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Sample records for agonist lipopolysaccharide lps

  1. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Zeinab G.; Kalansuriya, Pabasara; Capon, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a preliminary investigation of the use the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall constituent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a natural chemical cue to stimulate and alter the expression of fungal secondary metabolism. Integrated high-throughput micro-cultivation and micro-analysis methods determined that 6 of 40 (15%) of fungi tested responded to an optimal exposure to LPS (0.6 ng/mL) by activating, enhancing or accelerating secondary metabolite production. To explore the possible mechanisms behind this effect, we employed light and fluorescent microscopy in conjunction with a nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive fluorescent dye and an NO scavenger to provide evidence that LPS stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism coincided with LPS activation of NO. Several case studies demonstrated that LPS stimulation can be scaled from single microplate well (1.5 mL) to preparative (>400 mL) scale cultures. For example, LPS treatment of Penicillium sp. (ACM-4616) enhanced pseurotin A and activated pseurotin A1 and pseurotin A2 biosynthesis, whereas LPS treatment of Aspergillus sp. (CMB-M81F) substantially accelerated and enhanced the biosynthesis of shornephine A and a series of biosynthetically related ardeemins and activated production of neoasterriquinone. As an indication of broader potential, we provide evidence that cultures of Penicillium sp. (CMB-TF0411), Aspergillus niger (ACM-4993F), Rhizopus oryzae (ACM-165F) and Thanatephorus cucumeris (ACM-194F) were responsive to LPS stimulation, the latter two examples being particular noteworthy as neither are known to produce secondary metabolites. Our results encourage the view that LPS stimulation can be used as a valuable tool to expand the molecular discovery potential of fungal strains that either have been exhaustively studied by or are unresponsive to traditional culture methodology. PMID:25379339

  2. Toxicity of hemoglobin solutions: hemoglobin is a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding protein which enhances LPS biological activity.

    PubMed

    Roth, R I; Kaca, W

    1994-01-01

    Administration of alpha alpha-crosslinked stroma-free hemoglobin (SFH) as a cell-free resuscitation fluid is associated with multiple organ toxicities. Many of these toxicities are characteristic of the pathophysiological effects of bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). To better understand the potential role of LPS in the observed in vivo toxicities of SFH, we examined mixtures of SFH and E. coli LPS for evidence of LPS-SFH complex formation. LPS-SFH complexes were demonstrated by three techniques: ultrafiltration through 300 kDa cut-off membranes, which distinguished LPS in complexes (87-89% < 300 kDa) from LPS alone (90% > 300 kDa); density centrifugation through 5% sucrose, which distinguished denser LPS alone from LPS-SFH complexes; and precipitation by 67% ethanol, which demonstrated 2-3 fold increased precipitability of complexes compared to SFH alone. Interaction of LPS with SFH was also associated with markedly increased biological activity of LPS, as manifested by enhancement of LPS activation of Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL), increased release of human mononuclear cell tissue factor, and enhanced production of cultured human endothelial cell tissue factor. These results demonstrated that hemoglobin can serve as an endotoxin binding protein, and that this interaction results in the alteration of several LPS physical characteristics and enhancement of LPS biological activities.

  3. Catalytic properties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding protein. Transfer of LPS to soluble CD14.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Wright, S D

    1996-02-23

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding protein (LBP) is a lipid transfer protein that catalyzes transfer of LPS monomers from micelles to a binding site on soluble CD14 (sCD14) and transfer of LPS from LPS.sCD14 complexes to HDL particles. To characterize the first of these two reactions, LPS covalently derivatized with the fluorophore, boron dipyrromethene difluoride (BODIPY), was used to monitor LBP-catalyzed movement of LPS in real time. The fluorescence efficiency of micelles of BODIPY-LPS was low but was strongly increased upon dissolution in detergent or upon binding to sCD14. Spontaneous binding of BODIPY-LPS to sCD14 was very slow but was accelerated by substoichiometric concentration of LBP, and the rate of binding was measured under a variety of conditions. LBP-catalyzed transfer was first order with respect to both sCD14 and LPS concentration, and the apparent Km values were 1 approximately 2 microg/ml for sCD14 and 100 ng/ml for LPS. The maximum turnover number for LBP was approximately 150 molecules of LPS min-1 LBP-1. LBP alone caused a small but measurable increase in the fluorescence of BODIPY-LPS, suggesting that it bound LPS aggregates but did not readily remove LPS monomers. The subsequent addition of sCD14 caused a large fluorescence increase, suggesting transfer of BODIPY-LPS to sCD14. These and other observations suggest that LPS is transferred by an ordered ternary complex reaction mechanism in which LBP transfers LPS monomer from LPS aggregates to sCD14 without dissociating from the LPS aggregate. PMID:8626747

  4. Hemoglobin, a newly recognized lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein that enhances LPS biological activity.

    PubMed

    Kaca, W; Roth, R I; Levin, J

    1994-10-01

    Cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) is a purified preparation of human hemoglobin that is being developed as a resuscitation fluid. In vivo administration of hemoglobin has resulted in significant toxicity, due in part to contamination with bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)). To better understand this toxicity, we have studied the interaction between Hb and LPS. Mixtures of each of three different Hb preparations (cross-linked alpha alpha Hb, cross-linked carbon monoxy-alpha alpha HbCO, and non-cross-linked (native) HbAo) and LPS (Escherichia coli O26:B6 or Proteus mirabilis S1959) were examined by several independent methods for evidence of Hb.LPS complex formation. Binding assays in microtiter plates demonstrated saturable binding of LPS to immobilized Hb, with a kD of 3.1 x 10(-8) M. Binding of LPS to Hb also was demonstrated wiht a radiolabeled LPS photoaffinity probe. Ultrafiltration of Hb/LPS mixtures by 300- and 100-kDa cut-off membranes showed that the majority of LPS in these mixtures (87-97 and 64-72%, respectively) was detected in the filtrates, in contrast to the lack of filterability of LPS in the absence of Hb. Density centrifugation demonstrated that LPS co-migrated with each of the three Hbs, whereas unbound LPS had a distinctly greater sedimentation velocity than Hb or Hb.LPS complexes. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that in the presence of Hb, LPS migrated into the gel and co-electrophoresed with Hb, whereas LPS alone did not appreciably enter the gel. Finally, precipitation by ethanol of each of the three Hb preparations was increased in the presence of LPS compared with precipitation in the absence of LPS. Interaction of LPS with each of the three Hb preparations was also associated with altered biological activity of LPS, as shown by enhancement of LPS activation of Limulus amebocyte lysate. Therefore, our data provide several lines of independent evidence for Hb-LPS complex formation and indicated that LPS

  5. Cyclic Limulus anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) factor-derived peptide CLP-19 antagonizes LPS function by blocking binding to LPS binding protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Ni, Bing; Ren, Jian-dong; Chen, Jian-hong; Tian, Zhi-qiang; Tang, Min; Li, Di; Xia, Peiyuan

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation and septic shock due to endotoxins from Gram-negative bacteria infection continue to pose significant challenges to human healthcare. It is, therefore, necessary to develop therapeutic strategies targeting endotoxins, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), to prevent their potentially systemic effects. Pathogenesis due to Gram-negative bacteria involves LPS binding to the host LPS-binding protein (LBP), causing detrimental downstream signaling cascades. Our previous study showed that CLP-19, a synthetic peptide derived from the Limulus anti-LPS factor (LALF), could effectively neutralize LPS toxicity; however, the detailed mechanisms underlying this anti-LPS effect remained unexplained. Thus, we carried out investigations to determine how the CLP-19 neutralizes LPS toxicity. CLP-19 was found to block LPS binding to LBP in a dose-dependent manner, as evidenced by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, CLP-19 blocked LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling proteins p38, extracellular signal-regulating kinase (ERK)1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2. Furthermore, CLP-19 potency in LPS antagonism in vitro and in vivo was directly associated with its ability to block the LPS-LBP interaction. Taken together, the results suggested that CLP-19's inhibitory effect on LPS-LBP binding and on the subsequent MAPK pathway signaling may be responsible for its anti-LPS mechanism. This peptide appears to represent a potential therapeutic agent for clinical treatment of sepsis. PMID:22040879

  6. Effects of PPAR-γ agonist treatment on LPS-induced mastitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mingfeng, Ding; Xiaodong, Ming; Yue, Liu; Taikui, Piao; Lei, Xiao; Ming, Liu

    2014-12-01

    PPAR-γ, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, plays an important role in lipid metabolism and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of synthetic PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis in rats. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by the injection of LPS through the duct of the mammary gland. Rosiglitazone was injected 1 h before the induction of LPS intraperitoneally. The results showed that rosiglitazone attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), and the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, Western blotting showed that rosiglitazone inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65. These results indicated that rosiglitazone has a protective effect on mastitis, and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of rosiglitazone on LPS-induced mastitis in rats may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB signaling pathways. PPAR-γ may be a potential therapeutic target against mastitis.

  7. Estrogen or estrogen receptor agonist inhibits lipopolysaccharide induced microglial activation and death.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua A; Das, Arabinda; Butler, Jonathan T; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2011-09-01

    Inflammation is an important pathogenic mechanism in many neurodegenerative disorders. Activated microglia play a pivotal role in releasing pro-inflammatory factors including interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) for inducing inflammation. While microglia mediated inflammation is essential in maintaining CNS homeostasis, chronic inflammation results in activation of proteases for cell death. Here, we examined the effect of PPT (estrogen receptor α agonist), DPN (estrogen receptor β agonist), and estrogen on rat primary microglia following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure of microglia to LPS (200 ng/ml) for 24 h induced cell death. After LPS toxicity for 15 min, microglia were treated with 25 nM PPT, 25 nM DPN, or 100 nM estrogen that prevented cell death by attenuating the release of IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2. Treatment of cells with 100 nM fulvestrant (estrogen receptor antagonist) prior to addition of PPT, DPN, or estrogen significantly decreased their ability to prevent cell death, indicating involvement of estrogen receptor (ER) in providing PPT, DPN, or estrogen mediated cytoprotection. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses showed alterations in mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2, calpain, and calpastatin during apoptosis. We also examined mRNA expression of ERβ and ERα following exposure of microglia to LPS and subsequent treatment with PPT, DPN, or estrogen. We found that estrogen or estrogen receptor agonists upregulated expression of ERs. Overall, results indicate that estrogen receptor agonist or estrogen uses a receptor mediated pathway to protect microglia from LPS toxicity.

  8. Beta-adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists counteract LPS-induced neuronal death in retinal cultures by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kunizo; Wood, John P M; Osborne, Neville N

    2003-09-26

    Treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 72 h was shown to dose-dependently increase nitric oxide production from 6-day-old retinal cultures. Cell death, as determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and an increase in neuronal labelling for TUNEL, was elevated concurrently. During treatment there was an increase of both inducible nitric oxide synthase and glial fibrillary acidic protein labelling in glial cells and a reduction in the number of gamma-aminobutyric acid-positive neurones. The NOS inhibitors, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, dexamethasone and indomethacin potently inhibited both nitric oxide stimulation and cell death caused by LPS. In this study, the beta(2)- (ICI-18551), beta(1)- (betaxolol) and mixed beta(1)/beta(2)- (timolol, metipranolol) adrenergic receptor antagonists were all shown to attenuate LPS-induced LDH release from these cultures, but to have no effect on LPS-stimulated nitric oxide production. This effect was mimicked by the calcium channel blocker, nifedipine. Interestingly, the beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, salbutamol, arterenol and isoproterenol were also able to attenuate cell death caused by LPS. Moreover, these compounds also inhibited LPS-stimulated nitric oxide release. These studies suggest that LPS stimulates nitric oxide release from cultured retinal glial cells and that this process leads to neurone death. beta-adrenergic receptor agonists prevent the effects of LPS by inhibiting the stimulation of nitric oxide production. The data also suggest that beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists can attenuate LPS-induced death of neurones, but that these compounds act in a manner that is neurone-dependent, is mimicked by blockade of calcium channels and is independent of the stimulation of nitric oxide release.

  9. Bartonella quintana lipopolysaccharide (LPS): structure and characteristics of a potent TLR4 antagonist for in-vitro and in-vivo applications

    PubMed Central

    Malgorzata-Miller, Gosia; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The pattern recognition receptor TLR4 is well known as a crucial receptor during infection and inflammation. Several TLR4 antagonists have been reported to inhibit the function of TLR4. Both natural occurring antagonists, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria as well as synthetic compounds based on the lipid A structure of LPS have been described as potent inhibitors of TLR4. Here, we have examined the characteristics of a natural TLR4 antagonist, isolated from Bartonella quintana bacterium by elucidating its chemical primary structure. We have found that this TLR4 antagonist is actually a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) instead of a LPS, and that it acts very effective, with a high inhibitory activity against triggering by the LPS-TLR4 system in the presence of a potent TLR4 agonist (E. coli LPS). Furthermore, we demonstrate that B. quintana LPS is not inactivated by polymyxin B, a classical cyclic cationic polypeptide antibiotic that bind the lipid A part of LPS, such as E. coli LPS. Using a murine LPS/D-galactosamine endotoxaemia model we showed that treatment with B. quintana LPS could improve the survival rate significantly. Since endogenous TLR4 ligands have been associated with several inflammatory- and immune-diseases, B. quintana LPS might be a novel therapeutic strategy for TLR4-driven pathologies. PMID:27670746

  10. The CRTH2 agonist Pyl A prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced fetal death but induces preterm labour

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynne; Herbert, Bronwen R; MacIntyre, David A; Hunte, Emma; Ponnampalam, Sathana; Johnson, Mark R; Teoh, Tiong G; Bennett, Phillip R

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ 12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2) delays inflammation-induced preterm labour in the mouse and improves pup survival through the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by a mechanism yet to be elucidated. 15dPGJ2 is an agonist of the second prostaglandin D2 receptor, chemoattractant receptor homologous to the T helper 2 cell (CRTH2). In human T helper cells CRTH2 agonists induce the production of the anti-inflammatory interleukins IL-10 and IL-4. We hypothesized that CRTH2 is involved in the protective effect of 15dPGJ2 in inflammation-induced preterm labour in the murine model. We therefore studied the effects of a specific small molecule CRTH2 agonist on preterm labour and pup survival. An intrauterine injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to CD1 mice at embryonic day 16, ± CRTH2 agonist/vehicle controls. Mice were killed at 4.5 hr to assess fetal wellbeing and to harvest myometrium and pup brain for analysis of NF-κB, and T helper type 1/2 interleukins. To examine the effects of the CRTH2 agonist on LPS-induced preterm labour, mice were allowed to labour spontaneously. Direct effects of the CRTH2 agonist on uterine contractility were examined ex vivo on contracting myometrial strips. The CRTH2 agonist increased fetal survival from 20 to 100% in LPS-treated mice, and inhibited circular muscle contractility ex vivo. However, it augmented LPS-induced labour and significantly increased myometrial NF-κB, IL-1β, KC-GRO, interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α. This suggests that the action of 15dPGJ2 is not via CRTH2 and therefore small molecule CRTH2 agonists are not likely to be beneficial for the prevention of inflammation-induced preterm labour. PMID:23374103

  11. Tissue specific effects of the beta 2-adrenergic agonist salbutamol on LPS-induced IFN-gamma, IL-10 and TGF-beta responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Eijkelkamp, Niels; Cobelens, Pieter M; Sanders, Virginia M; Heijnen, Cobi J; Kavelaars, Annemieke

    2004-05-01

    Beta2-adrenergic agonists have immunomodulatory effects both in vitro and in vivo. We describe that oral salbutamol (beta-adrenergic agonist) administration has tissue-specific effects on cytokine production induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Salbutamol reduced LPS-induced IFN-gamma levels at both mucosal and non-mucosal sites. However, salbutamol increased IL-10 levels in the peritoneal cavity, but decreased levels in terminal ileum and lung. Salbutamol did not alter LPS-induced TGF-beta levels in the terminal ileum, but increased levels in liver and peritoneal cavity. Thus, orally administered salbutamol decreases LPS-induced IFN-gamma levels in all tissues tested, but has tissue specific effects on IL-10 and TGF-beta levels.

  12. TLR4/MD-2 activation by a synthetic agonist with no similarity to LPS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Su, Lijing; Morin, Matthew D.; Jones, Brian T.; Whitby, Landon R.; Surakattula, Murali M. R. P.; Huang, Hua; Shi, Hexin; Choi, Jin Huk; Wang, Kuan-wen; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Berger, Michael; Zhan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Boger, Dale L.; Beutler, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Structurally disparate molecules reportedly engage and activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and other TLRs, yet the interactions that mediate binding and activation by dissimilar ligands remain unknown. We describe Neoseptins, chemically synthesized peptidomimetics that bear no structural similarity to the established TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but productively engage the mouse TLR4 (mTLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complex. Neoseptin-3 activates mTLR4/MD-2 independently of CD14 and triggers canonical myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)- and Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF)-dependent signaling. The crystal structure mTLR4/MD-2/Neoseptin-3 at 2.57-Å resolution reveals that Neoseptin-3 binds as an asymmetrical dimer within the hydrophobic pocket of MD-2, inducing an active receptor complex similar to that induced by lipid A. However, Neoseptin-3 and lipid A form dissimilar molecular contacts to achieve receptor activation; hence strong TLR4/MD-2 agonists need not mimic LPS. PMID:26831104

  13. Effect of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Exposure on the Reproductive Organs of Immature Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Da Kyung; Lee, Sung-Ho

    2016-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin, elicits strong immune responses in mammals. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that LPS challenge profoundly affects female reproductive function. For example, LPS exposure affects steroidogenesis and folliculogenesis, resulting in delayed puberty onset. The present study was conducted to clarify the mechanism underlying the adverse effect of LPS on the delayed puberty in female rats. LPS was daily injected for 5 days (50 μg/kg, PND 25-29) to treated animals and the date at VO was evaluated through daily visual examination. At PND 39, animals were sacrificed, and the tissues were immediately removed and weighed. Among the reproductive organs, the weights of the ovaries and oviduct from LPS-treated animals were significantly lower than those of control animals. There were no changes in the weights of uterus and vagina between the LPS-treated and their control animals. Immunological challenge by LPS delayed VO. Multiple corpora lutea were found in the control ovaries, indicating ovulations were occurred. However, none of corpus luteum was present in the LPS-treated ovary. The transcription level of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), CYP11A1, CYP17A1 and CYP19 were significantly increased by LPS treatment. On the other hand, the levels of 3β- HSD, 17β-HSD and LH receptor were not changed by LPS challenge. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the repeated LPS exposure during the prepubertal period could induce multiple alterations in the steroidogenic machinery in ovary, and in turn, delayed puberty onset. The prepubertal LPS challenge model used in our study is useful to understand the reciprocal regulation of immune (stress) - reproductive function in early life. PMID:27660826

  14. Effect of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Exposure on the Reproductive Organs of Immature Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Da Kyung; Lee, Sung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin, elicits strong immune responses in mammals. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that LPS challenge profoundly affects female reproductive function. For example, LPS exposure affects steroidogenesis and folliculogenesis, resulting in delayed puberty onset. The present study was conducted to clarify the mechanism underlying the adverse effect of LPS on the delayed puberty in female rats. LPS was daily injected for 5 days (50 μg/kg, PND 25-29) to treated animals and the date at VO was evaluated through daily visual examination. At PND 39, animals were sacrificed, and the tissues were immediately removed and weighed. Among the reproductive organs, the weights of the ovaries and oviduct from LPS-treated animals were significantly lower than those of control animals. There were no changes in the weights of uterus and vagina between the LPS-treated and their control animals. Immunological challenge by LPS delayed VO. Multiple corpora lutea were found in the control ovaries, indicating ovulations were occurred. However, none of corpus luteum was present in the LPS-treated ovary. The transcription level of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), CYP11A1, CYP17A1 and CYP19 were significantly increased by LPS treatment. On the other hand, the levels of 3β- HSD, 17β-HSD and LH receptor were not changed by LPS challenge. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the repeated LPS exposure during the prepubertal period could induce multiple alterations in the steroidogenic machinery in ovary, and in turn, delayed puberty onset. The prepubertal LPS challenge model used in our study is useful to understand the reciprocal regulation of immune (stress) - reproductive function in early life. PMID:27660826

  15. Effect of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Exposure on the Reproductive Organs of Immature Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Da Kyung; Lee, Sung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin, elicits strong immune responses in mammals. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that LPS challenge profoundly affects female reproductive function. For example, LPS exposure affects steroidogenesis and folliculogenesis, resulting in delayed puberty onset. The present study was conducted to clarify the mechanism underlying the adverse effect of LPS on the delayed puberty in female rats. LPS was daily injected for 5 days (50 μg/kg, PND 25-29) to treated animals and the date at VO was evaluated through daily visual examination. At PND 39, animals were sacrificed, and the tissues were immediately removed and weighed. Among the reproductive organs, the weights of the ovaries and oviduct from LPS-treated animals were significantly lower than those of control animals. There were no changes in the weights of uterus and vagina between the LPS-treated and their control animals. Immunological challenge by LPS delayed VO. Multiple corpora lutea were found in the control ovaries, indicating ovulations were occurred. However, none of corpus luteum was present in the LPS-treated ovary. The transcription level of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), CYP11A1, CYP17A1 and CYP19 were significantly increased by LPS treatment. On the other hand, the levels of 3β- HSD, 17β-HSD and LH receptor were not changed by LPS challenge. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the repeated LPS exposure during the prepubertal period could induce multiple alterations in the steroidogenic machinery in ovary, and in turn, delayed puberty onset. The prepubertal LPS challenge model used in our study is useful to understand the reciprocal regulation of immune (stress) - reproductive function in early life.

  16. Prenatal transportation alters the metabolic response of Brahman bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the metabolic response to a postnatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day 60, 80,...

  17. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) disrupts particle transport, cilia function and sperm motility in an ex vivo oviduct model

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, A. M.; Di Fenza, M.; Kölle, S.

    2016-01-01

    The oviduct functions in the transportation of gametes to the site of fertilization (the ampulla) and is the site of early embryonic development. Alterations of this early developmental environment, such as the presence of sexually transmitted pathogens, may affect oviduct function leading to reduced fertilization rates and contribute to compromised embryonic development. In this study, sperm interactions, particle transport speed (PTS) and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the ampulla following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a constituent of the sexually transmitted pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia abortus, was investigated. Three complementary experiments were performed to analyse; (1) bound sperm motility and cilia function (2) transport velocity in the oviduct and (3) the expression of genes related to immune function and inflammatory response (CASP3, CD14, MYD88, TLR4 and TRAF6). The motility of bound sperm was significantly lower in ampullae that were exposed to LPS. CBF and PTS significantly increased after treatment with LPS for 2 hours. Finally, gene expression analysis revealed that CASP3 and CD14 were significantly upregulated and TLR4 trended towards increased expression following treatment with LPS. These findings provide an insight on the impact of LPS on the oviduct sperm interaction, and have implications for both male and female fertility. PMID:27079521

  18. Analysis of Ionomic Profiles of Canine Hairs Exposed to Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Stress.

    PubMed

    So, Kyoung-Min; Lee, Yoonseok; Bok, Jin Duck; Kim, Eun Bae; Chung, Myung Il

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a new insight on the response of canines to stress exposure; the ionomic profiles of canine hair (2.8 ± 0.3 years, 15.17 ± 2.1 kg) (n = 10) was determined before and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injections. LPS was intramuscularly injected to induce inflammatory stress responses which were confirmed by observing increases in the level of serum cortisol, aldosterone, and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α. The hair contents of 17 elements were obtained by applying analytical procedures using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The following elements: sodium(Na) and potassium(K) among macro-elements, iron(Fe) and manganese(Mn) among micro-elements, and aluminum(Al), nickel(Ni), and lead(Pb) for toxic elements, showed significant increased levels with the immunological stress. The degree of increase in toxic elements was remarkable with the stress exposure. A forty-five-fold increase seen in Al accumulation with the stress exposure was noteworthy. Although mercury(Hg) and cadmium(Cd) showed decreased levels with the stress exposure, the degree was negligible compared to the level of increase. Correlation pattern between the elements was changed with the immunological stress. Toxic elements became more correlated with macro- or micro-elements than with toxic elements themselves after the stress exposure. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that LPS challenge shifted the overall hair mineral profiles to a consistent direction changing Al and K up, even in animals with different hair mineral profiles before LPS treatment. In conclusion, the multivariate data processing and study of element distribution patterns provided new information about the ionomic response of the canine hairs to immunological stress, i.e., the ionomic profiles of canine hairs is strongly affected by the stress induced by LPS injections. PMID:26758868

  19. Inhibitory effects of the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist zilpaterol on the LPS-induced production of TNF-alpha in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Verhoeckx, K C M; Doornbos, R P; van der Greef, J; Witkamp, R F; Rodenburg, R J T

    2005-12-01

    In this study the anti-inflammatory properties of zilpaterol, a beta2-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonist specifically developed as a growth promoter in cattle were investigated. Although zilpaterol has a different structure compared with the beta2-AR agonists known to date, it was noted that it was able to bind to both the beta2-AR (Ki = 1.1 x 10(-6)) and the beta1-AR (Ki = 1.0 x 10(-5)). Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-exposed U937 macrophages, the production of cyclic adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) were investigated. Zilpaterol inhibited TNF-alpha release and induced intracellular cAMP levels in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of TNF-alpha release and induction of cAMP production was mainly mediated via the beta2-AR, as indicated by addition of beta1- and beta2-specific antagonists. The effects of zilpaterol were investigated in LPS-treated male Wistar rats after pretreatment with zilpaterol. Zilpaterol dosed at 500 microg/kg body weight reduced the TNF-alpha plasma levels. In conclusion, zilpaterol is a beta2-adrenergic agonist and an inhibitor of TNF-alpha production induced by LPS both in vivo and in vitro.

  20. Immunologic properties of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). III. Genetic linkage between the in vitro mitogenic and in vivo adjuvant properties of LPS.

    PubMed

    Skidmore, B J; Chiller, J M; Weigle, W O; Riblet, R; Watson, J

    1976-01-01

    The mechanism was investigated underlying the activity of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an adjuvant of antibody formation as assessed by its capacity to modulate the induction of tolerance in mice to the antigen human Ig G (HGG) into a state of immunity to HGG. The adjuvant activity of LPS was found to be closely correlated with its ability to function as a B-cell mitogen. This correlation was revealed by an analysis of the genetic control of the mitogenic and adjuvant properties of LPS utilizing the refractory state inherent in the C3H/HeJ mouse strain to these activities of LPS. Thus, mice that were the progeny of a backcross between the nonresponder C3H/JeJ parent and the responder (C3H/HeJ X CWB) F1 hybrid were individually typed for responsiveness to LPS, as an adjuvant and as a B-cell mitogen. It was found that LPS interfered with tolerance induction to HGG in vivo only in those backcross progeny whose spleen cells were also capable of responding mitogenically to LPS in vitro, demonstrating that the adjuvant and B-cell mitogenic properties of LPS are genetically linked. In contrast, these properties were observed to segregate independently from either H-2 or heavy chain allotype loci, and were not sex linked. These results are compatible with the concepts that, in this system, (a) the cellular site of action of LPS as an adjuvant is confined to B cells, and (b) the subcellular mode of action of LPS as an adjuvant may involve the delivery of a "signal" to B cells which is a stimulus for mitogenesis.

  1. Liver X receptor agonist prevents LPS-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yunhe; Tian, Yuan; Wei, Zhengkai; Liu, Hui; Song, Xiaojing; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Liver X receptor-α (LXR-α) which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a ligand-activated transcription factor. Best known for its ability to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, LXRs have recently also been implicated in regulation of inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of synthetic LXR-α agonist T0901317 on LPS-induced mastitis in mice. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. T0901317 was injected 1h before and 12h after induction of LPS intraperitoneally. The results showed that T0901317 significantly attenuated the infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes, and the activation of myeloperoxidase (MPO); down-regulated the level of pro-inflammatory mediators including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and PEG2; inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65, caused by LPS. Moreover, we report for the first time that LXR-α activation impaired LPS-induced mastitis. Taken together, these data indicated that T0901317 had protective effect on mastitis and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of T0901317 on LPS induced mastitis in mice may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB signaling pathway. LXR-α activation can be used as a therapeutic approach to treat mastitis.

  2. Prenatal transportation alters the acute phase response (APR) of bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the acute phase response (APR) to a postnatal Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day...

  3. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner-core phosphates are required for complete LPS synthesis and transport to the outer membrane in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Delucia, Angela M; Six, David A; Caughlan, Ruth E; Gee, Patricia; Hunt, Ian; Lam, Joseph S; Dean, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Gram-negative outer membrane (OM) integrity is maintained in part by Mg(2+) cross-links between phosphates on lipid A and on core sugars of adjacent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules. In contrast to other Gram-negative bacteria, waaP, encoding an inner-core kinase, could not be inactivated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To examine this further, expression of the kinases WaaP or WapP/WapQ/PA5006 was placed under the control of the arabinose-regulated pBAD promoter. Growth of these strains was arabinose dependent, confirming that core phosphorylation is essential in P. aeruginosa. Transmission electron micrographs of kinase-depleted cells revealed marked invaginations of the inner membrane. SDS-PAGE of total LPS from WaaP-depleted cells showed accumulation of a fast-migrating band. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed that LPS from these cells exhibits a unique truncated core consisting of two 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acids (Kdo), two l-glycero-d-manno-heptoses (Hep), and one hexose but completely devoid of phosphates, indicating that phosphorylation by WaaP is necessary for subsequent core phosphorylations. MS analysis of lipid A from WaaP-depleted cells revealed extensive 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose modification. OM prepared from these cells by Sarkosyl extraction of total membranes or by sucrose density gradient centrifugation lacked truncated LPS. Instead, truncated LPS was detected in the inner membrane fractions, consistent with impaired transport/assembly of this species into the OM. IMPORTANCE Gram-negative bacteria have an outer membrane (OM) comprised of a phospholipid inner leaflet and a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer leaflet. The OM protects cells from toxic molecules and is important for survival during infection. The LPS core kinase gene waaP can be deleted in several Gram-negative bacteria but not in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We used a controlled-expression system to deplete WaaP directly in P. aeruginosa cells, which halted growth. WaaP depletion

  4. Esculetin attenuates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammatory processes and depressive-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingpeng; Nang, Chen; Luo, Fen; Pan, Hong; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Jingyan; Zhou, Rui; Gao, Jin; Chang, Xiayun; He, He; Qiu, Yue; Wang, Jinglei; Long, Hongyan; Liu, Yu; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-09-01

    Esculetin is one of the major bioactive compounds of Cichorium intybus L. The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects and possible underlying mechanism of esculetin (Esc) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammatory processes and depressive-like behavior in mice. Mice were pretreatment with esculetin (Esc, 20, 40mg/kg, intragastric administration) and a positive control drug fluoxetine (Flu, 20mg/kg, intragastric administration) once daily for 7 consecutive days. At the 7th day, LPS (0.83mg/kg) was intraperitoneal injection 30min after drug administration. Higher dose (40mg/kg) of esculetin and fluoxetine significantly decreased immobility time in TST and FST. There was no significant effect on locomotor activity in mice by the drugs. Esculetin significantly reduced LPS-induced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum and hippocampus. Esculetin attenuated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway in hippocampus. In addition, neuroprotection of esculetin was attributed to the upregulations of Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated tyrosine kinase B (p-TrkB) protein expression in hippocampus. The obtained results demonstrated that esculetin exhibited antidepressant-like effects which might be related to the inhibition of NF-κB pathway and the activation of BDNF/TrkB signaling.

  5. Effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Ochrobactrum intermedium on sheep experimentally infected with Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, J M; Robles-Pérez, D; Valcárcel-Sancho, F; González-Guirado, A M; de Castro, I Casanova-García; Nieto-Martínez, J M; Rojo-Vázquez, F A; Martínez-Valladares, M

    2013-08-01

    The effects of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Ochrobactrum intermedium was evaluated in sheep experimentally infected with Fasciola hepatica. Animals were divided into four groups: two treated with the LPS (T1/T2) and two controls (C1/C2). T1/C1 were slaughtered at 30 days postinfection (dpi) and T2/C2 at 85 dpi. Body weight and body condition were found higher in T1 and T2 than in controls, although differences were not significant. Treated sheep showed lower cumulative fecal egg count than controls (p < 0.01). Levels of red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells, hemoglobin, and hematocrit (HCT) were higher in T1 and T2. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in RBC and HCT were found between groups at 84 dpi. More severe macrocytic and hypochromic anemia was observed in C1 and C2 than in treated groups. Total protein and albumin values were higher in T1 and T2 (p < 0.01) until 29 dpi. At the end of the trial, no significant differences were observed in hepatic enzymes, although gamma-glutamyl transferase and aspartate aminotransferase values were higher in C2, and alanine aminotransferase was higher in T2. At necropsy, the mean weight of liver, fibrosis in portal triads, and ganglion size were similar in all groups. The number and size of flukes was greater in C2 than in T2 (p < 0.05). The histological examinations revealed a higher degree of parenchymatous fibrosis in T2 compared to C2 (p < 0.05). The administration of LPS from O. intermedium increased the nonspecific resistance against F. hepatica in experimentally infected sheep.

  6. Esculetin attenuates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammatory processes and depressive-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingpeng; Nang, Chen; Luo, Fen; Pan, Hong; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Jingyan; Zhou, Rui; Gao, Jin; Chang, Xiayun; He, He; Qiu, Yue; Wang, Jinglei; Long, Hongyan; Liu, Yu; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-09-01

    Esculetin is one of the major bioactive compounds of Cichorium intybus L. The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects and possible underlying mechanism of esculetin (Esc) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammatory processes and depressive-like behavior in mice. Mice were pretreatment with esculetin (Esc, 20, 40mg/kg, intragastric administration) and a positive control drug fluoxetine (Flu, 20mg/kg, intragastric administration) once daily for 7 consecutive days. At the 7th day, LPS (0.83mg/kg) was intraperitoneal injection 30min after drug administration. Higher dose (40mg/kg) of esculetin and fluoxetine significantly decreased immobility time in TST and FST. There was no significant effect on locomotor activity in mice by the drugs. Esculetin significantly reduced LPS-induced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum and hippocampus. Esculetin attenuated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway in hippocampus. In addition, neuroprotection of esculetin was attributed to the upregulations of Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated tyrosine kinase B (p-TrkB) protein expression in hippocampus. The obtained results demonstrated that esculetin exhibited antidepressant-like effects which might be related to the inhibition of NF-κB pathway and the activation of BDNF/TrkB signaling. PMID:27133730

  7. Early expansion and expression of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF) gene family in the LPS-exposed monogonont rotifer Brachionus koreanus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Lee, Jeong-Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Seong; Rhee, Jae-Sung

    2015-10-01

    To date, a single lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF) homologue, mediating the expression of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α in terms of host defense was identified in vertebrates and most invertebrates such as insects, mollusks, and crustaceans. However, LITAF gene family members have recently been characterized in only two mollusks, Crassostrea gigas and Mytilus galloprovincialis. Although a large gene family expansion of LITAF homologues was observed in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the amino acid sequences encoded by the C. elegans LITAF homologue have low similarities to other LITAF gene family members. In this study, three LITAF genes were identified in the monogonont rotifer Brachionus koreanus. In silico analyses of B. koreanus LITAF genes of conserved domains and phylogenetic relationships supported gene annotations that indicated that LITAF is involved in innate immunity in primitive rotifers. To examine transcriptional sensitivity of B. koreanus LITAF genes, the rotifers were exposed to different concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Transcriptional levels of LITAF1 and LITAF2 gene were significantly upregulated dose- and time-dependently in response to LPS exposure for 24 h. LPS exposure induced glutathione (GSH) depletion and antioxidant enzyme activity levels for 24 h in B. koreanus. These results suggested that the B. koreanus LITAF gene family has potential sensitivities directly and/or indirectly to immune stimulator-triggered oxidative stress.

  8. Rosiglitazone, a Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR)-γ Agonist, Attenuates Inflammation Via NF-κB Inhibition in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Fang; Zou, Xun-Liang; Wu, Jun; Yu, Xue-Qing; Yang, Xiao

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the anti-inflammatory effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonist, rosiglitazone, in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced peritonitis rat model. LPS was intraperitoneally injected into rats to establish peritonitis model. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were assigned to normal saline (the solvent of LPS), LPS, rosiglitazone plus LPS, and rosiglitazone alone. A simple peritoneal equilibrium test was performed with 20 ml 4.25 % peritoneal dialysis fluid. We measured the leukocyte count in dialysate and ultrafiltration volume. Peritoneal membrane histochemical staining was performed, and peritoneal thickness was assessed. CD40 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA (ICAM-1 mRNA) levels in rat visceral peritoneum were detected by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. IL-6 in rat peritoneal dialysis effluent was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 and IκBα was analyzed by Western blot. LPS administration resulted in increased peritoneal thickness and decreased ultrafiltration volume. Rosiglitazone pretreatment significantly decreased peritoneal thickness. In addition to CD40 and ICAM-1 mRNA expression, the IL-6, p-p65, and p-IκBα protein expressions were enhanced in LPS-administered animals. Rosiglitazone pretreatment significantly decreased ICAM-1 mRNA upregulation, secretion of IL-6 protein, and phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 and IκBα without decreasing CD40 mRNA expression. Rosiglitazone has a protective effect in peritonitis, simultaneously decreasing NF-κB phosphorylation, suggesting that NF-κB signaling pathway mediated peritoneal inflammation induced by LPS. PPAR-γ might be considered a potential therapeutic target against peritonitis.

  9. Protein-energy malnutrition modifies the production of interleukin-10 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Fock, Ricardo Ambrósio; Vinolo, Marco Aurélio Ramirez; Crisma, Amanda Rabello; Nakajima, Karina; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Borelli, Primavera

    2008-10-01

    Malnutrition modifies resistance to infection by impairing a number of physiological processes including hematopoesis and the immune response. In this study, we examined the production of Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-10 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and also evaluated the cellularity of the blood, bone marrow, and spleen in a mouse model of protein-energy malnutrition. Two-month-old male Swiss mice were subjected to protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) with a low-protein diet (4%) as compared to the control diet (20%). When the experimental group lost approximately 20% of their original body weight, the animals from both groups received 1.25 microg of LPS intravenously. The cells in the blood, bone marrow, and spleen were counted, and circulating levels of IL-4 and IL-10 were evaluated in animals stimulated with LPS. Cells from the spleen, bone marrow, and peritoneal cavity of non-inoculated animals were collected for culture to evaluate the production of IL-4 and IL-10 after stimulating these cells with 1.25 microg of LPS in vitro. Malnourished animals presented leucopenia and a severe reduction in bone marrow, spleen, and peritoneal cavity cellularity before and after stimulus with LPS. The circulating levels of IL-10 were increased in malnourished animals inoculated with LPS when compared to control animals, although the levels of IL-4 did not differ. In cells cultured with LPS, we observed high levels of IL-10 in the bone marrow cells of malnourished animals. These findings suggest that malnourished mice present a deficient immune response to LPS. These alterations may be partly responsible for the immunodeficiency observed in these malnourished mice.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Inner-Core Phosphates Are Required for Complete LPS Synthesis and Transport to the Outer Membrane in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    DeLucia, Angela M.; Six, David A.; Caughlan, Ruth E.; Gee, Patricia; Hunt, Ian; Lam, Joseph S.; Dean, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gram-negative outer membrane (OM) integrity is maintained in part by Mg2+ cross-links between phosphates on lipid A and on core sugars of adjacent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules. In contrast to other Gram-negative bacteria, waaP, encoding an inner-core kinase, could not be inactivated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To examine this further, expression of the kinases WaaP or WapP/WapQ/PA5006 was placed under the control of the arabinose-regulated pBAD promoter. Growth of these strains was arabinose dependent, confirming that core phosphorylation is essential in P. aeruginosa. Transmission electron micrographs of kinase-depleted cells revealed marked invaginations of the inner membrane. SDS-PAGE of total LPS from WaaP-depleted cells showed accumulation of a fast-migrating band. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed that LPS from these cells exhibits a unique truncated core consisting of two 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acids (Kdo), two l-glycero-d-manno-heptoses (Hep), and one hexose but completely devoid of phosphates, indicating that phosphorylation by WaaP is necessary for subsequent core phosphorylations. MS analysis of lipid A from WaaP-depleted cells revealed extensive 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose modification. OM prepared from these cells by Sarkosyl extraction of total membranes or by sucrose density gradient centrifugation lacked truncated LPS. Instead, truncated LPS was detected in the inner membrane fractions, consistent with impaired transport/assembly of this species into the OM. PMID:21810964

  11. Dectin-1 agonist selectively induces IgG1 class switching by LPS-activated mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Beom-Seok; Park, Ha-Yan; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Park, Seok-Rae

    2016-10-01

    Heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae (HKSC) is an agonist for Dectin-1, a major fungal cell wall β-glucan receptor. We previously reported that HKSC selectively enhances IgG1 production by LPS-activated mouse B cells. To determine if this IgG1 selectivity is caused by selective IgG1 class switching, we performed RT-PCRs for measuring germline transcripts (GLTs), flow cytometric analyses for detecting Ig-expressing cells, and ELISPOT assays for measuring the number of Ig-secreting cells in HKSC/LPS-stimulated mouse B cell cultures. HKSC selectively enhanced expression of GLTγ1, the number of IgG1-expressing cells, and the number of IgG1-secreting B cells in the presence of LPS stimulation. In addition, HKSC induced the expression of CD69, an activation marker for B lymphocytes, and the expression of surface Dectin-1. Two Dectin-1 antagonists, laminarin and a neutralizing Dectin-1 antibody, selectively diminished HKSC-reinforced IgG1 production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, depleted zymosan (dzn), a Dectin-1 agonist with increased selectivity, also selectively enhanced GLTγ1 transcription. The Dectin-1 antagonists blocked dzn-induced IgG1 production by LPS-activated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Dectin-1 agonists selectively induce IgG1 class switching by direct stimulation of Dectin-1 on LPS-activated B cells resulting in selective production of IgG1. PMID:27568820

  12. Dectin-1 agonist selectively induces IgG1 class switching by LPS-activated mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Beom-Seok; Park, Ha-Yan; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Park, Seok-Rae

    2016-10-01

    Heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae (HKSC) is an agonist for Dectin-1, a major fungal cell wall β-glucan receptor. We previously reported that HKSC selectively enhances IgG1 production by LPS-activated mouse B cells. To determine if this IgG1 selectivity is caused by selective IgG1 class switching, we performed RT-PCRs for measuring germline transcripts (GLTs), flow cytometric analyses for detecting Ig-expressing cells, and ELISPOT assays for measuring the number of Ig-secreting cells in HKSC/LPS-stimulated mouse B cell cultures. HKSC selectively enhanced expression of GLTγ1, the number of IgG1-expressing cells, and the number of IgG1-secreting B cells in the presence of LPS stimulation. In addition, HKSC induced the expression of CD69, an activation marker for B lymphocytes, and the expression of surface Dectin-1. Two Dectin-1 antagonists, laminarin and a neutralizing Dectin-1 antibody, selectively diminished HKSC-reinforced IgG1 production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, depleted zymosan (dzn), a Dectin-1 agonist with increased selectivity, also selectively enhanced GLTγ1 transcription. The Dectin-1 antagonists blocked dzn-induced IgG1 production by LPS-activated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Dectin-1 agonists selectively induce IgG1 class switching by direct stimulation of Dectin-1 on LPS-activated B cells resulting in selective production of IgG1.

