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Sample records for agonist binding sites

  1. Agonist and antagonist protect sulfhydrals in the binding site of the D-1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.; Kebabian, J.W.; Fishman, P.H.

    1986-05-01

    An iodinated compound (/sup 125/I)-SCH 23982 (8-iodo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine-7-ol) has been characterized as a specific, high affinity (Kd = 0.7 nM) ligand for the D-1 dopamine receptor. The ligand binding site of the D-1 receptor in rat striatum was inactivated by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) in a time and concentration dependent manner. The inactivation was rapid and irreversible with a 70% net loss of binding sites. Scatchard analysis of binding to NEM-treated tissue showed a decrease both in receptor number and in radioligand affinity. The remaining receptors retained their selectivity for stereoisomers of both agonist and antagonist. Receptor occupancy by either a D-1 specific agonist or antagonist protected in a dose dependent manner the binding sites from inactivation by NEM; the agonist was more effective than the antagonist. The agonist high affinity site, however, was abolished in the absence or presence of protective compound, presumably because of inactivation of the GTP-binding component of adenylate cyclase. In this regard, there was a total loss of agonist- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity after NEM treatment. The authors conclude that the D-1 dopamine receptor contains NEM-sensitive sulfhydral group(s) at or near the vicinity of the ligand binding site.

  2. Number and locations of agonist binding sites required to activate homomeric Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Sine, Steven M; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-05-06

    Homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors contain five identical agonist binding sites, each formed at a subunit interface. To determine the number and locations of binding sites required to generate a stable active state, we constructed a receptor subunit with a mutation that disables the agonist binding site and a reporter mutation that alters unitary conductance and coexpressed mutant and nonmutant subunits. Although receptors with a range of different subunit compositions are produced, patch-clamp recordings reveal that the amplitude of each single-channel opening event reports the number and, for certain subunit combinations, the locations of subunits with intact binding sites. We find that receptors with three binding sites at nonconsecutive subunit interfaces exhibit maximal mean channel open time, receptors with binding sites at three consecutive or two nonconsecutive interfaces exhibit intermediate open time, and receptors with binding sites at two consecutive or one interface exhibit brief open time. Macroscopic recordings after rapid application of agonist reveal that channel activation slows and the extent of desensitization decreases as the number of binding sites per receptor decreases. The overall results provide a framework for defining mechanisms of activation and drug modulation for homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors.

  3. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  4. A molecular characterization of the agonist binding site of a nematode cys-loop GABA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Mark D; Kwaka, Ariel; Callanan, Micah K; Nusrat, Humza; Desaulniers, Jean-Paul; Forrester, Sean G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cys-loop GABA receptors represent important targets for human chemotherapeutics and insecticides and are potential targets for novel anthelmintics (nematicides). However, compared with insect and mammalian receptors, little is known regarding the pharmacological characteristics of nematode Cys-loop GABA receptors. Here we have investigated the agonist binding site of the Cys-loop GABA receptor UNC-49 (Hco-UNC-49) from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. Experimental Approach We used two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology to measure channel activation by classical GABA receptor agonists on Hco-UNC-49 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, along with site-directed mutagenesis and in silico homology modelling. Key Results The sulphonated molecules P4S and taurine had no effect on Hco-UNC-49. Other classical Cys-loop GABAA receptor agonists tested on the Hco-UNC-49B/C heteromeric channel had a rank order efficacy of GABA > trans-4-aminocrotonic acid > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid (IMA) > (R)-(−)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [R(−)-GABOB] > (S)-(+)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [S(+)-GABOB] > guanidinoacetic acid > isonipecotic acid > 5-aminovaleric acid (DAVA) (partial agonist) > β-alanine (partial agonist). In silico ligand docking revealed some variation in binding between agonists. Mutagenesis of a key serine residue in binding loop C to threonine had minimal effects on GABA and IMA but significantly increased the maximal response to DAVA and decreased twofold the EC50 for R(−)- and S(+)-GABOB. Conclusions and Implications The pharmacological profile of Hco-UNC-49 differed from that of vertebrate Cys-loop GABA receptors and insect resistance to dieldrin receptors, suggesting differences in the agonist binding pocket. These findings could be exploited to develop new drugs that specifically target GABA receptors of parasitic nematodes. PMID:25850584

  5. The effective opening of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with single agonist binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dustin K.; Stokes, Clare; Horenstein, Nicole A.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a means by which agonist-evoked responses of nicotinic receptors can be conditionally eliminated. Modification of α7L119C mutants by the sulfhydryl reagent 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSEA) reduces responses to acetylcholine (ACh) by more than 97%, whereas corresponding mutations in muscle-type receptors produce effects that depend on the specific subunits mutated and ACh concentration. We coexpressed α7L119C subunits with pseudo wild-type α7C116S subunits, as well as ACh-insensitive α7Y188F subunits with wild-type α7 subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes using varying ratios of cRNA. When mutant α7 cRNA was coinjected at a 5:1 ratio with wild-type cRNA, net charge responses to 300 µM ACh were retained by α7L119C-containing mutants after MTSEA modification and by the ACh-insensitive Y188F-containing mutants, even though the expected number of ACh-sensitive wild-type binding sites would on average be fewer than two per receptor. Responses of muscle-type receptors with one MTSEA-sensitive subunit were reduced at low ACh concentrations, but much less of an effect was observed when ACh concentrations were high (1 mM), indicating that saturation of a single binding site with agonist can evoke strong activation of nicotinic ACh receptors. Single-channel patch clamp analysis revealed that the burst durations of fetal wild-type and α1β1γδL121C receptors were equivalent until the α1β1γδL121C mutants were exposed to MTSEA, after which the majority (81%) of bursts were brief (≤2 ms). The longest duration events of the receptors modified at only one binding site were similar to the long bursts of native receptors traditionally associated with the activation of receptors with two sites containing bound agonists. PMID:21444659

  6. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  7. Investigation of the histamine H3 receptor binding site. Design and synthesis of hybrid agonists with a lipophilic side chain.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Watanabe, Takashi; Kudo, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, Fumikazu; Yamauchi, Miki; Kato, Kazuhiko; Kakui, Nobukazu; Sato, Yasuo

    2010-09-09

    As a part of our search for novel histamine H3 receptor agonists, we designed and synthesized hybrid compounds in which the lipophilic (4'-alkylphenylthio)ethyl moiety of a novel H3 receptor agonist, 4-(2-(4'-tert-butylphenylthio)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (1), was incorporated into N(alpha)-methylhistamine, immepip, and immethridine derivatives. These hybrid compounds were expected to interact concurrently with the histamine-binding site and a putative hydrophobic region in the H3 receptor. Among them, piperidine- and pyridine-type derivatives displayed partial agonist activity, and (S)-4-(1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)-2-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenylthio)ethyl)piperidine (36) was identified as a potent H3 agonist. We performed computational docking studies to examine the binding mode of the agonists. The results indicated that immepip interacts with the key residues, Asp114 and Glu206, in a different manner from histamine. The binding mode of 36 to these residues is similar to that of immepip, and the lipophilic tail of 36 has an additional interaction with a hydrophobic region in transmembrane helix 6 of the receptor. These results indicated that 36 served as a useful tool for studies on receptor-agonist interactions and drug design.

  8. The GABA agonist THIP a muscimol analogue, does not interfere with the benzodiazepine binding site on rats cortical membranes.

    PubMed

    Maurer, R

    1979-04-01

    THIP, a cyclic analogue of muscimol, is a powerful GABA agonist. It is as active as GABA in displacing [3H]muscimol from its binding site to cerebellar membranes (IC50 = 31.5 +/- 2.5 mM). However, unlike muscimol or GABA, it is devoid of any modulatory interaction with the benzodiazepine binding site on rat's cortical membranes. Homotaurine, isoguvacine and imidazole acetic acid are less active than muscimol and GABA for increasing the affinity of [3H]diazepam to cortical membrane preparations.

  9. Modelling and mutation studies on the histamine H1-receptor agonist binding site reveal different binding modes for H1-agonists: Asp116 (TM3) has a constitutive role in receptor stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Laak, Anton M.; Timmerman, Hendrik; Leurs, Rob; Nederkoorn, Paul H. J.; Smit, Martine J.; Donné-Op den Kelder, Gabriëlle M.

    1995-08-01

    A modelling study has been carried out, investigating the binding of histamine (Hist), 2-methylhistamine (2-MeHist) and 2-phenylhistamine (2-PhHist) at two postulated agonistic binding sites on transmembrane domain 5 (TM5) of the histamine H1-receptor. For this purpose a conformational analysis study was performed on three particular residues of TM5, i.e., Lys200, Thr203 and Asn207, for which a functional role in binding has been proposed. The most favourable results were obtained for the interaction between Hist and the Lys200/Asn207 pair. Therefore, Lys200 was subsequently mutated and converted to an alanine, resulting in a 50-fold decrease of H1-receptor stimulation by histamine. Altogether, the data suggest that the Lys200/Asn207 pair is important for activation of the H1-receptor by histamine. In contrast, analogues of 2-PhHist seem to belong to a distinct subclass of histamine agonists and an alternative mode of binding is proposed in which the 2-phenyl ring binds to the same receptor location as one of the aromatic rings of classical histamine H1-antagonists. Subsequently, the binding modes of the agonists Hist, 2-MeHist and 2-PhHist and the H1-antagonist cyproheptadine were evaluated in three different seven-α-helical models of the H1-receptor built in homology with bacteriorhodopsin, but using three different alignments. Our findings suggest that the position of the carboxylate group of Asp116 (TM3) within the receptor pocket depends on whether an agonist or an antagonist binds to the protein; a conformational change of this aspartate residue upon agonist binding is expected to play an essential role in receptor stimulation.

  10. Mutational mapping of the transmembrane binding site of the G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 and binding mode prediction of TGR5 agonists.

    PubMed

    Gertzen, Christoph G W; Spomer, Lina; Smits, Sander H J; Häussinger, Dieter; Keitel, Verena; Gohlke, Holger

    2015-11-02

    TGR5 (Gpbar-1, M-Bar) is a class A G-protein coupled bile acid-sensing receptor predominately expressed in brain, liver and gastrointestinal tract, and a promising drug target for the treatment of metabolic disorders. Due to the lack of a crystal structure of TGR5, the development of TGR5 agonists has been guided by ligand-based approaches so far. Three binding mode models of bile acid derivatives have been presented recently. However, they differ from one another in terms of overall orientation or with respect to the location and interactions of the cholane scaffold, or cannot explain all results from mutagenesis experiments. Here, we present an extended binding mode model based on an iterative and integrated computational and biological approach. An alignment of 68 TGR5 agonists based on this binding mode leads to a significant and good structure-based 3D QSAR model, which constitutes the most comprehensive structure-based 3D-QSAR study of TGR5 agonists undertaken so far and suggests that the binding mode model is a close representation of the "true" binding mode. The binding mode model is further substantiated in that effects predicted for eight mutations in the binding site agree with experimental analyses on the impact of these TGR5 variants on receptor activity. In the binding mode, the hydrophobic cholane scaffold of taurolithocholate orients towards the interior of the orthosteric binding site such that rings A and B are in contact with TM5 and TM6, the taurine side chain orients towards the extracellular opening of the binding site and forms a salt bridge with R79(EL1), and the 3-hydroxyl group forms hydrogen bonds with E169(5.44) and Y240(6.51). The binding mode thus differs in important aspects from the ones recently presented. These results are highly relevant for the development of novel, more potent agonists of TGR5 and should be a valuable starting point for the development of TGR5 antagonists, which could show antiproliferative effects in tumor

  11. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Dods, Rachel L; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-11-23

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide-receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design.

  12. Long-term modulation by postnatal oxytocin of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist binding sites in central autonomic regions and the role of prenatal stress.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cabiale, Z; Olausson, H; Sohlström, A; Agnati, L F; Narváez, J A; Uvnäs-Moberg, K; Fuxe, K

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate whether oxytocin administered in male rats subcutaneously early in life in the absence or presence of food restriction during pregnancy has life-long effects on the alpha(2)-agonist binding sites in the nucleus of the solitarii tract (NTS), in the hypothalamus and the amygdala, as evaluated by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Maternal food restriction alone increased the affinity of the alpha(2)-agonist [(3)H]UK14.304 binding sites exclusively in the NTS. In offspring from ad libitum fed dams, oxytocin treatment significantly increased the density of alpha(2)-agonist binding sites in the NTS and in the hypothalamus. The K(d) value of the alpha(2)-agonist binding sites in the hypothalamus of these rats, but not in the other regions studied, was also significantly increased. In offspring from food-restricted dams, oxytocin treatment produced a significant increase of the B(max) values in the hypothalamus and the amygdala and the K(d) value of the alpha(2)-agonist binding sites in the NTS of these rats also was selectively and significantly increased. These results suggest that a postnatal, oxytocin-induced increase of regional alpha(2)-adrenoceptor function can be seen in adulthood by a persistent, regionally selective increase in the density of central alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist binding sites, in the absence of an affinity change in the NTS. Such a regional increase of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor signalling in adulthood may contribute to the anti-stress action of postnatal oxytocin. By contrast, after prenatal stress, the potential increase in alpha(2)-adrenoceptor signalling takes place via selective increases of density with no changes of affinity of the alpha(2)-agonist binding sites in the hypothalamus and the amygdala.

  13. Short-term desensitization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse neuroblastoma cells: selective loss of agonist low-affinity and pirenzepine high-affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cioffi, C.L.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1986-09-01

    The effects of brief incubation with carbamylcholine on subsequent binding of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine were investigated in mouse neuroblastoma cells (clone N1E-115). This treatment demonstrated that the muscarinic receptors in this neuronal clone can be divided into two types; one which is readily susceptible to regulation by receptor agonists, whereas the other is resistant in this regard. In control cells, both pirenzepine and carbamylcholine interacted with high- and low-affinity subsets of muscarinic receptors. Computer-assisted analysis of the competition between pirenzepine and carbamylcholine with (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine showed that the receptor sites remaining upon desensitization are composed mainly of pirenzepine low-affinity and agonist high-affinity binding sites. Furthermore, there was an excellent correlation between the ability of various muscarinic receptor agonists to induce a decrease in consequent (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding and their efficacy in stimulating cyclic GMP synthesis in these cells. Thus, only the agonists that are known to recognize the receptor's low-affinity conformation in order to elicit increases in cyclic GMP levels were capable of diminishing ligand binding. Taken together, our present results suggest that the receptor population that is sensitive to regulation by agonists includes both the pirenzepine high-affinity and the agonist low-affinity receptor binding states. In addition, the sensitivity of these receptor subsets to rapid regulation by agonists further implicates their involvement in desensitization of muscarinic receptor-mediated cyclic GMP formation.

  14. Amino acids outside of the loops that define the agonist binding site are important for ligand binding to insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zewen; Han, Zhaojun; Liu, Shuhua; Zhang, Yixi; Song, Feng; Yao, Xiangmei; Gu, Jianhua

    2008-07-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) are the targets of several kinds of insecticides. Based on the mutagenesis studies of Torpedo californica nAChRs and solved structure of a molluscan, glial-derived soluble ACh-binding protein, a model of the agonist site was constructed with contributing amino acids from three distinct loops (A, B, and C) of the alpha subunits and another three loops (D, E, and F) of the non-alpha subunits. According to this model, most insect nAChR subunits can form the functional heteromeric or homomeric receptors. Actually, insect subunits themselves did not form any functional receptor at various combinations as yet, and only part of them can form the functional receptors with vertebrate non-alpha subunits. These findings suggested that the agonist binding for insect nAChRs was not only contributed by those key amino acids in six loops, but also some unidentified amino acids from other regions. In our previous studies on nAChRs for Nilaparvata lugens, a target-site mutation (Y151S) was found within two alpha subunits (Nlalpha1 and Nlalpha3). In Drosophila S2 cells and Xenopus oocytes, Nlalpha1 can form functional receptors with rat beta2 subunit. However, the same thing was not observed in Nlalpha3. In the present paper, by exchanging the corresponding regions between Nlalpha1 and Nlalpha3 to generate different chimeras, amino acid residues or residue clusters in the regions outside the six loops were found to play essential roles in agonist binding, especially for the amino acid clusters between loop B and C. This result indicated that the residues in the six loops could be necessary, but not enough for the activity of agonist binding.

  15. Agonists binding nicotinic receptors elicit specific channel-opening patterns at αγ and αδ sites

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Patrick; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Heckmann, Manfred; Dudel, Josef

    2014-01-01

    ‘Embryonic’ muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels (nAChRs) bind ligands at interfaces of α- and γ- or δ-subunits. αγ and αδ sites differ in affinity, but their contributions to opening the channel have remained elusive. We compared high-resolution patch clamp currents evoked by epibatidine (Ebd), carbamylcholine (CCh) and acetylcholine (ACh). Ebd binds with 75-fold higher affinity at αγ than at αδ sites, whereas CCh and ACh prefer αδ sites. Similar short (τO1), intermediate (τO2) and long (τO3) types of opening were observed with all three agonists. τO2 openings were maximally prevalent at low Ebd concentrations, binding at αγ sites. By contrast, τO1 openings appear to be generated at αδ sites. In addition, two types of burst appeared: short bursts of an average of 0.75 ms (τB1) that should arise from the αγ site, and long bursts of 12–25 ms (τB2) in duration arising from double liganded receptors. Limited by the temporal resolution, the closings within bursts were invariant at 3 μs. Corrected for missed closings, in the case of ACh the openings within long bursts lasted 170 μs and those in short bursts about 30 μs. Blocking αδ sites with α-conotoxin M1 (CTx) eliminated both τO1 and τB2 and left only τO2 and the short τB1 bursts, as expected. Furthermore we found desensitization when the receptors bound ACh only at the αγ site. When CTx was applied to ‘embryonic’ mouse endplates, monoquantal current rise times were increased, and amplitude and decay time constants were reduced, as expected. Thus the αγ and αδ sites of nAChRs elicit specific channel-opening patterns. PMID:24665094

  16. Mapping of the acetylcholine binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: ( sup 3 H)nicotine as an agonist photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, R.E.; Cohen, J.B. )

    1991-07-16

    The agonist ({sup 3}H)nicotine was used as a photoaffinity label for the acetylcholine binding sties on the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). ({sup 3}H)Nicotine binds at equilibrium with K{sub eq} = 0.6 {mu}M to the agonist binding sites. Irradiation with 254-nm light of AChR-rich membranes equilibrated with ({sup 3}H)nicotine resulted in covalent incorporation into the {alpha}- and {gamma}-subunits, which was inhibited by agonists and competitive antagonists but not by noncompetitive antagonists. Inhibition of labeling by d-tubocurarine demonstrated that the {alpha}-subunit was labeled via both agonist sites but the {gamma}-subunit was labeled only via the site that binds d-tubocurarine with high affinity. Chymotryptic digestion of the {alpha}-subunit confirmed that Try-198 was the principal amino acid labeled by ({sup 3}H)nicotine. This confirmation required a novel radiosequencing strategy employing o-phthalaldehyde ({sup 3}H)Nicotine, which is the first photoaffinity agonist used, labels primarily Tyr-198 in contrast to competitive antagonist affinity labels, which label primarily Tyr-190 and Cys-192/Cys-193.

  17. The novel alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist [3H]mivazerol binds to non-adrenergic binding sites in human striatum membranes that are distinct from imidazoline receptors.

    PubMed

    Flamez, A; Gillard, M; De Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G; Noyer, M

    1997-07-01

    The alpha 2 adrenergic agonist [3H]mivazerol labelled two populations of binding sites in membranes from the human striatum. Forty per cent of the sites labelled by 3 nM [3H]mivazerol corresponded to alpha 2 adrenergic receptors as they displayed a high affinity for (-)-adrenaline and for rauwolscine. The remaining binding was displaced by mivazerol with a pIC50 of 6.5 +/- 0.1. These sites displayed higher affinity for dexmedetomidine (pIC50 = 7.1 +/- 0.1), but much lower affinity for clonidine (pIC50 < 5.0) and for idazoxan (pIC50 = 5.1 +/- 0.1). Mivazerol also showed low affinity for the [3H]clonidine-labelled I1 imidazoline receptors and for the [3H]idazoxan-labelled I2 receptors (pIC50 = 5.1 and 3.9, respectively). These results suggest that the non-adrenergic [3H]mivazerol binding sites are distinct from the imidazoline receptors in the human striatum.

  18. Synthesis of GABAA Receptor Agonists and Evaluation of their α-Subunit Selectivity and Orientation in the GABA Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Michaela; Rabe, Holger; Strehle, Axelle; Dieler, Sandra; Debus, Fabian; Dannhardt, Gerd; Akabas, Myles H.; Lüddens, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Drugs used to treat various disorders target GABAA receptors. To develop α subunit selective compounds, we synthesized 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol (4-PIOL) derivatives. The 3-isoxazolol moiety was substituted by 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-one, 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-thione, and substituted 1,2,4-triazol-3-ol heterocycles with modifications to the basic piperidine substituent as well as substituents without basic nitrogen. Compounds were screened by [3H]muscimol binding and in patch-clamp experiments with heterologously expressed GABAA αiβ3γ2 receptors (i = 1–6). The effects of 5-aminomethyl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5d were comparable to GABA for all α subunit isoforms. 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5a and 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H- [1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-thione 6a were weak agonists at α3–, α3–, and α5–containing receptors. When coapplied with GABA they were antagonistic inα2–, α4–, and α6–containing receptors and potentiated α3-containing receptors. 6a protected GABA binding site cysteine-substitution mutants α1F64C and α1S68C from reacting with methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate. 6a specifically covalently modified the α1R66C thiol, in the GABA binding site, through its oxadiazolethione sulfur. These results demonstrate the feasibility of synthesizing α subtype selective GABA mimetic drugs. PMID:18651727

  19. The Startle Disease Mutation E103K Impairs Activation of Human Homomeric α1 Glycine Receptors by Disrupting an Intersubunit Salt Bridge across the Agonist Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Safar, Fatemah; Hurdiss, Elliot; Erotocritou, Marios; Greiner, Timo; Irvine, Mark W.; Fang, Guangyu; Jane, David; Yu, Rilei; Dämgen, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyR) belong to the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) superfamily and mediate fast inhibitory transmission in the vertebrate CNS. Disruption of glycinergic transmission by inherited mutations produces startle disease in man. Many startle mutations are in GlyRs and provide useful clues to the function of the channel domains. E103K is one of few startle mutations found in the extracellular agonist binding site of the channel, in loop A of the principal side of the subunit interface. Homology modeling shows that the side chain of Glu-103 is close to that of Arg-131, in loop E of the complementary side of the binding site, and may form a salt bridge at the back of the binding site, constraining its size. We investigated this hypothesis in recombinant human α1 GlyR by site-directed mutagenesis and functional measurements of agonist efficacy and potency by whole cell patch clamp and single channel recording. Despite its position near the binding site, E103K causes hyperekplexia by impairing the efficacy of glycine, its ability to gate the channel once bound, which is very high in wild type GlyR. Mutating Glu-103 and Arg-131 caused various degrees of loss-of-function in the action of glycine, whereas mutations in Arg-131 enhanced the efficacy of the slightly bigger partial agonist sarcosine (N-methylglycine). The effects of the single charge-swapping mutations of these two residues were largely rescued in the double mutant, supporting the possibility that they interact via a salt bridge that normally constrains the efficacy of larger agonist molecules. PMID:28174298

  20. Differential α4(+)/(−)β2 Agonist-binding Site Contributions to α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Function within and between Isoforms*

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Linda M.; Weltzin, Maegan M.; Eaton, J. Brek; Cooper, John F.; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Lukas, Ronald J.; Whiteaker, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Two α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4β2-nAChR) isoforms exist with (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2 subunit stoichiometries and high versus low agonist sensitivities (HS and LS), respectively. Both isoforms contain a pair of α4(+)/(−)β2 agonist-binding sites. The LS isoform also contains a unique α4(+)/(−)α4 site with lower agonist affinity than the α4(+)/(−)β2 sites. However, the relative roles of the conserved α4(+)/(−)β2 agonist-binding sites in and between the isoforms have not been studied. We used a fully linked subunit concatemeric nAChR approach to express pure populations of HS or LS isoform α4β2*-nAChR. This approach also allowed us to mutate individual subunit interfaces, or combinations thereof, on each isoform background. We used this approach to systematically mutate a triplet of β2 subunit (−)-face E-loop residues to their non-conserved α4 subunit counterparts or vice versa (β2HQT and α4VFL, respectively). Mutant-nAChR constructs (and unmodified controls) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Acetylcholine concentration-response curves and maximum function were measured using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Surface expression was measured with 125I-mAb 295 binding and was used to define function/nAChR. If the α4(+)/(−)β2 sites contribute equally to function, making identical β2HQT substitutions at either site should produce similar functional outcomes. Instead, highly differential outcomes within the HS isoform, and between the two isoforms, were observed. In contrast, α4VFL mutation effects were very similar in all positions of both isoforms. Our results indicate that the identity of subunits neighboring the otherwise equivalent α4(+)/(−)β2 agonist sites modifies their contributions to nAChR activation and that E-loop residues are an important contributor to this neighbor effect. PMID:26644472

  1. Differential α4(+)/(-)β2 Agonist-binding Site Contributions to α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Function within and between Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Linda M; Weltzin, Maegan M; Eaton, J Brek; Cooper, John F; Lindstrom, Jon M; Lukas, Ronald J; Whiteaker, Paul

    2016-01-29

    Two α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4β2-nAChR) isoforms exist with (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2 subunit stoichiometries and high versus low agonist sensitivities (HS and LS), respectively. Both isoforms contain a pair of α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist-binding sites. The LS isoform also contains a unique α4(+)/(-)α4 site with lower agonist affinity than the α4(+)/(-)β2 sites. However, the relative roles of the conserved α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist-binding sites in and between the isoforms have not been studied. We used a fully linked subunit concatemeric nAChR approach to express pure populations of HS or LS isoform α4β2*-nAChR. This approach also allowed us to mutate individual subunit interfaces, or combinations thereof, on each isoform background. We used this approach to systematically mutate a triplet of β2 subunit (-)-face E-loop residues to their non-conserved α4 subunit counterparts or vice versa (β2HQT and α4VFL, respectively). Mutant-nAChR constructs (and unmodified controls) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Acetylcholine concentration-response curves and maximum function were measured using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Surface expression was measured with (125)I-mAb 295 binding and was used to define function/nAChR. If the α4(+)/(-)β2 sites contribute equally to function, making identical β2HQT substitutions at either site should produce similar functional outcomes. Instead, highly differential outcomes within the HS isoform, and between the two isoforms, were observed. In contrast, α4VFL mutation effects were very similar in all positions of both isoforms. Our results indicate that the identity of subunits neighboring the otherwise equivalent α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist sites modifies their contributions to nAChR activation and that E-loop residues are an important contributor to this neighbor effect.

  2. The Unique α4(+)/(−)α4 Agonist Binding Site in (α4)3(β2)2 Subtype Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Permits Differential Agonist Desensitization Pharmacology versus the (α4)2(β2)3 Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, J. Brek; Lucero, Linda M.; Stratton, Harrison; Chang, Yongchang; Cooper, John F.; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Lukas, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Selected nicotinic agonists were used to activate and desensitize high-sensitivity (HS) (α4)2(β2)3) or low-sensitivity (LS) (α4)3(β2)2) isoforms of human α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Function was assessed using 86Rb+ efflux in a stably transfected SH-EP1-hα4β2 human epithelial cell line, and two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing concatenated pentameric HS or LS α4β2-nAChR constructs (HSP and LSP). Unlike previously studied agonists, desensitization by the highly selective agonists A-85380 [3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine] and sazetidine-A (Saz-A) preferentially reduced α4β2-nAChR HS-phase versus LS-phase responses. The concatenated-nAChR experiments confirmed that approximately 20% of LS-isoform acetylcholine-induced function occurs in an HS-like phase, which is abolished by Saz-A preincubation. Six mutant LSPs were generated, each targeting a conserved agonist binding residue within the LS-isoform-only α4(+)/(−)α4 interface agonist binding site. Every mutation reduced the percentage of LS-phase function, demonstrating that this site underpins LS-phase function. Oocyte-surface expression of the HSP and each of the LSP constructs was statistically indistinguishable, as measured using β2-subunit–specific [125I]mAb295 labeling. However, maximum function is approximately five times greater on a “per-receptor” basis for unmodified LSP versus HSP α4β2-nAChRs. Thus, recruitment of the α4(+)/(−)α4 site at higher agonist concentrations appears to augment otherwise-similar function mediated by the pair of α4(+)/(−)β2 sites shared by both isoforms. These studies elucidate the receptor-level differences underlying the differential pharmacology of the two α4β2-nAChR isoforms, and demonstrate that HS versus LS α4β2-nAChR activity can be selectively manipulated using pharmacological approaches. Since α4β2 nAChRs are the predominant neuronal subtype, these discoveries likely

  3. Characterization of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid binding site in U937 membranes using a novel radiolabeled agonist, 20-125i-14,15-epoxyeicosa-8(Z)-enoic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqi; Tuniki, Venugopal Raju; Anjaiah, Siddam; Falck, J R; Hillard, Cecilia J; Campbell, William B

    2008-03-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are important regulators of vascular tone and homeostasis. Whether they initiate signaling through membrane receptors is unclear. We developed 20-iodo-14,15-epoxyeicosa-8(Z)-enoic acid (20-I-14,15-EE8ZE), a radiolabeled EET agonist, to characterize EET binding to membranes of U937 cells. 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE stimulated cAMP production in U937 cells with similar potency, but it decreased efficacy compared with 11,12-EET. Maximum cAMP production increased 4.2-fold, with an EC(50) value of 9 muM. Like 14,15-EET, 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE relaxed bovine coronary arteries, with a similar EC(50) value. Both 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE agonist activities were blocked by the EET antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)enoic acid (14,15-EE5ZE). Specific 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE binding to U937 membranes reached equilibrium within 10 min and remained unchanged for 30 min at 4 degrees C. The binding was saturable, reversible, and exhibited K(D) and B(max) values of 11.8 +/- 1.1 nM and 5.8 +/- 0.2 pmol/mg protein, respectively. Pretreatment of the membranes with guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate reduced the B(max) in a concentration-related manner. 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE binding was inhibited by eicosanoids with potency order of 11,12-EET >14,15-EE5ZE approximately 14,15-EET > 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid > 14,15-EET-thiirane >14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid. This order is in agreement with the efficacy and potency of cAMP production. In summary, 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE is a radiolabeled EET agonist that is useful to study binding and metabolism. Using this radioligand, we have identified a specific high-affinity and high-abundance EET binding site in U937 cell membranes. This binding site could represent a specific EET receptor, which is probably a G protein-coupled receptor.

  4. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  5. Increased Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Protein Underlies Chronic Nicotine-Induced Up-Regulation of Nicotinic Agonist Binding Sites in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    McClure-Begley, Tristan D.; Whiteaker, Paul; Salminen, Outi; Brown, Robert W. B.; Cooper, John; Collins, Allan C.; Lindstrom, Jon M.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic nicotine treatment elicits a brain region-selective increase in the number of high-affinity agonist binding sites, a phenomenon termed up-regulation. Nicotine-induced up-regulation of α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in cell cultures results from increased assembly and/or decreased degradation of nAChRs, leading to increased nAChR protein levels. To evaluate whether the increased binding in mouse brain results from an increase in nAChR subunit proteins, C57BL/6 mice were treated with nicotine by chronic intravenous infusion. Tissue sections were prepared, and binding of [125I]3-((2S)-azetidinylmethoxy)-5-iodo-pyridine (A85380) to β2*-nAChR sites, [125I]monoclonal antibody (mAb) 299 to α4 nAChR subunits, and [125I]mAb 270 to β2 nAChR subunits was determined by quantitative autoradiography. Chronic nicotine treatment dose-dependently increased binding of all three ligands. In regions that express α4β2-nAChR almost exclusively, binding of all three ligands increased coordinately. However, in brain regions containing significant β2*-nAChR without α4 subunits, relatively less increase in mAb 270 binding to β2 subunits was observed. Signal intensity measured with the mAbs was lower than that with [125I]A85380, perhaps because the small ligand penetrated deeply into the sections, whereas the much larger mAbs encountered permeability barriers. Immunoprecipitation of [125I]epibatidine binding sites with mAb 270 in select regions of nicotine-treated mice was nearly quantitative, although somewhat less so with mAb 299, confirming that the mAbs effectively recognize their targets. The patterns of change measured using immunoprecipitation were comparable with those determined autoradiographically. Thus, increases in α4β2*-nAChR binding sites after chronic nicotine treatment reflect increased nAChR protein. PMID:21228066

  6. Role in the selectivity of neonicotinoids of insect-specific basic residues in loop D of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding site.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Masaru; Yokota, Maiko; Ihara, Makoto; Akamatsu, Miki; Sattelle, David B; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2006-10-01

    The insecticide imidacloprid and structurally related neonicotinoids act selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). To investigate the mechanism of neonicotinoid selectivity, we have examined the effects of mutations to basic amino acid residues in loop D of the nAChR acetylcholine (ACh) binding site on the interactions with imidacloprid. The receptors investigated are the recombinant chicken alpha4beta2 nAChR and Drosophila melanogaster Dalpha2/chicken beta2 hybrid nAChR expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Although mutations of Thr77 in loop D of the beta2 subunit resulted in a barely detectable effect on the imidacloprid concentration-response curve for the alpha4beta2 nAChR, T77R;E79V double mutations shifted the curve dramatically to higher affinity binding of imidacloprid. Likewise, T77K;E79R and T77N;E79R double mutations in the Dalpha2beta2 nAChR also resulted in a shift to a higher affinity for imidacloprid, which exceeded that observed for a single mutation of Thr77 to basic residues. By contrast, these double mutations scarcely influenced the ACh concentration-response curve, suggesting selective interactions with imidacloprid of the newly introduced basic residues. Computational, homology models of the agonist binding domain of the wild-type and mutant alpha4beta2 and Dalpha2beta2 nAChRs with imidacloprid bound were generated based on the crystal structures of acetylcholine binding proteins of Lymnaea stagnalis and Aplysia californica. The models indicate that the nitro group of imidacloprid interacts directly with the introduced basic residues at position 77, whereas those at position 79 either prevent or permit such interactions depending on their electrostatic properties, thereby explaining the observed functional changes resulting from site-directed mutagenesis.

  7. Ligand Binding at the α4-α4 Agonist-Binding Site of the α4β2 nAChR Triggers Receptor Activation through a Pre-Activated Conformational State

    PubMed Central

    Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Ahring, Philip K.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Absalom, Nathan L.

    2016-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant subtype in the brain and exists in two functional stoichiometries: (α4)3(β2)2 and (α4)2(β2)3. A distinct feature of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor is the biphasic activation response to the endogenous agonist acetylcholine, where it is activated with high potency and low efficacy when two α4-β2 binding sites are occupied and with low potency/high efficacy when a third α4-α4 binding site is occupied. Further, exogenous ligands can bind to the third α4-α4 binding site and potentiate the activation of the receptor by ACh that is bound at the two α4-β2 sites. We propose that perturbations of the recently described pre-activation step when a third binding site is occupied are a key driver of these distinct activation properties. To investigate this, we used a combination of simple linear kinetic models and voltage clamp electrophysiology to determine whether transitions into the pre-activated state were increased when three binding sites were occupied. We separated the binding at the two different sites with ligands selective for the α4-β2 site (Sazetidine-A and TC-2559) and the α4-α4 site (NS9283) and identified that when a third binding site was occupied, changes in the concentration-response curves were best explained by an increase in transitions into a pre-activated state. We propose that perturbations of transitions into a pre-activated state are essential to explain the activation properties of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor by acetylcholine and other ligands. Considering the widespread clinical use of benzodiazepines, this discovery of a conserved mechanism that benzodiazepines and ACh potentiate receptor activation via a third binding site can be exploited to develop therapeutics with similar properties at other cys-loop receptors. PMID:27552221

  8. Site-directed mutagenesis of human beta-adrenergic receptors: substitution of aspartic acid-130 by asparagine produces a receptor with high-affinity agonist binding that is uncoupled from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, C M; Chung, F Z; Wang, C D; Venter, J C

    1988-01-01

    By using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, we have produced a point mutation (guanine to adenine) at nucleotide 388 of the gene for human beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR) that results in a substitution of asparagine for the highly conserved aspartic acid at position 130 in the putative third transmembrane domain of the human beta AR ([Asn130]beta AR). We have examined the functional significance of this mutation in B-82 cells continuously expressing the mutant [Asn130]beta AR. The mutant [Asn130]beta AR displayed normal antagonist binding but unusually high-affinity agonist binding (5- to 10-fold higher than wild-type beta AR), consistent with a single class of high-affinity binding sites. The mutant beta AR displayed guanine nucleotide-sensitive changes in agonist affinity (3- to 5-fold shift) implying an interaction between the beta AR and the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein; however, the ability of guanine nucleotides to alter agonist affinity was attenuated. Addition of saturating concentrations of isoproterenol to cell cultures expressing mutant [Asn130]-beta ARs had no effect on intracellular levels of cAMP, indicating that the mutant beta AR is unable to affect stimulation of adenylate cyclase. These results indicate that substitution of the aspartic acid with asparagine at residue 130 of the human beta AR dissociates the well-characterized guanine nucleotide effects on agonist affinity from those on activation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein and adenylate cyclase and suggests the existence of two distinct counterions for the amine portion of catecholamines that are associated with high- and low-affinity agonist binding states of beta AR. Images PMID:2840663

  9. Rate constants of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors in rat brain medulla. Evaluation by competition kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, G.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1985-07-25

    The method of competition kinetics, which measures the binding kinetics of an unlabeled ligand through its effect on the binding kinetics of a labeled ligand, was employed to investigate the kinetics of muscarinic agonist binding to rat brain medulla pons homogenates. The agonists studied were acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and oxotremorine, with N-methyl-4-(TH)piperidyl benzilate employed as the radiolabeled ligand. Our results suggested that the binding of muscarinic agonists to the high affinity sites is characterized by dissociation rate constants higher by 2 orders of magnitude than those of antagonists, with rather similar association rate constants. Our findings also suggest that isomerization of the muscarinic receptors following ligand binding is significant in the case of antagonists, but not of agonists. Moreover, it is demonstrated that in the medulla pons preparation, agonist-induced interconversion between high and low affinity bindings sites does not occur to an appreciable extent.

  10. Computational modeling toward understanding agonist binding on dopamine 3.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaxue; Lu, Xuefeng; Yang, Chao-Yie; Huang, Zhimin; Fu, Wei; Hou, Tingjun; Zhang, Jian

    2010-09-27

    The dopamine 3 (D3) receptor is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of nervous system disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, and current research interests primarily focus on the discovery/design of potent D3 agonists. Herein, a well-designed computational protocol, which combines pharmacophore identification, homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was employed to understand the agonist binding on D3 aiming to provide insights into the development of novel potent D3 agonists. We (1) identified the chemical features required in effective D3 agonists by pharmacophore modeling based upon 18 known diverse D3 agonists; (2) constructed the three-dimensional (3D) structure of D3 based on homology modeling and the pharmacophore hypothesis; (3) identified the binding modes of the agonists to D3 by the correlation between the predicted binding free energies and the experimental values; and (4) investigated the induced fit of D3 upon agonist binding through MD simulations. The pharmacophore models of the D3 agonists and the 3D structure of D3 can be used for either ligand- or receptor-based drug design. Furthermore, the MD simulations further give the insight that the long and flexible EL2 acts as a "door" for agonist binding, and the "ionic lock" at the bottom of TM3 and TM6 is essential to transduce the activation signal.

  11. The M1 muscarinic receptor allosteric agonists AC-42 and 1-[1'-(2-methylbenzyl)-1,4'-bipiperidin-4-yl]-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one bind to a unique site distinct from the acetylcholine orthosteric site.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Marlene A; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Pascarella, Danette M; O'Brien, Julie A; Sur, Cyrille

    2010-10-01

    Activation of M1 muscarinic receptors occurs through orthosteric and allosteric binding sites. To identify critical residues, site-directed mutagenesis and chimeric receptors were evaluated in functional calcium mobilization assays to compare orthosteric agonists, acetylcholine and xanomeline, M1 allosteric agonists AC-42 (4-n-butyl-1-[4-(2-methylphenyl)-4-oxo-1-butyl]-piperidine hydrogen chloride), TBPB (1-[1'-(2-methylbenzyl)-1,4'-bipiperidin-4-yl]-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one), and the clozapine metabolite N-desmethylclozapine. A minimal epitope has been defined for AC-42 that comprises the first 45 amino acids, the third extracellular loop, and seventh transmembrane domain (Mol Pharmacol 61:1297-1302, 2002). Using chimeric M1 and M3 receptor constructs, the AC-42 minimal epitope has been extended to also include transmembrane II. Phe77 was identified as a critical residue for maintenance of AC-42 and TBPB agonist activity. In contrast, the functional activity of N-desmethylclozapine did not require Phe77. To further map the binding site of AC-42, TBPB, and N-desmethylclozapine, point mutations previously reported to affect activities of M1 orthosteric agonists and antagonists were studied. Docking into an M1 receptor homology model revealed that AC-42 and TBPB share a similar binding pocket adjacent to the orthosteric binding site at the opposite face of Trp101. In contrast, the activity of N-desmethylclozapine was generally unaffected by the point mutations studied, and the docking indicated that N-desmethylclozapine bound to a site distinct from AC-42 and TBPB overlapping with the orthosteric site. These results suggest that structurally diverse allosteric agonists AC-42, TBPB, and N-desmethylclozapine may interact with different subsets of residues, supporting the hypothesis that M1 receptor activation can occur through at least three different binding domains.

  12. Salt bridges overlapping the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist binding site reveal a coincidence detector for G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D; Mosberg, Henry I; Conn, P Michael

    2011-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to molecular biological approaches and to computer modeling. These techniques and interspecies comparisons are used to identify structural features that are important for both intracellular trafficking and GnRHR activation yet distinguish between these processes. Our model features two salt (Arg(38)-Asp(98) and Glu(90)-Lys(121)) and two disulfide (Cys(14)-Cys(200) and Cys(114)-Cys(196)) bridges, all of which are required for the human GnRHR to traffic to the plasma membrane. This study reveals that both constitutive and ligand-induced activation are associated with a "coincidence detector" that occurs when an agonist binds. The observed constitutive activation of receptors lacking Glu(90)-Lys(121), but not Arg(38)-Asp(98) ionic bridge, suggests that the role of the former connection is holding the receptor in the inactive conformation. Both the aromatic ring and hydroxyl group of Tyr(284) and the hydrogen bonding of Ser(217) are important for efficient receptor activation. Our modeling results, supported by the observed influence of Lys(191) from extracellular loop 2 (EL2) and a four-residue motif surrounding this loop on ligand binding and receptor activation, suggest that the positioning of EL2 within the seven-α-helical bundle regulates receptor stability, proper trafficking, and function.

  13. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  14. A Potent and Site-Selective Agonist of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Junichiro; Mio, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Otsuka, Shinya; Mori, Yasuo; Uesugi, Motonari

    2015-12-23

    TRPA1 is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel family that is expressed primarily on sensory neurons. This chemosensor is activated through covalent modification of multiple cysteine residues with a wide range of reactive compounds including allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), a spicy component of wasabi. The present study reports on potent and selective agonists of TRPA1, discovered through screening 1657 electrophilic molecules. In an effort to validate the mode of action of hit molecules, we noted a new TRPA1-selective agonist, JT010 (molecule 1), which opens the TRPA1 channel by covalently and site-selectively binding to Cys621 (EC50 = 0.65 nM). The results suggest that a single modification of Cys621 is sufficient to open the TRPA1 channel. The TRPA1-selective probe described herein might be useful for further mechanistic studies of TRPA1 activation.

  15. Insights into a highly conserved network of hydrogen bonds in the agonist binding site of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a structural and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Alexandre; Graton, Jérôme; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2014-10-01

    Structural and theoretical studies on the geometrical features of a hydrogen-bond network occurring in the binding site of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and composed of interconnected WxPD (Trp-x-Pro-Asp) and SWyz (Ser-Trp-yz) sequences from loops A and B, respectively, have been carried out. Multiple sequence alignments using as template the sequence of the apoform of Aplysia californica acetylcholine binding protein (Ac-AChBP) show the strict conservation of serine and tryptophan residues of the loop B SWyz sequence. Considering a sample of 19 high resolution AChBP structures, the strong conformational preferences of the key tryptophan residue has been pointing out, whatever the form, free or bounded, of AChBP. The geometry of the motif hydrogen-bond network has been characterized through the analyses of seven distances. The robustness of the various hydrogen-bond interactions is pointed out, the one involving the aspartate carboxylate group and the serine residue being the shortest of the network. The role of a cooperative effect involving a NH(His145)…OH (Ser142) hydrogen bond is highlighted. Density functional theory calculations on several simplified models based on the motif hydrogen-bond network allow probing the importance of the various hydrogen-bond interactions. The removal of the Ser142 hydroxyl group induces strong structural rearrangements, in agreement with the structural observations. Molecular electrostatic potential calculations on model systems highlight the importance of a cooperative effect in the whole hydrogen-bond network. More precisely, the key role of the Ser142 hydroxyl group, involved in several hydrogen bonds, is underlined.

  16. Identification of an extracellular segment of the oxytocin receptor providing agonist-specific binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Hawtin, S R; Howard, H C; Wheatley, M

    2001-03-01

    The effects of the peptide hormone oxytocin are mediated by oxytocin receptors (OTRs) expressed by the target tissue. The OTR is a member of the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Defining differences between the interaction of agonists and antagonists with the OTR at the molecular level is of fundamental importance, and is addressed in this study. Using truncated and chimaeric receptor constructs, we establish that a small 12-residue segment in the distal portion of the N-terminus of the human OTR provides important epitopes which are required for agonist binding. In contrast, this segment does not contribute to the binding site for antagonists, whether peptide or non-peptide. It does, however, have a role in agonist-induced OTR signalling. Oxytocin is also an agonist at the vasopressin V(1a) receptor (V(1a)R). A chimaeric receptor (V(1a)R(N)-OTR) was engineered in which the N-terminus of the OTR was substituted by the corresponding, but unrelated, sequence from the N-terminus of the V(1a)R. We show that the V(1a)R N-terminus present in V(1a)R(N)-OTR fully restored both agonist binding and intracellular signalling to a dysfunctional truncated OTR construct. The N-terminal segment does not, however, contribute to receptor-selective agonism between the OTR and the V(1a)R. Our data establish a key role for the distal N-terminus of the OTR in providing agonist-specific binding epitopes.

  17. Agonist and antagonist binding to rat brain muscarinic receptors: influence of aging

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwitz, D.; Egozi, Y.; Henis, Y.I.; Kloog, Y.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1987-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the binding properties of muscarinic receptors in six brain regions in mature and old rats of both sexes by employing direct binding of (/sup 3/H)-antagonist as well as of the labeled natural neurotransmitter, (/sup 3/H)-acetylcholine (( /sup 3/H)-AcCh). In addition, age-related factors were evaluated in the modulation processes involved in agonist binding. The results indicate that as the rat ages the density of the muscarinic receptors is altered differently in the various brain regions: it is decreased in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and olfactory bulb of both male and female rats, but is increased (58%) in the brain stem of senescent males while no significant change is observed for females. The use of the highly sensitive technique measuring direct binding of (/sup 3/H)-AcCh facilitated the separate detection of age-related changes in the two classes (high- and low-affinity) of muscarinic agonist binding sites. In old female rats the density of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)-AcCh binding sites was preserved in all tissues studied, indicating that the decreases in muscarinic receptor density observed with (/sup 3/H)-antagonist represent a loss of low-affinity agonist binding sites. In contrast, (/sup 3/H)-AcCh binding is decreased in the hypothalamus and increased in the brain stem of old male rats. These data imply sexual dimorphism of the aging process in central cholinergic mechanisms.

  18. Analysis of full and partial agonists binding to beta2-adrenergic receptor suggests a role of transmembrane helix V in agonist-specific conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Reynolds, Kimberly A; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A; Roth, Christopher B; Yeager, Mark; Abagyan, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    The 2.4 A crystal structure of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR) in complex with the high-affinity inverse agonist (-)-carazolol provides a detailed structural framework for the analysis of ligand recognition by adrenergic receptors. Insights into agonist binding and the corresponding conformational changes triggering G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation mechanism are of special interest. Here we show that while the carazolol pocket captured in the beta(2)AR crystal structure accommodates (-)-isoproterenol and other agonists without steric clashes, a finite movement of the flexible extracellular part of TM-V helix (TM-Ve) obtained by receptor optimization in the presence of docked ligand can further improve the calculated binding affinities for agonist compounds. Tilting of TM-Ve towards the receptor axis provides a more complete description of polar receptor-ligand interactions for full and partial agonists, by enabling optimal engagement of agonists with two experimentally identified anchor sites, formed by Asp113/Asn312 and Ser203/Ser204/Ser207 side chains. Further, receptor models incorporating a flexible TM-V backbone allow reliable prediction of binding affinities for a set of diverse ligands, suggesting potential utility of this approach to design of effective and subtype-specific agonists for adrenergic receptors. Systematic differences in capacity of partial, full and inverse agonists to induce TM-V helix tilt in the beta(2)AR model suggest potential role of TM-V as a conformational "rheostat" involved in the whole spectrum of beta(2)AR responses to small molecule signals.

  19. Ligand Promiscuity of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists and Antagonists Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Soshilov, Anatoly A.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that can be activated by structurally diverse chemicals. To examine the mechanisms responsible for the promiscuity in AhR ligand binding, we determined the effects of mutations within the AhR ligand-binding domain (LBD) on the activity of diverse AhR ligands. Site-directed mutagenesis identified Ile319 of the mouse AhR and, to a lesser extent, Phe318 as residues involved in ligand-selective modulation of AhR transformation using a panel of 12 AhR ligands. These ligands could be categorized into four distinct structurally related groups based on their ability to activate AhR mutants at position 319 in vitro. The mutation I319K was selectively activated by FICZ and not by other examined ligands in vitro and in cell culture. F318L and F318A mutations resulted in the conversion of AhR agonists β-naphthoflavone and 3-methylcholanthrene, respectively, into partial agonists/antagonists. Hsp90 binding to the AhR was decreased with several mutations and was inversely correlated with AhR ligand-binding promiscuity. Together, these data define overlapping amino acid residues within the AhR LBD involved in the selectivity of ligand binding, the agonist or antagonist mode of ligand binding, and hsp90 binding and provide insights into the ligand diversity of AhR activators. PMID:24591650

  20. Studying the binding interactions of allosteric agonists and antagonists of the CXCR4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Planesas, Jesús M; Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I; Borrell, José I; Teixidó, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    Several examples of allosteric modulators of GPCRs have been reported recently in the literature, but understanding their molecular mechanism presents a new challenge for medicinal chemistry. For the specific case of the cellular receptor CXCR4, it is known that pepducins (lipidated fragments of intracellular GPCR loops) such as ATI-2341 modulate CXCR4 activity agonistically via an allosteric mechanism. Moreover, there are also examples of small organic molecules such as AMD11070 and GSK812397 which may also act as allosteric antagonists. However, incomplete knowledge of the ligand-binding sites has hampered a detailed molecular understanding of how these inhibitors work. Here, we attempt to answer this question by analysing the binding interactions between the CXCR4 receptor and the above-mentioned allosteric modulators. We propose two different allosteric binding sites, one located in the intracellular loops 1, 2 and 3 (ICL1, ICL2 and ICL3) which binds the pepducin agonist ATI-2341, and the other at a subsite of the main extracellular orthosteric binding pocket between extracellular loops 1 and 2 and the N-terminus, which binds the antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397. Allosteric interactions between the CXCR4 and ATI-2341 were predicted by combining different modeling approaches. First, a rotational blind docking search was applied and the best poses were subsequently refined using flexible docking methods and molecular dynamic simulations. For the AMD11070 and GSK812397 antagonists, the entire CXCR4 protein surface was explored by blind docking in order to define the binding region. A second docking analysis by subsites was then performed to refine the allosteric interactions. Finally, we identified the binding residues that appear to be essential for CXCR4 allosteric modulators.

  1. Ascorbic acid enables reversible dopamine receptor /sup 3/H-agonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.; Sibley, D.R.; Hamblin, M.; Creese, I.

    1981-11-16

    The effects of ascorbic acid on dopaminergic /sup 3/H-agonist receptor binding were studied in membrane homogenates of bovine anterior pituitary and caudate, and rat striatum. In all tissues virtually no stereospecific binding (defined using 1uM (+)butaclamol) of the /sup 3/H-agonists N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA), apomorphine, or dopamine could be demonstrated in the absence of ascorbic acid. Although levels of total /sup 3/H-agonist binding were three to five times greater in the absence than in the presence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, the increased binding was entirely non-stereospecific. Greater amounts of dopamine-inhibitable /sup 3/H-NPA binding could be demonstrated in the absence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, but this measure of ''specific binding'' was demonstrated not to represent dopamine receptor binding since several other catecholamines and catechol were equipotent with dopamine and more potent than the dopamine agonist (+/-)amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) in inhibiting this binding. High levels of dopamine-displaceable /sup 3/H-agonist binding were detected in fresh and boiled homogenates of cerebellum, an area of brain which receives no dopaminergic innervation, further demonstrating the non-specific nature of /sup 3/H-agonist binding in the absence of ascorbic acid. These studies emphasize that under typical assay conditions ascorbic acid is required in order to demonstrate reversible and specific /sup 3/H-agonist binding to dopamine receptors.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of agonist and antagonist binding to the chicken brain melatonin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Chong, N. W.; Sugden, D.

    1994-01-01

    1. The binding of 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin to chicken brain membranes, and the inhibition of binding by melatonin, N-acetyltryptamine and luzindole, were examined at temperatures between 4 degrees C and 37 degrees C. 2. At all temperatures studied, the binding affinity (Kd or Ki) for 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin, melatonin (both agonists) and, to a lesser extent, N-acetyltryptamine (a partial agonist) was reduced by inclusion of guanosine triphosphate (GTP, 1 mM) in the assay. GTP did not affect the Ki for luzindole, a melatonin receptor antagonist. 3. The maximal density of binding sites (Bmax) was not affected by temperature but the Kd showed a peak at 21 degrees C with lower values at both higher and lower temperatures giving curvilinear van't Hoff plots (lnKA vs l/temperature). 4. Derived changes in entropy (delta S degree) and enthalpy (delta H degree) of binding for all of the melatonin ligands decreased as temperature increased. 5. The affinity, and thus the free energy of binding, delta G degree, of these ligands at the melatonin receptor have identical values at several temperatures yet at these temperatures delta S degree and delta H degree were very different, implying that more than one intermolecular force must be involved in the binding of ligand and receptor. 6. Conceivably, the large positive delta S degree observed at low temperatures, perhaps as a result of hydrophobic interactions, is compensated by a corresponding, but opposite, change in enthalpy at higher temperatures. However, it is not clear what type of binding force(s) would show such a temperature-dependence. 7. These studies suggest that caution must be exercised in the molecular interpretation of derived measures of delta S degree and delta H degree obtained from direct measurements of delta G degree. PMID:8012710

  3. Modulation of [3H]diazepam binding in rat cortical membranes by GABAA agonists.

    PubMed

    Wong, E H; Iversen, L L

    1985-04-01

    GABAA receptor agonists modulate [3H]diazepam binding in rat cortical membranes with different efficacies. At 23 degrees C, the relative potencies for enhancement of [3H]diazepam binding by agonists parallel their potencies in inhibiting [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid [( 3H]GABA) binding. The agonist concentrations needed for enhancement of [3H]diazepam binding are up to 35 times higher than for [3H]GABA binding and correspond closely to the concentrations required for displacement of [3H]bicuculline methochloride (BMC) binding. The maximum enhancement of [3H]diazepam varied among agonists: muscimol = GABA greater than isoguvacine greater than 3-aminopropane sulphonic acid (3APS) = imidazoleacetic acid (IAA) greater than 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo (4,5,6)-pyridin-3-ol (THIP) = taurine greater than piperidine 4-sulphonic acid (P4S). At 37 degrees C, the potencies of agonists remained unchanged, but isoguvacine, 3 APS, and THIP acquired efficacies similar to GABA, whereas IAA, taurine, and P4S maintained their partial agonist profiles. At both temperatures the agonist-induced enhancement of [3H]diazepam binding was reversible by bicuculline methobromide and by the steroid GABA antagonist RU 5135. These results stress the importance of studying receptor-receptor interaction under near-physiological conditions and offer an in vitro assay that may predict the agonist status of putative GABA receptor ligands.

