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Sample records for agonist binding domain

  1. Agonist binding to the NMDA receptor drives movement of its cytoplasmic domain without ion flow.

    PubMed

    Dore, Kim; Aow, Jonathan; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-11-24

    The NMDA receptor (R) plays important roles in brain physiology and pathology as an ion channel. Here we examine the ion flow-independent coupling of agonist to the NMDAR cytoplasmic domain (cd). We measure FRET between fluorescently tagged cytoplasmic domains of GluN1 subunits of NMDARs expressed in neurons. Different neuronal compartments display varying levels of FRET, consistent with different NMDARcd conformations. Agonist binding drives a rapid and transient ion flow-independent reduction in FRET between GluN1 subunits within individual NMDARs. Intracellular infusion of an antibody targeting the GluN1 cytoplasmic domain blocks agonist-driven FRET changes in the absence of ion flow, supporting agonist-driven movement of the NMDARcd. These studies indicate that extracellular ligand binding to the NMDAR can transmit conformational information into the cell in the absence of ion flow. PMID:26553997

  2. Agonist binding to the NMDA receptor drives movement of its cytoplasmic domain without ion flow

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Kim; Aow, Jonathan; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (R) plays important roles in brain physiology and pathology as an ion channel. Here we examine the ion flow-independent coupling of agonist to the NMDAR cytoplasmic domain (cd). We measure FRET between fluorescently tagged cytoplasmic domains of GluN1 subunits of NMDARs expressed in neurons. Different neuronal compartments display varying levels of FRET, consistent with different NMDARcd conformations. Agonist binding drives a rapid and transient ion flow-independent reduction in FRET between GluN1 subunits within individual NMDARs. Intracellular infusion of an antibody targeting the GluN1 cytoplasmic domain blocks agonist-driven FRET changes in the absence of ion flow, supporting agonist-driven movement of the NMDARcd. These studies indicate that extracellular ligand binding to the NMDAR can transmit conformational information into the cell in the absence of ion flow. PMID:26553997

  3. Treatment for chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice using parathyroid hormone agonists and antagonists linked to a collagen binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Suda, Hirofumi; Miyata, Shigeru; Sakon, Joshua; Matsushita, Osamu; Gensure, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) agonists and antagonists have been shown to improve hair growth after chemotherapy; however, rapid clearance and systemic side-effects complicate their usage. To facilitate delivery and retention to skin, we fused PTH agonists and antagonists to the collagen binding domain (CBD) of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. in-vitro studies showed that the agonist fusion protein, PTH-CBD, bound collagen and activated the PTH/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor in SaOS-2 cells. The antagonist fusion proteins, PTH(7–33)-CBD and PTH([−1]–33)-CBD, also bound collagen and antagonized PTH(1–34) effect in SaOS-2 cells; however, PTH(7–33)-CBD had lower intrinsic activity. Distribution studies confirmed uptake of PTH-CBD to the skin at 1 and 12 hr after subcutaneous injection. We assessed in vivo efficacy of PTH-CBD and PTH(7–33)-CBD in C57BL/6J mice. Animals were depilated to synchronize the hair follicles; treated on Day 7 with agonist, antagonist, or vehicle; treated on Day 9 with cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle; and sacrificed on Day 39. Normal mice (no chemo and no treatment) showed rapid regrowth of hair and normal histology. Chemo + Vehicle mice showed reduced hair regrowth and decreased pigmentation; histology revealed reduced number and dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Chemo + Antagonist mice were grossly and histologically indistinguishable from Chemo + Vehicle mice. Chemo + Agonist mice showed more rapid regrowth and repigmentation of hair; histologically, there was a normal number of hair follicles, most of which were in the anagen phase. Overall, the agonist PTH-CBD had prominent effects in reducing chemotherapy-induced damage of hair follicles and may show promise as a therapy for chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:22130912

  4. Molecular blueprint of allosteric binding sites in a homologue of the agonist-binding domain of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Spurny, Radovan; Debaveye, Sarah; Farinha, Ana; Veys, Ken; Vos, Ann M.; Gossas, Thomas; Atack, John; Bertrand, Sonia; Bertrand, Daniel; Danielson, U. Helena; Tresadern, Gary; Ulens, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) belongs to the family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels and is involved in fast synaptic signaling. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified chimera of the extracellular domain of the native α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and acetylcholine binding protein, termed α7-AChBP. This chimeric receptor was used to conduct an innovative fragment-library screening in combination with X-ray crystallography to identify allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site is surface-exposed and is located near the N-terminal α-helix of the extracellular domain. Ligand binding at this site causes a conformational change of the α-helix as the fragment wedges between the α-helix and a loop homologous to the main immunogenic region of the muscle α1 subunit. A second site is located in the vestibule of the receptor, in a preexisting intrasubunit pocket opposite the agonist binding site and corresponds to a previously identified site involved in positive allosteric modulation of the bacterial homolog ELIC. A third site is located at a pocket right below the agonist binding site. Using electrophysiological recordings on the human α7 nAChR we demonstrate that the identified fragments, which bind at these sites, can modulate receptor activation. This work presents a structural framework for different allosteric binding sites in the α7 nAChR and paves the way for future development of novel allosteric modulators with therapeutic potential. PMID:25918415

  5. A Structural Switch between Agonist and Antagonist Bound Conformations for a Ligand-Optimized Model of the Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Arden; Phillips, Jessica L.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Perdew, Gary H.; Kolluri, Siva K.; Bisson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse group of genes. Exogenous AHR ligands include the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which is a potent agonist, and the synthetic AHR antagonist N-2-(1H-indol-3yl)ethyl)-9-isopropyl-2-(5-methylpyridin-3-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351). As no experimentally determined structure of the ligand binding domain exists, homology models have been utilized for virtual ligand screening (VLS) to search for novel ligands. Here, we have developed an “agonist-optimized” homology model of the human AHR ligand binding domain, and this model aided in the discovery of two human AHR agonists by VLS. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of an agonist TCDD-bound and antagonist GNF351-bound version of this model in order to gain insights into the mechanics of the AHR ligand-binding pocket. These simulations identified residues 307–329 as a flexible segment of the AHR ligand pocket that adopts discrete conformations upon agonist or antagonist binding. This flexible segment of the AHR may act as a structural switch that determines the agonist or antagonist activity of a given AHR ligand. PMID:25329374

  6. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L.

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  7. Involvement of the N-terminal region of the human mineralocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domain in agonist and antagonist binding as revealed by a new monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Jalaguier, S; Lupo, B; Hugon, G; Rafestin-Oblin, M E; Auzou, G

    1997-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the mechanism of binding to the human mineralocorticoid receptor (hMR), we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb) raised against the hormone-binding domain (HBD). For this purpose, mice were immunized with a fusion protein including the sequence Thr729-Lys984 of hMR. After ELISA screening, mAb 18C7 was selected for its specificity towards the HBD. This antibody recognized both the denatured and native MR forms, as well as the hetero-oligomeric MR form and the transformed MR state. By using several HBD subfragments, the mAb 18C7 epitope was located in the N-terminal region of the HBD from Thr729 to Leu765. We then studied the effect of the antibody on aldosterone and progesterone binding to the hMR. When 18C7 was incubated with liganded MR, it was able to partly displace (20%) the hormone from its binding site. When 18C7 was incubated with MR before aldosterone or progesterone, the antibody inhibited 75-80% of the binding. The effect of 18C7 on the binding was similar with both hormones. A sucrose gradient analysis indicated the simultaneous presence of two kinds of receptor complexes: the steroid-MR complex and the antibody-MR complex. After its associated proteins, especially the heat-shock protein hsp90, had been cross-linked with the hMR by dimethylpimelimidate, 18C7 was still able to react with the receptor. Our results indicated that the epitope recognized by 18C7 was directly implicated in hormone binding. The lack of steroid binding of HBD mutants with the Thr729-Leu765 sequence deleted [Jalaguier, Mesnier, Léger and Auzou (1996) J. Steroid Biochem. Mol. Biol. 57, 43-50] supports this hypothesis. Because of the similar behaviours of aldosterone and progesterone, we conclude that the N-terminal Thr729-Leu765 region of the HBD is similarly involved in the binding of both hormones. PMID:9164841

  8. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 acts in concert with the cholecystokinin receptor agonist, cerulein, to induce IL-33-dependent chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Sadakane, Y; Yagama, N; Sakurai, T; Ezoe, H; Kudo, M; Chiba, T; Strober, W

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) fulfills important host-defense functions via its responses to a variety of gut pathogens. Recently, however, we showed that in acute pancreatitis caused by administration of cholecystokinin receptor (CCKR) agonist (cerulein) NOD1 also has a role in inflammation via its responses to gut commensal organisms. In the present study, we explored the long-term outcome of such NOD1 responsiveness in a new model of chronic pancreatitis induced by repeated administration of low doses of cerulein in combination with NOD1 ligand. We found that the development of chronic pancreatitis in this model requires intact NOD1 and type I IFN signaling and that such signaling mediates a macrophage-mediated inflammatory response that supports interleukin (IL)-33 production by acinar cells. The IL-33, in turn, has a necessary role in the induction of IL-13 and TGF-β1, factors causing the fibrotic reaction characteristic of chronic pancreatitis. Interestingly, the Th2 effects of IL-33 were attenuated by the concomitant type I IFN response since the inflammation was marked by clear increases in IFN-γ and TNF-α production but only marginal increases in IL-4 production. These studies establish chronic pancreatitis as an IL-33-dependent inflammation resulting from synergistic interactions between the NOD1 and CCKR signaling pathways. PMID:26813347

  9. Open tubular columns containing the immobilized ligand binding domain of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and γ for dual agonists characterization by frontal affinity chromatography with MS detection

    PubMed Central

    Temporini, C.; Pochetti, G.; Fracchiolla, G.; Piemontese, L.; Montanari, R.; Moaddel, R.; Laghezza, A.; Altieri, F.; Cervoni, L.; Ubiali, D.; Prada, E.; Loiodice, F.; Massolini, G.; Calleri, E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily. In the last years novel PPARs ligands have been identified and these include PPARα/γ dual agonists. To rapidly identify novel PPARs dual ligands, a robust binding assay amenable to high-throughput screening towards PPAR isoforms would be desirable. In this work we describe a parallel assay based on the principles of Frontal Affinity Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (FAC-MS) that can be used to characterize dual agonists. For this purpose the ligand binding domain of PPARα receptor was immobilized onto the surface of open tubular capillaries to create new PPAR-alpha-OT columns to be used in parallel with PPAR-gamma-OT columns. The two biochromatographic systems were used in both ranking and Kd experiments towards new ureidofibrate-like dual agonists for subtype selectivity ratio determination. In order to validate the system, the Kd values determined by frontal analysis chromatography were compared to the affinity constants obtained by ITC experiments. The results of this study strongly demonstrate the specific nature of the interaction of the ligands with the two immobilized receptor subtypes. PMID:23466198

  10. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  11. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  12. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    PubMed

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  13. Defining Nicotinic Agonist Binding Surfaces through Photoaffinity Labeling†

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Maltby, David; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Zhang, Nanjing; Durkin, Kathleen A.; Presley, Jack; Talley, Todd T.; Taylor, Palmer; Burlingame, Alma L.; Casida, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChR) agonists are potential therapeutic agents for neurological dysfunction. In the present study, the homopentameric mollusk ACh binding protein (AChBP), used as a surrogate for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the nAChR, was specifically derivatized by the highly potent agonist azidoepibatidine (AzEPI) prepared as a photoaffinity probe and radioligand. One EPI-nitrene photoactivated molecule was incorporated in each subunit interface binding site based on analysis of the intact derivatized protein. Tryptic fragments of the modified AChBP were analyzed by collision-induced dissociation and Edman sequencing of radiolabeled peptides. Each specific EPI-nitrene-modified site involved either Tyr195 of loop C on the principal or (+)-face or Met116 of loop E on the complementary or (−)-face. The two derivatization sites were observed in similar frequency, providing evidence of the reactivity of the azido/nitrene probe substituent and close proximity to both residues. [3H]AzEPI binds to the α4β2 nAChR at a single high-affinity site and photoaffinity-labels only the α4 subunit, presumably modifying Tyr225 spatially corresponding to Tyr195 of AChBP. Phe137 of the β2 nAChR subunit, equivalent to Met116 of AChBP, conceivably lacks sufficient reactivity with the nitrene generated from the probe. The present photoaffinity labeling in a physiologically relevant condition combined with the crystal structure of AChBP allows development of precise structural models for the AzEPI interactions with AChBP and α4β2 nAChR. These findings enabled us to use AChBP as a structural surrogate to define the nAChR agonist site. PMID:17614369

  14. Computational modeling toward understanding agonist binding on dopamine 3.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaxue; Lu, Xuefeng; Yang, Chao-Yie; Huang, Zhimin; Fu, Wei; Hou, Tingjun; Zhang, Jian

    2010-09-27

    The dopamine 3 (D3) receptor is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of nervous system disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, and current research interests primarily focus on the discovery/design of potent D3 agonists. Herein, a well-designed computational protocol, which combines pharmacophore identification, homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was employed to understand the agonist binding on D3 aiming to provide insights into the development of novel potent D3 agonists. We (1) identified the chemical features required in effective D3 agonists by pharmacophore modeling based upon 18 known diverse D3 agonists; (2) constructed the three-dimensional (3D) structure of D3 based on homology modeling and the pharmacophore hypothesis; (3) identified the binding modes of the agonists to D3 by the correlation between the predicted binding free energies and the experimental values; and (4) investigated the induced fit of D3 upon agonist binding through MD simulations. The pharmacophore models of the D3 agonists and the 3D structure of D3 can be used for either ligand- or receptor-based drug design. Furthermore, the MD simulations further give the insight that the long and flexible EL2 acts as a "door" for agonist binding, and the "ionic lock" at the bottom of TM3 and TM6 is essential to transduce the activation signal. PMID:20695484

  15. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  16. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  17. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  18. Role of extracellular domain dimerization in agonist-induced activation of natriuretic peptide receptor A.

    PubMed

    Parat, Marie; McNicoll, Normand; Wilkes, Brian; Fournier, Alain; De Léan, André

    2008-02-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR) A is composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) with a ligand binding site, a single transmembrane region, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. The natural agonists atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP) bind and activate NPRA, leading to cyclic GMP production, which is responsible for their role in cardiovascular homeostasis. Previous studies suggested that stabilization of a dimeric form of NPRA by agonist is essential for receptor activation. However, ligand specificity and sequential steps of this dimerization process have not been investigated. We used radioligand binding, fluorescence resonance energy transfer homoquenching, and molecular modeling to characterize the interaction of human NPRA-ECD with ANP, BNP, the superagonist (Arg(10),Leu(12),Ser(17),Leu(18))-rANP-(1-28), the minimized analog mini-ANP and the antagonist (Arg(6),beta-cyclohexyl-Ala(8),d-Tic(16),Arg(17),Cys(18))-rANP-(6-18)-amide (A71915). ANP binds to preformed ECD dimers and spontaneous dimerization is the rate-limiting step of the ligand binding process. All the studied peptides, including A71915 antagonist, induce a dose-dependent fluorescence homoquenching, specific to dimerization, with potencies highly correlated with their binding affinities. A71915 induced more quenching than other peptides, suggesting stabilization by the antagonist of ECD dimer in a distinct inactive conformation. In summary, these results indicate that the ligand-induced dimerization process of NPRA is different from that for cytokine receptor model. Agonists or antagonists bind to preformed dimeric ECD, leading to dimer stabilization in an active or inactive conformation, respectively. Furthermore, the highly sensitive fluorescence assay designed to assess dimerization could serve as a powerful tool for further detailing the kinetic steps involved in natriuretic peptide receptor binding and activation. PMID:17965196

  19. Binding mode prediction of aplysiatoxin, a potent agonist of protein kinase C, through molecular simulation and structure-activity study on simplified analogs of the receptor-recognition domain.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Yoshiki; Yanagita, Ryo C; Takahashi, Chise; Kawanami, Yasuhiro; Irie, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-15

    Aplysiatoxin (ATX) is a naturally occurring tumor promoter isolated from a sea hare and cyanobacteria. ATX binds to, and activates, protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes and shows anti-proliferative activity against human cancer cell lines. Recently, ATX has attracted attention as a lead compound for the development of novel anticancer drugs. In order to predict the binding mode between ATX and protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) C1B domain, we carried out molecular docking simulation, atomistic molecular dynamics simulation in phospholipid membrane environment, and structure-activity study on a simple acyclic analog of ATX. These studies provided the binding model where the carbonyl group at position 27, the hydroxyl group at position 30, and the phenolic hydroxyl group at position 20 of ATX were involved in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the PKCδ C1B domain, which would be useful for the rational design of ATX derivatives as anticancer lead compounds. PMID:27436807

  20. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site. PMID:27298318

  1. Ascorbic acid enables reversible dopamine receptor /sup 3/H-agonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.; Sibley, D.R.; Hamblin, M.; Creese, I.

    1981-11-16

    The effects of ascorbic acid on dopaminergic /sup 3/H-agonist receptor binding were studied in membrane homogenates of bovine anterior pituitary and caudate, and rat striatum. In all tissues virtually no stereospecific binding (defined using 1uM (+)butaclamol) of the /sup 3/H-agonists N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA), apomorphine, or dopamine could be demonstrated in the absence of ascorbic acid. Although levels of total /sup 3/H-agonist binding were three to five times greater in the absence than in the presence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, the increased binding was entirely non-stereospecific. Greater amounts of dopamine-inhibitable /sup 3/H-NPA binding could be demonstrated in the absence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, but this measure of ''specific binding'' was demonstrated not to represent dopamine receptor binding since several other catecholamines and catechol were equipotent with dopamine and more potent than the dopamine agonist (+/-)amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) in inhibiting this binding. High levels of dopamine-displaceable /sup 3/H-agonist binding were detected in fresh and boiled homogenates of cerebellum, an area of brain which receives no dopaminergic innervation, further demonstrating the non-specific nature of /sup 3/H-agonist binding in the absence of ascorbic acid. These studies emphasize that under typical assay conditions ascorbic acid is required in order to demonstrate reversible and specific /sup 3/H-agonist binding to dopamine receptors.

  2. Functional map of arrestin binding to phosphorylated opsin, with and without agonist.

    PubMed

    Peterhans, Christian; Lally, Ciara C M; Ostermaier, Martin K; Sommer, Martha E; Standfuss, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Arrestins desensitize G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and act as mediators of signalling. Here we investigated the interactions of arrestin-1 with two functionally distinct forms of the dim-light photoreceptor rhodopsin. Using unbiased scanning mutagenesis we probed the individual contribution of each arrestin residue to the interaction with the phosphorylated apo-receptor (Ops-P) and the agonist-bound form (Meta II-P). Disruption of the polar core or displacement of the C-tail strengthened binding to both receptor forms. In contrast, mutations of phosphate-binding residues (phosphosensors) suggest the phosphorylated receptor C-terminus binds arrestin differently for Meta II-P and Ops-P. Likewise, mutations within the inter-domain interface, variations in the receptor-binding loops and the C-edge of arrestin reveal different binding modes. In summary, our results indicate that arrestin-1 binding to Meta II-P and Ops-P is similarly dependent on arrestin activation, although the complexes formed with these two receptor forms are structurally distinct. PMID:27350090

  3. Functional map of arrestin binding to phosphorylated opsin, with and without agonist

    PubMed Central

    Peterhans, Christian; Lally, Ciara C. M.; Ostermaier, Martin K.; Sommer, Martha E.; Standfuss, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Arrestins desensitize G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and act as mediators of signalling. Here we investigated the interactions of arrestin-1 with two functionally distinct forms of the dim-light photoreceptor rhodopsin. Using unbiased scanning mutagenesis we probed the individual contribution of each arrestin residue to the interaction with the phosphorylated apo-receptor (Ops-P) and the agonist-bound form (Meta II-P). Disruption of the polar core or displacement of the C-tail strengthened binding to both receptor forms. In contrast, mutations of phosphate-binding residues (phosphosensors) suggest the phosphorylated receptor C-terminus binds arrestin differently for Meta II-P and Ops-P. Likewise, mutations within the inter-domain interface, variations in the receptor-binding loops and the C-edge of arrestin reveal different binding modes. In summary, our results indicate that arrestin-1 binding to Meta II-P and Ops-P is similarly dependent on arrestin activation, although the complexes formed with these two receptor forms are structurally distinct. PMID:27350090

  4. Direct measurement of agonist binding to genetically engineered peptides of the acetylcholine receptor by selective T sub 1 NMR relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Y.; Navon, G. ); Aronheim, A.; Gershoni, J.M. )

    1990-03-13

    Interactions of four ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with genetically engineered peptides have been studied by NMR. A recombinant cholinergic binding site was prepared as a fusion protein between a truncated form of the bacterial protein trpE and a peptide corresponding to the sequence {alpha}184-200 from the Torpedo californica receptor. This construct binds {alpha}-bungarotoxin while the trpE protein alone does not, and thus serves as a negative control. In this study agonist binding to {alpha}184-200 is demonstrated by monitoring the T{sub 1} relaxation of the ligand's protons in the presence and absence of the recombinant binding site. This binding is specific as it can be competed with {alpha}-bungarotoxin. Quantitative analyses of such competitions yielded the concentration of binding sites, which corresponded to 3.3% and 16.5% of the total protein, for partially purified and affinity-purified {alpha}184-200 constructs, respectively. The K{sub D} values for the binding of acetylcholine, nicotine, d-tubocurarine, and gallamine to the affinity-purified construct were 1.4, 1.4, 0.20, and 0.21 mM, respectively, while K{sub D}'s with the nontoxin binding protein were all above 10 mM. Thus, this is a direct demonstration that the toxin binding domain {alpha}184-200 may comprise a major component of the cholinergic agonist site.

  5. The monocyte binding domain(s) on human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Nik Jaafar, M I; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1984-06-01

    Monocyte binding has previously been assigned to the C gamma 3 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) largely on the ability of the pFc' fragment to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. This ability is markedly reduced compared to the intact parent IgG. We find this result with a conventional pFc' preparation but this preparation is found to contain trace contamination of parent IgG as demonstrated by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies directed against C gamma 2 domain and light-chain epitopes of human IgG. Extensive immunoaffinity purification of the pFc' preparation removes its inhibitory ability indicating that this originates in the trace contamination of parent IgG (or Fc). Neither of the human IgG1 paraproteins TIM, lacking the C gamma 2 domain, or SIZ, lacking the C gamma 3 domain, are found to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. The hinge-deleted IgG1 Dob protein shows little or no inhibitory ability. Indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain in monocyte binding is considered. We suggest finally that the site of interaction is found either on the C gamma 2 domain alone or between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains. PMID:6235444

  6. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  7. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  8. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  9. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  10. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na+ in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na+-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na+ sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na+ increased cell surface [3H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na+ by Cs+ or NH4+ inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na+ over Cs+. Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  11. Mapping the agonist binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Orientation requirements for activation by covalent agonist.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, D A; Cohen, J B

    2000-04-28

    To characterize the structural requirements for ligand orientation compatible with activation of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), we used Cys mutagenesis in conjunction with sulfhydryl-reactive reagents to tether primary or quaternary amines at defined positions within the agonist binding site of nAChRs containing mutant alpha- or gamma-subunits expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 4-(N-Maleimido)benzyltrimethylammonium and 2-aminoethylmethanethiosulfonate acted as irreversible antagonists when tethered at alphaY93C, alphaY198C, or gammaE57C, as well as at alphaN94C (2-aminoethylmethanethiosulfonate only). [2-(Trimethylammonium)-ethyl]-methanethiosulfonate (MTSET), which attaches thiocholine to binding site Cys, also acted as an irreversible antagonist when tethered at alphaY93C, alphaN94C, or gammaE57C. However, MTSET modification of alphaY198C resulted in prolonged activation of the nAChR not reversible by washing but inhibitable by subsequent exposure to non-competitive antagonists. Modification of alphaY198C (or any of the other positions tested) by [(trimethylammonium)methyl]methanethiosulfonate resulted only in irreversible inhibition, while modification of alphaY198C by [3-(trimethylammonium)propyl]methanethiosulfonate resulted in irreversible activation of nAChR, but at lower efficacy than by MTSET. Thus changing the length of the tethering arm by less than 1 A in either direction markedly effects the ability of the covalent trimethylammonium to activate the nAChR, and agonist activation depends on a very selective orientation of the quaternary ammonium within the agonist binding site. PMID:10777557

  12. Cellulose-binding domains: biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ilan; Shoseyov, Oded

    2002-11-01

    Many researchers have acknowledged the fact that there exists an immense potential for the application of the cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) in the field of biotechnology. This becomes apparent when the phrase "cellulose-binding domain" is used as the key word for a computerized patent search; more then 150 hits are retrieved. Cellulose is an ideal matrix for large-scale affinity purification procedures. This chemically inert matrix has excellent physical properties as well as low affinity for nonspecific protein binding. It is available in a diverse range of forms and sizes, is pharmaceutically safe, and relatively inexpensive. Present studies into the application of CBDs in industry have established that they can be applied in the modification of physical and chemical properties of composite materials and the development of modified materials with improved properties. In agro-biotechnology, CBDs can be used to modify polysaccharide materials both in vivo and in vitro. The CBDs exert nonhydrolytic fiber disruption on cellulose-containing materials. The potential applications of "CBD technology" range from modulating the architecture of individual cells to the modification of an entire organism. Expressing these genes under specific promoters and using appropriate trafficking signals, can be used to alter the nutritional value and texture of agricultural crops and their final products. PMID:14550028

  13. A molecular characterization of the agonist binding site of a nematode cys-loop GABA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Mark D; Kwaka, Ariel; Callanan, Micah K; Nusrat, Humza; Desaulniers, Jean-Paul; Forrester, Sean G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cys-loop GABA receptors represent important targets for human chemotherapeutics and insecticides and are potential targets for novel anthelmintics (nematicides). However, compared with insect and mammalian receptors, little is known regarding the pharmacological characteristics of nematode Cys-loop GABA receptors. Here we have investigated the agonist binding site of the Cys-loop GABA receptor UNC-49 (Hco-UNC-49) from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. Experimental Approach We used two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology to measure channel activation by classical GABA receptor agonists on Hco-UNC-49 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, along with site-directed mutagenesis and in silico homology modelling. Key Results The sulphonated molecules P4S and taurine had no effect on Hco-UNC-49. Other classical Cys-loop GABAA receptor agonists tested on the Hco-UNC-49B/C heteromeric channel had a rank order efficacy of GABA > trans-4-aminocrotonic acid > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid (IMA) > (R)-(−)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [R(−)-GABOB] > (S)-(+)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [S(+)-GABOB] > guanidinoacetic acid > isonipecotic acid > 5-aminovaleric acid (DAVA) (partial agonist) > β-alanine (partial agonist). In silico ligand docking revealed some variation in binding between agonists. Mutagenesis of a key serine residue in binding loop C to threonine had minimal effects on GABA and IMA but significantly increased the maximal response to DAVA and decreased twofold the EC50 for R(−)- and S(+)-GABOB. Conclusions and Implications The pharmacological profile of Hco-UNC-49 differed from that of vertebrate Cys-loop GABA receptors and insect resistance to dieldrin receptors, suggesting differences in the agonist binding pocket. These findings could be exploited to develop new drugs that specifically target GABA receptors of parasitic nematodes. PMID:25850584

  14. Estrogen receptor transcription and transactivation: Structure-function relationship in DNA- and ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Marc; Gangloff, Monique; Marie Wurtz, Jean; Moras, Dino

    2000-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are members of the nuclear receptor steroid family that exhibit specific structural features, ligand-binding domain sequence identity and dimeric interactions, that single them out. The crystal structures of their DNA-binding domains give some insight into how nuclear receptors discriminate between DNA response elements. The various ligand-binding domain crystal structures of the two known estrogen receptor isotypes (α and β) allow one to interpret ligand specificity and reveal the interactions responsible for stabilizing the activation helix H12 in the agonist and antagonist positions. PMID:11250728

  15. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  16. A Three-Site Mechanism for Agonist/Antagonist Selective Binding to Vasopressin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Noureldin; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco L; Haensele, Elke; Banting, Lee; Whitley, David C; Sopkova-de Oliveira Santos, Jana; Bureau, Ronan; Clark, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations with metadynamics enhanced sampling reveal three distinct binding sites for arginine vasopressin (AVP) within its V2 -receptor (V2 R). Two of these, the vestibule and intermediate sites, block (antagonize) the receptor, and the third is the orthosteric activation (agonist) site. The contacts found for the orthosteric site satisfy all the requirements deduced from mutagenesis experiments. Metadynamics simulations for V2 R and its V1a R-analog give an excellent correlation with experimental binding free energies by assuming that the most stable binding site in the simulations corresponds to the experimental binding free energy in each case. The resulting three-site mechanism separates agonists from antagonists and explains subtype selectivity. PMID:27184628

  17. Agonist binding and function at the human alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor: allosteric modulation by amilorides.

    PubMed

    Leppik, R A; Birdsall, N J

    2000-11-01

    It has been found previously that amilorides act via an allosteric site on the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor to strongly inhibit antagonist binding. In this study, allosteric modulation of agonist binding and function at the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor was explored. The dissociation rate of the agonist [(3)H]UK14304 from alpha(2A)-receptors was decreased by the amilorides in a concentration-dependent manner. This contrasts with the increases in (3)H-antagonist dissociation rate found previously. The agonist-amiloride analog interaction data could be fitted to equations derived from the ternary complex allosteric model. The calculated log affinities of the amilorides at the [(3)H]UK14304-occupied receptor increased with the size of the 5-N-alkyl side chain and ranged from 2.4 for amiloride to 4.2 for 5-(N,N-hexamethylene)-amiloride. The calculated negative cooperativities cover a narrow range, in sharp contrast to the broad range found for antagonist-amiloride analog interactions. The effects of the amilorides on the agonist actions of UK14304, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were explored using a [(35)S]GTPgammaS functional assay, and the parameters calculated for the cooperativities and affinities of the UK14304-amiloride analog interactions, using the equation derived from the ternary complex allosteric model, were in good agreement with those derived from the kinetic studies. Therefore both the binding and functional data provide further support for the existence of a well defined allosteric site on the human alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. The binding mode of the amilorides at the agonist-occupied and antagonist-occupied receptor differs markedly but, within each group, the structure of either the agonist or the antagonist examined has only a slight effect on the allosteric interactions. PMID:11040058

  18. Binding characteristics of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid as a weak but selective GABAB receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Mathivet, P; Bernasconi, R; De Barry, J; Marescaux, C; Bittiger, H

    1997-02-19

    The aim of this study was to reexamine the concept that gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a weak but selective agonist at gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors, using binding experiments with several radioligands. Ki values of GHB were similar (approximately equal to 100 microM) in three agonist radioligand assays for GABAB receptors, [3H]baclofen (beta-para-chlorophenyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid), [3H]CGP 27492 (3-aminopropyl-phosphinic acid) and [3H]GABA, in the presence of the GABAA receptor agonist isoguvacine with rat cortical, cerebellar and hippocampal membranes. In competition experiments between GHB and the GABAB receptor antagonist, [3H]CGP 54626 (3-N [1-{(S)-3,4-dichlorophenyl}-ethylamino]-2-(S)-hydroxypropyl cyclo-hexylmethyl phosphinic acid), the IC50 values were significantly increased with 300 microM of 5'-guanyl-imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p), which suggested that guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) modulate GHB binding on GABAB receptors. The inhibition by GHB of [3H]CGP 27492 binding in cortical membranes was not altered in the presence of 0.3 or 3 mM of the two GHB dehydrogenase inhibitors, valproate and ethosuximide. Thus, GHB is not reconverted into GABA by GHB dehydrogenase. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that GHB is an endogenous weak but selective agonist at GABAB receptors. PMID:9083788

  19. Possible differences in modes of agonist and antagonist binding at human 5-HT6 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pullagurla, Manik R; Westkaemper, Richard B; Glennon, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    A graphics model of the human 5-HT6 receptor was constructed and automated docking studies were performed. The model suggests that 5-HT6 antagonist arylsulfonyltryptamines might bind differently than that of the agonist serotonin. Furthermore, the model explains many of the empirical results from our previous structure-affinity studies. PMID:15357994

  20. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  1. Interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with dopaminergic D3 binding sites in rat striatum. Evidence that (/sup 3/H)dopamine can label a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.E.; Creese, I.

    1985-02-01

    The interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with /sup 3/H-agonist labeled D3 dopaminergic binding sites of rat striatum have been characterized by radioligand-binding techniques. When the binding of (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)apomorphine to D2 dopamine receptors is blocked by the inclusion of D2 selective concentrations of unlabeled spiroperidol or domperidone, these ligands appear to label selectively the previously termed D3 binding site. Antagonist/(/sup 3/H)dopamine competition curves are of uniformly steep slope (nH . 1.0), suggesting the presence of a single D3 binding site. The relative potencies of antagonists to inhibit D3 specific (/sup 3/H)dopamine binding are significantly correlated with their potencies to block D1 dopamine receptors as measured by the inhibition of both dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase and (/sup 3/H)flupentixol-binding activities. The affinities of agonists to inhibit D3 specific (/sup 3/H)dopamine binding are also correlated with estimates of these agonists affinities for the high affinity binding component of agonist/(/sup 3/H)flupentixol competition curves. Both D3 specific (/sup 3/H) dopamine binding and the high affinity agonist-binding component of dopamine/(/sup 3/H)flupentixol competition curves show a similar sensitivity to guanine nucleotides. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the D3 binding site is related to a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor.

  2. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    PubMed Central

    Ettrup, Anders; da Cunha-Bang, Sophie; McMahon, Brenda; Lehel, Szabolcs; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Skibsted, Anine W; Jørgensen, Louise M; Hansen, Martin; Baandrup, Anders O; Bache, Søren; Svarer, Claus; Kristensen, Jesper L; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2014-01-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [11C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT2A receptors with [11C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input measurements provided the most optimal quantification of cerebral [11C]Cimbi-36 binding. Reference tissue modeling was feasible as it induced a negative but predictable bias in [11C]Cimbi-36 PET outcome measures. In five subjects, pretreatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin before a second PET scan significantly decreased [11C]Cimbi-36 binding in all cortical regions with no effects in cerebellum. These results confirm that [11C]Cimbi-36 binding is selective for 5-HT2A receptors in the cerebral cortex and that cerebellum is an appropriate reference tissue for quantification of 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. Thus, we here describe [11C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. PMID:24780897

  3. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N.; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E.; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouseTM platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  4. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-02-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouse(TM) platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  5. Binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon, a high affinity mu-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Spetea, Mariana; Tóth, Fanni; Schütz, Johannes; Otvös, Ferenc; Tóth, Géza; Benyhe, Sandor; Borsodi, Anna; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2003-07-01

    The highly potent micro -opioid receptor agonist 14-methoxymetopon (4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-5beta,17-dimethylmorphinan-6-one) was prepared in tritium labelled form by a catalytic dehalogenation method resulting in a specific radioactivity of 15.9 Ci/mmol. Opioid binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon were determined using radioligand binding assay in rat brain membranes. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon specifically labelled a single class of opioid sites with affinity in low subnanomolar range (Ki = 0.43 nm) and maximal number of binding sites of 314 fmol/mg protein. Binding of [3H]14-methoxymetopon was inhibited by ligands selective for the micro -opioid receptor with high potency, while selective kappa-opioids and delta-opioids were weaker inhibitors. 14-Methoxymetopon increased guanosine-5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding with an EC50 of 70.9 nm, thus, providing evidence for the agonist character of this ligand. The increase of [35S]GTPgammaS binding was inhibited by naloxone and selective micro -opioid antagonists, indicating a micro -opioid receptor-mediated action. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon is one of the few nonpeptide mu-opioid receptor agonists available in radiolabelled form up to now. Due to its high affinity and selectivity, high stability and extremely low nonspecific binding (<10%), this radioligand would be an important and useful tool in probing mu-opioid receptor mechanisms, as well as to promote a further understanding of the opioid system at the cellular and molecular level. PMID:12887410

  6. Modulation of agonist binding to human dopamine receptor subtypes by L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide and a peptidomimetic analog.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vaneeta; Mann, Amandeep; Costain, Willard; Pontoriero, Giuseppe; Castellano, Jessica M; Skoblenick, Kevin; Gupta, Suresh K; Pristupa, Zdenek; Niznik, Hyman B; Johnson, Rodney L; Nair, Venugopalan D; Mishra, Ram K

    2005-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the hypothalamic tripeptide L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG) and its conformationally constrained analog 3(R)-[(2(S)-pyrrolidinylcarbonyl)amino]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide (PAOPA) in modulating agonist binding to human dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected with respective cDNAs. Both PLG and PAOPA enhanced agonist [3H]N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) and [3H]quinpirole binding in a dose-dependent manner to the DA D2L,D2S, and D4 receptors. However, agonist binding to the D1 and D3 receptors and antagonist binding to the D2L receptors by PLG were not significantly affected. Scatchard analysis of [3H]NPA binding to membranes in the presence of PLG revealed a significant increase in affinity of the agonist binding sites for the D2L, D2S, and D4 receptors. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition curves revealed that PLG and PAOPA increased the population and affinity of the high-affinity form of the D2L receptor and attenuated guanosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imido)-triphosphate-induced inhibition of high-affinity agonist binding sites for the DA D2L receptor. Furthermore, direct NPA binding with D2L cell membranes pretreated with suramin, a compound that can uncouple receptor/G protein complexes, and incubated with and without DA showed that both PLG and PAOPA had only increased agonist binding in membranes pretreated with both suramin and DA, suggesting that PLG requires the D2L receptor/G protein complex to increase agonist binding. These results suggest that PLG possibly modulates DA D2S, D2L, and D4 receptors in an allosteric manner and that the coupling of D2 receptors to the G protein is essential for this modulation to occur. PMID:16126839

  7. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  8. Solubilization and characterization of guanine nucleotide-sensitive muscarinic agonist binding sites from rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Berrie, C. P.; Birdsall, N. J.; Hulme, E. C.; Keen, M.; Stockton, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors from rat myocardial membranes may be solubilized by digitonin in good yield at low temperatures in the presence of Mg2+. Under these conditions, up to 60% of the soluble receptors show high affinity binding for the potent agonist [3H]-oxotremorine-M (KA = 10(9)M-1), which is inhibited by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate. The muscarinic binding site labelled with [3H]-oxotremorine-M has a higher sedimentation coefficient (13.4 s) than sites labelled with a 3H antagonist in the presence of guanylylimidodiphosphate (11.6 s) and probably represents a complex between the ligand binding subunit of the receptor and a guanine nucleotide binding protein. PMID:6478115

  9. Inhibitory GTP binding protein G/sub i/ regulates US -adrenoceptor affinity towards US -agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, I.; Levitzki, A.

    1987-05-01

    Treatment of S-49 lymphoma cell membranes with pertussis toxin (PT) causes a three-fold reduction of US -adrenoceptor (US AR) affinity towards isoproterenol. A similar treatment with cholera toxin (CT) does not cause such a modulation. The effects were studied by the detailed analysis of SVI-cyanopindolol (CYP) binding curves in the absence and presence of increasing agonist concentrations. Thus, the authors were able to compare in detail the effects of G/sub s/ and G/sub i/ on the agonist-associated state of the US AR. In contrast to these findings, PT treatment does not have any effect on the displacement of SVI-CYP by (-)isoproterenol. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory GTP protein G/sub i/ modulates the US AR affinity towards US -agonists. This might be due to the association of G/sub i/ with the agonist-bound US AR x G/sub s/ x C complex within the membrane. This hypothesis, as well as others, is under investigation.

  10. Structural and evolutionary division of phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Temple, Brenda; Bencharit, Sompop; Kimple, Adam J; Siderovski, David P; Johnson, Gary L

    2005-01-01

    Proteins encoding phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains function as adaptors or scaffolds to organize the signaling complexes involved in wide-ranging physiological processes including neural development, immunity, tissue homeostasis and cell growth. There are more than 200 proteins in eukaryotes and nearly 60 human proteins having PTB domains. Six PTB domain encoded proteins have been found to have mutations that contribute to inherited human diseases including familial stroke, hypercholesteremia, coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, demonstrating the importance of PTB scaffold proteins in organizing critical signaling complexes. PTB domains bind both peptides and headgroups of phosphatidylinositides, utilizing two distinct binding motifs to mediate spatial organization and localization within cells. The structure of PTB domains confers specificity for binding peptides having a NPXY motif with differing requirements for phosphorylation of the tyrosine within this recognition sequence. In this review, we use structural, evolutionary and functional analysis to divide PTB domains into three groups represented by phosphotyrosine-dependent Shc-like, phosphotyrosine-dependent IRS-like and phosphotyrosine-independent Dab-like PTBs, with the Dab-like PTB domains representing nearly 75% of proteins encoding PTB domains. In addition, we further define the binding characteristics of the cognate ligands for each group of PTB domains. The signaling complexes organized by PTB domain encoded proteins are largely unknown and represents an important challenge in systems biology for the future. PMID:15567406

  11. Conformational changes of the glucocorticoid receptor ligand binding domain induced by ligand and cofactor binding, and the location of cofactor binding sites determined by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Frego, Lee; Davidson, Walter

    2006-01-01

    HXMS (hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry) of the glucocorticoid receptor ligand-binding domain (GR LBD) complexed with the agonist dexamethasone and the antagonist RU-486 is described. Variations in the rates of exchange were observed in regions consistent with the published crystal structures of GR LBD complexed with RU-486 when compared with the GR dexamethasone complex. We also report the HXMS results for agonist-bound GR LBD with the coactivator transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (TIF2) and anatagonist-bound GR LBD with nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). Alterations in exchange rates observed for agonist-bound GR LBD with TIF2 present were consistent with the published crystal structural contacts for the complex. Alterations in exchange rates observed for antagonist-bound GR LBD with NCoR were a subset of those observed with TIF2 binding, suggesting a common or overlapping binding site for coactivator and corepressor. PMID:16600964

  12. Reconstitution of high affinity. cap alpha. /sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding by fusion with a pertussis toxin substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.H.; Neubig, R.R.

    1986-03-05

    High affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding is thought to occur via a coupling of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptor with N/sub i/, the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide binding protein. Human platelet membranes pretreated at pH 11.5 exhibit a selective inactivation of agonist binding and N/sub i/. To further study the mechanism of agonist binding, alkali treated membranes (ATM) were mixed with membranes pretreated with 10 ..mu..M phenoxybenzamine to block ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors (POB-M). The combined membrane pellet was incubated in 50% polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote membrane-membrane fusion and assayed for binding to the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 (UK) and the antagonist (/sup 3/H) yohimbine. PEG treatment resulted in a 2-4 fold enhancement of UK binding whereas yohimbine binding was unchanged. No enhancement of UK binding was observed in the absence of PEG treatment. The reconstitution was dependent on the addition of POB-M. They found that a 1:1 ratio of POB-M:ATM was optimal. Reconstituted binding was inhibited by GppNHp. Fusion of rat C6 glioma cell membranes, which do not contain ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors, also enhanced agonist binding to ATM. Fusion of C6 membranes from cells treated with pertussis toxin did not enhance (/sup 3/H) UK binding. These data show that a pertussis toxin sensitive membrane component, possibly N/sub i/, can reconstitute high affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist binding.

  13. A Unified Model of the GABAA Receptor Comprising Agonist and Benzodiazepine Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Pernille Louise; Sander, Tommy; Balle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present a full-length α1β2γ2 GABA receptor model optimized for agonists and benzodiazepine (BZD) allosteric modulators. We propose binding hypotheses for the agonists GABA, muscimol and THIP and for the allosteric modulator diazepam (DZP). The receptor model is primarily based on the glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) from C. elegans and includes additional structural information from the prokaryotic ligand-gated ion channel ELIC in a few regions. Available mutational data of the binding sites are well explained by the model and the proposed ligand binding poses. We suggest a GABA binding mode similar to the binding mode of glutamate in the GluCl X-ray structure. Key interactions are predicted with residues α1R66, β2T202, α1T129, β2E155, β2Y205 and the backbone of β2S156. Muscimol is predicted to bind similarly, however, with minor differences rationalized with quantum mechanical energy calculations. Muscimol key interactions are predicted to be α1R66, β2T202, α1T129, β2E155, β2Y205 and β2F200. Furthermore, we argue that a water molecule could mediate further interactions between muscimol and the backbone of β2S156 and β2Y157. DZP is predicted to bind with interactions comparable to those of the agonists in the orthosteric site. The carbonyl group of DZP is predicted to interact with two threonines α1T206 and γ2T142, similar to the acidic moiety of GABA. The chlorine atom of DZP is placed near the important α1H101 and the N-methyl group near α1Y159, α1T206, and α1Y209. We present a binding mode of DZP in which the pending phenyl moiety of DZP is buried in the binding pocket and thus shielded from solvent exposure. Our full length GABAA receptor is made available as Model S1. PMID:23308109

  14. Insight into the Binding Mode of Agonists of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor from Calculated Electron Densities

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Michael E; Gutbrod, Oliver; Matthiesen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are among the most prominent and most economically important insecticide targets. Thus, an understanding of the modes of binding of respective agonists is important for the design of specific compounds with favorable vertebrate profiles. In the case of nAChRs, the lack of available high-resolution X-ray structures leaves theoretical considerations as the only viable option. Starting from classical homology and docking approaches, binding mode hypotheses are created for five agonists of the nAChR, covering insecticides in the main group 4 of the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC) mode of action (MoA) classification, namely, neonicotinoids, nicotine, sulfoxaflor, and butenolides. To better understand these binding modes, the topologies of calculated electron densities of small-model systems are analyzed in the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The theoretically obtained modes of binding are very much in line with the biology-driven IRAC MoA classification of the investigated ligands. PMID:26175091

  15. Contrasting roles of leu(356) in the human CCK(1) receptor for antagonist SR 27897 and agonist SR 146131 binding.

    PubMed

    Gouldson, P; Legoux, P; Carillon, C; Delpech, B; Le Fur, G; Ferrara, P; Shire, D

    1999-11-01

    A new highly specific, potent non-peptide agonist for the cholecystokinin subtype 1 receptor (CCK(1)), SR 146131 (2-[4-(4-chloro-2, 5-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-(2-cyclohexyl-ethyl)-thiazol-2-ylcarbamoyl ]-5, 7-dimethyl-indol-1-yl-1-acetic acid) was recently described [Bignon, E., Bachy, A., Boigegrain, R., Brodin, R., Cottineau, M., Gully, D., Herbert, J.-M., Keane, P., Labie, C., Molimard, J.-C., Olliero, D., Oury-Donat, F., Petereau, C., Prabonneaud, V., Rockstroh, M.-P., Schaeffer, P., Servant, O.Thurneyssen, O., Soubrié, P., Pascal, M., Maffrand, J.-P., Le Fur, G., 1999. SR 146131: a new, potent, orally active and selective non-peptide cholecystokinin subtype I receptor agonist: I. In vitro studies. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 289, 742-751]. From binding and activity assays with chimeric constructs of human CCK(1) and the cholecystokinin subtype 2 receptor (CCK(2)) and receptors carrying point mutations, we show that Leu(356), situated in transmembrane domain seven in the CCK(1) receptor, is a putative contact point for SR 146131. In contrast, Leu(356) is probably not in contact with the CCK(1) receptor specific antagonist SR 27897 (1-[2-(4-(2-chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)aminocarbonyl indoyl]acetic acid), a compound structurally related to SR 146131, since its replacement by alanine, histidine or asparagine gave receptors having wild-type CCK(1) receptor SR 27897 binding affinity. Previous mutational analysis of His(381), the cognate position in the rat CCK(2) receptor, had implicated it as being involved in subtype specificity for SR 27897, results which we confirm with corresponding mutations in the human CCK(2) receptor. Moreover, binding and activity assays with the natural CCK receptor agonist, CCK-8S, show that CCK-8S is more susceptible to the mutations in that position in the CCK(1) receptor than in the CCK(2) receptor. The results suggest different binding modes for SR 27897, SR 146131 and CCK-8S in each CCK receptor subtype. PMID:10594328

  16. Structure of the S1S2 Glutamate Binding Domain of GluR3

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ahmed H.; Wang, Qi; Sondermann, Holger; Oswald, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are the most prevalent excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the vertebrate central nervous system. Determining the structural differences between the binding sites of different subtypes is crucial to our understanding of neuronal circuits and to the development of subtype specific drugs. The structures of the binding domain (S1S2) of the GluR3 (flip) AMPA receptor subunit bound to glutamate and AMPA and the GluR2 (flop) subunit bound to glutamate were determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.9, 2.1, and 1.55 Å, respectively. Overall, the structure of GluR3 (flip) S1S2 is very similar to GluR2 (flop) S1S2 (backbone RMSD of 0.30 ± 0.05 for glutamate-bound and 0.26 ± 0.01 for AMPA-bound). The differences in the flip and flop isoforms are subtle and largely arise from one hydrogen bond across the dimer interface and associated water molecules. Comparison of the binding affinity for various agonists and partial agonists suggest that the S1S2 domains of GluR2 and GluR3 show only small differences in affinity, unlike what is found for the intact receptors (with the exception of one ligand, Cl-HIBO, which has a ten-fold difference in affinity for GluR2 vs GluR3). PMID:19003990

  17. Structural Determinants for the Binding of Morphinan Agonists to the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaojing; Campomanes, Pablo; Kless, Achim; Schapitz, Inga; Wagener, Markus; Koch, Thomas; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic descriptions of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) noncovalently binding with two of its prototypical morphinan agonists, morphine (MOP) and hydromorphone (HMP), are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Subtle differences between the binding modes and hydration properties of MOP and HMP emerge from the calculations. Alchemical free energy perturbation calculations show qualitative agreement with in vitro experiments performed in this work: indeed, the binding free energy difference between MOP and HMP computed by forward and backward alchemical transformation is 1.2±1.1 and 0.8±0.8 kcal/mol, respectively, to be compared with 0.4±0.3 kcal/mol from experiment. Comparison with an MD simulation of μOR covalently bound with the antagonist β-funaltrexamine hints to agonist-induced conformational changes associated with an early event of the receptor's activation: a shift of the transmembrane helix 6 relative to the transmembrane helix 3 and a consequent loss of the key R165-T279 interhelical hydrogen bond. This finding is consistent with a previous proposal suggesting that the R165-T279 hydrogen bond between these two helices indicates an inactive receptor conformation. PMID:26280453

  18. Structural Determinants for the Binding of Morphinan Agonists to the μ-Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kless, Achim; Schapitz, Inga; Wagener, Markus; Koch, Thomas; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic descriptions of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) noncovalently binding with two of its prototypical morphinan agonists, morphine (MOP) and hydromorphone (HMP), are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Subtle differences between the binding modes and hydration properties of MOP and HMP emerge from the calculations. Alchemical free energy perturbation calculations show qualitative agreement with in vitro experiments performed in this work: indeed, the binding free energy difference between MOP and HMP computed by forward and backward alchemical transformation is 1.2±1.1 and 0.8±0.8 kcal/mol, respectively, to be compared with 0.4±0.3 kcal/mol from experiment. Comparison with an MD simulation of μOR covalently bound with the antagonist β-funaltrexamine hints to agonist-induced conformational changes associated with an early event of the receptor’s activation: a shift of the transmembrane helix 6 relative to the transmembrane helix 3 and a consequent loss of the key R165-T279 interhelical hydrogen bond. This finding is consistent with a previous proposal suggesting that the R165-T279 hydrogen bond between these two helices indicates an inactive receptor conformation. PMID:26280453

  19. Structural Dynamics of the Cereblon Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Marcus D.; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution. PMID:26024445

  20. The Intimin periplasmic domain mediates dimerisation and binding to peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Leo, Jack C; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Chaubey, Manish; Schütz, Monika; Kühner, Daniel; Bertsche, Ute; Schwarz, Heinz; Götz, Friedrich; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Coles, Murray; Linke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Intimin and Invasin are prototypical inverse (Type Ve) autotransporters and important virulence factors of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Yersinia spp. respectively. In addition to a C-terminal extracellular domain and a β-barrel transmembrane domain, both proteins also contain a short N-terminal periplasmic domain that, in Intimin, includes a lysin motif (LysM), which is thought to mediate binding to peptidoglycan. We show that the periplasmic domain of Intimin does bind to peptidoglycan both in vitro and in vivo, but only under acidic conditions. We were able to determine a dissociation constant of 0.8 μM for this interaction, whereas the Invasin periplasmic domain, which lacks a LysM, bound only weakly in vitro and failed to bind peptidoglycan in vivo. We present the solution structure of the Intimin LysM, which has an additional α-helix conserved within inverse autotransporter LysMs but lacking in others. In contrast to previous reports, we demonstrate that the periplasmic domain of Intimin mediates dimerisation. We further show that dimerisation and peptidoglycan binding are general features of LysM-containing inverse autotransporters. Peptidoglycan binding by the periplasmic domain in the infection process may aid in resisting mechanical and chemical stress during transit through the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25353290

  1. Snooker Structure-Based Pharmacophore Model Explains Differences in Agonist and Blocker Binding to Bitter Receptor hTAS2R39

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Wibke S. U.; Sanders, Marijn P. A.; van Buren, Leo; Gouka, Robin J.; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Ritschel, Tina

    2015-01-01

    The human bitter taste receptor hTAS2R39 can be activated by many dietary (iso)flavonoids. Furthermore, hTAS2R39 activity can be blocked by 6-methoxyflavanones, 4’-fluoro-6-methoxyflavanone in particular. A structure-based pharmacophore model of the hTAS2R39 binding pocket was built using Snooker software, which has been used successfully before for drug design of GPCRs of the rhodopsin subfamily. For the validation of the model, two sets of compounds, both of which contained actives and inactives, were used: (i) an (iso)flavonoid-dedicated set, and (ii) a more generic, structurally diverse set. Agonists were characterized by their linear binding geometry and the fact that they bound deeply in the hTAS2R39 pocket, mapping the hydrogen donor feature based on T5.45 and N3.36, analogues of which have been proposed to play a key role in activation of GPCRs. Blockers lack hydrogen-bond donors enabling contact to the receptor. Furthermore, they had a crooked geometry, which could sterically hinder movement of the TM domains upon receptor activation. Our results reveal characteristics of hTAS2R39 agonist and bitter blocker binding, which might facilitate the development of blockers suitable to counter the bitterness of dietary hTAS2R39 agonists in food applications. PMID:25729848

  2. Snooker structure-based pharmacophore model explains differences in agonist and blocker binding to bitter receptor hTAS2R39.

    PubMed

    Roland, Wibke S U; Sanders, Marijn P A; van Buren, Leo; Gouka, Robin J; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Ritschel, Tina

    2015-01-01

    The human bitter taste receptor hTAS2R39 can be activated by many dietary (iso)flavonoids. Furthermore, hTAS2R39 activity can be blocked by 6-methoxyflavanones, 4'-fluoro-6-methoxyflavanone in particular. A structure-based pharmacophore model of the hTAS2R39 binding pocket was built using Snooker software, which has been used successfully before for drug design of GPCRs of the rhodopsin subfamily. For the validation of the model, two sets of compounds, both of which contained actives and inactives, were used: (i) an (iso)flavonoid-dedicated set, and (ii) a more generic, structurally diverse set. Agonists were characterized by their linear binding geometry and the fact that they bound deeply in the hTAS2R39 pocket, mapping the hydrogen donor feature based on T5.45 and N3.36, analogues of which have been proposed to play a key role in activation of GPCRs. Blockers lack hydrogen-bond donors enabling contact to the receptor. Furthermore, they had a crooked geometry, which could sterically hinder movement of the TM domains upon receptor activation. Our results reveal characteristics of hTAS2R39 agonist and bitter blocker binding, which might facilitate the development of blockers suitable to counter the bitterness of dietary hTAS2R39 agonists in food applications. PMID:25729848

  3. Alpha-amylase starch binding domains: cooperative effects of binding to starch granules of multiple tandemly arranged domains.

    PubMed

    Guillén, D; Santiago, M; Linares, L; Pérez, R; Morlon, J; Ruiz, B; Sánchez, S; Rodríguez-Sanoja, R

    2007-06-01

    The Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase starch binding domain (SBD) is a functional domain responsible for binding to insoluble starch. Structurally, this domain is dissimilar from other reported SBDs because it is composed of five identical tandem modules of 91 amino acids each. To understand adsorption phenomena specific to this SBD, the importance of their modular arrangement in relationship to binding ability was investigated. Peptides corresponding to one, two, three, four, or five modules were expressed as His-tagged proteins. Protein binding assays showed an increased capacity of adsorption as a function of the number of modules, suggesting that each unit of the SBD may act in an additive or synergic way to optimize binding to raw starch. PMID:17468268

  4. Fused protein domains inhibit DNA binding by LexA.

    PubMed Central

    Golemis, E A; Brent, R

    1992-01-01

    Many studies of transcription activation employ fusions of activation domains to DNA binding domains derived from the bacterial repressor LexA and the yeast activator GAL4. Such studies often implicitly assume that DNA binding by the chimeric proteins is equivalent to that of the protein donating the DNA binding moiety. To directly investigate this issue, we compared operator binding by a series of LexA-derivative proteins to operator binding by native LexA, by using both in vivo and in vitro assays. We show that operator binding by many proteins such as LexA-Myc, LexA-Fos, and LexA-Bicoid is severely impaired, while binding of other LexA-derivative proteins, such as those that carry bacterially encoded acidic sequences ("acid blobs"), is not. Our results also show that DNA binding by LexA derivatives that contain the LexA carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (amino acids 88 to 202) is considerably stronger than binding by fusions that lack it and that heterologous dimerization motifs cannot substitute for the LexA88-202 function. These results suggest the need to reevaluate some previous studies of activation that employed LexA derivatives and modifications to recent experimental approaches that use LexA and GAL4 derivatives to detect and study protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:1620111

  5. Interactions of dopamine agonists with brain D1 receptors labeled by /sup 3/H-antagonists. Evidence for the presence of high and low affinity agonist-binding states

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.E.; Hamblin, M.W.; Creese, I.

    1985-02-01

    The interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with /sup 3/H-antagonist labeled D1 dopamine receptors of rat striatum have been characterized. (/sup 3/H)Flupentixol has been found to selectively label D1 dopamine receptors when its binding to D2 dopamine receptors is blocked by the inclusion of D2 selective concentrations of unlabeled spiroperidol or domperidone. Antagonist//sup 3/H-antagonist competition curves are of uniformly steep slope (nH . 1.0) suggesting the presence of a single D1 dopamine receptor. Agonist//sup 3/H-antagonist competition curves are extremely shallow (nH less than or equal to 0.5) for agonists of high relative efficacy, suggesting the presence of heterogeneous populations of agonist-binding states of the D1 dopamine receptor. Computer-modeling techniques were used to estimate affinities and relative site densities for these heterogeneous binding states. This analysis indicates that the ratio of agonist affinities for low and high affinity agonist-binding states is correlated with agonist relative efficacies in activating adenylate cyclase in membrane homogenates. Under the assay conditions employed, the addition of saturating concentrations of guanine nucleotides reduced, but did not abolish, the relative density of high affinity agonist-binding sites. These binding data can, at least in part, be explained by postulating two states of the D1 dopamine receptor, inducible by agonists but not by antagonists and modulated by guanine nucleotides.

  6. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  7. Computational Analysis of the Binding Specificities of PH Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi; Liang, Zhongjie; Shen, Bairong; Hu, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains share low sequence identities but extremely conserved structures. They have been found in many proteins for cellular signal-dependent membrane targeting by binding inositol phosphates to perform different physiological functions. In order to understand the sequence-structure relationship and binding specificities of PH domains, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and sequence-based combined with structure-based binding analysis were employed in our research. In the structural aspect, the binding specificities were shown to correlate with the hydropathy characteristics of PH domains and electrostatic properties of the bound inositol phosphates. By comparing these structure properties with sequence-based profiles of physicochemical properties, PH domains can be classified into four functional subgroups according to their binding specificities and affinities to inositol phosphates. The method not only provides a simple and practical paradigm to predict binding specificities for functional genomic research but also gives new insight into the understanding of the basis of diseases with respect to PH domain structures. PMID:26881206

  8. Cysteine accessibility analysis of the human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand-binding domain identifies L119 as a gatekeeper.