  13. On the translocation of bacteria and their lipopolysaccharides between blood and peripheral locations in chronic, inflammatory diseases: the central roles of LPS and LPS-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kell, Douglas B; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-11-01

    We have recently highlighted (and added to) the considerable evidence that blood can contain dormant bacteria. By definition, such bacteria may be resuscitated (and thus proliferate). This may occur under conditions that lead to or exacerbate chronic, inflammatory diseases that are normally considered to lack a microbial component. Bacterial cell wall components, such as the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative strains, are well known as potent inflammatory agents, but should normally be cleared. Thus, their continuing production and replenishment from dormant bacterial reservoirs provides an easy explanation for the continuing, low-grade inflammation (and inflammatory cytokine production) that is characteristic of many such diseases. Although experimental conditions and determinants have varied considerably between investigators, we summarise the evidence that in a great many circumstances LPS can play a central role in all of these processes, including in particular cell death processes that permit translocation between the gut, blood and other tissues. Such localised cell death processes might also contribute strongly to the specific diseases of interest. The bacterial requirement for free iron explains the strong co-existence in these diseases of iron dysregulation, LPS production, and inflammation. Overall this analysis provides an integrative picture, with significant predictive power, that is able to link these processes via the centrality of a dormant blood microbiome that can resuscitate and shed cell wall components. PMID:26345428

  14. Transcriptional profiling of the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pretreatment in blood from probiotics-treated dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Adjei-Fremah, Sarah; Ekwemalor, Kingsley; Asiamah, Emmanuel; Ismail, Hamid; Worku, Mulumebet

    2016-12-01

    Probiotic supplements are beneficial for animal health and rumen function; and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from gram negative bacteria have been associated with inflammatory diseases. In this study the transcriptional profile in whole blood collected from probiotics-treated cows was investigated in response to stimulation with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in vitro. Microarray experiment was performed between LPS-treated and control samples using the Agilent one-color bovine v2 bovine (v2) 4x44K array slides. Global gene expression analysis identified 13,658 differentially expressed genes (fold change cutoff ≥ 2, P < 0.05), 3816 upregulated genes and 9842 downregulated genes in blood in response to LPS. Treatment with LPS resulted in increased expression of TLR4 (Fold change (FC) = 3.16) and transcription factor NFkB (FC = 5.4) and decreased the expression of genes including TLR1 (FC = - 2.54), TLR3 (FC = - 2.43), TLR10 (FC = - 3.88), NOD2 (FC = - 2.4), NOD1 (FC = - 2.45) and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1B (- 3.27). The regulation of the genes involved in inflammation signaling pathway suggests that probiotics may stimulate the innate immune response of animal against parasitic and bacterial infections. We have provided a detailed description of the experimental design, microarray experiment and normalization and analysis of data which have been deposited into NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO): GSE75240. PMID:27656413

  15. Changes in the antigenic and molecular structure of. gamma. -irradiated bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Suba, E.A.; Tsai, C.M.; Elin, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    Ionization radiation is known to alter the biological properties of LPS. The author treated a highly purified LPS from E. coli in aqueous medium with /sup 60/Co-radiation. The changes in the antigenic and molecular structure of LPS were studied in double immunodiffusion/immunoelectrophoresis (rabbit antiserum) and sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), respectively. Untreated LPS revealed two major antigenic components and, due to varying lengths of the O-polysaccharide side chain, a series of homopolymers (SDS-PAGE). High doses of ..gamma..-radiation destroyed all antigenic reactivities and all stainable bands on SDS-PAGE. However, lower doses of radiation were selective. Disappearance of the more radiation-sensitive, electrophoretically fast-migrating antigenic component paralleled elimination of the long O-side chain containing molecules. The relatively radiation-resistant, less anodic second antigenic component cross-reacted with LPS of another E. coli strain and corresponded to LPS molecules composed of R-core and lipid A (SDS-PAGE). These findings explain the in vivo loss of antibody protection from shock before non-specific resistance with ..gamma..-irradiation of LPS.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Biliary Epithelial Cell NRas Activation Requires Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR).

    PubMed

    Trussoni, Christy E; Tabibian, James H; Splinter, Patrick L; O'Hara, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocytes (biliary epithelial cells) actively participate in microbe-induced proinflammatory responses in the liver and contribute to inflammatory and infectious cholangiopathies. We previously demonstrated that cholangiocyte TLR-dependent NRas activation contributes to proinflammatory/ proliferative responses. We test the hypothesis that LPS-induced activation of NRas requires the EGFR. SV40-transformed human cholangiocytes (H69 cells), or low passage normal human cholangiocytes (NHC), were treated with LPS in the presence or absence of EGFR or ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (TACE) inhibitors. Ras activation assays, quantitative RT-PCR, and proliferation assays were performed in cells cultured with or without inhibitors or an siRNA to Grb2. Immunofluorescence for phospho-EGFR was performed on LPS-treated mouse samples and specimens from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, hepatitis C, and normal livers. LPS-treatment induced an association between the TLR/MyD88 and EGFR/Grb2 signaling apparatus, NRas activation, and EGFR phosphorylation. NRas activation was sensitive to EGFR and TACE inhibitors and correlated with EGFR phosphorylation. The TACE inhibitor and Grb2 depletion prevented LPS-induced IL6 expression (p<0.05) and proliferation (p<0.01). Additionally, cholangiocytes from LPS-treated mouse livers and human primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) livers exhibited increased phospho-EGFR (p<0.01). Moreover, LPS-induced mouse cholangiocyte proliferation was inhibited by concurrent treatment with the EGFR inhibitor, Erlotinib. Our results suggest that EGFR is essential for LPS-induced, TLR4/MyD88-mediated NRas activation and induction of a robust proinflammatory cholangiocyte response. These findings have implications not only for revealing the signaling potential of TLRs, but also implicate EGFR as an integral component of cholangiocyte TLR-induced proinflammatory processes.

  17. Induction of phenoloxidase and other immunological activities in the humoral fluids of amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri challenged with Lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

    PubMed

    Pang, Qiuxiang; Liu, Xuemei; Zhao, Bosheng; Sun, Huanhuan

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge concerning the humoral immunity is scarce in amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri. This study measured the humoral parameters including phenoloxidase (PO) activity, lysozyme activity, antimicrobial activity, microbial agglutinin, and hemagglutinin in amphioxus humoral fluids before and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Humoral fluids from unchallenged Branchiostoma belcheri (B. belcheri) had PO activity, lysozyme, antimicrobial, microbial agglutinating, and hemagglutinating activities, which may represent part of the baseline level of innate immunity in this organism. After challenge with LPS, many humoral parameters were all increased significantly including the PO activity, lysozyme activity, growth-inhibiting activities against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Vibrio alginolyticus (V. alginolyticus), growth-inhibiting activities against Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), microbial agglutinating activities against Micrococcus lysodeikticus (M. lysodeikticus), B. subtilis, and S. aureus, and hemagglutinating activities against rabbit and human A and O erythrocytes. In contrast, the agglutinating activities against V. harveyi and E. coli and the hemagglutinating activity against human B erythrocytes in the humoral fluids were reduced in response to LPS challenge. It appears that the humoral fluids of B. belcheri contain components that are able to differentiate different microbes and different human blood cell types. PMID:22733094

  18. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced autophagy is involved in the restriction of Escherichia coli in peritoneal mesothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Host cell autophagy is implicated in the control of intracellular pathogen. Escherichia coli (E.coli) is the most common organism caused single-germ enterobacterial peritonitis during peritoneal dialysis. In this study, we investigated autophagy of peritoneal mesothelial cells and its role in defense against E.coli. Results Autophagy in human peritoneal mesothelial cell line (HMrSV5) was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a dose-dependent and time-dependent way, which was demonstrated by increased expression of Beclin-1 and light chain 3 (LC3)-II, the accumulation of punctate green fluorescent protein-LC3, and a higher number of monodansylcadaverine-labeled autophagic vacuoles. After incubation of HMrSV5 cells with E.coli following LPS stimulation, both the intracellular bactericidal activity and the co-localization of E.coli (K12-strain) with autophagosomes were enhanced. Conversely, blockade of autophagy with 3-methyladenine, wortmannin or Beclin-1 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) led to a significant reduction in autophagy-associated protein expression, attenuation of intracellular bactericidal activity, and reduced co-localization of E.coli with monodansylcadaverine-labeled autophagosomes. In addition, treatment of HMrSV5 cells with LPS caused a dose-dependent and time-dependent increase in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression. Both knockdown of TLR4 with siRNA and pharmacological inhibition of TLR4 with Polymyxin B significantly decreased LPS-induced autophagy. Furthermore, TLR4 siRNA attenuated remarkably LPS-induced intracellular bactericidal activity. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated for the first time that LPS-induced autophagy in peritoneal mesothelial cells could enhance the intracellular bactericidal activity and the co-localization of E.coli with autophagosomes. The activation of TLR4 signaling was involved in this process. These results indicate that LPS-induced autophagy may be a cell-autonomous defense mechanism triggered in

  19. LPS pretreatment ameliorates D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced acute liver failure in rat.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jin-Zhong; Wang, Li-Ping; Zhang, Sai-Nan; Shi, Ke-Qing; Chen, Shao-Long; Yang, Nai-Bin; Ni, Shun-Lan; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Lu, Ming-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) remains an extremely poor prognosis and high mortality; with no effective treatments. The endotoxin tolerance (ET) phenotype has been reported to exhibit protective activities in several sepsis models. We now investigated the effects and underlying intraperitoneal injection of the same volume of pyrogen-free 0.9% sodium chloride instead of LPS for five consecutive days before D-GalN/LPS injection in rats. The serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, ALT, AST and TBiL from ET + ALF group and ALF group were measured at different time points. Our results showed that ET + ALF group markedly reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, ALT, AST and TBiL and histological features in the ET + ALF group were improved significantly. Furthermore, LPS pre-treatment inhibited D-GalN/LPS-induced NF-κB activation, Bax activation, signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) activities. LPS pre-treatment also significantly enhance the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and suppressors of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3). Our experimental data indicated that ET might alleviate D-GalN/LPS-induced ALF by inhibiting the inflammatory response, inactivation of STAT1 and STAT3 and up-regulation of SOCS1 and SOCS3.

  20. Cardiorespiratory control and cytokine profile in response to heat stress, hypoxia, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure during early neonatal period.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Fiona B; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Wilson, Richard J A; Hasan, Shabih U

    2016-02-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is one of the most common causes of postneonatal infant mortality in the developed world. An insufficient cardiorespiratory response to multiple environmental stressors (such as prone sleeping positioning, overwrapping, and infection), during a critical period of development in a vulnerable infant, may result in SIDS. However, the effect of multiple risk factors on cardiorespiratory responses has rarely been tested experimentally. Therefore, this study aimed to quantify the independent and possible interactive effects of infection, hyperthermia, and hypoxia on cardiorespiratory control in rats during the neonatal period. We hypothesized that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration will negatively impact cardiorespiratory responses to increased ambient temperature and hypoxia in neonatal rats. Sprague-Dawley neonatal rat pups were studied at postnatal day 6-8. Rats were examined at an ambient temperature of 33°C or 38°C. Within each group, rats were allocated to control, saline, or LPS (200 μg/kg) treatments. Cardiorespiratory and thermal responses were recorded and analyzed before, during, and after a hypoxic exposure (10% O2). Serum samples were taken at the end of each experiment to measure cytokine concentrations. LPS significantly increased cytokine concentrations (such as TNFα, IL-1β, MCP-1, and IL-10) compared to control. Our results do not support a three-way interaction between experimental factors on cardiorespiratory control. However, independently, heat stress decreased minute ventilation during normoxia and increased the hypoxic ventilatory response. Furthermore, LPS decreased hypoxia-induced tachycardia. Herein, we provide an extensive serum cytokine profile under various experimental conditions and new evidence that neonatal cardiorespiratory responses are adversely affected by dual interactions of environmental stress factors. PMID:26811056

  1. Effects of transportation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge on vaginal temperature in crossbred heifer calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effects of transportation and subsequent LPS challenge on heifer vaginal temperature (Tvag). Brahman x British heifers (n=44) of from Raymond, MS, were weaned and acclimated to a high roughage diet fed in GrowSafe® bunks for 25 d. Heifers were blocked by body weight (BW) and...

  2. Enhancement of the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in steers supplemented with chromium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty steers received a premix that added 0 (control) or 0.2 mg/kg of chromium (KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) to the total diet on a dry matter basis for 55 d. Steer...

  3. Chromium supplementation enhances the metabolic response of steers to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) supplementation on the metabolic response to LPS challenge was examined. Steers (n=20; 235±4 kg body weight (BW)) received a premix that added 0 (Con) or 0.2 mg/kg Cr to the total diet (DM (dry matter) basis) for ...

  4. Chromium supplementation enhances the acute phase response of steers to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty crossbred steers (235±4 kg BW) received 0 ppb (Control; C) or 200 ppb chromium propionate (CHR) for 55 days. Steers were fitted with jugular catheters and rectal temperature (RT) recording...

  5. The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on whole blood oxidative response as assessed by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence in dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differences between lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on whole blood oxidative response using luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL) are currently unknown in cattle. Luminol-dependent CL measures the amount of reactive oxygen species released from leukocytes a...

  6. The symbiotic defect of Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharide mutants is suppressed by lpsZ sup + , a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.N.V.; Klein, S.; Signer, E.R. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1990-05-01

    exo mutants of Rhizobium meliloti SU47, which fail to secrete acidic extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), induce Fix{sup {minus}} nodules on alfalfa. However, mutants of R. meliloti Rm41 carrying the same exo lesions induce normal Fix{sup +} nodules. The authors show that such induction is due to a gene from strain Rm41, which they call lpsZ{sup +}, that is missing in strain SU47. lpsZ{sup +} does not restore EPS production but instead alters the composition an structure of lipopolysaccharide. In both SU47 and Rm41, either lpsZ{sup +} or exo{sup +} is sufficient for normal nodulation. This suggests that in R. meliloti EPS and lipopolysaccharide can perform the same function in nodule development.

  7. Protective effects of carnosine alone and together with alpha-tocopherol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus ethanol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Kalaz, Esra Betül; Aydın, A Fatih; Doğan-Ekici, Işın; Çoban, Jale; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Uysal, Müjdat

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of carnosine (CAR) alone and together with vitamin E (Vit E) on alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) in rats. ASH was induced by ethanol (3 times; 5 g/kg; 12 h intervals, via gavage), followed by a single dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 mg/kg; i.p.). CAR (250 mg/kg; i.p.) and Vit E (200 mg D-α-tocopherol/kg; via gavage) were administered 30 min before and 90 min after the LPS injection. CAR treatment lowered high serum transaminase activities together with hepatic histopathologic improvements in rats with ASH. Reactive oxygen species formation, malondialdehyde levels, myeloperoxidase activities and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and collagen 1α1 (COL1A1) expressions were observed to decrease. These improvements were more remarkable in CAR plus Vit E-treated rats. Our results indicate that CAR may be effective in suppressing proinflammatory, prooxidant, and profibrotic factors in the liver of rats with ASH. PMID:26773358

  8. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from periodontal pathogenic bacteria facilitate oncogenic herpesvirus infection within primary oral cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; DeFee, Michael R; Cao, Yueyu; Wen, Jiling; Wen, Xiaofei; Noverr, Mairi C; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) remains the most common tumor arising in patients with HIV/AIDS, and involvement of the oral cavity represents one of the most common clinical manifestations of this tumor. HIV infection incurs an increased risk for periodontal diseases and oral carriage of a variety of bacteria. Whether interactions involving pathogenic bacteria and oncogenic viruses in the local environment facilitate replication or maintenance of these viruses in the oral cavity remains unknown. In the current study, our data indicate that pretreatment of primary human oral fibroblasts with two prototypical pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) produced by oral pathogenic bacteria-lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), increase KSHV entry and subsequent viral latent gene expression during de novo infection. Further experiments demonstrate that the underlying mechanisms induced by LTA and/or LPS include upregulation of cellular receptor, increasing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activating intracellular signaling pathways such as MAPK and NF-κB, and all of which are closely associated with KSHV entry or gene expression within oral cells. Based on these findings, we hope to provide the framework of developing novel targeted approaches for treatment and prevention of oral KSHV infection and KS development in high-risk HIV-positive patients.

  9. Protective effects of carnosine alone and together with alpha-tocopherol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus ethanol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Kalaz, Esra Betül; Aydın, A Fatih; Doğan-Ekici, Işın; Çoban, Jale; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Uysal, Müjdat

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of carnosine (CAR) alone and together with vitamin E (Vit E) on alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) in rats. ASH was induced by ethanol (3 times; 5 g/kg; 12 h intervals, via gavage), followed by a single dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 mg/kg; i.p.). CAR (250 mg/kg; i.p.) and Vit E (200 mg D-α-tocopherol/kg; via gavage) were administered 30 min before and 90 min after the LPS injection. CAR treatment lowered high serum transaminase activities together with hepatic histopathologic improvements in rats with ASH. Reactive oxygen species formation, malondialdehyde levels, myeloperoxidase activities and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and collagen 1α1 (COL1A1) expressions were observed to decrease. These improvements were more remarkable in CAR plus Vit E-treated rats. Our results indicate that CAR may be effective in suppressing proinflammatory, prooxidant, and profibrotic factors in the liver of rats with ASH.

  10. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Algae-Derived Lipid Extracts on Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Stimulated Human THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ruairi C; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Bahar, Bojlul; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Algae contain a number of anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and chlorophyll a, hence as dietary ingredients, their extracts may be effective in chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of lipid extracts from three red seaweeds (Porphyra dioica, Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus) and one microalga (Pavlova lutheri) were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages. Extracts contained 34%-42% total fatty acids as n-3 PUFA and 5%-7% crude extract as pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene and fucoxanthin. Pretreatment of the THP-1 cells with lipid extract from P. palmata inhibited production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 (p < 0.05) and IL-8 (p < 0.05) while that of P. lutheri inhibited IL-6 (p < 0.01) production. Quantitative gene expression analysis of a panel of 92 genes linked to inflammatory signaling pathway revealed down-regulation of the expression of 14 pro-inflammatory genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR8, TRAF5, TRAF6, TNFSF18, IL6R, IL23, CCR1, CCR4, CCL17, STAT3, MAP3K1) by the lipid extracts. The lipid extracts effectively inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated via toll-like receptors, chemokines and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling molecules. These results suggest that lipid extracts from P. lutheri, P. palmata, P. dioica and C. crispus can inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory pathways in human macrophages. Therefore, algal lipid extracts should be further explored as anti-inflammatory ingredients for chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases. PMID:26308008

  11. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Algae-Derived Lipid Extracts on Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Stimulated Human THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Ruairi C.; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Bahar, Bojlul; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Algae contain a number of anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and chlorophyll a, hence as dietary ingredients, their extracts may be effective in chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of lipid extracts from three red seaweeds (Porphyra dioica, Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus) and one microalga (Pavlova lutheri) were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages. Extracts contained 34%–42% total fatty acids as n-3 PUFA and 5%–7% crude extract as pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene and fucoxanthin. Pretreatment of the THP-1 cells with lipid extract from P. palmata inhibited production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 (p < 0.05) and IL-8 (p < 0.05) while that of P. lutheri inhibited IL-6 (p < 0.01) production. Quantitative gene expression analysis of a panel of 92 genes linked to inflammatory signaling pathway revealed down-regulation of the expression of 14 pro-inflammatory genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR8, TRAF5, TRAF6, TNFSF18, IL6R, IL23, CCR1, CCR4, CCL17, STAT3, MAP3K1) by the lipid extracts. The lipid extracts effectively inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated via toll-like receptors, chemokines and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling molecules. These results suggest that lipid extracts from P. lutheri, P. palmata, P. dioica and C. crispus can inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory pathways in human macrophages. Therefore, algal lipid extracts should be further explored as anti-inflammatory ingredients for chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases. PMID:26308008

  12. Perturbation of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Micelles by Sushi 3 (S3) antimicrobial peptide. The importance of an intermolecular disulfide bond in S3 dimer for binding, disruption, and neutralization of LPS.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wohland, Thorsten; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2004-11-26

    S3 peptide, derived from the Sushi 3 domain of Factor C, which is the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-sensitive serine protease of the horseshoe crab coagulation cascade, was shown previously to harbor antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria. However, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we demonstrate that the intermolecular disulfide bonding of S3 resulting in S3 dimers is indispensable for its interaction with LPS. The binding properties of the S3 monomer and dimer to LPS were analyzed by several approaches including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based assay, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). It is evident that the S3 dimer exhibits stronger binding to LPS, demonstrating 50% LPS-neutralizing capability at a concentration of 1 mum. Circular dichroism spectrometry revealed that the S3 peptide undergoes conformational change in the presence of a disulfide bridge, transitioning from a random coil to beta-sheet structure. Using a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy monitoring system, we describe a novel approach for examining the mechanism of peptide interaction with LPS in the native environment. The strategy shows that intermolecular disulfide bonding of S3 into dimers plays a critical role in its propensity to disrupt LPS micelles and consequently neutralize LPS activity. S3 dimers display detergent-like properties in disrupting LPS micelles. Considering intermolecular disulfide bonds as an important parameter in the structure-activity relationship, this insight provides clues for the future design of improved LPS-binding and -neutralizing peptides.

  13. Identification of a new anti-LPS agent, geniposide, from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, and its ability of direct binding and neutralization of lipopolysaccharide in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xinchuan; Yang, Dong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Ning; Li, Bin; Cao, Hongwei; Lu, Yongling; Wei, Guo; Zhou, Hong; Zheng, Jiang

    2010-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS/endotoxin) is a key pathogen recognition molecule for sepsis. Currently, one of the therapeutic approaches for severe sepsis is focusing on the neutralization of LPS, and clinical trials have shown a lot of traditional Chinese herbs possess anti-sepsis function. Herein, to elucidate the bioactive components of traditional Chinese herbs that can neutralize LPS, the lipid A-binding abilities of sixty herbs were tested using affinity biosensor technology. The aqueous extract of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, traditionally used to treat inflammation in Asian countries for centuries, was further investigated. Subsequently, a monomer, identified as geniposide, was isolated. In vitro, geniposide was found to directly bind LPS and neutralize LPS. It dose-dependently inhibited cytokines release from RAW264.7 cells induced by LPS without affecting the cell viability, and inhibited TNF-α mRNA expression up-regulated by LPS. However, geniposide did not decrease TNF-α release induced by CpG DNA, Poly I:C or IL-1β. Significantly, geniposide dose-dependently down-regulated TLR4 mRNA expression up-regulated by LPS, and suppressed the phosphorylations of p38 MAKP induced by LPS but not by IL-1β. In vivo, geniposide (40mg/kg) could significantly protect mice challenge with lethal heat-killed E. coli, and dose-dependently decreased the level of serum endotoxin which was tightly associated with the cytokine levels in endotoxemia mice. In summary, we successfully isolated geniposide from G. jasminoides Ellis. Geniposide directly bound LPS and neutralized LPS in vitro, and significantly protected sepsis model mice. Therefore, geniposide could be as a useful lead compound for anti-sepsis drug development. PMID:20655404

  14. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 can elicit dose- and time-dependent immune priming in Galleria mellonella larvae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Yi, Yunhong; Lv, Yingying; Li, Mei; Wang, Jia; Qiu, Lihong

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we primed Galleria mellonella larvae by haemocoel injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 to determine whether bacterial LPS can induce enhanced immune protection (recently called immune priming). We also analyzed the relationship between changes in the levels of innate immune elements and the degree of enhanced immune protection in the larvae at designated time points after priming. The larvae that received experimental doses (20.0, 10.0 and 5.0μg per larva) of LPS demonstrated increased resistance against lethal challenge with P. luminescens TT01; the degree and period of protection correlated positively with the priming dose. These results indicated that the P. luminescens TT01 LPS could induce typical immune priming in G. mellonella. Moreover, the levels of innate immune parameters (i.e. haemocyte density, phagocytosis, haemocyte encapsulation ability, and antibacterial activity of cell-free haemolymph) and endogenous enzyme activities (i.e. acid phosphatase, ACP; alkaline phosphatase, AKP; superoxide dismutase, SOD and lysozyme, LSZ) were significantly increased following priming of the larvae with LPS, whereas the activities of peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) were significantly decreased. All of the parameters examined changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that G. mellonella larvae could modulate their immune responses based on different doses of LPS used for priming, and that priming phenomenon in G. mellonella larvae elicited by LPS was mediated by the innate immune elements and enzyme activity. PMID:25796336

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist selectively augments thymopoiesis and prevents cell apoptosis in LPS induced thymic atrophy model independent of gonadal steroids.

    PubMed

    Ullewar, Meenal P; Umathe, Sudhir N

    2014-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) causes acute thymic atrophy, a phenomenon that has been linked to immune dysfunction and poor survival during sepsis. The systemic response to LPS involves a rise in glucocorticoids and proinflammatory cytokines which contribute greatly to thymic involution and apoptosis. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog exerts thymopoietic regulatory effects and possesses immunostimulant properties. We determined whether leuprolide, a GnRH analog can be useful in LPS induced thymic involution and apoptosis. Mice injected with 100 μg of LPS intraperitoneally led to involution of thymus, to decrease of CD4(+)8(+) thymocyte subset, and to fragmentation of thymic DNA. Leuprolide (100 μg/mouse, s.c.) pretreatment significantly attenuated LPS induced thymic atrophy, and also reduced LPS induced systemic rise in corticosterone levels. The observed effect of leuprolide remained unaffected in castrated and ovariectomized mice. Collectively, leuprolide has protective action independent of gonadal steroids, which was mediated by blunting of the systemic corticosteroid response in LPS induced thymic atrophy model.

  16. Bioactive phytochemicals of leaf essential oils of Cinnamomum osmophloeum prevent lipopolysaccharide/D-galactosamine (LPS/D-GalN)-induced acute hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yu-Tang; Huang, Chi-Chang; Ho, Shang-Tse; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Chi-Chen; Lin, Chien-Tsong; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2011-08-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioactive phytochemicals of leaf essential oils of Cinnamomum osmophloeum on lipopolysaccharide/D-galactosamine (LPS/D-GalN)-induced acute hepatitis. The results revealed that post-treatment with 100 μmol/kg trans-cinnamaldehyde, (-)-aromadendrene, T-cadinol, or α-cadinol significantly decreased the aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels in serum. Moreover, both T-cadinol and α-cadinol treatments decreased the expressions of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) in the liver tissues when compared with the LPS/D-GalN group. Liver histopathology also showed that silymarin, trans-cinnamaldehyde, (-)-aromadendrene, T-cadinol, or α-cadinol significantly reduced the incidence of liver lesions induced by LPS/D-GalN. These results suggest that the above phytochemicals exhibit potent hepatoprotection against LPS/D-GalN-induced liver damage in mice, and their hepatoprotective effects may be due to the modulation of anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:21699244

  17. Melatonin attenuated mediators of neuroinflammation and alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mRNA expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated rat astrocytoma cells, C6.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Rituraj; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2012-09-01

    Melatonin has been known to affect a variety of astrocytes functions in many neurological disorders but its mechanism of action on neuroinflammatory cascade and alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) expression are still not properly understood. Present study demonstrated that treatment of C6 cells with melatonin for 24 hours significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitrative and oxidative stress, expressions of cyclooxigenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Melatonin also modulated LPS-induced mRNA expressions of α7-nAChR and inflammatory cytokine genes. Furthermore, melatonin reversed LPS-induced changes in C/EBP homologous protein 10 (CHOP), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1(mPGES-1) and phosphorylated p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (P-p38). Treatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) inhibited α7-nAChR mRNA expression in LPS-induced C6 cells. Our findings explored anti-neuroinflammatory action of melatonin, which may suggests its beneficial roles in the neuroinflammation associated disorders.

  18. Polyphenolic extracts from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) protect colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co cells) from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation--modulation of microRNA 126.

    PubMed

    Ojwang, Leonnard O; Banerjee, Nivedita; Noratto, Giuliana D; Angel-Morales, Gabriela; Hachibamba, Twambo; Awika, Joseph M; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2015-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is a drought tolerant crop with several agronomic advantages over other legumes. This study evaluated varieties from four major cowpea phenotypes (black, red, light brown and white) containing different phenolic profiles for their anti-inflammatory property on non-malignant colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co) cells challenged with an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay on the LPS-stimulated cells revealed antioxidative potential of black and red cowpea varieties. Real-time qRT-PCR analysis in LPS-stimulated cells revealed down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, VCAM-1), transcription factor NF-κB and modulation of microRNA-126 (specific post-transcriptional regulator of VCAM-1) by cowpea polyphenolics. The ability of cowpea polyphenols to modulate miR-126 signaling and its target gene VCAM-1 were studied in LPS-stimulated endothelial cells transfected with a specific inhibitor of miR-126, and treated with 10 mg GAE/L black cowpea extract where the extract in part reversed the effect of the miR-126 inhibitor. This suggests that cowpea may exert their anti-inflammatory activities at least in part through induction of miR-126 that then down-regulate VCAM-1 mRNA and protein expressions. Overall, Cowpea therefore is promising as an anti-inflammatory dietary component. PMID:25300227

  19. Polyphenolic extracts from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) protect colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co cells) from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation--modulation of microRNA 126.

    PubMed

    Ojwang, Leonnard O; Banerjee, Nivedita; Noratto, Giuliana D; Angel-Morales, Gabriela; Hachibamba, Twambo; Awika, Joseph M; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2015-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is a drought tolerant crop with several agronomic advantages over other legumes. This study evaluated varieties from four major cowpea phenotypes (black, red, light brown and white) containing different phenolic profiles for their anti-inflammatory property on non-malignant colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co) cells challenged with an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay on the LPS-stimulated cells revealed antioxidative potential of black and red cowpea varieties. Real-time qRT-PCR analysis in LPS-stimulated cells revealed down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, VCAM-1), transcription factor NF-κB and modulation of microRNA-126 (specific post-transcriptional regulator of VCAM-1) by cowpea polyphenolics. The ability of cowpea polyphenols to modulate miR-126 signaling and its target gene VCAM-1 were studied in LPS-stimulated endothelial cells transfected with a specific inhibitor of miR-126, and treated with 10 mg GAE/L black cowpea extract where the extract in part reversed the effect of the miR-126 inhibitor. This suggests that cowpea may exert their anti-inflammatory activities at least in part through induction of miR-126 that then down-regulate VCAM-1 mRNA and protein expressions. Overall, Cowpea therefore is promising as an anti-inflammatory dietary component.

  20. Hydration, Ionic Valence and Cross-Linking Propensities of Cations Determine the Stability of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Agrinaldo; Pontes, Frederico J.; Lins, Roberto D.; Soares, Thereza A.

    2013-10-29

    The supra-molecular structure of LPS aggregates governs outer membrane permeability and activation of the host immune response during Gram-negative bacterial infections. Molecular dynamics simulations unveil at atomic resolution 10 the subtle balance between cation hydration and cross-link ability in modulating phase transitions of LPS membranes.

  1. Chitosan Oligosaccharide Reduces Intestinal Inflammation That Involves Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Activation in Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Challenged Piglets.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Xiao, Dingfu; Tan, Bie; Xiao, Hao; Wang, Jing; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Huang, Ruilin; Yang, Chenbo; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-13

    Chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) is a degradation product of chitosan with antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial effects. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary COS on the intestinal inflammatory response and the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathways that may be involved using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged piglet model. A total of 40 weaned piglets were used in a 2 × 2 factorial design; the main factors were dietary treatment (basal or 300 μg/kg COS) and inflammatory challenge (LPS or saline). On the morning of days 14 and 21 after the initiation of treatment, the piglets were injected intraperitoneally with Escherichia coli LPS at 60 and 80 μg/kg body weight or the same amount of sterilized saline, respectively. Blood and small intestine samples were collected on day 14 or 21, respectively. The results showed that piglets challenged with LPS have a significant decrease in average daily gain and gain:feed and histopathological injury in the jejunum and ileum, whereas dietary supplementation with COS significantly alleviated intestinal injury induced by LPS. Piglets fed the COS diet had lower serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 6, and IL-8 as well as lower intestinal abundances of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA but higher anti-inflammatory cytokine mRNA compared with piglets fed the basal diet among LPS-challenged piglets (p < 0.05). Dietary COS increased intestinal CaSR and PLCβ2 protein expressions in both saline- and LPS-treated piglets, but decreased p-NF-κB p65, IKKα/β, and IκB protein expressions in LPS-challenged piglets (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that COS has the potential to reduce the intestinal inflammatory response, which is concomitant with the activation of CaSR and the inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathways under an inflammatory stimulus.

  2. Viscoelastic and ultrastructural characteristics of whole blood and plasma in Alzheimer-type dementia, and the possible role of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS).

    PubMed

    Bester, Janette; Soma, Prashilla; Kell, Douglas B; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer-type dementia (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Patients typically present with neuro- and systemic inflammation and iron dysregulation, associated with oxidative damage that reflects in hypercoagulability. Hypercoagulability is closely associated with increased fibrinogen and in AD patients fibrinogen has been implicated in the development of neuroinflammation and memory deficits. There is still no clear reason precisely why (a) this hypercoagulable state, (b) iron dysregulation and (c) increased fibrinogen could together lead to the loss of neuronal structure and cognitive function. Here we suggest an alternative hypothesis based on previous ultrastructural evidence of the presence of a (dormant) blood microbiome in AD. Furthermore, we argue that bacterial cell wall components, such as the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative strains, might be the cause of the continuing and low-grade inflammation, characteristic of AD. Here, we follow an integrated approach, by studying the viscoelastic and ultrastructural properties of AD plasma and whole blood by using scanning electron microscopy, Thromboelastography (TEG®) and the Global Thrombosis Test (GTT®). Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the presence and close proximity of microbes to erythrocytes. TEG® analysis showed a hypercoagulable state in AD. TEG® results where LPS was added to naive blood showed the same trends as were found with the AD patients, while the GTT® results (where only platelet activity is measured), were not affected by the added LPS, suggesting that LPS does not directly impact platelet function. Our findings reinforce the importance of further investigating the role of LPS in AD. PMID:26462180

  3. Viscoelastic and ultrastructural characteristics of whole blood and plasma in Alzheimer-type dementia, and the possible role of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS)

    PubMed Central

    Bester, Janette; Soma, Prashilla; Kell, Douglas B.; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer-type dementia (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Patients typically present with neuro- and systemic inflammation and iron dysregulation, associated with oxidative damage that reflects in hypercoagulability. Hypercoagulability is closely associated with increased fibrin(ogen) and in AD patients fibrin(ogen) has been implicated in the development of neuroinflammation and memory deficits. There is still no clear reason precisely why (a) this hypercoagulable state, (b) iron dysregulation and (c) increased fibrin(ogen) could together lead to the loss of neuronal structure and cognitive function. Here we suggest an alternative hypothesis based on previous ultrastructural evidence of the presence of a (dormant) blood microbiome in AD. Furthermore, we argue that bacterial cell wall components, such as the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative strains, might be the cause of the continuing and low-grade inflammation, characteristic of AD. Here, we follow an integrated approach, by studying the viscoelastic and ultrastructural properties of AD plasma and whole blood by using scanning electron microscopy, Thromboelastography (TEG®) and the Global Thrombosis Test (GTT®). Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the presence and close proximity of microbes to erythrocytes. TEG® analysis showed a hypercoagulable state in AD. TEG® results where LPS was added to naive blood showed the same trends as were found with the AD patients, while the GTT® results (where only platelet activity is measured), were not affected by the added LPS, suggesting that LPS does not directly impact platelet function. Our findings reinforce the importance of further investigating the role of LPS in AD. PMID:26462180

  4. The suppression of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation during the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS): beneficial or detrimental to endothelial barrier?

    PubMed

    Bogatcheva, Natalia V; Zemskova, Marina A; Poirier, Christophe; Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Kolosova, Irina; Bresnick, Anne R; Verin, Alexander D

    2011-12-01

    Sepsis-induced vascular leakage is a major underlying cause of the respiratory dysfunction seen in severe sepsis. Here, we studied the role of MLC phosphorylation in LPS-induced endothelial hyperpermeability and assessed how the changes in phospho-MLC distribution affect LPS-induced barrier dysfunction. We demonstrated that the changes in human lung microvascular endothelial permeability are preceded by the increase in intracellular calcium level, and increase in MYPT and MLC phosphorylation. Using the siRNA approach, we showed that both LPS-induced barrier dysfunction and MLC phosphorylation are attenuated by the depletion of the smooth muscle isoform of MLC kinase (MLCK) and Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2). Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of both ROCK1 and 2 with Y-27632 exacerbated LPS-induced drop in transendothelial resistance, although significantly decreasing MLC phosphorylation level. We next studied the involvement of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathways in LPS-induced barrier dysfunction. We showed that LPS decreased the level of PKA-dependent phosphorylation in endothelial cells; and the pretreatment with forskolin or PKA activator bnz-cAMP counteracted this effect. Forskolin and bnz-cAMP also attenuated LPS-induced increase in MLC phosphorylation level. As we have shown earlier (Bogatcheva et al., 2009), forskolin and bnz-cAMP provide protection from LPS-induced barrier dysfunction. We compared the effects of bnz-cAMP and Y-27632 on phospho-MLC distribution and observed that while bnz-cAMP increased the association of the phospho-MLC signal with the cortical structures, Y-27632 decreased this association. These data indicate that an overall decrease in MLC phosphorylation could be either beneficial or detrimental to endothelial barrier, depending on the intracellular locale of major phospho-MLC changes. PMID:21302311

  5. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Promotes Apoptosis in Human Breast Epithelial × Breast Cancer Hybrids, but Not in Parental Cells.

    PubMed

    Fried, Sabrina; Tosun, Songuel; Troost, Gabriele; Keil, Silvia; Zaenker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) belong to the group of pathogen recognition receptors known to play a crucial role in the innate immune system. In cancer, TLR expression is still debated controversially due to contradictory results reporting that both induction of apoptosis as well as tumor progression could depend on TLR signaling, whereby recent data rather indicate a pro-tumorigenic effect. The biological phenomenon of cell fusion has been associated with cancer progression due to findings revealing that fusion-derived hybrid cells could exhibit properties like an increased metastatogenic capacity and an increased drug resistance. Thus, M13MDA435 hybrid cell lines, which derived from spontaneous fusion events between human M13SV1-EGFP-Neo breast epithelial cells and human MDA-MB-435-Hyg breast cancer cells, were investigated. Cultivation of cells in the presence of the TLR4 ligand LPS potently induced apoptosis in all hybrid clones, but not in parental cells, which was most likely attributed to differential kinetics of the TLR4 signal transduction cascade. Activation of this pathway concomitant with NF-κB nuclear translocation and TNF-α expression was solely observed in hybrid cells. However, induction of LPS mediated apoptosis was not TNF-α dependent since TNF-α neutralization was not correlated to a decreased amount of dead cells. In addition to TNF-α, LPS also caused IFN-β expression in hybrid clones 1 and 3. Interestingly, hybrid clones differ in the mode of LPS induced apoptosis. While neutralization of IFN-β was sufficient to impair the LPS induced apoptosis in M13MDA435-1 and -3 hybrids, the amount of apoptotic M13MDA435-2 and -4 hybrid cells remained unchanged in the presence of neutralizing IFN-β antibodies. In summary, the fusion of non-LPS susceptible parental human breast epithelial cells and human breast cancer cells gave rise to LPS susceptible hybrid cells, which is in view with the cell fusion hypothesis that hybrid cells could exhibit novel

  6. A low-level diode laser therapy reduces the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced periodontal ligament cell inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T. H.; Chen, C. C.; Liu, S. L.; Lu, Y. C.; Kao, C. T.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytologic effects of inflammatory periodontal ligament cells in vitro after low-level laser therapy. Human periodontal ligament cells were cultured, exposed to lipopolysaccharide and subjected to low-level laser treatment of 5 J cm-2 or 10 J cm-2 using a 920 nm diode laser. A periodontal ligament cell attachment was observed under a microscope, and the cell viability was quantified by a mitochondrial colorimetric assay. Lipopolysaccharide-treated periodontal ligament cells were irradiated with the low-level laser, and the expression levels of several inflammatory markers, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1, and pErk kinase, were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The data were collected and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance; p < 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The low-level laser treatment of periodontal ligament cells increased their ability to attach and survive. After irradiation, the expression levels of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1 in lipopolysaccharide-exposed periodontal ligament cells decreased over time (p < 0.05). In periodontal ligament cells, low-level diode laser treatment increased the cells’ proliferative ability and decreased the expression of the examined inflammatory mediators.

  7. miR-146a is essential for lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cross-tolerance against kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yan; Jia, Ping; Fang, Yi; Liu, Hong; Jiao, Xiaoyan; He, John C.; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-146a is one of most important microRNAs involved in development of endotoxin tolerance via (toll-like receptors) TLRs/ NF-κB pathway. In this study, we sought to identify the mechanistic role of miR-146a in mediating the protective effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pretreatment on kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury. A locked nucleic acid–modified anti-miR-146a given before LPS treatment knocked down miR-146a expression and completely negated LPS-mediated protection against kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury. Knockdown of miR-146a resulted in significantly higher histopathological scores for tubular damage, expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. Furthermore, knockdown of miR-146a greatly up-regulated the protein levels of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK-1) and tumor-necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), which are known target genes of miR-146a, leading to activation of NF-κB. Finally, elevation of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65/p50 and caspase-3 expression, degradation of cytosolic IkBα and BcL-xL, and substantially exacerbation of tubular cell apoptosis were inversely correlated with miR-146a expression. Taken together, our results identify that miR146a exerts a kidney protective effect through negative regulation of acute inflammatory response by suppressing NF-κB activation and proinflammatory genes expression. PMID:27250735

  8. High-Fat Diet Induces Periodontitis in Mice through Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) Receptor Signaling: Protective Action of Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Blasco-Baque, Vincent; Serino, Matteo; Vergnes, Jean-Noël; Riant, Elodie; Loubieres, Pascale; Arnal, Jean-François; Gourdy, Pierre; Sixou, Michel; Burcelin, Rémy; Kemoun, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background A fat-enriched diet favors the development of gram negative bacteria in the intestine which is linked to the occurrence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Interestingly, some pathogenic gram negative bacteria are commonly associated with the development of periodontitis which, like T2D, is characterized by a chronic low-grade inflammation. Moreover, estrogens have been shown to regulate glucose homeostasis via an LPS receptor dependent immune-modulation. In this study, we evaluated whether diet-induced metabolic disease would favor the development of periodontitis in mice. In addition, the regulatory role of estrogens in this process was assessed. Methods Four-week-old C57BL6/J WT and CD14 (part of the TLR-4 machinery for LPS-recognition) knock-out female mice were ovariectomised and subcutaneously implanted with pellets releasing either placebo or 17β-estradiol (E2). Mice were then fed with either a normal chow or a high-fat diet for four weeks. The development of diabetes was monitored by an intraperitoneal glucose-tolerance test and plasma insulin concentration while periodontitis was assessed by identification of pathogens, quantification of periodontal soft tissue inflammation and alveolar bone loss. Results The fat-enriched diet increased the prevalence of periodontal pathogenic microbiota like Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia, gingival inflammation and alveolar bone loss. E2 treatment prevented this effect and CD14 knock-out mice resisted high-fat diet-induced periodontal defects. Conclusions/Significance Our data show that mice fed with a diabetogenic diet developed defects and microflora of tooth supporting-tissues typically associated with periodontitis. Moreover, our results suggest a causal link between the activation of the LPS pathway on innate immunity by periodontal microbiota and HFD-induced periodontitis, a pathophysiological mechanism that could be targeted by estrogens. PMID:23133617

  9. Cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharides and human health – a review

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; Schluter, Philip J; Shaw, Glen R

    2006-01-01

    Cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharide/s (LPS) are frequently cited in the cyanobacteria literature as toxins responsible for a variety of heath effects in humans, from skin rashes to gastrointestinal, respiratory and allergic reactions. The attribution of toxic properties to cyanobacterial LPS dates from the 1970s, when it was thought that lipid A, the toxic moiety of LPS, was structurally and functionally conserved across all Gram-negative bacteria. However, more recent research has shown that this is not the case, and lipid A structures are now known to be very different, expressing properties ranging from LPS agonists, through weak endotoxicity to LPS antagonists. Although cyanobacterial LPS is widely cited as a putative toxin, most of the small number of formal research reports describe cyanobacterial LPS as weakly toxic compared to LPS from the Enterobacteriaceae. We systematically reviewed the literature on cyanobacterial LPS, and also examined the much lager body of literature relating to heterotrophic bacterial LPS and the atypical lipid A structures of some photosynthetic bacteria. While the literature on the biological activity of heterotrophic bacterial LPS is overwhelmingly large and therefore difficult to review for the purposes of exclusion, we were unable to find a convincing body of evidence to suggest that heterotrophic bacterial LPS, in the absence of other virulence factors, is responsible for acute gastrointestinal, dermatological or allergic reactions via natural exposure routes in humans. There is a danger that initial speculation about cyanobacterial LPS may evolve into orthodoxy without basis in research findings. No cyanobacterial lipid A structures have been described and published to date, so a recommendation is made that cyanobacteriologists should not continue to attribute such a diverse range of clinical symptoms to cyanobacterial LPS without research confirmation. PMID:16563160

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi-induced immunosuppression: B cells undergo spontaneous apoptosis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) arrests their proliferation during acute infection

    PubMed Central

    Zuñiga, E; Motran, C; Montes, C L; Diaz, F L; Bocco, J L; Gruppi, A

    2000-01-01

    Acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is characterized by multiple manifestations of immunosuppression of both cellular and humoral responses. B cells isolated at the acute stage of infection have shown marked impairment in their response to polyclonal activators in vitro. The present work aims at studying the B cell compartment in the context of acute T. cruzi infection to provide evidence for B cell activation, spontaneous apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle upon mitogenic stimulation as a mechanism underlying B cell hyporesponse. We found that B cells from acutely infected mice, which fail to respond to the mitogen LPS, showed spontaneous proliferation and production of IgM, indicating a high level of B cell activation. Furthermore, these activated B cells also exhibited an increase in Fas expression and apoptosis in cultures without an exogenous stimulus. On the other hand, B cells from early acute and chronic infected mice did not present activation or apoptosis, and were able to respond properly to the mitogen. Upon in vitro stimulation with LPS, B cells from hyporesponder mice failed to progress through the cell cycle (G0/G1 arrest), nor did they increase the levels of apoptosis. These results indicate that B cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest could be the mechanisms that control intense B cell expansion, but at the same time could be delaying the emergence of a specific immune response against the parasite. PMID:10691924

  11. Garlic (Allium sativum) Extracts Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toll-Like Receptor 4 Dimerization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Garlic has been used as a folk medicine for a long history. Numerous studies demonstrated that garlic extracts and its sulfur-containing compounds inhibit nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) activation induced by various receptor agonist including lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These effects suggest that garl...