  4. Rapid kinetics of 2-adrenergic agonist binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, W.; Neubig, R.R.

    1987-05-01

    Activation of 2-adrenergic receptors in human platelets results in inhibition of adenylate cyclase (AC). To elucidate the relation between agonist binding and response, the authors have used a novel rapid-mix quench method to compare the kinetics of binding and response. At functionally effective concentrations, the time course of binding of the full 2-agonist, (TH)UK14,304 (UK), to purified platelet membranes was faster than could be measured manually. Using the rapid-mix quench method, agonist binding was quantitated for times for 0.3 to 60 seconds. UK binding exhibited biexponential kinetics. The rate constant of the fast binding component increases linearly with agonist concentration from 1 to 100 nM with a second order rate constant and 7 x 10WM s (at 25C). The slow rate constant was nearly independent of agonist concentration. The half times of the fast and slow components of binding for 100 nM UK are 1.5 seconds and approximately 2 minutes respectively. The rate and magnitude of the fast binding was unaffected by 10 M GTP whereas the magnitude of the slow phase was markedly reduced. Inhibition of forskolin stimulated AC by 100 M epinephrine occurs with a lag of 5-10 seconds in the presence of 10 M GTP. At lower GTP concentrations, this lag is prolonged. The observation that the fast component of agonist binding precedes inhibition even at agonist concentrations 20-fold lower than the EC40 for responses indicates that the rate limiting step in inhibition of AC is distal to the binding of agonist.

  5. Sigma1 recognition sites in rabbit iris-ciliary body: topical sigma1-site agonists lower intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Bucolo, C; Campana, G; Di Toro, R; Cacciaguerra, S; Spampinato, S

    1999-06-01

    In this study, we examined the presence of sigma1 and sigma2 sites in the rabbit iris-ciliary body by receptor binding and investigated their effects on intraocular pressure (IOP) in albino rabbits. The iris-ciliary body has binding sites for the sigma1-site agonist [3H](+)-pentazocine (Kd = 4.6 nM; Bmax = 212 fmol/mg protein) and sigma2 sites labeled with [3H]1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) (Kd = 8. 2 nM; Bmax = 1120 fmol/mg protein). In competition binding studies, (+)-pentazocine and the sigma antagonist NE-100 displayed high affinity for sigma1 sites (Ki = 2.1 and 2.4 nM, respectively), whereas (+)-N-allylnormetazocine (NANM) was less potent (Ki = 178 nM). Unilateral topical (+)-pentazocine (0.01-0.1%) caused a significant dose-related reduction of IOP in ocular normotensive rabbits and in the alpha-chymotrypsin model of ocular hypertension. (+)-NANM was less potent than (+)-pentazocine. Neither compound altered the IOP of the contralateral eye, and their hypotensive activity was blocked by NE-100 that, by itself, had no effect on IOP. (-)-Pentazocine, (-)-NANM, and DTG had no effect on IOP. DTG prevented the hypotensive effect of (+)-pentazocine, suggesting that it acts as a sigma1-site antagonist. sigma-Site ligands did not affect pupil diameter or cause ocular inflammation. Topical [3H](+)-pentazocine reaches the intraocular tissues within 30 min, and its uptake in the iris-ciliary body and retina was significantly reduced by topical pretreatment with NE-100, as expected for a receptor-specific agent. Reverse-phase HPLC confirmed the presence of intact (+)-pentazocine in iris-ciliary body homogenates. sigma1-Site agonists may offer a novel class of agents potentially effective in the control of ocular hypertension.

  6. A unique binding epitope for salvinorin A, a non-nitrogenous kappa opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Kane, Brian E; Nieto, Marcelo J; McCurdy, Christopher R; Ferguson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Salvinorin A is a potent kappa opioid receptor (KOP) agonist with unique structural and pharmacological properties. This non-nitrogenous ligand lacks nearly all the structural features commonly associated with opioid ligand binding and selectivity. This study explores the structural basis to salvinorin A binding and selectivity using a combination of chimeric and single-point mutant opioid receptors. The experiments were designed based on previous models of salvinorin A that locate the ligand within a pocket formed by transmembrane (TM) II, VI, and VII. More traditional sites of opioid recognition were also explored, including the highly conserved aspartate in TM III (D138) and the KOP selectivity site E297, to determine the role, if any, that these residues play in binding and selectivity. The results indicate that salvinorin A recognizes a cluster of residues in TM II and VII, including Q115, Y119, Y312, Y313, and Y320. Based on the position of these residues within the receptor, and prior study on salvinorin A, a model is proposed that aligns the ligand vertically, between TM II and VII. In this orientation, the ligand spans residues that are spaced one to two turns down the face of the helices within the receptor cavity. The ligand is also in close proximity to EL-2 which, based on chimeric data, is proposed to play an indirect role in salvinorin A binding and selectivity.

  7. NMR spectroscopy of the ligand binding core of ionotropic glutamate receptor 2 bound to 5-substituted willardiine partial agonists

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Oswald, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate receptors mediate neuronal intercommunication in the central nervous system by coupling extracellular neurotransmitter-receptor interactions to ion channel conductivity. To gain insight into structural and dynamical factors that underlie this coupling, solution NMR experiments were performed on the bi-lobed ligand-binding core of glutamate receptor 2 in complexes with a set of willardiine partial agonists. These agonists are valuable for studying structure-function relationships because their 5-position substituent size is correlated with ligand efficacy and extent of receptor desensitization whereas the substituent electronegativity is correlated with ligand potency. NMR results show that the protein backbone amide chemical shift deviations correlate mainly with efficacy and extent of desensitization. Pronounced deviations occur at specific residues in the ligand-binding site and in the two helical segments that join the lobes by a disulfide bond. Experiments detecting conformational exchange show that micro- to millisecond timescale motions also occur near the disulfide bond and vary largely with efficacy and extent of desensitization. These results thus identify regions displaying structural and dynamical dissimilarity arising from differences in ligand-protein interactions and lobe closure which may play a critical role in receptor response. Furthermore, measures of line broadening and conformational exchange for a portion of the ligand-binding site correlate with ligand EC50 data. These results do not have any correlate in the currently available crystal structures and thus provide a novel view of ligand-binding events that may be associated with agonist potency differences. PMID:18387631

  8. Data of protein-RNA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook; Park, Byungkyu; Choi, Daesik; Han, Kyungsook

    2017-02-01

    Despite the increasing number of protein-RNA complexes in structure databases, few data resources have been made available which can be readily used in developing or testing a method for predicting either protein-binding sites in RNA sequences or RNA-binding sites in protein sequences. The problem of predicting protein-binding sites in RNA has received much less attention than the problem of predicting RNA-binding sites in protein. The data presented in this paper are related to the article entitled "PRIdictor: Protein-RNA Interaction predictor" (Tuvshinjargal et al. 2016) [1]. PRIdictor can predict protein-binding sites in RNA as well as RNA-binding sites in protein at the nucleotide- and residue-levels. This paper presents four datasets that were used to test four prediction models of PRIdictor: (1) model RP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from protein and RNA sequences, (2) model RaP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from RNA sequence alone, (3) model PR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein and RNA sequences, and (4) model PaR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein sequence alone. The datasets supplied in this article can be used as a valuable resource to evaluate and compare different methods for predicting protein-RNA binding sites.

  9. Identification, characterization, and developmental regulation of embryonic benzodiazepine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, L.A.; Gibbs, T.T.; Farb, D.H.

    1987-06-01

    We report the identification and characterization of 2 classes of benzodiazepine binding sites in the embryonic chick CNS. Binding was examined by competition and saturation binding experiments, using as radioligands /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, a classical benzodiazepine anxiolytic, and /sup 3/H-Ro5-4864, a convulsant benzodiazepine. The results demonstrate that high-affinity (KD = 2.3 nM) /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding sites (site-A) are present by embryonic day 5 (Hamburger and Hamilton stage 27) and increase throughout development (Bmax = 0.3 and 1.3 pmol/mg protein in 7 and 20 d brain membranes, respectively). When 7 or 20 d brain membranes are photoaffinity-labeled with /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam and ultraviolet light, the radioactivity migrates as 2 bands on SDS-PAGE, consistent with Mrs of 48,000 and 51,000. GABA potentiates /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding at both 7 and 20 d of development, indicating that site-A is coupled to receptors for GABA early in development. Importantly, we have also identified a novel site (site-B) that binds classical benzodiazepine agonists with low affinity (micromolar) but displays high affinity for Ro5-4864 (KD = 41 nM). Site-B displays characteristics expected for a functional receptor, including stereospecificity and sensitivity to inactivation by heat and protease treatment. Saturation binding studies employing /sup 3/H-Ro5-4864 indicate that the levels of site-B are similar in 7 and 20 d brain (ca. 2.5 pmol/mg protein). The function of site-B is not known, but its preponderance in 7 d brain, relative to site-A, suggests that it might be important during early embryonic development.

  10. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na+ in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na+-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na+ sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na+ increased cell surface [3H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na+ by Cs+ or NH4+ inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na+ over Cs+. Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  11. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-05-03

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations.

  12. Thioredoxin binding site of phosphoribulokinase overlaps the catalytic site. [R

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, M.A.; Hartman, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    The ATP-regulatory binding site of phosphoribulokinase was studied using bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate (BrAcNHEtOP). BrAcNHEtOP binds to the active-regulatory binding site of the protein. Following trypsin degradation of the labeled protein, fragments were separated by HPLC and sequenced. (DT)

  13. A novel non-opioid binding site for endomorphin-1.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, I; Toth, F; Biyashev, D; Szatmari, I; Monory, K; Tomboly, C; Toth, G; Benyhe, S; Borsodi, A

    2016-08-01

    Endomorphins are natural amidated opioid tetrapeptides with the following structure: Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-1), and Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-2). Endomorphins interact selectively with the μ-opioid or MOP receptors and exhibit nanomolar or sub-nanomolar receptor binding affinities, therefore they suggested to be endogenous agonists for the μ-opioid receptors. Endomorphins mediate a number of characteristic opioid effects, such as antinociception, however there are several physiological functions in which endomorphins appear to act in a fashion that does not involve binding to and activation of the μ-opioid receptor. Our recent data indicate that a radiolabelled [(3)H]endomorphin-1 with a specific radioactivity of 2.35 TBq/mmol - prepared by catalytic dehalogenation of the diiodinated peptide precursor in the presence of tritium gas - is able to bind to a second, naloxone insensitive recognition site in rat brain membranes. Binding heterogeneity, i.e., the presence of higher (Kd = 0.4 nM / Bmax = 120 fmol/mg protein) and lower (Kd = 8.2 nM / Bmax = 432 fmol/mg protein) affinity binding components is observed both in saturation binding experiments followed by Schatchard analysis, and in equilibrium competition binding studies. The signs of receptor multiplicity, e.g., curvilinear Schatchard plots or biphasic displacement curves are seen only if the non-specific binding is measured in the presence of excess unlabeled endomorphin-1 and not in the presence of excess unlabeled naloxone. The second, lower affinity non-opioid binding site is not recognized by heterocyclic opioid alkaloid ligands, neither agonists such as morphine, nor antagonists such as naloxone. On the contrary, endomorphin-1 is displaced from its lower affinity, higher capacity binding site by several natural neuropeptides, including methionine-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, nociceptin-orphanin FQ, angiotensin and FMRF-amide. This naloxone-insensitive, consequently non-opioid binding site seems

  14. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. )

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  15. THIP and isoguvacine are partial agonists of GABA-stimulated benzodiazepine receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Karobath, M; Lippitsch, M

    1979-10-15

    The effects of THIP and isoguvacine on 3H-flunitrazepam binding to washed membranes prepared from the cerebral cortex of adult rats have been examined. THIP, which has only minimal stimulatory effects on benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor binding, has been found to inhibit the stimulation induced by small concentrations (2 microM) of exogenous GABA. While isoguvacine stimulates BZ receptor binding, although to a smaller extent than GABA, it also antagonizes the stimulation of BZ receptor binding induced by GABA. Thus THIP and isoguvacine exhibit the properties of a partial agonist of GABA-stimulated BZ receptor binding.

  16. (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, D.A.; Taylor, D.P.; Enna, S.J.

    1983-05-01

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone ((/sup 3/) THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of (/sup 3/)THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, (/sup 3/) THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that (/sup 3/)THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors.

  17. Agonist Binding and Desensitization of the μ-Opioid Receptor Is Modulated by Phosphorylation of the C-Terminal Tail Domain

    PubMed Central

    Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Bunzow, James R.; Williams, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Sustained activation of G protein–coupled receptors can lead to a rapid decline in signaling through acute receptor desensitization. In the case of the μ-opioid receptor (MOPr), this desensitization may play a role in the development of analgesic tolerance. It is understood that phosphorylation of MOPr promotes association with β-arrestin proteins, which then facilitates desensitization and receptor internalization. Agonists that induce acute desensitization have been shown to induce a noncanonical high-affinity agonist binding state in MOPr, conferring a persistent memory of prior receptor activation. In the current study, live-cell confocal imaging was used to investigate the role of receptor phosphorylation in agonist binding to MOPr. A phosphorylation cluster in the C-terminal tail of MOPr was identified as a mediator of agonist-induced affinity changes in MOPr. This site is unique from the primary phosphorylation cluster responsible for β-arrestin binding and internalization. Electrophysiologic measurements of receptor function suggest that both phosphorylation clusters may play a parallel role during acute receptor desensitization. Desensitization was unaffected by alanine mutation of either phosphorylation cluster, but was largely eliminated when both clusters were mutated. Overall, this work suggests that there are multiple effects of MOPr phosphorylation that appear to regulate MOPr function: one affecting β-arrestin binding and a second affecting agonist binding. PMID:25934731

  18. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  19. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, S.M. . Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. )

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  20. Molecular exploration of the α(1A)-adrenoceptor orthosteric site: binding site definition for epinephrine, HEAT and prazosin.

    PubMed

    Maïga, Arhamatoulaye; Dupont, Mélanie; Blanchet, Guillaume; Marcon, Elodie; Gilquin, Bernard; Servent, Denis; Gilles, Nicolas

    2014-12-20

    Despite the physiological and pharmacological importance of the α1A-adrenoreceptor, the mode of interactions of classical agonists and radioactive ligands with this receptor is not yet clearly defined. Here, we used mutagenesis studies and binding experiments to evaluate the importance of 11 receptor sites for the binding of (125)I-HEAT, (3)H-prazosin and epinephrine. Only one residue (F312) commonly interacts with the three molecules, and, surprisingly, D106 interacts only with epinephrine in a moderate way. Our docking model shows that prazosin and HEAT are almost superimposed into the orthosteric pocket with their tetralone and quinazoline rings close to the phenyl ring of the agonist.

  1. A citrate-binding site in calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, T; Eisenstein, M; Muszkat, K A; Fleminger, G

    1998-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a major Ca2+ messenger which, upon Ca2+ activation, binds and activates a number of target enzymes involved in crucial cellular processes. The dependence on Ca2+ ion concentration suggests that CaM activation may be modulated by low-affinity Ca2+ chelators. The effect on CaM structure and function of citrate ion, a Ca2+ chelator commonly found in the cytosol and the mitochondria, was therefore investigated. A series of structural and biochemical methods, including tryptic mapping, immunological recognition by specific monoclonal antibodies, CIDNP-NMR, binding to specific ligands and association with radiolabeled citrate, showed that citrate induces conformational modifications in CaM which affect the shape and activity of the protein. These changes were shown to be associated with the C-terminal lobe of the molecule and involve actual binding of citrate to CaM. Analyzing X-ray structures of several citrate-binding proteins by computerized molecular graphics enabled us to identify a putative citrate-binding site (CBS) on the CaM molecule around residues Arg106-His107. Owing to the tight proximity of this site to the third Ca(2+)-binding loop of CaM, binding of citrate is presumably translated into changes in Ca2+ binding to site III (and indirectly to site IV). These changes apparently affect the structural and biochemical properties of the conformation-sensitive protein.

  2. Opioid binding site in EL-4 thymoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, E.; Spector, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using EL-4 thymoma cell-line we found a binding site similar to the k opioid receptor of the nervous system. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine indicated a single site with a K/sub D/ = 60 +/- 17 nM and Bmax = 2.7 +/- 0.8 pmols/10/sup 6/ cells. To characterize this binding site, competition studies were performed using selective compounds for the various opioid receptors. The k agonist U-50,488H was the most potent displacer of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine with an IC/sub 50/ value = 0.57..mu..M. The two steroisomers levorphanol and dextrorphan showed the same affinity for this site. While morphine, (D-Pen/sup 2/, D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin and ..beta..-endorphin failed to displace, except at very high concentrations, codeine demonstrated a IC/sub 50/ = 60..mu..M, that was similar to naloxone. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Binding of an ( sup 125 I) labelled thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor agonist to baboon platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, G.W. II; De Jesus, A. )

    1989-12-01

    To characterize the thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) receptor on baboon platelets the binding of (125I)BOP was studied. (125I)BOP bound to washed baboon platelets in a saturable manner. Scatchard analysis of binding isotherms revealed a Kd of 1.12 +/- 0.08 nM and a binding capacity of 54 +/- 5 fmoles/10(8) platelets (326 sites/platelet). Several TXA2/PGH2 agonists and antagonists displaced (125I)BOP from its baboon platelet binding site with a rank order of potency similar to human platelets: I-BOP greater than SQ29548 greater than U46619 = I-PTA-OH greater than PTA-OH. I-BOP aggregated washed baboon platelets with an EC50 of 10 +/- 4 nM. The results indicate that (125I)BOP binds to the TXA2/PGH2 receptor on baboon platelets and that this receptor is similar to its human counterpart.

  4. Predicted metal binding sites for phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashok; Roy, Sudeep; Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Roy, Pratibha; Mishra, Manoj; Khan, Feroz; Meena, Abha

    2009-09-05

    Metal ion binding domains are found in proteins that mediate transport, buffering or detoxification of metal ions. The objective of the study is to design and analyze metal binding motifs against the genes involved in phytoremediation. This is being done on the basis of certain pre-requisite amino-acid residues known to bind metal ions/metal complexes in medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP's). Earlier work on MAP's have shown that heavy metals accumulated by aromatic and medicinal plants do not appear in the essential oil and that some of these species are able to grow in metal contaminated sites. A pattern search against the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL databases yielded true positives in each case showing the high specificity of the motifs designed for the ions of nickel, lead, molybdenum, manganese, cadmium, zinc, iron, cobalt and xenobiotic compounds. Motifs were also studied against PDB structures. Results of the study suggested the presence of binding sites on the surface of protein molecules involved. PDB structures of proteins were finally predicted for the binding sites functionality in their respective phytoremediation usage. This was further validated through CASTp server to study its physico-chemical properties. Bioinformatics implications would help in designing strategy for developing transgenic plants with increased metal binding capacity. These metal binding factors can be used to restrict metal update by plants. This helps in reducing the possibility of metal movement into the food chain.

  5. Autoantibodies Enhance Agonist Action and Binding to Cardiac Muscarinic Receptors in Chronic Chagas’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Ciria C.; Nascimento, José H.; Chaves, Elen A.; Costa, Patrícia C.; Masuda, Masako O.; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos de Carvalho, Antônio C.; Giménez, Luis E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M2AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M2AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M2AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M2AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [3H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [3H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC50 of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 × 10−8, 1.33 × 10−7, and 2.0 × 10−7 mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M2AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  6. Autoantibodies enhance agonist action and binding to cardiac muscarinic receptors in chronic Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ciria C; Nascimento, Jose H; Chaves, Elen A; Costa, Patricia C; Masuda, Masako O; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos DE Carvalho, Antonio C; Gimenez, Luis E

    2008-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M(2)-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M(2)AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M(2)AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M(2)AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [(3)H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([(3)H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M(2)AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [(3)H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [(3)H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC(50) of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 x 10(- 8), 1.33 x 10(- 7), and 2.0 x 10(- 7) mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M(2)AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action.

  7. Coupling between agonist and chloride ionophore sites of the GABA(A) receptor: agonist/antagonist efficacy of 4-PIOL.

    PubMed

    Rabe, H; Picard, R; Uusi-Oukari, M; Hevers, W; Lüddens, H; Korpi, E R

    2000-12-15

    Eight gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mimetics were tested on their ability to differentiate native GABA(A) receptor subtypes present in various rat brain regions. In rat brain cryostat sections, little regional variations by the agonistic actions of muscimol, thiomuscimol, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoazolo(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol, piperidine-4-sulphonic acid, taurine and beta-alanine on [35S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]TBPS) binding to GABA(A) receptor channels were found. They were very similar to those found for GABA itself and indicated no direct correlation with single subunit distributions for any of these compounds. Only the low-efficacy GABA mimetic 5-(4-piperidyl)isoxazol-3-ol (4-PIOL) acted like a weak partial agonist or antagonist depending on the brain area. As the cerebellar granule cell layer was relatively insensitive to both modes of action, we tested 4-PIOL in recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 (widespread major subtype) and alpha6beta2gamma2 (cerebellar granule cell restricted) receptors where it had different effects on GABA-modulated [35S]TBPS binding and on electrophysiological responses. 4-PIOL may thus serve as a potential lead for receptor subtype selective compounds.

  8. Allosteric binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wess, Jürgen

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Molecular Pharmacology, Tränkle et al. (p. 1597) present new findings regarding the existence of a second allosteric site on the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 mAChR). The M2 mAChR is a prototypic class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that has proven to be a very useful model system to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the binding of allosteric GPCR ligands. Previous studies have identified several allosteric muscarinic ligands, including the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor tacrine and the bis-pyridinium derivative 4,4'-bis-[(2,6-dichloro-benzyloxy-imino)-methyl]-1,1'-propane-1,3-diyl-bis-pyridinium dibromide (Duo3), which, in contrast to conventional allosteric muscarinic ligands, display concentration-effect curves with slope factors >1. By analyzing the interactions of tacrine and Duo3 with other allosteric muscarinic agents predicted to bind to the previously identified ;common' allosteric binding site, Tränkle et al. provide evidence suggesting that two allosteric agents and one orthosteric ligand may be able to bind to the M2 mAChR simultaneously. Moreover, studies with mutant mAChRs indicated that the M2 receptor epitopes involved in the binding of tacrine and Duo3 may not be identical. Molecular modeling and ligand docking studies suggested that the additional allosteric site probably represents a subdomain of the receptor's allosteric binding cleft. Because allosteric binding sites have been found on many other GPCRs and drugs interacting with these sites are thought to have great therapeutic potential, the study by Tränkle et al. should be of considerable general interest.

  9. Bridging lectin binding sites by multivalent carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Valentin; Pieters, Roland J

    2013-05-21

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions are involved in a multitude of biological recognition processes. Since individual protein-carbohydrate interactions are usually weak, multivalency is often required to achieve biologically relevant binding affinities and selectivities. Among the possible mechanisms responsible for binding enhancement by multivalency, the simultaneous attachment of a multivalent ligand to several binding sites of a multivalent receptor (i.e. chelation) has been proven to have a strong impact. This article summarizes recent examples of chelating lectin ligands of different size. Covered lectins include the Shiga-like toxin, where the shortest distance between binding sites is ca. 9 Å, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (shortest distance between binding sites 13-14 Å), LecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (shortest distance 26 Å), cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin (shortest distance 31 Å), anti-HIV antibody 2G12 (shortest distance 31 Å), concanavalin A (ConA) (shortest distance 72 Å), RCA120 (shortest distance 100 Å), and Erythrina cristagalli (ECL) (shortest distance 100 Å). While chelating binding of the discussed ligands is likely, experimental proof, for example by X-ray crystallography, is limited to only a few cases.

  10. Competitive interaction of agonists and antagonists with 5-HT3 recognition sites in membranes of neuroblastoma cells labelled with (/sup 3/H)ICS 205-930

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, D.; Neijt, H.C.; Karpf, A.

    1989-01-01

    (3H)ICS 205-930 labelled 5-HT3 recognition sites in membranes prepared from murine neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells. Binding was rapid, reversible, saturable and stereoselective to an apparently homogeneous population of sites. Kinetic studies revealed that agonists and antagonists produced a monophasic dissociation reaction of (3H)ICS 205-930 from its recognition sites. The dissociation rate constant of the radioligand was similar whether the dissociation was induced by an agonist or an antagonist. Competition studies carried out with agonists and antagonists also suggested the presence of a homogeneous population of (3H)ICS 205-930 recognition sites. Competition curves were best fit for a 1 site model. (3H)ICS 205-930 binding sites displayed the pharmacological profile of a 5-HT3 receptor. The interactions of agonists and antagonists with (3H)ICS 205-930 recognition sites were apparently competitive in nature, as demonstrated in kinetic and equilibrium experiments. In saturation experiments carried out with (3H)ICS 205-930 in the presence and the absence of unlabelled agonists and antagonists, apparent Bmax values were not reduced whereas apparent Kd values were increased in the presence of competing ligands. There was a good agreement between apparent pKB values calculated for the competing ligands in saturation experiments and pKd values calculated from competition experiments. The present data demonstrate that (3H)ICS 205-930 labels a homogeneous population of sites at which agonists and antagonists interact competitively.

  11. Inhibitory GTP binding protein G/sub i/ regulates US -adrenoceptor affinity towards US -agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, I.; Levitzki, A.

    1987-05-01

    Treatment of S-49 lymphoma cell membranes with pertussis toxin (PT) causes a three-fold reduction of US -adrenoceptor (US AR) affinity towards isoproterenol. A similar treatment with cholera toxin (CT) does not cause such a modulation. The effects were studied by the detailed analysis of SVI-cyanopindolol (CYP) binding curves in the absence and presence of increasing agonist concentrations. Thus, the authors were able to compare in detail the effects of G/sub s/ and G/sub i/ on the agonist-associated state of the US AR. In contrast to these findings, PT treatment does not have any effect on the displacement of SVI-CYP by (-)isoproterenol. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory GTP protein G/sub i/ modulates the US AR affinity towards US -agonists. This might be due to the association of G/sub i/ with the agonist-bound US AR x G/sub s/ x C complex within the membrane. This hypothesis, as well as others, is under investigation.

  12. Specificity of Auxin-binding Sites on Maize Coleoptile Membranes as Possible Receptor Sites for Auxin Action 1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Peter M.; Dohrmann, Ulrike; Hertel, Rainer

    1977-01-01

    Dissociation coefficients of auxin-binding sites on maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile membranes were measured, for 48 auxins and related ring compounds, by competitive displacement of 14C-naphthaleneacetic acid from the binding sites. The sites bind with high affinity several ring compounds with acidic side chains 2 to 4 carbons long, and much more weakly bind neutral ring compounds and phenols related to these active acids, most phenoxyalkylcarboxylic acids, and arylcarboxylic acids except benzoic acid, which scarcely binds, and triiodobenzoic acids, which bind strongly. Specificity of the binding is narrowed in the presence of a low molecular weight “supernatant factor” that occurs in maize and other tissues. Activity of many of the analogs as auxin agonists or antagonists in the cell elongation response was determined with maize coleoptiles. These activities on the whole roughly parallel the affinities of the binding sites for the same compounds, especially affinities measured in the presence of supernatant factor, but there are some quantitative discrepancies, especially among phenoxyalkylcarboxylic acids. In view of several factors that can cause receptor affinity and biological activity values to diverge quantitatively among analogs, the findings appear to support the presumption that the auxin-binding sites may be receptors for auxin action. PMID:16660143

  13. Radiation inactivation reveals discrete cation binding sites that modulate dihydropyridine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolger, G.T.; Skolnick, P.; Kempner, E.S. )

    1989-08-01

    In low ionic strength buffer (5 mM Tris.HCl), the binding of (3H) nitrendipine to dihydropyridine calcium antagonist binding sites of mouse forebrain membranes is increased by both Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. Radiation inactivation was used to determine the target size of ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding sites in 5 mM Tris.HCl buffer, in the presence and absence of these cations. After irradiation, ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine binding in buffer with or without Na+ was diminished, due to a loss of binding sites and also to an increase in Kd. After accounting for radiation effects on the dissociation constant, the target size for the nitrendipine binding site in buffer was 160-170 kDa and was 170-180 kDa in the presence of sodium. In the presence of calcium ions, ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding showed no radiation effects on Kd and yielded a target size of 150-170 kDa. These findings suggest, as in the case of opioid receptors, the presence of high molecular weight membrane components that modulate cation-induced alterations in radioligand binding to dihydropyridine binding sites.

  14. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions. PMID:26540053

  15. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Mace G.

    2017-01-01

    The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP) of estrogen receptor α (ERα) allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D) protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors. PMID:28061508

  16. Pharmacophore modeling, comprehensive 3D-QSAR, and binding mode analysis of TGR5 agonists.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Thangaraj; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2017-04-01

    Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) is emerging as an important and promising target for the development of anti-diabetic drugs. Pharmacophore modeling and atom-based 3D-QSAR studies were carried out on a new series of 5-phenoxy-1,3-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxamides as highly potent agonists of TGR5. The generated best six featured pharmacophore model AAHHRR consists of two hydrogen bond acceptors (A): two hydrophobic groups (H) and two aromatic rings (R). The constructed 3D-QSAR model acquired excellent correlation coefficient value (R(2 )=( )0.9018), exhibited good predictive power (Q(2 )=( )0.8494) and high Fisher ratio (F = 61.2). The pharmacophore model was validated through Guner-Henry (GH) scoring method. The GH value of 0.5743 indicated that the AAHHRR model was statistically valuable and reliable in the identification of TGR5 agonists. Furthermore, the combined approach of molecular docking and binding free energy calculations were carried out for the 5-phenoxy-1,3-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxamides to explore the binding mode and interaction pattern. The generated contour maps revealed the important structural insights for the activity of the compounds. The results obtained from this study could be helpful in the development of novel and more potent agonists of TGR5.

  17. Reconstitution of high affinity. cap alpha. /sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding by fusion with a pertussis toxin substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.H.; Neubig, R.R.

    1986-03-05

    High affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding is thought to occur via a coupling of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptor with N/sub i/, the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide binding protein. Human platelet membranes pretreated at pH 11.5 exhibit a selective inactivation of agonist binding and N/sub i/. To further study the mechanism of agonist binding, alkali treated membranes (ATM) were mixed with membranes pretreated with 10 ..mu..M phenoxybenzamine to block ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors (POB-M). The combined membrane pellet was incubated in 50% polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote membrane-membrane fusion and assayed for binding to the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 (UK) and the antagonist (/sup 3/H) yohimbine. PEG treatment resulted in a 2-4 fold enhancement of UK binding whereas yohimbine binding was unchanged. No enhancement of UK binding was observed in the absence of PEG treatment. The reconstitution was dependent on the addition of POB-M. They found that a 1:1 ratio of POB-M:ATM was optimal. Reconstituted binding was inhibited by GppNHp. Fusion of rat C6 glioma cell membranes, which do not contain ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors, also enhanced agonist binding to ATM. Fusion of C6 membranes from cells treated with pertussis toxin did not enhance (/sup 3/H) UK binding. These data show that a pertussis toxin sensitive membrane component, possibly N/sub i/, can reconstitute high affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist binding.

  18. Insight into the Binding Mode of Agonists of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor from Calculated Electron Densities

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Michael E; Gutbrod, Oliver; Matthiesen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are among the most prominent and most economically important insecticide targets. Thus, an understanding of the modes of binding of respective agonists is important for the design of specific compounds with favorable vertebrate profiles. In the case of nAChRs, the lack of available high-resolution X-ray structures leaves theoretical considerations as the only viable option. Starting from classical homology and docking approaches, binding mode hypotheses are created for five agonists of the nAChR, covering insecticides in the main group 4 of the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC) mode of action (MoA) classification, namely, neonicotinoids, nicotine, sulfoxaflor, and butenolides. To better understand these binding modes, the topologies of calculated electron densities of small-model systems are analyzed in the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The theoretically obtained modes of binding are very much in line with the biology-driven IRAC MoA classification of the investigated ligands. PMID:26175091

  19. Insight into the Binding Mode of Agonists of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor from Calculated Electron Densities.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michael E; Gutbrod, Oliver; Matthiesen, Svend

    2015-07-15

    Insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are among the most prominent and most economically important insecticide targets. Thus, an understanding of the modes of binding of respective agonists is important for the design of specific compounds with favorable vertebrate profiles. In the case of nAChRs, the lack of available high-resolution X-ray structures leaves theoretical considerations as the only viable option. Starting from classical homology and docking approaches, binding mode hypotheses are created for five agonists of the nAChR, covering insecticides in the main group 4 of the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC) mode of action (MoA) classification, namely, neonicotinoids, nicotine, sulfoxaflor, and butenolides. To better understand these binding modes, the topologies of calculated electron densities of small-model systems are analyzed in the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The theoretically obtained modes of binding are very much in line with the biology-driven IRAC MoA classification of the investigated ligands.

  20. Binding of dexamethasone to rat liver nuclei in vivo and in vitro: evidence for two distinct binding sites.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, S H; Shaper, J H

    1984-03-01

    The binding of [3H]dexamethasone (DEX) to rat liver nuclei in vitro and in vivo have been compared. In vitro, purified nuclei displayed a single class of specific glucocorticoid binding sites with a dissociation constant (Kd) of approximately 10(-7) M for [3H]DEX at 4 degrees C. The glucocorticoid agonists prednisolone, cortisol, and corticosterone and the antagonists progesterone and cortexolone competed avidly for this site, but the potent glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide (TA) competed poorly in vitro. Nuclei isolated from the livers of intact rats contained 1-2 X 10(4) [3H]DEX binding sites/nucleus. Up to 85% of the binding sites were recovered in the nuclear envelope (NE) fraction when NE were prepared either before or after labeling with [3H]DEX in vitro. After adrenalectomy, the specific [3H]DEX binding capacity of both nuclei and NE decreased to 15-20% of control values, indicating sensitivity of the binding sites to hormonal status of the animals. Efforts to restore the binding capacity by administration of exogenous glucocorticoids, however, were unsuccessful. After labeling of rat liver nuclei in vivo by intraperitoneal injection of [3H]DEX or [3H]TA into living animals, the steroid specificity and subnuclear localization of radiolabel were different. Both [3H]TA (which did not bind in vitro) and [3H]DEX became localized to nuclei in a saturable fashion in vivo. With either of these ligands, approximately 20% of the total nuclear radiolabel was recovered in the NE fraction. These results suggest the presence of two separate and distinct binding sites in rat liver nuclei, one which is localized to the NE and binds [3H]DEX (but not [3H]TA) in vitro, and another which is not localized to the NE but binds [3H]DEX and [3H]TA in vivo.

  1. Structural Determinants for the Binding of Morphinan Agonists to the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaojing; Campomanes, Pablo; Kless, Achim; Schapitz, Inga; Wagener, Markus; Koch, Thomas; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic descriptions of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) noncovalently binding with two of its prototypical morphinan agonists, morphine (MOP) and hydromorphone (HMP), are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Subtle differences between the binding modes and hydration properties of MOP and HMP emerge from the calculations. Alchemical free energy perturbation calculations show qualitative agreement with in vitro experiments performed in this work: indeed, the binding free energy difference between MOP and HMP computed by forward and backward alchemical transformation is 1.2±1.1 and 0.8±0.8 kcal/mol, respectively, to be compared with 0.4±0.3 kcal/mol from experiment. Comparison with an MD simulation of μOR covalently bound with the antagonist β-funaltrexamine hints to agonist-induced conformational changes associated with an early event of the receptor's activation: a shift of the transmembrane helix 6 relative to the transmembrane helix 3 and a consequent loss of the key R165-T279 interhelical hydrogen bond. This finding is consistent with a previous proposal suggesting that the R165-T279 hydrogen bond between these two helices indicates an inactive receptor conformation.

  2. Functional map of arrestin binding to phosphorylated opsin, with and without agonist

    PubMed Central

    Peterhans, Christian; Lally, Ciara C. M.; Ostermaier, Martin K.; Sommer, Martha E.; Standfuss, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Arrestins desensitize G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and act as mediators of signalling. Here we investigated the interactions of arrestin-1 with two functionally distinct forms of the dim-light photoreceptor rhodopsin. Using unbiased scanning mutagenesis we probed the individual contribution of each arrestin residue to the interaction with the phosphorylated apo-receptor (Ops-P) and the agonist-bound form (Meta II-P). Disruption of the polar core or displacement of the C-tail strengthened binding to both receptor forms. In contrast, mutations of phosphate-binding residues (phosphosensors) suggest the phosphorylated receptor C-terminus binds arrestin differently for Meta II-P and Ops-P. Likewise, mutations within the inter-domain interface, variations in the receptor-binding loops and the C-edge of arrestin reveal different binding modes. In summary, our results indicate that arrestin-1 binding to Meta II-P and Ops-P is similarly dependent on arrestin activation, although the complexes formed with these two receptor forms are structurally distinct. PMID:27350090

  3. Predicting tissue specific transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of gene regulation often utilize genome-wide predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Most existing prediction methods are based on sequence information alone, ignoring biological contexts such as developmental stages and tissue types. Experimental methods to study in vivo binding, including ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, can only study one transcription factor in a single cell type and under a specific condition in each experiment, and therefore cannot scale to determine the full set of regulatory interactions in mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks. Results We developed a new computational approach, PIPES, for predicting tissue-specific TF binding. PIPES integrates in vitro protein binding microarrays (PBMs), sequence conservation and tissue-specific epigenetic (DNase I hypersensitivity) information. We demonstrate that PIPES improves over existing methods on distinguishing between in vivo bound and unbound sequences using ChIP-seq data for 11 mouse TFs. In addition, our predictions are in good agreement with current knowledge of tissue-specific TF regulation. Conclusions We provide a systematic map of computationally predicted tissue-specific binding targets for 284 mouse TFs across 55 tissue/cell types. Such comprehensive resource is useful for researchers studying gene regulation. PMID:24238150

  4. Ligand-binding domain of an α7-nicotinic receptor chimera and its complex with agonist.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Xing; Huang, Sun; Bren, Nina; Noridomi, Kaori; Dellisanti, Cosma D; Sine, Steven M; Chen, Lin

    2011-09-11

    The α(7) acetylcholine receptor (AChR) mediates pre- and postsynaptic neurotransmission in the central nervous system and is a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric and inflammatory disorders. We determined the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of a receptor chimera constructed from the human α(7) AChR and Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), which shares 64% sequence identity and 71% similarity with native α(7). We also determined the structure with bound epibatidine, a potent AChR agonist. Comparison of the structures revealed molecular rearrangements and interactions that mediate agonist recognition and early steps in signal transduction in α(7) AChRs. The structures further revealed a ring of negative charge within the central vestibule, poised to contribute to cation selectivity. Structure-guided mutational studies disclosed distinctive contributions to agonist recognition and signal transduction in α(7) AChRs. The structures provide a realistic template for structure-aided drug design and for defining structure-function relationships of α(7) AChRs.

  5. Polypropylene glycol is a selective binding inhibitor for LTA and other structurally related TLR2 agonists.

    PubMed

    Draing, Christian; Traub, Stephanie; Deininger, Susanne; Mang, Philippa; Möller, Heiko M; Manso, Miguel; Rossi, Francois; Morath, Siegfried; Hartung, Thomas; von Aulock, Sonja

    2008-03-01

    Polypropylene glycol (PPG) is commonly added to bacterial cultures to avoid foaming. However, lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from bacteria grown with PPG lacked cytokine-inducing potency in human blood. We tested the blocking efficacy of several glycols on the cytokine response to staphylococcal LTA in human blood. PPG 1200 was the most potent inhibitor tested, shown for TNF, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TGF-beta induction, and displayed no cytotoxic effects. TNF induction by Staphylococcus aureus or by Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 agonists (di- and triacylated lipopeptides and LTA) was also inhibited by PPG 1200, but not that induced by Escherichia coli or TLR4 agonists. In flow cytometric studies, PPG-carrying nanobeads bound more rhodamine-labeled LTA than those with glycerol. Additionally, the methyl group peak in the (1)H-NMR of LTA shifted after incubation with increasing PPG 1200 concentrations. Sequential incubation of polystyrene plates with LTA, then PPG 1200 and then blood, with washing steps in between, showed that LTA-induced TNF release was inhibited. But when PPG 1200 was pre-incubated with blood that was washed before LTA was added, TNF induction was not repressed, demonstrating that PPG binds LTA and not cellular structures. In summary, PPG 1200 is a novel inhibitor of cytokine induction by TLR2 agonists, which interferes directly with the ligands.

  6. Modeling the dynamics of airway constriction: effects of agonist transport and binding.

    PubMed

    Amin, Samir D; Majumdar, Arnab; Frey, Urs; Suki, Béla

    2010-08-01

    Recent advances have revealed that during exogenous airway challenge, airway diameters cannot be adequately predicted by their initial diameters. Furthermore, airway diameters can also vary greatly in time on scales shorter than a breath. To better understand these phenomena, we developed a multiscale model that allowed us to simulate aerosol challenge in the airways during ventilation. The model incorporates agonist-receptor binding kinetics to govern the temporal response of airway smooth muscle contraction on individual airway segments, which, together with airway wall mechanics, determines local airway caliber. Global agonist transport and deposition are coupled with pressure-driven flow, linking local airway constrictions with global flow dynamics. During the course of challenge, airway constriction alters the flow pattern, redistributing the agonist to less constricted regions. This results in a negative feedback that may be a protective property of the normal lung. As a consequence, repetitive challenge can cause spatial constriction patterns to evolve in time, resulting in a loss of predictability of airway diameters. Additionally, the model offers new insights into several phenomena including the intra- and interbreath dynamics of airway constriction throughout the tree structure.

  7. Competitive antagonists and partial agonists at the glycine modulatory site of the mouse N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, G; Johnson, J W; Ascher, P

    1990-01-01

    1. Kynurenate (Kyn), 7-chlorokynurenate (7-Cl-Kyn), 3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one (HA-966) and D-cycloserine are known to bind to the glycine site that modulates the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) response of vertebrate central neurones. The effects of these compounds were investigated with patch-clamp and fast-perfusion techniques on mouse cortical neurones in primary culture in an effort to establish whether they act as antagonists, partial agonists and/or inverse agonists of glycine. A fast drug application method allowed the study of both steady-state and transient responses. 2. The analysis of steady-state responses indicates that the main effects of Kyn and 7-Cl-Kyn are those expected from competitive antagonists of glycine, with a dissociation constant of 15 microM for Kyn, and of 0.3 microM for 7-Cl-Kyn. Concentration jumps indicate that at all concentrations of glycine, and in particular in the absence of added glycine, the blockade by Kyn and 7-Cl-Kyn develops at a rate which is close to the rate of dissociation of glycine from its binding site and is independent of antagonist concentration. 3. The main effects of D-cycloserine and of HA-966 are those of partial agonists of high and low efficacy, respectively. In the absence of added glycine, D-cycloserine always produced a potentiation, while HA-966 produced either a potentiation or an inhibition. This can be explained by assuming the presence of a variable level of contaminating glycine. With both D-cycloserine and HA-966, concentration jumps produced biphasic relaxations in which the onset rate of the slow component was, here again, close to the rate of dissociation of glycine from its binding site. 4. These results can be interpreted by assuming that (1) Kyn and 7-Cl-Kyn are competitive antagonists of glycine, (2) HA-966 and D-cycloserine are partial agonists, (3) in the absence of added glycine some glycine is present in the extracellular solution and (4) the response in the total absence of glycine

  8. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  9. Nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites exert interdependent effects on the binding affinities of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    We can determine the effects of many possible sequence variations in transcription factor binding sites using microarray binding experiments. Analysis of wild-type and mutant Zif268 (Egr1) zinc fingers bound to microarrays containing all possible central 3 bp triplet binding sites indicates that the nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites cannot be treated independently. This indicates that the current practice of characterizing transcription factor binding sites by mutating individual positions of binding sites one base pair at a time does not provide a true picture of the sequence specificity. Similarly, current bioinformatic practices using either just a consensus sequence, or even mononucleotide frequency weight matrices to provide more complete descriptions of transcription factor binding sites, are not accurate in depicting the true binding site specificities, since these methods rely upon the assumption that the nucleotides of binding sites exert independent effects on binding affinity. Our results stress the importance of complete reference tables of all possible binding sites for comparing protein binding preferences for various DNA sequences. We also show results suggesting that microarray binding data using particular subsets of all possible binding sites can be used to extrapolate the relative binding affinities of all possible full-length binding sites, given a known binding site for use as a starting sequence for site preference refinement. PMID:11861919

  10. Coarse-grained/molecular mechanics of the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor: experimentally-validated detailed structural prediction of agonist binding.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Alessandro; Capece, Luciana; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Gasparini, Paolo; Behrens, Maik; Carloni, Paolo; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Bitter molecules in humans are detected by ∼25 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The lack of atomic resolution structure for any of them is complicating an in depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying bitter taste perception. Here, we investigate the molecular determinants of the interaction of the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor with its agonists phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and propylthiouracil (PROP). We use the recently developed hybrid Molecular Mechanics/Coarse Grained (MM/CG) method tailored specifically for GPCRs. The method, through an extensive exploration of the conformational space in the binding pocket, allows the identification of several residues important for agonist binding that would have been very difficult to capture from the standard bioinformatics/docking approach. Our calculations suggest that both agonists bind to Asn103, Phe197, Phe264 and Trp201, whilst they do not interact with the so-called extra cellular loop 2, involved in cis-retinal binding in the GPCR rhodopsin. These predictions are consistent with data sets based on more than 20 site-directed mutagenesis and functional calcium imaging experiments of TAS2R38. The method could be readily used for other GPCRs for which experimental information is currently lacking.

  11. Benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist-induced kindling of rats alters learning and glutamate binding.

    PubMed

    Rössler, A S; Schröder, H; Dodd, R H; Chapouthier, G; Grecksch, G

    2000-09-01

    Kindling, recognized as a model of epilepsy, can be obtained by applications of repeated nonconvulsive stimulations that finally lead to generalized seizures. Epileptics often show cognitive impairments. The present work analyzed the learning performance of male Wistar rats kindled with a convulsant inverse agonist of the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex, methyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCM). This compound is also known to have an action on learning processes. It was thus interesting to verify if beta-CCM kindling had the same impairing action on learning as other kindling agents, such as pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). A two-way active-avoidance shuttle-box learning task was chosen, because a deficit was found after PTZ kindling in this learning model. On the other hand, hippocampal glutamate binding, has previously been shown to be modified by both seizures and learning. Thus, the level of glutamate binding was also measured in the present study. Results showed that fully kindled rats had poorer learning performance after the third day of test than controls or not fully kindled animals. L-[3H] glutamate binding to hippocampal membrane fractions of the fully kindled animals was significantly higher when compared with controls, whereas L-[3H] glutamate binding of not fully kindled subjects did not differ from that of controls. Neuronal plasticity changes are a possible explanation for the correlation between kindling, learning deficits, and increased glutamate binding.

  12. Investigation of the mechanism of agonist and inverse agonist action at D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Lin, Hong; Strange, Philip G

    2004-05-01

    This study investigated, for the D2 dopamine receptor, the relation between the ability of agonists and inverse agonists to stabilise different states of the receptor and their relative efficacies. Ki values for agonists were determined in competition versus the binding of the antagonist [3H]spiperone. Competition data were fitted best by a two-binding site model (with the exception of bromocriptine, for which a one-binding site model provided the best fit) and agonist affinities for the higher (Kh) (G protein-coupled) and lower affinity (Kl) (G protein-uncoupled) sites determined. Ki values for agonists were also determined in competition versus the binding of the agonist [3H]N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) to provide a second estimate of Kh. Maximal agonist effects (Emax) and their potencies (EC50) were determined from concentration-response curves for agonist stimulation of guanosine-5'-O-(3-[32S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding. The ability of agonists to stabilise the G protein-coupled state of the receptor (Kl/Kh determined from ligand-binding assays) did not correlate with either of two measures of relative efficacy (relative Emax, Kl/EC50) of agonists determined in [35S]GTPgammaS-binding assays, when the data for all of the compounds tested were analysed. For a subset of compounds, however, there was a relation between Kl/Kh and Emax. Competition-binding data versus [3H]spiperone and [3H]NPA for a range of inverse agonists were fitted best by a one-binding site model. Ki values for the inverse agonists tested were slightly lower in competition versus [3H]NPA compared to [3H]spiperone. These data do not provide support for the idea that inverse agonists act by binding preferentially to the ground state of the receptor.

  13. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  14. A Common Anesthetic Binding Site for Inhibition of Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kinde, Monica N.; Bu, Weiming; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Yan; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying functionally relevant anesthetic binding sites in pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) is an important step toward understanding molecular mechanisms underlying anesthetic action. The anesthetic propofol is known to inhibit cation-conducting pLGICs, including a prokaryotic pLGIC ELIC, but the sites responsible for functional inhibition remain undetermined. Methods We photolabeled ELIC with a light-activated derivative of propofol (AziPm) and performed 19F NMR to support propofol binding to a transmembrane domain (TMD) intra-subunit pocket. To differentiate sites responsible for propofol inhibition from those that are functionally irrelevant, we made an ELIC-GABAAR chimera that replaced the ELIC TMD with the α1β3GABAAR TMD and compared functional responses of ELIC-GABAAR and ELIC to propofol modulations. Results Photolabeling showed multiple AziPm-binding sites in the extracellular domain (ECD), but only one site in the TMD with labeled residues M265 and F308 in the resting state of ELIC. Notably, this TMD site is an intra-subunit pocket that overlaps with binding sites for anesthetics, including propofol, found previously in other pLGICs. 19F NMR supported propofol binding to this TMD intra-subunit pocket only in the absence of agonist. Functional measurements of ELIC-GABAAR showed propofol potentiation of the agonist-elicited current instead of inhibition observed on ELIC. Conclusions The distinctly different responses of ELIC and ELIC-GABAAR to propofol support the functional relevance of propofol binding to the TMD. Combining the newly identified TMD intra-subunit pocket in ELIC with equivalent TMD anesthetic sites found previously in other cationic pLGICs, we propose this TMD pocket as a common site for anesthetic inhibition of pLGICs. PMID:26756520

  15. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency.

    PubMed

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-07-14

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3-4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [(3)H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [(35)S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [(35)S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes.

  16. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency

    PubMed Central

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M.; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G.; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G.; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3–4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [3H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [35S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [35S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  17. Neuroprotection by a novel NMDAR functional glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Patric K; Potter, Pamela E; Aguilar, Jennifer; Decandia, Maria; Moskal, Joseph R

    2009-08-26

    GLYX-13 (threonine-proline-proline-threonine-amide) is an amidated di-pyrrolidine that acts as a functional partial agonist at the glycine site on N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs). GLYX-13 can both increase NMDAR conductance at NR2B-containing receptors, and reduce conductance of non-NR2B-containing receptors. Here, we report that GLYX-13 potently reduces delayed (24 h) death of CA1 pyramidal neurons produced by bilateral carotid occlusion in Mongolian gerbils, when administered up to 5 h post-ischemia. GLYX-13 also reduced delayed (24 h) neuronal death of CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus principal neurons elicited by oxygen/glucose deprivation in in-vitro hippocampal organotypic slice cultures, when applied up to 2 h post-oxygen/glucose deprivation. The glycine site full agonist D-serine completely occluded neuroprotection, indicating that GLYX-13 acts by modulating activation of this site.

  18. Being a binding site: characterizing residue composition of binding sites on proteins.

    PubMed

    Iván, Gábor; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince

    2007-12-30

    The Protein Data Bank contains the description of more than 45,000 three-dimensional protein and nucleic-acid structures today. Started to exist as the computer-readable depository of crystallographic data complementing printed articles, the proper interpretation of the content of the individual files in the PDB still frequently needs the detailed information found in the citing publication. This fact implies that the fully automatic processing of the whole PDB is a very hard task. We first cleaned and re-structured the PDB data, then analyzed the residue composition of the binding sites in the whole PDB for frequency and for hidden association rules. Main results of the paper: (i) the cleaning and repairing algorithm (ii) redundancy elimination from the data (iii) application of association rule mining to the cleaned non-redundant data set. We have found numerous significant relations of the residue-composition of the ligand binding sites on protein surfaces, summarized in two figures. One of the classical data-mining methods for exploring implication-rules, the association-rule mining, is capable to find previously unknown residue-set preferences of bind ligands on protein surfaces. Since protein-ligand binding is a key step in enzymatic mechanisms and in drug discovery, these uncovered preferences in the study of more than 19,500 binding sites may help in identifying new binding protein-ligand pairs.

  19. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    PubMed Central

    Kantcheva, Adriana K.; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Nissen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding. PMID:23641004

  20. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters.

    PubMed

    Kantcheva, Adriana K; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Nissen, Poul

    2013-05-21

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding.

  1. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na/sup +/ channel interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-12

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na/sup +/ channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) (G-protein(s)). These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxin to Na/sup +/ channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na/sup +/ channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na/sup +/channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na/sup +/ channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na/sup +/ channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues.

  2. Characterization of binding sites for /sup 3/H-spiroperidol in human retina

    SciTech Connect

    McGonigle, P.; Wax, M.B.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1988-05-01

    Binding sites for the D-2-selective antagonist (/sup 3/H)-spiroperidol were characterized in human retina. Nonspecific binding, measured in the presence of 2 microM (+)-butaclamol, made up 20% of total binding. Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 3/H)-spiroperidol resulted in linear plots and yielded a Kd value of 87 pM and a Bmax value of 1500 fmol/mg protein. In studies of the inhibition of the binding of (/sup 3/H)-spiroperidol, (+)-butaclamol was approximately 1000-fold more potent than the (-)-stereoisomer. The inhibition curve for dopamine was shifted to the right and the Hill coefficient was increased by the addition of 300 microM GTP. This effect was agonist-specific and suggests that some of the receptors are coupled to stimulation or inhibition of the enzyme adenylate cyclase. The inhibition curves for most of the antagonists had Hill coefficients between 0.6 and 0.8. Hill coefficients were also consistently less than 1.0 for agonists even in the presence of GTP. Nonlinear regression analysis of untransformed data revealed that these shallow inhibition curves were best explained by the presence of two populations of binding sites, 40% of the sites having a high affinity for dopamine in the presence of GTP and domperidone and the remaining 60% having a lower affinity for these ligands. The larger population of sites had a higher affinity for sulpiride, fluphenazine, and N-propylnorapomorphine in the presence of GTP. The possibility that either of these classes of sites consisted of serotonin receptors was ruled out by the finding that the 5-HT2 antagonist ketanserin had a low affinity for both classes of sites.

  3. Characterization of binding sites for 3H-spiroperidol in human retina.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, P; Wax, M B; Molinoff, P B

    1988-05-01

    Binding sites for the D-2-selective antagonist (3H)-spiroperidol were characterized in human retina. Nonspecific binding, measured in the presence of 2 microM (+)-butaclamol, made up 20% of total binding. Scatchard analysis of the binding of (3H)-spiroperidol resulted in linear plots and yielded a Kd value of 87 pM and a Bmax value of 1500 fmol/mg protein. In studies of the inhibition of the binding of (3H)-spiroperidol, (+)-butaclamol was approximately 1000-fold more potent than the (-)-stereoisomer. The inhibition curve for dopamine was shifted to the right and the Hill coefficient was increased by the addition of 300 microM GTP. This effect was agonist-specific and suggests that some of the receptors are coupled to stimulation or inhibition of the enzyme adenylate cyclase. The inhibition curves for most of the antagonists had Hill coefficients between 0.6 and 0.8. Hill coefficients were also consistently less than 1.0 for agonists even in the presence of GTP. Nonlinear regression analysis of untransformed data revealed that these shallow inhibition curves were best explained by the presence of two populations of binding sites, 40% of the sites having a high affinity for dopamine in the presence of GTP and domperidone and the remaining 60% having a lower affinity for these ligands. The larger population of sites had a higher affinity for sulpiride, fluphenazine, and N-propylnorapomorphine in the presence of GTP. The possibility that either of these classes of sites consisted of serotonin receptors was ruled out by the finding that the 5-HT2 antagonist ketanserin had a low affinity for both classes of sites.

  4. Resolving protein structure-function-binding site relationships from a binding site similarity network perspective.

    PubMed

    Mudgal, Richa; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2017-03-25

    Functional annotation is seldom straightforward with complexities arising due to functional divergence in protein families or functional convergence between non-homologous protein families, leading to mis-annotations. An enzyme may contain multiple domains and not all domains may be involved in a given function, adding to the complexity in function annotation. To address this, we use binding site information from bound cognate ligands and catalytic residues, since it can help in resolving fold-function relationships at a finer level and with higher confidence. A comprehensive database of 2,020 fold-function-binding site relationships has been systematically generated. A network-based approach is employed to capture the complexity in these relationships, from which different types of associations are deciphered, that identify versatile protein folds performing diverse functions, same function associated with multiple folds and one-to-one relationships. Binding site similarity networks integrated with fold, function and ligand similarity information are generated to understand the depth of these relationships. Apart from the observed continuity in the functional site space, network properties of these revealed versatile families with topologically different or dissimilar binding sites and structural families that perform very similar functions. As a case study, subtle changes in the active site of a set of evolutionarily related superfamilies are studied using these networks. Tracing of such similarities in evolutionarily related proteins provide clues into the transition and evolution of protein functions. Insights from this study will be helpful in accurate and reliable functional annotations of uncharacterized proteins, poly-pharmacology and designing enzymes with new functional capabilities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Decreased agonist, but not antagonist, binding to the naturally occurring Thr92Lys variant of the h5-HT7(a) receptor.

