-binding domains of P-gp. Four compounds were found that inhibit ATP hydrolysis by P-gp. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we showed that at least three of these compounds affected nucleotide binding to the transporter. These studies represent a successful proof of principle demonstrating the potential of targeted approaches for identifying specific inhibitors of P-gp. PMID:25270578

  18. Structure of the Taz2 domain of p300: insights into ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Maria; Dauter, Zbigniew; Cherry, Scott; Tropea, Joseph E.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-01-12

    CBP and its paralog p300 are histone acetyl transferases that regulate gene expression by interacting with multiple transcription factors via specialized domains. The structure of a segment of human p300 protein (residues 1723-1836) corresponding to the extended zinc-binding Taz2 domain has been investigated. The crystal structure was solved by the SAD approach utilizing the anomalous diffraction signal of the bound Zn ions. The structure comprises an atypical helical bundle stabilized by three Zn ions and closely resembles the solution structures determined previously for shorter peptides. Residues 1813-1834 from the current construct form a helical extension of the C-terminal helix and make extensive crystal-contact interactions with the peptide-binding site of Taz2, providing additional insights into the mechanism of the recognition of diverse transactivation domains (TADs) by Taz2. On the basis of these results and molecular modeling, a hypothetical model of the binding of phosphorylated p53 TAD1 to Taz2 has been proposed.

  19. Slow, Reversible, Coupled Folding and Binding of the Spectrin Tetramerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, S.L.; Rogers, J.M.; Hill, S.A.; Clarke, J.

    2012-01-01

    Many intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are significantly unstructured under physiological conditions. A number of these IDPs have been shown to undergo coupled folding and binding reactions whereby they can gain structure upon association with an appropriate partner protein. In general, these systems display weaker binding affinities than do systems with association between completely structured domains, with micromolar Kd values appearing typical. One such system is the association between α- and β-spectrin, where two partially structured, incomplete domains associate to form a fully structured, three-helix bundle, the spectrin tetramerization domain. Here, we use this model system to demonstrate a method for fitting association and dissociation kinetic traces where, using typical biophysical concentrations, the association reactions are expected to be highly reversible. We elucidate the unusually slow, two-state kinetics of spectrin assembly in solution. The advantages of studying kinetics in this regime include the potential for gaining equilibrium constants as well as rate constants, and for performing experiments with low protein concentrations. We suggest that this approach would be particularly appropriate for high-throughput mutational analysis of two-state reversible binding processes. PMID:23200054

  20. Ubiquitin binding by the CUE domain promotes endosomal localization of the Rab5 GEF Vps9

    PubMed Central

    Shideler, Tess; Nickerson, Daniel P.; Merz, Alexey J.; Odorizzi, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Vps9 and Muk1 are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that regulate membrane trafficking in the endolysosomal pathway by activating Rab5 GTPases. We show that Vps9 is the primary Rab5 GEF required for biogenesis of late endosomal multivesicular bodies (MVBs). However, only Vps9 (but not Muk1) is required for the formation of aberrant class E compartments that arise upon dysfunction of endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). ESCRT dysfunction causes ubiquitinated transmembrane proteins to accumulate at endosomes, and we demonstrate that endosomal recruitment of Vps9 is promoted by its ubiquitin-binding CUE domain. Muk1 lacks ubiquitin-binding motifs, but its fusion to the Vps9 CUE domain allows Muk1 to rescue endosome morphology, cargo trafficking, and cellular stress-tolerance phenotypes that result from loss of Vps9 function. These results indicate that ubiquitin binding by the CUE domain promotes Vps9 function in endolysosomal membrane trafficking via promotion of localization. PMID:25673804

  1. A preformed compact ribosome-binding domain in the cricket paralysis-like virus IRES RNAs

    PubMed Central

    COSTANTINO, DAVID; KIEFT, JEFFREY S.

    2005-01-01

    The internal ribosome site RNA of the cricket paralysis-like viruses (CrPV-like) binds directly to the ribosome, assembling the translation machinery without initiation factors. This mechanism does not require initiator tRNA, and translation starts from a non-AUG codon. A wealth of biochemical data has yielded a working model for this process, but the three-dimensional structure and biophysical characteristics of the unbound CrPV-like IRES RNAs are largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that the CrPV-like IRESes prefold into a two-part structure in the presence of magnesium ions. The largest part is a prefolded compact RNA domain that shares folding and structural characteristics with other compactly folded RNAs such as group I intron RNAs and RNase P RNA. Chemical probing reveals that the CrPV-like IRES’ compact domain contains RNA helices that are packed tightly enough to exclude solvent, and analytical ultracentrifugation indicates a large change in the shape of the IRES upon folding. Formation of this compact domain is necessary for binding of the 40S subunit, and the structural organization of the unbound IRES RNA is consistent with the hypothesis that the IRES is functionally and structurally preorganized before ribosome binding. PMID:15701733

  2. Solution structure of the ubiquitin-binding domain in Swa2p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chim, Nicholas; Gall, Walter E; Xiao, Jing; Harris, Mark P; Graham, Todd R; Krezel, Andrzej M

    2004-03-01

    The SWA2/AUX1 gene has been proposed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of mammalian auxilin. Swa2p is required for clathrin assembly/dissassembly in vivo, thereby implicating it in intracellular protein and lipid trafficking. While investigating the 287-residue N-terminal region of Swa2p, we found a single stably folded domain between residues 140 and 180. Using binding assays and structural analysis, we established this to be a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, unidentified by bioinformatics of the yeast genome. We determined the solution structure of this Swa2p domain and found a characteristic three-helix UBA fold. Comparisons of structures of known UBA folds reveal that the position of the third helix is quite variable. This helix in Swa2p UBA contains a bulkier tyrosine in place of smaller residues found in other UBAs and cannot pack as close to the second helix. The molecular surface of Swa2p UBA has a mostly negative potential, with a single hydrophobic surface patch found also in the UBA domains of human protein, HHR23A. The presence of a UBA domain implicates Swa2p in novel roles involving ubiquitin and ubiquitinated substrates. We propose that Swa2p is a multifunctional protein capable of recognizing several proteins through its protein-protein recognition domains. PMID:14997574

  3. Identification of adducin-binding residues on the cytoplasmic domain of erythrocyte membrane protein, band 3.

    PubMed

    Franco, Taina; Chu, Haiyan; Low, Philip S

    2016-10-01

    Two major complexes form structural bridges that connect the erythrocyte membrane to its underlying spectrin-based cytoskeleton. Although the band 3-ankyrin bridge may account for most of the membrane-to-cytoskeleton interactions, the linkage between the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3) and adducin has also been shown to be critical to membrane integrity. In the present paper, we demonstrate that adducin, a major component of the spectrin-actin junctional complex, binds primarily to residues 246-264 of cdb3, and mutation of two exposed glutamic acid residues within this sequence completely abrogates both α- and β-adducin binding. Because these residues are located next to the ankyrin-binding site on cdb3, it seems unlikely that band 3 can bind ankyrin and adducin concurrently, reducing the chances of an association between the ankyrin and junctional complexes that would significantly compromise erythrocyte membrane integrity. We also demonstrate that adducin binds the kidney isoform of cdb3, a spliceoform that lacks the first 65 amino acids of erythrocyte cdb3, including the central strand of a large β-pleated sheet. Because kidney cdb3 is not known to bind any of the common peripheral protein partners of erythrocyte cdb3, including ankyrin, protein 4.1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, and phosphofructokinase, retention of this affinity for adducin was unexpected.

  4. Nucleotide binding domain 1 of the human retinal ABC transporter functions as a general ribonucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Biswas, E E

    2001-07-27

    Members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily are transmembrane proteins that are found in a variety of tissues which transport substances across cell membranes in an energy-dependent manner. The retina-specific ABC protein (ABCR) has been linked through genetic studies to a number of inherited visual disorders, including Stargardt macular degeneration and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Like other ABC transporters, ABCR is characterized by two nucleotide binding domains and two transmembrane domains. We have cloned and expressed the 522-amino acid (aa) N-terminal cytoplasmic region (aa 854-1375) of ABCR containing nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) with a purification tag at its amino terminus. The expressed recombinant protein was found to be soluble and was purified using single-step affinity chromatography. The purified protein migrated as a 66 kDa protein on SDS-PAGE. Analysis of the ATP binding and hydrolysis properties of the NBD1 polypeptide demonstrated significant differences between NBD1 and NBD2 [Biswas, E. E., and Biswas, S. B. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 15879-15886]. NBD1 was active as an ATPase, and nucleotide inhibition studies suggested that nucleotide binding was not specific for ATP and all four ribonucleotides can compete for binding. Further analysis demonstrated that NBD1 is a general nucleotidase capable of hydrolysis of ATP, CTP, GTP, and UTP. In contrast, NBD2 is specific for adenosine nucleotides (ATP and dATP). NBD1 bound ATP with a higher affinity than NBD2 (K(mNBD1) = 200 microm vs K(mNBD2) = 631 microm) but was less efficient as an ATPase (V(maxNBD1) = 28.9 nmol min(-)(1) mg(-)(1) vs V(maxNBD2) = 144 nmol min(-)(1) mg(-)(1)). The binding efficiencies for CTP and GTP were comparable to that observed for ATP (K(mCTP) = 155 microm vs K(mGTP) = 183 microm), while that observed for UTP was decreased 2-fold (K(mUTP) = 436 microm). Thus, the nucleotide binding preference of NBD1 is as follows: CTP > GTP > ATP > UTP. These

  5. Anthrax toxin lethal factor domain 3 is highly mobile and responsive to ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Maize, Kimberly M.; Kurbanov, Elbek K.; De La Mora-Rey, Teresa; Geders, Todd W.; Hwang, Dong-Jin; Walters, Michael A.; Johnson, Rodney L.; Amin, Elizabeth A.; Finzel, Barry C.

    2014-01-01

    The secreted anthrax toxin consists of three components: the protective antigen (PA), edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF). LF, a zinc metalloproteinase, compromises the host immune system primarily by targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases in macrophages. Peptide substrates and small-molecule inhibitors bind LF in the space between domains 3 and 4 of the hydrolase. Domain 3 is attached on a hinge to domain 2 via residues Ile300 and Pro385, and can move through an angular arc of greater than 35° in response to the binding of different ligands. Here, multiple LF structures including five new complexes with co-crystallized inhibitors are compared and three frequently populated LF conformational states termed ‘bioactive’, ‘open’ and ‘tight’ are identified. The bioactive position is observed with large substrate peptides and leaves all peptide-recognition subsites open and accessible. The tight state is seen in unliganded and small-molecule complex structures. In this state, domain 3 is clamped over certain substrate subsites, blocking access. The open position appears to be an intermediate state between these extremes and is observed owing to steric constraints imposed by specific bound ligands. The tight conformation may be the lowest-energy conformation among the reported structures, as it is the position observed with no bound ligand, while the open and bioactive conformations are likely to be ligand-induced. PMID:25372673

  6. Binding Moral Foundations and the Narrowing of Ideological Conflict to the Traditional Morality Domain.

    PubMed

    Malka, Ariel; Osborne, Danny; Soto, Christopher J; Greaves, Lara M; Sibley, Chris G; Lelkes, Yphtach

    2016-09-01

    Moral foundations theory (MFT) posits that binding moral foundations (purity, authority, and ingroup loyalty) are rooted in the need for groups to promote order and cohesion, and that they therefore underlie political conservatism. We present evidence that binding foundations (and the related construct of disgust sensitivity) are associated with lower levels of ideological polarization on political issues outside the domain of moral traditionalism. Consistent support for this hypothesis was obtained from three large American Internet-based samples and one large national sample of New Zealanders (combined N = 7,874). We suggest that when political issues do not have inherent relevance to moral traditionalism, binding foundations promote a small centrist shift away from ideologically prescribed positions, and that they do so out of desire for national uniformity and cohesion. PMID:27340150

  7. Sensitive and rapid detection of staphylococcus aureus in milk via cell binding domain of lysin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junping; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Yun; Li, Heng; Yang, Hang; Wei, Hongping

    2016-03-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important food-borne pathogen in dairy products contaminated through raw ingredients or improper food handling. Rapid detection of S. aureus with high sensitivity is of significance for food quality and safety. In this study, a new method was developed for detecting S. aureus in milk by coupling immunomagnetic separation with enzyme linked cell wall binding domain (CBD) of lysin plyV12, which can bind to S. aureus with high affinity. There are millions of binding sites present on the cell surface of S. aureus for the CBD attachment, which greatly improves the detection sensitivity. The method has the overall testing time of only 1.5h with the detection limit of 4 × 10(3)CFU/mL in spiked milk. Because it is simple, rapid and sensitive, this method could be used for the detection of S. aureus in various food samples.

  8. Binding Moral Foundations and the Narrowing of Ideological Conflict to the Traditional Morality Domain.

    PubMed

    Malka, Ariel; Osborne, Danny; Soto, Christopher J; Greaves, Lara M; Sibley, Chris G; Lelkes, Yphtach

    2016-09-01

    Moral foundations theory (MFT) posits that binding moral foundations (purity, authority, and ingroup loyalty) are rooted in the need for groups to promote order and cohesion, and that they therefore underlie political conservatism. We present evidence that binding foundations (and the related construct of disgust sensitivity) are associated with lower levels of ideological polarization on political issues outside the domain of moral traditionalism. Consistent support for this hypothesis was obtained from three large American Internet-based samples and one large national sample of New Zealanders (combined N = 7,874). We suggest that when political issues do not have inherent relevance to moral traditionalism, binding foundations promote a small centrist shift away from ideologically prescribed positions, and that they do so out of desire for national uniformity and cohesion.

  9. Inactivation of Multiple Bacterial Histidine Kinases by Targeting the ATP-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial agents that exploit new targets will be required to combat the perpetual rise of bacterial resistance to current antibiotics. We are exploring the inhibition of histidine kinases, constituents of two-component systems. Two-component systems are the primary signaling pathways that bacteria utilize to respond to their environment. They are ubiquitous in bacteria and trigger various pathogenic mechanisms. To attenuate these signaling pathways, we sought to broadly target the histidine kinase family by focusing on their highly conserved ATP-binding domain. Development of a fluorescence polarization displacement assay facilitated high-throughput screening of ∼53 000 diverse small molecules for binding to the ATP-binding pocket. Of these compounds, nine inhibited the catalytic activity of two or more histidine kinases. These scaffolds could provide valuable starting points for the design of broadly effective HK inhibitors, global reduction of bacterial signaling, and ultimately, a class of antibiotics that function by a new mechanism of action. PMID:25531939

  10. Site-directed mutants of human RECQ1 reveal functional importance of the zinc binding domain.

    PubMed

    Sami, Furqan; Gary, Ronald K; Fang, Yayin; Sharma, Sudha

    2016-08-01

    RecQ helicases are a highly conserved family of ATP-dependent DNA-unwinding enzymes with key roles in DNA replication and repair in all kingdoms of life. The RECQ1 gene encodes the most abundant RecQ homolog in humans. We engineered full-length RECQ1 harboring point mutations in the zinc-binding motif (amino acids 419-480) within the conserved RecQ-specific-C-terminal (RQC) domain known to be critical for diverse biochemical and cellular functions of RecQ helicases. Wild-type RECQ1 contains a zinc ion. Substitution of three of the four conserved cysteine residues that coordinate zinc severely impaired the ATPase and DNA unwinding activities but retained DNA binding and single strand DNA annealing activities. Furthermore, alteration of these residues attenuated zinc binding and significantly changed the overall conformation of full-length RECQ1 protein. In contrast, substitution of cysteine residue at position 471 resulted in a wild-type like RECQ1 protein. Differential contribution of the conserved cysteine residues to the structure and functions of the RECQ1 protein is also inferred by homology modeling. Overall, our results indicate that the zinc binding motif in the RQC domain of RECQ1 is a key structural element that is essential for the structure-functions of RECQ1. Given the recent association of RECQ1 mutations with breast cancer, these results will contribute to understanding the molecular basis of RECQ1 functions in cancer etiology. PMID:27248010

  11. Exploring the binding domain of EmrE, the smallest multidrug transporter.

    PubMed

    Sharoni, Michal; Steiner-Mordoch, Sonia; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2005-09-23

    EmrE is a small multidrug transporter in Escherichia coli that extrudes various positively charged drugs across the plasma membrane in exchange with protons, thereby rendering cells resistant to these compounds. Biochemical experiments indicate that the basic functional unit of EmrE is a dimer where the common binding site for protons and substrate is formed by the interaction of an essential charged residue (Glu14) from both EmrE monomers. Previous studies implied that other residues in the vicinity of Glu14 are part of the binding domain. Alkylation of Cys replacements in the same transmembrane domain inhibits the activity of the protein and this inhibition is fully prevented by substrates of EmrE. To monitor directly the reaction we tested also the extent of modification using fluorescein-5-maleimide. While most residues are not accessible or only partially accessible, four, Y4C, I5C, L7C, and A10C, were modified at least 80%. Furthermore, preincubation with tetraphenylphosphonium reduces the reaction of two of these residues by up to 80%. To study other essential residues we generated functional hetero-oligomers and challenged them with various methane thiosulfonates. Taken together the findings imply the existence of a binding cavity accessible to alkylating reagents where at least three residues from TM1, Tyr40 from TM2, and Trp63 in TM3 are involved in substrate binding. PMID:16049002

  12. Crystallographic and Biochemical Analysis of the Ran-Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, James R.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; MIT

    2009-08-13

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) resides in circular openings within the nuclear envelope and serves as the sole conduit to facilitate nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. The asymmetric distribution of the small G protein Ran across the nuclear envelope regulates directionality of protein transport. Ran interacts with the NPC of metazoa via two asymmetrically localized components, Nup153 at the nuclear face and Nup358 at the cytoplasmic face. Both nucleoporins contain a stretch of distinct, Ran-binding zinc finger domains. Here, we present six crystal structures of Nup153-zinc fingers in complex with Ran and a 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of RanGDP. Crystal engineering allowed us to obtain well diffracting crystals so that all ZnF-Ran complex structures are refined to high resolution. Each of the four zinc finger modules of Nup153 binds one Ran molecule in apparently non-allosteric fashion. The affinity is measurably higher for RanGDP than for RanGTP and varies modestly between the individual zinc fingers. By microcalorimetric and mutational analysis, we determined that one specific hydrogen bond accounts for most of the differences in the binding affinity of individual zinc fingers. Genomic analysis reveals that only in animals do NPCs contain Ran-binding zinc fingers. We speculate that these organisms evolved a mechanism to maintain a high local concentration of Ran at the vicinity of the NPC, using this zinc finger domain as a sink.