    PubMed

    Papke, Roger L; Stokes, Clare; Williams, Dustin K; Wang, Jingyi; Horenstein, Nicole A

    2011-01-01

    A large number of structurally diverse ligands have been produced to selectively target α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We applied the method of scanning cysteine accessibility mutations (SCAM) to the ligand-binding domain of the α7 nAChR to identify subdomains of particular importance to the binding and subsequent activation by select agonists. We evaluated the activity of four structurally distinct α7 agonists on wild-type human α7 and 44 targeted mutants expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Responses were measured prior and subsequent to the application of the sulfhydryl reagent methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium (MTSEA). One mutant (C116S) served as a Cys-null control, and the additional mutants were made in the C116S background. In many cases, the insertion of free cysteines into the agonist-binding site had a negative effect on function, with 12 of 44 mutants showing no detectable responses to ACh, and with only 19 of the 44 mutants showing sufficiently large responses to permit further study. Several of the cysteine mutations, including W55C, showed selectively reduced responses to the largest agonist tested, 2-methoxy,4-hydroxy-benzylidene anabaseine. Interestingly, although homology models suggest that most of the introduced cysteine mutations should have had good solvent accessibility, application of MTSEA had no effect or produced only modest changes in the agonist response profile of most mutants. Consistent with previous studies implicating W55 to play important roles in agonist activation, MTSEA treatment further decreased the functional responses of W55C to all the test agonists. While the cysteine mutation at L119 itself had relatively little effect on receptor function, treatment of L119C receptors with MTSEA or alternative cationic sulfhydryl reagents profoundly decreased activation by all agonists tested, suggesting a general block of gating. The homologous mutation in heteromeric nAChRs produced similar results, provided that the

  9. Chemical modification of A1 adenosine receptors in rat brain membranes. Evidence for histidine in different domains of the ligand binding site.

    PubMed

    Klotz, K N; Lohse, M J; Schwabe, U

    1988-11-25

    Chemical modification of amino acid residues was used to probe the ligand recognition site of A1 adenosine receptors from rat brain membranes. The effect of treatment with group-specific reagents on agonist and antagonist radioligand binding was investigated. The histidine-specific reagent diethylpyrocarbonate (DEP) induced a loss of binding of the agonist R-N6-[3H] phenylisopropyladenosine ([3H]PIA), which could be prevented in part by agonists, but not by antagonists. DEP treatment induced also a loss of binding of the antagonist [3H]8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine ([3H]DPCPX). Antagonists protected A1 receptors from this inactivation while agonists did not. This result provided evidence for the existence of at least 2 different histidine residues involved in ligand binding. Consistent with a modification of the binding site, DEP did not alter the affinity of [3H]DPCPX, but reduced receptor number. From the selective protection of [3H] PIA and [3H]DPCPX binding from inactivation, it is concluded that agonists and antagonists occupy different domains at the binding site. Sulfhydryl modifying reagents did not influence antagonist binding, but inhibited agonist binding. This effect is explained by modification of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein. Pyridoxal 5-phosphate inactivated both [3H]PIA and [3H]DPCPX binding, but the receptors could not be protected from inactivation by ligands. Therefore, no amino group seems to be located at the ligand binding site. In addition, it was shown that no further amino acids with polar side chains are present. The absence of hydrophilic amino acids from the recognition site of the receptor apart from histidine suggests an explanation for the lack of hydrophilic ligands with high affinity for A1 receptors. PMID:3182861

  10. Comprehensive Identification of RNA-Binding Domains in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Castello, Alfredo; Fischer, Bernd; Frese, Christian K; Horos, Rastislav; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Foehr, Sophia; Curk, Tomaz; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Hentze, Matthias W

    2016-08-18

    Mammalian cells harbor more than a thousand RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), with half of these employing unknown modes of RNA binding. We developed RBDmap to determine the RNA-binding sites of native RBPs on a proteome-wide scale. We identified 1,174 binding sites within 529 HeLa cell RBPs, discovering numerous RNA-binding domains (RBDs). Catalytic centers or protein-protein interaction domains are in close relationship with RNA-binding sites, invoking possible effector roles of RNA in the control of protein function. Nearly half of the RNA-binding sites map to intrinsically disordered regions, uncovering unstructured domains as prevalent partners in protein-RNA interactions. RNA-binding sites represent hot spots for defined posttranslational modifications such as lysine acetylation and tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting metabolic and signal-dependent regulation of RBP function. RBDs display a high degree of evolutionary conservation and incidence of Mendelian mutations, suggestive of important functional roles. RBDmap thus yields profound insights into native protein-RNA interactions in living cells. PMID:27453046

  11. Molecular Evolution of the Oxygen-Binding Hemerythrin Domain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis during Precambrian times entailed the diversification of strategies minimizing reactive oxygen species-associated damage. Four families of oxygen-carrier proteins (hemoglobin, hemerythrin and the two non-homologous families of arthropodan and molluscan hemocyanins) are known to have evolved independently the capacity to bind oxygen reversibly, providing cells with strategies to cope with the evolutionary pressure of oxygen accumulation. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin was first studied in marine invertebrates but further research has made it clear that it is present in the three domains of life, strongly suggesting that its origin predated the emergence of eukaryotes. Results Oxygen-binding hemerythrins are a monophyletic sub-group of the hemerythrin/HHE (histidine, histidine, glutamic acid) cation-binding domain. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologs were unambiguously identified in 367/2236 bacterial, 21/150 archaeal and 4/135 eukaryotic genomes. Overall, oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues were found in the same proportion as single-domain and as long protein sequences. The associated functions of protein domains in long hemerythrin sequences can be classified in three major groups: signal transduction, phosphorelay response regulation, and protein binding. This suggests that in many organisms the reversible oxygen-binding capacity was incorporated in signaling pathways. A maximum-likelihood tree of oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues revealed a complex evolutionary history in which lateral gene transfer, duplications and gene losses appear to have played an important role. Conclusions Hemerythrin is an ancient protein domain with a complex evolutionary history. The distinctive iron-binding coordination site of oxygen-binding hemerythrins evolved first in prokaryotes, very likely prior to the divergence of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and spread into many bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic species. The later

  12. A novel p53-binding domain in CUL7.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jocelyn S; Arai, Takehiro; DeCaprio, James A

    2006-09-15

    CUL7 is a member of the cullin RING ligase family and forms an SCF-like complex with SKP1 and FBXW8. CUL7 is required for normal mouse embryonic development and cellular proliferation, and is highly homologous to PARC, a p53-associated, parkin-like cytoplasmic protein. We determined that CUL7, in a manner similar to PARC, can bind directly to p53 but does not affect p53 expression. We identified a discrete, co-linear domain in CUL7 that is conserved in PARC and HERC2, and is necessary and sufficient for p53-binding. The presence of p53 stabilized expression of this domain and we demonstrate that this p53-binding domain of CUL7 contributes to the cytoplasmic localization of CUL7. The results support the model that p53 plays a role in regulation of CUL7 activity. PMID:16875676

  13. A novel p53-binding domain in CUL7

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, Jocelyn S.; Arai, Takehiro; De Caprio, James A. . E-mail: james_decaprio@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-09-15

    CUL7 is a member of the cullin RING ligase family and forms an SCF-like complex with SKP1 and FBXW8. CUL7 is required for normal mouse embryonic development and cellular proliferation, and is highly homologous to PARC, a p53-associated, parkin-like cytoplasmic protein. We determined that CUL7, in a manner similar to PARC, can bind directly to p53 but does not affect p53 expression. We identified a discrete, co-linear domain in CUL7 that is conserved in PARC and HERC2, and is necessary and sufficient for p53-binding. The presence of p53 stabilized expression of this domain and we demonstrate that this p53-binding domain of CUL7 contributes to the cytoplasmic localization of CUL7. The results support the model that p53 plays a role in regulation of CUL7 activity.

  14. Structural stabilization of GTP-binding domains in circularly permuted GTPases: Implications for RNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Baskaran; Verma, Sunil Kumar; Prakash, Balaji

    2006-01-01

    GTP hydrolysis by GTPases requires crucial residues embedded in a conserved G-domain as sequence motifs G1–G5. However, in some of the recently identified GTPases, the motif order is circularly permuted. All possible circular permutations were identified after artificially permuting the classical GTPases and subjecting them to profile Hidden Markov Model searches. This revealed G4–G5–G1–G2–G3 as the only possible circular permutation that can exist in nature. It was also possible to recognize a structural rationale for the absence of other permutations, which either destabilize the invariant GTPase fold or disrupt regions that provide critical residues for GTP binding and hydrolysis, such as Switch-I and Switch-II. The circular permutation relocates Switch-II to the C-terminus and leaves it unfastened, thus affecting GTP binding and hydrolysis. Stabilizing this region would require the presence of an additional domain following Switch-II. Circularly permuted GTPases (cpGTPases) conform to such a requirement and always possess an ‘anchoring’ C-terminal domain. There are four sub-families of cpGTPases, of which three possess an additional domain N-terminal to the G-domain. The biochemical function of these domains, based on available experimental reports and domain recognition analysis carried out here, are suggestive of RNA binding. The features that dictate RNA binding are unique to each subfamily. It is possible that RNA-binding modulates GTP binding or vice versa. In addition, phylogenetic analysis indicates a closer evolutionary relationship between cpGTPases and a set of universally conserved bacterial GTPases that bind the ribosome. It appears that cpGTPases are RNA-binding proteins possessing a means to relate GTP binding to RNA binding. PMID:16648363

  15. Receptor-mediated binding and uptake of GnRH agonist and antagonist by pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jennes, L.; Stumpf, W.E.; Conn, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The intracellular pathway of an enzyme resistant GnRH agonist (D- Lys6 -GnRH) conjugated to ferritin or to colloidal gold was followed in cultured pituitary cells. After an initial uniform distribution over the cell surface of gonadotropes, the electrondense marker was internalized, either individually or in small groups. After longer incubation times, the marker appeared in the lysosomal compartment and the Golgi apparatus, where it could be found in the vesicular as well as cisternal portion. In addition, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of the GnRH antagonist D-p-Glu1-D-Phe2-D-Trp3-D- Lys6 -GnRH was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography after 30 and 60 min of incubation to ensure uptake. At both time points, in in vitro as well as in vivo studies, silver grains were localized over cytoplasmic organelles of castration cells, including dilated endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, and clear vesicles. No consistent association with cell nuclei, mitochondria, or secretory vesicles could be observed. The results suggest that both agonist and antagonist are binding selectively to the plasma membrane of gonadotropes and subsequently are taken up via receptor-mediated endocytosis for degradation or possible action on synthetic processes.

  16. PDZ Domain Binding Selectivity Is Optimized Across the Mouse Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Stiffler, Michael A.; Chen, Jiunn R.; Grantcharova, Viara P.; Lei, Ying; Fuchs, Daniel; Allen, John E.; Zaslavskaia, Lioudmila A.; MacBeath, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    PDZ domains have long been thought to cluster into discrete functional classes defined by their peptide-binding preferences. We used protein microarrays and quantitative fluorescence polarization to characterize the binding selectivity of 157 mouse PDZ domains with respect to 217 genome-encoded peptides. We then trained a multidomain selectivity model to predict PDZ domain–peptide interactions across the mouse proteome with an accuracy that exceeds many large-scale, experimental investigations of protein-protein interactions. Contrary to the current paradigm, PDZ domains do not fall into discrete classes; instead, they are evenly distributed throughout selectivity space, which suggests that they have been optimized across the proteome to minimize cross-reactivity. We predict that focusing on families of interaction domains, which facilitates the integration of experimentation and modeling, will play an increasingly important role in future investigations of protein function. PMID:17641200

  17. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na/sup +/ channel interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-12

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na/sup +/ channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) (G-protein(s)). These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxin to Na/sup +/ channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na/sup +/ channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na/sup +/channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na/sup +/ channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na/sup +/ channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues.

  18. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis. PMID:25448478

  19. Identification of Novel Anionic Phospholipid Binding Domains in Neutral Sphingomyelinase 2 with Selective Binding Preference*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bill X.; Clarke, Christopher J.; Matmati, Nabil; Montefusco, David; Bartke, Nana; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide are recognized as vital regulators of many biological processes. Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2) is one of the key enzymes regulating ceramide production. It was previously shown that the enzymatic activity of nSMase2 was dependent on anionic phospholipids (APLs). In this study, the structural requirements for APL-selective binding of nSMase2 were determined and characterized. Using lipid-protein overlay assays, nSMase2 interacted specifically and directly with several APLs, including phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid. Lipid-protein binding studies of deletion mutants identified two discrete APL binding domains in the N terminus of nSMase2. Further, mutagenesis experiments pinpointed the core sequences and major cationic amino acids in the domains that are necessary for the cooperative activation of nSMase2 by APLs. The first domain included the first amino-terminal hydrophobic segment and Arg-33, which were essential for nSMase2 to interact with APLs. The second binding domain was comprised of the second hydrophobic segment and Arg-92 and Arg-93. Moreover, mutation of one or both domains decreased APL binding and APL-dependent catalytic activity of nSMase2. Further, mutation of both domains in nSMase2 reduced its plasma membrane localization. Finally, these binding domains are also important for the capability of nSMase2 to rescue the defects of yeast lacking the nSMase homologue, ISC1. In conclusion, these data have identified the APL binding domains of nSMase2 for the first time. The analysis of interactions between nSMase2 and APLs will contribute to our understanding of signaling pathways mediated by sphingolipid metabolites. PMID:21550973

  20. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  1. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  2. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  4. Molecular basis of agonist binding to the type A cholecystokinin receptor.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence J; Lybrand, Terry P

    2002-12-01

    The receptors for cholecystokinin (CCK) peptides are guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors in the rhodopsin/beta-adrenergic receptor family. The molecular basis of natural ligand binding to the type A CCK receptor has been studied using ligand structure-activity series, receptor mutagenesis, and photoaffinity labeling studies. These have focused attention on the extracellular loop and tail domains, with the most direct insights coming from intrinsic photoaffinity labeling studies. A model of the binding of CCK to this receptor is consistent with all these studies. This model places the carboxyl terminus of CCK adjacent to the amino-terminal tail outside of transmembrane segment 1, the mid-region of the peptide adjacent to the third extracellular loop outside of transmembrane segment 7, and includes a charge-charge interaction between peptide residue tyrosine-sulfate 27 and the arginine residue in the second extracellular loop of the receptor in position 197. PMID:12688369

  5. The receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype C binds phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD(50) of ∼1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a "dual receptor" mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro domain. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides in both assays. Interactions with phosphoinositides may facilitate tighter binding between neuronal membranes and BoNT/C. PMID:22120109

  6. The evolution of putative starch-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Machovic, Martin; Janecek, Stefan

    2006-11-27

    The present bioinformatics analysis was focused on the starch-binding domains (SBDs) and SBD-like motifs sequentially related to carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families CBM20 and CBM21. Originally, these SBDs were known from microbial amylases only. At present homologous starch- and glycogen-binding domains (or putative SBD sequences) have been recognised in various plant and animal proteins. The sequence comparison clearly showed that the SBD-like sequences in genethonin-1, starch synthase III and glucan branching enzyme should possess the real SBD function since the two tryptophans (or at least two aromatics) of the typical starch-binding site 1 are conserved in their sequences. The same should apply also for the sequences corresponding with the so-called KIS-domain of plant AKINbetagamma protein that is a homologue of the animal AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The evolutionary tree classified the compared SBDs into three distinct groups: (i) the family CBM20 (the motifs from genethonins, laforins, starch excess 4 protein, beta-subunits of the animal AMPK and all plant and yeast homologues, and eventually from amylopullulanases); (ii) the family CBM21 (the motifs from regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase 1 together with those from starch synthase III); and (iii) the (CBM20+CBM21)-related group (the motifs from the pullulanase subfamily consisting of pullulanase, branching enzyme, isoamylase and maltooligosyl trehalohydrolase). PMID:17084392

  7. Structural Basis for Viral Late-Domain Binding to Alix

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,S.; Joshi, A.; Nagashima, K.; Freed, E.; Hurley, J.

    2007-01-01

    The modular protein Alix is a central node in endosomal-lysosomal trafficking and the budding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. The Gag p6 protein of HIV-1 contains a LYPx{sub n}LxxL motif that is required for Alix-mediated budding and binds a region of Alix spanning residues 360-702. The structure of this fragment of Alix has the shape of the letter 'V' and is termed the V domain. The V domain has a topologically complex arrangement of 11 {alpha}-helices, with connecting loops that cross three times between the two arms of the V. The conserved residue Phe676 is at the center of a large hydrophobic pocket and is crucial for binding to a peptide model of HIV-1 p6. Overexpression of the V domain inhibits HIV-1 release from cells. This inhibition of release is reversed by mutations that block binding of the Alix V domain to p6.

  8. Structures of the spectrin-ankyrin interaction binding domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Huang, Lei; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2010-01-07

    As key components of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, spectrin and ankyrin specifically interact to tether the spectrin cytoskeleton to the cell membrane. The structure of the spectrin binding domain of ankyrin and the ankyrin binding domain of spectrin have been solved to elucidate the structural basis for ankyrin-spectrin recognition. The structure of repeats 14 and 15 of spectrin shows that these repeats are similar to all other spectrin repeats. One feature that could account for the preference of ankyrin for these repeats is the presence of a conserved, negatively charged patch on one side of repeat 14. The structure of the ankyrin ZU5 domain shows a novel structure containing a {beta} core. The structure reveals that the canonical ZU5 consensus sequence is likely to be missing an important region that codes for a {beta} strand that forms part of the core of the domain. In addition, a positively charged region is suggestive of a binding surface for the negatively charged spectrin repeat 14. Previously reported mutants of ankyrin that map to this region lie mostly on the surface of the protein, although at least one is likely to be part of the core.

  9. NMDA receptor desensitization regulated by direct binding to PDZ1-2 domains of PSD-95

    PubMed Central

    Sornarajah, Lavan; Vasuta, Oana Cristina; Zhang, Lily; Sutton, Christine; Li, Bo; El-Husseini, Alaa; Raymond, Lynn A.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activity by desensitization is important in physiological and pathological states; NMDAR desensitization contributes in shaping synaptic responses and may be protective by limiting calcium influx during sustained glutamate insults. We previously reported that glycine-independent desensitization decreases during hippocampal neuronal development, correlating with NMDAR synaptic localization and association with post-synaptic density 95 (PSD-95). PSD-95/Discs large/zona occludens (PDZ)-1,2 domains of PSD-95 bind to the C-terminus of NMDAR NR2 subunits. The role of PSD-95 in anchoring signaling proteins near NMDARs is well documented. To determine if PSD-95-induced changes in NMDAR desensitization occur because of direct binding to NR2 or due to recruitment of regulatory proteins, we tested the effects of various PSD-95 constructs on NMDAR currents in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and neurons. In HEK cells, wild-type PSD-95 significantly reduced wild-type NMDAR desensitization without altering currents of NMDARs containing NR2A-S1462A, a mutation that abolishes PSD-95 binding. The PSD-95 N-terminus truncated after the PDZ1-2 domains was sufficient for this effect in neurons with low endogenous PSD-95 levels; in NMDAR-expressing HEK cells, the effect persisted when PSD-95 multimerization was eliminated. Moreover, other PSD-95 family members with highly homologous PDZ1-2 domains significantly reduced NMDAR desensitization. In mature neurons, disruption of PSD-95/NMDAR interaction through protein kinase C (PKC) activation increased desensitization to levels found in immature neurons, and this effect was not due to PKC direct regulation of NMDAR activity. We conclude that direct binding of PSD-95 increases stability of NMDAR responses to agonist exposure in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. PMID:18400955

  10. Two amino acids, located in transmembrane domains VI and VII, determine the selectivity of the peptide agonist SMS 201-995 for the SSTR2 somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Kaupmann, K; Bruns, C; Raulf, F; Weber, H P; Mattes, H; Lübbert, H

    1995-01-01

    Human somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5) bind their natural ligands SRIF-14 and SRIF-28 with high affinity. By contrast, short synthetic SRIF analogues such as SMS 201-995, a peptide agonist used for the treatment of various endocrine and malignant disorders, display sub-nanomolar affinity only for the receptor subtype SSTR2. To understand the molecular nature of selective peptide agonist binding to somatostatin receptors we have now, by site-directed mutagenesis, identified amino acids mediating SMS 201-995 specificity for SSTR2. Sequentially, amino acids in SSTR1, a receptor subtype exhibiting low affinity for SMS 201-995, were exchanged for the corresponding SSTR2 residues. After three consecutive steps, in which eight amino acids were exchanged, a SSTR1 mutant receptor with high affinity for SMS 201-995 was obtained. Receptor mutants with different combinations of these eight amino acids were then constructed. A single Ser305 to Phe mutation in TM VII increased the affinity of SSTR1 for SMS 201-995 nearly 100-fold. When this mutation was combined with an exchange of Gln291 to Asn in TM VI, almost full susceptibility to SMS 201-995 was obtained. Thus, it is concluded that the specificity of SMS 201-995 for SSTR2 is mainly defined by these two amino acids in transmembrane domains VI and VII. Using the conjugate gradient method we have, by analogy to the well established structure of bacteriorhodopsin, built a model for SRIF receptor-ligand interactions that explains the importance of Gln291 and Ser305 for the selectivity of agonists. Images PMID:7882976

  11. Crystal structures of complexes of vitamin D receptor ligand-binding domain with lithocholic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Masuno, Hiroyuki; Ikura, Teikichi; Morizono, Daisuke; Orita, Isamu; Yamada, Sachiko; Shimizu, Masato; Ito, Nobutoshi

    2013-01-01

    The secondary bile acid lithocholic acid (LCA) and its derivatives act as selective modulators of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), although their structures fundamentally differ from that of the natural hormone 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3)]. Here, we have determined the crystal structures of the ligand-binding domain of rat VDR (VDR-LBD) in ternary complexes with a synthetic partial peptide of the coactivator MED1 (mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 1) and four ligands, LCA, 3-keto LCA, LCA acetate, and LCA propionate, with the goal of elucidating their agonistic mechanism. LCA and its derivatives bind to the same ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of VDR-LBD that 1,25(OH)2D3 binds to, but in the opposite orientation; their A-ring is positioned at the top of the LBP, whereas their acyclic tail is located at the bottom of the LBP. However, most of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions observed in the complex with 1,25(OH)2D3 are reproduced in the complexes with LCA and its derivatives. Additional interactions between VDR-LBD and the C-3 substituents of the A-ring are also observed in the complexes with LCA and its derivatives. These may result in the observed difference in the potency among the LCA-type ligands. PMID:23723390

  12. Identification of a calmodulin-binding domain in Sema4D that regulates its exodomain shedding in platelets.

    PubMed

    Mou, Peipei; Zeng, Zhao; Li, Qiang; Liu, Xiaohui; Xin, Xiaoran; Wannemacher, Kenneth M; Ruan, Changgeng; Li, Renhao; Brass, Lawrence F; Zhu, Li

    2013-05-16

    Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is a transmembrane protein that supports contact-dependent amplification of platelet activation by collagen before being gradually cleaved by the metalloprotease ADAM17, as we have previously shown. Cleavage releases a soluble 120-kDa exodomain fragment for which receptors exist on platelets and endothelial cells. Here we have examined the mechanism that regulates Sema4D exodomain cleavage. The results show that the membrane-proximal cytoplasmic domain of Sema4D contains a binding site for calmodulin within the polybasic region Arg762-Lys779. Coprecipitation studies show that Sema4D and calmodulin are associated in resting platelets, forming a complex that dissociates upon platelet activation by the agonists that trigger Sema4D cleavage. Inhibiting calmodulin with W7 or introducing a membrane-permeable peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding site is sufficient to trigger the dissociation of Sema4D from calmodulin and initiate cleavage. Conversely, deletion of the calmodulin-binding site causes constitutive shedding of Sema4D. These results show that (1) Sema4D is a calmodulin-binding protein with a site of interaction in its membrane-proximal cytoplasmic domain, (2) platelet agonists cause dissociation of the calmodulin-Sema4D complex, and (3) dissociation of the complex is sufficient to trigger ADAM17-dependent cleavage of Sema4D, releasing a bioactive fragment. PMID:23564909

  13. Binding of [3H]-muscimol, a potent gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor agonist, to membranes of the bovine retina.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, N. N.

    1980-01-01

    1 The binding of [3H]-muscimol, a potent gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor agonist, to crude membrane preparations of bovine retina was studied, using a filtration method to isolate membrane-bound ligand. 2 Specific binding was found to be saturable and occurred at two binding sites with affinity constants of 4.3 nM and 38.2 nM. 3 Binding was sodium-independent, enhanced by both freezing and Triton X-100 treatment but abolished with sodium laurylsulphate. 4 The binding sites demonstrated a high degree of pharmacological specificity, GABA being a potent displacer of [3H]-muscimol. 5 A higher degree of [3H]-muscimol binding was associated with subcellular fractions enriched with photoreceptor synaptosomes rather than with fractions enriched with conventional synaptosomes. PMID:7470740

  14. Structural and Single-Channel Results Indicate that the Rates of Ligand Binding Domain Closing and Opening Directly Impact AMPA Receptor Gating

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,W.; Cho, Y.; Lolis, E.; Howe, J.

    2008-01-01

    At most excitatory central synapses, glutamate is released from presynaptic terminals and binds to postsynaptic AMPA receptors, initiating a series of conformational changes that result in ion channel opening. Efficient transmission at these synapses requires that glutamate binding to AMPA receptors results in rapid and near-synchronous opening of postsynaptic receptor channels. In addition, if the information encoded in the frequency of action potential discharge is to be transmitted faithfully, glutamate must dissociate from the receptor quickly, enabling the synapse to discriminate presynaptic action potentials that are spaced closely in time. The current view is that the efficacy of agonists is directly related to the extent to which ligand binding results in closure of the binding domain. For glutamate to dissociate from the receptor, however, the binding domain must open. Previously, we showed that mutations in glutamate receptor subunit 2 that should destabilize the closed conformation not only sped deactivation but also altered the relative efficacy of glutamate and quisqualate. Here we present x-ray crystallographic and single-channel data that support the conclusions that binding domain closing necessarily precedes channel opening and that the kinetics of conformational changes at the level of the binding domain importantly influence ion channel gating. Our findings suggest that the stability of the closed-cleft conformation has been tuned during evolution so that glutamate dissociates from the receptor as rapidly as possible but remains an efficacious agonist.

  15. Structure of the RNA-Binding Domain of Telomerase: Implications For RNA Recognition and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Rouda,S.; Skordalakes, E.

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex, replicates the linear ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, thus taking care of the 'end of replication problem.' TERT contains an essential and universally conserved domain (TRBD) that makes extensive contacts with the RNA (TER) component of the holoenzyme, and this interaction is thought to facilitate TERT/TER assembly and repeat-addition processivity. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of TRBD from Tetrahymena thermophila. The nearly all-helical structure comprises a nucleic acid-binding fold suitable for TER binding. An extended pocket on the surface of the protein, formed by two conserved motifs (CP and T motifs) comprises TRBD's RNA-binding pocket. The width and the chemical nature of this pocket suggest that it binds both single- and double-stranded RNA, possibly stem I, and the template boundary element (TBE). Moreover, the structure provides clues into the role of this domain in TERT/TER stabilization and telomerase repeat-addition processivity.

  16. SARS Coronavirus-unique Domain (SUD): Three-domain Molecular Architecture in Solution and RNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Margaret A.; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Neuman, Benjamin W.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3) of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) includes a “SARS-unique region” (SUD) consisting of three globular domains separated by short linker peptide segments. This paper reports NMR structure determinations of the C-terminal domain (SUD-C) and of a two-domain construct (SUD-MC) containing the middle domain (SUD-M) and the C-terminal domain, and NMR data on the conformational states of the N-terminal domain (SUD-N) and the SUD-NM two-domain construct. Both SUD-N and SUD-NM are monomeric and globular in solution, and in SUD-NM there is high mobility in the two-residue interdomain linking sequence, with no preferred relative orientation of the two domains. SUD-C adopts a frataxin-like fold and has structural similarity to DNA-binding domains of DNA-modifying enzymes. The structures of both SUD-M (previously determined) and SUD-C (from the present study) are maintained in SUD-MC, where the two domains are flexibly linked. Gel shift experiments showed that both SUD-C and SUD-MC bind to single-stranded RNA and recognize purine bases more strongly than pyrimidine bases, whereby SUD-MC binds to a more restricted set of purine-containing RNA sequences than SUD-M. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments with observation of the 15N-labeled proteins further resulted in the delineation of the RNA binding sites, i.e., in SUD-M a positively charged surface area with a pronounced cavity, and in SUD-C several residues of an antiparallel β-sheet. Overall, the present data provide evidence for molecular mechanisms involving concerted actions of SUD-M and SUD-C, which result in specific RNA-binding that might be unique to the SUD, and thus to the SARS-CoV. PMID:20493876

  17. Opioid agonists binding and responses in SH-SY5Y cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, E. M.; Hoffmann, B. B.; Loew, G. H.

    1992-01-01

    SH-SY5Y (human neuroblastoma) cultured cells, known to have mu-opioid receptors, have been used to assess and compare the ability of eight representative mu-selective compounds from diverse opioid families to recognize and activate these receptors. A wide range of receptor affinities spanning a factor of 10,000 was found between the highest affinity fentanyl analogs (Ki = 0.1nM) and the lowest affinity analog, meperidine (Ki = 1 microM). A similar range was found for inhibition of PGE1-stimulated cAMP accumulation with a rank order of activities that closely paralleled binding affinities. Maximum inhibition of cAMP accumulation by each compound was about 80%. Maximum stimulation of GTPase activity (approximately 50%) was also similar for all compounds except the lowest affinity meperidine. Both effects were naloxone reversible. These results provide further evidence that mu-receptors are coupled to inhibition of adenylate cyclase and that the SH-SY5Y cell line is a good system for assessment of mu-agonists functional responses.

  18. Insights into how nucleotide-binding domains power ABC transport.

    PubMed

    Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W; Bilton, Paul; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Sadler, Peter J; Campopiano, Dominic J; Sansom, Mark S P; Iwata, So

    2009-09-01

    The mechanism by which nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of ABC transporters power the transport of substrates across cell membranes is currently unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of an NBD, FbpC, from the Neisseria gonorrhoeae ferric iron uptake transporter with an unusual and substantial domain swap in the C-terminal regulatory domain. This entanglement suggests that FbpC is unable to open to the same extent as the homologous protein MalK. Using molecular dynamics we demonstrate that this is not the case: both NBDs open rapidly once ATP is removed. We conclude from this result that the closed structures of FbpC and MalK have higher free energies than their respective open states. This result has important implications for our understanding of the mechanism of power generation in ABC transporters, because the unwinding of this free energy ensures that the opening of these two NBDs is also powered. PMID:19748342

  19. Nuclear receptor ligand-binding domains: reduction of helix H12 dynamics to favour crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Nahoum, Virginie; Lipski, Alexandra; Quillard, Fabien; Guichou, Jean-François; Boublik, Yvan; Pérez, Efrèn; Germain, Pierre; Lera, Angel R. de; Bourguet, William

    2008-07-01

    Attempts have been made to crystallize the ligand-binding domain of the human retinoid X receptor in complex with a variety of newly synthesized ligands. An inverse correlation was observed between the ‘crystallizability’ and the structural dynamics of the various receptor–ligand complexes. Crystallization trials of the human retinoid X receptor α ligand-binding domain (RXRα LBD) in complex with various ligands have been carried out. Using fluorescence anisotropy, it has been found that when compared with agonists these small-molecule effectors enhance the dynamics of the RXRα LBD C-terminal helix H12. In some cases, the mobility of this helix could be dramatically reduced by the addition of a 13-residue co-activator fragment (CoA). In keeping with these observations, crystals have been obtained of the corresponding ternary RXRα LBD–ligand–CoA complexes. In contrast, attempts to crystallize complexes with a highly mobile H12 remained unsuccessful. These experimental observations substantiate the previously recognized role of co-regulator fragments in facilitating the crystallization of nuclear receptor LBDs.

  20. Predicting binding within disordered protein regions to structurally characterised peptide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Khan, Waqasuddin; Duffy, Fergal; Pollastri, Gianluca; Shields, Denis C; Mooney, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Disordered regions of proteins often bind to structured domains, mediating interactions within and between proteins. However, it is difficult to identify a priori the short disordered regions involved in binding. We set out to determine if docking such peptide regions to peptide binding domains would assist in these predictions.We assembled a redundancy reduced dataset of SLiM (Short Linear Motif) containing proteins from the ELM database. We selected 84 sequences which had an associated PDB structures showing the SLiM bound to a protein receptor, where the SLiM was found within a 50 residue region of the protein sequence which was predicted to be disordered. First, we investigated the Vina docking scores of overlapping tripeptides from the 50 residue SLiM containing disordered regions of the protein sequence to the corresponding PDB domain. We found only weak discrimination of docking scores between peptides involved in binding and adjacent non-binding peptides in this context (AUC 0.58).Next, we trained a bidirectional recurrent neural network (BRNN) using as input the protein sequence, predicted secondary structure, Vina docking score and predicted disorder score. The results were very promising (AUC 0.72) showing that multiple sources of information can be combined to produce results which are clearly superior to any single source.We conclude that the Vina docking score alone has only modest power to define the location of a peptide within a larger protein region known to contain it. However, combining this information with other knowledge (using machine learning methods) clearly improves the identification of peptide binding regions within a protein sequence. This approach combining docking with machine learning is primarily a predictor of binding to peptide-binding sites, and is not intended as a predictor of specificity of binding to particular receptors. PMID:24019881

  1. In silico analysis of human Toll-like receptor 7 ligand binding domain.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Chhedi Lal; Akhtar, Salman; Sayyed, Uzma; Pathak, Neelam; Bajpai, Preeti

    2016-05-01

    Toll-like receptors recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns are preface actors for innate immunity. Among them TLR7 is a transmembrane protein playing very crucial role in the signaling pathways involved in innate immunity by recognizing viral ssRNA and specific small molecule agonists. The unavailability of experimental 3D structure of this receptor till date hampers the focused exploration of TLR7 interaction with its ligands. However, several proteins possessing high homology domain enabled us to construct a reliable 3D model of hTLR7 ECD, which was employed to generate the homodimer model using protein-protein docking strategy. Further molecular docking studies between developed homodimer model and ligands were performed to explore the most preferred site of hTLR7 ECD interacting with ligands. The comparative analysis of docking energies and protein-ligand interactions of all the ligands revealed resiquimod as the prominent agonist. Furthermore, molecular interactions between protein-ligand complexes suggested LRR15 and LRR16 region of hTLR7 ECD as the most preferential site for ligand binding. The Ser434 and Gly437 of LRR15 region of hTLR7 were found to be conserved with Drosophila Toll protein. The obtained complex model may lead to a better understanding of TLR7 functioning along with its inheritance from invertebrates to mammals. PMID:25817271

  2. Autoantibodies enhance agonist action and binding to cardiac muscarinic receptors in chronic Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ciria C; Nascimento, Jose H; Chaves, Elen A; Costa, Patricia C; Masuda, Masako O; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos DE Carvalho, Antonio C; Gimenez, Luis E

    2008-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M(2)-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M(2)AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M(2)AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M(2)AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [(3)H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([(3)H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M(2)AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [(3)H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [(3)H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC(50) of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 x 10(- 8), 1.33 x 10(- 7), and 2.0 x 10(- 7) mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M(2)AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  3. Autoantibodies Enhance Agonist Action and Binding to Cardiac Muscarinic Receptors in Chronic Chagas’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Ciria C.; Nascimento, José H.; Chaves, Elen A.; Costa, Patrícia C.; Masuda, Masako O.; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos de Carvalho, Antônio C.; Giménez, Luis E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M2AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M2AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M2AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M2AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [3H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [3H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC50 of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 × 10−8, 1.33 × 10−7, and 2.0 × 10−7 mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M2AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  4. Complex between α-bungarotoxin and an α7 nicotinic receptor ligand-binding domain chimaera

    PubMed Central

    Bren, Nina; Cheng, Kevin; Gomoto, Ryan; Chen, Lin; Sine, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    To identify high-affinity interactions between long-chain α-neurotoxins and nicotinic receptors, we determined the crystal structure of the complex between α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) and a pentameric ligand-binding domain constructed from the human α7 AChR (acetylcholine receptor) and AChBP (acetylcholine-binding protein). The complex buries ~2000 Å2 (1 Å = 0.1 nm) of surface area, within which Arg36 and Phe32 from finger II of α-btx form a π-cation stack that aligns edge-to-face with the conserved Tyr184 from loop-C of α7, while Asp30 of α-btx forms a hydrogen bond with the hydroxy group of Tyr184. These inter-residue interactions diverge from those in a 4.2 Å structure of α-ctx (α-cobratoxin) bound to AChBP, but are similar to those in a 1.94 Å structure of α-btx bound to the monomeric α1 extracellular domain, although compared with the monomer-bound complex, the α-btx backbone exhibits a large shift relative to the protein surface. Mutational analyses show that replacing Tyr184 with a threonine residue abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, whereas replacing with a phenylalanine residue maintains high affinity. Comparison of the α-btx complex with that coupled to the agonist epibatidine reveals structural rearrangements within the binding pocket and throughout each subunit. The overall findings high-light structural principles by which α-neurotoxins interact with nicotinic receptors. PMID:23800261

  5. Ubiquitin binds to and regulates a subset of SH3 domains

    PubMed Central

    Stamenova, Svetoslava D.; French, Michael E.; He, Yuan; Francis, Smitha A.; Kramer, Zachary B.; Hicke, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Summary SH3 domains are modules of 50-70 amino acids that promote interactions among proteins, often participating in the assembly of large dynamic complexes. These domains bind to peptide ligands, which usually contain a core Pro-X-X-Pro (PXXP) sequence. Here we identify a class of SH3 domains that binds to ubiquitin. The yeast endocytic protein Sla1, as well as the mammalian proteins CIN85 and amphiphysin, carry ubiquitin-binding SH3 domains. Ubiquitin and peptide ligands bind to the same hydrophobic groove on the SH3 domain surface, and ubiquitin and a PXXP-containing protein fragment compete for binding to SH3 domains. We conclude that a subset of SH3 domains constitutes a distinct type of ubiquitin-binding domain, and that ubiquitin-binding can negatively regulate interaction of SH3 domains with canonical proline-rich ligands. PMID:17244534

  6. Mutations within the agonist-binding site convert the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor into a Zn2+-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Grudzinska, Joanna; Schumann, Tanja; Schemm, Rudolf; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2008-01-01

    The divalent cation Zn2+ has been shown to regulate inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS by affecting the activation of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR). In spinal neurons and cells expressing recombinant GlyRs, low micromolar (<10 microM) concentrations of Zn2+ enhance glycine currents, whereas higher concentrations (>10 microM) have an inhibitory effect. Mutational studies have localized the Zn2+ binding sites mediating allosteric potentiation and inhibition of GlyRs in distinct regions of the N-terminal extracellular domain of the GlyR alpha-subunits. Here, we examined the Zn2+ sensitivity of different mutations within the agonist binding site of the homomeric alpha(1)-subunit GlyR upon heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. This revealed that six substitutions within the ligand-binding pocket result in a total loss of Zn2+ inhibition. Furthermore, substitution of the positively charged residues arginine 65 and arginine 131 by alanine (alpha(1)(R65A), alpha(1)(R131A), or of the aromatic residue phenylalanine 207 by histidine (alpha(1)(F207H)), converted the alpha(1) GlyR into a chloride channel that was activated by Zn2+ alone. Dose-response analysis of the alpha(1)(F207H) GlyR disclosed an EC(50) value of 1.2 microM for Zn2+ activation; concomitantly the apparent glycine affinity was 1000-fold reduced. Thus, single point mutations within the agonist-binding site of the alpha(1) subunit convert the inhibitory GlyR from a glycine-gated into a selectively Zn2+-activated chloride channel. This might be exploited for the design of metal-specific biosensors by modeling-assisted mutagenesis. PMID:18690053

  7. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tammy; Gaultney, Robert A.; Floden, Angela M.; Brissette, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp) is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysinses in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen (Plg), a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to Plg, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp–Plg interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound Plg to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds Plg via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that Plg bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding Plg are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:26500634

  8. Sequential coagulation factor VIIa domain binding to tissue factor

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterlund, Maria; Persson, Egon; Freskgard, Per-Ola . E-mail: msv@ifm.liu.se

    2005-12-02

    Vessel wall tissue factor (TF) is exposed to blood upon vascular damage which enables association with factor VIIa (FVIIa). This leads to initiation of the blood coagulation cascade through localization and allosteric induction of FVIIa procoagulant activity. To examine the docking pathway of the FVIIa-TF complex, various residues in the extracellular part of TF (sTF) that are known to interact with FVIIa were replaced with cysteines labelled with a fluorescent probe. By using stopped-flow fluorescence kinetic measurements in combination with surface plasmon resonance analysis, we studied the association of the resulting sTF variants with FVIIa. We found the docking trajectory to be a sequence of events in which the protease domain of FVIIa initiates contact with sTF. Thereafter, the two proteins are tethered via the first epidermal growth factor-like and finally the {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. The two labelled sTF residues interacting with the protease domain of FVIIa bind or become eventually ordered at different rates, revealing kinetic details pertinent to the allosteric activation of FVIIa by sTF. Moreover, when the Gla domain of FVIIa is removed the difference in the rate of association for the remaining domains is much more pronounced.

  9. Control of domain swapping in bovine odorant-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Roberto; Vincent, Florence; Ashcroft, Alison E; Accornero, Paolo; Grolli, Stefano; Valencia, Christel; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2002-01-01

    As revealed by the X-ray structure, bovine odorant-binding protein (OBPb) is a domain swapped dimer [Tegoni, Ramoni, Bignetti, Spinelli and Cambillau (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 863-867; Bianchet, Bains, Petosi, Pevsner, Snyder, Monaco and Amzel (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 934-939]. This contrasts with all known mammalian OBPs, which are monomers, and in particular with porcine OBP (OBPp), sharing 42.3% identity with OBPb. By the mechanism of domain swapping, monomers are proposed to evolve into dimers and oligomers, as observed in human prion. Comparison of bovine and porcine OBP sequences pointed at OBPp glycine 121, in the hinge linking the beta-barrel to the alpha-helix. The absence of this residue in OBPb might explain why the normal lipocalin beta-turn is not formed. In order to decipher the domain swapping determinants we have produced a mutant of OBPb in which a glycine residue was inserted after position 121, and a mutant of OBPp in which glycine 121 was deleted. The latter mutation did not result in dimerization, while OBPb-121Gly+ became monomeric, suggesting that domain swapping was reversed. Careful structural analysis revealed that besides the presence of a glycine in the hinge, the dimer interface formed by the C-termini and by the presence of the lipocalins conserved disulphide bridge may also control domain swapping. PMID:11931632

  10. PKCepsilon regulates behavioral sensitivity, binding and tolerance to the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Melisa J; Newton, Philip M; McMahon, Thomas; Connolly, Jacklyn; Huibers, Anne; Whistler, Jennifer; Messing, Robert O

    2009-06-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1) is one of the most abundant G protein-coupled receptors in the brain, but little is known about the mechanisms that modulate CB1 receptor signaling. Here, we show that inhibition or null mutation of the epsilon isozyme of protein kinase C (PKCepsilon) selectively enhances behavioral responses to the CB1 agonist WIN55,212-2 in mice, but not to the structurally unrelated CB1 agonist CP55,940. Binding affinity for [(3)H] WIN55,212-2 was increased in brain membranes from PKCepsilon(-/-) mice compared with PKCepsilon(+/+) mice. There was no difference in binding of the inverse agonist [(3)H] SR141716A. In addition, repeated administration of WIN55,212-2 produced greater analgesic and thermal tolerance in PKCvarepsilon(-/-) mice compared with PKCepsilon(+/+)mice. These results indicate that PKCvarepsilon selectively regulates behavioral sensitivity, CB1 receptor binding and tolerance to WIN55,212-2. PMID:19158669

  11. Spatial Approximation between Secretin Residue Five and the Third Extracellular Loop of Its Receptor Provides New Insight into the Molecular Basis of Natural Agonist Binding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Pinon, Delia I.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Abagyan, Ruben; Miller, Laurence J.

    2013-01-01

    The amino terminus of class II G protein-coupled receptors plays an important role in ligand binding and receptor activation. Understanding of the conformation of the amino-terminal domain of these receptors has been substantially advanced with the solution of nuclear magnetic resonance and crystal structures of this region of receptors for corticotrophin-releasing factor, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, and gastric inhibitory polypeptide. However, the orientation of the amino terminus relative to the receptor core and how the receptor gets activated upon ligand binding remain unclear. In this work, we have used photoaffinity labeling to identify a critical spatial approximation between residue five of secretin and a residue within the proposed third extracellular loop of the secretin receptor. This was achieved by purification, deglycosylation, cyanogen bromide cleavage, and sequencing of labeled wild-type and mutant secretin receptors. This constraint has been used to refine our evolving molecular model of secretin docked at the intact receptor, which for the first time includes refined helical bundle and loop regions and reflects a peptide-binding groove within the receptor amino terminus that directs the amino terminus of the peptide toward the receptor body. This model is fully consistent with the endogenous agonist mechanism for class II G protein-coupled receptor activation, where ligand binding promotes the interaction of a portion of the receptor amino terminus with the receptor body to activate it. PMID:18467541

  12. Immunochemical analysis of the glucocorticoid receptor: identification of a third domain separate from the steroid-binding and DNA-binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Carlstedt-Duke, J; Okret, S; Wrange, O; Gustafsson, J A

    1982-01-01

    The glucocorticoid-receptor complex can be subdivided into three separate domains by limited proteolysis with trypsin or alpha-chymotrypsin. The following characteristics can be separated: steroid-binding activity (domain A), DNA-binding activity (domain B), and immunoactivity (domain C). We have previously reported the separation of the steroid-binding domain from the DNA-binding domain by limited proteolysis of the receptor with trypsin. In this paper, we report the detection by immunochemical analysis of a third domain of the glucocorticoid receptor, which does not bind hormone. Immunoactivity was detected by using specific antiglucocorticoid receptor antibodies raised in rabbits against purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor and the assay used was an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After digestion with alpha-chymotrypsin, the immunoactive region of the receptor (domain C) was separated from the other two domains (A and B). The immunoactive fragment was found to have a Stokes radius of 2.6 nm. Further digestion with alpha-chymotrypsin resulted in separation of the immunoactive fragment to give a fragment having a Stokes radius of 1.4 nm. The immunoactive domain could be separated from the half of the glucocorticoid receptor containing the steroid-binding and the DNA-binding domains (Stokes radius, 3.3 nm), by limited proteolysis of the receptor by alpha-chymotrypsin followed by gel filtration or chromatography on DNA-cellulose. PMID:6181503

  13. CORRELATION OF THE ANTICHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY OF A SERIES OF ORGANOPHOSPHATES WITH THEIR ABILITY TO COMPETE WITH AGONIST BINDING TO MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some compounds that inhibit acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) activity compete directly with quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding, a muscarinic antagonist which binds to all subtypes equally, and with cis-methyldioxolane (CD), an agonist that binds with high affinity to the M2 subtype...

  14. Polyphosphoinositide binding domains: key to inositol lipid biology

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Gerald R. V.; Balla, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphoinositides (PPIn) are an important family of phospholipids located on the cytoplasmic leaflet of eukaryotic cell membranes. Collectively, they are critical for the regulation many aspects of membrane homeostasis and signaling, with notable relevance to human physiology and disease. This regulation is achieved through the selective interaction of these lipids with hundreds of cellular proteins, and thus the capability to study these localized interactions is crucial to understanding their functions. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the principle types of PPIn-protein interactions, focusing on specific lipid-binding domains. We then discuss how these domains have been re-tasked by biologists as molecular probes for these lipids in living cells. Finally, we describe how the knowledge gained with these probes, when combined with other techniques, has led to the current view of the lipids’ localization and function in eukaryotes, focusing mainly on animal cells. PMID:25732852

  15. MODELING THE BINDING OF THE METABOLITES OF SOME POLYCYCLIC AROMTIC HYDROCARBONS TO THE LIGAND BINDING DOMAIN OF THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the binding of the metabolites of some Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor
    James Rabinowitz, Stephen Little, Katrina Brown, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC; Un...

  16. Targeting the inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein BIR3 binding domains.

    PubMed

    Jaquith, James B

    2014-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular apoptosis and cytokine signaling. IAP family members include XIAP, cIAP1, cIAP2, NAIP, survivin, Apollon/Bruce, ML-IAP/livin and TIAP. The IAPs have been targeted using both antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors. Several research teams have advanced compounds that bind the highly conserved BIR3 domains of the IAPs into clinical trials, as single agents and in combination with standard of care. This patent review highlights the medicinal chemistry strategies that have been applied to the development of clinical compounds. PMID:24998289

  17. Intersubunit binding domains within tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Yohrling, G J; Jiang, G C; Mockus, S M; Vrana, K E

    2000-08-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) belongs to the aromatic amino acid hydroxylase superfamily, which includes phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The crystal structures for both PAH and TH have been reported, but a crystallographic model of TPH remains elusive. For this reason, we have utilized the information presented in the TH crystal structure in combination with primary sequence alignments to design point mutations in potential structural domains of the TPH protein. Mutation of a TH salt bridge (K170E) was sufficient to alter enzyme macromolecular assembly. We found that the disruption of the cognate intersubunit dimerization salt bridge (K111-E223) in TPH, however, did not affect the macromolecular assembly of TPH. Enzyme peaks representing only tetramers were observed with size exclusion chromatography. By contrast, a single-point mutation within the tetramerization domain of TPH (L435A) was sufficient to disrupt the normal homotetrameric assembly of TPH. These studies indicate that, although the proposed salt bridge dimerization interface of TH is conserved in TPH, this hypothetical TPH intersubunit binding domain, K111-E223, is not required for the proper macromolecular assembly of the protein. However, leucine 435 within the tetramerization domain is necessary for the proper macromolecular assembly of TPH. PMID:10900078

  18. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  19. Probing the structure and function of the estrogen receptor ligand binding domain by analysis of mutants with altered transactivation characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, F C; Lee, H S; Ferrara, J; Willson, T M; White, J H

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a genetic screen for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to isolate estrogen receptor (ER) mutants with altered transactivation characteristics. Use of a "reverse" ER, in which the mutagenized ligand binding domain was placed at the N terminus of the receptor, eliminated the isolation of truncated constitutively active mutants. A library was screened with a low-affinity estrogen, 2-methoxyestrone (2ME), at concentrations 50-fold lower than those required for activation of the unmutagenized ER. Several mutants displaying enhanced sensitivity to 2ME were isolated. We further characterized a mutant carrying the substitution L536P, which was located immediately N terminal to the AF-2-activating domain of the receptor. Amino acid 536 corresponds to a ligand contact residue in retinoic acid receptor gamma, suggesting that key contact points are conserved among receptors. Introduction of L536P into the original ER cDNA isolate HE0, which contains the substitution G400V, rendered the receptor more sensitive to a variety of agonists. When introduced into the wild-type ER HEG0, L536P also rendered the receptor more sensitive to agonists, and, in addition, induced high levels of constitutive activity that could be inhibited by antiestrogens. Estrogens containing a keto substitution in the steroid D ring, but not those containing a hydroxyl group, were full agonists of L536P-HEG0. Limited proteolytic analysis suggested that the L536P substitution, which is located immediately N terminal to the AF-2 domain, induces a conformational change in the ER that partially mimics binding by hormone. Both HEG0 and L536P-HEG0 formed complexes with hsp90 in vitro, indicating a lack of correlation between interaction with hsp90 in vitro and hormonal regulation of ER transactivation in vivo. This supports the idea that a factor(s) acting downstream of hsp90 is important for controlling activity of the hormone-free receptor. PMID:9234721

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein LprG (Rv1411c) binds triacylated glycolipid agonists of Toll-like receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drage, Michael G.; Tsai, Han-Chun; Pecora, Nicole D.; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Arida, Ahmad R.; Shukla, Supriya; Rojas, Roxana E.; Seshadri, Chetan; Moody, D. Branch; Boom, W. Henry; Sacchettini, James C.; Harding, Clifford V.

    2010-09-27

    Knockout of lprG results in decreased virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in mice. MTB lipoprotein LprG has TLR2 agonist activity, which is thought to be dependent on its N-terminal triacylation. Unexpectedly, here we find that nonacylated LprG retains TLR2 activity. Moreover, we show LprG association with triacylated glycolipid TLR2 agonists lipoarabinomannan, lipomannan and phosphatidylinositol mannosides (which share core structures). Binding of triacylated species was specific to LprG (not LprA) and increased LprG TLR2 agonist activity; conversely, association of glycolipids with LprG enhanced their recognition by TLR2. The crystal structure of LprG in complex with phosphatidylinositol mannoside revealed a hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the three alkyl chains of the ligand. In conclusion, we demonstrate a glycolipid binding function of LprG that enhances recognition of triacylated MTB glycolipids by TLR2 and may affect glycolipid assembly or transport for bacterial cell wall biogenesis.

  1. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  2. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  3. Chemical Modification of the M1 Agonist VU0364572 Reveals Molecular Switches in Pharmacology and a Bitopic Binding Mode

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the discovery of VU0364572 and VU0357017 as M1-selective agonists that appear to activate M1 through actions at an allosteric site. Previous studies have revealed that chemical scaffolds for many allosteric modulators contain molecular switches that allow discovery of allosteric antagonists and allosteric agonists or positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) based on a single chemical scaffold. Based on this, we initiated a series of studies to develop selective M1 allosteric antagonists based on the VU0364572 scaffold. Interestingly, two lead antagonists identified in this series, VU0409774 and VU0409775, inhibited ACh-induced Ca2+ responses at rat M1–5 receptor subtypes, suggesting they are nonselective muscarinic antagonists. VU0409774 and VU0409775 also completely displaced binding of the nonselective radioligand [3H]-NMS at M1 and M3 mAChRs with affinities similar to their functional IC50 values. Finally, Schild analysis revealed that these compounds inhibit M1 responses through a fully competitive interaction at the orthosteric binding site. This surprising finding prompted further studies to determine whether agonist activity of VU0364572 and VU0357017 may also engage in previously unappreciated actions at the orthosteric site on M1. Surprisingly, both VU0364572 and VU0357017 completely displaced [3H]-NMS binding to the orthosteric site of M1–M5 receptors at high concentrations. Furthermore, evaluation of agonist activity in systems with varying levels of receptor reserve and Furchgott analysis using a cell line expressing M1 under control of an inducible promotor was consistent with an action of these compounds as weak orthosteric partial agonists of M1. However, consistent with previous studies suggesting actions at a site that is distinct from the orthosteric binding site, VU0364572 or VU0357017 slowed the rate of [3H]-NMS dissociation from CHO-rM1 membranes. Together, these results suggest that VU0364572 and VU0357017 act as

  4. Glutathione Binding to the Bcl-2 Homology-3 Domain Groove

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Angela K.; Loucks, F. Alexandra; Schroeder, Emily K.; Bouchard, Ron J.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Bcl-2 protects cells against mitochondrial oxidative stress and subsequent apoptosis. However, the mechanism underlying the antioxidant function of Bcl-2 is currently unknown. Recently, Bax and several Bcl-2 homology-3 domain (BH3)-only proteins (Bid, Puma, and Noxa) have been shown to induce a pro-oxidant state at mitochondria (1-4). Given the opposing effects of Bcl-2 and Bax/BH3-only proteins on the redox state of mitochondria, we hypothesized that the antioxidant function of Bcl-2 is antagonized by its interaction with the BH3 domains of pro-apoptotic family members. Here, we show that BH3 mimetics that bind to a hydrophobic surface (the BH3 groove) of Bcl-2 induce GSH-sensitive mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons. BH3 mimetics displace a discrete mitochondrial GSH pool in neurons and suppress GSH transport into isolated rat brain mitochondria. Moreover, BH3 mimetics and the BH3-only protein, Bim, inhibit a novel interaction between Bcl-2 and GSH in vitro. These results suggest that Bcl-2 regulates an essential pool of mitochondrial GSH and that this regulation may depend upon Bcl-2 directly interacting with GSH via the BH3 groove. We conclude that this novel GSH binding property of Bcl-2 likely plays a central role in its antioxidant function at mitochondria. PMID:17690097

  5. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-01-11

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [alpha-(32)P]8-N(3)-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  6. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Allan L.; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [α-32P]8-N3-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  7. NMR Solution Structure and DNA Binding Model of the DNA Binding Domain of Competence Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Carey A.; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Thompson, Richele J.; Perego, Marta; Cavanagh, John

    2010-01-01

    Competence protein A (ComA) is a response regulator protein involved in the development of genetic competence in the Gram-positive spore forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis, as well as the regulation of the production of degradative enzymes and antibiotic synthesis. ComA belongs to the NarL family of proteins which are characterized by a C-terminal transcriptional activator domain that consists of a bundle of four helices, where the second and third helices (α8 and α9) form a helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain. Using NMR spectroscopy, the high resolution three-dimensional solution structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of ComA (ComAC) has been determined. In addition, surface plasmon resonance and NMR protein-DNA titration experiments allowed for the analysis of the interaction of ComAC with its target DNA sequences. Combining the solution structure and biochemical data, a model of ComAC bound to the ComA recognition sequences on the srfA promoter has been developed. The model shows that for DNA binding, ComA uses the conserved helix-turn-helix motif present in other NarL family members. However, the model also reveals that ComA may use a slightly different part of the helix-turn-helix motif and there appears to be some associated domain re-orientation. These observations suggest a basis for DNA binding specificity within the NarL family. PMID:20302877

  8. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel indazolyl glucocorticoid receptor partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, John L; Sheppeck, James E; Wang, Jim; Dhar, T G Murali; Cavallaro, Cullen; Doweyko, Arthur M; Mckay, Lorraine; Cunningham, Mark D; Habte, Sium F; Nadler, Steven G; Dodd, John H; Somerville, John E; Barrish, Joel C

    2013-10-01

    SAR was used to further develop an indazole class of non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor agonists aided by a GR LBD (ligand-binding domain)-agonist co-crystal structure described in the accompanying paper. Progress towards discovering a dissociated GR agonist guided by human in vitro assays biased the optimization of this compound series towards partial agonists that possessed excellent selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors. PMID:23916594

  9. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  10. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  11. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Characterization of Dihydrotestosterone-Induced Conformational Perturbations in Androgen Receptor Ligand-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Jasuja, Ravi; Ulloor, Jagadish; Yengo, Christopher M.; Choong, Karen; Istomin, Andrei Y.; Livesay, Dennis R.; Jacobs, Donald J.; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Mikšovská, Jaroslava; Larsen, Randy W.; Bhasin, Shalender

    2009-01-01

    Ligand-induced conformational perturbations in androgen receptor (AR) are important in coactivator recruitment and transactivation. However, molecular rearrangements in AR ligand-binding domain (AR-LBD) associated with agonist binding and their kinetic and thermodynamic parameters are poorly understood. We used steady-state second-derivative absorption and emission spectroscopy, pressure and temperature perturbations, and 4,4′-bis-anilinonaphthalene 8-sulfonate (bis-ANS) partitioning to determine the kinetics and thermodynamics of the conformational changes in AR-LBD after dihydrotestosterone (DHT) binding. In presence of DHT, the second-derivative absorption spectrum showed a red shift and a change in peak-to-peak distance. Emission intensity increased upon DHT binding, and center of spectral mass was blue shifted, denoting conformational changes resulting in more hydrophobic environment for tyrosines and tryptophans within a more compact DHT-bound receptor. In pressure perturbation calorimetry, DHT-induced energetic stabilization increased the Gibbs free energy of unfolding to 8.4 ± 1.3 kcal/mol from 3.5 ± 1.6 kcal/mol. Bis-ANS partitioning studies revealed that upon DHT binding, AR-LBD underwent biphasic rearrangement with a high activation energy (13.4 kcal/mol). An initial, molten globule-like burst phase (k ∼30 sec−1) with greater solvent accessibility was followed by rearrangement (k ∼0.01 sec−1), leading to a more compact conformation than apo-AR-LBD. Molecular simulations demonstrated unique sensitivity of tyrosine and tryptophan residues during pressure unfolding with rearrangement of residues in the coactivator recruitment surfaces distant from the ligand-binding pocket. In conclusion, DHT binding leads to energetic stabilization of AR-LBD domain and substantial rearrangement of residues distant from the ligand-binding pocket. DHT binding to AR-LBD involves biphasic receptor rearrangement including population of a molten globule

  12. Domain Selection in Metallothionein 1A: Affinity-Controlled Mechanisms of Zinc Binding and Cadmium Exchange.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Tyler B J; Irvine, Gordon W; Stillman, Martin J

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian metallothioneins (MTs) are small, metal binding proteins implicated in cellular metal ion homeostasis and heavy metal detoxification. Divalent, metal-saturated MTs form two distinct domains; the N-terminal β domain binds three metals using nine Cys residues, and the C-terminal α domain binds four metals with 11 Cys residues. Domain selection during zinc binding and cadmium exchange to human MT1A was examined using a series of competition reactions with mixtures of the isolated domain fragments. These experiments were conducted at two biologically significant pH conditions where MTs exist in vivo. Neither zinc binding nor cadmium exchange showed any significant degree of specificity or selectivity based on detailed analysis of electrospray ionization mass spectrometric and circular dichroic data. Under acidic conditions, zinc binding and cadmium exchange showed slight α domain selectivity because of the increased preference for cooperative clustering of the α domain. Modeling of the reactions showed that at both physiological (7.4) and acidic (5.8) pHs, zinc binding and cadmium exchanges occur essentially randomly between the two fragments. The metal binding affinity distributions between the domain fragments are comingled and not significantly separated as required for a domain specific mechanism. The models show rather that the order of the binding events follows the order of the binding affinities that are distributed across both domains and that this can be considered quantitatively by the KF(Cd)/KF(Zn) binding constant ratio for each metal bound. PMID:26167879

  13. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptorα Agonists Differentially Regulate Inhibitor of DNA Binding Expression in Rodents and Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, María del Carmen; Corton, J. Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Álvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans. PMID:22701468

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα agonists differentially regulate inhibitor of DNA binding expression in rodents and human cells.