    PubMed

    Brüss, Michael; Kiel, Sibylle; Bönisch, Heinz; Kostanian, Arevat; Göthert, Manfred

    2005-08-01

    In the present study on transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells, we aimed at establishing whether expression of the naturally occurring Thr92Lys variation of the Gs-coupled h5-HT7(a) receptor leads to changes of ligand binding properties, of agonist-evoked cAMP formation and/or of antagonist-mediated blockade of the latter. Binding of [3H]5-carboxamidotryptamine ([3H]5-CT) to membranes and stimulated [3H]cAMP accumulation in whole cells were determined. Saturation binding experiments in membranes of transiently transfected cells expressing either the wild-type or the variant receptor revealed a single binding site in both cases and no difference in Bmax between both receptor isoforms. In competition binding experiments in membranes of stably transfected cells, the Thr92Lys variant exhibited a 2.8-11 times lower binding affinity of the ligands 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-CT, 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-4yl)-1H-indole (RU24969), (+/-)-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) and sumatriptan compared to the wild-type receptor. However, the variant did not differ from the wild-type with respect to the binding properties of the antagonists (R)-3-(2-(2-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)ethyl)-pyrrolodine-1-sulfonyl)phenol hydrochloride (SB-269970), risperidone, mesulergine and clozapine. In agreement with the decreased binding affinity of 5-HT, 5-CT, RU24969 and 8-OH-DPAT for the variant receptor, these agonists were less potent in stimulating [3H]cAMP accumulation in cells stably expressing the Thr92Lys h5-HT7(a) receptor. Sumatriptan did not stimulate cAMP accumulation in spite of its affinity for both receptor isoforms pointing to a putative weak antagonistic property of this drug at the h5-HT7 receptor. SB-269970 and clozapine were equipotent at both the variant and the wild-type receptor in producing a rightward shift of the 5-HT concentration-response curve for its stimulant effect on [3H]cAMP accumulation. In view of, e.g., the

  6. Trans-gamma-hydroxycrotonic acid binding sites in brain: evidence for a subpopulation of gamma-hydroxybutyrate sites.

    PubMed

    Hechler, V; Schmitt, M; Bourguignon, J J; Maitre, M

    1990-03-02

    Trans-gamma-hydroxycrotonate (THCA), a compound naturally present in rat brain, possesses high-affinity binding sites with a heterogeneous distribution which are superimposable with those for gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Binding studies of THCA on rat brain membranes revealed two binding components, one of high affinity (Kd1, 7 nM, Bmax1 42 fmol/mg protein) and the other of low affinity (Kd2, 2 microM, Bmax2 13 pmol/mg protein). Displacement curves of [3H]THCA by THCA and GHB or of [3H]GHB by THCA are in favour of the existence of a specific high affinity site for THCA. Quantitative autoradiography with image analysis of [3H]THCA binding in rat brain slices indicated that [3H]THCA high affinity binding was displaced at a lower potency by GHB. THCA showed also some selectivity in displacing [3H]GHB from its high affinity binding site (Kd = 95 nM). This mutual overlap favours a subpopulation of GHB receptors, which have THCA as a natural ligand, showing partial agonistic properties compared to GHB. The functional significance of this result remains unknown.

  7. The (--)(/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol binding to rat adipocyte membranes: an explanation of curvilinear Scatchard plots and implications for quantitation of beta-adrenergic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Dax, E.M.; Partilla, J.S.; Gregerman, R.I.

    1982-09-01

    In rat adipocyte membranes, both beta-adrenergic agonists and beta-adrenergic antagonists competed with (--)(/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol for high affinity (KD 2-4 nM) and low capacity binding sites. The antagonists but not the agonists competed with (--)(/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol for lower affinity and higher capacity sites. The present studies were performed in order to characterize the adipocyte beta-adrenergic receptor and distinguish it from low affinity, higher capacity sites which were heat-labile and not stereoselective. When isoproterenol was used to define the nonspecific binding, saturation studies showed a single binding site with a capacity of approximately 100 fmol/mg membrane protein (corresponding to approximately 50,000 sites/adipocyte). Binding was saturated by 10 nM (--)(/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol. Approximate KD's of 204 nM were observed. Kinetic analysis of (--)(/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol binding provided an independent measurement of KD between 0.75 and 1.1 nM. This binding site had the characteristics of a beta 1-adrenergic receptor with the potency of isoproterenol greater than norepinephrine greater than or equal to epinephrine as competitors of binding. Furthermore, the KD of inhibition of (--)(/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol binding correlated with the Ki of inhibition by antagonists or Ka of activation by agonists of glycerol release in isolated adipocytes (r . 0.968, P less than 0.001). These results suggest that beta-adrenergic agonists compete with (--)(/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol for the high affinity binding site which represents the physiological site. Furthermore, the use of antagonists (propranolol, alprenolol) to define specific beta-binding includes nonspecific site(s) as well as the beta-adrenergic site. Previous characterization and quantitation of beta receptors in rat fat cell membranes may have been in error by incorporating both types of binding in their measurement.

  8. Autoradiographic localization of [3H]thiocolchicoside binding sites in the rat brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Balduini, W; De Angelis, V; Mazzoni, E; Depoortere, H; Cattabeni, F; Cimino, M

    2001-06-01

    Thiocolchicoside is used in humans as a myorelaxant drug with anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity. Recently we established the experimental conditions that allowed the identification of [3H]thiocolchicoside binding sites in synaptic membranes of rat spinal cord and cerebral cortex. The pharmacological characterization of these sites indicated that GABA and several of its agonists and antagonists, as well as strychnine, were able to interact with [3H]thiocolchicoside binding in a dose-dependent manner and with different affinities. In order to gain more insight into the nature and the anatomical distribution of the binding sites labeled by [3H]thiocolchicoside, in the present study we examined the localization of these sites on parasagittal and coronal sections of the rat brain and spinal cord, respectively, using receptor autoradiography. In the spinal cord an intense signal was observed in the gray matter, with the highest density occurring in the superficial layers of the dorsal horns. Strychnine completely displaced [3H]thiocolchicoside binding, whereas GABA only partially removed the radioligand from its binding sites. In the brain, specific binding occurred in several areas and was displaced by both GABA and strychnine. The distribution of [3H]thiocolchicoside binding sites in brain sections, however, did not match that found for [3H]muscimol. Furthermore, cold thiocolchicoside was not able to completely displace [3H]muscimol binding, and showed a different efficacy in the various areas labeled by the radioligand. We conclude that thiocolchicoside may interact with a subpopulation of GABA(A) receptors having low-affinity binding sites for GABA. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity to strychnine in the spinal cord indicates an interaction also with strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, suggesting that the pharmacological effects of thiocolchicoside may be the result of its interaction with different receptor populations.

  9. Predicting Ca2+-binding Sites Using Refined Carbon Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kun; Wang, Xue; Wong, Hing C.; Wohlhueter, Robert; Kirberger, Michael P.; Chen, Guantao; Yang, Jenny J.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying Ca2+-binding sites in proteins is the first step towards understanding the molecular basis of diseases related to Ca2+-binding proteins. Currently, these sites are identified in structures either through X-ray crystallography or NMR analysis. However, Ca2+-binding sites are not always visible in X-ray structures due to flexibility in the binding region or low occupancy in a Ca2+-binding site. Similarly, both Ca2+ and its ligand oxygens are not directly observed in NMR structures. To improve our ability to predict Ca2+-binding sites in both X-ray and NMR structures, we report a new graph theory algorithm (MUGC) to predict Ca2+-binding sites. Using carbon atoms covalently bonded to the chelating oxygen atoms, and without explicit reference to side-chain oxygen ligand coordinates, MUGC is able to achieve 94% sensitivity with 76% selectivity on a dataset of X-ray structures comprised of 43 Ca2+-binding proteins. Additionally, prediction of Ca2+-binding sites in NMR structures were obtained by MUGC using a different set of parameters determined by analysis of both Ca2+-constrained and unconstrained Ca2+-loaded structures derived from NMR data. MUGC identified 20 out of 21 Ca2+-binding sites in NMR structures inferred without the use of Ca2+ constraints. MUGC predictions are also highly-selective for Ca2+-binding sites as analyses of binding sites for Mg2+, Zn2+, and Pb2+ were not identified as Ca2+-binding sites. These results indicate that the geometric arrangement of the second-shell carbon cluster is sufficient for both accurate identification of Ca2+-binding sites in NMR and X-ray structures, and for selective differentiation between Ca2+ and other relevant divalent cations. PMID:22821762

  10. Different positioning of the ligand-binding domain helix 12 and the F domain of the estrogen receptor accounts for functional differences between agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, M; Rientjes, J M; Stewart, A F

    1998-01-01

    The estrogen receptor is capable of binding a diverse set of ligands that are broadly categorized as agonists or antagonists, depending on their abilities to induce or interfere with transcriptional responsiveness. We show, using a fusion protein assay for ligand-binding which does not rely on transcriptional responsiveness, that agonists and antagonists differently position the C-terminus of the ligand-binding domain (helix 12) and the F domain. Upon antagonist binding, the F domain interferes with the fusion protein activity. Mutational disruption of helix 12 alters the position of the F domain, imposing interference after agonist or antagonist binding. Genetically selected inversion mutations where only agonists, but not antagonists, induce interference are similarly reliant on helix 12 and F domain positioning. Our results demonstrate that agonists and antagonists differently position helix 12 and implicate the F domain in mechanisms of antagonist action. PMID:9451001

  11. A new class of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists with a novel binding epitope shows antidiabetic effects.

    PubMed

    Ostberg, Tove; Svensson, Stefan; Selén, Göran; Uppenberg, Jonas; Thor, Markus; Sundbom, Maj; Sydow-Bäckman, Mona; Gustavsson, Anna-Lena; Jendeberg, Lena

    2004-09-24

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the NR1 subfamily of nuclear receptors. The PPARs play key roles in the control of glucose and lipid homeostasis, and the synthetic isoform-specific PPAR agonists are used clinically to improve insulin sensitivity and to lower serum triglyceride levels. All of the previously reported PPAR agonists form the same characteristic interactions with the receptor, which have been postulated to be important for the induction of agonistic activity. Here we describe a new class of PPARalpha/gamma modulators, the 5-substituted 2-benzoylaminobenzoic acids (2-BABAs). As shown by x-ray crystallography, the representative compounds BVT.13, BVT.762, and BVT.763, utilize a novel binding epitope and lack the agonist-characteristic interactions. Despite this, some compounds within the 2-BABA family are potent agonists in a cell-based reporter gene assay. Furthermore, BVT.13 displays antidiabetic effects in ob/ob mice. We concluded that the 2-BABA binding mode can be used to design isoform-specific PPAR modulators with biological activity in vivo.

  12. Glucocorticoid--receptor interactions. Studies of the negative co-operativity induced by steroid interactions with a secondary, hydrophobic, binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T R; Bell, P A

    1980-01-01

    The effects of steroids on the binding of [1,2-3H]dexamethasone and [1,2-3H]progesterone to the glucocorticoid receptor of rat thymus cytosol were studied. Although both glucocorticoid agonists and antagonists competed with [1,2-3H]dexamethasone for binding to the receptor under equilibrium conditions, only glucocorticoid antagonists of partial agonists, at micromolar concentrations, were capable of accelerating the rate of dissociation of previously bound [1,2-3H]dexamethasone from the receptor. Antagonists or partial agonists also enhanced the rate of dissociation of [1,2-3H]progesterone from the glucocorticoid receptor, with identical specificity and concentration--response characteristics. These effects are attributed to the presence on the receptor of a secondary, low-affinity, binding site for glucocorticoid antagonists, the occupancy of which produces negatively co-operative interactions with the primary glucocorticoid-binding site. In contrast with the interactions with the primary site, the interactions of steroids with the negatively co-operative site appear to be primarily hydrophobic in nature, and the site resembles the steroid-binding site of progestin-binding proteins in its specificity, though not its affinity. The results also suggest that the initial interactions of both glucocorticoid agonists and antagonists with the receptor under equilibrium conditions are with one primary site on a receptor existing in one conformation only. PMID:7406882

  13. Substrate and drug binding sites in LeuT.

    PubMed

    Nyola, Ajeeta; Karpowich, Nathan K; Zhen, Juan; Marden, Jennifer; Reith, Maarten E; Wang, Da-Neng

    2010-08-01

    LeuT is a member of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter family, which includes the neuronal transporters for serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. The original crystal structure of LeuT shows a primary leucine-binding site at the center of the protein. LeuT is inhibited by different classes of antidepressants that act as potent inhibitors of the serotonin transporter. The newly determined crystal structures of LeuT-antidepressant complexes provide opportunities to probe drug binding in the serotonin transporter, of which the exact position remains controversial. Structure of a LeuT-tryptophan complex shows an overlapping binding site with the primary substrate site. A secondary substrate binding site was recently identified, where the binding of a leucine triggers the cytoplasmic release of the primary substrate. This two binding site model presents opportunities for a better understanding of drug binding and the mechanism of inhibition for mammalian transporters.

  14. Invariant Aspartic Acid in Muscle Nicotinic Receptor Contributes Selectively to the Kinetics of Agonist Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Yong; Sine, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    We examined functional contributions of interdomain contacts within the nicotinic receptor ligand binding site using single channel kinetic analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, and a homology model of the major extracellular region. At the principal face of the binding site, the invariant αD89 forms a highly conserved interdomain contact near αT148, αW149, and αT150. Patch-clamp recordings show that the mutation αD89N markedly slows acetylcholine (ACh) binding to receptors in the resting closed state, but does not affect rates of channel opening and closing. Neither αT148L, αT150A, nor mutations at both positions substantially affects the kinetics of receptor activation, showing that hydroxyl side chains at these positions are not hydrogen bond donors for the strong acceptor αD89. However substituting a negative charge at αT148, but not at αT150, counteracts the effect of αD89N, demonstrating that a negative charge in the region of interdomain contact confers rapid association of ACh. Interpreted within the structural framework of ACh binding protein and a homology model of the receptor ligand binding site, these results implicate main chain amide groups in the domain harboring αW149 as principal hydrogen bond donors for αD89. The specific effect of αD89N on ACh association suggests that interdomain hydrogen bonding positions αW149 for optimal interaction with ACh. PMID:15504901

  15. Type II oestrogen binding sites in human colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Piantelli, M; Ricci, R; Larocca, L M; Rinelli, A; Capelli, A; Rizzo, S; Scambia, G; Ranelletti, F O

    1990-01-01

    Seven cases of colorectal adenocarcinomas were investigated for the presence of oestrogen receptors and progesterone receptors. The tumours specifically bound oestradiol. This binding almost exclusively resulted from the presence of high numbers of type II oestrogen binding sites. Oestrogen receptors were absent or present at very low concentrations. Immunohistochemical investigation of nuclear oestrogen receptors gave negative results. This indicates that antioestrogen receptor antibodies recognise oestrogen receptors but not type II oestrogen binding sites. The presence of specific type II oestrogen binding sites and progesterone binding offers further evidence for a potential role for these steroids and their receptors in colorectal carcinoma. PMID:2266171

  16. Why Transcription Factor Binding Sites Are Ten Nucleotides Long

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alexander J.; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled primarily by transcription factors, whose DNA binding sites are typically 10 nt long. We develop a population-genetic model to understand how the length and information content of such binding sites evolve. Our analysis is based on an inherent trade-off between specificity, which is greater in long binding sites, and robustness to mutation, which is greater in short binding sites. The evolutionary stable distribution of binding site lengths predicted by the model agrees with the empirical distribution (5–31 nt, with mean 9.9 nt for eukaryotes), and it is remarkably robust to variation in the underlying parameters of population size, mutation rate, number of transcription factor targets, and strength of selection for proper binding and selection against improper binding. In a systematic data set of eukaryotic and prokaryotic transcription factors we also uncover strong relationships between the length of a binding site and its information content per nucleotide, as well as between the number of targets a transcription factor regulates and the information content in its binding sites. Our analysis explains these features as well as the remarkable conservation of binding site characteristics across diverse taxa. PMID:22887818

  17. Participation of central imidazoline binding sites in antinociceptive effect of ethanol and nicotine in rats.

    PubMed

    Aglawe, Manish Manohar; Taksande, Brijesh Gulabrao; Kuldhariya, Sharvari Shambabu; Chopde, Chandrabhan Tukaram; Umekar, Milind Janrao; Kotagale, Nandkishor Ramdas

    2014-06-01

    Despite synergistic morbidity and mortality, concomitant consumption of alcohol and tobacco is increasing, and their antinociceptive effect has been linked with co-abuse. Present study was designed to investigate the role of imidazoline binding sites in the antinociceptive effect of nicotine, ethanol, and their combination. Separate group of male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were treated with different doses of alcohol (0.50-2 g/kg, i.p.) or nicotine (0.25-1 mg/kg, i.p.), and their combination evaluated in tail flick test. Influence of endogenous imidazoline binding site ligands, agonist, and antagonists were determined by their prior treatment with effective or subeffective doses of either ethanol or nicotine. Ethanol, nicotine, or their subeffective dose combination exhibited significant antinociceptive effects in dose-dependent manner. Antinociceptive effect of ethanol and nicotine was significantly augmented by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of endogenous imidazoline receptor ligands, harmane (25 μg/rat, i.c.v.) and agmatine (10 μg/rat, i.c.v.), as well as imidazoline I1 /α2 adrenergic receptor agonist, clonidine (2 μg/rat, i.c.v.), I1 agonist moxonidine (25 μg/rat, i.c.v.), and imidazoline I2 agonist, 2-BFI (10 μg/rat, i.c.v.). Conversely, antinociception elicited by ethanol or nicotine or their subeffective dose combination was antagonized by pretreatment with imidazoline I1 antagonist, efaroxan (10 μg/rat, i.c.v.), and I2 antagonist, idazoxan (4 μg/rat, i.c.v.), at their per se ineffective doses. These findings project imidazoline binding ligands as important therapeutic molecules for central antinociceptive activity as well as may reduce the co-abuse potential of alcohol and nicotine.

  18. Exploring the binding site of the human muscarinic M3 receptor: Homology modeling and docking study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostopovici, Liliana; Mracec, Maria; Mracec, Mircea; Borota, Ana

    The human muscarinic M3 receptor (hM3) and its interactions with selective agonists and antagonists were investigated by means of combined homology and docking approach. Also, two pharmacophoric models for the hM3 agonist and antagonist binding sites were proposed. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of hM3 receptor was modeled based on the high-resolution X-ray structure of bovine rhodopsin from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). To validate the reliability of the model obtained, the main chain torsion angles phi (?) and psi (?) were examined in a Ramachandran plot, and all omega angles were measured for peptidic bond planarity. The characteristics of the active site, the position, and the orientation of ligands in situ, as well as the binding modes of the representative agonists and antagonists, were analyzed by applying a molecular docking technique using the AutoDock 3.0.5 program. Specific interactions responsible for recognition of the hM3 receptor, like ionic bond formed between protonated amine of the ligands and the Asp3.6 side chain were identified. Structure-reactivity relationships have been explained by analyzing the 3D structure of the hM3 model and the ligand conformations resulted from molecular docking simulation.

  19. Autoradiographic localization of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.D.; Springall, D.R.; Wharton, J.; Polak, J.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques and {sup 125}I-labeled endothelin-1 were used to study the distribution of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin. Specific endothelin-1 binding sites were localized to blood vessels (capillaries, deep cutaneous vascular plexus, arteries, and arterioles), the deep dermal and connective tissue sheath of hair follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands, and arrector pili muscle. Specific binding was inhibited by endothelin-2 and endothelin-3 as well as endothelin-1. Non-specific binding was found in the epidermis and the medulla of hair follicles. No binding was found in connective tissue or fat. These vascular binding sites may represent endothelin receptors, in keeping with the known cutaneous vasoconstrictor actions of the peptide. If all binding sites are receptors, the results suggest that endothelin could also regulate the function of sweat glands and may have trophic effects in the skin.

  20. Protein function annotation by local binding site surface similarity.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against ∼60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that predated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of 12 currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins.

  1. Whole-genome cartography of estrogen receptor alpha binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Yo; Vega, Vinsensius B; Thomsen, Jane S; Zhang, Tao; Kong, Say Li; Xie, Min; Chiu, Kuo Ping; Lipovich, Leonard; Barnett, Daniel H; Stossi, Fabio; Yeo, Ailing; George, Joshy; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A; Lee, Yew Kok; Charn, Tze Howe; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Miller, Lance D; Cheung, Edwin; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Ruan, Yijun; Bourque, Guillaume; Wei, Chia-Lin; Liu, Edison T

    2007-06-01

    Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation-paired end diTag cloning and sequencing strategy, we mapped estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) binding sites in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We identified 1,234 high confidence binding clusters of which 94% are projected to be bona fide ERalpha binding regions. Only 5% of the mapped estrogen receptor binding sites are located within 5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start sites of adjacent genes, regions containing the proximal promoters, whereas vast majority of the sites are mapped to intronic or distal locations (>5 kb from 5' and 3' ends of adjacent transcript), suggesting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms over significant physical distances. Of all the identified sites, 71% harbored putative full estrogen response elements (EREs), 25% bore ERE half sites, and only 4% had no recognizable ERE sequences. Genes in the vicinity of ERalpha binding sites were enriched for regulation by estradiol in MCF-7 cells, and their expression profiles in patient samples segregate ERalpha-positive from ERalpha-negative breast tumors. The expression dynamics of the genes adjacent to ERalpha binding sites suggest a direct induction of gene expression through binding to ERE-like sequences, whereas transcriptional repression by ERalpha appears to be through indirect mechanisms. Our analysis also indicates a number of candidate transcription factor binding sites adjacent to occupied EREs at frequencies much greater than by chance, including the previously reported FOXA1 sites, and demonstrate the potential involvement of one such putative adjacent factor, Sp1, in the global regulation of ERalpha target genes. Unexpectedly, we found that only 22%-24% of the bona fide human ERalpha binding sites were overlapping conserved regions in whole genome vertebrate alignments, which suggest limited conservation of functional binding sites. Taken together, this genome-scale analysis suggests complex but definable rules governing ERalpha binding and gene

  2. Opioid agonists binding and responses in SH-SY5Y cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, E. M.; Hoffmann, B. B.; Loew, G. H.

    1992-01-01

    SH-SY5Y (human neuroblastoma) cultured cells, known to have mu-opioid receptors, have been used to assess and compare the ability of eight representative mu-selective compounds from diverse opioid families to recognize and activate these receptors. A wide range of receptor affinities spanning a factor of 10,000 was found between the highest affinity fentanyl analogs (Ki = 0.1nM) and the lowest affinity analog, meperidine (Ki = 1 microM). A similar range was found for inhibition of PGE1-stimulated cAMP accumulation with a rank order of activities that closely paralleled binding affinities. Maximum inhibition of cAMP accumulation by each compound was about 80%. Maximum stimulation of GTPase activity (approximately 50%) was also similar for all compounds except the lowest affinity meperidine. Both effects were naloxone reversible. These results provide further evidence that mu-receptors are coupled to inhibition of adenylate cyclase and that the SH-SY5Y cell line is a good system for assessment of mu-agonists functional responses.

  3. Inotropic effect, binding properties, and calcium flux effects of the calcium channel agonist CGP 28392 in intact cultured embryonic chick ventricular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, S.; Kim, D.; Smith, T.W.; Marsh, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    CGP 28392 is a recently described dihydropyridine derivative with positive inotropic properties. To study the mechanism of action of this putative calcium channel agonist, we have related the effects of CGP 28392 on contraction (measured with an optical video system) and radioactive calcium uptake to ligand-binding studies in cultured, spontaneously beating chick embryo ventricular cells. CGP 28392 produced a concentration-dependent increase in amplitude and velocity of contraction (EC/sub 50/ = 2 x 10(-7) M; maximum contractile effect = 85% of the calcium 3.6 mM response). Nifedipine produced a shift to the right of the concentration-effect curve for CGP 28392 without decreasing the maximum contractile response, suggesting competitive antagonism (pA2 = 8.3). Computer analysis of displacement of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding to intact heart cells by unlabeled CGP 28392 indicated a K /sub D/ = 2.2 +/- 0.95 x 10(-7) M, in good agreement with the EC/sub 50/ for the inotropic effect. CGP 28392 increased the rate of radioactive calcium influx (+39% at 10 seconds) without altering beating rate, while nifedipine decreased radioactive calcium influx and antagonized the CGP 28392-induced increase in calcium influx. Our results indicate that, in intact cultured myocytes, CGP 28392 acts as a calcium channel agonist and competes for the dihydropyridine-binding site of the slow calcium channel. In contrast to calcium channel blockers, CGP 28392 increases calcium influx and enhances the contractile state.

  4. The psychostimulant d-threo-(R,R)-methylphenidate binds as an agonist to the 5HT(1A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, J S; DeVane, C L; Ramamoorthy, S; Zhu, Hao-Jie

    2009-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether d-threo-(R,R)-methylphenidate (MPH) was exerting binding activity as an agonist or antagonist of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2B receptors. [35S]guanosine5'[gamma-thio]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding assay and field-stimulated Guinea pig ileum assay were used to determine 5-HT(1A) receptor agonism and antagonism activity of d-threo-(R,R)-MPH. The results suggested d-threo-(R,R)-MPH induced 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist activity at 100 microM. The Guinea pig ileum functional assay showed that d-threo-(R,R)-MPH produced agonist-like reduction of neurogenic twitch with an EC50 5.65 +/- 0.36 microM. At 30 microM concentrations, d-threo-(R,R)-MPH produced 171 +/- 4.24% of the relaxation relative to that caused by 0.12 microM 8-OH-DPAT. However, d-threo-(R,R)-MPH exhibited no significant pharmacological activity in rat stomach fundus 5-HT(2B) receptor functional assay. Thus, d-threo-(R,R)-MPH appears to act as a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist in vitro. It is speculated that the activation of 5-HT(1A) receptor might play a partial role in d-threo-(R,R)-MPH mediated dopamine (DA) release in the brain.

  5. Investigating the Role of Loop C Hydrophilic Residue ‘T244’ in the Binding Site of ρ1 GABAC Receptors via Site Mutation and Partial Agonism

    PubMed Central

    Naffaa, Moawiah M.; Absalom, Nathan; Solomon, V. Raja; Chebib, Mary; Hibbs, David E.; Hanrahan, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    The loop C hydrophilic residue, threonine 244 lines the orthosteric binding site of ρ1 GABAC receptors was studied by point mutation into serine, alanine and cysteine, and tested with GABA, some representative partial agonists and antagonists. Thr244 has a hydroxyl group essential for GABA activity that is constrained by the threonine methyl group, orienting it toward the binding site. Significant decreases in activation effects of the studied ligands at ρ1 T244S mutant receptors, suggests a critical role for this residue. Results of aliphatic and heteroaromatic partial agonists demonstrate different pharmacological effects at ρ1 T244S mutant receptors when co-applied with GABA EC50 responses. ρ1 T244A and ρ1 T244C mutant receptors have minimal sensitivity to GABA at high mM concentrations, whereas, the ρ1 WT partial agonists, β-alanine and MTSEA demonstrate more efficacy and potency, respectively, than GABA at these mutant receptors. This study explores the role of Thr244 in the binding of agonists as an initial step during channel gating by moving loop C towards the ligand. PMID:27244450

  6. Rapid agonist-induced loss of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin opioid receptor sites in NG108-15, but not SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, R.I.; Lameh, J.; Sadee, W. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have measured {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites on intact SK-N-SH and NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells, respectively, in culture. Use of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin ({beta}E) as a tracer, together with {beta}E(6-31) to block high-affinity non-opioid binding in both cell lines, permitted the measurement of cell surface {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites. Labeling was at {delta} sites in NG108-15 cells and predominantly at {mu} sites in SK-N-SH cells. Pretreatment with the {mu} and {delta} agonist, DADLE, caused a rapid loss of cell surface {delta} receptor sites in NG108-15 cells, but failed to reduce significantly {mu} receptor density in SK-N-SH cells.

  7. Modelling of the binding site of the human m1 muscarinic receptor: Experimental validation and refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, Hélène; Trumpp-Kallmeyer, Susanne; Schreuder, Herman; Hoflack, , Jan; Hibert, Marcel; Wermuth, Camille-Georges

    1997-07-01

    Our model of the human m1 muscarinic receptor has been refined on the basis of the recently published projection map of bovine rhodopsin. The refined model has a slightly different helix arrangement, which reveals the presence of an extra hydrophobic pocket located between helices 3, 4 and 5. The interaction of series of agonists and antagonists with the m1 muscarinic receptor has been studied experimentally by site-directed mutagenesis. In order to account for the observed results, three-dimensional models of m1 ligands docked in the target receptor are proposed. Qualitatively, the obtained models are in good agreement with the experimental observations. Agonists and partial agonists have a relatively small size. They can bind to the same region of the receptor using, however, different anchoring receptor residues. Antagonists are usually larger molecules, filling almost completely the same pocket as agonists. They can usually produce much stronger interactions with aromatic residues. Experimental data combined with molecular modelling studies highlight how subtle and diverse receptor-ligand interactions could be.

  8. Sizes of Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Asada, K

    1986-12-25

    The sizes of the Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids were estimated by target size analysis, assaying the membrane-bound Mn that was resistant to EDTA washing after radiation inactivation. The inactivation curve showed well the inactivation of two independent Mn-binding sites of different sizes: about two-thirds of the Mn coordinated to a binding site of 65 kDa, and the rest bound to a much smaller site of only about 3 kDa. In the large site, there was about 1 g atom of Mn/110 mol of chlorophyll in spinach thylakoids, which was constant in normally grown plants, although the Mn level in the small site depended on culture conditions. Thylakoids that had been incubated with hydroxylamine or in 0.8 M Tris lost Mn exclusively from the large binding site.

  9. Sizes of Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, M.; Asada, K.

    1986-12-25

    The sizes of the Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids were estimated by target size analysis, assaying the membrane-bound Mn that was resistant to EDTA washing after radiation inactivation. The inactivation curve showed well the inactivation of two independent Mn-binding sites of different sizes: about two-thirds of the Mn coordinated to a binding site of 65 kDa, and the rest bound to a much smaller site of only about 3 kDa. In the large site, there was about 1 g atom of Mn/110 mol of chlorophyll in spinach thylakoids, which was constant in normally grown plants, although the Mn level in the small site depended on culture conditions. Thylakoids that had been incubated with hydroxylamine or in 0.8 M Tris lost Mn exclusively from the large binding site.

  10. Structure and localisation of drug binding sites on neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Ravna, Aina W; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Dahl, Svein G

    2009-10-01

    The dopamine (DAT), serotontin (SERT) and noradrenalin (NET) transporters are molecular targets for different classes of psychotropic drugs. The crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus LeuT(Aa) was used as a template for molecular modeling of DAT, SERT and NET, and two putative drug binding sites (pocket 1 and 2) in each transporter were identified. Cocaine was docked into binding pocket 1 of DAT, corresponding to the leucine binding site in LeuT(Aa), which involved transmembrane helices (TMHs) 1, 3, 6 and 8. Clomipramine was docked into binding pocket 2 of DAT, involving TMHs 1, 3, 6, 10 and 11, and extracellular loops 4 and 6, corresponding to the clomipramine binding site in a crystal structure of a LeuT(Aa)-clomipramine complex. The structures of the proposed cocaine- and tricyclic antidepressant-binding sites may be of particular interest for the design of novel DAT interacting ligands.

  11. Methyl Substitution of a Rexinoid Agonist Improves Potency and Reveals Site of Lipid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3′,4′-Dihydro-1′(2′H)-naphthalen-1′-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of these new analogues are reported here along with the X-ray crystal structures of each homologue bound to the ligand binding domain of hRXRα. We demonstrate that each homologue of 9cUAB30 is a more potent agonist, but only the 7-methyl-9cUAB30 caused severe hyperlipidemia in rats. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structures of these new rexinoids and bexarotene (Targretin) bound to hRXRα-LBD, we reveal that each rexinoid, which induced hyperlipidemia, had methyl groups that interacted with helix 7 residues of the LBD. PMID:24801499

  12. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, C.; Nguyen, K.; Schapira, M.

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize—or read—methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions.

  13. Characterization of [3H]thiocolchicoside binding sites in rat spinal cord and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Balduini, W; Cimino, M; Depoortere, H; Cattabeni, F

    1999-07-02

    Thiocolchicoside, a semi-synthetic derivative of the naturally occurring compound colchicoside with a relaxant effect on skeletal muscle, has been found to displace both [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid ([3H]GABA) and [3H]strychnine binding, suggesting an interaction with both GABA and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. In order to gain further insight into the interaction of thiocolchicoside with these receptors, the binding of [3H]thiocolchicoside in rat spinal cord-brainstem and cortical synaptic membranes was characterized. [3H]Thiocolchicoside binding was saturable in both tissues examined. In spinal cord-brainstem membranes, we found a K(D) of 254 +/- 47 nM and a Bmax of 2.39 +/- 0.36 pmol/mg protein, whereas in cortical membranes, a K(D) of 176 nM and a Bmax of 4.20 pmol/mg protein was observed. A similar K(D) value was found in kinetic experiments performed in spinal cord-brainstem membranes. Heterologous displacement experiments showed that GABA and strychnine displaced the binding in a dose-dependent manner, whereas glycine was ineffective. [3H]Thiocolchicoside binding was also displaced by several GABA(A) receptor agonists and antagonists, but not by baclofen, flunitrazepam, guvacine, picrotoxin or by other drugs unrelated to GABA transmission. In spinal cord-brainstem, and to a lower extent, in cortical membranes, GABA and its analogs were not able to completely displace [3H]thiocolchicoside specific binding indicating that, besides GABA(A) receptors, thiocolchicoside can bind to another unidentified site. Unlabelled thiocolchicoside, however, completely displaced [3H]muscimol binding both in cortical and in spinal cord-brainstem synaptic membranes with an IC50 in the low microM range. Neurosteroids were found to modulate the binding in cortical but not in spinal cord-brainstem synaptic membranes. We conclude that [3H]thiocolchicoside binding shows a pharmacological profile indicating an interaction with the GABA(A) receptor. The different affinities

  14. Treatment for chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice using parathyroid hormone agonists and antagonists linked to a collagen binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Suda, Hirofumi; Miyata, Shigeru; Sakon, Joshua; Matsushita, Osamu; Gensure, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) agonists and antagonists have been shown to improve hair growth after chemotherapy; however, rapid clearance and systemic side-effects complicate their usage. To facilitate delivery and retention to skin, we fused PTH agonists and antagonists to the collagen binding domain (CBD) of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. in-vitro studies showed that the agonist fusion protein, PTH-CBD, bound collagen and activated the PTH/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor in SaOS-2 cells. The antagonist fusion proteins, PTH(7–33)-CBD and PTH([−1]–33)-CBD, also bound collagen and antagonized PTH(1–34) effect in SaOS-2 cells; however, PTH(7–33)-CBD had lower intrinsic activity. Distribution studies confirmed uptake of PTH-CBD to the skin at 1 and 12 hr after subcutaneous injection. We assessed in vivo efficacy of PTH-CBD and PTH(7–33)-CBD in C57BL/6J mice. Animals were depilated to synchronize the hair follicles; treated on Day 7 with agonist, antagonist, or vehicle; treated on Day 9 with cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle; and sacrificed on Day 39. Normal mice (no chemo and no treatment) showed rapid regrowth of hair and normal histology. Chemo + Vehicle mice showed reduced hair regrowth and decreased pigmentation; histology revealed reduced number and dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Chemo + Antagonist mice were grossly and histologically indistinguishable from Chemo + Vehicle mice. Chemo + Agonist mice showed more rapid regrowth and repigmentation of hair; histologically, there was a normal number of hair follicles, most of which were in the anagen phase. Overall, the agonist PTH-CBD had prominent effects in reducing chemotherapy-induced damage of hair follicles and may show promise as a therapy for chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:22130912

  15. Mapping of receptor binding sites on IL-1 beta by reconstruction of IL-1ra-like domains.

    PubMed

    Boraschi, D; Bossù, P; Ruggiero, P; Tagliabue, A; Bertini, R; Macchia, G; Gasbarro, C; Pellegrini, L; Melillo, G; Ulisse, E; Visconti, U; Bizzarri, C; Del Grosso, E; Mackay, A R; Frascotti, G; Frigerio, F; Grifantini, R; Grandi, G

    1995-11-15

    Upon structure comparison between IL-1 beta and its antagonist IL-1ra, single or multiple residues along the IL-1 beta sequence were replaced with the corresponding amino acids present in the IL-1ra protein, in the attempt to identify sites important for receptor binding and for biologic activity on the two molecules. Ten of fifteen mutant proteins had activity comparable to that of wild-type IL-1 beta in three different biologic assays and in receptor binding, indicating that the introduced changes did not influence the functional structure of the protein. Conversely, three mutants (SMIL-9: 127/263 R/T-->W/Y; SMIL-10: 125/127/263/265 T/R/T/Q-->R/W/Y/E; SMIL-15:222/227 I/E-->S/S) showed an increased binding capacity for IL-1RI, not paralleled by increased agonist activity, indicating that the introduced IL-1ra residues could be involved in the nonagonist IL-1RI binding site. On the other hand, two mutants showed diminished binding capacity with concomitant decrease in biologic activity. Both mutants (SMIL-1, five substitutions in the loop 202-214; and SMIL-3, total replacement of the loop 164-173 with the IL-1ra stretch 52-55) included substitutions of residues allegedly important for agonist binding to IL-1RI. Mutant SMIL-3 showed the most profound reduction in binding capacity for IL-1RI (CDw121a) and a more than 1,000-fold reduced biologic activity both in vitro and in vivo, but it retained full capacity of binding to IL-1RII (CDw121b) and acted as a selective antagonist of IL-1RII. From these results the following conclusions can be drawn. IL-1 beta binds to IL-1RI and to IL-1RII through different sites, and the loop 164-173 appears as one of the areas involved in the selective interaction with IL-1RI. Agonist (IL-1 beta) and nonagonist (IL-1ra) binding to IL-1RI occur through distinct sites, with loops 164-173 and 202-214 of IL-1 beta identified as two of the sites selectively involved in agonist binding to the activating receptor.

  16. Interactions of full and partial agonists with HT29 cell alpha 2-adrenoceptor: comparative study of (/sup 3/H)UK-14,304 and (/sup 3/H)clonidine binding

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, H.; Galitzky, J.; Senard, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    The HT29 cell line expresses alpha 2-adrenoceptors that are negatively coupled to the adenylate cyclase system and is, in this respect, a valuable model for in vitro study of alpha 2-adrenergic receptivity in a tissue from human origin. In these cancerous cells, UK-14,304 is a full agonist of the alpha 2-adrenergic-mediated inhibition of the vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced cyclic AMP accumulation, whereas clonidine acts only as a partial agonist. In the present report, we used (3H)UK-14,304 as radioligand and compared its binding characteristics with those of (3H)clonidine in order to better understand the difference between full and partial agonism on the basis of agonist/receptor interactions. (3H)UK-14,304 labeled with high affinity (KD = 0.39 +/- 0.05 nM) a single class of sites having the pharmacological specificity of an alpha 2-adrenoceptor. Comparison of (3H)UK-14,304, (3H)clonidine, and (3H)yohimbine Bmax proved that both 3H-agonists labeled the same number of sites (172 +/- 14 versus 179 +/- 21 fmol/mg of protein), whereas the 3H-antagonist recognized more sites (246 +/- 22 fmol/mg of protein). Inhibition of (3H)yohimbine by the two agonists was consistent with the existence of an heterogeneous population of receptors and analysis of the data according a two-site inhibition model showed (1) that the KiL/KiH ratio was higher for UK-14,304 than for clonidine and (2) that the percentages of high affinity state receptor recognized by both agonists were identical (56 +/- 4% with UK-14,304 and 59 +/- 5% with clonidine). Kinetics of (3H)UK-14,304 and (3H)clonidine binding indicated more complex agonist-receptor interactions than equilibrium data did. Association as well as dissociation of both radioligands appeared to be biphasic, suggesting a relative heterogeneity of 3H-agonist binding sites.

  17. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  18. The number of nucleotide binding sites in cytochrome C oxidase.

    PubMed

    Rieger, T; Napiwotzki, J; Hüther, F J; Kadenbach, B

    1995-12-05

    The binding of 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-adenosine-5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP), [35S]ATP alpha S and 8-azido-[gamma-32P]ATP to isolated cytochrome c oxidase of bovine heart and liver and to the two-subunit enzyme of Paracoccus dentrificans was studied by measuring the fluorescence change or bound radioactivity, respectively. With TNP-ATP three binding sites were determined at cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart and liver, both with two dissociation constants Kd of about 0.2 and 0.9 microM. Trypsin treatment of the enzyme from bovine heart, resulted in one binding site with a Kd of 0.3 microM. The two-subunit enzyme of Paracoccus dentrificans had only one binding site with a Kd of 3.6 microM. The binding of [35S]ATP alpha S to cytochrome c oxidase was studied by equilibrium dialysis. With the enzyme of bovine heart seven and the enzyme of liver six high-affinity binding sites with apparent Kd's of 7.5 and 12 microM, respectively, were obtained. The two-subunit enzyme of Paracoccus denitrificans had one binding site with a Kd of 20 microM. The large number of binding sites at cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart, mainly at nuclear coded subunits, was verified by photoaffinity labelling with 8-azido-[gamma-32P]ATP.

  19. Multiple binding sites in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: An opportunity for polypharmacolgy.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Bermudez, Isabel; Varas, Rodrigo; Reyes-Parada, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    For decades, the development of selective compounds has been the main goal for chemists and biologists involved in drug discovery. However, diverse lines of evidence indicate that polypharmacological agents, i.e. those that act simultaneously at various protein targets, might show better profiles than selective ligands, regarding both efficacy and side effects. On the other hand, the availability of the crystal structure of different receptors allows a detailed analysis of the main interactions between drugs and receptors in a specific binding site. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) constitute a large and diverse family of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) that, as a product of its modulation, regulate neurotransmitter release, which in turns produce a global neuromodulation of the central nervous system. nAChRs are pentameric protein complexes in such a way that expression of compatible subunits can lead to various receptor assemblies or subtypes. The agonist binding site, located at the extracellular region, exhibits different properties depending on the subunits that conform the receptor. In the last years, it has been recognized that nAChRs could also contain one or more allosteric sites which could bind non-classical nicotinic ligands including several therapeutically useful drugs. The presence of multiple binding sites in nAChRs offers an interesting possibility for the development of novel polypharmacological agents with a wide spectrum of actions.

  20. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine.

  1. Mapping the heparin-binding site of the BMP antagonist gremlin by site-directed mutagenesis based on predictive modelling.

    PubMed

    Tatsinkam, Arnold Junior; Mulloy, Barbara; Rider, Christopher C

    2015-08-15

    Gremlin is a member of the CAN (cerberus and DAN) family of secreted BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) antagonists and also an agonist of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) receptor-2. It is critical in limb skeleton and kidney development and is re-expressed during tissue fibrosis. Gremlin binds strongly to heparin and heparan sulfate and, in the present study, we sought to investigate its heparin-binding site. In order to explore a putative non-contiguous binding site predicted by computational molecular modelling, we substituted a total of 11 key arginines and lysines located in three basic residue sequence clusters with homologous sequences from cerberus and DAN (differential screening selected gene abberative in neuroblastoma), CAN proteins which lack basic residues in these positions. A panel of six Myc-tagged gremlin mutants, MGR-1-MGR-6 (MGR, mutant gremlin), each containing different combinations of targeted substitutions, all showed markedly reduced affinity for heparin as demonstrated by their NaCl elution on heparin affinity chromatography, thus verifying our predictions. Both MGR-5 and MGR-6 retained BMP-4-binding activity comparable to that of wild-type gremlin. Low-molecular-mass heparin neither promoted nor inhibited BMP-4 binding. Finally, glutaraldehyde cross-linking demonstrated that gremlin forms non-covalent dimers, similar behaviour to that of DAN and also PRDC (protein related to cerberus and DAN), another CAN protein. The resulting dimer would possess two heparin-binding sites, each running along an exposed surface on the second β-strand finger loop of one of the monomers.

  2. Quantitative encoding of a partial agonist effect on individual opioid receptors by multi-site phosphorylation and threshold detection

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Elaine K.; Trester-Zedlitz, Michelle; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Kotowski, Sarah J.; Krutchinsky, Andrew N.; Burlingame, Alma L.; von Zastrow, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Many drugs act as partial agonists of seven-transmembrane signaling receptors when compared to endogenous ligands. Partial agonism is well described as a 'macroscopic' property manifest at the level of physiological systems or cell populations, but it is not known whether partial agonists encode discrete regulatory information at the 'microscopic' level of individual receptors. We addressed this question by focusing on morphine, a partial agonist drug for µ-type opioid peptide receptors, and combining quantitative mass spectrometry with cell biological analysis to investigate morphine's reduced efficacy for promoting receptor endocytosis when compared to a peptide full agonist. We show that these chemically distinct ligands produce a complex, and qualitatively similar mixture of phosphorylated opioid receptor forms in intact cells. Quantitatively, however, the agonists promote markedly disproportional production of multi-site phosphorylation involving a specific Ser/Thr motif, whose modification at more than one residue is essential for efficient recruitment of the adaptor protein β-arrestin to clathrin-coated pits that mediate subsequent endocytosis of MORs. These results reveal quantitative encoding of agonist-selective endocytosis at the level of individual opioid receptors, based on the conserved biochemical principles of multi-site phosphorylation and threshold detection. PMID:21868358

  3. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  4. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  5. Structural signatures of antibiotic binding sites on the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    David-Eden, Hilda; Mankin, Alexander S.; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The ribosome represents a major target for antibacterial drugs. Being a complex molecular machine, it offers many potential sites for functional interference. The high-resolution structures of ribosome in complex with various antibiotics provide a unique data set for understanding the universal features of drug-binding pockets on the ribosome. In this work, we have analyzed the structural and evolutionary properties of 65 antibiotic binding sites (ABSs) in the ribosome. We compared these sites to similar-size computed pockets extracted from the small and large ribosomal subunits. Based on this analysis, we defined properties of the known drug-binding sites, which constitute the signature of a ‘druggable’ site. The most noticeable properties of the ABSs are prevalence of non-paired bases, a strong bias in favor of unusual syn conformation of the RNA bases and an unusual sugar pucker. We propose that despite the different geometric and chemical properties of diverse antibiotics, their binding sites tend to have common attributes that possibly reflect the potency of the pocket for binding small molecules. Finally, we utilized the ensemble of properties to derive a druggability index, which can be used in conjunction with site functionality information to identify new drug-binding sites on the ribosome. PMID:20494981

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein LprG (Rv1411c) binds triacylated glycolipid agonists of Toll-like receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drage, Michael G.; Tsai, Han-Chun; Pecora, Nicole D.; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Arida, Ahmad R.; Shukla, Supriya; Rojas, Roxana E.; Seshadri, Chetan; Moody, D. Branch; Boom, W. Henry; Sacchettini, James C.; Harding, Clifford V.

    2010-09-27

    Knockout of lprG results in decreased virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in mice. MTB lipoprotein LprG has TLR2 agonist activity, which is thought to be dependent on its N-terminal triacylation. Unexpectedly, here we find that nonacylated LprG retains TLR2 activity. Moreover, we show LprG association with triacylated glycolipid TLR2 agonists lipoarabinomannan, lipomannan and phosphatidylinositol mannosides (which share core structures). Binding of triacylated species was specific to LprG (not LprA) and increased LprG TLR2 agonist activity; conversely, association of glycolipids with LprG enhanced their recognition by TLR2. The crystal structure of LprG in complex with phosphatidylinositol mannoside revealed a hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the three alkyl chains of the ligand. In conclusion, we demonstrate a glycolipid binding function of LprG that enhances recognition of triacylated MTB glycolipids by TLR2 and may affect glycolipid assembly or transport for bacterial cell wall biogenesis.

  7. Influence of sulfhydryl sites on metal binding by bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nell, Ryan M.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2017-02-01

    The role of sulfhydryl sites within bacterial cell envelopes is still unknown, but the sites may control the fate and bioavailability of metals. Organic sulfhydryl compounds are important complexing ligands in aqueous systems and they can influence metal speciation in natural waters. Though representing only approximately 5-10% of the total available binding sites on bacterial surfaces, sulfhydryl sites exhibit high binding affinities for some metals. Due to the potential importance of bacterial sulfhydryl sites in natural systems, metal-bacterial sulfhydryl site binding constants must be determined in order to construct accurate models of the fate and distribution of metals in these systems. To date, only Cd-sulfhydryl binding has been quantified. In this study, the thermodynamic stabilities of Mn-, Co-, Ni-, Zn-, Sr- and Pb-sulfhydryl bacterial cell envelope complexes were determined for the bacterial species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Metal adsorption experiments were conducted as a function of both pH, ranging from 5.0 to 7.0, and metal loading, from 0.5 to 40.0 μmol/g (wet weight) bacteria, in batch experiments in order to determine if metal-sulfhydryl binding occurs. Initially, the data were used to calculate the value of the stability constants for the important metal-sulfhydryl bacterial complexes for each metal-loading condition studied, assuming a single binding reaction for the dominant metal-binding site type under the pH conditions of the experiments. For most of the metals that we studied, these calculated stability constant values increased significantly with decreasing metal loading, strongly suggesting that our initial assumption was not valid and that more than one type of binding occurs at the assumed binding site. We then modeled each dataset with two distinct site types with identical acidity constants: one site with a high metal-site stability constant value, which we take to represent metal-sulfhydryl binding and which dominates under low

  8. A NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, that simultaneously enhances LTP and reduces LTD at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-lei; Sullivan, John A.; Moskal, Joseph R.; Stanton, Patric K.

    2008-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDAR) are a key route for Ca2+ influx into neurons important to both activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and, when uncontrolled, triggering events that cause neuronal degeneration and death. Among regulatory binding sites on the NMDAR complex is a glycine binding site, distinct from the glutamate binding site, which must be co-activated for NMDAR channel opening. We developed a novel glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, which is both nootropic and neuroprotective in vivo. Here, we assessed the effects of GLYX-13 on long-term synaptic plasticity and NMDAR transmission at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in hippocampal slices in vitro. GLYX-13 simultaneously enhanced the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission, while reducing long-term depression (LTD). GLYX-13 reduced NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons evoked by low-frequency Schaffer collateral stimulation, but enhanced NMDAR currents during high-frequency bursts of activity, and these actions were occluded by a saturating concentration of the glycine site agonist D-serine. Direct two-photon imaging of Schaffer collateral burst-evoked increases in [Ca2+] in individual dendritic spines revealed that GLYX-13 selectively enhanced burst-induced NMDAR-dependent spine Ca2+ influx. Examining the rate of MK-801 block of synaptic versus extrasynaptic NMDAR-gated channels revealed that GLYX-13 selectively enhanced activation of burst-driven extrasynaptic NMDARs, with an action that was blocked by the NR2B-selective NMDAR antagonist ifenprodil. Our data suggest that GLYX-13 may have unique therapeutic potential as a learning and memory enhancer because of its ability to simultaneously enhance LTP and suppress LTD. PMID:18796308

  9. A NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, simultaneously enhances LTP and reduces LTD at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-lei; Sullivan, John A; Moskal, Joseph R; Stanton, Patric K

    2008-12-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs) are a key route for Ca2+ influx into neurons important to both activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and, when uncontrolled, triggering events that cause neuronal degeneration and death. Among regulatory binding sites on the NMDAR complex is a glycine binding site, distinct from the glutamate binding site, which must be co-activated for NMDAR channel opening. We developed a novel glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, which is both nootropic and neuroprotective in vivo. Here, we assessed the effects of GLYX-13 on long-term synaptic plasticity and NMDAR transmission at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in hippocampal slices in vitro. GLYX-13 simultaneously enhanced the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission, while reducing long-term depression (LTD). GLYX-13 reduced NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons evoked by low frequency Schaffer collateral stimulation, but enhanced NMDAR currents during high frequency bursts of activity, and these actions were occluded by a saturating concentration of the glycine site agonist d-serine. Direct two-photon imaging of Schaffer collateral burst-evoked increases in [Ca2+] in individual dendritic spines revealed that GLYX-13 selectively enhanced burst-induced NMDAR-dependent spine Ca2+ influx. Examining the rate of MK-801 block of synaptic versus extrasynaptic NMDAR-gated channels revealed that GLYX-13 selectively enhanced activation of burst-driven extrasynaptic NMDARs, with an action that was blocked by the NR2B-selective NMDAR antagonist ifenprodil. Our data suggest that GLYX-13 may have unique therapeutic potential as a learning and memory enhancer because of its ability to simultaneously enhance LTP and suppress LTD.

  10. Localization of gonadotropin binding sites in human ovarian neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, R.; Kitayama, S.; Yamoto, M.; Shima, K.; Ooshima, A. )

    1989-10-01

    The binding of human luteinizing hormone and human follicle-stimulating hormone to ovarian tumor biopsy specimens from 29 patients was analyzed. The binding sites for human luteinizing hormone were demonstrated in one tumor of epithelial origin (mucinous cystadenoma) and in one of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor). The binding sites for human follicle-stimulating hormone were found in three tumors of epithelial origin (serous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenoma) and in two of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor and theca-granulosa cell tumor). The surface-binding autoradiographic study revealed that the binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the stromal tissue. The results suggest that gonadotropic hormones may play a role in the growth and differentiation of a certain type of human ovarian neoplasms.

  11. Engineered α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as models for measuring agonist binding and effect at the orthosteric low-affinity α4-α4 interface.

    PubMed

    Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan; Pedersen, Martin H F; Rohde, Line A; Kastrup, Jette S; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Chebib, Mary; Gajhede, Michael; Balle, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4β2 is important for normal mammalian brain function and is known to express in two different stoichiometries, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2. While these are similar in many aspects, the (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry differs by harboring a third orthosteric acetylcholine binding site located at the α4-α4 interface. Interestingly, the third binding site has, so far, only been documented using electrophysiological assays, actual binding affinities of nicotinic receptor ligands to this site are not known. The present study was therefore aimed at determining binding affinities of nicotinic ligands to the α4-α4 interface. Given that epibatidine shows large functional potency differences at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces, biphasic binding properties would be expected at (α4)3(β2)2 receptors. However, standard saturation binding experiments with [(3)H]epibatidine did not reveal biphasic binding under the conditions utilized. Therefore, an engineered β2 construct (β2(HQT)), which converts the β(-) face to resemble that of an α4(-) face, was utilized to create (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptors harboring three α4-α4 interfaces. With this receptor, low affinity binding of epibatidine with a Kd of ∼5 nM was observed in sharp contrast to a Kd value of ∼10 pM observed for wild-type receptors. A strong correlation between binding affinities at the (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptor and functional potencies at the wild-type receptor of a range of nicotinic ligands highlighted the validity of using the mutational approach. Finally, large differences in activities at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces were observed for structurally related agonists underscoring the need for establishing all binding parameters of compounds at α4β2 receptors.

  12. An additional substrate binding site in a bacterial phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Ronau, Judith A; Paul, Lake N; Fuchs, Julian E; Corn, Isaac R; Wagner, Kyle T; Liedl, Klaus R; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Das, Chittaranjan

    2013-09-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes oxidation of phenylalanine to tyrosine, a reaction that must be kept under tight regulatory control. Mammalian PAH has a regulatory domain in which binding of the substrate leads to allosteric activation of the enzyme. However, the existence of PAH regulation in evolutionarily distant organisms, for example some bacteria in which it occurs, has so far been underappreciated. In an attempt to crystallographically characterize substrate binding by PAH from Chromobacterium violaceum, a single-domain monomeric enzyme, electron density for phenylalanine was observed at a distal site 15.7 Å from the active site. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments revealed a dissociation constant of 24 ± 1.1 μM for phenylalanine. Under the same conditions, ITC revealed no detectable binding for alanine, tyrosine, or isoleucine, indicating the distal site may be selective for phenylalanine. Point mutations of amino acid residues in the distal site that contact phenylalanine (F258A, Y155A, T254A) led to impaired binding, consistent with the presence of distal site binding in solution. Although kinetic analysis revealed that the distal site mutants suffer discernible loss of their catalytic activity, X-ray crystallographic analysis of Y155A and F258A, the two mutants with the most noticeable decrease in activity, revealed no discernible change in the structure of their active sites, suggesting that the effect of distal binding may result from protein dynamics in solution.

  13. Autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Osheroff, P.L.; Phillips, H.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and exerts its best understood actions in the mammalian reproductive system. Using a biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin, the authors have previously shown by in vitro autoradiography specific relaxin binding sites in rat uterus, cervix, and brain tissues. Using the same approach, they describe here a detailed localization of human relaxin binding sites in the rat brain. Displaceable relaxin binding sites are distributed in discrete regions of the olfactory system, neocortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, midbrain, and medulla of the male and female rat brain. Characterization of the relaxin binding sites in the subfornical organ and neocortex reveals a single class of high-affinity sites (Kd = 1.4 nM) in both regions. The binding of relaxin to two of the circumventricular organs (subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis) and the neurosecretory magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei) provides the anatomical and biochemical basis for emerging physiological evidence suggesting a central role for relaxin in the control of blood pressure and hormone release. They conclude that specific, high-affinity relaxin binding sites are present in discrete regions of the rat brain and that the distribution of some of these sites may be consistent with a role for relaxin in control of vascular volume and blood pressure.