  13. Bacterial SPOR domains are recruited to septal peptidoglycan by binding to glycan strands that lack stem peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yahashiri, Atsushi; Jorgenson, Matthew A.; Weiss, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial SPOR domains bind peptidoglycan (PG) and are thought to target proteins to the cell division site by binding to “denuded” glycan strands that lack stem peptides, but uncertainties remain, in part because septal-specific binding has yet to be studied in a purified system. Here we show that fusions of GFP to SPOR domains from the Escherichia coli cell-division proteins DamX, DedD, FtsN, and RlpA all localize to septal regions of purified PG sacculi obtained from E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. Treatment of sacculi with an amidase that removes stem peptides enhanced SPOR domain binding, whereas treatment with a lytic transglycosylase that removes denuded glycans reduced SPOR domain binding. These findings demonstrate unequivocally that SPOR domains localize by binding to septal PG, that the physiologically relevant binding site is indeed a denuded glycan, and that denuded glycans are enriched in septal PG rather than distributed uniformly around the sacculus. Accumulation of denuded glycans in the septal PG of both E. coli and B. subtilis, organisms separated by 1 billion years of evolution, suggests that sequential removal of stem peptides followed by degradation of the glycan backbone is an ancient feature of PG turnover during bacterial cell division. Linking SPOR domain localization to the abundance of a structure (denuded glycans) present only transiently during biogenesis of septal PG provides a mechanism for coordinating the function of SPOR domain proteins with the progress of cell division. PMID:26305949

  14. The complex regulatory function of the ligand-binding domain of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor.

    PubMed

    Devogelaere, Benoit; Verbert, Leen; Parys, Jan B; Missiaen, Ludwig; De Smedt, Humbert

    2008-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor (IP(3)R) can be divided in three functionally distinct regions: a ligand-binding domain, a modulatory domain and a channel domain. Numerous regulatory mechanisms including inter- and intra-molecular protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation events act via these domains to regulate the function of the IP(3)R. Regulation at the level of the ligand-binding domain primarily affects the affinity for IP(3). The extent of IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release (IICR) is, however, not only determined by the affinity for IP(3) but also by the effectiveness of the coupling between ligand binding and channel opening. As a result, regulation as well as malfunction of IICR may be affected by both steps in the activation mechanism. The 3D structures of the two subdomains of the ligand-binding domain have recently been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. This allows a more detailed molecular explanation of the regulatory events situated at the ligand-binding domain of the IP(3)R. In this review, we will focus on recent structural and functional data on the ligand-binding domain that have extended and clarified the view on the molecular mechanisms of IP(3)R regulation.

  15. DNA and Protein Footprinting Analysis of the Modulation of DNA Binding by the N-Terminal Domain of the Saccharomyces cervisiae TATA Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta,S.; Cheng, H.; Mollah, A.; Jamison, E.; Morris, S.; Chance, M.; Khrapunov, S.; Brenowitz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae TATA binding protein (TBP) and its isolated C-terminal conserved core domain (TBPc) were prepared with measured high specific DNA-binding activities. Direct, quantitative comparison of TATA box binding by TBP and TBPc reveals greater affinity by TBPc for either of two high-affinity sequences at several different experimental conditions. TBPc associates more rapidly than TBP to TATA box bearing DNA and dissociates more slowly. The structural origins of the thermodynamic and kinetic effects of the N-terminal domain on DNA binding by TBP were explored in comparative studies of TBPc and TBP by 'protein footprinting' with hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) side chain oxidation. Some residues within TBPc and the C-terminal domain of TBP are comparably protected by DNA, consistent with solvent accessibility changes calculated from core domain crystal structures. In contrast, the reactivity of some residues located on the top surface and the DNA-binding saddle of the C-terminal domain differs between TBP and TBPc in both the presence and absence of bound DNA; these results are not predicted from the crystal structures. A strikingly different pattern of side chain oxidation is observed for TBP when a nonionic detergent is present. Taken together, these results are consistent with the N-terminal domain actively modulating TATA box binding by TBP and nonionic detergent modulating the interdomain interaction.

  16. Rational design of orally-active, pyrrolidine-based progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Scott K.; Washburn, David G.; Frazee, James S.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Hoang, Tram H.; Lapinski, Leahann; Grygielko, Eugene T.; Glace, Lindsay E.; Trizna, Walter; Williams, Shawn P.; Duraiswami, Chaya; Bray, Jeffrey D.; Laping, Nicholas J.

    2010-09-03

    Using the X-ray crystal structure of an amide-based progesterone receptor (PR) partial agonist bound to the PR ligand binding domain, a novel PR partial agonist class containing a pyrrolidine ring was designed. Members of this class of N-alkylpyrrolidines demonstrate potent and highly selective partial agonism of the progesterone receptor, and one of these analogs was shown to be efficacious upon oral dosing in the OVX rat model of estrogen opposition.

  17. THUMP--a predicted RNA-binding domain shared by 4-thiouridine, pseudouridine synthases and RNA methylases.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Koonin, E V

    2001-04-01

    Sequence profile searches were used to identify an ancient domain in ThiI-like thiouridine synthases, conserved RNA methylases, archaeal pseudouridine synthases and several uncharacterized proteins. We predict that this domain is an RNA-binding domain that adopts an alpha/beta fold similar to that found in the C-terminal domain of translation initiation factor 3 and ribosomal protein S8.

  18. Calcium Activation of the Ca-ATPase Enhances Conformational Heterogeneity Between Nucleotide Binding and Phosphorylation Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2004-04-13

    High-resolution crystal structures obtained in two conformations of the Ca-ATPase suggest that a large-scale rigid-body domain reorientation of approximately 50 involving the nucleotide-binding (N) domain is required to permit the transfer of the -phosphoryl group of ATP to Asp351 in the phosphorylation (P) domain during coupled calcium transport. However, variability observed in the orientation of the N-domain relative to the P-domain in both different crystal structures of the Ca-ATPase following calcium activation, and structures of other P-type ATPases, suggests the presence of conformational heterogeneity in solution which may be modulated by contact interactions within the crystal. Therefore, to address the extent of conformational heterogeneity between these domains in solution, we have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure the spatial separation and conformational heterogeneity between donor (i.e., 5-[[2-[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]amino] naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) and acceptor (i.e., fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate) chromophores covalently bound to the P- and N-domains, respectively, within the Ca-ATPase stabilized in different enzymatic states associated with the transport cycle. In comparison to the unliganded enzyme, the spatial separation and conformational heterogeneity between these domains is unaffected by enzyme phosphorylation. However, calcium-activation results in a 3.4 increase in the average spatial separation, which increases from 29.4 to 32.8 , in good agreement with the high-resolution structures where these sites are respectively separated by 31.6 (1 IWO.pdb) and 35.9 (1EUL.pdb). Thus, the crystal structures accurately reflect the average solution structures of the Ca-ATPase. However, there is substantial conformational heterogeneity for all enzyme states measured, indicating that formation of catalytically important transition states involves a subpopulation of enzyme intermediates. These results suggest that the

  19. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-05-20

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site.

  20. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-05-20

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site. PMID:27002154

  1. Structurally conserved erythrocyte-binding domain in Plasmodium provides a versatile scaffold for alternate receptor engagement

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczyk, Jakub; Lim, Nicholas T. Y.; Arnott, Alicia; He, Wen-Qiang; Nguitragool, Wang; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Mok, Yee-Foong; Murphy, James M.; Smith, Katherine R.; Lee, Stuart; Bahlo, Melanie; Mueller, Ivo; Barry, Alyssa E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how malaria parasites gain entry into human red blood cells is essential for developing strategies to stop blood stage infection. Plasmodium vivax preferentially invades reticulocytes, which are immature red blood cells. The organism has two erythrocyte-binding protein families: namely, the Duffy-binding protein (PvDBP) and the reticulocyte-binding protein (PvRBP) families. Several members of the PvRBP family bind reticulocytes, specifically suggesting a role in mediating host cell selectivity of P. vivax. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first high-resolution crystal structure of an erythrocyte-binding domain from PvRBP2a, solved at 2.12 Å resolution. The monomeric molecule consists of 10 α-helices and one short β-hairpin, and, although the structural fold is similar to that of PfRh5—the essential invasion ligand in Plasmodium falciparum—its surface properties are distinct and provide a possible mechanism for recognition of alternate receptors. Sequence alignments of the crystallized fragment of PvRBP2a with other PvRBPs highlight the conserved placement of disulfide bonds. PvRBP2a binds mature red blood cells through recognition of an erythrocyte receptor that is neuraminidase- and chymotrypsin-resistant but trypsin-sensitive. By examining the patterns of sequence diversity within field isolates, we have identified and mapped polymorphic residues to the PvRBP2a structure. Using mutagenesis, we have also defined the critical residues required for erythrocyte binding. Characterization of the structural features that govern functional erythrocyte binding for the PvRBP family provides a framework for generating new tools that block P. vivax blood stage infection. PMID:26715754

  2. Identification of a Ser/Thr cluster in the C-terminal domain of the human prostaglandin receptor EP4 that is essential for agonist-induced beta-arrestin1 recruitment but differs from the apparent principal phosphorylation site.

    PubMed Central

    Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Hermosilla, Ricardo; Rehwald, Mathias; Rönnstrand, Lars; Schülein, Ralf; Wernstedt, Christer; Püschel, Gerhard Paul

    2004-01-01

    hEP4-R (human prostaglandin E2 receptor, subtype EP4) is a G(s)-linked heterotrimeric GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor). It undergoes agonist-induced desensitization and internalization that depend on the presence of its C-terminal domain. Desensitization and internalization of GPCRs are often linked to agonist-induced beta-arrestin complex formation, which is stabilized by phosphorylation. Subsequently beta-arrestin uncouples the receptor from its G-protein and links it to the endocytotic machinery. The C-terminal domain of hEP4-R contains 38 Ser/Thr residues that represent potential phosphorylation sites. The present study aimed to analyse the relevance of these Ser/Thr residues for agonist-induced phosphorylation, interaction with beta-arrestin and internalization. In response to agonist treatment, hEP4-R was phosphorylated. By analysis of proteolytic phosphopeptides of the wild-type receptor and mutants in which groups of Ser/Thr residues had been replaced by Ala, the principal phosphorylation site was mapped to a Ser/Thr-containing region comprising residues 370-382, the presence of which was necessary and sufficient to obtain full agonist-induced phosphorylation. A cluster of Ser/Thr residues (Ser-389-Ser-390-Thr-391-Ser-392) distal to this site, but not the principal phosphorylation site, was essential to allow agonist-induced recruitment of beta-arrestin1. However, phosphorylation greatly enhanced the stability of the beta-arrestin1-receptor complexes. For maximal agonist-induced internalization, phosphorylation of the principal phosphorylation site was not required, but both beta-arrestin1 recruitment and the presence of Ser/Thr residues in the distal half of the C-terminal domain were necessary. PMID:14709160

  3. Phylogenetic Distribution and Evolution of the Linked RNA-Binding and NOT1-Binding Domains in the Tristetraprolin Family of Tandem CCCH Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    In humans, the tristetraprolin or TTP family of CCCH tandem zinc finger (TZF) proteins comprises 3 members, encoded by the genes ZFP36, ZFP36L1, and ZFP36L2. These proteins have direct orthologues in essentially all vertebrates studied, with the exception of birds, which appear to lack a version of ZFP36. Additional family members are found in rodents, amphibians, and fish. In general, the encoded proteins contain 2 critical macromolecular interaction domains: the CCCH TZF domain, which is necessary for high-affinity binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA; and an extreme C-terminal domain that, in the case of TTP, interacts with NOT1, the scaffold of a large multi-protein complex that contains deadenylases. TTP and its related proteins act by first binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA, and then recruiting deadenylases to the mRNA, where they can processively remove the adenosine residues from the poly(A) tail. Highly conserved TZF domains have been found in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeasts, and these domains can bind AU-rich elements that resemble those bound by the mammalian proteins. However, certain fungi appear to lack proteins with intact TZF domains, and the TTP family proteins that are expressed in other fungi often lack the characteristic C-terminal NOT1 binding domain found in the mammalian proteins. For these reasons, we investigated the phylogenetic distribution of the relevant sequences in available databases. Both domains are present in family member proteins from most lineages of eukaryotes, suggesting their mutual presence in a common ancestor. However, the vertebrate type of NOT1-binding domain is missing in most fungi, and the TZF domain itself has disappeared or degenerated in recently evolved fungi. Nonetheless, both domains are present together in the proteins from several unicellular eukaryotes, including at least 1 fungus, and they seem to have remained together during the evolution of metazoans. PMID:24697206

  4. Niemann-Pick type C 1 function requires lumenal domain residues that mediate cholesterol-dependent NPC2 binding.

    PubMed

    Deffieu, Maika S; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2011-11-22

    Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) protein is needed for cellular utilization of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol that has been delivered to lysosomes. The protein has 13 transmembrane domains, three large lumenal domains, and a cytoplasmic tail. NPC1's lumenally oriented, N-terminal domain binds cholesterol and has been proposed to receive cholesterol from NPC2 protein as part of the process by which cholesterol is exported from lysosomes into the cytosol. Using surface plasmon resonance and affinity chromatography, we show here that the second lumenal domain of NPC1 binds directly to NPC2 protein. For these experiments, a soluble NPC1 lumenal domain 2 was engineered by replacing adjacent transmembrane domains with antiparallel coiled-coil sequences. Interaction of NPC2 with NPC1 lumenal domain 2 is only detected at acidic pH, conditions that are optimal for cholesterol binding to NPC2 and transfer to NPC1; the pH is also appropriate for the acidic environment where binding would take place. Binding to NPC1 domain 2 requires the presence of cholesterol on NPC2 protein, a finding that supports directional transfer of cholesterol from NPC2 onto NPC1's N-terminal domain. Finally, human disease-causing mutations in NPC1 domain 2 decrease NPC2 binding, suggesting that NPC2 binding is necessary for NPC1 function in humans. These data support a model in which NPC1 domain 2 holds NPC2 in position to facilitate directional cholesterol transfer from NPC2 onto NPC1 protein for export from lysosomes.

  5. PDZ Binding Domains, Structural Disorder and Phosphorylation: A Menage-a-trois Tailing Dcp2 mRNA Decapping Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Dilantha

    2016-01-01

    Diverse cellular activities are mediated through the interaction of protein domains and their binding partners. One such protein domain widely distributed in the higher metazoan world is the PDZ domain, which facilitates abundant protein-protein interactions. The PDZ domain-PDZ binding domain interaction has been implicated in several pathologies including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Down syndrome. PDZ domains bind to C-terminal peptides/proteins which have either of the following combinations: S/T-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type I, hydrophobic-Xhydrophobic- COOH for type II, and D/E-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type III, although hydrophobicity in the termini form the key characteristic of the PDZ-binding domains. We identified and characterized a Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana, a protein containing a putative PDZ-binding domain using mutagenesis and protein biochemistry. Now we are using bioinformatics to study the Cterminal end of mRNA decapping enzymes from complex metazoans with the aim of (1) identifying putative PDZ-binding domains (2) Correlating structural disorder with PDZ binding domains and (3) Demonstrating the presence of phosphorylation sites in C-terminal extremities of Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzymes. It is proposed here that the trinity of PDZbinding domains, structural disorder and phosphorylation-susceptible sites are a feature of the Dcp2 family of decapping enzymes and perhaps is a wider trick in protein evolution where scaffolding/tethering is a requirement for localization and function. It is critical though laboratory-based supporting evidence is sought to back-up this bioinformatics exploration into tail regions of mRNA decapping enzymes. PMID:27151193

  6. The endothelin ET(B) receptor agonist [125I]BQ-3020 binds predominantly to nerves in the bovine retractor penis muscle and penile artery.