  12. Molecular characterization and immune response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1, 2 and 3 genes in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Zhi; He, An-Yuan; Chen, Li-Qiao; Limbu, Samwel Mchele; Wang, Ya-Wen; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are inverse feedback regulators of cytokine and hormone signaling mediated by the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway that are involved in immunity, growth and development of organisms. In the present study, three SOCS genes, SOCS-1, SOCS-2 and SOCS-3, were identified in an economically important fish, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) referred to as NtSOCS-1, NtSOCS-2 and NtSOCS-3. Multiple alignments showed that, the three SOCS molecules share highly conserved functional domains, including the SRC homology 2 (SH2) domain, the extended SH2 subdomain (ESS) and the SOCS box with others vertebrate counterparts. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that NtSOCS-1, 2 and 3 belong to the SOCS type II subfamily. Whereas NtSOCS-1 and 3 showed close evolutionary relationship with Perciformes, NtSOCS-2 was more related to Salmoniformes. Tissue specific expression results showed that, NtSOCS-1, 2 and 3 were constitutively expressed in all nine tissues examined. NtSOCS-1 and 3 were highly expressed in immune-related tissues, such as gills, foregut and head kidney. However, NtSOCS-2 was superlatively expressed in liver, brain and heart. In vivo, NtSOCS-1 and 3 mRNA levels were up-regulated after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge while NtSOCS-2 was down-regulated. In vitro, LPS stimulation increased NtSOCS-3 mRNA expression, however it inhibited the transcription of NtSOCS-1 and 2. Collectively, our findings suggest that, the NtSOCS-1 and 3 might play significant role(s) in innate immune response, while NtSOCS-2 may be more involved in metabolic regulation.

  13. Molecular characterization and immune response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1, 2 and 3 genes in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Zhi; He, An-Yuan; Chen, Li-Qiao; Limbu, Samwel Mchele; Wang, Ya-Wen; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are inverse feedback regulators of cytokine and hormone signaling mediated by the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway that are involved in immunity, growth and development of organisms. In the present study, three SOCS genes, SOCS-1, SOCS-2 and SOCS-3, were identified in an economically important fish, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) referred to as NtSOCS-1, NtSOCS-2 and NtSOCS-3. Multiple alignments showed that, the three SOCS molecules share highly conserved functional domains, including the SRC homology 2 (SH2) domain, the extended SH2 subdomain (ESS) and the SOCS box with others vertebrate counterparts. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that NtSOCS-1, 2 and 3 belong to the SOCS type II subfamily. Whereas NtSOCS-1 and 3 showed close evolutionary relationship with Perciformes, NtSOCS-2 was more related to Salmoniformes. Tissue specific expression results showed that, NtSOCS-1, 2 and 3 were constitutively expressed in all nine tissues examined. NtSOCS-1 and 3 were highly expressed in immune-related tissues, such as gills, foregut and head kidney. However, NtSOCS-2 was superlatively expressed in liver, brain and heart. In vivo, NtSOCS-1 and 3 mRNA levels were up-regulated after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge while NtSOCS-2 was down-regulated. In vitro, LPS stimulation increased NtSOCS-3 mRNA expression, however it inhibited the transcription of NtSOCS-1 and 2. Collectively, our findings suggest that, the NtSOCS-1 and 3 might play significant role(s) in innate immune response, while NtSOCS-2 may be more involved in metabolic regulation. PMID:26820103

  14. Antibacterial activity of a synthetic peptide that mimics the LPS binding domain of Indian mud crab, Scylla serrata anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (SsALF) also involved in the modulation of vaginal immune functions through NF-kB signaling.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sachin; Yedery, R D; Patgaonkar, M S; Selvaakumar, C; Reddy, K V R

    2011-01-01

    Recently the cDNA coding for anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) has been identified from the Indian mud crab, Scylla serrata and has been named S. serrata anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (SsALF). SsALF protein sequence demonstrated the presence of two highly conserved cystine residues between which the putative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding domain is known to be located. In this study, we have designed and synthesized a 24 amino acid linear (lSsALF24) and a cyclic (cSsALF24) peptides based on this putative LPS binding domain and demonstrated the ability of these peptides to bind to LPS. The peptides were active against vaginal pathogens demonstrated by MIC, CFU and phagocytosis assays. cSsALF24 did not show toxicity to human vaginal epithelial cells (HeLa-S3), macrophages and rabbit erythrocytes even at high concentration (64.64 μM). Flow cytometry results demonstrated that cSsALF24 peptide suppressed LPS induced phagocytosis of FITC labeled E. coli. HeLa cells were stimulated with LPS (10 μg/ml) alone for 6 h or after two washings with PBS, treated for 1 h with cSsALF24 (64.64 μM). After washing, the cells were cultured for 24 h in fresh media. The spent media as well as cells were collected for the determination of cytokine/chemokine levels such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) using ELISA and RT-PCR respectively. Similar results were obtained with LPS stimulated cells treated with c/nSsALF24 or unstimulated cells treated with c/nSsALF24. The expression of cytokine/chemokines and mRNA's coding these proteins were unaffected in c/nSsALF24 treated cells. In contrast, in LPS stimulated cells, the expression levels of these molecules were up-regulated via the induction of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB) levels. However, the expression of these pro-inflammatory markers was decreased in LPS stimulated cells following the treatment with cSsALF24, attributing anti

  15. Protective Role of Flavonoids and Lipophilic Compounds from Jatropha platyphylla on the Suppression of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Inflammation in Macrophage Cells.

    PubMed

    Ambriz-Pérez, Dulce L; Bang, Woo Young; Nair, Vimal; Angulo-Escalante, Miguel A; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; Heredia, J Basilio

    2016-03-01

    Seventeen polyphenols (e.g, apigenin, genistein, and luteolin glycosides) and 11 lipophilic compounds (e.g., fatty acids, sterols, and terpenes) were detected by LC-MS/MS-ESI and GC-MS, respectively, in Jatropha platyphylla. Extracts from pulp, kernel, and leaves and fractions were studied to know their effect on some pro-inflammatory mediators. Phenolic and lipophilic extracts showed significant inhibitory effects on ROS and NO production while not affecting mitochondrial activity or superoxide generation rate in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. In addition, NO production was also diminished by lipophilic leaf fractions F1 and F2 with the latter fraction showing a greater effect and composed mainly of sterols and terpene. Furthermore, total extracts showed nonselective inhibitions against cyclooxygenase COX-1 and COX-2 activities. All together, these results suggest that J. platyphylla extracts have potential in treating inflammatory diseases and their activity is mediated by flavonoids and lipophilic compounds. PMID:26872073

  16. Protective Role of Ternatin Anthocyanins and Quercetin Glycosides from Butterfly Pea (Clitoria ternatea Leguminosae) Blue Flower Petals against Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Inflammation in Macrophage Cells.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vimal; Bang, Woo Young; Schreckinger, Elisa; Andarwulan, Nuri; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis

    2015-07-22

    Twelve phenolic metabolites (nine ternatin anthocyanins and three glycosylated quercetins) were identified from the blue flowers of Clitoria ternatea by high-performance liquid chromatography diode array detection and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n)). Three anthocyanins not reported in this species before show fragmentation pattern of the ternatin class. Extracts were fractionated in fractions containing flavonols (F3) and ternatin anthocyanins (F4). In general, C. ternatea polyphenols showed anti-inflammatory properties in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells with distinct molecular targets. Flavonols (F3) showed strong inhibition of COX-2 activity and partial ROS suppression. On the other hand, the ternatin anthocyanins (F4) inhibited nuclear NF-κB translocation, iNOS protein expression, and NO production through a non-ROS suppression mechanism. Accordingly, quercetin glycosides and ternatin anthocyanins from the blue flower petals of C. ternatea may be useful in developing drugs or nutraceuticals for protection against chronic inflammatory diseases by suppressing the excessive production of pro-inflammatory mediators from macrophage cells. PMID:26120869

  17. Protective Role of Ternatin Anthocyanins and Quercetin Glycosides from Butterfly Pea (Clitoria ternatea Leguminosae) Blue Flower Petals against Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Inflammation in Macrophage Cells.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vimal; Bang, Woo Young; Schreckinger, Elisa; Andarwulan, Nuri; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis

    2015-07-22

    Twelve phenolic metabolites (nine ternatin anthocyanins and three glycosylated quercetins) were identified from the blue flowers of Clitoria ternatea by high-performance liquid chromatography diode array detection and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n)). Three anthocyanins not reported in this species before show fragmentation pattern of the ternatin class. Extracts were fractionated in fractions containing flavonols (F3) and ternatin anthocyanins (F4). In general, C. ternatea polyphenols showed anti-inflammatory properties in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells with distinct molecular targets. Flavonols (F3) showed strong inhibition of COX-2 activity and partial ROS suppression. On the other hand, the ternatin anthocyanins (F4) inhibited nuclear NF-κB translocation, iNOS protein expression, and NO production through a non-ROS suppression mechanism. Accordingly, quercetin glycosides and ternatin anthocyanins from the blue flower petals of C. ternatea may be useful in developing drugs or nutraceuticals for protection against chronic inflammatory diseases by suppressing the excessive production of pro-inflammatory mediators from macrophage cells.

  18. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC’s regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9−/−) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9−/−. We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9−/−, which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9−/−. Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  19. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), up-regulate the IL-1-mRNA and down-regulate the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamine synthetase (GS)-mRNAs in astroglial primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Letournel-Boulland, M L; Fages, C; Rolland, B; Tardy, M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacteria, has been studied in both exponentially growing and confluent morphologically differentiated astroglial cells in primary cultures. The expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Glutamine Synthetase (GS) were investigated in parallel with proliferation and expression of IL-1 beta-mRNA. During the exponential growth, proliferation was severely inhibited by LPS. The effect was time- and dose-dependent. On confluent differentiated cells LPS induced an inhibition of cell proliferation which was associated with a down-regulation of GFAP-mRNA, GS-mRNA and GS expressions and with a transitory increase in IL-1 beta mRNA expression. The observed effects might interact with the astroglial developmental program and with the astroglial function.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blunt the response of Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) glucose inhibited (GI) neurons to decreased glucose.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lihong; Sheng, Zhenyu; Potian, Joseph; Deak, Adam; Rohowsky-Kochan, Christine; Routh, Vanessa H

    2016-10-01

    A population of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons which co-express Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are inhibited at physiological levels of brain glucose and activated when glucose levels decline (e.g. glucose-inhibited or GI neurons). Fasting enhances the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits the enhanced activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose following a fast. Mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) on their NPY promoter were used to identify NPY/AgRP neurons. Fasting for 24h and LPS injection decreased blood glucose levels. As we have found previously, fasting increased c-fos expression in NPY/AgRP neurons and increased the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. As we predicted, LPS blunted these effects of fasting at the 24h time point. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blocked the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. These data suggest that LPS and TNFα may alter glucose and energy homeostasis, in part, due to changes in the glucose sensitivity of NPY/AgRP neurons. Interestingly, our findings also suggest that NPY/AgRP-GI neurons use a distinct mechanism to sense changes in extracellular glucose as compared to our previous studies of GI neurons in the adjacent ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus.

  1. Flagellin and lipopolysaccharide up-regulation of IL-6 and CXCLi2 gene expression in chicken heterophils is mediated by NF-kappaB and AP-1 pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Toll-like receptor agonists, flagellin (FLG) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been shown to stimulate chicken heterophils to induce the expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by a mechanism involving the triggering of differential MEK-ERK signaling cascades. However, the transl...

  2. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated angiopoietin-2-dependent autocrine angiogenesis is regulated by NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Menden, Heather; Welak, Scott; Cossette, Stephanie; Ramchandran, Ramani; Sampath, Venkatesh

    2015-02-27

    Sepsis-mediated endothelial Angiopoeitin-2 (Ang2) signaling may contribute to microvascular remodeling in the developing lung. The mechanisms by which bacterial cell wall components such as LPS mediate Ang2 signaling in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs) remain understudied. In HPMEC, LPS-induced Ang2, Tie2, and VEGF-A protein expression was preceded by increased superoxide formation. NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) inhibition, but not Nox4 or Nox1 inhibition, attenuated LPS-induced superoxide formation and Ang2, Tie2, and VEGF-A expression. Nox2 silencing, but not Nox4 or Nox1 silencing, inhibited LPS-mediated inhibitor of κ-B kinase β (IKKβ) and p38 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB and AP-1. In HPMECs, LPS increased the number of angiogenic tube and network formations in Matrigel by >3-fold. Conditioned media from LPS-treated cells also induced angiogenic tube and network formation in the presence of Toll-like receptor 4 blockade but not in the presence of Ang2 and VEGF blockade. Nox2 inhibition or conditioned media from Nox2-silenced cells attenuated LPS-induced tube and network formation. Ang2 and VEGF-A treatment rescued angiogenesis in Nox2-silenced cells. We propose that Nox2 regulates LPS-mediated Ang2-dependent autocrine angiogenesis in HPMECs through the IKKβ/NF-κB and MAPK/AP-1 pathways. PMID:25568324

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta agonist ameliorated inflammasome activation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Yeon, Jong Eun; Ko, Eun Jung; Yoon, Eileen L; Suh, Sang Jun; Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Hae Rim; Kang, Seoung Hee; Yoo, Yang Jae; Je, Jihye; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inflammasome activation and the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-δ agonist treatment in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice were classified according to control or high fat diet (HFD) with or without PPAR-δ agonist (GW) over period of 12 wk [control, HFD, HFD + lipopolysaccharide (LPS), HFD + LPS + GW group]. HepG2 cells were exposed to palmitic acid (PA) and/or LPS in the absence or presence of GW. RESULTS: HFD caused glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. In mice fed an HFD with LPS, caspase-1 and interleukin (IL)-1β in the liver were significantly increased. Treatment with GW ameliorated the steatosis and inhibited overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In HepG2 cells, PA and LPS treatment markedly increased mRNA of several nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family members (NLRP3, NLRP6, and NLRP10), caspase-1 and IL-1β. PA and LPS also exaggerated reactive oxygen species production. All of the above effects of PA and LPS were reduced by GW. GW also enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK-α. CONCLUSION: PPAR-δ agonist reduces fatty acid-induced inflammation and steatosis by suppressing inflammasome activation. Targeting the inflammasome by the PPAR-δ agonist may have therapeutic implication for NAFLD. PMID:26668503

  4. Anti-inflammation effect of methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside on adjuvant induced-arthritis rats and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Sun, Jialin; Xin, Wenyu; Li, Yongjie; Ni, Lin; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2015-03-01

    Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside (MSL) is a derivative of natural salicylate isolated from Gaultheria yunnanensis (Franch.) Rehder, which is widely used for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), swelling and pain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of MSL on the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat in vivo and explore the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanism of MSL in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Our results showed that MSL significantly inhibited the arthritis progression in AIA rats, decreasing the right hind paw swelling and ankle diameter, attenuating histopathological changes and suppressing the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in AIA rats. Besides, MSL had potent anti-inflammatory effects on the LPS-activated RAW264.7. MSL dose-dependently inhibited the activity of COX-1, and COX-2. Moreover, MSL prominently inhibited LPS-induced activation of MAPK in RAW264.7 cells by blocking phosphorylation of p38 and ERK. Our study suggests that MSL may be effective in the treatment of inflammatory diseases by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokine production and regulating the MAPK signal pathway. PMID:25637446

  5. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blunt the response of Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) glucose inhibited (GI) neurons to decreased glucose.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lihong; Sheng, Zhenyu; Potian, Joseph; Deak, Adam; Rohowsky-Kochan, Christine; Routh, Vanessa H

    2016-10-01

    A population of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons which co-express Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are inhibited at physiological levels of brain glucose and activated when glucose levels decline (e.g. glucose-inhibited or GI neurons). Fasting enhances the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits the enhanced activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose following a fast. Mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) on their NPY promoter were used to identify NPY/AgRP neurons. Fasting for 24h and LPS injection decreased blood glucose levels. As we have found previously, fasting increased c-fos expression in NPY/AgRP neurons and increased the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. As we predicted, LPS blunted these effects of fasting at the 24h time point. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blocked the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. These data suggest that LPS and TNFα may alter glucose and energy homeostasis, in part, due to changes in the glucose sensitivity of NPY/AgRP neurons. Interestingly, our findings also suggest that NPY/AgRP-GI neurons use a distinct mechanism to sense changes in extracellular glucose as compared to our previous studies of GI neurons in the adjacent ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:27473896

  6. Flagellin and lipopolysaccharide up-regulation of IL-6 and CXCLi2 gene expression in chicken heterophils is mediated by ERK1/2-dependent activation of AP-1 and NF-kappaB signaling pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Toll-like receptor agonists, flagellin (FLG) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), stimulate chicken heterophils to induce the expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by a mechanism involving the triggering of differential MEK-ERK signaling cascades. However, the translocation and activa...

  7. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Hongjie; Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli; Xiang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  8. C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Interferon Gamma-Inducible Protein 10 (IP-10), and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Are Associated with Risk of Tuberculosis after Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Tenforde, Mark W.; Gupte, Nikhil; Dowdy, David W.; Asmuth, David M.; Balagopal, Ashwin; Pollard, Richard B.; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Lama, Javier R.; Pillay, Sandy; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Pawar, Jyoti; Santos, Breno; Riviere, Cynthia; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Hakim, James G.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Bollinger, Robert; Semba, Richard D.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gupta, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association between pre-antiretroviral (ART) inflammation and immune activation and risk for incident tuberculosis (TB) after ART initiation among adults is uncertain. Design Nested case-control study (n = 332) within ACTG PEARLS trial of three ART regimens among 1571 HIV-infected, treatment-naïve adults in 9 countries. We compared cases (participants with incident TB diagnosed by 96 weeks) to a random sample of controls (participants who did not develop TB, stratified by country and treatment arm). Methods We measured pre-ART C-reactive protein (CRP), EndoCab IgM, ferritin, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interferon gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), soluble CD14 (sCD14), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and CD4/DR+/38+ and CD8/DR+/38+ T cells. Markers were defined according to established cutoff definitions when available, 75th percentile of measured values when not, and detectable versus undetectable for LPS. Using logistic regression, we measured associations between biomarkers and incident TB, adjusting for age, sex, study site, treatment arm, baseline CD4 and log10 viral load. We assessed the discriminatory value of biomarkers using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Seventy-seven persons (4.9%) developed incident TB during follow-up. Elevated baseline CRP (aOR 3.25, 95% CI: 1.55–6.81) and IP-10 (aOR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.05–3.39), detectable plasma LPS (aOR 2.39, 95% CI: 1.13–5.06), and the established TB risk factors anemia and hypoalbuminemia were independently associated with incident TB. In ROC analysis, CRP, albumin, and LPS improved discrimination only modestly for TB risk when added to baseline routine patient characteristics including CD4 count, body mass index, and prior TB. Conclusion Incident TB occurs commonly after ART initiation. Although associated with higher post-ART TB risk, baseline CRP, IP-10, and LPS add limited value to routine patient characteristics

  9. Soluble CD14 Enhances the Response of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells to P. gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Andrukhov, Oleh; Andrukhova, Olena; Özdemir, Burcu; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Moritz, Andreas; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are lacking membrane CD14, which is an important component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling through toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. In the present study we investigated the effect of soluble CD14 on the response of human PDLSCs to LPS of Porphyromonas (P.) gingivalis. Human PDLSCs (hPDLSCs) were stimulated with P. gingivalis LPS in the presence or in the absence of soluble CD14 (sCD14) and the production of interleukin (IL)-6, chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 8 (CXCL8), and chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) was measured. The response to P. gingivalis LPS was compared with that to TLR4 agonist Escherichia coli LPS and TLR2-agonist Pam3CSK4. The response of hPDLSCs to both P. gingivalis LPS and E. coli LPS was significantly enhanced by sCD14. In the absence of sCD14, no significant difference in the hPDLSCs response to two kinds of LPS was observed. These responses were significantly lower compared to that to Pam3CSK4. In the presence of sCD14, the response of hPdLSCs to P. gingivalis LPS was markedly higher than that to E. coli LPS and comparable with that to Pam3CSK4. The response of hPdLSCs to bacterial LPS is strongly augmented by sCD14. Local levels of sCD14 could be an important factor for modulation of the host response against periodontal pathogens. PMID:27504628

  10. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF) of Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-05-01

    The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD) in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2) from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future. PMID:27213409

  11. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF) of Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD) in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2) from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future. PMID:27213409

  12. The dopamine D3 receptor regulates the effects of methamphetamine on LPS-induced cytokine production in murine mast cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li; Li, Xia; Ren, Hui-Xun; Wu, Feng; Li, Ming; Wang, Biao; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Cheng, Wei-Ying; Li, Ju-Ping; Chen, Yan-Jiong; Chen, Teng

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine (METH) alter inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production in the periphery. However, the effect of METH on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune responses and its underlying mechanism of action remains unclear. The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) plays an important role in METH addiction, indicating that the D3R may regulate METH-mediated immune responses. In this study, we examined the effect of METH on mast cell released cytokines in the lungs and thymi of mice stimulated by LPS, and on LPS-induced murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Moreover, we used D3R-deficient mice to investigate the effect of this receptor on LPS-stimulated mast cell released cytokine production after METH treatment in the lungs and thymi. The effects of a D3R agonist and antagonist on LPS-induced cytokine production after METH treatment in murine BMMCs were also evaluated. METH suppressed LPS-induced cytokine production in the lungs and thymi of wild-type (WT) mice and BMMCs. However, METH did not alter LPS-induced cytokine production in the lungs and thymi of D3R-deficient mice. When BMMCs were treated with the D3R receptor antagonist, NGB2904 hydrochloride (NGB-2904), METH did not alter LPS-induced cytokine production. However, treatment with the D3R agonist, 7-hydroxy-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (7-OH-DPAT), significantly enhanced the effects of METH on LPS-induced cytokine production. Our results suggest that METH regulates mast cell released cytokines production in an LPS-induced mouse model via the D3R.

  13. Protection of mice against the lethal toxicity of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by immunization with anti-idiotype antibody to a monoclonal antibody to lipid A from Eikenella corrodens LPS.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, T; Takazoe, I; Okuda, K

    1990-01-01

    We produced anti-idiotype antibodies to antibody to lipid A from Eikenella corrodens. The ALA-1 monoclonal antibody (immunoglobulin M [IgM] isotype), which had already been produced in our laboratory (T. Kato, I. Takazoe, and K. Okuda, Infect. Immun. 57:656-659, 1989), had reacted strongly with lipid A from E. corrodens, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella minnesota. Four anti-idiotype monoclonal antibodies to ALA-1 (Ab1), designated A2LA-1 (IgG1 isotype), A2LA-2 (IgG2a isotype), A2LA-3 (IgG2a isotype), and A2LA-4 (IgG3 isotype), which recognized the idiotype Ab1, were produced. A2LA-1, A2LA-2, and A2LA-3 were capable of over 61% inhibition of ALA-1 reactivity to E. coli J5 lipid A in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system. The sera of mice and rabbits immunized with the anti-idiotype antibodies revealed that the internal image anti-idiotype antibody induced the production of IgG antibodies that cross-reacted with or bound to lipid A. These studies indicate that A2LA-1 and A2LA-2 contained an antigenic epitope that mimicked lipid A. Immunization of mice with A2LA-1 resulted in prevention of lethal toxicity from E. coli J5 lipopolysaccharide. PMID:2404870

  14. Chlamydial hemagglutinin identified as lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Watkins, N G; Caldwell, H D; Hackstadt, T

    1987-08-01

    Chlamydial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) agglutinated mouse and rabbit erythrocytes but not human, guinea pig, or pronghorn antelope erythrocytes. Hemagglutination was not specific for Chlamydia spp., as rough LPSs from Coxiella burnetii and Escherichia coli also agglutinated erythrocytes from the same animal species. Nonagglutinated and agglutinated erythrocytes bound equivalent amounts of LPS, indicating that hemagglutination was not due to a specific interaction of chlamydial LPS with erythrocytes. Thus, hemagglutination by chlamydial LPS is not mediated by specific receptor-ligand interactions but is a property of the altered surface of the LPS-coated erythrocytes. PMID:3301820

  15. An adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) gene from Apostichopus japonicus; molecular cloning and expression analysis in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge and thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Chai, Xin-Yue; Tu, Jie; Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Li, Chao-Feng; Jiang, Sen-Hao; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2016-02-01

    The adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) play a vital role in energy metabolism via ADP/ATP exchange in eukaryotic cells. Apostichopus japonicus (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea) is an important economic species in China. Here, a cDNA representing an ANT gene of A. japonicus was isolated and characterized from respiratory tree and named AjANT. The full-length AjANT cDNA is 1924 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 38 bp, 3'-UTR of 980 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 906 bp encoding a polypeptide of 301 amino acids. The protein contains three homologous repeat Mito_carr domains (Pfam00153). The deduced AjANT protein sequence has 49-81% in comparison to ANT proteins from other individuals. The predicted tertiary structure of AjANT protein is highly similar to animal ANT proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AjANT is closely related to Holothuroidea ANT genes. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that AjANT expression is higher in the respiratory tree than in other examined tissues. After thermal stress or LPS challenge, expression of AjANT was significantly fluctuant compared to the control. These results suggested that changes in the expression of ANT gene might be involved in immune defense and in protecting A. japonicus against thermal stress. PMID:26706223

  16. Dynamics of Antagonistic Potency of Rhodobacter capsulatus PG Lipopolysaccharide against Endotoxin-Induced Effects.

    PubMed

    Kabanov, D S; Serov, D A; Zubova, S V; Grachev, S V; Prokhorenko, I R

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of antagonistic potency of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Rhodobacter capsulatus PG on the synthesis of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, IFN-γ) and antiinflammatory (IL-10, IL-1Ra) cytokines induced by highly stimulatory endotoxins from Escherichia coli or Salmonella enterica have been studied. Using human whole blood, we have shown that R. capsulatus PG LPS inhibited most pronouncedly the endotoxin-induced synthesis of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-6 during the first 6 h after endotoxin challenge. Similarly, the endotoxin-induced release of IFN-γ was abolished by R. capsulatus PG LPS as well (24 h). In contrast to the above-mentioned cytokines, the relatively weak antagonistic activity of R. capsulatus PG LPS against endotoxin-triggered production of IL-6 and IL-8 was revealed. Since R. capsulatus PG LPS displays more potent antagonistic activity against deleterious effects of S. enterica LPS than those of E. coli LPS in the cases of such cytokines as IL-1β (6 and 24 h), IL-6 and IL-8 (4 h), we conclude that the effectiveness of protective action of antagonist is mostly determined by the primary lipid A structure of the employed agonist.

  17. Liver X receptor agonist GW3965 dose-dependently regulates lps-mediated liver injury and modulates posttranscriptional TNF-alpha production and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in liver macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun Yong; Dahle, Maria K; Steffensen, Knut R; Reinholt, Finn P; Collins, Jon L; Thiemermann, Christoph; Aasen, Ansgar O; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Wang, Jacob E

    2009-11-01

    Modulation of the host inflammatory response to infection may be a key approach to improve the outcome of patients with sepsis and organ injury. We previously reported that pretreatment of rats with the liver X receptor (LXR) agonist GW3965 reduced the liver injury associated with endotoxemia and attenuated the production of TNF-alpha by rat Kupffer cells. Here, we examine the dose-dependent effect of GW3965 on liver injury and cytokine production in a rat model of endotoxemia and explore the mechanisms underlying TNF-alpha attenuation in Kupffer cells. Low doses of GW3965 (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) administered 30 min before infusion of LPS and peptidoglycan significantly attenuated the increase in plasma levels of the liver injury markers alanine aminotransferase and bilirubin (6 h) as well as the inflammatory mediators TNF-alpha (1 h) and prostaglandin E2 (6 h) associated with endotoxemia. In contrast, pretreatment with a higher dose of GW3965 (1.0 mg/kg) had no such effect. Studies in primary cultures of rat Kupffer cells demonstrated that LXR agonist treatment attenuated both the secreted and cell-associated levels of TNF-alpha, whereas TNF-alpha mRNA levels were not altered. Phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which plays a major role in production of TNF-alpha at the posttranscriptional level, was attenuated by GW3965 treatment in Kupffer cells. Experiments in murine LXR-deficient Kupffer cells demonstrated enhanced production of TNF-alpha in Kupffer cells from LXR-alpha(-/-) mice when challenged with LPS compared with LXR-beta(-/-) and wild-type Kupffer cells. Taken together, these results argue in favor of a novel mechanism for LXR-mediated attenuation of liver injury by interfering with posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-alpha in Kupffer cells. PMID:19295476

  18. Differential host response to LPS variants in amniochorion and the TLR4/MD-2 system in Macaca nemestrina

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Justine; Jain, Sumita; Carl, David J.; Paolella, Louis; Darveau, Richard P.; Gravett, Michael G.; Waldorf, Kristina M. Adams

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Microbial-specific factors are likely critical in determining whether bacteria trigger preterm labor. Structural variations in lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacteria, can determine whether LPS has an inflammatory (agonist) or anti-inflammatory (antagonist) effect through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Our objective was to determine whether amniochorion can discriminate between LPS variants in a nonhuman primate model. We also cloned Macaca nemestrina TLR4 and MD-2 and compared this complex functionally to the human homologue to establish whether nonhuman primates could be used to study TLR4 signaling in preterm birth. STUDY DESIGN Amniochorion explants from M. nemestrina were stimulated with a panel of LPS variants for 24 hours. Supernatants were analyzed for IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8 and prostaglandins E2 and F2α. Tissue expression of TLR1, 2, 4, 6, MyD88 and NF-kB was studied by RT-PCR. M. nemestrina TLR4 and MD2 genes were cloned and compared with their human counterparts in a recombinant TLR4 signaling system to determine LPS sensitivity. RESULTS LPS variants differentially stimulated cytokines and prostaglandins, which was not related to transcriptional changes of TLR4 or other TLRs. Nearly all elements of LPS binding and TLR4 leucine-rich repeats were conserved between humans and M. nemestrina. TLR4/MD-2 signaling complexes from both species were equally sensitive to LPS variants. CONCLUSIONS LPS variants elicit a hierarchical inflammatory response within amniochorion that may contribute to preterm birth. LPS sensitivity is similar between M. nemestrina and humans, validating M. nemestrina as an appropriate model to study TLR4 signaling in preterm birth. PMID:20619890

  19. Influence of Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide as an adjuvant on the immunogenicity of HPV-16 L1VLP vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Ardestani, Susan Kaboudanian; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Abdoli, Asghar

    2015-04-01

    Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has less toxicity and no pyrogenic properties in comparison with other bacterial LPS. It is a toll-like receptor 4 agonist and has been shown to have the potential use as a vaccine adjuvant. In this study, the immunostimulatory properties of LPS from smooth and rough strains of B. abortus (S19 and RB51) as adjuvants were investigated for the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L1 virus-like particles (L1VLPs) vaccines. C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times either with HPV-16 L1VLPs alone, or in combination with smooth LPS (S-LPS), rough LPS (R-LPS), aluminum hydroxide or a mixture of them as adjuvant. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring the specific and total IgG levels, and also the T-cell immune response of mice was evaluated by measuring different cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17. Results showed that serum anti-HPV16 L1VLP IgG antibody titers was significantly higher in mice immunized with a combination of VLPs and R-LPS or S-LPS compared with other immunized groups. Co-administration of HPV-16 L1VLPs with R-LPS elicited the highest levels of splenocytes cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17 and TNF-α) and also effectively induced improvement of a Th1-type cytokine response characterized with a high ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10. The data indicate that B. abortus LPS particularly RB51-LPS enhances the immune responses to HPV-16 L1VLPs and suggests its potential as an adjuvant for the development of a potent prophylactic HPV vaccine and other candidate vaccines.

  20. ENDOTHELIAL CELL TOLERANCE TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE CHALLENGE IS INDUCED BY MONOPHOSPHORYL LIPID A

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Ryan J.; Choi, Hyehun; Koch, Stephen R.; Fensterheim, Benjamin A.; Lamb, Fred S.; Sherwood, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Prior exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produces a reduced or “tolerant” inflammatory response to subsequent challenges with LPS, however the potent pro-inflammatory effects of LPS limit its clinical benefit. The adjuvant Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) is a weak toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist that induces negligible inflammation but retains potent immunomodulatory properties. We postulated that pre-treatment with MPLA would inhibit the inflammatory response of endothelial cells to secondary LPS challenge. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), were exposed to MPLA (10 µg/ml), LPS (100 ng/ml) or vehicle control. HUVECs were then washed and maintained in culture for 24 hours before being challenged with LPS (100 ng/ml). Supernatants were collected and examined for cytokine production in the presence or absence of siRNA inhibitors of critical TLR4 signaling proteins. Pretreatment with MPLA attenuated IL-6 production to secondary LPS challenge to a similar degree as LPS. The application of MyD88 siRNA dramatically reduced MPLA-induced tolerance while TRIF siRNA had no effect. The tolerant phenotype in endothelial cells was associated with reduced IKK, p38 and JNK phosphorylation and enhanced IRAK-M expression for LPS primed HUVECs, but less so in MPLA primed cells. Instead, MPLA-primed HUVECs demonstrated enhanced ERK phosphorylation. In contrast to leukocytes in which tolerance is largely TRIF-dependent, MyD88 signaling mediated endotoxin tolerance in endothelial cells. Most importantly, MPLA, a vaccine adjuvant with a wide therapeutic window, induced tolerance to LPS in endothelial cells. PMID:26669797

  1. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Jianguo

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  2. NMDA Receptor Blockade by Ketamine Abrogates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior in C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Adam K; Budac, David P; Bisulco, Stephanie; Lee, Anna W; Smith, Robin A; Beenders, Brent; Kelley, Keith W; Dantzer, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces depressive-like behavior by activating indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO; O'Connor et al, 2009c). IDO degrades tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway. Using mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of kynurenine metabolites in the brain of mice injected at the periphery with 1 mg/kg LPS, we show that LPS activates the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase pathway that ultimately degrades kynurenine into quinolinic acid. As quinolinic acid acts as an N-methyl-𝒟-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist, we used the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine to assess the role of NMDA receptor activation in LPS-induced depressive-like behavior. Here, we report that a low dose of ketamine (6 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) immediately before administration of LPS (0.83 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) in C57Bl/6 J mice abrogated the development of LPS-induced depressive-like behavior, without altering LPS-induced sickness measured by body weight loss, decreased motor activity, and reduced food intake. Depressive-like behavior was measured 24 h after LPS by decreased sucrose preference and increased immobility in the forced swim test (FST). Ketamine had no effect on LPS-induced cytokine expression in the liver and brain, IDO activation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) transcripts. The ability of ketamine to abrogate LPS-induced depressive-like behavior independently of a possible interference with LPS-induced inflammatory signaling was confirmed when ketamine was administered 10 h after LPS instead of immediately before LPS. In contrast, ketamine had no effect when administered 24 h before LPS. To confirm that NMDA receptor antagonism by ketamine mediates the antidepressant-like activity of this compound in LPS-treated mice, mice were pretreated with the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX) to block

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Membrane Building and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sunhwan; Wu, Emilia L.; Stuhlsatz, Danielle; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Widmalm, Göran; Im, Wonpil

    2015-01-01

    Summary While membrane simulations are widely employed to study the structure and dynamics of various lipid bilayers and membrane proteins in the bilayers, simulations of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in membrane environments have been limited due to its structural complexity, difficulties in building LPS-membrane systems, and lack of appropriate molecular force field. In this work, as a first step to extend CHARMM-GUI Membrane Builder to incorporate LPS molecules and to explore their structures and dynamics in membrane environments using molecular dynamics simulations, we describe step-by-step procedures to build LPS bilayer systems using CHARMM and the recently developed CHARMM carbohydrate and lipid force fields. Such procedures are illustrated by building various bilayers of Escherichia coli O6 LPS and their preliminary simulation results are given in terms of per-LPS area and density distributions of various components along the membrane normal. PMID:25753722

  4. Inhibition of IRAK-4 activity for rescuing endotoxin LPS-induced septic mortality in mice by lonicerae flos extract

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sun Hong; Roh, Eunmiri; Kim, Hyun Soo; Baek, Seung-Il; Choi, Nam Song; Kim, Narae; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •Lonicerae flos extract (HS-23) is a clinical candidate, Phase I for sepsis treatment. •Here, HS-23 or its major constituents rescued LPS-induced septic mortality in mice. •As a mechanism, they directly inhibited IRAK-4-catalyzed kinase activity. •Thus, they suppressed LPS-induced expression of NF-κB/AP-1-target inflammatory genes. -- Abstract: Lonicerae flos extract (HS-23) is a clinical candidate currently undergoing Phase I trial in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected healthy human volunteers, but its molecular basis remains to be defined. Here, we investigated protective effects of HS-23 or its major constituents on Escherichia coli LPS-induced septic mortality in mice. Intravenous treatment with HS-23 rescued LPS-intoxicated C57BL/6J mice under septic conditions, and decreased the levels of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) in the blood. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) and its isomers were assigned as major constituents of HS-23 in the protection against endotoxemia. As a molecular mechanism, HS-23 or CGA isomers inhibited endotoxin LPS-induced autophosphorylation of the IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) in mouse peritoneal macrophages as well as the kinase activity of IRAK-4 in cell-free reactions. HS-23 consequently suppressed downstream pathways critical for LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB or activating protein 1 (AP-1) in the peritoneal macrophages. HS-23 also inhibited various toll-like receptor agonists-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, and down-regulated LPS-induced expression of NF-κB/AP-1-target inflammatory genes in the cells. Taken together, HS-23 or CGA isomers exhibited anti-inflammatory therapy against LPS-induced septic mortality in mice, at least in part, mediated through the inhibition of IRAK-4.

  5. Induction of murine adenosine A(2A) receptor expression by LPS: analysis of the 5' upstream promoter.

    PubMed

    Elson, G; Eisenberg, M; Garg, C; Outram, S; Ferrante, C J; Hasko, G; Leibovich, S J

    2013-04-01

    Non-activated macrophages express low levels of A(2A)Rs and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) upregulates A(2A)R expression in an NF-κB-dependent manner. The murine A(2A)R gene is encoded by three exons, m1, m2 and m3. Exons m2 and m3 are conserved, while m1 encodes the 5' untranslated UTR. Three m1 variants have been defined, m1A, m1B and m1C, with m1C being farthest from the transcriptional start site. LPS upregulates A(2A)Rs in primary murine peritoneal and bone-marrow-derived macrophages and RAW264.7 cells by selectively splicing m1C to m2, through a promoter located upstream of m1C. We have cloned ∼1.6 kb upstream of m1C into pGL4.16(luc2CP/Hygro) promoterless vector. This construct in RAW 264.7 cells responds to LPS, and adenosine receptor agonists augmented LPS responsiveness. The NF-κB inhibitors BAY-11 and triptolide inhibited LPS-dependent induction. Deletion of a key proximal NF-κB site (402-417) abrogated LPS responsiveness, while deletion of distal NF-κB and C/EBPβ sites did not. Site-directed mutagenesis of CREB (309-320), STAT1 (526-531) and AP2 (566-569) sites had little effect on LPS and adenosine receptor agonist responsiveness; however, mutation of a second STAT1 site (582-588) abrogated this responsiveness. Further analysis of this promoter should provide valuable insights into regulation of A(2A)R expression in macrophages in response to inflammatory stimuli.

  6. A novel class of endotoxin receptor agonists with simplified structure, toll-like receptor 4-dependent immunostimulatory action, and adjuvant activity.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Lynn D; Ishizaka, Sally T; McGuinness, Pamela; Zhang, Huiming; Gavin, Wendy; DeCosta, Bruce; Meng, Zhaoyang; Yang, Hu; Mullarkey, Maureen; Young, Donna W; Yang, Hua; Rossignol, Daniel P; Nault, Anneliese; Rose, Jeffrey; Przetak, Melinda; Chow, Jesse C; Gusovsky, Fabian

    2002-02-01

    A series of novel, synthetic compounds containing lipids linked to a phosphate-containing acyclic backbone are shown to have similar biological properties to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These compounds showed intrinsic agonistic properties when tested for their ability to stimulate tumor necrosis factor-alpha in human whole blood and interleukin-6 in U373 human glioblastoma cells without added LPS coreceptor CD14. The presence of the LPS antagonist E5564 completely blocked responses, suggesting that the novel compounds and LPS share a common mechanism of cell activation. Stereoselectivity of the molecules was observed in vitro; compounds with an R,R,R,R-configuration were strongly agonistic, whereas compounds with an R,S,S,R-configuration were much weaker in their activity on human whole blood and U373 cells. We also tested the effect of the compounds in cells transfected with the LPS receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), with similar results, further supporting a shared mechanism with LPS. This was confirmed in vivo where the agonists failed to elicit cytokine responses in C3H/HeJ mice lacking TLR4 signaling. Because LPS-like molecules enhance immune responses, the compounds were mixed with tetanus toxoid and administered to mice in an immunization protocol to test for adjuvant activity. They enhanced the generation of specific antibodies against tetanus toxoid. Our results indicate that these unique compounds behave as agonists of TLR4, resulting in responses similar to those elicited by LPS. They display adjuvant activity in vivo and may be useful for the development of vaccine therapies.