  14. Novel agonists of benzodiazepine receptors: design, synthesis, binding assay and pharmacological evaluation of 1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidinone and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Faizi, Mehrdad; Dabirian, Sara; Tajali, Hamed; Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Zavareh, Elham Rezaee; Shahhosseini, Soraya; Tabatabai, Sayyed Abbas

    2015-02-01

    Agonists of benzodiazepine (BZD) binding site in GABA receptors are widely used in clinical practice. In spite of their benefits they have several side effects, so synthesis of new agonists of these receptors to get more specific effect and better profile of adverse drug reactions is still continued. Novel BZD agonists were designed based on the pharmacophore/receptor model of BZD binding site of GABAA receptor. Energy minima conformers of the designed compounds and estazolam, a known BZD receptor agonist, were well superimposed in conformational analysis. Docking studies revealed that the carbonyl group of the compound 4c, 3-(2-chlorobenzyl)-5-methyl-2-phenyl-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7(3H)-one, was near the nitrogen moiety of triazole ring of estazolam providing the hydrogen bond acceptor in proper direction in the BDZ-binding site of GABAA receptor model (α1β2ϒ2). The designed compounds were synthesized and their in vitro affinity for the central BZD receptor was determined. Most of the novel compounds had better affinity for the BZD site of action on GABAA receptor complex than diazepam. Finally, the novel compound 4c with the best affinity in radioligand receptor binding assay (Ki=0.42 nM and IC50=0.68 nM) was selected as candidate for in vivo evaluation. This compound showed significant hypnotic activity and weak anticonvulsant effect with no impairment on learning and memory performance in mouse. The pharmacological effects of the compound 4c were antagonized by flumazenil, a BZD antagonist, which confirms the involvement of BZD receptors in the biological effects of the novel ligand.

  15. Characterization of 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoyl-sulfonamides as 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid agonists: use for studies of metabolism and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqi; Holmes, Blythe B; Gopal, V Raj; Kishore, R V Krishna; Sangras, Bhavani; Yi, Xiu-Yu; Falck, J R; Campbell, William B

    2007-06-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P450 epoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid. EETs mediate numerous biological functions. In coronary arteries, they regulate vascular tone by the activation of smooth muscle large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channels to cause hyperpolarization and relaxation. We developed a series of 14,15-EET agonists, 14,15-EET-phenyliodosulfonamide (14,15-EET-PISA), 14,15-EET-biotinsulfonamide (14,15-EET-BSA), and 14,15-EET-benzoyldihydrocinnamide-sulfonamide (14,15-EET-BZDC-SA) as tools to characterize 14,15-EET metabolism and binding. Agonist activities of these analogs were characterized in precontraced bovine coronary arterial rings. All three analogs induced concentration-dependent relaxation and were equipotent with 14,15-EET. Relaxations to these analogs were inhibited by the BK(Ca) channel blocker iberiotoxin (100 nM), the 14,15-EET antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoylmethylsulfonamide (10 muM), and abolished by 20 mM extracellular K(+). 14,15-EET-PISA is metabolized to 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoyl-PISA by soluble epoxide hydrolase in bovine coronary arteries and U937 cells but not U937 cell membrane fractions. 14,15-EET-P(125)ISA binding to human U937 cell membranes was time-dependent, concentration-dependent, and saturable. The specific binding reached equilibrium by 15 min at 4 degrees C and remained unchanged up to 30 min. The estimated K(d) and B(max) were 148.3 +/- 36.4 nM and 3.3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg protein, respectively. These data suggest that 14,15-EET-PISA, 14,15-EET-BSA, and 14,15-EET-BZDC-SA are full 14,15-EET agonists. 14,15-EET-P(125)ISA is a new radiolabeled tool to study EET metabolism and binding. Our results also provide preliminary evidence that EETs exert their biological effect through a membrane binding site/receptor.

  16. In vivo receptor binding of opioid drugs at the mu site

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, J.S.; Holford, N.H.; Sadee, W.

    1985-06-01

    The in vivo receptor binding of a series of opioid drugs was investigated in intact rats after s.c. administration of (/sup 3/H)etorphine tracer, which selectively binds to mu sites in vivo. Receptor binding was determined by a membrane filtration assay immediately after sacrifice of the animals and brain homogenization. Coadministration of unlabeled opioid drugs together with tracer led to a dose-dependent decrease of in vivo tracer binding. Estimates of the doses required to occupy 50% of the mu sites in vivo established the following potency rank order: diprenorphine, naloxone, buprenorphine, etorphine, levallorphan, cyclazocine, sufentanil, nalorphine, ethylketocyclazocine, ketocyclazocine, pentazocine, morphine. In vivo-in vitro differences among the relative receptor binding potencies were only partially accounted for by differences in their access to the brain and the regulatory effects of Na+ and GTP, which are expected to reduce agonist affinities in vivo. The relationship among mu receptor occupancy in vivo and pharmacological effects of the opioid drugs is described.

  17. Drug Promiscuity in PDB: Protein Binding Site Similarity Is Key

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Drug repositioning applies established drugs to new disease indications with increasing success. A pre-requisite for drug repurposing is drug promiscuity (polypharmacology) – a drug’s ability to bind to several targets. There is a long standing debate on the reasons for drug promiscuity. Based on large compound screens, hydrophobicity and molecular weight have been suggested as key reasons. However, the results are sometimes contradictory and leave space for further analysis. Protein structures offer a structural dimension to explain promiscuity: Can a drug bind multiple targets because the drug is flexible or because the targets are structurally similar or even share similar binding sites? We present a systematic study of drug promiscuity based on structural data of PDB target proteins with a set of 164 promiscuous drugs. We show that there is no correlation between the degree of promiscuity and ligand properties such as hydrophobicity or molecular weight but a weak correlation to conformational flexibility. However, we do find a correlation between promiscuity and structural similarity as well as binding site similarity of protein targets. In particular, 71% of the drugs have at least two targets with similar binding sites. In order to overcome issues in detection of remotely similar binding sites, we employed a score for binding site similarity: LigandRMSD measures the similarity of the aligned ligands and uncovers remote local similarities in proteins. It can be applied to arbitrary structural binding site alignments. Three representative examples, namely the anti-cancer drug methotrexate, the natural product quercetin and the anti-diabetic drug acarbose are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that global structural and binding site similarity play a more important role to explain the observed drug promiscuity in the PDB than physicochemical drug properties like hydrophobicity or molecular weight. Additionally, we find ligand flexibility to have a

  18. Single-Channel Current Through Nicotinic Receptor Produced by Closure of Binding Site C-Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hailong; Cheng, Xiaolin; McCammon, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the initial coupling of agonist binding to channel gating of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor using targeted molecular-dynamics (TMD) simulation. After TMD simulation to accelerate closure of the C-loops at the agonist binding sites, the region of the pore that passes through the cell membrane expands. To determine whether the structural changes in the pore result in ion conduction, we used a coarse-grained ion conduction simulator, Biology Boltzmann transport Monte Carlo, and applied it to two structural frames taken before and after TMD simulation. The structural model before TMD simulation represents the channel in the proposed resting state, whereas the model after TMD simulation represents the channel in the proposed active state. Under external voltage biases, the channel in the active state was permeable to cations. Our simulated ion conductance approaches that obtained experimentally and recapitulates several functional properties characteristic of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Thus, closure of the C-loop triggers a structural change in the channel sufficient to account for the open channel current. This approach of applying Biology Boltzmann transport Monte Carlo simulation can be used to further investigate the binding to gating transduction mechanism and the structural bases for ion selection and translocation.

  19. High density of benzodiazepine binding sites in the substantia innominata of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Sarter, M.; Schneider, H.H.

    1988-07-01

    In order to study the neuronal basis of the pharmacological interactions between benzodiazepine receptor ligands and cortical cholinergic turnover, we examined the regional distribution of specific benzodiazepine binding sites using in vitro autoradiography. In the basal forebrain, the substantia innominata contained a high density of (/sup 3/H)lormetazepam (LMZ) binding sites (Bmax = 277 fmol/mg tissue; Kd = 0.55 nM). The label could be displaced by diazepam (IC50 = 100 nM), the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist beta-carboline ZK 93426 (45 nM) and the partial inverse agonist beta-carboline FG 7142 (540 nM). It is hypothesized that the amnesic effects of benzodiazepine receptor agonists are exerted through benzodiazepine receptors which are situated on cholinergic neurons in the substantia innominata and are involved in a tonic inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release. The benzodiazepine receptor antagonist ZK 93426 may exert its nootropic effects via benzodiazepine receptors in the substantia innominata and, consequently, by disinhibiting cortical acetylcholine release.

  20. Development of cholecystokinin binding sites in rat upper gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, P.H.; Moran, T.H.; Goldrich, M.; McHugh, P.R.

    1987-04-01

    Autoradiography using /sup 125/I-labeled Bolton Hunter-CCK-33 was used to study the distribution of cholecystokinin binding sites at different stages of development in the rat upper gastrointestinal tract. Cholecystokinin (CCK) binding was present in the distal stomach, esophagus, and gastroduodenal junction in the rat fetus of gestational age of 17 days. In the 20-day fetus, specific binding was found in the gastric mucosa, antral circular muscle, and pyloric sphincter. Mucosal binding declined during postnatal development and had disappeared by day 15. Antral binding declined sharply between day 10 and day 15 and disappeared by day 50. Pyloric muscle binding was present in fetal stomach and persisted in the adult. Pancreatic CCK binding was not observed before day 10. These results suggest that CCK may have a role in the control of gastric emptying and ingestive behavior in the neonatal rat.

  1. Aminoglycoside antibiotics: A-site specific binding to 16S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2009-06-01

    The A-site of 16S rRNA, which is a part of the 30S ribosomal subunit involved in prokaryotic translation, is a well known aminoglycoside binding site. Full characterization of the conformational changes undergone at the A-site upon aminoglycoside binding is essential for development of future RNA/drug complexes; however, the massiveness of 16S makes this very difficult. Recently, studies have found that a 27 base RNA construct (16S27) that comprises the A-site subdomain of 16S behaves similarly to the whole A-site domain. ESI-MS, ion mobility and molecular dynamics methods were utilized in this study to analyze the A-site of 16S27 before and after the addition of ribostamycin (R), paromomycin (P) and lividomycin (L). The ESI mass spectrum for 16S27 alone illustrated both single-stranded 16S27 and double-stranded (16S27)2 complexes. Upon aminoglycoside addition, the mass spectra showed that only one aminoglycoside binds to 16S27, while either one or two bind to (16S27)2. Ion mobility measurements and molecular dynamics calculations were utilized in determining the solvent-free structures of the 16S27 and (16S27)2 complexes. These studies found 16S27 in a hairpin conformation while (16S27)2 existed as a cruciform. Only one aminoglycoside binds to the single A-site of the 16S27 hairpin and this attachment compresses the hairpin. Since two A-sites exist for the (16S27)2 cruciform, either one or two aminoglycosides may bind. The aminoglycosides compress the A-sites causing the cruciform with just one aminoglycoside bound to be larger than the cruciform with two bound. Non-specific binding was not observed in any of the aminoglycoside/16S27 complexes.

  2. Characterization of a domoic acid binding site from Pacific razor clam.

    PubMed

    Trainer, Vera L; Bill, Brian D

    2004-08-10

    The Pacific razor clam, Siliqua patula, is known to retain domoic acid, a water-soluble glutamate receptor agonist produced by diatoms of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. The mechanism by which razor clams tolerate high levels of the toxin, domoic acid, in their tissues while still retaining normal nerve function is unknown. In our study, a domoic acid binding site was solubilized from razor clam siphon using a combination of Triton X-100 and digitonin. In a Scatchard analysis using [3H]kainic acid, the partially-purified membrane showed two distinct receptor sites, a high affinity, low capacity site with a KD (mean +/- S.E.) of 28 +/- 9.4 nM and a maximal binding capacity of 12 +/- 3.8 pmol/mg protein and a low affinity, high capacity site with a mM affinity for radiolabeled kainic acid, the latter site which was lost upon solubilization. Competition experiments showed that the rank order potency for competitive ligands in displacing [3H]kainate binding from the membrane-bound receptors was quisqualate > ibotenate > iodowillardiine = AMPA = fluorowillardiine > domoate > kainate > L-glutamate. At high micromolar concentrations, NBQX, NMDA and ATPA showed little or no ability to displace [3H]kainate. In contrast, Scatchard analysis using [3H]glutamate showed linearity, indicating the presence of a single binding site with a KD and Bmax of 500 +/- 50 nM and 14 +/- 0.8 pmol/mg protein, respectively. These results suggest that razor clam siphon contains both a high and low affinity receptor site for kainic acid and may contain more than one subtype of glutamate receptor, thereby allowing the clam to function normally in a marine environment that often contains high concentrations of domoic acid.

  3. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Javier; Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Scholes, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/.

  4. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/. PMID:26987123

  5. Cation binding site of cytochrome c oxidase: progress report.

    PubMed

    Vygodina, Tatiana V; Kirichenko, Anna; Konstantinov, Alexander A

    2014-07-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart binds Ca(2+) reversibly at a specific Cation Binding Site located near the outer face of the mitochondrial membrane. Ca(2+) shifts the absorption spectrum of heme a, which allowed earlier the determination of the kinetic and equilibrium characteristics of the binding, and, as shown recently, the binding of calcium to the site inhibits cytochrome oxidase activity at low turnover rates of the enzyme [Vygodina, Т., Kirichenko, A., Konstantinov, A.A (2013). Direct Regulation of Cytochrome c Oxidase by Calcium Ions. PloS ONE 8, e74436]. This paper summarizes further progress in the studies of the Cation Binding Site in this group presenting the results to be reported at 18th EBEC Meeting in Lisbon, 2014. The paper revises specificity of the bovine oxidase Cation Binding Site for different cations, describes dependence of the Ca(2+)-induced inhibition on turnover rate of the enzyme and reports very high affinity binding of calcium with the "slow" form of cytochrome oxidase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Guest Editors: Manuela Pereira and Miguel Teixeira.

  6. Characteristics of the binding of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine to rabbit ventricular membranes: modification by other Ca++ channel antagonists and by the Ca++ channel agonist Bay K 8644

    SciTech Connect

    Janis, R.A.; Sarmiento, J.G.; Maurer, S.C.; Bolger, G.T.; Triggle, D.J.

    1984-10-01

    This study was carried out to characterize (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding to cardiac membranes and to test the hypothesis that high affinity binding of Ca++ channel antagonists and agonists is to Ca++ channels. Binding was specific, rapid, reversible and stereoselective. The relative order of potency of nifedipine analogs for inhibition of binding was the same as that for inhibition of smooth and cardiac muscle contraction. Results with diltiazem, verapamil and lidoflazine were consistent with the hypothesis that nondihydropyridine Ca++ channel antagonists act at one or more sites allosterically linked to the 1,4-dihydropyridine site in cardiac cells. The Ca++ channel agonist Bay K 8644 (methyl-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3-nitro-4-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-pyridine- 5-carboxylate) displaced specifically bound (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine in an apparently competitive manner with an IC50 value of 5 nM. The results suggest that organic antagonists do not act by physically blocking the Ca++ channel. The data also support the hypothesis that the high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine in isolated cardiac membranes are associated with Ca++ channels that are inactivated or are otherwise unavailable for opening.

  7. Cloned human 5-HT1A receptor pharmacology determined using agonist binding and measurement of cAMP accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Najam A; Drace, Colene D; Williams, Gary W; Crider, Julie Y

    2004-10-01

    Twenty agonists and nine antagonists were evaluated for their ability to compete for [3H]-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin ([3H]-8-OH-DPAT) binding to the cloned human serotonin-1A (ch-5-HT1A) receptor expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and for their ability to alter adenylyl cyclase activity in the same cells. The most potent full agonists of high affinity included N,N-dipropyl-5-carboxamidotryptamine (pEC50=9.6 +/- 0.1), MDL 73005EF (pEC50=9.3 +/- 0.2), 5-methyl-urapidil (pEC50=9.2 +/- 0.1), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (pEC50=9.1 +/- 0.2), R(+)-8-OH-DPAT (pEC50=8.6 +/- 0.1) and BMY-7378 (pEC50=8.6 +/- 0.1). WB-4101 (pEC50=8.3 +/- 0.2; IA=79%), clozapine (pEC50=8.1 +/- 0.3; IA=29%), (buspirone (pEC50=7.6 +/- 0.2; IA=79%), quipazine (pEC50 <5; IA=45%) and R-DOI (pEC50 < 5; IA=31%) were weaker agonists with partial agonist properties. The most potent antagonists were WAY-100,635 (pKi=10.2 +/- 0.1), methiothepin (pKi=8.8 +/- 0.2), spiperone (pKi=8.7 +/- 0.2) and NAN-190 (pKi=8.5 +/- 0.2). The receptor affinities and functional potencies were well correlated (r=0.88; P <0.0001). Our binding data correlated well with the pharmacology of endogenous 5-HT1A receptors in the rabbit iris-ciliary body (r=0.91; P <0.001) and rat hippocampus (r=0.93, P <0.0001). Our functional cAMP data correlated well with other cAMP accumulation data (r=0.8, P <0.01 vs calf hippocampus) but less so with [35S]-GTPgammaS binding to the ch-5-HT(1A) receptor as a functional activity read-out (r=0.58, P <0.05). The present study provides a detailed pharmacological characterization of the ch-5-HT1A receptor using binding and functional assays.

  8. ‘Carba’-carfentanil (trans isomer): a μ opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist with a distinct binding mode

    PubMed Central

    Weltrowska, Grazyna; Lemieux, Carole; Chung, Nga N.; Guo, Jason J.; Wilkes, Brian C.; Schiller, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence to indicate that a positively charged nitrogen of endogenous and exogenous opioid ligands forms a salt bridge with the Asp residue in the third transmembrane helix of opioid receptors. To further examine the role of this electrostatic interaction in opioid receptor binding and activation, we synthesized ‘carba’-analogues of the highly potent μ opioid analgesic carfentanil (3), in which the piperidine nitrogen was replaced with a carbon. The resulting trans isomer (8b) showed reduced, but still significant MOR binding affinity (Kiμ = 95.2 nM) with no MOR versus DOR binding selectivity and was a MOR partial agonist. The cis isomer (8a) was essentially inactive. A MOR docking study indicated that 8b bound to the same binding pocket as parent 3, but its binding mode was somewhat different. A reevaluation of the uncharged morphine derivative N-formylnormorphine (9) indicated that it was a weak MOR antagonist showing no preference for MOR over KOR. Taken together, the results indicate that deletion of the positively charged nitrogen in μ opioid analgesics reduces MOR binding affinity by 2–3 orders of magnitude and may have pronounced effects on the intrinsic efficacy and on the opioid receptor selectivity profile. PMID:25129170

  9. Mg NMR in DNA solutions: Dominance of site binding effects.

    PubMed

    Rose, D M; Bleam, M L; Record, M T; Bryant, R G

    1980-11-01

    (25)Mg NMR spectroscopy is applied to a study of magnesium ion interactions with DNA, which is considered as a model for a linear polyelectrolyte. It is demonstrated that the magnesium ion spectrum is complicated by a non-Lorent-zian line shape and is dominated by the effects of chemical exchange with macromolecule binding sites. A distinction is made between specific-site interactions in which the magnesium ion loses a water molecule from the first coordination sphere on binding and those interactions, referred to as territorial binding, in which the ion maintains its first coordination sphere complement of solvent. The first type of site-binding interactions are shown to dominate the magnesium ion NMR spectrum, based on a consideration of the magnitudes of the observed (25)Mg relaxation rates compared with (23)Na relaxation rates, the clear contributions of chemical exchange-limited relaxation, and an ion displacement experiment employing sodium.

  10. SiteLight: binding-site prediction using phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Inbal; Wolfson, Haim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2003-07-01

    Phage display enables the presentation of a large number of peptides on the surface of phage particles. Such libraries can be tested for binding to target molecules of interest by means of affinity selection. Here we present SiteLight, a novel computational tool for binding site prediction using phage display libraries. SiteLight is an algorithm that maps the 1D peptide library onto a three-dimensional (3D) protein surface. It is applicable to complexes made up of a protein Template and any type of molecule termed Target. Given the three-dimensional structure of a Template and a collection of sequences derived from biopanning against the Target, the Template interaction site with the Target is predicted. We have created a large diverse data set for assessing the ability of SiteLight to correctly predict binding sites. SiteLight predictive mapping enables discrimination between the binding and nonbinding parts of the surface. This prediction can be used to effectively reduce the surface by 75% without excluding the binding site. In 63% of the cases we have tested, there is at least one binding site prediction that overlaps the interface by at least 50%. These results suggest the applicability of phage display libraries for automated binding site prediction on three-dimensional structures. For most effective binding site prediction we propose using a random phage display library twice, to scan both binding partners of a given complex. The derived peptides are mapped to the other binding partner (now used as a Template). Here, the surface of each partner is reduced by 75%, focusing their relative positions with respect to each other significantly. Such information can be utilized to improve docking algorithms and scoring functions.

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα agonists differentially regulate inhibitor of DNA binding expression in rodents and human cells.

    PubMed

    González, María Del Carmen; Corton, J Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Alvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans.

  12. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptorα Agonists Differentially Regulate Inhibitor of DNA Binding Expression in Rodents and Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, María del Carmen; Corton, J. Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Álvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans. PMID:22701468

  13. Characterisation of imidazoline I2 binding sites in pig brain.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Neil J; Lupo, Patrick A; Nutt, David J; Hudson, Alan L; Robinson, Emma S J

    2005-09-05

    The imidazoline I2 binding sites in the central nervous system have previously been described in several different species including rat, mouse, rabbit and frog. The present study has investigated the imidazoline I2 binding site, and its relationship to the monoamine oxidase isoforms, in pig whole brain and compared the results obtained with data from other species. Results from saturation binding studies revealed that the imidazoline I2-selective ligand, [3H]2BFI (2-(2-benzofuranyl)-2-imidazoline) labelled a single saturable population of sites with a KD=6.6 nM and Bmax=771.7 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological characterisation of the sites was similar to that previously reported with a rank order of potency for the imidazoline I2 ligands of 2BFI>BU224>Idazoxan>BU226. Displacement by the imidazoline I1 ligands was low affinity and the monoamine oxidase inhibitors displaced with micromolar affinity. The majority of compounds displaced the binding in a monophasic manner, however, displacement by the putative endogenous ligand, harmane was biphasic. The relative populations of the two monoamine oxidase isoforms revealed a 10 fold greater expression of monoamine oxidase B relative to monoamine oxidase A. These data confirm the presence of imidazoline I2 binding sites in pig brain and show that their pharmacology is characteristic of that seen in other species. The proportion of monoamine oxidase A and B expressed in the pig brain is similar to that seen in the human brain therefore, given the association between imidazoline I2 binding sites and monoamine oxidase, the pig may provide a more useful model for human imidazoline I2 binding sites than other species such as the rat.

  14. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus SarA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Sterba, Kristen M; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Blevins, Jon S; Hurlburt, Barry K; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2003-08-01

    The staphylococcal accessory regulator locus (sarA) encodes a DNA-binding protein (SarA) that modulates expression of over 100 genes. Whether this occurs via a direct interaction between SarA and cis elements associated with its target genes is unclear, partly because the definitive characteristics of a SarA binding site have not been identified. In this work, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) were used to identify a SarA binding site(s) upstream of the SarA-regulated gene cna. The results suggest the existence of multiple high-affinity binding sites within the cna promoter region. Using a SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) procedure and purified, recombinant SarA, we also selected DNA targets that contain a high-affinity SarA binding site from a random pool of DNA fragments. These fragments were subsequently cloned and sequenced. Randomly chosen clones were also examined by EMSA. These DNA fragments bound SarA with affinities comparable to those of recognized SarA-regulated genes, including cna, fnbA, and sspA. The composition of SarA-selected DNAs was AT rich, which is consistent with the nucleotide composition of the Staphylococcus aureus genome. Alignment of selected DNAs revealed a 7-bp consensus (ATTTTAT) that was present with no more than one mismatch in 46 of 56 sequenced clones. By using the same criteria, consensus binding sites were also identified upstream of the S. aureus genes spa, fnbA, sspA, agr, hla, and cna. With the exception of cna, which has not been previously examined, this 7-bp motif was within the putative SarA binding site previously associated with each gene.

  15. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  16. A Structural Switch between Agonist and Antagonist Bound Conformations for a Ligand-Optimized Model of the Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Arden; Phillips, Jessica L.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Perdew, Gary H.; Kolluri, Siva K.; Bisson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse group of genes. Exogenous AHR ligands include the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which is a potent agonist, and the synthetic AHR antagonist N-2-(1H-indol-3yl)ethyl)-9-isopropyl-2-(5-methylpyridin-3-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351). As no experimentally determined structure of the ligand binding domain exists, homology models have been utilized for virtual ligand screening (VLS) to search for novel ligands. Here, we have developed an “agonist-optimized” homology model of the human AHR ligand binding domain, and this model aided in the discovery of two human AHR agonists by VLS. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of an agonist TCDD-bound and antagonist GNF351-bound version of this model in order to gain insights into the mechanics of the AHR ligand-binding pocket. These simulations identified residues 307–329 as a flexible segment of the AHR ligand pocket that adopts discrete conformations upon agonist or antagonist binding. This flexible segment of the AHR may act as a structural switch that determines the agonist or antagonist activity of a given AHR ligand. PMID:25329374

  17. Modeling lanthanide series binding sites on humic acid.

    PubMed

    Pourret, Olivier; Martinez, Raul E

    2009-02-01

    Lanthanide (Ln) binding to humic acid (HA) has been investigated by combining ultrafiltration and ICP-MS techniques. A Langmuir-sorption-isotherm metal-complexation model was used in conjunction with a linear programming method (LPM) to fit experimental data representing various experimental conditions both in HA/Ln ratio (varying between 5 and 20) and in pH range (from 2 to 10) with an ionic strength of 10(-3) mol L(-1). The LPM approach, not requiring prior knowledge of surface complexation parameters, was used to solve the existing discrepancies in LnHA binding constants and site densities. The application of the LPM to experimental data revealed the presence of two discrete metal binding sites at low humic acid concentrations (5 mg L(-1)), with log metal complexation constants (logK(S,j)) of 2.65+/-0.05 and 7.00 (depending on Ln). The corresponding site densities were 2.71+/-0.57x10(-8) and 0.58+/-0.32x10(-8) mol of Ln(3+)/mg of HA (depending on Ln). Total site densities of 3.28+/-0.28x10(-8), 4.99+/-0.02x10(-8), and 5.01+/-0.01x10(-8) mol mg(-1) were obtained by LPM for humic acid, for humic acid concentrations of 5, 10, and 20 mg L(-1), respectively. These results confirm that lanthanide binding occurs mainly at weak sites (i.e., ca. 80%) and second at strong sites (i.e., ca. 20%). The first group of discrete metal binding sites may be attributed to carboxylic groups (known to be the main binding sites of Ln in HA), and the second metal binding group to phenolic moieties. Moreover, this study evidences heterogeneity in the distribution of the binding sites among Ln. Eventually, the LPM approach produced feasible and reasonable results, but it was less sensitive to error and did not require an a priori assumption of the number and concentration of binding sites.

  18. The I1-imidazoline receptor: from binding site to therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ernsberger, Paul; Friedman, Jacob E.; Koletsky, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective To review previous work and present additional evidence characterizing the I1-imidazoline receptor and its role in cellular signaling, central cardiovascular control, and the treatment of metabolic syndromes. Second-generation centrally-acting antihypertensives inhibit sympathetic activity mainly via imidazoline receptors, whereas first-generation agents act viaα2-adrenergic receptors. The I1 subtype of imidazoline receptor resides in the plasma membrane and binds central antihypertensives with high affinity. Methods and results Radioligand binding assays have characterized I1-imidazoline sites in the brainstem site of action for these agents in the rostral ventrolateral medulla. Binding affinity at I1-imidazoline sites, but not at other classes of imidazoline binding sites, correlates closely with the potency of central antihypertensive agents in animals and in human clinical trials. The antihypertensive action of systemic moxonidine is eliminated by the I1/α2-antagonist efaroxan, but not by selective blockade of α2-adrenergic receptors. Until now, the cell signaling pathway coupled to I1-imidazoline receptors was unknown. Using a model system lacking α2-adrenergic receptors (PC12 pheochromocytoma cells) we have found that moxonidine acts as an agonist at the cell level and I1-imidazoline receptor activation leads to the production of the second messenger diacylglycerol, most likely through direct activation of phosphatidylcholine-selective phospholipase C. The obese spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR; SHROB strain) shows many of the abnormalities that cluster in human syndrome X, including elevations in blood pressure, serum lipids and insulin. SHROB and their lean SHR littermates were treated with moxonidine at 8 mg/kg per day. SHROB and SHR treated with moxonidine showed not only lowered blood pressure but also improved glucose tolerance and facilitated insulin secretion in response to a glucose load. Because α2-adrenergic agonists impair

  19. Guanyl nucleotide interactions with dopaminergic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol in human caudate and putamen: guanyl nucleotides enhance ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation and cause an apparent loss of high affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Andorn, A.C.; Bacon, B.R.; Nguyen-Hunh, A.T.; Parlato, S.J.; Stitts, J.A.

    1988-02-01

    The human caudate and putamen contain two high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Both of these affinity states exhibit dopaminergic selectivity. Ascorbic acid, at 0.1 mM, induces a slow loss of the low affinity component of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding in these tissues. The addition of guanyl nucleotides to the ascorbate produces a more rapid loss of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding which includes a loss of the highest affinity state for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Ascorbate induces lipid peroxidation in human caudate and putamen, an effect that is further enhanced by guanyl and inosine nucleotides. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides have no effect on (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding but do decrease the affinity of dopamine at each affinity state greater than 60-fold. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides apparently decrease agonist affinity at human brain dopamine2-binding sites without causing an interconversion of agonist affinity states.

  20. Probing binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-01

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein–RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein–protein and protein–RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein–RNA recognition sites with desired affinity. PMID:26365245

  1. Probing binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-29

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein-RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein-RNA recognition sites with desired affinity.

  2. Gaussian mapping of chemical fragments in ligand binding sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Murcia, Marta; Constans, Pere; Pérez, Carlos; Ortiz, Angel R.

    2004-02-01

    We present a new approach to automatically define a quasi-optimal minimal set of pharmacophoric points mapping the interaction properties of a user-defined ligand binding site. The method is based on a fitting algorithm where a grid of sampled interaction energies of the target protein with small chemical fragments in the binding site is approximated by a linear expansion of Gaussian functions. A heuristic approximation selects from this expansion the smallest possible set of Gaussians required to describe the interaction properties of the binding site within a prespecified accuracy. We have evaluated the performance of the approach by comparing the computed Gaussians with the positions of aromatic sites found in experimental protein-ligand complexes. For a set of 53 complexes, good correspondence is found in general. At a 95% significance level, ˜65% of the predicted interaction points have an aromatic binding site within 1.5 Å. We then studied the utility of these points in docking using the program DOCK. Short docking times, with an average of ˜0.18 s per conformer, are obtained, while retaining, both for rigid and flexible docking, the ability to sample native-like binding modes for the ligand. An average 4-5-fold speed-up in docking times and a similar success rate is estimated with respect to the standard DOCK protocol. Abbreviations: RMSD - root mean square deviation; ASA - Atomic Shell Approximation; LSF - Least-Squares Fitting; 3D - three-dimensional; VDW - Van der Waals.

  3. Identification of an imidazoline binding protein: Creatine kinase and an imidazoline-2 binding site

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Atsuko; Tyacke, Robin J.; Robinson, James J.; Husbands, Stephen M.; Minchin, Michael C.W.; Nutt, David J.; Hudson, Alan L.

    2009-01-01

    Drugs that bind to imidazoline binding proteins have major physiological actions. To date, three subtypes of such proteins, I1, I2 and I3, have been proposed, although characterisations of these binding proteins are lacking. I2 binding sites are found throughout the brain, particularly dense in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Selective I2 ligands demonstrate antidepressant-like activity and the identity of the proteins that respond to such ligands remained unknown until now. Here we report the isolation of a ∼ 45 kDa imidazoline binding protein from rabbit and rat brain using a high affinity ligand for the I2 subtype, 2-BFI, to generate an affinity column. Following protein sequencing of the isolated ∼ 45 kDa imidazoline binding protein, we identified it to be brain creatine kinase (B-CK). B-CK shows high binding capacity to selective I2 ligands; [3H]-2-BFI (5 nM) specifically bound to B-CK (2330 ± 815 fmol mg protein− 1). We predicted an I2 binding pocket near the active site of B-CK using molecular modelling. Furthermore, B-CK activity was inhibited by a selective I2 irreversible ligand, where 20 μM BU99006 reduced the enzyme activity by 16%, confirming the interaction between B-CK and the I2 ligand. In summary, we have identified B-CK to be the ∼ 45 kDa imidazoline binding protein and we have demonstrated the existence of an I2 binding site within this enzyme. The importance of B-CK in regulating neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release may well explain the various actions of I2 ligands in brain and the alterations in densities of I2 binding sites in psychiatric disorders. PMID:19410564

  4. Candida glabrata binds to glycosylated and lectinic receptors on the coronary endothelial luminal membrane and inhibits flow sense and cardiac responses to agonists.

    PubMed

    Torres-Tirado, David; Knabb, Maureen; Castaño, Irene; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Rubio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata (CG) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that initiates infection by binding to host cells via specific lectin-like adhesin proteins. We have previously shown the importance of lectin-oligosaccharide binding in cardiac responses to flow and agonists. Because of the lectinic-oligosaccharide nature of CG binding, we tested the ability of CG to alter the agonist- and flow-induced changes in cardiac function in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed strong attachment of CG to the coronary endothelium, even after extensive washing. CG shifted the coronary flow vs. auricular-ventricular (AV) delay relationship upward, indicating that greater flow was required to achieve the same AV delay. This effect was completely reversed with mannose, partially reversed with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, but hyaluronan had no effect. Western blot analysis was used to determine binding of CG to isolated coronary endothelial luminal membrane (CELM) receptors, and the results indicate that flow-sensitive CELM receptors, ANG II type I, α-adrenergic 1A receptor, endothelin-2, and VCAM-1 bind to CG. In addition, CG inhibited agonist-induced effects of bradykinin, angiotensin, and phenylephrine on AV delay, coronary perfusion pressure, and left ventricular pressure. Mannose reversed the inhibitory effects of CG on the agonist responses. These results suggest that CG directly binds to flow-sensitive CELM receptors via lectinic-oligosaccharide interactions with mannose and disrupts the lectin-oligosaccharide binding necessary for flow-induced cardiac responses.

  5. Penicillin-binding site on the Escherichia coli cell envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, L.; Lee, Y.; Schwarz, U.; Lorian, V.

    1986-08-01

    The binding of /sup 35/S-labeled penicillin to distinct penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the cell envelope obtained from the sonication of Escherichia coli was studied at different pHs ranging from 4 to 11. Experiments distinguishing the effect of pH on penicillin binding by PBP 5/6 from its effect on beta-lactamase activity indicated that although substantial binding occurred at the lowest pH, the amount of binding increased with pH, reaching a maximum at pH 10. Based on earlier studies, it is proposed that the binding at high pH involves the formation of a covalent bond between the C-7 of penicillin and free epsilon amino groups of the PBPs. At pHs ranging from 4 to 8, position 1 of penicillin, occupied by sulfur, is considered to be the site that establishes a covalent bond with the sulfhydryl groups of PBP 5. The use of specific blockers of free epsilon amino groups or sulfhydryl groups indicated that wherever the presence of each had little or no effect on the binding of penicillin by PBP 5, the presence of both completely prevented binding. The specific blocker of the hydroxyl group of serine did not affect the binding of penicillin.

  6. Insulin binding sites in various segments of the rabbit nephron

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, R.; Emmanouel, D.S.; Katz, A.I.

    1983-07-01

    Insulin binds specifically to basolateral renal cortical membranes and modifies tubular electrolyte transport, but the target sites of this hormone in the nephron have not been identified. Using a microassay that permits measurement of hormone binding in discrete tubule segments we have determined the binding sites of /sup 125/I-insulin along the rabbit nephron. Assays were performed under conditions that minimize insulin degradation, and specific binding was measured as the difference between /sup 125/I-insulin bound in the presence or absence of excess (10(-5) M) unlabeled hormone. Insulin monoiodinated in position A14 was used in all assays. Specific insulin binding (attomol . cm-1 +/- SE) was highest in the distal convoluted tubule (180.5 +/- 15.0) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (132.9 +/- 14.6), followed by the proximal convoluted and straight tubule. When expressed per milligram protein, insulin binding capacity was highest along the entire thick ascending limb (medullary and cortical portions) and the distal convoluted tubule, i.e., the ''diluting segment'' (congruent to 10(-13) mol . mg protein-1), and was lower (congruent to 4 X 10(-14) mol . mg protein-1), and remarkably similar, in all other nephron segments. Binding specificity was verified in competition studies with unlabeled insulin, insulin analogues (proinsulin and desoctapeptide insulin), and unrelated hormones (glucagon, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone). In addition, serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibody from two patients with type B insulin resistance syndrome markedly inhibited insulin binding to isolated tubules. Whether calculated per unit tubule length or protein content, insulin binding is highest in the thick ascending limb and the distal convoluted tubule, the same nephron sites where a regulatory role in sodium transport has been postulated for this hormone.

  7. On the Site and Mechanism of Action of β3-Adrenoceptor Agonists in the Bladder

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The clinical success of mirabegron as the first β3-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist for treatment of the overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome, has resulted in substantial interest in its site and mechanism of action. Even if the adrenergic innervation of the bladder and urethra has been well studied, the location(s) of β3-ARs in different structures within the bladder wall and urethra, and the mode(s) of action of β3-AR stimulation have still not been established. The recent demonstration of β3-ARs on cholinergic nerve terminals with no immunoreactivity in urothelium or detrusor smooth muscle, is not in agreement with previous morphological studies, and functional data strongly suggest that β3-ARs can be found these structures. However, recent studies suggest that the β3-ARs on detrusor smooth muscle may not be the functionally most relevant. The assumption that β3-AR activation during bladder filling inhibits acetylcholine release from parasympathetic neurons by a prejunctional mechanism and that this decreases bladder micromotions that generate afferent activity, is an attractive hypothesis. It does not exclude that other mechanisms may be contributing, and supports combined approaches to reduce afferent activity for treatment of the OAB syndrome. PMID:28361520

  8. Iodine 125-lysergic acid diethylamide binds to a novel serotonergic site on rat choroid plexus epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yagaloff, K.A.; Hartig, P.R.

    1985-12-01

    /sup 125/I-Lysergic acid diethylamide (/sup 125/I-LSD) binds with high affinity to serotonergic sites on rat choroid plexus. These sites were localized to choroid plexus epithelial cells by use of a novel high resolution stripping film technique for light microscopic autoradiography. In membrane preparations from rat choroid plexus, the serotonergic site density was 3100 fmol/mg of protein, which is 10-fold higher than the density of any other serotonergic site in brain homogenates. The choroid plexus site exhibits a novel pharmacology that does not match the properties of 5-hydroxytryptamine-1a (5-HT1a), 5-HT1b, or 5-HT2 serotonergic sites. /sup 125/I-LSD binding to the choroid plexus site is potently inhibited by mianserin, serotonin, and (+)-LSD. Other serotonergic, dopaminergic, and adrenergic agonists and antagonists exhibit moderate to weak affinities for this site. The rat choroid plexus /sup 125/I-LSD binding site appears to represent a new type of serotonergic site which is located on non-neuronal cells in this tissue.

  9. Evidence for chemoreceptors with bimodular ligand-binding regions harboring two signal-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Molina, Estela; Reyes-Darias, José-Antonio; Lacal, Jesús; Ramos, Juan L.; García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Gavira, Jose A.; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemoreceptor-based signaling is a central mechanism in bacterial signal transduction. Receptors are classified according to the size of their ligand-binding region. The well-studied cluster I proteins have a 100- to 150-residue ligand-binding region that contains a single site for chemoattractant recognition. Cluster II receptors, which contain a 220- to 300-residue ligand-binding region and which are almost as abundant as cluster I receptors, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report high-resolution structures of the ligand-binding region of the cluster II McpS chemotaxis receptor (McpS-LBR) of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 in complex with different chemoattractants. The structure of McpS-LBR represents a small-molecule binding domain composed of two modules, each able to bind different signal molecules. Malate and succinate were found to bind to the membrane-proximal module, whereas acetate binds to the membrane-distal module. A structural alignment of the two modules revealed that the ligand-binding sites could be superimposed and that amino acids involved in ligand recognition are conserved in both binding sites. Ligand binding to both modules was shown to trigger chemotactic responses. Further analysis showed that McpS-like receptors were found in different classes of proteobacteria, indicating that this mode of response to different carbon sources may be universally distributed. The physiological relevance of the McpS architecture may lie in its capacity to respond with high sensitivity to the preferred carbon sources malate and succinate and, at the same time, mediate lower sensitivity responses to the less preferred but very abundant carbon source acetate. PMID:23112148

  10. Relations between high-affinity binding sites of markers for binding regions on human serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Kragh-Hansen, U

    1985-01-01

    Binding of warfarin, digitoxin, diazepam, salicylate and Phenol Red, individually or in different pair combinations, to defatted human serum albumin at ligand/protein molar ratios less than 1:1 was studied at pH 7.0. The binding was determined by ultrafiltration. Some of the experiments were repeated with the use of equilibrium dialysis in order to strengthen the results. Irrespective of the method used, all ligands bind to one high-affinity binding site with an association constant in the range 10(4)-10(6) M-1. High-affinity binding of the following pair of ligands took place independently: warfarin-Phenol Red, warfarin-diazepam, warfarin-digitoxin and digitoxin-diazepam. Simultaneous binding of warfarin and salicylate led to a mutual decrease in binding of one another, as did simultaneous binding of digitoxin and Phenol Red. Both effects could be accounted for by a coupling constant. The coupling constant is the factor by which the primary association constants are affected; in these examples of anti-co-operativity the factor has a value between 0 and 1. In the first example it was calculated to be 0.8 and in the latter 0.5. Finally, digitoxin and salicylate were found to compete for a common high-affinity binding site. The present findings support the proposal of four separate primary binding sites for warfarin, digitoxin (and salicylate), diazepam and Phenol Red. An attempt to correlate this partial binding model for serum albumin with other models in the literature is made. PMID:3977850

  11. Synthetic human serum albumin Sudlow I binding site mimics.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Björn C G; Rosengren, Annika M; Näslund, Inga; Andersson, Per Ola; Nicholls, Ian A

    2010-11-25

    Here, we report the design, synthesis, and characterization of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) derived mimics of the human serum albumin (HSA) Sudlow I site-the binding site for the anticoagulant warfarin. MIP design was based upon a combination of experimental ((1)H NMR) and computational (molecular dynamics) methods. Two MIPs and corresponding nonimprinted reference polymers were synthesized and characterized (scanning electron microscopy; nitrogen sorption; and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). MIP-ligand recognition was examined using radioligand binding studies, where the largest number of selective sites was found in a warfarin-imprinted methacrylic acid-ethylene dimethacrylate copolymer (MAA-MIP). The warfarin selectivity of this MIP was confirmed using radioligand displacement and zonal chromatographic studies. A direct comparison of MIP-warfarin binding characteristics with those of the HSA Sudlow I binding site was made, and similarities in site population (per gram polymer or protein) and affinities were observed. The warfarin selectivity of the MIP suggests its potential for use as a recognition element in a MIP-based warfarin sensor and even as a model to aid in understanding and steering blood-plasma protein-regulated transport processes or even for the development of warfarin sensors.

  12. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jay M; Cura, Anthony J; Lloyd, Kenneth P; Carruthers, Anthony

    2015-05-15

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites-the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis.

  13. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. IMPORTANCE We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. PMID:26764003

  14. Curcumin recognizes a unique binding site of tubulin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Soumyananda; Das, Lalita; Kapoor, Neha; Das, Amlan; Dwivedi, Vishnu; Poddar, Asim; Chakraborti, Gopal; Janik, Mark; Basu, Gautam; Panda, Dulal; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Surolia, Avadhesha; Bhattacharyya, Bhabatarak

    2011-09-22

    Although curcumin is known for its anticarcinogenic properties, the exact mechanism of its action or the identity of the target receptor is not completely understood. Studies on a series of curcumin analogues, synthesized to investigate their tubulin binding affinities and tubulin self-assembly inhibition, showed that: (i) curcumin acts as a bifunctional ligand, (ii) analogues with substitution at the diketone and acetylation of the terminal phenolic groups of curcumin are less effective, (iii) a benzylidiene derivative, compound 7, is more effective than curcumin in inhibiting tubulin self-assembly. Cell-based studies also showed compound 7 to be more effective than curcumin. Using fluorescence spectroscopy we show that curcumin binds tubulin 32 Å away from the colchicine-binding site. Docking studies also suggests that the curcumin-binding site to be close to the vinblastine-binding site. Structure-activity studies suggest that the tridented nature of compound 7 is responsible for its higher affinity for tubulin compared to curcumin.

  15. Specific binding sites for muramyl peptides on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.H.S.; Krueger, J.M.; Karnovsky, M.L.

    1986-03-15

    Two radiolabeled (/sup 125/I) muramyl peptide derivatives of high specific activity were prepared: a tripeptide with an iodinated C-terminal tyrosine methyl ester (Ligand I), and a muramyl tripeptide with a C-terminal lysine derivatized with Bolton-Hunter reagent (Ligand II). These were used to characterize binding of muramyl peptides to monolayers of murine macrophages. Saturable high-affinity binding to resident, caseinate-elicited, and Listeria-activated peritoneal cells was observed with both radioligands. Binding affinities varied with the state of activation of the macrophages, and K/sub D/ values ranged from 48 +/- 33 pM (for resident macrophages, Ligand I) to 1020 +/- 90 pM (for activated macrophages, Ligand II). Specific binding sites were also found on a macrophage-derived cell line. The ability of several unlabeled muramyl peptides to compete with Ligands I and II for their binding sites was tested. Competition was stereospecific and correlated with known biological activities of these compounds (i.e., immunoadjuvanticity, pyrogenicity, and somnogenicity). The sites identified here for Ligands I and II may mediate some of the effects that muramyl peptides have previously been demonstrated to have on macrophages.

  16. Molecular simulations of multimodal ligand-protein binding: elucidation of binding sites and correlation with experiments.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alexander S; Garde, Shekhar; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-11-17

    Multimodal chromatography, which employs more than one mode of interaction between ligands and proteins, has been shown to have unique selectivity and high efficacy for protein purification. To test the ability of free solution molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water to identify binding regions on the protein surface and to shed light on the "pseudo affinity" nature of multimodal interactions, we performed MD simulations of a model protein ubiquitin in aqueous solution of free ligands. Comparisons of MD with NMR spectroscopy of ubiquitin mutants in solutions of free ligands show a good agreement between the two with regard to the preferred binding region on the surface of the protein and several binding sites. MD simulations also identify additional binding sites that were not observed in the NMR experiments. "Bound" ligands were found to be sufficiently flexible and to access a number of favorable conformations, suggesting only a moderate loss of ligand entropy in the "pseudo affinity" binding of these multimodal ligands. Analysis of locations of chemical subunits of the ligand on the protein surface indicated that electrostatic interaction units were located on the periphery of the preferred binding region on the protein. The analysis of the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity maps, and the binding of both acetate and benzene probes were used to further study the localization of individual ligand moieties. These results suggest that water-mediated electrostatic interactions help the localization and orientation of the MM ligand to the binding region with additional stability provided by nonspecific hydrophobic interactions.

  17. Pharmacologic characterization and autoradiographic distribution of binding sites for iodinated tachykinins in the rat central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, S.H.; Helke, C.J.; Burcher, E.; Shults, C.W.; O'Donohue, T.L.

    1986-11-01

    P-type, E-type, and K-type tachykinin binding sites have been identified in the mammalian CNS. These sites may be tachykinin receptors for which the mammalian neuropeptides substance P, neuromedin K, and substance K are the preferred natural agonists, respectively. In the present investigation, we have compared the pharmacology and the autoradiographic distribution of CNS binding sites for the iodinated (/sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter reagent) tachykinins substance P, eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K. Iodinated eledoisin and neuromedin K exhibited an E-type binding pattern in cortical membranes. Iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K each labeled sites that had a similar distribution but one that was considerably different from that of sites labeled by iodinated substance P. CNS regions where there were detectable densities of binding sites for iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K and few or no sites for iodinated substance P included cortical layers IV-VI, mediolateral septum, supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei, interpeduncular nucleus, ventral tegmental area, and substantia nigra pars compacta. Binding sites for SP were generally more widespread in the CNS. CNS regions where there was a substantial density of binding sites for iodinated substance P and few or no sites for iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K included cortical layers I and II, olfactory tubercle, nucleus accumbens, caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, medial and lateral septum, endopiriform nucleus, rostral thalamus, medial and lateral preoptic nuclei, arcuate nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, dorsal parabrachial nucleus, parabigeminal nucleus, cerebellum, inferior olive, nucleus ambiguus, retrofacial and reticular nuclei, and spinal cord autonomic and somatic motor nuclei.

  18. Serotonergic agonists behave as partial agonists at the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Rinken, A; Ferré, S; Terasmaa, A; Owman, C; Fuxe, K

    1999-02-25

    RAT dopamine D2short receptors expressed in CHO cells were characterized by activation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding. There were no significant differences between the maximal effects seen in activation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding caused by dopaminergic agonists, but the effects of 5-HT, 8OH-DPAT and 5-methoxytryptamine amounted to 47 +/- 7%, 43 +/- 5% and 70 +/- 7% of the dopamine effect, respectively. The dopaminergic antagonist (+)butaclamol inhibited activations of both types of ligands with equal potency (pA2 = 8.9 +/- 0.1), indicating that only one type of receptor is involved. In competition with [3H]raclopride binding, dopaminergic agonists showed 53 +/- 2% of the binding sites in the GTP-dependent high-affinity state, whereas 5-HT showed only 20 +/- 3%. Taken together, the results indicate that serotonergic agonists behave as typical partial agonists for D2 receptors with potential antiparkinsonian activity.

  19. Pharmacological characterization of cis-nitromethylene neonicotinoids in relation to imidacloprid binding sites in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Bao, H; Shao, X; Zhang, Y; Yao, X; Liu, Z; Li, Z

    2010-02-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides, such as imidacloprid, are selective agonists of the insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and extensively used in areas of crop protection and animal health to control a variety of insect pest species. Here we describe that two cis-nitromethylene neonicotinoids (IPPA152002 and IPPA152004), recently synthesized in our laboratory, discriminated between the high and low affinity imidacloprid binding sites in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, a major insect pest of rice crops in many parts of Asia. [(3)H]imidacloprid has two binding sites with different affinities (Kd value of 0.0035 +/- 0.0006 nM for the high-affinity site and 1.47 +/- 0.22 nM for the low-affinity site). Although the cis-nitromethylene neonicotinoids showed low displacement ability (Ki values of 0.15 +/- 0.03 microM and 0.42 +/- 0.07 microM for IPPA152002 and IPPA152004, respectively) against [(3)H]imidacloprid binding, low concentrations (0.01 microM) of IPPA152002 completely inhibited [(3)H]imidacloprid binding at its high-affinity site. In Xenopus oocytes co-injected with cRNA encoding Nlalpha1 and rat beta2 subunits, obvious inward currents were detected in response to applications of IPPA152002 and IPPA152004, although the agonist potency is reduced to that of imidacloprid. The previously identified Y151S mutation in Nlalpha1 showed significant effects on the agonist potency of IPPA152002 and IPPA152004, such as a 75.8% and 70.6% reduction in Imax, and a 2.4- and 2.1-fold increase in EC(50). This data clearly shows that the two newly described cis-nitromethylene neonicotinoids act on insect nAChRs and like imidacloprid, discriminated between high and low affinity binding sites in N. lugens native nAChRs. These compounds may be useful tools to further elucidate the pharmacology and nature of neonicotinoid binding sites.

  20. Irreversible blockade of the high and low affinity ( sup 3 H) naloxone binding sites by C-6 derivatives of morphinane-6-ones

    SciTech Connect

    Krizsan, D. ); Varga, E.; Benyhe, S.; Szucs, M.; Borsodi, A. ); Hosztafi, S. )

    1991-01-01

    C-6 derivatives-hydrazones, phenylhydrazones, dinitrophenylhydrazones, oximes and semicarbazones - of morphinane-6-ones were synthesized and their binding characteristics were studied on rat brain membranes. The dihydromorphinone and oxymorphone derivatives compete for the ({sup 3}H)naloxone binding sites with high affinity, while the dihydrocodeinone and oxycodone derivatives are less potent. The affinity of the new compounds is decreased for the delta sites as compared to the parent ligands. The ligands bearing bulky substituents also bind with low affinity to the kappa sites. The modification decreased the Na{sup +}-index of compounds indicating their mixed agonist-antagonist character. The dihydromorphinone derivatives are all capable to block irreversibly the high affinity binding site of ({sup 3}H)naloxone, whereas the dihydrocodeinone derivatives block irreversibly the low affinity site. A possible mechanism for the inhibition is suggested.

  1. Characterization of a labile naloxone binding site (lambda site) in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Yu, V; Sadée, W

    1985-05-01

    A high-affinity binding site selective for naloxone and other 4,5-epoxymorphinans (lambda site) has been previously described in rat brain. Following homogenization of freshly dissected brain, the lambda sites convert from a high-affinity to a low-affinity state. When measured with [3H]naloxone, the decay is very rapid at 20 degrees C (t 1/2 less than 2 min), whereas it is progressively slowed at lower temperatures. Proteinase inhibitors, antoxidants, and sulfhydryl group-protecting agents failed to prevent this conversion. Kinetic measurements of mu and lambda binding at varying temperatures demonstrated that the decrease in lambda binding does not coincide with the concurrent increase in mu binding and that the loss of high-affinity lambda binding at 20 degrees C can be partially restored when the temperature is lowered to 0 degrees C. The low-affinity state of the lambda site is rather stable in the Tris buffer homogenates and is susceptible to digestion by a protease. The (-)-isomer of WIN 44,441, a benzomorphan drug, binds to lambda sites with moderate affinity (dissociation constant, KD = 63 nM), whereas the (+)-isomer does not (KD greater than 10,000 nM), thus establishing stereoselectivity of the binding process. Neither the high-affinity nor the low-affinity state of lambda binding is significantly affected by the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride or 50 microM Gpp(NH)p, (a GTP analog), which is in contrast to the dramatic effect of these agents on the established opioid receptor system. Naltrexone, naloxone, nalorphine, and morphine (in this order of decreasing potency) bind to the lambda site in vivo in intact rat brain over dosage ranges that are commonly employed in pharmacological studies.

  2. Probing Molecular Docking in a Charged Model Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Brenk, Ruth; Vetter, Stefan W.; Boyce, Sarah E.; Goodin, David B.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    A model binding site was used to investigate charge–charge interactions in molecular docking. This simple site, a small (180 Å3) engineered cavity in cyctochrome c peroxidase (CCP), is negatively charged and completely buried from solvent, allowing us to explore the balance between electrostatic energy and ligand desolvation energy in a system where many of the common approximations in docking do not apply. A database with about 5300 molecules was docked into this cavity. Retrospective testing with known ligands and decoys showed that overall the balance between electrostatic interaction and desolvation energy was captured. More interesting were prospective docking scre”ens that looked for novel ligands, especially those that might reveal problems with the docking and energy methods. Based on screens of the 5300 compound database, both high-scoring and low-scoring molecules were acquired and tested for binding. Out of 16 new, high-scoring compounds tested, 15 were observed to bind. All of these were small heterocyclic cations. Binding constants were measured for a few of these, they ranged between 20 μM and 60 μM. Crystal structures were determined for ten of these ligands in complex with the protein. The observed ligand geometry corresponded closely to that predicted by docking. Several low-scoring alkyl amino cations were also tested and found to bind. The low docking score of these molecules owed to the relatively high charge density of the charged amino group and the corresponding high desolvation penalty. When the complex structures of those ligands were determined, a bound water molecule was observed interacting with the amino group and a backbone carbonyl group of the cavity. This water molecule mitigates the desolvation penalty and improves the interaction energy relative to that of the “naked” site used in the docking screen. Finally, six low-scoring neutral molecules were also tested, with a view to looking for false negative predictions

  3. Lack of Ligand-Selective Binding of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor to Putative DNA Binding Sites Regulating Expression of Bax and Paraoxonase 1 Genes

    PubMed Central

    DeGroot, Danica E.; Hayashi, Ai; Denison, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions of the murine Bax and human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genes reportedly contain unique DRE-like sequences that respond to AhRs activated by some ligands but not others. Given the significant implications of this observation to understanding the diversity in AhR responses and that of other ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, a combination of DNA binding, nuclear translocation and gene expression analysis was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these ligand-selective responses. Although known AhR agonists stimulated AhR nuclear translocation, DRE binding and gene expression, the ligand-selective DRE-like DNA elements identified in the Bax and PON1 upstream regulatory regions failed to bind ligand-activated AhR or confer AhR-responsiveness upon a reporter gene. These results argue against the reported ligand-selectivity of AhR DNA binding and suggest DNA binding by ligand activated AhR involves DRE-containing DNA. PMID:24200861

  4. Binding ability of impromidine, a potent H2 agonist of histamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anouar, A.; Lhadi, E.; Decock, P.; Kozlowskyinst4, H.