    PubMed

    Parkkisenniemi, U M; Palkama, A; Virtanen, I; Klinge, E

    2000-11-01

    Preliminary pharmacological experiments have suggested that in the bovine retractor penis muscle there are relaxation-mediating endothelin ET(B) receptors, at least part of which are located on the inhibitory nitrergic nerves. The present work was undertaken to test this hypothesis by means of receptor autoradiography and additional pharmacological experiments. In the retractor penis muscle and the penile artery, specific binding of the ETB receptor-selective agonist [125I]BQ-3020 took place predominantly to nerve trunks and minor nerve branches. The situation was the same in the dorsal metatarsal artery, that was included as a reference because of its different innervation. Throughout the nerves the silver grains were evenly distributed over the nuclei of Schwann cells and the spaces between them. In the retractor penis there was also a small amount of specific binding to smooth muscle. No specific endothelial binding was observed in any of the tissues examined. The pharmacological studies confirmed that the relaxation of the retractor penis muscle induced by the ET(B) receptor-selective agonist, sarafotoxin S6c, is susceptible to tetrodotoxin as well as to inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The relaxation was also characterized by inconsistency, weakness and tachyphylaxis. The electrical field stimulation-induced submaximal relaxation of the retractor penis was unaffected by stimulation or blockade of ET(B) receptors. The autoradiography suggests that in all the three bovine tissues studied there are ET(B) receptors located on nerves independently of the type of efferent nerve. The pharmacological experiments do not support the concept that in the bovine retractor penis muscle neuronal ET(B) receptors exert important immediate effects on the functioning of the penile erection-mediating nitrergic nerves.

  7. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB2Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB2Rs (hCB2Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB2Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB2Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB2Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB2R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB2Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB2Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB1 and CB2Rs. PMID:23537664

  8. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K; Franks, Lirit N; Moran, Jeffery H; Prather, Paul L

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB2Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB2Rs (hCB2Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB2Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB2Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB2Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB2R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB2Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB2Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB1 and CB2Rs.

  9. The TCF C-clamp DNA binding domain expands the Wnt transcriptome via alternative target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hoverter, Nate P.; Zeller, Michael D.; McQuade, Miriam M.; Garibaldi, Angela; Busch, Anke; Selwan, Elizabeth M.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Baldi, Pierre; Waterman, Marian L.

    2014-01-01

    LEF/TCFs direct the final step in Wnt/β-catenin signalling by recruiting β-catenin to genes for activation of transcription. Ancient, non-vertebrate TCFs contain two DNA binding domains, a High Mobility Group box for recognition of the Wnt Response Element (WRE; 5′-CTTTGWWS-3′) and the C-clamp domain for recognition of the GC-rich Helper motif (5′-RCCGCC-3′). Two vertebrate TCFs (TCF-1/TCF7 and TCF-4/TCF7L2) use the C-clamp as an alternatively spliced domain to regulate cell-cycle progression, but how the C-clamp influences TCF binding and activity genome-wide is not known. Here, we used a doxycycline inducible system with ChIP-seq to assess how the C-clamp influences human TCF1 binding genome-wide. Metabolic pulse-labeling of nascent RNA with 4′Thiouridine was used with RNA-seq to connect binding to the Wnt transcriptome. We find that the C-clamp enables targeting to a greater number of gene loci for stronger occupancy and transcription regulation. The C-clamp uses Helper sites concurrently with WREs for gene targeting, but it also targets TCF1 to sites that do not have readily identifiable canonical WREs. The coupled ChIP-seq/4′Thiouridine-seq analysis identified new Wnt target genes, including additional regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, C-clamp containing isoforms of TCFs are potent transcriptional regulators with an expanded transcriptome directed by C-clamp-Helper site interactions. PMID:25414359

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae Genome-wide Identification and Characterization of BOX Element-binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Wang, Changzheng; Wan, Min; Wu, Yin; Ma, Qianli

    2015-11-01

    The BOX elements are short repetitive DNA sequences that distribute randomly in intergenic regions of the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome. The function and origin of such elements are still unknown, but they were found to modulate expression of neighboring genes. Evidences suggested that the modulation's mechanism can be fulfilled by sequence-specific interaction of BOX elements with transcription factor family proteins. However, the type and function of these BOX-binding proteins still remain largely unexplored to date. In the current study we described a synthetic protocol to investigate the recognition and interaction between a highly conserved site of BOX elements and the DNA-binding domains of a variety of putative transcription factors in the pneumococcal genome. With the protocol we were able to predict those high-affinity domain binders of the conserved BOX DNA site (BOX DNA) in a high-throughput manner, and analyzed sequence-specific interaction in the domainDNA recognition at molecular level. Consequently, a number of putative transcription factor domains with both high affinity and specificity for the BOX DNA were identified, from which the helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif of a small heat shock factor was selected as a case study and tested for its binding capability toward the double-stranded BOX DNA using fluorescence anisotropy analysis. As might be expected, a relatively high affinity was detected for the interaction of HTH motif with BOX DNA with dissociation constant at nanomolar level. Molecular dynamics simulation, atomic structure examination and binding energy analysis revealed a complicated network of intensive nonbonded interactions across the complex interface, which confers both stability and specificity for the complex architecture. PMID:27491035

  11. Study on Folate Binding Domain of Dihydrofolate Reductase in Different Plant species and Human beings.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Aveek; Datta, Animesh Kumar; Datta, Siraj

    2014-01-01

    Data base (NCBI and TIGR) searches are made to retrieve protein sequences of different plant species namely Medicago truncatula, Pisum sativum, Ricinus communis, Arabidopsis thaliana, Vitis vinifera, Glycine max, Daucus carota, Oryza sativa Japonica Group, Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata, Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa Indica Group, Zea mays and careful alignment of derived sequences shows 95% or higher identity. Similarly, DHFR sequence of human being is also retrieved from NCBI. A phylogenetic tree is constructed from different plant and human DHFR domain using the Neighbour - Joining method in MEGA 5.05. Conservation score is performed by using PARALINE. Result suggests that folate binding domain of dihydrofolare reductase is conserved (score 8.06) and excepting some minor variations the basic structure of the domain in both plant species and human being is rather similar. Human DHFR domain contains PEKN sequence near active site, though proline is common for all the selected organisms but the other sequences are different in plants. The plant domain is always associated with TS (Thymidylate synthase). Plant based system is predicted to be an effective model for assessment of MTX (Methotrexate) and other antifolate drugs.

  12. Luminescent and substrate binding activities of firefly luciferase N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Zako, Tamotsu; Ayabe, Keiichi; Aburatani, Takahide; Kamiya, Noriho; Kitayama, Atsushi; Ueda, Hiroshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2003-07-30

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes highly efficient emission of light from the substrates luciferin, Mg-ATP, and oxygen. A number of amino acid residues are identified to be important for the luminescent activity, and almost all the key residues are thought to be located in the N-terminal domain (1-437), except one in the C-terminal domain, Lys529, which is thought to be critical for efficient substrate orientation. Here we show that the purified N-terminal domain still binds to the substrates luciferin and ATP with reduced affinity, and retains luminescent activity of up to 0.03% of the wild-type enzyme (WT), indicating that all the essential residues for the activity are located in the N-terminal domain. Also found is low luminescence enhancement by coenzyme A (CoA), which implies a lower product inhibition than in the WT enzyme. These findings have interesting implications for the light emission reaction mechanism of the enzyme, such as reaction intermediates, product inhibition, and the role of the C-terminal domain.

  13. Crystal structure of two CD46 domains reveals an extended measles virus-binding surface.

    PubMed Central

    Casasnovas, J M; Larvie, M; Stehle, T

    1999-01-01

    Measles virus is a paramyxovirus which, like other members of the family such as respiratory syncytial virus, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The cell surface receptor for measles virus in humans is CD46, a complement cofactor. We report here the crystal structure at 3.1 A resolution of the measles virus-binding fragment of CD46. The structure reveals the architecture and spatial arrangement of two glycosylated short consensus repeats with a pronounced interdomain bend and some flexibility at the domain interface. Amino acids involved in measles virus binding define a large, glycan-free surface that extends from the top of the first to the bottom of the second repeat. The extended virus-binding surface of CD46 differs strikingly from those reported for the human virus receptor proteins CD4 and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), suggesting that the CD46 structure utilizes a novel mode of virus recognition. A highly hydrophobic and protruding loop at the base of the first repeat bears a critical virus-binding residue, thereby defining an important recognition epitope. Molecules that mimic the conformation of this loop potentially could be effective anti-viral agents by preventing binding of measles virus to CD46. PMID:10357804

  14. Fusion to a highly stable consensus albumin binding domain allows for tunable pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Steven A; Gibbs, Alan C; Conk, Michelle; Yi, Fang; Maguire, Diane; Kane, Colleen; O'Neil, Karyn T

    2015-10-01

    A number of classes of proteins have been engineered for high stability using consensus sequence design methods. Here we describe the engineering of a novel albumin binding domain (ABD) three-helix bundle protein. The resulting engineered ABD molecule, called ABDCon, is expressed at high levels in the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli and is highly stable, with a melting temperature of 81.5°C. ABDCon binds human, monkey and mouse serum albumins with affinity as high as 61 pM. The solution structure of ABDCon is consistent with the three-helix bundle design and epitope mapping studies enabled a precise definition of the albumin binding interface. Fusion of a 10 kDa scaffold protein to ABDCon results in a long terminal half-life of 60 h in mice and 182 h in cynomolgus monkeys. To explore the link between albumin affinity and in vivo exposure, mutations were designed at the albumin binding interface of ABDCon yielding variants that span an 11 000-fold range in affinity. The PK properties of five such variants were determined in mice in order to demonstrate the tunable nature of serum half-life, exposure and clearance with variations in albumin binding affinity.

  15. A specific domain in alpha-catenin mediates binding to beta-catenin or plakoglobin.

    PubMed

    Huber, O; Krohn, M; Kemler, R

    1997-08-01

    The E-cadherin-catenin adhesion complex has been the subject of many structural and functional studies because of its importance in development, normal tissue function and carcinogenesis. It is well established that the cytoplasmic domain of E-cadherin binds either beta-catenin or plakoglobin, which both can assemble alpha-catenin into the complex. Recently we have identified an alpha-catenin binding site in beta-catenin and plakoglobin and postulated, based on sequence analysis, that these protein-protein interactions are mediated by a hydrophobic interaction mechanism. Here we have now identified the reciprocal complementary binding site in alpha-catenin which mediates its interaction with beta-catenin and plakoglobin. Using in vitro association assays with C-terminal truncations of alpha-catenin expressed as recombinant fusion proteins, we found that the N-terminal 146 amino acids are required for this interaction. We then identified a peptide of 27 amino acids within this sequence (amino acid positions 117-143) which is necessary and sufficient to bind beta-catenin or plakoglobin. As shown by mutational analysis, hydrophobic amino acids within this binding site are important for the interaction. The results described here, together with our previous work, give strong support for the idea that these proteins associate by hydrophobic interactions of two alpha-helices.

  16. Transcriptional activation by the acidic domain of Vmw65 requires the integrity of the domain and involves additional determinants distinct from those necessary for TFIIB binding.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S; Greaves, R; O'Hare, P

    1993-01-01

    In this work we have examined the requirements for activity of the acidic domain of Vmw65 (VP16) by deletion and site-directed mutagenesis of the region in the context of GAL4 fusion proteins. The results indicate that the present interpretation of what actually constitutes the activation domain is not correct. We demonstrate, using a promoter with one target site which is efficiently activated by the wild-type (wt) fusion protein, that amino acids distal to residue 453 are critical for activity. Truncation of the domain or substitution of residues in the distal region almost completely abrogate activity. However, inactivating mutations within the distal region are complemented by using a promoter containing multiple target sites. Moreover, duplication of the proximal region, but not the distal region, restores the ability to activate a promoter with a single target site. These results indicate some distinct qualitative difference between the proximal and distal regions. We have also examined the binding of nuclear proteins to the wt domain and to a variant with the distal region inactivated by mutation. The lack of activity of this variant is not explained by a lack of binding of TFIIB, a protein previously reported to be the likely target of the acidic domain. Therefore some additional function is involved in transcriptional activation by the acid domain, and determinants distinct from those involved in TFIIB binding are required for this function. Analysis of the total protein profiles binding to the wt and mutant domains has demonstrated the selective binding to the wt domain of a 135-kDa polypeptide, which is therefore a candidate component involved in this additional function. This is the first report to provide evidence for the proposal of a multiplicity of interactions within the acidic domain, by uncoupling requirements for one function from those for another. Images PMID:8395001

  17. Zinc-induced interaction of the metal-binding domain of amyloid-β peptide with DNA.

    PubMed

    Khmeleva, Svetlana A; Mezentsev, Yuri V; Kozin, Sergey A; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Ivanov, Alexis S; Bodoev, Nikolay V; Makarov, Alexander A; Radko, Sergey P

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of the 16-mer synthetic peptide (Aβ16), which represents the metal-binding domain of the amyloid-β with DNA, was studied employing the surface plasmon resonance technique. It has been shown that Aβ16 binds to the duplex DNA in the presence of zinc ions and thus the metal-binding domain can serve as a zinc-dependent DNA-binding site of the amyloid-β. The interaction of Aβ16 with DNA most probably depends on oligomerization of the peptide and is dominated by interaction with phosphates of the DNA backbone.

  18. Pancreatic Polypeptide Is Recognized by Two Hydrophobic Domains of the Human Y4 Receptor Binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Pedragosa-Badia, Xavier; Sliwoski, Gregory R.; Dong Nguyen, Elizabeth; Lindner, Diana; Stichel, Jan; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.

    2014-01-01

    Structural characterization of the human Y4 receptor (hY4R) interaction with human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) is crucial, not only for understanding its biological function but also for testing treatment strategies for obesity that target this interaction. Here, the interaction of receptor mutants with pancreatic polypeptide analogs was studied through double-cycle mutagenesis. To guide mutagenesis and interpret results, a three-dimensional comparative model of the hY4R-hPP complex was constructed based on all available class A G protein-coupled receptor crystal structures and refined using experimental data. Our study reveals that residues of the hPP and the hY4R form a complex network consisting of ionic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen binding. Residues Tyr2.64, Asp2.68, Asn6.55, Asn7.32, and Phe7.35 of Y4R are found to be important in receptor activation by hPP. Specifically, Tyr2.64 interacts with Tyr27 of hPP through hydrophobic contacts. Asn7.32 is affected by modifications on position Arg33 of hPP, suggesting a hydrogen bond between these two residues. Likewise, we find that Phe7.35 is affected by modifications of hPP at positions 33 and 36, indicating interactions between these three amino acids. Taken together, we demonstrate that the top of transmembrane helix 2 (TM2) and the top of transmembrane helices 6 and 7 (TM6–TM7) form the core of the peptide binding pocket. These findings will contribute to the rational design of ligands that bind the receptor more effectively to produce an enhanced agonistic or antagonistic effect. PMID:24375409

  19. Engineered α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as models for measuring agonist binding and effect at the orthosteric low-affinity α4-α4 interface.

    PubMed

    Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan; Pedersen, Martin H F; Rohde, Line A; Kastrup, Jette S; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Chebib, Mary; Gajhede, Michael; Balle, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4β2 is important for normal mammalian brain function and is known to express in two different stoichiometries, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2. While these are similar in many aspects, the (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry differs by harboring a third orthosteric acetylcholine binding site located at the α4-α4 interface. Interestingly, the third binding site has, so far, only been documented using electrophysiological assays, actual binding affinities of nicotinic receptor ligands to this site are not known. The present study was therefore aimed at determining binding affinities of nicotinic ligands to the α4-α4 interface. Given that epibatidine shows large functional potency differences at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces, biphasic binding properties would be expected at (α4)3(β2)2 receptors. However, standard saturation binding experiments with [(3)H]epibatidine did not reveal biphasic binding under the conditions utilized. Therefore, an engineered β2 construct (β2(HQT)), which converts the β(-) face to resemble that of an α4(-) face, was utilized to create (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptors harboring three α4-α4 interfaces. With this receptor, low affinity binding of epibatidine with a Kd of ∼5 nM was observed in sharp contrast to a Kd value of ∼10 pM observed for wild-type receptors. A strong correlation between binding affinities at the (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptor and functional potencies at the wild-type receptor of a range of nicotinic ligands highlighted the validity of using the mutational approach. Finally, large differences in activities at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces were observed for structurally related agonists underscoring the need for establishing all binding parameters of compounds at α4β2 receptors.