    PubMed

    González, María Del Carmen; Corton, J Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Alvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans. PMID:22701468

  15. The Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Stereotype C Binds Phosphoinositides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD50 of {approx} 1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a 'dual receptor' mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Here, using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides. Additional interactions to phosphoinositides may help BoNT/C bind membrane more tightly and transduct signals for subsequent steps of intoxication. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of host cell membrane recognition by BoNTs.

  16. The RNA binding domain of Pumilio antagonizes poly-adenosine binding protein and accelerates deadenylation.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Chase A; Raynard, Nathan A; Blewett, Nathan H; Van Etten, Jamie; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2014-08-01

    PUF proteins are potent repressors that serve important roles in stem cell maintenance, neurological processes, and embryonic development. These functions are driven by PUF protein recognition of specific binding sites within the 3' untranslated regions of target mRNAs. In this study, we investigated mechanisms of repression by the founding PUF, Drosophila Pumilio, and its human orthologs. Here, we evaluated a previously proposed model wherein the Pumilio RNA binding domain (RBD) binds Argonaute, which in turn blocks the translational activity of the eukaryotic elongation factor 1A. Surprisingly, we found that Argonautes are not necessary for repression elicited by Drosophila and human PUFs in vivo. A second model proposed that the RBD of Pumilio represses by recruiting deadenylases to shorten the mRNA's polyadenosine tail. Indeed, the RBD binds to the Pop2 deadenylase and accelerates deadenylation; however, this activity is not crucial for regulation. Rather, we determined that the poly(A) is necessary for repression by the RBD. Our results reveal that poly(A)-dependent repression by the RBD requires the poly(A) binding protein, pAbp. Furthermore, we show that repression by the human PUM2 RBD requires the pAbp ortholog, PABPC1. Pumilio associates with pAbp but does not disrupt binding of pAbp to the mRNA. Taken together, our data support a model wherein the Pumilio RBD antagonizes the ability of pAbp to promote translation. Thus, the conserved function of the PUF RBD is to bind specific mRNAs, antagonize pAbp function, and promote deadenylation. PMID:24942623

  17. Membrane Binding and Modulation of the PDZ Domain of PICK1

    PubMed Central

    Erlendsson, Simon; Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolding proteins serve to assemble protein complexes in dynamic processes by means of specific protein-protein and protein-lipid binding domains. Many of these domains bind either proteins or lipids exclusively; however, it has become increasingly evident that certain domains are capable of binding both. Especially, many PDZ domains, which are highly abundant protein-protein binding domains, bind lipids and membranes. Here we provide an overview of recent large-scale studies trying to generalize and rationalize the binding patterns as well as specificity of PDZ domains towards membrane lipids. Moreover, we review how these PDZ-membrane interactions are regulated in the case of the synaptic scaffolding protein PICK1 and how this might affect cellular localization and function. PMID:26501328

  18. Binding of an ( sup 125 I) labelled thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor agonist to baboon platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, G.W. II; De Jesus, A. )

    1989-12-01

    To characterize the thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) receptor on baboon platelets the binding of (125I)BOP was studied. (125I)BOP bound to washed baboon platelets in a saturable manner. Scatchard analysis of binding isotherms revealed a Kd of 1.12 +/- 0.08 nM and a binding capacity of 54 +/- 5 fmoles/10(8) platelets (326 sites/platelet). Several TXA2/PGH2 agonists and antagonists displaced (125I)BOP from its baboon platelet binding site with a rank order of potency similar to human platelets: I-BOP greater than SQ29548 greater than U46619 = I-PTA-OH greater than PTA-OH. I-BOP aggregated washed baboon platelets with an EC50 of 10 +/- 4 nM. The results indicate that (125I)BOP binds to the TXA2/PGH2 receptor on baboon platelets and that this receptor is similar to its human counterpart.

  19. Candida glabrata binds to glycosylated and lectinic receptors on the coronary endothelial luminal membrane and inhibits flow sense and cardiac responses to agonists.

    PubMed

    Torres-Tirado, David; Knabb, Maureen; Castaño, Irene; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Rubio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata (CG) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that initiates infection by binding to host cells via specific lectin-like adhesin proteins. We have previously shown the importance of lectin-oligosaccharide binding in cardiac responses to flow and agonists. Because of the lectinic-oligosaccharide nature of CG binding, we tested the ability of CG to alter the agonist- and flow-induced changes in cardiac function in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed strong attachment of CG to the coronary endothelium, even after extensive washing. CG shifted the coronary flow vs. auricular-ventricular (AV) delay relationship upward, indicating that greater flow was required to achieve the same AV delay. This effect was completely reversed with mannose, partially reversed with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, but hyaluronan had no effect. Western blot analysis was used to determine binding of CG to isolated coronary endothelial luminal membrane (CELM) receptors, and the results indicate that flow-sensitive CELM receptors, ANG II type I, α-adrenergic 1A receptor, endothelin-2, and VCAM-1 bind to CG. In addition, CG inhibited agonist-induced effects of bradykinin, angiotensin, and phenylephrine on AV delay, coronary perfusion pressure, and left ventricular pressure. Mannose reversed the inhibitory effects of CG on the agonist responses. These results suggest that CG directly binds to flow-sensitive CELM receptors via lectinic-oligosaccharide interactions with mannose and disrupts the lectin-oligosaccharide binding necessary for flow-induced cardiac responses. PMID:26491100

  20. Ligand binding to WW tandem domains of YAP2 transcriptional regulator is under negative cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; Hoang, Lawrence M; Bhat, Vikas; McDonald, Caleb B; Sudol, Marius; Farooq, Amjad

    2014-12-01

    YES-associated protein 2 (YAP2) transcriptional regulator drives a multitude of cellular processes, including the newly discovered Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, by virtue of the ability of its WW domains to bind and recruit PPXY-containing ligands to specific subcellular compartments. Herein, we employ an array of biophysical tools to investigate allosteric communication between the WW tandem domains of YAP2. Our data show that the WW tandem domains of YAP2 negatively cooperate when binding to their cognate ligands. Moreover, the molecular origin of such negative cooperativity lies in an unfavorable entropic contribution to the overall free energy relative to ligand binding to isolated WW domains. Consistent with this notion, the WW tandem domains adopt a fixed spatial orientation such that the WW1 domain curves outwards and stacks onto the binding groove of the WW2 domain, thereby sterically hindering ligand binding to both itself and its tandem partner. Although ligand binding to both WW domains disrupts such interdomain stacking interaction, they reorient themselves and adopt an alternative fixed spatial orientation in the liganded state by virtue of their ability to engage laterally so as to allow their binding grooves to point outwards and away from each other. In short, while the ability of WW tandem domains to aid ligand binding is well documented, our demonstration that they may also be subject to negative binding cooperativity represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the molecular action of this ubiquitous family of protein modules. PMID:25283809

  1. Ligand Binding to WW Tandem Domains of YAP2 Transcriptional Regulator Is Under Negative Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Schuchardt, Brett J.; Mikles, David C.; Hoang, Lawrence M.; Bhat, Vikas; McDonald, Caleb B.; Sudol, Marius; Farooq, Amjad

    2014-01-01

    YAP2 transcriptional regulator drives a multitude of cellular processes, including the newly discovered Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, by virtue of the ability of its WW domains to bind and recruit PPXY-containing ligands to specific subcellular compartments. Herein, we employ an array of biophysical tools to investigate allosteric communication between the WW tandem domains of YAP2. Our data show that the WW tandem domains of YAP2 negatively cooperate when binding to their cognate ligands. Moreover, the molecular origin of such negative cooperativity lies in an unfavorable entropic contribution to the overall free energy relative to ligand binding to isolated WW domains. Consistent with this notion, the WW tandem domains adopt a fixed spatial orientation such that the WW1 domain curves outwards and stacks onto the binding groove of WW2 domain, thereby sterically hindering ligand binding to both itself and its tandem partner. Although ligand binding to both WW domains disrupts such interdomain stacking interaction, they reorient themselves and adopt an alternative fixed spatial orientation in the liganded state by virtue of their ability to engage laterally so as to allow their binding grooves to point outwards and away from each other. In short, while the ability of WW tandem domains to aid ligand binding is well-documented, our demonstration that they may also be subject to negative binding cooperativity represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the molecular action of this ubiquitous family of protein modules. PMID:25283809

  2. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-01-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein–albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug. PMID:25864124

  3. Structure of the ERM protein moesin reveals the FERM domain fold masked by an extended actin binding tail domain.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M A; Reczek, D; Bretscher, A; Karplus, P A

    2000-04-28

    The ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) protein family link actin filaments of cell surface structures to the plasma membrane, using a C-terminal F-actin binding segment and an N-terminal FERM domain, a common membrane binding module. ERM proteins are regulated by an intramolecular association of the FERM and C-terminal tail domains that masks their binding sites. The crystal structure of a dormant moesin FERM/tail complex reveals that the FERM domain has three compact lobes including an integrated PTB/PH/ EVH1 fold, with the C-terminal segment bound as an extended peptide masking a large surface of the FERM domain. This extended binding mode suggests a novel mechanism for how different signals could produce varying levels of activation. Sequence conservation suggests a similar regulation of the tumor suppressor merlin. PMID:10847681

  4. Mapping of the acetylcholine binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: ( sup 3 H)nicotine as an agonist photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, R.E.; Cohen, J.B. )

    1991-07-16

    The agonist ({sup 3}H)nicotine was used as a photoaffinity label for the acetylcholine binding sties on the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). ({sup 3}H)Nicotine binds at equilibrium with K{sub eq} = 0.6 {mu}M to the agonist binding sites. Irradiation with 254-nm light of AChR-rich membranes equilibrated with ({sup 3}H)nicotine resulted in covalent incorporation into the {alpha}- and {gamma}-subunits, which was inhibited by agonists and competitive antagonists but not by noncompetitive antagonists. Inhibition of labeling by d-tubocurarine demonstrated that the {alpha}-subunit was labeled via both agonist sites but the {gamma}-subunit was labeled only via the site that binds d-tubocurarine with high affinity. Chymotryptic digestion of the {alpha}-subunit confirmed that Try-198 was the principal amino acid labeled by ({sup 3}H)nicotine. This confirmation required a novel radiosequencing strategy employing o-phthalaldehyde ({sup 3}H)Nicotine, which is the first photoaffinity agonist used, labels primarily Tyr-198 in contrast to competitive antagonist affinity labels, which label primarily Tyr-190 and Cys-192/Cys-193.

  5. Integrin LFA-1 alpha subunit contains an ICAM-1 binding site in domains V and VI.

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, P; Bates, P A; Harvey, J; Bennett, R I; Hogg, N

    1994-01-01

    In order to identify a binding site for ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on the beta 2 integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), protein fragments of LFA-1 were made by in vitro translation of a series of constructs which featured domain-sized deletions starting from the N-terminus of the alpha subunit of LFA-1. Monoclonal antibodies and ICAM-1 were tested for their ability to bind to these protein fragments. Results show that the putative divalent cation binding domains V and VI contain an ICAM-1 binding site. A series of consecutive peptides covering these domains indicated two discontinuous areas as specific contact sites: residues 458-467 in domain V and residues 497-516 in domain VI. A three-dimensional model of these domains of LFA-1 was constructed based on the sequence similarity to known EF hands. The two regions critical for the interaction of LFA-1 with ICAM-1 lie adjacent to each other, the first next to the non-functional EF hand in domain V and the second coinciding with the potential divalent cation binding loop in domain VI. The binding of ICAM-1 with the domain V and VI region in solution was not sensitive to divalent cation chelation. In short, a critical motif for ICAM-1 binding to the alpha subunit of LFA-1 is shared between two regions of domains V and VI. Images PMID:7909511

  6. Site of action of a pentapeptide agonist at the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor. Insight into a small molecule agonist-binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Pinon, Delia I.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2011-01-01

    The development of small molecule agonists for class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been quite challenging. With proof-of-concept that exenatide, the parenterally administered peptide agonist of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) receptor, is an effective treatment for patients with diabetes mellitus, the development of small molecule agonists could have substantial advantages. We previously reported a lead for small molecule GLP1 receptor agonist development representing the pentapeptide NRTFD. In this work, we have prepared an NRTFD derivative incorporating a photolabile benzoylphenylalanine and used it to define its site of action. This peptide probe was a full agonist with potency similar to NRTFD, which bound specifically and saturably to a single, distinct site within the GLP1 receptor. Peptide mapping using cyanogen bromide and endoproteinase Lys-C cleavage of labeled wild type and M397L mutant receptor constructs identified the site of covalent attachment of NRTFD within the third extracellular loop above the sixth transmembrane segment. This region is the same as that identified using an analogous photolabile probe based on secretin receptor sequences, and has been shown in mutagenesis studies to be important for natural agonist action of several members of this family. While these observations suggest that small molecule ligands can act at a site bordering the third extracellular loop to activate this class B GPCR, the relationship of this site to the site of action of the amino-terminal end of the natural agonist peptide is unclear. PMID:22079758

  7. Cooperative DNA Binding and Sequence-Selective Recognition Conferred by the STAT Amino-Terminal Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Sun, Ya-Lin; Hoey, Timothy

    1996-08-01

    STAT proteins (signal transducers and activators of transcription) activate distinct target genes despite having similar DNA binding preferences. The transcriptional specificity of STAT proteins was investigated on natural STAT binding sites near the interferon-gamma gene. These sites are arranged in multiple copies and required cooperative interactions for STAT binding. The conserved amino-terminal domain of STAT proteins was required for cooperative DNA binding, although this domain was not essential for dimerization or binding to a single site. Cooperative binding interactions enabled the STAT proteins to recognize variations of the consensus site. These sites can be specific for the different STAT proteins and may function to direct selective transcriptional activation.

  8. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) heparin binding domain binds to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Kallapur, S G; Akeson, R A

    1992-12-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been strongly implicated in several aspects of neural development. NCAM mediated adhesion has been proposed to involve a homophilic interaction between NCAMs on adjacent cells. The heparin binding domain (HBD) is an amino acid sequence within NCAM and has been shown to be involved in NCAM mediated adhesion but the relationship of this domain to NCAM segments mediating homophilic adhesion has not been defined. In the present study, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the HBD has been used as a substrate to determine its role in NCAM mediated adhesion. A neural cell line expressing NCAM (B35) and its derived clone which does not express NCAM (B35 clone 3) adhered similarly to plates coated with HBD peptide. A polyclonal antiserum to NCAM inhibited B35 cell-HBD peptide adhesion by only 10%, a value not statistically different from inhibition caused by preimmune serum. Both these experiments suggested no direct NCAM-HBD interactions. To test whether the HBD peptide bound to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), HSPG synthesis was inhibited using beta-D-xyloside. After treatment, B35 cell adhesion to the HBD peptide, but not to control substrates, was significantly decreased. B35 cell adhesion to the HBD peptide could be inhibited by 10(-7) M heparin but not chondroitin sulfate. Preincubation of the substrate (HBD peptide) with heparin caused dramatic reduction of B35 cell-HBD peptide adhesion whereas preincubation of B35 cells with heparin caused only modest reductions in cell-HBD adhesion. Furthermore, inhibition of HSPG sulfation with sodium chlorate also decreased the adhesion of B35 cells to the HBD peptide. These results strongly suggest that, within the assay system, the NCAM HBD does not participate in homophilic interactions but binds to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan. This interaction potentially represents an important mechanism of NCAM adhesion and further supports the view that NCAM has

  9. T antigen origin-binding domain of simian virus 40: determinants of specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Sanford, David G; Luo, Xuelian; Sudmeier, James L; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Bullock, Peter A; Bachovchin, William W

    2004-06-01

    To better understand origin recognition and initiation of DNA replication, we have examined by NMR complexes formed between the origin-binding domain of SV40 T antigen (T-ag-obd), the initiator protein of the SV40 virus, and cognate and noncognate DNA oligomers. The results reveal two structural effects associated with "origin-specific" binding that are absent in nonspecific DNA binding. The first is the formation of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) involving His 203, a residue that genetic studies have previously identified as crucial to both specific and nonspecific DNA binding in full-length T antigen. In free T-ag-obd, the side chain of His 203 has a pK(a) value of approximately 5, titrating to the N(epsilon)(1)H tautomer at neutral pH (Sudmeier, J. L., et al. (1996) J. Magn. Reson., Ser. B 113, 236-247). In complexes with origin DNA, His 203 N(delta)(1) becomes protonated and remains nontitrating as the imidazolium cation at all pH values from 4 to 8. The H-bonded N(delta1)H resonates at 15.9 ppm, an unusually large N-H proton chemical shift, of a magnitude previously observed only in the catalytic triad of serine proteases at low pH. The formation of this H-bond requires the middle G/C base pair of the recognition pentanucleotide, GAGGC. The second structural effect is a selective distortion of the A/T base pair characterized by a large (0.6 ppm) upfield chemical-shift change of its Watson-Crick proton, while nearby H-bonded protons remain relatively unaffected. The results indicate that T antigen, like many other DNA-binding proteins, may employ "catalytic" or "transition-state-like" interactions in binding its cognate DNA (Jen-Jacobson, L. (1997) Biopolymers 44, 153-180), which may be the solution to the well-known paradox between the relatively modest DNA-binding specificity exhibited by initiator proteins and the high specificity of initiation. PMID:15170330

  10. Structural Basis of Rnd1 Binding to Plexin Rho GTPase Binding Domains (RBDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Hota, Prasanta K.; Tong, Yufeng; Li, Buren; Shen, Limin; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Borthakur, Susmita; Kim, SoonJeung; Tempel, Wolfram; Buck, Matthias; Park, Hee-Won

    2011-09-20

    Plexin receptors regulate cell adhesion, migration, and guidance. The Rho GTPase binding domain (RBD) of plexin-A1 and -B1 can bind GTPases, including Rnd1. By contrast, plexin-C1 and -D1 reportedly bind Rnd2 but associate with Rnd1 only weakly. The structural basis of this differential Rnd1 GTPase binding to plexin RBDs remains unclear. Here, we solved the structure of the plexin-A2 RBD in complex with Rnd1 and the structures of the plexin-C1 and plexin-D1 RBDs alone, also compared with the previously determined plexin-B1 RBD.Rnd1 complex structure. The plexin-A2 RBD {center_dot} Rnd1 complex is a heterodimer, whereas plexin-B1 and -A2 RBDs homodimerize at high concentration in solution, consistent with a proposed model for plexin activation. Plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs are monomeric, consistent with major residue changes in the homodimerization loop. In plexin-A2 and -B1, the RBD {beta}3-{beta}4 loop adjusts its conformation to allow Rnd1 binding, whereas minimal structural changes occur in Rnd1. The plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs lack several key non-polar residues at the corresponding GTPase binding surface and do not significantly interact with Rnd1. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements on plexin-C1 and -D1 mutants reveal that the introduction of non-polar residues in this loop generates affinity for Rnd1. Structure and sequence comparisons suggest a similar mode of Rnd1 binding to the RBDs, whereas mutagenesis suggests that the interface with the highly homologous Rnd2 GTPase is different in detail. Our results confirm, from a structural perspective, that Rnd1 does not play a role in the activation of plexin-C1 and -D1. Plexin functions appear to be regulated by subfamily-specific mechanisms, some of which involve different Rho family GTPases.

  11. In vivo (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding: evidence for accumulation in corpus striatum by agonist-mediated receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Chugani, D.C.; Ackermann, R.F.; Phelps, M.E.

    1988-06-01

    The processes of receptor internalization and recycling have been well-documented for receptors for hormones, growth factors, lysosomal enzymes, and cellular substrates. Evidence also exists that these processes also occur for beta-adrenergic, muscarinic cholinergic, and delta-opiate receptors in frog erythrocytes or cultured nervous tissue. In this study, evidence is presented that agonist-mediated receptor internalization and recycling occurs at the dopamine receptor in rat corpus striatum. First, the in vivo binding of the dopamine antagonist (3H)spiperone was increased by both electrical stimulation and pharmacologically induced increases of dopamine release. Conversely, depletion of dopamine with reserpine decreased in vivo (3H)spiperone binding, but the same reserpine treatment did not alter its in vitro binding. Second, the rate of dissociation of (3H)spiperone from microsomal membranes prepared from rat striatum following in vivo binding was fivefold slower than its dissociation following in vitro equilibrium binding. Mild detergent treatment, employed to disrupt endocytic vesicle membranes, increased the rate of dissociation of in vivo bound (3H)spiperone from microsomal membranes to values not significantly different from its in vitro bound dissociation rate. Third, treatment of rats with chloroquine, a drug that prevents receptor recycling but not internalization, prior to (3H)spiperone injection resulted in a selective increase of in vivo (3H)spiperone binding in the light microsome membranes. The existence of mechanisms that rapidly alter the number of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses provides dynamic regulation of receptors in response to varied acute stimulation states.

  12. Identification of Important Regions for Ethylene Binding and Signaling in the Transmembrane Domain of the ETR1 Ethylene Receptor of Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuyi; Esch, Jeff J.; Shiu, Shin-Han; Agula, Hasi; Binder, Brad M.; Chang, Caren; Patterson, Sara E.; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2006-01-01

    The ethylene binding domain (EBD) of the Arabidopsis thaliana ETR1 receptor is modeled as three membrane-spanning helices. We surveyed ethylene binding activity in different kingdoms and performed a bioinformatic analysis of the EBD. Ethylene binding is confined to land plants, Chara, and a group of cyanobacteria but is largely absent in other organisms, consistent with our finding that EBD-like sequences are overrepresented among plant and cyanobacterial species. We made amino acid substitutions in 37 partially or completely conserved residues of the EBD and assayed their effects on ethylene binding and signaling. Mutations primarily in residues in Helices I and II midregions eliminated ethylene binding and conferred constitutive signaling, consistent with the inverse-agonist model of ethylene receptor signaling and indicating that these residues define the ethylene binding pocket. The largest class of mutations, clustered near the cytoplasmic ends of Helices I and III, gave normal ethylene binding activity yet still conferred constitutive signaling. Therefore, these residues may play a role in turning off the signal transmitter domain of the receptor. By contrast, only two mutations were loss of function with respect to signaling. These findings yield insight into the structure and function of the EBD and suggest a conserved role of the EBD as a negative regulator of the signal transmitter domain. PMID:17189345

  13. Binding to retinoblastoma pocket domain does not alter the inter-domain flexibility of the J domain of SV40 large T antigen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christina K; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Hammel, Michal; Pipas, James; Chazin, Walter J

    2012-02-15

    Simian Virus 40 uses the large T antigen (Tag) to bind and inactivate retinoblastoma tumor suppressor proteins (Rb), which can result in cellular transformation. Tag is a modular protein with four domains connected by flexible linkers. The N-terminal J domain of Tag is necessary for Rb inactivation. Binding of Rb is mediated by an LXCXE consensus motif immediately C-terminal to the J domain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to study the structural dynamics and interaction of Rb with the LXCXE motif, the J domain and a construct (N(260)) extending from the J domain through the origin binding domain (OBD). NMR and SAXS data revealed substantial flexibility between the domains in N(260). Binding of pRb to a construct containing the LXCXE motif and the J domain revealed weak interactions between pRb and the J domain. Analysis of the complex of pRb and N(260) indicated that the OBD is not involved and retains its dynamic independence from the remainder of Tag. These results support a 'chaperone' model in which the J domain of Tag changes its orientation as it acts upon different protein complexes. PMID:22227098

  14. Comparison of S. cerevisiae F-BAR domain structures reveals a conserved inositol phosphate binding site

    PubMed Central

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Alvarado, Diego; Schmitz, Karl R.; Kenniston, Jon A.; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY F-BAR domains control membrane interactions in endocytosis, cytokinesis, and cell signaling. Although generally thought to bind curved membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids, numerous functional studies argue that differences in lipid-binding selectivities of F-BAR domains are functionally important. Here, we compare membrane-binding properties of the S. cerevisiae F-BAR domains in vitro and in vivo. Whereas some F-BAR domains (such as Bzz1p and Hof1p F-BARs) bind equally well to all phospholipids, the F-BAR domain from the RhoGAP Rgd1p preferentially binds phosphoinositides. We determined X-ray crystal structures of F-BAR domains from Hof1p and Rgd1p, the latter bound to an inositol phosphate. The structures explain phospholipid-binding selectivity differences, and reveal an F-BAR phosphoinositide binding site that is fully conserved in a mammalian RhoGAP called Gmip, and is partly retained in certain other F-BAR domains. Our findings reveal previously unappreciated determinants of F-BAR domain lipid-binding specificity, and provide a basis for its prediction from sequence. PMID:25620000

  15. Proline-rich sequences that bind to Src homology 3 domains with individual specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandropoulos, K; Cheng, G; Baltimore, D

    1995-01-01

    To study the binding specificity of Src homology 3 (SH3) domains, we have screened a mouse embryonic expression library for peptide fragments that interact with them. Several clones were identified that express fragments of proteins which, through proline-rich binding sites, exhibit differential binding specificity to various SH3 domains. Src-SH3-specific binding uses a sequence of 7 aa of the consensus RPLPXXP, in which the N-terminal arginine is very important. The SH3 domains of the Src-related kinases Fyn, Lyn, and Hck bind to this sequence with the same affinity as that of the Src SH3. In contrast, a quite different proline-rich sequence from the Btk protein kinase binds to the Fyn, Lyn, and Hck SH3 domains, but not to the Src SH3. Specific binding of the Abl SH3 requires a longer, more proline-rich sequence but no arginine. One clone that binds to both Src and Abl SH3 domains through a common site exhibits reversed binding orientation, in that an arginine indispensable for binding to all tested SH3 domains occurs at the C terminus. Another clone contains overlapping yet distinct Src and Abl SH3 binding sites. Binding to the SH3 domains is mediated by a common PXXP amino acid sequence motif present on all ligands, and specificity comes about from other interactions, often ones involving arginine. The rules governing in vivo usage of particular sites by particular SH3 domains are not clear, but one binding orientation may be more specific than another. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7536925

  16. An aprotinin binding site localized in the hormone binding domain of the estrogen receptor from calf uterus.

    PubMed

    Nigro, V; Medici, N; Abbondanza, C; Minucci, S; Moncharmont, B; Molinari, A M; Puca, G A

    1990-07-31

    It has been proposed that the estrogen receptor bears proteolytic activity responsible for its own transformation. This activity was inhibited by aprotinin. Incubation of transformed ER with aprotinin modified the proteolytic digestion of the hormone binding subunit by proteinase K. The smallest hormone-binding fragment of the ER, obtained by tryptic digestion, was still able to bind to aprotinin. These results suggest that aprotinin interacts with ER and the hormone-binding domain of ER is endowed with a specific aprotinin-binding site. PMID:1696480

  17. The BEN domain is a novel sequence-specific DNA-binding domain conserved in neural transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Serganov, Artem A.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Lai, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that Drosophila Insensitive (Insv) promotes sensory organ development and has activity as a nuclear corepressor for the Notch transcription factor Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)]. Insv lacks domains of known biochemical function but contains a single BEN domain (i.e., a “BEN-solo” protein). Our chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis confirmed binding of Insensitive to Su(H) target genes in the Enhancer of split gene complex [E(spl)-C]; however, de novo motif analysis revealed a novel site strongly enriched in Insv peaks (TCYAATHRGAA). We validate binding of endogenous Insv to genomic regions bearing such sites, whose associated genes are enriched for neural functions and are functionally repressed by Insv. Unexpectedly, we found that the Insv BEN domain binds specifically to this sequence motif and that Insv directly regulates transcription via this motif. We determined the crystal structure of the BEN–DNA target complex, revealing homodimeric binding of the BEN domain and extensive nucleotide contacts via α helices and a C-terminal loop. Point mutations in key DNA-contacting residues severely impair DNA binding in vitro and capacity for transcriptional regulation in vivo. We further demonstrate DNA-binding and repression activities by the mammalian neural BEN-solo protein BEND5. Altogether, we define novel DNA-binding activity in a conserved family of transcriptional repressors, opening a molecular window on this extensive gene family. PMID:23468431

  18. The ligand binding domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Immunological analysis.

    PubMed

    Kachalsky, S G; Aladjem, M; Barchan, D; Fuchs, S

    1993-03-01

    The interaction of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) binding site domain with specific antibodies and with alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) has been compared. The cloned and expressed ligand binding domain of the mouse AChR alpha-subunit binds alpha-BTX, whereas the mongoose-expressed domain is not recognized by alpha-BTX. On the other hand, both the mouse and mongoose domains bind to the site-specific monoclonal antibody 5.5. These results demonstrate that the structural requirements for binding of alpha-BTX and mcAb 5.5, both of which interact with the AChR binding site, are distinct from each other. PMID:8440381

  19. A SAM oligomerization domain shapes the genomic binding landscape of the LEAFY transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Sayou, Camille; Nanao, Max H.; Jamin, Marc; Posé, David; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Grégoire, Laura; Tichtinsky, Gabrielle; Denay, Grégoire; Ott, Felix; Peirats Llobet, Marta; Schmid, Markus; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms directing transcription factors (TFs) to specific genome regions is essential to understand and predict transcriptional regulation. TFs recognize short DNA motifs primarily through their DNA-binding domain. Some TFs also possess an oligomerization domain suspected to potentiate DNA binding but for which the genome-wide influence remains poorly understood. Here we focus on the LEAFY transcription factor, a master regulator of flower development in angiosperms. We have determined the crystal structure of its conserved amino-terminal domain, revealing an unanticipated Sterile Alpha Motif oligomerization domain. We show that this domain is essential to LEAFY floral function. Moreover, combined biochemical and genome-wide assays suggest that oligomerization is required for LEAFY to access regions with low-affinity binding sites or closed chromatin. This finding shows that domains that do not directly contact DNA can nevertheless have a profound impact on the DNA binding landscape of a TF. PMID:27097556

  20. A SAM oligomerization domain shapes the genomic binding landscape of the LEAFY transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Sayou, Camille; Nanao, Max H; Jamin, Marc; Posé, David; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Grégoire, Laura; Tichtinsky, Gabrielle; Denay, Grégoire; Ott, Felix; Peirats Llobet, Marta; Schmid, Markus; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms directing transcription factors (TFs) to specific genome regions is essential to understand and predict transcriptional regulation. TFs recognize short DNA motifs primarily through their DNA-binding domain. Some TFs also possess an oligomerization domain suspected to potentiate DNA binding but for which the genome-wide influence remains poorly understood. Here we focus on the LEAFY transcription factor, a master regulator of flower development in angiosperms. We have determined the crystal structure of its conserved amino-terminal domain, revealing an unanticipated Sterile Alpha Motif oligomerization domain. We show that this domain is essential to LEAFY floral function. Moreover, combined biochemical and genome-wide assays suggest that oligomerization is required for LEAFY to access regions with low-affinity binding sites or closed chromatin. This finding shows that domains that do not directly contact DNA can nevertheless have a profound impact on the DNA binding landscape of a TF. PMID:27097556

  1. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency

    PubMed Central

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M.; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G.; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G.; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3–4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [3H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [35S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [35S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  2. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency.

    PubMed

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-07-14

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3-4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [(3)H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [(35)S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [(35)S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  3. Binding ability of impromidine, a potent H2 agonist of histamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anouar, A.; Lhadi, E.; Decock, P.; Kozlowskyinst4, H.

    1999-09-01

    Impromidine (fig.1) is a potent and selective histamine H2 receptor agonist and its structure comprises a strongly basic guanidine group containing two different imidazole-containing side chains. The present work deals with the study of coordination equilibria between impromidine and Cu(II) and Ni(II) in aqueous solution at 25 circC. Potentiometric, UV-Visible and EPR studies on Cu(II) complexes with impromidine have shown that this anti-ulcerogenic drug is a very potent chelating agent. This drug is found to be a very effective ligand for Ni(II) ions also. The effective coordination of impromidine to metal ions may have significant biological implications. L'impromidine est un agoniste H2 de l'histamine, sa structure possède un groupement guanidinique de forte basicité et dont l'environne ment des deux groupements imidazoliques est différent. Le présent travail consiste en l'étude de la coordination de l'impromidine avec le Cu(II) et le Ni(II) en milieu aqueux à 25 circC. La potentiométrie, LíUV-Visible et la RPE montrent que le cuivre se coordine très fortement avec l'impromidine. Nous avons trouvé que ce médicament se coordine aussi fortement avec le nickel(II). La coordination de l'impromidine avec les métaux pourrait avoir des applications importantes en médecine.

  4. Structure, Energetics and Dynamics of Binding Coactivator Peptide to Human Retinoid X Receptor Alpha Ligand Binding Domain Complex with 9-cis-Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Gang; Boerma, LeeAnn J; Cox, Bryan D; Qiu, Cheng; Kang, Sebyung; Smith, Craig D; Renfrow, Matthew B; Muccio, Donald D

    2010-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, which are activated by the potent agonist 9-cis retinoic acid (9cRA). 9cRA binds to the ligand binding domain (LBD) of RXRs, and recruits coactivator proteins for gene transcription. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, the binding of a 13-mer coactivator peptide, GRIP-1, to the hRXRα-LBD homodimer complex containing 9cRA (hRXRα-LBD:9cRA:GRIP-1) is reported between 20° and 37 °C. ΔG is temperature independent (−8.5 kcal/mol), and GRIP-1 binding is driven by ΔH (−9.2 kcal/mol) at 25 °C. ΔCp is large and negative (−401 cal/mol-K). The crystal structure of hRXRα-LBD:9cRA:GRIP-1 is reported at 2.05 Å. When the structures of hRXRα-LBD:9cRA:GRIP-1 and hRXRα-LBD:9cRA (1FBY) homodimers are compared, E453 and E456 on helix 12 bury and form ionic interactions with GRIP-1. R302 on helix 4 realigns to form new salt bridges to both E453 and E456. F277 (helix 3), F437 (helix 11), and F450 (helix 12) move toward the hydrophobic interior. The changes in the near-UV spectrum at 260 nm of the hRXRα-LBD:9cRA:GRIP-1 support this structural change. Helix 11 tilts toward helix 12 by ≈ 1 Å modifying the ring conformation of 9cRA. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectroscopy indicate GRIP-1 binding to hRXRα-LBD:9cRA significantly decreases the exchange rates for peptides containing helices 3 (F277), 4 (R302), 11 (F437) and 12 (E453; E456). The structural changes and loss of dynamics of the GRIP-1 bound structure are used to interpret the energetics of coactivator peptide binding to the agonist-bound hRXRα-LBD. PMID:21049972

  5. Wnts grasp the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 at two distinct binding sites.

    PubMed

    Kerekes, Krisztina; Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2015-10-01

    Wnts have a structure resembling a hand with "thumb" and "index" fingers that grasp the cysteine rich domains of Frizzled receptors at two distinct binding sites. In the present work we show that the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 is also bound by Wnts at two sites. Using C-terminal domains of Wnt5a and Wnt7a and arginine-scanning mutagenesis of the WIF domain we demonstrate that, whereas the N-terminal, lipid-modified "thumb" of Wnts interacts with the alkyl-binding site of the WIF domain, the C-terminal domain of Wnts (Wnt-CTD) binds to a surface on the opposite side of the WIF domain. PMID:26342861

  6. PROPERTIES OF CATALYTIC, LINKER AND CHITIN-BINDING DOMAINS OF INSECT CHITINASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manduca sexta (tobacco hornworm) chitinase is a glycoprotein that consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain, a Ser/Thr-rich linker region, and a C-terminal chitin-binding domain. To delineate the properties of these domains, we have generated truncated forms of chitinase, which were expressed in i...

  7. Solution structure of telomere binding domain of AtTRB2 derived from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Won Kyung; Kim, Heeyoun; Kim, Eunhee; Cheong, Chaejoon; Cho, Myeon Haeng; Lee, Weontae

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • We have determined solution structure of Myb domain of AtTRB2. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 is located in the N-terminal region. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 binds to plant telomeric DNA without fourth helix. • Helix 2 and 3 of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 are involved in DNA recognition. • AtTRB2 is a novel protein distinguished from other known plant TBP. - Abstract: Telomere homeostasis is regulated by telomere-associated proteins, and the Myb domain is well conserved for telomere binding. AtTRB2 is a member of the SMH (Single-Myb-Histone)-like family in Arabidopsis thaliana, having an N-terminal Myb domain, which is responsible for DNA binding. The Myb domain of AtTRB2 contains three α-helices and loops for DNA binding, which is unusual given that other plant telomere-binding proteins have an additional fourth helix that is essential for DNA binding. To understand the structural role for telomeric DNA binding of AtTRB2, we determined the solution structure of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 (AtTRB2{sub 1–64}) using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In addition, the inter-molecular interaction between AtTRB2{sub 1–64} and telomeric DNA has been characterized by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and NMR titration analyses for both plant (TTTAGGG)n and human (TTAGGG)n telomere sequences. Data revealed that Trp28, Arg29, and Val47 residues located in Helix 2 and Helix 3 are crucial for DNA binding, which are well conserved among other plant telomere binding proteins. We concluded that although AtTRB2 is devoid of the additional fourth helix in the Myb-extension domain, it is able to bind to plant telomeric repeat sequences as well as human telomeric repeat sequences.

  8. Design and x-ray crystal structures of high-potency nonsteroidal glucocorticoid agonists exploiting a novel binding site on the receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Coe, Diane M.; Cooper, Tony W.J.; House, David; Iannone, Marie A.; Macdonald, Simon J.F.; Madauss, Kevin P.; McLay, Iain M.; Shipley, Tracy J.; Taylor, Simon J.; Tran, Thuy B.; Uings, Iain J.; Weller, Victoria; Williams, Shawn P.

    2010-09-17

    Crystallography and computer modeling have been used to exploit a previously unexplored channel in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Highly potent, nonsteroidal indazole amides showing excellent complementarity to the channel were designed with the assistance of the computational technique AlleGrow. The accuracy of the design process was demonstrated through crystallographic structural determination of the GR ligand-binding domain-agonist complex of the D-prolinamide derivative 11. The utility of the channel was further exemplified through the design of a potent phenylindazole in which structural motifs, seen to interact with the traditional GR ligand pocket, were abandoned and replaced by interactions within the new channel. Occupation of the channel was confirmed with a second GR crystal structure of this truncated D-alaninamide derivative 13. Compound 11 displays properties compatible with development as an intranasal solution formulation, whereas oral bioavailability has been demonstrated with a related truncated exemplar 14. Data with the pyrrolidinone amide 12 demonstrate the potential for further elaboration within the 'meta' channel to deliver compounds with selectivity for the desired transrepressive activity of glucocorticoids. The discovery of these interactions with this important receptor offers significant opportunities for the design of novel GR modulators.

  9. Binding of thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 agonists to human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Halushka, P. V.; Kochel, P. J.; Mais, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The competition of [125I]-9, 11 dimethylmethano-11, 12 methano-16-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)-13, 14-dihydro-13-aza 15 alpha beta-omega-tetranor-thromboxane A2 ([125I]-PTA-OH), a thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist, with a series of thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) mimetics for binding to the putative TXA2/PGH2 receptor in washed human platelets was studied. The rank order potency for the series of mimetics to compete with [125I]-PTA-OH for binding was compared with their rank order potency for induction of platelet aggregation. The rank order potency for the mimetics to compete with [125I]-PTA-OH for binding was ONO-11113 greater than SQ-26655 greater than U44069 greater than U46619 = 9, 11-azo PGH2 greater than MB28767. This rank order potency was highly correlated with their rank order potency for inducing platelet aggregation (r = 0.992). Changes in the intra or extracellular concentrations of Na+ did not have a significant effect on the competition between U46619 and [125I]-PTA-OH for binding to the putative receptor. In summary, it appears that these TXA2/PGH2 mimetics activate human platelets through the putative TXA2/PGH2 receptor. PMID:3594077

  10. Structure of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human androgen receptor in complex with a selective modulator LGD2226

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Xiao-qin; Li, He; Liang, Kai-ni; Miner, Jeffrey N.; Hong, Mei; Kallel, E. Adam; Oeveren, Arjan van; Zhi, Lin; Jiang, Tao

    2006-11-01

    Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor in complex with LGD2226. The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible steroid hormone receptor that mediates androgen action, determining male sexual phenotypes and promoting spermatogenesis. As the androgens play a dominant role in male sexual development and function, steroidal androgen agonists have been used clinically for some years. However, there is a risk of potential side effects and most steroidal androgens cannot be dosed orally, which limits the use of these substances. 1,2-Dihydro-6-N,N-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-quinolinone (LGD2226) is a synthetic nonsteroidal ligand and a novel selective AR modulator. The crystal structure of the complex of LGD2226 with the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (AR LBD) at 2.1 Å was solved and compared with the structure of the AR LBD–R1881 complex. It is hoped that this will aid in further explaining the selectivity of LGD2226 observed in in vitro and in vivo assays and in developing more selective and effective therapeutic agents.

  11. Cross-talk among structural domains of human DBP upon binding 25-hydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arjun; Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    Serum vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is structurally very similar to serum albumin (ALB); both have three distinct structural domains and high cysteine-content. Yet, functionally they are very different. DBP possesses high affinity for vitamin D metabolites and G-actin, but ALB does not. It has been suggested that there may be cross-talk among the domains so that binding of one ligand may influence the binding of others. In this study we have employed 2-p-toluidinyl-6-sulphonate (TNS), a reporter molecule that fluoresces upon binding to hydrophobic pockets of DBP. We observed that recombinant domain III possesses strong binding for TNS, which is not influenced by 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D3), yet TNS-fluorescence of the whole protein is quenched by 25-OH-D3. These results provide a direct evidence of cross-talk among the structural domains of DBP. PMID:18035050

  12. Protective Effect of an Antibody against Specific Extracellular Domain of TLR2 on Agonists-Driven Inflammatory and Allergic Response

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tianwu; Cai, Jun; Peng, Yanxia; Zhang, Lifang; Lan, Qiaofen; Chen, Yanwen; Liao, Huanjin; Xie, Tong; Wu, Ping; Pan, Qingjun

    2016-01-01

    Specific blocking strategies of TLR2-mediated inflammatory signaling and hypersensitivity reactions may offer novel therapeutic strategies to prevent a variety of diseases. In this study, we investigated the blocking effects of a new anti-TLR2 antibody anti-T20 against a 20 mer peptide T20 located in the extracellular specific domain of mouse TLR2. In addition, the effects of the anti-T20 in vitro, measuring the inhibition of the IL-6 and TNF-α production in response to PGN, LTA, and Pam3CSK4-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, were determined. In vivo, the effects of anti-T20 on a lethal anaphylaxis model using PGN-challenged OVA allergic mice, including the rectal temperature and mortality, and serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and LTC4 were assayed. The results showed that anti-T20 specifically bound to TLR2 and significantly inhibited PGN, LTA, and Pam3CSK4-driven TNF-α and IL-6 production by RAW264.7 cells. Also, anti-T20 protected OVA allergic mice from PGN-induced lethal anaphylaxis, and the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and LTC4 of anti-T20 treated PGN-challenged OVA allergic mice were decreased as compared to isotype control of anti-T20 treated mice. In summary, this study produced a new antibody against the specific extracellular domain of TLR2 which has protective effect on TLR2 agonists-driven inflammatory and allergic response. PMID:27213155

  13. STRUCTURAL FOLD, CONSERVATION AND FE(II) BINDING OF THE INTRACELLULAR DOMAIN OF PROKARYOTE FEOB

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-01-01

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain’s two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function. PMID:20123128

  14. Fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes: sequence of the binding domain involved in adherence of streptococci to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Talay, S R; Valentin-Weigand, P; Jerlström, P G; Timmis, K N; Chhatwal, G S

    1992-01-01

    The sequence of the fibronectin-binding domain of the fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes (Sfb protein) was determined, and its role in streptococcal adherence was investigated by use of an Sfb fusion protein in adherence studies. A 1-kb DNA fragment coding for the binding domain of Sfb protein was cloned into the expression vector pEX31 to produce an Sfb fusion protein consisting of the N-terminal part of MS2 polymerase and a C-terminal fragment of the streptococcal protein. Induction of the vector promoter resulted in hyperexpression of fibronectin-binding fusion protein in the cytoplasm of the recombinant Escherichia coli cells. Sequence determination of the cloned 1-kb fragment revealed an in-frame reading frame for a 268-amino-acid peptide composed of a 37-amino-acid sequence which is completely repeated three times and incompletely repeated a fourth time. Cloning of one repeat into pEX31 resulted in expression of small fusion peptides that show fibronectin-binding activity, indicating that one repeat contains at least one binding domain. Each repeat exhibits two charged domains and shows high homology with the 38-amino-acid D3 repeat of the fibronectin-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus. Sequence comparison with other streptococcal ligand-binding surface proteins, including M protein, failed to reveal significant homology, which suggests that Sfb protein represents a novel type of functional protein in S. pyogenes. The Sfb fusion protein isolated from the cytoplasm of recombinant cells was purified by fast protein liquid chromatography. It showed a strong competitive inhibition of fibronectin binding to S. pyogenes and of the adherence of bacteria to cultured epithelial cells. In contrast, purified streptococcal lipoteichoic acid showed only a weak inhibition of fibronectin binding and streptococcal adherence. These results demonstrate that Sfb protein is directly involved in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of S. pyogenes to

  15. Cross-Species Differential Plasma Protein Binding of MBX-102/JNJ39659100: A Novel PPAR-γ Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Holly J.; Gregoire, Francine; Ma, Fang; Martin, Robert; Zhao, Spring; Lavan, Brian E.

    2008-01-01

    Drug binding to plasma proteins restricts their free and active concentrations, thereby affecting their pharmacokinetic properties. Species differences in plasma protein levels complicate the understanding of interspecies pharmacodynamic and toxicological effects. MBX-102 acid/JNJ39659100 is a novel PPAR-γ agonist in development for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Studies were performed to evaluate plasma protein binding to MBX-102 acid and evaluate species differences in free drug levels. Equilibrium dialysis studies demonstrated that MBX-102 acid is highly bound (>98%) to human, rat and mouse albumin and that free MBX-102 acid levels are higher in rodent than in human plasma. Interspecies differences in free drug levels were further studied using PPAR-γ transactivation assays and a newly developed PPAR-γ corepressor displacement (biochemical) assay. PPAR-γ transactivation and corepressor displacement by MBX-102 acid was higher in rat and mouse serum than human serum. These results confirm the relevance of interspecies differences in free MBX-102 acid levels. PMID:18815616

  16. Molecular recognition of two 2,4-syn-functionalized (S)-glutamate analogues by the kainate receptor GluK3 ligand binding domain.

    PubMed

    Venskutonytė, Raminta; Larsen, Anja P; Frydenvang, Karla; Gajhede, Michael; Sagot, Emmanuelle; Assaf, Zeinab; Gefflaut, Thierry; Pickering, Darryl S; Bunch, Lennart; Kastrup, Jette S

    2014-10-01

    The kainate receptors are the least studied subfamily of ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors are thought to have a neuromodulatory role and have been associated with a variety of disorders in the central nervous system. This makes kainate receptors interesting potential drug targets. Today, structures of the ligand binding domain (LBD) of the kainate receptor GluK3 are only known in complex with the endogenous agonist glutamate, the natural product kainate, and two synthetic agonists. Herein we report structures of GluK3 LBD in complex with two 2,4-syn-functionalized (S)-glutamate analogues to investigate their structural potential as chemical scaffolds. Similar binding affinities at GluK3 were determined for the 2-(methylcarbamoyl)ethyl analogue (Ki =4.0 μM) and the 2-(methoxycarbonyl)ethyl analogue (Ki =1.7 μM), in agreement with the similar positioning of the compounds within the binding pocket. As the binding affinity is similar to that of glutamate, this type of Cγ substituent could be used as a scaffold for introduction of even larger substituents reaching into unexplored binding site regions to achieve subtype selectivity. PMID:25044437

  17. Structure-function relationships in the catalytic and starch binding domains of glucoamylase.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, P M; Reilly, P J

    1994-03-01

    Sixteen primary sequences from five sub-families of fungal, yeast and bacterial glucoamylases were related to structural information from the model of the catalytic domain of Aspergillus awamori var. X100 glucoamylase obtained by protein crystallography. This domain is composed of thirteen alpha-helices, with five conserved regions defining the active site. Interactions between methyl alpha-maltoside and active site residues were modelled, and the importance of these residues on the catalytic action of different glucoamylases was shown by their presence in each primary sequence. The overall structure of the starch binding domain of some fungal glucoamylases was determined based on homology to the C-terminal domains of Bacillus cyclodextrin glucosyl-transferases. Crystallography indicated that this domain contains 6-8 beta-strands and homology allowed the attribution of a disulfide bridge in the glucoamylase starch binding domain. Glucoamylase residues Thr525, Asn530 and Trp560, homologous to Bacillus stearothermophilus cyclodextrin glucosyltransferase residues binding to maltose in the C-terminal domain, could be involved in raw-starch binding. The structure and length of the linker region between the catalytic and starch binding domains in fungal glucoamylases can vary substantially, a further indication of the functional independence of the two domains. PMID:8177888

  18. IQGAP proteins reveal an atypical phosphoinositide (aPI) binding domain with a pseudo C2 domain fold.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Miles J; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R; van Aalten, Daan M F; Downes, C Peter; Batty, Ian H

    2012-06-29

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP(3)). The binding affinity for PtdInsP(3), together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP(3) effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules. PMID:22493426

  19. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  20. The Binding of Syndapin SH3 Domain to Dynamin Proline-rich Domain Involves Short and Long Distance Elements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lin; Xue, Jing; Kwan, Ann; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Wielens, Jerome; von Kleist, Lisa; Cubeddu, Liza; Guo, Zhong; Stow, Jennifer L; Parker, Michael W; Mackay, Joel P; Robinson, Phillip J

    2016-04-29

    Dynamin is a GTPase that mediates vesicle fission during synaptic vesicle endocytosis. Its long C-terminal proline-rich domain contains 13 PXXP motifs, which orchestrate its interactions with multiple proteins. The SH3 domains of syndapin and endophilin bind the PXXP motifs called Site 2 and 3 (Pro-786-Pro-793) at the N-terminal end of the proline-rich domain, whereas the amphiphysin SH3 binds Site 9 (Pro-833-Pro-836) toward the C-terminal end. In some proteins, SH3/peptide interactions also involve short distance elements, which are 5-15 amino acid extensions flanking the central PXXP motif for high affinity binding. Here we found two previously unrecognized elements in the central and the C-terminal end of the dynamin proline-rich domain that account for a significant increase in syndapin binding affinity compared with a previously reported Site 2 and Site 3 PXXP peptide alone. The first new element (Gly-807-Gly-811) is short distance element on the C-terminal side of Site 2 PXXP, which might contact a groove identified under the RT loop of the SH3 domain. The second element (Arg-838-Pro-844) is located about 50 amino acids downstream of Site 2. These two elements provide additional specificity to the syndapin SH3 domain outside of the well described polyproline-binding groove. Thus, the dynamin/syndapin interaction is mediated via a network of multiple contacts outside the core PXXP motif over a previously unrecognized extended region of the proline-rich domain. To our knowledge this is the first example among known SH3 interactions to involve spatially separated and extended long-range elements that combine to provide a higher affinity interaction. PMID:26893375

  1. Identification of the minimal binding region of a Plasmodium falciparum IgM binding PfEMP1 domain

    PubMed Central

    Semblat, Jean-Philippe; Ghumra, Ashfaq; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Wallis, Russell; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Raza, Ahmed; Rowe, J.Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Binding of host immunoglobulin is a common immune evasion mechanism demonstrated by microbial pathogens. Previous work showed that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum binds the Fc-region of human IgM molecules, resulting in a coating of IgM on the surface of infected erythrocytes. IgM binding is a property of P. falciparum strains showing virulence-related phenotypes such as erythrocyte rosetting. The parasite ligands for IgM binding are members of the diverse P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein One (PfEMP1) family. However, little is known about the amino acid sequence requirements for IgM binding. Here we studied an IgM binding domain from a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant, DBL4ζ of TM284var1, and found that the minimal IgM binding region mapped to the central region of the DBL domain, comprising all of subdomain 2 and adjoining parts of subdomains 1 and 3. Site-directed mutagenesis of charged amino acids within subdomain 2, predicted by molecular modelling to form the IgM binding site, showed no marked effect on IgM binding properties. Overall, this study identifies the minimal IgM binding region of a PfEMP1 domain, and indicates that the existing homology model of PfEMP1-IgM interaction is incorrect. Further work is needed to identify the specific interaction site for IgM within the minimal binding region of PfEMP1. PMID:26094597

  2. Homology-modeled ligand-binding domains of medaka estrogen receptors and androgen receptors: A model system for the study of reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Jianzhou Shen Xueyan; Yan Zuowei; Zhao Haobin; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2009-02-27

    Estrogen and androgen and their receptors play critical roles in physiological processes such as sexual differentiation and development. Using the available structural models for the human estrogen receptors alpha and beta and androgen receptor as templates, we designed in silico agonist and antagonist models of medaka estrogen receptor (meER) alpha, beta-1, and beta-2, and androgen receptor (meAR) alpha and beta. Using these models, we studied (1) the structural relationship between the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of ERs and ARs of human and medaka, and (2) whether medaka ER and AR can be potential models for studying the ligand-binding activities of various agonists and antagonists of these receptors by docking analysis. A high level of conservation was observed between the sequences of the ligand-binding domains of meER{alpha} and huER{alpha}, meER{beta}1 and huER{beta}, meER{beta}2, and huER{beta} with 62.8%, 66.4%, and 65.1% identity, respectively. The sequence conservation between meAR{alpha} and huAR, meAR{beta}, and huAR was found with 70.1% and 61.0% of identity, respectively. Thirty-three selected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including both agonists and antagonists, were docked into the LBD of ER and AR, and the corresponding docking score for medaka models and human templates were calculated. In order to confirm the conservation of the overall geometry and the binding pocket, the backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) for C{alpha} atoms was derived from the structure superposition of all 10 medaka homology models to the six human templates. Our results suggested conformational conservation between the ERs and ARs of medaka and human, Thus, medaka could be highly useful as a model system for studies involving estrogen and androgen interaction with their receptors.

  3. An Unusual Cation-Binding Site and Distinct Domain-Domain Interactions Distinguish Class II Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate Synthases.