    1999-09-01

    Impromidine (fig.1) is a potent and selective histamine H2 receptor agonist and its structure comprises a strongly basic guanidine group containing two different imidazole-containing side chains. The present work deals with the study of coordination equilibria between impromidine and Cu(II) and Ni(II) in aqueous solution at 25 circC. Potentiometric, UV-Visible and EPR studies on Cu(II) complexes with impromidine have shown that this anti-ulcerogenic drug is a very potent chelating agent. This drug is found to be a very effective ligand for Ni(II) ions also. The effective coordination of impromidine to metal ions may have significant biological implications. L'impromidine est un agoniste H2 de l'histamine, sa structure possède un groupement guanidinique de forte basicité et dont l'environne ment des deux groupements imidazoliques est différent. Le présent travail consiste en l'étude de la coordination de l'impromidine avec le Cu(II) et le Ni(II) en milieu aqueux à 25 circC. La potentiométrie, LíUV-Visible et la RPE montrent que le cuivre se coordine très fortement avec l'impromidine. Nous avons trouvé que ce médicament se coordine aussi fortement avec le nickel(II). La coordination de l'impromidine avec les métaux pourrait avoir des applications importantes en médecine.

  5. E2F in vivo binding specificity: Comparison of consensus versus nonconsensus binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Alina; Jin, Victor X.; Rabinovich, Roman; Xu, Xiaoqin; Farnham, Peggy J.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that most sites bound by E2F family members in vivo do not contain E2F consensus motifs. However, differences between in vivo target sites that contain or lack a consensus E2F motif have not been explored. To understand how E2F binding specificity is achieved in vivo, we have addressed how E2F family members are recruited to core promoter regions that lack a consensus motif and are excluded from other regions that contain a consensus motif. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) assays, we have shown that the predominant factors specifying whether E2F is recruited to an in vivo binding site are (1) the site must be in a core promoter and (2) the region must be utilized as a promoter in that cell type. We have tested three models for recruitment of E2F to core promoters lacking a consensus site, including (1) indirect recruitment, (2) looping to the core promoter mediated by an E2F bound to a distal motif, and (3) assisted binding of E2F to a site that weakly resembles an E2F motif. To test these models, we developed a new in vivo assay, termed eChIP, which allows analysis of transcription factor binding to isolated fragments. Our findings suggest that in vivo (1) a consensus motif is not sufficient to recruit E2Fs, (2) E2Fs can bind to isolated regions that lack a consensus motif, and (3) binding can require regions other than the best match to the E2F motif. PMID:18836037

  6. Characterization and distribution of binding sites for a new neurotensin receptor antagonist ligand, [3H]SR 48692, in the guinea pig brain1

    PubMed Central

    Betancur, Catalina; Canton, Maryse; Gully, Danielle; Vela, Gema; Pélaprat, Didier; Rostène, William

    1995-01-01

    SR 48692, a selective non-peptide antagonist of neurotensin (NT) receptors was recently developed. In the present work we studied the binding properties of the corresponding radioligand, 3H-SR 48692, in the adult guinea-pig brain. The characterization of 3H-SR 48692 binding was carried out on brain membrane preparations and the distribution of 3H-SR 48692 binding sites was determined by receptor autoradiography, and compared to that of 125I-NT binding sites. In brain homogenates, 3H-SR 48692 bound to a single population of sites with a Kd of 2.19 nM and a Bmax of 1.15 pmol/mg protein. This Bmax value was 20 times higher than that observed for 125I-NT. NT agonists were able to competitively interact with the entire population of binding sites labeled by 3H-SR 48692, but their affinities were much lower than those observed for 125I-NT. By contrast, NT antagonists exhibited similar abilities to inhibit the binding of both radioligands. The addition of unlabeled NT in saturation assays revealed a competitive inhibition of 3H-SR 48692 binding, suggesting that agonist and antagonists ligands bind to overlapping domains of the NT receptor. The autoradiographic distribution of the low-affinity NT binding sites detected by 3H-SR 48692 (96% of the receptors) was very similar to the distribution of high-affinity receptors labeled with 125I-NT (4% of the receptors). In addition, the binding of 3H-SR 48692 was insensitive to guanyl nucleotides. Taken together, these findings suggest that the binding sites detected by 3H-SR 48692 in the guinea-pig brain mainly represent the uncoupled form of the NT receptor. PMID:7791120

  7. Peanut lectin-binding sites in large bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H S

    1982-10-01

    Peanut lectin is known to bind to B-D-Gal-(1 leads to 3)-D-GalNac which provides antigenic determination for the T (TAg) blood group antigen. We examined 33 rectosigmoid carcinomas and 15 corresponding controls for their ability to express peanut lectin-binding sites. In controls one could localize TAg to the supranuclear portion of the cell, however, in cancers one noticed a cytostructural relocalization of TAg with the following two major patterns: localization to the region of the glycocalyx and localization intracytoplasmically in the apical portion of the cell. These two patterns were associated with glandular differentiation. Less frequently noted or in association with the above was a mucin glob-like pattern and/or a fine diffuse intracytoplasmic pattern associated with solid, nonglandular areas. The more poorly differentiated cancers less frequently expressed peanut lectin-binding sites. Benign (nontransitional zone) epithelium in those patients whose tumor expressed TAg was negative for peanut lectin-binding sites in 66 per cent of the cases. Reduced tumoral glycosyltransferases may explain this increased synthesis of TAg in cancers as compared with controls, if one considers TAg to be an incomplete glycoprotein of the MN blood group system.

  8. Principal pathway coupling agonist binding to channel gating in nicotinic receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won Yong; Sine, Steven M.

    2005-11-01

    Synaptic receptors respond to neurotransmitters by opening an intrinsic ion channel in the final step in synaptic transmission. How binding of the neurotransmitter is conveyed over the long distance to the channel remains a central question in neurobiology. Here we delineate a principal pathway that links neurotransmitter binding to channel gating by using a structural model of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor at 4-Å resolution, recordings of currents through single receptor channels and determinations of energetic coupling between pairs of residues. We show that a pair of invariant arginine and glutamate residues in each receptor α-subunit electrostatically links peripheral and inner β-sheets from the binding domain and positions them to engage with the channel. The key glutamate and flanking valine residues energetically couple to conserved proline and serine residues emerging from the top of the channel-forming α-helix, suggesting that this is the point at which the binding domain triggers opening of the channel. The series of interresidue couplings identified here constitutes a primary allosteric pathway that links neurotransmitter binding to channel gating.

  9. Photoaffinity labeling in target- and binding-site identification

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ewan; Collins, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling (PAL) using a chemical probe to covalently bind its target in response to activation by light has become a frequently used tool in drug discovery for identifying new drug targets and molecular interactions, and for probing the location and structure of binding sites. Methods to identify the specific target proteins of hit molecules from phenotypic screens are highly valuable in early drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the principles of PAL including probe design and experimental techniques for in vitro and live cell investigations. We emphasize the need to optimize and validate probes and highlight examples of the successful application of PAL across multiple disease areas. PMID:25686004

  10. Identification of a high-affinity binding site for dinotefuran in the nerve cord of the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Satoshi; Komaki, Iori; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2006-04-01

    The binding of the neonicotinoid insecticide dinotefuran to insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) was examined by a centrifugation method using the nerve cord membranes of American cockroaches and [3H]dinotefuran (78 Ci mmol-1). The Kd and Bmax values of [3H]dinotefuran binding were estimated to be 13.7 nM and 14.8 fmol 40 microg-1 protein respectively by Scatchard analysis. Epibatidine, an nAChR agonist, showed a rather lower affinity to the dinotefuran binding site (IC50=991 nM) than dinotefuran (IC50=5.02 nM). Imidacloprid and nereistoxin displayed lower potencies than dinotefuran but higher potencies than epibatidine. The potencies of five dinotefuran analogues in inhibiting the specific binding of [3H]dinotefuran to nerve cord membranes were determined. A good correlation (r2=0.970) was observed between the -log IC50 values of the tested compounds and their piperonyl butoxide-synergised insecticidal activities (-log LD50 values) against German cockroaches. The results indicate that a high-affinity binding site for dinotefuran is present in the nerve cord of the American cockroach and that the binding of ligands to the site leads to the manifestation of insecticidal activity.

  11. Comparison of SARS and NL63 papain-like protease binding sites and binding site dynamics: inhibitor design implications.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rima; Tang, Sishi; Zhao, Guijun; Lu, Hui; Case, David A; Johnson, Michael E

    2011-11-25

    The human severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and the NL63 coronaviruses are human respiratory pathogens for which no effective antiviral treatment exists. The papain-like cysteine proteases encoded by the coronavirus (SARS-CoV: PLpro; NL63: PLP1 and PLP2) represent potential targets for antiviral drug development. Three recent inhibitor-bound PLpro structures highlight the role of an extremely flexible six-residue loop in inhibitor binding. The high binding site plasticity is a major challenge in computational drug discovery/design efforts. From conventional molecular dynamics and accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations, we find that with conventional molecular dynamics simulation, PLpro translationally samples the open and closed conformation of BL2 loop on a picosecond-nanosecond timescale but does not reproduce the peptide bond inversion between loop residues Tyr269 and Gln270 that is observed on inhibitor GRL0617 binding. Only aMD simulation, starting from the closed loop conformation, reproduced the 180° ϕ-ψ dihedral rotation back to the open loop state. The Tyr-Gln peptide bond inversion appears to involve a progressive conformational change of the full loop, starting at one side, and progressing to the other. We used the SARS-CoV apo X-ray structure to develop a model of the NL63-PLP2 catalytic site. Superimposition of the PLP2 model on the PLpro X-ray structure identifies binding site residues in PLP2 that contribute to the distinct substrate cleavage site specificities between the two proteases. The topological and electrostatic differences between the two protease binding sites also help explain the selectivity of non-covalent PLpro inhibitors.

  12. Model of the whole rat AT1 receptor and the ligand-binding site.

    PubMed

    Baleanu-Gogonea, Camelia; Karnik, Sadashiva

    2006-02-01

    We present a three-dimensional model of the rat type 1 receptor (AT1) for the hormone angiotensin II (Ang II). Ang II and the AT1 receptor play a critical role in the cell-signaling process responsible for the actions of renin-angiotensin system in the regulation of blood pressure, water-electrolyte homeostasis and cell growth. Development of improved therapeutics would be significantly enhanced with the availability of a 3D-structure model for the AT1 receptor and of the binding site for agonists and antagonists. This model was constructed using a combination of computation and homology-modeling techniques starting with the experimentally determined three-dimensional structure of bovine rhodopsin (PDB#1F88) as a template. All 359 residues and two disulfide bonds in the rat AT1 receptor have been accounted for in this model. Ramachandran-map analysis and a 1 nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of the solvated receptor with and without the bound ligand, Ang II, lend credence to the validity of the model. Docking calculations were performed with the agonist, Ang II and the antihypertensive antagonist, losartan. [Figure: see text].

  13. Distinct OGT-Binding Sites Promote HCF-1 Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Tanja; Waridel, Patrice; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Zoete, Vincent; Herr, Winship

    2015-01-01

    Human HCF-1 (also referred to as HCFC-1) is a transcriptional co-regulator that undergoes a complex maturation process involving extensive O-GlcNAcylation and site-specific proteolysis. HCF-1 proteolysis results in two active, noncovalently associated HCF-1N and HCF-1C subunits that regulate distinct phases of the cell-division cycle. HCF-1 O-GlcNAcylation and site-specific proteolysis are both catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), which thus displays an unusual dual enzymatic activity. OGT cleaves HCF-1 at six highly conserved 26 amino acid repeat sequences called HCF-1PRO repeats. Here we characterize the substrate requirements for OGT cleavage of HCF-1. We show that the HCF-1PRO-repeat cleavage signal possesses particular OGT-binding properties. The glutamate residue at the cleavage site that is intimately involved in the cleavage reaction specifically inhibits association with OGT and its bound cofactor UDP-GlcNAc. Further, we identify a novel OGT-binding sequence nearby the first HCF-1PRO-repeat cleavage signal that enhances cleavage. These results demonstrate that distinct OGT-binding sites in HCF-1 promote proteolysis, and provide novel insights into the mechanism of this unusual protease activity. PMID:26305326

  14. The most effective influence of 17-(3-ethoxypropyl) substituent on the binding affinity and the agonistic activity in KNT-127 derivatives, δ opioid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Toru; Ida, Yoshihiro; Iihara, Yusuke; Nakajima, Ryo; Hirayama, Shigeto; Iwai, Takashi; Fujii, Hideaki; Nagase, Hiroshi

    2013-12-15

    We investigated the structure-activity relationship of KNT-127 (opioid δ agonist) derivatives with various 17-substituents which are different in length and size. The 17-substituent in KNT-127 derivatives exerted a great influence on the affinity and agonistic activity for the δ receptor. While the compounds with electron-donating 17-substituents showed higher affinities for the δ receptor than those with electron-withdrawing groups, KNT-127 derivatives with 17-fluoroalkyl groups (the high electron-withdrawing groups) showed high selectivities for the δ receptor among evaluated compounds. In addition, the basicity of nitrogen as well as the structure of the 17-N substituent such as the length and configuration at an asymmetric carbon atom contributed to agonist properties for the δ receptor. Thus, the analog with a 17-(3-ethoxypropyl) group showed the best selectively and potent agonistic activity for the δ receptor among KNT-127 derivatives. These findings should be useful for designing novel δ selective agonists.

  15. Positive cooperative regulation of double binding sites for human acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-10-25

    Acetylcholinesterase is a potent enzyme that regulates neurotransmission by rapidly hydrolyzing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in synapses of the nervous system. As drug target of anti-AD, it has catalytic and peripheral anionic sites. However, the regulation relation between these two sites is unclear. Therefore, we constructed dynamics fluctuation network based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the regulation mechanism. The results suggest that the correlation network in double-site system (hAChE/TZ5) is distinctly different from that in the free state and single-site systems (hAChE/huprine and hAChE/1YL). The community network analysis indicates that the information freely transfers from the peripheral anionic site to the catalytic active site in hAChE/TZ5. Furthermore, the binding free energy between the inhibitor and hAChE for hAChE/TZ5 is significantly lower than of either hAChE/huprine or hAChE/1YL. Thus, a hypothesis of 'positive cooperative regulation' is proposed for the regulation of double binding sites and further confirmed by the weakening and mutation community analyses. Finally, one possible cooperative regulation pathway of W86-TZ5-W286 was identified based on the shortest path algorithm and was confirmed by the network perturbation analysis. Interestingly, the regulation pathway for single-site systems is significantly different from that of dual-site system. The process targeting on the shortest pathway can better regulate the hydrolyzing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and significantly inhibit the aggregation of Aβ amyloid.

  16. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L.

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  17. Discovery of the ammonium substrate site on glutamine synthetase, a third cation binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, S. H.; Kuo, I.; Eisenberg, D.

    1995-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to yield glutamine, ADP, and inorganic phosphate in the presence of divalent cations. Bacterial GS is an enzyme of 12 identical subunits, arranged in two rings of 6, with the active site between each pair of subunits in a ring. In earlier work, we have reported the locations within the funnel-shaped active site of the substrates glutamate and ATP and of the two divalent cations, but the site for ammonia (or ammonium) has remained elusive. Here we report the discovery by X-ray crystallography of a binding site on GS for monovalent cations, Tl+ and Cs+, which is probably the binding site for the substrate ammonium ion. Fourier difference maps show the following. (1) Tl+ and Cs+ bind at essentially the same site, with ligands being Glu 212, Tyr 179, Asp 50', Ser 53' of the adjacent subunit, and the substrate glutamate. From its position adjacent to the substrate glutamate and the cofactor ADP, we propose that this monovalent cation site is the substrate ammonium ion binding site. This proposal is supported by enzyme kinetics. Our kinetic measurements show that Tl+, Cs+, and NH4+ are competitive inhibitors to NH2OH in the gamma-glutamyl transfer reaction. (2) GS is a trimetallic enzyme containing two divalent cation sites (n1, n2) and one monovalent cation site per subunit. These three closely spaced ions are all at the active site: the distance between n1 and n2 is 6 A, between n1 and Tl+ is 4 A, and between n2 and Tl+ is 7 A. Glu 212 and the substrate glutamate are bridging ligands for the n1 ion and Tl+. (3) The presence of a monovalent cation in this site may enhance the structural stability of GS, because of its effect of balancing the negative charges of the substrate glutamate and its ligands and because of strengthening the "side-to-side" intersubunit interaction through the cation-protein bonding. (4) The presence of the cofactor ADP increases the Tl+ binding to GS

  18. Agonist-induced changes in the phosphorylation of the myosin- binding subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase and CPI17, two regulatory factors of myosin light chain phosphatase, in smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Niiro, Naohisa; Koga, Yasuhiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    The inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) enhances smooth muscle contraction at a constant [Ca2+]. There are two components, myosin-binding subunit of MLCP (MBS) and CPI17, thought to be responsible for the inhibition of MLCP by external stimuli. The phosphorylation of MBS at Thr-641 and of CPI17 at Thr-38 inhibits the MLCP activity in vitro. Here we determined the changes in the phosphorylation of MBS and CPI17 after agonist stimulation in intact as well as permeabilized smooth muscle strips using phosphorylation-site-specific antibodies as probes. The CPI17 phosphorylation transiently increased after agonist stimulation in both alpha-toxin skinned and intact fibres. The time course of the increase in CPI17 phosphorylation after stimulation correlated with the increase in myosin regulatory light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. The increase in CPI17 phosphorylation was significantly diminished by Y27632, a Rho kinase inhibitor, and GF109203x, a protein kinase C inhibitor, suggesting that both the protein kinase C and Rho kinase pathways influence the change in CPI17 phosphorylation. On the other hand, a significant level of MBS phosphorylation at Thr-641, an inhibitory site, was observed in the resting state for both skinned and intact fibres and the agonist stimulation did not significantly alter the MBS phosphorylation level at Thr-641. While the removal of the agonist markedly decreased MLC phosphorylation and induced relaxation, the phosphorylation of MBS was unchanged, while CPI17 phosphorylation markedly diminished. These results strongly suggest that the phosphorylation of CPI17 plays a more significant role in the agonist-induced increase in myosin phosphorylation and contraction of smooth muscle than MBS phosphorylation in the Ca2+-independent activation mechanism of smooth muscle contraction. PMID:12296769

  19. Contractile 5-HT1 receptors in human isolated pial arterioles: correlation with 5-HT1D binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, E.; Bouchard, D.

    1991-01-01

    1. The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor responsible for inducing vasoconstriction in human isolated pial arterioles has been pharmacologically characterized. 2. Of several 5-HT agonists tested, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) was the most potent and the rank order of agonist potency can be summarized as: 5-CT greater than 5-HT greater than RU 24969 = alpha-methyl-5-HT = methysergide much greater than MDL 72832 = 2-methyl-5-HT much greater than 2-dipropylamino-8-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-naphthalene (8-OH-DPAT). With few exceptions, the maximal contractile responses of these agonists were comparable to that induced by 5-HT. 3. A correlation analysis performed between the agonists vascular potency (pD2 values) and their affinities (pKD values) published at various subtypes of 5-HT binding sites showed a positive significant correlation with rat cortical 5-HT1B (r = 0.86; P less than 0.01) and human caudate 5-HT1D (r = 0.98; P less than 0.005) subtypes. 4. Selective antagonists at 5-HT2 (ketanserin, mianserin, MDL 11939) and 5-HT3 (MDL 72222) sites were totally devoid of inhibitory activity on the 5-HT-induced contraction, an observation which agreed with the agonist data and further excluded activation of these receptors. In contrast, the 5-HT1-like/5-HT2 antagonist methiothepin and the non-selective 5-HT1D compound metergoline inhibited with high affinity the contraction induced by 5-HT with respective pA2 values of 8.55 +/- 0.16 and 6.88 +/- 0.05. This contractile response was, however, insensitive to 5-HT1B (propranolol) and 5-HT1C (mesulergine, mianserin) antagonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2043924

  20. Visualization of specific binding sites of benzodiazepine in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Shinotoh, H.; Yamasaki, T.; Inoue, O.; Itoh, T.; Suzuki, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Tateno, Y.; Ikehira, H.

    1986-10-01

    Using 11C-labeled Ro15-1788 and positron emission tomography, studies of benzodiazepine binding sites in the human brain were performed on four normal volunteers. Rapid and high accumulation of 11C activity was observed in the brain after i.v. injection of (11C)Ro15-1788, the maximum of which was within 12 min. Initial distribution of 11C activity in the brain was similar to the distribution of the normal cerebral blood flow. Ten minutes after injection, however, a high uptake of 11C activity was observed in the cerebral cortex and moderate uptake was seen in the cerebellar cortex, the basal ganglia, and the thalamus. The accumulation of 11C activity was low in the brain stem. This distribution of 11C activity was approximately parallel to the known distribution of benzodiazepine receptors. Saturation experiments were performed on four volunteers with oral administration of 0.3-1.8 mg/kg of cold Ro15-1788 prior to injection. Initial distribution of 11C activity following injection peaked within 2 min and then the accumulation of 11C activity decreased rapidly and remarkably throughout the brain. The results indicated that (11C) Ro15-1788 associates and dissociates to specific and nonspecific binding sites rapidly and has a high ratio of specific receptor binding to nonspecific binding in vivo. Carbon-11 Ro15-1788 is a suitable radioligand for the study of benzodiazepine receptors in vivo in humans.

  1. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  2. A Conserved Steroid Binding Site in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Ling; Mills, Denise A.; Buhrow, Leann; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2010-09-02

    Micromolar concentrations of the bile salt deoxycholate are shown to rescue the activity of an inactive mutant, E101A, in the K proton pathway of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase. A crystal structure of the wild-type enzyme reveals, as predicted, deoxycholate bound with its carboxyl group at the entrance of the K path. Since cholate is a known potent inhibitor of bovine oxidase and is seen in a similar position in the bovine structure, the crystallographically defined, conserved steroid binding site could reveal a regulatory site for steroids or structurally related molecules that act on the essential K proton path.

  3. Minimal Zn2+ Binding Site of Amyloid-β

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Kulikova, Alexandra A.; Golovin, Andrey V.; Tkachev, Yaroslav V.; Archakov, Alexander I.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc-induced aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is a hallmark molecular feature of Alzheimer's disease. Here we provide direct thermodynamic evidence that elucidates the role of the Aβ region 6–14 as the minimal Zn2+ binding site wherein the ion is coordinated by His6, Glu11, His13, and His14. With the help of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, the region 11–14 was determined as the primary zinc recognition site and considered an important drug-target candidate to prevent Zn2+-induced aggregation of Aβ. PMID:21081056

  4. Minimal Zn(2+) binding site of amyloid-β.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Kulikova, Alexandra A; Golovin, Andrey V; Tkachev, Yaroslav V; Archakov, Alexander I; Kozin, Sergey A; Makarov, Alexander A

    2010-11-17

    Zinc-induced aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is a hallmark molecular feature of Alzheimer's disease. Here we provide direct thermodynamic evidence that elucidates the role of the Aβ region 6-14 as the minimal Zn(2+) binding site wherein the ion is coordinated by His(6), Glu(11), His(13), and His(14). With the help of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, the region 11-14 was determined as the primary zinc recognition site and considered an important drug-target candidate to prevent Zn(2+)-induced aggregation of Aβ.

  5. Analysis of zinc binding sites in protein crystal structures.

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, I. L.; Nadassy, K.; Wodak, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    The geometrical properties of zinc binding sites in a dataset of high quality protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank have been examined to identify important differences between zinc sites that are directly involved in catalysis and those that play a structural role. Coordination angles in the zinc primary coordination sphere are compared with ideal values for each coordination geometry, and zinc coordination distances are compared with those in small zinc complexes from the Cambridge Structural Database as a guide of expected trends. We find that distances and angles in the primary coordination sphere are in general close to the expected (or ideal) values. Deviations occur primarily for oxygen coordinating atoms and are found to be mainly due to H-bonding of the oxygen coordinating ligand to protein residues, bidentate binding arrangements, and multi-zinc sites. We find that H-bonding of oxygen containing residues (or water) to zinc bound histidines is almost universal in our dataset and defines the elec-His-Zn motif. Analysis of the stereochemistry shows that carboxyl elec-His-Zn motifs are geometrically rigid, while water elec-His-Zn motifs show the most geometrical variation. As catalytic motifs have a higher proportion of carboxyl elec atoms than structural motifs, they provide a more rigid framework for zinc binding. This is understood biologically, as a small distortion in the zinc position in an enzyme can have serious consequences on the enzymatic reaction. We also analyze the sequence pattern of the zinc ligands and residues that provide elecs, and identify conserved hydrophobic residues in the endopeptidases that also appear to contribute to stabilizing the catalytic zinc site. A zinc binding template in protein crystal structures is derived from these observations. PMID:10082367

  6. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  7. Two mechanisms of ion selectivity in protein binding sites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haibo; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Roux, Benoît

    2010-11-23

    A theoretical framework is presented to clarify the molecular determinants of ion selectivity in protein binding sites. The relative free energy of a bound ion is expressed in terms of the main coordinating ligands coupled to an effective potential of mean force representing the influence of the rest of the protein. The latter is separated into two main contributions. The first includes all the forces keeping the ion and the coordinating ligands confined to a microscopic subvolume but does not prevent the ligands from adapting to a smaller or larger ion. The second regroups all the remaining forces that control the precise geometry of the coordinating ligands best adapted to a given ion. The theoretical framework makes it possible to delineate two important limiting cases. In the limit where the geometric forces are dominant (rigid binding site), ion selectivity is controlled by the ion-ligand interactions within the matching cavity size according to the familiar "snug-fit" mechanism of host-guest chemistry. In the limit where the geometric forces are negligible, the ion and ligands behave as a "confined microdroplet" that is free to fluctuate and adapt to ions of different sizes. In this case, ion selectivity is set by the interplay between ion-ligand and ligand-ligand interactions and is controlled by the number and the chemical type of ion-coordinating ligands. The framework is illustrated by considering the ion-selective binding sites in the KcsA channel and the LeuT transporter.

  8. Binding sites of retinol and retinoic acid with serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Belatik, A; Hotchandani, S; Bariyanga, J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-02-01

    Retinoids are effectively transported in the bloodstream via serum albumins. We report the complexation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with retinol and retinoic acid at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration and various retinoid contents. FTIR, CD and fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to analyze retinoid binding site, the binding constant and the effects of complexation on BSA stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that retinoids bind BSA via hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions with overall binding constants of K(Ret)(-BSA) = 5.3 (±0.8) × 10(6) M(-1) and K(Retac-BSA) = 2.3 (±0.4) × 10(6) M(-1). The number of bound retinoid molecules (n) was 1.20 (±0.2) for retinol and 1.8 (±0.3) for retinoic acid. Molecular modeling showed the participation of several amino acids in retinoid-BSA complexes stabilized by H-bonding network. The retinoid binding altered BSA conformation with a major reduction of α-helix from 61% (free BSA) to 36% (retinol-BSA) and 26% (retinoic acid-BSA) with an increase in turn and random coil structures indicating a partial protein unfolding. The results indicate that serum albumins are capable of transporting retinoids in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Mechanistic Insight into NMDA Receptor Dysregulation by Rare Variants in the GluN2A and GluN2B Agonist Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Swanger, Sharon A; Chen, Wenjuan; Wells, Gordon; Burger, Pieter B; Tankovic, Anel; Bhattacharya, Subhrajit; Strong, Katie L; Hu, Chun; Kusumoto, Hirofumi; Zhang, Jing; Adams, David R; Millichap, John J; Petrovski, Slavé; Traynelis, Stephen F; Yuan, Hongjie

    2016-12-01

    Epilepsy and intellectual disability are associated with rare variants in the GluN2A and GluN2B (encoded by GRIN2A and GRIN2B) subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), a ligand-gated ion channel with essential roles in brain development and function. By assessing genetic variation across GluN2 domains, we determined that the agonist binding domain, transmembrane domain, and the linker regions between these domains were particularly intolerant to functional variation. Notably, the agonist binding domain of GluN2B exhibited significantly more variation intolerance than that of GluN2A. To understand the ramifications of missense variation in the agonist binding domain, we investigated the mechanisms by which 25 rare variants in the GluN2A and GluN2B agonist binding domains dysregulated NMDAR activity. When introduced into recombinant human NMDARs, these rare variants identified in individuals with neurologic disease had complex, and sometimes opposing, consequences on agonist binding, channel gating, receptor biogenesis, and forward trafficking. Our approach combined quantitative assessments of these effects to estimate the overall impact on synaptic and non-synaptic NMDAR function. Interestingly, similar neurologic diseases were associated with both gain- and loss-of-function variants in the same gene. Most rare variants in GluN2A were associated with epilepsy, whereas GluN2B variants were associated with intellectual disability with or without seizures. Finally, discerning the mechanisms underlying NMDAR dysregulation by these rare variants allowed investigations of pharmacologic strategies to correct NMDAR function.

  10. Direct GR Binding Sites Potentiate Clusters of TF Binding across the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Vockley, Christopher M; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; McDowell, Ian C; Majoros, William H; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E

    2016-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds the human genome at >10,000 sites but only regulates the expression of hundreds of genes. To determine the functional effect of each site, we measured the glucocorticoid (GC) responsive activity of nearly all GR binding sites (GBSs) captured using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in A549 cells. 13% of GBSs assayed had GC-induced activity. The responsive sites were defined by direct GR binding via a GC response element (GRE) and exclusively increased reporter-gene expression. Meanwhile, most GBSs lacked GC-induced reporter activity. The non-responsive sites had epigenetic features of steady-state enhancers and clustered around direct GBSs. Together, our data support a model in which clusters of GBSs observed with ChIP-seq reflect interactions between direct and tethered GBSs over tens of kilobases. We further show that those interactions can synergistically modulate the activity of direct GBSs and may therefore play a major role in driving gene activation in response to GCs.

  11. Desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) and [3H]dFBr-Labeled Binding Sites in a Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hamouda, Ayman K.; Wang, Ze-Jun; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Jain, Atul D.; Glennon, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) is a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of α4β2 and α2β2 nAChRs that, at concentrations >1 µM, also inhibits these receptors and α7 nAChRs. However, its interactions with muscle-type nAChRs have not been characterized, and the locations of its binding site(s) in any nAChR are not known. We report here that dFBr inhibits human muscle (αβεδ) and Torpedo (αβγδ) nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes with IC50 values of ∼1 μM. dFBr also inhibited the equilibrium binding of ion channel blockers to Torpedo nAChRs with higher affinity in the nAChR desensitized state ([3H]phencyclidine; IC50 = 4 μM) than in the resting state ([3H]tetracaine; IC50 = 60 μM), whereas it bound with only very low affinity to the ACh binding sites ([3H]ACh, IC50 = 1 mM). Upon irradiation at 312 nm, [3H]dFBr photoincorporated into amino acids within the Torpedo nAChR ion channel with the efficiency of photoincorporation enhanced in the presence of agonist and the agonist-enhanced photolabeling inhibitable by phencyclidine. In the presence of agonist, [3H]dFBr also photolabeled amino acids in the nAChR extracellular domain within binding pockets identified previously for the nonselective nAChR PAMs galantamine and physostigmine at the canonical α-γ interface containing the transmitter binding sites and at the noncanonical δ-β subunit interface. These results establish that dFBr inhibits muscle-type nAChR by binding in the ion channel and that [3H]dFBr is a photoaffinity probe with broad amino acid side chain reactivity. PMID:25870334

  12. Camptothecin-binding site in human serum albumin and protein transformations induced by drug binding.

    PubMed

    Fleury, F; Ianoul, A; Berjot, M; Feofanov, A; Alix, A J; Nabiev, I

    1997-07-14

    Circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectroscopy were employed in order to locate a camptothecin (CPT)-binding site within human serum albumin (HSA) and to identify protein structural transformations induced by CPT binding. A competitive binding of CPT and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (a ligand occupying IIIA structural sub-domain of the protein) to HSA does not show any competition and demonstrates that the ligands are located in the different binding sites, whereas a HSA-bound CPT may be replaced by warfarin, occupying IIA structural sub-domain of the protein. Raman and CD spectra of HSA and HSA/CPT complexes show that the CPT-binding does not induce changes of the global protein secondary structure. On the other hand, Raman spectra reveal pronounced CPT-induced local structural modifications of the HSA molecule, involving changes in configuration of the two disulfide bonds and transfer of a single Trp-residue to hydrophilic environment. These data suggest that CPT is bound in the region of interdomain connections within the IIA structural domain of HSA and it induces relative movement of the protein structural domains.

  13. Molecular modelling and competition binding study of Br-noscapine and colchicine provide insight into noscapinoid-tubulin binding site.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep K; Santoshi, Seneha; Rai, Ankit; Joshi, Harish C

    2011-06-01

    We have previously discovered the tubulin-binding anti-cancer properties of noscapine and its derivatives (noscapinoids). Here, we present three lines of evidence that noscapinoids bind at or near the well studied colchicine binding site of tubulin: (1) in silico molecular docking studies of Br-noscapine and noscapine yield highest docking score with the well characterised colchicine-binding site from the co-crystal structure; (2) the molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA) scoring results ΔΔG(bind-cald) for both noscapine and Br-noscapine (3.915 and 3.025 kcal/mol) are in reasonably good agreement with our experimentally determined binding affinity (ΔΔG(bind-Expt) of 3.570 and 2.988 kcal/mol, derived from K(d) values); and (3) Br-noscapine competes with colchicine binding to tubulin. The simplest interpretation of these collective data is that Br-noscapine binds tubulin at a site overlapping with, or very close to colchicine-binding site of tubulin. Although we cannot rule out a formal possibility that Br-noscapine might bind to a site distinct and distant from the colchicine-binding site that might negatively influence the colchicine binding to tubulin.

  14. Protein-Binding RNA Aptamers Affect Molecular Interactions Distantly from Their Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Daniel M.; Thuesen, Cathrine K.; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A.; Behrens, Manja A.; Dam, Karen; Sørensen, Hans P.; Pedersen, Jan S.; Ploug, Michael; Jensen, Jan K.; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site. PMID:25793507

  15. Defining the binding site of homotetrameric R67 dihydrofolate reductase and correlating binding enthalpy with catalysis.

    PubMed

    Strader, Michael Brad; Chopra, Shaileja; Jackson, Michael; Smiley, R Derike; Stinnett, Lori; Wu, Jun; Howell, Elizabeth E

    2004-06-15

    R67 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a novel protein that possesses 222 symmetry. A single active site pore traverses the length of the homotetramer. Although the 222 symmetry implies that four symmetry-related binding sites should exist for each substrate as well as each cofactor, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies indicate only two molecules bind. Three possible combinations include two dihydrofolate molecules, two NADPH molecules, or one substrate with one cofactor. The latter is the productive ternary complex. To evaluate the roles of A36, Y46, T51, G64, and V66 residues in binding and catalysis, a site-directed mutagenesis approach was employed. One mutation per gene produces four mutations per active site pore, which often result in large cumulative effects. Conservative mutations at these positions either eliminate the ability of the gene to confer trimethoprim resistance or have no effect on catalysis. This result, in conjunction with previous mutagenesis studies on K32, K33, S65, Q67, I68, and Y69 [Strader, M. B., et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 11344-11352; Hicks, S. N., et al. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 10569-10578; Park, H., et al. (1997) Protein Eng. 10, 1415-1424], allows mapping of the active site surface. Residues for which conservative mutations have large effects on binding and catalysis include K32, Q67, I68, and Y69. These residues form a stripe that establishes the ligand binding surface. Residues that accommodate conservative mutations that do not greatly affect catalysis include K33, Y46, T51, S65, and V66. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies were also conducted on many of the mutants described above to determine the enthalpy of folate binding to the R67 DHFR.NADPH complex. A linear correlation between this DeltaH value and log k(cat)/K(m) is observed. Since structural tightness appears to be correlated with the exothermicity of the binding interaction, this leads to the hypothesis that enthalpy-driven formation of the ternary

  16. Kinetics of binding of dihydropyridine calcium channel ligands to skeletal muscle membranes: Evidence for low-affinity sites and for the involvement of G proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.M.J.; Bladen, C. )

    1991-06-11

    Detailed kinetic studies of the binding of the calcium channel antagonist (+)-({sup 3}H)PN200-110 to membrane preparations form rabbit skeletal muscle have demonstrated that, in addition to the high-affinity sites that are readily measured in equilibrium and kinetic experiments, there are also dihydropyridine binding sites with much lower affinities. These sites were detected by the ability of micromolar concentrations of several dihydropyridines to accelerate the rate of dissociation of (+)-({sup 3}H)PN200-110 from its high-affinity sites. The observed increase in rate was dependent on the concentration of competing ligand, and half-maximal effects occurred at approximately 10 {mu}M for the agonist ({plus minus})-Bay K8644 and for the antagonists nifedipine, ({plus minus})-nitrendipine, and (+)-PN200-110. The low-affinity sites appear to be stereospecific since ({minus})-PN200-110 (1-200 {mu}M) did not affect the dissociation rate. The possible involvement of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in dihydropyridine binding has been investigated by studying the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP{gamma}S) and guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP{beta}S) on binding parameters. GTP{gamma}S did increase the ability of ({plus minus})-({sup 3}H)PN200-110. These results suggest that skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors have low-affinity binding sites that may be involved in the regulation of calcium channel function and that activation of a guanine nucleotide binding protein may modulate the binding of agonists but not of antagonists to these sites.

  17. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    PubMed

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides.

  18. Photoaffinity labeling of uncoupler binding sites on mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Kurup, C K; Sanadi, D R

    1977-02-01

    3H 2-azido-4-nitrophenol, a photoactive uncoupler, has been synthesized, and its uncoupling action on oxidative phosphorylation and its binding to the mitochondrial membrane have been studied. The uncoupler bound covalently to the mitochondrial membrane on photoirradiation was 3-4 times that bound reversibly in the absence of light. When irradiation was carried out in the presence of serum albumin, covalent binding was significantly depressed. The pattern of loss of ATP-Pi exchange activity with increasing amounts of the uncoupler suggests that serum albumin prevents the binding of the uncoupler to the functional sites as well. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of photoaffinity labeled submitochondrial particles in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate revealed that a 9000 dalton peptide bound high levels of uncoupler. Other proteins in the molecular weight range of 20,000-40,000 and 55,000 were also labeled. Photolysis in the presence of serum albumin or ATP decreased the covalent binding of the uncoupler to all the proteins, but particularly to the 20,000 dalton component. Soluble ATPase and the mitochondrial proteolipid purified from labeled mitochondria showed the presence of label.

  19. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  20. A Unitary Anesthetic-Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Vedula, L.; Brannigan, G; Economou, N; Xi, J; Hall, M; Liu, R; Rossi, M; Dailey, W; Grasty, K; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABAA receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  1. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.

    2009-10-21

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  2. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. ); Nicoletti, G. ); Holan, G. )

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  3. Coenzyme A Binding to the Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb Increases Conformational Sampling of Antibiotic Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohu; Norris, Adrianne; Baudry, Jerome Y; Serpersu, Engin H

    2011-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to describe the dynamic properties of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb (AAC) in its apo and coenzyme A (CoASH) bound forms. The {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H HSQC spectra indicate a partial structural change and coupling of the CoASH binding site with another region in the protein upon the CoASH titration into the apo enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate a significant structural and dynamic variation of the long loop in the antibiotic binding domain in the form of a relatively slow (250 ns), concerted opening motion in the CoASH enzyme complex and that binding of the CoASH increases the structural flexibility of the loop, leading to an interchange between several similar equally populated conformations.

  4. Insights into the Binding of Phenyltiocarbamide (PTC) Agonist to Its Target Human TAS2R38 Bitter Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Giorgetti, Alejandro; Lanzara, Carmela; Gasparini, Paolo; Carloni, Paolo; Born, Stephan; Brockhoff, Anne; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Humans' bitter taste perception is mediated by the hTAS2R subfamily of the G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs). Structural information on these receptors is currently limited. Here we identify residues involved in the binding of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and in receptor activation in one of the most widely studied hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R38) by means of structural bioinformatics and molecular docking. The predictions are validated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments that involve specific residues located in the putative binding site and trans-membrane (TM) helices 6 and 7 putatively involved in receptor activation. Based on our measurements, we suggest that (i) residue N103 participates actively in PTC binding, in line with previous computational studies. (ii) W99, M100 and S259 contribute to define the size and shape of the binding cavity. (iii) W99 and M100, along with F255 and V296, play a key role for receptor activation, providing insights on bitter taste receptor activation not emerging from the previously reported computational models. PMID:20811630

  5. Insights into the binding of Phenyltiocarbamide (PTC) agonist to its target human TAS2R38 bitter receptor.

    PubMed

    Biarnés, Xevi; Marchiori, Alessandro; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Lanzara, Carmela; Gasparini, Paolo; Carloni, Paolo; Born, Stephan; Brockhoff, Anne; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-08-25

    Humans' bitter taste perception is mediated by the hTAS2R subfamily of the G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs). Structural information on these receptors is currently limited. Here we identify residues involved in the binding of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and in receptor activation in one of the most widely studied hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R38) by means of structural bioinformatics and molecular docking. The predictions are validated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments that involve specific residues located in the putative binding site and trans-membrane (TM) helices 6 and 7 putatively involved in receptor activation. Based on our measurements, we suggest that (i) residue N103 participates actively in PTC binding, in line with previous computational studies. (ii) W99, M100 and S259 contribute to define the size and shape of the binding cavity. (iii) W99 and M100, along with F255 and V296, play a key role for receptor activation, providing insights on bitter taste receptor activation not emerging from the previously reported computational models.

  6. Suppression of spreading depolarization and stabilization of dendritic spines by GLYX-13, an NMDA receptor glycine-site functional partial agonist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Shuttleworth, C William; Moskal, Joseph R; Stanton, Patric K

    2015-11-01

    Cortical spreading depolarization (SD) is a slow self-propagating wave of mass cellular depolarization in brain tissue, thought to be the underlying cause of migraine scintillating scotoma and aura, and associated with stroke, traumatic brain injury, and termination of status epilepticus. The N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor (NMDAR), which gates influx of calcium and is an important trigger of long-term synaptic plasticity, is also a contributor to the initiation and propagation of SD. The current study tested the potential of pharmacological modulation of NMDAR activity through the obligatory co-agonist binding site, to suppress the initiation of SD, and modulate the effects of SD on dendritic spine morphology, in in vitro hippocampal slices. A novel NMDAR functional glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, sometimes completely prevented the induction of SD and consistently slowed its rate of propagation. The passage of SD through the hippocampal CA1 region produced a rapid retraction of dendritic spines which reversed after neuronal depolarization had recovered. GLYX-13 improved the rate and extent of return of dendritic spines to their original sizes and locations following SD, suggesting that NMDAR modulators can protect synaptic connections in the brain from structural alterations elicited by SD. These data indicate that NMDAR modulation to renormalize activity may be an effective new treatment strategy for suppression or amelioration of the contribution of SD to short and long-term symptoms of migraine attacks, as well as the effects of SD on tissue damaged by stroke or traumatic brain injury.

  7. Conformational flexibility of the agonist binding jaw of the human P2X3 receptor is a prerequisite for channel opening

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, M; Hausmann, R; Dopychai, A; Grohmann, M; Franke, H; Nieber, K; Schmalzing, G; Illes, P; Riedel, T

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is assumed that ATP induces closure of the binding jaw of ligand-gated P2X receptors, which eventually results in the opening of the membrane channel and the flux of cations. Immobilization by cysteine mutagenesis of the binding jaw inhibited ATP-induced current responses, but did not allow discrimination between disturbances of binding, gating, subunit assembly or trafficking to the plasma membrane. Experimental Approach A molecular model of the pain-relevant human (h)P2X3 receptor was used to identify amino acid pairs, which were located at the lips of the binding jaw and did not participate in agonist binding but strongly approached each other even in the absence of ATP. Key Results A series of cysteine double mutant hP2X3 receptors, expressed in HEK293 cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes, exhibited depressed current responses to α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP) due to the formation of spontaneous inter-subunit disulfide bonds. Reducing these bonds with dithiothreitol reversed the blockade of the α,β-meATP transmembrane current. Amino-reactive fluorescence labelling of the His-tagged hP2X3 receptor and its mutants expressed in HEK293 or X. laevis oocytes demonstrated the formation of inter-subunit cross links in cysteine double mutants and, in addition, confirmed their correct trimeric assembly and cell surface expression. Conclusions and Implications In conclusion, spontaneous tightening of the binding jaw of the hP2X3 receptor by inter-subunit cross-linking of cysteine residues substituted at positions not directly involved in agonist binding inhibited agonist-evoked currents without interfering with binding, subunit assembly or trafficking. PMID:24989924

  8. Lipid binding to the carotenoid binding site in photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sasmit S; Tang, Kai; Kálmán, László

    2011-10-12

    Lipid binding to the carotenoid binding site near the inactive bacteriochlorophyll monomer was probed in the reaction centers of carotenoid-less mutant, R-26 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Recently, a marked light-induced change of the local dielectric constant in the vicinity of the inactive bacteriochlorophyll monomer was reported in wild type that was attributed to structural changes that ultimately lengthened the lifetime of the charge-separated state by 3 orders of magnitude (Deshmukh, S. S.; Williams, J. C.; Allen, J. P.; Kalman, L. Biochemistry 2011, 50, 340). Here in the R-26 reaction centers, the combination of light-induced structural changes and lipid binding resulted in a 5 orders of magnitude increase in the lifetime of the charge-separated state involving the oxidized dimer and the reduced primary quinone in proteoliposomes. Only saturated phospholipids with fatty acid chains of 12 and 14 carbon atoms long were bound successfully at 8 °C by cooling the reaction center protein slowly from room temperature. In addition to reporting a dramatic increase of the lifetime of the charge-separated state at physiologically relevant temperatures, this study reveals a novel lipid binding site in photosynthetic reaction center. These results shed light on a new potential application of the reaction center in energy storage as a light-driven biocapacitor since the charges separated by ∼30 Å in a low-dielectric medium can be prevented from recombination for hours.

  9. A mutational analysis of the acetylcholine receptor channel transmitter binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Akk, G; Zhou, M; Auerbach, A

    1999-01-01

    Mutagenesis and single-channel kinetic analysis were used to investigate the roles of four acetylcholine receptor channel (AChR) residues that are candidates for interacting directly with the agonist. The EC50 of the ACh dose-response curve was increased following alpha-subunit mutations Y93F and Y198F and epsilon-subunit mutations D175N and E184Q. Single-channel kinetic modeling indicates that the increase was caused mainly by a reduced gating equilibrium constant (Theta) in alphaY198F and epsilonD175N, by an increase in the equilibrium dissociation constant for ACh (KD) and a reduction in Theta in alphaY93F, and only by a reduction in KD in epsilonE184Q. This mutation altered the affinity of only one of the two binding sites and was the only mutation that reduced competition by extracellular K+. Additional mutations of epsilonE184 showed that K+ competition was unaltered in epsilonE184D and was virtually eliminated in epsilonE184K, but that neither of these mutations altered the intrinsic affinity for ACh. Thus there is an apparent electrostatic interaction between the epsilonE184 side chain and K+ ( approximately 1.7kBT), but not ACh+. The results are discussed in terms of multisite and induced-fit models of ligand binding to the AChR. PMID:9876135

  10. Non-charged amino acids from three different domains contribute to link agonist binding to channel gating in alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Marcos; Mulet, José; Sala, Salvador; Sala, Francisco; Criado, Manuel

    2007-10-01

    Binding of agonists to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors results in channel opening. Previously, we have shown that several charged residues at three different domains of the alpha7 nicotinic receptor are involved in coupling binding and gating, probably through a network of electrostatic interactions. This network, however, could also be integrated by other residues. To test this hypothesis, non-charged amino acids were mutated and expression levels and electrophysiological responses of mutant receptors were determined. Mutants at positions Asn47 and Gln48 (loop 2), Ile130, Trp134, and Gln140 (loop 7), and Thr264 (M2-M3 linker) showed poor or null functional responses, despite significant membrane expression. By contrast, mutants F137A and S265A exhibited a gain of function effect. In all cases, changes in dose-response relationships were small, EC(50) values being between threefold smaller and fivefold larger, arguing against large modifications of agonist binding. Peak currents decayed at the same rate in all receptors except two, excluding large effects on desensitization. Thus, the observed changes could be mostly caused by alterations of the gating characteristics. Moreover, analysis of double mutants showed an interconnection between some residues in these domains, especially Gln48 with Ile130, suggesting a potential coupling between agonist binding and channel gating through these amino acids.

  11. Conformational changes in the metal-binding sites of cardiac troponin C induced by calcium binding

    SciTech Connect

    Krudy, G.A.; Brito, R.M.M.; Putkey, J.A.; Rosevear, P.R. )

    1992-02-18

    Isotope labeling of recombinant normal cardiac troponin C (cTnC3) with {sup 15}N-enriched amino acids and multidimensional NMR were used to assign the downfield-shifted amide protons of Gly residues at position 6 in Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops II, III, and IV, as well a tightly hydrogen-bonded amides within the short antiparallel {beta}-sheets between pairs of Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops. The amide protons of Gly70, Gly110, and Gly146 were found to be shifted significantly downfield from the remaining amide proton resonances in Ca{sup 2+}-saturated cTnC3. No downfield-shifted Gly resonance was observed from the naturally inactive site I. Comparison of downfield-shifted amide protons in the Ca{sup 2+}-saturated forms of cTnC3 and CBM-IIA, a mutant having Asp65 replaced by Ala, demonstrated the Gly70 is hydrogen bonded to the carboxylate side chain of Asp65. Thus, the hydrogen bond between Gly and Asp in positions 6 and 1, respectively, of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding loop appears crucial for maintaining the integrity of the helix-loop-helix Ca{sup 2+}-binding sites. The amide protons of Ile112 and Ile148 in the C-terminal domain and Ile36 in the N-terminal domain {beta}-sheets exhibit chemical shifts consistent with hydrogen-bond formation between the pair of Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops in each domain of Ca{sup 2+}-saturated cTnC3. In the absence of Ca{sup 2+}, no strong hydrogen bonds were detected between the {beta}-strands in the N-terminal domain of cTnC3. Thus, Ca{sup 2+} binding at site II results in a tightening of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding loop and formation of one strong hydrogen bond between {beta}-strands in the N-terminal domain. These changes may initiate movement of helices in the N-terminal domain responsible for the interaction of TnC with troponin I.

  12. Principal component analysis of binding energies for single-point mutants of hT2R16 bound to an agonist correlate with experimental mutant cell response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Derek E; Willick, Darryl L; Ruckel, Joseph B; Floriano, Wely B

    2015-01-01

    Directed evolution is a technique that enables the identification of mutants of a particular protein that carry a desired property by successive rounds of random mutagenesis, screening, and selection. This technique has many applications, including the development of G protein-coupled receptor-based biosensors and designer drugs for personalized medicine. Although effective, directed evolution is not without challenges and can greatly benefit from the development of computational techniques to predict the functional outcome of single-point amino acid substitutions. In this article, we describe a molecular dynamics-based approach to predict the effects of single amino acid substitutions on agonist binding (salicin) to a human bitter taste receptor (hT2R16). An experimentally determined functional map of single-point amino acid substitutions was used to validate the whole-protein molecular dynamics-based predictive functions. Molecular docking was used to construct a wild-type agonist-receptor complex, providing a starting structure for single-point substitution simulations. The effects of each single amino acid substitution in the functional response of the receptor to its agonist were estimated using three binding energy schemes with increasing inclusion of solvation effects. We show that molecular docking combined with molecular mechanics simulations of single-point mutants of the agonist-receptor complex accurately predicts the functional outcome of single amino acid substitutions in a human bitter taste receptor.

  13. Mixed kappa agonists and mu agonists/antagonists as potential pharmacotherapeutics for cocaine abuse: synthesis and opioid receptor binding affinity of N-substituted derivatives of morphinan.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, J L; Gu, X H; van Vliet, L A; DeNunzio, N J; Rusovici, D E; Cohen, D J; Negus, S S; Mello, N K; Bidlack, J M

    2001-10-22

    A series of new N-substituted derivatives of morphinan was synthesized and their binding affinity for the three opioid receptors (mu, delta, and kappa) was determined. A paradoxical effect of N-propargyl (MCL-117) and N-(3-iodoprop-(2E)-enyl) (MCL-118) substituents on the binding affinities for the mu and kappa opioid receptors was observed. All of these novel derivatives showed a preference for the mu and kappa versus delta binding.

  14. Viral receptor-binding site antibodies with diverse germline origins

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Aaron G.; Therkelsen, Matthew D.; Stewart, Shaun; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Haynes, Barton F.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines for rapidly evolving pathogens will confer lasting immunity if they elicit antibodies recognizing conserved epitopes, such as a receptor-binding site (RBS). From characteristics of an influenza-virus RBS-directed antibody, we devised a signature motif to search for similar antibodies. We identified, from three vaccinees, over 100 candidates encoded by eleven different VH genes. Crystal structures show that antibodies in this class engage the hemagglutinin RBS and mimic binding of the receptor, sialic acid, by supplying a critical dipeptide on their projecting, heavy-chain third complementarity determining region. They share contacts with conserved, receptor-binding residues but contact different residues on the RBS periphery, limiting the likelihood of viral escape when several such antibodies are present. These data show that related modes of RBS recognition can arise from different germline origins and mature through diverse affinity maturation pathways. Immunogens focused on an RBS-directed response will thus have a broad range of B-cell targets. PMID:25959776

  15. Altering the GTP binding site of the DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/TB-RBP, decreases RNA binding and may create a dominant negative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chennathukuzhi, V M; Kurihara, Y; Bray, J D; Yang, J; Hecht, N B

    2001-11-01

    The DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/Testis Brain RNA-binding protein (Translin/TB-RBP), contains a putative GTP binding site in its C-terminus which is highly conserved. To determine if guanine nucleotide binding to this site functionally alters nucleic acid binding, electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed with RNA and DNA binding probes. GTP, but not GDP, reduces RNA binding by approximately 50% and the poorly hydrolyzed GTP analog, GTPgammaS, reduces binding by >90% in gel shift and immunoprecipitation assays. No similar reduction of DNA binding is seen. When the putative GTP binding site of TB-RBP, amino acid sequence VTAGD, is altered to VTNSD by site directed mutagenesis, GTP will no longer bind to TB-RBP(GTP) and TB-RBP(GTP) no longer binds to RNA, although DNA binding is not affected. Yeast two-hybrid assays reveal that like wild-type TB-RBP, TB-RBP(GTP) will interact with itself, with wild-type TB-RBP and with Translin associated factor X (Trax). Transfection of TB-RBP(GTP) into NIH 3T3 cells leads to a marked increase in cell death suggesting a dominant negative function for TB-RBP(GTP) in cells. These data suggest TB-RBP is an RNA-binding protein whose activity is allosterically controlled by nucleotide binding.

  16. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  17. Examination of the thiamin diphosphate binding site in yeast transketolase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Meshalkina, L; Nilsson, U; Wikner, C; Kostikowa, T; Schneider, G

    1997-03-01

    The role of two conserved amino acid residues in the thiamin diphosphate binding site of yeast transketolase has been analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of E162, which is part of a cluster of glutamic acid residues at the subunit interface, by alanine or glutamine results in mutant enzymes with most catalytic properties similar to wild-type enzyme. The two mutant enzymes show, however, significant increases in the K0.5 values for thiamin diphosphate in the absence of substrate and in the lag of the reaction progress curves. This suggests that the interaction of E162 with residue E418, and possibly E167, from the second subunit is important for formation and stabilization of the transketolase dimer. Replacement of the conserved residue D382, which is buried upon binding of thiamin diphosphate, by asparagine and alanine, results in mutant enzymes severely impaired in thiamin diphosphate binding and catalytic efficiency. The 25-80-fold increase in K0.5 for thiamin diphosphate suggests that D382 is involved in cofactor binding, probably by electrostatic compensation of the positive charge of the thiazolium ring and stabilization of a flexible loop at the active site. The decrease in catalytic activities in the D382 mutants indicates that this residue might also be important in subsequent steps in catalysis.