  20. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  1. A Rational Engineering Strategy for Designing Protein A-Binding Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Henry, Kevin A; Sulea, Traian; van Faassen, Henk; Hussack, Greg; Purisima, Enrico O; MacKenzie, C Roger; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) and streptococcal protein G (SpG) affinity chromatography are the gold standards for purifying monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in therapeutic applications. However, camelid VHH single-domain Abs (sdAbs or VHHs) are not bound by SpG and only sporadically bound by SpA. Currently, VHHs require affinity tag-based purification, which limits their therapeutic potential and adds considerable complexity and cost to their production. Here we describe a simple and rapid mutagenesis-based approach designed to confer SpA binding upon a priori non-SpA-binding VHHs. We show that SpA binding of VHHs is determined primarily by the same set of residues as in human mAbs, albeit with an unexpected degree of tolerance to substitutions at certain core and non-core positions and some limited dependence on at least one residue outside the SpA interface, and that SpA binding could be successfully introduced into five VHHs against three different targets with no adverse effects on expression yield or antigen binding. Next-generation sequencing of llama, alpaca and dromedary VHH repertoires suggested that species differences in SpA binding may result from frequency variation in specific deleterious polymorphisms, especially Ile57. Thus, the SpA binding phenotype of camelid VHHs can be easily modulated to take advantage of tag-less purification techniques, although the frequency with which this is required may depend on the source species. PMID:27631624

  2. Zinc fingers, zinc clusters, and zinc twists in DNA-binding protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Coleman, J E; Auld, D S

    1991-01-01

    We now recognize three distinct motifs of DNA-binding zinc proteins: (i) zinc fingers, (ii) zinc clusters, and (iii) zinc twists. Until very recently, x-ray crystallographic or NMR three-dimensional structure analyses of DNA-binding zinc proteins have not been available to serve as standards of reference for the zinc binding sites of these families of proteins. Those of the DNA-binding domains of the fungal transcription factor GAL4 and the rat glucocorticoid receptor are the first to have been determined. Both proteins contain two zinc binding sites, and in both, cysteine residues are the sole zinc ligands. In GAL4, two zinc atoms are bound to six cysteine residues which form a "zinc cluster" akin to that of metallothionein; the distance between the two zinc atoms of GAL4 is approximately 3.5 A. In the glucocorticoid receptor, each zinc atom is bound to four cysteine residues; the interatomic zinc-zinc distance is approximately 13 A, and in this instance, a "zinc twist" is represented by a helical DNA recognition site located between the two zinc atoms. Zinc clusters and zinc twists are here recognized as two distinctive motifs in DNA-binding proteins containing multiple zinc atoms. For native "zinc fingers," structural data do not exist as yet; consequently, the interatomic distances between zinc atoms are not known. As further structural data become available, the structural and functional significance of these different motifs in their binding to DNA and other proteins participating in the transmission of the genetic message will become apparent. Images PMID:1846973

  3. A Rational Engineering Strategy for Designing Protein A-Binding Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin A.; Sulea, Traian; van Faassen, Henk; Hussack, Greg; Purisima, Enrico O.; MacKenzie, C. Roger; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) and streptococcal protein G (SpG) affinity chromatography are the gold standards for purifying monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in therapeutic applications. However, camelid VHH single-domain Abs (sdAbs or VHHs) are not bound by SpG and only sporadically bound by SpA. Currently, VHHs require affinity tag-based purification, which limits their therapeutic potential and adds considerable complexity and cost to their production. Here we describe a simple and rapid mutagenesis-based approach designed to confer SpA binding upon a priori non-SpA-binding VHHs. We show that SpA binding of VHHs is determined primarily by the same set of residues as in human mAbs, albeit with an unexpected degree of tolerance to substitutions at certain core and non-core positions and some limited dependence on at least one residue outside the SpA interface, and that SpA binding could be successfully introduced into five VHHs against three different targets with no adverse effects on expression yield or antigen binding. Next-generation sequencing of llama, alpaca and dromedary VHH repertoires suggested that species differences in SpA binding may result from frequency variation in specific deleterious polymorphisms, especially Ile57. Thus, the SpA binding phenotype of camelid VHHs can be easily modulated to take advantage of tag-less purification techniques, although the frequency with which this is required may depend on the source species. PMID:27631624

  4. Defining the erythrocyte binding domains of Plasmodium vivax tryptophan rich antigen 33.5.

    PubMed

    Bora, Hema; Tyagi, Rupesh Kumar; Sharma, Yagya Dutta

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan-rich antigens play important role in host-parasite interaction. One of the Plasmodium vivax tryptophan-rich antigens called PvTRAg33.5 had earlier been shown to be predominantly of alpha helical in nature with multidomain structure, induced immune responses in humans, binds to host erythrocytes, and its sequence is highly conserved in the parasite population. In the present study, we divided this protein into three different parts i.e. N-terminal (amino acid position 24-106), middle (amino acid position 107-192), and C-terminal region (amino acid position 185-275) and determined the erythrocyte binding activity of these fragments. This binding activity was retained by the middle and C-terminal fragments covering 107 to 275 amino acid region of the PvTRAg33.5 protein. Eight non-overlapping peptides covering this 107 to 275 amino acid region were then synthesized and tested for their erythrocyte binding activity to further define the binding domains. Only two peptides, peptide P4 (at 171-191 amino acid position) and peptide P8 (at 255-275 amino acid position), were found to contain the erythrocyte binding activity. Competition assay revealed that each peptide recognizes its own erythrocyte receptor. These two peptides were found to be located on two parallel helices at one end of the protein in the modelled structure and could be exposed on its surface to form a suitable site for protein-protein interaction. Natural antibodies present in the sera of the P. vivax exposed individuals or the polyclonal rabbit antibodies against this protein were able to inhibit the erythrocyte binding activity of PvTRAg33.5, its fragments, and these two synthetic peptides P4 and P8. Further studies on receptor-ligand interaction might lead to the development of the therapeutic reagent. PMID:23638151

  5. Identification of the Calmodulin-Binding Domains of Fas Death Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bliss J.; Samal, Alexandra B.; Vlach, Jiri; Fernandez, Timothy F.; Brooke, Dewey; Prevelige, Peter E.; Saad, Jamil S.

    2016-01-01

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by binding of a Fas ligand to the ectodomain of the surface death receptor Fas protein. Subsequently, the intracellular death domain of Fas (FasDD) and that of the Fas-associated protein (FADD) interact to form the core of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), a crucial step for activation of caspases that induce cell death. Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM) is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells and specifically interacts with FasDD to regulate the apoptotic/survival signaling pathway. Inhibition of CaM activity in DISC stimulates apoptosis significantly. We have recently shown that CaM forms a ternary complex with FasDD (2:1 CaM:FasDD). However, the molecular mechanism by which CaM binds to two distinct FasDD motifs is not fully understood. Here, we employed mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), biophysical, and biochemical methods to identify the binding regions of FasDD and provide a molecular basis for the role of CaM in Fas–mediated apoptosis. Proteolytic digestion and mass spectrometry data revealed that peptides spanning residues 209–239 (Fas-Pep1) and 251–288 (Fas-Pep2) constitute the two CaM-binding regions of FasDD. To determine the molecular mechanism of interaction, we have characterized the binding of recombinant/synthetic Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 peptides with CaM. Our data show that both peptides engage the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM simultaneously. Binding of Fas-Pep1 to CaM is entropically driven while that of Fas-Pep2 to CaM is enthalpically driven, indicating that a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces contribute to the stabilization of the FasDD–CaM complex. Our data suggest that because Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 are involved in extensive intermolecular contacts with the death domain of FADD, binding of CaM to these regions may hinder its ability to bind to FADD, thus greatly inhibiting the initiation of apoptotic signaling

  6. An Aptamer against the Matrix Binding Domain on the Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Impairs Virion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Orabi, Ahmed; Bieringer, Maria; Geerlof, Arie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatitis B virus (HBV) particle is an icosahedral nucleocapsid surrounded by a lipid envelope containing viral surface proteins. A small domain (matrix domain [MD]) in the large surface protein L and a narrow region (matrix binding domain [MBD]) including isoleucine 126 on the capsid surface have been mapped, in which point mutations such as core I126A specifically blocked nucleocapsid envelopment. It is possible that the two domains interact with each other during virion morphogenesis. By the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method, we evolved DNA aptamers from an oligonucleotide library binding to purified recombinant capsids but not binding to the corresponding I126A mutant capsids. Aptamers bound to capsids were separated from unbound molecules by filtration. After 13 rounds of selections and amplifications, 16 different aptamers were found among 73 clones. The four most frequent aptamers represented more than 50% of the clones. The main aptamer, AO-01 (13 clones, 18%), showed the lowest dissociation constant (Kd) of 180 ± 82 nM for capsid binding among the four molecules. Its Kd for I126A capsids was 1,306 ± 503 nM. Cotransfection of Huh7 cells with AO-01 and an HBV genomic construct resulted in 47% inhibition of virion production at 3 days posttransfection, but there was no inhibition by cotransfection of an aptamer with a random sequence. The half-life of AO-01 in cells was 2 h, which might explain the incomplete inhibition. The results support the importance of the MBD for nucleocapsid envelopment. Inhibiting the MD-MBD interaction with a low-molecular-weight substance might represent a new approach for an antiviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Approximately 240 million people are persistently infected with HBV. To date, antiviral therapies depend on a single target, the viral reverse transcriptase. Future additional targets could be viral protein-protein interactions. We selected a 55-base-long single-stranded DNA

  7. A green fluorescent protein solubility screen in E. coli reveals domain boundaries of the GTP-binding domain in the P element transposase

    PubMed Central

    Sabogal, Alex; Rio, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding and hydrolysis events often act as molecular switches in proteins, modulating conformational changes between active and inactive states in many signaling molecules and transport systems. The P element transposase of Drosophila melanogaster requires GTP binding to proceed along its reaction pathway, following initial site-specific DNA binding. GTP binding is unique to P elements and may represent a novel form of transpositional regulation, allowing the bound transposase to find a second site, looping the transposon DNA for strand cleavage and excision. The GTP-binding activity has been previously mapped to the central portion of the transposase protein; however, the P element transposase contains little sequence identity with known GTP-binding folds. To identify soluble, active transposase domains, a GFP solubility screen was used testing the solubility of random P element gene fragments in E. coli. The screen produced a single clone spanning known GTP-binding residues in the central portion of the transposase coding region. This clone, amino acids 275–409 in the P element transposase, was soluble, highly expressed in E.coli and active for GTP-binding activity, therefore is a candidate for future biochemical and structural studies. In addition, the chimeric screen revealed a minimal N-terminal THAP DNA-binding domain attached to an extended leucine zipper coiled-coil dimerization domain in the P element transposase, precisely delineating the DNA-binding and dimerization activities on the primary sequence. This study highlights the use of a GFP-based solubility screen on a large multidomain protein to identify highly expressed, soluble truncated domain subregions. PMID:20842711

  8. BuD, a helix–loop–helix DNA-binding domain for genome modification

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Stefano; Molina, Rafael; López-Méndez, Blanca; Juillerat, Alexandre; Bertonati, Claudia; Daboussi, Fayza; Campos-Olivas, Ramon; Duchateau, Phillippe; Montoya, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    DNA editing offers new possibilities in synthetic biology and biomedicine for modulation or modification of cellular functions to organisms. However, inaccuracy in this process may lead to genome damage. To address this important problem, a strategy allowing specific gene modification has been achieved through the addition, removal or exchange of DNA sequences using customized proteins and the endogenous DNA-repair machinery. Therefore, the engineering of specific protein–DNA interactions in protein scaffolds is key to providing ‘toolkits’ for precise genome modification or regulation of gene expression. In a search for putative DNA-binding domains, BurrH, a protein that recognizes a 19 bp DNA target, was identified. Here, its apo and DNA-bound crystal structures are reported, revealing a central region containing 19 repeats of a helix–loop–helix modular domain (BurrH domain; BuD), which identifies the DNA target by a single residue-to-nucleotide code, thus facilitating its redesign for gene targeting. New DNA-binding specificities have been engineered in this template, showing that BuD-derived nucleases (BuDNs) induce high levels of gene targeting in a locus of the human haemoglobin β (HBB) gene close to mutations responsible for sickle-cell anaemia. Hence, the unique combination of high efficiency and specificity of the BuD arrays can push forward diverse genome-modification approaches for cell or organism redesign, opening new avenues for gene editing. PMID:25004980

  9. Allosteric communication between DNA-binding and light-responsive domains of diatom class I aureochromes

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ankan; Herman, Elena; Serif, Manuel; Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Hepp, Sebastian; Pokorny, Richard; Kroth, Peter G.; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    The modular architecture of aureochrome blue light receptors, found in several algal groups including diatoms, is unique by having the LOV-type photoreceptor domain fused to the C-terminus of its putative effector, an N-terminal DNA-binding bZIP module. The structural and functional understanding of aureochromes’ light-dependent signaling mechanism is limited, despite their promise as an optogenetic tool. We show that class I aureochromes 1a and 1c from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum are regulated in a light-independent circadian rhythm. These aureochromes are capable to form functional homo- and heterodimers, which recognize the ACGT core sequence within the canonical ‘aureo box’, TGACGT, in a light-independent manner. The bZIP domain holds a more folded and less flexible but extended conformation in the duplex DNA-bound state. FT-IR spectroscopy in the absence and the presence of DNA shows light-dependent helix unfolding in the LOV domain, which leads to conformational changes in the bZIP region. The solution structure of DNA bound to aureochrome points to a tilted orientation that was further validated by molecular dynamics simulations. We propose that aureochrome signaling relies on an allosteric pathway from LOV to bZIP that results in conformational changes near the bZIP-DNA interface without major effects on the binding affinity. PMID:27179025

  10. A new metal binding domain involved in cadmium, cobalt and zinc transport

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Aaron T.; Barupala, Dulmini; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2015-01-01

    The P1B-ATPases, which couple cation transport across membranes to ATP hydrolysis, are central to metal homeostasis in all organisms. An important feature of P1B-ATPases is the presence of soluble metal binding domains that regulate transport activity. Only one type of MBD has been characterized extensively, but bioinformatics analyses indicate that a diversity of MBDs may exist in nature. Here we report the biochemical, structural, and functional characterization of a new MBD from the Cupriavidus metallidurans P1B-4-ATPase CzcP (CzcP MBD). The CzcP MBD binds two Cd2+, Co2+, or Zn2+ ions in distinct and unique sites, and adopts an unexpected fold consisting of two fused ferredoxin-like domains. Both in vitro and in vivo activity assays using full length CzcP, truncated CzcP, and several variants indicate a regulatory role for the MBD and distinct functions for the two metal binding sites. Taken together, these findings elucidate a previously unknown MBD and suggest new regulatory mechanisms for metal transport by P1B-ATPases. PMID:26192600

  11. A New Metal Binding Domain Involved in Cadmium, Cobalt and Zinc Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Aaron T.; Barupala, Dulmini; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2015-07-20

    In the P1B-ATPases, which couple cation transport across membranes to ATP hydrolysis, are central to metal homeostasis in all organisms. An important feature of P1B-ATPases is the presence of soluble metal binding domains (MBDs) that regulate transport activity. Only one type of MBD has been characterized extensively, but bioinformatics analyses indicate that a diversity of MBDs may exist in nature. Here we report the biochemical, structural and functional characterization of a new MBD from the Cupriavidus metallidurans P1B-4-ATPase CzcP (CzcP MBD). The CzcP MBD binds two Cd2+, Co2+ or Zn2+ ions in distinct and unique sites and adopts an unexpected fold consisting of two fused ferredoxin-like domains. Both in vitro and in vivo activity assays using full-length CzcP, truncated CzcP and several variants indicate a regulatory role for the MBD and distinct functions for the two metal binding sites. Moreover, these findings elucidate a previously unknown MBD and suggest new regulatory mechanisms for metal transport by P1B-ATPases.

  12. Characterisation of single domain ATP-binding cassette protien homologues of Theileria parva.

    PubMed

    Kibe, M K; Macklin, M; Gobright, E; Bishop, R; Urakawa, T; ole-MoiYoi, O K

    2001-09-01

    Two distinct genes encoding single domain, ATP-binding cassette transport protein homologues of Theileria parva were cloned and sequenced. Neither of the genes is tandemly duplicated. One gene, TpABC1, encodes a predicted protein of 593 amino acids with an N-terminal hydrophobic domain containing six potential membrane-spanning segments. A single discontinuous ATP-binding element was located in the C-terminal region of TpABC1. The second gene, TpABC2, also contains a single C-terminal ATP-binding motif. Copies of TpABC2 were present at four loci in the T. parva genome on three different chromosomes. TpABC1 exhibited allelic polymorphism between stocks of the parasite. Comparison of cDNA and genomic sequences revealed that TpABC1 contained seven short introns, between 29 and 84 bp in length. The full-length TpABC1 protein was expressed in insect cells using the baculovirus system. Application of antibodies raised against the recombinant antigen to western blots of T. parva piroplasm lysates detected an 85 kDa protein in this life-cycle stage.