    PubMed

    Light, Samuel H; Krishna, Sankar N; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-03-01

    Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) catalyzes a critical step in the biosynthesis of a number of aromatic metabolites. An essential prokaryotic enzyme and the molecular target of the herbicide glyphosate, EPSPSs are the subject of both pharmaceutical and commercial interest. Two EPSPS classes that exhibit low sequence homology, differing substrate/glyphosate affinities, and distinct cation activation properties have previously been described. Here, we report structural studies of the monovalent cation-binding class II Coxiella burnetii EPSPS (cbEPSPS). Three cbEPSPS crystal structures reveal that the enzyme undergoes substantial conformational changes that alter the electrostatic potential of the active site. A complex with shikimate-3-phosphate, inorganic phosphate (Pi), and K(+) reveals that ligand induced domain closure produces an unusual cation-binding site bordered on three sides by the N-terminal domain, C-terminal domain, and the product Pi. A crystal structure of the class I Vibrio cholerae EPSPS (vcEPSPS) clarifies the basis of differential class I and class II cation responsiveness, showing that in class I EPSPSs a lysine side chain occupies the would-be cation-binding site. Finally, we identify distinct patterns of sequence conservation at the domain-domain interface and propose that the two EPSPS classes have evolved to differently optimize domain opening-closing dynamics. PMID:26813771

  4. Synthesis of GABAA Receptor Agonists and Evaluation of their α-Subunit Selectivity and Orientation in the GABA Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Michaela; Rabe, Holger; Strehle, Axelle; Dieler, Sandra; Debus, Fabian; Dannhardt, Gerd; Akabas, Myles H.; Lüddens, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Drugs used to treat various disorders target GABAA receptors. To develop α subunit selective compounds, we synthesized 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol (4-PIOL) derivatives. The 3-isoxazolol moiety was substituted by 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-one, 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-thione, and substituted 1,2,4-triazol-3-ol heterocycles with modifications to the basic piperidine substituent as well as substituents without basic nitrogen. Compounds were screened by [3H]muscimol binding and in patch-clamp experiments with heterologously expressed GABAA αiβ3γ2 receptors (i = 1–6). The effects of 5-aminomethyl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5d were comparable to GABA for all α subunit isoforms. 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5a and 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H- [1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-thione 6a were weak agonists at α3–, α3–, and α5–containing receptors. When coapplied with GABA they were antagonistic inα2–, α4–, and α6–containing receptors and potentiated α3-containing receptors. 6a protected GABA binding site cysteine-substitution mutants α1F64C and α1S68C from reacting with methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate. 6a specifically covalently modified the α1R66C thiol, in the GABA binding site, through its oxadiazolethione sulfur. These results demonstrate the feasibility of synthesizing α subtype selective GABA mimetic drugs. PMID:18651727

  5. Probing the Binding Pocket of the Broadly Tuned Human Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R14 by Chemical Modification of Cognate Agonists.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Rafik; Nowak, Stefanie; Di Pizio, Antonella; Kitaneh, Hothaifa; Abu-Jaish, Alaa; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Niv, Masha Y; Behrens, Maik

    2016-07-01

    Sensing potentially harmful bitter substances in the oral cavity is achieved by a group of (˜) 25 receptors, named TAS2Rs, which are expressed in specialized sensory cells and recognize individual but overlapping sets of bitter compounds. The receptors differ in their tuning breadths ranging from narrowly to broadly tuned receptors. One of the most broadly tuned human bitter taste receptors is the TAS2R14 recognizing an enormous variety of chemically diverse synthetic and natural bitter compounds, including numerous medicinal drugs. This suggests that this receptor possesses a large readily accessible ligand binding pocket. To allow probing the accessibility and size of the ligand binding pocket, we chemically modified cognate agonists and tested receptor responses in functional assays. The addition of large functional groups to agonists was usually possible without abolishing agonistic activity. The newly synthesized agonist derivatives were modeled in the binding site of the receptor, providing comparison to the mother substances and rationalization of the in vitro activities of this series of compounds. PMID:26825540

  6. Biochemical and Immunological Characterization of Truncated Fragments of the Receptor-Binding Domains of C. difficile Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jui-Hsin; Shen, Zhe-Qing; Lien, Shu-Pei; Hsiao, Kuang-Nan; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Chi-Chang; Siu, Leung-Kei; Chong, Pele Choi-Sing

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emerging pathogen responsible for opportunistic infections in hospitals worldwide and is the main cause of antibiotic-associated pseudo-membranous colitis and diarrhea in humans. Clostridial toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB) specifically bind to unknown glycoprotein(s) on the surface of epithelial cells in the host intestine, disrupting the intestinal barrier and ultimately leading to acute inflammation and diarrhea. The C-terminal receptor-binding domain (RBD) of TcdA, which is responsible for the initial binding of the toxin to host glycoproteins, has been predicted to contain 7 potential oligosaccharide-binding sites. To study the specific roles and functions of these 7 putative lectin-like binding regions, a consensus sequence of TcdA RBD derived from different C. difficile strains deposited in the NCBI protein database and three truncated fragments corresponding to the N-terminal (residues 1–411), middle (residues 296–701), and C-terminal portions (residues 524–911) of the RBD (F1, F2 and F3, respectively) were designed and expressed in Escherichia coli. In this study, the recombinant RBD (rRBD) and its truncated fragments were purified, characterized biologically and found to have the following similar properties: (a) are capable of binding to the cell surface of both Vero and Caco-2 cells; (b) possess Toll-like receptor agonist-like adjuvant activities that can activate dendritic cell maturation and increase the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines; and (c) function as potent adjuvants in the intramuscular immunization route to enhance immune responses against weak immunogens. Although F1, F2 and F3 have similar repetitive amino acid sequences and putative oligosaccharide-binding domains, they do not possess the same biological and immunological properties: (i) TcdA rRBD and its fragments bind to the cell surface, but only TcdA rRBD and F3 internalize into Vero cells within 15 min; (ii) the fragments exhibit various levels

  7. Biochemical and Immunological Characterization of Truncated Fragments of the Receptor-Binding Domains of C. difficile Toxin A.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jui-Hsin; Shen, Zhe-Qing; Lien, Shu-Pei; Hsiao, Kuang-Nan; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Chi-Chang; Siu, Leung-Kei; Chong, Pele Choi-Sing

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emerging pathogen responsible for opportunistic infections in hospitals worldwide and is the main cause of antibiotic-associated pseudo-membranous colitis and diarrhea in humans. Clostridial toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB) specifically bind to unknown glycoprotein(s) on the surface of epithelial cells in the host intestine, disrupting the intestinal barrier and ultimately leading to acute inflammation and diarrhea. The C-terminal receptor-binding domain (RBD) of TcdA, which is responsible for the initial binding of the toxin to host glycoproteins, has been predicted to contain 7 potential oligosaccharide-binding sites. To study the specific roles and functions of these 7 putative lectin-like binding regions, a consensus sequence of TcdA RBD derived from different C. difficile strains deposited in the NCBI protein database and three truncated fragments corresponding to the N-terminal (residues 1-411), middle (residues 296-701), and C-terminal portions (residues 524-911) of the RBD (F1, F2 and F3, respectively) were designed and expressed in Escherichia coli. In this study, the recombinant RBD (rRBD) and its truncated fragments were purified, characterized biologically and found to have the following similar properties: (a) are capable of binding to the cell surface of both Vero and Caco-2 cells; (b) possess Toll-like receptor agonist-like adjuvant activities that can activate dendritic cell maturation and increase the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines; and (c) function as potent adjuvants in the intramuscular immunization route to enhance immune responses against weak immunogens. Although F1, F2 and F3 have similar repetitive amino acid sequences and putative oligosaccharide-binding domains, they do not possess the same biological and immunological properties: (i) TcdA rRBD and its fragments bind to the cell surface, but only TcdA rRBD and F3 internalize into Vero cells within 15 min; (ii) the fragments exhibit various levels of

  8. Recognition of the disordered p53 transactivation domain by the transcriptional adapter zinc finger domains of CREB-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Krois, Alexander S; Ferreon, Josephine C; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2016-03-29

    An important component of the activity of p53 as a tumor suppressor is its interaction with the transcriptional coactivators cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300, which activate transcription of p53-regulated stress response genes and stabilize p53 against ubiquitin-mediated degradation. The highest affinity interactions are between the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of p53 and the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains of CBP/p300. The NMR spectra of simple binary complexes of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains with the p53TAD suffer from exchange broadening, but innovations in construct design and isotopic labeling have enabled us to obtain high-resolution structures using fusion proteins, uniformly labeled in the case of the TAZ2-p53TAD fusion and segmentally labeled through transintein splicing for the TAZ1-p53TAD fusion. The p53TAD is bipartite, with two interaction motifs, termed AD1 and AD2, which fold to form short amphipathic helices upon binding to TAZ1 and TAZ2 whereas intervening regions of the p53TAD remain flexible. Both the AD1 and AD2 motifs bind to hydrophobic surfaces of the TAZ domains, with AD2 making more extensive hydrophobic contacts consistent with its greater contribution to the binding affinity. Binding of AD1 and AD2 is synergistic, and structural studies performed with isolated motifs can be misleading. The present structures of the full-length p53TAD complexes demonstrate the versatility of the interactions available to an intrinsically disordered domain containing bipartite interaction motifs and provide valuable insights into the structural basis of the affinity changes that occur upon stress-related posttranslational modification. PMID:26976603

  9. Defining a minimal estrogen receptor DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Mader, S; Chambon, P; White, J H

    1993-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a transcriptional regulator which binds to cognate palindromic DNA sequences known as estrogen response elements (EREs). A 66 amino acid core region which contains two zinc fingers and is highly conserved among the nuclear receptors is essential for site specific DNA recognition. However, it remains unclear how many flanking amino acids in addition to the zinc finger core are required for DNA binding. Here, we have characterized the minimal DNA binding region of the human ER by analysing the DNA binding properties of a series of deletion mutants expressed in bacteria. We find that the 66 amino acid zinc finger core of the DBD fails to bind DNA, and that the C-terminal end of the minimal ER DBD required for binding to perfectly palindromic EREs corresponds to the limit of 100% amino acid homology between the chicken and human receptors, which represents the boundary between regions C and D in the ER. Moreover, amino acids of region D up to 30 residues C-terminal to the zinc fingers greatly stabilize DNA binding by the DBD to perfectly palindromic EREs and are absolutely required for formation of gel retardation complexes by the DBD on certain physiological imperfectly palindromic EREs. These results indicate that in addition to the zinc finger core, amino acids C-terminal to the core in regions C and D play a key role in DNA binding by the ER, particularly to imperfectly palindromic response elements. The ER DBD expressed in E. coli binds as a dimer to ERE palindromes in a highly cooperative manner and forms only low levels of monomeric protein-DNA complexes on either palindromic or half-palindromic response elements. Conversion of ER amino acids 222 to 226, which lie within region C, to the corresponding residues of the human RAR alpha abolishes formation of dimeric protein-DNA complexes. Conversely, replacement of the same region of RAR alpha with ER residues 222 to 226 creates a derivative that, unlike the RAR alpha DBD, binds

  10. Characterization of substrate binding of the WW domains in human WWP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiahong; Wang, Nan; Jiang, Yafei; Tan, Hongwei; Zheng, Jimin; Chen, Guangju; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-07-01

    WW domains harbor substrates containing proline-rich motifs, but the substrate specificity and binding mechanism remain elusive for those WW domains less amenable for structural studies, such as human WWP2 (hWWP2). Herein we have employed multiple techniques to investigate the second WW domain (WW2) in hWWP2. Our results show that hWWP2 is a specialized E3 for PPxY motif-containing substrates only and does not recognize other amino acids and phospho-residues. The strongest binding affinity of WW2, and the incompatibility between each WW domain, imply a novel relationship, and our SPR experiment reveals a dynamic binding mode in Class-I WW domains for the first time. The results from alanine-scanning mutagenesis and modeling further point to functionally conserved residues in WW2. PMID:25999310

  11. SH3b Cell wall binding domains can enhance anti-staphylococcal activity of endolysin lytic domains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases and a potential new source of antimicrobials. A large subset of these proteins contain a C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domain that has been shown [for some] to be essential for accurate cell wall recognition and subsequent staphylolytic ac...

  12. Evaluation of Selected Binding Domains for the Analysis of Ubiquitinated Proteomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ansong, Charles; Brown, Joseph N.; Yang, Feng; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-08-01

    Ubiquitination is an abundant post-translational modification that consists of covalent attachment of ubiquitin to lysine residues or the N-terminus of proteins. Mono- and polyubiquitination have been shown to be involved in many critical eukaryotic cellular functions and are often disrupted by intracellular bacterial pathogens. Affinity enrichment of ubiquitinated proteins enables global analysis of this key modification. In this context, the use of ubiquitin-binding domains is a promising but relatively unexplored alternative to more broadly used immunoaffinity or tagged affinity enrichment methods. In this study, we evaluated the application of eight ubiquitin-binding domains that have differing affinities for ubiquitination states. Small-scale proteomics analysis identified ~200 ubiquitinated protein candidates per ubiquitin-binding domain pull-down experiment. Results from subsequent Western blot analyses that employed anti-ubiquitin or monoclonal antibodies against polyubiquitination at lysine 48 and 63 suggest that ubiquitin-binding domains from Dsk2 and ubiquilin-1 have the broadest specificity in that they captured most types of ubiquitination, whereas the binding domain from NBR1 was more selective to polyubiquitination. These data demonstrate that with optimized purification conditions, ubiquitin-binding domains can be an alternative tool for proteomic applications. This approach is especially promising for the analysis of tissues or cells resistant to transfection, of which the overexpression of tagged ubiquitin is a major hurdle.

  13. The endothelial cell binding determinant of human factor IX resides in the. gamma. -carboxyglutamic acid domain

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, J.R.; Roberts, H.R.; Stafford, D.W. ); Smith, K.J. United Blood Services, Albuquerque, NM )

    1992-02-18

    The blood coagulation factor IX(a) binds specifically to a site on endothelial cells with a K{sub d} of 2.0-3.0 nM. A number of previous studies have attempted to define the region(s) of factor IX(a) that mediate this interaction. These studies suggested that there are two regions of factor IX(a), the {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain and the epidermal growth factor like (EGF-like) domains, that mediate high-affinity binding to endothelial cells. Recently, however, the participation of the EGF1 domain has been excluded from the interaction. This indicated that if there was an EGF component of factor IX contributing to the binding affinity, then it must be in the second EGF-like domain. In order to further evaluate this relationship, the authors performed competitive binding experiments between {sup 125}I plasma factor IX and a set of six chimeric proteins composed of portions of factor VII and factor IX. The data suggest that the high-affinity interaction between factor IX and the endothelial cell binding site is mediated by the factor IX Gla domain and that the factor IX EGF domains are not involved in binding specificity.

  14. Conformational flexibility of the agonist binding jaw of the human P2X3 receptor is a prerequisite for channel opening

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, M; Hausmann, R; Dopychai, A; Grohmann, M; Franke, H; Nieber, K; Schmalzing, G; Illes, P; Riedel, T

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is assumed that ATP induces closure of the binding jaw of ligand-gated P2X receptors, which eventually results in the opening of the membrane channel and the flux of cations. Immobilization by cysteine mutagenesis of the binding jaw inhibited ATP-induced current responses, but did not allow discrimination between disturbances of binding, gating, subunit assembly or trafficking to the plasma membrane. Experimental Approach A molecular model of the pain-relevant human (h)P2X3 receptor was used to identify amino acid pairs, which were located at the lips of the binding jaw and did not participate in agonist binding but strongly approached each other even in the absence of ATP. Key Results A series of cysteine double mutant hP2X3 receptors, expressed in HEK293 cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes, exhibited depressed current responses to α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP) due to the formation of spontaneous inter-subunit disulfide bonds. Reducing these bonds with dithiothreitol reversed the blockade of the α,β-meATP transmembrane current. Amino-reactive fluorescence labelling of the His-tagged hP2X3 receptor and its mutants expressed in HEK293 or X. laevis oocytes demonstrated the formation of inter-subunit cross links in cysteine double mutants and, in addition, confirmed their correct trimeric assembly and cell surface expression. Conclusions and Implications In conclusion, spontaneous tightening of the binding jaw of the hP2X3 receptor by inter-subunit cross-linking of cysteine residues substituted at positions not directly involved in agonist binding inhibited agonist-evoked currents without interfering with binding, subunit assembly or trafficking. PMID:24989924

  15. Ligand binding to the PDZ domains of postsynaptic density protein 95.

    PubMed

    Toto, Angelo; Pedersen, Søren W; Karlsson, O Andreas; Moran, Griffin E; Andersson, Eva; Chi, Celestine N; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2016-05-01

    Cellular scaffolding and signalling is generally governed by multidomain proteins, where each domain has a particular function. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) is involved in synapse formation and is a typical example of such a multidomain protein. Protein-protein interactions of PSD-95 are well studied and include the following three protein ligands: (i)N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluN2B, (ii) neuronal nitric oxide synthase and (iii) cysteine-rich protein (CRIPT), all of which bind to one or more of the three PDZ domains in PSD-95. While interactions for individual PDZ domains of PSD-95 have been well studied, less is known about the influence of neighbouring domains on the function of the respective individual domain. We therefore performed a systematic study on the ligand-binding kinetics of PSD-95 using constructs of different size for PSD-95 and its ligands. Regarding the canonical peptide-binding pocket and relatively short peptides (up to 15-mer), the PDZ domains in PSD-95 by and large work as individual binding modules. However, in agreement with previous studies, residues outside of the canonical binding pocket modulate the affinity of the ligands. In particular, the dissociation of the 101 amino acid CRIPT from PSD-95 is slowed down at least 10-fold for full-length PSD-95 when compared with the individual PDZ3 domain. PMID:26941280

  16. Identification of Novel Membrane-binding Domains in Multiple Yeast Cdc42 Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Satoe

    2007-01-01

    The Rho-type GTPase Cdc42 is a central regulator of eukaryotic cell polarity and signal transduction. In budding yeast, Cdc42 regulates polarity and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in part through the PAK-family kinase Ste20. Activation of Ste20 requires a Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) domain, which mediates its recruitment to membrane-associated Cdc42. Here, we identify a separate domain in Ste20 that interacts directly with membrane phospholipids and is critical for its function. This short region, termed the basic-rich (BR) domain, can target green fluorescent protein to the plasma membrane in vivo and binds PIP2-containing liposomes in vitro. Mutation of basic or hydrophobic residues in the BR domain abolishes polarized localization of Ste20 and its function in both MAP kinase–dependent and independent pathways. Thus, Cdc42 binding is required but is insufficient; instead, direct membrane binding by Ste20 is also required. Nevertheless, phospholipid specificity is not essential in vivo, because the BR domain can be replaced with several heterologous lipid-binding domains of varying lipid preferences. We also identify functionally important BR domains in two other yeast Cdc42 effectors, Gic1 and Gic2, suggesting that cooperation between protein–protein and protein–membrane interactions is a prevalent mechanism during Cdc42-regulated signaling and perhaps for other dynamic localization events at the cell cortex. PMID:17914055

  17. Proton-translocating nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase. Reconstitution of the extramembranous nucleotide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Hatefi, Y

    1995-11-24

    The nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase of bovine mitochondria is a homodimer of monomer M(r) = 109,065. The monomer is composed of three domains, an NH2-terminal 430-residue-long hydrophilic domain I that binds NAD(H), a central 400-residue-long hydrophobic domain II that is largely membrane intercalated and carries the enzyme's proton channel, and a COOH-terminal 200-residue-long hydrophilic domain III that binds NADP(H). Domains I and III protrude into the mitochondrial matrix, where they presumably come together to form the enzyme's catalytic site. The two-subunit transhydrogenase of Escherichia coli and the three-subunit transhydrogenase of Rhodospirillum rubrum have each the same overall tridomain hydropathy profile as the bovine enzyme. Domain I of the R. rubrum enzyme (the alpha 1 subunit) is water soluble and easily removed from the chromatophore membranes. We have isolated domain I of the bovine transhydrogenase after controlled trypsinolysis of the purified enzyme and have expressed in E. coli and purified therefrom domain III of this enzyme. This paper shows that an active bidomain transhydrogenase lacking domain II can be reconstituted by the combination of purified bovine domains I plus III or R. rubrum domain I plus bovine domain III. PMID:7499307

  18. Anti-peptide monoclonal antibody imaging of a common binding domain involved in muscle regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Van Eyk, J. E.; Caday-Malcolm, R. A.; Yu, L.; Irvin, R. T.; Hodges, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Multiple-component regulatory protein systems function through a generalized mechanism where a single regulatory protein or ligand binds to a variety of receptors to modulate specific functions in a physiologically sensitive context. Muscle contraction is regulated by the interaction of actin with troponin I (TnI) or myosin in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner. Actin utilizes a single binding domain (residues 1-28) to bind to residues 104-115 of TnI (Van Eyk JE, Sönnichsen FD, Sykes BD, Hodges RS, 1991, In: Rüegg JC, ed, Peptides as probes in muscle research, Heidelberg, Germany: Springer-Verlag, pp 15-31) and to myosin subfragment 1 (S1, an enzymatic fragment of myosin containing both the actin and ATP binding sites) (Van Eyk JE, Hodges RS, 1991, Biochemistry 30:11676-11682) in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner. We have utilized an anti-TnI peptide (104-115) monoclonal antibody, Mab B4, that binds specifically to TnI, to image the common binding domain of actin and thus mimic the activity of actin including activation of the S1 ATPase activity and TnI-mediated regulation of the S1 ATPase. Mab B4 has also been utilized to identify a receptor binding domain on myosin (residues 633-644) that is recognized by actin. Interestingly, Mab B4 binds to the native protein receptors TnI and S1 with relative affinities of 100- and 25,000-fold higher than the binding affinity to the 12-residue peptide immunogen. Thus, anti-peptide monoclonal antibodies prepared against a receptor binding domain can mimic the ligand binding domain and be utilized as a powerful tool for the detailed analysis of complex multiple-component regulatory systems. PMID:7613476

  19. Agonist and antagonist bind differently to 5-HT1A receptors during Alzheimer's disease: A post-mortem study with PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benjamin; Sebti, Johan; Verdurand, Mathieu; Fieux, Sylvain; Billard, Thierry; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Troakes, Claire; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Zimmer, Luc

    2016-10-01

    PET imaging studies using 5-HT1A receptor radiotracers show a decreased density of this receptor in hippocampi of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) at advanced stages. However, current 5-HT1A receptor radiopharmaceuticals used in neuroimaging are antagonists, thought to bind to 5-HT1A receptors in different functional states (i.e., both the one which displays high affinity for agonists and is thought to mediate receptor activation, as well as the state which has low affinity for agonists). Comparing the PET imaging obtained using an agonist radiotracer, which binds selectively to functional receptors, with the PET imaging obtained using an antagonist radiotracer would therefore provide original information on 5-HT1A receptor impairment during AD. Quantitative autoradiography using [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF, a 5-HT1A agonist and antagonist, respectively, was measured in hippocampi of patients with AD (n = 25, at different Braak stages) and control subjects (n = 9). The neuronal density was measured in the same tissues by NeuN immunohistochemistry. The specific binding of both radiotracers was determined by addition of WAY-100635, a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. The autoradiography distribution of both 5-HT1A PET radiotracers varied across hippocampus regions. The highest binding density was in the pyramidal layer of CA1. Incubation with Gpp(NH)p, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, reduced significantly [(18)F]F13640 binding in hippocampal regions, confirming its preferential interaction with G-coupled receptors, and slightly increased [(18)F]MPPF binding. In the CA1 subfield, [(18)F]F13640 binding was significantly decreased at Braak stages I/II (-19%), Braak stages III/IV (-23%), and Braak stages V/VI (-36%) versus control. In contrast, [(18)F]MPPF binding was statistically reduced only at the most advanced Braak stages V/VI compared to control (-33%). Since [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF can be used in vivo in humans, this

  20. Analysis of cyclic and acyclic nicotinic cholinergic agonists using radioligand binding, single channel recording, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    McGroddy, K A; Carter, A A; Tubbert, M M; Oswald, R E

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between the structure and function of a series of nicotinic cholinergic agonists has been studied using radioligand binding, single channel recording, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The cyclic compound 1,1-dimethyl-4-acetylpiperazinium iodide and its trifluoromethyl analogue (F3-PIP) interact with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) from both Torpedo electroplaque and BC3H-1 cells at lower concentrations than the acyclic derivatives, N,N,N,N'-tetramethyl-N'-acetylethylenediamine iodide and its fluorinated analogue (F3-TED). The magnitude of the difference in potencies depends on the type of measurement. In binding experiments, the differences between the two classes of compounds depends mainly on the conditions of the experiment. In measurements of the initial interaction with the nAChR, the PIP compounds have an affinity approximately one order of magnitude higher than that of the TED compounds. Longer incubations indicated that the PIP compounds were able to induce a time-dependent shift in receptor affinity consistent with desensitization, whereas the TED compounds were unable to induce such a shift. The activation of single channel currents by the cyclic compounds occurs at concentrations approximately two orders of magnitude lower than for the acyclic compounds, but the TED compounds exhibit a larger degree of channel blockade than the PIP compounds. Previous work (McGroddy, K.A., and R.E. Oswald. 1992. Biophys. J. 64:314-324) has shown that the TED compounds can exist in two energetically distinct conformational states related by an isomerization of the amide bond. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance experiments suggest that the higher energy population of the TED compounds may interact preferentially with the ACh binding sites on the nAChRs and that a significant fraction of the difference between the initial affinity of the PIP and TED compounds may be accounted for by the predominance in solution of a conformational state

  1. Functional characterization of the Cdc42p binding domain of yeast Ste20p protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Wu, C; Leeuw, T; Fourest-Lieuvin, A; Segall, J E; Thomas, D Y

    1997-01-01

    Ste20p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the Ste20p/p65PAK family of protein kinases which are highly conserved from yeast to man and regulate conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Ste20p fulfills multiple roles in pheromone signaling, morphological switching and vegetative growth and binds Cdc42p, a Rho-like small GTP binding protein required for polarized morphogenesis. We have analyzed the functional consequences of mutations that prevent binding of Cdc42p to Ste20p. The complete amino-terminal, non-catalytic half of Ste20p, including the conserved Cdc42p binding domain, was dispensable for heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated pheromone signaling. However, the Cdc42p binding domain was necessary for filamentous growth in response to nitrogen starvation and for an essential function that Ste20p shares with its isoform Cla4p during vegetative growth. Moreover, the Cdc42p binding domain was required for cell-cell adhesion during conjugation. Subcellular localization of wild-type and mutant Ste20p fused to green fluorescent protein showed that the Cdc42p binding domain is needed to direct localization of Ste20p to regions of polarized growth. These results suggest that Ste20p is regulated in different developmental pathways by different mechanisms which involve heterotrimeric and small GTP binding proteins. PMID:9009270

  2. Structural and functional characterizations reveal the importance of a zinc binding domain in Bloom's syndrome helicase

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rong-bin; Rigolet, Pascal; Zargarian, Loussiné; Fermandjian, Serge; Xi, Xu Guang

    2005-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive human disorder characterized by genomic instability and a predisposition to a wide variety of cancers. The gene mutated in BS, BLM, encodes a protein containing three domains: an N-terminal domain whose function remains elusive, a helicase domain characterized by seven ‘signature’ motifs conserved in a wide range of helicases and a C-terminal extension that can be further divided into two sub-domains: RecQ-Ct and HRDC. The RecQ-Ct domain appears essential because two point-mutations altering highly conserved cysteine residues within this domain have been found in BS patients. We report herein that BLM contains a zinc ion. Modelling studies suggest that four conserved cysteine residues within the RecQ-Ct domain coordinate this zinc ion and subsequent mutagenesis studies further confirm this prediction. Biochemical and biophysical studies show that the ATPase, helicase and DNA binding activities of the mutants are severely modified. Structural analysis of both wild-type and mutant proteins reveal that alteration of cysteine residues does not significantly change the overall conformation. The observed defects in ATPase and helicase activities were inferred to result from a compromise of DNA binding. Our results implicate an important role of this zinc binding domain in both DNA binding and protein conformation. They could be pivotal for understanding the molecular basis of BS disease. PMID:15930159

  3. Ligand binding PAS domains in a genomic, cellular, and structural context

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jonathan T.; Crosson, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domains occur in proteins from all kingdoms of life. In the bacterial kingdom, PAS domains are commonly positioned at the amino terminus of signaling proteins such as sensor histidine kinases, cyclic-di-GMP synthases/hydrolases, and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Although these domains are highly divergent at the primary sequence level, the structures of dozens of PAS domains across a broad section of sequence space have been solved, revealing a conserved three-dimensional architecture. An all-versus-all alignment of 63 PAS structures demonstrates that the PAS domain family forms structural clades on the basis of two principal variables: (a) topological location inside or outside the plasma membrane and (b) the class of small molecule that they bind. The binding of a chemically diverse range of small-molecule metabolites is a hallmark of the PAS domain family. PAS ligand binding either functions as a primary cue to initiate a cellular signaling response or provides the domain with the capacity to respond to secondary physical or chemical signals such as gas molecules, redox potential, or photons. This review synthesizes the current state of knowledge of the structural foundations and evolution of ligand recognition and binding by PAS domains. PMID:21663441

  4. BclxL Changes Conformation upon Binding to Wild-type but Not Mutant p53 DNA Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Hagn, Franz; Klein, Christian; Demmer, Oliver; Marchenko, Natasha; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M.; Kessler, Horst

    2010-01-01

    p53 can induce apoptosis through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization by interaction of its DNA binding region with the anti-apoptotic proteins BclxL and Bcl2. However, little is known about the action of p53 at the mitochondria in molecular detail. By using NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization we characterized the binding of wild-type and mutant p53 DNA binding domains to BclxL and show that the wild-type p53 DNA binding domain leads to structural changes in the BH3 binding region of BclxL, whereas mutants fail to induce such effects due to reduced affinity. This was probed by induced chemical shift and residual dipolar coupling data. These data imply that p53 partly achieves its pro-apoptotic function at the mitochondria by facilitating interaction between BclxL and BH3-only proteins in an allosteric mode of action. Furthermore, we characterize for the first time the binding behavior of Pifithrin-μ, a specific small molecule inhibitor of the p53-BclxL interaction, and present a structural model of the protein-ligand complex. A rather unusual behavior is revealed whereby Pifithrin-μ binds to both sides of the protein-protein complex. These data should facilitate the rational design of more potent specific BclxL-p53 inhibitors. PMID:19955567

  5. BclxL changes conformation upon binding to wild-type but not mutant p53 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Hagn, Franz; Klein, Christian; Demmer, Oliver; Marchenko, Natasha; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M; Kessler, Horst

    2010-01-29

    p53 can induce apoptosis through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization by interaction of its DNA binding region with the anti-apoptotic proteins BclxL and Bcl2. However, little is known about the action of p53 at the mitochondria in molecular detail. By using NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization we characterized the binding of wild-type and mutant p53 DNA binding domains to BclxL and show that the wild-type p53 DNA binding domain leads to structural changes in the BH3 binding region of BclxL, whereas mutants fail to induce such effects due to reduced affinity. This was probed by induced chemical shift and residual dipolar coupling data. These data imply that p53 partly achieves its pro-apoptotic function at the mitochondria by facilitating interaction between BclxL and BH3-only proteins in an allosteric mode of action. Furthermore, we characterize for the first time the binding behavior of Pifithrin-mu, a specific small molecule inhibitor of the p53-BclxL interaction, and present a structural model of the protein-ligand complex. A rather unusual behavior is revealed whereby Pifithrin-mu binds to both sides of the protein-protein complex. These data should facilitate the rational design of more potent specific BclxL-p53 inhibitors. PMID:19955567

  6. Characterization of ERM transactivation domain binding to the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator subunit MED25

    PubMed Central

    Landrieu, Isabelle; Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Rucktooa, Prakash; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD) of ERM/ETV5 (ERM38–68), a PEA3 group member of Ets-related transcription factors, directly interacts with the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. Molecular details of this interaction were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The TAD is disordered in solution but has a propensity to adopt local transient secondary structure. We show that it folds upon binding to MED25 and that the resulting ERM–MED25 complex displays characteristics of a fuzzy complex. Mutational analysis further reveals that two aromatic residues in the ERM TAD (F47 and W57) are involved in the binding to MED25 and participate in the ability of ERM TAD to activate transcription. Mutation of a key residue Q451 in the VP16 H1 binding pocket of MED25 affects the binding of ERM. Furthermore, competition experiments show that ERM and VP16 H1 share a common binding interface on MED25. NMR data confirms the occupancy of this binding pocket by ERM TAD. Based on these experimental data, a structural model of a functional interaction is proposed. This study provides mechanistic insights into the Mediator–transactivator interactions. PMID:26130716

  7. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  8. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  9. The Role of Flexibility and Conformational Selection in the Binding Promiscuity of PDZ Domains

    PubMed Central

    Münz, Márton; Hein, Jotun; Biggin, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    In molecular recognition, it is often the case that ligand binding is coupled to conformational change in one or both of the binding partners. Two hypotheses describe the limiting cases involved; the first is the induced fit and the second is the conformational selection model. The conformational selection model requires that the protein adopts conformations that are similar to the ligand-bound conformation in the absence of ligand, whilst the induced-fit model predicts that the ligand-bound conformation of the protein is only accessible when the ligand is actually bound. The flexibility of the apo protein clearly plays a major role in these interpretations. For many proteins involved in signaling pathways there is the added complication that they are often promiscuous in that they are capable of binding to different ligand partners. The relationship between protein flexibility and promiscuity is an area of active research and is perhaps best exemplified by the PDZ domain family of proteins. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the relationship between flexibility and promiscuity in five PDZ domains: the human Dvl2 (Dishevelled-2) PDZ domain, the human Erbin PDZ domain, the PDZ1 domain of InaD (inactivation no after-potential D protein) from fruit fly, the PDZ7 domain of GRIP1 (glutamate receptor interacting protein 1) from rat and the PDZ2 domain of PTP-BL (protein tyrosine phosphatase) from mouse. We show that despite their high structural similarity, the PDZ binding sites have significantly different dynamics. Importantly, the degree of binding pocket flexibility was found to be closely related to the various characteristics of peptide binding specificity and promiscuity of the five PDZ domains. Our findings suggest that the intrinsic motions of the apo structures play a key role in distinguishing functional properties of different PDZ domains and allow us to make predictions that can be experimentally tested. PMID:23133356

  10. The DNA-Binding Domain of Yeast Rap1 Interacts with Double-Stranded DNA in Multiple Binding Modes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae repressor-activator protein 1 (Rap1) is an essential protein involved in multiple steps of DNA regulation, as an activator in transcription, as a repressor at silencer elements, and as a major component of the shelterin-like complex at telomeres. All the known functions of Rap1 require the known high-affinity and specific interaction of the DNA-binding domain with its recognition sequences. In this work, we focus on the interaction of the DNA-binding domain of Rap1 (Rap1DBD) with double-stranded DNA substrates. Unexpectedly, we found that while Rap1DBD forms a high-affinity 1:1 complex with its DNA recognition site, it can also form lower-affinity complexes with higher stoichiometries on DNA. These lower-affinity interactions are independent of the presence of the recognition sequence, and we propose they originate from the ability of Rap1DBD to bind to DNA in two different binding modes. In one high-affinity binding mode, Rap1DBD likely binds in the conformation observed in the available crystal structures. In the other alternative lower-affinity binding mode, we propose that a single Myb-like domain of the Rap1DBD makes interactions with DNA, allowing for more than one protein molecule to bind to the DNA substrates. Our findings suggest that the Rap1DBD does not simply target the protein to its recognition sequence but rather it might be a possible point of regulation. PMID:25382181

  11. Akt1 binds focal adhesion kinase via the Akt1 kinase domain independently of the pleckstrin homology domain.

    PubMed

    Basson, M D; Zeng, B; Wang, S

    2015-10-01

    Akt1 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) are protein kinases that play key roles in normal cell signaling. Individually, aberrant expression of these kinases has been linked to a variety of cancers. Together, Akt1/FAK interactions facilitate cancer metastasis by increasing cell adhesion under conditions of increased extracellular pressure. Pathological and iatrogenic sources of pressure arise from tumor growth against constraining stroma or direct perioperative manipulation. We previously reported that 15 mmHg increased extracellular pressure causes Akt1 to both directly interact with FAK and to phosphorylate and activate it. We investigated the nature of the Akt1/FAK binding by creating truncations of recombinant FAK, conjugated to glutathione S-transferase (GST), to pull down full-length Akt1. Western blots probing for Akt1 showed that FAK/Akt1 binding persisted in FAK truncations consisting of only amino acids 1-126, FAK(NT1), which contains the F1 subdomain of its band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, and moesin (FERM) domain. Using FAK(NT1) as bait, we then pulled down truncated versions of recombinant Akt1 conjugated to HA (human influenza hemagglutinin). Probes for GST-FAK(NT1) showed Akt1-FAK binding to occur in the absence of the both the Akt1 (N)-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and its adjacent hinge region. The Akt1 (C)-terminal regulatory domain was equally unnecessary for Akt1/FAK co-immunoprecipitation. Truncations involving the Akt1 catalytic domain showed that the domain by itself was enough to pull down FAK. Additionally, a fragment spanning from the PH domain to half way through the catalytic domain demonstrated increased FAK binding compared to full length Akt1. These results begin to delineate the Akt1/FAK interaction and can be used to manipulate their force-activated signal interactions. Furthermore, the finding that the N-terminal half of the Akt1 catalytic domain binds so strongly to FAK when cleaved from the rest of the protein may suggest a means

  12. Sulfhydryl group(s) in the ligand binding site of the D-1 dopamine receptor: specific protection by agonist and antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.; Kassis, S.; Kebabian, J.; Fishman, P.H.

    1986-10-21

    An iodinated compound, (/sup 125/I)-8-iodo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepin-7-ol, has been recently reported to be a specific ligand for the D-1 dopamine receptor. Due to its high affinity and specific activity, this ligand was chosen for the biochemical characterization of the D-1 receptor. Alkylation of particulate fractions of rat caudate nucleus by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) caused an inactivation of the D-1 receptor, as measured by diminished binding of the radioligand to the receptor. The inactivation of the receptor sites by NEM was rapid and irreversible, resulting in a 70% net loss of binding sites. On the basis of Scatchard analysis of binding to NEM-treated tissue, the loss in binding sites was due to a net decrease in the receptor number with a 2-fold decrease in the affinity of the receptor for the radioligand. Receptor occupancy by either a D-1 specific agonist or antagonist protected the ligand binding sites from NEM-mediated inactivation. NEM treatment of the receptor in the absence or presence of protective compound abolished the agonist high-affinity state of the receptor as well as membrane adenylate cyclase activity. The above-treated striatal membranes were fused with HeLa membranes and assayed for dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. When the sources of D-1 receptors were from agonist-protected membranes, the receptors retained the ability to functionally couple to the HeLa adenylate cyclase. These results suggest that the D-1 dopamine receptor contains NEM-sensitive sulfhydryl group(s) either at or near the vicinity of the ligand binding sites, which are critical for both receptor binding and function.

  13. Artificial zinc finger DNA binding domains: versatile tools for genome engineering and modulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mir A; Barrow, Joeva J; Shen, Yong; Haq, Md Imdadul; Bungert, Jörg

    2015-11-01

    Genome editing and alteration of gene expression by synthetic DNA binding activities gained a lot of momentum over the last decade. This is due to the development of new DNA binding molecules with enhanced binding specificity. The most commonly used DNA binding modules are zinc fingers (ZFs), TALE-domains, and the RNA component of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These binding modules are fused or linked to either nucleases that cut the DNA and induce DNA repair processes, or to protein domains that activate or repress transcription of genes close to the targeted site in the genome. This review focuses on the structure, design, and applications of ZF DNA binding domains (ZFDBDs). ZFDBDs are relatively small and have been shown to penetrate the cell membrane without additional tags suggesting that they could be delivered to cells without a DNA or RNA intermediate. Advanced algorithms that are based on extensive knowledge of the mode of ZF/DNA interactions are used to design the amino acid composition of ZFDBDs so that they bind to unique sites in the genome. Off-target binding has been a concern for all synthetic DNA binding molecules. Thus, increasing the specificity and affinity of ZFDBDs will have a significant impact on their use in analytical or therapeutic settings. PMID:25989233

  14. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  15. Membrane Binding and Self-Association of the Epsin N-Terminal Homology Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Jao, Christine C.; Lyman, Edward; Gallop, Jennifer L.; Peter, Brian J.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Langen, Ralf; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Epsin possesses a conserved epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain that acts as a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate‐lipid‐targeting and membrane‐curvature‐generating element. Upon binding phosphatidylinositol 4,5‐bisphosphate, the N-terminal helix (H0) of the ENTH domain becomes structured and aids in the aggregation of ENTH domains, which results in extensive membrane remodeling. In this article, atomistic and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the structure and the stability of ENTH domain aggregates on lipid bilayers. EPR experiments are also reported for systems composed of different ENTH-bound membrane morphologies, including membrane vesicles as well as preformed membrane tubules. The EPR data are used to help develop a molecular model of ENTH domain aggregates on preformed lipid tubules that are then studied by CG MD simulation. The combined computational and experimental approach suggests that ENTH domains exist predominantly as monomers on vesiculated structures, while ENTH domains self-associate into dimeric structures and even higher‐order oligomers on the membrane tubes. The results emphasize that the arrangement of ENTH domain aggregates depends strongly on whether the local membrane curvature is isotropic or anisotropic. The molecular mechanism of ENTH‐domain-induced membrane vesiculation and tubulation and the implications of the epsin's role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis resulting from the interplay between ENTH domain membrane binding and ENTH domain self-association are also discussed. PMID:22922484

  16. Flexible DNA binding of the BTB/POZ-domain protein FBI-1.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-08-01

    POZ-domain transcription factors are characterized by the presence of a protein-protein interaction domain called the POZ or BTB domain at their N terminus and zinc fingers at their C terminus. Despite the large number of POZ-domain transcription factors that have been identified to date and the significant insights that have been gained into their cellular functions, relatively little is known about their DNA binding properties. FBI-1 is a BTB/POZ-domain protein that has been shown to modulate HIV-1 Tat trans-activation and to repress transcription of some cellular genes. We have used various viral and cellular FBI-1 binding sites to characterize the interaction of a POZ-domain protein with DNA in detail. We find that FBI-1 binds to inverted sequence repeats downstream of the HIV-1 transcription start site. Remarkably, it binds efficiently to probes carrying these repeats in various orientations and spacings with no particular rotational alignment, indicating that its interaction with DNA is highly flexible. Indeed, FBI-1 binding sites in the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, the c-fos gene, and the c-myc P1 and P2 promoters reveal variously spaced direct, inverted, and everted sequence repeats with the consensus sequence G(A/G)GGG(T/C)(C/T)(T/C)(C/T) for each repeat. PMID:12750370

  17. Activation Domain-Mediated Enhancement of Activator Binding to Chromatin in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Christopher A.; Kingston, Robert E.

    1996-10-01

    DNA binding by transcriptional activators is typically an obligatory step in the activation of gene expression. Activator binding and subsequent steps in transcription are repressed by genomic chromatin. Studies in vitro have suggested that overcoming this repression is an important function of some activation domains. Here we provide quantitative in vivo evidence that the activation domain of GAL4-VP16 can increase the affinity of GAL4 for its binding site on genomic DNA in mammalian cells. Moreover, the VP16 activation domain has a much greater stimulatory effect on expression from a genomic reporter gene than on a transiently transfected reporter gene, where factor binding is more permissive. We found that not all activation domains showed a greater activation potential in a genomic context, suggesting that only some activation domains can function in vivo to alleviate the repressive effects of chromatin. These data demonstrate the importance of activation domains in relieving chromatin-mediated repression in vivo and suggest that one way they function is to increase binding of the activator itself.

  18. The binding of vinca domain agents to tubulin: structural and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Anthony; Knossow, Marcel; Wang, Chunguang; Gigant, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Vinca domain ligands are small molecules that interfere with the binding of vinblastine to tubulin and inhibit microtubule assembly. Many such compounds cause isodesmic association which results in difficulties in biochemical or structural studies of their interaction with tubulin. The complex of two tubulins with the stathmin-like domain of the RB3 protein (T(2)R) is a protofilament-like short assembly that does not assemble further. This has allowed structural studies of the binding of several vinca domain ligands by X-ray crystallography as crystals of the corresponding complexes diffract to near atomic resolution. This proved that their sites are located at the interface of two tubulin molecules arranged as in a curved protofilament. These sites overlap with that of vinblastine. Structural data are generally consistent with the results of available structure-function studies, though subtle differences exist. Binding in solution to the vinca domain displayed in T(2)R is conveniently studied by fluorescence spectroscopy or by monitoring inhibition of the T(2)R GTPase activity. In addition, inhibition of nucleotide exchange allows characterization of the binding to the vinca domain moiety displayed by the beta-subunit of an isolated tubulin molecule. T(2)R is therefore a useful tool to characterize and dissect the binding of vinca domain ligands to tubulin. In addition, these studies have provided new information on the interaction of tubulin with guanine nucleotides, namely on the mechanisms of nucleotide exchange and hydrolysis. PMID:20466145

  19. Simultaneous Binding of Two Peptidyl Ligands by a Src Homology 2 Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Jinjin; Yuan, Chunhua; Hard, Ryan L.; Park, In-Hee; Li, Chenglong; Bell, Charles; Pei, Dehua

    2012-03-15

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains mediate protein-protein interactions by recognizing phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing sequences of target proteins. In all of the SH2 domain-pY peptide interactions described to date, the SH2 domain binds to a single pY peptide. Here, determination of the cocrystal structure of the N-terminal SH2 domain of phosphatase SHP-2 bound to a class IV peptide (VIpYFVP) revealed a noncanonical 1:2 (protein-peptide) complex. The first peptide binds in a canonical manner with its pY side chain inserted in the usual binding pocket, while the second pairs up with the first to form two antiparallel {beta}-strands that extend the central {beta}-sheet of the SH2 domain. This unprecedented binding mode was confirmed in the solution phase by NMR experiments and shown to be adopted by pY peptides derived from cellular proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance studies revealed that the binding of the first peptide is pY-dependent, but phosphorylation is not required for the second peptide. Our findings suggest a potential new function for the SH2 domain as a molecular clamp to promote dimerization of signaling proteins.

  20. Calmodulin-binding domains in Alzheimer's disease proteins: extending the calcium hypothesis.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Myre, Michael A

    2004-08-01

    The calcium hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) invokes the disruption of calcium signaling as the underlying cause of neuronal dysfunction and ultimately apoptosis. As a primary calcium signal transducer, calmodulin (CaM) responds to cytosolic calcium fluxes by binding to and regulating the activity of target CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Ca(2+)-dependent CaMBPs primarily contain domains (CaMBDs) that can be classified into motifs based upon variations on the basic amphiphilic alpha-helix domain involving conserved hydrophobic residues at positions 1-10, 1-14 or 1-16. In contrast, an IQ or IQ-like domain often mediates Ca(2+)-independent CaM-binding. Based on these attributes, a search for CaMBDs reveals that many of the proteins intimately linked to AD may be calmodulin-binding proteins, opening new avenues for research on this devastating disease. PMID:15249195

  1. High throughput strategy to identify inhibitors of histone-binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Elise K.; Albaugh, Brittany N.; Denu, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Many epigenetic proteins recognize the posttranslational modification state of chromatin through their histone binding domains, and thereby recruit nuclear complexes to specific loci within the genome. A number of these domains have been implicated in cancer and other diseases through aberrant binding of chromatin; therefore, identifying small molecules that disrupt histone binding could be a powerful mechanism for disease therapy. We have developed a high throughput assay for the detection of histone peptide:domain interactions utilizing AlphaScreen technology. Here, we describe how the assay can be first optimized and then performed for high throughput screening of small molecule binding inhibitors. We also describe strategies for biochemical validation of small molecules identified. PMID:22910207

  2. Understanding the molecular basis of substrate binding specificity of PTB domains

    PubMed Central

    Sain, Neetu; Tiwari, Garima; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions mediated by phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains play a crucial role in various cellular processes. In order to understand the structural basis of substrate recognition by PTB domains, multiple explicit solvent atomistic simulations of 100ns duration have been carried out on 6 PTB-peptide complexes with known binding affinities. MM/PBSA binding energy values calculated from these MD trajectories and residue based statistical pair potential score show good correlation with the experimental dissociation constants. Our analysis also shows that the modeled structures of PTB domains can be used to develop less compute intensive residue level statistical pair potential based approaches for predicting interaction partners of PTB domains. PMID:27526776

  3. A small molecule directly inhibits the p53 transactivation domain from binding to replication protein A

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Carnes, Katie A.; Soto, Patricia; Liu, Shengqin; Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Oakley, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), essential for DNA replication, repair and DNA damage signalling, possesses six ssDNA-binding domains (DBDs), including DBD-F on the N-terminus of the largest subunit, RPA70. This domain functions as a binding site for p53 and other DNA damage and repair proteins that contain amphipathic alpha helical domains. Here, we demonstrate direct binding of both ssDNA and the transactivation domain 2 of p53 (p53TAD2) to DBD-F, as well as DBD-F-directed dsDNA strand separation by RPA, all of which are inhibited by fumaropimaric acid (FPA). FPA binds directly to RPA, resulting in a conformational shift as determined through quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in full length RPA. Structural analogues of FPA provide insight on chemical properties that are required for inhibition. Finally, we confirm the inability of RPA possessing R41E and R43E mutations to bind to p53, destabilize dsDNA and quench tryptophan fluorescence by FPA, suggesting that protein binding, DNA modulation and inhibitor binding all occur within the same site on DBD-F. The disruption of p53–RPA interactions by FPA may disturb the regulatory functions of p53 and RPA, thereby inhibiting cellular pathways that control the cell cycle and maintain the integrity of the human genome. PMID:23267009

  4. Crystal Structure of Human SSRP1 Middle Domain Reveals a Role in DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Zeng, Fuxing; Liu, Yiwei; Shao, Chen; Li, Sai; Lv, Hui; Shi, Yunyu; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    SSRP1 is a subunit of the FACT complex, an important histone chaperone required for transcriptional regulation, DNA replication and damage repair. SSRP1 also plays important roles in transcriptional regulation independent of Spt16 and interacts with other proteins. Here, we report the crystal structure of the middle domain of SSRP1. It consists of tandem pleckstrin homology (PH) domains. These domains differ from the typical PH domain in that PH1 domain has an extra conserved βαβ topology. SSRP1 contains the well-characterized DNA-binding HMG-1 domain. Our studies revealed that SSRP1-M can also participate in DNA binding, and that this binding involves one positively charged patch on the surface of the structure. In addition, SSRP1-M did not bind to histones, which was assessed through pull-down assays. This aspect makes the protein different from other related proteins adopting the double PH domain structure. Our studies facilitate the understanding of SSRP1 and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of interaction with DNA and histones of the FACT complex. PMID:26687053

  5. Identification of two independent nucleosome-binding domains in the transcriptional co-activator SPBP.

    PubMed

    Darvekar, Sagar; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Eriksen, Agnete Bratsberg; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2012-02-15

    Transcriptional regulation requires co-ordinated action of transcription factors, co-activator complexes and general transcription factors to access specific loci in the dense chromatin structure. In the present study we demonstrate that the transcriptional co-regulator SPBP [stromelysin-1 PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor)-responsive element binding protein] contains two independent chromatin-binding domains, the SPBP-(1551-1666) region and the C-terminal extended PHD [ePHD/ADD (extended plant homeodomain/ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L)] domain. The region 1551-1666 is a novel core nucleosome-interaction domain located adjacent to the AT-hook motif in the DNA-binding domain. This novel nucleosome-binding region is critically important for proper localization of SPBP in the cell nucleus. The ePHD/ADD domain associates with nucleosomes in a histone tail-dependent manner, and has significant impact on the dynamic interaction between SPBP and chromatin. Furthermore, SPBP and its homologue RAI1 (retinoic-acid-inducible protein 1), are strongly enriched on chromatin in interphase HeLa cells, and both proteins display low nuclear mobility. RAI1 contains a region with homology to the novel nucleosome-binding region SPBP-(1551-1666) and an ePHD/ADD domain with ability to bind nucleosomes. These results indicate that the transcriptional co-regulator SPBP and its homologue RAI1 implicated in Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome both belong to the expanding family of chromatin-binding proteins containing several domains involved in specific chromatin interactions. PMID:22081970

  6. Mutation analysis of the cellulose-binding domain of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose-binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, M A; Doi, R H

    1994-01-01

    Cellulose-binding protein A (CbpA) has been previously shown to mediate the interaction between crystalline cellulose substrates and the cellulase enzyme complex of Clostridium cellulovorans. CbpA contains a family III cellulose-binding domain (CBD) which, when expressed independently, binds specifically to crystalline cellulose. A series of N- and C-terminal deletions and a series of small internal deletions of the CBD were created to determine whether the entire region previously described as a CBD is required for the cellulose-binding function. The N- and C-terminal deletions reduced binding affinity by 10- to 100-fold. Small internal deletions of the CBD resulted in substantial reduction of CBD function. Some, but not all, point mutations throughout the sequence had significant disruptive effects on the binding ability of the CBD. Thus, mutations in any region of the CBD had effects on the binding of the fragment to cellulose. The results indicate that the entire 163-amino-acid region of the CBD is required for maximal binding to crystalline cellulose. Images PMID:7961505

  7. Structure-function analysis of the DNA binding domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ABF1.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, G; Kim, J; Rho, H M; Jung, G

    1995-01-01

    To localize the DNA binding domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ars binding factor 1 (ABF1), a multifunctional DNA binding protein, plasmid constructs carrying point mutations and internal deletions in the ABF1 gene were generated and expressed in Escherichia coli. Normal and mutant ABF1 proteins were purified by affinity chromatography and their DNA binding activities were analyzed. The substitution of His61, Cys66 and His67 respectively, located in the zinc finger motif in the N-terminal region (amino acids 40-91), eliminated the DNA binding activity of ABF1 protein. Point mutations in the middle region of ABF1, specifically at Leu353, Leu399, Tyr403, Gly404, Phe410 and Lys434, also eliminated or reduced DNA binding activity. However, the DNA binding activity of point mutants of Ser307, Ser496 and Glu649 was the same as that of wild-type ABF1 protein and deletion mutants of amino acids 200-265, between the zinc finger region and the middle region (residues 323-496) retained DNA binding activity. As a result, we confirmed that the DNA binding domain of ABF1 appears to be bipartite and another DNA binding motif, other than the zinc finger motif, is situated between amino acid residues 323 and 496. Images PMID:7659521

  8. Verprolin function in endocytosis and actin organization. Roles of the Las17p (yeast WASP)-binding domain and a novel C-terminal actin-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Rajmohan, Rajamuthiah; Meng, Lei; Ren, Gang; Vajjhala, Parimala R; Munn, Alan L

    2007-08-01

    Vrp1p (verprolin, End5p) is the yeast ortholog of human Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP)-interacting protein (WIP). Vrp1p localizes to the cortical actin cytoskeleton, is necessary for its polarization to sites of growth and is also essential for endocytosis. At elevated temperature, Vrp1p becomes essential for growth. A C-terminal Vrp1p fragment (C-Vrp1p) retains the ability to localize to the cortical actin cytoskeleton and function in actin-cytoskeleton polarization, endocytosis and growth. Here, we demonstrate that two submodules in C-Vrp1p are required for actin-cytoskeleton polarization: a novel C-terminal actin-binding submodule (CABS) that contains a novel G-actin-binding domain, which we call a verprolin homology 2 C-terminal (VH2-C) domain; and a second submodule comprising the Las17p-binding domain (LBD) that binds Las17p (yeast WASP). The LBD localizes C-Vrp1p to membranes and the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Intriguingly, the LBD is sufficient to restore endocytosis and growth at elevated temperature to Vrp1p-deficient cells. The CABS also restores these functions, but only if modified by a lipid anchor to provide membrane association. Our findings highlight the role of Las17p binding for Vrp1p membrane association, suggest general membrane association may be more important than specific targeting to the cortical actin cytoskeleton for Vrp1p function in endocytosis and cell growth, and suggest that Vrp1p binding to individual effectors may alter their physiological activity. PMID:17635585

  9. Structural and evolutionary divergence of cyclic nucleotide binding domains in eukaryotic pathogens: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Smita; Kennedy, Eileen J; Herberg, Friedrich W; Hui, Raymond; Taylor, Susan S; Langsley, Gordon; Kannan, Natarajan

    2015-10-01

    Many cellular functions in eukaryotic pathogens are mediated by the cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domain, which senses second messengers such as cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. Although CNB domain-containing proteins have been identified in many pathogenic organisms, an incomplete understanding of how CNB domains in pathogens differ from other eukaryotic hosts has hindered the development of selective inhibitors for CNB domains associated with infectious diseases. Here, we identify and classify CNB domain-containing proteins in eukaryotic genomes to understand the evolutionary basis for CNB domain functional divergence in pathogens. We identify 359 CNB domain-containing proteins in 31 pathogenic organisms and classify them into distinct subfamilies based on sequence similarity within the CNB domain as well as functional domains associated with the CNB domain. Our study reveals novel subfamilies with pathogen-specific variations in the phosphate-binding cassette. Analyzing these variations in light of existing structural and functional data provides new insights into ligand specificity and promiscuity and clues for drug design. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25847873

  10. 5-HT1A receptor agonist-antagonist binding affinity difference as a measure of intrinsic activity in recombinant and native tissue systems

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J; Collin, L; Ho, M; Riley, G; Scott, C; Selkirk, J V; Price, G W

    2000-01-01

    It has been reported that radiolabelled agonist : antagonist binding affinity ratios can predict functional efficacy at several different receptors. This study investigates whether this prediction is true for recombinant and native tissue 5-HT1A receptors. Saturation studies using [3H]-8-OH-DPAT and [3H]-MPPF revealed a single, high affinity site (KD∼1 nM) in HEK293 cells expressing human 5-HT1A receptors and rat cortex. In recombinant cells, [3H]-MPPF labelled 3–4 fold more sites than [3H]-8-OH-DPAT suggesting the presence of more than one affinity state of the receptor. [3H]-Spiperone labelled a single, lower affinity site in HEK293 cells expressing h5-HT1A receptors but did not bind to native tissue 5-HT1A receptors. These data suggest that, in transfected HEK293 cells, human 5-HT1A receptors exist in different affinity states but in native rat cortical tissue the majority of receptors appear to exist in the high agonist affinity state. Receptor agonists inhibited [3H]-MPPF binding from recombinant 5-HT1A receptors in a biphasic manner, whereas antagonists and partial agonists gave monophasic inhibition curves. All compounds displaced [3H]-8-OH-DPAT and [3H]-spiperone binding in a monophasic manner. In rat cortex, all compounds displaced [3H]-MPPF and [3H]-8-OH-DPAT in a monophasic manner. Functional evaluation of compounds, using [35S]-GTPγS binding, produced a range of intrinsic activities from full agonism, displayed by 5-HT and 5-CT to inverse agonism displayed by spiperone. [3H]-8-OH-DPAT : [3H]-MPPF pKi difference correlated well with functional intrinsic activity (r=0.86) as did [3H]-8-OH-DPAT : [3H]-spiperone pKi difference with functional intrinsic activity (r=0.96). Thus agonist : antagonist binding affinity differences may be used to predict functional efficacy at human 5-HT1A receptors expressed in HEK293 cells where both high and low agonist affinity states are present but not at native rat cortical 5-HT1A receptors in which

  11. Stability and Sugar Recognition Ability of Ricin-Like Carbohydrate Binding Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Nellas, Ricky B; Glover, Mary M; Shen, Tongye

    2011-01-01

    Lectins are a class of proteins known for their novel binding to saccharides. Understanding this sugar recognition process can be crucial in creating structure-based designs of proteins with various biological roles. We focus on the sugar binding of a particular lectin, ricin, which has two -trefoil carbohydrate-binding domains (CRDs) found in several plant protein toxins. The binding ability of possible sites of ricin-like CRD has been puzzling. The apo and various (multiple) ligand-bound forms of the sugar-binding domains of ricin were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. By evaluating structural stability, hydrogen bond dynamics, flexibility, and binding energy, we obtained a detailed picture of the sugar recognition of the ricin-like CRD. Unlike what was previously believed, we found that the binding abilities of the two known sites are not independent of each other. The binding ability of one site is positively affected by the other site. While the mean positions of different binding scenarios are not altered significantly, the flexibility of the binding pockets visibly decreases upon multiple ligand binding. This change in flexibility seems to be the origin of the binding cooperativity. All the hydrogen bonds that are strong in the monoligand state are also strong in the double-ligand complex, although the stability is much higher in the latter form due to cooperativity. These strong hydrogen bonds in a monoligand state are deemed to be the essential hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, by examining the structural correlation matrix, the two domains are structurally one entity. Galactose hydroxyl groups, OH4 and OH3, are the most critical parts in both site 1 and site 2 recognition.

  12. Two Unique Ligand-Binding Clamps of Rhizopus oryzae Starch Binding Domain for Helical Structure Disruption of Amylose

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting-Ying; Ci, Yuan-Pei; Chou, Wei-I; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chou, Wei-Yao; Li, Kun-Mou; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2012-01-01

    The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD) has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21) members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs. PMID:22815939

  13. The first X-ray crystal structure of the glucocorticoid receptor bound to a non-steroidal agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Madauss, Kevin P.; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Mclay, Iain; Stewart, Eugene L.; Uings, Iain J.; Weingarten, Gordon; Williams, Shawn P.

    2009-07-23

    The amino-pyrazole 2,6-dichloro-N-ethyl benzamide 1 is a selective GR agonist with dexamethasone-like in vitro potency. Its X-ray crystal structure in the GR LBD (Glucocorticoid ligand-binding domain) is described and compared to other reported structures of steroidal GR agonists in the GR LBD (3E7C).

  14. Identification of two uridine binding domain peptides of the UDP-glucose-binding site of rabbit muscle glycogenin.

    PubMed

    Carrizo, M E; Curtino, J A

    1998-12-30

    Glycogenin, the autoglucosyltransferase that initiates the de novo biosynthesis of glycogen, photoaffinity labeled with [beta32P]5-azido-UDP-glucose. The photoinsertion of the azidouridine derivative showed activating ultraviolet light dependency, saturation effects, and inhibition by UDP-glucose, thus demonstrating the specificity of the interaction. In the absence of Mn2+, the requirement for the catalytic activity of glycogenin, the photolabeling decreased by 70%. Competitive binding experiments indicated that the pyrophosphate or a phosphate was the moiety of UDP-glucose implicated in the strongest interaction at the binding site. Proteolytic digestion of photolabeled glycogenin resulted in the identification of two labeled fragments, 89-143 and 168-233, that carried the uridine binding sites. This is the first report of the region of glycogenin that harbors the UDP-glucose-binding domain. PMID:9918805

  15. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, {Delta}N-hH1.4, were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both histones bind to chromatin, however, {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of {Delta}N-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain ({Delta}N-hH1.4). The {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that {Delta}N-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  16. Autoradiography of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor-activated G proteins in guinea pig brain sections by agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, D S; Palmier, C; Colpaert, F C; Pauwels, P J

    1998-03-01

    G protein activation mediated by serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT(1B/D) receptors in guinea pig brain was investigated by using quantitative autoradiography of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding to brain sections. [35S]GTPgammaS binding was stimulated by the mixed 5-HT1A/5-HT(1B/D) agonist L694247 in brain structures enriched in 5-HT1A binding sites, i.e., hippocampus (+140 +/- 14%), dorsal raphe (+70 +/- 8%), lateral septum (+52 +/- 12%), cingulate (+36 +/- 8%), and entorhinal cortex (+34 +/- 5%). L694247 caused little or no stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding in brain regions with high densities of 5-HT(1B/D) binding sites (e.g., substantia nigra, striatum, central gray, and dorsal subiculum). The [35S]GTPgammaS binding response was antagonized by WAY100635 (10 microM) and methiothepin (10 microM). In contrast, the 5-HT1B inverse agonist SB224289 (10 microM) did not affect the L694247-mediated [35S]GTPgammaS binding response, and the mixed 5-HT(1B/D) antagonist GR127935 (10 microM) yielded a partial blockade. The distribution pattern of the [35S]GTPgammaS binding response and the antagonist profile suggest the L694247-mediated response in guinea pig brain to be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition to L694247, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin, and flesinoxan also stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding; their maximal responses varied between 46 and 52% compared with L694247, irrespective of the brain structure being considered. Sumatriptan, rizatriptan, and zolmitriptan (10 microM) stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in the hippocampus by 20-50%. Naratriptan, CP122638, and dihydroergotamine stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding to a similar level as L694247 in hippocampus, lateral septum, and dorsal raphe. It appears that under the present experimental conditions, G protein activation through 5-HT1A but not 5-HT(1B/D) receptors can be measured in guinea pig brain sections. PMID:9489749

  17. Crystal Structure of the Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 1 (Chd1) DNA-binding Domain in Complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma A.; Heroux A.; Jenkins K. R.; Bowman G. D.

    2011-12-09

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-dependent machines that dynamically alter the chromatin packaging of eukaryotic genomes by assembling, sliding, and displacing nucleosomes. The Chd1 chromatin remodeler possesses a C-terminal DNA-binding domain that is required for efficient nucleosome sliding and believed to be essential for sensing the length of DNA flanking the nucleosome core. The structure of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain was recently shown to consist of a SANT and SLIDE domain, analogous to the DNA-binding domain of the ISWI family, yet the details of how Chd1 recognized DNA were not known. Here we present the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chd1 DNA-binding domain in complex with a DNA duplex. The bound DNA duplex is straight, consistent with the preference exhibited by the Chd1 DNA-binding domain for extranucleosomal DNA. Comparison of this structure with the recently solved ISW1a DNA-binding domain bound to DNA reveals that DNA lays across each protein at a distinct angle, yet contacts similar surfaces on the SANT and SLIDE domains. In contrast to the minor groove binding seen for Isw1 and predicted for Chd1, the SLIDE domain of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain contacts the DNA major groove. The majority of direct contacts with the phosphate backbone occur only on one DNA strand, suggesting that Chd1 may not strongly discriminate between major and minor grooves.