  7. Neuropeptide FF inhibits LPS-mediated osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Long; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Ma, Xiao-Li; Shang, Peng; Yang, Tuanming; Qian, Airong

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) has been implicated in many physiological processes. Previously, we have reported that NPFF modulates the viability and nitric oxide (NO) production of RAW264.7 macrophages. In this study, we investigated the influence of NPFF on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated osteoclast formation of RAW264.7 cells. Our results suggest that, NPFF dose-dependently (1 nM, 10 nM and 100 nM) inhibited osteoclast formation, TRAP enzyme activity and bone resorption in osteoclasts induced by LPS respectively. Moreover, LPS-provoked NO release was also inhibited by NPFF treatment, indicating a NO-dependent pathway is mainly involved. Furthermore, the alterations of osteoclast marker genes were also assessed including TRAP, Cathepsin K, MMP-9, NFATc1 and Runx2. NPFF downregulated LPS-caused gene augmentations of TRAP, Cathepsin K and MMP-9, whereas showed no influences on NFATc1 and Runx2. In addition, NPFF receptor 2 (NPFFR2) mRNA expression was also augmented in response to NPFF treatment, hinting the involvement of NPFFR2 pathway. It should be mentioned that RF9 (1 µ M), a reported pharmacological inhibitor for NPFF receptors, exerted NPFF-like agonist properties as to attenuate osteoclastogenesis. Collectively, our findings provide new evidence for the in vitro activity of NPFF on osteoclasts, which may be helpful to extend the scope of NPFF functions.

  8. Fenoterol inhibits LPS-induced AMPK activation and inflammatory cytokine production through β-arrestin-2 in THP-1 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Xu, Ming; Zhang, You-Yi; He, Bei

    2015-06-26

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway is involved in regulating inflammation in several cell lines. We reported that fenoterol, a β{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor (β{sub 2}-AR) agonist, had anti-inflammatory effects in THP-1 cells, a monocytic cell line. Whether the fenoterol anti-inflammatory effect involves the AMPK pathway is unknown. In this study, we explored the mechanism of β{sub 2}-AR stimulation with fenoterol in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine secretion in THP-1 cells. We studied whether fenoterol and β-arrestin-2 or AMPKα1 subunit knockdown could affect LPS-induced AMPK activation, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and inflammatory cytokine secretion. LPS-induced AMPK activation and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) release were reduced with fenoterol pretreatment of THP-1 cells. SiRNA knockdown of β-arrestin-2 abolished the fenoterol inhibition of LPS-induced AMPK activation and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) release, thus β-arrestin-2 mediated the anti-inflammatory effects of fenoterol on LPS-treated THP-1 cells. In addition, siRNA knockdown of AMPKα1 significantly attenuated the LPS-induced NF-κB activation and IL-1β release, so AMPKα1 was a key signaling molecule involved in LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine production. These results suggested the β{sub 2}-AR agonist fenoterol inhibited LPS-induced AMPK activation and IL-1β release via β-arrestin-2 in THP-1 cells. The exploration of these mechanisms may help optimize therapeutic agents targeting these pathways in inflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • β{sub 2}-AR agonist fenoterol exerts its protective effect on LPS-treated THP-1 cells. • Fenoterol inhibits LPS-induced AMPK activation and IL-1β production. • β-arrestin2 mediates fenoterol-inhibited AMPK activation and IL-1β release. • AMPKα1 is involved in LPS-induced NF-κB activation and IL-1β production.

  9. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  10. Comparative airway inflammatory response of normal volunteers to ozone and lipopolysaccharide challenge

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are environmental pollutants with adverse heatth effects noted in both healthy and asthmatic individuals. The authors and others have shown that inhalation of ozone and LPS both induce airway neutrophilia. Based on these similarities, the author...

  11. Administration of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist MRK-016 rescues acquisition and memory consolidation following peripheral administration of bacterial endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Eimerbrink, M J; White, J D; Pendry, R J; Hodges, S L; Sadler, L N; Wiles, J D; Weintraub, M K; Chumley, M J; Boehm, G W

    2015-07-15

    Recent evidence suggests that inflammation-induced decrements in cognitive function can be mitigated via manipulation of excitatory or inhibitory transmission. We tested the ability of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist, MRK-016 (MRK) to protect against LPS-induced deficits in memory acquisition and consolidation, using a contextual fear conditioning (CFC) paradigm. In Experiment One, mice received lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or MRK injections prior to CFC training, and were then tested 24h after training. In Experiment Two, animals received similar treatment injections immediately after training, and were tested 24h later. Additionally, hippocampal samples were collected 4h after LPS injections and immediately after testing, to evaluate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mRNA expression. Results indicate that MRK can protect against LPS-induced learning/memory decrements in both paradigms. We also found, in both paradigms, that animals treated with LPS/Saline expressed significantly less BDNF mRNA when compared to Saline/Saline-treated animals 4h after LPS administration, but that MRK did not restore BDNF expression levels. Further, treatment administrations had no effect on IGF-1 mRNA expression at any collection time-point. In summary, MRK-016 can protect against LPS-induced deficits in memory acquisition and consolidation, in this hippocampus-dependent paradigm, though this protection occurs independently of recovery of BDNF expression. PMID:25823763

  12. Inflammatory caspases are innate immune receptors for intracellular LPS.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianjin; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Yupeng; Gao, Wenqing; Ding, Jingjin; Li, Peng; Hu, Liyan; Shao, Feng

    2014-10-01

    The murine caspase-11 non-canonical inflammasome responds to various bacterial infections. Caspase-11 activation-induced pyroptosis, in response to cytoplasmic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is critical for endotoxic shock in mice. The mechanism underlying cytosolic LPS sensing and the responsible pattern recognition receptor are unknown. Here we show that human monocytes, epithelial cells and keratinocytes undergo necrosis upon cytoplasmic delivery of LPS. LPS-induced cytotoxicity was mediated by human caspase-4 that could functionally complement murine caspase-11. Human caspase-4 and the mouse homologue caspase-11 (hereafter referred to as caspase-4/11) and also human caspase-5, directly bound to LPS and lipid A with high specificity and affinity. LPS associated with endogenous caspase-11 in pyroptotic cells. Insect-cell purified caspase-4/11 underwent oligomerization upon LPS binding, resulting in activation of the caspases. Underacylated lipid IVa and lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS) could bind to caspase-4/11 but failed to induce their oligomerization and activation. LPS binding was mediated by the CARD domain of the caspase. Binding-deficient CARD-domain point mutants did not respond to LPS with oligomerization or activation and failed to induce pyroptosis upon LPS electroporation or bacterial infections. The function of caspase-4/5/11 represents a new mode of pattern recognition in immunity and also an unprecedented means of caspase activation. PMID:25119034

  13. Non-typhoidal Salmonella encephalopathy involving lipopolysaccharide in cattle.

    PubMed

    Xiong, N; Brewer, M T; Anderson, K L; Carlson, S A

    2013-02-22

    This study assessed the involvement of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the non-typhoidal Salmonella encephalopathy (NTSE) caused by a unique isolate of Salmonella enterica serovar Saint-paul (SstpNPG). NTSE was prevented by genetic (deletion of murE) or pharmacologic (polymyxin) disruption of LPS on SstpNPG although the disruption of LPS did not deter brain penetration of the strain. This is the first study to demonstrate that LPS is involved in the manifestations of NTSE. PMID:22939987

  14. BML-111 Protected LPS/D-GalN-Induced Acute Liver Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dan; Liu, Hai-Ling; Yu, Zhong-Jian; Huang, Yong-Hong; Gao, Dian; Hao, Hua; Liao, Shou-Sheng; Xu, Fang-Yun; Zhou, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) display unique pro-resolving and anti-inflammatory functions in a variety of inflammatory conditions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of BML-111 (5(S),6(R),7-trihydroxyheptanoic acid methyl ester), the agonist of lipoxin A4 receptor, in a model of Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and d-Galactosamine (d-GalN) induced acute liver injury, and to explore the mechanisms. Histopathological analyses were carried out to quantify liver injury degree. The activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO) were examined to evaluate the levels of neutrophil infiltration. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in serum were detected to evaluate the functions of the liver. The amounts of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the expression levels of transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were examined using Western blotting. The antioxidant capacity, the activities of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) were analyzed with the kits via biochemical analysis. We established the model of acute liver injury with lipopolysaccharide and d-Galactosamine (LPS/d-GalN): (1) histopathological results and MPO activities, with the activities of AST and ALT in serum, consistently demonstrated LPS and d-GalN challenge could cause severe liver damage, but BML-111 could prevent pathological changes, inhibit neutrophil infiltration, and improve the hepatic function; (2) LPS/d-GalN increased TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, and IL-10, while decreasing TGF-β1. However, BML-111 could repress LPS/d-GalN -induced TNF-α, IL-1β and COX-2, meanwhile increasing the expression levels of TGF-β1 and IL-10; (3) LPS/d-GalN inhibited the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and hydroxyl

  15. BML-111 Protected LPS/D-GalN-Induced Acute Liver Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dan; Liu, Hai-Ling; Yu, Zhong-Jian; Huang, Yong-Hong; Gao, Dian; Hao, Hua; Liao, Shou-Sheng; Xu, Fang-Yun; Zhou, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) display unique pro-resolving and anti-inflammatory functions in a variety of inflammatory conditions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of BML-111 (5(S),6(R),7-trihydroxyheptanoic acid methyl ester), the agonist of lipoxin A₄ receptor, in a model of Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and d-Galactosamine (d-GalN) induced acute liver injury, and to explore the mechanisms. Histopathological analyses were carried out to quantify liver injury degree. The activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO) were examined to evaluate the levels of neutrophil infiltration. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in serum were detected to evaluate the functions of the liver. The amounts of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the expression levels of transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were examined using Western blotting. The antioxidant capacity, the activities of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) were analyzed with the kits via biochemical analysis. We established the model of acute liver injury with lipopolysaccharide and d-Galactosamine (LPS/d-GalN): (1) histopathological results and MPO activities, with the activities of AST and ALT in serum, consistently demonstrated LPS and d-GalN challenge could cause severe liver damage, but BML-111 could prevent pathological changes, inhibit neutrophil infiltration, and improve the hepatic function; (2) LPS/d-GalN increased TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, and IL-10, while decreasing TGF-β1. However, BML-111 could repress LPS/d-GalN -induced TNF-α, IL-1β and COX-2, meanwhile increasing the expression levels of TGF-β1 and IL-10; (3) LPS/d-GalN inhibited the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and hydroxyl

  16. Metformin Inhibits the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species from NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase to Limit Induction of Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and Boosts Interleukin-10 (IL-10) in Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Beth; Tannahill, Gillian M; Murphy, Michael P; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-08-14

    Metformin, a frontline treatment for type II diabetes mellitus, decreases production of the pro-form of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β in response to LPS in macrophages. We found that it specifically inhibited pro-IL-1β production, having no effect on TNF-α. Furthermore, metformin boosted induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in response to LPS. We ruled out a role for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the effect of metformin because activation of AMPK with A769662 did not mimic metformin here. Furthermore, metformin was still inhibitory in AMKPα1- or AMPKβ1-deficient cells. The activity of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) was inhibited by metformin. Another complex I inhibitor, rotenone, mimicked the effect of metformin on pro-IL-1β and IL-10. LPS induced reactive oxygen species production, an effect inhibited by metformin or rotenone pretreatment. MitoQ, a mitochondrially targeted antioxidant, decreased LPS-induced IL-1β without affecting TNF-α. These results, therefore, implicate complex I in LPS action in macrophages.

  17. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes is modulated by cyclic AMP, prostaglandin E(2), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Hinz, B; Brune, K; Pahl, A

    2000-11-30

    Using human blood monocytes (for determination of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA by RT-PCR) and human whole blood (for prostanoid determination), the present study investigates the influence of the second messenger cAMP on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced COX-2 expression with particular emphasis on the role of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in this process. Elevation of intracellular cAMP with a cell-permeable cAMP analogue (dibutyryl cAMP), an adenylyl cyclase activator (cholera toxin), or a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) substantially enhanced LPS-induced PGE(2) formation and COX-2 mRNA expression, but did not modify COX-2 enzyme activity. Moreover, up-regulation of LPS-induced COX-2 expression was caused by PGE(2), butaprost (selective agonist of the adenylyl cyclase-coupled EP(2) receptor) and 11-deoxy PGE(1) (EP(2)/EP(4) agonist), whereas sulprostone (EP(3)/EP(1) agonist) left COX-2 expression unaltered. Abrogation of LPS-induced PGE(2) synthesis with the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 caused a decrease in COX-2 mRNA levels that was restored by exogenous PGE(2) and mimicked by S(+)-flurbiprofen and ketoprofen. Overall, these results indicate a modulatory role of cAMP in the regulation of COX-2 expression. PGE(2), a cAMP-elevating final product of the COX-2 pathway, may autoregulate COX-2 expression in human monocytes via a positive feedback mechanism.

  18. Immunochemical identification of Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, N; Freer, E; Weintraub, A; Ramirez, M; Lind, S; Moreno, E

    1994-01-01

    Sera from Brucella abortus-infected and -vaccinated bovines recognized four lipopolysaccharide (LPS) determinants: two in the O-polysaccharide (A and C), one in the core oligosaccharide from rough Brucella LPS (R), and one in lipid A (LA). From 46 different hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against various LPS moieties, 9 different specificities were identified. Two epitopes, A and C/Y, were present in the O-polysaccharide. Two epitopes were found in the core oligosaccharide (R1 and R2) of rough Brucella LPS. MAbs against R1 and R2 epitopes reacted against LPS from different rough Brucella species; however, MAbs directed to the R2 epitope also reacted against enterobacterial LPS from deep rough mutants. Three epitopes (LA1, LA2, and LA3) were located in the lipid A backbone. Different sets of MAbs recognized two epitopes in the lipid A-associated outer membrane protein (LAOmp3-1 and LAOmp3-2). LPS preparations from smooth brucellae had small amounts of rough-type LPS. Although LPS from rough brucellae did not show smooth-type LPS in western blots (immunoblots), two hybridomas generated from mice immunized with rough B. abortus produced antibodies against smooth B. abortus LPS. Results are discussed in relation to the structure and function of B. abortus LPS and to previous findings on the epitopic density of the molecule. Images PMID:7496947

  19. Iron oxide nanoparticles modulate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in primary human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Susann; Stenvik, Jørgen; Nilsen, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Co-stimulation of the immune system to more than one agent concomitantly is very common in real life, and considering the increasing use of engineered nanoparticles and nanomaterials, it is highly relevant to assess the ability of these materials to modulate key innate immune responses, which has not yet been studied in detail. We investigated the immunomodulatory effects of 10 nm and 30 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) on primary human monocytes in the presence and absence of Toll-like receptor 4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Prior to the cell studies, we characterized the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles in cell culture medium and ensured that the nanoparticles were free from biological contamination. Cellular uptake of the IONPs in monocytes was assessed using transmission electron microscopy. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that the IONPs per se did not induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. However, the IONPs had the ability to suppress LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines in primary human monocytes in an LPS and a particle dose-dependent manner. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled LPS, we showed that the effects correlated with impaired LPS internalization by monocytes in the presence of IONPs, which could be partly explained by LPS adsorption onto the nanoparticle surface. Additionally, the results from particle pretreatment experiments indicate that other cellular mechanisms might also play a role in the observed effects, which warrants further studies to elucidate the additional mechanisms underlying the capacity of IONPs to alter the reactivity of monocytes to LPS and to mount an appropriate cellular response. PMID:27695322

  20. Iron oxide nanoparticles modulate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in primary human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Susann; Stenvik, Jørgen; Nilsen, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Co-stimulation of the immune system to more than one agent concomitantly is very common in real life, and considering the increasing use of engineered nanoparticles and nanomaterials, it is highly relevant to assess the ability of these materials to modulate key innate immune responses, which has not yet been studied in detail. We investigated the immunomodulatory effects of 10 nm and 30 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) on primary human monocytes in the presence and absence of Toll-like receptor 4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Prior to the cell studies, we characterized the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles in cell culture medium and ensured that the nanoparticles were free from biological contamination. Cellular uptake of the IONPs in monocytes was assessed using transmission electron microscopy. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that the IONPs per se did not induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. However, the IONPs had the ability to suppress LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines in primary human monocytes in an LPS and a particle dose-dependent manner. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled LPS, we showed that the effects correlated with impaired LPS internalization by monocytes in the presence of IONPs, which could be partly explained by LPS adsorption onto the nanoparticle surface. Additionally, the results from particle pretreatment experiments indicate that other cellular mechanisms might also play a role in the observed effects, which warrants further studies to elucidate the additional mechanisms underlying the capacity of IONPs to alter the reactivity of monocytes to LPS and to mount an appropriate cellular response.

  1. Social management of LPS-induced inflammation in Formica polyctena ants.

    PubMed

    Aubert, A; Richard, F-J

    2008-08-01

    Invertebrates, and especially insects, constitute valuable and convenient models for the study of the evolutionary roots of immune-related behaviors. With stable conditions in the nest, high population densities, and frequent interactions, social insects such as ants provide an excellent system for examining the spread of pathogens. The evolutionary success of these species raises questions about the behavioral responses of social insects to an infected nestmate. In this experiment, we tested the behavioral changes of the red wood ant Formica polyctena toward an immune-stimulated nestmate. We used bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) to active the innate immune system of individual worker ants without biasing our observation with possible cues or host-manipulation from a living pathogen. We show that LPS-induced immune activation in ants triggers behavioral changes in nestmates. Contrary to what would be expected, we did not find removal strategies (e.g. agonistic behaviors) or avoidance of the pathogenic source, but rather a balance between a limitation of pathogen dissemination (i.e. decreased trophallaxis and locomotion of the LPS-treated ant), and what could constitute the behavioral basis for a "social vaccination" (i.e. increased grooming). This supports the importance of social interactions in resistance to disease in social insects, and perhaps social animals in general.

  2. Protein-energy malnutrition decreases the expression of TLR-4/MD-2 and CD14 receptors in peritoneal macrophages and reduces the synthesis of TNF-alpha in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice.

    PubMed

    Fock, Ricardo Ambrósio; Vinolo, Marco Aurélio Ramirez; de Moura Sá Rocha, Vanessa; de Sá Rocha, Luiz Carlos; Borelli, Primavera

    2007-11-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) modifies resistance to infection, impairing a number of physiological processes, including hematopoiesis. In this study, we examined a few aspects of the inflammatory response to LPS in a model of PEM. We evaluated the cellularity of the blood, bone marrow and spleen, as well as phagocytic, fungicidal and spreading activity, the production in vivo and in vitro of TNF-alpha, IL-1alpha and IL-6, and the expression of CD14 and TLR-4/MD-2 receptors in macrophages. Two-month-old male Swiss mice were submitted to PEM with a low-protein diet containing 4% protein as compared to 20% protein in the control diet. When the experimental group had attained about 20% loss of their original body weight, they were used in the experiments. Malnourished animals presented anemia, leucopenia and severe reduction in bone marrow, spleen and peritoneal cavity cellularity. The production of TNF-alpha, IL-1alpha and IL-6 stimulated in vivo with LPS and the production of IL-6 in bone marrow cells cultured with LPS and the production of TNF-alpha in bone marrow, spleen and peritoneal cells cultured with LPS were significantly lower in malnourished animals. The expression of CD14 and TLR-4/MD-2 receptors was found to be significantly lower in macrophages of malnourished animals. These findings suggest that malnourished animals present a deficient response to LPS. The lower expression of the CD14 and TLR-4/MD-2 receptors may be partly responsible for the immunodeficiency observed in the malnourished mice. These data lead us to infer that the nutritional state interferes with the activation of macrophages and with the capacity to mount an immune response.

  3. Oxidized low density lipoprotein suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in microglia: Oxidative stress acts through control of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ohn Soon; Lee, Chang Seok; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo . E-mail: jouilo@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-03-31

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is readily oxidized under certain conditions, resulting in the formation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Despite numerous in vitro reports that reveal the pathogenic role of oxidative stress, anti-oxidative strategies have underperformed in the clinic. In this study, we examine the role of oxLDL in brain inflammatory responses using cultured rat brain microglia. We demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in these cells. It also decreases LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and production of nitric oxide, and reduces LPS-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Oxysterols, known components of oxLDL and endogenous agonists of liver X receptor, can simulate the inhibitory effects of oxLDL in LPS-activated microglia. In addition, their inhibitory effects were mimicked by liver X receptor (LXR) agonists and potentiated by a retinoid X receptor agonist, suggesting these molecules heterodimerize to function as oxysterol receptors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in brain microglia and that these inhibitory effects are mediated by oxysterols and, at least in part, by the nuclear receptor LXR. Our results suggest an additional mechanism of action for oxidative stress that acts indirectly via modulation of inflammatory responses. Although further studies are needed, these results answer in part the question of why anti-oxidative strategies have not been successful in clinical situations. Moreover, as brain inflammation participates in the initiation and progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, the present data provide information that should prove a useful guide for designing therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative brain diseases.

  4. Oxidized low density lipoprotein suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in microglia: oxidative stress acts through control of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ohn Soon; Lee, Chang Seok; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo

    2006-03-31

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is readily oxidized under certain conditions, resulting in the formation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Despite numerous in vitro reports that reveal the pathogenic role of oxidative stress, anti-oxidative strategies have underperformed in the clinic. In this study, we examine the role of oxLDL in brain inflammatory responses using cultured rat brain microglia. We demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in these cells. It also decreases LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and production of nitric oxide, and reduces LPS-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Oxysterols, known components of oxLDL and endogenous agonists of liver X receptor, can simulate the inhibitory effects of oxLDL in LPS-activated microglia. In addition, their inhibitory effects were mimicked by liver X receptor (LXR) agonists and potentiated by a retinoid X receptor agonist, suggesting these molecules heterodimerize to function as oxysterol receptors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in brain microglia and that these inhibitory effects are mediated by oxysterols and, at least in part, by the nuclear receptor LXR. Our results suggest an additional mechanism of action for oxidative stress that acts indirectly via modulation of inflammatory responses. Although further studies are needed, these results answer in part the question of why anti-oxidative strategies have not been successful in clinical situations. Moreover, as brain inflammation participates in the initiation and progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, the present data provide information that should prove a useful guide for designing therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative brain diseases.

  5. ABCA1 promotes the efflux of bacterial LPS from macrophages and accelerates recovery from LPS-induced tolerance[S

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Patricia A.; Gauthier, Karine C.; Varley, Alan W.; Kitchens, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in both lipid metabolism and innate immunity. We show here that macrophage ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), a transporter known for its ability to promote apolipoprotein-dependent cholesterol efflux, also participates in the removal of an immunostimulatory bacterial lipid, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Whereas monocytes require an exogenous lipoprotein acceptor to remove cell-associated LPS, macrophages released LPS in the absence of an exogenous acceptor by a mechanism that was driven, in part, by endogenous apolipoprotein E (apoE). Agents that increased ABCA1 expression increased LPS efflux from wild-type but not ABCA1-deficient macrophages. Preexposure of peritoneal macrophages to LPS for 24 h increased the expression of ABCA1 and increased LPS efflux with a requirement for exogenous apolipoproteins due to suppression of endogenous apoE production. In contrast, LPS preconditioning of ABCA1-deficient macrophages significantly decreased LPS efflux and led to prolonged retention of cell-surface LPS. Although the initial response to LPS was similar in wild-type and ABCA1-deficient macrophages, LPS-induced tolerance was greater and more prolonged in macrophages that lacked ABCA1. Our results define a new role for macrophage ABCA1 in removing cell-associated LPS and restoring normal macrophage responsiveness. PMID:20472936

  6. Hemoglobin: a newly recognized binding protein for bacterial endotoxins (LPS).

    PubMed

    Roth, R I; Kaca, W; Levin, J

    1994-01-01

    Administration of purified hemoglobin (Hb) as a cell-free resuscitation fluid is associated with multiple organ toxicities. Many of these toxicities are characteristic of the pathophysiological effects of bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). To better understand the potential role of LPS in the observed in vivo toxicities of Hb, we examined mixtures of Hb and LPS for evidence of LPS-Hb complex formation. LPS-Hb complexes were demonstrated by three techniques: ultrafiltration through 300 kDa cut-off membranes, which distinguished LPS in complexes (87-89% < 300 kDa) from LPS alone (90% > 300 kDa); density centrifugation through sucrose, which distinguished denser LPS alone from LPS-Hb complexes; and precipitation by 67% ethanol, which demonstrated 2-3 fold increased precipitability of Hb in complexes compared to Hb alone. Interaction of LPS with Hb was also associated with markedly increased biological activity of LPS, as manifested by enhancement of LPS activation of Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL), increased release of human mononuclear cell tissue factor, and enhanced production of human endothelial cell tissue factor. These results demonstrated that hemoglobin can serve as an endotoxin binding protein, and that this interaction results in the alteration of several of the physical characteristics of LPS and enhancement of the biological activities of LPS. These findings suggest that a mechanism for the toxicity of infused Hb in vivo may involve potentiation of the biological effects of LPS. In addition, these observations suggest a mechanism by which LPS-related morbidity during sepsis could be enhanced by erythrocyte hemolysis.

  7. Synthetic LPS-Binding Polymer Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tian

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the principal components of most gram-negative bacteria's outer membrane, is a type of contaminant that can be frequently found in recombinant DNA products. Because of its strong and even lethal biological effects, selective LPS removal from bioproducts solution is of particular importance in the pharmaceutical and health care industries. In this thesis, for the first time, a proof-of-concept study on preparing LPS-binding hydrogel-like NPs through facile one-step free-radical polymerization was presented. With the incorporation of various hydrophobic (TBAm), cationic (APM, GUA) monomers and cross-linkers (BIS, PEG), a small library of NPs was constructed. Their FITC-LPS binding behaviors were investigated and compared with those of commercially available LPS-binding products. Moreover, the LPS binding selectivity of the NPs was also explored by studying the NPs-BSA interactions. The results showed that all NPs obtained generally presented higher FITC-LPS binding capacity in lower ionic strength buffer than higher ionic strength. However, unlike commercial poly-lysine cellulose and polymyxin B agarose beads' nearly linear increase of FITC-LPS binding with particle concentration, NPs exhibited serious aggregation and the binding quickly saturated or even decreased at high particle concentration. Among various types of NPs, higher FITC-LPS binding capacity was observed for those containing more hydrophobic monomers (TBAm). However, surprisingly, more cationic NPs with higher content of APM exhibited decreased FITC-LPS binding in high ionic strength conditions. Additionally, when new cationic monomer and cross-linker, GUA and PEG, were applied to replace APM and BIS, the obtained NPs showed improved FITC-LPS binding capacity at low NP concentration. But compared with APM- and BIS-containing NPs, the FITC-LPS binding capacity of GUA- and PEG-containing NPs saturated earlier. To investigate the NPs' binding to proteins, we tested the NPs

  8. 5-HT2A receptors control body temperature in mice during LPS-induced inflammation via regulation of NO production.

    PubMed

    Voronova, Irina P; Khramova, Galina M; Kulikova, Elizabeth A; Petrovskii, Dmitrii V; Bazovkina, Daria V; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the regulation of numerous normal and pathological physiological functions. At the same time, its involvement in the regulation of body temperature (Tb) in normal conditions is obscure. Here we study the effect of the 5-HT2A receptor activation or blockade on Tb in sick animals. The experiments were carried out on adult C57BL/6 mouse males. Systemic inflammation and sickness were produced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg, ip), while the 5-HT2A receptor was stimulated or blocked through the administration of the receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin (1mg/kg), respectively. LPS, DOI or ketanserin alone produced no effect on Tb. However, administration of LPS together with a peripheral or central ketanserin injection reduced Tb (32.2°C). Ketanserin reversed the LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase in the brain. Consequently, an involvement of NO in the mechanism of the hypothermic effect of ketanserin in sick mice was hypothesized. Administration of LPS together with NO synthase inhibitor, l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (60mg/kg, ip) resulted in deep (28.5°C) and prolonged (8h) hypothermia, while administration of l-nitro-arginine methyl ester alone produced no effect on Tb. Thus, 5-HT2A receptors play a key role in Tb control in sick mice. Blockade of this GPCR produces hypothermia in mice with systemic inflammation via attenuation of LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate an unexpected role of 5-HT2A receptors in inflammation and NO production and have a considerable biological impact on understanding the mechanism of animal adaptation to pathogens and parasites. Moreover, adverse side effects of 5-HT2A receptor antagonists in patients with inflammation may be expected. PMID:26621247

  9. 5-HT2A receptors control body temperature in mice during LPS-induced inflammation via regulation of NO production.

    PubMed

    Voronova, Irina P; Khramova, Galina M; Kulikova, Elizabeth A; Petrovskii, Dmitrii V; Bazovkina, Daria V; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the regulation of numerous normal and pathological physiological functions. At the same time, its involvement in the regulation of body temperature (Tb) in normal conditions is obscure. Here we study the effect of the 5-HT2A receptor activation or blockade on Tb in sick animals. The experiments were carried out on adult C57BL/6 mouse males. Systemic inflammation and sickness were produced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg, ip), while the 5-HT2A receptor was stimulated or blocked through the administration of the receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin (1mg/kg), respectively. LPS, DOI or ketanserin alone produced no effect on Tb. However, administration of LPS together with a peripheral or central ketanserin injection reduced Tb (32.2°C). Ketanserin reversed the LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase in the brain. Consequently, an involvement of NO in the mechanism of the hypothermic effect of ketanserin in sick mice was hypothesized. Administration of LPS together with NO synthase inhibitor, l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (60mg/kg, ip) resulted in deep (28.5°C) and prolonged (8h) hypothermia, while administration of l-nitro-arginine methyl ester alone produced no effect on Tb. Thus, 5-HT2A receptors play a key role in Tb control in sick mice. Blockade of this GPCR produces hypothermia in mice with systemic inflammation via attenuation of LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate an unexpected role of 5-HT2A receptors in inflammation and NO production and have a considerable biological impact on understanding the mechanism of animal adaptation to pathogens and parasites. Moreover, adverse side effects of 5-HT2A receptor antagonists in patients with inflammation may be expected.

  10. Physical properties of defined lipopolysaccharide salts.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, R T; Haug, A; McGroarty, E J

    1983-04-12

    The electron spin resonance probes 5-doxylstearate and 4-(dodecyldimethylammonio)-1-oxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine bromide were used to characterize the fluidity of the acyl chain and head-group regions, respectively, of defined salts of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli K12. The removal of the weakly bound divalent cations from native LPS by electrodialysis and their replacement by sodium had little effect on the midpoint of the lipid-phase transition or on head-group mobility. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide acyl chain mobility increased following electrodialysis. The replacement of most of the remaining cations with sodium resulted in a further dramatic increase in mobility in both the polar and nonpolar regions of lipopolysaccharide. Head-group mobility of the sodium salt of LPS was shown to be reduced with the addition of divalent cations. Furthermore, evidence is presented which suggests that low magnesium concentrations may induce phase separations in the sodium salt. The magnesium salt of lipopolysaccharide closely resembled the native form in both head-group and acyl chain mobility although the cation charge to phosphorus ratio in the magnesium salt was greater than that detected in the native isolate. Analyses of other lipopolysaccharide salts support our hypothesis that many of the observed differences in the physical and pathological properties of lipopolysaccharide salts may simply be explained by the degree of charge neutralization. PMID:6303400

  11. Lipopolysaccharide Engineering in Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Elder; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; Meiring, Hugo; van der Ley, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Engineering the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic pathway offers the potential to obtain modified derivatives with optimized adjuvant properties. Neisseria meningitidis strain H44/76 was modified by expression of the pagL gene encoding lipid A 3-O-deacylase from Bordetella bronchiseptica and by inactivation of the lgtB gene encoding the terminal oligosaccharide galactosyltransferase. Mass spectrometry analysis of purified mutant LPS was used for detailed compositional analysis of all present molecular species. This determined that the modified LPS was mainly pentaacylated, demonstrating high efficiency of conversion from the hexaacyl to the 3-O-deacylated form by heterologous lipid A 3-O-deacylase (PagL) expression. MS analyses also provided evidence for expression of only one major oligosaccharide glycoform, which lacked the terminal galactose residue as expected from inactivation of the lgtB gene. The immunomodulatory properties of PagL-deacylated LPS were compared with another pentaacyl form obtained from an lpxL1− mutant, which lacks the 2′ secondary acyl chain. Although both LPS mutants displayed impaired capacity to induce production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 in the monocytic cell line Mono Mac 6, induction of the Toll-interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β-dependent chemokine interferon-γ-induced protein 10 was largely retained only for the lgtB−/pagL+ mutant. Removal of remaining hexaacyl species exclusively present in lgtB−/pagL+ LPS demonstrated that these minor species potentiate but do not determine the activity of this LPS. These results are the first to indicate a qualitatively different response of human innate cells to pentaacyl lpxL1− and pagL+ LPS and show the importance of detailed structure-function analysis when working with modified lipid A structures. The pagL+ LPS has significant potential as immune modulator in humans. PMID:24492609

  12. Proteomic analysis of macrophage activated with salmonella lipopolysaccharide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages play pivotal role in immunity. They are activated by many pathogen derived molecules such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) which trigger the production of various proteins and peptides that drive and resolve inflammation. There are numerous studies on the effect of LPS at the genome level bu...

  13. Proteomic changes in chicken plasma induced by Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are cell wall components of gram-negative bacteria that cause inflammation and sickness through genetic and proteomic activation. The objective of our study was to identify the proteomic changes in plasma associated with inflammation induced by LPS treatment. Five-week-old ...

  14. [Phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Hrytsaĭ, R V; Iakovleva, L M; Varbanets', L D

    2014-01-01

    The study is dedicated to research of phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides. This causative agent is one of the most dangerous among potato bacterial diseases. It is revealed that the inhibitory effect of LPS solution on seedlings germination is more noticeable on crops susceptible to brown rot. Maximal total phytotoxic properties have been shown by LPS from strains 35, 52b, TX1 and TS3, which were characterized by relatively low rhamnose content. Relative to the control plants LPS may diminish and some ones--increase the root length, height and weight of seedlings, subject to particular strain. But the stimulation revealed is minor.

  15. Role of the NOD1/NF-κB pathway on bovine neutrophil responses to crude lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liang-Jun; Tan, Xun; Fan, Guo-Juan; Jiang, Ya-Nan; Shah, Qurban A

    2016-08-01

    Cytosolic nucleotide oligomerisation domain (NOD)-like receptors play an important role in host defence against infection. Reduced NOD1 expression has been observed in dysfunctional neutrophils derived from periparturient cattle known to be most susceptible to coliform mastitis. However, whether impairment of NOD1 suppresses the immune responses of bovine neutrophils during bacterial infections remains unknown. Crude (phenol extracted) lipopolysaccharide (cLPS), which often contains other immunostimulatory molecules, including NOD1 agonist, is known to induce almost the whole bacterial response. This study was conducted to explore the role of NOD1/nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway in the cytokine and functional responses of bovine neutrophils challenged with Escherichia coli-derived cLPS. Freshly isolated blood neutrophils from healthy heifers were pre-incubated for 2 h with ML130, a selective inhibitor of NOD1/NF-κB pathway. Cells were then exposed to cLPS for additional 4 h. Inhibition of the NOD1/NF-κB pathway resulted in a decrease in cLPS-induced phosphorylation of the inhibitor of NF-κBα (IκBα) in neutrophils. Impairment of the NOD1/NF-κB pathway tended to down-regulate mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, chemokines IL-8 and C-X-C motif ligand 2 (CXCL2), and adhesion molecules CD11b and CD62L, in cLPS-challenged cells. Functional analyses showed that blocking the NOD1/NF-κB pathway inhibited neutrophil migration and phagocytic killing capacity, and promoted neutrophil death upon cLPS stimulation. The data presented here demonstrate that activation of NOD1/NF-κB pathway contributes to the functional responses of neutrophils to cLPS. PMID:27387722

  16. Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide in Utero Alters the Postnatal Metabolic Response in Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal metabolic response to an LPS challenge in beef heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were assigned to a prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 micrograms/kg BW LPS s...

  17. In utero exposure to lipopolysaccharide alters the postnatal metabolic response in heifers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal metabolic response to LPS challenge in heifer calves. Pregnant crossbred cows (n=50) were separated into prenatal stress (PNS; n=25; administered 0.1 microgram per kilogram body weight LPS ...

  18. Removal of lipopolysaccharides from protein-lipopolysaccharide complexes by nonflammable solvents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Miao-Fang; Williams, Christie; Murray, Michael V; Ropp, Philip A

    2005-02-25

    During the recovery of recombinant proteins from gram negative bacteria, many of the methods used to extract proteins from cells release lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin) along with the protein of interest. In many instances, LPS will co-purify with the target protein due to specific or non-specific protein-LPS interactions. We have investigated the ability of alkanediols to effect the separation of LPS from protein-LPS complexes while the complexes are immobilized on ion exchange chromatographic resins. Proteins were complexed with fluorescently labeled LPS and bound to ion exchange resin. Alkanediol washes of the resins were preformed and the proteins eluted. Column eluates were monitored for LPS and protein by fluorescence and UV spectroscopy, respectively. Alkanediols were effective agents for dissociating LPS from protein-LPS complexes. The efficiency of LPS removal increased with increasing alkanediol chain length. The 1,2-alkanediol isomers were more effective than terminal alkanediol isomers in the separation of LPS from protein-LPS complexes, while the separation of LPS from protein-LPS complexes was more efficient on cation exchangers than on anion exchangers. In addition, it was noted during these investigations that the 1,2-alkanediols increased the retention time of the proteins on the ion exchange resins. Alkanediols provide a safer alternative to the use of other organics such as alcohols or acetonitrile for the separation of LPS from protein due to their lower toxicity and decreased inflammability. In addition, they are less costly than many of the detergents that have been used for similar purposes.

  19. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter knock down-mice are more susceptible to inflammation, c-Fos expression and sickness behavior induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Leite, Hércules Ribeiro; Oliveira-Lima, Onésia Cristina de; Pereira, Luciana de Melo; Oliveira, Vinícius Elias de Moura; Prado, Vania Ferreira; Prado, Marco Antônio Máximo; Pereira, Grace Schenatto; Massensini, André Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    In addition to the well-known functions as a neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh) can modulate of the immune system. Nonetheless, how endogenous ACh release inflammatory responses is still not clear. To address this question, we took advantage of an animal model with a decreased ACh release due a reduction (knockdown) in vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) expression (VAChT-KD(HOM)). These animals were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Afterwards, we evaluated sickness behavior and quantified systemic and cerebral inflammation as well as neuronal activation in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC). VAChT-KD(HOM) mice that were injected with LPS (10mg/kg) showed increased mortality rate as compared to control mice. In line with this result, a low dose of LPS (0.1mg/kg) increased the levels of pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in the spleen and brain of VAChT-KD(HOM) mice in comparison with controls. Similarly, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were increased in VAChT-KD(HOM) mice. This excessive cytokine production was completely prevented by administration of a nicotinic receptor agonist (0.4mg/kg) prior to the LPS injection. Three hours after the LPS injection, c-Fos expression increased in the DVC region of VAChT-KD(HOM) mice compared to controls. In addition, VAChT-KD(HOM) mice showed behavioral changes such as lowered locomotor and exploratory activity and reduced social interaction after the LPS challenge, when compared to control mice. Taken together, our results show that the decreased ability to release ACh exacerbates systemic and cerebral inflammation and promotes neural activation and behavioral changes induced by LPS. In conclusion, our findings support the notion that activity of cholinergic pathways, which can be modulated by VAChT expression, controls inflammatory and neural responses to LPS challenge.

  20. Liver X receptor activation protects against inflammation and enhances autophagy in myocardium of neonatal mouse challenged by lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; He, Siyi; Gao, Junwei; Li, Jingwei; Fan, Xiaotang; Xiao, Ying-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) has been emerged as negative regulators of cardiomyocytic inflammation. The cellular process of autophagy is believed to play a protective role in myocardium during the inflammatory status. In this study, we investigated the role of LXRs agonist TO901317 (TO) on lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced myocardial inflammation and autophagy. The results showed that TO pretreatment significantly reduced the LPS-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells, elevation of NF-κB protein, TNF-α, and IL-6 mRNA levels in the myocardium. Moreover, LPS stimulated autophagy in neonatal mice heart, and this effect was further enhanced by TO pretreatment as evidenced by increased LC3-II/GAPDH ratio increment. Furthermore, TUNEL assay revealed LPS stimulation also increased the number of apoptotic cells in the myocardium, and the increment was inhibited by TO pretreatment. Our findings suggested that attenuation of inflammation and apoptosis, and enhancement of autophagy by TO may contribute to the protection of myocardium under inflammatory condition.

  1. Sitagliptin attenuates inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cardiomyocytes via nuclear factor-κB pathway inhibition

    PubMed Central

    LIN, CHIEN-HUNG; LIN, CHUNG-CHING

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) are responsible for glucose homeostasis, and have been shown to reduce inflammation in preclinical studies. The aim of the present study was to determine whether sitagliptin, an inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), as a GLP-1 receptor agonist, exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on cardiomyoblasts during lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Exposure to LPS increased the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-6 (IL)-6 and IL-1β in H9c2 cells, and also resulted in elevations in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Treatment with the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin dose-dependently downregulated the mRNA levels of IL-6, COX-2 and iNOS in LPS-stimulated H9c2 cells. In addition, sitagliptin inhibited the increased protein expression of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β. NF-κB mRNA expression was reduced and its translocation to the nucleus was suppressed by treatment with sitagliptin. The present results demonstrated that sitagliptin exerts a beneficial effect on cardiomyoblasts exposed to LPS by inhibiting expression of inflammatory mediators and suppressing NF-κB activation. These findings indicate that the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin may serve a function in cardiac remodeling attributed to sepsis-induced inflammation. PMID:27284355

  2. Ephedrine hydrochloride protects mice from LPS challenge by promoting IL-10 secretion and inhibiting proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuejuan; Guo, Ziyi; He, Weigang; Yang, Yang; Li, Yuhu; Zheng, Aoxiang; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Jinzhu; Wen, Mingyue; Yang, Muyi; An, Huazhang; Ji, Guang; Yu, Yizhi

    2012-05-01

    Sepsis and its derivative endotoxic shock are still serious conditions with high mortality in the intensive care unit. The mechanisms that ensure the balance of proinflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokine production are of particular importance. As an active α- and β-adrenergic agonist, ephedrine hydrochloride (EH) is a widely used agent for cardiovascular diseases, especially boosting blood pressure. Here we demonstrate that EH increased Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated production of interleukin 10 (IL-10) through p38 MAPK activation. Simultaneously, EH negatively regulated the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Consistently, EH increased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced serum IL-10 and inhibited tumor necrotic factor-α (TNFα) production in vivo. As a result, EH treatment protected mice from endotoxic shock by lethal LPS challenge. In brief, our data demonstrated that EH could contribute to immune homeostasis by balancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokine in TLR4 signaling. This study provides a potential usage of EH in autoimmunologic diseases or other severe inflammations.