  13. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  14. The Influence of Adnectin Binding on the Extracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Guodong; Ahn, Joomi; Houel, Stephane; Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Cohen, Daniel; Xie, Dianlin; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2014-12-01

    The precise and unambiguous elucidation and characterization of interactions between a high affinity recognition entity and its cognate protein provides important insights for the design and development of drugs with optimized properties and efficacy. In oncology, one important target protein has been shown to be the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through the development of therapeutic anticancer antibodies that are selective inhibitors of EGFR activity. More recently, smaller protein derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin termed an adnectin has also been shown to inhibit EGFR in clinical studies. The mechanism of EGFR inhibition by either an adnectin or an antibody results from specific binding of the high affinity protein to the extracellular portion of EGFR (exEGFR) in a manner that prevents phosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domain of the receptor and thereby blocks intracellular signaling. Here, the structural changes induced upon binding were studied by probing the solution conformations of full length exEGFR alone and bound to a cognate adnectin through hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The effects of binding in solution were identified and compared with the structure of a bound complex determined by X-ray crystallography.

  15. The STAS domain of mammalian SLC26A5 prestin harbours an anion-binding site.

    PubMed

    Lolli, Graziano; Pasqualetto, Elisa; Costanzi, Elisa; Bonetto, Greta; Battistutta, Roberto

    2016-02-15

    Prestin is a unique ATP- and Ca(2+)-independent molecular motor with piezoelectric characteristics responsible for the electromotile properties of mammalian cochlear outer hair cells, i.e. the capacity of these cells to modify their length in response to electric stimuli. This 'electromotility' is at the basis of the exceptional sensitivity and frequency selectivity distinctive of mammals. Prestin belongs to the SLC26 (solute carrier 26) family of anion transporters and needs anions to function properly, particularly Cl(-). In the present study, using X-ray crystallography we reveal that the STAS (sulfate transporter and anti-sigma factor antagonist) domain of mammalian prestin, considered an 'incomplete' transporter, harbours an unanticipated anion-binding site. In parallel, we present the first crystal structure of a prestin STAS domain from a non-mammalian vertebrate prestin (chicken) that behaves as a 'full' transporter. Notably, in chicken STAS, the anion-binding site is lacking because of a local structural rearrangement, indicating that the presence of the STAS anion-binding site is exclusive to mammalian prestin. PMID:26635354

  16. Modulation of integrin antagonist signaling by ligand binding of the heparin-binding domain of vitronectin to the alphaVbeta3 integrin.

    PubMed

    Maile, Laura A; Aday, Ariel W; Busby, Walker H; Sanghani, Ravi; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Clemmons, David R

    2008-10-01

    The interaction between the arginine glycine and aspartic acid motif (RGD) of integrin ligands such as vitronectin and the integrin receptor alphaVbeta3 in mediating cell attachment has been well described. Similarly, the ability of disintegrins, small RGD containing peptides, to inhibit cell attachment and other cellular processes has also been studied extensively. Recently, we characterized a second site of interaction between vitronectin and its integrin partner. We determined that amino acids within the heparin-binding domain of vitronectin bind to a cysteine loop (C-loop) region of beta3 and that this interaction is required for the positive effects of alphaVbeta3 ligand occupancy on IGF-I signaling in smooth muscle cells. In this study we examine the signaling events activated following ligand binding of disintegrins to the alphaVbeta3 and the ability of these signals to be regulated by binding of the heparin-binding domain of vitronectin. We demonstrate that disintegrin ligand binding activates a series of events including the sequential activation of the tyrosine kinases c-Src and Syk. This leads to the activation of calpain and the cleavage of the beta3 cytoplasmic tail. Addition of vitronectin or a peptide homologous to the heparin-binding domain inhibited activation of this pathway. Our results suggest that the signaling events that occur following ligand binding to the alphaVbeta3 integrin reflects a balance between the effects mediated through the RGD binding site interaction and the effects mediated by the heparin binding site interaction and that for intact vitronectin the effect of the heparin-binding domain predominates.

  17. Enzymatic Activities of RNase H Domains of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with Substrate Binding Domains of Bacterial RNases H1 and H2.

    PubMed

    Permanasari, Etin-Diah; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2015-06-01

    Thermotoga maritima RNase H1 and Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 have an N-terminal substrate binding domain, termed hybrid binding domain (TmaHBD), and N-terminal domain (BstNTD), respectively. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a heterodimer consisting of a P66 subunit and a P51 subunit. The P66 subunit contains a C-terminal RNase H domain, which exhibits RNase H activity either in the presence of Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) ions. The isolated RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT (RNH(HIV)) is inactive, possibly due to the lack of a substrate binding ability, disorder of a loop containing His539, and increased flexibility. To examine whether the activity of RNH(HIV) is restored by the attachment of TmaHBD or BstNTD to its N-terminus, two chimeric proteins, TmaHBD-RNH(HIV) and BstNTD-RNH(HIV), were constructed and characterized. Both chimeric proteins bound to RNA/DNA hybrid more strongly than RNH(HIV) and exhibited enzymatic activity in the presence of Mn(2+) ions. They did not exhibit activity or exhibited very weak activity in the presence of Mg(2+) ions. These results indicate that TmaHBD and BstNTD function as an RNA/DNA hybrid binding tag, and greatly increase the substrate binding affinity and Mn(2+)-dependent activity of RNH(HIV) but do not restore the Mg(2+)-dependent activity of RNH(HIV). PMID:25673083

  18. NMR solution structure of a dsRNA binding domain from Drosophila staufen protein reveals homology to the N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S5.

    PubMed Central

    Bycroft, M; Grünert, S; Murzin, A G; Proctor, M; St Johnston, D

    1995-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) is an approximately 65 amino acid motif that is found in a variety of proteins that interact with double-stranded (ds) RNA, such as Escherichia coli RNase III and the dsRNA-dependent kinase, PKR. Drosophila staufen protein contains five copies of this motif, and the third of these binds dsRNA in vitro. Using multinuclear/multidimensional NMR methods, we have determined that staufen dsRBD3 forms a compact protein domain with an alpha-beta-beta-beta-alpha structure in which the two alpha-helices lie on one face of a three-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet. This structure is very similar to that of the N-terminal domain of a prokaryotic ribosomal protein S5. Furthermore, the consensus derived from all known S5p family sequences shares several conserved residues with the dsRBD consensus sequence, indicating that the two domains share a common evolutionary origin. Using in vitro mutagenesis, we have identified several surface residues which are important for the RNA binding of the dsRBD, and these all lie on the same side of the domain. Two residues that are essential for RNA binding, F32 and K50, are also conserved in the S5 protein family, suggesting that the two domains interact with RNA in a similar way. Images PMID:7628456

  19. Crystal Structure of the Bovine lactadherin C2 Domain, a Membrane Binding Motif, Shows Similarity to the C2 Domains of Factor V and Factor VIII

    SciTech Connect

    Lin,L.

    2007-01-01

    Lactadherin, a glycoprotein secreted by a variety of cell types, contains two EGF domains and two C domains with sequence homology to the C domains of blood coagulation proteins factor V and factor VIII. Like these proteins, lactadherin binds to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes with high affinity. We determined the crystal structure of the bovine lactadherin C2 domain (residues 1 to 158) at 2.4 {angstrom}. The lactadherin C2 structure is similar to the C2 domains of factors V and VIII (rmsd of C{sub {alpha}} atoms of 0.9 {angstrom} and 1.2 {angstrom}, and sequence identities of 43% and 38%, respectively). The lactadherin C2 domain has a discoidin-like fold containing two {beta}-sheets of five and three antiparallel {beta}-strands packed against one another. The N and C termini are linked by a disulfide bridge between Cys1 and Cys158. One {beta}-turn and two loops containing solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues extend from the C2 domain {beta}-sandwich core. In analogy with the C2 domains of factors V and VIII, some or all of these solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues, Trp26, Leu28, Phe31, and Phe81, likely participate in membrane binding. The C2 domain of lactadherin may serve as a marker of cell surface phosphatidylserine exposure and may have potential as a unique anti-thrombotic agent.

  20. Relationship between inhibition of cyclic AMP production in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the rat D2(444) receptor and antagonist/agonist binding ratios.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, E. A.; Middlemiss, D. N.; Ragan, C. I.

    1995-01-01

    1. Radioligand binding assays using [3H]-(-)-sulpiride, in the presence of 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 100 microM guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp) and [3H]-N0437 were developed to label the low and high agonist affinity states of the rD2(444) receptor (long form of the rat D2 receptor) respectively. The ratios of the affinities of compounds in these two assays (Kapp [3H]-(-)-supiride/Kapp [3H]-N-0437) were then calculated. 2. The prediction that the binding ratio reflected the functional efficacy of a compound was supported by measurement of the ability of a number of compounds acting at dopamine receptors to inhibit rD2(444)-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP production. When the rank order of the ratios of a number of these compounds was compared to their ability to inhibit the production of cyclic AMP, a significant correlation was seen (Spearman rank correlation coefficient = 0.943, P = 0.01). 3. In conclusion, the sulpiride/N-0437 binding ratio reliably predicted the efficacy of compounds acting at dopamine receptors to inhibit cyclic AMP production mediated by the rD2(444) receptor. PMID:7582561

  1. Prolonged administration in vivo of alpha and beta adrenergic agonists decreases insulin binding to rat myocardial membranes in vitro by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Desoye, G.; Ertl-Stockinger, U.; Porta, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Male Sprague Dawley rats were continuously treated in vivo for 6, 12 and 20 hours with a combination of an alpha- (beta-) adrenoreceptor agonist and a beta- (alpha-) adrenoreceptor antagonist in subcutaneously implanted depot tablets. Crude membranes prepared from myocardial cells exhibited a decreased maximum binding of ({sup 125}I)-insulin after 20 hours irrespective of the treatment applied. Scatchard and non-linear regression analysis of the displacement curves assuming two non-cooperative binding sites revealed a downregulation of the high affinity receptors for about 85% and a concomitant 2.5-fold increased receptor affinity under beta-adrenergic influence. In contrast, alpha-adrenergic treatment did not affect the receptor number but decreased the high affinity by 70%. The low affinity binding sites were virtually unaffected by the different treatments. The phospholipid and cholesterol contents of the membranes were not significantly altered. The phospholipid/cholesterol ratios after 12 and 20 hours of alpha-adrenergic treatment, however, were decreased.

  2. NMR structure of a biologically active peptide containing the RNA-binding domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

    PubMed Central

    Mujeeb, A; Bishop, K; Peterlin, B M; Turck, C; Parslow, T G; James, T L

    1994-01-01

    The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhances transcription by binding to a specific RNA element on nascent viral transcripts. Binding is mediated by a 10-amino acid basic domain that is rich in arginines and lysines. Here we report the three-dimensional peptide backbone structure of a biologically active 25-mer peptide that contains the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat basic domain linked to the core regulatory domain of another lentiviral Tat--i.e., that from equine infectious anemia virus. Circular dichroism and two-dimensional proton NMR studies of this hybrid peptide indicate that the Tat basic domain forms a stable alpha-helix, whereas the adjacent regulatory sequence is mostly in extended form. These findings suggest that the tendency to form stable alpha-helices may be a common property of arginine- and lysine-rich RNA-binding domains. Images PMID:8058789

  3. Structural characterisation of the native fetuin-binding protein Scilla campanulata agglutinin: a novel two-domain lectin.

    PubMed

    Wright, L M; Reynolds, C D; Rizkallah, P J; Allen, A K; Van Damme, E J; Donovan, M J; Peumans, W J

    2000-02-18

    The three-dimensional structure of a 244-residue, multivalent, fetuin-binding lectin, SCAfet, isolated from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs, has been solved at 3.3 A resolution by molecular replacement using the coordinates of the 119-residue, mannose-binding lectin, SCAman, also from bluebell bulbs. Unlike most monocot mannose-binding lectins, such as Galanthus nivalis agglutinin from snowdrop bulbs, which fold into a single domain, SCAfet contains two domains with approximately 55% sequence identity, joined by a linker peptide. Both domains are made up of a 12-stranded beta-prism II fold, with three putative carbohydrate-binding sites, one on each subdomain. SCAfet binds to the complex saccharides of various animal glycoproteins but not to simple sugars.

  4. A cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 binding site within the C domain of the retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Pan, W; Cox, S; Hoess, R H; Grafström, R H

    2001-04-01

    Phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) by the cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 4 complex (cdk4/D1) is a key regulatory step for maintaining the orderly progression of the cell cycle. The B domain of Rb contains a site that recognizes and binds the LXCXE motif found in D-type cyclins. This interaction is important for phosphorylation of Rb by cdk4/D1, although in vitro the Rb C domain alone is efficiently phosphorylated by cdk4/D1. A mutation in the C domain of Rb, L901Q, has been identified that completely abolishes cdk4/D1 phosphorylation of the isolated C domain. By contrast, the L901Q mutation has no effect on phosphorylation by either cyclin E/cdk2 or cyclin B/cdk1, suggesting that the interaction between L901Q and cdk4/D1 is specific. Introduction of the L901Q mutation into Rb containing the A, B, and C domains results in phosphorylation becoming predominantly dependent on the LXCXE binding region. However, when the LXCXE binding region of Rb is mutated, phosphorylation becomes dependent on the L901 site within the C domain. The L901 binding site can supplant the LXCXE binding site for the cdk4/D1-dependent phosphorylation of S780 and S795 but not S807/S811. Despite the limited homology between C domains of Rb, p107, and p130, the L901 site is conserved and introduction of the L925Q mutation into the isolated C domain of p107 also inhibits phosphorylation by cdk4/D1. These data support a model for cdk4/D1 recognizing two independent binding sites in Rb and suggests a conservation of this C domain binding motif for cyclin D1/cdk4 kinase among the Rb family of proteins. PMID:11306463

  5. Nitroarginine and tetrahydrobiopterin binding to the haem domain of neuronal nitric oxide synthase using a scintillation proximity assay.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Boyhan, A; Lowe, P N

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) have a bidomain structure comprised of an N-terminal oxygenase domain and a C-terminal reductase domain. The oxygenase domain binds haem, (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-l-biopterin (tetrahydrobiopterin) and arginine, is the site where nitric oxide synthesis takes place and contains determinants for dimeric interactions. A novel scintillation proximity assay has been established for equilibrium and kinetic measurements of substrate, inhibitor and cofactor binding to a recombinant N-terminal haem-binding domain of rat neuronal NOS (nNOS). Apparent Kd values for nNOS haem-domain-binding of arginine and Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (nitroarginine) were measured as 1.6 microM and 25 nM respectively. The kinetics of [3H]nitroarginine binding and dissociation yielded an association rate constant of 1.3x10(4) s-1.M-1 and a dissociation rate constant of 1.2x10(-4) s-1. These values are comparable to literature values obtained for full-length nNOS, suggesting that many characteristics of the arginine binding site of NOS are conserved in the haem-binding domain. Additionally, apparent Kd values were compared and were found to be similar for the inhibitors, L-NG-monomethylarginine, S-ethylisothiourea, N-iminoethyl-L-ornithine, imidazole, 7-nitroindazole and 1400W (N-[3-(aminomethyl) benzyl] acetamidine). [3H]Tetrahydrobiopterin bound to the nNOS haem domain with an apparent Kd of 20 nM. Binding was inhibited by 7-nitroindazole and stimulated by S-ethylisothiourea. The kinetics of interaction with tetrahydrobiopterin were complex, showing a triphasic binding process and a single off rate. An alternating catalytic site mechanism for NOS is proposed. PMID:9576868

  6. The DNA binding domain of GAL4 forms a binuclear metal ion complex.

    PubMed

    Pan, T; Coleman, J E

    1990-03-27

    The transcription factor GAL4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires Zn(II) or Cd(II) for specific recognition of the UASG sequence (Pan & Coleman, 1989). An N-terminal fragment consisting of the first 63 amino acid residues of GAL4 [GAL4(63)] has been obtained by partial tryptic proteolysis of a cloned and overproduced N-terminal domain of 149 residues, GAL(149). We show that GAL4(63) contains the minimal GAL4 DNA binding domain. GAL4(63) binds tightly 1-2 mol of Zn(II) or 2 mol of Cd(II). 113Cd NMR of 113Cd(II)-substituted GAL4(63) reveals structural identity between the metal binding domains of GAL4(63) and that of the larger precursor GAL4(149). 113Cd(II) can be substituted for the Zn(II) in GAL4(63), and two 113Cd NMR signals are observed at 706 and 669 ppm, both suggesting coordination of 113Cd(II) to three or four -S- ligands. With the exception of the N-terminal methionine, the only sulfur-containing residues are the six highly conserved cysteines. High-resolution 1H NMR of Zn(II)-GAL4(63) and Cd(II)-GAL4(63) show the two proteins to have almost identical conformations and to be present as monomers in solutions up to millimolar concentration. This leads us to postulate that GAL4 does not possess a TFIIIA-like "Zn-finger" but forms a binuclear metal cluster involving all six cysteines in a "cloverleaf"-like array. GAL4(63) contains about 60% alpha-helix, estimated from circular dichroism. Removal of the native Zn(II) causes substantial unfolding of the secondary structure. Unlike GAL4(149), the resultant apoprotein is not induced to refold by readdition of Zn(II) at low concentrations. PMID:2186803