  18. Conserved properties of individual Ca2+-binding sites in calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Halling, D. Brent; Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hall, Amelia W.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca2+-sensing protein that is highly conserved and ubiquitous in eukaryotes. In humans it is a locus of life-threatening cardiomyopathies. The primary function of CaM is to transduce Ca2+ concentration into cellular signals by binding to a wide range of target proteins in a Ca2+-dependent manner. We do not fully understand how CaM performs its role as a high-fidelity signal transducer for more than 300 target proteins, but diversity among its four Ca2+-binding sites, called EF-hands, may contribute to CaM’s functional versatility. We therefore looked at the conservation of CaM sequences over deep evolutionary time, focusing primarily on the four EF-hand motifs. Expanding on previous work, we found that CaM evolves slowly but that its evolutionary rate is substantially faster in fungi. We also found that the four EF-hands have distinguishing biophysical and structural properties that span eukaryotes. These results suggest that all eukaryotes require CaM to decode Ca2+ signals using four specialized EF-hands, each with specific, conserved traits. In addition, we provide an extensive map of sites associated with target proteins and with human disease and correlate these with evolutionary sequence diversity. Our comprehensive evolutionary analysis provides a basis for understanding the sequence space associated with CaM function and should help guide future work on the relationship between structure, function, and disease. PMID:26884197

  19. Imidazoline binding sites and receptors in cardiovascular tissue.

    PubMed

    Molderings, G J; Göthert, M

    1999-01-01

    1. Imidazoline binding sites and receptors and their endogenous ligands have been identified in cardiovascular tissue of various species including human beings. 2. I2- (but only exceptionally I1-)imidazoline binding sites have been shown to exist on cardiac myocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells; at present, their functional role is unknown. 3. The sympathetic nerves supplying the cardiovascular system are endowed with presynaptic inhibitory imidazoline receptors that may become of therapeutic relevance as targets of drugs. 4. ATP-sensitive K+ channels present in heart and blood vessels can be blocked by several imidazolines and guanidines; hence, those drugs can interfere with the cardioprotective effects resulting from K(ATP) channel activation by a decrease in the endogenous ligand ATP or by drugs. 5. Imidazoline derivatives exhibit antiarrhythmic properties that are due to a reduction of sympathetic tone by central and peripheral mechanisms and to blockade of postsynaptic alpha2-adrenoceptors in the heart and coronary arteries. 6. Agmatine and clonidine-displacing substance, which are endogenous ligands at imidazoline and alpha2-receptors, are present in the blood serum and appear to participate in vascular smooth muscle proliferation and blood pressure regulation.

  20. Atrial natriuretic factor binding sites in experimental congestive heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, C.; Thibault, G.; Wrobel-Konrad, E.; De Lean, A.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M. )

    1989-10-01

    A quantitative in vitro autoradiographic study was performed on the aorta, renal glomeruli, and adrenal cortex of cardiomyopathic hamsters in various stages of heart failure and correlated, in some instances, with in vivo autoradiography. The results indicate virtually no correlation between the degree of congestive heart failure and the density of 125I-labeled atrial natriuretic factor ((Ser99, Tyr126)ANF) binding sites (Bmax) in the tissues examined. Whereas the Bmax was increased in the thoracic aorta in moderate and severe heart failure, there were no significant changes in the zona glomerulosa. The renal glomeruli Bmax was lower in mild and moderate heart failure compared with control and severe heart failure. The proportion of ANF B- and C-receptors was also evaluated in sections of the aorta, adrenal, and kidney of control and cardiomyopathic hamsters with severe heart failure. (Arg102, Cys121)ANF (des-(Gln113, Ser114, Gly115, Leu116, Gly117) NH2) (C-ANF) at 10(-6) M displaced approximately 505 of (Ser99, Tyr126)125I-ANF bound in the aorta and renal glomeruli and approximately 20% in the adrenal zona glomerulosa in both series of animals. These results suggest that ANF may exert a buffering effect on the vasoconstriction of heart failure and to a certain extent may inhibit aldosterone secretion. The impairment of renal sodium excretion does not appear to be related to glomerular ANF binding sites at any stage of the disease.

  1. The first intron of the human growth hormone gene contains a binding site for glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Moore, D D; Marks, A R; Buckley, D I; Kapler, G; Payvar, F; Goodman, H M

    1985-02-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) protein stimulates transcription from a variety of cellular genes. We show here that GCR partially purified from rat liver binds specifically to a site within the first intron of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene, approximately 100 base pairs downstream from the start of hGH transcription. GCR binding is selectively inhibited by methylation of two short, symmetrically arranged clusters of guanine residues within this site. A cloned synthetic 24-base-pair deoxyoligonucleotide containing the predicted GCR binding sequence interacts specifically with GCR. The hGH binding site shares sequence homology with a GCR binding site upstream from the human metallothionein II gene and a subset of GCR binding sites from mouse mammary tumor virus. All of these binding sites for this eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory protein show remarkable similarity in overall geometry to the binding sites for several prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  2. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ting-Ying; Lin, Chih-Kang; Lin, Chih-Wei; Weng, Yi-Zhong; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chang, Darby Tien-Hao

    2012-01-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes can be summarized as a PWM. This technique provides an effective alternative when the chromatin immunoprecipitation data are unavailable for PWM inference. To facilitate the procedure of predicting PWMs based on protein–DNA complexes or even structures of the unbound state, the web server, DBD2BS, is presented in this study. The DBD2BS uses an atom-level knowledge-based potential function to predict PWMs characterizing the sequences to which the query DBD structure can bind. For unbound queries, a list of 1066 DBD–DNA complexes (including 1813 protein chains) is compiled for use as templates for synthesizing bound structures. The DBD2BS provides users with an easy-to-use interface for visualizing the PWMs predicted based on different templates and the spatial relationships of the query protein, the DBDs and the DNAs. The DBD2BS is the first attempt to predict PWMs of DBDs from unbound structures rather than from bound ones. This approach increases the number of existing protein structures that can be exploited when analyzing protein–DNA interactions. In a recent study, the authors showed that the kernel adopted by the DBD2BS can generate PWMs consistent with those obtained from the experimental data. The use of DBD2BS to predict PWMs can be incorporated with sequence-based methods to discover binding sites in genome-wide studies. Available at: http://dbd2bs.csie.ntu.edu.tw/, http://dbd2bs.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/, and http://dbd2bs.ee.ncku.edu.tw. PMID:22693214

  3. Antidepressant binding site in a bacterial homologue of neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satinder K; Yamashita, Atsuko; Gouaux, Eric

    2007-08-23

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 A above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational design of

  4. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational

  5. Snooker Structure-Based Pharmacophore Model Explains Differences in Agonist and Blocker Binding to Bitter Receptor hTAS2R39

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Wibke S. U.; Sanders, Marijn P. A.; van Buren, Leo; Gouka, Robin J.; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Ritschel, Tina

    2015-01-01

    The human bitter taste receptor hTAS2R39 can be activated by many dietary (iso)flavonoids. Furthermore, hTAS2R39 activity can be blocked by 6-methoxyflavanones, 4’-fluoro-6-methoxyflavanone in particular. A structure-based pharmacophore model of the hTAS2R39 binding pocket was built using Snooker software, which has been used successfully before for drug design of GPCRs of the rhodopsin subfamily. For the validation of the model, two sets of compounds, both of which contained actives and inactives, were used: (i) an (iso)flavonoid-dedicated set, and (ii) a more generic, structurally diverse set. Agonists were characterized by their linear binding geometry and the fact that they bound deeply in the hTAS2R39 pocket, mapping the hydrogen donor feature based on T5.45 and N3.36, analogues of which have been proposed to play a key role in activation of GPCRs. Blockers lack hydrogen-bond donors enabling contact to the receptor. Furthermore, they had a crooked geometry, which could sterically hinder movement of the TM domains upon receptor activation. Our results reveal characteristics of hTAS2R39 agonist and bitter blocker binding, which might facilitate the development of blockers suitable to counter the bitterness of dietary hTAS2R39 agonists in food applications. PMID:25729848

  6. Oligosaccharyltransferase directly binds to ribosome at a location near the translocon-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Y.; Li, H.; Li, Hua; Lennarz, W. J.

    2009-04-28

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OT) transfers high mannose-type glycans to the nascent polypeptides that are translated by the membrane-bound ribosome and translocated into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum through the Sec61 translocon complex. In this article, we show that purified ribosomes and OT can form a binary complex with a stoichiometry of {approx}1 to 1 in the presence of detergent. We present evidence that OT may bind to the large ribosomal subunit near the site where nascent polypeptides exit. We further show that OT and the Sec61 complex can simultaneously bind to ribosomes in vitro. Based on existing data and our findings, we propose that cotranslational translocation and N-glycosylation of nascent polypeptides are mediated by a ternary supramolecular complex consisting of OT, the Sec61 complex, and ribosomes.

  7. Identification of a putative binding site critical for general anesthetic activation of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Ton, Hoai T; Phan, Thieu X; Abramyan, Ara M; Shi, Lei; Ahern, Gerard P

    2017-04-04

    General anesthetics suppress CNS activity by modulating the function of membrane ion channels, in particular, by enhancing activity of GABAA receptors. In contrast, several volatile (isoflurane, desflurane) and i.v. (propofol) general anesthetics excite peripheral sensory nerves to cause pain and irritation upon administration. These noxious anesthetics activate transient receptor potential ankyrin repeat 1 (TRPA1), a major nociceptive ion channel, but the underlying mechanisms and site of action are unknown. Here we exploit the observation that pungent anesthetics activate mammalian but not Drosophila TRPA1. Analysis of chimeric Drosophila and mouse TRPA1 channels reveal a critical role for the fifth transmembrane domain (S5) in sensing anesthetics. Interestingly, we show that anesthetics share with the antagonist A-967079 a potential binding pocket lined by residues in the S5, S6, and the first pore helix; isoflurane competitively disrupts A-967079 antagonism, and introducing these mammalian TRPA1 residues into dTRPA1 recapitulates anesthetic agonism. Furthermore, molecular modeling predicts that isoflurane and propofol bind to this pocket by forming H-bond and halogen-bond interactions with Ser-876, Met-915, and Met-956. Mutagenizing Met-915 or Met-956 selectively abolishes activation by isoflurane and propofol without affecting actions of A-967079 or the agonist, menthol. Thus, our combined experimental and computational results reveal the potential binding mode of noxious general anesthetics at TRPA1. These data may provide a structural basis for designing drugs to counter the noxious and vasorelaxant properties of general anesthetics and may prove useful in understanding effects of anesthetics on related ion channels.

  8. GE23077 binds to the RNA polymerase 'i' and 'i+1' sites and prevents the binding of initiating nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Degen, David; Ho, Mary X; Sineva, Elena; Ebright, Katherine Y; Ebright, Yon W; Mekler, Vladimir; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Feng, Yu; Yin, Ruiheng; Tuske, Steve; Irschik, Herbert; Jansen, Rolf; Maffioli, Sonia; Donadio, Stefano; Arnold, Eddy; Ebright, Richard H

    2014-04-22

    Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and structural approaches, we show that the cyclic-peptide antibiotic GE23077 (GE) binds directly to the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) active-center 'i' and 'i+1' nucleotide binding sites, preventing the binding of initiating nucleotides, and thereby preventing transcription initiation. The target-based resistance spectrum for GE is unusually small, reflecting the fact that the GE binding site on RNAP includes residues of the RNAP active center that cannot be substituted without loss of RNAP activity. The GE binding site on RNAP is different from the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, GE and rifamycins do not exhibit cross-resistance, and GE and a rifamycin can bind simultaneously to RNAP. The GE binding site on RNAP is immediately adjacent to the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, covalent linkage of GE to a rifamycin provides a bipartite inhibitor having very high potency and very low susceptibility to target-based resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02450.001.

  9. Ligand-Specific Roles for Transmembrane 5 Serine Residues in the Binding and Efficacy of Dopamine D1 Receptor Catechol Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Chemel, Benjamin R.; Bonner, Lisa A.; Watts, Val J.

    2012-01-01

    To refine further the structure-activity relationships of D1 dopamine receptor agonists, we investigated the roles of three conserved serine residues [Ser198(5.42), Ser199(5.43), and Ser202(5.46)] in agonist binding and receptor activation. These transmembrane domain 5 (TM5) residues are believed to engage catechol ligands through polar interactions. We stably expressed wild-type or mutant (S198A, S199A, and S202A) D1 receptors in human embryonic kidney cells. These receptors were expressed at similar levels (approximately 2000 fmol/mg) and bound the radioligand [3H]R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH 23390), although S198A and S199A displayed significant losses of affinity compared with that for wild-type receptors. The endogenous agonist, dopamine, had losses of potency at each of the mutant receptors. We tested cyclohexyl-substituted isochroman, carbocyclic, and chroman bicyclic dopamine analogs and found that the mutations affected the chroman to a lesser extent than the other compounds. These results support our hypothesis that the decreased D1 activity of chroman analogs results from a ligand intramolecular hydrogen bond that impairs the ability of the catechol to engage the receptor. Sensitivities of these rigid catechol agonists to the effects of the serine mutations were dependent on ligand geometry, particularly with respect to the rotameric conformation of the ethylamine side chain and the distance between the amino group and each catechol hydroxyl. Functional experiments in striatal tissue suggest that the ability to engage TM5 serines is largely correlated with agonist efficacy for cAMP stimulation. These results provide a new understanding of the complexities of D1 ligand recognition and agonist activation and have implications for the design of rigid catechol ligands. PMID:22334593

  10. Binding of coumarins to site I of human serum albumin. Effect of the fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Zatón, A M; Ferrer, J M; Ruiz de Gordoa, J C; Marquínez, M A

    1995-07-14

    It is known that binding site I on human serum albumin (HSA) consists of a zone of two overlapping regions: the specific binding region represented by warfarin binding and the specific binding region represented by azapropazone and phenylbutazone binding. In this paper binding parameters to defatted HSA and to HSA with fatty acids (molar ratio of fatty acid/HSA = 4) were compared. High-affinity binding sites for warfarin, 4-chromanol, 4-hydroxycoumarin, coumarin, 3-acetylcoumarin and phenylbutazone (759,549 M-1 > Ka > 67,024 M-1) constitute binding site I on HSA. In this binding area defatted HSA can bind two molecules of warfarin, but the presence of fatty acids diminish the binding capacity of warfarin to HSA (2 > n > 1).

  11. Equilibrium binding of single-stranded DNA to the secondary DNA binding site of the bacterial recombinase RecA.

    PubMed

    Gourves, A S; Defais, M; Johnson, N P

    2001-03-30

    The bacterial recombinase RecA forms a nucleoprotein filament in vitro with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at its primary DNA binding site, site I. This filament has a second site, site II, which binds ssDNA and double-stranded DNA. We have investigated the binding of ssDNA to the RecA protein in the presence of adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) cofactor using fluorescence anisotropy. The RecA protein carried out DNA strand exchange with a 5'-fluorescein-labeled 32-mer oligonucleotide. The anisotropy signal was shown to measure oligonucleotide binding to RecA, and the relationship between signal and binding density was determined. Binding of ssDNA to site I of RecA was stable at high NaCl concentrations. Binding to site II could be described by a simple two-state equilibrium, K = 4.5 +/- 1.5 x 10(5) m(-1) (37 degrees C, 150 mm NaCl, pH 7.4). The reaction was enthalpy-driven and entropy-opposed. It depended on salt concentration and was sensitive to the type of monovalent anion, suggesting that anion-dependent protein conformations contribute to ssDNA binding at site II.

  12. Human Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Ligand-Interaction Motif: Transmembrane Helix 2 Cysteine, C2.59(89), as Determinant of Classical Cannabinoid Agonist Activity and Binding Pose.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Peng, Yan; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Fan, Pusheng; Janero, David R; Thakur, Ganesh A; Mercier, Richard W; Sun, Xin; Ma, Xiaoyu; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2017-03-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R)-dependent signaling is implicated in neuronal physiology and immune surveillance by brain microglia. Selective CB2R agonists hold therapeutic promise for inflammatory and other neurological disorders. Information on human CB2R (hCB2R) ligand-binding and functional domains is needed to inform the rational design and optimization of candidate druglike hCB2R agonists. Prior demonstration that hCB2R transmembrane helix 2 (TMH2) cysteine C2.59(89) reacts with small-molecule methanethiosulfonates showed that this cysteine residue is accessible to sulfhydryl derivatization reagents. We now report the design and application of two novel, pharmacologically active, high-affinity molecular probes, AM4073 and AM4099, as chemical reporters to interrogate directly the interaction of classical cannabinoid agonists with hCB2R cysteine residues. AM4073 has one electrophilic isothiocyanate (NCS) functionality at the C9 position of its cyclohexenyl C-ring, whereas AM4099 has NCS groups at that position and at the terminus of its aromatic A-ring C3 side chain. Pretreatment of wild-type hCB2R with either probe reduced subsequent [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by ∼60%. Conservative serine substitution of any hCB2R TMH cysteine residue except C2.59(89) did not affect the reduction of [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by either probe, suggesting that AM4073 and AM4099 interact irreversibly with this TMH2 cysteine. In contrast, AM841, an exceptionally potent hCB2R megagonist and direct AM4073/4099 congener bearing a single electrophilic NCS group at the terminus of its C3 side chain, had been demonstrated to bind covalently to TMH6 cysteine C6.47(257) and not C2.59(89). Molecular modeling indicates that the AM4073-hCB2R* interaction at C2.59(89) orients this classical cannabinoid away from TMH6 and toward the TMH2-TMH3 interface in the receptor's hydrophobic binding pocket, whereas the AM841-hCB2R* interaction at C6.47(257) favors agonist orientation toward

  13. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Biscone, Mark J.; Miamidian, John L.; Muchiri, John M.; Baik, Sarah S.W.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Reeves, Jacqueline D. . E-mail: jreeves@MonogramBio.com

    2006-07-20

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner.

  14. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-05-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, /sup 3/H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion (/sup 3/H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that /sup 3/H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin.

  15. A Sialic Acid Binding Site in a Human Picornavirus

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Martin; Hähnlein-Schick, Irmgard; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Arnberg, Niklas; Stehle, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    The picornaviruses coxsackievirus A24 variant (CVA24v) and enterovirus 70 (EV70) cause continued outbreaks and pandemics of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC), a highly contagious eye disease against which neither vaccines nor antiviral drugs are currently available. Moreover, these viruses can cause symptoms in the cornea, upper respiratory tract, and neurological impairments such as acute flaccid paralysis. EV70 and CVA24v are both known to use 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) for cell attachment, thus providing a putative link between the glycan receptor specificity and cell tropism and disease. We report the structures of an intact human picornavirus in complex with a range of glycans terminating in Neu5Ac. We determined the structure of the CVA24v to 1.40 Å resolution, screened different glycans bearing Neu5Ac for CVA24v binding, and structurally characterized interactions with candidate glycan receptors. Biochemical studies verified the relevance of the binding site and demonstrated a preference of CVA24v for α2,6-linked glycans. This preference can be rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations that show that α2,6-linked glycans can establish more contacts with the viral capsid. Our results form an excellent platform for the design of antiviral compounds to prevent AHC. PMID:25329320

  16. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  17. Binding of L-(/sup 3/H)nicotine to a single class of high affinity sites in rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Lippiello, P.M.; Fernandes, K.G.

    1986-05-01

    The binding of optically pure L-(/sup 3/H)nicotine to rat brain membrane preparations was studied using a rapid filtration method. The binding properties observed depended on the method used for tissue isolation. The most consistent results were obtained with membranes prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors, without divalent cations. Binding was saturable, reversible, and stereospecific. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of high affinity sites with an average KD of 2 nM and a Bmax of approximately 200 fmol/mg of protein. The Hill coefficient was near unity. The KD calculated from the kinetic rate constants for association (k1 = 0.012 min-1 nM-1) and dissociation (k-1 = 0.04 min-1) was around 3 nM, in good agreement with the dissociation constant determined from equilibrium binding. In competition studies, cholinergic agonists were generally the most effective in inhibiting L-(/sup 3/H)nicotine binding, whereas antagonists were relatively ineffective. The D-isomer of nicotine was about 60-fold less potent than the L-isomer in inhibiting binding. The results were unaffected by temperature, with the exception that Bmax was somewhat lower at 37 degrees. The equilibrium binding properties of these sites were essentially identical in adult male and female brain. However, Bmax was lower in fetal brain tissue. The present findings are consistent with the idea that there is a single class of high affinity nicotinic binding sites in rat brain with cholinoceptive properties.

  18. Chloramphenicol binding to human serum albumin: Determination of binding constants and binding sites by steady-state fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Zhao, Guangyu; Chen, Shoucong; Liu, Feng; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Li

    2009-07-01

    The interaction between chloramphenicol and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by fluorescence, UV/vis, circular dichroism (CD) and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of HSA by chloramphenicol was the result of the formation of drug-HSA complex, and the effective quenching constants ( Ka) were 2.852 × 10 4, 2.765 × 10 4, 2.638 × 10 4 and 2.542 × 10 4 M -1 at 287, 295, 303 and 311 K, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (Δ H) and entropy change (Δ S) for the reaction were calculated to be -3.634 kJ mol -1 and 72.66 J mol -1 K -1 according to van't Hoff equation. The results indicated that the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions played a major role in the binding of drug to HSA. The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained to be 3.63 nm according to Förster's theory. Site marker competitive experiments indicated that the binding of drug to HSA primarily took place in subdomain IIA. The alterations of HSA secondary structure in the presence of chloramphenicol were confirmed by the evidences from synchronous fluorescence, CD and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. In addition, the effect of common ions on the binding constants of drug-HSA complex was also discussed.

  19. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  20. Prediction of the Human EP1 Receptor Binding Site by Homology Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Behnoush; Madadkar-Sobhani, Armin; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Mahmoudian, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    The prostanoid receptor EP1 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) known to be involved in a variety of pathological disorders such as pain, fever and inflammation. These receptors are important drug targets, but design of subtype specific agonists and antagonists has been partially hampered by the absence of three-dimensional structures for these receptors. To understand the molecular interactions of the PGE2, an endogen ligand, with the EP1 receptor, a homology model of the human EP1 receptor (hEP1R) with all connecting loops was constructed from the 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure (PDB code: 1L9H) of bovine rhodopsin. The initial model generated by MODELLER was subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to assess quality of the model. Also, a step by step ligand-supported model refinement was performed, including initial docking of PGE2 and iloprost in the putative binding site, followed by several rounds of energy minimizations and molecular dynamics simulations. Docking studies were performed for PGE2 and some other related compounds in the active site of the final hEP1 receptor model. The docking enabled us to identify key molecular interactions supported by the mutagenesis data. Also, the correlation of r2=0.81 was observed between the Ki values and the docking scores of 15 prostanoid compounds. The results obtained in this study may provide new insights toward understanding the active site conformation of the hEP1 receptor and can be used for the structure-based design of novel specific ligands. PMID:22145106

  1. MicroRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaochun; Rennie, William A; Mallick, Bibekanand; Kanoria, Shaveta; Long, Dang; Wolenc, Adam; Carmack, C Steven; Ding, Ye

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Since the discovery of lin-4, the founding member of the miRNA family, over 360 miRNAs have been identified for Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Prediction and validation of targets are essential for elucidation of regulatory functions of these miRNAs. For C. elegans, crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) has been successfully performed for the identification of target mRNA sequences bound by Argonaute protein ALG-1. In addition, reliable annotation of the 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) as well as developmental stage-specific expression profiles for both miRNAs and 3' UTR isoforms are available. By utilizing these data, we developed statistical models and bioinformatics tools for both transcriptome-scale and developmental stage-specific predictions of miRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs. In performance evaluation via cross validation on the ALG-1 CLIP data, the models were found to offer major improvements over established algorithms for predicting both seed sites and seedless sites. In particular, our top-ranked predictions have a substantially higher true positive rate, suggesting a much higher likelihood of positive experimental validation. A gene ontology analysis of stage-specific predictions suggests that miRNAs are involved in dynamic regulation of biological functions during C. elegans development. In particular, miRNAs preferentially target genes related to development, cell cycle, trafficking, and cell signaling processes. A database for both transcriptome-scale and stage-specific predictions and software for implementing the prediction models are available through the Sfold web server at http://sfold.wadsworth.org.

  2. Tetrazepam: a benzodiazepine which dissociates sedation from other benzodiazepine activities. II. In vitro and in vivo interactions with benzodiazepine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, P.E.; Bachy, A.; Morre, M.; Biziere, K.

    1988-05-01

    Tetrazepam is a 1,4-benzodiazepine (BZD) derivative which, in rodents, appears to have very little sedative and ataxic effects. In an attempt to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this particular pharmacological profile we examined the interaction of tetrazepam with BZD binding sites. Tetrazepam interacted competitively with central and peripheral BZD binding sites and exhibited comparable affinities for both sites. Tetrazepam was approximately one-seventh as potent as diazepam at the central receptor and as potent as diazepam at the peripheral binding site. Tetrazepam did not distinguish type I from type II central BZD receptors, as evidenced by comparable affinities for the cerebellar and hippocampal receptors. In vitro autoradiographic studies showed that tetrazepam displaced (3H)flunitrazepam from rat brain membranes without any clear regional specificity. Like all BZD receptor agonists, tetrazepam exhibited a gamma-aminobutyric acid shift, a photoaffinity shift and potentiated the binding of 35S-t-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate to rat brain membranes. However, the latter effect was observed at relatively high concentrations of tetrazepam. In vivo, tetrazepam displaced specifically bound (3H)flunitrazepam from mouse brain (ID50, 37 mg/kg p.o. vs 3.5 mg/kg p.o. for diazepam) and from mouse kidney (ID50, 38 mg/kg p.o. vs. 21 mg/kg p.o. for diazepam). It is concluded that tetrazepam is a BZD receptor agonist; the molecular mechanisms which underly the low sedative potential of the drug cannot at present be explained by a particular interaction with either central or peripheral BZD binding sites, but may be related to the drug's relatively weak effect on 35S-t-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate binding.

  3. Characterization of ruthenium red-binding sites of the Ca(2+)-ATPase from sarcoplasmic reticulum and their interaction with Ca(2+)-binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Corbalan-Garcia, S; Teruel, J A; Gomez-Fernandez, J C

    1992-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase has previously been shown to bind and dissociate two Ca2+ ions in a sequential mode. This behaviour is confirmed here by inducing sequential Ca2+ dissociation with Ruthenium Red. Ruthenium Red binds to sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (6 nmol/mg) with a Kd = 2 microM, producing biphasic kinetics of Ca2+ dissociation from the Ca(2+)-ATPase, decreasing the affinity for Ca2+ binding. Studies on the effect of Ca2+ on Ruthenium Red binding indicate that Ruthenium Red does not bind to the high-affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites, as suggested by the following observations: (i) micromolar concentrations of Ca2+ do not significantly alter Ruthenium Red binding to the sarcoplasmic reticulum; (ii) quenching of the fluorescence of fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate (FITC) bound to Ca(2+)-ATPase by Ruthenium Red (resembling Ruthenium Red binding) is not prevented by micromolar concentrations of Ca2+; (iii) quenching of FITC fluorescence by Ca2+ binding to the high-affinity sites is achieved even though Ruthenium Red is bound to the Ca(2+)-ATPase; and (iv) micromolar Ca2+ concentrations prevent inhibition of the ATP-hydrolytic capability by dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide modification, but Ruthenium Red does not. However, micromolar concentrations of lanthanides (La3+ and Tb3+) and millimolar concentrations of bivalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) inhibit Ruthenium Red binding as well as quenching of FITC-labelled Ca(2+)-ATPase fluorescence by Ruthenium Red. Studies of Ruthenium Red binding to tryptic fragments of Ca(2+)-ATPase, as demonstrated by ligand blotting, indicate that Ruthenium Red does not bind to the A1 subfragment. Our observations suggest that Ruthenium Red might bind to a cation-binding site in Ca(2+)-ATPase inducing fast release of the last bound Ca2+ by interactions between the sites. PMID:1280106

  4. Fluorescence energy transfer between points in G-actin: the nucleotide-binding site, the metal-binding site and Cys-373 residue.

    PubMed

    Miki, M; Wahl, P

    1985-04-05

    Fluorescence energy transfers were studied in order to investigate the spatial relationships between the nucleotide-binding site, the metal-binding site and the Cys-373 residue in the G-actin molecule. When 1-N6-ethenoadenosine-5'-triphosphate (epsilon-ATP) in the nucleotide-binding site and Co2+ or Ni2+ in the metal-binding site were used as fluorescence donor and acceptor, respectively, the fluorescence intensity of epsilon-ATP was perfectly quenched by Ni2+ or Co2+. This indicated that the nucleotide-binding site is very close to the metal-binding site; the distance should be less than 10 A. When N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (IAEDANS) bound to Cys-373 residue and Co2+ in the metal-binding site were used as a fluorescence donor and an acceptor, respectively, the transfer efficiency was equal to 5 +/- 1%. The corresponding distance was calculated to be 23-32 A, assuming a random orientation factor K2 = 2/3.

  5. Extensive Rigid Analogue Design Maps the Binding Conformation of Potent N-Benzylphenethylamine 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Agonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on the structure of the superpotent 5-HT2A agonist 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine, which consists of a ring-substituted phenethylamine skeleton modified with an N-benzyl group, we designed and synthesized a small library of constrained analogues to identify the optimal arrangement of the pharmacophoric elements of the ligand. Structures consisted of diversely substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines, piperidines, and one benzazepine. Based on the structure of (S,S)-9b, which showed the highest affinity of the series, we propose an optimal binding conformation. (S,S)-9b also displayed 124-fold selectivity for the 5-HT2A over the 5-HT2C receptor, making it the most selective 5-HT2A receptor agonist ligand currently known. PMID:23336049

  6. Binding and activity of the prostacyclin receptor (IP) agonists, treprostinil and iloprost, at human prostanoid receptors: treprostinil is a potent DP1 and EP2 agonist.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Brendan J; Silverstein, Adam M; Mottola, David M; Clapp, Lucie H

    2012-07-01

    The prostacyclin analogues, iloprost and treprostinil are extensively used in treating pulmonary hypertension. Their binding profile and corresponding biochemical cellular responses on human prostanoid receptors expressed in cell lines, have now been compared. Iloprost had high binding affinity for EP1 and IP receptors (Ki 1.1 and 3.9 nM, respectively), low affinity for FP, EP3 or EP4 receptors, and very low affinity for EP2, DP1 or TP receptors. By contrast, treprostinil had high affinity for the DP1, EP2 and IP receptors (Ki 4.4, 3.6 and 32 nM, respectively), low affinity for EP1 and EP4 receptors and even lower affinity for EP3, FP and TP receptors. In functional assays, iloprost had similar high activity in elevating cyclic AMP levels in cells expressing the human IP receptor and stimulating calcium influx in cells expressing EP1 receptors (EC50 0.37 and 0.3 nM, respectively) with the rank order of activity on the other receptors comparable to the binding assays. As with binding studies, treprostinil elevated cyclic AMP with a similar high potency in cells expressing DP1, IP and EP2 receptors (EC50 0.6, 1.9 and 6.2 nM, respectively), but had low activity at the other receptors. Activation of IP, DP1 and EP2 receptors, as with treprostinil, can all result in vasodilatation of human pulmonary arteries. However, activation of EP1 receptors can provoke vasoconstriction, and hence may offset the IP-receptor mediated vasodilator effects of iloprost. Treprostinil may therefore differ from iloprost in its overall beneficial pulmonary vasorelaxant profile and other pharmacological actions, especially in diseases where the IP receptor is down-regulated.

  7. Identification and characterization of a novel high affinity metal-binding site in the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M R; Simorre, J P; Hanson, P; Mokler, V; Bellon, L; Beigelman, L; Pardi, A

    1999-01-01

    A novel metal-binding site has been identified in the hammerhead ribozyme by 31P NMR. The metal-binding site is associated with the A13 phosphate in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme and is distinct from any previously identified metal-binding sites. 31P NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the metal-binding affinity for this site and leads to an apparent dissociation constant of 250-570 microM at 25 degrees C for binding of a single Mg2+ ion. The NMR data also show evidence of a structural change at this site upon metal binding and these results are compared with previous data on metal-induced structural changes in the core of the hammerhead ribozyme. These NMR data were combined with the X-ray structure of the hammerhead ribozyme (Pley HW, Flaherty KM, McKay DB. 1994. Nature 372:68-74) to model RNA ligands involved in binding the metal at this A13 site. In this model, the A13 metal-binding site is structurally similar to the previously identified A(g) metal-binding site and illustrates the symmetrical nature of the tandem G x A base pairs in domain 2 of the hammerhead ribozyme. These results demonstrate that 31P NMR represents an important method for both identification and characterization of metal-binding sites in nucleic acids. PMID:10445883

  8. Shared binding sites in Lepidoptera for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins.

    PubMed

    Herrero, S; González-Cabrera, J; Tabashnik, B E; Ferré, J

    2001-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxins act by binding to specific target sites in the insect midgut epithelial membrane. The best-known mechanism of resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins is reduced binding to target sites. Because alteration of a binding site shared by several toxins may cause resistance to all of them, knowledge of which toxins share binding sites is useful for predicting cross-resistance. Conversely, cross-resistance among toxins suggests that the toxins share a binding site. At least two strains of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) with resistance to Cry1A toxins and reduced binding of Cry1A toxins have strong cross-resistance to Cry1Ja. Thus, we hypothesized that Cry1Ja shares binding sites with Cry1A toxins. We tested this hypothesis in six moth and butterfly species, each from a different family: Cacyreus marshalli (Lycaenidae), Lobesia botrana (Tortricidae), Manduca sexta (Sphingidae), Pectinophora gossypiella (Gelechiidae), P. xylostella (Plutellidae), and Spodoptera exigua (Noctuidae). Although the extent of competition varied among species, experiments with biotinylated Cry1Ja and radiolabeled Cry1Ac showed that Cry1Ja and Cry1Ac competed for binding sites in all six species. A recent report also indicates shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins in Heliothis virescens (Noctuidae). Thus, shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A occur in all lepidopteran species tested so far.

  9. Binding sites for. alpha. -bungarotoxin and the noncompetitive inhibitor phencyclidine on a synthetic peptide comprising residues 172-227 of the. alpha. -subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly-Roberts, D.L.; Lentz, T.L. )

    1991-07-30

    The binding of the competitive antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-Btx) and the noncompetitive inhibitor phencyclidine (PCP) to a synthetic peptide comprising residues 172-227 of the {alpha}-subunit of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor has been characterized. {sup 125}I-{alpha}-Btx bound to the 172-227 peptide in a solid-phase assay and was competed by {alpha}-Btx d-tubocurarine and NaCl. In the presence of 0.02% sodium dodecyl sulfate, {sup 125}I-{alpha}-Btx bound to the 56-residue peptide with a K{sub D} of 3.5 nM, as determined by equilibrium saturation binding studies. Because {alpha}Btx binds to a peptide comprising residues 173-204 with the same affinity and does not bind to a peptide comprising residues 205-227, the competitive antagonist and hence agonist binding site lies between residues 173 and 204. After photoaffinity labeling, ({sup 3}H)PCP was bound to the 172-227 peptide. ({sup 3}H)PCP binding was inhibited by chlorpromazine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. It is concluded that a high-affinity binding site for PCP is located between residues 205 and 227, which includes the first 18 residues of transmembrane segment M1, and that a low-affinity site is located in the competitive antagonist binding site between residues 173 and 204. These results show that a synthetic peptide comprising residues 172-227 of the {alpha} subunit contains three binding sites, one for {alpha}-Btx and two for PCP. Previous studies on the intact receptor indicate high-affinity PCP binding occurs in the receptor channel.

  10. Competitive binding between mercury and copper for reduced sulfur binding sites on dissolved organic matter from the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbig, C. A.; Aiken, G. R.; Ryan, J. N.

    2007-12-01

    The interaction of mercury and dissolved organic matter (DOM) strongly influences the biogeochemistry of mercury in the Florida Everglades. Previous laboratory-based studies of simple systems at environmentally relevant concentrations of mercury(II) (a soft Lewis acid) and DOM found strong conditional binding constants (log KHgL' = 28-31). These large constants result from the interaction of mercury(II) with reduced sulfur (a soft Lewis base) sites on DOM. Reported conditional binding constants for other metals with DOM (e.g. log KCuL' = 11-14), suggest that metals of borderline Lewis acidity would not compete with mercury(II) for the strongest binding sites at environmentally relevant concentrations. However, the small proportion of strong binding sites responsible for mercury(II) binding have proven to be susceptible to competitive effects from borderline metals. Equilibrium dialysis experiments using organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades were designed to determine the effects of competitive binding between copper(II) and mercury(II) on DOM binding sites. These experiments demonstrated that copper(II), a borderline Lewis acid, effectively competed for strong DOM sites at concentrations only 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than experimental mercury(II) concentrations (which ranged from 0.05 to 0.2nM). Our results indicate that the reduced sulfur sites responsible for Hg(II) binding on DOM also have high affinities for borderline metals. Interactions of copper(II) and DOM were also investigated in the absence of mercury(II). These results further substantiate the significance of a small concentration of strong binding sites on DOM. At low copper(II) to DOM ratios, preliminary results indicate that the binding interactions between copper(II) and DOM are significantly greater than previously reported and are close to those measured for DOM-mercury(II) binding. We conclude that currently available binding constants for metals of interest (borderline

  11. The dietary polyphenols trans-resveratrol and curcumin selectively bind human CB1 cannabinoid receptors with nanomolar affinities and function as antagonists/inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Seely, Kathryn A; Levi, Mark S; Prather, Paul L

    2009-07-01

    The dietary polyphenols trans-resveratrol [5-[(1E)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethenyl]-1,3-benzenediol; found in red wine] and curcumin [1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione] (found in curry powders) exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects via poorly defined mechanisms. It is interesting that cannabinoids, derived from the marijuana plant (Cannabis sativa), produce similar protective effects via CB1 and CB2 receptors. We examined whether trans-resveratrol, curcumin, and ASC-J9 [1,7-bis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-hydroxy-1E,4E,6E-heptatriene-3-one] (a curcumin analog) act as ligands at cannabinoid receptors. All three bind to human (h) CB1 and mouse CB1 receptors with nanomolar affinities, displaying only micromolar affinities for hCB2 receptors. Characteristic of inverse agonists, the polyphenols inhibit basal G-protein activity in membranes prepared from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-hCB1 cells or mouse brain that is reversed by a neutral CB1 antagonist. Furthermore, they competitively antagonize G-protein activation produced by a CB1 agonist. In intact CHO-hCB1 cells, the polyphenols act as neutral antagonists, producing no effect when tested alone, whereas competitively antagonizing CB1 agonist mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. Confirming their neutral antagonist profile in cells, the polyphenols similarly attenuate stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity produced by a CB1 inverse agonist. In mice, the polyphenols dose-dependently reverse acute hypothermia produced by a CB1 agonist. Upon repeated administration, the polyphenols also reduce body weight in mice similar to that produced by a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist. Finally, trans-resveratrol and curcumin share common structural motifs with other known cannabinoid receptor ligands. Collectively, we suggest that trans-resveratrol and curcumin act as antagonists/inverse agonists at CB1 receptors at dietary relevant concentrations. Therefore, these polyphenols and their

  12. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R.; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A.; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-01-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5–inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented. PMID:27139631

  13. A Specific Cholesterol Binding Site Is Established by the 2.8 Å Structure of the Human [beta][subscript 2]-Adrenergic Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Michael A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Griffith, Mark T.; Roth, Christopher B.; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Kuhn, Peter; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2008-07-08

    The role of cholesterol in eukaryotic membrane protein function has been attributed primarily to an influence on membrane fluidity and curvature. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a thermally stabilized human {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor bound to cholesterol and the partial inverse agonist timolol. The receptors pack as monomers in an antiparallel association with two distinct cholesterol molecules bound per receptor, but not in the packing interface, thereby indicating a structurally relevant cholesterol-binding site between helices I, II, III, and IV. Thermal stability analysis using isothermal denaturation confirms that a cholesterol analog significantly enhances the stability of the receptor. A consensus motif is defined that predicts cholesterol binding for 44% of human class A receptors, suggesting that specific sterol binding is important to the structure and stability of other G protein-coupled receptors, and that this site may provide a target for therapeutic discovery.

  14. Development of a radioligand, [(3)H]LY2119620, to probe the human M(2) and M(4) muscarinic receptor allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed

    Schober, Douglas A; Croy, Carrie H; Xiao, Hongling; Christopoulos, Arthur; Felder, Christian C

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we characterized a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) potentiator, LY2119620 (3-amino-5-chloro-N-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-6-[2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-2-oxoethoxy]thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide) as a novel probe of the human M2 and M4 allosteric binding sites. Since the discovery of allosteric binding sites on G protein-coupled receptors, compounds targeting these novel sites have been starting to emerge. For example, LY2033298 (3-amino-5-chloro-6-methoxy-4-methyl-thieno(2,3-b)pyridine-2-carboxylic acid cyclopropylamid) and a derivative of this chemical scaffold, VU152100 (3-amino-N-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4,6-dim​ethylthieno[2,3-b]pyridine carboxamide), bind to the human M4 mAChR allosteric pocket. In the current study, we characterized LY2119620, a compound similar in structure to LY2033298 and binds to the same allosteric site on the human M4 mAChRs. However, LY2119620 also binds to an allosteric site on the human M2 subtype. [(3)H]NMS ([(3)H]N-methylscopolamine) binding experiments confirm that LY2119620 does not compete for the orthosteric binding pocket at any of the five muscarinic receptor subtypes. Dissociation kinetic studies using [(3)H]NMS further support that LY2119620 binds allosterically to the M2 and M4 mAChRs and was positively cooperative with muscarinic orthosteric agonists. To probe directly the allosteric sites on M2 and M4, we radiolabeled LY2119620. Cooperativity binding of [(3)H]LY2119620 with mAChR orthosteric agonists detects significant changes in Bmax values with little change in Kd, suggesting a G protein-dependent process. Furthermore, [(3)H]LY2119620 was displaced by compounds of similar chemical structure but not by previously described mAChR allosteric compounds such as gallamine or WIN 62,577 (17-β-hydroxy-17-α-ethynyl-δ-4-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole). Our results therefore demonstrate the development of a radioligand, [(3)H]LY2119620 to probe specifically the human M2 and M4 muscarinic

  15. Deformed protein binding sites and cofactor binding sites are required for the function of a small segment-specific regulatory element in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, C; Pinsonneault, J; Gellon, G; McGinnis, N; McGinnis, W

    1994-01-01

    How each of the homeotic selector proteins can regulate distinct sets of DNA target elements in embryos is not understood. Here we describe a detailed functional dissection of a small element that is specifically regulated by the Deformed homeotic protein. This 120 bp element (module E) is part of a larger 2.7 kb autoregulatory enhancer that maintains Deformed (Dfd) transcription in the epidermis of the maxillary and mandibular segments of Drosophila embryos. In vitro binding assays show that module E contains only one Dfd protein binding site. Mutations in the Dfd binding site that increase or decrease its in vitro affinity for Dfd protein generate parallel changes in the regulatory activity of module E in transgenic embryos, strong evidence that the in vitro-defined binding site is a direct target of Dfd protein in embryos. However, a monomer or multimer of the Dfd binding region alone is not sufficient to supply Dfd-dependent, segment-specific reporter gene expression. An analysis of a systematic series of clustered point mutations in module E revealed that an additional region containing an imperfect inverted repeat sequence is also required for the function of this homeotic protein response element. The Dfd binding site and the putative cofactor binding site(s) in the region of the inverted repeat are both necessary and in combination sufficient for the function of module E. Images PMID:7910795

  16. Gibbs Recursive Sampler: finding transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William; Rouchka, Eric C; Lawrence, Charles E

    2003-07-01

    The Gibbs Motif Sampler is a software package for locating common elements in collections of biopolymer sequences. In this paper we describe a new variation of the Gibbs Motif Sampler, the Gibbs Recursive Sampler, which has been developed specifically for locating multiple transcription factor binding sites for multiple transcription factors simultaneously in unaligned DNA sequences that may be heterogeneous in DNA composition. Here we describe the basic operation of the web-based version of this sampler. The sampler may be acces-sed at http://bayesweb.wadsworth.org/gibbs/gibbs.html and at http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/bayesian/gibbs/gibbs.html. An online user guide is available at http://bayesweb.wadsworth.org/gibbs/bernoulli.html and at http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/bayesian/gibbs/manual/bernoulli.html. Solaris, Solaris.x86 and Linux versions of the sampler are available as stand-alone programs for academic and not-for-profit users. Commercial licenses are also available. The Gibbs Recursive Sampler is distributed in accordance with the ISCB level 0 guidelines and a requirement for citation of use in scientific publications.

  17. Mutations and Binding Sites of Human Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Schaefer, Ulf; Jankovic, Boris R.; Archer, John A. C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, “insertions” are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. PMID:22670148

  18. Energetic localization of saxitoxin in its channel binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Gaurav; Shang, Lisa; Li, Xiufeng; Dudley, Samuel C

    2002-01-01

    Saxitoxin (STX) selectively blocks the voltage-gated sodium channel at the outer vestibule lined by P-loops of the four domains. Neosaxitoxin has an additional -OH group at the N1 position of the 1,2,3 guanidinium (N1-OH) that interacts with domains I and IV of the Na(+) channel. Determination of a second toxin interaction with the channel would fix the location of STX. Gonyautoxin 2,3 and Gonyautoxin 1,4 are C-11 sulfated derivatives of saxitoxin and neosaxitoxin, respectively. We used these variants to constrain the STX docking orientation by energetically localizing the C-11 sulfate in the outer vestibule. Interactions between the C-11 sulfate and each of the four domains of the channel were determined by a systematic approach to mutant cycle analysis in which all known carboxyl groups important for site 1 toxin binding were neutralized, allowing energetic triangulation of the toxin sulfate and overcoming some limitations of mutant cycles. Toxin IC(50)s were measured by two-electrode voltage clamp from Xenopus oocytes injected with the channel mRNA. Three unique types of analysis based on the coupling results localized the C-11 sulfate between domains III and IV. Combined with our previous report, the data establish the orientation of STX in the outer vestibule and confirm the clockwise arrangement of the channel domains. PMID:12124273

  19. Computational Characterization and Prediction of Estrogen Receptor Coactivator Binding Site Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Gutendorf, andJ. Westendorf. 2000. Endocrine disruptors in fried meat: PhIP is an estrogen. Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer...binding site of the ERa LBD [3-5]. Because these studies have focused on the estradiol binding site, new potential ER disruptors that bind in the co...activator site have been missed. Our proposal focuses on developing a new computational approach to predict therapeutically useful ERa disruptors by

  20. Site-specific dephosphorylation of tau of apolipoprotein E-deficient and control mice by M1 muscarinic agonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Genis, I; Fisher, A; Michaelson, D M

    1999-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice have memory deficits that are associated with synaptic loss of basal forebrain cholinergic projections and with hyperphosphorylation of distinct epitopes of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Furthermore, treatment of apoE-deficient mice with the M1 selective agonist 1-methylpiperidine-4-spiro-(2'-methylthiazoline) [AF150(S)] abolishes their memory deficits and results in recovery of their brain cholinergic markers. In the present study, we used a panel of anti-tau monoclonal antibodies to further map the tau epitopes that are hyperphosphorylated in apoE-deficient mice and examined the effects of prolonged treatment with AF150(S). This revealed that tau of apoE-deficient mice contains a distinct, hyperphosphorylated "hot spot" domain which is localized N-terminally to the microtubule binding domain of tau, and that AF150(S) has an epitope-specific tau dephosphorylating effect whose magnitude is affected by apoE deficiency. Accordingly, epitopes which reside in the hyperphosphorylated "hot spot" are dephosphorylated by AF150(S) in apoE-deficient mice but are almost unaffected in the controls, whereas epitopes which flank this tau domain are dephosphorylated by AF150(S) in both mice groups. In contrast, epitopes located at the N and C terminals of tau are unaffected by AF150(S) in both groups of mice. These findings suggest that apoE deficiency results in hyperphosphorylation of a distinct tau domain whose excess phosphorylation can be reduced by muscarinic treatment.

  1. Determination of energies and sites of binding of PFOA and PFOS to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Muscionico, Isabella; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2010-11-25

    Structure and energies of the binding sites of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) to human serum albumin (HSA) were determined through molecular modeling. The calculations consisted of a compound approach based on docking, followed by molecular dynamics simulations and by the estimation of the free binding energies adopting WHAM-umbrella sampling and semiempirical methodologies. The binding sites so determined are common either to known HSA fatty acids sites or to other HSA sites known to bind to pharmaceutical compounds such as warfarin, thyroxine, indole, and benzodiazepin. Among the PFOA binding sites, five have interaction energies in excess of -6 kcal/mol, which become nine for PFOS. The calculated binding free energy of PFOA to the Trp 214 binding site is the highest among the PFOA complexes, -8.0 kcal/mol, in good agreement with literature experimental data. The PFOS binding site with the highest energy, -8.8 kcal/mol, is located near the Trp 214 binding site, thus partially affecting its activity. The maximum number of ligands that can be bound to HSA is 9 for PFOA and 11 for PFOS. The calculated data were adopted to predict the level of complexation of HSA as a function of the concentration of PFOA and PFOS found in human blood for different levels of exposition. The analysis of the factors contributing to the complex binding energy permitted to outline a set of guidelines for the rational design of alternative fluorinated surfactants with a lower bioaccumulation potential.

  2. Modeling Complex Equilibria in ITC Experiments: Thermodynamic Parameters Estimation for a Three Binding Site Model

    PubMed Central

    Le, Vu H.; Buscaglia, Robert; Chaires, Jonathan B.; Lewis, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Isothermal Titration Calorimetry, ITC, is a powerful technique that can be used to estimate a complete set of thermodynamic parameters (e.g. Keq (or ΔG), ΔH, ΔS, and n) for a ligand binding interaction described by a thermodynamic model. Thermodynamic models are constructed by combination of equilibrium constant, mass balance, and charge balance equations for the system under study. Commercial ITC instruments are supplied with software that includes a number of simple interaction models, for example one binding site, two binding sites, sequential sites, and n-independent binding sites. More complex models for example, three or more binding sites, one site with multiple binding mechanisms, linked equilibria, or equilibria involving macromolecular conformational selection through ligand binding need to be developed on a case by case basis by the ITC user. In this paper we provide an algorithm (and a link to our MATLAB program) for the non-linear regression analysis of a multiple binding site model with up to four overlapping binding equilibria. Error analysis demonstrates that fitting ITC data for multiple parameters (e.g. up to nine parameters in the three binding site model) yields thermodynamic parameters with acceptable accuracy. PMID:23262283

  3. Centrally acting hypotensive agents with affinity for 5-HT1A binding sites inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in calf hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Schoeffter, P.; Hoyer, D.

    1988-01-01

    1. A number of centrally acting hypotensive agents and other ligands with high affinity for 5-hydroxytryptamine1A (5-HT1A) recognition sites have been tested on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in calf hippocampus, a functional model for 5-HT1A-receptors. 2. Concentration-dependent inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was elicited by the reference 5-HT1-receptor agonists (mean EC50 value, nM): 5-HT (22), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, 3.2), 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 8.6), N,N-dipropyl-5-carboxamidotryptamine (DP-5-CT, 2.3), 1-[2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-piperazine (PAPP or LY 165163, 20), 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H indole (RU 24969, 20), buspirone (65) and ipsapirone (56). Emax amounted to 18-20% inhibition for all but the latter two agonists (14%). 3. The following hypotensive agents with high affinity for 5-HT1A sites were potent agonists in this system (mean EC50 value, nM): flesinoxan (24), indorenate (99), erythro-1-(1-[2-(1,4-benzodioxan-2-yl)-2-hydroxyethyl]-4-piperidyl )- 2-benzimidazolinone (R 28935, 2.5), urapidil (390) and 5-methyl-urapidil (3.5). The first two agents were full agonists, whereas the latter three acted as partial agonists with 60-80% efficacy. 4. Metergoline and methysergide behaved as full agonists and cyanopindolol as a partial agonist with low efficacy. Spiroxatrine and 2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)aminomethyl- 1,4-benzodioxane (WB 4101) which bind to 5-HT1A sites with nanomolar affinity, were agonists and inhibited potently forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in calf hippocampus, showing mean EC50 values of 23 and 15 nM, respectively. Spiroxatrine and WB 4101 yielded 90% and 50% efficacy, respectively. 5. Spiperone and methiothepin (each 1 microM) caused rightward shifts of the concentration-effect curve to 8-OH-DPAT, without loss of the maximal effect, as did the partial agonist cyanopindolol (0.1 microM) and the

  4. Ankyrin-independent membrane protein-binding sites for brain and erythrocyte spectrin.

    PubMed

    Steiner, J P; Bennett, V

    1988-10-05

    Brain spectrin reassociates in in vitro binding assays with protein(s) in highly extracted brain membranes quantitatively depleted of ankyrin and spectrin. These newly described membrane sites for spectrin are biologically significant and involve a protein since (a) binding occurs optimally at physiological pH (6.7-6.9) and salt concentrations (50 mM), (b) binding is abolished by digestion of membranes with alpha-chymotrypsin, (c) Scatchard analysis is consistent with a binding capacity of at least 50 pmol/mg total membrane protein, and highest affinity of 3 nM. The major ankyrin-independent binding activity of brain spectrin is localized to the beta subunit of spectrin. Brain membranes also contain high affinity binding sites for erythrocyte spectrin, but a 3-4 fold lower capacity than for brain spectrin. Some spectrin-binding sites associate preferentially with brain spectrin, some with erythrocyte spectrin, and some associate with both types of spectrin. Erythrocyte spectrin contains distinct binding domains for ankyrin and brain membrane protein sites, since the Mr = 72,000 spectrin-binding fragment of ankyrin does not compete for binding of spectrin to brain membranes. Spectrin binds to a small number of ankyrin-independent sites in erythrocyte membranes present in about 10,000-15,000 copies/cell or 10% of the number of sites for ankyrin. Brain spectrin binds to these sites better than erythrocyte spectrin suggesting that erythrocytes have residual binding sites for nonerythroid spectrin. Ankyrin-independent-binding proteins that selectively bind to certain isoforms of spectrin provide a potentially important flexibility in cellular localization and time of synthesis of proteins involved in spectrin-membrane interactions. This flexibility has implications for assembly of the membrane skeleton and targeting of spectrin isoforms to specialized regions of cells.

  5. Using sequence-specific chemical and structural properties of DNA to predict transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Amy L; Hlavacek, William S; Unkefer, Pat J; Mu, Fangping

    2010-11-18

    An important step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the DNA binding sites recognized by each transcription factor (TF). Conventional approaches to prediction of TF binding sites involve the definition of consensus sequences or position-specific weight matrices and rely on statistical analysis of DNA sequences of known binding sites. Here, we present a method called SiteSleuth in which DNA structure prediction, computational chemistry, and machine learning are applied to develop models for TF binding sites. In this approach, binary classifiers are trained to discriminate between true and false binding sites based on the sequence-specific chemical and structural features of DNA. These features are determined via molecular dynamics calculations in which we consider each base in different local neighborhoods. For each of 54 TFs in Escherichia coli, for which at least five DNA binding sites are documented in RegulonDB, the TF binding sites and portions of the non-coding genome sequence are mapped to feature vectors and used in training. According to cross-validation analysis and a comparison of computational predictions against ChIP-chip data available for the TF Fis, SiteSleuth outperforms three conventional approaches: Match, MATRIX SEARCH, and the method of Berg and von Hippel. SiteSleuth also outperforms QPMEME, a method similar to SiteSleuth in that it involves a learning algorithm. The main advantage of SiteSleuth is a lower false positive rate.

  6. Structural identification of DnaK binding sites within bovine and sheep bactenecin Bac7.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Michael; Kieslich, Bjorn; Berthold, Nicole; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Strater, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial resistance against common antibiotics is an increasing health problem. New pharmaceuticals for the treatment of infections caused by resistant pathogens are needed. Small proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) from insects are known to bind intracellularly to the conventional substrate binding cleft of the E. coli Hsp70 chaperone DnaK. Furthermore, bactenecins from mammals, members of the cathelicidin family, also contain potential DnaK binding sites. Crystal structures of bovine and sheep Bac7 in complex with the DnaK substrate binding domain show that the peptides bind in the forward binding mode with a leucine positioned in the central hydrophobic pocket. In most structures, proline and arginine residues preceding leucine occupy the hydrophobic DnaK binding sites -1 and -2. Within bovine Bac7, four potential DnaK binding sites were identified.

  7. Duplicate gene divergence by changes in microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-02-02

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes.

  8. Duplicate Gene Divergence by Changes in MicroRNA Binding Sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes. PMID:25644246

  9. Alignment-free ultra-high-throughput comparison of druggable protein-ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Weill, Nathanaël; Rognan, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Inferring the biological function of a protein from its three-dimensional structure as well as explaining why a drug may bind to various targets is of crucial importance to modern drug discovery. Here we present a generic 4833-integer vector describing druggable protein-ligand binding sites that can be applied to any protein and any binding cavity. The fingerprint registers counts of pharmacophoric triplets from the Calpha atomic coordinates of binding-site-lining residues. Starting from a customized data set of diverse protein-ligand binding site pairs, the most appropriate metric and a similarity threshold could be defined for similar binding sites. The method (FuzCav) has been used in various scenarios: (i) screening a collection of 6000 binding sites for similarity to different queries; (ii) classifying protein families (serine endopeptidases, protein kinases) by binding site diversity; (iii) discriminating adenine-binding cavities from decoys. The fingerprint generation and comparison supports ultra-high throughput (ca. 1000 measures/s), does not require prior alignment of protein binding sites, and is able to detect local similarity among subpockets. It is thus particularly well suited to the functional annotation of novel genomic structures with low sequence identity to known X-ray templates.