  3. Characterization of lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli K-12 mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Boman, H G; Monner, D A

    1975-01-01

    Chemical analyses of the carbohydrate composition of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from a number of LPS mutants were used to propose a schematic composition for the LPS from Escherichia coli K-12. The formula contains four regions: the first consists of lipid A, ketodeoxyoctonoic acid, and a phosphorous component; the second contains only heptose; the third only glucose; and the fourth additional glucose, galactose, and rhamnose. LPS from E. coli B may have a similar composition but lacks the galactose and rhamnose units. A set of LPS-specific bacteriophages were used for comparing three mutants of Salmonella with a number of LPS mutants of E. coli K-12. The results confirm that there are basic similarities in the first and second regions of the LPS structure; they also support the four region divisions of the LPS formula. Paper chromatography was used for characterization of 32-P-labeled LPS from different strains of E. coli and Salmonella. The Rf values for LPS varied from 0.27 to 0.75 depending on the amounts of carbohydrates in the molecule. LPS from all strains studied was homogenous except for strain D31 which produced two types of LPS. Mild acid hydrolysis of labeled LPS liberated lipid A and two other components with phosphate, one of which was assigned to the first region. It is suggested that paper chromatography can be used in biosynthetic studies concerning regions 2 to 4. Images PMID:1089628

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Endotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Raetz, Christian R. H.; Whitfield, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Summary Since lipopolysaccharide endotoxins of Gram-negative bacteria were last reviewed in this series in 1990, much has been learned about the assembly and signaling functions of these remarkable glycoconjugates. Lipopolysaccharides typically consist of a hydrophobic domain known as lipid A (or endotoxin), a non-repeating “core” oligosaccharide, and a distal polysaccharide (or O-antigen). The flood of recent genomic data has made it possible to study lipopolysaccharide assembly in diverse Gram-negative bacteria, many of which are human or plant pathogens, and to create mutants or hybrid constructs with novel properties. Unexpectedly, key genes for lipid A biosynthesis have also been found in higher plants, indicating that eucaryotic lipid A-like molecules may exist. The carbohydrate diversity of lipopolysaccharides is better appreciated now than ten years ago, but much remains to be learned about function. Sequence comparisons suggest that extensive lateral transfer of genes for the assembly of O-antigens has occurred among bacteria. The most significant finding in the field of endotoxin biology since 1990 has been the identification of the plasma membrane protein TLR4 as the lipid A signaling receptor of animal cells. The latter belongs to a family of innate immunity receptors, all of which possess a large extracellular domain of leucine-rich repeats, a single trans-membrane segment and a smaller cytoplasmic signaling region that engages the adaptor protein MyD88. The expanding knowledge of TLR4 specificity and its downstream signaling pathways should provide new opportunities for blocking the inflammatory side effects of sepsis. Future progress will require insights into lipopolysaccharide-protein recognition at the atomic level, greater understanding of intra- and inter-cellular lipopolysaccharide trafficking, and incisive biological approaches that combine the tools of bacterial and animal genetics. PMID:12045108

  5. VISUALIZATION AND ANALYSIS OF LPS DISTRIBUTION IN BINARY PHOSPHOLIPID BILAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Florencia, Henning María; Susana, Sanchez; Laura, Bakás

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin released from the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria during infections. It have been reported that LPS may play a rol in the outer membrane of bacteria similar to that of cholesterol in eukaryotic plasma membranes. In this article we compare the effect of introducing LPS or cholesterol in liposomes made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine on the solubilization process by Triton X-100. The results show that liposomes containing LPS or Cholesterol are more resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 than the binary phospholipid mixtures at 4°C. The LPS distribution was analyzed on GUVs of DPPC:DOPC using FITC-LPS. Solid and liquid-crystalline domains were visualized labeling the GUVs with LAURDAN and GP images were acquired using a two-photon microscope. The images show a selective distribution of LPS in gel domains. Our results support the hypothesis that LPS could aggregate and concentrate selectively in biological membranes providing a mechanism to bring together several components of the LPS-sensing machinery. PMID:19324006

  6. LPS inhibits caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in RAW264.7 macrophages induced by the AMPK activator AICAR

    SciTech Connect

    Russe, Otto Quintus Möser, Christine V. Kynast, Katharina L. King, Tanya S. Olbrich, Katrin Grösch, Sabine Geisslinger, Gerd Niederberger, Ellen

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • AMPK-activation induces caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. • Apoptosis is associated with decreased mTOR and increased p21 levels. • All effects can be significantly inhibited by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. - Abstract: AMP-activated kinase is a cellular energy sensor which is activated in stages of increased ATP consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decreasing inflammatory processes and the disease progress of diabetes and obesity, respectively. Furthermore, AMPK activation has been linked with induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer and vascular cells, indicating that it might have a therapeutic impact for the treatment of cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the impact of AMPK on the proliferation of macrophages, which also play a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and in inflammatory processes, has not been focused so far. We have assessed the influence of AICAR- and metformin-induced AMPK activation on cell viability of macrophages with and without inflammatory stimulation, respectively. In cells without inflammatory stimulation, we found a strong induction of caspase 3-dependent apoptosis associated with decreased mTOR levels and increased expression of p21. Interestingly, these effects could be inhibited by co-stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by other proinflammatory cytokines suggesting that AICAR induces apoptosis via AMPK in a TLR4-pathway dependent manner. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK activation is not only associated with positive effects but might also contribute to risk factors by disturbing important features of macrophages. The fact that LPS is able to restore AMPK-associated apoptosis might indicate an important role of TLR4 agonists in preventing unfavorable cell death of immune cells.

  7. A(1) and A(3) adenosine receptors inhibit LPS-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 accumulation in murine astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Stefanelli, Angela; Fazzi, Debora; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2013-10-01

    Adenosine (Ado) exerts neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory functions by acting through four receptor subtypes A1, A2A, A2B and A3. Astrocytes are one of its targets in the central nervous system. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis, is induced after hypoxia, ischemia and inflammation and plays an important role in brain injury. HIF-1 is expressed by astrocytes, however the regulatory role played by Ado on HIF-1α modulation induced by inflammatory and hypoxic conditions has not been investigated. Primary murine astrocytes were activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without Ado, Ado receptor agonists, antagonists and receptor silencing, before exposure to normoxia or hypoxia. HIF-1α accumulation and downstream genes regulation were determined. Ado inhibited LPS-increased HIF-1α accumulation under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, through activation of A1 and A3 receptors. In cells incubated with the blockers of p44/42 MAPK and Akt, LPS-induced HIF-1α accumulation was significantly decreased in normoxia and hypoxia, suggesting the involvement of p44/42 MAPK and Akt in this effect and Ado inhibited kinases phosphorylation. A series of angiogenesis and metabolism related genes were modulated by hypoxia in an HIF-1 dependent way, but not further increased by LPS, with the exception of GLUT-1 and hexochinase II that were elevated by LPS only in normoxia and inhibited by Ado receptors. Instead, genes involved in inflammation, like inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and A2B receptors, were increased by LPS in normoxia, strongly stimulated by LPS in concert with hypoxia and inhibited by Ado, through A1 and A3 receptor subtypes. In conclusion A1 and A3 receptors reduce the LPS-mediated HIF-1α accumulation in murine astrocytes, resulting in a downregulation of genes involved in inflammation and hypoxic injury, like iNOS and A2B receptors, in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

  8. Anti-LPS antibodies reduce endotoxemia in whole body Co-60 irradiated primates - A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.T.; Gaffin, S.L.; Wessels, B.C.; Brock-Utne, J.G.; Jordaan, J.P. )

    1990-09-01

    A previously established primate model was used to evaluate the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) in radiation sickness. Vervet monkeys were Co-60 irradiated with an LD100 exposure and had periodic blood samples taken for the determination of LPS and anti-LPS lgG antibodies and for bacteriological studies. On day 2 postirradiation, primates were treated with either sterile 0.9 percent saline, or equine anti-LPS hyperimmune plasma, or tripotassium-dicitrato-bismuthate (Denol). Results indicate that anti-LPS-treated animals survived significantly longer than both the other groups and, since LPS may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, and headaches, it is suggested that Anti-LPS administration may be of value in reducing plasma LPS concentration in humans and improving their performance and survivability. 24 refs.

  9. Structure and Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of mainly Gram-negative bacteria and cyanobacteria. The LPS molecules from marine and terrestrial bacteria show structural variations, even among strains within the same species living in the same environment. Cyanobacterial LPS has a unique structure, since it lacks heptose and 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (also known as keto-deoxyoctulosonate (KDO)), which are present in the core region of common Gram-negative LPS. In addition, the cyanobacterial lipid A region lacks phosphates and contains odd-chain hydroxylated fatty acids. While the role of Gram-negative lipid A in the regulation of the innate immune response through Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 4 signaling is well characterized, the role of the structurally different cyanobacterial lipid A in TLR4 signaling is not well understood. The uncontrolled inflammatory response of TLR4 leads to autoimmune diseases such as sepsis, and thus the less virulent marine cyanobacterial LPS molecules can be effective to inhibit TLR4 signaling. This review highlights the structural comparison of LPS molecules from marine cyanobacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. We discuss the potential use of marine cyanobacterial LPS as a TLR4 antagonist, and the effects of cyanobacterial LPS on humans and marine organisms. PMID:26198237

  10. Structure and Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of mainly Gram-negative bacteria and cyanobacteria. The LPS molecules from marine and terrestrial bacteria show structural variations, even among strains within the same species living in the same environment. Cyanobacterial LPS has a unique structure, since it lacks heptose and 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (also known as keto-deoxyoctulosonate (KDO)), which are present in the core region of common Gram-negative LPS. In addition, the cyanobacterial lipid A region lacks phosphates and contains odd-chain hydroxylated fatty acids. While the role of Gram-negative lipid A in the regulation of the innate immune response through Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 4 signaling is well characterized, the role of the structurally different cyanobacterial lipid A in TLR4 signaling is not well understood. The uncontrolled inflammatory response of TLR4 leads to autoimmune diseases such as sepsis, and thus the less virulent marine cyanobacterial LPS molecules can be effective to inhibit TLR4 signaling. This review highlights the structural comparison of LPS molecules from marine cyanobacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. We discuss the potential use of marine cyanobacterial LPS as a TLR4 antagonist, and the effects of cyanobacterial LPS on humans and marine organisms. PMID:26198237

  11. LPS response and tolerance in the zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Novoa, B.; Bowman, TV.; Zon, L.; Figueras, A

    2009-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been used in the present work to study the fish response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure and LPS tolerance. These mechanisms are not completely understood in mammals and, presently, are totally unknown in fish. Zebrafish larval survival was assessed following treatment with various types of LPS at a variety of concentrations to determine the sensitivity of zebrafish to LPS-induced immune activation. In addition, fish pre-treated with a sublethal concentration of LPS did not die after exposure to a lethal concentration of LPS demonstrating, for the first time, that LPS tolerance also happens in fish. The time interval between pretreatment and secondary exposure as well as the type of pretreatment dictated the strength of protection. Since zebrafish are in intimate contact with microorganisms, the high resistance of fish to LPS suggests that there must be a tight control of the LPS receptor cluster in order to avoid an excess of inflammation. One of these components is CXCR4, which has previously been shown to regulate the signal transduced by TLR4. Treating fish with AMD 3100, a specific inhibitor of CXCR4, increased LPS treatment associated mortality. Blocking CXCR4 via chemical or genetic inhibition resulted in a reversion of LPS tolerance, thus further supporting the negative regulatory role of CXCR4 in this inflammatory response. In support of an inhibitory role for CXCR4 in the inflammatory cascade, IL1 transcript levels were elevated in both unstimulated and LPS stimulated zebrafish Odysseus (CXCR4 deficient mutant) larvae. PMID:19110060

  12. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide augments febrile-range hyperthermia-induced heat shock protein 70 expression and extracellular release in human THP1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Ramarathnam, Aparna; Hasday, Jeffrey D; Singh, Ishwar S

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, a devastating and often lethal complication of severe infection, is characterized by fever and dysregulated inflammation. While infections activate the inflammatory response in part through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), fever can partially activate the heat shock response with generation of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Since extracellular HSPs, especially HSP70 (eHSP70), are proinflammatory TLR agonists, we investigated how exposure to the TLR4 agonist, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and febrile range hyperthermia (FRH; 39.5°C) modify HSP70 expression and extracellular release. Using differentiated THP1 cells, we found that concurrent exposure to FRH and LPS as well as TLR2 and TLR3 agonists synergized to activate expression of inducible HSP72 (HSPA1A) mRNA and protein via a p38 MAP kinase-requiring mechanism. Treatment with LPS for 6 h stimulated eHSP70 release; levels of eHSP70 released at 39.5°C were higher than at 37°C roughly paralleling the increase in intracellular HSP72 in the 39.5°C cells. By contrast, 6 h exposure to FRH in the absence of LPS failed to promote eHSP70 release. Release of eHSP70 by LPS-treated THP1 cells was inhibited by glibenclamide, but not brefeldin, indicating that eHSP70 secretion occurred via a non-classical protein secretory mechanism. Analysis of eHSP70 levels in exosomes and exosome-depleted culture supernatants from LPS-treated THP1 cells using ELISA demonstrated similar eHSP70 levels in unfractionated and exosome-depleted culture supernatants, indicating that LPS-stimulated eHSP70 release did not occur via the exosome pathway. Immunoblot analysis of the exosome fraction of culture supernatants from these cells showed constitutive HSC70 (HSPA8) to be the predominant HSP70 family member present in exosomes. In summary, we have shown that LPS stimulates macrophages to secrete inducible HSP72 via a non-classical non-exosomal pathway while synergizing with FRH exposure to increase both intracellular and secreted levels

  13. Effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist and antagonist ligands on production of inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 in endotoxemic mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, S R; Terminelli, C; Denhardt, G

    2000-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that mice primed with Corynebacterium parvum produce higher levels of inflammatory cytokines than unprimed mice upon challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Herein, we describe experiments in which two cannabinoid (CB) agonists, WIN 55212-2 [(R)-(+)-[2, 3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]1, 4-benzoxazin-6-yl](1-naphthyl)methanone) and HU-210 [(-)-11-hydroxy-delta(8) tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethylheptyl], were examined for their effects on LPS-induced cytokines in C. parvum-primed and unprimed mice. These agonists have been reported to bind selectively to the CB2 and CB1 receptor subtypes, respectively. WIN 55212-2 (3.1-50 mg/kg i.p.) and HU-210 (0.05-0.4 mg/kg i.p.) decreased serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-12 (IL-12) and increased IL-10 when administered to mice before LPS. The drugs also protected C. parvum mice (but not unprimed mice) against the lethal effects of LPS. The protection afforded to C. parvum mice could not be attributed to the higher levels of IL-10 present in these mice after agonist treatment. The WIN 55212-2- and HU-210-mediated changes in the responsiveness of mice to LPS were antagonized by SR141716A [N-(piperdin-1-yl)-5-(4-chloropheny)-1-(2, 4-dichloropheny)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide hydrochloride], a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, but not by SR144528 [N-[(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo[2.2. 1]heptan-2-yl]5-(4-choro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)p yrazole-3 -carboxamide], a selective antagonist at the CB2 receptor. Therefore, both CB agonists modulated LPS responses through the CB1 receptor. Surprisingly, SR141716A itself modulated cytokine responses in a manner identical with that of WIN 55212-2 and HU-210 when administered alone to mice. The agonist-like effects of SR141716A, which were more striking in unprimed than in primed mice, suggested that the antagonist also could function as a partial agonist at the CB1 receptor. Our findings indicate a role

  14. Core region in Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kotełko, K; Gromska, W; Papierz, M; Sidorczyk, Z; Krajewska, D; Szer, K

    1977-01-01

    Four R mutants of P. mirabilis were isolated. The composition of their degraded polysaccharides (PS) obtained from the respective lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as well as the composition and properties of the PS-fractions separated by column chromatography were examined. The results were compared with those obtained with PS of the wild type. One of the mutants could be classified as an Ra-type mutant, presenting a complete LPS core. This polysaccharide core contains: galacturonic acid, glucosamine, glucose, D-glycero-D-mannoheptose, L-glycero-D-mannoheptose in a molar ratio of 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 : 2 and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate. Taking into consideration the common sugars described previously in the LPS chemotypes of P. hauseri, the composition of the complete core region mentioned above represents the LPS core part of all the chemotypes, containing two different heptoses.

  15. Sphingosine kinase 1 deficiency exacerbates LPS-induced neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Grin'kina, Natalia M; Karnabi, Eddy E; Damania, Dushyant; Wadgaonkar, Sunil; Muslimov, Ilham A; Wadgaonkar, Raj

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS), which contributes to numerous neurodegenerative diseases and results in encephalopathy and neuroinflammation, is poorly understood. Sphingolipid metabolism plays a crucial role in maintaining cellular processes in the CNS, and thus mediates the various pathological consequences of inflammation. For a better understanding of the role of sphingosine kinase activation during neuroinflammation, we developed a bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced brain injury model. The onset of the inflammatory response was observed beginning 4 hours after intracerebral injection of LPS into the lateral ventricles of the brain. A comparison of established neuroinflammatory parameters such as white matter rarefactions, development of cytotoxic edema, astrogliosis, loss of oligodendrocytes, and major cytokines levels in wild type and knockout mice suggested that the neuroinflammatory response in SphK1-/- mice was significantly upregulated. At 6 hours after intracerebroventricular injection of LPS in SphK1-/- mice, the immunoreactivity of the microglia markers and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were significantly increased, while the oligodendrocyte marker O4 was decreased compared to WT mice. Furthermore, western blotting data showed increased levels of GFAP. These results suggest that SphK1 activation is involved in the regulation of LPS induced brain injury. RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS: • Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intracerebral injection induces severe neuroinflammation. • Sphingosine kinase 1 deletion worsens the effect of the LPS. • Overexpression of SphK1 might be a potential new treatment approach to neuroinflammation.

  16. Retinoic acid receptor agonist Am80 inhibits CXCL2 production from microglial BV-2 cells via attenuation of NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Moeka; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Shudo, Koichi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that retinoic acid receptor agonists such as Am80 exerts anti-inflammatory actions in the central nervous system, although detailed mechanisms of the action remain largely unknown. Our previous findings suggest that Am80 provides therapeutic effect on intracerebral hemorrhage in mice via suppression of expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2). Here we investigated the mechanisms of inhibitory action of Am80 on expression of CXCL2 and other pro-inflammatory factors in microglial BV-2 cells. Pretreatment with Am80 markedly suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of CXCL2 mRNA and release of CXCL2 protein. Am80 had no effect on LPS-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. On the other hand, Am80 prevented LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 subunit of NF-κB complex. In addition, total expression levels of p65 and IκBα proteins, as well as of mRNAs encoding p65 and IκBα, were lowered by Am80. Dependence of CXCL2 expression on NF-κB was confirmed by the effect of an NF-κB inhibitor caffeic acid phenethyl ester that abolished LPS-induced CXCL2 expression. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester also abolished LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor α, which may be relevant to the inhibitory effect of Am80 on expression of these pro-inflammatory factors. We additionally found that Am80 attenuated LPS-induced up-regulation of CD14, a co-receptor for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). These results suggest that inhibitory effect on TLR4 signaling mediated by NF-κB pathway underlies the anti-inflammatory action of retinoic acid receptor agonists in microglia. PMID:27351827

  17. Flow cytometric analysis of crayfish haemocytes activated by lipopolysaccharides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardenas, W.; Dankert, J.R.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria are strong stimulators of white river crayfish, Procambarus zonangulus, haemocytes in vitro. Following haemocyte treatment with LPS and with LPS from rough mutant R5 (LPS Rc) from Salmonella minnesota, flow cytometric analysis revealed a conspicuous and reproducible decrease in cell size as compared to control haemocytes. These LPS molecules also caused a reduction in haemocyte viability as assessed by flow cytometry with the fluorescent dyes calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer. The onset of cell size reduction was gradual and occurred prior to cell death. Haemocytes treated with LPS from S. minnesota without the Lipid A moiety (detoxified LPS) decreased in size without a reduction of viability. The action of LPS on crayfish haemocytes appeared to be related to the activation of the prophenoloxidase system because phenoloxidase (PO)-specific activity in the supernatants from control and detoxified LPS-treated cells was significantly lower than that from LPS and LPS-Rc treated cells (P < 0.05). Furthermore, addition of trypsin inhibitor to the LPS treatments caused noticeable delays in cell size and viability changes. These patterns of cellular activation by LPS formulations indicated that crayfish haemocytes react differently to the polysaccharide and lipid A moieties of LPS, where lipid A is cytotoxic and the polysaccharide portion is stimulatory. These effects concur with the general pattern of mammalian cell activation by LPS, thereby indicting commone innate immune recognition mechanisms to bacterial antigens between cells from mammals and invertebrates. These definitive molecular approaches used to verify and identify mechanisms of invertbrate haemocyte responses to LPS could be applied with other glycoconjugates, soluble mediators, or xenobiotic compounds.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide enhances bradykinin-induced signal transduction via activation of Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK in canine tracheal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shue-Fen; Wang, Chuan-Chwan; Chiu, Chi-Tso; Chien, Chin-Sung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Lin, Chien-Huang; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was found to induce inflammatory responses and to enhance bronchial hyperreactivity to several contractile agonists. However, the implication of LPS in the pathogenesis of bronchial hyperreactivity was not completely understood. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effect of LPS on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation associated with potentiation of bradykinin (BK)-induced inositol phosphates (IPs) accumulation and Ca2+ mobilization in canine cultured tracheal smooth muscle cells (TSMCs).LPS stimulated phosphorylation of p42/p44 MAPK in a time- and concentration-dependent manner using a Western blot analysis against a specific phosphorylated form of MAPK antibody. Maximal stimulation of the p42 and p44 MAPK isoforms occurred after 7 min-incubation and the maximal effect was achieved with 100 μg ml−1 LPS.Pretreatment of TSMCs with LPS potentiated BK-induced IPs accumulation and Ca2+ mobilization. However, there was no effect on the IPs response induced by endothelin-1, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and carbachol. In addition, pretreatment with PDGF-BB enhanced BK-induced IPs response.These enhancements by LPS and PDGF-BB might be due to an increase in BK B2 receptor density (Bmax) in TSMCs, characterized by competitive inhibition of [3H]-BK binding using B1 and B2 receptor-selective reagents.The enhancing effects of LPS and PDGF-BB were attenuated by PD98059, an inhibitor of MAPK kinase (MEK), suggesting that the effect of LPS may share a common signalling pathway with PDGF-BB in TSMCs.Furthermore, overexpression of dominant negative mutants, H-Ras-15A and Raf-N4, significantly suppressed p42/p44 MAPK activation induced by LPS and PDGF-BB, indicating that Ras and Raf may be required for activation of these kinases.These results suggest that the augmentation of BK-induced responses produced by LPS might be, at least in part, mediated through activation of Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK pathway in TSMCs. PMID:10952668

  19. [Modulation of immune response by bacterial lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Aldapa-Vega, Gustavo; Pastelín-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a molecule that is profusely found on the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is also a potent stimulator of the immune response. As the main molecule on the bacterial surface, is also the most biologically active. The immune response of the host is activated by the recognition of LPS through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and this receptor-ligand interaction is closely linked to LPS structure. Microorganisms have evolved systems to control the expression and structure of LPS, producing structural variants that are used for modulating the host immune responses during infection. Examples of this include Helicobacter pylori, Francisella tularensis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella spp. High concentrations of LPS can cause fever, increased heart rate and lead to septic shock and death. However, at relatively low concentrations some LPS are highly active immunomodulators, which can induce non-specific resistance to invading microorganisms. The elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the recognition of LPS and its structural variants has been fundamental to understand inflammation and is currently a pivotal field of research to understand the innate immune response, inflammation, the complex host-pathogen relationship and has important implications for the rational development of new immunomodulators and adjuvants. PMID:27560917

  20. [Modulation of immune response by bacterial lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Aldapa-Vega, Gustavo; Pastelín-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a molecule that is profusely found on the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is also a potent stimulator of the immune response. As the main molecule on the bacterial surface, is also the most biologically active. The immune response of the host is activated by the recognition of LPS through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and this receptor-ligand interaction is closely linked to LPS structure. Microorganisms have evolved systems to control the expression and structure of LPS, producing structural variants that are used for modulating the host immune responses during infection. Examples of this include Helicobacter pylori, Francisella tularensis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella spp. High concentrations of LPS can cause fever, increased heart rate and lead to septic shock and death. However, at relatively low concentrations some LPS are highly active immunomodulators, which can induce non-specific resistance to invading microorganisms. The elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the recognition of LPS and its structural variants has been fundamental to understand inflammation and is currently a pivotal field of research to understand the innate immune response, inflammation, the complex host-pathogen relationship and has important implications for the rational development of new immunomodulators and adjuvants.

  1. Export of O-specific lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Valvano, Miguel A

    2003-05-01

    The O antigen is the most surface-exposed component of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule and its biogenesis involves several complex mechanisms not completely well understood. All of these mechanisms involve biochemical reactions that occur on the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane as well as several different translocation pathways that deliver the nascent O antigens in a glycolipid form to the periplasmic side of the plasma membrane. This article discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms operating in the biogenesis of the O-specific LPS.

  2. Granzyme K synergistically potentiates LPS-induced cytokine responses in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Wensink, Annette C; Kemp, Vera; Fermie, Job; García Laorden, M Isabel; van der Poll, Tom; Hack, C Erik; Bovenschen, Niels

    2014-04-22

    Granzymes are serine proteases released by cytotoxic lymphocytes to induce apoptosis in virus-infected cells and tumor cells. Evidence is emerging that granzymes also play a role in controlling inflammation. Granzyme serum levels are elevated in patients with autoimmune diseases and infections, including sepsis. However, the function of extracellular granzymes in inflammation largely remains unknown. Here, we show that granzyme K (GrK) binds to Gram-negative bacteria and their cell-wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GrK synergistically enhances LPS-induced cytokine release in vitro from primary human monocytes and in vivo in a mouse model of LPS challenge. Intriguingly, these extracellular effects are independent of GrK catalytic activity. GrK disaggregates LPS from micelles and augments LPS-CD14 complex formation, thereby likely boosting monocyte activation by LPS. We conclude that extracellular GrK is an unexpected direct modulator of LPS-TLR4 signaling during the antimicrobial innate immune response.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide mutants of Rhizobium meliloti are not defective in symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Clover, R.H.; Kieber, J.; Signer, E.R. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Rhizobium meliloti selected primarily for bacteriophage resistance fall into 13 groups. Mutants in the four best-characterized groups (class A, lpsB, lpsC, and class D), which map to the rhizobial chromosome, appear to affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as judged by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies and behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of extracted LPS. Mutations in all 13 groups, in an otherwise wild-type genetic background, are Fix{sup +} on alfalfa. This suggests that LPS does not play a major role in symbiosis. Mutations in lpsB, however, are Fix{sup {minus}} in one particular genetic background, evidently because of the cumulative effect of several independent background mutations. In addition, an auxotrophic mutation evidently equivalent to Escherichia coli carAB is Fix{sup {minus}} on alfalfa.

  4. Effects of Estrogen Receptor Agonists on Regulation of the Inflammatory Response in Astrocytes from Young Adult and Middle-Aged Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Danielle K; Johnson, Adam B.; Stohlgren, Shannon; Simpson, Ashley; Sohrabji, Farida

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen has been shown to attenuate the inflammatory response following injury or lipopolysaccharide treatment in several organ systems. Estrogen's actions are transduced through two estrogen receptor sub-types, estrogen receptor (ER) -alpha and estrogen receptor-beta, whose actions may be overlapping or independent of each other. The present study examined the effects of ERα- and ERβ-specific ligands in regulating the inflammatory response in primary astrocyte cultures. Pre-treatment with 17β-estradiol (ERα/ERβ agonist), HPTE (ERα agonist/ERβ antagonist) and DPN (ERβ agonist) led to attenuation of IL-1β, TNFα, and MMP-9 in astrocyte media derived from young adult (3-4 mos.) and reproductive senescent female (9-11 mos., acyclic) astrocyte cultures, while pretreatment with PPT (ERα agonist) attenuated IL-1β (but not TNFα or MMP-9) in both young and senescent-derived astrocyte cultures. Our previous work determined that 17β-estradiol was unable to attenuate the LPS-induced increase in IL-1β in olfactory bulb primary microglial cultures derived from either young adult or reproductive senescent females. In young adult-derived microglial cultures, the LPS-induced increase in IL-1β was not attenuated by pre-treatment with 17β-estradiol, PPT or HPTE. Interestingly, the ERβ agonist, DPN significantly decreased IL-1β following LPS treatment in young adult-derived microglia. Thus while both microglia and astrocytes synthesize and release inflammatory mediators, the present data shows that compounds which bind ERβ are more effective in attenuating proinflammatory cytokines in both cell types and may therefore be a more effective agent for future therapeutic use. PMID:18328572

  5. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide enhances polymorphonuclear leukocyte function independent of changes in intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Klein, J B; Payne, V; Schepers, T M; McLeish, K R

    1990-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) enhanced expression of C3bi receptors (CR3), phagocytosis of opsonized bacteria, and subsequent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The role of changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in LPS-induced priming was examined by determining the effect of modulators of intracellular calcium on enhanced PMN function, determining the ability of calcium ionophores to reproduce the effects of LPS, and measuring PMN [Ca2+]i following addition of LPS. Inhibition of intracellular calcium-dependent processes with TMB-8 or quin-2 blocked all three measures of LPS-induced priming. LPS did not stimulate an increase in [Ca2+]i, and calcium ionophores failed to reproduce the effect of LPS. Maintenance of [Ca2+]i is necessary for LPS priming, but an increase in [Ca2+]i is not a component of the signal transduction pathway leading to PMN priming by LPS.

  6. β-Adrenoceptor activation depresses brain inflammation and is neuroprotective in lipopolysaccharide-induced sensitization to oxygen-glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammation acting in synergy with brain ischemia aggravates perinatal ischemic brain damage. The sensitizing effect of pro-inflammatory exposure prior to hypoxia is dependent on signaling by TNF-α through TNF receptor (TNFR) 1. Adrenoceptor (AR) activation is known to modulate the immune response and synaptic transmission. The possible protective effect of α˜ and β˜AR activation against neuronal damage caused by tissue ischemia and inflammation, acting in concert, was evaluated in murine hippocampal organotypic slices treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and subsequently subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Method Hippocampal slices from mice were obtained at P6, and were grown in vitro for 9 days on nitrocellulose membranes. Slices were treated with β1(dobutamine)-, β2(terbutaline)-, α1(phenylephrine)- and α2(clonidine)-AR agonists (5 and 50 μM, respectively) during LPS (1 μg/mL, 24 h) -exposure followed by exposure to OGD (15 min) in a hypoxic chamber. Cell death in the slice CA1 region was assessed by propidium iodide staining of dead cells. Results Exposure to LPS + OGD caused extensive cell death from 4 up to 48 h after reoxygenation. Co-incubation with β1-agonist (50 μM) during LPS exposure before OGD conferred complete protection from cell death (P < 0.001) whereas the β2-agonist (50 μM) was partially protective (p < 0.01). Phenylephrine was weakly protective while no protection was attained by clonidine. Exposure to both β1- and β2-agonist during LPS exposure decreased the levels of secreted TNF-α, IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and prevented microglia activation in the slices. Dobutamine remained neuroprotective in slices exposed to pure OGD as well as in TNFR1-/- and TNFR2-/- slices exposed to LPS followed by OGD. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that activation of both β1- and β2-receptors is neuroprotective and may offer mechanistic insights valuable for development of neuro-protective strategies

  7. Serotype-dependent expression patterns of stabilized lipopolysaccharide aggregates in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans strains.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Haruko; Fujise, Osamu; Miura, Mayumi; Tanaka, Ayako; Hisano, Kyoko; Haraguchi, Akira; Hamachi, Takafumi; Maeda, Katsumasa

    2012-10-01

    Above a critical concentration, amphiphilic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules in an aqueous environment form aggregate structures, probably because of interactions involving hydrophobic bonds. Ionic bonds involving divalent cations stabilize these aggregate structures, making them resistant to breakdown by detergents. The aim of this study was to examine expression patterns of stabilized LPS aggregates in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a microorganism that causes periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of various serotypes and truncated LPS mutants were prepared for this study. Following treatment with a two-phase separation system using the detergent Triton X-114, crude LPS extracts of the study strains were separated into detergent-phase LPS (DP-LPS) and aqueous-phase LPS (AP-LPS). Repeated treatment of the aqueous phase with the two-phase separation system produced only a slight decrease in AP-LPS, suggesting that AP-LPS was resistant to the detergent and thus distinguishable from DP-LPS. The presence of divalent cations increased the yield of AP-LPS. AP-LPS expression patterns were serotype-dependent; serotypes b and f showing early expression, and serotypes a and c late expression. In addition, highly truncated LPS from a waaD (rfaD) mutant were unable to generate AP-LPS, suggesting involvement of the LPS structure in the generation of AP-LPS. The two-phase separation was able to distinguish two types of LPS with different physical states at the supramolecular structure level. Hence, AP-LPS likely represents stabilized LPS aggregates, whereas DP-LPS might be derived from non-stabilized aggregates. Furthermore, time-dependent expression of stabilized LPS aggregates was found to be serotype-dependent in A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  8. Role of SIRT1 in regulation of LPS- or two ethanol metabolites-induced TNF-alpha production in cultured macrophage cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheng; Ajmo, Joanne M; Rogers, Christopher Q; Liang, Xiaomei; Le, Lisa; Murr, Michel M; Peng, Yanhua; You, Min

    2009-05-01

    Dysregulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is an NAD(+)-dependent class III protein deacetylase that is known to be involved in regulating production of proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-alpha. In the present study, we examined the role of SIRT1 signaling in TNF-alpha generation stimulated by either lipopolysaccharide (LPS), acetaldehyde (AcH), or acetate (two major metabolites of ethanol) in two cultured macrophage cell lines. In both rat Kupffer cell line 1 (RKC1) and murine RAW 264.7 macrophages, treatment with either LPS, AcH, or acetate caused significant decreases in SIRT1 transcription, translation, and activation, which essentially demonstrated an inverse relationship with TNF-alpha levels. LPS, AcH, and acetate each provoked the release of TNF-alpha from RKC1 cells, whereas coincubation with resveratrol (a potent SIRT1 agonist) inhibited this effect. Conversely, addition of sirtinol (a known SIRT1 inhibitor) or knocking down SIRT1 by the small silencing SIRT1 plasmid (SIRT1shRNA) augmented TNF-alpha release, suggesting that impairment of SIRT1 may contribute to TNF-alpha secretion. Further mechanistic studies revealed that inhibition of SIRT1 by LPS, AcH, or acetate was associated with a marked increase in the acetylation of the RelA/p65 subunit of nuclear transcription factor (NF-kappaB) and promotion of NF-kappaB transcriptional activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT1-NF-kappaB signaling is involved in regulating LPS- and metabolites-of-ethanol-mediated TNF-alpha production in rat Kupffer cells and in murine macrophages. Our study provides new insights into understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:19299582

  9. Characterization of the apoLp-III/LPS complex: insight in the mode of binding interaction

    PubMed Central

    Oztug, Merve; Martinon, Daisy; Weers, Paul M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoproteins are able to associate with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), potentially providing protection against septic shock. To gain insight in the molecular details of this binding interaction, apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) from Galleria mellonella was used as a model. The binding of apoLp-III to LPS was optimal around 37–40 °C, close to the LPS phase transition temperature. ApoLp-III formed complexes with LPS from E. coli (serotype O55:B5) with a diameter of 24 nm, a molecular weight of ~390 kDa, containing four molecules of apoLp-III and 24 molecules of LPS. The LPS-bound form of the protein was substantially more resistant to guanidine-induced denaturation compared to unbound protein. The denaturation profile displayed a multiphase character with a steep drop in secondary structure between 0–1 M guanidine, and a slower decrease above 1 M guanidine HCl. In contrast, apoLp-III bound to detoxified LPS was only slightly more resistant to guanidine HCl induced denaturation compared to unbound protein. Analysis of size-exclusion FPLC elution profiles of mixtures of apoLp-III with LPS or detoxified LPS indicated a much weaker binding interaction with detoxified LPS compared to intact LPS. These results indicate that apoLp-III initially interacts with exposed carbohydrate regions, but that the lipid A region is required for a more stable LPS binding interaction. PMID:22779761

  10. Activation of AMPK attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury by upregulation of PGC1α and SOD1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guizuo; Song, Yang; Feng, Wei; Liu, Lu; Zhu, Yanting; Xie, Xinming; Pan, Yilin; Ke, Rui; Li, Shaojun; Li, Fangwei; Yang, Lan; Li, Manxiang

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that an imbalance between oxidation and antioxidation is involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been shown to inhibit the occurrence of ALI/ARDS. However, it is unknown whether activation of AMPK benefits ALI/ARDS by restoration of the oxidant and antioxidant balance, and which mechanisms are responsible for this process. The present study aimed to address these issues. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced pronounced pathological changes of ALI in mice; these were accompanied by elevated production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) compared with control mice. Prior treatment of mice with the AMPK agonist metformin significantly suppressed the LPS-induced development of ALI, reduced the elevation of MDA and increased the activity of SOD. Further analysis indicated that activation of AMPK also stimulated the protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). This study suggests that activation of AMPK by metformin inhibits oxidative stress by upregulation of PGC1α and SOD1, thereby suppressing the development of ALI/ARDS, and has potential value in the clinical treatment of such conditions. PMID:27602077

  11. Lipopolysaccharide rapidly modifies adenosine receptor transcripts in murine and human macrophages: role of NF-kappaB in A(2A) adenosine receptor induction.

    PubMed

    Murphree, Lauren J; Sullivan, Gail W; Marshall, Melissa A; Linden, Joel

    2005-11-01

    The A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) mediates anti-inflammatory actions of adenosine in a variety of cell types. LPS (lipopolysaccharide) was reported to induce a small (<2-fold) increase in the expression of A(2A)AR mRNA in human monocytes and monocytic cell lines. We investigated the effects of LPS on the expression of adenosine receptor mRNAs in primary mouse IPMPhi (intraperitoneal macrophages), human macrophages and Wehi-3 cells. Treatment with 10 ng/ml LPS for 4 h produced a >100-fold increase in A(2A)AR mRNA. LPS-induced increases in mRNA for A(2A)AR and TNFalpha (tumour necrosis factor alpha) are reduced by 90% in IPMPhi pretreated with the NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) inhibitor, BAY 11-7082 {(E)3-[(4-methylphenyl)sulphonyl]-2-propenenitrile; 10 microM}. In Wehi-3 cells exposed to LPS, A(2A)AR and A(2B)AR transcripts are elevated by 290- and 10-fold respectively, the A(1)AR transcript is unchanged and the A(3)AR transcript is decreased by 67%. The induction of A(2A)AR mRNA by LPS is detectable after 1 h, reaches a peak at 6 h at 600 times control and remains elevated beyond 24 h. The ED50 (effective dose) of LPS is 2.3 ng/ml. A(2A)AR receptor number, measured by 125I-ZM241385 binding to whole cells, is undetectable in naïve cells and increases linearly at a rate of 23 receptors x cell(-1) x min(-1) to a B(max) of 348 fmol/mg (28000 receptors/cell) in 20 h. The increase in receptor number is correlated with an increase in the potency of an A(2A) agonist (4-{3-[6-amino-9-(5-ethylcarbamoyl-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydro-furan-2-yl)-9H-purin-2-yl]-prop-2-ynyl}-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid methyl ester; referred to as ATL146e) to stimulate cAMP in these cells. After LPS pretreatment, the potency of the A(2A) agonist, ATL146e, to reduce TNFalpha release from IPMPhi was increased by 200-fold. The results support the hypothesis that regulation of adenosine receptor expression, especially up-regulation of the A(2A)AR, is part of a delayed feedback mechanism

  12. Lack of LCAT reduces the LPS-neutralizing capacity of HDL and enhances LPS-induced inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Petropoulou, Peristera-Ioanna; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Theodoropoulos, Vassilios; Hatziri, Aikaterini; Stamou, Panagiota; Karavia, Eleni A; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Kypreos, Kyriakos E

    2015-10-01

    HDL has important immunomodulatory properties, including the attenuation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response. As lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is a critical enzyme in the maturation of HDL we investigated whether LCAT-deficient (Lcat(-/-)) mice present an increased LPS-induced inflammatory response. LPS (100μg/kg body weight)-induced cytokine response in Lcat(-/-) mice was markedly enhanced and prolonged compared to wild-type mice. Importantly, reintroducing LCAT expression using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer reverted their phenotype to that of wild-type mice. Ex vivo stimulation of whole blood with LPS (1-100ng/mL) showed a similar enhanced pro-inflammatory phenotype. Further characterization in RAW 264.7 macrophages in vitro showed that serum and HDL, but not chylomicrons, VLDL or the lipid-free protein fraction of Lcat(-/-) mice, had a reduced capacity to attenuate the LPS-induced TNFα response. Analysis of apolipoprotein composition revealed that LCAT-deficient HDL lacks significant amounts of ApoA-I and ApoA-II and is primarily composed of ApoE, while HDL from Apoa1(-/-) mice is highly enriched in ApoE and ApoA-II. ApoA-I-deficiency did not affect the capacity of HDL to neutralize LPS, though Apoa1(-/-) mice showed a pronounced LPS-induced cytokine response. Additional immunophenotyping showed that Lcat(-/-) , but not Apoa1(-/-) mice, have markedly increased circulating monocyte numbers as a result of increased Cd11b(+)Ly6C(med) monocytes, whereas 'pro-inflammatory' Cd11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes were reduced. In line with this observation, peritoneal macrophages of Lcat(-/-) mice showed a markedly dampened LPS-induced TNFα response. We conclude that LCAT-deficiency increases LPS-induced inflammation in mice due to reduced LPS-neutralizing capacity of immature discoidal HDL and increased monocyte number. PMID:26170061

  13. Adsorption of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist to Alum-Based Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Dampens Pro-T Helper 2 Activities and Enhances Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Juliana; Mirotti, Luciana; Rodriguez, Dunia; Gomes, Eliane; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum salts gels (alum) are TLR-independent adjuvants and have been used to boost antibody responses in alum-based vaccines such as diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT) triple vaccine. However, the pro-Th2 activity of alum-based vaccine formulations has not been fully appreciated. Here we found that alum-based tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine was biased toward a Th-2 profile as shown by TT-induced airway eosinophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production, and high levels of IgE anaphylactic antibodies. The adsorption into alum of prototypic TLR4 agonists such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli consistently dampened TT-induced Th2 activities without inducing IFNγ or Th1-like responses in the lung. Conversely, adsorption of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) extracted from Salmonella minnesota, which is a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β- (TRIF-) biased TLR4 agonist, was less effective in decreasing Th-2 responses. Importantly, in a situation with antigenic competition (OVA plus TT), TT-specific IgG1 or IgG2a was decreased compared with TT sensitization. Notably, LPS increased the production of IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibodies. In conclusion, the addition of LPS induces a more robust IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibody production and concomitantly decreases Th2-cellular and humoral responses, indicating a potential use of alum/TLR-based vaccines.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    PubMed

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  15. Self-assembly of lipopolysaccharide layers on allantoin crystals.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Jiang, Qiu Zhen; Gagnon, Pete

    2014-08-01

    Self-assembly of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on solid surfaces is important for the study of bacterial membranes, but has not been possible due to technical difficulties and the lack of suitable solid supports. Recently we found that crystals of the natural compound allantoin selectively bind pure LPS with sub-nanomolar affinity. The physicochemical origins of this selectivity and the adsorption mode of LPS on allantoin crystals remain, however, unknown. In this study we present evidence that LPS adsorption on allantoin crystals is initiated through hydrogen-bond attachment of hydrophilic LPS regions. Hydrophobic interactions between alkyl chains of adjacently adsorbed LPS molecules subsequently promote self-assembly of LPS layers. The essential role of hydrogen-bond interactions is corroborated by our finding that allantoin crystals bind to practically any hydrophilic surface chemistry. Binding contributions of hydrophobic interactions between LPS alkyl chains are evidenced by the endothermic nature of the adsorption process and explain why the binding affinity for LPS is several orders of magnitude higher than for proteins (lysozyme, BSA and IgG) and polysaccharides. Self-assembly of LPS layers via hydrogen-bond attachment on allantoin crystals emerges as a novel binding mechanism and could be considered as a practical method for preparing biomimetic membranes on a solid support.

  16. EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXERCISE CONDITIONING ON THERMAL RESPONSES TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE AND TURPENTINE ABSCESS IN FEMALE RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exercise conditioning has been shown to alter basal thermoregulatory processes as well as the response to inflammatory agents. Two such agents, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and turpentine (TPT) are inducers of fever in rats. LPS, given intraperitoneally (i.p.), involves a sys...

  17. In Utero Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Alters the Postnatal Acute Phase Response in Beef Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the potential effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal acute phase response (APR) to an LPS challenge in heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were separated into prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 microgr...

  18. The exposure to lipopolysaccharide in utero alters growth performance of calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal growth performance of calves. Pregnant crossbred cows (n=50) were separated into prenatal stress (PNS; n=25; administered 0.1 microgram per kilogram body weight LPS subcutaneously) and sali...