  18. Mutations that bypass tRNA binding activate the intrinsically defective kinase domain in GCN2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongfang; Hu, Cuihua; Dong, Jinsheng; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2002-01-01

    The protein kinase GCN2 is activated in amino acid-starved cells on binding of uncharged tRNA to a histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS)-related domain. We isolated two point mutations in the protein kinase (PK) domain, R794G and F842L, that permit strong kinase activity in the absence of tRNA binding. These mutations also bypass the requirement for ribosome binding, dimerization, and association with the GCN1/GCN20 regulatory complex, suggesting that all of these functions facilitate tRNA binding to wild-type GCN2. While the isolated wild-type PK domain was completely inert, the mutant PK was highly active in vivo and in vitro. These results identify an inhibitory structure intrinsic to the PK domain that must be overcome on tRNA binding by interactions with a regulatory region, most likely the N terminus of the HisRS segment. As Arg 794 and Phe 842 are predicted to lie close to one another and to the active site, they may participate directly in misaligning active site residues. Autophosphorylation of the activation loop was stimulated by R794G and F842L, and the autophosphorylation sites remained critical for GCN2 function in the presence of these mutations. Our results imply a two-step activation mechanism involving distinct conformational changes in the PK domain. PMID:12023305

  19. Potent inhibition of Grb2 SH2 domain binding by non-phosphate-containing ligands.

    PubMed

    Yao, Z J; King, C R; Cao, T; Kelley, J; Milne, G W; Voigt, J H; Burke, T R

    1999-01-14

    Development of Grb2 Src homology 2 (SH2) domain binding inhibitors has important implications for treatment of a variety of diseases, including several cancers. In cellular studies, inhibitors of Grb2 SH2 domain binding have to date been large, highly charged peptides which relied on special transport devices for cell membrane penetration. Work presented in the current study examines a variety of pTyr mimetics in the context of a high-affinity Grb2 binding platform. Among the analogues studied are new non-phosphorus-containing pTyr mimetics 23a and 23b which, when incorporated into tripeptide structures 18f and 20f, are able to inhibit Grb2 SH2 domain binding with affinities among the best yet reported for non-phosphorus-containing SH2 domain inhibitors (IC50 values of 6.7 and 1.3 microM, respectively). The present study has also demonstrated the usefulness of the Nalpha-oxalyl group as an auxiliary which enhances the binding potency of both phosphorus- and non-phosphorus-containing pTyr mimetics. When combined with the (phosphonomethyl)phenylalanine (Pmp) residue to give analogues such as L-20d, potent inhibition of Grb2 SH2 domain binding can be achieved both in extracellular assays using isolated Grb2 SH2 domain protein and in intracellular systems measuring the association of endogenous Grb2 with its cognate p185erbB-2 ligand. These latter effects can be achieved at micromolar to submicromolar concentrations without prodrug derivatization. The oxalyl-containing pTyr mimetics presented in this study should be of general usefulness for the development of other Grb2 SH2 domain antagonists, independent of the beta-bend-mimicking platform utilized for their display. PMID:9888830

  20. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  1. Crucial role for the VWF A1 domain in binding to type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Flood, Veronica H; Schlauderaff, Abraham C; Haberichter, Sandra L; Slobodianuk, Tricia L; Jacobi, Paula M; Bellissimo, Daniel B; Christopherson, Pamela A; Friedman, Kenneth D; Gill, Joan Cox; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Montgomery, Robert R

    2015-04-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) contains binding sites for platelets and for vascular collagens to facilitate clot formation at sites of injury. Although previous work has shown that VWF can bind type IV collagen (collagen 4), little characterization of this interaction has been performed. We examined the binding of VWF to collagen 4 in vitro and extended this characterization to a murine model of defective VWF-collagen 4 interactions. The interactions of VWF and collagen 4 were further studied using plasma samples from a large study of both healthy controls and subjects with different types of von Willebrand disease (VWD). Our results show that collagen 4 appears to bind VWF exclusively via the VWF A1 domain, and that specific sequence variations identified through VWF patient samples and through site-directed mutagenesis in the VWF A1 domain can decrease or abrogate this interaction. In addition, VWF-dependent platelet binding to collagen 4 under flow conditions requires an intact VWF A1 domain. We observed that decreased binding to collagen 4 was associated with select VWF A1 domain sequence variations in type 1 and type 2M VWD. This suggests an additional mechanism through which VWF variants may alter hemostasis. PMID:25662333

  2. Crucial role for the VWF A1 domain in binding to type IV collagen

    PubMed Central

    Schlauderaff, Abraham C.; Haberichter, Sandra L.; Slobodianuk, Tricia L.; Jacobi, Paula M.; Bellissimo, Daniel B.; Christopherson, Pamela A.; Friedman, Kenneth D.; Gill, Joan Cox; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Montgomery, Robert R.; Abshire, T.; Dunn, A.; Bennett, C.; Lusher, J.; Rajpurkar, M.; Brown, D.; Shapiro, A.; Lentz, S.; Gill, J.; Leissinger, C.; Ragni, M.; Hord, J.; Manco-Johnson, M.; Strouse, J.; Ma, A.; Valentino, L.; Boggio, L.; Sharathkumar, A.; Gruppo, R.; Kerlin, B.; Journeycake, J.; Kulkarni, R.; Green, D.; Mahoney, D.; Mathias, L.; Bedros, A.; Diamond, C.; Neff, A.; DiMichele, D.; Giardina, P.; Cohen, A.; Paidas, M.; Werner, E.; Matsunaga, A.; Tarantino, M.; Shafer, F.; Konkle, B.; Cuker, A.; Kouides, P.; Stein, D.

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) contains binding sites for platelets and for vascular collagens to facilitate clot formation at sites of injury. Although previous work has shown that VWF can bind type IV collagen (collagen 4), little characterization of this interaction has been performed. We examined the binding of VWF to collagen 4 in vitro and extended this characterization to a murine model of defective VWF–collagen 4 interactions. The interactions of VWF and collagen 4 were further studied using plasma samples from a large study of both healthy controls and subjects with different types of von Willebrand disease (VWD). Our results show that collagen 4 appears to bind VWF exclusively via the VWF A1 domain, and that specific sequence variations identified through VWF patient samples and through site-directed mutagenesis in the VWF A1 domain can decrease or abrogate this interaction. In addition, VWF-dependent platelet binding to collagen 4 under flow conditions requires an intact VWF A1 domain. We observed that decreased binding to collagen 4 was associated with select VWF A1 domain sequence variations in type 1 and type 2M VWD. This suggests an additional mechanism through which VWF variants may alter hemostasis. PMID:25662333

  3. LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins bind to the serine/threonine-rich domain of thrombomodulin.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Eiji; Okamoto, Takayuki; Takagi, Yoshimi; Honda, Goichi; Suzuki, Koji; Imai, Hiroshi; Shimaoka, Motomu

    2016-05-13

    LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins regulate leukocyte trafficking in health and disease by binding primarily to IgSF ligand ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 on endothelial cells. Here we have shown that the anti-coagulant molecule thrombomodulin (TM), found on the surface of endothelial cells, functions as a potentially new ligand for leukocyte integrins. We generated a recombinant extracellular domain of human TM and Fc fusion protein (TM-domains 123-Fc), and showed that pheripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) bind to TM-domains 123-Fc dependent upon integrin activation. We then demonstrated that αL integrin-blocking mAb, αM integrin-blocking mAb, and β2 integrin-blocking mAb inhibited the binding of PBMCs to TM-domains 123-Fc. Furthermore, we show that the serine/threonine-rich domain (domain 3) of TM is required for the interaction with the LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins to occur on PBMCs. These results demonstrate that the LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins on leukocytes bind to TM, thereby establishing the molecular and structural basis underlying LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrin interaction with TM on endothelial cells. In fact, integrin-TM interactions might be involved in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte adhesion with endothelial cells. PMID:27055590

  4. Plant Kinesin-Like Calmodulin Binding Protein Employs Its Regulatory Domain for Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Maia V.; Malanina, Galina G.; Waitzman, Joshua S.; Rice, Sarah E.; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein (KCBP), a Kinesin-14 family motor protein, is involved in the structural organization of microtubules during mitosis and trichome morphogenesis in plants. The molecular mechanism of microtubule bundling by KCBP remains unknown. KCBP binding to microtubules is regulated by Ca2+-binding proteins that recognize its C-terminal regulatory domain. In this work, we have discovered a new function of the regulatory domain. We present a crystal structure of an Arabidopsis KCBP fragment showing that the C-terminal regulatory domain forms a dimerization interface for KCBP. This dimerization site is distinct from the dimerization interface within the N-terminal domain. Side chains of hydrophobic residues of the calmodulin binding helix of the regulatory domain form the C-terminal dimerization interface. Biochemical experiments show that another segment of the regulatory domain located beyond the dimerization interface, its negatively charged coil, is unexpectedly and absolutely required to stabilize the dimers. The strong microtubule bundling properties of KCBP are unaffected by deletion of the C-terminal regulatory domain. The slow minus-end directed motility of KCBP is also unchanged in vitro. Although the C-terminal domain is not essential for microtubule bundling, we suggest that KCBP may use its two independent dimerization interfaces to support different types of bundled microtubule structures in cells. Two distinct dimerization sites may provide a mechanism for microtubule rearrangement in response to Ca2+ signaling since Ca2+- binding proteins can disengage KCBP dimers dependent on its C-terminal dimerization interface. PMID:23805258

  5. Plant Kinesin-Like Calmodulin Binding Protein Employs Its Regulatory Domain for Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Maia V; Malanina, Galina G; Waitzman, Joshua S; Rice, Sarah E; Fletterick, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein (KCBP), a Kinesin-14 family motor protein, is involved in the structural organization of microtubules during mitosis and trichome morphogenesis in plants. The molecular mechanism of microtubule bundling by KCBP remains unknown. KCBP binding to microtubules is regulated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins that recognize its C-terminal regulatory domain. In this work, we have discovered a new function of the regulatory domain. We present a crystal structure of an Arabidopsis KCBP fragment showing that the C-terminal regulatory domain forms a dimerization interface for KCBP. This dimerization site is distinct from the dimerization interface within the N-terminal domain. Side chains of hydrophobic residues of the calmodulin binding helix of the regulatory domain form the C-terminal dimerization interface. Biochemical experiments show that another segment of the regulatory domain located beyond the dimerization interface, its negatively charged coil, is unexpectedly and absolutely required to stabilize the dimers. The strong microtubule bundling properties of KCBP are unaffected by deletion of the C-terminal regulatory domain. The slow minus-end directed motility of KCBP is also unchanged in vitro. Although the C-terminal domain is not essential for microtubule bundling, we suggest that KCBP may use its two independent dimerization interfaces to support different types of bundled microtubule structures in cells. Two distinct dimerization sites may provide a mechanism for microtubule rearrangement in response to Ca(2+) signaling since Ca(2+)- binding proteins can disengage KCBP dimers dependent on its C-terminal dimerization interface. PMID:23805258

  6. Inhibition of αIIbβ3 Ligand Binding by an αIIb Peptide that Clasps the Hybrid Domain to the βI Domain of β3

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen Hwa; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Tsoukatos, Demokritos C.; Aylward, Kelly; Moussis, Vassilios; Tsikaris, Vassilios; Trypou, Paraskevi; Egot, Marion; Baruch, Dominique; Kieffer, Nelly; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla

    2015-01-01

    Agonist-stimulated platelet activation triggers conformational changes of integrin αIIbβ3, allowing fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation. We have previously shown that an octapeptide, p1YMESRADR8, corresponding to amino acids 313–320 of the β-ribbon extending from the β-propeller domain of αIIb, acts as a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. Here we have performed in silico modelling analysis of the interaction of this peptide with αIIbβ3 in its bent and closed (not swing-out) conformation and show that the peptide is able to act as a substitute for the β-ribbon by forming a clasp restraining the β3 hybrid and βI domains in a closed conformation. The involvement of species-specific residues of the β3 hybrid domain (E356 and K384) and the β1 domain (E297) as well as an intrapeptide bond (pE315-pR317) were confirmed as important for this interaction by mutagenesis studies of αIIbβ3 expressed in CHO cells and native or substituted peptide inhibitory studies on platelet functions. Furthermore, NMR data corroborate the above results. Our findings provide insight into the important functional role of the αIIb β-ribbon in preventing integrin αIIbβ3 head piece opening, and highlight a potential new therapeutic approach to prevent integrin ligand binding. PMID:26332040

  7. Polyelectrolyte Complex for Heparin Binding Domain Osteogenic Growth Factor Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wing Moon Lam, Raymond; Abbah, Sunny Akogwu; Ming, Wang; Naidu, Mathanapriya; Ng, Felly; Tao, Hu; Goh Cho Hong, James; Ting, Kang; Hee Kit, Wong

    2016-01-01

    During reconstructive bone surgeries, supraphysiological amounts of growth factors are empirically loaded onto scaffolds to promote successful bone fusion. Large doses of highly potent biological agents are required due to growth factor instability as a result of rapid enzymatic degradation as well as carrier inefficiencies in localizing sufficient amounts of growth factor at implant sites. Hence, strategies that prolong the stability of growth factors such as BMP-2/NELL-1, and control their release could actually lower their efficacious dose and thus reduce the need for larger doses during future bone regeneration surgeries. This in turn will reduce side effects and growth factor costs. Self-assembled PECs have been fabricated to provide better control of BMP-2/NELL-1 delivery via heparin binding and further potentiate growth factor bioactivity by enhancing in vivo stability. Here we illustrate the simplicity of PEC fabrication which aids in the delivery of a variety of growth factors during reconstructive bone surgeries. PMID:27585207

  8. Detection of persistent organic pollutants binding modes with androgen receptor ligand binding domain by docking and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are persistent in the environment after release from industrial compounds, combustion productions or pesticides. The exposure of POPs has been related to various reproductive disturbances, such as reduced semen quality, testicular cancer, and imbalanced sex ratio. Among POPs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4’-DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the most widespread and well-studied compounds. Recent studies have revealed that 4,4’-DDE is an antagonist of androgen receptor (AR). However, the mechanism of the inhibition remains elusive. CB-153 is the most common congener of PCBs, while the action of CB-153 on AR is still under debate. Results Molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches have been employed to study binding modes and inhibition mechanism of 4,4’-DDE and CB-153 against AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Several potential binding sites have been detected and analyzed. One possible binding site is the same binding site of AR natural ligand androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Another one is on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function (AF2) region, which is crucial for the co-activators recruitment. Besides, a novel possible binding site was observed for POPs with low binding free energy with the receptor. Detailed interactions between ligands and the receptor have been represented. The disrupting mechanism of POPs against AR has also been discussed. Conclusions POPs disrupt the function of AR through binding to three possible biding sites on AR/LBD. One of them shares the same binding site of natural ligand of AR. Another one is on AF2 region. The third one is in a cleft near N-terminal of the receptor. Significantly, values of binding free energy of POPs with AR/LBD are comparable to that of natural ligand androgen DHT. PMID:24053684

  9. The calmodulin-binding domain of the mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Minami, Y; Kawasaki, H; Suzuki, K; Yahara, I

    1993-05-01

    The mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) and Ca(2+)-calmodulin were cross-linked at an equimolar ratio using a carbodiimide zero-length cross-linker. To identify the calmodulin-binding domain(s) of HSP90, CNBr-cleaved peptide fragments of HSP90 were mixed with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and cross-linked. Amino acid sequence determination revealed that an HSP90 alpha-derived peptide starting at the 486th amino acid residue was contained in the cross-linked products, which contains a calmodulin-binding motif (from Lys500 to Ile520). A similar motif is present also in HSP90 beta (from Lys491 to Val511). The synthetic peptides corresponding to these putative calmodulin-binding sequences were found to be cross-linked with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and to prevent the cross-linking of HSP90 and Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Both HSP90 alpha and HSP90 beta bind Ca2+. The HSP90 peptides bind HSP90 and thereby inhibit the binding of Ca2+. In addition, the HSP90 peptides augment the self-oligomerization of HSP90 induced at elevated temperatures. These results suggest that the calmodulin-binding domain of HSP90 might interact with another part of the same molecule and that Ca(2+)-calmodulin might modulate the structure and function of HSP90 through abolishing the intramolecular interaction. PMID:8486648

  10. A Substrate-induced Biotin Binding Pocket in the Carboxyltransferase Domain of Pyruvate Carboxylase*

    PubMed Central

    Lietzan, Adam D.; St. Maurice, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxyl transfer reactions by efficiently coordinating multiple reactions between spatially distinct active sites. Pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the bicarbonate- and MgATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To complete the overall reaction, the tethered biotin prosthetic group must first gain access to the biotin carboxylase domain and become carboxylated and then translocate to the carboxyltransferase domain, where the carboxyl group is transferred from biotin to pyruvate. Here, we report structural and kinetic evidence for the formation of a substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of PC from Rhizobium etli. Structures of the carboxyltransferase domain reveal that R. etli PC occupies a symmetrical conformation in the absence of the biotin carboxylase domain and that the carboxyltransferase domain active site is conformationally rearranged upon pyruvate binding. This conformational change is stabilized by the interaction of the conserved residues Asp590 and Tyr628 and results in the formation of the biotin binding pocket. Site-directed mutations at these residues reduce the rate of biotin-dependent reactions but have no effect on the rate of biotin-independent oxaloacetate decarboxylation. Given the conservation with carboxyltransferase domains in oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, the structure-based mechanism described for PC may be applicable to the larger family of biotin-dependent enzymes. PMID:23698000

  11. The Crystal Structure of the Heparin-Binding Reelin-N Domain of F-Spondin

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Kemin; Duquette, Mark; Liu, Jin-huan; Lawler, Jack; Wang, Jia-huai

    2008-09-23

    The extracellular matrix protein F-spondin mediates axon guidance during neuronal development. Its N-terminal domain, termed the reelin-N domain, is conserved in F-spondins, reelins, and other extracellular matrix proteins. In this study, a recombinant human reelin-N domain has been expressed, purified, and shown to bind heparin. The crystal structure of the reelin-N domain resolved to 2.0 {angstrom} reveals a variant immunoglobulin-like fold and potential heparin-binding sites. Substantial conformational variations even in secondary structure are observed between the two chemically identical reelin-N domains in one crystallographic asymmetric unit. The variations may result from extensive, highly specific interactions across the interface of the two reelin-N domains. The calculated values of buried surface area and the interface's shape complementarity are consistent with the formation of a weak dimer. The homophilic asymmetric dimer can potentially offer advantages in binding to ligands such as glycosaminoglycans, which may, in turn, bridge the two reelin-N domains and stabilize the dimer.

  12. Allosteric role of the large-scale domain opening in biological catch-binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2009-05-01

    The proposed model demonstrates the allosteric role of the two-domain region of the receptor protein in the increased lifetimes of biological receptor/ligand bonds subjected to an external force. The interaction between the domains is represented by a bounded potential, containing two minima corresponding to the attached and separated conformations of the two protein domains. The dissociative potential with a single minimum describing receptor/ligand binding fluctuates between deep and shallow states, depending on whether the domains are attached or separated. A number of valuable analytic expressions are derived and are used to interpret experimental data for two catch bonds. The P-selectin/P-selectin-glycoprotein-ligand-1 (PSGL-1) bond is controlled by the interface between the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and lectin domains of P-selectin, and the type 1 fimbrial adhesive protein (FimH)/mannose bond is governed by the interface between the lectin and pilin domains of FimH. Catch-binding occurs in these systems when the external force stretches the receptor proteins and increases the interdomain distance. The allosteric effect is supported by independent measurements, in which the domains are kept separated by attachment of another ligand. The proposed model accurately describes the experimentally observed anomalous behavior of the lifetimes of the P-selectin/PSGL-1 and FimH/mannose complexes as a function of applied force and provides valuable insights into the mechanism of catch-binding.

  13. Indole Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonists Active in a Model of Dyslipidemia Act via a Unique Association with an Agonist Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Luz, John G; Carson, Matthew W; Condon, Bradley; Clawson, David; Pustilnik, Anna; Kohlman, Daniel T; Barr, Robert J; Bean, James S; Dill, M Joelle; Sindelar, Dana K; Maletic, Milan; Coghlan, Michael J

    2015-08-27

    To further elucidate the structural activity correlation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonism, the crystal structure of the GR ligand-binding domain (GR LBD) complex with a nonsteroidal antagonist, compound 8, was determined. This novel indole sulfonamide shows in vitro activity comparable to known GR antagonists such as mifepristone, and notably, this molecule lowers LDL (-74%) and raises HDL (+73%) in a hamster model of dyslipidemia. This is the first reported crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to a nonsteroidal antagonist, and this article provides additional elements for the design and pharmacology of clinically relevant nonsteroidal GR antagonists that may have greater selectivity and fewer side effects than their steroidal counterparts. PMID:26218343

  14. P-glycoprotein substrate binding domains are located at the transmembrane domain/transmembrane domain interfaces: a combined photoaffinity labeling-protein homology modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Pleban, Karin; Kopp, Stephan; Csaszar, Edina; Peer, Michael; Hrebicek, Thomas; Rizzi, Andreas; Ecker, Gerhard F; Chiba, Peter

    2005-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an energy-dependent multidrug efflux pump conferring resistance to cancer chemotherapy. Characterization of the mechanism of drug transport at a molecular level represents an important prerequisite for the design of pump inhibitors, which resensitize cancer cells to standard chemotherapy. In addition, P-glycoprotein plays an important role for early absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity profiling in drug development. A set of propafenonetype substrate photoaffinity ligands has been used in this study in conjunction with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry to define the substrate binding domain(s) of P-gp in more detail. The highest labeling was observed in transmembrane segments 3, 5, 8, and 11. A homology model for P-gp was generated on the basis of the dimeric crystal structure of Vibrio cholerae MsbA, an essential lipid transporter. Thereafter, the labeling pattern was projected onto the 3D atomic-detail model of P-gp to allow a visualization of the binding domain(s). Labeling is predicted by the model to occur at the two transmembrane domain/transmembrane domain interfaces formed between the amino- and carboxyl-terminal half of P-gp. These interfaces are formed by transmembrane (TM) segments 3 and 11 on one hand and TM segments 5 and 8 on the other hand. Available data on LmrA and AcrB, two bacterial multidrug efflux pumps, suggest that binding at domain interfaces may be a general feature of polyspecific drug efflux pumps. PMID:15509712

  15. Effectors of animal and plant pathogens use a common domain to bind host phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Guo, Yirui; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.; Gardner, Kevin H.; Orth, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial Type III Secretion Systems deliver effectors into host cells to manipulate cellular processes to the advantage of the pathogen. Many host targets of these effectors are found on membranes. Therefore, to identify their targets, effectors often use specialized membrane-localization domains to localize to appropriate host membranes. However, the molecular mechanisms used by many domains are unknown. Here we identify a conserved bacterial phosphoinositide-binding domain (BPD) that is found in functionally diverse Type III effectors of both plant and animal pathogens. We show that members of the BPD family functionally bind phosphoinositides and mediate localization to host membranes. Moreover, NMR studies reveal that the BPD of the newly identified Vibrio parahaemolyticus Type III effector VopR is unfolded in solution, but folds into a specific structure upon binding its ligand phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate. Thus, our findings suggest a possible mechanism for promoting refolding of Type III effectors after delivery into host cells. PMID:24346350

  16. Bacterial cadherin domains as carbohydrate binding modules: determination of affinity constants to insoluble complex polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Weiner, Ronald M; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Cadherin (CA) and cadherin-like (CADG) doublet domains from the complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans 2-40, demonstrated reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides, which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. Here we describe a procedure based on adsorption of CA and CADG doublet domains to different insoluble complex polysaccharides, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) for visualizing and quantifying the distribution of cadherins between the bound and unbound fractions. Scatchard plots were employed to determine the kinetics of interactions of CA and CADG with several complex carbohydrates. On the basis of these binding studies, the CA and CADG doublet domains are proposed to form a new family of carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). PMID:22843394

  17. Prolonged agonist stimulation does not alter the protein composition of membrane domains in spite of dramatic changes induced in a specific signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Matousek, Petr; Novotny, Jirí; Rudajev, Vladimír; Svoboda, Petr

    2005-01-01

    Protein composition of membrane domains prepared by three different procedures (mechanical homogenization, alkaline treatment with 1 M Na2CO3 [pH 11.0], or extraction with nonionic detergent Triton X-100), and isolated from the bulk of plasma membranes by flotation on equilibrium sucrose density gradients, was analyzed by two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis and compared in preparations from control (quiescent) and agonist-stimulated human embryonic kidney cells (HEK)293 or S49 cells. HEK293 cells (clone e2m11) stably expressing high levels of thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor and G11alpha protein were stimulated by thyrotropin-releasing hormone and S49 lymphoma cells by the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist isoprenaline. Whereas sustained exposure (16 h) of both cell lines to the appropriate hormones led to substantial cellular redistribution and downregulation of the cognate G proteins (G(q)alpha/G11alpha and G(s)alpha, respectively), the distribution and levels of nonstimulated G(i) proteins remained unchanged. The 2D electrophoretic analysis of membrane domains distinguished approx 150-170 major proteins in these structures and none of these proteins was significantly altered by prolonged agonist stimulation. Furthermore, specific immunochemical determination of a number of plasma membrane markers, including transmembrane and glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored peripheral proteins, confirmed that their detergent-extractability/solubility was not influenced by hormone treatment. Collectively, our present data indicate that sustained hormone stimulation of target cells does not alter the basic protein composition of membrane domain/raft compartments of the plasma membrane in spite of marked changes proceeding in a given signaling cascade. PMID:15673926

  18. FHA domains as phospho-threonine binding modules in cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hammet, Andrew; Pike, Brietta L; McNees, Carolyn J; Conlan, Lindus A; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2003-01-01

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are present in >200 diverse proteins in all phyla from bacteria to mammals and seem to be particularly prevalent in proteins with cell cycle control functions. Recent work from several laboratories has considerably improved our understanding of the structure and function of these domains that were virtually unknown a few years ago, and the first disease associations of FHA domains have now emerged. FHA domains form 11-stranded beta-sandwiches that contain some 100-180 amino acid residues with a high degree of sequence diversity. FHA domains act as phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interaction modules that preferentially bind to phospho-threonine residues in their targets. Interestingly, point mutations in the human CHK2 gene that lead to single-residue amino acid substitutions in the FHA domain of this cell cycle checkpoint kinase have been found to cause a subset of cases of the Li-Fraumeni multi-cancer syndrome. PMID:12716058

  19. Ligand-Binding Properties of the Carboxyl-Terminal Repeat Domain of Streptococcus mutans Glucan-Binding Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Wolfgang; Banas, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypothesis and to quantitate the ligand-binding specificities of the GbpA GBD, several fusion proteins were generated and tested by affinity electrophoresis or by precipitation of protein-ligand complexes, allowing the determination of binding constants. It was determined that the 16 YG repeats in GbpA comprise its GBD and that GbpA has a greater affinity for dextran (a water-soluble form of glucan) than for mutan (a water-insoluble form of glucan). Placement of the GBD at the carboxyl terminus was necessary for maximum glucan binding, and deletion of as few as two YG repeats from either end of the GBD reduced the affinity for dextran by over 10-fold. Interestingly, the binding constant of GbpA for dextran was 34-fold higher than that calculated for the GBDs of two S. mutans GTFs, one of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-soluble glucan and the other of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan. PMID:10633107

  20. Ligand-binding properties of the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain of Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A.

    PubMed

    Haas, W; Banas, J A

    2000-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypothesis and to quantitate the ligand-binding specificities of the GbpA GBD, several fusion proteins were generated and tested by affinity electrophoresis or by precipitation of protein-ligand complexes, allowing the determination of binding constants. It was determined that the 16 YG repeats in GbpA comprise its GBD and that GbpA has a greater affinity for dextran (a water-soluble form of glucan) than for mutan (a water-insoluble form of glucan). Placement of the GBD at the carboxyl terminus was necessary for maximum glucan binding, and deletion of as few as two YG repeats from either end of the GBD reduced the affinity for dextran by over 10-fold. Interestingly, the binding constant of GbpA for dextran was 34-fold higher than that calculated for the GBDs of two S. mutans GTFs, one of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-soluble glucan and the other of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan. PMID:10633107

  1. Starch-binding domains in the CBM45 family--low-affinity domains from glucan, water dikinase and α-amylase involved in plastidial starch metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glaring, Mikkel A; Baumann, Martin J; Abou Hachem, Maher; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Natsuko; Santelia, Diana; Sigurskjold, Bent W; Zeeman, Samuel C; Blennow, Andreas; Svensson, Birte

    2011-04-01

    Starch-binding domains are noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules that mediate binding to granular starch. The starch-binding domains from the carbohydrate-binding module family 45 (CBM45, http://www.cazy.org) are found as N-terminal tandem repeats in a small number of enzymes, primarily from photosynthesizing organisms. Isolated domains from representatives of each of the two classes of enzyme carrying CBM45-type domains, the Solanum tuberosumα-glucan, water dikinase and the Arabidopsis thaliana plastidial α-amylase 3, were expressed as recombinant proteins and characterized. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to verify the conformational integrity of an isolated CBM45 domain, revealing a surprisingly high thermal stability (T(m) of 84.8 °C). The functionality of CBM45 was demonstrated in planta by yellow/green fluorescent protein fusions and transient expression in tobacco leaves. Affinities for starch and soluble cyclodextrin starch mimics were measured by adsorption assays, surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry analyses. The data indicate that CBM45 binds with an affinity of about two orders of magnitude lower than the classical starch-binding domains from extracellular microbial amylolytic enzymes. This suggests that low-affinity starch-binding domains are a recurring feature in plastidial starch metabolism, and supports the hypothesis that reversible binding, effectuated through low-affinity interaction with starch granules, facilitates dynamic regulation of enzyme activities and, hence, of starch metabolism. PMID:21294843

  2. The alpha2beta1 integrin inhibitor rhodocetin binds to the A-domain of the integrin alpha2 subunit proximal to the collagen-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Eble, Johannes A; Tuckwell, Danny S

    2003-01-01

    Rhodocetin is a snake venom protein that binds to alpha2beta1 integrin, inhibiting its interaction with its endogenous ligand collagen. We have determined the mechanism by which rhodocetin inhibits the function of alpha2beta1. The interaction of alpha2beta1 with collagen and rhodocetin differed: Ca(2+) ions and slightly acidic pH values increased the binding of alpha2beta1 integrin to rhodocetin in contrast with their attenuating effect on collagen binding, suggesting that rhodocetin preferentially binds to a less active conformation of alpha2beta1 integrin. The alpha2A-domain [von Willebrand factor domain A homology domain (A-domain) of the integrin alpha2 subunit] is the major site for collagen binding to alpha2beta1. Recombinant alpha2A-domain bound rhodocetin, demonstrating that the A-domain is also the rhodocetin-binding domain. Although the interaction of alpha2beta1 with rhodocetin is affected by altering divalent cations, the interaction of the A-domain was divalent-cation-independent. The rhodocetin-binding site on the alpha2A-domain was mapped first by identifying an anti-alpha2 antibody that blocked rhodocetin binding and then mapping the epitope of the antibody using human-mouse alpha2A-domain chimaeras; and secondly, by binding studies with alpha2A-domain, which bear point mutations in the vicinity of the mapped epitope. In this way, the rhodocetin-binding site was identified as the alpha3-alpha4 loop plus adjacent alpha-helices. This region is known to form part of the collagen-binding site, thus attaining a mainly competitive mode of inhibition by rhodocetin. PMID:12871211

  3. Inhibition of HIV derived lentiviral production by TAR RNA binding domain of TAT protein

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Michael Y; Zhang, Jiying; He, Yukai

    2005-01-01

    Background A critical step in the production of new HIV virions involves the TAT protein binding to the TAR element. The TAT protein contains in close proximity its TAR RNA binding domain and protein transduction domain (PTD). The PTD domain of TAT has been identified as being instrumental in the protein's ability to cross mammalian cell and nuclear membranes. All together, this information led us to form the hypothesis that a protein containing the TAR RNA binding domain could compete with the native full length TAT protein and effectively block the TAR RNA binding site in transduced HIV infected cells. Results We synthesized a short peptide named Tat-P, which contained the TAR RNA binding and PTD domains to examine whether the peptide has the potential of inhibiting TAT dependent HIV replication. We investigated the inhibiting effects of Tat-P in vitro using a HIV derived lentiviral vector model. We found that the TAT PTD domain not only efficiently transduced test cells, but also effectively inhibited the production of lentiviral particles in a TAT dependent manner. These results were also supported by data derived from the TAT activated LTR-luciferase expression model and RNA binding assays. Conclusion Tat-P may become part of a category of anti-HIV drugs that competes with full length TAT proteins to inhibit HIV replication. In addition, this study indicates that the HIV derived lentiviral vector system is a safe and reliable screening method for anti-HIV drugs, especially for those targeting the interaction of TAT and TAR RNAs. PMID:16293193

  4. Identification of pleckstrin-homology-domain-containing proteins with novel phosphoinositide-binding specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Dowler, S; Currie , R A; Campbell , D G; Deak, M; Kular, G; Downes, C P; Alessi, D R

    2000-01-01

    The second messenger phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)] is generated by the action of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), and regulates a plethora of cellular processes. An approach for dissecting the mechanisms by which these processes are regulated is to identify proteins that interact specifically with PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3). The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain has become recognized as the specialized module used by many proteins to interact with PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3). Recent work has led to the identification of a putative phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate-binding motif (PPBM) at the N-terminal regions of PH domains that interact with this lipid. We have searched expressed sequence tag databases for novel proteins containing PH domains possessing a PPBM. Surprisingly, many of the PH domains that we identified do not bind PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), but instead possess unexpected and novel phosphoinositide-binding specificities in vitro. These include proteins possessing PH domains that interact specifically with PtdIns(3,4)P(2) [TAPP1 (tandem PH-domain-containing protein-1) and TAPP2], PtdIns4P [FAPP1 (phosphatidylinositol-four-phosphate adaptor protein-1)], PtdIns3P [PEPP1 (phosphatidylinositol-three-phosphate-binding PH-domain protein-1) and AtPH1] and PtdIns(3,5)P(2) (centaurin-beta2). We have also identified two related homologues of PEPP1, termed PEPP2 and PEPP3, that may also interact with PtdIns3P. This study lays the foundation for future work to establish the phospholipid-binding specificities of these proteins in vivo, and their physiological role(s). PMID:11001876

  5. Simultaneous prediction of binding free energy and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions

    PubMed Central

    Crivelli, Joseph J.; Lemmon, Gordon; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between protein domains and linear peptides underlie many biological processes. Among these interactions, the recognition of C-terminal peptides by PDZ domains is one of the most ubiquitous. In this work, we present a mathematical model for PDZ domain-peptide interactions capable of predicting both affinity and specificity of binding based on x-ray crystal structures and comparative modeling with Rosetta. We developed our mathematical model using a large phage display dataset describing binding specificity for a wild type PDZ domain and 91 single mutants, as well as binding affinity data for a wild type PDZ domain binding to 28 different peptides. Structural refinement was carried out through several Rosetta protocols, the most accurate of which included flexible peptide docking and several iterations of side chain repacking and backbone minimization. Our findings emphasize the importance of backbone flexibility and the energetic contributions of side chain-side chain hydrogen bonds in accurately predicting interactions. We also determined that predicting PDZ domain-peptide interactions became increasingly challenging as the length of the peptide increased in the N-terminal direction. In the training dataset, predicted binding energies correlated with those derived through calorimetry and specificity switches introduced through single mutations at interface positions were recapitulated. In independent tests, our best performing protocol was capable of predicting dissociation constants well within one order of magnitude of the experimental values and specificity profiles at the level of accuracy of previous studies. To our knowledge, this approach represents the first integrated protocol for predicting both affinity and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions. PMID:24305904

  6. Sequence Discrimination by Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of a DNA Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogos, Joseph A.; Hsu, Tien; Bolton, Jesse; Kafatos, Fotis C.

    1992-09-01

    Two major developmentally regulated isoforms of the Drosophila chorion transcription factor CF2 differ by an extra zinc finger within the DNA binding domain. The preferred DNA binding sites were determined and are distinguished by an internal duplication of TAT in the site recognized by the isoform with the extra finger. The results are consistent with modular interactions between zinc fingers and trinucleotides and also suggest rules for recognition of AT-rich DNA sites by zinc finger proteins. The results show how modular finger interactions with trinucleotides can be used, in conjunction with alternative splicing, to alter the binding specificity and increase the spectrum of sites recognized by a DNA binding domain. Thus, CF2 may potentially regulate distinct sets of target genes during development.

  7. Crystal structure of the DNA binding domain of the replication initiation protein E1 from papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Enemark, E J; Chen, G; Vaughn, D E; Stenlund, A; Joshua-Tor, L

    2000-07-01

    Papillomaviral infection causes both benign and malignant lesions and is a necessary cause of cervical carcinoma. Replication of this virus requires the replication initiation proteins E1 and E2, which bind cooperatively at the origin of replication (ori) as an (E1)2-(E2)2-DNA complex. This is a precursor to larger E1 complexes that distort and unwind the ori. We present the crystal structure of the E1 DNA binding domain refined to 1.9 A resolution. Residues critical for DNA binding are located on an extended loop and an alpha helix. We identify the E1 dimerization surface by selective mutations at an E1/E1 interface observed in the crystal and propose a model for the (E1)2-DNA complex. These and other observations suggest how the E1 DNA binding domain orchestrates assembly of the hexameric helicase on the ori. PMID:10949036

  8. ADAR Proteins: Double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barraud, Pierre; Allain, Frédéric H.-T

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine editing within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine is read as a guanine by most cellular processes and therefore these changes create codons for a different amino acid, stop codons or even a new splice-site allowing protein diversity generated from a single gene. We are reviewing here the current structural and molecular knowledge on RNA editing by the ADAR family of protein. We focus especially on two types of nucleic acid binding domains present in ADARs, namely the double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA binding domains. PMID:21728134

  9. Glucoamylase starch-binding domain of Aspergillus niger B1: molecular cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Paldi, Tzur; Levy, Ilan; Shoseyov, Oded

    2003-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are protein domains located within a carbohydrate-active enzyme, with a discrete fold that can be separated from the catalytic domain. Starch-binding domains (SBDs) are CBMs that are usually found at the C-terminus in many amylolytic enzymes. The SBD from Aspergillus niger B1 (CMI CC 324262) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as an independent domain and the recombinant protein was purified on starch. The A. niger B1 SBD was found to be similar to SBD from A. kawachii, A. niger var. awamori and A. shirusami (95-96% identity) and was classified as a member of the CBM family 20. Characterization of SBD binding to starch indicated that it is essentially irreversible and that its affinity to cationic or anionic starch, as well as to potato or corn starch, does not differ significantly. These observations indicate that the fundamental binding area on these starches is essentially the same. Natural and chemically modified starches are among the most useful biopolymers employed in the industry. Our study demonstrates that SBD binds effectively to both anionic and cationic starch. PMID:12646045

  10. Sec1/Munc18 protein Vps33 binds to SNARE domains and the quaternary SNARE complex

    PubMed Central

    Lobingier, Braden T.; Merz, Alexey J.

    2012-01-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins catalyze membrane fusion events in the secretory and endolysosomal systems, and all SNARE-mediated fusion processes require cofactors of the Sec1/Munc18 (SM) family. Vps33 is an SM protein and subunit of the Vps-C complexes HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) and CORVET (class C core vacuole/endosome tethering), which are central regulators of endocytic traffic. Here we present biochemical studies of interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar SNAREs and the HOPS holocomplex or Vps33 alone. HOPS binds the N-terminal Habc domain of the Qa-family SNARE Vam3, but Vps33 is not required for this interaction. Instead, Vps33 binds the SNARE domains of Vam3, Vam7, and Nyv1. Vps33 directly binds vacuolar quaternary SNARE complexes, and the affinity of Vps33 for SNARE complexes is greater than for individual SNAREs. Through targeted mutational analyses, we identify missense mutations of Vps33 that produce a novel set of defects, including cargo missorting and the loss of Vps33-HOPS association. Together these data suggest a working model for membrane docking: HOPS associates with N-terminal domains of Vam3 and Vam7 through Vps33-independent interactions, which are followed by binding of Vps33, the HOPS SM protein, to SNARE domains and finally to the quaternary SNARE complex. Our results also strengthen the hypothesis that SNARE complex binding is a core attribute of SM protein function. PMID:23051737

  11. A Novel Approach to Predict Core Residues on Cancer-Related DNA-Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Protein–DNA interactions are involved in different cancer pathways. In particular, the DNA-binding domains of proteins can determine where and how gene regulatory regions are bound in different cell lines at different stages. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method to predict and locate the core residues on cancer-related DNA-binding domains. In this study, we propose a computational method to predict and locate core residues on DNA-binding domains. In particular, we have selected the cancer-related DNA-binding domains for in-depth studies, namely, winged Helix Turn Helix family, homeodomain family, and basic Helix-Loop-Helix family. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the core residues involved in protein–DNA interactions, as verified by the existing structural data. Given its good performance, various aspects of the method are discussed and explored: for instance, different uses of prediction algorithm, different protein domains, and hotspot threshold setting. PMID:27279732

  12. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    SciTech Connect

    Briers, Yves; Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J.; Hendrix, Jelle; Engelborghs, Yves; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2009-05-29

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBD{sub KZ}), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage {phi}KZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBD{sub KZ} and green fluorescent protein (PBD{sub KZ}-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBD{sub KZ}-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} for the PBD{sub KZ}-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBD{sub KZ}-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  13. The Cytoplasmic Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1 Affects Binding of the Protective Antigen▿

    PubMed Central

    Go, Mandy Y.; Chow, Edith M. C.; Mogridge, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin binds the I domain of the receptor ANTXR1. Integrin I domains convert between open and closed conformations that bind ligand with high and low affinities, respectively; this process is regulated by signaling from the cytoplasmic domains. To assess whether intracellular signals might influence the interaction between ANTXR1 and PA, we compared two splice variants of ANTXR1 that differ only in their cytoplasmic domains. We found that cells expressing ANTXR1 splice variant 1 (ANTXR1-sv1) bound markedly less PA than did cells expressing a similar level of the shorter splice variant ANTXR1-sv2. ANTXR1-sv1 but not ANTXR1-sv2 associated with the actin cytoskeleton, although disruption of the cytoskeleton did not affect binding of ANTXR-sv1 to PA. Introduction of a cytoplasmic domain missense mutation found in the related receptor ANTXR2 in a patient with juvenile hyaline fibromatosis impaired actin association and increased binding of PA to ANTXR1-sv1. These results suggest that ANTXR1 has two affinity states that may be modulated by cytoplasmic signals. PMID:18936178

  14. A Novel Approach to Predict Core Residues on Cancer-Related DNA-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in different cancer pathways. In particular, the DNA-binding domains of proteins can determine where and how gene regulatory regions are bound in different cell lines at different stages. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method to predict and locate the core residues on cancer-related DNA-binding domains. In this study, we propose a computational method to predict and locate core residues on DNA-binding domains. In particular, we have selected the cancer-related DNA-binding domains for in-depth studies, namely, winged Helix Turn Helix family, homeodomain family, and basic Helix-Loop-Helix family. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the core residues involved in protein-DNA interactions, as verified by the existing structural data. Given its good performance, various aspects of the method are discussed and explored: for instance, different uses of prediction algorithm, different protein domains, and hotspot threshold setting. PMID:27279732

  15. A bistable genetic switch based on designable DNA-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Lebar, Tina; Bezeljak, Urban; Golob, Anja; Jerala, Miha; Kadunc, Lucija; Pirš, Boštjan; Stražar, Martin; Vučko, Dušan; Zupančič, Uroš; Benčina, Mojca; Forstnerič, Vida; Gaber, Rok; Lonzarić, Jan; Majerle, Andreja; Oblak, Alja; Smole, Anže; Jerala, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Bistable switches are fundamental regulatory elements of complex systems, ranging from electronics to living cells. Designed genetic toggle switches have been constructed from pairs of natural transcriptional repressors wired to inhibit one another. The complexity of the engineered regulatory circuits can be increased using orthogonal transcriptional regulators based on designed DNA-binding domains. However, a mutual repressor-based toggle switch comprising DNA-binding domains of transcription-activator-like effectors (TALEs) did not support bistability in mammalian cells. Here, the challenge of engineering a bistable switch based on monomeric DNA-binding domains is solved via the introduction of a positive feedback loop composed of activators based on the same TALE domains as their opposing repressors and competition for the same DNA operator site. This design introduces nonlinearity and results in epigenetic bistability. This principle could be used to employ other monomeric DNA-binding domains such as CRISPR for applications ranging from reprogramming cells to building digital biological memory. PMID:25264186

  16. Evaluation of the Interaction between Phosphohistidine Analogues and Phosphotyrosine Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Tom E; Horner, Katherine A; Webb, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of peptides containing phosphohistidine analogues and their homologues with the prototypical phosphotyrosine binding SH2 domain from the eukaryotic cell signalling protein Grb2 by using a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and a fluorescence anisotropy competition assay. These investigations demonstrated that the triazole class of phosphohistidine analogues are capable of binding too, suggesting that phosphohistidine could potentially be detected by this class of proteins in vivo. PMID:24771713

  17. Structure of REV-ERBβ Ligand-binding Domain Bound to a Porphyrin Antagonist*

    PubMed Central

    Matta-Camacho, Edna; Banerjee, Subhashis; Hughes, Travis S.; Solt, Laura A.; Wang, Yongjun; Burris, Thomas P.; Kojetin, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors that play important roles in the regulation of circadian physiology, metabolism, and immune function. Although the REV-ERBs were originally characterized as orphan receptors, recent studies have demonstrated that they function as receptors for heme. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP) and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) are ligands that bind directly to the REV-ERBs. However, instead of mimicking the agonist action of heme, CoPP and ZnPP function as antagonists of REV-ERB function. This was unexpected because the only distinction between these ligands is the metal ion that is coordinated. To understand the structural basis by which REV-ERBβ can differentiate between a porphyrin agonist and antagonist, we characterized the interaction between REV-ERBβ with heme, CoPP, and ZnPP using biochemical and structural approaches, including x-ray crystallography and NMR. The crystal structure of CoPP-bound REV-ERBβ indicates only minor conformational changes induced by CoPP compared with heme, including the porphyrin ring of CoPP, which adopts a planar conformation as opposed to the puckered conformation observed in the heme-bound REV-ERBβ crystal structure. Thus, subtle changes in the porphyrin metal center and ring conformation may influence the agonist versus antagonist action of porphyrins and when considered with other studies suggest that gas binding to the iron metal center heme may drive alterations in REV-ERB activity. PMID:24872411

  18. Calcium binding to calmodulin mutants having domain-specific effects on the regulation of ion channels.

    PubMed

    VanScyoc, Wendy S; Newman, Rhonda A; Sorensen, Brenda R; Shea, Madeline A

    2006-12-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential, eukaryotic protein comprised of two highly homologous domains (N and C). CaM binds four calcium ions cooperatively, regulating a wide array of target proteins. A genetic screen of Paramecia by Kung [Kung, C. et al. (1992) Cell Calcium 13, 413-425] demonstrated that the domains of CaM have separable physiological roles: "under-reactive" mutations affecting calcium-dependent sodium currents mapped to the N-domain, while "over-reactive" mutations affecting calcium-dependent potassium currents localized to the C-domain of CaM. To determine whether and how these mutations affected intrinsic calcium-binding properties of CaM domains, phenylalanine fluorescence was used to monitor calcium binding to sites I and II (N-domain) and tyrosine fluorescence was used to monitor sites III and IV (C-domain). To explore interdomain interactions, binding properties of each full-length mutant were compared to those of its corresponding domain fragments. The calcium-binding properties of six under-reactive mutants (V35I/D50N, G40E, G40E/D50N, D50G, E54K, and G59S) and one over-reactive mutant (M145V) were indistinguishable from those of wild-type CaM, despite their deleterious physiological effects on ion-channel regulation. Four over-reactive mutants (D95G, S101F, E104K, and H135R) significantly decreased the calcium affinity of the C-domain. Of these, one (E104K) also increased the calcium affinity of the N-domain, demonstrating that the magnitude and direction of wild-type interdomain coupling had been perturbed. This suggests that, while some of these mutations alter calcium-binding directly, others probably alter CaM-channel association or calcium-triggered conformational change in the context of a ternary complex with the affected ion channel. PMID:17128970

  19. Structural and functional similarities between the nucleotide-binding domains of CFTR and GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, M R; Welsh, M J

    1995-01-01

    The opening and closing of the CFTR Cl- channel are regulated by ATP hydrolysis at its two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). However, the mechanism and functional significance of ATP hydrolysis are unknown. Sequence similarity between the NBDs of CFTR and GTP-binding proteins suggested the NBDs might have a structure and perhaps a function like that of GTP-binding proteins. Based on this similarity, we predicted that the terminal residue of the LSGGQ motif in the NBDs of CFTR corresponds to a highly conserved glutamine residue in GTP-binding proteins that directly catalyzes the GTPase reaction. Mutations of this residue in NBD1 or NBD2, which were predicted to increase or decrease the rate of hydrolysis, altered the duration of channel closed and open times in a specific manner without altering ion conduction properties or ADP-dependent inhibition. These results suggest that the NBDs of CFTR, and consequently other ABC transporters, may have a structure and a function analogous to those of GTP-binding proteins. We conclude that the rates of ATP hydrolysis at NBD1 and at NBD2 determine the duration of the two states of the channel, closed and open, much as the rate of GTP hydrolysis by GTP-binding proteins determines the duration of their active state. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:8599650

  20. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  1. Properties of the DNA-binding domain of the simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    McVey, D; Strauss, M; Gluzman, Y

    1989-01-01

    T antigen (Tag) from simian virus 40 binds specifically to two distinct sites in the viral origin of replication and to single-stranded DNA. Analysis of the protein domain responsible for these activities revealed the following. (i) The C-terminal boundary of the origin-specific and single-strand-specific DNA-binding domain is at or near amino acid 246; furthermore, the maximum of these DNA-binding activities coincides with a narrow C-terminal boundary, spanning 4 amino acids (246 to 249) and declines sharply in proteins with C termini which differ by a few (4 to 10) amino acids; (ii) a polypeptide spanning residues 132 to 246 of Tag is an independent domain responsible for origin-specific DNA binding and presumably for single-stranded DNA binding; and (iii) a comparison of identical N-terminal fragments of Tag purified from mammalian and bacterial cells revealed differential specificity and levels of activity between the two sources of protein. A role for posttranslational modification (phosphorylation) in controlling the DNA-binding activity of Tag is discussed. Images PMID:2555700

  2. Putative binding modes of Ku70-SAP domain with double strand DNA: a molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen; Pluth, Janice M; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-05-01

    The channel structure of the Ku protein elegantly reveals the mechanistic basis of sequence-independent DNA-end binding, which is essential to genome integrity after exposure to ionizing radiation or in V(D)J recombination. However, contradicting evidence indicates that this protein is also involved in the regulation of gene expression and in other regulatory processes with intact chromosomes. This computational study predicts that a putative DNA binding domain of this protein, the SAP domain, can form DNA-bound complexes with relatively high affinities (ΔG ≈ -20 kcal mol(-1)). The binding modes are searched by low frequency vibration modes driven by the fully flexible docking method while binding affinities are calculated by the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. We find this well defined 5 kDa domain with a helix-extended loop-helix structure is suitable to form favorable electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with either the major groove or the minor groove of DNA. The calculation also reveals the sequence specified binding preference which may relate to the observed pause sites when Ku translocates along DNA and the perplex binding of Ku with circular DNA. PMID:21947447

  3. Extensive Rigid Analogue Design Maps the Binding Conformation of Potent N-Benzylphenethylamine 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Agonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on the structure of the superpotent 5-HT2A agonist 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine, which consists of a ring-substituted phenethylamine skeleton modified with an N-benzyl group, we designed and synthesized a small library of constrained analogues to identify the optimal arrangement of the pharmacophoric elements of the ligand. Structures consisted of diversely substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines, piperidines, and one benzazepine. Based on the structure of (S,S)-9b, which showed the highest affinity of the series, we propose an optimal binding conformation. (S,S)-9b also displayed 124-fold selectivity for the 5-HT2A over the 5-HT2C receptor, making it the most selective 5-HT2A receptor agonist ligand currently known. PMID:23336049

  4. Critical VWF A1 Domain Residues Influence Type VI Collagen Binding

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Veronica H.; Gill, Joan Cox; Christopherson, Pamela A.; Bellissimo, Daniel B.; Friedman, Kenneth D.; Haberichter, Sandra L.; Lentz, Steven R.; Montgomery, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Von Willebrand factor (VWF) binds to subendothelial collagen at sites of vascular injury. Laboratory testing for von Willebrand disease (VWD), however, does not always include collagen binding assays (VWF:CB) and standard VWF:CB assays use type I and/or type III collagen rather than type VI collagen. Objectives We report here on several mutations that exclusively alter binding to type VI collagen. Patients/methods Healthy controls and index cases from the Zimmerman Program for the Molecular and Clinical Biology of VWD were analyzed for VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), VWF ristocetin cofactor activity, and VWF:CB with types I, III, and VI collagen. VWF gene sequencing was performed for all subjects. Results Two healthy controls and one type 1 VWD subject were heterozygous for an A1 domain sequence variation, R1399H, and displayed a selective decreased binding to type VI collagen but not types I and III. Expression of recombinant 1399H VWF resulted in absent binding to type VI collagen. Two other VWF A1 domain mutations, S1387I and Q1402P, displayed diminished binding to type VI collagen. An 11 amino acid deletion in the A1 domain also abrogated binding to type VI collagen. Conclusions VWF:CB may be useful in diagnosis of VWD, as a decreased VWF:CB/VWF:Ag ratio may reflect specific loss of collagen binding ability. Mutations that exclusively affect type VI collagen binding may be associated with bleeding, yet missed by current VWF testing. PMID:22507569

  5. Redox state of p63 and p73 core domains regulates sequence-specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Tichý, Vlastimil; Navrátilová, Lucie; Adámik, Matej; Fojta, Miroslav; Brázdová, Marie

    2013-04-19

    Cysteine oxidation and covalent modification of redox sensitive transcription factors including p53 are known, among others, as important events in cell response to oxidative stress. All p53 family proteins p53, p63 and p73 act as stress-responsive transcription factors. Oxidation of p53 central DNA binding domain destroys its structure and abolishes its sequence-specific binding by affecting zinc ion coordination at the protein-DNA interface. Proteins p63 and p73 can bind the same response elements as p53 but exhibit distinct functions. Moreover, all three proteins contain highly conserved cysteines in central DNA binding domain suitable for possible redox modulation. In this work we report for the first time the redox sensitivity of p63 and p73 core domains to a thiol oxidizing agent azodicarboxylic acid bis[dimethylamide] (diamide). Oxidation of both p63 and p73 abolished sequence-specific binding to p53 consensus sequence, depending on the agent concentration. In the presence of specific DNA all p53 family core domains were partially protected against loss of DNA binding activity due to diamide treatment. Furthermore, we detected conditional reversibility of core domain oxidation for all p53 family members and a role of zinc ions in this process. We showed that p63 and p73 proteins had greater ability to resist the diamide oxidation in comparison with p53. Our results show p63 and p73 as redox sensitive proteins with possible functionality in response of p53 family proteins to oxidative stress. PMID:23501101

  6. Matrix Domain Modulates HIV-1 Gag's Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity via Inositol Phosphate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher P.; Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Rein, Alan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Retroviruses replicate by reverse transcribing their single-stranded RNA genomes into double-stranded DNA using specific cellular tRNAs to prime cDNA synthesis. In HIV-1, human tRNA3Lys serves as the primer and is packaged into virions during assembly. The viral Gag protein is believed to chaperone tRNA3Lys placement onto the genomic RNA primer binding site; however, the timing and possible regulation of this event are currently unknown. Composed of the matrix (MA), capsid (CA), nucleocapsid (NC), and p6 domains, the multifunctional HIV-1 Gag polyprotein orchestrates the highly coordinated process of virion assembly, but the contribution of these domains to tRNA3Lys annealing is unclear. Here, we show that NC is absolutely essential for annealing and that the MA domain inhibits Gag's tRNA annealing capability. During assembly, MA specifically interacts with inositol phosphate (IP)-containing lipids in the plasma membrane (PM). Surprisingly, we find that IPs stimulate Gag-facilitated tRNA annealing but do not stimulate annealing in Gag variants lacking the MA domain or containing point mutations involved in PM binding. Moreover, we find that IPs prevent MA from binding to nucleic acids but have little effect on NC or Gag. We propose that Gag binds to RNA either with both NC and MA domains or with NC alone and that MA-IP interactions alter Gag's binding mode. We propose that MA's interactions with the PM trigger the switch between these two binding modes and stimulate Gag's chaperone function, which may be important for the regulation of events such as tRNA primer annealing. PMID:21123373

  7. Conserved SMP domains of the ERMES complex bind phospholipids and mediate tether assembly

    PubMed Central

    AhYoung, Andrew P.; Jiang, Jiansen; Zhang, Jiang; Khoi Dang, Xuan; Loo, Joseph A.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Egea, Pascal F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane contact sites (MCS) between organelles are proposed as nexuses for the exchange of lipids, small molecules, and other signals crucial to cellular function and homeostasis. Various protein complexes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial encounter structure (ERMES), function as dynamic molecular tethers between organelles. Here, we report the reconstitution and characterization of subcomplexes formed by the cytoplasm-exposed synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid-binding protein (SMP) domains present in three of the five ERMES subunits—the soluble protein Mdm12, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident membrane protein Mmm1, and the mitochondrial membrane protein Mdm34. SMP domains are conserved lipid-binding domains found exclusively in proteins at MCS. We show that the SMP domains of Mdm12 and Mmm1 associate into a tight heterotetramer with equimolecular stoichiometry. Our 17-Å-resolution EM structure of the complex reveals an elongated crescent-shaped particle in which two Mdm12 subunits occupy symmetric but distal positions at the opposite ends of a central ER-anchored Mmm1 homodimer. Rigid body fitting of homology models of these SMP domains in the density maps reveals a distinctive extended tubular structure likely traversed by a hydrophobic tunnel. Furthermore, these two SMP domains bind phospholipids and display a strong preference for phosphatidylcholines, a class of phospholipids whose exchange between the ER and mitochondria is essential. Last, we show that the three SMP-containing ERMES subunits form a ternary complex in which Mdm12 bridges Mmm1 to Mdm34. Our findings highlight roles for SMP domains in ERMES assembly and phospholipid binding and suggest a structure-based mechanism for the facilitated transport of phospholipids between organelles. PMID:26056272

  8. Differential polyubiquitin recognition by tandem ubiquitin binding domains of Rabex-5.

    PubMed

    Shin, Donghyuk; Lee, Sei Young; Han, Seungsoo; Ren, Shuo; Kim, Soyoun; Aikawa, Yoshikatsu; Lee, Sangho

    2012-07-13

    Linkage-specific polyubiquitination regulates many cellular processes. The N-terminal fragment of Rabex-5 (Rabex-5(9-73)) contains tandem ubiquitin binding domains: A20_ZF and MIU. The A20_ZF-MIU of Rabex-5 is known to bind monoubiquitin but molecular details of polyubiquitin binding affinity and linkage selectivity by Rabex-5(9-73) remain elusive. Here we report that Rabex-5(9-73) binds linear, K63- and K48-linked tetraubiquitin (Ub(4)) chains with K(d) of 0.1-1 μM, determined by biolayer interferometry. Mutational analysis of qualitative and quantitative binding data reveals that MIU is more important than A20_ZF in linkage-specific polyubiquitin recognition. MIU prefers binding to linear and K63-linked Ub(4) with sub μM affinities. However, A20_ZF recognizes the three linkage-specific Ub(4) with similar affinities with K(d) of 3-4 μM, unlike ZnF4 of A20. Taken together, our data suggest differential physiological roles of the two ubiquitin binding domains in Rabex-5. PMID:22705550

  9. The structural plasticity of SCA7 domains defines their differential nucleosome-binding properties

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Jacques; Wang, Ying-Hui; Spedale, Gianpiero; Atkinson, R Andrew; Romier, Christophe; Hamiche, Ali; Pijnappel, W W M Pim; Timmers, H Th Marc; Tora, László; Devys, Didier; Kieffer, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    SAGA (Spt–Ada–Gcn5 acetyltransferase), a coactivator complex involved in chromatin remodelling, harbours both histone acetylation and deubiquitination activities. ATXN7/Sgf73 and ATXN7L3, two subunits of the SAGA deubiquitination module, contain an SCA7 domain characterized by an atypical zinc-finger. We show that the yeast Sgf73–SCA7 domain is not required to recruit Sgf73 into SAGA. Instead, it binds to nucleosomes, a property that is conserved in the human ATXN7–SCA7 domain but is lost in the ATXN7L3 domain. The solution structures of the SCA7 domain of both ATXN7 and ATXN7L3 reveal a new, common zinc-finger motif at the heart of two distinct folds, providing a molecular basis for the observed functional differences. PMID:20634802

  10. Differential α4(+)/(-)β2 Agonist-binding Site Contributions to α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Function within and between Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Linda M; Weltzin, Maegan M; Eaton, J Brek; Cooper, John F; Lindstrom, Jon M; Lukas, Ronald J; Whiteaker, Paul

    2016-01-29

    Two α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4β2-nAChR) isoforms exist with (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2 subunit stoichiometries and high versus low agonist sensitivities (HS and LS), respectively. Both isoforms contain a pair of α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist-binding sites. The LS isoform also contains a unique α4(+)/(-)α4 site with lower agonist affinity than the α4(+)/(-)β2 sites. However, the relative roles of the conserved α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist-binding sites in and between the isoforms have not been studied. We used a fully linked subunit concatemeric nAChR approach to express pure populations of HS or LS isoform α4β2*-nAChR. This approach also allowed us to mutate individual subunit interfaces, or combinations thereof, on each isoform background. We used this approach to systematically mutate a triplet of β2 subunit (-)-face E-loop residues to their non-conserved α4 subunit counterparts or vice versa (β2HQT and α4VFL, respectively). Mutant-nAChR constructs (and unmodified controls) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Acetylcholine concentration-response curves and maximum function were measured using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Surface expression was measured with (125)I-mAb 295 binding and was used to define function/nAChR. If the α4(+)/(-)β2 sites contribute equally to function, making identical β2HQT substitutions at either site should produce similar functional outcomes. Instead, highly differential outcomes within the HS isoform, and between the two isoforms, were observed. In contrast, α4VFL mutation effects were very similar in all positions of both isoforms. Our results indicate that the identity of subunits neighboring the otherwise equivalent α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist sites modifies their contributions to nAChR activation and that E-loop residues are an important contributor to this neighbor effect. PMID:26644472

  11. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange.