  7. Honokiol: A non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist from nature☆

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Atanas G.; Wang, Jian N.; Gu, Shi P.; Bu, Jing; Kramer, Matthias P.; Baumgartner, Lisa; Fakhrudin, Nanang; Ladurner, Angela; Malainer, Clemens; Vuorinen, Anna; Noha, Stefan M.; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Schuster, Daniela; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M.; Heiss, Elke H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are clinically used to counteract hyperglycemia. However, so far experienced unwanted side effects, such as weight gain, promote the search for new PPARγ activators. Methods We used a combination of in silico, in vitro, cell-based and in vivo models to identify and validate natural products as promising leads for partial novel PPARγ agonists. Results The natural product honokiol from the traditional Chinese herbal drug Magnolia bark was in silico predicted to bind into the PPARγ ligand binding pocket as dimer. Honokiol indeed directly bound to purified PPARγ ligand-binding domain (LBD) and acted as partial agonist in a PPARγ-mediated luciferase reporter assay. Honokiol was then directly compared to the clinically used full agonist pioglitazone with regard to stimulation of glucose uptake in adipocytes as well as adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. While honokiol stimulated basal glucose uptake to a similar extent as pioglitazone, it did not induce adipogenesis in contrast to pioglitazone. In diabetic KKAy mice oral application of honokiol prevented hyperglycemia and suppressed weight gain. Conclusion We identified honokiol as a partial non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist in vitro which prevented hyperglycemia and weight gain in vivo. General significance This observed activity profile suggests honokiol as promising new pharmaceutical lead or dietary supplement to combat metabolic disease, and provides a molecular explanation for the use of Magnolia in traditional medicine. PMID:23811337

  8. New Helical Binding Domain Mediates a Glycosyltransferase Activity of a Bifunctional Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Meixian; Yang, Tiandi; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Serine-rich repeat glycoproteins (SRRPs) conserved in streptococci and staphylococci are important for bacterial colonization and pathogenesis. Fap1, a well studied SRRP is a major surface constituent of Streptococcus parasanguinis and is required for bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Biogenesis of Fap1 is a multistep process that involves both glycosylation and secretion. A series of glycosyltransferases catalyze sequential glycosylation of Fap1. We have identified a unique hybrid protein dGT1 (dual glycosyltransferase 1) that contains two distinct domains. N-terminal DUF1792 is a novel GT-D-type glycosyltransferase, transferring Glc residues to Glc-GlcNAc-modified Fap1. C-terminal dGT1 (CgT) is predicted to possess a typical GT-A-type glycosyltransferase, however, the activity remains unknown. In this study, we determine that CgT is a distinct glycosyltransferase, transferring GlcNAc residues to Glc-Glc-GlcNAc-modified Fap1. A 2.4-Å x-ray crystal structure reveals that CgT has a unique binding domain consisting of three α helices in addition to a typical GT-A-type glycosyltransferase domain. The helical domain is crucial for the oligomerization of CgT. Structural and biochemical studies revealed that the helix domain is required for the protein-protein interaction and crucial for the glycosyltransferase activity of CgT in vitro and in vivo. As the helix domain presents a novel structural fold, we conclude that CgT represents a new member of GT-A-type glycosyltransferases. PMID:27539847

  9. Strategy to target the substrate binding site of SET domain protein methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kong T; Li, Fengling; Poda, Gennadiy; Smil, David; Vedadi, Masoud; Schapira, Matthieu

    2013-03-25

    Protein methyltransferases (PMTs) are a novel gene family of therapeutic relevance involved in chromatin-mediated signaling and other biological mechanisms. Most PMTs are organized around the structurally conserved SET domain that catalyzes the methylation of a substrate lysine. A few potent chemical inhibitors compete with the protein substrate, and all are anchored in the channel recruiting the methyl-accepting lysine. We propose a novel strategy to design focused chemical libraries targeting the substrate binding site, where a limited number of warheads each occupying the lysine-channel of multiple enzymes would be decorated by different substituents. A variety of sequence and structure-based approaches used to analyze the diversity of the lysine channel of SET domain PMTs support the relevance of this strategy. We show that chemical fragments derived from published inhibitors are valid warheads that can be used in the design of novel focused libraries targeting other PMTs.

  10. Binding specificities of the GYF domains from two Saccharomyces cerevisiae paralogs.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Alexander; Sjöström, Michael; Wieslander, Ake

    2007-09-01

    We have used multivariate statistics and z-scales to represent peptide sequences in a PLS-QSAR model of previously studied binding affinities [Kofler,M., Motzny,K. and Freund,C. (2005b) Mol. Cell. Proteomics, 4, 1797-1811.] of two GYF domains to an array of immobilized synthetic peptides. As a result, we established structural determinants of the binding specificities of the two proteins. Our model was used to define new sets of yeast proteins potentially interacting with Syh1 (YPL105C) and Smy2 (YBR172C). These sets were subsequently examined for co-occurrence of Gene Ontology terms, leading to suggest a group of likely interacting proteins with a common function in mRNA catabolism. Finally, subcellular localization of a GFP-fused Syh1 and Smy2 reinforced the possibility that these proteins reside in cytoplasmic sites of mRNA degradation, thereby providing experimental confirmation to the predictions from the model.

  11. Structural domains in NADPH: Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases involved in catalysis and substrate binding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Timko, Michael P.

    1999-09-24

    Until recently little direct information was available about specific structural determinants within the light-dependent NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases (PORs) required for substrate and cofactor binding, catalytic activity, and thylakoid membrane localization. Based on our previous DOE-funded studies, during the past year we brought to fruition a number of ongoing experiments, initiated several new avenues of investigations, and overall have made considerable progress towards establishing the basic structural parameters governing POR function. Our studies to date have defined residues and domains involved in substrate and cofactor binding and catalysis, and elaborated on the mechanism for membrane localization of POR in developing plastids. Our results and their significance, as well as our work in progress, are detailed.

  12. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  13. Chimeric plant calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase gene with a neural visinin-like calcium-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Patil, S; Takezawa, D; Poovaiah, B W

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca2+ and Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca(2+)-binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca(2+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approximately 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, 45Ca-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca2+. The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca2+ signaling in plants. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7761420

  14. Eisosomes Are Dynamic Plasma Membrane Domains Showing Pil1-Lsp1 Heteroligomer Binding Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Olivera-Couto, Agustina; Salzman, Valentina; Mailhos, Milagros; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Aguilar, Pablo S.

    2015-01-01

    Eisosomes are plasma membrane domains concentrating lipids, transporters, and signaling molecules. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, these domains are structured by scaffolds composed mainly by two cytoplasmic proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. Eisosomes are immobile domains, have relatively uniform size, and encompass thousands of units of the core proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. In this work we used fluorescence fluctuation analytical methods to determine the dynamics of eisosome core proteins at different subcellular locations. Using a combination of scanning techniques with autocorrelation analysis, we show that Pil1 and Lsp1 cytoplasmic pools freely diffuse whereas an eisosome-associated fraction of these proteins exhibits slow dynamics that fit with a binding-unbinding equilibrium. Number and brightness analysis shows that the eisosome-associated fraction is oligomeric, while cytoplasmic pools have lower aggregation states. Fluorescence lifetime imaging results indicate that Pil1 and Lsp1 directly interact in the cytoplasm and within the eisosomes. These results support a model where Pil1-Lsp1 heterodimers are the minimal eisosomes building blocks. Moreover, individual-eisosome fluorescence fluctuation analysis shows that eisosomes in the same cell are not equal domains: while roughly half of them are mostly static, the other half is actively exchanging core protein subunits. PMID:25863055

  15. The receptor binding domain of MERS-CoV: the dawn of vaccine and treatment development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jin-Chun; Feng, Ling; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2014-03-01

    The newly emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is becoming another "SARS-like" threat to the world. It has an extremely high death rate (∼50%) as there is no vaccine or efficient therapeutics. The identification of the structures of both the MERS-CoV receptor binding domain (RBD) and its complex with dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), raises the hope of alleviating this currently severe situation. In this review, we examined the molecular basis of the RBD-receptor interaction to outline why/how could we use MERS-CoV RBD to develop vaccines and antiviral drugs.

  16. Structure-Based Design of a Periplasmic Binding Protein Antagonist that Prevents Domain Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Borrok, M. Jack; Zhu, Yimin; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2009-07-31

    Many receptors undergo ligand-induced conformational changes to initiate signal transduction. Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are bacterial receptors that exhibit dramatic conformational changes upon ligand binding. These proteins mediate a wide variety of fundamental processes including transport, chemotaxis, and quorum sensing. Despite the importance of these receptors, no PBP antagonists have been identified and characterized. In this study, we identify 3-O-methyl-D-glucose as an antagonist of glucose/galactose-binding protein and demonstrate that it inhibits glucose chemotaxis in E. coli. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography, we show that this antagonist acts as a wedge. It prevents the large-scale domain closure that gives rise to the active signaling state. Guided by these results and the structures of open and closed glucose/galactose-binding protein, we designed and synthesized an antagonist composed of two linked glucose residues. These findings provide a blueprint for the design of new bacterial PBP inhibitors. Given the key role of PBPs in microbial physiology, we anticipate that PBP antagonists will have widespread uses as probes and antimicrobial agents.

  17. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  18. Retargeting Sleeping Beauty Transposon Insertions by Engineered Zinc Finger DNA-binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Katrin; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Miskey, Csaba; Chen, Wei; Cathomen, Toni; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is a nonviral, integrating vector system with proven efficacy in preclinical animal models, and thus holds promise for future clinical applications. However, SB has a close-to-random insertion profile that could lead to genotoxic effects, thereby presenting a potential safety issue. We evaluated zinc finger (ZF) DNA-binding domains (DBDs) for their abilities to introduce a bias into SB's insertion profile. E2C, that binds a unique site in the erbB-2 gene, mediated locus-specific transposon insertions at low frequencies. A novel ZF targeting LINE1 repeats, ZF-B, showed specific binding to an 18-bp site represented by ~12,000 copies in the human genome. We mapped SB insertions using linear-amplification (LAM)-PCR and Illumina sequencing. Targeted insertions with ZF-B peaked at approximately fourfold enrichment of transposition around ZF-B binding sites yielding ~45% overall frequency of insertion into LINE1. A decrease in the ZF-B dataset with respect to transposon insertions in genes was found, suggesting that LINE1 repeats act as a sponge that “soak up” a fraction of SB insertions and thereby redirect them away from genes. Improvements in ZF technology and a careful choice of targeted genomic regions may improve the safety profile of SB for future clinical applications. PMID:22776959

  19. Characterization of the secondary structure of calmodulin in complex with a calmodulin-binding domain peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, S.M.; Schneider, D.M.; Strobel, L.A.; Wand, A.J. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana ); Van Berkum, M.F.A.; Means, A.R. )

    1992-02-11

    The interaction between calcium-saturated chicken calmodulin and a peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding domain of the chicken smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase has been studied by multinuclear and multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance methods. Extensive {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonance assignments of calmodulin in the complex have been obtained from the analysis of two- and three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The assignment of calmodulin in the complex was facilitated by the use of selective labeling of the protein with {alpha}-{sup 15}N-labeled valine, alanine, lysine, leucine, and glycine. These provided reference points during the main-chain-directed analysis of three-dimensional spectra of complexes prepared with uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled calmodulin. The pattern of nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) seen among main-chain amide NH, C{sub {alpha}}H, and C{sub {beta}}H hydrogens indicates that the secondary structure of the globular domains of calmodulin in the complex closely corresponds to that observed in the calcium-saturated state of the protein in the absence of bound peptide. However, the backbone conformation of residues 76-84 adopts an extended chain conformation upon binding of the peptide in contrast to its helical conformation in the absence of peptide. A sufficient number of NOEs between the globular domains of calmodulin and the bound peptide have been found to indicate that the N- and C-terminal regions of the peptide interact with the C- and N-terminal domains of calmodulin, respectively. The significance of these results are discussed in terms of recently proposed models for the structure of calmodulin-peptide complexes.

  20. Interfacial binding and aggregation of lamin A tail domains associated with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Yaron, Peter N; Qin, Zhao; Shenoy, Siddharth; Buehler, Markus J; Lösche, Mathias; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2014-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a premature aging disorder associated with the expression of ∆50 lamin A (∆50LA), a mutant form of the nuclear structural protein lamin A (LA). ∆50LA is missing 50 amino acids from the tail domain and retains a C-terminal farnesyl group that is cleaved from the wild-type LA. Many of the cellular pathologies of HGPS are thought to be a consequence of protein-membrane association mediated by the retained farnesyl group. To better characterize the protein-membrane interface, we quantified binding of purified recombinant ∆50LA tail domain (∆50LA-TD) to tethered bilayer membranes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphocholine using surface plasmon resonance. Farnesylated ∆50LA-TD binds to the membrane interface only in the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) at physiological ionic strength. At extremely low ionic strength, both the farnesylated and non-farnesylated forms of ∆50LA-TD bind to the membrane surface in amounts that exceed those expected for a densely packed protein monolayer. Interestingly, the wild-type LA-TD with no farnesylation also associates with membranes at low ionic strength but forms only a single layer. We suggest that electrostatic interactions are mediated by charge clusters with a net positive charge that we calculate on the surface of the LA-TDs. These studies suggest that the accumulation of ∆50LA at the inner nuclear membrane observed in cells is due to a combination of aggregation and membrane association rather than simple membrane binding; electrostatics plays an important role in mediating this association.

  1. Interfacial binding and aggregation of lamin A tail domains associated with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Yaron, Peter N.; Qin, Zhao; Shenoy, Siddharth; Buehler, Markus J.; Lösche, Mathias; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a premature aging disorder associated with the expression of Δ50 lamin A (Δ50LA), a mutant form of the nuclear structural protein lamin A (LA). Δ50LA is missing 50 amino acids from the tail domain and retains a C-terminal farnesyl group that is cleaved from the wild-type LA. Many of the cellular pathologies of HGPS are thought to be a consequence of protein-membrane association mediated by the retained farnesyl group. To better characterize the protein-membrane interface, we quantified binding of purified recombinant Δ50LA tail domain (Δ50LA-TD) to tethered bilayer membranes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphocholine using surface plasmon resonance. Farnesylated Δ50LATD binds to the membrane interface only in the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+ at physiological ionic strength. At extremely low ionic strength, both the farnesylated and non-farnesylated forms of Δ50LA-TD bind to the membrane surface in amounts that exceed those expected for a densely packed protein monolayer. Interestingly, the wild-type LA-TD with no farnesylation also associates with membranes at low ionic strength but forms only a single layer. We suggest that electrostatic interactions are mediated by charge clusters with a net positive charge that we calculate on the surface of the LA-TDs. These studies suggest that the accumulation of Δ50LA at the inner nuclear membrane observed in cells is due to a combination of aggregation and membrane association rather than simple membrane binding; electrostatics plays an important role in mediating this association. PMID:25194277

  2. The collagen binding domain of gelatinase A modulates degradation of collagen IV by gelatinase B.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Magda; Monaco, Susanna; Van Den Steen, Philippe E; Sbardella, Diego; Grasso, Giuseppe; Marini, Stefano; Overall, Christopher M; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Coletta, Massimo

    2009-02-20

    Type IV collagen remodeling plays a critical role in inflammatory responses, angiogenesis and metastasis. Its remodeling is executed by a family of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), of which the constitutive gelatinase A (MMP2) and the inducible gelatinase B (MMP9) are key examples. Thus, in many pathological conditions, both gelatinases act together. Kinetic data are reported for the enzymatic processing at 37 degrees C of type IV collagen from human placenta by MMP9 and its modulation by the fibronectin-like collagen binding domain (CBD) of MMP2. The alpha1 and alpha2 chain components of type IV collagen were cleaved by gelatinases and identified by mass spectrometry as well as Edman sequencing. Surface plasmon resonance interaction assays showed that CBD bound type IV collagen at two topologically distinct sites. On the basis of linked-function analysis, we demonstrated that CBD of MMP2 tuned the cleavage of collagen IV by MMP9, presumably by inducing a ligand-linked structural change on the type IV collagen. At low concentrations, the CBD bound the first site and thereby allosterically modulated the binding of MMP9 to collagen IV, thus enhancing the collagenolytic activity of MMP9. At high concentrations, CBD binding to the second site interfered with MMP9 binding to collagen IV, acting as a competitive inhibitor. Interestingly, modulation of collagen IV degradation by inactive forms of MMP2 also occurred in a cell-based system, revealing that this interrelationship affected neutrophil migration across a collagen IV membrane. The regulation of the proteolytic processing by a catalytically inactive domain (i.e., CBD) suggests that the two gelatinases might cooperate in degrading substrates even when either one is inactive. This observation reinforces the idea of exosite targets for MMP inhibitors, which should include all macromolecular substrate recognition sites.