  19. Toxicity and immunogenicity of Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide incorporated into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Petrov, A B; Semenov, B F; Vartanyan, Y P; Zakirov, M M; Torchilin, V P; Trubetskoy, V S; Koshkina, N V; L'Vov, V L; Verner, I K; Lopyrev, I V

    1992-09-01

    To obtain nontoxic and highly immunogenic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for immunization, we incorporated Neisseria meningitidis LPS into liposomes. Native LPS and its salts were incorporated by the method of dehydration-rehydration of vesicles or prolonged cosonication. The most complete incorporation of LPS into liposomes and a decrease in toxicity were achieved by the method of dehydration-rehydration of vesicles. Three forms of LPS (H+ form, Mg2+ salt, and triethanolamine salt) showed different solubilities in water, the acidic form of LPS, with the most pronounced hydrophobic properties, being capable of practically complete association with liposomal membranes. An evaluation of the activity of liposomal LPS in vitro (by the Limulus amoebocyte test) and in vivo (by monitoring the pyrogenic reaction in rabbits) revealed a decrease in endotoxin activity of up to 1,000-fold. In addition, the pyrogenic activity of liposomal LPS was comparable to that of a meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Liposomes had a pronounced adjuvant effect on the immune response to LPS. Thus, the level of anti-LPS plaque-forming cells in the spleens of mice immunized with liposomal LPS was 1 order of magnitude higher and could be observed for a longer time (until day 21, i.e., the term of observation) than in mice immunized with free LPS. The same regularity was revealed in a study done with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This study also established that antibodies induced by immunization belonged to the immunoglobulin M and G classes, which are capable of prolonged circulation. Moreover, liposomal LPS induced a pronounced immune response in CBA/N mice (defective in B lymphocytes of the LyB-5+ subpopulation). The latter results indicate that the immunogenic action of liposomal LPS occurs at an early age.

  20. Toxicity and immunogenicity of Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide incorporated into liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, A B; Semenov, B F; Vartanyan, Y P; Zakirov, M M; Torchilin, V P; Trubetskoy, V S; Koshkina, N V; L'Vov, V L; Verner, I K; Lopyrev, I V

    1992-01-01

    To obtain nontoxic and highly immunogenic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for immunization, we incorporated Neisseria meningitidis LPS into liposomes. Native LPS and its salts were incorporated by the method of dehydration-rehydration of vesicles or prolonged cosonication. The most complete incorporation of LPS into liposomes and a decrease in toxicity were achieved by the method of dehydration-rehydration of vesicles. Three forms of LPS (H+ form, Mg2+ salt, and triethanolamine salt) showed different solubilities in water, the acidic form of LPS, with the most pronounced hydrophobic properties, being capable of practically complete association with liposomal membranes. An evaluation of the activity of liposomal LPS in vitro (by the Limulus amoebocyte test) and in vivo (by monitoring the pyrogenic reaction in rabbits) revealed a decrease in endotoxin activity of up to 1,000-fold. In addition, the pyrogenic activity of liposomal LPS was comparable to that of a meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Liposomes had a pronounced adjuvant effect on the immune response to LPS. Thus, the level of anti-LPS plaque-forming cells in the spleens of mice immunized with liposomal LPS was 1 order of magnitude higher and could be observed for a longer time (until day 21, i.e., the term of observation) than in mice immunized with free LPS. The same regularity was revealed in a study done with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This study also established that antibodies induced by immunization belonged to the immunoglobulin M and G classes, which are capable of prolonged circulation. Moreover, liposomal LPS induced a pronounced immune response in CBA/N mice (defective in B lymphocytes of the LyB-5+ subpopulation). The latter results indicate that the immunogenic action of liposomal LPS occurs at an early age. PMID:1500196

  1. Deletion of Monoglyceride Lipase in Astrocytes Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Neuroinflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Grabner, Gernot F.; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Wagner, Bernhard; Gao, Yuanqing; Farzi, Aitak; Taschler, Ulrike; Radner, Franz P. W.; Schweiger, Martina; Lass, Achim; Holzer, Peter; Zinser, Erwin; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Yi, Chun-Xia; Zimmermann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) is required for efficient hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglyerol (2-AG) in the brain generating arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol. This metabolic function makes MGL an interesting target for the treatment of neuroinflammation, since 2-AG exhibits anti-inflammatory properties and AA is a precursor for pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Astrocytes are an important source of AA and 2-AG, and highly express MGL. In the present study, we dissected the distinct contribution of MGL in astrocytes on brain 2-AG and AA metabolism by generating a mouse model with genetic deletion of MGL specifically in astrocytes (MKOGFAP). MKOGFAP mice exhibit moderately increased 2-AG and reduced AA levels in brain. Minor accumulation of 2-AG in the brain of MKOGFAP mice does not cause cannabinoid receptor desensitization as previously observed in mice globally lacking MGL. Importantly, MKOGFAP mice exhibit reduced brain prostaglandin E2 and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels upon peripheral lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. These observations indicate that MGL-mediated degradation of 2-AG in astrocytes provides AA for prostaglandin synthesis promoting LPS-induced neuroinflammation. The beneficial effect of astrocyte-specific MGL-deficiency is not fully abrogated by the inverse cannabinoid receptor 1 agonist SR141716 (Rimonabant) suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects are rather caused by reduced prostaglandin synthesis than by activation of cannabinoid receptors. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that MGL in astrocytes is an important regulator of 2-AG levels, AA availability, and neuroinflammation. PMID:26565024

  2. Neuroprotective Activity of (−)-Epigallocatechin Gallate against Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Biao; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) mediated systemic inflammation plays a critical role in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major component in green tea, on LPS-mediated inflammation and neurotoxicity. LPS treatment of macrophages induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6). However, EGCG pretreatment of macrophages significantly inhibited LPS-mediated induction of these cytokines. In addition, EGCG significantly diminished LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines in the peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMCs). Supernatant from EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures was found to be less cytotoxic to neurons than that from non-EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures. Furthermore, EGCG treatment of neurons could inhibit LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus EGCG represents a potent and useful neuroprotective agent for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders. PMID:27191001

  3. LPS-TLR4 Pathway Mediates Ductular Cell Expansion in Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Odena, Gemma; Chen, Jiegen; Lozano, Juan Jose; Altamirano, Jose; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Affo, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Matsushita, Hiroshi; Zou, Jian; Dumitru, Raluca; Caballeria, Juan; Gines, Pere; Arroyo, Vicente; You, Min; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Valla, Dominique; Crews, Fulton; Seki, Ekihiro; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Bataller, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is the most severe form of alcoholic liver disease for which there are no effective therapies. Patients with AH show impaired hepatocyte proliferation, expansion of inefficient ductular cells and high lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels. It is unknown whether LPS mediates ductular cell expansion. We performed transcriptome studies and identified keratin 23 (KRT23) as a new ductular cell marker. KRT23 expression correlated with mortality and LPS serum levels. LPS-TLR4 pathway role in ductular cell expansion was assessed in human and mouse progenitor cells, liver slices and liver injured TLR4 KO mice. In AH patients, ductular cell expansion correlated with portal hypertension and collagen expression. Functional studies in ductular cells showed that KRT23 regulates collagen expression. These results support a role for LPS-TLR4 pathway in promoting ductular reaction in AH. Maneuvers aimed at decreasing LPS serum levels in AH patients could have beneficial effects by preventing ductular reaction development. PMID:27752144

  4. Mechanistic study of macrophage activation by LPS stimulation using fluorescence imaging techinques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of the outer membrane of gram negative bacteria, has been suggested that stimulates macrophages secrete a wide variety of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO). However, the cellular mechanisms of NO generation in macrophage by LPS stimulation are not well known. In this study, LPS stimulated NO generation in macrophage was determined by measuring fluorescence changes with a NO specific probe DAF-FM DA. Using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, we found an increase of protein kinase C (PKC) activation was dynamically monitored in macrophages treated with LPS. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in macrophage was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, the PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 inhibited LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation and NO production. These results indicated that LPS stimulated NF-κB mediated NO production by activating PKC.

  5. Mechanistic study of macrophage activation by LPS stimulation using fluorescence imaging techinques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of the outer membrane of gram negative bacteria, has been suggested that stimulates macrophages secrete a wide variety of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO). However, the cellular mechanisms of NO generation in macrophage by LPS stimulation are not well known. In this study, LPS stimulated NO generation in macrophage was determined by measuring fluorescence changes with a NO specific probe DAF-FM DA. Using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, we found an increase of protein kinase C (PKC) activation was dynamically monitored in macrophages treated with LPS. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in macrophage was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, the PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 inhibited LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation and NO production. These results indicated that LPS stimulated NF-κB mediated NO production by activating PKC.

  6. Protective effect of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone agonist in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Sridhar, Supriya; Gorshkov, Boris; Alieva, Irina B.; Kasa, Anita; Gonzales, Joyce; Potapenko, Olena; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pillich, Helena; Rick, Ferenc G.; Block, Norman L.; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Lucas, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Antibiotic treatment of patients infected with G− or G+ bacteria promotes release of the toxins lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pneumolysin (PLY) in their lungs. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 protects human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC), expressing splice variant 1 (SV-1) of the receptor, from PLY-induced barrier dysfunction. We investigated whether JI-34 also blunts LPS-induced hyperpermeability. Since GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) signaling can potentially stimulate both cAMP-dependent barrier-protective pathways as well as barrier-disruptive protein kinase C pathways, we studied their interaction in GHRH agonist-treated HL-MVEC, in the presence of PLY, by means of siRNA-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) depletion. Methods: Barrier function measurements were done in HL-MVEC monolayers using Electrical Cell substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) and VE-cadherin expression by Western blotting. Capillary leak was assessed by Evans Blue dye (EBD) incorporation. Cytokine generation in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by multiplex analysis. PKA and PKC-α activity were assessed by Western blotting. Results: GHRH agonist JI-34 significantly blunts LPS-induced barrier dysfunction, at least in part by preserving VE-cadherin expression, while not affecting inflammation. In addition to activating PKA, GHRH agonist also increases PKC-α activity in PLY-treated HL-MVEC. Treatment with PLY significantly decreases resistance in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but does so even more in PKA-depleted monolayers. Pretreatment with GHRH agonist blunts PLY-induced permeability in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but fails to improve barrier function in PKA-depleted PLY-treated monolayers. Conclusions: GHRH signaling in HL-MVEC protects from both LPS and PLY-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and concurrently induces a barrier-protective PKA-mediated and a barrier-disruptive PKC-α-induced pathway in the presence of PLY, the

  7. Deciphering the dual effect of lipopolysaccharides from plant pathogenic Pectobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Kettani-Halabi; Daniel, Tran; Aurélien, Dauphin; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Rafik, Errakhi; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Florence, Val; Mustapha, Ennaji Moulay; François, Bouteau

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a component of the outer cell surface of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and play an essential role for bacterial growth and survival. Lipopolysaccharides represent typical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules and have been reported to induce defense-related responses, including the expression of defense genes and the suppression of the hypersensitive response in plants. However, depending on their origin and the challenged plant, LPS were shown to have complex and different roles. In this study we showed that LPS from plant pathogens Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum induce common and different responses in A. thaliana cells when compared to those induced by LPS from non-phytopathogens Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among common responses to both types of LPS are the transcription of defense genes and their ability to limit of cell death induced by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum. However, the differential kinetics and amplitude in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation seemed to regulate defense gene transcription and be determinant to induce programmed cell death in response to LPS from the plant pathogenic Pectobacterium. These data suggest that different signaling pathways could be activated by LPS in A. thaliana cells. PMID:25760034

  8. Deciphering the dual effect of lipopolysaccharides from plant pathogenic Pectobacterium.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Kettani-Halabi; Daniel, Tran; Aurélien, Dauphin; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Rafik, Errakhi; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Florence, Val; Mustapha, Ennaji Moulay; François, Bouteau

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a component of the outer cell surface of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and play an essential role for bacterial growth and survival. Lipopolysaccharides represent typical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules and have been reported to induce defense-related responses, including the expression of defense genes and the suppression of the hypersensitive response in plants. However, depending on their origin and the challenged plant, LPS were shown to have complex and different roles. In this study we showed that LPS from plant pathogens Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum induce common and different responses in A. thaliana cells when compared to those induced by LPS from non-phytopathogens Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among common responses to both types of LPS are the transcription of defense genes and their ability to limit of cell death induced by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum. However, the differential kinetics and amplitude in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation seemed to regulate defense gene transcription and be determinant to induce programmed cell death in response to LPS from the plant pathogenic Pectobacterium. These data suggest that different signaling pathways could be activated by LPS in A. thaliana cells.

  9. Revisiting the interaction between the chaperone Skp and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Burmann, Björn M; Holdbrook, Daniel A; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-03-24

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function.

  10. Revisiting the Interaction between the Chaperone Skp and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Burmann, Björn M.; Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function. PMID:25809264

  11. Maternal lipopolysaccharide treatment differentially affects 5-HT(2A) and mGlu2/3 receptor function in the adult male and female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Wischhof, Lena; Irrsack, Ellen; Dietz, Frank; Koch, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Maternal infection during pregnancy increases the risk for the offspring to develop schizophrenia. However, it is still not fully understood which biochemical mechanisms are responsible for the emergence of neuropsychiatric symptoms following prenatal immune activation. The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and glutamate system have prominently been associated with the schizophrenia pathophysiology but also with the mechanism of antipsychotic drug actions. Here, we investigated the behavioral and cellular response to 5-HT2A and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu)2/3 receptor stimulation in male and female offspring born to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mothers. Additionally, we assessed protein expression levels of prefrontal 5-HT2A and mGlu2 receptors. Prenatally LPS-exposed male and female offspring showed locomotor hyperactivity and increased head-twitch behavior in response to the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI. In LPS-exposed male offspring, the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 failed to reduce DOI-induced prepulse inhibition deficits. In LPS-males, the behavioral changes were further accompanied by enhanced DOI-induced c-Fos protein expression and an up-regulation of prefrontal 5-HT2A receptors. No changes in either 5-HT2A or mGlu2 receptor protein levels were found in female offspring. Our data support the hypothesis of an involvement of maternal infection during pregnancy contributing, at least partially, to the pathology of schizophrenia. Identifying biochemical alterations that parallel the behavioral deficits may help to improve therapeutic strategies in the treatment of this mental illness. Since most studies in rodents almost exclusively include male subjects, our data further contribute to elucidating possible gender differences in the effects of prenatal infection on 5-HT2A and mGlu2/3 receptor function. PMID:26051401

  12. Human monocyte CD14 is upregulated by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Landmann, R; Knopf, H P; Link, S; Sansano, S; Schumann, R; Zimmerli, W

    1996-01-01

    Membrane CD14 is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced monocyte activation; it binds LPS, and antibodies against CD14 block the effects of low-dose LPS. It is unknown how LPS regulates its own receptor CD14 in vitro. Therefore, we investigated the effects of LPS on CD14 mRNA and membrane and soluble CD14 (mCD14 and sCD14, respectively) in human monocytes and macrophages. No changes were observed during the first 3 h of LPS stimulation. After 6 to 15 h, LPS weakly reduced CD14 mRNA and mCD14 and transiently enhanced sCD14 release. A 2-day incubation with LPS caused increases in the levels of CD14 mRNA (2-fold), mCD14 (2-fold), sCD14 (1.5-fold), and LPS-fluorescein isothiocyanate binding (1.5-fold); a 5-h incubation with LPS was sufficient to induce the late effects on mCD14 and sCD14. The maximal effect on mCD14 and sCD14 was reached with > or = 1 ng of LPS per ml; the proportional distribution of the two sCD14 isoforms was not modified by LPS. Besides rough and smooth LPS, lipid A, heat-killed Escherichia coli, lipoteichoic acid, and Staphylococcus aureus cell wall extract (10 micrograms/ml) caused similar increases of mCD14. The LPS effect was blocked by polymyxin B but not by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha, anti-interleukin-6, anti-gamma interferon, and anti-LPS-binding protein. LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha production was abolished after a second 4-h challenge. In contrast, the LPS-induced increases CD14 mRNA, mCD14, and sCD14 were stronger and appeared earlier after a second LPS challenge. In conclusion, CD14 is transcriptionally upregulated by LPS and other bacterial cell wall constituents. PMID:8613389

  13. Thermo-nanoimprinted biomimetic probe for LPS and LTA immunosensing.

    PubMed

    Buchegger, Patricia; Lieberzeit, Peter A; Preininger, Claudia

    2014-02-01

    A complex prepolymerized film comprising monomers, cross-linkers, and initiator is usually used to create molecularly imprinted polymers. We herein exploit ready-to-use resist materials and link molecular surface imprinting with UV- and thermo-nanoimprinting techniques to create a sensor layer for the specific recognition of the bacterial surface markers lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). To account for the highly polar moieties of LPS and LTA, we evaluate different resist and stamp materials of distinct surface properties by AFM and molecularly imprinted sorbent assays. Thermo nanoimprinting of LPS and LTA micelles to Epon 1002F films exhibits excellent sensitivity of up to 13 times increased signals compared to those of the nonimprinted films and negligible cross-reaction with the tested nonspecific analyte. Additionally, the sensitivity and selectivity of the thermo nanoimprints is compared to conventional molecular surface imprints using a cocktail of acrylic monomers in QCM measurements. PMID:24392724

  14. Visualization and analysis of lipopolysaccharide distribution in binary phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Maria Florencia; Sanchez, Susana; Bakas, Laura

    2009-05-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria during infections. It have been reported that LPS may play a role in the outer membrane of bacteria similar to that of cholesterol in eukaryotic plasma membranes. In this article we compare the effect of introducing LPS or cholesterol in liposomes made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine on the solubilization process by Triton X-100. The results show that liposomes containing LPS or cholesterol are more resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 than the binary phospholipid mixtures at 4 {sup o}C. The LPS distribution was analyzed on GUVs of DPPC:DOPC using FITC-LPS. Solid and liquid-crystalline domains were visualized labeling the GUVs with LAURDAN and GP images were acquired using a two-photon microscope. The images show a selective distribution of LPS in gel domains. Our results support the hypothesis that LPS could aggregate and concentrate selectively in biological membranes providing a mechanism to bring together several components of the LPS-sensing machinery.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide-induced hemolysis: Evidence for direct membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brauckmann, Stephan; Effenberger-Neidnicht, Katharina; de Groot, Herbert; Nagel, Michael; Mayer, Christian; Peters, Jürgen; Hartmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    While hemolysis in patients with sepsis is associated with increased mortality its mechanisms are unknown and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 mediated effects, complement-mediated hemolysis, or direct cell membrane effects are all conceivable mechanisms. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that toxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as non-toxic RS-LPS evokes hemolysis (1) by direct membrane effects, and (2) independent of the complement system and TLR-4 activation. We found, that incubation with LPS resulted in a marked time and concentration dependent increase of free hemoglobin concentration and LDH activity in whole blood and washed red cells. Red cell integrity was diminished as shown by decreased osmotic resistance, formation of schistocytes and rolls, and a decrease in red cell membrane stiffness. Non-toxic RS-LPS inhibited the LPS-evoked increase in TNF-α concentration demonstrating its TLR-4 antagonism, but augmented LPS-induced increase in supernatant hemoglobin concentration and membrane disturbances. Removal of plasma components in washed red cell assays failed to attenuate hemolysis. In summary, this study demonstrates direct physicochemical interactions of LPS with red cell membranes resulting in hemolysis under in vitro conditions. It might thus be hypothesized, that not all effects of LPS are mediated by TLR and may explain LPS toxicity in cells missing TLR. PMID:27759044

  16. Roles of different forms of lipopolysaccharides in Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Hui; Wang, Kuan-Chung; Hong, Yu-Hau; Chu, Tai-Hsiang; Chu, Yu-Ju; Chou, I-Chun; Lu, Der-Kang; Chen, Chiao-Yen; Yang, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Mei; Cheng, Chiu-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are critical components for the fitness of most gram-negative bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum causes a deadly wilting disease in many crops; however, the pathogenic roles of different forms of LPS and their pathways of biogenesis remain unknown. By screening for phage-resistant mutants of R. solanacearum Pss4, whose genome sequence is unavailable, mutants with various types of structural defects in LPS were isolated. Pathogenesis assays of the mutants revealed that production of rough LPS (R-LPS), which does not contain O-polysaccharides, was sufficient to cause necrosis on Nicotiana benthamiana and induce the hypersensitive response on N. tabacum. However, biosynthesis of smooth LPS (S-LPS), which contains O-polysaccharides, was required for bacterial proliferation at infection sites on N. benthamiana leaves and for proliferation and causing wilt on tomato. Complementation tests confirmed the involvement of the previously unidentified cluster RSc2201 to RSc2204 in the formation of R. solanacearum S-LPS. With these data and the availability of the annotated genomic sequence of strain GMI1000, certain loci involved in key steps of R. solanacearum LPS biosynthesis were identified. The strategy of this work could be useful for similar studies in other bacteria without available genome sequences.

  17. The effects of Nigella sativa on sickness behavior induced by lipopolysaccharide in male Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Fatemeh; Abareshi, Azam; Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Gholamnezhad, Zahra; Saeedjalali, Mohsen; Mohebbati, Reza; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neuroimmune factors contribute on the pathogenesis of sickness behaviors. Nigella sativa (NS) has anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety and anti-depressive effects. In the present study, the effect of NS hydro-alcoholic extract on sickness behavior induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided into five groups (n=10 in each): (1) control (saline), (2) LPS (1 mg/kg, administered two hours before behavioral tests), (3-5) LPS-Nigella sativa 100 , 200 and 400 mg/kg (LPS-NS 100, LPS-NS 200 and LPS-NS 400, respectively). Open- field (OF), elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swimming test (FST) were performed. Results: In OF, LPS reduced the peripheral crossing, peripheral distance, total crossing and total distance compared to control (p<0.01- p<0.001). The central crossing, central distance and central time in LPS-NS 100, LPS-NS200 and LPS-NS 400 groups were higher than LPS (p<0.01- p<0.001). In EPM, LPS decreased the open arm entries, open arm time and closed arm entries while increased the closed time compared to control (p<0.001). Pretreatment by NS extract reversed the effects of LPS (p<0.05- p<0.001). In FST, LPS increased the immobility time while, decreased the climbing and active times compared to control (p<0.05- p<0.001). In LPS-NS 100, LPS-NS 200 and LPS-NS 400 groups the immobility time was less while, the active and climbing times were more than those of LPS (p<0.05- p<0.001). Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the hydro-alcoholic extract of NS reduced the LPS-induced sickness behaviors in rats. Further investigations are required for better understanding the responsible compound (s) and the underlying mechanism(s). PMID:27247927

  18. Lipopolysaccharide modulation of a CD14-like molecule on porcine alveolar macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielian, T. L.; Ross, C. R.; McVey, D. S.; Chapes, S. K.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation antigen 14 (CD14) functions as a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) LPS-binding protein (LBP) complexes. Because LPS has varying effects on CD14 expression in vitro, we evaluated CD14 expression in response to LPS with a fully differentiated macrophage phenotype, the alveolar macrophage. By using flow microfluorometric analysis and a radioimmunoassay with an anti-human CD14 monoclonal antibody (My4) that cross-reacts with porcine CD14, we found that macrophages stimulated with LPS for 24 h exhibited a two- to fivefold increase in CD14-like antigen compared with unstimulated cells. At low concentrations of LPS, up-regulation of the CD14-like antigen was dependent on serum; at higher concentrations of LPS, serum was not required. In the absence of serum a 10-fold higher dose of LPS (10 ng/ml) was required to increase CD14-like expression. In addition, LPS-induced CD14-like up-regulation correlated with secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, regardless of serum concentration. Blockade with My4 antibody significantly inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion at 1 ng/ml of LPS. However, inhibition decreased as we increased the LPS concentration, suggesting the existence of CD14-independent pathways of macrophage activation in response to LPS. Alternatively, My4 may have a lower affinity for the porcine CD14 antigen than LPS, which may have only partially blocked the LPS-LBP binding site at high concentrations of LPS. Therefore, these data suggest that LPS activation of porcine alveolar macrophages for 24 h increased CD14-like receptor expression. The degree of CD14-like up-regulation was related to LPS concentration, however, activation did not require the presence of serum at high concentrations of LPS.

  19. Role of the physical state of Salmonella lipopolysaccharide in expression of biological and endotoxic properties.

    PubMed Central

    Shnyra, A; Hultenby, K; Lindberg, A A

    1993-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from three strains of Salmonella typhimurium, i.e., the rough Re mutant SL1102, the rough Ra mutant TV119, and the smooth strain SH4809, was first electrodialyzed (eLPS) and then divalent cation deprived by EDTA treatment and finally made monomeric by deoxycholate solubilization. The removal of excess detergent by extensive dialysis in the absence of mineral cations resulted in the reassociation of LPS subunits into monodisperse micelles of reduced aggregation number (dLPS) as estimated by electron microscopy and gel filtration chromatography. For all LPS chemotypes tested, the developed procedure reproducibly results in stable and clear solutions of dLPS in concentrations of up to 100 mg/ml. The dLPS and eLPS preparations possessed the same reactivity with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against different LPS domains. The 100% lethal dose in galactosamine-sensitized mice of 0.01 microgram for the smooth eLPS was from 10- to 100-fold lower than that of dLPS at 0.1 to 1.0 microgram. dLPS from both the smooth strain and the Ra mutant had a significantly reduced capacity to activate the proenzyme cascade in the Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay in comparison with the slightly reduced activity of dLPS from the Re mutant. In contrast, dLPS as well as the deoxycholate-dispersed and then diluted eLPS from the smooth strain had a higher mitogenic activity on splenocytes than eLPS. The results indicate that the biological and endotoxic properties of LPS are significantly influenced by the physical state of its aggregates in aqueous solutions. The approach developed for production of a stable and dispersed form of LPS should further assist in investigation of LPS properties and interpretation of the data of endotoxic research. Images PMID:8225609

  20. Immunochemical characterization of Brucella lipopolysaccharides and polysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, E; Speth, S L; Jones, L M; Berman, D T

    1981-01-01

    Purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted with phenol-water from smooth Brucella abortus was hydrolyzed with 1% acetic acid at 100 degrees C. The degraded polysaccharide (AH) released gave reactions of identity with the native polysaccharide hapten (NH) in phenol-water- or trichloroacetic acid-extracted endotoxin preparations of B. abortus and with the polysaccharide (poly B) extracted by trichloroacetic acid from rough B. melitensis strain B115. Poly B was present in the soluble cytoplasmic fraction but not in the membrane fraction, of disrupted B115 cells. It could not be extracted from three rough mutants of B. abortus or from B canis or B. ovis cells. Both AH and NH shared determinants present on smooth LPS and missing from poly B. Sugars found in purified LPS, NH, and AH included mannose, glucose, quinovosamine, glucosamine, and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate. Poly B contained only a trace amount of quinovosamine and no 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate detectable by the thiobarbiturate assay. Sera from some rabbits immunized with pure smooth LPS and some, but not all, cows infected with field strains of B. abortus recognized the determinants missing from poly B. A subclass-specific enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that most of the antibody in sera from infected cows which binds to smooth LPS and to NH is of the immunoglobulin G1 subclass. Images PMID:6163716

  1. Silibinin ameliorates LPS-induced memory deficits in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ritu; Garabadu, Debapriya; Teja, Gangineni Ravi; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2014-12-01

    Neuroinflammation is considered as one of the predisposing factor in the etiology of several neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of silibinin (SIL) in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammatory model. The effect of SIL on memory function was also evaluated on normal rats without LPS administration. In the first experiment, male rats were divided into five groups. Except control group animals, all rats received bilateral intracerebroventricular injection of LPS (5 μg/5 μl) into lateral ventricles on the first day of the experimental schedule. Control rats received bilateral intracerebroventricular injection of artificial cerebrospinal fluid into lateral ventricles. SIL in doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o. was administered 1h before LPS injection and continued for 7 days. On Day-7, SIL attenuated the LPS-induced long-term and working memory loss in elevated plus and Y-maze test respectively. Further, SIL dose-dependently attenuated LPS-induced decrease in acetylcholine level and increase in the acetylcholinestrase activity in hippocampus and pre-frontal cortex. SIL ameliorated LPS-induced decrease in the mitochondrial complex activity (I, IV and V) and integrity, increase in lipid peroxidation and decrease in the activity of superoxide dismutase in both the brain regions. SIL attenuated amyloidogenesis in the hippocampus, while it decreased the LPS-induced increase in the level of NFκB in the pre-frontal cortex. In another study, SIL dose-dependently, enhanced memory functions in the normal rats, indicating its nootropic activity. Hence, SIL could be a potential candidate in the management of neuroinflammation-related memory disorders.

  2. Titanium particles and surface-bound LPS activate different pathways in IC-21 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Luciana P; Xing, Zhiqing; Hasty, Karen A; Smith, Richard A

    2006-10-01

    It is still unknown if wear-debris particles themselves induce osteolysis or if they serve a functional role as receptors for ligands that incite an inflammatory response that ultimately leads to bone resorption. In this study, commercially pure titanium particles (cpTi) were subjected to a serial combination of different cleaning methods to remove Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or were incubated in LPS solutions of known concentrations. Then, the response of the macrophage cell line IC-21 to the cleaned particles, LPS-bound Ti particles, and soluble LPS was examined. It was found that cleaned particles up to 1000 particles per cell did not stimulate macrophages to release Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or Interleukin 6 (IL-6), but they significantly increased the release of Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) when the particle concentration was higher than 500 particles per cell. At one particle per cell, Ti particles bound with LPS stimulated the release of IL-6 and TNF-alpha by macrophages. The level of released cytokines was dependent on, and correlated with, the amount of LPS present on the particles. The macrophages were more sensitive to soluble LPS than to particle-bound LPS, and the simultaneous addition of cleaned Ti particles did not have additional effects on the effects of soluble LPS. This study shows evidence that, cpTi particles and LPS have distinct mechanisms of action on the IC-21 macrophages, but that both contribute to the development of an inflammatory response. PMID:16544307

  3. T4 Phage Tail Adhesin Gp12 Counteracts LPS-Induced Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Kłopot, Anna; Soluch, Ryszard; Szkuta, Piotr; Kęska, Weronika; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Konopka, Agnieszka; Nowak, Marcin; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages that infect Gram-negative bacteria often bind to the bacterial surface by interaction of specific proteins with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Short tail fiber proteins (tail adhesin, gp12) mediate adsorption of T4-like bacteriophages to Escherichia coli, binding surface proteins or LPS. Produced as a recombinant protein, gp12 retains its ability to bind LPS. Since LPS is able to exert a major impact on the immune response in animals and in humans, we have tested LPS-binding phage protein gp12 as a potential modulator of the LPS-induced immune response. We have produced tail adhesin gp12 in a bacterial expression system and confirmed its ability to form trimers and to bind LPS in vitro by dynamic light scattering. This product had no negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation in vitro. Further, no harmful effects of this protein were observed in mice. Thus, gp12 was used in combination with LPS in a murine model, and it decreased the inflammatory response to LPS in vivo, as assessed by serum levels of cytokines IL-1 alpha and IL-6 and by histopathological analysis of spleen, liver, kidney and lungs. Thus, in future studies gp12 may be considered as a potential tool for modulating and specifically for counteracting LPS-related physiological effects in vivo. PMID:27471503

  4. T4 Phage Tail Adhesin Gp12 Counteracts LPS-Induced Inflammation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Kłopot, Anna; Soluch, Ryszard; Szkuta, Piotr; Kęska, Weronika; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Konopka, Agnieszka; Nowak, Marcin; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages that infect Gram-negative bacteria often bind to the bacterial surface by interaction of specific proteins with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Short tail fiber proteins (tail adhesin, gp12) mediate adsorption of T4-like bacteriophages to Escherichia coli, binding surface proteins or LPS. Produced as a recombinant protein, gp12 retains its ability to bind LPS. Since LPS is able to exert a major impact on the immune response in animals and in humans, we have tested LPS-binding phage protein gp12 as a potential modulator of the LPS-induced immune response. We have produced tail adhesin gp12 in a bacterial expression system and confirmed its ability to form trimers and to bind LPS in vitro by dynamic light scattering. This product had no negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation in vitro. Further, no harmful effects of this protein were observed in mice. Thus, gp12 was used in combination with LPS in a murine model, and it decreased the inflammatory response to LPS in vivo, as assessed by serum levels of cytokines IL-1 alpha and IL-6 and by histopathological analysis of spleen, liver, kidney and lungs. Thus, in future studies gp12 may be considered as a potential tool for modulating and specifically for counteracting LPS-related physiological effects in vivo. PMID:27471503

  5. LPS priming potentiates and prolongs proinflammatory cytokine response to the trichothecene deoxynivalenol in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahidul; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-02-15

    Simultaneous exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) markedly amplifies induction of proinflammatory cytokine expression as well as IL-1-driven lymphocyte apoptosis by trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) in the mouse. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that LPS priming will sensitize a host to DON-induced proinflammatory cytokine induction and apoptosis. In mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg bw) ip. and treated 8 h later with DON po., the minimum DON doses for inducing IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha} serum proteins and splenic mRNAs were significantly lower than the DON doses required for vehicle-primed mice. LPS priming also decreased onset time and dramatically increased magnitude and duration of cytokine responses. LPS-primed mice maintained heightened sensitivity to DON for up to 24 h. LPS priming doses as low as 50 {mu}g/kg bw evoked sensitization. DNA fragmentation analysis and flow cytometry also revealed that mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg) for 8 h and exposed to DON (12.5 mg/kg) exhibited massive thymocyte loss by apoptosis 12 h later compared to mice exposed to DON or LPS alone. LPS priming decreased DON-induced p38 and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation was not involved in increased cytokine responses. Taken together, exposure to LPS rendered mice highly susceptible to DON induction of cytokine expression and this correlated with increased apoptosis in the thymus.

  6. A central role for the mammalian target of rapamycin in LPS-induced anorexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yunshuang; Wang, Yi; Li, Dan; Song, Zhigang; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), also known as endotoxin, induces profound anorexia. However, the LPS-provoked pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and the neural mechanisms underlying the development of anorexia are not clear. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of metabolism, cell growth, and protein synthesis. This study aimed to determine whether the mTOR pathway is involved in LPS-induced anorexia. Effects of LPS on hypothalamic gene/protein expression in mice were measured by RT-PCR or western blotting analysis. To determine whether inhibition of mTOR signaling could attenuate LPS-induced anorexia, we administered an i.c.v. injection of rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, on LPS-treated male mice. In this study, we showed that LPS stimulates the mTOR signaling pathway through the enhanced phosphorylation of mTOR(Ser2448) and p70S6K(Thr389). We also showed that LPS administration increased the phosphorylation of FOXO1(Ser256), the p65 subunit of nuclear factor kappa B (P<0.05), and FOXO1/3a(Thr) (24) (/) (32) (P<0.01). Blocking the mTOR pathway significantly attenuated the LPS-induced anorexia by decreasing the phosphorylation of p70S6K(Thr389), FOXO1(Ser256), and FOXO1/3a(Thr) (24) (/) (32). These results suggest promising approaches for the prevention and treatment of LPS-induced anorexia.

  7. Modulation of citric acid-induced cough following lipopolysaccharide-mediated neutrophilia in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Brown, Claire; Selig, William M; Ellis, James L

    2007-01-01

    This investigation examined a possible correlation between lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary neutrophilia and cough. Conscious male guinea pigs were acutely exposed to aerosolized LPS and thereafter at various times challenged with citric acid aerosol (CA; 250mM) to induce cough followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) to quantitate inflammatory cell accumulation. LPS caused a hyporesponsive cough at 24h post-LPS with neutrophilia apparent from 2h post-LPS. By 96h post-LPS both cough and neutrophilia had returned towards normal. Dexamethasone (DEX, 2mgkg(-1)/day for 3 days prior) did not affect the cough hyporesponsiveness at 24h; however it attenuated LPS-induced BAL fluid neutrophilia. Since LPS can stimulate inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) we hypothesized that the cough hyporesponsiveness may involve nitric oxide. To investigate this we treated animals with an aerosolized iNOS inhibitor 1400W (1mM) immediately prior to LPS. 1400W had no significant effect on either cough hyporesponsiveness or BAL fluid neutrophilia at 24h post-LPS. Despite differing effects on neutrophilia, these findings clearly indicate that neither DEX nor iNOS inhibition had any direct effect on LPS-induced cough hyporesponsiveness. The mechanism underlying the LPS-induced cough hyporesponsiveness does not appear to be directly linked to LPS-induced neutrophilic inflammation.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    May, Janine M; Sherman, David J; Simpson, Brent W; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Simpson, Brent W.; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM. PMID:26370939

  10. Immunochemical analysis of lipopolysaccharide-like component extracted from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Schwarzová, K; Ciznár, I

    2004-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis and its modifications were applied to analysis of a lipopolysaccharide-like component (LPS-LC) extracted from Borrelia garinii strains K24 and K48 isolated from Ixodes ricinus and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strain B31. A modification of the hot phenol-water method was used for isolation of LPS. Immunoelectrophoresis (IE) and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) of LPS-LC with polyclonal rabbit antisera revealed a pattern and properties partially similar to LPS from other Gram-negative bacteria. B. garinii LPS-LC formed in CIE a diffuse band extending from the start to the anode. Similarly, the shape and position of the band in IE did not show major differences from LPS of other Gram-negative bacteria. The LPS-LC extracted from the three genomic groups of B. burgdorferi sensu lato were found to have similar immunochemical properties irrespective of their genotype origin.

  11. Micheliolide inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory response and protects mice from LPS challenge

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiangyang; Jiang, Xinru; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Yuli; Miao, Zhulei; He, Weigang; Yang, Guizhen; Lv, Zhenhui; Yu, Yizhi; Zheng, Yuejuan

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the principal cause of fatality in the intensive care units worldwide. It involves uncontrolled inflammatory response resulting in multi-organ failure and even death. Micheliolide (MCL), a sesquiterpene lactone, was reported to inhibit dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced inflammatory intestinal disease, colitis-associated cancer and rheumatic arthritis. Nevertheless, the role of MCL in microbial infection and sepsis is unclear. We demonstrated that MCL decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the main cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria)-mediated production of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, etc) in Raw264.7 cells, primary macrophages, dendritic cells and human monocytes. MCL plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting LPS-induced activation of NF-κB and PI3K/Akt/p70S6K pathways. It has negligible impact on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. In the acute peritonitis mouse model, MCL reduced the secretion of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, IFN-β and IL-10 in sera, and ameliorated lung and liver damage. MCL down-regulated the high mortality rate caused by lethal LPS challenge. Collectively, our data illustrated that MCL enabled maintenance of immune equilibrium may represent a potentially new anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drug candidate in the treatment of sepsis and septic shock. PMID:26984741

  12. Activation of lung toll-like receptors does not exacerbate sickness responses to lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Walker, Adam K; Hsieh, Jennifer; Luu, Katherine V; Radwan, Aiat A; Valverde, Gabriella R; Dickey, Burton F; Tuvim, Michael J; Dantzer, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Pneumonia represents a leading cause of death. Recently, a novel treatment strategy for pneumonia has involved enhancing the host pulmonary innate immune response by pre-exposure to aerosolized toll-like receptor (TLR)9 and TLR2/6 agonists, known as O/P. O/P inhalation in mice has been demonstrated to stimulate innate lung immunity, and thus increase survival against subsequent pneumonia infection while producing barely detectable increases in systemic cytokines. Here, we examined the safety of O/P treatment when used in mice that are inflamed systemically. Swiss-Webster mice were treated with two doses of aerosolized O/P (1× or 8×) vs phosphate buffered saline (PBS) either immediately before intraperitoneal injection of 0.1mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PBS (equivolume) or 2h after. Sickness responses (reduced body weight, food intake, activity and social interaction) were examined at 2 and 5.5h post-treatment. Immediately following behavioral testing, mice were euthanized, perfused with PBS, and brains, spleens, livers and lungs snap frozen for assessment of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs. While O/P treatment alone increased lung IL-1β, IFNγ and TNF-α, no such effects were observed in the brain, spleen or liver. Furthermore, there was no evidence that O/P treatment administered before or after LPS had any synergizing effect to potentiate the cytokine response to LPS in any compartment measured. Supportive of these findings were the measures of sickness behaviors that did not show any increased sickness response in O/P-treated mice exposed to LPS, suggestive that the cytokine signal produced in the lungs from O/P inhalation did not propagate to the brain and synergize with LPS-induced neuroinflammation. These findings support the safety of the use of O/P inhalation as a preventative measure against pneumonia and demonstrate a unique ability of the lungs to compartmentalize pulmonary inflammation and limit propagation of the cytokine signal to the brain.

  13. Inhibitory effect of a phosphatidyl ethanolamine derivative on LPS-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chunghyun; An, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jung-Ln; Lee, Hayyoung; Paik, Sang-Gi

    2009-02-28

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. Today, around 60% of all cases of sepsis are caused by Gram-negative bacteria. The cell wall component lipopoly-saccharide (LPS) is the main initiator of the cascade of cellular reactions in Gram-negative infections. The core receptors for LPS are toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MD-2 and CD14. Attempts have been made to antagonize the toxic effect of endotoxin using monoclonal antibodies against CD14 and synthetic lipopolysaccharides but there is as yet no effective treatment for septic syndrome. Here, we describe an inhibitory effect of a phosphatidylethanolamine derivative, PE-DTPA (phosphatidylethanolamine diethyl-enetriaminepentaacetate) on LPS recognition. PE-DTPA bound strongly to CD14 (K ( d ), 9.52 x 10(-8) M). It dose dependency inhibited LPS-mediated activation of human myeloid cells, mouse macrophage cells and human whole blood as measured by the production of tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-alpha) and nitric oxide, whereas other phospho-lipids including phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine had little effect. PE-DTPA also inhibited transcription dependent on NF-kappaB activation when it was added together with LPS, and it rescued LPS-primed mice from septic death. These results suggest that PE-DTPA is a potent antagonist of LPS, and that it acts by competing for binding to CD14. PMID:19277509

  14. CD14 mediates binding of high doses of LPS but is dispensable for TNF-α production.

    PubMed

    Borzęcka, Kinga; Płóciennikowska, Agnieszka; Björkelund, Hanna; Sobota, Andrzej; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Activation of macrophages with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) involves a sequential engagement of serum LPS-binding protein (LBP), plasma membrane CD14, and TLR4/MD-2 signaling complex. We analyzed participation of CD14 in TNF-α production stimulated with 1-1000 ng/mL of smooth or rough LPS (sLPS or rLPS) and in sLPS binding to RAW264 and J744 cells. CD14 was indispensable for TNF-α generation induced by a low concentration, 1 ng/mL, of sLPS and rLPS. At higher doses of both LPS forms (100-1000 ng/mL), TNF-α release required CD14 to much lower extent. Among the two forms of LPS, rLPS-induced TNF-α production was less CD14-dependent and could proceed in the absence of serum as an LBP source. On the other hand, the involvement of CD14 was crucial for the binding of 1000 ng/mL of sLPS judging from an inhibitory effect of the anti-CD14 antibody. The binding of sLPS was also strongly inhibited by dextran sulfate, a competitive ligand of scavenger receptors (SR). In the presence of dextran sulfate, sLPS-induced production of TNF-α was upregulated about 1.6-fold. The data indicate that CD14 together with SR participates in the binding of high doses of sLPS. However, CD14 contribution to TNF α production induced by high concentrations of sLPS and rLPS can be limited. PMID:24489448

  15. Potentiation of methamphetamine neurotoxicity by intrastriatal lipopolysaccharide administration.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bae Dong; Shin, Eun-Joo; Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Jin, Chun-Hui; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Seok Joo; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Wie, Myung-Bok; Bing, Guoying; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2010-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has indicated that neuroinflammation is one of the important etiologic factors of Parkinson's disease (PD). Earlier studies have employed the inflammogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce inflammation of dopaminergic neurons. Methamphetamine (MA) dopaminergic toxicity similar to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) toxicity is frequently cited as a model of PD. In the present study, we examined whether striatal LPS exposure potentiates MA-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Combined treatment with LPS and MA significantly potentiates behavioral impairment and dopaminergic deficit. However, this combination did not significantly alter the other monoaminergic systems (e.g., serotonin, norepinephrine, and histamine). Consistently, microglial activation, labeled by F4/80 or Iba-1 in the nigrostriatal region was more pronounced with the combined treatment of LPS and MA compared to either treatment alone, but this combination did not significantly alter the microglial activation in other brain regions (e.g., hippocampus, dorsal raphe nuclei, and locus ceruleus). Furthermore, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and pro-apoptotic changes in the striatum were more accentuated with combined treatment of LPS and MA compared to either treatment alone. In addition, it is important that cytoplasmic accumulation of alpha-synuclein was observed in the substantia nigra of mice treated with LPS plus MA, and that L-Dopa treatment significantly attenuated behavioral changes and dopaminergic deficits induced by LPS plus MA. These results suggest that combined treatment of LPS with MA is a potential animal model for PD.