  10. Identification of a second substrate-binding site in solute-sodium symporters.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Lee, Ashley S E; Bracher, Susanne; Jung, Heinrich; Paz, Aviv; Kumar, Jay P; Abramson, Jeff; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-02

    The structure of the sodium/galactose transporter (vSGLT), a solute-sodium symporter (SSS) from Vibrio parahaemolyticus, shares a common structural fold with LeuT of the neurotransmitter-sodium symporter family. Structural alignments between LeuT and vSGLT reveal that the crystallographically identified galactose-binding site in vSGLT is located in a more extracellular location relative to the central substrate-binding site (S1) in LeuT. Our computational analyses suggest the existence of an additional galactose-binding site in vSGLT that aligns to the S1 site of LeuT. Radiolabeled galactose saturation binding experiments indicate that, like LeuT, vSGLT can simultaneously bind two substrate molecules under equilibrium conditions. Mutating key residues in the individual substrate-binding sites reduced the molar substrate-to-protein binding stoichiometry to ~1. In addition, the related and more experimentally tractable SSS member PutP (the Na(+)/proline transporter) also exhibits a binding stoichiometry of 2. Targeting residues in the proposed sites with mutations results in the reduction of the binding stoichiometry and is accompanied by severely impaired translocation of proline. Our data suggest that substrate transport by SSS members requires both substrate-binding sites, thereby implying that SSSs and neurotransmitter-sodium symporters share common mechanistic elements in substrate transport.

  11. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  12. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    James, I.F.; Goldstein, A.

    1984-05-01

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, (/sup 3/H) dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for (/sup 3/H) (D-Ala2, D-Leu5)enkephalin and (3H)ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites.

  13. Benzodiazepine recognition site inverse agonists Ro-15-4513 and FG 7142 both antagonize the EEG effects of ethanol in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Marrosu, F.; Mereu, G.; Giorgi, O.; Corda, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142, two inverse agonists for benzodiazepine recognition sites, to antagonize the EEG effects of ethanol in freely moving rats. Ethanol induced sedation and ataxia associated with a progressive suppression of the fast cortical activities and an enhancement of low frequencies in both cortical and hippocampal tracings. In contrast, Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142 both caused a state of alertness associated with desynchronized cortical activity and theta hippocampal rhythm as well as spiking activity which was predominantly observed in the cortical tracings. When rats were treated with FG 7142 or Ro 15-4513 either before or after ethanol, a reciprocal antagonism of the behavioral and EEG effects of ethanol and of the partial inverse agonists was observed. These data support the view that the anti-ethanol effects of Ro 15-4513 may be related to its partial inverse agonist properties.

  14. TEMPLE: analysing population genetic variation at transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Litovchenko, Maria; Laurent, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Genetic variation occurring at the level of regulatory sequences can affect phenotypes and fitness in natural populations. This variation can be analysed in a population genetic framework to study how genetic drift and selection affect the evolution of these functional elements. However, doing this requires a good understanding of the location and nature of regulatory regions and has long been a major hurdle. The current proliferation of genomewide profiling experiments of transcription factor occupancies greatly improves our ability to identify genomic regions involved in specific DNA-protein interactions. Although software exists for predicting transcription factor binding sites (TFBS), and the effects of genetic variants on TFBS specificity, there are no tools currently available for inferring this information jointly with the genetic variation at TFBS in natural populations. We developed the software Transcription Elements Mapping at the Population LEvel (TEMPLE), which predicts TFBS, evaluates the effects of genetic variants on TFBS specificity and summarizes the genetic variation occurring at TFBS in intraspecific sequence alignments. We demonstrate that TEMPLE's TFBS prediction algorithms gives identical results to PATSER, a software distribution commonly used in the field. We also illustrate the unique features of TEMPLE by analysing TFBS diversity for the TF Senseless (SENS) in one ancestral and one cosmopolitan population of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. TEMPLE can be used to localize TFBS that are characterized by strong genetic differentiation across natural populations. This will be particularly useful for studies aiming to identify adaptive mutations. TEMPLE is a java-based cross-platform software that easily maps the genetic diversity at predicted TFBSs using a graphical interface, or from the Unix command line.

  15. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  16. Late evolutionary appearance of 'peripheral-type' binding sites for benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Bolger, G T; Weissman, B A; Lueddens, H; Basile, A S; Mantione, C R; Barrett, J E; Witkin, J M; Paul, S M; Skolnick, P

    1985-07-15

    Four classes of non-mammalian vertebrates were examined for the presence of both 'brain-specific' and 'peripheral-type' binding sites for benzodiazepines in the central nervous system. 'Brain-specific' binding sites for benzodiazepines were found in the central nervous systems of all non-mammalian vertebrates studied. However, in contrast to mammals, either very low or undetectable levels of 'peripheral-type' binding sites for benzodiazepines were observed in the central nervous systems of these non-mammalian vertebrates. Furthermore, the density of 'peripheral-type' binding sites for benzodiazepines in non-mammalian vertebrate heart was less than or equal to 2% of that found in mammalian cardiac tissue. These findings suggest a very late evolutionary appearance of 'peripheral-type' binding sites for benzodiazepines, implying that these sites may have (a) highly specialized function(s) in both peripheral tissues and the central nervous system.

  17. An Unexpected Mode Of Binding Defines BMS948 as A Full Retinoic Acid Receptor β (RARβ, NR1B2) Selective Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Vivat, Valérie; Krishnasamy, Gunasekaran; Gronemeyer, Hinrich; Bourguet, William; Germain, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid is an important regulator of cell differentiation which plays major roles in embryonic development and tissue remodeling. The biological action of retinoic acid is mediated by three nuclear receptors denoted RARα, β and γ. Multiple studies support that RARβ possesses functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor and indeed, its expression is frequently lost in neoplastic tissues. However, it has been recently reported that RARβ could also play a role in mammary gland tumorigenesis, thus demonstrating the important but yet incompletely understood function of this receptor in cancer development. As a consequence, there is a great need for RARβ-selective agonists and antagonists as tools to facilitate the pharmacological analysis of this protein in vitro and in vivo as well as for potential therapeutic interventions. Here we provide experimental evidences that the novel synthetic retinoid BMS948 is an RARβ-selective ligand exhibiting a full transcriptional agonistic activity and activating RARβ as efficiently as the reference agonist TTNPB. In addition, we solved the crystal structures of the RARβ ligand-binding domain in complex with BMS948 and two related compounds, BMS641 and BMS411. These structures provided a rationale to explain how a single retinoid can be at the same time an RARα antagonist and an RARβ full agonist, and revealed the structural basis of partial agonism. Finally, in addition to revealing that a flip by 180° of the amide linker, that usually confers RARα selectivity, accounts for the RARβ selectivity of BMS948, the structural analysis uncovers guidelines for the rational design of RARβ-selective antagonists. PMID:25933005

  18. Selectivity of ORC binding sites and the relation to replication timing, fragile sites, and deletions in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Benoit; Ji, Zhe; Struhl, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds sites from which DNA replication is initiated. We address ORC binding selectivity in vivo by mapping ∼52,000 ORC2 binding sites throughout the human genome. The ORC binding profile is broader than those of sequence-specific transcription factors, suggesting that ORC is not bound or recruited to specific DNA sequences. Instead, ORC binds nonspecifically to open (DNase I-hypersensitive) regions containing active chromatin marks such as H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation. ORC sites in early and late replicating regions have similar properties, but there are far more ORC sites in early replicating regions. This suggests that replication timing is due primarily to ORC density and stochastic firing of origins. Computational simulation of stochastic firing from identified ORC sites is in accord with replication timing data. Large genomic regions with a paucity of ORC sites are strongly associated with common fragile sites and recurrent deletions in cancers. We suggest that replication origins, replication timing, and replication-dependent chromosome breaks are determined primarily by the genomic distribution of activator proteins at enhancers and promoters. These activators recruit nucleosome-modifying complexes to create the appropriate chromatin structure that allows ORC binding and subsequent origin firing. PMID:27436900

  19. Adaptive Evolution and the Birth of CTCF Binding Sites in the Drosophila Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaochun; Zhang, Yong E.; Nègre, Nicolas; Chen, Sidi; Long, Manyuan; White, Kevin P.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the physical interaction between cis-regulatory DNA sequences and proteins drive the evolution of gene expression. However, it has proven difficult to accurately quantify evolutionary rates of such binding change or to estimate the relative effects of selection and drift in shaping the binding evolution. Here we examine the genome-wide binding of CTCF in four species of Drosophila separated by between ∼2.5 and 25 million years. CTCF is a highly conserved protein known to be associated with insulator sequences in the genomes of human and Drosophila. Although the binding preference for CTCF is highly conserved, we find that CTCF binding itself is highly evolutionarily dynamic and has adaptively evolved. Between species, binding divergence increased linearly with evolutionary distance, and CTCF binding profiles are diverging rapidly at the rate of 2.22% per million years (Myr). At least 89 new CTCF binding sites have originated in the Drosophila melanogaster genome since the most recent common ancestor with Drosophila simulans. Comparing these data to genome sequence data from 37 different strains of Drosophila melanogaster, we detected signatures of selection in both newly gained and evolutionarily conserved binding sites. Newly evolved CTCF binding sites show a significantly stronger signature for positive selection than older sites. Comparative gene expression profiling revealed that expression divergence of genes adjacent to CTCF binding site is significantly associated with the gain and loss of CTCF binding. Further, the birth of new genes is associated with the birth of new CTCF binding sites. Our data indicate that binding of Drosophila CTCF protein has evolved under natural selection, and CTCF binding evolution has shaped both the evolution of gene expression and genome evolution during the birth of new genes. PMID:23139640

  20. A molecular model of the folate binding site of Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southerland, William M.

    1994-04-01

    The inhibition of Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) continues to be the major treatment strategy for P. carinii pneumonia (PCP). The design of new anti-pneumocystis agents would be significantly enhanced by the availability of a 3D model of the methotrexate (MTX) binding site of the P. carinii DHFR. However, an X-ray crystal structure of the P. carinii DHFR is not yet available. Alignment of the amino acid sequences of P. carinii and Lactobacillus casei DHFRs indicates that the two proteins show approximately 80% homology among MTX binding-site residues. This high level of homology suggests that the L. casei DHFR MTX binding-site structure could serve as a structural template in developing a model of the P. carinii DHFR MTX binding site. Therefore, the X-ray crystal structure of L. casei DHFR was used to develop a 3D model of the methotrexate binding site of P. carinii DHFR. The molecular modeling and dynamics software QUANTA/CHARMm was used. Amino acid residue mutations and deletions were performed using QUANTA and macromolecular minimizations were achieved with CHARMm. The MTX binding-site residues of L. casei DHFR were mutated to the corresponding residues of the P. carinii DHFR sequence. The resulting structure was extensively minimized. The resulting P. carinii MTX binding-site model showed significant differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns from the L. casei MTX binding site. Also, the P. carinii site is more hydrophobic than the corresponding L. casei site. Analysis of atom-to-atom close contacts between methotrexate and protein binding-site residues indicates that the P. carinii MTX binding-site complex is primarily stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, while the L. casei complex is mostly stabilized by electrostatic interactions. The model is consistent with the observed increased sensitivity of P. carinii DHFR to lipid-soluble inhibitors and provides a rational basis for the design of new anti-pneumocystis agents.

  1. Characterization of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland and median eminence of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Calvo, J.R.; Rubio, A.; Goberna, R.; Guerrero, J.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of specific melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland (HG) and median eminence (ME) of the rat was studied using ({sup 125}I)melatonin. Binding of melatonin to membrane crude preparations of both tissues was dependent on time and temperature. Thus, maximal binding was obtained at 37{degree}C after 30-60 min incubation. Binding was also dependent on protein concentration. The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin was saturable, exhibiting only the class of binding sites in both tissues. The dissociation constants (Kd) were 170 and 190 pM for ME and HG, respectively. The concentration of the binding sites in ME was 8 fmol/mg protein, and in the HG 4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin to ME or HG was inhibited by increasing concentration of native melatonin; 50% inhibition was observed at about 702 and 422 nM for ME and HG, respectively. Additionally, the ({sup 125}I)melatonin binding to the crude membranes was not affected by the addition of different drugs such as norepinephrine, isoproterenol, phenylephrine, propranolol, or prazosin. The results confirm the presence of melatonin binding sites in median eminence and show, for the first time, the existence of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland.

  2. Autoradiographic Mapping of 5-HT(1B/1D) Binding Sites in the Rhesus Monkey Brain Using [carbonyl-C]zolmitriptan.

    PubMed

    Lindhe, Orjan; Almqvist, Per; Kågedal, Matts; Gustafsson, Sven-Åke; Bergström, Mats; Nilsson, Dag; Antoni, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Zolmitriptan is a serotonin 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist that is an effective and well-tolerated drug for migraine treatment. In a human positron emission tomography study, [(11)C]zolmitriptan crossed the blood-brain barrier but no clear pattern of regional uptake was discernable. The objective of this study was to map the binding of [(11)C]zolmitriptan in Rhesus monkey brain using whole hemisphere in vitro autoradiography with [(11)C]zolmitriptan as a radioligand. In saturation studies, [(11)C]zolmitriptan showed specific (90%) binding to a population of high-affinity binding sites (Kd 0.95-5.06 nM). There was regional distribution of binding sites with the highest density in the ventral pallidum, followed by the external globus pallidus, substantia nigra, visual cortex, and nucleus accumbens. In competitive binding studies with 5-HT(1) receptor antagonists, [(11)C]zolmitriptan binding was blocked by selective 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) ligands in all target areas. There was no appreciable change in binding with the addition of a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist.

  3. Crystal structure of equine serum albumin in complex with cetirizine reveals a novel drug binding site.

    PubMed

    Handing, Katarzyna B; Shabalin, Ivan G; Szlachta, Karol; Majorek, Karolina A; Minor, Wladek

    2016-03-01

    Serum albumin (SA) is the main transporter of drugs in mammalian blood plasma. Here, we report the first crystal structure of equine serum albumin (ESA) in complex with antihistamine drug cetirizine at a resolution of 2.1Å. Cetirizine is bound in two sites--a novel drug binding site (CBS1) and the fatty acid binding site 6 (CBS2). Both sites differ from those that have been proposed in multiple reports based on equilibrium dialysis and fluorescence studies for mammalian albumins as cetirizine binding sites. We show that the residues forming the binding pockets in ESA are highly conserved in human serum albumin (HSA), and suggest that binding of cetirizine to HSA will be similar. In support of that hypothesis, we show that the dissociation constants for cetirizine binding to CBS2 in ESA and HSA are identical using tryptophan fluorescence quenching. Presence of lysine and arginine residues that have been previously reported to undergo nonenzymatic glycosylation in CBS1 and CBS2 suggests that cetirizine transport in patients with diabetes could be altered. A review of all available SA structures from the PDB shows that in addition to the novel drug binding site we present here (CBS1), there are two pockets on SA capable of binding drugs that do not overlap with fatty acid binding sites and have not been discussed in published reviews.

  4. In vivo binding of [11C]SKF 75670 and [11C]SKF 82957 in rat brain: two dopamine D-1 receptor agonist ligands.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, J N; Wilson, A A; Valente, C M; Hussey, D; Wilson, D; Houle, S

    1996-01-01

    The high affinity benzazepine D1 agonists SKF 75670 and SKF 82957 labeled with C-11 were evaluated in vivo in rats as potential radioligands for imaging dopamine D1 receptors with positron emission tomography (PET). Their in vivo pharmacological profile revealed selective binding for both tracers in rat brain regions rich in D1 receptors such as the caudate-putamen. The more lipophilic [11C]SKF 82957 (6-chloro-[11C]SKF 75670) showed a higher brain uptake (more than 2-fold up to 30 min), higher specific uptake in the striatum and higher signal-to-noise ratio (striatum-to-cerebellum = 3.2 +/- 0.4 for [11C]SKF 75670 and 9.7 +/- 2.5 for [11C]SKF 82957 at 60 min post-injection) as compared to [11C]SKF 75670. Both radiotracers exhibited high specificity and selectivity for D1 receptors, since only D1 competitors but not the D2 antagonist sulpiride or the 5-HT2 antagonist ritanserin reduced significantly their binding the striatum with [11C]SKF 75670 or the striatum and olfactory tubercles with [11C]SKF 82957. Previous reports have shown that only D1 agonists can recognize the functional high-affinity state from the low-affinity state of D1 receptors. [11C]SKF 75670 and especially [11C]SKF 82957 are D1 agonist radioligands that can potentially be used to study in vivo the functional high-affinity state of D1 receptors using PET.

  5. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, M. E.; Altenberg, G. A.

    2013-10-15

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides “sandwiched” at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation.

  6. Biochemical study of prolactin binding sites in Xenopus laevis brain and choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Muccioli, G.; Guardabassi, A.; Pattono, P. )

    1990-03-01

    The occurrence of prolactin binding sites in some brain structures (telencephalon, ventral hypothalamus, myelencephalon, hypophysis, and choroid plexus) from Xenopus laevis (anuran amphibian) was studied by the in vitro biochemical technique. The higher binding values were obtained at the level of the choroid plexus and above all of the hypothalamus. On the bases of hormonal specificity and high affinity, these binding sites are very similar to those of prolactin receptors of classical target tissues as well as of those described by us in other structures from Xenopus. To our knowledge, the present results provide the first demonstration of the occurrence of prolactin specific binding sites in Xenopus laevis choroid plexus cells.

  7. 2-([sup 125]I) iodomelatonin binding sites in rat adrenals: Pharmacological characteristics and subcellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Persengiev, S.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Specific binding sites for 2-[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin, a selective radiolabeled melatonin receptor ligand, were detected and characterized in rat adrenal membranes. Saturation studies demonstrated that 2-[[sup 125]I]iodomelatonin binds to a single class of sites with an affinity constant (Kd) of 541 pM and a total binding capacity (Bmax) of 3.23 fmol/mg protein. Competition experiments revealed that the relative order of potency of compounds tested was as follows: 6-chloromelatonin > 2-iodomelatonin > melatonin > 5-methoxytryptamine > 5-methoxytryptophol. The highest density of binding sites was found in membranes from nuclear and mitochondrial subcellular fractions.

  8. Evidence for a non-opioid sigma binding site din the guinea-pig myenteric plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, F.; Pascaud, X.; Vauche, D.; Junien, J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of a binding site to (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 was demonstrated in a guinea-pig myenteric plexus (MYP) membrane preparation. Specific binding to this receptor was saturable, reversible, linear with protein concentration and consisted of two components, a high affinity site and a low affinity site. Morphine and naloxone 10/sup -4/M were unable to displace (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding. Haloperidol, imipramine, ethylketocyclazocine and propranolol were among the most potent compounds to inhibit this specific binding. These results suggest the presence of a non-opioid haloperidol sensitive sigma receptor in the MYP of the guinea-pig.

  9. Acute repeated intracerebroventricular injections of angiotensin II reduce agonist and antagonist radioligand binding in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and median preoptic nucleus in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Speth, Robert C; Vento, Peter J; Carrera, Eduardo J; Gonzalez-Reily, Luz; Linares, Andrea; Santos, Kira; Swindle, Jamala D; Daniels, Derek

    2014-10-02

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates water and saline intakes when injected into the brain of rats. This arises from activation of the AT1 Ang II receptor subtype. Acute repeated injections, however, decrease the water intake response to Ang II without affecting saline intake. Previous studies provide evidence that Ang II-induced water intake is mediated via the classical G protein coupling pathway, whereas the saline intake caused by Ang II is mediated by an ERK 1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway. Accordingly, the different behavioral response to repeated injections of Ang II may reflect a selective effect on G protein coupling. To test this hypothesis, we examined the binding of a radiolabeled agonist ((125)I-sarcosine(1) Ang II) and a radiolabeled antagonist ((125)I-sarcosine(1), isoleucine(8) Ang II) in brain homogenates and tissue sections prepared from rats given repeated injections of Ang II or vehicle. Although no treatment-related differences were found in hypothalamic homogenates, a focus on specific brain structures using receptor autoradiography, found that the desensitization treatment reduced binding of both radioligands in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and median preoptic nucleus (MnPO), but not in the subfornical organ (SFO). Because G protein coupling is reported to have a selective effect on agonist binding without affecting antagonist binding, these findings do not support a G protein uncoupling treatment effect. This suggests that receptor number is more critical to the water intake response than the saline intake response, or that pathways downstream from the G protein mediate desensitization of the water intake response.

  10. In vivo binding of PRDM9 reveals interactions with noncanonical genomic sites

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Corinne; Clément, Julie A.J.; Buard, Jérôme; Leblanc, Benjamin; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Duret, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed an extensive analysis of PRDM9 binding in mouse spermatocytes. Unexpectedly, we identified a noncanonical recruitment of PRDM9 to sites that lack recombination activity and the PRDM9 binding consensus motif. These sites include gene promoters, where PRDM9 is recruited in a DSB-dependent manner. Another subset reveals DSB-independent interactions between PRDM9 and genomic sites, such as the binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF. We propose that these DSB-independent sites result from interactions between hotspot-bound PRDM9 and genomic sequences located on the chromosome axis. PMID:28336543

  11. In vivo binding of PRDM9 reveals interactions with noncanonical genomic sites.

    PubMed

    Grey, Corinne; Clément, Julie A J; Buard, Jérôme; Leblanc, Benjamin; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Duret, Laurent; de Massy, Bernard

    2017-04-01

    In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed an extensive analysis of PRDM9 binding in mouse spermatocytes. Unexpectedly, we identified a noncanonical recruitment of PRDM9 to sites that lack recombination activity and the PRDM9 binding consensus motif. These sites include gene promoters, where PRDM9 is recruited in a DSB-dependent manner. Another subset reveals DSB-independent interactions between PRDM9 and genomic sites, such as the binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF. We propose that these DSB-independent sites result from interactions between hotspot-bound PRDM9 and genomic sequences located on the chromosome axis.

  12. Autoradiographic localization of endothelin-1 binding sites in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems

    SciTech Connect

    Power, R.F.; Wharton, J.; Zhao, Y.; Bloom, S.R.; Polak, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Specific high-affinity binding sites for endothelin-1 (ET-1) have been demonstrated in peripheral tissues using the technique of in vitro receptor autoradiography. Binding was time dependent and saturable and inhibited by coincubation with an excess of unlabeled ET-1 but resistant to dissociation. Binding sites were localized to blood vessels of all sizes including coronary arteries, intrapulmonary vessels, and intrarenal and intrasplenic arteries. In addition, high-affinity binding sites were identified on airway smooth muscle, over alveolar septa, and on nerve trunks. Scatchard analysis of the data revealed a Bmax of 250 amol/mm2 and a Kd of 0.1 nM for the binding of rat tracheal smooth muscle, with similar values for porcine coronary artery. The localization of binding sites is consistent with the known effects of ET-1 and suggests a direct action on specific receptors.

  13. IP3 receptor binds to and sensitizes TRPV4 channel to osmotic stimuli via a calmodulin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Elias, Anna; Lorenzo, Ivan M; Vicente, Rubén; Valverde, Miguel A

    2008-11-14

    Activation of the non-selective cation channel TRPV4 by mechanical and osmotic stimuli requires the involvement of phospholipase A2 and the subsequent production of the arachidonic acid metabolites, epoxieicosatrienoic acids (EET). Previous studies have shown that inositol trisphosphate (IP3) sensitizes TRPV4 to mechanical, osmotic, and direct EET stimulation. We now search for the IP3 receptor-binding site on TRPV4 and its relevance to IP3-mediated sensitization. Three putative sites involved in protein-protein interactions were evaluated: a proline-rich domain (PRD), a calmodulin (CaM)-binding site, and the last four amino acids (DAPL) that show a PDZ-binding motif-like. TRPV4-DeltaCaM-(Delta812-831) channels preserved activation by hypotonicity, 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and EET but lost their physical interaction with IP3 receptor 3 and IP3-mediated sensitization. Deletion of a PDZ-binding motif-like (TRPV4-DeltaDAPL) did not affect channel activity or IP3-mediated sensitization, whereas TRPV4-DeltaPRD-(Delta132-144) resulted in loss of channel function despite correct trafficking. We conclude that IP3-mediated sensitization requires IP3 receptor binding to a TRPV4 C-terminal domain that overlaps with a previously described calmodulin-binding site.

  14. A novel 4 S [3H]beta-naphthoflavone-binding protein in liver cytosol of female Sprague-Dawley rats treated with aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Brauze, D; Malejka-Giganti, D

    2000-01-01

    beta-Naphthoflavone (beta-NF) is a widely used inducer of phase-I and phase-II enzymes controlled by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Studies of competitive binding with (3)H-labelled 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have shown that beta-NF is a high-affinity ligand for AhR and also for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-binding protein, both soluble proteins of rat liver in 8 S and 4 S fractions, respectively, of sucrose gradients. This study examined binding of [(3)H]beta-NF to liver cytosolic proteins of female Sprague-Dawley rats. Treatment of rats with beta-NF, 3-MC, TCDD or alpha-naphthoflavone (alpha-NF) increased the specific [(3)H]beta-NF binding to liver cytosol up to 125-fold that of vehicle (corn oil)-treated rats (<100 fmol/mg of protein). Sucrose gradients revealed a large 4 S and a small 8 S peak of radioactivity from [(3)H]beta-NF binding to cytosols of beta-NF-, 3-MC-, TCDD- or alpha-NF-treated rats. Whereas co-incubation with the unlabelled beta-NF eliminated both peaks, co-incubation with 2,3, 7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) eliminated only the 8 S peak. The sucrose density gradient from [(3)H]TCDD binding to cytosol of beta-NF- or TCDD-treated rats yielded a small 4 S and a larger 8 S peak; only the latter was abolished by co-incubation with TCDF. Thus, the patterns of sedimentation, distribution and elimination of radioactivity from the 8 S fraction of the liver cytosols from beta-NF-, 3-MC-, TCDD- or alpha-NF-treated rats were characteristic for the AhR, whereas those from the 4 S fraction appeared specific for [(3)H]beta-NF binding. The data indicate that potent AhR agonists, TCDD, 3-MC and beta-NF, and to a lesser extent alpha-NF, a weak AhR agonist, induce a 4 S [(3)H]beta-NF-binding protein in liver cytosol of female rats. alpha-NF, beta-NF and 3-MC were effective competitors (80-85% inhibition) of the [(3)H]beta-NF-specific binding to the beta-NF-, 3 MC- or TCDD

  15. Does transcription play a role in creating a condensin binding site?

    PubMed

    Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved condensin complex is essential for the condensation and integrity of chromosomes through cell division. Published data argue that high levels of transcription contribute to specify some condensin-binding sites on chromosomes but the exact role of transcription in this process remains elusive. Here we discuss our recent data addressing the role of transcription in establishing a condensin-binding site.

  16. Activation of a GTP-binding protein and a GTP-binding-protein-coupled receptor kinase (beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1) by a muscarinic receptor m2 mutant lacking phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, K; Haga, K; Haga, T; Moro, O; Sadée, W

    1994-12-01

    A mutant of the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor), lacking a large part of the third intracellular loop, was expressed and purified using the baculovirus/insect cell culture system. The mutant was not phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, as expected from the previous assignment of phosphorylation sites to the central part of the third intracellular loop. However, the m2 receptor mutant was capable of stimulating beta-adrenergic-receptor-kinase-1-mediated phosphorylation of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the m2 phosphorylation sites in an agonist-dependent manner. Both mutant and wild-type m2 receptors reconstituted with the guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G protein), G(o) and G(i)2, displayed guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, as assessed by displacement of [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding with carbamoylcholine, and both stimulated guanosine 5'-3-O-[35S]thiotriphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding in the presence of carbamoylcholine and GDP. The Ki values of carbamoylcholine effects on [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding were indistinguishable for the mutant and wild-type m2 receptors. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the wild-type m2 receptor by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1 did not affect m2 interaction with G proteins as assessed by the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [35S]GTP[S]. These results indicate that (a) the m2 receptor serves both as an activator and as a substrate of beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, and (b) a large part of the third intracellular loop of the m2 receptor does not contribute to interaction with G proteins and its phosphorylation by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase does not uncouple the receptor and G proteins in reconstituted lipid vesicles.

  17. Reduction in lipophilicity improved the solubility, plasma–protein binding, and permeability of tertiary sulfonamide RORc inverse agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Fauber, Benjamin P.; René, Olivier; de Leon Boenig, Gladys; Burton, Brenda; Deng, Yuzhong; Eidenschenk, Céline; Everett, Christine; Gobbi, Alberto; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Johnson, Adam R.; La, Hank; Liimatta, Marya; Lockey, Peter; Norman, Maxine; Ouyang, Wenjun; Wang, Weiru; Wong, Harvey

    2014-08-01

    Using structure-based drug design principles, we identified opportunities to reduce the lipophilicity of our tertiary sulfonamide RORc inverse agonists. The new analogs possessed improved RORc cellular potencies with >77-fold selectivity for RORc over other nuclear receptors in our cell assay suite. The reduction in lipophilicity also led to an increased plasma–protein unbound fraction and improvements in cellular permeability and aqueous solubility.

  18. Are high-affinity progesterone binding site(s) from porcine liver microsomes members of the sigma receptor family?

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Schmieding, K; Falkenstein, E; Wehling, M

    1998-04-24

    Membrane progesterone binding sites have been purified recently from pig liver. Since progesterone is considered as an endogenous sigma (sigma) receptor ligand, these sites were characterized pharmacologically by ligands selective for sigma receptor and dopamine receptor binding sites, and by other drugs from distinct pharmacological classes. Binding studies using the radioligand [3H]progesterone were done in crude membrane preparations and solubilized fractions to determine half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values, from which inhibitory constants (Ki values) were calculated. Radioligand binding was inhibited by the sigma receptor ligands haloperidol, carbetapentane citrate, 1,3-Di(2-tolyl)guanidine (DTG), R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2 aminopropane HCl (R(-)-PPAAP HCl), or sigma receptor antagonists like (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine HCl (R(+)-PPP HCl) and cis-9-[3-(3,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)propyl]-9H-carbazole dihydrochloride (rimcazole 2HCl). The hierarchy of inhibitory action was not fully compatible with either sigma receptor class I (moderate affinity of pentazocine, diphenylhydantoin (phenytoin) insensitivity) or II sites (high affinity of carbetapentane). The data thus suggest that progesterone binding sites in porcine liver membranes are related to the sigma receptor binding site superfamily, but may represent a particular species with progesterone specificity.

  19. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  20. Analysis of transcription-factor binding-site evolution by using the Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancliff, Mark; Park, Jeong-Man

    2016-12-01

    We investigate a quasi-species mutation-selection model of transcription-factor binding-site evolution. By considering the mesa and the crater fitness landscapes designed to describe these binding sites and point mutations, we derive an evolution equation for the population distribution of binding sequences. In the long-length limit, the evolution equation is replaced by a Hamilton-Jacobi equation which we solve for the stationary state solution. From the stationary solution, we derive the population distributions and find that an error threshold, separating populations in which the binding site does or does not evolve, only exists for certain values of the fitness parameters. A phase diagram in this parameter space is derived and shows a critical line below which no error threshold exists. We also investigate the evolution of multiple binding sites for the same transcription factor. For two binding sites, we perform an analysis similar to that for a single site and determine a phase diagram showing different phases with both, one, or no binding sites selected. In the phase diagram, the phase boundary between the one-or-two selected site phases is qualitatively different for the mesa and the crater fitness landscapes. As fitness benefits for a second bound transcription factor tend to zero, the minimum mutation rate at which the two-site phase occurs diverges in the mesa landscape whereas the mutation rate at the phase boundary tends to a finite value for the crater landscape.

  1. Label-free microscale thermophoresis discriminates sites and affinity of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Susanne A I; Wienken, Christoph J; Geissler, Sandra; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Reiter, Alwin; Trauner, Dirk; Braun, Dieter; Baaske, Philipp

    2012-10-15

    Look, no label! Microscale thermophoresis makes use of the intrinsic fluorescence of proteins to quantify the binding affinities of ligands and discriminate between binding sites. This method is suitable for studying binding interactions of very small amounts of protein in solution. The binding of ligands to iGluR membrane receptors, small-molecule inhibitorss to kinase p38, aptamers to thrombin, and Ca(2+) ions to synaptotagmin was quantified.

  2. Characterization of Naphthaleneacetic Acid Binding to Receptor Sites on Cellular Membranes of Maize Coleoptile Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Peter M.; Dohrmann, Ulrike; Hertel, Rainer

    1977-01-01

    Characteristics of and optimum conditions for saturable (“specific”) binding of [14C]naphthaleneacetic acid to sites located on membranous particles from maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles are described. Most, if not all, of the specific binding appears to be due to a single kinetic class of binding sites having a KD of 5 to 7 × 10−7m for naphthalene-1-acetic acid (NAA). Binding of NAA is insensitive to high monovalent salt concentrations, indicating that binding is not primarily ionic. However, specific binding is inhibited by Mg2+ or Ca2+ above 5 mm. Specific binding is improved by organic acids, especially citrate. Binding is heat-labile and is sensitive to agents that act either on proteins or on lipids. Specific binding is reversibly inactivated by reducing agents such as dithioerythritol; a reducible group, possibly a disulfide group, may be located at the binding site and required for its function. The affinity of the specific binding sites for auxins is modified by an unidentified dialyzable, heat-stable, apparently amphoteric, organic factor (“supernatant factor”) found in maize tissue. PMID:16659851

  3. Incorporating replacement free energy of binding-site waters in molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanzi; Zhao, Lifeng; Peng, Shiming; Huang, Niu

    2014-09-01

    Binding-site water molecules play a crucial role in protein-ligand recognition, either being displaced upon ligand binding or forming water bridges to stabilize the complex. However, rigorously treating explicit binding-site waters is challenging in molecular docking, which requires to fully sample ensembles of waters and to consider the free energy cost of replacing waters. Here, we describe a method to incorporate structural and energetic properties of binding-site waters into molecular docking. We first developed a solvent property analysis (SPA) program to compute the replacement free energies of binding-site water molecules by post-processing molecular dynamics trajectories obtained from ligand-free protein structure simulation in explicit water. Next, we implemented a distance-dependent scoring term into DOCK scoring function to take account of the water replacement free energy cost upon ligand binding. We assessed this approach in protein targets containing important binding-site waters, and we demonstrated that our approach is reliable in reproducing the crystal binding geometries of protein-ligand-water complexes, as well as moderately improving the ligand docking enrichment performance. In addition, SPA program (free available to academic users upon request) may be applied in identifying hot-spot binding-site residues and structure-based lead optimization.

  4. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/-S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and trazolate, and a diaryl-triazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin

  5. Detecting O2 binding sites in protein cavities

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Ryo; Yoshimura, Yuichi; Xue, Mengjun; Kameda, Tomoshi; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Internal cavities are important elements in protein structure, dynamics, stability and function. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate the binding of molecular oxygen (O2) to cavities in a well-studied model for ligand binding, the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. On increasing the O2 concentration to 8.9 mM, changes in 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts and signal broadening were observed specifically for backbone amide and side chain methyl groups located around the two hydrophobic cavities of the protein. O2-induced longitudinal relaxation enhancements for amide and methyl protons could be adequately accounted for by paramagnetic dipolar relaxation. These data provide the first experimental demonstration that O2 binds specifically to the hydrophobic, and not the hydrophilic cavities, in a protein. Molecular dynamics simulations visualized the rotational and translational motions of O2 in the cavities, as well as the binding and egress of O2, suggesting that the channel consisting of helices D, E, G, H, and J could be the potential gateway for ligand binding to the protein. Due to strong paramagnetic relaxation effects, O2 gas-pressure NMR measurements can detect hydrophobic cavities when populated to as little as 1%, and thereby provide a general and highly sensitive method for detecting oxygen binding in proteins. PMID:26830762

  6. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  7. A permanent ion binding site located between two gates of the Shaker K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Harris, R E; Larsson, H P; Isacoff, E Y

    1998-04-01

    K+ channels can be occupied by multiple permeant ions that appear to bind at discrete locations in the conduction pathway. Neither the molecular nature of the binding sites nor their relation to the activation or inactivation gates that control ion flow are well understood. We used the permeant ion Ba2+ as a K+ analog to probe for K+ ion binding sites and their relationship to the activation and inactivation gates. Our data are consistent with the existence of three single-file permeant-ion binding sites: one deep site, which binds Ba2+ with high affinity, and two more external sites whose occupancy influences Ba2+ movement to and from the deep site. All three sites are accessible to the external solution in channels with a closed activation gate, and the deep site lies between the activation gate and the C-type inactivation gate. We identify mutations in the P-region that disrupt two of the binding sites, as well as an energy barrier between the sites that may be part of the selectivity filter.

  8. Evaluation of the Significance of Starch Surface Binding Sites on Human Pancreatic α-Amylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Caner, Sami; Kwan, Emily; Li, Chunmin; Brayer, Gary D; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-11-01

    Starch provides the major source of caloric intake in many diets. Cleavage of starch into malto-oligosaccharides in the gut is catalyzed by pancreatic α-amylase. These oligosaccharides are then further cleaved by gut wall α-glucosidases to release glucose, which is absorbed into the bloodstream. Potential surface binding sites for starch on the pancreatic amylase, distinct from the active site of the amylase, have been identified through X-ray crystallographic analyses. The role of these sites in the degradation of both starch granules and soluble starch was probed by the generation of a series of surface variants modified at each site to disrupt binding. Kinetic analysis of the binding and/or cleavage of substrates ranging from simple maltotriosides to soluble starch and insoluble starch granules has allowed evaluation of the potential role of each such surface site. In this way, two key surface binding sites, on the same face as the active site, are identified. One site, containing a pair of aromatic residues, is responsible for attachment to starch granules, while a second site featuring a tryptophan residue around which a malto-oligosaccharide wraps is shown to heavily influence soluble starch binding and hydrolysis. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms by which enzymes tackle the degradation of largely insoluble polymers and also present some new approaches to the interrogation of the binding sites involved.

  9. A permanent ion binding site located between two gates of the Shaker K+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, R E; Larsson, H P; Isacoff, E Y

    1998-01-01

    K+ channels can be occupied by multiple permeant ions that appear to bind at discrete locations in the conduction pathway. Neither the molecular nature of the binding sites nor their relation to the activation or inactivation gates that control ion flow are well understood. We used the permeant ion Ba2+ as a K+ analog to probe for K+ ion binding sites and their relationship to the activation and inactivation gates. Our data are consistent with the existence of three single-file permeant-ion binding sites: one deep site, which binds Ba2+ with high affinity, and two more external sites whose occupancy influences Ba2+ movement to and from the deep site. All three sites are accessible to the external solution in channels with a closed activation gate, and the deep site lies between the activation gate and the C-type inactivation gate. We identify mutations in the P-region that disrupt two of the binding sites, as well as an energy barrier between the sites that may be part of the selectivity filter. PMID:9545043

  10. Characterization of the binding sites for dicarboxylic acids on bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Tonsgard, J H; Meredith, S C

    1991-01-01

    Dicarboxylic acids are prominent features of several diseases, including Reye's syndrome and inborn errors of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, dicarboxylic acids are potentially toxic to cellular processes. Previous studies [Tonsgard, Mendelson & Meredith (1988) J. Clin. Invest. 82, 1567-1573] demonstrated that long-chain dicarboxylic acids have a single high-affinity binding site and between one and three lower-affinity sites on albumin. Medium-chain-length dicarboxylic acids have a single low-affinity site. We further characterized dicarboxylic acid binding to albumin in order to understand the potential effects of drugs and other ligands on dicarboxylic acid binding and toxicity. Progesterone and oleate competitively inhibit octadecanedioic acid binding to the single high-affinity site. Octanoate inhibits binding to the low-affinity sites. Dansylated probes for subdomain 2AB inhibit dodecanedioic acid binding whereas probes for subdomain 3AB do not. In contrast, low concentrations of octadecanedioic acid inhibit the binding of dansylated probes to subdomain 3AB and 2AB. L-Tryptophan, which binds in subdomain 3AB, inhibits hexadecanedioic acid binding but has no effect on dodecanedioic acid. Bilirubin and acetylsalicylic acid, which bind in subdomain 2AB, inhibit the binding of medium-chain and long-chain dicarboxylic acids. Our results suggest that long-chain dicarboxylic acids bind in subdomains 2C, 3AB and 2AB. The single low-affinity binding site for medium-chain dicarboxylic acids is in subdomain 2AB. These studies suggest that dicarboxylic acids are likely to be unbound in disease states and may be potentially toxic. PMID:2064600

  11. Transcription Factor Binding Site Positioning in Yeast: Proximal Promoter Motifs Characterize TATA-Less Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of ‘proximal promoter motifs’ (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters. PMID:21931670

  12. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    PubMed

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  13. Functional identification and characterization of sodium binding sites in Na symporters.

    PubMed

    Loo, Donald D F; Jiang, Xuan; Gorraitz, Edurne; Hirayama, Bruce A; Wright, Ernest M

    2013-11-19

    Sodium cotransporters from several different gene families belong to the leucine transporter (LeuT) structural family. Although the identification of Na(+) in binding sites is beyond the resolution of the structures, two Na(+) binding sites (Na1 and Na2) have been proposed in LeuT. Na2 is conserved in the LeuT family but Na1 is not. A biophysical method has been used to measure sodium dissociation constants (Kd) of wild-type and mutant human sodium glucose cotransport (hSGLT1) proteins to identify the Na(+) binding sites in hSGLT1. The Na1 site is formed by residues in the sugar binding pocket, and their mutation influences sodium binding to Na1 but not to Na2. For the canonical Na2 site formed by two -OH side chains, S392 and S393, and three backbone carbonyls, mutation of S392 to cysteine increased the sodium Kd by sixfold. This was accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the apparent sugar and phlorizin affinities. We suggest that mutation of S392 in the Na2 site produces a structural rearrangement of the sugar binding pocket to disrupt both the binding of the second Na(+) and the binding of sugar. In contrast, the S393 mutations produce no significant changes in sodium, sugar, and phlorizin affinities. We conclude that the Na2 site is conserved in hSGLT1, the side chain of S392 and the backbone carbonyl of S393 are important in the first Na(+) binding, and that Na(+) binding to Na2 promotes binding to Na1 and also sugar binding.

  14. In vivo brain dopaminergic receptor site mapping using /sup 75/Se-labeled pergolide analogs: the effects of various dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, A.

    1986-01-01

    Perogolide mesylate is a new synthetic ergoline derivative which is reported to possess agonistic activity at central dopamine receptor sites in the brain. The authors have synthesized a (/sup 75/Se)-radiolabeled pergolide mesylate derivative, (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate, which, after i.v. administration to mature male rats, showed a time course differentiation in the uptake of this radiolabeled compound in isolated peripheral and central (brain) tissues that are known to be rich in dopamine receptor sites. Further studies were conducted in which the animals were preexposed to the dopamine receptor agonist SKF-38393, as well as the dopamine receptor antagonists (+)-butaclamol, (-)-butaclamol, (+/-)-butaclamol and (-)-chloroethylnorapomorphine, to substantiate the specific peripheral and central localization patterns of (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate. Further investigations were also conducted in which the animals received an i.v. administration of N-isopropyl-l-123-p-iodoamphetamine ((/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine). However, (/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine did not demonstrate a specific affinity for any type of receptor site in the brain. These investigations further substantiated the fact that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate does cross the blood-brain barrier is quickly localized at specific dopamine receptor sites in the intact rat brain and that this localization pattern can be affected by preexposure to different dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Therefore, these investigations provided further evidence that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate and other radiolabeled ergoline analogs might be useful as brain dopamine receptor localization radiopharmaceuticals.

  15. Kinetic and Equilibrium Analysis of Estradiol in Uterus: A Model of Binding-Site Distribution in Uterine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David; Gorski, Jack

    1972-01-01

    Kinetic and equilibrium binding studies indicate that the process by which the complex of estradiol-binding protein is transferred to the cell nuclei is very rapid and is readily reversible in intact cells; that is, the cytosol and nuclear binding sites are in a rapidly reversible equilibrium. Binding of the hormone appears to shift this equilibrium such that a large percent of the filled binding sites become associated with the nuclear fraction. A model is presented to show that the quantity of filled nuclear binding sites present at any estradiol concentration can be determined strictly by the initial binding between the hormone and the cytosol binding sites. PMID:4508334

  16. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  17. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Thomas T.

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  18. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin.

    PubMed

    Eghorn, Laura F; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Bay, Tina; Higgins, David; Frølund, Bente; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-10-05

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA function at δ-containing GABAA receptors, and the naturally occurring flavonoid catechin. These compounds increased [3H]NCS-382 binding to 185-272% in high micromolar concentrations. Monastrol and (+)-catechin significantly reduced [3H]NCS-382 dissociation rates and induced conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed modulation was critically probe-dependent. Both monastrol and (+)-catechin were agonists at recombinant α4β3δ receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. When monastrol and GHB were co-applied no changes were seen compared to the individual responses. In summary, we have identified the compounds monastrol and catechin as the first allosteric modulators of GHB high-affinity binding sites. Despite their relatively weak affinity, these compounds may aid in further characterization of the GHB high-affinity sites that are likely to represent certain GABAA receptors.

  19. Genome wide features, distribution and correlations of NF-Y binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zambelli, Federico; Pavesi, Giulio

    2016-10-18

    NF-Y is a trimeric transcription factor that binds on DNA the CCAAT-box motif. In this article we reviewed and complemented with additional bioinformatic analysis existing data on genome-wide NF-Y binding characterization in human, reaching the following main conclusions: (1) about half of NF-Y binding sites are located at promoters, about 60-80 base pairs from transcription start sites; NF-Y binding to distal genomic regions takes place at inactive chromatin loci and/or DNA repetitive elements more often than active enhancers; (2) on almost half of its binding sites, regardless of their genomic localization (promoters or distal regions), NF-Y finds on DNA more than one CCAAT-box, and most of those multiple CCAAT binding loci present precise spacing and organization of the elements composing them; (3) there exists a well defined class of transcription factors that show genome-wide co-localization with NF-Y. Some of them lack their canonical binding site in binding regions overlapping with NF-Y, hence hinting at NF-Y mediated recruitment, while others show a precise positioning on DNA of their binding sites with respect to the CCAAT box bound by NF-Y. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear Factor Y in Development and Disease, edited by Prof. Roberto Mantovani.

  20. Binding of [3H]SCH23390 to a non-dopaminergic site in bovine kidney.

    PubMed

    Hollis, C M; Turner, J D; Strange, P G

    1992-05-08

    Binding of the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist [3H]SCH23390 to bovine renal cortical membranes has been studied. Specific binding of [3H]SCH23390 was saturable and reversible and stereoisomers of SCH23390 competed stereoselectively. In contrast, competition with the isomers of butaclamol was not stereoselective and dopamine failed to compete for the [3H]SCH23390 binding site. The site is therefore not a D1 dopamine receptor. Competition studies with a very wide range of compounds failed to define the nature of the [3H]SCH23390 binding sites in renal cortex whereas in parallel studies the characteristics of [3H]SCH23390 binding in caudate nucleus were entirely consistent with those of D1 dopamine receptors. The nature of [3H]SCH23390 binding in preparations of tubular and glomerular membranes was found to be virtually identical to those of crude renal cortical membranes indicating lack of compartmentation of these sites. Autoradiographic studies of [3H]SCH23390 binding in bovine kidney showed significantly higher levels of binding sites in renal cortex compared with renal medulla and this was confirmed by direct ligand binding studies.

  1. Pharmacological specificity of some psychotomimetic and antipsychotic agents for the sigma and PCP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Itzhak, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacological specificity of representative psychotomimetic agents such a phencyclidine (PCP) analogs, opiate benzomorphans and several antipsychotic agents was assessed for the sigma and PCP binding sites. In a series of binding experiments, in rat brain membranes, sigma and PCP binding sites were labeled with (/sup 3/H)-1-(1-(3-hydroxyphenyl) cyclohexyl) piperidine ((/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH), (+)(/sup 3/H)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047) and (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-(3-hydroxy-phenyl)-N-(1-propyl) piperidine and ((+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP). PCP analogs inhibit potently high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding and (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 binding, moderately the low affinity binding component of (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and very weakly (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding. (+)SKF 10047 and cyclazocine are potent to moderate inhibitors of (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047, high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PCP-3-OH binding. The antipsychotic agents display high affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding sites, moderate affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 sites and have no effect on either the high or low affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding. 20 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Heparanase Activates Antithrombin through the Binding to Its Heparin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Águila, Sonia; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that participates in morphogenesis, tissue repair, heparan sulphates turnover and immune response processes. It is over-expressed in tumor cells favoring the metastasis as it penetrates the endothelial layer that lines blood vessels and facilitates the metastasis by degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix. Heparanase may also affect the hemostatic system in a non-enzymatic manner, up-regulating the expression of tissue factor, which is the initiator of blood coagulation, and dissociating tissue factor pathway inhibitor on the cell surface membrane of endothelial and tumor cells, thus resulting in a procoagulant state. Trying to check the effect of heparanase on heparin, a highly sulphated glycosaminoglycan, when it activates antithrombin, our results demonstrated that heparanase, but not proheparanase, interacted directly with antithrombin in a non-covalent manner. This interaction resulted in the activation of antithrombin, which is the most important endogenous anticoagulant. This activation mainly accelerated FXa inhibition, supporting an allosteric activation effect. Heparanase bound to the heparin binding site of antithrombin as the activation of Pro41Leu, Arg47Cys, Lys114Ala and Lys125Alaantithrombin mutants was impaired when it was compared to wild type antithrombin. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis showed that heparanase induced an activating conformational change in antithrombin similar to that induced by heparin and with a KD of 18.81 pM. In conclusion, under physiological pH and low levels of tissue factor, heparanase may exert a non-enzymatic function interacting and activating the inhibitory function of antithrombin. PMID:27322195

  3. Multiple sup 3 H-oxytocin binding sites in rat myometrial plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Crankshaw, D.; Gaspar, V.; Pliska, V. )

    1990-01-01

    The affinity spectrum method has been used to analyse binding isotherms for {sup 3}H-oxytocin to rat myometrial plasma membranes. Three populations of binding sites with dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.6-1.5 x 10(-9), 0.4-1.0 x 10(-7) and 7 x 10(-6) mol/l were identified and their existence verified by cluster analysis based on similarities between Kd, binding capacity and Hill coefficient. When experimental values were compared to theoretical curves constructed using the estimated binding parameters, good fits were obtained. Binding parameters obtained by this method were not influenced by the presence of GTP gamma S (guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate) in the incubation medium. The binding parameters agree reasonably well with those found in uterine cells, they support the existence of a medium affinity site and may allow for an explanation of some of the discrepancies between binding and response in this system.

  4. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time.

  5. Immunomodulatory role of melatonin: specific binding sites in human and rodent lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Calvo, J R; Rafii-el-Idrissi, M; Pozo, D; Guerrero, J M

    1995-04-01

    This paper reviews the evidence that supports the hypothesis of the existence of specific binding sites for melatonin on immune cells. These binding sites have been described in human blood lymphocytes and granulocytes, and thymus, spleen, and bursa of Fabricius from different rodents and birds. The dissociation constant values of these binding sites are in the 0.1-1 nM range, suggesting that melatonin may play a physiological role in lymphocyte regulation. Moreover, melatonin binding sites appear to be modulated by guanine nucleotides. Therefore, in addition to other mechanisms described for the regulation of immune function by melatonin, a direct mechanism of regulation can be involved via binding of melatonin by immunocompetent cells.

  6. Autoradiographic localization of peptide YY and neuropeptide Y binding sites in the medulla oblongata

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, R.A.; McDonald, T.J.; Robertson, H.A.

    1988-09-01

    Peptide YY is a highly potent emetic when given intravenously in dogs. We hypothesized that the area postrema, a small brain stem nucleus that acts as a chemoreceptive trigger zone for vomiting and lies outside the blood-brain barrier, might have receptors that PYY would bind to, in order to mediate the emetic response. We prepared (/sup 125/I)PYY and used autoradiography to show that high affinity binding sites for this ligand were highly localized in the area postrema and related nuclei of the dog medulla oblongata. Furthermore, the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites in the rat medulla oblongata was very similar to that in the dog; the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites throughout the rat brain was seen to be similar to the distribution of (/sup 125/I)NPY binding sites.

  7. Cluster Analysis of p53 Binding Site Sequences Reveals Subsets with Different Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Hyun; Latysheva, Natasha S.; Iggo, Richard D.; Barker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    p53 is an important regulator of cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis and metabolism, and is frequently mutated in tumors. It functions as a tetramer, where each component dimer binds to a decameric DNA region known as a response element. We identify p53 binding site subtypes and examine the functional and evolutionary properties of these subtypes. We start with over 1700 known binding sites and, with no prior labeling, identify two sets of response elements by unsupervised clustering. When combined, they give rise to three types of p53 binding sites. We find that probabilistic and alignment-based assessments of cross-species conservation show no strong evidence of differential conservation between types of binding sites. In contrast, functional analysis of the genes most proximal to the binding sites provides strong bioinformatic evidence of functional differentiation between the three types of binding sites. Our results are consistent with recent structural data identifying two conformations of the L1 loop in the DNA binding domain, suggesting that they reflect biologically meaningful groups imposed by the p53 protein structure. PMID:27812278

  8. Cooperative binding of an Ultrabithorax homeodomain protein to nearby and distant DNA sites.

    PubMed Central

    Beachy, P A; Varkey, J; Young, K E; von Kessler, D P; Sun, B I; Ekker, S C

    1993-01-01

    Cooperativity in binding of regulatory proteins to multiple DNA sites can heighten the sensitivity and specificity of the transcriptional response. We report here the cooperative DNA-binding properties of a developmentally active regulatory protein encoded by the Drosophila homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx). We show that naturally occurring binding sites for the Ubx-encoded protein contain clusters of multiple individual binding site sequences. Such sites can form complexes containing a dozen or more Ubx-encoded protein molecules, with simultaneous cooperative interactions between adjacent and distant DNA sites. The distant mode of interaction involves a DNA looping mechanism; both modes appear to enhance transcriptional activation in a simple yeast assay system. We found that cooperative binding is dependent on sequences outside the homeodomain, and we have identified regions predicted to form coiled coils carboxy terminal to the homeodomains of the Ubx-encoded protein and several other homeotic proteins. On the basis of our findings, we propose a multisite integrative model of homeotic protein action in which functional regulatory elements can be built from a few high-affinity sites, from many lower-affinity sites, or from sites of some intermediate number and affinity. An important corollary of this model is that even small differences in binding of homeotic proteins to individual sites could be summed to yield large overall differences in binding to multiple sites. This model is consistent with reports that homeodomain protein targets contain multiple individual binding site sequences distributed throughout sizable DNA regions. Also consistent is a recent report that sequences carboxy terminal to the Ubx homeodomain can contribute to segmental specificity. Images PMID:8105373

  9. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and tracazolate, and a diaryltriazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin and LY81067 on the saturable binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS in cortical membranes are compared. The present findings are consistent with the interpretation that /sup 35/S-TBPS bind at or near the picrotoxin-sensitive anion recognition sites of the GABA/benzodiazepine/picrotoxin receptor complex.

  10. Protein binding site analysis for drug discovery using a computational fragment-based method.

    PubMed

    Ludington, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    One of the most powerful tools for designing drug molecules is an understanding of the target protein's binding site. Identifying key amino acids and understanding the electronic, steric, and solvation properties of the site enables the design of potent ligands. Of equal importance for the success of a drug discovery program is the evaluation of binding site druggability. Determining, a priori, if a particular binding site has the appropriate character to bind drug-like ligands saves research time and money.While there are a variety of experimental and computational techniques to identify and characterize binding sites, the focus of this chapter is on Binding Site Analysis (BSA) using virtual fragment simulations. The methodology of the technique is described, along with examples of successful application to drug discovery programs. BSA both indicates if a protein is a viable target for drug discovery and provides a roadmap for designing ligands. Using a computational fragment-based method is a effective means of understanding of a binding site.

  11. Host-Guest Binding-Site-Tunable Self-Assembly of Stimuli-Responsive Supramolecular Polymers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hao; Qi, Miao; Liu, Yuyang; Tian, Wei

    2016-06-13

    Despite the remarkable progress made in controllable self-assembly of stimuli-responsive supramolecular polymers (SSPs), a basic issue that has not been consideration to date is the essential binding site. The noncovalent binding sites, which connect the building blocks and endow supramolecular polymers with their ability to respond to stimuli, are expected to strongly affect the self-assembly of SSPs. Herein, the design and synthesis of a dual-stimuli thermo- and photoresponsive Y-shaped supramolecular polymer (SSP2) with two adjacent β-cyclodextrin/azobenzene (β-CD/Azo) binding sites, and another SSP (SSP1) with similar building blocks, but only one β-CD/Azo binding site as a control, are described. Upon gradually increasing the polymer solution temperature or irradiating with UV light, SSP2 self-assemblies with a higher binding-site distribution density; exhibits a flower-like morphology, smaller size, and more stable dynamic aggregation process; and greater controllability for drug-release behavior than those observed with SSP1 self-assemblies. The host-guest binding-site-tunable self-assembly was attributed to the positive cooperativity generated among adjacent binding sites on the surfaces of SSP2 self-assemblies. This work is beneficial for precisely controlling the structural parameters and controlled release function of SSP self-assemblies.

  12. A functional study of concanavalin A-histamine binding site overlap in Tetrahymena phagocytosis test.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Darvas, Z; László, V

    1983-01-01

    Treatment with histamine stimulated the phagocytotic activity of the Tetrahymena to a measurable degree, which was still demonstrable after a week (about 40 generations). Concanavalin A, which binds to the same membrane binding site as histamine, inhibited the stimulatory action of subsequently added histamine, but did not in itself influence phagocytotic activity in any way. The inhibitory effect of Con A on the histamine binding site proved to be dose-dependent. These observations stress the importance of investigating the functional context--as sole realistic measure--of receptor--ligand bindings.