    PubMed

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H; Gittens, William H; Townsend, Philip D; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2016-01-15

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  12. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H.; Gittens, William H.; Townsend, Philip D.; Sharples, Gary J.; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  13. ATP binding to the pseudokinase domain of JAK2 is critical for pathogenic activation.

    PubMed

    Hammarén, Henrik M; Ungureanu, Daniela; Grisouard, Jean; Skoda, Radek C; Hubbard, Stevan R; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-04-14

    Pseudokinases lack conserved motifs typically required for kinase activity. Nearly half of pseudokinases bind ATP, but only few retain phosphotransfer activity, leaving the functional role of nucleotide binding in most cases unknown. Janus kinases (JAKs) are nonreceptor tyrosine kinases with a tandem pseudokinase-kinase domain configuration, where the pseudokinase domain (JAK homology 2, JH2) has important regulatory functions and harbors mutations underlying hematological and immunological diseases. JH2 of JAK1, JAK2, and TYK2 all bind ATP, but the significance of this is unclear. We characterize the role of nucleotide binding in normal and pathogenic JAK signaling using comprehensive structure-based mutagenesis. Disruption of JH2 ATP binding in wild-type JAK2 has only minor effects, and in the presence of type I cytokine receptors, the mutations do not affect JAK2 activation. However, JH2 mutants devoid of ATP binding ameliorate the hyperactivation of JAK2 V617F. Disrupting ATP binding in JH2 also inhibits the hyperactivity of other pathogenic JAK2 mutants, as well as of JAK1 V658F, and prevents induction of erythrocytosis in a JAK2 V617F myeloproliferative neoplasm mouse model. Molecular dynamic simulations and thermal-shift analysis indicate that ATP binding stabilizes JH2, with a pronounced effect on the C helix region, which plays a critical role in pathogenic activation of JAK2. Taken together, our results suggest that ATP binding to JH2 serves a structural role in JAKs, which is required for aberrant activity of pathogenic JAK mutants. The inhibitory effect of abrogating JH2 ATP binding in pathogenic JAK mutants may warrant novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25825724

  14. Characterization of the fibrinogen binding domain of bacteriophage lysin from Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ho Seong; Sullam, Paul M

    2011-09-01

    The binding of bacteria to human platelets is a likely central mechanism in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. Platelet binding by Streptococcus mitis SF100 is mediated in part by a lysin encoded by the lysogenic bacteriophage SM1. In addition to its role in the phage life cycle, lysin mediates the binding of S. mitis to human platelets via its interaction with fibrinogen on the platelet surface. To better define the region of lysin mediating fibrinogen binding, we tested a series of purified lysin truncation variants for their abilities to bind this protein. These studies revealed that the fibrinogen binding domain of lysin is contained within the region spanned by amino acid residues 102 to 198 (lysin(102-198)). This region has no sequence homology to other known fibrinogen binding proteins. Lysin(102-198) bound fibrinogen comparably to full-length lysin and with the same selectivity for the fibrinogen Aα and Bβ chains. Lysin(102-198) also inhibited the binding in vitro of S. mitis to human fibrinogen and platelets. When assessed by platelet aggregometry, the disruption of the lysin gene in SF100 resulted in a significantly longer time to the onset of aggregation of human platelets than that of the parent strain. The preincubation of platelets with purified lysin(102-198) also delayed the onset of aggregation by SF100. These results indicate that the binding of lysin to fibrinogen is mediated by a specific domain of the phage protein and that this interaction is important for both platelet binding and aggregation by S. mitis. PMID:21690235

  15. A summary of staphylococcal C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcal peptidoglycan hydrolases are a potential new source of antimicrobials. A large subset of these proteins contain a C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domain that has been shown for some to be essential for accurate cell wall recognition and subsequent staphylolytic activity, propert...

  16. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Robson F; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2009-01-01

    The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan. PMID:19682383

  17. Conserved DNA binding and self-association domains of the Drosophila zeste protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J D; Chan, C S; Pirrotta, V

    1992-01-01

    The zeste gene product is involved in two types of genetic effects dependent on chromosome pairing: transvection and the zeste-white interaction. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence with that of the Drosophila virilis gene shows that several blocks of amino acid sequence have been very highly conserved. One of these regions corresponds to the DNA binding domain. Site-directed mutations in this region indicate that a sequence resembling that of the homeodomain DNA recognition helix is essential for DNA binding activity. The integrity of an amphipathic helical region is also essential for binding activity and is likely to be responsible for dimerization of the DNA binding domain. Another very strongly conserved domain of zeste is the C-terminal region, predicted to form a long helical structure with two sets of heptad repeats that constitute two long hydrophobic ridges at opposite ends and on opposite faces of the helix. We show that this domain is responsible for the extensive aggregation properties of zeste that are required for its role in transvection phenomena. A model is proposed according to which the hydrophobic ridges induce the formation of open-ended coiled-coil structures holding together many hundreds of zeste molecules and possibly anchoring these complexes to other nuclear structures. Images PMID:1732733

  18. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  19. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  20. A small cellulose binding domain protein in Phytophtora is cell wall localized

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose binding domains (CBD) are structurally conserved regions linked to catalytic regions of cellulolytic enzymes. While widespread amongst saprophytic fungi that subsist on plant cell wall polysaccharides, they are not generally present in plant pathogenic fungi. A genome wide survey of CBDs w...

  1. 1918 Influenza receptor binding domain variants bind and replicate in primary human airway cells regardless of receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Davis, A Sally; Chertow, Daniel S; Kindrachuk, Jason; Qi, Li; Schwartzman, Louis M; Suzich, Jon; Alsaaty, Sara; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2016-06-01

    The 1918 influenza pandemic caused ~50 million deaths. Many questions remain regarding the origin, pathogenicity, and mechanisms of human adaptation of this virus. Avian-adapted influenza A viruses preferentially bind α2,3-linked sialic acids (Sia) while human-adapted viruses preferentially bind α2,6-linked Sia. A change in Sia preference from α2,3 to α2,6 is thought to be a requirement for human adaptation of avian influenza viruses. Autopsy data from 1918 cases, however, suggest that factors other than Sia preference played a role in viral binding and entry to human airway cells. Here, we evaluated binding and entry of five 1918 influenza receptor binding domain variants in a primary human airway cell model along with control avian and human influenza viruses. We observed that all five variants bound and entered cells efficiently and that Sia preference did not predict entry of influenza A virus to primary human airway cells evaluated in this model. PMID:27062579

  2. Critical Role of Heparin Binding Domains of Ameloblastin for Dental Epithelium Cell Adhesion and Ameloblastoma Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Akira; Iwamoto, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Emiko; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yamada, Aya; Arakaki, Makiko; Harada, Hidemitsu; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Seiji; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Fukumoto, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    AMBN (ameloblastin) is an enamel matrix protein that regulates cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of ameloblasts. In AMBN-deficient mice, ameloblasts are detached from the enamel matrix, continue to proliferate, and form a multiple cell layer; often, odontogenic tumors develop in the maxilla with age. However, the mechanism of AMBN functions in these biological processes remains unclear. By using recombinant AMBN proteins, we found that AMBN had heparin binding domains at the C-terminal half and that these domains were critical for AMBN binding to dental epithelial cells. Overexpression of full-length AMBN protein inhibited proliferation of human ameloblastoma AM-1 cells, but overexpression of heparin binding domain-deficient AMBN protein had no inhibitory effect. In full-length AMBN-overexpressing AM-1 cells, the expression of Msx2, which is involved in the dental epithelial progenitor phenotype, was decreased, whereas the expression of cell proliferation inhibitors p21 and p27 was increased. We also found that the expression of enamelin, a marker of differentiated ameloblasts, was induced, suggesting that AMBN promotes odontogenic tumor differentiation. Thus, our results suggest that AMBN promotes cell binding through the heparin binding sites and plays an important role in preventing odontogenic tumor development by suppressing cell proliferation and maintaining differentiation phenotype through Msx2, p21, and p27. PMID:19648121

  3. Analysis of the hormone-binding domain of steroid receptors using chimeras generated by homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Danielsen, Mark . E-mail: dan@bc.georgetown.edu

    2005-08-15

    The glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor are members of the steroid receptor family that exhibit ligand cross-reactivity. Specificity of steroid receptor action is investigated in the present work by the construction and characterization of chimeras between the glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor. We used an innovative approach to make novel steroid receptor proteins in vivo that in general, contrary to our expectations, show increased ligand specificity compared to the parental receptors. We describe a receptor that is specific for the potent synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide and does not bind aldosterone. A further set of chimeras has an increased ability to discriminate between ligands, responding potently to mineralocorticoids and only very weakly to synthetic glucocorticoids. A chimera with the fusion site in the hinge highlights the importance of the region between the DNA-binding and the hormone-binding domains since, unlike both the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, it only responds to mineralocorticoids. One chimera has reduced specificity in that it acts as a general corticoid receptor, responding to glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids with similar potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that regions of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domains are functionally non-reciprocal. We present transcriptional, hormone-binding, and structure-modeling evidence that suggests that receptor-specific interactions within and across domains mediate aspects of specificity in transcriptional responses to steroids.

  4. A Prevalent Peptide-Binding Domain Guides Ribosomal Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Brandon J.; Hudson, Graham A.; Dunbar, Kyle L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a rapidly growing natural product class. RiPP precursor peptides can undergo extensive enzymatic tailoring, yielding structurally and functionally diverse products, and their biosynthetic logic makes them attractive bioengineering targets. Recent work suggests that unrelated RiPP modifying enzymes contain structurally similar precursor peptide-binding domains. Using profile hidden Markov model comparisons, we discovered related and previously unrecognized peptide-binding domains in proteins spanning the majority of known prokaryotic RiPP classes; thus, we named this conserved domain the RiPP precursor peptide recognition element (RRE). Through binding studies, we verify the role of the RRE for three distinct RiPP classes: linear azole-containing peptides, thiopeptides, and lasso peptides. Because numerous RiPP biosynthetic enzymes act on peptide substrates, our findings have powerful predictive value as to which protein(s) drive substrate binding, laying a foundation for further characterization of RiPP biosynthetic pathways and the rational engineering of new peptide-binding activities. PMID:26167873

  5. The Smc5-Smc6 heterodimer associates with DNA through several independent binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Marc-André; Dhanaraman, Thillaivillalan; D’Amours, Damien

    2015-01-01

    The Smc5-6 complex is required for the maintenance of genome integrity through its functions in DNA repair and chromosome biogenesis. However, the specific mode of action of Smc5 and Smc6 in these processes remains largely unknown. We previously showed that individual components of the Smc5-Smc6 complex bind strongly to DNA as monomers, despite the absence of a canonical DNA-binding domain (DBD) in these proteins. How heterodimerization of Smc5-6 affects its binding to DNA, and which parts of the SMC molecules confer DNA-binding activity is not known at present. To address this knowledge gap, we characterized the functional domains of the Smc5-6 heterodimer and identify two DBDs in each SMC molecule. The first DBD is located within the SMC hinge region and its adjacent coiled-coil arms, while the second is found in the conserved ATPase head domain. These DBDs can independently recapitulate the substrate preference of the full-length Smc5 and Smc6 proteins. We also show that heterodimerization of full-length proteins specifically increases the affinity of the resulting complex for double-stranded DNA substrates. Collectively, our findings provide critical insights into the structural requirements for effective binding of the Smc5-6 complex to DNA repair substrates in vitro and in live cells. PMID:25984708

  6. Nerve growth factor binding domain of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Welcher, A.A.; Bitler, C.M.; Radeke, M.J.; Shooter, E.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A structural analysis of the rat low-affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor was undertaken to define the NGF binding domain. Mutant NGF receptor DNA constructs were expressed in mouse fibroblasts or COS cells, and the ability of the mutant receptors to bind NGF was assayed. In the first mutant, all but 16 amino acid residues of the intracellular domain of the receptor were removed. This receptor bound NGF with a K{sub d} comparable to that of the wild-type receptor. A second mutant contained only the four cysteine-rich sequences from the extracellular portion of the protein. This mutant was expressed in COS cells and the resultant protein was a secreted soluble form of the receptor that was able to bind NGF. Two N-terminal deletions, in which either the first cystein-rich sequence or the first and part of the second cystein-rich sequences were removed, bound NGF. However, a mutant lacking all four cysteine-rich sequences was unable to bind NGF. These results show that the four cysteine-rich sequences of the NGF receptor contain the NGF binding domain.

  7. Optimal fusion of antibody binding domains resulted in higher affinity and wider specificity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinhua; Kojima, Tomoki; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Antibody is a very important protein in biotechnological and biomedical fields because of its high affinity and specificity to various antigens. Due to the rise of human antibody therapeutics, its cost-effective purification is an urgent issue for bio-industry. In this study, we made novel fusion proteins PAxPG with a flexible (DDAKK)n linker between the two Ig binding domains derived from Staphylococcus protein A and Streptococcus protein G. The fusion proteins bound human and mouse IgGs and their fragments with up to 58-times higher affinity and wider specificity than the parental binding domains. Interestingly, the optimal linker for human Fab fragment was n = 4, which was close to the modeled distance between the termini of domains bound to heavy chain, implying increased avidity as a possible mechanism. For binding to Fc, the longest n=6 linker gave the highest affinity, implying longer interchain distance between the two binding sites. The novel fusion protein with optimized interdomain linker length will be a useful tool for the purification and detection of various IgGs including mouse IgG1 that binds only weakly to natural protein A. PMID:25910963

  8. VHS domains of ESCRT-0 cooperate in high-avidity binding to polyubiquitinated cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xuefeng; Hurley, James H.

    2010-03-30

    VHS (Vps27, Hrs, and STAM) domains occur in ESCRT-0 subunits Hrs and STAM, GGA adapters, and other trafficking proteins. The structure of the STAM VHS domain-ubiquitin complex was solved at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, revealing that determinants for ubiquitin recognition are conserved in nearly all VHS domains. VHS domains from all classes of VHS-domain containing proteins in yeast and humans, including both subunits of ESCRT-0, bound ubiquitin in vitro. ESCRTs have been implicated in the sorting of Lys63-linked polyubiquitinated cargo. Intact human ESCRT-0 binds Lys63-linked tetraubiquitin 50-fold more tightly than monoubiquitin, though only 2-fold more tightly than Lys48-linked tetraubiquitin. The gain in affinity is attributed to the cooperation of flexibly connected VHS and UIM motifs of ESCRT-0 in avid binding to the polyubiquitin chain. Mutational analysis of all the five ubiquitin-binding sites in yeast ESCRT-0 shows that cooperation between them is required for the sorting of the Lys63-linked polyubiquitinated cargo Cps1 to the vacuole.

  9. The neurofibromin recruitment factor Spred1 binds to the GAP related domain without affecting Ras inactivation.

    PubMed

    Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Mercado, Ellen L; Maly, Karl; McCormick, Frank; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Legius syndrome are related diseases with partially overlapping symptoms caused by alterations of the tumor suppressor genes NF1 (encoding the protein neurofibromin) and SPRED1 (encoding sprouty-related, EVH1 domain-containing protein 1, Spred1), respectively. Both proteins are negative regulators of Ras/MAPK signaling with neurofibromin functioning as a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (GAP) and Spred1 acting on hitherto undefined components of the pathway. Importantly, neurofibromin has been identified as a key protein in the development of cancer, as it is genetically altered in a large number of sporadic human malignancies unrelated to NF1. Spred1 has previously been demonstrated to interact with neurofibromin via its N-terminal Ena/VASP Homology 1 (EVH1) domain and to mediate membrane translocation of its target dependent on its C-terminal Sprouty domain. However, the region of neurofibromin required for the interaction with Spred1 has remained unclear. Here we show that the EVH1 domain of Spred1 binds to the noncatalytic (GAPex) portion of the GAP-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin. Binding is compatible with simultaneous binding of Ras and does not interfere with GAP activity. Our study points to a potential targeting function of the GAPex subdomain of neurofibromin that is present in all known canonical RasGAPs. PMID:27313208

  10. Solution structure of the Drosha double-stranded RNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drosha is a nuclear RNase III enzyme that initiates processing of regulatory microRNA. Together with partner protein DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 (DGCR8), it forms the Microprocessor complex, which cleaves precursor transcripts called primary microRNA to produce hairpin precursor microRNA. In addition to two RNase III catalytic domains, Drosha contains a C-terminal double-stranded RNA-binding domain (dsRBD). To gain insight into the function of this domain, we determined the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure. Results We report here the solution structure of the dsRBD from Drosha (Drosha-dsRBD). The αβββα fold is similar to other dsRBD structures. A unique extended loop distinguishes this domain from other dsRBDs of known structure. Conclusions Despite uncertainties about RNA-binding properties of the Drosha-dsRBD, its structure suggests it retains RNA-binding features. We propose that this domain may contribute to substrate recognition in the Drosha-DGCR8 Microprocessor complex. PMID:20226070

  11. The neurofibromin recruitment factor Spred1 binds to the GAP related domain without affecting Ras inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Mercado, Ellen L.; Maly, Karl; McCormick, Frank; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Legius syndrome are related diseases with partially overlapping symptoms caused by alterations of the tumor suppressor genes NF1 (encoding the protein neurofibromin) and SPRED1 (encoding sprouty-related, EVH1 domain-containing protein 1, Spred1), respectively. Both proteins are negative regulators of Ras/MAPK signaling with neurofibromin functioning as a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (GAP) and Spred1 acting on hitherto undefined components of the pathway. Importantly, neurofibromin has been identified as a key protein in the development of cancer, as it is genetically altered in a large number of sporadic human malignancies unrelated to NF1. Spred1 has previously been demonstrated to interact with neurofibromin via its N-terminal Ena/VASP Homology 1 (EVH1) domain and to mediate membrane translocation of its target dependent on its C-terminal Sprouty domain. However, the region of neurofibromin required for the interaction with Spred1 has remained unclear. Here we show that the EVH1 domain of Spred1 binds to the noncatalytic (GAPex) portion of the GAP-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin. Binding is compatible with simultaneous binding of Ras and does not interfere with GAP activity. Our study points to a potential targeting function of the GAPex subdomain of neurofibromin that is present in all known canonical RasGAPs. PMID:27313208

  12. Identification of the Receptor-Binding Domain of the Spike Glycoprotein of Human Betacoronavirus HKU1

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiuyuan; Góes, Luiz Gustavo Bentim; Osborne, Christina; Castano, Anna; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coronavirus spike (S) glycoproteins mediate receptor binding, membrane fusion, and virus entry and determine host range. Murine betacoronavirus (β-CoV) in group A uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of S protein to bind to its receptor, whereas the β-CoVs severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV in group B and Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV in group C and several α-CoVs use the downstream C domain in their S proteins to recognize their receptor proteins. To identify the receptor-binding domain in the spike of human β-CoV HKU1 in group A, we generated and mapped a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the ectodomain of HKU1 spike protein. They did not cross-react with S proteins of any other CoV tested. Most of the HKU1 spike MAbs recognized epitopes in the C domain between amino acids 535 and 673, indicating that this region is immunodominant. Two of the MAbs blocked HKU1 virus infection of primary human tracheal-bronchial epithelial (HTBE) cells. Preincubation of HTBE cells with a truncated HKU1 S protein that includes the C domain blocked infection with HKU1 virus, but preincubation of cells with truncated S protein containing only the NTD did not block infection. These data suggest that the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of HKU1 spike protein is located in the C domain, where the spike proteins of α-CoVs and β-CoVs in groups B and C bind to their specific receptor proteins. Thus, two β-CoVs in group A, HKU1 and murine CoV, have evolved to use different regions of their spike glycoproteins to recognize their respective receptor proteins. IMPORTANCE Mouse hepatitis virus, a β-CoV in group A, uses the galectin-like NTD in its spike protein to bind its receptor protein, while HCoV-OC43, another β-CoV in group A, uses the NTD to bind to its sialic-acid containing receptor. In marked contrast, the NTD of the spike glycoprotein of human respiratory β-CoV HKU1, which is also in group A, does not bind sugar. In this study, we showed that for the

  13. Ezrin self-association involves binding of an N-terminal domain to a normally masked C-terminal domain that includes the F-actin binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Gary, R; Bretscher, A

    1995-01-01

    Ezrin is a membrane-cytoskeletal linking protein that is concentrated in actin-rich surface structures. It is closely related to the microvillar proteins radixin and moesin and to the tumor suppressor merlin/schwannomin. Cell extracts contain ezrin dimers and ezrin-moesin heterodimers in addition to monomers. Truncated ezrin fusion proteins were assayed by blot overlay to determine which regions mediate self-association. Here we report that ezrin self-association occurs by head-to-tail joining of distinct N-terminal and C-terminal domains. It is likely that these domains, termed N- and C-ERMADs (ezrin-radixin-moesin association domain), are responsible for homotypic and heterotypic associations among ERM family members. The N-ERMAD of ezrin resided within amino acids 1-296; deletion of 10 additional residues resulted in loss of activity. The C-ERMAD was mapped to the last 107 amino acids of ezrin, residues 479-585. The two residues at the C-terminus were required for activity, and the region from 530-585 was insufficient. The C-ERMAD was masked in the native monomer. Exposure of this domain required unfolding ezrin with sodium dodecyl sulfate or expressing the domain as part of a truncated protein. Intermolecular association could not occur unless the C-ERMAD had been made accessible to its N-terminal partner. It can be inferred that dimerization in vivo requires an activation step that exposes this masked domain. The conformationally inaccessible C-terminal region included the F-actin binding site, suggesting that this activity is likewise regulated by masking. Images PMID:7579708

  14. Solution structure of the DNA binding domain of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Lodi, P J; Ernst, J A; Kuszewski, J; Hickman, A B; Engelman, A; Craigie, R; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1995-08-01

    The solution structure of the DNA binding domain of HIV-1 integrase (residues 220-270) has been determined by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The protein is a dimer in solution, and each subunit is composed of a five-stranded beta-barrel with a topology very similar to that of the SH3 domain. The dimer is formed by a stacked beta-interface comprising strands 2, 3, and 4, with the two triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheets, one from each subunit, oriented antiparallel to each other. One surface of the dimer, bounded by the loop between strands beta 1 and beta 2, forms a saddle-shaped groove with dimensions of approximately 24 x 23 x 12 A in cross section. Lys264, which has been shown from mutational data to be involved in DNA binding, protrudes from this surface, implicating the saddle-shaped groove as the potential DNA binding site. PMID:7632683

  15. Eukaryotic RNases H1 act processively by interactions through the duplex RNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Gaidamakov, Sergei A.; Gorshkova, Inna I.; Schuck, Peter; Steinbach, Peter J.; Yamada, Hirofumi; Crouch, Robert J.; Cerritelli, Susana M.

    2005-01-01

    Ribonucleases H have mostly been implicated in eliminating short RNA primers used for initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Escherichia coli RNase HI cleaves these RNA–DNA hybrids in a distributive manner. We report here that eukaryotic RNases H1 have evolved to be processive enzymes by attaching a duplex RNA-binding domain to the RNase H region. Highly conserved amino acids of the duplex RNA-binding domain are required for processivity and nucleic acid binding, which leads to dimerization of the protein. The need for a processive enzyme underscores the importance in eukaryotic cells of processing long hybrids, most of which remain to be identified. However, long RNA–DNA hybrids formed during immunoglobulin class-switch recombination are potential targets for RNase H1 in the nucleus. In mitochondria, where RNase H1 is essential for DNA formation during embryogenesis, long hybrids may be involved in DNA replication. PMID:15831789

  16. Structure and VP16 binding of the Mediator Med25 activator interaction domain.

    PubMed

    Vojnic, Erika; Mourão, André; Seizl, Martin; Simon, Bernd; Wenzeck, Larissa; Larivière, Laurent; Baumli, Sonja; Baumgart, Karen; Meisterernst, Michael; Sattler, Michael; Cramer, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    Eukaryotic transcription is regulated by interactions between gene-specific activators and the coactivator complex Mediator. Here we report the NMR structure of the Mediator subunit Med25 (also called Arc92) activator interaction domain (ACID) and analyze the structural and functional interaction of ACID with the archetypical acidic transcription activator VP16. Unlike other known activator targets, ACID forms a seven-stranded β-barrel framed by three helices. The VP16 subdomains H1 and H2 bind to opposite faces of ACID and cooperate during promoter-dependent activated transcription in a in vitro system. The activator-binding ACID faces are functionally required and conserved among higher eukaryotes. Comparison with published activator structures reveals that the VP16 activation domain uses distinct interaction modes to adapt to unrelated target surfaces and folds that evolved for activator binding. PMID:21378965

  17. The extended arms of DNA-binding domains: a tale of tails.

    PubMed

    Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Dragan, Anatoly I; Privalov, Peter L

    2006-10-01

    DNA-binding domains (DBDs) frequently have N- or C-terminal tails, rich in lysine and/or arginine and disordered in free solution, that bind the DNA separately from and in the opposite groove to the folded domain. Is their role simply to increase affinity for DNA or do they have a role in specificity, that is, sequence recognition? One approach to answering this question is to analyze the contribution of such tails to the overall energetics of binding. It turns out that, despite similarities of amino acid sequence, three distinct categories of DBD extension exist: (i) those that are purely electrostatic and lack specificity, (ii) those that are largely non-electrostatic with a high contribution to specificity and (iii) those of mixed character that show sequence preference. Because in all cases the tails also increase the affinity for target DNA, they represent a crucial component of the machinery for selective gene activation or repression. PMID:16920361

  18. LINC Complexes Form by Binding of Three KASH Peptides to Domain Interfaces of Trimeric SUN Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa, Brian A.; Rothballer, Andrea; Kutay, Ulrike; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-08-31

    Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the nuclear envelope and are composed of KASH and SUN proteins residing in the outer and inner nuclear membrane, respectively. LINC formation relies on direct binding of KASH and SUN in the perinuclear space. Thereby, molecular tethers are formed that can transmit forces for chromosome movements, nuclear migration, and anchorage. We present crystal structures of the human SUN2-KASH1/2 complex, the core of the LINC complex. The SUN2 domain is rigidly attached to a trimeric coiled coil that prepositions it to bind three KASH peptides. The peptides bind in three deep and expansive grooves formed between adjacent SUN domains, effectively acting as molecular glue. In addition, a disulfide between conserved cysteines on SUN and KASH covalently links both proteins. The structure provides the basis of LINC complex formation and suggests a model for how LINC complexes might arrange into higher-order clusters to enhance force-coupling.

  19. Structural basis for selective binding of m6A RNA by the YTHDC1 YTH domain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Ke; Roundtree, Ian A; Tempel, Wolfram; Li, Yanjun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Min, Jinrong

    2014-11-01

    N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is the most abundant internal modification of nearly all eukaryotic mRNAs and has recently been reported to be recognized by the YTH domain family proteins. Here we present the crystal structures of the YTH domain of YTHDC1, a member of the YTH domain family, and its complex with an m(6)A-containing RNA. Our structural studies, together with transcriptome-wide identification of YTHDC1-binding sites and biochemical experiments, not only reveal the specific mode of m(6)A-YTH binding but also explain the preferential recognition of the GG(m(6)A)C sequences by YTHDC1. PMID:25242552

  20. Neutralization of Clostridium difficile toxin A with single-domain antibodies targeting the cell receptor binding domain.

    PubMed

    Hussack, Greg; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi; van Faassen, Henk; Songer, J Glenn; Ng, Kenneth K-S; MacKenzie, Roger; Tanha, Jamshid

    2011-03-18

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of nosocomial infection in North America and a considerable challenge to healthcare professionals in hospitals and nursing homes. The gram-positive bacterium produces two high molecular weight exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which are the major virulence factors responsible for C. difficile-associated disease and are targets for C. difficile-associated disease therapy. Here, recombinant single-domain antibody fragments (V(H)Hs), which specifically target the cell receptor binding domains of TcdA or TcdB, were isolated from an immune llama phage display library and characterized. Four V(H)Hs (A4.2, A5.1, A20.1, and A26.8), all shown to recognize conformational epitopes, were potent neutralizers of the cytopathic effects of toxin A on fibroblast cells in an in vitro assay. The neutralizing potency was further enhanced when V(H)Hs were administered in paired or triplet combinations at the same overall V(H)H concentration, suggesting recognition of nonoverlapping TcdA epitopes. Biacore epitope mapping experiments revealed that some synergistic combinations consisted of V(H)Hs recognizing overlapping epitopes, an indication that factors other than mere epitope blocking are responsible for the increased neutralization. Further binding assays revealed TcdA-specific V(H)Hs neutralized toxin A by binding to sites other than the carbohydrate binding pocket of the toxin. With favorable characteristics such as high production yield, potent toxin neutralization, and intrinsic stability, these V(H)Hs are attractive systemic therapeutics but are more so as oral therapeutics in the destabilizing environment of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21216961

  1. Proteolytic dissection of Zab, the Z-DNA-binding domain of human ADAR1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, T.; Lowenhaupt, K.; Kim, Y. G.; Li, L.; Brown, B. A. 2nd; Herbert, A.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Zalpha is a peptide motif that binds to Z-DNA with high affinity. This motif binds to alternating dC-dG sequences stabilized in the Z-conformation by means of bromination or supercoiling, but not to B-DNA. Zalpha is part of the N-terminal region of double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase (ADAR1), a candidate enzyme for nuclear pre-mRNA editing in mammals. Zalpha is conserved in ADAR1 from many species; in each case, there is a second similar motif, Zbeta, separated from Zalpha by a more divergent linker. To investigate the structure-function relationship of Zalpha, its domain structure was studied by limited proteolysis. Proteolytic profiles indicated that Zalpha is part of a domain, Zab, of 229 amino acids (residues 133-361 in human ADAR1). This domain contains both Zalpha and Zbeta as well as a tandem repeat of a 49-amino acid linker module. Prolonged proteolysis revealed a minimal core domain of 77 amino acids (positions 133-209), containing only Zalpha, which is sufficient to bind left-handed Z-DNA; however, the substrate binding is strikingly different from that of Zab. The second motif, Zbeta, retains its structural integrity only in the context of Zab and does not bind Z-DNA as a separate entity. These results suggest that Zalpha and Zbeta act as a single bipartite domain. In the presence of substrate DNA, Zab becomes more resistant to proteases, suggesting that it adopts a more rigid structure when bound to its substrate, possibly with conformational changes in parts of the protein.

  2. Nonspecific Binding Domains in Lipid Membranes Induced by Phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chia Yee; Han, Chung-Ta; Chao, Ling

    2016-07-12

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is a peripheral membrane protein that can hydrolyze phospholipids to produce lysolipids and fatty acids. It has been found to play crucial roles in various cellular processes and is thought as a potential candidate for triggering drug release from liposomes for medical treatment. Here, we directly observed that PLA2 hydrolysis reaction can induce the formation of PLA2-binding domains at lipid bilayer interface and found that the formation was significantly influenced by the fluidity of the lipid bilayer. We prepared supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) with various molar ratios of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) to adjust the reactivity and fluidity of the lipid bilayers. A significant amount of the PLA2-induced domains was observed in mixtures of DPPC and DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) but not in either pure DPPC or pure DOPC bilayer, which might be the reason that previous studies rarely observed these domains in lipid bilayer systems. The fluorescently labeled PLA2 experiment showed that newly formed domains acted as binding templates for PLA2. The AFM result showed that the induced domain has stepwise plateau structure, suggesting that PLA2 hydrolysis products may align as bilayers and accumulate layer by layer on the support, and the hydrophobic acyl chains at the side of the layer structure may be exposed to the outside aqueous environment. The introduced hydrophobic region could have hydrophobic interactions with proteins and therefore can attract the binding of not only PLA2 but also other types of proteins such as proteoglycans and streptavidin. The results suggest that the formation of PLA2-induced domains may convert part of a zwitterionic nonsticky lipid membrane to a site where biomolecules can nonspecifically bind. PMID:27218880

  3. Intragenic suppressors of Hsp70 mutants: Interplay between the ATPase- and peptide-binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Julie E.; Voisine, Cindy; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    1999-01-01

    ATP hydrolysis and polypeptide binding, the two key activities of Hsp70 molecular chaperones, are inherent properties of different domains of the protein. The coupling of these two activities is critical because the bound nucleotide determines, in part, the affinity of Hsp70s for protein substrate. In addition, cochaperones of the Hsp40 (DnaJ) class, which stimulate Hsp70 ATPase activity, have been proposed to play an important role in promoting efficient Hsp70 substrate binding. Because little is understood about this functional interaction between domains of Hsp70s, we investigated mutations in the region encoding the ATPase domain that acted as intragenic suppressors of a lethal mutation (I485N) mapping to the peptide-binding domain of the mitochondrial Hsp70 Ssc1. Analogous amino acid substitution in the ATPase domain of the Escherichia coli Hsp70 DnaK had a similar intragenic suppressive effect on the corresponding I462T temperature-sensitive peptide-binding domain mutation. I462T protein had a normal basal ATPase activity and was capable of nucleotide-dependent conformation changes. However, the reduced affinity of I462T for substrate peptide (and DnaJ) is likely responsible for the inability of I462T to function in vivo. The suppressor mutation (D79A) appears to partly alleviate the defect in DnaJ ATPase stimulation caused by I462T, suggesting that alteration in the interaction with DnaJ may alter the chaperone cycle to allow productive interaction with polypeptide substrates. Preservation of the intragenic suppression phenotypes between eukaryotic mitochondrial and bacterial Hsp70s suggests that the phenomenon studied here is a fundamental aspect of the function of Hsp70:Hsp40 chaperone machines. PMID:10430932

  4. Mutations in the nucleotide binding domain 1 signature motif region rescue processing and functional defects of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator delta f508.

    PubMed

    DeCarvalho, Ana C V; Gansheroff, Lisa J; Teem, John L

    2002-09-27

    The gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a phosphorylation- and nucleotide-regulated chloride channel, is mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Deletion of a phenylalanine at amino acid position 508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) is the most prevalent CF-causing mutation and results in defective protein processing and reduced CFTR function, leading to chloride impermeability in CF epithelia and heterologous systems. Using a STE6/CFTRDeltaF508 chimera system in yeast, we isolated two novel DeltaF508 revertant mutations, I539T and G550E, proximal to and within the conserved ABC signature motif of NBD1, respectively. Western blot and functional analysis in mammalian cells indicate that mutations I539T and G550E each partially rescue the CFTRDeltaF508 defect. Furthermore, a combination of both revertant mutations resulted in a 38-fold increase in CFTRDeltaF508-mediated chloride current, representing 29% of wild type channel activity. The G550E mutation increased the sensitivity of CFTRDeltaF508 and wild type CFTR to activation by cAMP agonists and blocked the enhancement of CFTRDeltaF508 channel activity by 2 mm 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. The data show that the DeltaF508 defect can be significantly rescued by second-site mutations in the nucleotide binding domain 1 region, that includes the LSGGQ consensus motif. PMID:12110684

  5. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  6. Gating of the CFTR Cl- channel by ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain dimerisation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sheppard, David N

    2009-05-15

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a fundamental role in fluid and electrolyte transport across epithelial tissues. Based on its structure, function and regulation, CFTR is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. These transporters are assembled from two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). In the vast majority of ABC transporters, the NBDs form a common engine that utilises the energy of ATP hydrolysis to pump a wide spectrum of substrates through diverse transmembrane pathways formed by the MSDs. By contrast, in CFTR the MSDs form a pathway for passive anion flow that is gated by cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis by the NBDs. Here, we consider how the interaction of ATP with two ATP-binding sites, formed by the NBDs, powers conformational changes in CFTR structure to gate the channel pore. We explore how conserved sequences from both NBDs form ATP-binding sites at the interface of an NBD dimer and highlight the distinct roles that each binding site plays during the gating cycle. Knowledge of how ATP gates the CFTR Cl- channel is critical for understanding CFTR's physiological role, its malfunction in disease and the mechanism of action of small molecules that modulate CFTR channel gating. PMID:19332488

  7. Gating of the CFTR Cl− channel by ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain dimerisation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sheppard, David N

    2009-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a fundamental role in fluid and electrolyte transport across epithelial tissues. Based on its structure, function and regulation, CFTR is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. These transporters are assembled from two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). In the vast majority of ABC transporters, the NBDs form a common engine that utilises the energy of ATP hydrolysis to pump a wide spectrum of substrates through diverse transmembrane pathways formed by the MSDs. By contrast, in CFTR the MSDs form a pathway for passive anion flow that is gated by cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis by the NBDs. Here, we consider how the interaction of ATP with two ATP-binding sites, formed by the NBDs, powers conformational changes in CFTR structure to gate the channel pore. We explore how conserved sequences from both NBDs form ATP-binding sites at the interface of an NBD dimer and highlight the distinct roles that each binding site plays during the gating cycle. Knowledge of how ATP gates the CFTR Cl− channel is critical for understanding CFTR's physiological role, its malfunction in disease and the mechanism of action of small molecules that modulate CFTR channel gating. PMID:19332488

  8. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Kaplan, David L; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-26

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  9. Structural Analysis of the Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known. The mechanism for entry into neuronal cells for serotypes A, B, E, F, and G involves a well understood dual receptor (protein and ganglioside) process, however, the mechanism of entry for serotypes C and D remains unclear. To provide structural insights into how BoNT/D enters neuronal cells, the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain (S863-E1276) for this serotype (BoNT/D-HCR) was determined at 1.65{angstrom} resolution. While BoNT/D-HCR adopts an overall fold similar to that observed in other known BoNT HCRs, several major structural differences are present. These structural differences are located at, or near, putative receptor binding sites and may be responsible for BoNT/D host preferences. Two loops, S1195-I1204 and K1236-N1244, located on both sides of the putative protein receptor binding pocket, are displaced >10{angstrom} relative to the corresponding residues in the crystal structures of BoNT/B and G. Obvious clashes were observed in the putative protein receptor binding site when the BoNT/B protein receptor synaptotagmin II was modeled into the BoNT/D-HCR structure. Although a ganglioside binding site has never been unambiguously identified in BoNT/D-HCR, a shallow cavity in an analogous location to the other BoNT serotypes HCR domains is observed in BoNT/D-HCR that has features compatible with membrane binding. A portion of a loop near the putative receptor binding site, K1236-N1244, is hydrophobic and solvent-exposed and may directly bind membrane lipids. Liposome-binding experiments with BoNT/D-HCR demonstrate that this membrane lipid may be phosphatidylethanolamine.

  10. Structural analysis of the receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Lin; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2010-10-28

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known. The mechanism for entry into neuronal cells for serotypes A, B, E, F, and G involves a well understood dual receptor (protein and ganglioside) process, however, the mechanism of entry for serotypes C and D remains unclear. To provide structural insights into how BoNT/D enters neuronal cells, the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain (S863-E1276) for this serotype (BoNT/D-HCR) was determined at 1.65 Å resolution. While BoNT/D-HCR adopts an overall fold similar to that observed in other known BoNT HCRs, several major structural differences are present. These structural differences are located at, or near, putative receptor binding sites and may be responsible for BoNT/D host preferences. Two loops, S1195-I1204 and K1236-N1244, located on both sides of the putative protein receptor binding pocket, are displaced >10 Å relative to the corresponding residues in the crystal structures of BoNT/B and G. Obvious clashes were observed in the putative protein receptor binding site when the BoNT/B protein receptor synaptotagmin II was modeled into the BoNT/D-HCR structure. Although a ganglioside binding site has never been unambiguously identified in BoNT/D-HCR, a shallow cavity in an analogous location to the other BoNT serotypes HCR domains is observed in BoNT/D-HCR that has features compatible with membrane binding. A portion of a loop near the putative receptor binding site, K1236-N1244, is hydrophobic and solvent-exposed and may directly bind membrane lipids. Liposome-binding experiments with BoNT/D-HCR demonstrate that this membrane lipid may be phosphatidylethanolamine.

  11. The exomer cargo adaptor structure reveals a novel GTPase-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Jon E; Richardson, Brian C; Strassner, Amanda M; Fromme, J Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Cargo adaptors control intracellular trafficking of transmembrane proteins by sorting them into membrane transport carriers. The COPI, COPII, and clathrin cargo adaptors are structurally well characterized, but other cargo adaptors remain poorly understood. Exomer is a specialized cargo adaptor that sorts specific proteins into trans-Golgi network (TGN)-derived vesicles in response to cellular signals. Exomer is recruited to the TGN by the Arf1 GTPase, a universally conserved trafficking regulator. Here, we report the crystal structure of a tetrameric exomer complex composed of two copies each of the Chs5 and Chs6 subunits. The structure reveals the FN3 and BRCT domains of Chs5, which together we refer to as the FBE domain (FN3–BRCT of exomer), project from the exomer core complex. The overall architecture of the FBE domain is reminiscent of the appendage domains of other cargo adaptors, although it exhibits a distinct topology. In contrast to appendage domains, which bind accessory factors, we show that the primary role of the FBE domain is to bind Arf1 for recruitment of exomer to membranes. PMID:23000721

  12. Use of cellulases and recombinant cellulose binding domains for refining TCF kraft pulp.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Edith M; Chriac, A Iulia; Pastor, F I Javier; Diaz, Pilar; Vidal, Teresa; Torres, Antonio L

    2010-01-01

    The modular endoglucanase Cel9B from Paenibacillus barcinonensis is a highly efficient biocatalyst, which expedites pulp refining and reduces the associated energy costs as a result. In this work, we set out to identify the specific structural domain or domains responsible for the action of this enzyme on cellulose fibre surfaces with a view to facilitating the development of new cellulases for optimum biorefining. Using the recombinant enzymes GH9-CBD3c, Fn3-CBD3b, and CBD3b, which are truncated forms of Cel9B, allowed us to assess the individual effects of the catalytic, cellulose binding, and fibronectin-like domains of the enzyme on the refining of TCF kraft pulp from Eucalyptus globulus. Based on the physico-mechanical properties obtained, the truncated form containing the catalytic domain (GH9-CBD3c) has a strong effect on fibre morphology. Comparing its effect with that of the whole cellulase (Cel9B) revealed that the truncated enzyme contributes to increasing paper strength through improved tensile strength and burst strength and also that the truncated form is more effective than the whole enzyme in improving tear resistance. Therefore, the catalytic domain of Cel9B has biorefining action on pulp. Although cellulose binding domains (CBDs) are less efficient toward pulp refining, evidence obtained in this work suggests that CBD3b alters fibre surfaces and influences paper properties as a result. PMID:20730755

  13. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J.; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  14. In silico identification and pharmacological evaluation of novel endocrine disrupting chemicals that act via the ligand-binding domain of the estrogen receptor α.

    PubMed

    McRobb, Fiona M; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-09-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) pose a significant threat to human health, society, and the environment. Many EDCs elicit their toxic effects through nuclear hormone receptors, like the estrogen receptor α (ERα). In silico models can be used to prioritize chemicals for toxicological evaluation to reduce the amount of costly pharmacological testing and enable early alerts for newly designed compounds. However, many of the current computational models are overly dependent on the chemistry of known modulators and perform poorly for novel chemical scaffolds. Herein we describe the development of computational, three-dimensional multi-conformational pocket-field docking, and chemical-field docking models for the identification of novel EDCs that act via the ligand-binding domain of ERα. These models were highly accurate in the retrospective task of distinguishing known high-affinity ERα modulators from inactive or decoy molecules, with minimal training. To illustrate the utility of the models in prospective in silico compound screening, we screened a database of over 6000 environmental chemicals and evaluated the 24 top-ranked hits in an ERα transcriptional activation assay and a differential scanning fluorimetry-based ERα binding assay. Promisingly, six chemicals displayed ERα agonist activity (32nM-3.98μM) and two chemicals had moderately stabilizing effects on ERα. Two newly identified active compounds were chemically related β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists, dobutamine, and ractopamine (a feed additive that promotes leanness in cattle and poultry), which are the first βAR agonists identified as activators of ERα-mediated gene transcription. This approach can be applied to other receptors implicated in endocrine disruption. PMID:24928891

  15. In Silico Identification and Pharmacological Evaluation of Novel Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals That Act via the Ligand-Binding Domain of the Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) pose a significant threat to human health, society, and the environment. Many EDCs elicit their toxic effects through nuclear hormone receptors, like the estrogen receptor α (ERα). In silico models can be used to prioritize chemicals for toxicological evaluation to reduce the amount of costly pharmacological testing and enable early alerts for newly designed compounds. However, many of the current computational models are overly dependent on the chemistry of known modulators and perform poorly for novel chemical scaffolds. Herein we describe the development of computational, three-dimensional multi-conformational pocket-field docking, and chemical-field docking models for the identification of novel EDCs that act via the ligand-binding domain of ERα. These models were highly accurate in the retrospective task of distinguishing known high-affinity ERα modulators from inactive or decoy molecules, with minimal training. To illustrate the utility of the models in prospective in silico compound screening, we screened a database of over 6000 environmental chemicals and evaluated the 24 top-ranked hits in an ERα transcriptional activation assay and a differential scanning fluorimetry-based ERα binding assay. Promisingly, six chemicals displayed ERα agonist activity (32nM–3.98μM) and two chemicals had moderately stabilizing effects on ERα. Two newly identified active compounds were chemically related β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists, dobutamine, and ractopamine (a feed additive that promotes leanness in cattle and poultry), which are the first βAR agonists identified as activators of ERα-mediated gene transcription. This approach can be applied to other receptors implicated in endocrine disruption. PMID:24928891

  16. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

    PubMed Central

    Badireddy, Suguna; Rajendran, Abinaya; Anand, Ganesh Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP) metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain). In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins. PMID:25922789

  17. Conformational States and Kinetics of the Calcium Binding Domain of NADPH Oxidase 5

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Motl, Nicole; Levek, Kelli; Chen, Liu Qi; Yang, Ya-Ping; Johnson, Tremylla; Hamilton, Lindsey; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2010-01-01

    Superoxide generated by human NADPH oxidase 5 (NOX5) is of growing importance for various physiological and pathological processes. The activity of NOX5 appears to be regulated by a self-contained Ca2+ binding domain (CaBD). Recently Bánfi et al. suggest that the conformational change of CaBD upon Ca2+ binding is essential for domain-domain interaction and superoxide production. The authors studied its structural change using intrinsic Trp fluorescence and hydrophobic dye binding; however, their conformational study was not thorough and the kinetics of metal binding was not demonstrated. Here we generated the recombinant CaBD and an E99Q/E143Q mutant to characterize them using fluorescence spectroscopy. Ca2+ binding to CaBD induces a conformational change that exposes hydrophobic patches and increases the quenching accessibilities of its Trp residues and AEDANS at Cys107. The circular dichroism spectra indicated no significant changes in the secondary structures of CaBD upon metal binding. Stopped-flow spectrometry revealed a fast Ca2+ dissociation from the N-terminal half, followed by a slow Ca2+ dissociation from the C-terminal half. Combined with a chemical stability study, we concluded that the C-terminal half of CaBD has a higher Ca2+ binding affinity, a higher chemical stability, and a slow Ca2+ dissociation. The Mg2+-bound CaBD was also investigated and the results indicate that its structure is similar to the apo form. The rate of Mg2+ dissociation was close to that of Ca2+ dissociation. Our data suggest that the N- and C-terminal halves of CaBD are not completely structurally independent. PMID:20648216

  18. A Low Affinity Ground State Conformation for the Dynein Microtubule Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Lynn; Tikhonenko, Irina; Banavali, Nilesh K.; LeMaster, David M.; Koonce, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Dynein interacts with microtubules through a dedicated binding domain that is dynamically controlled to achieve high or low affinity, depending on the state of nucleotide bound in a distant catalytic pocket. The active sites for microtubule binding and ATP hydrolysis communicate via conformational changes transduced through a ∼10-nm length antiparallel coiled-coil stalk, which connects the binding domain to the roughly 300-kDa motor core. Recently, an x-ray structure of the murine cytoplasmic dynein microtubule binding domain (MTBD) in a weak affinity conformation was published, containing a covalently constrained β+ registry for the coiled-coil stalk segment (Carter, A. P., Garbarino, J. E., Wilson-Kubalek, E. M., Shipley, W. E., Cho, C., Milligan, R. A., Vale, R. D., and Gibbons, I. R. (2008) Science 322, 1691–1695). We here present an NMR analysis of the isolated MTBD from Dictyostelium discoideum that demonstrates the coiled-coil β+ registry corresponds to the low energy conformation for this functional region of dynein. Addition of sequence encoding roughly half of the coiled-coil stalk proximal to the binding tip results in a decreased affinity of the MTBD for microtubules. In contrast, addition of the complete coiled-coil sequence drives the MTBD to the conformationally unstable, high affinity binding state. These results suggest a thermodynamic coupling between conformational free energy differences in the α and β+ registries of the coiled-coil stalk that acts as a switch between high and low affinity conformations of the MTBD. A balancing of opposing conformations in the stalk and MTBD enables potentially modest long-range interactions arising from ATP binding in the motor core to induce a relaxation of the MTBD into the stable low affinity state. PMID:20351100

  19. A Complete Backbone Assignment of the Apolipoprotein E LDL Receptor Binding Domain [Letter to the Editor

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Chao; Sivashanmugam, Arun; Hoyt, David W.; Wang, Jianjun

    2005-06-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a 299-residue exchangeable apolipoprotein that was initially recognized as a major determinant in lipoprotein metabolism and cardiovascular diseases. Recent evidence has indicated that apoE also plays critical roles in several other important biological processes not directly related to its lipid transport function, including Alzheimer's disease, cognitive function, immunoregulation, cell signaling, and possibly even infectious diseases. ApoE contains two structural/functional domains: A N-terminal domain spanning residues 1-191 that is responsible for apoE's LDL receptor binding activity and a C-terminal domain (residues 216-199) that is responsible for lipoprotein-binding (1). The x-ray crystal structure of the lipid-free apoE N-terminal domain was solved by Wilson et al in 1991 which represented the only high-resolution structure of this protein. This structure showed an unusually elongated four-helix bundle (2) that was organized in such 2 a way that its hydrophobic faces were directed towards the protein interior, whereas the hydrophilic faces were oriented towards the solvent. The major receptor-binding region, residues 130-150, was located on the fourth helix. The amphipathic a-helices were connected by short loops, giving rise to a compact, globular structure. However, this structure only contained residues 23-165. Recent studies have shown that residues beyond residues 23-165 are also very important to the apoE LDL receptor binding activity. For example, a mutation at position R172 reduces the receptor binding activity of apoE to only {approx}2% (3). In addition, an E3K mutant significantly increased the apoE receptor binding activity as well (4). While the x-ray crystal structure of the apoE N-terminal domain provided detailed structural information for most region of this domain, this structure does not provide an explanation of the above experimental results regarding the structural contribution to apoE's LDL receptor

  20. Functional characterization of spectrin-actin-binding domains in 4.1 family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Gimm, J Aura; An, Xiuli; Nunomura, Wataru; Mohandas, Narla

    2002-06-11

    Protein 4.1R is the prototypical member of a protein family that includes 4.1G, 4.1B, and 4.1N. 4.1R plays a crucial role in maintaining membrane mechanical integrity by binding cooperatively to spectrin and actin through its spectrin-actin-binding (SAB) domain. While the binary interaction between 4.1R and spectrin has been well characterized, the actin binding site in 4.1R remains unidentified. Moreover, little is known about the interaction of 4.1R homologues with spectrin and actin. In the present study, we showed that the 8 aa motif (LKKNFMES) within the 10 kDa spectrin-actin-binding domain of 4.1R plays a critical role in binding of 4.1R to actin. Recombinant 4.1R SAB domain peptides with mutations in this motif showed a marked decrease in their ability to form ternary complexes with spectrin and actin. Binary protein-protein interaction studies revealed that this decrease resulted from the inability of mutant SAB peptides to bind to actin filaments while affinity for spectrin was unchanged. We also documented that the 14 C-terminal residues of the 21 amino acid cassette encoded by exon 16 in conjunction with residues 27-43 encoded by exon 17 constituted a fully functional minimal spectrin-binding motif. Finally, we showed that 4.1N SAB domain was unable to form a ternary complex with spectrin and actin, while 4.1G and 4.1B SAB domains were able to form such a complex but less efficiently than 4.1R SAB. This was due to a decrease in the ability of 4.1G and 4.1B SAB domain to interact with actin but not with spectrin. These data enabled us to propose a model for the 4.1R-spectrin-actin ternary complex which may serve as a general paradigm for regulation of spectrin-based cytoskeleton interaction in various cell types. PMID:12044158

  1. Agonist binding to β-adrenergic receptors on human airway epithelial cells inhibits migration and wound repair.

    PubMed

    Peitzman, Elizabeth R; Zaidman, Nathan A; Maniak, Peter J; O'Grady, Scott M

    2015-12-15

    Human airway epithelial cells express β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs), which regulate mucociliary clearance by stimulating transepithelial anion transport and ciliary beat frequency. Previous studies using airway epithelial cells showed that stimulation with isoproterenol increased cell migration and wound repair by a cAMP-dependent mechanism. In the present study, impedance-sensing arrays were used to measure cell migration and epithelial restitution following wounding of confluent normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and Calu-3 cells by electroporation. Stimulation with epinephrine or the β2-AR-selective agonist salbutamol significantly delayed wound closure and reduced the mean surface area of lamellipodia protruding into the wound. Treatment with the β-AR bias agonist carvedilol or isoetharine also produced a delay in epithelial restitution similar in magnitude to epinephrine and salbutamol. Measurements of extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation following salbutamol or carvedilol stimulation showed no significant change in the level of phosphorylation compared with untreated control cells. However, inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A activity completely blocked the delay in wound closure produced by β-AR agonists. In Calu-3 cells, where CFTR expression was inhibited by RNAi, salbutamol did not inhibit wound repair, suggesting that β-AR agonist stimulation and loss of CFTR function share a common pathway leading to inhibition of epithelial repair. Confocal images of the basal membrane of Calu-3 cells labeled with anti-β1-integrin (clone HUTS-4) antibody showed that treatment with epinephrine or carvedilol reduced the level of activated integrin in the membrane. These findings suggest that treatment with β-AR agonists delays airway epithelial repair by a G protein- and cAMP-independent mechanism involving protein phosphatase 2A and a reduction in β1-integrin activation in the basal membrane. PMID:26491049

  2. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  3. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  4. Recombinant preparation and functional studies of EspI ATP binding domain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanyu; Wang, Huilin; Sun, Tao; Tian, Shuangliang; Lin, Donghai; Guo, Chenyun

    2016-07-01

    The ESX-1 secretion system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is required for the virulence of tubercle bacillus. EspI, the ESX-1 secretion-associated protein in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtEspI), is involved in repressing the activity of ESX-1-mediated secretion when the cellular ATP level is low. The ATP binding domain of MtEspI plays a crucial role in this regulatory process. However, further structural and functional studies of MtEspI are hindered due to the bottleneck of obtaining stable and pure recombinant protein. In this study, we systematically analyzed the structure and function of MtEspI using bioinformatics tools and tried various expression constructs to recombinantly express full-length and truncated MtEspI ATP binding domain. Finally, we prepared pure and stable MtEspI ATP binding domain, MtEspI415-493, in Escherichia coli by fusion expression and purification with dual tag, Glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag and (His)6 tag. (31)P NMR titration assay indicated that MtEspI415-493 possessed a moderate affinity (∼μM) for ATP and the residue K425 was located at the binding site. The protocol described here may provide a train of thought for recombinant preparation of other ESX-1 secretion-associated proteins. PMID:27017992

  5. Evolutionary history of redox metal-binding domains across the tree of life.

    PubMed

    Harel, Arye; Bromberg, Yana; Falkowski, Paul G; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2014-05-13

    Oxidoreductases mediate electron transfer (i.e., redox) reactions across the tree of life and ultimately facilitate the biologically driven fluxes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur on Earth. The core enzymes responsible for these reactions are ancient, often small in size, and highly diverse in amino acid sequence, and many require specific transition metals in their active sites. Here we reconstruct the evolution of metal-binding domains in extant oxidoreductases using a flexible network approach and permissive profile alignments based on available microbial genome data. Our results suggest there were at least 10 independent origins of redox domain families. However, we also identified multiple ancient connections between Fe2S2- (adrenodoxin-like) and heme- (cytochrome c) binding domains. Our results suggest that these two iron-containing redox families had a single common ancestor that underwent duplication and divergence. The iron-containing protein family constitutes ∼50% of all metal-containing oxidoreductases and potentially catalyzed redox reactions in the Archean oceans. Heme-binding domains seem to be derived via modular evolutionary processes that ultimately form the backbone of redox reactions in both anaerobic and aerobic respiration and photosynthesis. The empirically discovered network allows us to peer into the ancient history of microbial metabolism on our planet. PMID:24778258

  6. Evolutionary history of redox metal-binding domains across the tree of life

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Arye; Bromberg, Yana; Falkowski, Paul G.; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2014-01-01

    Oxidoreductases mediate electron transfer (i.e., redox) reactions across the tree of life and ultimately facilitate the biologically driven fluxes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur on Earth. The core enzymes responsible for these reactions are ancient, often small in size, and highly diverse in amino acid sequence, and many require specific transition metals in their active sites. Here we reconstruct the evolution of metal-binding domains in extant oxidoreductases using a flexible network approach and permissive profile alignments based on available microbial genome data. Our results suggest there were at least 10 independent origins of redox domain families. However, we also identified multiple ancient connections between Fe2S2- (adrenodoxin-like) and heme- (cytochrome c) binding domains. Our results suggest that these two iron-containing redox families had a single common ancestor that underwent duplication and divergence. The iron-containing protein family constitutes ∼50% of all metal-containing oxidoreductases and potentially catalyzed redox reactions in the Archean oceans. Heme-binding domains seem to be derived via modular evolutionary processes that ultimately form the backbone of redox reactions in both anaerobic and aerobic respiration and photosynthesis. The empirically discovered network allows us to peer into the ancient history of microbial metabolism on our planet. PMID:24778258

  7. A Novel Kinesin-Like Protein with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse developmental processes in plants through the action of calmodulin. A cDNA expression library from developing anthers of tobacco was screened with S-35-labeled calmodulin to isolate cDNAs encoding calmodulin-binding proteins. Among several clones isolated, a kinesin-like gene (TCK1) that encodes a calmodulin-binding kinesin-like protein was obtained. The TCK1 cDNA encodes a protein with 1265 amino acid residues. Its structural features are very similar to those of known kinesin heavy chains and kinesin-like proteins from plants and animals, with one distinct exception. Unlike other known kinesin-like proteins, TCK1 contains a calmodulin-binding domain which distinguishes it from all other known kinesin genes. Escherichia coli-expressed TCK1 binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In addition to the presence of a calmodulin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal, it also has a leucine zipper motif in the stalk region. The amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminal of TCK1 has striking homology with the mechanochemical motor domain of kinesins. The motor domain has ATPase activity that is stimulated by microtubules. Southern blot analysis revealed that TCK1 is coded by a single gene. Expression studies indicated that TCKI is expressed in all of the tissues tested. Its expression is highest in the stigma and anther, especially during the early stages of anther development. Our results suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin may play an important role in the function of this microtubule-associated motor protein and may be involved in the regulation of microtubule-based intracellular transport.