  16. Biological activities of Eikenella corrodens outer membrane and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Progulske, A; Mishell, R; Trummel, C; Holt, S C

    1984-01-01

    Highly purified preparations of the outer membrane and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Eikenella corrodens strain ATCC 23834 and the outer membrane fraction (OMF) of strain 470 were tested in in vitro biological assays. The OMFs of both strains were found to be mitogenic for BDF and C3H/HeJ murine splenocytes. The E. corrodens LPS was mitogenic for BDF spleen cells; however, doses of LPS as high as 50 micrograms/ml failed to stimulate C3H/HeJ cells. When incubated with T-lymphocyte-depleted C3H/HeJ splenocytes, the strain 23834 OMF demonstrated significant mitogenic activity, indicating that the OMF is a B-cell mitogen by a mechanism other than that elicited by conventional LPS. The E. corrodens 23834 OMF and LPS were stimulators of bone resorption when tested in organ cultures of fetal rat long bones. In contrast, the strain 470 OMF was only weakly stimulatory. Both OMFs and LPSs demonstrated "endotoxic" activity, since as little as 0.062 micrograms of E. corrodens LPS and 0.015 micrograms of the OMFs induced gelation in the Limulus amebocyte clotting assay. Thus, despite having a "nonclassical" LPS biochemistry, the E. corrodens LPS elicits classical endotoxic activities. These results also indicate that the surface structures of E. corrodens have significant biological activities as measured in vitro. The expression of such activities in vivo may play an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis as well as other E. corrodens infections. PMID:6360893

  17. Antioxidant Effects of Cranberry Powder in Lipopolysaccharide Treated Hypercholesterolemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Joung; Kim, Jung Hee; Kwak, Ho-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of cranberry power on antioxidant defense system in rats fed an atherogenic diet and injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the following 5 groups: normal diet+saline (NS), atherogenic diet+saline (AS), atherogenic diet+LPS (AL), atherogenic diet with 5% cranberry powder+LPS (AL-C5), and atherogenic diet with 10% cranberry powder+LPS (AL-C10). Total antioxidant status measured by ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) was significantly reduced by LPS injection (24%) and was restored by the cranberry powder treatment (P<0.05). In addition, the mean level of plasma total phenolics was significantly decreased by LPS injection (P<0.05) and tended to be increased when cranberry powder was incorporated in to the diet. Activity of serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) tended to be lowered by LPS injection and declined further in cranberry powder fortified groups. Overall results indicate that dietary cranberry powder may provide appropriate antioxidants to counter the diminished antioxidant status induced by exposing hypercholesterolemic rats to LPS. PMID:25054105

  18. Arabidopsis LBP/BPI related-1 and -2 bind to LPS directly and regulate PR1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Iizasa, Sayaka; Iizasa, Ei’ichi; Matsuzaki, Sawako; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Yutaka; Watanabe, Keiichi; Nagano, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and acts as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that triggers immune responses in both plants and animals. LPS-binding protein (LBP) and bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), which bind to LPS and play important roles in immunity of mammals, have been well studied. However, the molecule contributing to LPS binding in plants is mostly unknown. The Arabidopsis genome carries two genes encoding LBP/BPI-related proteins which we designated as AtLBP/BPI related-1 (AtLBR-1) and AtLBP/BPI related-2 (AtLBR-2). We found that their N-terminal domains were co-purified with cell wall-derived LPS when expressed in E. coli. Since this finding implied the direct binding of AtLBRs to LPS, we also confirmed binding by using LPS-free AtLBRs and purified LPS. AtLBRs directly bind to both rough and smooth types of LPS. We also demonstrated that LPS-treated atlbr mutant Arabidopsis exhibit a significant delay of induction of defence-related gene pathogenesis-related 1 (PR1) but no other PR genes. Furthermore, LPS-treated atlbr mutants showed defects in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These results demonstrate that, as well as LBP and BPI of mammals, AtLBRs also play an important role in the LPS-induced immune response of plants. PMID:27273538

  19. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates agonist-induced pulmonary edema in mice with targeted disruption of the gene for natriuretic peptide receptor-A

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Whei; Green, Sabrina; Grinnell, Katie L.; Machan, Jason T.; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits agonist-induced pulmonary edema formation, but the signaling pathway responsible is not well defined. To investigate the role of the particulate guanylate cyclase-linked receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), we measured acute lung injury responses in intact mice and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) with normal and disrupted expression of NPR-A. NPR-A wild-type (NPR-A+/+), heterozygous (NPR-A+/−), and knockout (NPR-A−/−) mice were anesthetized and treated with thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lung injury was assessed by lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight and by protein and cell concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. No difference in pulmonary edema formation was seen between NPR-A genotypes under baseline conditions. TRAP and LPS increased lung W/D weight and BAL fluid cell counts more in NPR-A−/− mice than in NPR-A+/− or NPR-A+/+ mice, but no genotype-related differences were seen in TRAP-induced increases in bloodless lung W/D weight or LPS-induced increases in BAL protein concentration. Pretreatment with ANP infusion completely blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and blunted LPS-induced increases in BAL cell counts and protein concentration in both NPR-A−/− and NPR-A+/+ mice. Thrombin decreased transmembrane electrical resistance in monolayers of PMVECs in vitro, and this effect was attenuated by ANP in PMVECs isolated from both genotypes. Administration of the NPR-C-specific ligand, cANF, also blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and LPS-induced increases in BAL cell count and protein concentration in NPR-A+/+ and NPR-A−/− mice. We conclude that ANP is capable of attenuating agonist-induced lung edema in the absence of NPR-A. The protective effect of ANP on agonist-induced lung injury and pulmonary barrier function may be mediated by NPR-C. PMID:23195629

  20. Human complement activation by lipopolysaccharides from bacteroides oralis, fusobacterium nucleatum, and veillonella parvula.

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, H; Dahlén, G; Nilsson, L A

    1979-01-01

    The properties of different lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparations to induce C3 conversion in human serum was studied by means of crossed immunoelectrophoresis. C3 conversion by the alternative pathway was evaluated after calcium depletion, and lipid A-dependent activation was measured by means of inhibition with polymyxin B sulfate. LPS from Bacteroides oralis converted Co mainly via the alternative pathway, whereas LPS from Fusobacterium nucleatum and Veillonella parvula const pronounced lipid A-dependent conversion. The results are discussed in relation to the chemical composition of the LPS preparations. Images PMID:121108

  1. ROLE OF CELL SIGNALING IN PROTECTION FROM DIESEL AND LPS INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously demonstrated in CD-1 mice that pre-administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor (SB203580) reduces acute lung injury and inflammation following pulmonary exposures to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here ...

  2. Effect of chocolate and Propolfenol on rabbit spermatogenesis and sperm quality following bacterial lipopolysaccharide treatment.

    PubMed

    Collodel, Giulia; Moretti, Elena; Del Vecchio, Maria Teresa; Biagi, Marco; Cardinali, Raffaella; Mazzi, Lucia; Brecchia, Gabriele; Maranesi, Margherita; Manca, Daniela; Castellini, Cesare

    2014-08-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the effects of chocolate and propolis-enriched diets on rabbit spermatogenesis, sperm motility, and ultrastructure following bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. Thirty-two New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups. The LPS-Propolfenol(®) group received propolis (500 mg/kg/day) in their diet for 15 days, while the LPS-chocolate group was fed 70% cacao chocolate (1 g/1 kg/day) for the same period. Following the diet treatments, rabbits in the LPS-Propolfenol(®) and LPS-chocolate groups, and an LPS group received a single intraperitoneal dose of 50 μg/kg LPS, and the control group received only saline. Kinematic sperm traits were evaluated with a computer assisted sperm analyzer (CASA) system, and ultrastructural characteristics were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Testicular and epididymal tissues were observed by light microscopy and TEM and multiplex real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was used to detect and quantify toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) gene expression. The values of the analyzed semen parameters of rabbits treated with LPS-Propolfenol(®) and LPS-chocolate did not show any variations compared with the control group, but they were lower in rabbits treated only with LPS. Alterations observed in the testicular tissue of LPS treated-rabbits were not detected in specimens from the LPS-chocolate and LPS-Propolfenol(®) groups, which showed normal spermatogenesis. The TLR-4 mRNA expression was similar in controls, in LPS treated, and in LPS-chocolate groups, but it was significantly (p < 0.01) decreased in LPS-Propolfenol(®) rabbits. In conclusion, a chocolate and propolis-enriched diet showed a protective effect on the spermatogenetic process of buck rabbits following LPS treatment.

  3. Dynamics and Interactions of OmpF and LPS: Influence on Pore Accessibility and Ion Permeability.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhilon S; Re, Suyong; Wu, Emilia L; Qi, Yifei; Klebba, Phillip E; Widmalm, Göran; Yeom, Min Sun; Sugita, Yuji; Im, Wonpil

    2016-02-23

    The asymmetric outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is formed of the inner leaflet with phospholipids and the outer leaflet with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Outer membrane protein F (OmpF) is a trimeric porin responsible for the passive transport of small molecules across the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. Here, we report the impact of different levels of heterogeneity in LPS environments on the structure and dynamics of OmpF using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations provide insight into the flexibility and dynamics of LPS components that are highly dependent on local environments, with lipid A being the most rigid and O-antigen being the most flexible. Increased flexibility of O-antigen polysaccharides is observed in heterogeneous LPS systems, where the adjacent O-antigen repeating units are weakly interacting and thus more dynamic, compared to homogeneous LPS systems in which LPS interacts strongly with each other with limited overall flexibility due to dense packing. The model systems were validated by comparing molecular-level details of interactions between OmpF surface residues and LPS core sugars with experimental data, establishing the importance of LPS core oligosaccharides in shielding OmpF surface epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies. There are LPS environmental influences on the movement of bulk ions (K(+) and Cl(-)), but the ion selectivity of OmpF is mainly affected by bulk ion concentration. PMID:26910429

  4. Ouabain Modulates the Lipid Composition of Hippocampal Plasma Membranes from Rats with LPS-induced Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Israel José Pereira; Kinoshita, Paula Fernanda; Scavone, Cristoforo; Mignaco, Julio Alberto; Barbosa, Leandro Augusto de Oliveira; Santos, Hérica de Lima

    2015-12-01

    The effects of ouabain (OUA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vivo on hippocampal membranes (RHM) of Wistar male rats aged 3 months were analyzed. After intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of OUA only, LPS only, OUA plus LPS, or saline, the content of proteins, phospholipids, cholesterol and gangliosides from RHM was analyzed. The total protein and cholesterol contents of RHM were not significantly affected by OUA or LPS for the experimentally paired groups. In contrast, total phospholipids and gangliosides were strongly modulated by either OUA or LPS treatments. LPS reduced the total phospholipids (roughly 23 %) and increased the total gangliosides (approximately 40 %). OUA alone increased the total phospholipids (around 23 %) and also the total gangliosides (nearly 34 %). OUA pretreatment compensated the LPS-induced changes, preserving the total phospholipids and gangliosides around the same levels of the control. Thus, an acute treatment with OUA not only modulated the composition of hippocampal membranes from 3-month-old rats, but also was apparently able to counteract membrane alterations resulting from LPS-induced neuroinflammation. This study demonstrates for the first time that the OUA capacity modulates the lipid composition of hippocampal plasma membranes from rats with LPS-induced neuroinflammation.

  5. A high-resolution map in the chromosomal region surrounding the Lps locus

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, S.T.; Lariviere, L.; Gros, P.

    1996-02-01

    The Lps locus on mouse chromosome 4 controls host responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide, a major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The C3H/HeJ inbred mouse strain is characterized by a mutant Lps allele (Lps{sup d}) that renders it hyporesponsive to LPS and naturally tolerant of its lethal effects. To identify the Lps gene by a positional cloning strategy, we have analyzed a total of 1604 backcross mice from a preexisting interspecific backcross panel of 259 (Mus spretus x C57BL/6J)F1 x C57BL/6J and two novel panels of 597 (DBA/2J x C3H/HeJ)F1 x C3H/HeJ and 748 (C57BL/6J x C3H/HeJ)F1 x C3H/HeJ segregating at Lps. A total of 50 DNA markers have been mapped in a 11.8-cM span overlapping the Lps locus. This positions the Lps locus within a 1.1-cM interval, flanked proximally by a large cluster of markers, including three known genes (Cd30l, Hxb, and Ambp), and distally by two microsatellite markers (D4Mit7/D4Mit178). The localization of the Lps locus is several centimorgans proximal to that previously assigned. 52 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Ambroxol reduces LPS toxicity mediated by induction of alkaline phosphatases in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Iwao; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Harada, Tsuyoshi; Kikuno, Akira; Hokari, Shigeru; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2004-08-01

    Alkaline phosphatases (APs) have been suggested to detoxify lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by dephosphorylation. Ambroxol, a bronchial expectorant, is known to accelerate the secretion of pulmonary surfactant particles including AP molecules as a pharmacological action. In the present study, some beneficial effects of ambroxol on LPS toxicity in the rat lung were investigated. In an experiment using the rat lung organ culture, AP activities were enhanced in a time-dependent manner by incubation with 25 microM of ambroxol in both the tissue and the medium. Western blot analysis indicated that AP activity was elevated by the treatment with ambroxol, due to the induction of surfactant proteins (SPs) and AP molecules. In the in vivo experiment, the serum LPS content was markedly increased after LPS administration to rats by intratracheal instillation of 20 mg/kg. However, when the rats were pretreated with oral ambroxol (1.0 mg/kg) at 1 h before LPS challenge, the area under the concentration--time curve (AUC) of serum LPS was significantly decreased. These results suggest that ambroxol inhibits the translocation of LPS from the lung into the circulation as well as its detoxification effect via the elevation of AP activity. Bromhexine, another expectorant, is less effective than ambroxol as an LPS detoxificant. Maintenance of high AP activity level in the lung suggests APs to have physiological significant effects against the inflammatory events induced by LPS.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO-1 Lipopolysaccharide-Diphtheria Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine: Preparation, Characterization and Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Najafzadeh, Faezeh; Shapouri, Reza; Rahnema, Mehdi; Rokhsartalab Azar, Shadi; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO-1 infections through immunological means has been proved to be efficient and protective. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to produce a conjugate vaccine composed of detoxified lipopolysaccharide (D-LPS) P. aeruginosa and diphtheria toxoid (DT). Materials and Methods: Firstly, LPS was purified and characterized from P. aeruginosa PAO1 and then detoxified. D-LPS was covalently coupled to DT as a carrier protein via amidation method with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer molecule and 1-ethyl-3- (3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a linker. The molar ratio of LPS to DT in the prepared conjugate was 3:1. The immunogenicity of D-LPS-DT conjugate vaccine in mice model was evaluated as well. Results: The conjugate was devoid of endotoxin activity and 0.125 U/mL of D-LPS was acceptable for immunization. D-LPS-DT conjugate was nonpyrogenic for rabbits and nontoxic for mice. Mice immunization with D-LPS-DT conjugate vaccine elicited the fourfold higher IgG antibody compared to D-LPS. Anti-LPS IgG antibody was predominantly IgG1 subclass and then IgG3, IgG2a and IgG2b, respectively. Conclusions: Vaccine based on the conjugation of P. aeruginosa PAO-1 LPS with DT increased anti-LPS antibodies and had a significant potential to protect against Pseudomonas infections. PMID:26301059

  8. The detergent octylglucoside neutralizes lipopolysaccharide in a specific manner.

    PubMed

    Henrich, B; Guadarrama, R; Zähringer, U; MacKenzie, C R

    2001-04-01

    The stimulatory effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on human macrophages was found to be neutralized by the detergent octylglucoside (OG). Both macrophage stimulation and reactivity in a limulus amebocyte lysate test were suppressed by suspension of LPS in OG at concentrations between 0.25 and 2.5 mM, whereas other stimulatory lipopeptides and lipid containing stimulants were unaffected by OG. LPS at concentrations causing maximal stimulation of macrophages could be completely neutralized by non-toxic concentrations of OG. In addition, it was found that the neutralization in complex mixtures of macromolecules, such as bacterial cell lysate, was specific for LPS and that the stimulatory activity of the other substances in the mixture was not affected by the OG.

  9. Genetics of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Schnaitman, C A; Klena, J D

    1993-01-01

    From a historical perspective, the study of both the biochemistry and the genetics of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis began with the enteric bacteria. These organisms have again come to the forefront as the blocks of genes involved in LPS synthesis have been sequenced and analyzed. A number of new and unanticipated genes were found in these clusters, indicating a complexity of the biochemical pathways which was not predicted from the older studies. One of the most dramatic areas of LPS research has been the elucidation of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway. Four of the genes in this pathway have now been identified and sequenced, and three of them are located in a complex operon which also contains genes involved in DNA and phospholipid synthesis. The rfa gene cluster, which contains many of the genes for LPS core synthesis, includes at least 17 genes. One of the remarkable findings in this cluster is a group of several genes which appear to be involved in the synthesis of alternate rough core species which are modified so that they cannot be acceptors for O-specific polysaccharides. The rfb gene clusters which encode O-antigen synthesis have been sequenced from a number of serotypes and exhibit the genetic polymorphism anticipated on the basis of the chemical complexity of the O antigens. These clusters appear to have originated by the exchange of blocks of genes among ancestral organisms. Among the large number of LPS genes which have now been sequenced from these rfa and rfb clusters, there are none which encode proteins that appear to be secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane and surprisingly few which encode integral membrane proteins or proteins with extensive hydrophobic domains. These data, together with sequence comparison and complementation experiments across strain and species lines, suggest that the LPS biosynthetic enzymes may be organized into clusters on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane which are organized around a few key membrane

  10. Dual action of chronic ethanol treatment on LPS-induced response in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Heimfarth, Luana; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Leite, Marina C; Guerra, Maria Cristina; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2012-08-15

    In this study we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of chronic ethanol (EtOH) treatment on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated C6 glioma cells. The cells were chronically treated with 200mM EtOH; coincubation with LPS and EtOH was obtained upon addition of 2μg/ml LPS to the incubation medium in the last 24h of EtOH exposure. We found that EtOH prevented the LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) without decreasing cell viability. Either LPS treated or EtOH plus LPS treated cells presented upregulated glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and downregulated vimentin levels characterizing a program of reactive astrogliosis. Also, EtOH plus LPS stimulation greatly increased the oxidative stress generation evaluated by DCF-DA measurement, while either EtOH alone or LPS alone was unable to induce oxidative stress. Western blot analysis indicated that either EtOH, LPS or EtOH plus LPS treatments are unable to affect Akt/GSK3β signaling pathway. However, LPS alone and EtOH plus LPS co-treatment inhibited Erk phosphorylation. A dramatic loss of stress fibers was found in EtOH exposed cells, evaluated by cytochemistry using phalloidin-fluorescein. However, LPS alone was not able to disrupt actin organization. Furthermore, cells co-incubated with LPS and EtOH presented reversion of the disrupted stress fibers provoked by EtOH. Supporting this action, RhoA and vinculin immunocontent were upregulated in response to EtOH plus LPS. Interestingly, EtOH suppresses the inflammatory cascade (TNFα production) in response to LPS. Concomitantly it sustains Erk inhibition, increases oxidative stress generation and induces reactive astrogliosis in the presence of LPS, conditions associated with neurotoxicity. The effects observed were not supported by actin reorganization. Altogether, these findings suggest that Erk signaling inhibition could play a role in both suppressing TNFα production and inducing oxidative stress generation and astrogliosis

  11. SIRT2 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Dal; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Knockout of SIRT2 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression. • Lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production is decreased in SIRT2 KO macrophage. • SIRT2 deficiency suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced ROS production in macrophage. • M1-macrophage related factors are decreased in SIRT2 deficient cells. • SIRT2 deficiency decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NFκB. - Abstract: Introduction: SIRT2 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases and associated with numerous processes such as infection, carcinogenesis, DNA damage and cell cycle regulation. However, the role of SIRT2 in inflammatory process in macrophage remains unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, we have evaluated the regulatory effects of SIRT2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages isolated from SIRT2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice or Raw264.7 macrophage cells. As inflammatory parameters, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the productions of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and M1-macrophage-related factors were evaluated. We also examined the effects of SIRT2 on activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) signaling. Results: SIRT2 deficiency inhibits LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. SIRT2-siRNA transfection also suppressed LPS-induced iNOS expression in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from SIRT2 KO mice produced lower nitric oxide and expressed lower levels of M1-macrophage related markers including iNOS and CD86 in response to LPS than WT mice. Decrease of SIRT2 reduced the LPS-induced reactive oxygen species production. Deficiency of SIRT2 resulted in inhibition of NFκB activation through reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. The phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 was significantly decreased in SIRT2-deficient macrophages after LPS stimulation. Discussion: Our data suggested that

  12. Lipopolysaccharide Disrupts Mitochondrial Physiology in Skeletal Muscle via Disparate Effects on Sphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Melissa E.; Simmons, Kurtis J.; Tippetts, Trevor S.; Thatcher, Mikayla O.; Saito, Rex R.; Hubbard, Sheryl T.; Trumbull, Annie M.; Parker, Brian A.; Taylor, Oliver J.; Bikman, Benjamin T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are prevalent pathogenic molecules that are found within tissues and blood. Elevated circulating LPS is a feature of obesity and sepsis, both of which are associated with mitochondrial abnormalities that are key pathological features of LPS excess. However, the mechanism of LPS-induced mitochondrial alterations remains poorly understood. Herein we demonstrate the necessity of sphingolipid accrual in mediating altered mitochondrial physiology in skeletal muscle following LPS exposure. In particular, we found LPS elicited disparate effects on the sphingolipids dihydroceramides (DhCer) and ceramides (Cer) in both cultured myotubes and in muscle of LPS-injected mice. Although LPS-treated myotubes had reduced DhCer and increased Cer as well as increased mitochondrial respiration, muscle from LPS-injected mice manifested a reverse trend, namely elevated DhCer, but reduced Cer as well as reduced mitochondrial respiration. In addition, we found that LPS treatment caused mitochondrial fission, likely via dynamin-related protein 1, and increased oxidative stress. However, inhibition of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis via myriocin protected normal mitochondrial function in spite of LPS, but inhibition of DhCer desaturase 1, which increases DhCer, but not Cer, exacerbated mitochondrial respiration with LPS. In an attempt to reconcile the incongruent effects of LPS in isolated muscle cells and whole muscle tissue, we incubated myotubes with conditioned medium from treated macrophages. In contrast to direct myotube LPS treatment, conditioned medium from LPS-treated macrophages reduced myotube respiration, but this was again mitigated with sphingolipid inhibition. Thus, macrophage sphingolipid production appears to be necessary for LPS-induced mitochondrial alterations in skeletal muscle tissue. PMID:26529656

  13. Maternal LPS exposure during pregnancy impairs testicular development, steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in male offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Yang, Lu-Lu; Hu, Yong-Fang; Wang, Bi-Wei; Huang, Yin-Yin; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, De-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with adverse developmental outcomes including embryonic resorption, fetal death, congenital teratogenesis and fetal growth retardation. Here, we explored the effects of maternal LPS exposure during pregnancy on testicular development, steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in male offspring. The pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (50 µg/kg) daily from gestational day (GD) 13 to GD 17. At fetal period, a significant decrease in body weight and abnormal Leydig cell aggregations were observed in males whose mothers were exposed to LPS during pregnancy. At postnatal day (PND) 26, anogenital distance (AGD), a sensitive index of altered androgen action, was markedly reduced in male pups whose mothers were exposed to LPS daily from GD13 to GD 17. At PND35, the weight of testes, prostates and seminal vesicles, and serum testosterone (T) level were significantly decreased in LPS-treated male pups. At adulthood, the number of sperm was significantly decreased in male offspring whose mothers were exposed to LPS on GD 13-17. Maternal LPS exposure during gestation obviously diminished the percent of seminiferous tubules in stages I-VI, increased the percent of seminiferous tubules in stages IX-XII, and caused massive sloughing of germ cells in seminiferous tubules in mouse testes. Moreover, maternal LPS exposure significantly reduced serum T level in male mice whose mothers were exposed to LPS challenge during pregnancy. Taken together, these results suggest that maternal LPS exposure during pregnancy disrupts T production. The decreased T synthesis might be associated with LPS-induced impairments for spermatogenesis in male offspring.

  14. Induction of IL-1 during hemodialysis: Transmembrane passage of intact endotoxins (LPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Laude-Sharp, M.; Caroff, M.; Simard, L.; Pusineri, C.; Kazatchkine, M.D.; Haeffner-Cavaillon, N. )

    1990-12-01

    Circulating monocytes of patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis are triggered to produce interleukin-1 (IL-1) in vivo. Intradialytic induction of IL-1 is associated with complement activation in patients dialyzed with first-use cellulose membranes. Chronic stimulation of IL-1 production occurs because of an yet unidentified mechanism in patients dialyzed with high permeability membranes. The present study demonstrates that intact bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules may cross cuprophan, AN69 and polysulfone membranes under in vitro conditions simulating in vivo hemodialysis. The experiments used purified LPS from Neisseria meningitidis and LPS from Pseudomonas testosteroni, a bacterial strain grown out from a clinically used dialysate. LPS were purified to homogeneity and radiolabeled. Transmembrane passage of 3H-labeled LPS was observed within the first five minutes of dialysis. A total of 0.1 to 1% of 3H-labeled LPS were recovered in the dialysate compartment after one hour of dialysis. High amounts of LPS, representing 40 to 70% of the amount originally present in the dialysate, were absorbed onto high permeability membranes. Low amounts of LPS were absorbed onto cuprophan membranes. The amount of LPS absorbed decreased with the concentration of LPS in the dialysate. LPS recovered from the blood compartment exhibited the same molecular weight as that used to contaminate the dialysate. Biochemically detectable transmembrane passage of LPS was not associated with that of material detectable using the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. An IL-1-inducing activity was, however, detected in the blood compartment upon dialysis with high permeability membranes, as previously found by others with cuprophan membranes.

  15. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Agonists with Preference for Human over Mouse TLR4 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Heeke, Darren S.; Rao, Eileen; Maynard, Sean K.; Hornigold, David; McCrae, Christopher; Fraser, Neil; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yu, Li; Williams, Nicola; King, Sarah; Cooper, Martin E.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Woo, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    The best-characterized Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands are lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its chemically modified and detoxified variant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Although both molecules are active for human TLR4, they demonstrate a potency preference for mouse TLR4 based on data from transfected cell lines and primary cells of both species. After a high throughput screening process of small molecule libraries, we have discovered a new class of TLR4 agonist with a species preference profile differing from MPL. Products of the 4-component Ugi synthesis reaction were demonstrated to potently trigger human TLR4-transfected HEK cells but not mouse TLR4, although inclusion of the human MD2 with mTLR4 was able to partially recover activity. Co-expression of CD14 was not required for optimal activity of Ugi compounds on transfected cells, as it is for LPS. The species preference profile for the panel of Ugi compounds was found to be strongly active for human and cynomolgus monkey primary cells, with reduced but still substantial activity for most Ugi compounds on guinea pig cells. Mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret, and cotton rat cells displayed little or no activity when exposed to Ugi compounds. However, engineering the human versions of TLR4 and MD2 to be expressed in mTLR4/MD2 deficient mice allowed for robust activity by Ugi compounds both in vitro and in vivo. These findings extend the range of compounds available for development as agonists of TLR4 and identify novel molecules which reverse the TLR4 triggering preference of MPL for mouse TLR4 over human TLR4. Such compounds may be amenable to formulation as more potent human-specific TLR4L-based adjuvants than typical MPL-based adjuvants. PMID:27736941

  16. Lipopolysaccharide induced acute red eye and corneal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Schultz, C L; Morck, D W; McKay, S G; Olson, M E; Buret, A

    1997-01-01

    Using a new animal model, the aims of this study were to assess the role played by purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of acute red-eye reactions (ARE) and corneal ulcers. In addition, IL-1 alpha was assessed for its implications in the formation of corneal ulcers. Following corneal abrasion, eyes of rabbits underwent single or double exposures to various doses of LPS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Serratia marcescens. This protocol induced ARE symptoms, and their severity depended on the dosage, number of LPS exposures, and type of LPS used (LPS from S. marcescens showing highest virulence). Corneal ulcers were induced by delivering a high dose of Serratia LPS (100 micrograms) followed by a low dose (10 micrograms). Histopathological examination revealed that both ARE and corneal ulceration were associated with prominent neutrophil infiltration. In addition, many lymphocytes and other monocytic cells infiltrated ulcerated ocular tissue. Tear fluids obtained from ulcerated eyes contained high concentrations of a protein recognized by anti-rabbit IL-1 alpha antibodies as demonstrated by immunoblotting studies. The results indicate that LPS can induce ARE and corneal ulceration in the absence of any live bacteria. Moreover, the findings implicate the accumulation of neutrophils and IL-1 alpha-related proteins in the pathogenesis of ARE and corneal ulcers.

  17. Deterioration of spatial learning performances in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Arai, K; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Nishiyama, N

    2001-11-01

    It is well demonstrated that acute or chronic stress leads to reduction of learning ability. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, induces profound physiological and behavioral changes, including fever, decrease in food motivation, and decrease in social behavior. These changes might be interpreted as an acute stress reaction to the LPS. In the present study, therefore, we investigated the effects of LPS (400-800 microg/kg, i.p.) on spatial learning performances using C57BL/6J male mice. In the Morris water-maze task, spatial learning performances were examined in six trials of training for two consecutive days. LPS-treated mice took a longer time to reach the hidden platform than control mice (F(1,60)=4.80801, P<0.05 at 600 microg/kg). In addition, injection of LPS decreased the percent of correct choices in the Y-maze test (P<0.05 at 800 microg/kg). LPS, however, did not alter the body weight, grip tone, motor activity or swimming speed. Taken together, these results indicate that LPS treatment specifically impaired spatial learning performances.

  18. [Extraction and characterization of the lipopolysaccharide of Bartonella quintana

    PubMed

    Matera, G.; Liberto, M.C.; Pollio, A.; Diana, R.; Martucci, M.; Parlato, G.; Gulletta, E.; Foca', A.

    1999-01-01

    Bartonella quintana has been reported as the cause of trench fever, persistent endocarditis, bacteriaemia and has been isolated with an increasing incidence in clinical specimens from AIDS patients. One of the main pathogenic factors of gram-negative bacteria, including B. quintana, is the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, very little information is available on the features of Bartonella LPS. The aim of the present study was to extract, purify and characterise B. quintana LPS. The effect of the LPS under scrutiny was also evaluated on TNFa release by means of the "in vitro" human whole blood model of sepsis. The Oklahoma strain of B. quintana was grown on sheep blood agar, at 37 C, in a moist atmosphere containing 5% carbon dioxide. Cells were harvested and washed in sterile and apyrogenic saline solution and LPS extracted following the procedure of Westphal e Jann (1965), modified by Minnick (1994). The LPS of B. quintana showed the migration pattern of a deep rough chemotype, and the chromogenic limulus amoebocyte lysate test (LAL test) revealed strong reactivity at low concentrations (6.2 pg/ml). Samples of human whole blood stimulated by 1000 ng/ml of B. quintana LPS released 1707 378 pg/ml of TNFa.

  19. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the hemocyte apoptosis of Eriocheir sinensis *

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai-sheng; Lyu, Sun-jian; Xu, Jie-hao; Lu, Bin-jie; Zhao, Jing; Li, Song; Li, Yi-qun; Chen, Yu-yin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the possible toxicity mechanism of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from Gram-negative bacteria in Eriocheir sinensis hemocytes. Apoptotic hemocytes and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by the LPS were monitored by the combination of flow cytometry and microscope observation. It was shown that LPS induced serious damage on the DNA and morphological changes in hemocytes, including cell shrinkage, fracture of nucleus membrane, margination, condensation and fragmentation of chromatin, and formation of apoptotic bodies indicating obvious hemocyte apoptosis. As compared with the control group, the apoptotic cell ratio increased to 30.61% and 39.01% after 1-h exposure and 57.72% and 75.01% after 2-h exposure to 1 and 10 μg/ml LPS, respectively (P<0.05). Significant outburst of ROS production was observed in LPS-treated hemocytes with approximately 176.6% of relative dichlorofluorescein mean fluorescence at 1-h exposure, followed by a drastic decline (P<0.05). These results indicated that LPS would induce oxidative stress on hemocytes from E. sinensis and cause ROS burst, DNA damage, and subsequently apoptosis. The process of ROS-mediated apoptosis might be one of the potential toxicity mechanisms of LPS on crustacean hemocytes. PMID:26642180

  20. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  1. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide activates CD57-negative human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kanevskiy, L M; Erokhina, S A; Streltsova, M A; Telford, W G; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-12-01

    NK cells play an important regulatory role in sepsis by induction and augmentation of proinflammatory reactions in early stages of the septic process and by suppression of immune response in later stages of inflammation. The present work was aimed at the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the main pathogenic factor of sepsis development, on human NK cells ex vivo. We show that LPS activates immature CD57-negative NK cells, which typically constitute less than half of the normal NK cell population in human peripheral blood. Under conditions of NK cell stimulation with IL-2, addition of LPS provokes an increase in IFN-γ production. However, LPS both increased and inhibited NK cell cytotoxic activity. It is important to note that the activation of NK cells on LPS addition was observed in the absence of TLR4 on the NK cell surface. These results confirm our previous data arguing for a direct interaction of LPS with NK cells and evidence an atypical mechanism of LPS-induced NK cell activation without the involvement of surface TLR4.

  2. Montelukast attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cardiac injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Khodir, A E; Ghoneim, H A; Rahim, M A; Suddek, G M

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the possible protective effects of montelukast (MNT) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac injury, in comparison to dexamethasone (DEX), a standard anti-inflammatory. Male Sprague Dawley rats (160-180 g) were assigned to five groups (n = 8/group): (1) control; (2) LPS (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)); (3) LPS + MNT (10 mg/kg, per os (p.o.)); (4) LPS + MNT (20 mg/kg, p.o.); and (5) LPS + DEX (1 mg/kg, i.p.). Twenty-four hours after LPS injection, heart/body weight (BW) ratio and percent survival of rats were determined. Serum total protein, creatine kinase muscle/brain (CK-MB), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were measured. Heart samples were taken for histological assessment and for determination of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) contents. Cardiac tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expression was evaluated immunohistochemically. LPS significantly increased heart/BW ratio, serum CK-MB, ALP, and LDH activities and decreased percent survival and serum total protein levels. MDA content increased in heart tissues with a concomitant reduction in GSH content. Immunohistochemical staining of heart specimens from LPS-treated rats revealed high expression of TNF-α. MNT significantly reduced percent mortality and suppressed the release of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers when compared with LPS group. Additionally, MNT effectively preserved tissue morphology as evidenced by histological evaluation. MNT (20 mg/kg) was more effective in alleviating LPS-induced heart injury when compared with both MNT (10 mg/kg) and DEX (1 mg/kg), as evidenced by decrease in positive staining by TNF-α immunohistochemically, decrease MDA, and increase GSH content in heart tissue. This study demonstrates that MNT might have cardioprotective effects against the inflammatory process during endotoxemia. This effect can be attributed to its antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26089034

  3. Comparison of lipopolysaccharide structures of Bordetella pertussis clinical isolates from pre- and post-vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Albitar-Nehme, Sami; Basheer, Soorej M; Njamkepo, Elisabeth; Brisson, Jean-Robert; Guiso, Nicole; Caroff, Martine

    2013-08-30

    Endotoxins are lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and major constituents of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Bordetella pertussis LPS were the only major antigens, of this agent of whooping-cough, that were not yet analyzed on isolates from the pre- and post-vaccination era. We compared here the LPS structures of four clinical isolates with that of the vaccine strain BP 1414. All physico-chemical analyses, including SDS-PAGE, TLC, and different MALDI mass spectrometry approaches were convergent. They helped demonstrating that, on the contrary to some other B. pertussis major antigens, no modification occurred in the dodecasaccharide core structure, as well as in the whole LPS molecules. These results are rendering these major antigens good potential vaccine components. Molecular modeling of this conserved LPS structure also confirmed the conclusions of previous experiments leading to the production of anti-LPS monoclonal antibodies and defining the main epitopes of these major antigens.

  4. Antigenic potential of a highly conserved Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide inner core structure defined by chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Anika; Yang, You; Claus, Heike; Pereira, Claney L; Cox, Andrew D; Vogel, Ulrich; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H

    2015-01-22

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide. We studied the potential of synthetic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core structures as broadly protective antigens against N. meningitidis. Based on the specific reactivity of human serum antibodies to synthetic LPS cores, we selected a highly conserved LPS core tetrasaccharide as a promising antigen. This LPS inner core tetrasaccharide induced a robust IgG response in mice when formulated as an immunogenic glycoconjugate. Binding of raised mouse serum to a broad collection of N. meningitidis strains demonstrated the accessibility of the LPS core on viable bacteria. The distal trisaccharide was identified as the crucial epitope, whereas the proximal Kdo moiety was immunodominant and induced mainly nonprotective antibodies that are responsible for lack of functional protection in polyclonal serum. Our results identified key antigenic determinants of LPS core glycan and, hence, may aid the design of a broadly protective immunization against N. meningitidis. PMID:25601073

  5. Bacteriophage adhesin-coated long-period gratings for bacterial lipopolysaccharide recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Mikulic, Predrag; Bock, Wojtek J.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report an application of the optical fiber long-period gratings (LPGs) working near the dispersion turning point of higher order cladding modes for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recognition. We show that when the LPG is functionalized with the bacteriophage adhesin, it is capable of very specific LPS detection. Thus, we compare label-free binding effect for specific to the adhesin LPS-positive and non-specific LPS-negative. The resonance wavelength shift induced by the LPS-positive reaches 2.9 nm, while for LPS-negative the shift is negligible. The LPG-based sensing structure allows for monitoring of the binding phenomenon in real time and with good accuracy.

  6. Release of lipopolysaccharide from intracellular compartments containing Salmonella typhimurium to vesicles of the host epithelial cell.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-del Portillo, F; Stein, M A; Finlay, B B

    1997-01-01

    The biological effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on eucaryotic cells have traditionally been characterized following extracellular challenge of LPS on susceptible cells. In this study, we report the capacity of Salmonella typhimurium to release LPS once it is located in the intracellular environment of cultured epithelial cells. LPS is liberated from vacuolar compartments, where intracellular bacteria reside, to vesicles present in the host cell cytosol. The vesicle-associated LPS is detected in infected cells from the time when invading bacteria enter the host cell. Release of LPS is restricted to S. typhimurium-infected cells, with no LPS observed in neighboring uninfected cells, suggesting that dissemination of LPS occurs entirely within the intracellular environment of the infected cell. The amount of LPS present in host vesicles reaches a maximum when intracellular S. typhimurium cells start to proliferate, a time at which the entire host cell cytosol is filled with numerous vesicles containing LPS. All these data support the concept that intracellular bacterial pathogens might signal the host cell from intracellular locations by releasing bioactive bacterial components such as LPS. PMID:8975888

  7. Deletion of Ovarian Hormones Induces a Sickness Behavior in Rats Comparable to the Effect of Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Azizi-Malekabadi, Hamid; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Pourganji, Masoume; Zabihi, Hoda; Saeedjalali, Mohsen; Anaeigoudari, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimmune factors have been proposed as the contributors to the pathogenesis of sickness behaviors. The effects of female gonadal hormones on both neuroinflammation and depression have also been well considered. In the present study, the capability of deletion of ovarian hormones to induce sickness-like behaviors in rats was compared with the effect lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The groups were including Sham, OVX, Sham-LPS, and OVX-LPS. The Sham-LPS and OVX-LPS groups were treated with LPS (250 μg/kg) two hours before conducting the behavioral tests. In the forced swimming (FST), the immobility times in both OVX and Sham-LPS groups were higher than that of Sham (P < 0.001). In open-field (OP) test, the central crossing number by OVX and Sham-LPS groups were lower than Sham (P < 0.001) while there were no significant differences between OVX-LPS and OVX groups. In elevated plus maze (EPM), the percent of entries to the open arm by both OVX and Sham-LPS groups was lower than that of Sham group (P < 0.001). The results of present study showed that deletion of ovarian hormones induced sickness behaviors in rats which were comparable to the effects of LPS. Moreover, further investigations are required in order to better understand the mechanism(s) involved. PMID:25705518

  8. Alkaline Phosphatase Protects Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Early Pregnancy Defects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wei; Ni, Hua; Herington, Jennifer; Reese, Jeff; Paria, Bibhash C.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive cytokine inflammatory response due to chronic or superphysiological level of microbial infection during pregnancy leads to pregnancy complications such as early pregnancy defects/loss and preterm birth. Bacterial toxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), long recognized as a potent proinflammatory mediator, has been identified as a risk factor for pregnancy complications. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) isozymes have been shown to detoxify LPS by dephosphorylation. In this study, we examined the role of alkaline phosphatase (AP) in mitigating LPS-induced early pregnancy complications in mice. We found that 1) the uterus prior to implantation and implantation sites following embryo implantation produce LPS recognition and dephosphorylation molecules TLR4 and tissue non-specific AP (TNAP) isozyme, respectively; 2) uterine TNAP isozyme dephosphorylates LPS at its sites of production; 3) while LPS administration following embryo implantation elicits proinflammatory cytokine mRNA levels at the embryo implantation sites (EISs) and causes early pregnancy loss, dephosphorylated LPS neither triggers proinflammatory cytokine mRNA levels at the EISs nor induces pregnancy complications; 4) AP isozyme supplementation to accelerate LPS detoxification attenuates LPS-induced pregnancy complications following embryo implantation. These findings suggest that a LPS dephosphorylation strategy using AP isozyme may have a unique therapeutic potential to mitigate LPS- or Gram-negative bacteria-induced pregnancy complications in at-risk women. PMID:25910276

  9. Orally administered melatonin prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xia, Mi-Zhen; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Tao, Fang-Biao; Xu, De-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been associated with adverse pregnant outcomes, including fetal demise, intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR), neural tube defects (NTDs) and preterm delivery in rodent animals. Previous studies demonstrated that melatonin protected against LPS-induced fetal demise, IUGR and preterm delivery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on LPS-induced NTDs. All pregnant mice except controls were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (25 µg/kg) daily from gestational day (GD)8 to GD12. Some pregnant mice were orally administered with melatonin (MT, 50 mg/kg) before each LPS injection. A five-day LPS injection resulted in 27.5% of fetuses with anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Additional experiment showed that maternal LPS exposure significantly down-regulated placental proton-coupled folate transporter (pcft) and disturbed folate transport from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Interestingly, melatonin significantly attenuated LPS-induced down-regulation of placental pcft. Moreover, melatonin markedly improved the transport of folate from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Correspondingly, orally administered melatonin reduced the incidence of LPS-induced anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Taken together, these results suggest that orally administered melatonin prevents LPS-induced NTDs through alleviating LPS-induced disturbance of folate transport from maternal circulation through the placenta into the fetus. PMID:25420102

  10. Lipopolysaccharide Is Cleared from the Circulation by Hepatocytes via the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Elena; Cirstea, Mihai; Kong, HyeJin Julia; Boyd, John H.; Wang, Yingjin; Russell, James A.; Walley, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. While decreased Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) function improves clinical outcomes in murine and human sepsis, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major Gram-negative bacteria endotoxin, is cleared from the circulation by hepatocyte Low Density Lipoprotein Receptors (LDLR)—receptors downregulated by PCSK9. We directly visualized LPS uptake and found that LPS is rapidly taken up by hepatocytes into the cell periphery. Over the course of 4 hours LPS is transported towards the cell center. We next found that clearance of injected LPS from the blood was reduced substantially in Ldlr knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice compared to wild type controls and, simultaneously, hepatic uptake of LPS was also reduced in Ldlr-/- mice. Specifically examining the role of hepatocytes, we further found that primary hepatocytes isolated from Ldlr-/- mice had greatly decreased LPS uptake. In the HepG2 immortalized human hepatocyte cell line, LDLR silencing similarly resulted in decreased LPS uptake. PCSK9 treatment reduces LDLR density on hepatocytes and, therefore, was another independent strategy to test our hypothesis. Incubation with PCSK9 reduced LPS uptake by hepatocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that hepatocytes clear LPS from the circulation via the LDLR and PCSK9 regulates LPS clearance from the circulation during sepsis by downregulation of hepatic LDLR. PMID:27171436

  11. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses.