  3. Binding of the Rhesus TRIM5α PRYSPRY Domain to Capsid is Necessary but not Sufficient for HIV-1 Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Branderiz-Nuñez, Alberto; Fricke, Thomas; Ivanov, Dmitri; Sarnak, Zoe; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The PRYSPRY domain of TRIM5α provides specificity and the capsid recognition motif to retroviral restriction. Restriction of HIV-1 by rhesus TRIM5α (TRIM5αrh) has been correlated to its ability to bind to the HIV-1 core, suggesting that capsid binding is required for restriction. This work explores whether the PRYSPRY domain of TRIM5αrh exhibits an additional function besides binding to the HIV-1 core. Using our recently described structure of the PRYSPRY domain, we performed an exhaustive structure-function study of the surface and interior residues of the PRYSPRY domain. Testing retroviral restriction and capsid binding of an extensive collection of 60 TRIM5αrh PRYSPRY variants revealed that binding is necessary but not sufficient for restriction. In support of this hypothesis, we showed that some human tripartite motif proteins bind the HIV-1 capsid but do not restrict HIV-1 infection, such as human TRIM6 and TRIM34. Overall this work suggested that the PRYSPRY domain serves an unknown function, distinct from the binding of TRIM5αrh to the HIV-1 core, to block HIV-1 infection. PMID:24314652

  4. Structural Basis for a Novel Intrapeptidyl H-bond and Reverse Binding of c-Cbl-TKB Domain Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ng,C.; Jackson, R.; Buschdorf, J.; Sun, Q.; Guy, G.; Sivaraman, J.

    2008-01-01

    The c-Cbl tyrosine kinase binding domain (Cbl-TKB), essentially an 'embedded' SH2 domain, has a critical role in targeting proteins for ubiquitination. To address how this domain can bind to disparate recognition mofits and to determine whether this results in variations in substrate-binding affinity, we compared crystal structures of the Cbl-TKB domain complexed with phosphorylated peptides of Sprouty2, Sprouty4, epidermal growth factor receptor, Syk, and c-Met receptors and validated the binding with point-mutational analyses using full-length proteins. An obligatory, intrapeptidyl H-bond between the phosphotyrosine and the conserved asparagine or adjacent arginine is essential for binding and orientates the peptide into a positively charged pocket on c-Cbl. Surprisingly, c-Met bound to Cbl in the reverse direction, which is unprecedented for SH2 domain binding. The necessity of this intrapeptidyl H-bond was confirmed with isothermal titration calorimetry experiments that also showed Sprouty2 to have the highest binding affinity to c-Cbl; this may enable the selective sequestration of c-Cbl from other target proteins.

  5. Crystal structure of the mismatch-specific thymine glycosylase domain of human methyl-CpG-binding protein MBD4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Zhonglai; Crombet, Lissete; Amaya, Maria F; Liu, Yanli; Zhang, Xiaoru; Kuang, Wenhua; Ma, Pengtao; Niu, Liping; Qi, Chao

    2011-09-01

    Methyl-CpG (mCpG) binding domain protein 4 (MBD4) is a member of mammalian DNA glycosylase superfamily. It contains an amino-proximal methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) and a C-terminal mismatch-specific glycosylase domain, which is an important molecule believed to be involved in maintaining of genome stability. Herein, we determined the crystal structure of C-terminal glycosylase domain of human MBD4. And the structural alignments of other helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) DNA glycosylases show that the human MBD4 glycosylase domain has the similar active site and the catalytic mechanisms as others. But the different residues in the N-terminal of domain result in the change of charge distribution on the surface of the protein, which suggest the different roles that may relate some diseases. PMID:21820404

  6. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  7. Cadherin Domains in the Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Are Carbohydrate-Binding Modules▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Bayer, Edward A.; Weiner, Ronald M.; Lamed, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 produces putative proteins that contain numerous cadherin and cadherin-like domains involved in intercellular contact interactions. The current study reveals that both domain types exhibit reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. PMID:21036994

  8. Identification of a new component of the agonist binding site of the nicotinic alpha 7 homooligomeric receptor.

    PubMed

    Corringer, P J; Galzi, J L; Eiselé, J L; Bertrand, S; Changeux, J P; Bertrand, D

    1995-05-19

    Tryptophan 54 of the alpha 7 neuronal nicotinic homooligomeric receptor is homologous to gamma-Trp-55 and delta-Trp-57 of non-alpha subunits of Torpedo receptor labeled by d-tubocurarine. This residue was mutated on the alpha 7-V201-5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)3 homooligomeric chimera, which displays alpha 7 nicotinic pharmacology, and for which both equilibrium binding studies and electrophysiological recordings could be carried out in parallel. Replacement of Trp-54 by a Phe, Ala, or His causes a progressive decrease both in binding affinity and in responses (EC50 or IC50) for acetylcholine, nicotine, and dihydro-beta-erythroidine, without significant modification in alpha-Bgtx binding. Except for Gln-56, comparatively small effects are observed when the other residues of the 52-58 region are mutated into alanine. These data support the participation of Trp-54 to ligand binding, and provide evidence for a new "complementary component" of the alpha 7 nicotinic binding site, distinct from its three-loop "principal component," and homologous to the "non-alpha component" present on gamma and delta subunits.

  9. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  10. A Novel Catalytic Function of Synthetic IgG-Binding Domain (Z Domain) from Staphylococcal Protein A: Light Emission with Coelenterazine.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara-Miura, Yuiko

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic IgG-binding domain (Z domain) of staphylococcal protein A catalyzes the oxidation of coelenterazine to emit light like a coelenterazine-utilizing luciferase. The Z domain derivatives (ZZ-gCys, Z-gCys and Z-domain) were purified and the luminescence properties were characterized by comparing with coelenterazine-utilizing luciferases, including Renilla luciferase, Gaussia luciferase and the catalytic 19 kDa protein of Oplophorus luciferase. Three Z domain derivatives showed luminescence activity with coelenterazine and the order of the initial maximum intensity of luminescence was ZZ-gCys (100%) > Z-gCys (36.8%) > Z-domain (1.1%) > bovine serum albumin (BSA; 0.9%) > staphylococcal protein A (0.1%) and the background value of coelenterazine (0.1%) in our conditions. The luminescence properties of ZZ-gCys showed the similarity to that of Gaussia luciferase, including the luminescence pattern, the emission spectrum, the stimulation by halogen ions and nonionic detergents and the substrate specificity for coelenterazine analogues. In contrast, the luminescence properties of Z-gCys were close to the catalytic 19 kDa protein of Oplophorus luciferase. The catalytic region of the Z domain for the luminescence reaction might be different from the IgG-binding region of the Z domain. PMID:24138575

  11. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  12. Direct binding of specific AUF1 isoforms to tandem zinc finger domains of tristetraprolin (TTP) family proteins.

    PubMed

    Kedar, Vishram P; Zucconi, Beth E; Wilson, Gerald M; Blackshear, Perry J

    2012-02-17

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype of a family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins that can bind to AU-rich elements in mRNAs and promote their decay. TTP binds to mRNA through its central tandem zinc finger domain; it then promotes mRNA deadenylation, considered to be the rate-limiting step in eukaryotic mRNA decay. We found that TTP and its related family members could bind to certain isoforms of another AU-rich element-binding protein, HNRNPD/AUF1, as well as a related protein, laAUF1. The interaction domain within AUF1p45 appeared to be a C-terminal "GY" region, and the interaction domain within TTP was the tandem zinc finger domain. Surprisingly, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP occurred even with TTP mutants that lacked RNA binding activity. In cell extracts, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP potentiated TTP binding to ARE-containing RNA probes, as determined by RNA gel shift assays; AUF1p45 did not bind to the RNA probes under these conditions. Using purified, recombinant proteins and a synthetic RNA target in FRET assays, we demonstrated that AUF1p45, but not AUF1p37, increased TTP binding affinity for RNA ∼5-fold. These data suggest that certain isoforms of AUF1 can serve as "co-activators" of TTP family protein binding to RNA. The results raise interesting questions about the ability of AUF1 isoforms to regulate the mRNA binding and decay-promoting activities of TTP and its family members as well as the ability of AUF1 proteins to serve as possible physical links between TTP and other mRNA decay proteins and structures.

  13. Carbohydrate-binding module 74 is a novel starch-binding domain associated with large and multidomain α-amylase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Valk, Vincent; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-06-01

    Microbacterium aurum B8.A is a bacterium that originates from a potato starch-processing plant and employs a GH13 α-amylase (MaAmyA) enzyme that forms pores in potato starch granules. MaAmyA is a large and multi-modular protein that contains a novel domain at its C terminus (Domain 2). Deletion of Domain 2 from MaAmyA did not affect its ability to degrade starch granules but resulted in a strong reduction in granular pore size. Here, we separately expressed and purified this Domain 2 in Escherichia coli and determined its likely function in starch pore formation. Domain 2 independently binds amylose, amylopectin, and granular starch but does not have any detectable catalytic (hydrolytic or oxidizing) activity on α-glucan substrates. Therefore, we propose that this novel starch-binding domain is a new carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), the first representative of family CBM74 that assists MaAmyA in efficient pore formation in starch granules. Protein sequence-based BLAST searches revealed that CBM74 occurs widespread, but in bacteria only, and is often associated with large and multi-domain α-amylases containing family CBM25 or CBM26 domains. CBM74 may specifically function in binding to granular starches to enhance the capability of α-amylase enzymes to degrade resistant starches (RSs). Interestingly, the majority of family CBM74 representatives are found in α-amylases originating from human gut-associated Bifidobacteria, where they may assist in resistant starch degradation. The CBM74 domain thus may have a strong impact on the efficiency of RS digestion in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27101946

  14. Structural and histone binding ability characterization of the ARB2 domain of a histone deacetylase Hda1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Zhu, Yuwei; Wang, Chongyuan; Yan, Hui; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Hda1 is the catalytic core component of the H2B- and H3- specific histone deacetylase (HDAC) complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is involved in the epigenetic repression and plays a crucial role in transcriptional regulation and developmental events. Though the N-terminal catalytic HDAC domain of Hda1 is well characterized, the function of the C-terminal ARB2 domain remains unknown. In this study, we determine the crystal structure of the ARB2 domain from S. cerevisiae Hda1 at a resolution of 2.7 Å. The ARB2 domain displays an α/β sandwich architecture with an arm protruding outside. Two ARB2 domain molecules form a compact homo-dimer via the arm elements, and assemble as an inverse “V” shape. The pull-down and ITC results reveal that the ARB2 domain possesses the histone binding ability, recognizing both the H2A-H2B dimer and H3-H4 tetramer. Perturbation of the dimer interface abolishes the histone binding ability of the ARB2 domain, indicating that the unique dimer architecture of the ARB2 domain coincides with the function for anchoring to histone. Collectively, our data report the first structure of the ARB2 domain and disclose its histone binding ability, which is of benefit for understanding the deacetylation reaction catalyzed by the class II Hda1 HDAC complex. PMID:27665728

  15. BS69/ZMYND11 C-Terminal Domains Bind and Inhibit EBNA2

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Xu, Muyu; Martinez, Ernest; Peng, Chih-Wen; Song, Jikui

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) plays an important role in driving immortalization of EBV-infected B cells through regulating the expression of many viral and cellular genes. We report a structural study of the tumor suppressor BS69/ZMYND11 C-terminal region, comprised of tandem coiled-coil-MYND domains (BS69CC-MYND), in complex with an EBNA2 peptide containing a PXLXP motif. The coiled-coil domain of BS69 self-associates to bring two separate MYND domains in close proximity, thereby enhancing the BS69 MYND-EBNA2 interaction. ITC analysis of BS69CC-MYND with a C-terminal fragment of EBNA2 further suggests that the BS69CC-MYND homodimer synergistically binds to the two EBNA2 PXLXP motifs that are respectively located in the conserved regions CR7 and CR8. Furthermore, we showed that EBNA2 interacts with BS69 and down-regulates its expression at both mRNA and protein levels in EBV-infected B cells. Ectopic BS69CC-MYND is recruited to viral target promoters through interactions with EBNA2, inhibits EBNA2-mediated transcription activation, and impairs proliferation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Substitution of critical residues in the MYND domain impairs the BS69-EBNA2 interaction and abolishes the BS69 inhibition of the EBNA2-mediated transactivation and LCL proliferation. This study identifies the BS69 C-terminal domains as an inhibitor of EBNA2, which may have important implications in development of novel therapeutic strategies against EBV infection. PMID:26845565

  16. Identification of a novel human subfamily of mitochondrial carriers with calcium-binding domains.

    PubMed

    del Arco, Araceli; Satrústegui, Jorgina

    2004-06-01

    Aralar1 and citrin were identified as calcium binding aspartate/glutamate carriers (AGC) in mitochondria. The presence of calcium binding motifs facing the extramitochondrial space allows the regulation of the transport activity of these carriers by cytosolic calcium and provides a new mechanism to transduce calcium signals in mitochondria without the requirement of calcium entry in the organelle. We now report the complete characterization of a second subfamily of human calcium binding mitochondrial carriers named SCaMC (short calcium-binding mitochondrial carriers). We have identified three SCaMC genes in the human genome. All code for highly conserved proteins (about 70-80% identity), of about 500 amino acids with a characteristic mitochondrial carrier domain at the C terminus, and an N-terminal extension harboring four EF-hand binding motifs with high similarity to calmodulin. All SCaMC proteins were found to be located exclusively in mitochondria, and their N-terminal extensions were dispensable for the correct mitochondrial targeting of the polypeptides. SCaMC-1 is the human orthologue of the rabbit Efinal protein, which was reported to be located in peroxisomes, and SCaMC-2 is the human orthologue of the rat MCSC protein, described as up-regulated by dexamethasone in AR42J cells. One of the SCaMC genes, SCaMC-2, has four variants generated by alternative splicing, resulting in proteins with a common C terminus but with variations in their N-terminal halves, including the loss of one to three EF-hand motifs. These results make SCaMC one of most complex subfamilies of mitochondrial carriers and suggest that the large number of isoforms and splice variants may confer different calcium sensitivity to the transport activity of these carriers.

  17. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.

  18. Novel missense mutation in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of HERG causes long QT syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Satler, C.A.; Walsh, E.P.; Vesely, M.R.

    1996-10-02

    Autosomal-dominant long QT syndrome (LQT) is an inherited disorder, predisposing affected individuals to sudden death from tachyarrhythmias. To identify the gene(s) responsible for LQT, we identified and characterized an LQT family consisting of 48 individuals. DNA was screened with 150 microsatellite polymorphic markers encompassing approximately 70% of the genome. We found evidence for linkage of the LQT phenotype to chromosome 7(q35-36). Marker D7S636 yielded a maximum lod score of 6.93 at a recombination fraction ({theta}) of 0.00. Haplotype analysis further localized the LQT gene within a 6-2-cM interval. HERG encodes a potassium channel which has been mapped to this region. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analyses demonstrated aberrant bands that were unique to all affected individuals. DNA sequencing of the aberrant bands demonstrated a G to A substitution in all affected patients; this point mutation results in the substitution of a highly conserved valine residue with a methionine (V822M) in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of this potassium channel. The cosegregation of this distinct mutation with LQT demonstrates that HERG is the LQT gene in this pedigree. Furthermore, the location and character of this mutation suggests that the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the potassium channel encoded by HERG plays an important role in normal cardiac repolarization and may decrease susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. 38 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2014-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors. PMID:25286857

  20. Expression and Purification of Functional Ligand-binding Domains of T1R3 Taste Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,Y.; Hobbs, J.; Vigues, S.; Olson, W.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2006-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors, including odor, taste, and vomeronasal receptors, comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the mammalian genome. However, little is known about the molecular determinants that are critical for the detection and discrimination of ligands by most of these receptors. This dearth of understanding is due in part to difficulties in preparing functional receptors suitable for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Here we describe in detail two strategies for the expression and purification of the ligand-binding domain of T1R taste receptors, which are constituents of the sweet and umami taste receptors. These class C GPCRs contain a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) that is the site of interaction with most ligands and that is amenable to expression as a separate polypeptide in heterologous cells. The NTD of mouse T1R3 was expressed as two distinct fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by column chromatography. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified NTD proteins shows them to be properly folded and capable of binding ligands. This methodology should not only facilitate the characterization of T1R ligand interactions but may also be useful for dissecting the function of other class C GPCRs such as the large family of orphan V2R vomeronasal receptors.