  8. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of the DNA-binding domain of FOXP1: Insight into its domain swapping and DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yuan-Ping; Chang, Chia-Hao; Shiu, Jia-Hau; Chang, Yao-Tsung; Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2011-01-01

    FOXP1 belongs to the P-subfamily of forkhead transcription factors and contains a conserved forkhead DNA-binding domain. According to size exclusion chromatography analysis, the forkhead domain of FOXP1 existed as a mixture of monomer and dimer. The dissociation constants of the forkhead domain of wild-type, C61S, and C61Y mutants of FOXP1 were 27.3, 28.8, and 332.0 μM, respectively. In contrast, FOXP1 A39P mutant formed only a monomer. NMR analysis also showed that FOXP1 C61S and C61Y mutants existed as a mixture. The solution structure of FOXP1 A39P/C61Y mutant was similar to the X-ray structure of the FOXP2 monomer. Comparison of backbone dynamics of FOXP1 A39P/C61Y and C61Y mutants showed that the residues preceding helix 3, the hinge region, exhibited the largest conformational exchange in FOXP1 monomer. The A39 residue of FOXP1 dimer has a lower order parameter with internal motion on the ps-ns timescale, suggesting that the dynamics of the hinge region of FOXP1 are important in the formation of the swapped dimer. The analysis also showed that the residues exhibiting the motions on the ps-ns and μs-ms timescales were located at the DNA-binding surface of FOXP1, suggesting the interactions between FOXP1 and DNA may be highly dynamic. PMID:21416545

  9. The structure of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding , glycosylated F-spondin domain of F-spondin- A C2-domain variant in an extracellular matrix protein.

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Lawler, J.

    2011-05-10

    F-spondin is a multi-domain extracellular matrix (ECM) protein and a contact-repellent molecule that directs axon outgrowth and cell migration during development. The reelin{_}N domain and the F-spondin domain (FS domain) comprise a proteolytic fragment that interacts with the cell membrane and guides the projection of commissural axons to floor plate. The FS domain is found in F-spondins, mindins, M-spondin and amphiF-spondin. We present the crystal structure of human F-spondin FS domain at 1.95{angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals a Ca{sup 2+}-binding C2 domain variant with an 8-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sandwich fold. Though the primary sequences of the FS domains of F-spondin and mindin are less than 36% identical, their overall structures are very similar. The unique feature of F-spondin FS domain is the presence of three disulfide bonds associated with the N- and C-termini of the domain and a highly conserved N-linked glycosylation site. The integrin-binding motif found in mindin is not conserved in the F-spondin FS domain. The structure of the F-spondin FS domain completes the structural studies of the multiple-domain ECM molecule. The homology of its core structure to a common Ca{sup 2+}- and lipid-binding C2 domain suggests that the F-spondin FS domain may be responsible for part of the membrane targeting of F-spondin in its regulation of axon development. The structural properties of the FS domain revealed in this study pave the way for further exploration into the functions of F-spondin.

  10. Structure of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein copper-binding domain at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Geoffrey Kwai-Wai; Adams, Julian J.; Cappai, Roberto; Parker, Michael W.

    2007-10-01

    An atomic resolution structure of the copper-binding domain of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein is presented. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, as its cleavage generates the Aβ peptide that is toxic to cells. APP is able to bind Cu{sup 2+} and reduce it to Cu{sup +} through its copper-binding domain (CuBD). The interaction between Cu{sup 2+} and APP leads to a decrease in Aβ production and to alleviation of the symptoms of the disease in mouse models. Structural studies of CuBD have been undertaken in order to better understand the mechanism behind the process. Here, the crystal structure of CuBD in the metal-free form determined to ultrahigh resolution (0.85 Å) is reported. The structure shows that the copper-binding residues of CuBD are rather rigid but that Met170, which is thought to be the electron source for Cu{sup 2+} reduction, adopts two different side-chain conformations. These observations shed light on the copper-binding and redox mechanisms of CuBD. The structure of CuBD at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of molecules that will deplete Aβ production.

  11. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains

    PubMed Central

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states. PMID:27160511

  12. Deciphering the unconventional peptide binding to the PDZ domain of MAST2.

    PubMed

    Delhommel, Florent; Chaffotte, Alain; Terrien, Elouan; Raynal, Bertrand; Buc, Henri; Delepierre, Muriel; Cordier, Florence; Wolff, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and microtubule-associated serine threonine kinase 2 (MAST2) are key negative regulators of survival pathways in neuronal cells. The two proteins interact via the PDZ (PSD-95, Dlg1, Zo-1) domain of MAST2 (MAST2-PDZ). During infection by rabies virus, the viral glycoprotein competes with PTEN for interaction with MAST2-PDZ and promotes neuronal survival. The C-terminal PDZ-binding motifs (PBMs) of the two proteins bind similarly to MAST2-PDZ through an unconventional network of connectivity involving two anchor points. Combining stopped-flow fluorescence, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), microcalorimetry and NMR, we document the kinetics of interaction between endogenous and viral ligands to MAST2-PDZ as well as the dynamic and structural effects of these interactions. Viral and PTEN peptide interactions to MAST2-PDZ occur via a unique kinetic step which involves both canonical C-terminal PBM binding and N-terminal anchoring. Indirect effects induced by the PBM binding include modifications to the structure and dynamics of the PDZ dimerization surface which prevent MAST2-PDZ auto-association. Such an energetic communication between binding sites and distal surfaces in PDZ domains provides interesting clues for protein regulation overall. PMID:25942057

  13. Structural Analysis on the Pathologic Mutant Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Darrell E; Suzuki, Shigeru; Mayama, Takafumi; Charmandari, Evangelia; Kino, Tomoshige

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene mutations may cause familial or sporadic generalized glucocorticoid resistance syndrome. Most of the missense forms distribute in the ligand-binding domain and impair its ligand-binding activity and formation of the activation function (AF)-2 that binds LXXLL motif-containing coactivators. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to ligand-binding domain of pathologic GR mutants to reveal their structural defects. Several calculated parameters including interaction energy for dexamethasone or the LXXLL peptide indicate that destruction of ligand-binding pocket (LBP) is a primary character. Their LBP defects are driven primarily by loss/reduction of the electrostatic interaction formed by R611 and T739 of the receptor to dexamethasone and a subsequent conformational mismatch, which deacylcortivazol resolves with its large phenylpyrazole moiety and efficiently stimulates transcriptional activity of the mutant receptors with LBP defect. Reduced affinity of the LXXLL peptide to AF-2 is caused mainly by disruption of the electrostatic bonds to the noncore leucine residues of this peptide that determine the peptide's specificity to GR, as well as by reduced noncovalent interaction against core leucines and subsequent exposure of the AF-2 surface to solvent. The results reveal molecular defects of pathologic mutant receptors and provide important insights to the actions of wild-type GR. PMID:26745667

  14. Structural Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Domain of the Aspartate Receptor Tar from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mise, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    The Escherichia coli cell-surface aspartate receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni(2+). These signals are transmitted from the extracellular region of Tar to the cytoplasmic region via the transmembrane domain. The mechanism by which extracellular signals are transmitted into the cell through conformational changes in Tar is predicted to involve a piston displacement of one of the α4 helices of the homodimer. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by an attractant, the three-dimensional structures of the E. coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate, Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively, were determined. Of the two ligand-binding sites, only one site was occupied, and it clearly showed the electron density of an aspartate. The slight changes in conformation and the electrostatic surface potential around the aspartate-binding site were observed. In addition, the presence of an aspartate stabilized residues Phe-150' and Arg-73. A pistonlike displacement of helix α4b' was also induced by aspartate binding as predicted by the piston model. Taken together, these small changes might be related to the induction of Tar activity and might disturb binding of the second aspartate to the second binding site in E. coli. PMID:27292793

  15. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states. PMID:27160511

  16. The Importin β Binding Domain as a Master Regulator of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Kaylen; Cingolani, Gino

    2010-01-01

    Specific and efficient recognition of import cargoes is essential to ensure nucleocytoplasmic transport. To this end, the prototypical karyopherin importin β associates with import cargoes directly or, more commonly, through import adaptors, such as importin α and snurportin. Adaptor proteins bind the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) of import cargoes while recruiting importin β via an N-terminal importin β binding (IBB) domain. The use of adaptors greatly expands and amplifies the repertoire of cellular cargoes that importin β can efficiently import into the cell nucleus and allows for fine regulation of nuclear import. Accordingly, the IBB-domain is a dedicated NLS, unique to adaptor proteins that functions as a molecular liaison between importin β and import cargoes. This review provides an overview of the molecular role played by the IBB-domain in orchestrating nucleocytoplasmic transport. Recent work has determined that the IBB-domain has specialized functions at every step of the import and export pathway. Unexpectedly, this stretch of ∼40 amino acids plays an essential role in regulating processes such as formation of the import complex, docking and translocation through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), release of import cargoes into the cell nucleus and finally recycling of import adaptors and importin β into the cytoplasm. Thus, the IBB-domain is a master regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport, whose complex molecular function is only recently beginning to emerge. PMID:21029753

  17. ALOG domains: provenance of plant homeotic and developmental regulators from the DNA-binding domain of a novel class of DIRS1-type retroposons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Members of the Arabidopsis LSH1 and Oryza G1 (ALOG) family of proteins have been shown to function as key developmental regulators in land plants. However, their precise mode of action remains unclear. Using sensitive sequence and structure analysis, we show that the ALOG domains are a distinct version of the N-terminal DNA-binding domain shared by the XerC/D-like, protelomerase, topoisomerase-IA, and Flp tyrosine recombinases. ALOG domains are distinguished by the insertion of an additional zinc ribbon into this DNA-binding domain. In particular, we show that the ALOG domain is derived from the XerC/D-like recombinases of a novel class of DIRS-1-like retroposons. Copies of this element, which have been recently inactivated, are present in several marine metazoan lineages, whereas the stramenopile Ectocarpus, retains an active copy of the same. Thus, we predict that ALOG domains help establish organ identity and differentiation by binding specific DNA sequences and acting as transcription factors or recruiters of repressive chromatin. They are also found in certain plant defense proteins, where they are predicted to function as DNA sensors. The evolutionary history of the ALOG domain represents a unique instance of a domain, otherwise exclusively found in retroelements, being recruited as a specific transcription factor in the streptophyte lineage of plants. Hence, they add to the growing evidence for derivation of DNA-binding domains of eukaryotic specific TFs from mobile and selfish elements. PMID:23146749

  18. Engineered staphylococcal protein A's IgG-binding domain with cathepsin L inhibitory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovic, Tomaz . E-mail: tomaz.bratkovic@ffa.uni-lj.si; Berlec, Ales; Popovic, Tatjana; Lunder, Mojca; Kreft, Samo; Urleb, Uros; Strukelj, Borut

    2006-10-13

    Inhibitory peptide of papain-like cysteine proteases, affinity selected from a random disulfide constrained phage-displayed peptide library, was grafted to staphylococcal protein A's B domain. Scaffold protein was additionally modified in order to allow solvent exposed display of peptide loop. Correct folding of fusion proteins was confirmed by CD-spectroscopy and by the ability to bind the Fc-region of rabbit IgG, a characteristic of parent domain. The recombinant constructs inhibited cathepsin L with inhibitory constants in the low-micromolar range.

  19. Phenylalanine Binding Is Linked to Dimerization of the Regulatory Domain of Phenylalanine Hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation has been used to analyze the oligomeric structure of the isolated regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase. The protein exhibits a monomer–dimer equilibrium with a dissociation constant of ∼46 μM; this value is unaffected by the removal of the 24 N-terminal residues or by phosphorylation of Ser16. In contrast, phenylalanine binding (Kd = 8 μM) stabilizes the dimer. These results suggest that dimerization of the regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase is linked to allosteric activation of the enzyme. PMID:25299136

  20. Domain rearrangement of SRP protein Ffh upon binding 4.5S RNA and the SRP receptor FtsY.

    PubMed

    Buskiewicz, Iwona; Kubarenko, Andriy; Peske, Frank; Rodnina, Marina V; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2005-06-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) mediates membrane targeting of translating ribosomes displaying a signal-anchor sequence. In Escherichia coli, SRP consists of 4.5S RNA and a protein, Ffh, that recognizes the signal peptide emerging from the ribosome and the SRP receptor at the membrane, FtsY. In the present work, we studied the interactions between the NG and M domains in Ffh and their rearrangements upon complex formation with 4.5S RNA and/or FtsY. In free Ffh, the NG and M domains are facing one another in an orientation that allows cross-linking between positions 231 in the G domain and 377 in the M domain. There are binding interactions between the two domains, as the isolated domains form a strong complex. The interdomain contacts are disrupted upon binding of Ffh to 4.5S RNA, consuming a part of the total binding energy of 4.5S RNA-Ffh association that is roughly equivalent to the free energy of domain binding to each other. In the SRP particle, the NG domain binds to 4.5S RNA in a region adjacent to the binding site of the M domain. Ffh binding to FtsY also requires a reorientation of NG and M domains. These results suggest that in free Ffh, the binding sites for 4.5S RNA and FtsY are occluded by strong domain-domain interactions which must be disrupted for the formation of SRP or the Ffh-FtsY complex. PMID:15923378

  1. A novel 4 S [3H]beta-naphthoflavone-binding protein in liver cytosol of female Sprague-Dawley rats treated with aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Brauze, D; Malejka-Giganti, D

    2000-01-01

    beta-Naphthoflavone (beta-NF) is a widely used inducer of phase-I and phase-II enzymes controlled by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Studies of competitive binding with (3)H-labelled 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have shown that beta-NF is a high-affinity ligand for AhR and also for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-binding protein, both soluble proteins of rat liver in 8 S and 4 S fractions, respectively, of sucrose gradients. This study examined binding of [(3)H]beta-NF to liver cytosolic proteins of female Sprague-Dawley rats. Treatment of rats with beta-NF, 3-MC, TCDD or alpha-naphthoflavone (alpha-NF) increased the specific [(3)H]beta-NF binding to liver cytosol up to 125-fold that of vehicle (corn oil)-treated rats (<100 fmol/mg of protein). Sucrose gradients revealed a large 4 S and a small 8 S peak of radioactivity from [(3)H]beta-NF binding to cytosols of beta-NF-, 3-MC-, TCDD- or alpha-NF-treated rats. Whereas co-incubation with the unlabelled beta-NF eliminated both peaks, co-incubation with 2,3, 7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) eliminated only the 8 S peak. The sucrose density gradient from [(3)H]TCDD binding to cytosol of beta-NF- or TCDD-treated rats yielded a small 4 S and a larger 8 S peak; only the latter was abolished by co-incubation with TCDF. Thus, the patterns of sedimentation, distribution and elimination of radioactivity from the 8 S fraction of the liver cytosols from beta-NF-, 3-MC-, TCDD- or alpha-NF-treated rats were characteristic for the AhR, whereas those from the 4 S fraction appeared specific for [(3)H]beta-NF binding. The data indicate that potent AhR agonists, TCDD, 3-MC and beta-NF, and to a lesser extent alpha-NF, a weak AhR agonist, induce a 4 S [(3)H]beta-NF-binding protein in liver cytosol of female rats. alpha-NF, beta-NF and 3-MC were effective competitors (80-85% inhibition) of the [(3)H]beta-NF-specific binding to the beta-NF-, 3 MC- or TCDD

  2. Reduction in lipophilicity improved the solubility, plasma-protein binding, and permeability of tertiary sulfonamide RORc inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Fauber, Benjamin P; René, Olivier; de Leon Boenig, Gladys; Burton, Brenda; Deng, Yuzhong; Eidenschenk, Céline; Everett, Christine; Gobbi, Alberto; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Johnson, Adam R; La, Hank; Liimatta, Marya; Lockey, Peter; Norman, Maxine; Ouyang, Wenjun; Wang, Weiru; Wong, Harvey

    2014-08-15

    Using structure-based drug design principles, we identified opportunities to reduce the lipophilicity of our tertiary sulfonamide RORc inverse agonists. The new analogs possessed improved RORc cellular potencies with >77-fold selectivity for RORc over other nuclear receptors in our cell assay suite. The reduction in lipophilicity also led to an increased plasma-protein unbound fraction and improvements in cellular permeability and aqueous solubility. PMID:25017032

  3. Structural fold, conservation and Fe(II) binding of the intracellular domain of prokaryote FeoB

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-09-17

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain's two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide-binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function.

  4. Predicted structure of the extracellular region of ligand-gated ion-channel receptors shows SH2-like and SH3-like domains forming the ligand-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Gready, J. E.; Ranganathan, S.; Schofield, P. R.; Matsuo, Y.; Nishikawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    Fast synaptic neurotransmission is mediated by ligand-gated ion-channel (LGIC) receptors, which include receptors for acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, glycine, and glutamate. LGICs are pentamers with extracellular ligand-binding domains and form integral membrane ion channels that are selective for cations (acetylcholine and serotonin 5HT3 receptors) or anions (GABAA and glycine receptors and the invertebrate glutamate-binding chloride channel). They form a protein superfamily with no sequence similarity to any protein of known structure. Using a 1D-3D structure mapping approach, we have modeled the extracellular ligand-binding domain based on a significant match with the SH2 and SH3 domains of the biotin repressor structure. Refinement of the model based on knowledge of the large family of SH2 and SH3 structures, sequence alignments, and use of structure templates for loop building, allows the prediction of both monomer and pentamer models. These are consistent with medium-resolution electron microscopy structures and with experimental structure/function data from ligand-binding, antibody-binding, mutagenesis, protein-labeling and subunit-linking studies, and glycosylation sites. Also, the predicted polarity of the channel pore calculated from electrostatic potential maps of pentamer models of superfamily members is consistent with known ion selectivities. Using the glycine receptor alpha 1 subunit, which forms homopentamers, the monomeric and pentameric models define the agonist and antagonist (strychnine) binding sites to a deep crevice formed by an extended loop, which includes the invariant disulfide bridge, between the SH2 and SH3 domains. A detailed binding site for strychnine is reported that is in strong agreement with known structure/function data. A site for interaction of the extracellular ligand-binding domain with the activation of the M2 transmembrane helix is also suggested. PMID:9144769

  5. Ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors facilitate tight control of split CRISPR activity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy P; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Gilbert, Luke A; Mayerl, Steven J; Lee, Brian H; Weissman, Jonathan S; Conklin, Bruce R; Wells, James A

    2016-01-01

    Cas9-based RNA-guided nuclease (RGN) has emerged to be a versatile method for genome editing due to the ease of construction of RGN reagents to target specific genomic sequences. The ability to control the activity of Cas9 with a high temporal resolution will facilitate tight regulation of genome editing processes for studying the dynamics of transcriptional regulation or epigenetic modifications in complex biological systems. Here we show that fusing ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors to split Cas9 protein fragments can provide chemical control over split Cas9 activity. The method has allowed us to control Cas9 activity in a tunable manner with no significant background, which has been challenging for other inducible Cas9 constructs. We anticipate that our design will provide opportunities through the use of different ligand-binding domains to enable multiplexed genome regulation of endogenous genes in distinct loci through simultaneous chemical regulation of orthogonal Cas9 variants. PMID:27363581

  6. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Buey, Rubén M; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M; Revuelta, José L

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  7. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  8. Ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors facilitate tight control of split CRISPR activity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duy P.; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Gilbert, Luke A.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Lee, Brian H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cas9-based RNA-guided nuclease (RGN) has emerged to be a versatile method for genome editing due to the ease of construction of RGN reagents to target specific genomic sequences. The ability to control the activity of Cas9 with a high temporal resolution will facilitate tight regulation of genome editing processes for studying the dynamics of transcriptional regulation or epigenetic modifications in complex biological systems. Here we show that fusing ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors to split Cas9 protein fragments can provide chemical control over split Cas9 activity. The method has allowed us to control Cas9 activity in a tunable manner with no significant background, which has been challenging for other inducible Cas9 constructs. We anticipate that our design will provide opportunities through the use of different ligand-binding domains to enable multiplexed genome regulation of endogenous genes in distinct loci through simultaneous chemical regulation of orthogonal Cas9 variants. PMID:27363581

  9. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  10. Genetic analysis of sequences in maltoporin that contribute to binding domains and pore structure.

    PubMed Central

    Heine, H G; Francis, G; Lee, K S; Ferenci, T

    1988-01-01

    Maltoporin (LamB protein) is a maltodextrin transport protein in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli with binding sites for bacteriophage lambda and maltosaccharides. Binding of starch by bacteria was found to inhibit swarming of Escherichia coli in soft agar plates; the inhibition was dependent on the maltodextrin affinity of maltoporin. On the basis of this observation, chemotactic cell-sorting techniques were developed for the isolation and analysis of mutants with an altered starch-binding phenotype. Fifteen lamB mutations generated by hydroxylamine and linker mutagenesis, as well as spontaneous mutations, were analyzed. The effects of the mutations on starch and lambda-binding, as well as transport specificity, were assayed. Mutations that affect residues near 8 to 18, 74 to 82, and 118 to 121 were found to affect starch binding and maltodextrin-selective functions strongly, confirming and extending previous results with substitutions at these regions. Substitutions and insertions in two previously undefined regions in the protein, in or near residues 194 and 360, also resulted in defects in maltodextrin-specific functions and indicate that C-terminal parts of the protein also contribute to the discontinuous binding and pore domains. There was a detectable transport defect in all binding-affected mutants, and one mutation caused near-total pore blocking towards both maltose and nonmaltoside. The highly discontinuous phage lambda-binding site was affected by mutations near residues 9 and 10 and 194, as well as previously established regions near residues 18, 148 to 165, 245 to 259, and 380 to 400. The significance of these mutations is discussed in the context of a model of the functional topology of maltoporin. The additional role of regions near residues 10 and 120 in maltoporin assembly, as well as starch binding, was suggested by the temperature-sensitive biogenesis of maltoporin in strains with one- or two-codon insertion at these sites. Images PMID

  11. Structural Studies of the Alzheimer's Amyloid Precursor Protein Copper-Binding Domain Reveal How It Binds Copper Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, G.K.-W.; Adams, J.J.; Harris, H.H.; Boas, J.F.; Curtain, C.C.; Galatis, D.; Master, C.L.; Barnham, K.J.; McKinstry, W.J.; Cappai, R.; Parker, M.W.; /Sydney U. /Monash U. /Melbourne U.

    2007-07-09

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia. Amyloid {beta} peptide (A {beta}), generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is central to AD pathogenesis. APP can function as a metalloprotein and modulate copper (Cu) transport, presumably via its extracellular Cu-binding domain (CuBD). Cu binding to the CuBD reduces A{beta} levels, suggesting that a Cu mimetic may have therapeutic potential. We describe here the atomic structures of apo CuBD from three crystal forms and found they have identical Cu-binding sites despite the different crystal lattices. The structure of Cu[2+]-bound CuBD reveals that the metal ligands are His147, His151, Tyrl68 and two water molecules, which are arranged in a square pyramidal geometry. The site resembles a Type 2 non-blue Cu center and is supported by electron paramagnetic resonance and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies. A previous study suggested that Met170 might be a ligand but we suggest that this residue plays a critical role as an electron donor in CuBDs ability to reduce Cu ions. The structure of Cu[+]-bound CuBD is almost identical to the Cu[2+]-bound structure except for the loss of one of the water ligands. The geometry of the site is unfavorable for Cu[+], thus providing a mechanism by which CuBD could readily transfer Cu ions to other proteins.

  12. Domain rearrangement of SRP protein Ffh upon binding 4.5S RNA and the SRP receptor FtsY

    PubMed Central

    BUSKIEWICZ, IWONA; KUBARENKO, ANDRIY; PESKE, FRANK; RODNINA, MARINA V.; WINTERMEYER, WOLFGANG

    2005-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) mediates membrane targeting of translating ribosomes displaying a signal-anchor sequence. In Escherichia coli, SRP consists of 4.5S RNA and a protein, Ffh, that recognizes the signal peptide emerging from the ribosome and the SRP receptor at the membrane, FtsY. In the present work, we studied the interactions between the NG and M domains in Ffh and their rearrangements upon complex formation with 4.5S RNA and/or FtsY. In free Ffh, the NG and M domains are facing one another in an orientation that allows cross-linking between positions 231 in the G domain and 377 in the M domain. There are binding interactions between the two domains, as the isolated domains form a strong complex. The interdomain contacts are disrupted upon binding of Ffh to 4.5S RNA, consuming a part of the total binding energy of 4.5S RNA-Ffh association that is roughly equivalent to the free energy of domain binding to each other. In the SRP particle, the NG domain binds to 4.5S RNA in a region adjacent to the binding site of the M domain. Ffh binding to FtsY also requires a reorientation of NG and M domains. These results suggest that in free Ffh, the binding sites for 4.5S RNA and FtsY are occluded by strong domain–domain interactions which must be disrupted for the formation of SRP or the Ffh-FtsY complex. PMID:15923378

  13. Rational design of orally-active, pyrrolidine-based progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Scott K.; Washburn, David G.; Frazee, James S.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Hoang, Tram H.; Lapinski, Leahann; Grygielko, Eugene T.; Glace, Lindsay E.; Trizna, Walter; Williams, Shawn P.; Duraiswami, Chaya; Bray, Jeffrey D.; Laping, Nicholas J.

    2010-09-03

    Using the X-ray crystal structure of an amide-based progesterone receptor (PR) partial agonist bound to the PR ligand binding domain, a novel PR partial agonist class containing a pyrrolidine ring was designed. Members of this class of N-alkylpyrrolidines demonstrate potent and highly selective partial agonism of the progesterone receptor, and one of these analogs was shown to be efficacious upon oral dosing in the OVX rat model of estrogen opposition.

  14. In Silico Screening for Inhibitors of P-Glycoprotein That Target the Nucleotide Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Frances K.; Follit, Courtney A.; Vogel, Pia D.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistances and the failure of chemotherapies are often caused by the expression or overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins such as the multidrug resistance protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp is expressed in the plasma membrane of many cell types and protects cells from accumulation of toxins. P-gp uses ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the transport of a broad range of mostly hydrophobic compounds across the plasma membrane and out of the cell. During cancer chemotherapy, the administration of therapeutics often selects for cells which overexpress P-gp, thereby creating populations of cancer cells resistant to a variety of chemically unrelated chemotherapeutics. The present study describes extremely high-throughput, massively parallel in silico ligand docking studies aimed at identifying reversible inhibitors of ATP hydrolysis that target the nucleotide-binding domains of P-gp. We used a structural model of human P-gp that we obtained from molecular dynamics experiments as the protein target for ligand docking. We employed a novel approach of subtractive docking experiments that identified ligands that bound predominantly to the nucleotide-binding domains but not the drug-binding domains of P-gp. Four compounds were found that inhibit ATP hydrolysis by P-gp. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we showed that at least three of these compounds affected nucleotide binding to the transporter. These studies represent a successful proof of principle demonstrating the potential of targeted approaches for identifying specific inhibitors of P-gp. PMID:25270578

  15. Modulating LOV Domain Photodynamics with a Residue Alteration outside the Chromophore Binding Site†

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang-Hun; Freddolino, Peter L.; Nash, Abigail I.; Carroll, Elizabeth C.; Schulten, Klaus; Gardner, Kevin H.; Larsen, Delmar S.

    2011-01-01

    Phototropins, a class of light-activated protein kinases, are essential for several blue light responses in plants and algae, including phototropism. These proteins contain two internal light, oxygen, and voltage sensitive (LOV) domains, which bind flavin chromophores and undergo a reversible photochemical formation of a cysteinyl-flavin adduct as part of the light sensing process. While the photodynamic properties of such photosensory domains are dictated by interactions between the chromophore and surrounding protein, more distant residues can play a significant role as well. Here we explore the role of the Phe434 residue in the photosensory response of the second LOV domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2), a model photochemical system for these LOV domains. Phe434 lies over 6 Å from the FMN chromophore in AsLOV2; nevertheless, a F434Y point mutation is likely to change several structural features of the chromophore binding site, as we demonstrate using molecular dynamics simulations. Transient absorption signals spanning 15 decades in time were compared for wildtype AsLOV2 and the F434Y mutant, showing that the latter has significantly altered photodynamics including (i) a faster intersystem crossing leading to triplet formation on a nanosecond time scale, (ii) biphasic formation of adduct state kinetics on the microsecond time scale, and (iii) greatly accelerated ground-state recovery kinetics on a second time scale. We present mechanistic models that link these spectroscopic differences to changes in the configuration of the critical cysteine residue and in the chromophore’s accessibility to solvent and oxygen according to MD trajectories and purging experiments. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of residues outside the chromophore-binding pocket in modulating LOV domain photodynamics. PMID:21323358

  16. Positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 silences class II transactivator expression in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, N; Gyory, I; Wright, G; Wood, J; Wright, K L

    2001-05-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA) acts as a master switch to activate expression of the genes required for MHC-II antigen presentation. During B-cell to plasma cell differentiation, MHC-II expression is actively silenced, but the mechanism has been unknown. In plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma the repression of MHC-II is associated with the loss of CIITA. We have identified that positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), a transcriptional repressor, inhibits CIITA expression in multiple myeloma cell lines. Repression of CIITA depends on the DNA binding activity of PRDI-BF1 and its specific binding site in the CIITA promoter. Deletion of a histone deacetylase recruitment domain in PRDI-BF1 does not inhibit repression of CIITA nor does blocking histone deacetylase activity. This is in contrast to PRDI-BF1 repression of the c-myc promoter. Repression of CIITA requires either the N-terminal acidic and conserved PR motif or the proline-rich domain. PRDI-BF1 has been shown to be a key regulator of B-cell and macrophage differentiation. These findings now indicate that PRDI-BF1 has at least two mechanisms of repression whose function is dependent on the nature of the target promoter. Importantly, PRDI-BF1 is defined as the key molecule in silencing CIITA and thus MHC-II in multiple myeloma cells. PMID:11279146

  17. A preformed compact ribosome-binding domain in the cricket paralysis-like virus IRES RNAs

    PubMed Central

    COSTANTINO, DAVID; KIEFT, JEFFREY S.

    2005-01-01

    The internal ribosome site RNA of the cricket paralysis-like viruses (CrPV-like) binds directly to the ribosome, assembling the translation machinery without initiation factors. This mechanism does not require initiator tRNA, and translation starts from a non-AUG codon. A wealth of biochemical data has yielded a working model for this process, but the three-dimensional structure and biophysical characteristics of the unbound CrPV-like IRES RNAs are largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that the CrPV-like IRESes prefold into a two-part structure in the presence of magnesium ions. The largest part is a prefolded compact RNA domain that shares folding and structural characteristics with other compactly folded RNAs such as group I intron RNAs and RNase P RNA. Chemical probing reveals that the CrPV-like IRES’ compact domain contains RNA helices that are packed tightly enough to exclude solvent, and analytical ultracentrifugation indicates a large change in the shape of the IRES upon folding. Formation of this compact domain is necessary for binding of the 40S subunit, and the structural organization of the unbound IRES RNA is consistent with the hypothesis that the IRES is functionally and structurally preorganized before ribosome binding. PMID:15701733

  18. Ubiquitin binding by the CUE domain promotes endosomal localization of the Rab5 GEF Vps9

    PubMed Central

    Shideler, Tess; Nickerson, Daniel P.; Merz, Alexey J.; Odorizzi, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Vps9 and Muk1 are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that regulate membrane trafficking in the endolysosomal pathway by activating Rab5 GTPases. We show that Vps9 is the primary Rab5 GEF required for biogenesis of late endosomal multivesicular bodies (MVBs). However, only Vps9 (but not Muk1) is required for the formation of aberrant class E compartments that arise upon dysfunction of endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). ESCRT dysfunction causes ubiquitinated transmembrane proteins to accumulate at endosomes, and we demonstrate that endosomal recruitment of Vps9 is promoted by its ubiquitin-binding CUE domain. Muk1 lacks ubiquitin-binding motifs, but its fusion to the Vps9 CUE domain allows Muk1 to rescue endosome morphology, cargo trafficking, and cellular stress-tolerance phenotypes that result from loss of Vps9 function. These results indicate that ubiquitin binding by the CUE domain promotes Vps9 function in endolysosomal membrane trafficking via promotion of localization. PMID:25673804

  19. Solution structure of the ubiquitin-binding domain in Swa2p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chim, Nicholas; Gall, Walter E; Xiao, Jing; Harris, Mark P; Graham, Todd R; Krezel, Andrzej M

    2004-03-01

    The SWA2/AUX1 gene has been proposed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of mammalian auxilin. Swa2p is required for clathrin assembly/dissassembly in vivo, thereby implicating it in intracellular protein and lipid trafficking. While investigating the 287-residue N-terminal region of Swa2p, we found a single stably folded domain between residues 140 and 180. Using binding assays and structural analysis, we established this to be a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, unidentified by bioinformatics of the yeast genome. We determined the solution structure of this Swa2p domain and found a characteristic three-helix UBA fold. Comparisons of structures of known UBA folds reveal that the position of the third helix is quite variable. This helix in Swa2p UBA contains a bulkier tyrosine in place of smaller residues found in other UBAs and cannot pack as close to the second helix. The molecular surface of Swa2p UBA has a mostly negative potential, with a single hydrophobic surface patch found also in the UBA domains of human protein, HHR23A. The presence of a UBA domain implicates Swa2p in novel roles involving ubiquitin and ubiquitinated substrates. We propose that Swa2p is a multifunctional protein capable of recognizing several proteins through its protein-protein recognition domains. PMID:14997574

  20. CXCL1/MGSA Is a Novel Glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding Chemokine: STRUCTURAL EVIDENCE FOR TWO DISTINCT NON-OVERLAPPING BINDING DOMAINS.

    PubMed

    Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-02-19

    In humans, the chemokine CXCL1/MGSA (hCXCL1) plays fundamental and diverse roles in pathophysiology, from microbial killing to cancer progression, by orchestrating the directed migration of immune and non-immune cells. Cellular trafficking is highly regulated and requires concentration gradients that are achieved by interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). However, very little is known regarding the structural basis underlying hCXCL1-GAG interactions. We addressed this by characterizing the binding of GAG heparin oligosaccharides to hCXCL1 using NMR spectroscopy. Binding experiments under conditions at which hCXCL1 exists as monomers and dimers indicate that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand. NMR experiments and modeling studies indicate that lysine and arginine residues mediate binding and that they are located in two non-overlapping domains. One domain, consisting of N-loop and C-helical residues (defined as α-domain) has also been identified previously as the GAG-binding domain for the related chemokine CXCL8/IL-8. The second domain, consisting of residues from the N terminus, 40s turn, and third β-strand (defined as β-domain) is novel. Eliminating β-domain binding by mutagenesis does not perturb α-domain binding, indicating two independent GAG-binding sites. It is known that N-loop and N-terminal residues mediate receptor activation, and we show that these residues are also involved in extensive GAG interactions. We also show that the GAG-bound hCXCL1 completely occlude receptor binding. We conclude that hCXCL1-GAG interactions provide stringent control over regulating chemokine levels and receptor accessibility and activation, and that chemotactic gradients mediate cellular trafficking to the target site. PMID:26721883

  1. Binding Moral Foundations and the Narrowing of Ideological Conflict to the Traditional Morality Domain.

    PubMed

    Malka, Ariel; Osborne, Danny; Soto, Christopher J; Greaves, Lara M; Sibley, Chris G; Lelkes, Yphtach

    2016-09-01

    Moral foundations theory (MFT) posits that binding moral foundations (purity, authority, and ingroup loyalty) are rooted in the need for groups to promote order and cohesion, and that they therefore underlie political conservatism. We present evidence that binding foundations (and the related construct of disgust sensitivity) are associated with lower levels of ideological polarization on political issues outside the domain of moral traditionalism. Consistent support for this hypothesis was obtained from three large American Internet-based samples and one large national sample of New Zealanders (combined N = 7,874). We suggest that when political issues do not have inherent relevance to moral traditionalism, binding foundations promote a small centrist shift away from ideologically prescribed positions, and that they do so out of desire for national uniformity and cohesion. PMID:27340150

  2. Halophilic characterization of starch-binding domain from Kocuria varians α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Sumitani, Jun-ichi; Kawaguchi, Takashi; Tokunaga, Masao

    2012-01-01

    The tandem starch-binding domains (KvSBD) located at carboxy-terminal region of halophilic α-amylase from moderate halophile, Kocuria varians, were expressed in E. coli with amino-terminal hexa-His-tag and purified to homogeneity. The recombinant KvSBD showed binding activity to raw starch granules at low to high salt concentrations. The binding activity of KvSBD to starch was fully reversible after heat-treatment at 85°C. Circular dichroism and thermal scanning experiments indicated that KvSBD showed fully reversible refolding upon cooling after complete melting at 70°C in the presence of 0.2-2.0M NaCl. The refolding rate was enhanced with higher salt concentration. PMID:22020156

  3. Sensitive and rapid detection of staphylococcus aureus in milk via cell binding domain of lysin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junping; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Yun; Li, Heng; Yang, Hang; Wei, Hongping

    2016-03-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important food-borne pathogen in dairy products contaminated through raw ingredients or improper food handling. Rapid detection of S. aureus with high sensitivity is of significance for food quality and safety. In this study, a new method was developed for detecting S. aureus in milk by coupling immunomagnetic separation with enzyme linked cell wall binding domain (CBD) of lysin plyV12, which can bind to S. aureus with high affinity. There are millions of binding sites present on the cell surface of S. aureus for the CBD attachment, which greatly improves the detection sensitivity. The method has the overall testing time of only 1.5h with the detection limit of 4 × 10(3)CFU/mL in spiked milk. Because it is simple, rapid and sensitive, this method could be used for the detection of S. aureus in various food samples. PMID:26433070

  4. Inactivation of Multiple Bacterial Histidine Kinases by Targeting the ATP-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial agents that exploit new targets will be required to combat the perpetual rise of bacterial resistance to current antibiotics. We are exploring the inhibition of histidine kinases, constituents of two-component systems. Two-component systems are the primary signaling pathways that bacteria utilize to respond to their environment. They are ubiquitous in bacteria and trigger various pathogenic mechanisms. To attenuate these signaling pathways, we sought to broadly target the histidine kinase family by focusing on their highly conserved ATP-binding domain. Development of a fluorescence polarization displacement assay facilitated high-throughput screening of ∼53 000 diverse small molecules for binding to the ATP-binding pocket. Of these compounds, nine inhibited the catalytic activity of two or more histidine kinases. These scaffolds could provide valuable starting points for the design of broadly effective HK inhibitors, global reduction of bacterial signaling, and ultimately, a class of antibiotics that function by a new mechanism of action. PMID:25531939

  5. Tailor-Made Ezrin Actin Binding Domain to Probe Its Interaction with Actin In-Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Rohini; Köster, Darius; Kalme, Sheetal; Mayor, Satyajit; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin, a member of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) protein family, is an Actin-plasma membrane linker protein mediating cellular integrity and function. In-vivo study of such interactions is a complex task due to the presence of a large number of endogenous binding partners for both Ezrin and Actin. Further, C-terminal actin binding capacity of the full length Ezrin is naturally shielded by its N-terminal, and only rendered active in the presence of Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) or phosphorylation at the C-terminal threonine. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the design, expression and purification of constructs, combining the Ezrin C-terminal actin binding domain, with functional elements such as fusion tags and fluorescence tags to facilitate purification and fluorescence microscopy based studies. For the first time, internal His tag was employed for purification of Ezrin actin binding domain based on in-silico modeling. The functionality (Ezrin-actin interaction) of these constructs was successfully demonstrated by using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy. This design can be extended to other members of the ERM family as well. PMID:25860910

  6. Crystallographicand Biochemical Analysis of the Ran-Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, J.; Schwartz, T

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) resides in circular openings within the nuclear envelope and serves as the sole conduit to facilitate nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. The asymmetric distribution of the small G protein Ran across the nuclear envelope regulates directionality of protein transport. Ran interacts with the NPC of metazoa via two asymmetrically localized components, Nup153 at the nuclear face and Nup358 at the cytoplasmic face. Both nucleoporins contain a stretch of distinct, Ran-binding zinc finger domains. Here, we present six crystal structures of Nup153-zinc fingers in complex with Ran and a 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of RanGDP. Crystal engineering allowed us to obtain well diffracting crystals so that all ZnF-Ran complex structures are refined to high resolution. Each of the four zinc finger modules of Nup153 binds one Ran molecule in apparently non-allosteric fashion. The affinity is measurably higher for RanGDP than for RanGTP and varies modestly between the individual zinc fingers. By microcalorimetric and mutational analysis, we determined that one specific hydrogen bond accounts for most of the differences in the binding affinity of individual zinc fingers. Genomic analysis reveals that only in animals do NPCs contain Ran-binding zinc fingers. We speculate that these organisms evolved a mechanism to maintain a high local concentration of Ran at the vicinity of the NPC, using this zinc finger domain as a sink.

  7. Crystallographic and Biochemical Analysis of the Ran-Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, James R.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; MIT

    2009-08-13

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) resides in circular openings within the nuclear envelope and serves as the sole conduit to facilitate nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. The asymmetric distribution of the small G protein Ran across the nuclear envelope regulates directionality of protein transport. Ran interacts with the NPC of metazoa via two asymmetrically localized components, Nup153 at the nuclear face and Nup358 at the cytoplasmic face. Both nucleoporins contain a stretch of distinct, Ran-binding zinc finger domains. Here, we present six crystal structures of Nup153-zinc fingers in complex with Ran and a 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of RanGDP. Crystal engineering allowed us to obtain well diffracting crystals so that all ZnF-Ran complex structures are refined to high resolution. Each of the four zinc finger modules of Nup153 binds one Ran molecule in apparently non-allosteric fashion. The affinity is measurably higher for RanGDP than for RanGTP and varies modestly between the individual zinc fingers. By microcalorimetric and mutational analysis, we determined that one specific hydrogen bond accounts for most of the differences in the binding affinity of individual zinc fingers. Genomic analysis reveals that only in animals do NPCs contain Ran-binding zinc fingers. We speculate that these organisms evolved a mechanism to maintain a high local concentration of Ran at the vicinity of the NPC, using this zinc finger domain as a sink.

  8. Epsin N-terminal homology domains bind on opposite sides of two SNAREs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Gossing, Michael; Fang, Pengfei; Zimmermann, Jana; Li, Xu; von Mollard, Gabriele Fischer; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun

    2011-01-01

    SNARE proteins are crucial for membrane fusion in vesicular transport. To ensure efficient and accurate fusion, SNAREs need to be sorted into different budding vesicles. This process is usually regulated by specific recognition between SNAREs and their adaptor proteins. How different pairs of SNAREs and adaptors achieve their recognition is unclear. Here, we report the recognition between yeast SNARE Vti1p and its adaptor Ent3p derived from three crystal structures. Surprisingly, this yeast pair Vti1p/Ent3p interacts through a distinct binding site compared to their homologues vti1b/epsinR in mammals. An opposite surface on Vti1p_Habc domain binds to a conserved area on the epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain of Ent3p. Two-hybrid, in vitro pull-down and in vivo experiments indicate this binding interface is important for correct localization of Vti1p in the cell. This previously undescribed discovery that a cargo and adaptor pair uses different binding sites across species suggests the diversity of SNARE-adaptor recognition in vesicular transport. PMID:21746902

  9. Site-directed mutants of human RECQ1 reveal functional importance of the zinc binding domain.

    PubMed

    Sami, Furqan; Gary, Ronald K; Fang, Yayin; Sharma, Sudha

    2016-08-01

    RecQ helicases are a highly conserved family of ATP-dependent DNA-unwinding enzymes with key roles in DNA replication and repair in all kingdoms of life. The RECQ1 gene encodes the most abundant RecQ homolog in humans. We engineered full-length RECQ1 harboring point mutations in the zinc-binding motif (amino acids 419-480) within the conserved RecQ-specific-C-terminal (RQC) domain known to be critical for diverse biochemical and cellular functions of RecQ helicases. Wild-type RECQ1 contains a zinc ion. Substitution of three of the four conserved cysteine residues that coordinate zinc severely impaired the ATPase and DNA unwinding activities but retained DNA binding and single strand DNA annealing activities. Furthermore, alteration of these residues attenuated zinc binding and significantly changed the overall conformation of full-length RECQ1 protein. In contrast, substitution of cysteine residue at position 471 resulted in a wild-type like RECQ1 protein. Differential contribution of the conserved cysteine residues to the structure and functions of the RECQ1 protein is also inferred by homology modeling. Overall, our results indicate that the zinc binding motif in the RQC domain of RECQ1 is a key structural element that is essential for the structure-functions of RECQ1. Given the recent association of RECQ1 mutations with breast cancer, these results will contribute to understanding the molecular basis of RECQ1 functions in cancer etiology. PMID:27248010

  10. Exploring the binding domain of EmrE, the smallest multidrug transporter.

    PubMed

    Sharoni, Michal; Steiner-Mordoch, Sonia; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2005-09-23

    EmrE is a small multidrug transporter in Escherichia coli that extrudes various positively charged drugs across the plasma membrane in exchange with protons, thereby rendering cells resistant to these compounds. Biochemical experiments indicate that the basic functional unit of EmrE is a dimer where the common binding site for protons and substrate is formed by the interaction of an essential charged residue (Glu14) from both EmrE monomers. Previous studies implied that other residues in the vicinity of Glu14 are part of the binding domain. Alkylation of Cys replacements in the same transmembrane domain inhibits the activity of the protein and this inhibition is fully prevented by substrates of EmrE. To monitor directly the reaction we tested also the extent of modification using fluorescein-5-maleimide. While most residues are not accessible or only partially accessible, four, Y4C, I5C, L7C, and A10C, were modified at least 80%. Furthermore, preincubation with tetraphenylphosphonium reduces the reaction of two of these residues by up to 80%. To study other essential residues we generated functional hetero-oligomers and challenged them with various methane thiosulfonates. Taken together the findings imply the existence of a binding cavity accessible to alkylating reagents where at least three residues from TM1, Tyr40 from TM2, and Trp63 in TM3 are involved in substrate binding. PMID:16049002

  11. Anthrax toxin lethal factor domain 3 is highly mobile and responsive to ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Maize, Kimberly M.; Kurbanov, Elbek K.; De La Mora-Rey, Teresa; Geders, Todd W.; Hwang, Dong-Jin; Walters, Michael A.; Johnson, Rodney L.; Amin, Elizabeth A.; Finzel, Barry C.

    2014-01-01

    The secreted anthrax toxin consists of three components: the protective antigen (PA), edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF). LF, a zinc metalloproteinase, compromises the host immune system primarily by targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases in macrophages. Peptide substrates and small-molecule inhibitors bind LF in the space between domains 3 and 4 of the hydrolase. Domain 3 is attached on a hinge to domain 2 via residues Ile300 and Pro385, and can move through an angular arc of greater than 35° in response to the binding of different ligands. Here, multiple LF structures including five new complexes with co-crystallized inhibitors are compared and three frequently populated LF conformational states termed ‘bioactive’, ‘open’ and ‘tight’ are identified. The bioactive position is observed with large substrate peptides and leaves all peptide-recognition subsites open and accessible. The tight state is seen in unliganded and small-molecule complex structures. In this state, domain 3 is clamped over certain substrate subsites, blocking access. The open position appears to be an intermediate state between these extremes and is observed owing to steric constraints imposed by specific bound ligands. The tight conformation may be the lowest-energy conformation among the reported structures, as it is the position observed with no bound ligand, while the open and bioactive conformations are likely to be ligand-induced. PMID:25372673

  12. Bacterial SPOR domains are recruited to septal peptidoglycan by binding to glycan strands that lack stem peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yahashiri, Atsushi; Jorgenson, Matthew A.; Weiss, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial SPOR domains bind peptidoglycan (PG) and are thought to target proteins to the cell division site by binding to “denuded” glycan strands that lack stem peptides, but uncertainties remain, in part because septal-specific binding has yet to be studied in a purified system. Here we show that fusions of GFP to SPOR domains from the Escherichia coli cell-division proteins DamX, DedD, FtsN, and RlpA all localize to septal regions of purified PG sacculi obtained from E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. Treatment of sacculi with an amidase that removes stem peptides enhanced SPOR domain binding, whereas treatment with a lytic transglycosylase that removes denuded glycans reduced SPOR domain binding. These findings demonstrate unequivocally that SPOR domains localize by binding to septal PG, that the physiologically relevant binding site is indeed a denuded glycan, and that denuded glycans are enriched in septal PG rather than distributed uniformly around the sacculus. Accumulation of denuded glycans in the septal PG of both E. coli and B. subtilis, organisms separated by 1 billion years of evolution, suggests that sequential removal of stem peptides followed by degradation of the glycan backbone is an ancient feature of PG turnover during bacterial cell division. Linking SPOR domain localization to the abundance of a structure (denuded glycans) present only transiently during biogenesis of septal PG provides a mechanism for coordinating the function of SPOR domain proteins with the progress of cell division. PMID:26305949

  13. Structural insights into the specific binding of huntingtin proline-rich region with the SH3 and WW domains.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Guang; Yan, Xian-Zhong; Song, Ai-Xin; Chang, Yong-Gang; Gao, Xue-Chao; Jiang, Nan; Zhang, Qi; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2006-12-01

    The interactions of huntingtin (Htt) with the SH3 domain- or WW domain-containing proteins have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD). We report the specific interactions of Htt proline-rich region (PRR) with the SH3GL3-SH3 domain and HYPA-WW1-2 domain pair by NMR. The results show that Htt PRR binds with the SH3 domain through nearly its entire chain, and that the binding region on the domain includes the canonical PxxP-binding site and the specificity pocket. The C terminus of PRR orients to the specificity pocket, whereas the N terminus orients to the PxxP-binding site. Htt PRR can also specifically bind to WW1-2; the N-terminal portion preferentially binds to WW1, while the C-terminal portion binds to WW2. This study provides structural insights into the specific interactions between Htt PRR and its binding partners as well as the alteration of these interactions that involve PRR, which may have implications for the understanding of HD. PMID:17161366

  14. DNA and Protein Footprinting Analysis of the Modulation of DNA Binding by the N-Terminal Domain of the Saccharomyces cervisiae TATA Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta,S.; Cheng, H.; Mollah, A.; Jamison, E.; Morris, S.; Chance, M.; Khrapunov, S.; Brenowitz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae TATA binding protein (TBP) and its isolated C-terminal conserved core domain (TBPc) were prepared with measured high specific DNA-binding activities. Direct, quantitative comparison of TATA box binding by TBP and TBPc reveals greater affinity by TBPc for either of two high-affinity sequences at several different experimental conditions. TBPc associates more rapidly than TBP to TATA box bearing DNA and dissociates more slowly. The structural origins of the thermodynamic and kinetic effects of the N-terminal domain on DNA binding by TBP were explored in comparative studies of TBPc and TBP by 'protein footprinting' with hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) side chain oxidation. Some residues within TBPc and the C-terminal domain of TBP are comparably protected by DNA, consistent with solvent accessibility changes calculated from core domain crystal structures. In contrast, the reactivity of some residues located on the top surface and the DNA-binding saddle of the C-terminal domain differs between TBP and TBPc in both the presence and absence of bound DNA; these results are not predicted from the crystal structures. A strikingly different pattern of side chain oxidation is observed for TBP when a nonionic detergent is present. Taken together, these results are consistent with the N-terminal domain actively modulating TATA box binding by TBP and nonionic detergent modulating the interdomain interaction.

  15. Identification of the Receptor Binding Domain of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanming; Rassa, John C.; deObaldia, Maria Elena; Albritton, Lorraine M.; Ross, Susan R.

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a betaretrovirus that infects rodent cells and uses mouse transferrin receptor 1 for cell entry. To characterize the interaction of MMTV with its receptor, we aligned the MMTV envelope surface (SU) protein with that of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MLV) and identified a putative receptor-binding domain (RBD) that included a receptor binding sequence (RBS) of five amino acids and a heparin-binding domain (HBD). Mutation of the HBD reduced virus infectivity, and soluble heparan sulfate blocked infection of cells by wild-type pseudovirus. Interestingly, some but not all MMTV-like elements found in primary and cultured human breast cancer cell lines, termed h-MTVs, had sequence alterations in the putative RBS. Single substitution of one of the amino acids found in an h-MTV RBS variant in the RBD of MMTV, Phe40 to Ser, did not alter species tropism but abolished both virus binding to cells and infectivity. Neutralizing anti-SU monoclonal antibodies also recognized a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein that contained the five-amino-acid RBS region from MMTV. The critical Phe40 residue is located on a surface of the MMTV RBD model that is distant from and may be structurally more rigid than the region of F-MLV RBD that contains its critical binding site residues. This suggests that, in contrast to other murine retroviruses, binding to its receptor may result in few or no changes in MMTV envelope protein conformation. PMID:12970432

  16. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120) and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM). Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC). A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans. PMID:22122911

  17. Structural architecture and interplay of the nucleotide- and erythrocyte binding domain of the reticulocyte binding protein Py235 from Plasmodium yoelii.

    PubMed

    Grüber, Ardina; Manimekalai, Malathy S S; Preiser, Peter R; Grüber, Gerhard

    2012-11-01

    Human malaria is caused by the cyclical invasion of the host's red blood cells (RBCs) by the invasive form of the parasite, the merozoite. The invasion of the RBC involves a range of parasite ligand receptor interactions, a process which is under intensive investigation. Two protein families are known to be important in the recognition and invasion of the human erythrocyte, the erythrocyte-binding like (EBL) proteins and the reticulocyte binding like proteins, of which the Py235 family in Plasmodium yoelii is a member. Recently the nucleotide binding domain (NBD94), that plays a role in ATP sensing, and the erythrocyte binding domain (EBD) of Py235, called EBD(1-194), have been identified. Binding of ATP leads to conformational changes within Py235 from P. yoelli and results in enhanced binding of the protein to the RBC. Structural features of these domains have been obtained, providing the platform to discuss how the structural architecture creates the basis for an interplay of the sensing NBD and the EBD domain in Py235. In analogy to the receptor-mediated ligand-dimerization model of the EBL proteins PvDBP and PfEBA-175 from Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum, respectively, we hypothesise that Py235 of P. yoelii binds via its EBD(1-194) domain to the RBC receptor, thereby inducing dimerization of the Py235-receptor complex. PMID:22878128

  18. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-05-20

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site. PMID:27002154

  19. Inhibition of Nuclear Receptor Binding SET Domain 2/Multiple Myeloma SET Domain by LEM-06 Implication for Epigenetic Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    di Luccio, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma SET domain (MMSET)/nuclear receptor binding SET domain 2 (NSD2) is a lysine histone methyltransferase (HMTase) and bona fide oncoprotein found aberrantly expressed in several cancers, suggesting potential role for novel therapeutic strategies. In particular, MMSET/NSD2 is emerging as a target for therapeutic interventions against multiple myeloma, especially t(4;14) myeloma that is associated with a significantly worse prognosis than other biological subgroups. Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematological malignancy in the United States, after non-Hodgkin lymphoma and remains an incurable malignancy. Thus, effective therapeutic strategies are greatly needed. HMTases inhibitors are scarce and no NSDs inhibitors have been isolated. Methods: We used homology modeling, molecular modeling simulations, virtual ligand screening, computational chemistry software for structure-activity relationship and performed in vitro H3K36 histone lysine methylation inhibitory assay using recombinant human NSD2-SET and human H3.1 histone. Results: Here, we report the discovery of LEM-06, a hit small molecule inhibitor of NSD2, with an IC50 of 0.8 mM against H3K36 methylation in vitro. Conclusions: We propose LEM-06 as a hit inhibitor that is useful to further optimize for exploring the biology of NSD2. LEM-06 derivatives may pave the way to specific NSD2 inhibitors suitable for therapeutic efforts against malignancies. PMID:26151044

  20. Structurally conserved erythrocyte-binding domain in Plasmodium provides a versatile scaffold for alternate receptor engagement

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczyk, Jakub; Lim, Nicholas T. Y.; Arnott, Alicia; He, Wen-Qiang; Nguitragool, Wang; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Mok, Yee-Foong; Murphy, James M.; Smith, Katherine R.; Lee, Stuart; Bahlo, Melanie; Mueller, Ivo; Barry, Alyssa E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how malaria parasites gain entry into human red blood cells is essential for developing strategies to stop blood stage infection. Plasmodium vivax preferentially invades reticulocytes, which are immature red blood cells. The organism has two erythrocyte-binding protein families: namely, the Duffy-binding protein (PvDBP) and the reticulocyte-binding protein (PvRBP) families. Several members of the PvRBP family bind reticulocytes, specifically suggesting a role in mediating host cell selectivity of P. vivax. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first high-resolution crystal structure of an erythrocyte-binding domain from PvRBP2a, solved at 2.12 Å resolution. The monomeric molecule consists of 10 α-helices and one short β-hairpin, and, although the structural fold is similar to that of PfRh5—the essential invasion ligand in Plasmodium falciparum—its surface properties are distinct and provide a possible mechanism for recognition of alternate receptors. Sequence alignments of the crystallized fragment of PvRBP2a with other PvRBPs highlight the conserved placement of disulfide bonds. PvRBP2a binds mature red blood cells through recognition of an erythrocyte receptor that is neuraminidase- and chymotrypsin-resistant but trypsin-sensitive. By examining the patterns of sequence diversity within field isolates, we have identified and mapped polymorphic residues to the PvRBP2a structure. Using mutagenesis, we have also defined the critical residues required for erythrocyte binding. Characterization of the structural features that govern functional erythrocyte binding for the PvRBP family provides a framework for generating new tools that block P. vivax blood stage infection. PMID:26715754

  1. A single residue mutation abolishes attachment of the CBM26 starch-binding domain from Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Oviedo, N; Escalante, L; Ruiz, B; Sánchez, S

    2009-03-01

    Starch is degraded by amylases that frequently have a modular structure composed of a catalytic domain and at least one non-catalytic domain that is involved in polysaccharide binding. The C-terminal domain from the Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase has an unusual architecture composed of five tandem starch-binding domains (SBDs). These domains belong to family 26 in the carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM) classification. It has been reported that members of this family have only one site for starch binding, where aromatic amino acids perform the binding function. In SBDs, fold similarities are better conserved than sequences; nevertheless, it is possible to identify in CBM26 members at least two aromatic residues highly conserved. We attempt to explain polysaccharide recognition for the L. amylovorus alpha-amylase SBD through site-directed mutagenesis of aromatic amino acids. Three amino acids were identified as essential for binding, two tyrosines and one tryptophan. Y18L and Y20L mutations were found to decrease the SBD binding capacity, but unexpectedly, the mutation at W32L led to a total loss of affinity, either with linear or ramified substrates. The critical role of Trp 32 in substrate binding confirms the presence of just one binding site in each alpha-amylase SBD. PMID:19052787

  2. Phylogenetic Distribution and Evolution of the Linked RNA-Binding and NOT1-Binding Domains in the Tristetraprolin Family of Tandem CCCH Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    In humans, the tristetraprolin or TTP family of CCCH tandem zinc finger (TZF) proteins comprises 3 members, encoded by the genes ZFP36, ZFP36L1, and ZFP36L2. These proteins have direct orthologues in essentially all vertebrates studied, with the exception of birds, which appear to lack a version of ZFP36. Additional family members are found in rodents, amphibians, and fish. In general, the encoded proteins contain 2 critical macromolecular interaction domains: the CCCH TZF domain, which is necessary for high-affinity binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA; and an extreme C-terminal domain that, in the case of TTP, interacts with NOT1, the scaffold of a large multi-protein complex that contains deadenylases. TTP and its related proteins act by first binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA, and then recruiting deadenylases to the mRNA, where they can processively remove the adenosine residues from the poly(A) tail. Highly conserved TZF domains have been found in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeasts, and these domains can bind AU-rich elements that resemble those bound by the mammalian proteins. However, certain fungi appear to lack proteins with intact TZF domains, and the TTP family proteins that are expressed in other fungi often lack the characteristic C-terminal NOT1 binding domain found in the mammalian proteins. For these reasons, we investigated the phylogenetic distribution of the relevant sequences in available databases. Both domains are present in family member proteins from most lineages of eukaryotes, suggesting their mutual presence in a common ancestor. However, the vertebrate type of NOT1-binding domain is missing in most fungi, and the TZF domain itself has disappeared or degenerated in recently evolved fungi. Nonetheless, both domains are present together in the proteins from several unicellular eukaryotes, including at least 1 fungus, and they seem to have remained together during the evolution of metazoans. PMID:24697206

  3. Lipid binding by the Unique and SH3 domains of c-Src suggests a new regulatory mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Yolanda; Maffei, Mariano; Igea, Ana; Amata, Irene; Gairí, Margarida; Nebreda, Angel R.; Bernadó, Pau; Pons, Miquel

    2013-01-01

    c-Src is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase involved in numerous signal transduction pathways. The kinase, SH3 and SH2 domains of c-Src are attached to the membrane-anchoring SH4 domain through the flexible Unique domain. Here we show intra- and intermolecular interactions involving the Unique and SH3 domains suggesting the presence of a previously unrecognized additional regulation layer in c-Src. We have characterized lipid binding by the Unique and SH3 domains, their intramolecular interaction and its allosteric modulation by a SH3-binding peptide or by Calcium-loaded calmodulin binding to the Unique domain. We also show reduced lipid binding following phosphorylation at conserved sites of the Unique domain. Finally, we show that injection of full-length c-Src with mutations that abolish lipid binding by the Unique domain causes a strong in vivo phenotype distinct from that of wild-type c-Src in a Xenopus oocyte model system, confirming the functional role of the Unique domain in c-Src regulation. PMID:23416516

  4. PDZ Binding Domains, Structural Disorder and Phosphorylation: A Menage-a-trois Tailing Dcp2 mRNA Decapping Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Dilantha

    2016-01-01

    Diverse cellular activities are mediated through the interaction of protein domains and their binding partners. One such protein domain widely distributed in the higher metazoan world is the PDZ domain, which facilitates abundant protein-protein interactions. The PDZ domain-PDZ binding domain interaction has been implicated in several pathologies including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Down syndrome. PDZ domains bind to C-terminal peptides/proteins which have either of the following combinations: S/T-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type I, hydrophobic-Xhydrophobic- COOH for type II, and D/E-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type III, although hydrophobicity in the termini form the key characteristic of the PDZ-binding domains. We identified and characterized a Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana, a protein containing a putative PDZ-binding domain using mutagenesis and protein biochemistry. Now we are using bioinformatics to study the Cterminal end of mRNA decapping enzymes from complex metazoans with the aim of (1) identifying putative PDZ-binding domains (2) Correlating structural disorder with PDZ binding domains and (3) Demonstrating the presence of phosphorylation sites in C-terminal extremities of Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzymes. It is proposed here that the trinity of PDZbinding domains, structural disorder and phosphorylation-susceptible sites are a feature of the Dcp2 family of decapping enzymes and perhaps is a wider trick in protein evolution where scaffolding/tethering is a requirement for localization and function. It is critical though laboratory-based supporting evidence is sought to back-up this bioinformatics exploration into tail regions of mRNA decapping enzymes. PMID:27151193

  5. Crystal structure of the trithorax group protein ASH2L reveals a forkhead-like DNA binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Sarvan, Sabina; Avdic, Vanja; Tremblay, Véronique; Chaturvedi, Chandra-Prakash; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Blais, Alexandre; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Brand, Marjorie; Couture, Jean-François

    2012-05-02

    Absent, small or homeotic discs-like 2 (ASH2L) is a trithorax group (TrxG) protein and a regulatory subunit of the SET1 family of lysine methyltransferases. Here we report that ASH2L binds DNA using a forkhead-like helix-wing-helix (HWH) domain. In vivo, the ASH2L HWH domain is required for binding to the {beta}-globin locus control region, histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4) trimethylation and maximal expression of the {beta}-globin gene (Hbb-1), validating the functional importance of the ASH2L DNA binding domain.