  13. Defining the Plasticity of Transcription Factor Binding Sites by Deconstructing DNA Consensus Sequences: The PhoP-Binding Sites among Gamma/Enterobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Oscar; Park, Sun-Yang; Huang, Henry; Groisman, Eduardo A.; Zwir, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptional regulators recognize specific DNA sequences. Because these sequences are embedded in the background of genomic DNA, it is hard to identify the key cis-regulatory elements that determine disparate patterns of gene expression. The detection of the intra- and inter-species differences among these sequences is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of both differential gene expression and evolution. Here, we address this problem by investigating the target promoters controlled by the DNA-binding PhoP protein, which governs virulence and Mg2+ homeostasis in several bacterial species. PhoP is particularly interesting; it is highly conserved in different gamma/enterobacteria, regulating not only ancestral genes but also governing the expression of dozens of horizontally acquired genes that differ from species to species. Our approach consists of decomposing the DNA binding site sequences for a given regulator into families of motifs (i.e., termed submotifs) using a machine learning method inspired by the “Divide & Conquer” strategy. By partitioning a motif into sub-patterns, computational advantages for classification were produced, resulting in the discovery of new members of a regulon, and alleviating the problem of distinguishing functional sites in chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray genome-wide analysis. Moreover, we found that certain partitions were useful in revealing biological properties of binding site sequences, including modular gains and losses of PhoP binding sites through evolutionary turnover events, as well as conservation in distant species. The high conservation of PhoP submotifs within gamma/enterobacteria, as well as the regulatory protein that recognizes them, suggests that the major cause of divergence between related species is not due to the binding sites, as was previously suggested for other regulators. Instead, the divergence may be attributed to the fast evolution of orthologous target genes and/or the

  14. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  15. Multi-site substrate binding and interplay in barley alpha-amylase 1.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Munch; Seo, Eun-Seong; Bozonnet, Sophie; Aghajari, Nushin; Robert, Xavier; Haser, Richard; Svensson, Birte

    2008-07-23

    Certain starch hydrolases possess secondary carbohydrate binding sites outside of the active site, suggesting that multi-site substrate interactions are functionally significant. In barley alpha-amylase both Tyr380, situated on a remote non-catalytic domain, and Tyr105 in subsite -6 of the active site cleft are principal carbohydrate binding residues. The dual active site/secondary site mutants Y105A/Y380A and Y105A/Y380M show that each of Tyr380 and Tyr105 is important, albeit not essential for binding, degradation, and multiple attack on polysaccharides, while Tyr105 predominates in oligosaccharide hydrolysis. Additional delicate structure/function relationships of the secondary site are uncovered using Y380A/H395A, Y380A, and H395A AMY1 mutants.

  16. A Predicted Binding Site for Cholesterol on the GABAA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hénin, Jérôme; Salari, Reza; Murlidaran, Sruthi; Brannigan, Grace

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of the GABA type A receptor (GABAAR) function by cholesterol and other steroids is documented at the functional level, yet its structural basis is largely unknown. Current data on structurally related modulators suggest that cholesterol binds to subunit interfaces between transmembrane domains of the GABAAR. We construct homology models of a human GABAAR based on the structure of the glutamate-gated chloride channel GluCl of Caenorhabditis elegans. The models show the possibility of previously unreported disulfide bridges linking the M1 and M3 transmembrane helices in the α and γ subunits. We discuss the biological relevance of such disulfide bridges. Using our models, we investigate cholesterol binding to intersubunit cavities of the GABAAR transmembrane domain. We find that very similar binding modes are predicted independently by three approaches: analogy with ivermectin in the GluCl crystal structure, automated docking by AutoDock, and spontaneous rebinding events in unbiased molecular dynamics simulations. Taken together, the models and atomistic simulations suggest a somewhat flexible binding mode, with several possible orientations. Finally, we explore the possibility that cholesterol promotes pore opening through a wedge mechanism. PMID:24806926

  17. Identification of 5-hydroxytryptamine1D binding sites in sheep caudate nucleus membranes.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, P J; Palmier, C; Briley, M

    1993-08-03

    Radioligand binding measurements were performed in membranes of sheep caudate nucleus using [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). [3H]5-HT labeled a population of high affinity binding sites with a Kd of 1.9 +/- 0.1 nM and a Bmax of 19.8 +/- 2.2 fmol/mg tissue. Combined 5-HTID/E binding sites were the predominant 5-HT1 subtype, accounting for 78% of the total population of 5-HT1 binding sites. 5-Carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) and sumatriptan yielded inhibition curves which best fitted a two-site model with high affinity values of 0.8 and 10.1 nM, and 1000 and 206 nM for their low affinity components. The proportion of the high affinity 5-CT and sumatriptan binding sites was 79 and 72%. The binding affinity profile of 5-HT1D binding sites [5-CT > 5-HT > d-LSD > 5-MeOT > sumatriptan > RU 24,969 > metergoline > tryptamine = rauwolscine = methylsergide > yohimbine = methiothepin > TFMPP = 8-OH-DPAT > 2-methyl-5-HT > mCPP = quipazine = CP 93,129 > ketanserin > (-)-propranolol = haloperidol = ipsapirone] compares well to that reported for 5-HT1D receptor sites in human caudate and cortex (correlation coefficient: 0.99 and 0.98). The present results indicate that sheep caudate nucleus is a valid tissue for studying interaction of compounds with 5-HT1D binding sites in the relative absence of 5-HT1E binding sites.

  18. Binding site number variation and high-affinity binding consensus of Myb-SANT-like transcription factor Adf-1 in Drosophilidae

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Michael; Juan, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the evolution of transcription factor binding sites and corresponding functional change of transcriptional regulation. In this context, we have examined the structural changes of the ADF-1 binding sites at the Adh promoters of Drosophila funebris and D. virilis. We detected an expanded footprinted region in D. funebris that contains various adjacent binding sites with different binding affinities. ADF-1 was described to direct sequence-specific DNA binding to sites consisting of the multiple trinucleotide repeat . The ADF-1 recognition sites with high binding affinity differ from this trinucleotide repeat consensus sequence and a new consensus sequence is proposed for the high-affinity ADF-1 binding sites. In vitro transcription experiments with the D. funebris and D. virilis ADF-1 binding regions revealed that stronger ADF-1 binding to the expanded D. funebris ADF-1 binding region only moderately lead to increased transcriptional activity of the Adh gene. The potential of this regional expansion is discussed in the context of different ADF-1 cellular concentrations and maintenance of the ADF-1 stimulus. Altogether, evolutionary change of ADF-1 binding regions involves both, rearrangements of complex binding site cluster and also nucleotide substitutions within sites that lead to different binding affinities. PMID:20542916

  19. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-08-31

    Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

  20. Purification of core-binding factor, a protein that binds the conserved core site in murine leukemia virus enhancers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S W; Speck, N A

    1992-01-01

    The Moloney murine leukemia virus causes thymic leukemias when injected into newborn mice. A major genetic determinant of the thymic disease specificity of the Moloney virus genetically maps to two protein binding sites in the Moloney virus enhancer, the leukemia virus factor b site and the adjacent core site. Point mutations introduced into either of these sites significantly shifts the disease specificity of the Moloney virus from thymic leukemia to erythroleukemia (N. A. Speck, B. Renjifo, E. Golemis, T. Frederickson, J. Hartley, and N. Hopkins, Genes Dev. 4:233-242, 1990). We have purified several polypeptides that bind to the core site in the Moloney virus enhancer. These proteins were purified from calf thymus nuclear extracts by selective pH denaturation, followed by chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, nonspecific double-stranded DNA-cellulose, and core oligonucleotide-coupled affinity columns. We have achieved greater than 13,000-fold purification of the core-binding factors (CBFs), with an overall yield of approximately 19%. Analysis of purified protein fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis reveals more than 10 polypeptides. Each of the polypeptides was recovered from an SDS-polyacrylamide gel, and those in the molecular size range of 19 to 35 kDa were demonstrated to have core-binding activity. The purified CBFs were shown by DNase I footprint analyses to bind the core site in the Moloney virus enhancer specifically, and also to core motifs in the enhancers from a simian immunodeficiency virus, the immunoglobulin mu chain, and T-cell receptor gamma-chain genes. Images PMID:1309596

  1. Arabidopsis Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 binding sites contain putative GAGA factor binding motifs within coding regions of genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is an essential regulator of gene expression that maintains genes in a repressed state by marking chromatin with trimethylated Histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3). In Arabidopsis, loss of PRC2 function leads to pleiotropic effects on growth and development thought to be due to ectopic expression of seed and embryo-specific genes. While there is some understanding of the mechanisms by which specific genes are targeted by PRC2 in animal systems, it is still not clear how PRC2 is recruited to specific regions of plant genomes. Results We used ChIP-seq to determine the genome-wide distribution of hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged FERTLIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE-HA), the Extra Sex Combs homolog protein present in all Arabidopsis PRC2 complexes. We found that the FIE-HA binding sites co-locate with a subset of the H3K27me3 sites in the genome and that the associated genes were more likely to be de-repressed in mutants of PRC2 components. The FIE-HA binding sites are enriched for three sequence motifs including a putative GAGA factor binding site that is also found in Drosophila Polycomb Response Elements (PREs). Conclusions Our results suggest that PRC2 binding sites in plant genomes share some sequence features with Drosophila PREs. However, unlike Drosophila PREs which are located in promoters and devoid of H3K27me3, Arabidopsis FIE binding sites tend to be in gene coding regions and co-localize with H3K27me3. PMID:24001316

  2. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans

    PubMed Central

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. PMID:26454764

  3. Carbonic anhydrase binding site parameterization in OPLS-AA force field.

    PubMed

    Bernadat, Guillaume; Supuran, Claudiu T; Iorga, Bogdan I

    2013-03-15

    The parameterization of carbonic anhydrase binding site in OPLS-AA force field was performed using quantum chemistry calculations. Both OH2 and OH(-) forms of the binding site were considered, showing important differences in terms of atomic partial charges. Three different parameterization protocols were used, and the results obtained highlighted the importance of including an extended binding site in the charge calculation. The force field parameters were subsequently validated using standard molecular dynamics simulations. The results presented in this work should greatly facilitate the use of molecular dynamics simulations for studying the carbonic anhydrase, and more generally, the metallo-enzymes.

  4. Preferential binding of the methyl-CpG binding domain protein 2 at methylated transcriptional start site regions.

    PubMed

    Chatagnon, Amandine; Perriaud, Laury; Nazaret, Nicolas; Croze, Séverine; Benhattar, Jean; Lachuer, Joël; Dante, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Methyl-CpG Binding Domain (MBD) proteins are thought to be key molecules in the interpretation of DNA methylation signals leading to gene silencing through recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. In cancer, the MBD-family member, MBD2, may be primarily involved in the repression of genes exhibiting methylated CpG at their 5' end. Here we ask whether MBD2 randomly associates methylated sequences, producing chance effects on transcription, or exhibits a more specific recognition of some methylated regions. Using chromatin and DNA immunoprecipitation, we analyzed MBD2 and RNA polymerase II deposition and DNA methylation in HeLa cells on arrays representing 25,500 promoter regions. This first whole-genome mapping revealed the preferential localization of MBD2 near transcription start sites (TSSs), within the region analyzed, 7.5 kb upstream through 2.45 kb downstream of 5' transcription start sites. Probe by probe analysis correlated MBD2 deposition and DNA methylation. Motif analysis did not reveal specific sequence motifs; however, CCG and CGC sequences seem to be overrepresented. Nonrandom association (multiple correspondence analysis, p < 0.0001) between silent genes, DNA methylation and MBD2 binding was observed. The association between MBD2 binding and transcriptional repression weakened as the distance between binding site and TSS increased, suggesting that MBD2 represses transcriptional initiation. This hypothesis may represent a functional explanation for the preferential binding of MBD2 at methyl-CpG in TSS regions.

  5. ConBind: motif-aware cross-species alignment for the identification of functional transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Schütte, Judith; Dijkstra, Maurits J.J.; Bawono, Punto; Kinston, Sarah J.; Göttgens, Berthold; Heringa, Jaap; Bonzanni, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is regulated by transcription factors (TFs) binding to promoter as well as distal enhancers. TFs recognize short, but specific binding sites (TFBSs) that are located within the promoter and enhancer regions. Functionally relevant TFBSs are often highly conserved during evolution leaving a strong phylogenetic signal. While multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a potent tool to detect the phylogenetic signal, the current MSA implementations are optimized to align the maximum number of identical nucleotides. This approach might result in the omission of conserved motifs that contain interchangeable nucleotides such as the ETS motif (IUPAC code: GGAW). Here, we introduce ConBind, a novel method to enhance alignment of short motifs, even if their mutual sequence similarity is only partial. ConBind improves the identification of conserved TFBSs by improving the alignment accuracy of TFBS families within orthologous DNA sequences. Functional validation of the Gfi1b + 13 enhancer reveals that ConBind identifies additional functionally important ETS binding sites that were missed by all other tested alignment tools. In addition to the analysis of known regulatory regions, our web tool is useful for the analysis of TFBSs on so far unknown DNA regions identified through ChIP-sequencing. PMID:26721389

  6. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  7. An Experimentally Based Computer Search Identifies Unstructured Membrane-binding Sites in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brzeska, Hanna; Guag, Jake; Remmert, Kirsten; Chacko, Susan; Korn, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Programs exist for searching protein sequences for potential membrane-penetrating segments (hydrophobic regions) and for lipid-binding sites with highly defined tertiary structures, such as PH, FERM, C2, ENTH, and other domains. However, a rapidly growing number of membrane-associated proteins (including cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, GTP-binding proteins, and their effectors) bind lipids through less structured regions. Here, we describe the development and testing of a simple computer search program that identifies unstructured potential membrane-binding sites. Initially, we found that both basic and hydrophobic amino acids, irrespective of sequence, contribute to the binding to acidic phospholipid vesicles of synthetic peptides that correspond to the putative membrane-binding domains of Acanthamoeba class I myosins. Based on these results, we modified a hydrophobicity scale giving Arg- and Lys-positive, rather than negative, values. Using this basic and hydrophobic scale with a standard search algorithm, we successfully identified previously determined unstructured membrane-binding sites in all 16 proteins tested. Importantly, basic and hydrophobic searches identified previously unknown potential membrane-binding sites in class I myosins, PAKs and CARMIL (capping protein, Arp2/3, myosin I linker; a membrane-associated cytoskeletal scaffold protein), and synthetic peptides and protein domains containing these newly identified sites bound to acidic phospholipids in vitro. PMID:20018884

  8. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M.; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  9. Distribution of cholecystokinin receptor binding sites in the human brain: an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Dietl, M.M.; Probst, A.; Palacios, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) binding sites were localized by in vitro autoradiography in human postmortem brain materials from 12 patients without reported neurological diseases using (125I)Bolton-Hunter CCK octapeptide (BHCCK-8) as a ligand. The pharmacological characteristics of BHCCK-8 binding to mounted tissue sections were comparable to those previously reported in the rat. CCK-8 being the most potent displacer, followed by caerulein, CCK-4, and gastrin I. The distribution of BHCCK-8 binding sites was heterogeneous. These sites were highly concentrated in a limited number of gray matter areas and nuclei. The highest binding densities were seen in the glomerular and external plexiform layers of the olfactory bulb. BHCCK-8 binding sites were also enriched in the neocortex, where they presented a laminar distribution with low levels in lamina I, moderate concentration in laminae II to IV, high density in lamina V, and low levels in lamina VI. A different laminar distribution was seen in the visual cortex, where a low receptor density was observed in lamina IV but higher density in laminae II and VI. In the basal ganglia the nucleus accumbens, caudatus, and the putamen presented moderate to high densities of binding sites, while the globus pallidus lacked sites of BHCCK-8 binding. In the limbic system the only area presenting moderate to high density was the amygdaloid complex, particularly in the granular nucleus, while most of the thalamic nuclei were extremely poor or lacked BHCCK-8 binding. The hippocampal formation showed low (CA1-3) to moderate (subiculum) densities. Midbrain areas generally disclosed very low levels of BHCCK-8 binding sites. The pontine gray and the nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis showed a relatively high density of CCK-8 receptor specific binding.

  10. Impact of germline and somatic missense variations on drug binding sites.

    PubMed

    Yan, C; Pattabiraman, N; Goecks, J; Lam, P; Nayak, A; Pan, Y; Torcivia-Rodriguez, J; Voskanian, A; Wan, Q; Mazumder, R

    2017-03-01

    Advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are generating a vast amount of data. This exacerbates the current challenge of translating NGS data into actionable clinical interpretations. We have comprehensively combined germline and somatic nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs) that affect drug binding sites in order to investigate their prevalence. The integrated data thus generated in conjunction with exome or whole-genome sequencing can be used to identify patients who may not respond to a specific drug because of alterations in drug binding efficacy due to nsSNVs in the target protein's gene. To identify the nsSNVs that may affect drug binding, protein-drug complex structures were retrieved from Protein Data Bank (PDB) followed by identification of amino acids in the protein-drug binding sites using an occluded surface method. Then, the germline and somatic mutations were mapped to these amino acids to identify which of these alter protein-drug binding sites. Using this method we identified 12 993 amino acid-drug binding sites across 253 unique proteins bound to 235 unique drugs. The integration of amino acid-drug binding sites data with both germline and somatic nsSNVs data sets revealed 3133 nsSNVs affecting amino acid-drug binding sites. In addition, a comprehensive drug target discovery was conducted based on protein structure similarity and conservation of amino acid-drug binding sites. Using this method, 81 paralogs were identified that could serve as alternative drug targets. In addition, non-human mammalian proteins bound to drugs were used to identify 142 homologs in humans that can potentially bind to drugs. In the current protein-drug pairs that contain somatic mutations within their binding site, we identified 85 proteins with significant differential gene expression changes associated with specific cancer types. Information on protein-drug binding predicted drug target proteins and prevalence of both somatic and

  11. In vivo effects of 3-iodocytisine: pharmacological and genetic analysis of hypothermia and evaluation of chronic treatment on nicotinic binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, C A; Marks, M J; Cassels, B K; Maccioni, R B

    2009-09-01

    Several cytisine derivatives have been developed in the search for more selective drugs at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Binding experiments in transfected cell lines showed that the iodination of cytisine in the position 3 of the pyridone ring increased potency at alpha7-nAChR and to a lesser extent at the alpha4beta2 subtypes, both of which are widely expressed in the brain. However, no in vivo studies have been published on this compound. Inhibition curves presented here using wild type, beta2, and beta4-null mutant mice confirm that 3-IC binds to alpha4beta2 *, alpha7 * and alpha3beta4 * receptors with higher affinity than cytisine (asterisk indicates the receptor may contain additional subunits, Lukas et al., 1999). Intraperitoneal injection of 3-iodocytisine (3-IC) induced considerable dose-dependent hypothermia in DBA/2J and C57BL/6J mice. This response was blocked by mecamylamine and partially inhibited by hexamethonium. beta4-null mice displayed significantly less 3-IC-induced hypothermia than wild-type mice, beta2-null mice were somewhat less affected than wild types, while responses of alpha7 *-null mice were similar to wild types. Mice treated chronically with 3-IC display a marked increase in alpha7 * and alpha4beta2 * binding sites determined by radioligand binding in membrane preparations from cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of 28 brain regions of mice treated with 3-IC was consistent with the membrane binding, detecting an increase of cytisine-sensitive [(125)I]epibatidine binding sites, while cytisine-resistant [(125)I]epibatidine sites were unchanged. [(125)I]alpha-Bungarotoxin binding sites also exhibited up-regulation. These results give a first evaluation of in vivo consequences of 3-IC as a potent agonist with marked effects on mice.

  12. Separate [3H]-nitrendipine binding sites in mitochondria and plasma membranes of bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed Central

    Ballesta, J. J.; Garcia, A. G.; Gutierrez, L. M.; Hidalgo, M. J.; Palmero, M.; Reig, J. A.; Viniegra, S.

    1990-01-01

    1. Two binding sites for the 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) derivative [3H]-nitrendipine have been found in the bovine adrenal medulla. The high-affinity site (Kd = 0.48 nM and Bmax = 128 fmol mg-1 protein) was specifically located in purified plasma membranes. The low-affinity site (Kd = 252 nM and Bmax = 169 pmol mg-1 protein) was located only in mitochondria. Chromaffin granule membranes lacked specific binding sites for [3H]-nitrendipine. 2. Kinetic analysis of the rates of association and dissociation of [3H]-nitrendipine, saturation isotherms and displacement experiments with unlabelled nitrendipine and PN200-110 revealed single, homogeneous populations of high- and low-affinity sites in plasma and mitochondrial membranes, respectively. 3. The high affinity site was sensitive to Ca2+ deprivation and heating; it was practically unaffected by changes in ionic strength of the medium and its optimal pH was slightly alkaline. This site exhibited a strong DHP stereoselectivity; diltiazem increased and verapamil decreased the affinity of [3H]-nitrendipine. 4. In contrast, binding of [3H]-nitrendipine to the low affinity site was more heat resistant and less affected by Ca2+ removal. Its optimal pH was slightly acid and the increase in ionic strength enhanced the number of available sites. The site had no DHP stereoselectivity. Verapamil decreased the dissociation constant of [3H]-nitrendipine acting in a non-competitive manner; diltiazem did not affect equilibrium binding parameters of [3H]-nitrendipine. 5. These results suggest that both biding sites reflect different receptor entities. The high-affinity binding site corresponds to the dihydropyridine receptor associated with the L-type calcium channel. The function of the mitochondrial, low-affinity binding site is, at present, unknown. PMID:1704272

  13. Specific binding of a dichloroacetamide herbicide safener in maize at a site that also binds thiocarbamate and chloroacetanilide herbicides.

    PubMed

    Walton, J D; Casida, J E

    1995-09-01

    Dichloroacetamide safeners such as N,N-diallyl-2,2-dichloroacetamide and (R,S)-3-dichloroacetyl-2,2,5-trimethyl-1,3-oxazolidine protect maize (Zea mays) against injury from thiocarbamate and chloroacetanilide herbicides. Binding activity of tritium-labeled (R,S)-3-dichloroacetyl-2,2,5-trimethyl-1,3-oxazolidine (15 Ci/mmol; referred to as [3H]Saf) was characterized in extracts of etiolated maize seedlings. The binding is saturable, involves a single class of binding sites (Kd 0.12 microM; maximal binding in coleoptiles 0.53 nmol/g fresh weight, equivalent to 55 pmol/mg protein), and is sensitive to boiling and protease treatment. Binding in etiolated maize seedlings is highest in the coleoptile and lowest in the leaves. Binding of [3H]Saf also occurs in etiolated sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) shoots but not several other cereals. There is a good correlation between known safener effectiveness and the concentration that inhibits [3H]Saf binding half-maximally among 21 dichloroacetamides and related compounds. N,N-Diallyl-2,2-dichloroacetamide had the lowest inhibitor concentration that reduces specific binding by 50% (IC50), 0.01 microM. [3H]Saf binding is inhibited by 4 chloroacetanilide herbicides with IC50 values of 0.07 to 0.48 microM and by 12 thiocarbamate herbicides and analogs with IC50 values of 0.06 to 2.3 microM. The inhibition of [3H]Saf binding by alachlor and S-ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate is competitive.

  14. Theory and simulation of diffusion-influenced, stochastically gated ligand binding to buried sites

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, Jorge L.; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    We consider the diffusion-influenced rate coefficient of ligand binding to a site located in a deep pocket on a protein; the binding pocket is flexible and can reorganize in response to ligand entrance. We extend to this flexible protein-ligand system a formalism developed previously [A. M. Berezhkovskii, A, Szabo, and H.-X. Zhou, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 075103 (2011)10.1063/1.3609973] for breaking the ligand-binding problem into an exterior problem and an interior problem. Conformational fluctuations of a bottleneck or a lid and the binding site are modeled as stochastic gating. We present analytical and Brownian dynamics simulation results for the case of a cylindrical pocket containing a binding site at the bottom. Induced switch, whereby the conformation of the protein adapts to the incoming ligand, leads to considerable rate enhancement. PMID:22010732

  15. Internal binding sites for MSH: Analyses in wild-type and variant Cloudman melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.; Hotchkiss, S.; Pawelek, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma cells express both external (plasma membrane) and internal binding sites for MSH. Using 125I-beta melanotropin (beta-MSH) as a probe, we report here an extensive series of studies on the biological relevance of these internal sites. Cells were swollen in a hypotonic buffer and lysed, and a particulate fraction was prepared by high-speed centrifugation. This fraction was incubated with 125I-beta-MSH with or without excess nonradioactive beta-MSH in the cold for 2 hours. The material was then layered onto a step-wise sucrose gradient and centrifuged; fractions were collected and counted in a gamma counter or assayed for various enzymatic activities. The following points were established: (1) Specific binding sites for MSH were observed sedimenting at an average density of 50% sucrose in amelanotic cells and at higher densities in melanotic cells. (2) These sites were similar in density to those observed when intact cells were labeled externally with 125I-beta-MSH and then warmed to promote internalization of the hormone. (3) Most of the internal binding sites were not as dense as fully melanized melanosomes. (4) In control experiments, the MSH binding sites were not found in cultured hepatoma cells. (5) Variant melanoma cells, which differed from the wild-type in their responses to MSH, had reduced expression of internal binding sites even though their ability to bind MSH to the outer cell surface appeared normal. (MSH-induced responses included changes in tyrosinase, dopa oxidase, and dopachrome conversion factor activities, melanization, proliferation, and morphology.) (6) Isobutylmethylxanthine, which enhanced cellular responsiveness to MSH, also enhanced expression of internal binding sites. The results indicate that expression of internal binding sites for MSH is an important criterion for cellular responsiveness to the hormone.

  16. Multiple specific binding sites for purified glucocorticoid receptors on mammary tumor virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Payvar, F; Firestone, G L; Ross, S R; Chandler, V L; Wrange, O; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Gustafsson, J A; Yamamoto, K R

    1982-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones selectively stimulate the rate of transcription of integrated mammary tumor virus (MTV) sequences in infected rat hepatoma cells. Using two independent assays, we find that purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor protein binds specifically to at least four widely separated regions on pure MTV proviral DNA. One of these specific binding domains, which itself contains at least two distinct receptor binding sites, resides within a fragment of viral DNA that maps 110-449 bp upstream of the promoter for MTV RNA synthesis. Three other binding domains lie downstream of the promoter and within the MTV primary transcription unit. Restriction fragments bearing separate binding domains have been introduced into cultured cells; transformants have been recovered in which the introduced fragments are expressed under glucocorticoid control. Thus, it appears that this assay will be useful for assessing the biological significance of the receptor binding sites detected in vitro.

  17. Rat submaxillary gland contains predominantly P-type tachykinin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, S.H.; Burcher, E.

    1985-11-01

    The specific binding of the /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter labeled tachykinins substance K (BHSK), eledoisin (BHE), and substance P (BHSP) was examined in crude membrane suspensions and by autoradiography in rat submaxillary gland. All three ligands at 0.1 nM concentrations exhibited binding that was inhibited by tachykinins in a potency rank order of substance P greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than eledoisin greater than kassinin greater than neuromedin K with slope factors essentially equal to unity. All tachykinins were 5 to 10 times more potent in inhibiting BHSK and BHE binding compared to BHSP binding. Autoradiographic visualization of BHSK and BHSP binding sites in the gland revealed extensive labeling of mucous and serous acini. The intensity of labeling was much less for BHSK than for BHSP. The results indicate that the rat submaxillary gland contains predominantly P-type tachykinin binding sites.

  18. The structure of the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator Fur reveals three functional metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dian, Cyril; Vitale, Sylvia; Leonard, Gordon A; Bahlawane, Christelle; Fauquant, Caroline; Leduc, Damien; Muller, Cécile; de Reuse, Hilde; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle; Terradot, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    Fur, the ferric uptake regulator, is a transcription factor that controls iron metabolism in bacteria. Binding of ferrous iron to Fur triggers a conformational change that activates the protein for binding to specific DNA sequences named Fur boxes. In Helicobacter pylori, HpFur is involved in acid response and is important for gastric colonization in model animals. Here we present the crystal structure of a functionally active HpFur mutant (HpFur2M; C78S-C150S) bound to zinc. Although its fold is similar to that of other Fur and Fur-like proteins, the crystal structure of HpFur reveals a unique structured N-terminal extension and an unusual C-terminal helix. The structure also shows three metal binding sites: S1 the structural ZnS₄ site previously characterized biochemically in HpFur and the two zinc sites identified in other Fur proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis and spectroscopy analyses of purified wild-type HpFur and various mutants show that the two metal binding sites common to other Fur proteins can be also metallated by cobalt. DNA protection and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate that, while these two sites influence the affinity of HpFur for DNA, only one is absolutely required for DNA binding and could be responsible for the conformational changes of Fur upon metal binding while the other is a secondary site.

  19. Bupropion Binds to Two Sites in the Torpedo Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Transmembrane Domain: A Photoaffinity Labeling Study with the Bupropion Analog [125I]-SADU-3-72

    PubMed Central

    Pandhare, Akash; Hamouda, Ayman K.; Staggs, Brandon; Aggarwal, Shaili; Duddempudi, Phaneendra K.; Lever, John R.; Lapinsky, David J.; Jansen, Michaela; Cohen, Jonathan B.; Blanton, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Bupropion, a clinically-used antidepressant and smoking-cessation drug, acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). To identify its binding site(s) in nAChRs, we developed a photoreactive bupropion analog, (±)-2-(N-tert-butylamino)-3′-[125I]-iodo-4′-azidopropiophenone (SADU-3-72). Based upon inhibition of [125I]SADU-3-72 binding, SADU-3-72 binds with high affinity (IC50 = 0.8 μM) to the Torpedo nAChR in the resting (closed channel) state and in the agonist-induced desensitized state, and bupropion binds to that site with three-fold higher affinity in the desensitized (IC50 = 1.2 μM) than in the resting state. Photolabeling of Torpedo nAChRs with [125I]SADU-3-72 followed by limited in-gel digestion of nAChR subunits with endoproteinase Glu-C established the presence of [125I]SADU-3-72 photoincorporation within nAChR subunit fragments containing M1-M2-M3 helices (αV8-20K, βV8-22/23K and γV8-24K) or M1-M2 helices (δV8-14). Photolabeling within βV8-22/23K, γV8-24K and δV8-14 was reduced in the desensitized state and inhibited by ion channel blockers selective for the resting (tetracaine) or desensitized (thienycyclohexylpiperidine (TCP)) state, and this pharmacologically specific photolabeling was localized to the M2-9 leucine ring (δLeu265, βLeu257) within the ion channel. In contrast, photolabeling within the αV8-20K was enhanced in the desensitized state and not inhibited by TCP, but was inhibited by bupropion. This agonist-enhanced photolabeling was localized to αTyr213 in αM1. These results establish the presence of two distinct bupropion binding sites within the Torpedo nAChR transmembrane domain: a high affinity site at the middle (M2-9) of the ion channel and a second site near the extracellular end of αM1 within a previously described halothane (general anesthetic) binding pocket. PMID:22394379

  20. Current Understanding of the Binding Sites, Capacity, Affinity, and Biological Significance of Metals in Melanin

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lian; Simon, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Metal chelation is often invoked as one of the main biological functions of melanin. In order to understand the interaction between metals and melanin, extensive studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the metal binding sites, binding capacity and affinity. These data are central to efforts aimed at elucidating the role metal binding plays in determining the physical, structural, biological, and photochemical properties of melanin. This article examines the current state of understanding of this field. PMID:17580858

  1. Toward an atomistic model for predicting transcription-factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Endres, Robert G; Schulthess, Thomas C; Wingreen, Ned S

    2004-11-01

    Identifying the specific DNA-binding sites of transcription-factor proteins is essential to understanding the regulation of gene expression in the cell. Bioinformatics approaches are fast compared to experiments, but require prior knowledge of multiple binding sites for each protein. Here, we present an atomistic force-field method to predict binding sites based only on the X-ray structure of a related bound complex. Specific flexible contacts between the protein and DNA are modeled by a library of amino acid side-chain rotamers. Using the example of the mouse transcription factor, Zif268, a well-studied zinc-finger protein, we show that the protein sequence alone, without the detailed experimental structure, gives a strong bias toward the consensus binding site.

  2. An Overview of Tubulin Inhibitors That Interact with the Colchicine Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Chen, Jianjun; Xiao, Min; Li, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin dynamics is a promising target for new chemotherapeutic agents. The colchicine binding site is one of the most important pockets for potential tubulin polymerization destabilizers. Colchicine binding site inhibitors (CBSI) exert their biological effects by inhibiting tubulin assembly and suppressing microtubule formation. A large number of molecules interacting with the colchicine binding site have been designed and synthesized with significant structural diversity. CBSIs have been modified as to chemical structure as well as pharmacokinetic properties, and tested in order to find a highly potent, low toxicity agent for treatment of cancers. CBSIs are believed to act by a common mechanism via binding to the colchicine site on tubulin. The present review is a synopsis of compounds that have been reported in the past decade that have provided an increase in our understanding of the actions of CBSIs. PMID:22814904

  3. Synthetic peptides mimicking the binding site of human acetylcholinesterase for its inhibitor fasciculin 2.

    PubMed

    Kafurke, Uwe; Erijman, Ariel; Aizner, Yonatan; Shifman, Julia M; Eichler, Jutta

    2015-09-01

    Molecules capable of mimicking protein binding and/or functional sites present useful tools for a range of biomedical applications, including the inhibition of protein-ligand interactions. Such mimics of protein binding sites can currently be generated through structure-based design and chemical synthesis. Computational protein design could be further used to optimize protein binding site mimetics through rationally designed mutations that improve intermolecular interactions or peptide stability. Here, as a model for the study, we chose an interaction between human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) and its inhibitor fasciculin-2 (Fas) because the structure and function of this complex is well understood. Structure-based design of mimics of the hAChE binding site for Fas yielded a peptide that binds to Fas at micromolar concentrations. Replacement of hAChE residues known to be essential for its interaction with Fas with alanine, in this peptide, resulted in almost complete loss of binding to Fas. Computational optimization of the hAChE mimetic peptide yielded a variant with slightly improved affinity to Fas, indicating that more rounds of computational optimization will be required to obtain peptide variants with greatly improved affinity for Fas. CD spectra in the absence and presence of Fas point to conformational changes in the peptide upon binding to Fas. Furthermore, binding of the optimized hAChE mimetic peptide to Fas could be inhibited by hAChE, providing evidence for a hAChE-specific peptide-Fas interaction.

  4. Threading polyintercalators with extremely slow dissociation rates and extended DNA binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amy Rhoden; Iverson, Brent L.

    2013-01-01

    The development of small molecules that bind DNA sequence specifically has the potential to modulate gene expression in a general way. One mode of DNA binding is intercalation, or the insertion of molecules between DNA base pairs. We have developed a modular polyintercalation system in which intercalating naphthalene diimide (NDI) units are connected by flexible linkers that alternate between the minor and major grooves of DNA when bound. We recently reported a threading tetraintercalator with a dissociation half-life of 16 days, the longest reported to date, from its preferred 14 bp binding site. Herein, three new tetraintercalator derivatives were synthesized with one, two, and three additional methylene units in the central major groove-binding linker. These molecules displayed dissociation half-lives of 57, 27, and 18 days, respectively, from the 14 bp site. The optimal major groove-binding linker was used in the design of an NDI hexaintercalator that was analyzed by gel-shift assays, DNase I footprinting, and UV-visible spectroscopy. The hexaintercalator bound its entire 22 bp binding site, the longest reported specific binding site for a synthetic, non-nucleic acid based DNA binding molecule, but with a significantly faster dissociation rate compared to the tetraintercalators. PMID:23919778

  5. Discovery and validation of information theory-based transcription factor and cofactor binding site motifs.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruipeng; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-11-28

    Data from ChIP-seq experiments can derive the genome-wide binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) and other regulatory proteins. We analyzed 765 ENCODE ChIP-seq peak datasets of 207 human TFs with a novel motif discovery pipeline based on recursive, thresholded entropy minimization. This approach, while obviating the need to compensate for skewed nucleotide composition, distinguishes true binding motifs from noise, quantifies the strengths of individual binding sites based on computed affinity and detects adjacent cofactor binding sites that coordinate with the targets of primary, immunoprecipitated TFs. We obtained contiguous and bipartite information theory-based position weight matrices (iPWMs) for 93 sequence-specific TFs, discovered 23 cofactor motifs for 127 TFs and revealed six high-confidence novel motifs. The reliability and accuracy of these iPWMs were determined via four independent validation methods, including the detection of experimentally proven binding sites, explanation of effects of characterized SNPs, comparison with previously published motifs and statistical analyses. We also predict previously unreported TF coregulatory interactions (e.g. TF complexes). These iPWMs constitute a powerful tool for predicting the effects of sequence variants in known binding sites, performing mutation analysis on regulatory SNPs and predicting previously unrecognized binding sites and target genes.

  6. Quantitative autoradiography of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Scatton, B.; Dubois, A.; Dubocovich, M.L.; Zahniser, N.R.; Fage, D.

    1985-03-04

    The distribution of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in the rat brain has been studied by quantitative autoradiography. The binding of /sup 3/H-nomifensine to caudate putamen sections was saturable, specific, of a highly affinity (Kd = 56 nM) and sodium-dependent. The dopamine uptake inhibitors benztropine, nomifensine, cocaine, bupropion and amfonelic acid were the most potent competitors of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding to striatal sections. The highest levels of (benztropine-displaceable) /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites were found in the caudate-putamen, the olfactory tubercle and the nucleus accumbens. 6-Hydroxy-dopamine-induced lesion of the ascending dopaminergic bundle resulted in a marked decrease in the /sup 3/H-ligand binding in these areas. Moderately high concentrations of the /sup 3/H-ligand were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the anteroventral thalamic nucleus, the cingulate cortex, the lateral septum, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the zona incerta and some hypothalamic nuclei. There were low levels of binding sites in the habenula, the dorsolateral geniculate body, the substantia nigra, the ventral tegmental area and the periaqueductal gray matter. These autoradiographic data are consistent with the hypothesis that /sup 3/H-nomifensine binds primarily to the presynaptic uptake site for dopamine but also labels the norepinephrine uptake site. 33 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  7. Estimating the relative position of risperidone primary binding site in Sera Albumins. Modeling from spectrofluorimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Celia Martins; Fragoso, Viviane Muniz S.; Silva, Dilson

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we used a mathematical model to study the interaction of risperidone with human and bovine serum albumins estimating the relative position of the primary binding site, based on the fluorescence quenching theory. Results have shown that the model was able to demonstrate that primary binding site for risperidone in HSA and BSA is very close to the position where is tryptophan 134 of BSA, possibly in domain 1B.

  8. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiajian; Stormo, Gary D

    2005-01-01

    Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data. PMID:16014175

  9. The nonpeptide oxytocin receptor agonist WAY 267,464: receptor-binding profile, prosocial effects and distribution of c-Fos expression in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hicks, C; Jorgensen, W; Brown, C; Fardell, J; Koehbach, J; Gruber, C W; Kassiou, M; Hunt, G E; McGregor, I S

    2012-07-01

    Previous research suggests that the nonpeptide oxytocin receptor (OTR) agonist WAY 267,464 may only partly mimic the effects of oxytocin in rodents. The present study further explored these differences and related them to OTR and vasopressin 1a receptor (V(1a) R) pharmacology and regional patterns of c-Fos expression. Binding data for WAY 267,464 and oxytocin were obtained by displacement binding assays on cellular membranes, while functional receptor data were generated by luciferase reporter assays. For behavioural testing, adolescent rats were tested in a social preference paradigm, the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and for locomotor activity changes following WAY 267,464 (10 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) or oxytocin (0.1 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.). The higher doses were also examined for their effects on regional c-Fos expression. Results showed that WAY 267,464 had higher affinity (K(i) ) at the V(1a) R than the OTR (113 versus 978 nm). However, it had no functional response at the V(1a) R and only a weak functional effect (EC(50) ) at the OTR (881 nm). This suggests WAY 267,464 is an OTR agonist with weak affinity and a possible V(1a) R antagonist. Oxytocin showed high binding at the OTR (1.0 nm) and V(1a) R (503 nm), with a functional EC(50) of 9.0 and 59.7 nm, respectively, indicating it is a potent OTR agonist and full V(1a) R agonist. WAY 267,464 (100 mg/kg), but not oxytocin, significantly increased the proportion of time spent with a live rat, over a dummy rat, in the social preference test. Neither compound affected EPM behaviour, whereas the higher doses of WAY 267,464 and oxytocin suppressed locomotor activity. WAY 267,464 and oxytocin produced similar c-Fos expression in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, central amygdala, lateral parabrachial nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract, suggesting a commonality of action at the OTR with the differential doses employed. However, WAY 267,464 caused greater c-Fos expression in the medial amygdala and the supraoptic

  10. Mechanism for binding site diversity on ankyrin. Comparison of binding sites on ankyrin for neurofascin and the Cl-/HCO3- anion exchanger.

    PubMed

    Michaely, P; Bennett, V

    1995-12-29

    Ankyrins are a family of spectrin-binding proteins that associate with at least seven distinct membrane proteins, including ion transporters and cell adhesion molecules. The membrane-binding domain of ankyrin is comprised of a tandem array of 24 ANK repeats organized into four 6-repeat folding domains. Tandem arrays of ANK repeats have been proposed to mediate protein interactions in a variety of proteins including factors involved in the regulation of transcription and the cell cycle. This report provides several new insights into the versatility of ANK repeats of ankyrin in protein recognition, using neurofascin and the Cl-/HCO3- anion exchanger as model ligands and ankyrinR as the prototypic ankyrin. Different combinations of ANK repeat domains from this ankyrin form two distinct, high affinity binding sites for neurofascin. One site requires both repeat domains 3 and 4. The other site involves both repeat domains 2 and 3, although domain 2 has significant activity alone. The sites appear to be independent with Kd values of 3 and 14 nM, respectively. Both the Cl-/HCO3- anion exchanger and neurofascin can interact simultaneously with repeat domains 3 and 4, because neurofascin is unable to displace binding of the anion exchanger cytoplasmic domain to domains 3 and 4, despite having a 3-5-fold higher affinity. These results demonstrate two levels of diversity in the binding sites on ankyrin: one resulting from different combinations of ANK repeat domains and another from different determinants within the same combination of repeat domains. One consequence of this diversity is that ankyrin can accommodate two neurofascin molecules as well as the anion exchanger through interactions mediated by ANK repeats. The ability of ankyrin to simultaneously associate with multiple types of membrane proteins is an unanticipated finding with implications for the assembly of integral membrane proteins into specialized regions of the plasma membrane.

  11. Dynamic coupling of regulated binding sites and cycling myosin heads in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2014-03-01

    In an activated muscle, binding sites on the thin filament and myosin heads switch frequently between different states. Because the status of the binding sites influences the status of the heads, and vice versa, the binding sites and myosin heads are dynamically coupled. The functional consequences of this coupling were investigated using MyoSim, a new computer model of muscle. MyoSim extends existing models based on Huxley-type distribution techniques by incorporating Ca(2+) activation and cooperative effects. It can also simulate arbitrary cross-bridge schemes set by the researcher. Initial calculations investigated the effects of altering the relative speeds of binding-site and cross-bridge kinetics, and of manipulating cooperative processes. Subsequent tests fitted simulated force records to experimental data recorded using permeabilized myocardial preparations. These calculations suggest that the rate of force development at maximum activation is limited by myosin cycling kinetics, whereas the rate at lower levels of activation is limited by how quickly binding sites become available. Additional tests investigated the behavior of transiently activated cells by driving simulations with experimentally recorded Ca(2+) signals. The unloaded shortening profile of a twitching myocyte could be reproduced using a model with two myosin states, cooperative activation, and strain-dependent kinetics. Collectively, these results demonstrate that dynamic coupling of binding sites and myosin heads is important for contractile function.

  12. MBSTAR: multiple instance learning for predicting specific functional binding sites in microRNA targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Dip; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression by binding to specific sites in the 3'untranslated regions of its target genes. Machine learning based miRNA target prediction algorithms first extract a set of features from potential binding sites (PBSs) in the mRNA and then train a classifier to distinguish targets from non-targets. However, they do not consider whether the PBSs are functional or not, and consequently result in high false positive rates. This substantially affects the follow up functional validation by experiments. We present a novel machine learning based approach, MBSTAR (Multiple instance learning of Binding Sites of miRNA TARgets), for accurate prediction of true or functional miRNA binding sites. Multiple instance learning framework is adopted to handle the lack of information about the actual binding sites in the target mRNAs. Biologically validated 9531 interacting and 973 non-interacting miRNA-mRNA pairs are identified from Tarbase 6.0 and confirmed with PAR-CLIP dataset. It is found that MBSTAR achieves the highest number of binding sites overlapping with PAR-CLIP with maximum F-Score of 0.337. Compared to the other methods, MBSTAR also predicts target mRNAs with highest accuracy. The tool and genome wide predictions are available at http://www.isical.ac.in/~bioinfo_miu/MBStar30.htm.

  13. Antimalarial 4(1H)-pyridones bind to the Qi site of cytochrome bc1

    PubMed Central

    Capper, Michael J.; O’Neill, Paul M.; Fisher, Nicholas; Strange, Richard W.; Moss, Darren; Ward, Stephen A.; Berry, Neil G.; Lawrenson, Alexandre S.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome bc1 is a proven drug target in the prevention and treatment of malaria. The rise in drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, the organism responsible for malaria, has generated a global effort in designing new classes of drugs. Much of the design/redesign work on overcoming this resistance has been focused on compounds that are presumed to bind the Qo site (one of two potential binding sites within cytochrome bc1) using the known crystal structure of this large membrane-bound macromolecular complex via in silico modeling. Cocrystallization of the cytochrome bc1 complex with the 4(1H)-pyridone class of inhibitors, GSK932121 and GW844520, that have been shown to be potent antimalarial agents in vivo, revealed that these inhibitors do not bind at the Qo site but bind at the Qi site. The discovery that these compounds bind at the Qi site may provide a molecular explanation for the cardiotoxicity and eventual failure of GSK932121 in phase-1 clinical trial and highlight the need for direct experimental observation of a compound bound to a target site before chemical optimization and development for clinical trials. The binding of the 4(1H)-pyridone class of inhibitors to Qi also explains the ability of this class to overcome parasite Qo-based atovaquone resistance and provides critical structural information for future design of new selective compounds with improved safety profiles. PMID:25564664

  14. Photoaffinity site-specific covalent labeling of human corticosteroid-binding globulin.

    PubMed Central

    Marver, D; Chiu, W; Wolff, M E; Edelman, I S

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed for the synthesis of high-specific-activity 21-diazo-21-[6,7-(3)H]deoxycorticosterone, an analog of corticosterone. This analog was used as a photoaffinity label of a high affinity steroid-binding protein, human corticosteroid-binding globulin. Based on direct binding studies and crosscompetition experiments, this diazo derivative exhibited the requisite affinity (within a factor of 1.5 times that of corticosterone) and site specificity to qualify as an affinity labeling legand. Irradiation of corticosteroid-binding globulin with the 21-diazo derivative resulted in irreversible binding to corticosteroid-binding globulin, identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Specificity of covalent binding to corticosteroid-binding globulin was established by competition analysis with various steroids. Irreversibility of photodependent binding was shown by persistence of the complex on electrophoresis (in contrast to the noncovalently linked complex), and resistance to exchange with corticosterone or pregnanediol and to solvent extraction. Site specificity of covalent binding was inferred from the effects of a scavenger, Tris-HC1, and fluorescence quenching of a neighboring tryptophan. PMID:1069998

  15. High affinity P2x-purinoceptor binding sites for [35S]-adenosine 5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate] in rat vas deferens membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, A. D.; Humphrey, P. P.

    1996-01-01

    1. The binding sites labelled by [35S]-adenosine 5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate]([35S]-ATP gamma S) at 4 degrees C in rat vas deferens membranes were studied and compared to the sites labelled by [3H]-alpha,beta-methylene ATP ([3H]-alpha beta meATP) to ascertain whether [35S]-ATP gamma S can be used to label the P2x purinoceptor. 2. In the presence of 4 mM CaCl2, the binding of 0.2 nM [35S]-ATP gamma S to vas deferens membranes was increased 3.4 fold, when compared to studies performed in the absence of calcium. However, binding did not appear to be solely to P2x purinoceptors since [35S]-ATP gamma S labelled a heterogeneous population of sites and about 72% of the sites possessed high affinity (pIC50 = 7.5) for guanosine 5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate] (GTP gamma S). Even in the presence of 1 microM GTP gamma S, to occlude the sites with high affinity for GTP gamma S, the binding of [35S]-ATP gamma S was heterogeneous and since there was also evidence of extensive metabolism of ATP in the presence of calcium, the binding of [35S]-ATP gamma S under these conditions was not studied further. 3. In the absence of calcium ions, [35S]-ATP gamma S bound to a single population of sites (pKD = 9.23; Bmax = 4270 fmol mg-1 protein). Binding reached steady state within 3 h (t1/2 = 38 min), was stable for a further 4 h and was readily reversible upon addition of 10 microM unlabelled ATP gamma S (t1/2 = 45 min). In competition studies the binding of 0.2 nM [35S]-ATP gamma S was inhibited by a number of P2x purinoceptor agonists and antagonists, but not by adenosine receptor agonists, staurosporine (1 microM) or several ATPase inhibitors. The rank order of agonist affinity estimates (pIC50 values) in competing for the [35S]-ATP gamma S binding sites was: ATP (9.01), 2-methylthio- ATP (8.79), ATP gamma S (8.73), alpha beta meATP (7.57), ADP (7.24), beta, gamma-methylene ATP (7.18), L-beta, gamma-methylene ATP (5.83), alpha, beta-methylene ADP (4.36). 4. Affinity estimates (pIC50 values) for

  16. Human retina contains polyamine sensitive [3H]-ifenprodil binding sites: implications for neuroprotection?

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, N; Xu, S

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—This study characterised the pharmacology of [3H]-ifenprodil binding to the polyamine binding sites (PBS) on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channel complex on human retinas. These data were correlated with the known neuroprotective effects of ifenprodil and eliprodil.
METHODS—Specific binding of [3H]-ifenprodil (under sigma site blockade) was investigated using human retinal homogenates and radioligand binding techniques. Scatchard and competition analyses were utilised to define the pharmacology of the [3H]-ifenprodil binding sites.
RESULTS—Specific binding of [3H]-ifenprodil comprised 73% (SEM 3%) of total and reflected interaction with two affinity sites (Kds = 0.39 and 4.3 µM) of different densities (Bmax = 14.4 and 105 pmol/ mg protein) (n = 5). The rank order of affinity of compounds competing for [3H]-ifenprodil binding to the high affinity PBS was: ifenprodil > eliprodil > arcaine > spermine > diaminodecane > spermidine > putrescine >> MK-801 (n = 3-7). However, [3H]-ifenprodil binding was minimally inhibited by glutamate, NMDA, and kainate.
CONCLUSION—These studies have shown, for the first time, the presence of specific [3H]-ifenprodil binding sites in the human retina with pharmacological characteristics of PBS associated with the NMDA receptor ionophore complex. The neuroprotective effects of eliprodil and ifenprodil may, in part, be mediated via these [3H]-ifenprodil labelled sites.

 Keywords: retina; neuroprotection; eliprodil; NMDA receptors PMID:10396205

  17. RPI-Bind: a structure-based method for accurate identification of RNA-protein binding sites.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiesi; Liu, Liang; Venkateswaran, Suresh; Song, Qianqian; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2017-04-04

    RNA and protein interactions play crucial roles in multiple biological processes, while these interactions are significantly influenced by the structures and sequences of protein and RNA molecules. In this study, we first performed an analysis of RNA-protein interacting complexes, and identified interface properties of sequences and structures, which reveal the diverse nature of the binding sites. With the observations, we built a three-step prediction model, namely RPI-Bind, for the identification of RNA-protein binding regions using the sequences and structures of both proteins and RNAs. The three steps include 1) the prediction of RNA binding regions on protein, 2) the prediction of protein binding regions on RNA, and 3) the prediction of interacting regions on both RNA and protein simultaneously, with the results from steps 1) and 2). Compared with existing methods, most of which employ only sequences, our model significantly improves the prediction accuracy at each of the three steps. Especially, our model outperforms the catRAPID by >20% at the 3(rd) step. All of these results indicate the importance of structures in RNA-protein interactions, and suggest that the RPI-Bind model is a powerful theoretical framework for studying RNA-protein interactions.

  18. Cl-/Ca2+-dependent L-glutamate binding sites do not correspond to 2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate-sensitive excitatory amino acid receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Fagg, G. E.; Lanthorn, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    A series of phosphono and phosphino analogues of glutamate were used to compare the pharmacological properties of (a) Cl-/Ca2+-dependent, 2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (AP4)-sensitive L-[3H]-glutamate binding sites in rat brain synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) and (b) AP4-sensitive excitatory synaptic responses by use of electrophysiological techniques. In the presence of Cl- and Ca2+, L-[3H]-glutamate bound to SPMs with Kd 804 nM and Bmax 53 pmol mg-1 protein. The AP4-sensitive (Ki 7.3 microM) population of binding sites represented 61% of L-glutamate specifically bound. omega-Substituted analogues of AP4 were potent inhibitors of L-[3H]-glutamate binding (Ki values 2.4-38 microM), whereas N-substituted compounds or propionic acid derivatives were inactive. Experiments with AP4 alone and in combination with other analogues demonstrated that the primary target of all substances was the AP4-sensitive population of L-glutamate binding sites. In the hippocampal slice in vitro, AP4 antagonized lateral perforant path-evoked field potentials with an IC50 of 2.7 microM. In contrast to their actions at AP4-sensitive L-glutamate binding sites, all other compounds (except for the omega-carboxymethylphosphino analogue, IC50 19 microM) were weak or inactive as antagonists of this synaptic response (IC50 values greater than 100 microM). Inactive compounds which exhibited activity in the binding assay did not reverse the synaptic depressant effects of AP4, indicating that they were neither agonists nor antagonists at AP4-sensitive synapses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2998527

  19. The platelet fibrinogen receptor: an immunogold-surface replica study of agonist-induced ligand binding and receptor clustering

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to its receptor, a heterodimer consisting of the plasma-membrane glycoproteins (GP) IIb and IIIa. Although the GPIIb-IIIa complex is present on the surface of unstimulated platelets, it binds fibrinogen only after platelet activation. We have used an immunogold-surface replica technique to study the distribution of GPIIb-IIIa and bound fibrinogen over broad areas of surface membranes in unstimulated, as well as thrombin-activated and ADP-activated human platelets. We found that the immunogold-labeled GPIIb-IIIa was monodispersed over the surface of unstimulated platelets, although the cell surface lacked immunoreactive fibrinogen. On thrombin-stimulated platelets, approximately 65% of the GPIIb-IIIa molecules were in clusters within the plane of the membrane. Fibrinogen, which had been released from the alpha-granules of these cells, bound to GPIIb-IIIa on the cell surface and was similarly clustered. To determine whether the receptors clustered before ligand binding, or as a consequence thereof, we studied the surface distribution of GPIIb-IIIa after stimulation with ADP, which causes activation of the fibrinogen receptor function of GPIIb-IIIa without inducing the release of fibrinogen. In the absence of added fibrinogen, the unoccupied, yet binding-competent receptors on ADP-stimulated platelets were monodispersed. The addition of fibrinogen caused the GPIIb-IIIa molecules to cluster on the cell surface. Clustering was also induced by the addition of the GPIIb-IIIa-binding domains of fibrinogen, namely the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser on the alpha-chain or the gamma-chain decapeptide gamma 402-411. These results show that receptor occupancy causes clustering of GPIIb-IIIa in activated platelets. PMID:3584243

  20. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding sites differentiated by their affinity for pirenzepine do not interconvert

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, D.W.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1986-05-01

    Although it has been suggested by many investigators that subtypes of muscarinic cholinergic receptors exist, physical studies of solubilized receptors have indicated that only a single molecular species may exist. To test the hypothesis that the putative muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat forebrain are interconvertible states of the same receptor, the selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZ) was used to protect muscarinic receptors from blockade by the irreversible muscarinic receptor antagonist propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM). If interconversion of high (M1) and low (M2) affinity binding sites for PZ occurs, incubation of cerebral cortical membranes with PBCM in the presence of PZ should not alter the proportions of M1 and M2 binding sites that are unalkylated (i.e., protected). If, on the other hand, the binding sites are not interconvertible, PZ should be able to selectively protect M1 sites and alter the proportions of unalkylated M1 and M2 binding sites. In the absence of PZ, treatment of cerebral cortical membranes with 20 nM PBCM at 4 degrees C for 50 min resulted in a 69% reduction in the density of M1 binding sites and a 55% reduction in the density of M2 binding sites with no change in the equilibrium dissociation constants of the radioligands (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (/sup 3/H)PZ. The reasons for this somewhat selective effect of PBCM are not apparent. In radioligand binding experiments using cerebral cortical membranes, PZ inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in a biphasic manner.