  1. Structural Basis and Function of XRN2-Binding by XTB Domains

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Hannes; Katic, Iskra; Gut, Heinz; Großhans, Helge

    2016-01-01

    The ribonuclease XRN2 is an essential player in RNA metabolism. In Caenorhabditis elegans, XRN2 functions with PAXT-1, which shares a putative XRN2-binding domain (XTBD) with otherwise unrelated mammalian proteins. Here, we characterize structure and function of an XTBD – XRN2 complex. Although XTBD stably interconnects two XRN2 domains through numerous interacting residues, mutation of a single critical residue suffices to disrupt XTBD – XRN2 complexes in vitro, and recapitulates paxt-1 null mutant phenotypes in vivo. Demonstrating conservation of function, vertebrate XTBD-containing proteins bind XRN2 in vitro, and human CDKN2AIPNL (C2AIL) can substitute for PAXT-1 in vivo. In vertebrates, where three distinct XTBD-containing proteins exist, XRN2 may partition to distinct stable heterodimeric complexes, likely differing in subcellular localization or function. In C. elegans, complex formation with the unique PAXT-1 serves to preserve the stability of XRN2 in the absence of substrate. PMID:26779609

  2. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    DOE PAGES

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; et al

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, themore » high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.« less

  3. The N-terminal fingers of chicken GATA-2 and GATA-3 are independent sequence-specific DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Pedone, P V; Omichinski, J G; Nony, P; Trainor, C; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M; Felsenfeld, G

    1997-05-15

    The GATA family of vertebrate DNA binding regulatory proteins are expressed in diverse tissues and at different times of development. However, the DNA binding regions of these proteins possess considerable homology and recognize a rather similar range of DNA sequence motifs. DNA binding is mediated through two domains, each containing a zinc finger. Previous results have led to the conclusion that although in some cases the N-terminal finger can contribute to specificity and strength of binding, it does not bind independently, whereas the C-terminal finger is both necessary and sufficient for binding. Here we show that although this is true for the N-terminal finger of GATA-1, those of GATA-2 and GATA-3 are capable of strong independent binding with a preference for the motif GATC. Binding requires the presence of two basic regions located on either side of the N-terminal finger. The absence of one of these near the GATA-1 N-terminal finger probably accounts for its inability to bind. The combination of a single finger and two basic regions is a new variant of a motif that has been previously found in the binding domains of other finger proteins. Our results suggest that the DNA binding properties of the N-terminal finger may help distinguish GATA-2 and GATA-3 from GATA-1 and the other GATA family members in their selective regulatory roles in vivo. PMID:9184231

  4. Insights into the Binding of Phenyltiocarbamide (PTC) Agonist to Its Target Human TAS2R38 Bitter Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Giorgetti, Alejandro; Lanzara, Carmela; Gasparini, Paolo; Carloni, Paolo; Born, Stephan; Brockhoff, Anne; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Humans' bitter taste perception is mediated by the hTAS2R subfamily of the G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs). Structural information on these receptors is currently limited. Here we identify residues involved in the binding of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and in receptor activation in one of the most widely studied hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R38) by means of structural bioinformatics and molecular docking. The predictions are validated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments that involve specific residues located in the putative binding site and trans-membrane (TM) helices 6 and 7 putatively involved in receptor activation. Based on our measurements, we suggest that (i) residue N103 participates actively in PTC binding, in line with previous computational studies. (ii) W99, M100 and S259 contribute to define the size and shape of the binding cavity. (iii) W99 and M100, along with F255 and V296, play a key role for receptor activation, providing insights on bitter taste receptor activation not emerging from the previously reported computational models. PMID:20811630

  5. Insights into the binding of Phenyltiocarbamide (PTC) agonist to its target human TAS2R38 bitter receptor.

    PubMed

    Biarnés, Xevi; Marchiori, Alessandro; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Lanzara, Carmela; Gasparini, Paolo; Carloni, Paolo; Born, Stephan; Brockhoff, Anne; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Humans' bitter taste perception is mediated by the hTAS2R subfamily of the G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs). Structural information on these receptors is currently limited. Here we identify residues involved in the binding of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and in receptor activation in one of the most widely studied hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R38) by means of structural bioinformatics and molecular docking. The predictions are validated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments that involve specific residues located in the putative binding site and trans-membrane (TM) helices 6 and 7 putatively involved in receptor activation. Based on our measurements, we suggest that (i) residue N103 participates actively in PTC binding, in line with previous computational studies. (ii) W99, M100 and S259 contribute to define the size and shape of the binding cavity. (iii) W99 and M100, along with F255 and V296, play a key role for receptor activation, providing insights on bitter taste receptor activation not emerging from the previously reported computational models. PMID:20811630

  6. Structure-Based Identification, Characterization, and Disruption of Human Securin-Binding SH3 Domains in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Keping; Qiu, Tiefeng; Li, Xianwen

    2016-05-27

    The human securin is an oncogenic transcription factor that has been found to promote migration and invasion of lung cancer and many other tumors. The protein contains a PxxP motif that can be recognized and bound by diverse cellular partners via Src homology (SH3) domain to regulate biological and pathological events. The motif is covered by a decapeptide segment (161)LGPPSPVKMP(170) (SecPeptide) as the potential binding site of SH3 domains. Here, we attempted to systemically identify the SH3 binding partners of human securin in lung cancer and to characterize the intermolecular interaction between SecPeptide and the identified SH3 domains. A bioinformatics protocol that integrated literature curation, complex structural modeling, and binding affinity analysis was described to perform systematic search against an array of SH3-containing proteins involved in lung cancer signaling pathway and, consequently, three putative domains, namely GRB2, CRK, and RasGAP, were identified that have high potential to recognize and bind SecPeptide. The molecular mechanism and biological implication underlying the intermolecular interaction between these domains and SecPetide were investigated at structural and energetic level. Surface plasmon resonance assay revealed a high or moderate affinity of SecPeptide and its two mutants binding to CRK-SH3 domain with dissociation constants Kd = 79.8, 24.2, and 64.6 µM, respectively. PMID:27210447

  7. Variola virus E3L Zα domain, but not its Z-DNA binding activity, is required for PKR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Meghna; Seo, Eun Joo; Dever, Thomas E

    2014-02-01

    Responding to viral infection, the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase PKR phosphorylates translation initiation factor eIF2α to inhibit cellular and viral protein synthesis. To overcome this host defense mechanism, many poxviruses express the protein E3L, containing an N-terminal Z-DNA binding (Zα) domain and a C-terminal dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD). While E3L is thought to inhibit PKR activation by sequestering dsRNA activators and by directly binding the kinase, the role of the Zα domain in PKR inhibition remains unclear. Here, we show that the E3L Zα domain is required to suppress the growth-inhibitory properties associated with expression of human PKR in yeast, to inhibit PKR kinase activity in vitro, and to reverse the inhibitory effects of PKR on reporter gene expression in mammalian cells treated with dsRNA. Whereas previous studies revealed that the Z-DNA binding activity of E3L is critical for viral pathogenesis, we identified point mutations in E3L that functionally uncouple Z-DNA binding and PKR inhibition. Thus, our studies reveal a molecular distinction between the nucleic acid binding and PKR inhibitory functions of the E3L Zα domain, and they support the notion that E3L contributes to viral pathogenesis by targeting PKR and other components of the cellular anti-viral defense pathway.

  8. Binding of beta gamma subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins to the PH domain of Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, S; Simon, M I; Witte, O N; Katz, A

    1994-01-01

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been implicated as the defective gene in both human and murine B-cell deficiencies. The identification of molecules that interact with Btk may shed light on critical processes in lymphocyte development. The N-terminal unique region of Btk contains a pleckstrin homology domain. This domain is found in a broad array of signaling molecules and implicated to function in protein-protein interactions. By using an in vitro binding assay and an in vivo competition assay, the pleckstrin homology domain of Btk was shown to interact with the beta gamma dimer of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). A highly conserved tryptophan residue in subdomain 6 of the pleckstrin homology domain was shown to play a critical role in the binding. The interaction of Btk with beta gamma suggests the existence of a unique connection between cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases and G proteins in cellular signal transduction. Images PMID:7972043

  9. Binding of basal transcription factor TFIIH to the acidic activation domains of VP16 and p53.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, H; Pearson, A; Coulombe, B; Truant, R; Zhang, S; Regier, J L; Triezenberg, S J; Reinberg, D; Flores, O; Ingles, C J

    1994-01-01

    Acidic transcriptional activation domains function well in both yeast and mammalian cells, and some have been shown to bind the general transcription factors TFIID and TFIIB. We now show that two acidic transactivators, herpes simplex virus VP16 and human p53, directly interact with the multisubunit human general transcription factor TFIIH and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae counterpart, factor b. The VP16- and p53-binding domains in these factors lie in the p62 subunit of TFIIH and in the homologous subunit, TFB1, of factor b. Point mutations in VP16 that reduce its transactivation activity in both yeast and mammalian cells weaken its binding to both yeast and human TFIIH. This suggests that binding of activation domains to TFIIH is an important aspect of transcriptional activation. Images PMID:7935417

  10. Recurrent hormone-binding domain truncated ESR1 amplifications in primary endometrial cancers suggest their implication in hormone independent growth.

    PubMed

    Holst, Frederik; Hoivik, Erling A; Gibson, William J; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Schumacher, Steven E; Asmann, Yan W; Grossmann, Patrick; Trovik, Jone; Necela, Brian M; Thompson, E Aubrey; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Salvesen, Helga B; Cherniack, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in both endometrial and breast cancers, and represents the most prevalent therapeutic target in breast cancer. However, anti-estrogen therapy has not been shown to be effective in endometrial cancer. Recently it has been shown that hormone-binding domain alterations of ERα in breast cancer contribute to acquired resistance to anti-estrogen therapy. In analyses of genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we observe that endometrial carcinomas manifest recurrent ESR1 gene amplifications that truncate the hormone-binding domain encoding region of ESR1 and are associated with reduced mRNA expression of exons encoding the hormone-binding domain. These findings support a role for hormone-binding alterations of ERα in primary endometrial cancer, with potentially important therapeutic implications. PMID:27160768

  11. Recurrent hormone-binding domain truncated ESR1 amplifications in primary endometrial cancers suggest their implication in hormone independent growth

    PubMed Central

    Holst, Frederik; Hoivik, Erling A.; Gibson, William J.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Schumacher, Steven E.; Asmann, Yan W.; Grossmann, Patrick; Trovik, Jone; Necela, Brian M.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Salvesen, Helga B.; Cherniack, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in both endometrial and breast cancers, and represents the most prevalent therapeutic target in breast cancer. However, anti-estrogen therapy has not been shown to be effective in endometrial cancer. Recently it has been shown that hormone-binding domain alterations of ERα in breast cancer contribute to acquired resistance to anti-estrogen therapy. In analyses of genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we observe that endometrial carcinomas manifest recurrent ESR1 gene amplifications that truncate the hormone-binding domain encoding region of ESR1 and are associated with reduced mRNA expression of exons encoding the hormone-binding domain. These findings support a role for hormone-binding alterations of ERα in primary endometrial cancer, with potentially important therapeutic implications. PMID:27160768

  12. ErbB3/HER3 intracellular domain is competent to bind ATP and catalyze autophosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Fumin; Telesco, Shannon E.; Liu, Yingting; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2010-06-21

    ErbB3/HER3 is one of four members of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER) or ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase family. ErbB3 binds neuregulins via its extracellular region and signals primarily by heterodimerizing with ErbB2/HER2/Neu. A recently appreciated role for ErbB3 in resistance of tumor cells to EGFR/ErbB2-targeted therapeutics has made it a focus of attention. However, efforts to inactivate ErbB3 therapeutically in parallel with other ErbB receptors are challenging because its intracellular kinase domain is thought to be an inactive pseudokinase that lacks several key conserved (and catalytically important) residues - including the catalytic base aspartate. We report here that, despite these sequence alterations, ErbB3 retains sufficient kinase activity to robustly trans-autophosphorylate its intracellular region - although it is substantially less active than EGFR and does not phosphorylate exogenous peptides. The ErbB3 kinase domain binds ATP with a K{sub d} of approximately 1.1 {micro}M. We describe a crystal structure of ErbB3 kinase bound to an ATP analogue, which resembles the inactive EGFR and ErbB4 kinase domains (but with a shortened {alpha}C-helix). Whereas mutations that destabilize this configuration activate EGFR and ErbB4 (and promote EGFR-dependent lung cancers), a similar mutation conversely inactivates ErbB3. Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we delineate a reaction pathway for ErbB3-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer that does not require the conserved catalytic base and can be catalyzed by the 'inactive-like'configuration observed crystallographically. These findings suggest that ErbB3 kinase activity within receptor dimers may be crucial for signaling and could represent an important therapeutic target.

  13. BuD, a helix–loop–helix DNA-binding domain for genome modification

    SciTech Connect

    Stella, Stefano; Molina, Rafael; López-Méndez, Blanca; Juillerat, Alexandre; Bertonati, Claudia; Daboussi, Fayza; Campos-Olivas, Ramon; Duchateau, Phillippe; Montoya, Guillermo

    2014-07-01

    Crystal structures of BurrH and the BurrH–DNA complex are reported. DNA editing offers new possibilities in synthetic biology and biomedicine for modulation or modification of cellular functions to organisms. However, inaccuracy in this process may lead to genome damage. To address this important problem, a strategy allowing specific gene modification has been achieved through the addition, removal or exchange of DNA sequences using customized proteins and the endogenous DNA-repair machinery. Therefore, the engineering of specific protein–DNA interactions in protein scaffolds is key to providing ‘toolkits’ for precise genome modification or regulation of gene expression. In a search for putative DNA-binding domains, BurrH, a protein that recognizes a 19 bp DNA target, was identified. Here, its apo and DNA-bound crystal structures are reported, revealing a central region containing 19 repeats of a helix–loop–helix modular domain (BurrH domain; BuD), which identifies the DNA target by a single residue-to-nucleotide code, thus facilitating its redesign for gene targeting. New DNA-binding specificities have been engineered in this template, showing that BuD-derived nucleases (BuDNs) induce high levels of gene targeting in a locus of the human haemoglobin β (HBB) gene close to mutations responsible for sickle-cell anaemia. Hence, the unique combination of high efficiency and specificity of the BuD arrays can push forward diverse genome-modification approaches for cell or organism redesign, opening new avenues for gene editing.

  14. Thermodynamics of Calcium binding to the Calmodulin N-terminal domain to evaluate site-specific affinity constants and cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Beccia, Maria Rosa; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Brémond, Nicolas; Pardoux, Romain; Blangy, Stéphanie; Guilbaud, Philippe; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential Ca(II)-dependent regulator of cell physiology. To understand its interaction with Ca(II) at a molecular level, it is essential to examine Ca(II) binding at each site of the protein, even if it is challenging to estimate the site-specific binding properties of the interdependent CaM-binding sites. In this study, we evaluated the site-specific Ca(II)-binding affinity of sites I and II of the N-terminal domain by combining site-directed mutagenesis and spectrofluorimetry. The mutations had very low impact on the protein structure and stability. We used these binding constants to evaluate the inter-site cooperativity energy and compared it with its lower limit value usually reported in the literature. We found that site I affinity for Ca(II) was 1.5 times that of site II and that cooperativity induced an approximately tenfold higher affinity for the second Ca(II)-binding event, as compared to the first one. We further showed that insertion of a tryptophan at position 7 of site II binding loop significantly increased site II affinity for Ca(II) and the intra-domain cooperativity. ΔH and ΔS parameters were studied by isothermal titration calorimetry for Ca(II) binding to site I, site II and to the entire N-terminal domain. They showed that calcium binding is mainly entropy driven for the first and second binding events. These findings provide molecular information on the structure-affinity relationship of the individual sites of the CaM N-terminal domain and new perspectives for the optimization of metal ion binding by mutating the EF-hand loops sequences.

  15. Crystal structure of a pair of follistatin-like and EF-hand calcium-binding domains in BM-40.

    PubMed Central

    Hohenester, E; Maurer, P; Timpl, R

    1997-01-01

    BM-40 (also known as SPARC or osteonectin) is an anti-adhesive secreted glycoprotein involved in tissue remodelling. Apart from an acidic N-terminal segment, BM-40 consists of a follistatin-like (FS) domain and an EF-hand calcium-binding (EC) domain. Here we report the crystal structure at 3.1 A resolution of the FS-EC domain pair of human BM-40. The two distinct domains interact through a small interface that involves the EF-hand pair of the EC domain. Residues implicated in cell binding, inhibition of cell spreading and disassembly of focal adhesions cluster on one face of BM-40, opposite the binding epitope for collagens and the N-linked carbohydra