  6. Structural, biochemical, and functional characterization of the cyclic nucleotide binding homology domain from the mouse EAG1 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Marques-Carvalho, Maria J; Sahoo, Nirakar; Muskett, Frederick W; Vieira-Pires, Ricardo S; Gabant, Guillaume; Cadene, Martine; Schönherr, Roland; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2012-10-12

    KCNH channels are voltage-gated potassium channels with important physiological functions. In these channels, a C-terminal cytoplasmic region, known as the cyclic nucleotide binding homology (CNB-homology) domain displays strong sequence similarity to cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domains. However, the isolated domain does not bind cyclic nucleotides. Here, we report the X-ray structure of the CNB-homology domain from the mouse EAG1 channel. Through comparison with the recently determined structure of the CNB-homology domain from the zebrafish ELK (eag-like K(+)) channel and the CNB domains from the MlotiK1 and HCN (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated) potassium channels, we establish the structural features of CNB-homology domains that explain the low affinity for cyclic nucleotides. Our structure establishes that the "self-liganded" conformation, where two residues of the C-terminus of the domain are bound in an equivalent position to cyclic nucleotides in CNB domains, is a conserved feature of CNB-homology domains. Importantly, we provide biochemical evidence that suggests that there is also an unliganded conformation where the C-terminus of the domain peels away from its bound position. A functional characterization of this unliganded conformation reveals a role of the CNB-homology domain in channel gating. PMID:22732247

  7. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae Genome-wide Identification and Characterization of BOX Element-binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Wang, Changzheng; Wan, Min; Wu, Yin; Ma, Qianli

    2015-11-01

    The BOX elements are short repetitive DNA sequences that distribute randomly in intergenic regions of the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome. The function and origin of such elements are still unknown, but they were found to modulate expression of neighboring genes. Evidences suggested that the modulation's mechanism can be fulfilled by sequence-specific interaction of BOX elements with transcription factor family proteins. However, the type and function of these BOX-binding proteins still remain largely unexplored to date. In the current study we described a synthetic protocol to investigate the recognition and interaction between a highly conserved site of BOX elements and the DNA-binding domains of a variety of putative transcription factors in the pneumococcal genome. With the protocol we were able to predict those high-affinity domain binders of the conserved BOX DNA site (BOX DNA) in a high-throughput manner, and analyzed sequence-specific interaction in the domainDNA recognition at molecular level. Consequently, a number of putative transcription factor domains with both high affinity and specificity for the BOX DNA were identified, from which the helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif of a small heat shock factor was selected as a case study and tested for its binding capability toward the double-stranded BOX DNA using fluorescence anisotropy analysis. As might be expected, a relatively high affinity was detected for the interaction of HTH motif with BOX DNA with dissociation constant at nanomolar level. Molecular dynamics simulation, atomic structure examination and binding energy analysis revealed a complicated network of intensive nonbonded interactions across the complex interface, which confers both stability and specificity for the complex architecture. PMID:27491035

  9. The TCF C-clamp DNA binding domain expands the Wnt transcriptome via alternative target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hoverter, Nate P.; Zeller, Michael D.; McQuade, Miriam M.; Garibaldi, Angela; Busch, Anke; Selwan, Elizabeth M.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Baldi, Pierre; Waterman, Marian L.

    2014-01-01

    LEF/TCFs direct the final step in Wnt/β-catenin signalling by recruiting β-catenin to genes for activation of transcription. Ancient, non-vertebrate TCFs contain two DNA binding domains, a High Mobility Group box for recognition of the Wnt Response Element (WRE; 5′-CTTTGWWS-3′) and the C-clamp domain for recognition of the GC-rich Helper motif (5′-RCCGCC-3′). Two vertebrate TCFs (TCF-1/TCF7 and TCF-4/TCF7L2) use the C-clamp as an alternatively spliced domain to regulate cell-cycle progression, but how the C-clamp influences TCF binding and activity genome-wide is not known. Here, we used a doxycycline inducible system with ChIP-seq to assess how the C-clamp influences human TCF1 binding genome-wide. Metabolic pulse-labeling of nascent RNA with 4′Thiouridine was used with RNA-seq to connect binding to the Wnt transcriptome. We find that the C-clamp enables targeting to a greater number of gene loci for stronger occupancy and transcription regulation. The C-clamp uses Helper sites concurrently with WREs for gene targeting, but it also targets TCF1 to sites that do not have readily identifiable canonical WREs. The coupled ChIP-seq/4′Thiouridine-seq analysis identified new Wnt target genes, including additional regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, C-clamp containing isoforms of TCFs are potent transcriptional regulators with an expanded transcriptome directed by C-clamp-Helper site interactions. PMID:25414359

  10. Functional connectivity between tRNA binding domains in glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sherman, J M; Thomann, H U; Söll, D

    1996-03-15

    The structure of Escherichia coli glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) in complex with tRNAGln and ATP has identified a number a sequence-specific protein-tRNA interactions. The contribution to glutamine identity has previously been determined for the nucleotides in tRNAGln. Here, we report the mutational analysis of residues in all three tRNA recognition domains of GlnRS, thus completing a survey of the major sequence-specific contacts between GlnRS and tRNAGln. Specifically, we analyzed the GlnRS determinants involved in recognition of the anticodon which is essential for glutamine identity and in the communication of anticodon recognition to the acceptor binding domain in GlnRS. A combined in vivo and in vitro approach has demonstrated that Arg341, which makes a single sequence-specific hydrogen bond with U35 in the anticodon of tRNAGln, is involved in initial RNA recognition and is an important positive determinant for this base in both cognate and non- cognate tRNA contexts. However, Arg341, as well as Arg402, which interacts with G36 in the anticodon, are negative determinants for non-cognate nucleotides at their respective positions. Analysis of acceptor-anticodon binding double mutants and of a mutation of Glu323 in the loop-strand-helix connectivity subdomain in GlnRS has further implicated this domain in the functional communication of anticodon recognition. The better than expected activity (anticooperativity) of these double mutants has led us to propose an "anticodon-independent" mechanism, in which the removal of certain synthetase interactions with the anticodon eliminates structural constraints, thus allowing the relaxed specificity mutants in the acceptor binding domain ot make more productive interactions. PMID:8601833

  11. Molecular interfaces of the galactose-binding protein Tectonin domains in host-pathogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Low, Diana Hooi Ping; Frecer, Vladimir; Le Saux, Agnès; Srinivasan, Ganesh Anand; Ho, Bow; Chen, Jianzhu; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2010-03-26

    Beta-propeller proteins function in catalysis, protein-protein interaction, cell cycle regulation, and innate immunity. The galactose-binding protein (GBP) from the plasma of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, is a beta-propeller protein that functions in antimicrobial defense. Studies have shown that upon binding to Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), GBP interacts with C-reactive protein (CRP) to form a pathogen-recognition complex, which helps to eliminate invading microbes. However, the molecular basis of interactions between GBP and LPS and how it interplays with CRP remain largely unknown. By homology modeling, we showed that GBP contains six beta-propeller/Tectonin domains. Ligand docking indicated that Tectonin domains 6 to 1 likely contain the LPS binding sites. Protein-protein interaction studies demonstrated that Tectonin domain 4 interacts most strongly with CRP. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry mapped distinct sites of GBP that interact with LPS and with CRP, consistent with in silico predictions. Furthermore, infection condition (lowered Ca(2+) level) increases GBP-CRP affinity by 1000-fold. Resupplementing the system with a physiological level of Ca(2+) did not reverse the protein-protein affinity to the basal state, suggesting that the infection-induced complex had undergone irreversible conformational change. We propose that GBP serves as a bridging molecule, participating in molecular interactions, GBP-LPS and GBP-CRP, to form a stable pathogen-recognition complex. The interaction interfaces in these two partners suggest that Tectonin domains can differentiate self/nonself, crucial to frontline defense against infection. In addition, GBP shares architectural and functional homologies to a human protein, hTectonin, suggesting its evolutionarily conservation for approximately 500 million years, from horseshoe crab to human. PMID:20118243

  12. The C2 Domain and Altered ATP-Binding Loop Phosphorylation at Ser359 Mediate the Redox-Dependent Increase in Protein Kinase C-δ Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianli; Yao, Yongneng; Zhang, Pingbo; Udayasuryan, Barath; Komissarova, Elena V.; Chen, Ju; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    The diverse roles of protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) in cellular growth, survival, and injury have been attributed to stimulus-specific differences in PKCδ signaling responses. PKCδ exerts membrane-delimited actions in cells activated by agonists that stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis. PKCδ is released from membranes as a Tyr313-phosphorylated enzyme that displays a high level of lipid-independent activity and altered substrate specificity during oxidative stress. This study identifies an interaction between PKCδ's Tyr313-phosphorylated hinge region and its phosphotyrosine-binding C2 domain that controls PKCδ's enzymology indirectly by decreasing phosphorylation in the kinase domain ATP-positioning loop at Ser359. We show that wild-type (WT) PKCδ displays a strong preference for substrates with serine as the phosphoacceptor residue at the active site when it harbors phosphomimetic or bulky substitutions at Ser359. In contrast, PKCδ-S359A displays lipid-independent activity toward substrates with either a serine or threonine as the phosphoacceptor residue. Additional studies in cardiomyocytes show that oxidative stress decreases Ser359 phosphorylation on native PKCδ and that PKCδ-S359A overexpression increases basal levels of phosphorylation on substrates with both phosphoacceptor site serine and threonine residues. Collectively, these studies identify a C2 domain-pTyr313 docking interaction that controls ATP-positioning loop phosphorylation as a novel, dynamically regulated, and physiologically relevant structural determinant of PKCδ catalytic activity. PMID:25755284

  13. Domains of ERRgamma that mediate homodimerization and interaction with factors stimulating DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Hentschke, Moritz; Süsens, Ute; Borgmeyer, Uwe

    2002-08-01

    The estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma/ERR3/NR3B3) is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily closely related to the estrogen receptors. To explore the DNA binding characteristics, the protein-DNA interaction was studied in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). In vitro translated ERRgamma binds as a homodimer to direct repeats (DR) without spacing of the nuclear receptor half-site 5'-AGGTCA-3' (DR-0), to extended half-sites, and to the inverted estrogen response element. Using ERRgamma deletion constructs, binding was found to be dependent on the presence of sequences in the ligand binding domain (LBD). A far-Western analysis revealed that ERRgamma forms dimers even in the absence of DNA. Two elements, located in the hinge region and in the LBD, respectively, are necessary for DNA-independent dimerization. DNA binding of bacterial expressed ERRgamma requires additional factors present in the serum and in cellular extracts. Fusion proteins of the germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF/NR6A1) with ERRgamma showed that the characteristic feature to be stimulated by additional factors can be transferred to a heterologous protein. The stimulating activity was further characterized and its target sequence narrowed down to a small element in the hinge region. PMID:12180985

  14. Identification of the integrin binding domain of the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis invasin protein.

    PubMed

    Leong, J M; Fournier, R S; Isberg, R R

    1990-06-01

    The invasin protein of the pathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis mediates entry of the bacterium into cultured mammalian cells by binding several beta 1 chain integrins. In this study, we identified the region of invasin responsible for cell recognition. Thirty-two monoclonal antibodies directed against invasin were isolated, and of those, six blocked cell attachment to invasin. These six antibodies recognized epitopes within the last 192 amino acids of invasin. Deletion mutants of invasin and maltose-binding protein (MBP)--invasin fusion proteins were generated and tested for cell attachment. All of the invasin derivatives that carried the carboxyl-terminal 192 amino acids retained cell binding activity. One carboxyl-terminal invasin fragment and seven MBP--invasin fusion proteins were purified. The purified derivatives that retained binding activity inhibited bacterial entry into cultured mammalian cells. These results indicated that the carboxyl-terminal 192 amino acids of invasin contains the integrin-binding domain, even though this region does not contain the tripeptide sequence Arg-Gly-Asp. PMID:1693333

  15. Pancreatic Polypeptide Is Recognized by Two Hydrophobic Domains of the Human Y4 Receptor Binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Pedragosa-Badia, Xavier; Sliwoski, Gregory R.; Dong Nguyen, Elizabeth; Lindner, Diana; Stichel, Jan; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.

    2014-01-01

    Structural characterization of the human Y4 receptor (hY4R) interaction with human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) is crucial, not only for understanding its biological function but also for testing treatment strategies for obesity that target this interaction. Here, the interaction of receptor mutants with pancreatic polypeptide analogs was studied through double-cycle mutagenesis. To guide mutagenesis and interpret results, a three-dimensional comparative model of the hY4R-hPP complex was constructed based on all available class A G protein-coupled receptor crystal structures and refined using experimental data. Our study reveals that residues of the hPP and the hY4R form a complex network consisting of ionic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen binding. Residues Tyr2.64, Asp2.68, Asn6.55, Asn7.32, and Phe7.35 of Y4R are found to be important in receptor activation by hPP. Specifically, Tyr2.64 interacts with Tyr27 of hPP through hydrophobic contacts. Asn7.32 is affected by modifications on position Arg33 of hPP, suggesting a hydrogen bond between these two residues. Likewise, we find that Phe7.35 is affected by modifications of hPP at positions 33 and 36, indicating interactions between these three amino acids. Taken together, we demonstrate that the top of transmembrane helix 2 (TM2) and the top of transmembrane helices 6 and 7 (TM6–TM7) form the core of the peptide binding pocket. These findings will contribute to the rational design of ligands that bind the receptor more effectively to produce an enhanced agonistic or antagonistic effect. PMID:24375409

  16. Toward an Understanding of Agonist Binding to Human Orexin-1 and Orexin-2 Receptors with G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Modeling and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) Orexin-1 (OX1) and Orexin-2 (OX2) are located predominantly in the brain and are linked to a range of different physiological functions, including the control of feeding, energy metabolism, modulation of neuro-endocrine function, and regulation of the sleep–wake cycle. The natural agonists for OX1 and OX2 are two neuropeptides, Orexin-A and Orexin-B, which have activity at both receptors. Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) has been reported on both the receptors and the peptides and has provided important insight into key features responsible for agonist activity. However, the structural interpretation of how these data are linked together is still lacking. In this work, we produced and used SDM data, homology modeling followed by MD simulation, and ensemble-flexible docking to generate binding poses of the Orexin peptides in the OX receptors to rationalize the SDM data. We also developed a protein pairwise similarity comparing method (ProS) and a GPCR-likeness assessment score (GLAS) to explore the structural data generated within a molecular dynamics simulation and to help distinguish between different GPCR substates. The results demonstrate how these newly developed methods of structural assessment for GPCRs can be used to provide a working model of neuropeptide–Orexin receptor interaction. PMID:24144388

  17. In vivo binding properties of SH2 domains from GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J A; Kashishian, A

    1993-01-01

    We have used a transient expression system and mutant platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors to study the binding specificities of the Src homology 2 (SH2) regions of the Ras GTPase-activator protein (GAP) and the p85 alpha subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3 kinase). A number of fusion proteins, each tagged with an epitope allowing recognition by a monoclonal antibody, were expressed at levels comparable to those of endogenous GAP. Fusion proteins containing the central SH2-SH3-SH2 region of GAP or the C-terminal region of p85 alpha, which includes two SH2 domains, bound to PDGF receptors in response to PDGF stimulation. Both fusion proteins showed the same requirements for tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the PDGF receptor as the full-length proteins from which they were derived, i.e., binding of the GAP fusion protein was reduced by mutation of Tyr-771, and binding of the p85 fusion protein was reduced by mutation of Tyr-740, Tyr-751, or both residues. Fusion proteins containing single SH2 domains from either GAP or p85 alpha did not bind detectably to PDGF receptors in this system, suggesting that two SH2 domains in a single polypeptide cooperate to raise the affinity of binding. The sequence specificities of individual SH2 domains were deduced from the binding properties of fusion proteins containing one SH2 domain from GAP and another from p85. The results suggest that the C-terminal GAP SH2 domain specifies binding to Tyr-771, the C-terminal p85 alpha SH2 domain binds to either Tyr-740 or Tyr-751, and each protein's N-terminal SH2 domain binds to unidentified phosphorylation sites.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8382774

  18. On the interactions between nucleotide binding domains and membrane spanning domains in cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator: A molecular dynamic study.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Luca; Moran, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) is a membrane protein whose mutations cause cystic fibrosis, a lethal genetic disease. We performed a molecular dynamic (MD) study of the properties of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) whose conformational changes, upon ATP binding, are the direct responsible of the gating mechanisms of CFTR. This study was done for the wild type (WT) CFTR and for the two most common mutations, ΔF508, that produces a traffic defect of the protein, and the mutation G551D, that causes a gating defect on CFTR. Using an homology model of the open channel conformation of the CFTR we thus introduced the mutations to the structure. Although the overall structures of the G551D and ΔF508 are quite well conserved, the NBD1-NBD2 interactions are severely modified in both mutants. NBD1 and NBD2 are indeed destabilized with a higher internal energy (Ei) in the ΔF508-CFTR. Differently, Ei does not change in the NBDs of G551D but, while the number of close contacts between NBD1 and NBD2 in ΔF508 is increased, a significant reduction of close contacts is found in the G551D mutated form. Hydrogen bonds formation between NBDs of the two mutated forms is also altered and it is slightly increased for the ΔF508, while are severely reduced in G551D. A consequent modification of the NBDs-ICLs interactions between residues involved in the transduction of the ATP binding and the channel gating is also registered. Indeed, while a major interaction is noticed between NBDs interface and ICL2 and ICL4 in the WT, this interaction is somehow altered in both mutated forms plausibly with effect on channel gating. Thus, single point mutations of the CFTR protein can reasonably results in channel gating defects due to alteration of the interaction mechanisms between the NBDs and NBDs-ICLs interfaces upon ATP-binding process. PMID:25640670

  19. Structure, function, and tethering of DNA-binding domains in σ⁵⁴ transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Vidangos, Natasha; Maris, Ann E; Young, Anisa; Hong, Eunmi; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Batchelor, Joseph D; Wemmer, David E

    2013-12-01

    We compare the structure, activity, and linkage of DNA-binding domains (DBDs) from σ(54) transcriptional activators and discuss how the properties of the DBDs and the linker to the neighboring domain are affected by the overall properties and requirements of the full proteins. These transcriptional activators bind upstream of specific promoters that utilize σ(54)-polymerase. Upon receiving a signal the activators assemble into hexamers, which then, through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis, drive a conformational change in polymerase that enables transcription initiation. We present structures of the DBDs of activators nitrogen regulatory protein C 1 (NtrC1) and Nif-like homolog 2 (Nlh2) from the thermophile Aquifex aeolicus. The structures of these domains and their relationship to other parts of the activators are discussed. These structures are compared with previously determined structures of the DBDs of NtrC4, NtrC, ZraR, and factor for inversion stimulation. The N-terminal linkers that connect the DBDs to the central domains in NtrC1 and Nlh2 were studied and found to be unstructured. Additionally, a crystal structure of full-length NtrC1 was solved, but density of the DBDs was extremely weak, further indicating that the linker between ATPase and DBDs functions as a flexible tether. Flexible linking of ATPase and DBDs is likely necessary to allow assembly of the active hexameric ATPase ring. The comparison of this set of activators also shows clearly that strong dimerization of the DBD only occurs when other domains do not dimerize strongly. PMID:23818155

  20. Defining the Erythrocyte Binding Domains of Plasmodium vivax Tryptophan Rich Antigen 33.5

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Hema; Tyagi, Rupesh Kumar; Sharma, Yagya Dutta

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan-rich antigens play important role in host-parasite interaction. One of the Plasmodium vivax tryptophan-rich antigens called PvTRAg33.5 had earlier been shown to be predominantly of alpha helical in nature with multidomain structure, induced immune responses in humans, binds to host erythrocytes, and its sequence is highly conserved in the parasite population. In the present study, we divided this protein into three different parts i.e. N-terminal (amino acid position 24–106), middle (amino acid position 107–192), and C-terminal region (amino acid position 185–275) and determined the erythrocyte binding activity of these fragments. This binding activity was retained by the middle and C-terminal fragments covering 107 to 275 amino acid region of the PvTRAg33.5 protein. Eight non-overlapping peptides covering this 107 to 275 amino acid region were then synthesized and tested for their erythrocyte binding activity to further define the binding domains. Only two peptides, peptide P4 (at 171–191 amino acid position) and peptide P8 (at 255–275 amino acid position), were found to contain the erythrocyte binding activity. Competition assay revealed that each peptide recognizes its own erythrocyte receptor. These two peptides were found to be located on two parallel helices at one end of the protein in the modelled structure and could be exposed on its surface to form a suitable site for protein-protein interaction. Natural antibodies present in the sera of the P. vivax exposed individuals or the polyclonal rabbit antibodies against this protein were able to inhibit the erythrocyte binding activity of PvTRAg33.5, its fragments, and these two synthetic peptides P4 and P8. Further studies on receptor-ligand interaction might lead to the development of the therapeutic reagent. PMID:23638151

  1. Identification of the Calmodulin-Binding Domains of Fas Death Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bliss J.; Samal, Alexandra B.; Vlach, Jiri; Fernandez, Timothy F.; Brooke, Dewey; Prevelige, Peter E.; Saad, Jamil S.

    2016-01-01

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by binding of a Fas ligand to the ectodomain of the surface death receptor Fas protein. Subsequently, the intracellular death domain of Fas (FasDD) and that of the Fas-associated protein (FADD) interact to form the core of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), a crucial step for activation of caspases that induce cell death. Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM) is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells and specifically interacts with FasDD to regulate the apoptotic/survival signaling pathway. Inhibition of CaM activity in DISC stimulates apoptosis significantly. We have recently shown that CaM forms a ternary complex with FasDD (2:1 CaM:FasDD). However, the molecular mechanism by which CaM binds to two distinct FasDD motifs is not fully understood. Here, we employed mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), biophysical, and biochemical methods to identify the binding regions of FasDD and provide a molecular basis for the role of CaM in Fas–mediated apoptosis. Proteolytic digestion and mass spectrometry data revealed that peptides spanning residues 209–239 (Fas-Pep1) and 251–288 (Fas-Pep2) constitute the two CaM-binding regions of FasDD. To determine the molecular mechanism of interaction, we have characterized the binding of recombinant/synthetic Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 peptides with CaM. Our data show that both peptides engage the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM simultaneously. Binding of Fas-Pep1 to CaM is entropically driven while that of Fas-Pep2 to CaM is enthalpically driven, indicating that a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces contribute to the stabilization of the FasDD–CaM complex. Our data suggest that because Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 are involved in extensive intermolecular contacts with the death domain of FADD, binding of CaM to these regions may hinder its ability to bind to FADD, thus greatly inhibiting the initiation of apoptotic signaling

  2. Identification of the Calmodulin-Binding Domains of Fas Death Receptor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bliss J; Samal, Alexandra B; Vlach, Jiri; Fernandez, Timothy F; Brooke, Dewey; Prevelige, Peter E; Saad, Jamil S

    2016-01-01

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by binding of a Fas ligand to the ectodomain of the surface death receptor Fas protein. Subsequently, the intracellular death domain of Fas (FasDD) and that of the Fas-associated protein (FADD) interact to form the core of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), a crucial step for activation of caspases that induce cell death. Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM) is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells and specifically interacts with FasDD to regulate the apoptotic/survival signaling pathway. Inhibition of CaM activity in DISC stimulates apoptosis significantly. We have recently shown that CaM forms a ternary complex with FasDD (2:1 CaM:FasDD). However, the molecular mechanism by which CaM binds to two distinct FasDD motifs is not fully understood. Here, we employed mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), biophysical, and biochemical methods to identify the binding regions of FasDD and provide a molecular basis for the role of CaM in Fas-mediated apoptosis. Proteolytic digestion and mass spectrometry data revealed that peptides spanning residues 209-239 (Fas-Pep1) and 251-288 (Fas-Pep2) constitute the two CaM-binding regions of FasDD. To determine the molecular mechanism of interaction, we have characterized the binding of recombinant/synthetic Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 peptides with CaM. Our data show that both peptides engage the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM simultaneously. Binding of Fas-Pep1 to CaM is entropically driven while that of Fas-Pep2 to CaM is enthalpically driven, indicating that a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces contribute to the stabilization of the FasDD-CaM complex. Our data suggest that because Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 are involved in extensive intermolecular contacts with the death domain of FADD, binding of CaM to these regions may hinder its ability to bind to FADD, thus greatly inhibiting the initiation of apoptotic signaling pathway

  3. An Aptamer against the Matrix Binding Domain on the Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Impairs Virion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Orabi, Ahmed; Bieringer, Maria; Geerlof, Arie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatitis B virus (HBV) particle is an icosahedral nucleocapsid surrounded by a lipid envelope containing viral surface proteins. A small domain (matrix domain [MD]) in the large surface protein L and a narrow region (matrix binding domain [MBD]) including isoleucine 126 on the capsid surface have been mapped, in which point mutations such as core I126A specifically blocked nucleocapsid envelopment. It is possible that the two domains interact with each other during virion morphogenesis. By the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method, we evolved DNA aptamers from an oligonucleotide library binding to purified recombinant capsids but not binding to the corresponding I126A mutant capsids. Aptamers bound to capsids were separated from unbound molecules by filtration. After 13 rounds of selections and amplifications, 16 different aptamers were found among 73 clones. The four most frequent aptamers represented more than 50% of the clones. The main aptamer, AO-01 (13 clones, 18%), showed the lowest dissociation constant (Kd) of 180 ± 82 nM for capsid binding among the four molecules. Its Kd for I126A capsids was 1,306 ± 503 nM. Cotransfection of Huh7 cells with AO-01 and an HBV genomic construct resulted in 47% inhibition of virion production at 3 days posttransfection, but there was no inhibition by cotransfection of an aptamer with a random sequence. The half-life of AO-01 in cells was 2 h, which might explain the incomplete inhibition. The results support the importance of the MBD for nucleocapsid envelopment. Inhibiting the MD-MBD interaction with a low-molecular-weight substance might represent a new approach for an antiviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Approximately 240 million people are persistently infected with HBV. To date, antiviral therapies depend on a single target, the viral reverse transcriptase. Future additional targets could be viral protein-protein interactions. We selected a 55-base-long single-stranded DNA

  4. Novel DNA-binding element within the C-terminal extension of the nuclear receptor DNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Jakób, Michał; Kołodziejczyk, Robert; Orłowski, Marek; Krzywda, Szymon; Kowalska, Agnieszka; Dutko-Gwóźdź, Joanna; Gwóźdź, Tomasz; Kochman, Marian; Jaskólski, Mariusz; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    The heterodimer of the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (Usp), members of the nuclear receptors superfamily, is considered as the functional receptor for ecdysteroids initiating molting and metamorphosis in insects. Here we report the 1.95 Å structure of the complex formed by the DNA-binding domains (DBDs) the EcR and the Usp, bound to the natural pseudopalindromic response element. Comparison of the structure with that obtained previously, using an idealized response element, shows how the EcRDBD, which has been previously reported to possess extraordinary flexibility, accommodates DNA-induced structural changes. Part of the C-terminal extension (CTE) of the EcRDBD folds into an α-helix whose location in the minor groove does not match any of the locations previously observed for nuclear receptors. Mutational analyses suggest that the α-helix is a component of EcR-box, a novel element indispensable for DNA-binding and located within the nuclear receptor CTE. This element seems to be a general feature of all known EcRs. PMID:17426125

  5. A green fluorescent protein solubility screen in E. coli reveals domain boundaries of the GTP-binding domain in the P element transposase

    PubMed Central

    Sabogal, Alex; Rio, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding and hydrolysis events often act as molecular switches in proteins, modulating conformational changes between active and inactive states in many signaling molecules and transport systems. The P element transposase of Drosophila melanogaster requires GTP binding to proceed along its reaction pathway, following initial site-specific DNA binding. GTP binding is unique to P elements and may represent a novel form of transpositional regulation, allowing the bound transposase to find a second site, looping the transposon DNA for strand cleavage and excision. The GTP-binding activity has been previously mapped to the central portion of the transposase protein; however, the P element transposase contains little sequence identity with known GTP-binding folds. To identify soluble, active transposase domains, a GFP solubility screen was used testing the solubility of random P element gene fragments in E. coli. The screen produced a single clone spanning known GTP-binding residues in the central portion of the transposase coding region. This clone, amino acids 275–409 in the P element transposase, was soluble, highly expressed in E.coli and active for GTP-binding activity, therefore is a candidate for future biochemical and structural studies. In addition, the chimeric screen revealed a minimal N-terminal THAP DNA-binding domain attached to an extended leucine zipper coiled-coil dimerization domain in the P element transposase, precisely delineating the DNA-binding and dimerization activities on the primary sequence. This study highlights the use of a GFP-based solubility screen on a large multidomain protein to identify highly expressed, soluble truncated domain subregions. PMID:20842711

  6. Temperature dependence of estrogen binding: importance of a subzone in the ligand binding domain of a novel piscine estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Tan, N S; Frecer, V; Lam, T J; Ding, J L

    1999-11-11

    The full length estrogen receptor from Oreochromis aureus (OaER) was cloned and expressed in vitro and in vivo as a functional transcription factor. Amino acid residues involved in the thermal stability of the receptor are located at/near subzones beta1 and beta3, which are highly conserved in other non-piscine species but not in OaER. Hormone binding studies, however, indicate that OaER is thermally stable but exhibited a approximately 3-fold reduced affinity for estrogen at elevated temperatures. Transfection of OaER into various cell lines cultured at different temperatures displayed a significant estrogen dose-response shift compared with that of chicken ER (cER). At 37 degrees C, OaER requires approximately 80-fold more estrogen to achieve half-maximal stimulation of CAT. Lowering of the incubation temperature from 37 degrees C to 25 degrees C or 20 degrees C resulted in a 4-fold increase in its affinity for estrogen. The thermally deficient transactivation of OaER at temperatures above 25 degrees C was fully prevented by high levels of estrogen. Thus, compared to cER, the OaER exhibits reduced affinity for estrogen at elevated temperature as reflected in its deficient transactivation capability. Amino acid replacements of OaER beta3 subzones with corresponding amino acids from cER could partially rescue this temperature sensitivity. The three-dimensional structure of the OaER ligand binding domain (LBD) was modelled based on conformational similarity and sequence homology with human RXRalpha apo, RARgamma holo and ERalpha LBDs. Unliganded and 17beta-estradiol-liganded OaER LBD retained the overall folding pattern of the nuclear receptor LBDs. The residues at/near the subzone beta3 of the LBD constitute the central core of OaER structure. Thus, amino acid alteration at this region potentially alters the structure and consequently its temperature-dependent ligand binding properties. PMID:10559464

  7. Crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Amick, Joseph; Schlanger, Simon E; Wachnowsky, Christine; Moseng, Mitchell A; Emerson, Corey C; Dare, Michelle; Luo, Wen-I; Ithychanda, Sujay S; Nix, Jay C; Cowan, J A; Page, Richard C; Misra, Saurav

    2014-01-01

    Mortalin, a member of the Hsp70-family of molecular chaperones, functions in a variety of processes including mitochondrial protein import and quality control, Fe-S cluster protein biogenesis, mitochondrial homeostasis, and regulation of p53. Mortalin is implicated in regulation of apoptosis, cell stress response, neurodegeneration, and cancer and is a target of the antitumor compound MKT-077. Like other Hsp70-family members, Mortalin consists of a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and a substrate-binding domain. We determined the crystal structure of the NBD of human Mortalin at 2.8 Å resolution. Although the Mortalin nucleotide-binding pocket is highly conserved relative to other Hsp70 family members, we find that its nucleotide affinity is weaker than that of Hsc70. A Parkinson's disease-associated mutation is located on the Mortalin-NBD surface and may contribute to Mortalin aggregation. We present structure-based models for how the Mortalin-NBD may interact with the nucleotide exchange factor GrpEL1, with p53, and with MKT-077. Our structure may contribute to the understanding of disease-associated Mortalin mutations and to improved Mortalin-targeting antitumor compounds. PMID:24687350

  8. A new metal binding domain involved in cadmium, cobalt and zinc transport.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron T; Barupala, Dulmini; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2015-09-01

    The P1B-ATPases, which couple cation transport across membranes to ATP hydrolysis, are central to metal homeostasis in all organisms. An important feature of P1B-ATPases is the presence of soluble metal binding domains (MBDs) that regulate transport activity. Only one type of MBD has been characterized extensively, but bioinformatics analyses indicate that a diversity of MBDs may exist in nature. Here we report the biochemical, structural and functional characterization of a new MBD from the Cupriavidus metallidurans P1B-4-ATPase CzcP (CzcP MBD). The CzcP MBD binds two Cd(2+), Co(2+) or Zn(2+) ions in distinct and unique sites and adopts an unexpected fold consisting of two fused ferredoxin-like domains. Both in vitro and in vivo activity assays using full-length CzcP, truncated CzcP and several variants indicate a regulatory role for the MBD and distinct functions for the two metal binding sites. Taken together, these findings elucidate a previously unknown MBD and suggest new regulatory mechanisms for metal transport by P1B-ATPases. PMID:26192600

  9. A new metal binding domain involved in cadmium, cobalt and zinc transport

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Aaron T.; Barupala, Dulmini; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2015-01-01

    The P1B-ATPases, which couple cation transport across membranes to ATP hydrolysis, are central to metal homeostasis in all organisms. An important feature of P1B-ATPases is the presence of soluble metal binding domains that regulate transport activity. Only one type of MBD has been characterized extensively, but bioinformatics analyses indicate that a diversity of MBDs may exist in nature. Here we report the biochemical, structural, and functional characterization of a new MBD from the Cupriavidus metallidurans P1B-4-ATPase CzcP (CzcP MBD). The CzcP MBD binds two Cd2+, Co2+, or Zn2+ ions in distinct and unique sites, and adopts an unexpected fold consisting of two fused ferredoxin-like domains. Both in vitro and in vivo activity assays using full length CzcP, truncated CzcP, and several variants indicate a regulatory role for the MBD and distinct functions for the two metal binding sites. Taken together, these findings elucidate a previously unknown MBD and suggest new regulatory mechanisms for metal transport by P1B-ATPases. PMID:26192600

  10. The influence of adnectin binding on the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Guodong; Ahn, Joomi; Houel, Stephane; Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Cohen, Daniel; Xie, Dianlin; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The precise and unambiguous elucidation and characterization of interactions between a high affinity recognition entity and its cognate protein provides important insights for the design and development of drugs with optimized properties and efficacy. In oncology, one important target protein has been shown to be the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through the development of therapeutic anticancer antibodies that are selective inhibitors of EGFR activity. More recently, smaller protein derived from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin termed an adnectin has also been shown to inhibit EGFR in clinical studies. The mechanism of EGFR inhibition by either an adnectin or an antibody results from specific binding of the high affinity protein to the extracellular portion of EGFR (exEGFR) in a manner that prevents phosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domain of the receptor and thereby blocks intracellular signaling. Here the structural changes induced upon binding were studied by probing the solution conformations of full length exEGFR alone and bound to a cognate adnectin through hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The effects of binding in solution were identified and compared with the structure of a bound complex determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:25223306

  11. RNA-binding proteins with prion-like domains in ALS and FTLD-U.

    PubMed

    Gitler, Aaron D; Shorter, James

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is a debilitating, and universally fatal, neurodegenerative disease that devastates upper and lower motor neurons. The causes of ALS are poorly understood. A central role for RNA-binding proteins and RNA metabolism in ALS has recently emerged. The RNA-binding proteins, TDP-43 and FUS, are principal components of cytoplasmic inclusions found in motor neurons of ALS patients and mutations in TDP-43 and FUS are linked to familial and sporadic ALS. Pathology and genetics also connect TDP-43 and FUS with frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). It was unknown whether mechanisms of FUS aggregation and toxicity were similar or different to those of TDP-43. To address this issue, we have employed yeast models and pure protein biochemistry to define mechanisms underlying TDP-43 and FUS aggregation and toxicity, and to identify genetic modifiers relevant for human disease. We have identified prion-like domains in FUS and TDP-43 and provide evidence that these domains are required for aggregation. Our studies have defined key similarities as well as important differences between the two proteins. Collectively, however, our findings lead us to suggest that FUS and TDP-43, though similar RNA-binding proteins, likely aggregate and confer disease phenotypes via distinct mechanisms. PMID:21847013

  12. A New Metal Binding Domain Involved in Cadmium, Cobalt and Zinc Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Aaron T.; Barupala, Dulmini; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2015-07-20

    In the P1B-ATPases, which couple cation transport across membranes to ATP hydrolysis, are central to metal homeostasis in all organisms. An important feature of P1B-ATPases is the presence of soluble metal binding domains (MBDs) that regulate transport activity. Only one type of MBD has been characterized extensively, but bioinformatics analyses indicate that a diversity of MBDs may exist in nature. Here we report the biochemical, structural and functional characterization of a new MBD from the Cupriavidus metallidurans P1B-4-ATPase CzcP (CzcP MBD). The CzcP MBD binds two Cd2+, Co2+ or Zn2+ ions in distinct and unique sites and adopts an unexpected fold consisting of two fused ferredoxin-like domains. Both in vitro and in vivo activity assays using full-length CzcP, truncated CzcP and several variants indicate a regulatory role for the MBD and distinct functions for the two metal binding sites. Moreover, these findings elucidate a previously unknown MBD and suggest new regulatory mechanisms for metal transport by P1B-ATPases.

  13. The Influence of Adnectin Binding on the Extracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Guodong; Ahn, Joomi; Houel, Stephane; Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Cohen, Daniel; Xie, Dianlin; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2014-12-01

    The precise and unambiguous elucidation and characterization of interactions between a high affinity recognition entity and its cognate protein provides important insights for the design and development of drugs with optimized properties and efficacy. In oncology, one important target protein has been shown to be the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through the development of therapeutic anticancer antibodies that are selective inhibitors of EGFR activity. More recently, smaller protein derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin termed an adnectin has also been shown to inhibit EGFR in clinical studies. The mechanism of EGFR inhibition by either an adnectin or an antibody results from specific binding of the high affinity protein to the extracellular portion of EGFR (exEGFR) in a manner that prevents phosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domain of the receptor and thereby blocks intracellular signaling. Here, the structural changes induced upon binding were studied by probing the solution conformations of full length exEGFR alone and bound to a cognate adnectin through hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The effects of binding in solution were identified and compared with the structure of a bound complex determined by X-ray crystallography.

  14. The STAS domain of mammalian SLC26A5 prestin harbours an anion-binding site.

    PubMed

    Lolli, Graziano; Pasqualetto, Elisa; Costanzi, Elisa; Bonetto, Greta; Battistutta, Roberto

    2016-02-15

    Prestin is a unique ATP- and Ca(2+)-independent molecular motor with piezoelectric characteristics responsible for the electromotile properties of mammalian cochlear outer hair cells, i.e. the capacity of these cells to modify their length in response to electric stimuli. This 'electromotility' is at the basis of the exceptional sensitivity and frequency selectivity distinctive of mammals. Prestin belongs to the SLC26 (solute carrier 26) family of anion transporters and needs anions to function properly, particularly Cl(-). In the present study, using X-ray crystallography we reveal that the STAS (sulfate transporter and anti-sigma factor antagonist) domain of mammalian prestin, considered an 'incomplete' transporter, harbours an unanticipated anion-binding site. In parallel, we present the first crystal structure of a prestin STAS domain from a non-mammalian vertebrate prestin (chicken) that behaves as a 'full' transporter. Notably, in chicken STAS, the anion-binding site is lacking because of a local structural rearrangement, indicating that the presence of the STAS anion-binding site is exclusive to mammalian prestin. PMID:26635354

  15. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  16. Allosteric communication between DNA-binding and light-responsive domains of diatom class I aureochromes

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ankan; Herman, Elena; Serif, Manuel; Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Hepp, Sebastian; Pokorny, Richard; Kroth, Peter G.; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    The modular architecture of aureochrome blue light receptors, found in several algal groups including diatoms, is unique by having the LOV-type photoreceptor domain fused to the C-terminus of its putative effector, an N-terminal DNA-binding bZIP module. The structural and functional understanding of aureochromes’ light-dependent signaling mechanism is limited, despite their promise as an optogenetic tool. We show that class I aureochromes 1a and 1c from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum are regulated in a light-independent circadian rhythm. These aureochromes are capable to form functional homo- and heterodimers, which recognize the ACGT core sequence within the canonical ‘aureo box’, TGACGT, in a light-independent manner. The bZIP domain holds a more folded and less flexible but extended conformation in the duplex DNA-bound state. FT-IR spectroscopy in the absence and the presence of DNA shows light-dependent helix unfolding in the LOV domain, which leads to conformational changes in the bZIP region. The solution structure of DNA bound to aureochrome points to a tilted orientation that was further validated by molecular dynamics simulations. We propose that aureochrome signaling relies on an allosteric pathway from LOV to bZIP that results in conformational changes near the bZIP-DNA interface without major effects on the binding affinity. PMID:27179025

  17. BuD, a helix–loop–helix DNA-binding domain for genome modification

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Stefano; Molina, Rafael; López-Méndez, Blanca; Juillerat, Alexandre; Bertonati, Claudia; Daboussi, Fayza; Campos-Olivas, Ramon; Duchateau, Phillippe; Montoya, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    DNA editing offers new possibilities in synthetic biology and biomedicine for modulation or modification of cellular functions to organisms. However, inaccuracy in this process may lead to genome damage. To address this important problem, a strategy allowing specific gene modification has been achieved through the addition, removal or exchange of DNA sequences using customized proteins and the endogenous DNA-repair machinery. Therefore, the engineering of specific protein–DNA interactions in protein scaffolds is key to providing ‘toolkits’ for precise genome modification or regulation of gene expression. In a search for putative DNA-binding domains, BurrH, a protein that recognizes a 19 bp DNA target, was identified. Here, its apo and DNA-bound crystal structures are reported, revealing a central region containing 19 repeats of a helix–loop–helix modular domain (BurrH domain; BuD), which identifies the DNA target by a single residue-to-nucleotide code, thus facilitating its redesign for gene targeting. New DNA-binding specificities have been engineered in this template, showing that BuD-derived nucleases (BuDNs) induce high levels of gene targeting in a locus of the human haemoglobin β (HBB) gene close to mutations responsible for sickle-cell anaemia. Hence, the unique combination of high efficiency and specificity of the BuD arrays can push forward diverse genome-modification approaches for cell or organism redesign, opening new avenues for gene editing. PMID:25004980

  18. Allosteric communication between DNA-binding and light-responsive domains of diatom class I aureochromes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ankan; Herman, Elena; Serif, Manuel; Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Hepp, Sebastian; Pokorny, Richard; Kroth, Peter G; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-07-01

    The modular architecture of aureochrome blue light receptors, found in several algal groups including diatoms, is unique by having the LOV-type photoreceptor domain fused to the C-terminus of its putative effector, an N-terminal DNA-binding bZIP module. The structural and functional understanding of aureochromes' light-dependent signaling mechanism is limited, despite their promise as an optogenetic tool. We show that class I aureochromes 1a and 1c from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum are regulated in a light-independent circadian rhythm. These aureochromes are capable to form functional homo- and heterodimers, which recognize the ACGT core sequence within the canonical 'aureo box', TGACGT, in a light-independent manner. The bZIP domain holds a more folded and less flexible but extended conformation in the duplex DNA-bound state. FT-IR spectroscopy in the absence and the presence of DNA shows light-dependent helix unfolding in the LOV domain, which leads to conformational changes in the bZIP region. The solution structure of DNA bound to aureochrome points to a tilted orientation that was further validated by molecular dynamics simulations. We propose that aureochrome signaling relies on an allosteric pathway from LOV to bZIP that results in conformational changes near the bZIP-DNA interface without major effects on the binding affinity. PMID:27179025

  19. Relationship between inhibition of cyclic AMP production in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the rat D2(444) receptor and antagonist/agonist binding ratios.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, E. A.; Middlemiss, D. N.; Ragan, C. I.

    1995-01-01

    1. Radioligand binding assays using [3H]-(-)-sulpiride, in the presence of 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 100 microM guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp) and [3H]-N0437 were developed to label the low and high agonist affinity states of the rD2(444) receptor (long form of the rat D2 receptor) respectively. The ratios of the affinities of compounds in these two assays (Kapp [3H]-(-)-supiride/Kapp [3H]-N-0437) were then calculated. 2. The prediction that the binding ratio reflected the functional efficacy of a compound was supported by measurement of the ability of a number of compounds acting at dopamine receptors to inhibit rD2(444)-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP production. When the rank order of the ratios of a number of these compounds was compared to their ability to inhibit the production of cyclic AMP, a significant correlation was seen (Spearman rank correlation coefficient = 0.943, P = 0.01). 3. In conclusion, the sulpiride/N-0437 binding ratio reliably predicted the efficacy of compounds acting at dopamine receptors to inhibit cyclic AMP production mediated by the rD2(444) receptor. PMID:7582561

  20. Honokiol: A non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist from nature☆

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Atanas G.; Wang, Jian N.; Gu, Shi P.; Bu, Jing; Kramer, Matthias P.; Baumgartner, Lisa; Fakhrudin, Nanang; Ladurner, Angela; Malainer, Clemens; Vuorinen, Anna; Noha, Stefan M.; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Schuster, Daniela; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M.; Heiss, Elke H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are clinically used to counteract hyperglycemia. However, so far experienced unwanted side effects, such as weight gain, promote the search for new PPARγ activators. Methods We used a combination of in silico, in vitro, cell-based and in vivo models to identify and validate natural products as promising leads for partial novel PPARγ agonists. Results The natural product honokiol from the traditional Chinese herbal drug Magnolia bark was in silico predicted to bind into the PPARγ ligand binding pocket as dimer. Honokiol indeed directly bound to purified PPARγ ligand-binding domain (LBD) and acted as partial agonist in a PPARγ-mediated luciferase reporter assay. Honokiol was then directly compared to the clinically used full agonist pioglitazone with regard to stimulation of glucose uptake in adipocytes as well as adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. While honokiol stimulated basal glucose uptake to a similar extent as pioglitazone, it did not induce adipogenesis in contrast to pioglitazone. In diabetic KKAy mice oral application of honokiol prevented hyperglycemia and suppressed weight gain. Conclusion We identified honokiol as a partial non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist in vitro which prevented hyperglycemia and weight gain in vivo. General significance This observed activity profile suggests honokiol as promising new pharmaceutical lead or dietary supplement to combat metabolic disease, and provides a molecular explanation for the use of Magnolia in traditional medicine. PMID:23811337

  1. The tRNA-binding moiety in GCN2 contains a dimerization domain that interacts with the kinase domain and is required for tRNA binding and kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongfang; Dong, Jinsheng; Hu, Cuihua; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2001-01-01

    GCN2 stimulates translation of GCN4 mRNA in amino acid-starved cells by phosphorylating translation initiation factor 2. GCN2 is activated by binding of uncharged tRNA to a domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS). The HisRS-like region contains two dimerization domains (HisRS-N and HisRS-C) required for GCN2 function in vivo but dispensable for dimerization by full-length GCN2. Residues corresponding to amino acids at the dimer interface of Escherichia coli HisRS were required for dimerization of recombinant HisRS-N and for tRNA binding by full-length GCN2, suggesting that HisRS-N dimerization promotes tRNA binding and kinase activation. HisRS-N also interacted with the protein kinase (PK) domain, and a deletion impairing this interaction destroyed GCN2 function without reducing tRNA binding; thus, HisRS-N–PK interaction appears to stimulate PK function. The C-terminal domain of GCN2 (C-term) interacted with the PK domain in a manner disrupted by an activating PK mutation (E803V). These results suggest that the C-term is an autoinhibitory domain, counteracted by tRNA binding. We conclude that multiple domain interactions, positive and negative, mediate the activation of GCN2 by uncharged tRNA. PMID:11250908

  2. Enzymatic Activities of RNase H Domains of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with Substrate Binding Domains of Bacterial RNases H1 and H2.

    PubMed

    Permanasari, Etin-Diah; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2015-06-01

    Thermotoga maritima RNase H1 and Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 have an N-terminal substrate binding domain, termed hybrid binding domain (TmaHBD), and N-terminal domain (BstNTD), respectively. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a heterodimer consisting of a P66 subunit and a P51 subunit. The P66 subunit contains a C-terminal RNase H domain, which exhibits RNase H activity either in the presence of Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) ions. The isolated RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT (RNH(HIV)) is inactive, possibly due to the lack of a substrate binding ability, disorder of a loop containing His539, and increased flexibility. To examine whether the activity of RNH(HIV) is restored by the attachment of TmaHBD or BstNTD to its N-terminus, two chimeric proteins, TmaHBD-RNH(HIV) and BstNTD-RNH(HIV), were constructed and characterized. Both chimeric proteins bound to RNA/DNA hybrid more strongly than RNH(HIV) and exhibited enzymatic activity in the presence of Mn(2+) ions. They did not exhibit activity or exhibited very weak activity in the presence of Mg(2+) ions. These results indicate that TmaHBD and BstNTD function as an RNA/DNA hybrid binding tag, and greatly increase the substrate binding affinity and Mn(2+)-dependent activity of RNH(HIV) but do not restore the Mg(2+)-dependent activity of RNH(HIV). PMID:25673083

  3. Biochemical Characterization of Nonamer Binding Domain of RAG1 Reveals its Thymine Preference with Respect to Length and Position.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Deepthi; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2016-01-01

    RAG complex consisting of RAG1 and RAG2 is a site-specific endonuclease responsible for the generation of antigen receptor diversity. It cleaves recombination signal sequence (RSS), comprising of conserved heptamer and nonamer. Nonamer binding domain (NBD) of RAG1 plays a central role in the recognition of RSS. To investigate the DNA binding properties of the domain, NBD of murine RAG1 was cloned, expressed and purified. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that NBD binds with high affinity to nonamer in the context of 12/23 RSS or heteroduplex DNA. NBD binding was specific to thymines when single stranded DNA containing poly A, C, G or T were used. Biolayer interferometry studies showed that poly T binding to NBD was robust and comparable to that of 12RSS. More than 23 nt was essential for NBD binding at homothymidine stretches. On a double-stranded DNA, NBD could bind to A:T stretches, but not G:C or random sequences. Although NBD is indispensable for sequence specific activity of RAGs, external supplementation of purified nonamer binding domain to NBD deleted cRAG1/cRAG2 did not restore its activity, suggesting that the overall domain architecture of RAG1 is important. Therefore, we define the sequence requirements of NBD binding to DNA. PMID:26742581

  4. Biochemical Characterization of Nonamer Binding Domain of RAG1 Reveals its Thymine Preference with Respect to Length and Position

    PubMed Central

    Raveendran, Deepthi; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2016-01-01

    RAG complex consisting of RAG1 and RAG2 is a site-specific endonuclease responsible for the generation of antigen receptor diversity. It cleaves recombination signal sequence (RSS), comprising of conserved heptamer and nonamer. Nonamer binding domain (NBD) of RAG1 plays a central role in the recognition of RSS. To investigate the DNA binding properties of the domain, NBD of murine RAG1 was cloned, expressed and purified. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that NBD binds with high affinity to nonamer in the context of 12/23 RSS or heteroduplex DNA. NBD binding was specific to thymines when single stranded DNA containing poly A, C, G or T were used. Biolayer interferometry studies showed that poly T binding to NBD was robust and comparable to that of 12RSS. More than 23 nt was essential for NBD binding at homothymidine stretches. On a double-stranded DNA, NBD could bind to A:T stretches, but not G:C or random sequences. Although NBD is indispensable for sequence specific activity of RAGs, external supplementation of purified nonamer binding domain to NBD deleted cRAG1/cRAG2 did not restore its activity, suggesting that the overall domain architecture of RAG1 is important. Therefore, we define the sequence requirements of NBD binding to DNA. PMID:26742581

  5. The p53 tetramer shows an induced-fit interaction of the C-terminal domain with the DNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    D'Abramo, M; Bešker, N; Desideri, A; Levine, A J; Melino, G; Chillemi, G

    2016-01-01

    The Trp53 gene is the most frequently mutated gene in all human cancers. Its protein product p53 is a very powerful transcription factor that can activate different biochemical pathways and affect the regulation of metabolism, senescence, DNA damage response, cell cycle and cell death. The understanding of its function at the molecular level could be of pivotal relevance for therapy. Investigation of long-range intra- and interdomain communications in the p53 tetramer–DNA complex was performed by means of an atomistic model that included the tetramerization helices in the C-terminal domain, the DNA-binding domains and a consensus DNA-binding site of 18 base pairs. Nonsymmetric dynamics are illustrated in the four DNA-binding domains, with loop L1 switching from inward to outward conformations with respect to the DNA major groove. Direct intra- and intermonomeric long-range communications between the tetramerization and DNA-binding domains are noted. These long-distance conformational changes link the C terminus with the DNA-binding domain and provide a biophysical rationale for the reported functional regulation of the p53 C-terminal region. A fine characterization of the DNA deformation caused by p53 binding is obtained, with ‘static' deformations always present and measured by the slide parameter in the central thymine–adenine base pairs; we also detect ‘dynamic' deformations switched on and off by particular p53 tetrameric conformations and measured by the roll and twist parameters in the same base pairs. These different conformations can indeed modulate the electrostatic potential isosurfaces of the whole p53–DNA complex. These results provide a molecular/biophysical understanding of the evident role of the C terminus in post-translational modification that regulates the transcriptional function of p53. Furthermore, the unstructured C terminus is able to facilitate contacts between the core DNA-binding domains of the tetramer. PMID:26477317

  6. The p53 tetramer shows an induced-fit interaction of the C-terminal domain with the DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    D'Abramo, M; Bešker, N; Desideri, A; Levine, A J; Melino, G; Chillemi, G

    2016-06-23

    The Trp53 gene is the most frequently mutated gene in all human cancers. Its protein product p53 is a very powerful transcription factor that can activate different biochemical pathways and affect the regulation of metabolism, senescence, DNA damage response, cell cycle and cell death. The understanding of its function at the molecular level could be of pivotal relevance for therapy. Investigation of long-range intra- and interdomain communications in the p53 tetramer-DNA complex was performed by means of an atomistic model that included the tetramerization helices in the C-terminal domain, the DNA-binding domains and a consensus DNA-binding site of 18 base pairs. Nonsymmetric dynamics are illustrated in the four DNA-binding domains, with loop L1 switching from inward to outward conformations with respect to the DNA major groove. Direct intra- and intermonomeric long-range communications between the tetramerization and DNA-binding domains are noted. These long-distance conformational changes link the C terminus with the DNA-binding domain and provide a biophysical rationale for the reported functional regulation of the p53 C-terminal region. A fine characterization of the DNA deformation caused by p53 binding is obtained, with 'static' deformations always present and measured by the slide parameter in the central thymine-adenine base pairs; we also detect 'dynamic' deformations switched on and off by particular p53 tetrameric conformations and measured by the roll and twist parameters in the same base pairs. These different conformations can indeed modulate the electrostatic potential isosurfaces of the whole p53-DNA complex. These results provide a molecular/biophysical understanding of the evident role of the C terminus in post-translational modification that regulates the transcriptional function of p53. Furthermore, the unstructured C terminus is able to facilitate contacts between the core DNA-binding domains of the tetramer. PMID:26477317

  7. Two carbohydrate recognizing domains from Cycas revoluta leaf lectin show the distinct sugar-binding specificity-A unique mannooligosaccharide recognition by N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Haraguchi, Tomokazu; Minami, Yuji; Yagi, Fumio; Hiemori, Keiko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Cycas revoluta leaf lectin (CRLL) of mannose-recognizing jacalin-related lectin (mJRL) has two tandem repeated carbohydrate recognition domains, and shows the characteristic sugar-binding specificity toward high mannose-glycans, compared with other mJRLs. We expressed the N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain (CRLL-N and CRLL-C) separately, to determine the fine sugar-binding specificity of each domain, using frontal affinity chromatography, glycan array and equilibrium dialysis. The specificity of CRLL toward high mannose was basically derived from CRLL-N, whereas CRLL-C had affinity for α1-6 extended mono-antennary complex-type glycans. Notably, the affinity of CRLL-N was most potent to one of three Man 8 glycans and Man 9 glycan, whereas the affinity of CRLL-C decreased with the increase in the number of extended α1-2 linked mannose residue. The recognition of the Man 8 glycans by CRLL-N has not been found for other mannose recognizing lectins. Glycan array reflected these specificities of the two domains. Furthermore, it was revealed by equilibrium dialysis method that the each domain had two sugar-binding sites, similar with Banlec, banana mannose-binding Jacalin-related lectin. PMID:26867733

  8. DNA Bending is Induced in an Enhancer by the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus E2 Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskaluk, Christopher; Bastia, Deepak

    1988-03-01

    The E2 gene of bovine