  12. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4+ T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. PMID:21631497

  13. Preservation of Renal Blood Flow by the Antioxidant EUK-134 in LPS-Treated Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Magder, Sheldon; Parthenis, Dimitrios G.; Al Ghouleh, Imad

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, the precise role of ROS in the septic process remains unknown. We hypothesized that treatment with EUK-134 (manganese-3-methoxy N,N'-bis(salicyclidene)ethylene-diamine chloride), a compound with superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, attenuates the vascular manifestations of sepsis in vivo. Pigs were instrumented to measure cardiac output and blood flow in renal, superior mesenteric and femoral arteries, and portal vein. Animals were treated with saline (control), lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 µg·kg−1·h−1), EUK-134, or EUK-134 plus LPS. Results show that an LPS-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) as well as a trend towards lower blood pressure (BP) were both attenuated by EUK-134. Renal blood flow decreased with LPS whereas superior mesenteric, portal and femoral flows did not change. Importantly, EUK-134 decreased the LPS-induced fall in renal blood flow and this was associated with a corresponding decrease in LPS-induced protein nitrotyrosinylation in the kidney. PO2, pH, base excess and systemic vascular resistance fell with LPS and were unaltered by EUK-134. EUK-134 also had no effect on LPS-associated increase in CO. Interestingly, EUK-134 alone resulted in higher CO, BP, PAP, mean circulatory filling pressure, and portal flow than controls. Taken together, these data support a protective role for EUK-134 in the renal circulation in sepsis. PMID:25815596

  14. Gram-negative trimeric porins have specific LPS binding sites that are essential for porin biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arunmanee, Wanatchaporn; Pathania, Monisha; Solovyova, Alexandra S; Le Brun, Anton P; Ridley, Helen; Baslé, Arnaud; van den Berg, Bert; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-08-23

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is an unusual asymmetric bilayer with an external monolayer of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and an inner layer of phospholipids. The LPS layer is rigid and stabilized by divalent cation cross-links between phosphate groups on the core oligosaccharide regions. This means that the OM is robust and highly impermeable to toxins and antibiotics. During their biogenesis, OM proteins (OMPs), which function as transporters and receptors, must integrate into this ordered monolayer while preserving its impermeability. Here we reveal the specific interactions between the trimeric porins of Enterobacteriaceae and LPS. Isolated porins form complexes with variable numbers of LPS molecules, which are stabilized by calcium ions. In earlier studies, two high-affinity sites were predicted to contain groups of positively charged side chains. Mutation of these residues led to the loss of LPS binding and, in one site, also prevented trimerization of the porin, explaining the previously observed effect of LPS mutants on porin folding. The high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a trimeric porin-LPS complex not only helps to explain the mutagenesis results but also reveals more complex, subtle porin-LPS interactions and a bridging calcium ion.

  15. Gram-negative trimeric porins have specific LPS binding sites that are essential for porin biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arunmanee, Wanatchaporn; Pathania, Monisha; Solovyova, Alexandra S; Le Brun, Anton P; Ridley, Helen; Baslé, Arnaud; van den Berg, Bert; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-08-23

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is an unusual asymmetric bilayer with an external monolayer of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and an inner layer of phospholipids. The LPS layer is rigid and stabilized by divalent cation cross-links between phosphate groups on the core oligosaccharide regions. This means that the OM is robust and highly impermeable to toxins and antibiotics. During their biogenesis, OM proteins (OMPs), which function as transporters and receptors, must integrate into this ordered monolayer while preserving its impermeability. Here we reveal the specific interactions between the trimeric porins of Enterobacteriaceae and LPS. Isolated porins form complexes with variable numbers of LPS molecules, which are stabilized by calcium ions. In earlier studies, two high-affinity sites were predicted to contain groups of positively charged side chains. Mutation of these residues led to the loss of LPS binding and, in one site, also prevented trimerization of the porin, explaining the previously observed effect of LPS mutants on porin folding. The high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a trimeric porin-LPS complex not only helps to explain the mutagenesis results but also reveals more complex, subtle porin-LPS interactions and a bridging calcium ion. PMID:27493217

  16. Systemic LPS Causes Chronic Neuroinflammation and Progressive Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Liya; Wu, Xuefei; Block, Michelle L.; Liu, Yuxin; Breese, George R.; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Knapp, Darin J.; Crews, Fulton T.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is implicated in the progressive nature of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. A single systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 5 mg/kg, i.p.) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) injection was administered in adult wild-type mice and in mice lacking TNFα receptors (TNF R1/R2−/−) to discern the mechanisms of inflammation transfer from the periphery to the brain and the neurodegenerative consequences. Systemic LPS administration resulted in rapid brain TNFα increase that remained elevated for 10 months, while peripheral TNFα (serum and liver) had subsided by 9 h (serum) and 1 week (liver). Systemic TNFα and LPS administration activated microglia and increased expression of brain pro-inflammatory factors (i.e., TNFα, MCP-1, IL-1β, and NF-κB p65) in wild-type mice, but not in TNF R1/R2−/− mice. Further, LPS reduced the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) by 23% at 7-months post-treatment, which progressed to 47% at 10 months. Together, these data demonstrate that through TNFα, peripheral inflammation in adult animals can: (1) activate brain microglia to produce chronically elevated pro-inflammatory factors; (2) induce delayed and progressive loss of DA neurons in the SN. These findings provide valuable insight into the potential pathogenesis and self-propelling nature of Parkinson's disease. PMID:17203472

  17. LPS induces pulp progenitor cell recruitment via complement activation.

    PubMed

    Chmilewsky, F; Jeanneau, C; Laurent, P; About, I

    2015-01-01

    Complement system, a major component of the natural immunity, has been recently identified as an important mediator of the dentin-pulp regeneration process through STRO-1 pulp cell recruitment by the C5a active fragment. Moreover, it has been shown recently that under stimulation with lipoteichoic acid, a complex component of the Gram-positive bacteria cell wall, human pulp fibroblasts are able to synthesize all proteins required for complement activation. However, Gram-negative bacteria, which are also involved in tooth decay, are known as powerful activators of complement system and inflammation. Here, we investigated the role of Gram-negative bacteria-induced complement activation on the pulp progenitor cell recruitment using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of all Gram-negative bacteria. Our results show that incubating pulp fibroblasts with LPS induced membrane attack complex formation and C5a release in serum-free fibroblast cultures. The produced C5a binds to the pulp progenitor cells' membrane and induces their migration toward the LPS stimulation chamber, as revealed by the dynamic transwell migration assays. The inhibition of this migration by the C5aR-specific antagonist W54011 indicates that the pulp progenitor migration is mediated by the interaction between C5a and C5aR. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a direct interaction between the recruitment of progenitor pulp cells and the activation of complement system generated by pulp fibroblast stimulation with LPS.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide structure and serum sensitivity of non-serogroupable Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, C C; Winstanley, F P; Weir, D M; Kinane, D F

    1987-09-01

    Bactericidal activities of normal human serum for non-serogroupable strains of Neisseria meningitidis were determined. In similar experiments with isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from localized infections, strains with group I lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were uniformly serum resistant and those with group II were serum sensitive. We found no similar association between serum sensitivity of the meningococcal strains and their lipopolysaccharide groups determined by the same pyocin typing system used to classify the gonococcal isolates. Immune mouse sera raised against non-serogroupable meningococci of either LPS group I or II were bactericidal for non-serogroupable strains of the same LPS group and also cross-reactive for strains of the opposite group. They were not bactericidal for the majority (13/17) of the serogroupable strains tested. These findings suggest there are antigens, in addition to the LPS and capsules, that elicit some of the "natural" bactericidal antibodies to pathogenic meningococci.

  19. CD36 Differently Regulates Macrophage Responses to Smooth and Rough Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Biedroń, Rafał; Peruń, Angelika; Józefowski, Szczepan

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major pathogen-associated molecular pattern of Gram-negative bacterial infections, and includes smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) chemotypes. Upon activation by LPS through CD14, TLR4/MD-2 heterodimers sequentially induce two waves of intracellular signaling for macrophage activation: the MyD88-dependent pathway from the plasma membrane and, following internalization, the TRIF-dependent pathway from endosomes. We sought to better define the role of scavenger receptors CD36 and CD204/SR-A as accessory LPS receptors that can contribute to pro-inflammatory and microbicidal activation of macrophages. We have found that CD36 differently regulates activation of mouse macrophages by S-LPS versus R-LPS. The ability of CD36 to substitute for CD14 in loading R-LPS, but not S-LPS onto TLR4/MD-2 allows CD14-independent macrophage responses to R-LPS. Conversely, S-LPS, but not R-LPS effectively stimulates CD14 binding to CD36, which favors S-LPS transfer from CD14 onto TLR4/MD-2 under conditions of low CD14 occupancy with S-LPS in serum-free medium. In contrast, in the presence of serum, CD36 reduces S-LPS binding to TLR4/MD-2 and the subsequent MyD88-dependent signaling, by mediating internalization of S-LPS/CD14 complexes. Additionally, CD36 positively regulates activation of TRIF-dependent signaling by both S-LPS and R-LPS, by promoting TLR4/MD-2 endocytosis. In contrast, we have found that SR-A does not function as a S-LPS receptor. Thus, by co-operating with CD14 in both R- and S-LPS loading onto TLR4/MD-2, CD36 can enhance the sensitivity of tissue-resident macrophages in detecting infections by Gram-negative bacteria. However, in later phases, following influx of serum to the infection site, the CD36-mediated negative regulation of MyD88-dependent branch of S-LPS-induced TLR4 signaling might constitute a mechanism to prevent an excessive inflammatory response, while preserving the adjuvant effect of S-LPS for adaptive immunity. PMID

  20. The effects of L-arginine on spatial memory and synaptic plasticity impairments induced by lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Reisi, Parham; Nosratabadi, Reza; Behradnia, Sepehr; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: An important role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuroinflammation has been suggested. It is also suggested that NO has a critical role in learning and memory. Neuro-inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been reported that deteriorates learning and memory. The effect of L-arginine (LA) as a precursor of NO on LPS-induced spatial learning and memory and neuronal plasticity impairment was evaluated. Materials and Methods: The animals were grouped into: (1) Control, (2) LPS, (3) LA-LPS, and (4) LA. The rats received intraperitoneally LPS (1 mg/kg) 2 h before experiments and LA (200 mg/kg) 30 min before LPS. The animals were examined in Morris water maze (MWM). Long-term potentiation (LTP) from CA1 area of the hippocampus was also assessed by 100 Hz stimulation in the ipsilateral Schaffer collateral pathway. Results: In MWM, time latency and traveled path were higher in LPS group than the control group (P < 0.001) whereas in LA-LPS group they were shorter than LPS group (P < 0.001). The amplitude and slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) decreased in LPS group compared to control group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01) whereas, there was not any significant difference in these parameters between LPS and LA-LPS groups. Conclusion: Administration of LPS impaired spatial memory and synaptic plasticity. Although LA ameliorated deleterious effects of LPS on learning of spatial tasks, it could not restore LPS-induced LTP impairment. PMID:26601090

  1. Characterization of a rabbit cationic protein (CAP18) with lipopolysaccharide-inhibitory activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, M; Shimomura, Y; Yoshida, M; Morgan, J G; Palings, I; Wilson, D; Yen, M H; Wright, S C; Larrick, J W

    1994-01-01

    Cationic antibacterial proteins (CAP) were purified from rabbit granulocytes, and the effects of CAP on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tissue factor generation by murine peritoneal macrophages and human blood monocytes were studied. CAP were purified from rabbit peritoneal leukocytes by using as an assay the agglutination of erythrocytes coated with Re-LPS. Two proteins with CAP activity, CAP18 (18 kDa) and CAP7 (7 kDa), were isolated by acid extraction, ethanol precipitation, affinity chromatography, gel filtration, and reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. On the basis of protein sequencing, CAP7 was identified as the C-terminal fragment of CAP18, designated CAP18(106-142). Various forms of LPS (S-LPS, Re-LPS, and lipid A) activate murine macrophages and human blood monocytes to generate tissue factor (tissue thromboplastin). Incubation of LPS for 18 h with partially purified CAP (heparin-Sepharose fraction) inhibited the capacity of LPS to induce tissue factor; however, purified CAP18 inhibited about 75% of the activity of S-LPS after 1 h of incubation. CAP more effectively inhibited S-LPS than Re-LPS or lipid A. Synthetic CAP18(106-142) inhibited LPS-induced tissue factor generation by murine macrophages. CAP18(106-142) has greater LPS-binding and LPS-neutralizing activities than CAP18. We hypothesize that CAP18 and the derivative peptide, CAP18(106-142), bind to LPS and alter the capacity of LPS to initiate disseminated intravascular coagulation. In this regard, CAP may have therapeutic potential for sepsis and endotoxin shock. Images PMID:8132348

  2. Comparison of Biological and Immunological Characterization of Lipopolysaccharides From Brucella abortus RB51 and S19

    PubMed Central

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Kaboudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Alamian, Saeed; Ahmadian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brucella abortus RB51 is a rough stable mutant strain, which has been widely used as a live vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in cattle instead of B. abortus strain S19. B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has unique properties in comparison to other bacterial LPS. Objectives: In the current study, two types of LPS, smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) were purified from B. abortus S19 and RB51, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate biological and immunological properties of purified LPS as an immunogenical determinant. Materials and Methods: Primarily, S19 and RB51 LPS were extracted and purified by two different modifications of the phenol water method. The final purity of LPS was determined by chemical analysis (2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO), glycan, phosphate and protein content) and different staining methods, following sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times at biweekly intervals with the same amount of purified LPSs. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring specific IgG levels and also different cytokine levels, such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10, were determined for assessing T-cell immune response. Results: Biochemical analysis data and SDS-PAGE profile showed that the chemical nature of S19 LPS is different from RB51 LPS. Both S and R-LPS induce an immune response. T-cell immune response induced by both S and R-LPS had almost the same pattern whereas S19 LPS elicited humoral immunity, which was higher than RB51 LPS. Conclusions: Purified LPS can be considered as a safe adjuvant and can be used as a component in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines targeting infectious disease, cancer and allergies. PMID:26862376

  3. Moesin Functions as a Lipopolysaccharide Receptor on Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Ziad N.; Amar, Salomon; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), a glycolipid found in the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria, induces the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 by monocytes/macrophages. The secretion of these biologically active compounds leads to multiple pathological conditions, such as septic shock. There is substantial evidence that chronic exposure to LPS mediates, at least in part, the tissue destruction associated with gram-negative infection. CD14, a 55-kDa protein, has been identified as an LPS receptor. In conjunction with a serum protein, LPS binding protein (LBP), LPS-CD14 interactions mediate many LPS functions in the inflammatory response. However, CD14 lacks a cytoplasmic domain, or any known signal transduction sequence motif, suggesting the existence of another cell surface domain capable of transducing signals. In this paper, we report a second, CD14-independent LPS binding site, which, based on biological activity, appears to be a functional LPS receptor. Cross-linking experiments were performed to identify LPS binding sites. Two molecules were identified: a 55-kDa protein (CD14) and a second, 78-kDa band. Sequencing of the 78-kDa protein by mass spectroscopic analysis revealed 100% homology with moesin (membrane-organizing extension spike protein). Antibody to CD14 induced partial blocking of the LPS response. However, antimoesin monoclonal antibody completely blocked the LPS-induced TNF-α response in human monocytes, without blocking CD14 binding of LPS. Irrelevant isotype controls had no effect. Additional experiments were performed to evaluate the specificity of the antimoesin blocking. Separate experiments evaluated antimoesin effects on monocyte chemotaxis, IL-1 production in response to IL-1 stimulation, and TNF-α secretion in response to Staphylococcus aureus stimulation. Antimoesin blocked only LPS-mediated events. The data suggest that moesin

  4. Inflammatory cytokine gene expression in human periodontal ligament fibroblasts stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Y; Kubota, T; Sasaguri, K; Sato, S; Suzuki, Y; Kumada, H; Umemoto, T

    1995-01-01

    The effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (P-LPS) and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (E-LPS) on the gene expression and production of inflammatory cytokines of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPLF) were examined by a Northern (RNA blot) assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. mRNAs for interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) were detected in HPLF cells, but IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, transforming growth factor alpha, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were not detected by reverse transcription-PCR. The expression of TGF-beta mRNA was not influenced by either LPS. P-LPS (1 to 10 micrograms/ml) and E-LPS (100 micrograms/ml) markedly stimulated the expression of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNAs compared with the control. The synthesis of IL-6 and IL-8 was also stimulated by 10 and 100 micrograms of both LPSs per ml, but IL-8 synthesis was not stimulated with E-LPS at 1 microgram/ml. Secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 into the culture medium was detected at 6 and 3 h, respectively, after exposure to P-LPS (10 micrograms/ml). These findings suggested that P. gingivalis leads to periodontal tissue destruction and alveolar bone resorption through IL-6 and IL-8 released from HPLF cells stimulated with its LPS. PMID:7642293

  5. Structural investigation of the lipopolysaccharide O-chain isolated from Burkholderia fungorum strain DSM 17061.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Antonia; Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Scherlach, Kirstin; Ross, Claudia; Silipo, Alba; Hertweck, Christian; Molinaro, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Gram-negative bacteria exhibit lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) on their outer membrane surface. LPS is considered one of the most potent bacterial virulence factors. Here we report the elucidation of the LPS O-chain structure isolated from Burkholderia fungorum, a bacterium isolated from the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that can act as a pathogen for plants and domesticated animals. The structure was determined by the employment of detailed chemical and NMR spectroscopy analyses as the following.

  6. Usefulness of ELISA Methods for Assessing LPS Interactions with Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sernández, Victoria; Orbegozo-Medina, Ricardo A.; Romarís, Fernanda; Paniagua, Esperanza; Ubeira, Florencio M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, can trigger severe inflammatory responses during bacterial infections, possibly leading to septic shock. One approach to combatting endotoxic shock is to neutralize the most conserved part and major mediator of LPS activity (lipid A) with LPS-binding proteins or peptides. Although several available assays evaluate the biological activity of these molecules on LPS (e.g. inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-α production in macrophages), the development of simple and cost-effective methods that would enable preliminary screening of large numbers of potential candidate molecules is of great interest. Moreover, it would be also desirable that such methods could provide information about the possible biological relevance of the interactions between proteins and LPS, which may enhance or neutralize LPS-induced inflammatory responses. In this study, we designed and evaluated different types of ELISA that could be used to study possible interactions between LPS and any protein or peptide. We also analysed the usefulness and limitations of the different ELISAs. Specifically, we tested the capacity of several proteins and peptides to bind FITC-labeled LPSs from Escherichia coli serotypes O111:B4 and O55:B5 in an indirect ELISA and in two competitive ELISAs including casein hydrolysate (hCAS) and biotinylated polymyxin B (captured by deglycosylated avidin; PMX) as LPS-binding agents in the solid phase. We also examined the influence of pH, detergents and different blocking agents on LPS binding. Our results showed that the competitive hCAS-ELISA performed under mildly acidic conditions can be used as a general method for studying LPS interactions, while the more restrictive PMX-ELISA may help to identify proteins/peptides that are likely to have neutralizing properties in vitro or in vivo. PMID:27249227

  7. Deletion of Monoglyceride Lipase in Astrocytes Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Grabner, Gernot F; Eichmann, Thomas O; Wagner, Bernhard; Gao, Yuanqing; Farzi, Aitak; Taschler, Ulrike; Radner, Franz P W; Schweiger, Martina; Lass, Achim; Holzer, Peter; Zinser, Erwin; Tschöp, Matthias H; Yi, Chun-Xia; Zimmermann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) is required for efficient hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglyerol (2-AG) in the brain generating arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol. This metabolic function makes MGL an interesting target for the treatment of neuroinflammation, since 2-AG exhibits anti-inflammatory properties and AA is a precursor for pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Astrocytes are an important source of AA and 2-AG, and highly express MGL. In the present study, we dissected the distinct contribution of MGL in astrocytes on brain 2-AG and AA metabolism by generating a mouse model with genetic deletion of MGL specifically in astrocytes (MKO(GFAP)). MKO(GFAP) mice exhibit moderately increased 2-AG and reduced AA levels in brain. Minor accumulation of 2-AG in the brain of MKO(GFAP) mice does not cause cannabinoid receptor desensitization as previously observed in mice globally lacking MGL. Importantly, MKO(GFAP) mice exhibit reduced brain prostaglandin E2 and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels upon peripheral lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. These observations indicate that MGL-mediated degradation of 2-AG in astrocytes provides AA for prostaglandin synthesis promoting LPS-induced neuroinflammation. The beneficial effect of astrocyte-specific MGL-deficiency is not fully abrogated by the inverse cannabinoid receptor 1 agonist SR141716 (Rimonabant) suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects are rather caused by reduced prostaglandin synthesis than by activation of cannabinoid receptors. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that MGL in astrocytes is an important regulator of 2-AG levels, AA availability, and neuroinflammation.

  8. Deletion of Monoglyceride Lipase in Astrocytes Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Grabner, Gernot F; Eichmann, Thomas O; Wagner, Bernhard; Gao, Yuanqing; Farzi, Aitak; Taschler, Ulrike; Radner, Franz P W; Schweiger, Martina; Lass, Achim; Holzer, Peter; Zinser, Erwin; Tschöp, Matthias H; Yi, Chun-Xia; Zimmermann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) is required for efficient hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglyerol (2-AG) in the brain generating arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol. This metabolic function makes MGL an interesting target for the treatment of neuroinflammation, since 2-AG exhibits anti-inflammatory properties and AA is a precursor for pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Astrocytes are an important source of AA and 2-AG, and highly express MGL. In the present study, we dissected the distinct contribution of MGL in astrocytes on brain 2-AG and AA metabolism by generating a mouse model with genetic deletion of MGL specifically in astrocytes (MKO(GFAP)). MKO(GFAP) mice exhibit moderately increased 2-AG and reduced AA levels in brain. Minor accumulation of 2-AG in the brain of MKO(GFAP) mice does not cause cannabinoid receptor desensitization as previously observed in mice globally lacking MGL. Importantly, MKO(GFAP) mice exhibit reduced brain prostaglandin E2 and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels upon peripheral lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. These observations indicate that MGL-mediated degradation of 2-AG in astrocytes provides AA for prostaglandin synthesis promoting LPS-induced neuroinflammation. The beneficial effect of astrocyte-specific MGL-deficiency is not fully abrogated by the inverse cannabinoid receptor 1 agonist SR141716 (Rimonabant) suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects are rather caused by reduced prostaglandin synthesis than by activation of cannabinoid receptors. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that MGL in astrocytes is an important regulator of 2-AG levels, AA availability, and neuroinflammation. PMID:26565024

  9. LPS-Stimulated Human Skin-Derived Stem Cells Enhance Neo-Vascularization during Dermal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kisch, Tobias; Weber, Caroline; Rapoport, Daniel H; Kruse, Charli; Schumann, Sandra; Stang, Felix H; Siemers, Frank; Matthießen, Anna E

    2015-01-01

    High numbers of adult stem cells are still required to improve the formation of new vessels in scaffolds to accelerate dermal regeneration. Recent data indicate a benefit for vascularization capacity by stimulating stem cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, stem cells derived from human skin (SDSC) were activated with LPS and seeded in a commercially available dermal substitute to examine vascularization in vivo. Besides, in vitro assays were performed to evaluate angiogenic factor release and tube formation ability. Results showed that LPS-activated SDSC significantly enhanced vascularization of the scaffolds, compared to unstimulated stem cells in vivo. Further, in vitro assays confirmed higher secretion rates of proangiogenic as well as proinflammatoric factors in the presence of LPS-activated SDSC. Our results suggest that combining activated stem cells and a dermal substitute is a promising option to enhance vascularization in scaffold-mediated dermal regeneration.

  10. The supramolecular structure of LPS-chitosan complexes of varied composition in relation to their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Davydova, V N; Volod'ko, A V; Sokolova, E V; Chusovitin, E A; Balagan, S A; Gorbach, V I; Galkin, N G; Yermak, I M; Solov'eva, T F

    2015-06-01

    The complexes of chitosan (Ch) with lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from Escherichia coli O55:B5 (E-LPS) and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis 1B 598 (Y-LPS) of various weight compositions were investigated using quasi-elastic light scattering, ζ-potential distribution assay and atomic force microscopy. The alteration of ζ-potential of E-LPS-Ch complexes from negative to positive values depending on Ch content was detected. The Y-LPS-Ch complexes had similar positive ζ-potentials regardless of Ch content. The transformation of the supramolecular structure of E-LPS after binding with to Ch was revealed. Screening of E-LPS and Y-LPS particles by Ch in the complexes with high polycation was detected. The ability of LPS-Ch complex to induce biosynthesis of TNF-α and reactive oxygen species in stimulated human mononuclear cells was studied. A significant decrease in activity complexes compared to that of the initial LPS was observed only for E-LPS-Ch complexes. PMID:25843841

  11. Blockade of nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor signaling reverses LPS-induced depressive-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Iris U; Ruzza, Chiara; Asth, Laila; Guerrini, Remo; Romão, Pedro R T; Gavioli, Elaine C; Calo, Girolamo

    2015-10-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ is the natural ligand of a Gi-protein coupled receptor named NOP. This peptidergic system is involved in the regulation of mood states and inflammatory responses. The present study aimed to investigate the consequences of blocking NOP signaling in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sickness and depressive-like behaviors in mice. LPS 0.8mg/kg, ip, significantly induced sickness signs such as weight loss, decrease of water and food intake and depressive-like behavior in the tail suspension test. Nortriptyline (ip, 60min prior the test) reversed the LPS-induced depressive states. The NOP receptor antagonist SB-612111, 30min prior LPS, did not modify LPS-induced sickness signs and depressive-like behavior. However, when injected 24h after LPS, NOP antagonists (UFP-101, icv, and SB-612111, ip) significantly reversed the mood effects of LPS. LPS evoked similar sickness signs and significantly increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) plasma levels 6h post-injection in wild-type ((NOP(+/+)) and NOP knockout ((NOP(-/-)) mice. However, LPS treatment elicited depressive-like effects in NOP(+/+) but not in NOP(-/-) mice. In conclusion, the pharmacological and genetic blockade of NOP signaling does not affect LPS evoked sickness signs while reversing depressive-like behavior. PMID:26028163

  12. Comparative conventional- and quantum dot-labeling strategies for LPS binding site detection in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Mgcina, Londiwe S.; Dubery, Ian A.; Piater, Lizelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria is recognized as a microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) and not only induces an innate immune response in plants, but also stimulates the development of characteristic defense responses. However, identification and characterization of a cell surface LPS-receptor/binding site, as described in mammals, remains elusive in plants. As an amphiphilic, macromolecular lipoglycan, intact LPS potentially contains three MAMP-active regions, represented by the O-polysaccharide chain, the core and the lipid A. Binding site studies with intact labeled LPS were conducted in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts and quantified using flow cytometry fluorescence changes. Quantum dots (Qdots), which allow non-covalent, hydrophobic labeling were used as a novel strategy in this study and compared to covalent, hydrophilic labeling with Alexa 488. Affinity for LPS-binding sites was clearly demonstrated by concentration-, temperature-, and time-dependent increases in protoplast fluorescence following treatment with the labeled LPS. Moreover, this induced fluorescence increase was convincingly reduced following pre-treatment with excess unlabeled LPS, thereby indicating reversibility of LPS binding. Inhibition of the binding process is also reported using endo- and exocytosis inhibitors. Here, we present evidence for the anticipated presence of LPS-specific binding sites in Arabidopsis protoplasts, and furthermore propose Qdots as a more sensitive LPS-labeling strategy in comparison to the conventional Alexa 488 hydrazide label for binding studies. PMID:26029233

  13. Inhibition of LPS toxicity by hepatic argininosuccinate synthase (ASS): novel roles for ASS in innate immune responses to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Prima, Victor; Wang, Alvin; Molina, Gabriel; Wang, Kevin K W; Svetlov, Stanislav I

    2011-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of Gram-negative bacteria, is implicated in the pathogenesis of endotoxemia/sepsis and multi-organ injury, including liver damage. We have shown that argininosuccinate synthase (ASS), a hepatic enzyme of the urea cycle, accumulates in circulation within 1h after treatment with both LPS alone and hepatotoxic combination of LPS and D-Galactosamine. These findings indicate ASS as a sensitive biomarker of liver responses to bacterial endotoxin. Furthermore, we suggest that the ASS release represents a potential counteracting liver reaction to LPS, and demonstrates anti-LPS activity of recombinant ASS (rASS) in vitro and in rodent models of endotoxemia in vivo. rASS physically bound to LPS, as indicated by a gel shift assay, and suppressed Escherichia coli growth in cultures consistent with direct antimicrobial properties of ASS. rASS reduced LPS cytotoxicity, TNF-α production, and increased cell viability in cultured mouse macrophages, even when added one hour following LPS challenge. Intraperitoneal injection of rASS (5 mg/kg) after treatment with a high dose of LPS remarkably increased survival of rodents, with a concomitant decrease of sepsis markers TNF-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in blood. These results suggest that the endogenous ASS constitutes a novel liver-derived component of the innate immune response to bacterial LPS, and that recombinant ASS could mitigate the lethal effects of bacterial endotoxins during sepsis.

  14. Use of mice tolerant to lipopolysaccharide to demonstrate requirement of cooperation between macrophages and lymphocytes to generate lipopolysaccharide-induced colony-stimulating factor in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Z; Hertogs, C F; Pluznik, D H

    1983-01-01

    Injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into mice was followed by a rapid elevation of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in the serum. A second, challenging injection of LPS given 3 to 4 days later failed to induce elevated levels of CSF in the serum. Such mice tolerant to LPS were used as an experimental tool to identify the CSF-producing cells which respond to LPS. We observed that generation of LPS-induced CSF in mice tolerant to LPS could be restored by an intraperitoneal injection of spleen cells 24 h before the challenging injection of LPS. Depletion of the adherent cells from the spleen cells reduced the ability of the splenic lymphocytes to restore the capacity of the mice tolerant to LPS to generate serum CSF. Reconstitution of the splenic lymphocytes with 5% thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, however, reestablished the restorative capacity of these cells, whereas almost no restoration was observed after direct injection of elicited peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that the spleen cells are active in generating CSF, provided that macrophages are present and can interact with the splenic lymphocytes to generate LPS-induced CSF in the serum. PMID:6602767

  15. Interaction between tachyplesin I, an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Takahiro; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kikukawa, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Demura, Makoto; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Kawano, Keiichi

    2014-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is the very first site of interactions with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to gain better insight into the interaction between LPS and AMPs, we determined the structure of tachyplesin I (TP I), an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, in its bound state with LPS and proposed the complex structure of TP I and LPS using a docking program. CD and NMR measurements revealed that binding to LPS slightly extends the two β-strands of TP I and stabilizes the whole structure of TP I. The fluorescence wavelength of an intrinsic tryptophan of TP I and fluorescence quenching in the presence or absence of LPS indicated that a tryptophan residue is incorporated into the hydrophobic environment of LPS. Finally, we succeeded in proposing a structural model for the complex of TP I and LPS by using a docking program. The calculated model structure suggested that the cationic residues of TP I interact with phosphate groups and saccharides of LPS, whereas hydrophobic residues interact with the acyl chains of LPS. PMID:24389234

  16. Interaction between tachyplesin I, an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Takahiro; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kikukawa, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Demura, Makoto; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Kawano, Keiichi

    2014-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is the very first site of interactions with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to gain better insight into the interaction between LPS and AMPs, we determined the structure of tachyplesin I (TP I), an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, in its bound state with LPS and proposed the complex structure of TP I and LPS using a docking program. CD and NMR measurements revealed that binding to LPS slightly extends the two β-strands of TP I and stabilizes the whole structure of TP I. The fluorescence wavelength of an intrinsic tryptophan of TP I and fluorescence quenching in the presence or absence of LPS indicated that a tryptophan residue is incorporated into the hydrophobic environment of LPS. Finally, we succeeded in proposing a structural model for the complex of TP I and LPS by using a docking program. The calculated model structure suggested that the cationic residues of TP I interact with phosphate groups and saccharides of LPS, whereas hydrophobic residues interact with the acyl chains of LPS.

  17. Peptide-assembled graphene oxide as a fluorescent turn-on sensor for lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) detection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seng Koon; Chen, Peng; Lee, Fook Loy; Moochhala, Shabbir; Liedberg, Bo

    2015-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a toxic inflammatory stimulator released from the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, known to be directly related to, for example, septic shock, that causes millions of casualties annually. This number could potentially be lowered significantly if specific, sensitive, and more simply applicable LPS biosensors existed. In this work, we present a facile, sensitive and selective LPS sensor, developed by assembling tetramethylrhodamine-labeled LPS-binding peptides on graphene oxide (GO). The fluorescence of the dye-labeled peptide is quenched upon interaction with GO. Specific binding to LPS triggers the release of the peptide-LPS complex from GO, resulting in fluorescence recovery. This fluorescent turn-on sensor offers an estimated limit of detection of 130 pM, which is the lowest ever reported among all synthetic LPS sensors to date. Importantly, this sensor is applicable for detection of LPS in commonly used clinical injectable fluids, and it enables selective detection of LPS from different bacterial strains as well as LPS on the membrane of living E. coli. PMID:26303386

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide Induced Proliferation and Activation of Natural Killer Cells in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Li; Jin, Jun-O

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promoted different innate immune activation than that promoted by Escherichia coli (E. coli) LPS. In this study, we examined the effect of P. gingivalis LPS on the proliferation and activation of natural killer (NK) cells in vivo and compared that function with that of E. coli LPS. Administration of P. gingivalis LPS to C57BL/6 mice induced stronger proliferation of NK cells in the spleen and submandibular lymph nodes (sLNs) and increased the number of circulating NK cells in blood compared to those treated with E. coli LPS. However, P. gingivalis LPS did not induce interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production and CD69 expression in the spleen and sLN NK cells in vivo, and this was attributed to the minimal activation of the spleen and sLN dendritic cells (DCs), including low levels of co-stimulatory molecule expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, P. gingivalis LPS-treated NK cells showed less cytotoxic activity against Yac-1 target cells than E. coli LPS-treated NK cells. Hence, these data demonstrated that P. gingivalis LPS promoted limited activation of spleen and sLN NK cells in vivo, and this may play a role in the chronic inflammatory state observed in periodontal disease. PMID:27548133

  19. Two physically and serologically distinct lipopolysaccharide profiles in strains of Bordetella pertussis and their phenotype variants.

    PubMed Central

    Peppler, M S

    1984-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from nine strains representing 18 phenotype variants of Bordetella pertussis could be grouped into one of two distinct profiles by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. One group, representing the wild-type LPS profile of B. pertussis, consisted of two silver-staining bands: a dominant brown-amber a band and a faster-migrating, minor, black-staining b band. The second group, representing a variant LPS profile, consisted of a single black-staining band of similar mobility to the b band in the wild-type profile. By electrophoretic transfer (Western) blot analysis, mouse antiserum raised against whole cells of Tohama I (prototype wild-type LPS strain) recognized only the a band from all strains/phenotypes possessing the wild-type LPS profile. In contrast, mouse antiserum raised against whole cells of 134 (prototype variant LPS strain) recognized all b bands, regardless of strain/phenotype, and could be shown to cross-react weakly with the a band from Tohama I. These results and results from cohemagglutination and immunodiffusion analyses support the classification of B. pertussis into one of two physiologically and serologically distinct LPS phenotypes: Lps AB for the wild-type profile and Lps B for the variant profile. The relationship of LPS type and phenotypic, or "phase," variation is discussed. Images PMID:6317567

  20. Adjuvant Activity of Naturally Occurring Monophosphoryl Lipopolysaccharide Preparations from Mucosa-Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Paula M.; Hadel, Diana M.; To, Thao T.

    2013-01-01

    Natural heterogeneity in the structure of the lipid A portion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produces differential effects on the innate immune response. Gram-negative bacterial species produce LPS structures that differ from the classic endotoxic LPS structures. These differences include hypoacylation and hypophosphorylation of the diglucosamine backbone, both differences known to decrease LPS toxicity. The effect of decreased toxicity on the adjuvant properties of many of these LPS structures has not been fully explored. Here we demonstrate that two naturally produced forms of monophosphorylated LPS, from the mucosa-associated bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Prevotella intermedia, function as immunological adjuvants for antigen-specific immune responses. Each form of mucosal LPS increased vaccination-initiated antigen-specific antibody titers in both quantity and quality when given simultaneously with vaccine antigen preparations. Interestingly, adjuvant effects on initial T cell clonal expansion were selective for CD4 T cells. No significant increase in CD8 T cell expansion was detected. MyD88/Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TRIF/TLR4 signaling pathways showed equally decreased signaling with the LPS forms studied here as with endotoxic LPS or detoxified monophosphorylated lipid A (MPLA). Natural monophosphorylated LPS from mucosa-associated bacteria functions as a weak but effective adjuvant for specific immune responses, with preferential effects on antibody and CD4 T cell responses over CD8 T cell responses. PMID:23798540

  1. Reciprocal interaction between the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the immune system tunes down the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Vargas, Natalí N; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Basualdo, María Del Carmen; García, Joselyn; Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara; Carrero, Julio C; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2014-08-15

    Several studies have shown circadian variations in the response of the immune system suggesting a role of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Here we show that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration in the beginning of the active period induced more severe responses in temperature and cytokines than LPS given in the rest period. Moreover night administered LPS increased SCN basal neuronal activity indicating a direct influence of inflammation on the SCN. Bilateral lesions of the SCN resulted in an increased inflammatory response to LPS demonstrating that an interaction between the SCN and the immune system modulates the intensity of the inflammatory response.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating LPS-Induced Inflammation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lykhmus, Olena; Mishra, Nibha; Koval, Lyudmyla; Kalashnyk, Olena; Gergalova, Galyna; Uspenska, Kateryna; Komisarenko, Serghiy; Soreq, Hermona; Skok, Maryna

    2016-01-01

    Neuro-inflammation, one of the pathogenic causes of neurodegenerative diseases, is regulated through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway via the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR). We previously showed that either bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or immunization with the α7(1–208) nAChR fragment decrease α7 nAChRs density in the mouse brain, exacerbating chronic inflammation, beta-amyloid accumulation and episodic memory decline, which mimic the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To study the molecular mechanisms underlying the LPS and antibody effects in the brain, we employed an in vivo model of acute LPS-induced inflammation and an in vitro model of cultured glioblastoma U373 cells. Here, we report that LPS challenge decreased the levels of α7 nAChR RNA and protein and of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) RNA and activity in distinct mouse brain regions, sensitized brain mitochondria to the apoptogenic effect of Ca2+ and modified brain microRNA profiles, including the cholinergic-regulatory CholinomiRs-132/212, in favor of anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic ones. Adding α7(1–208)-specific antibodies to the LPS challenge prevented elevation of both the anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic miRNAs while supporting the resistance of brain mitochondria to Ca2+ and maintaining α7 nAChR/AChE decreases. In U373 cells, α7-specific antibodies and LPS both stimulated interleukin-6 production through the p38/Src-dependent pathway. Our findings demonstrate that acute LPS-induced inflammation induces the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the brain, that α7 nAChR down-regulation limits this pathway, and that α7-specific antibodies aggravate neuroinflammation by inducing the pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 and dampening anti-inflammatory miRNAs; however, these antibodies may protect brain mitochondria and decrease the levels of pro-apoptotic miRNAs, preventing LPS-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:27013966

  3. A critical postnatal period of heightened vulnerability to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Rourke, Kyle S; Mayer, Catherine A; MacFarlane, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Evidence of respiratory abnormalities and vulnerability to infection during a critical period of development have been implicated in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Here we investigated whether the acute hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) exhibits a heightened vulnerability to the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) during a critical period of development. The acute HVR was measured 2h after an i.p. injection of saline or LPS (0.1mg/kg) at various postnatal (P) ages (P5, P10, or P20days). LPS attenuated the early (1-2min) and late (4-6min) phase of the acute HVR in P10 but not P5 or P20 rats. The P10 age group exhibited the largest increase in brainstem TNFα and iNOS mRNA expression following LPS. LPS also caused a higher mortality rate in P10 rats (48%) compared to P5 (12%) and P20 (0%) age groups. After stratifying LPS treated P10 rats into survivors vs non-survivors, only the latter exhibited an attenuated HVR (specifically the early phase). Thus, the heightened vulnerability to endotoxin exposure during this critical period of development is characterized by a depression of the ventilatory response to acute hypoxia in association with an increased incidence of mortality. These data share similarities with some of the circumstances surrounding a SIDS scenario, including evidence of infection, increased brainstem cytokine expression, a disturbance in respiratory control, and a peak incidence of mortality during a critical period of development.

  4. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide induced acute inflammation in lung by chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinshan; Xue, Jinling; Xu, Bi; Xie, Jiani; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-02-13

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also called endotoxin) is a pro-inflammatory constituent of gram negative bacteria and cyanobacteria, which causes a potential health risk in the process of routine urban application of reclaimed water, such as car wash, irrigation, scenic water refilling, etc. Previous studies indicated that the common disinfection treatment, chlorination, has little effect on endotoxin activity removal measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. However, in this study, significant decrease of acute inflammatory effects was observed in mouse lung, while LAL assay still presented a moderate increase of endotoxin activity. To explore the possible mechanisms, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results showed the chlorination happened in alkyl chain of LPS molecules, which could affect the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein. Also the size of LPS aggregates was found to drop significantly after treatment, which could be another results of chlorination caused polarity change. In conclusion, our observation demonstrated that chlorination is effective to reduce the LPS induced inflammation in lung, and it is recommended to use health effect-based methods to assess risk removal of water treatment technologies. PMID:26530889

  5. Alpinetin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Zhou, Li-shan; Yan, Li; Ren, Juan; Zhou, Dai-xing; Li, Shu-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Alpinetin, a novel plant flavonoid isolated from Alpinia katsumadai Hayata, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the effects of alpinetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury have not been reported. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects and the underlying mechanism of alpinetin against LPS-induced acute kidney injury in mice. The results showed that alpinetin inhibited LPS-induced kidney histopathologic changes, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine levels. Alpinetin also inhibited LPS-induced ROS, MDA, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production in kidney tissues. Meanwhile, Western blot analysis showed that alpinetin suppressed LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation in kidney tissues. In addition, alpinetin was found to up-regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, alpinetin protected LPS-induced kidney injury through activating Nrf2 and inhibiting TLR4 expression.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide Attenuates the Cytotoxicity of Resveratrol in Transformed Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Achy-Brou, Christelle A Adiabouah; Billack, Blase

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol and pterostilbene are natural products that are present in plants and have been incorporated into various dietary supplements. Numerous beneficial pharmacologic effects have been reported for these stilbenes; however, the mechanism by which these compounds exert a cytotoxic effect in RAW 264.7 macrophages has not been well characterized. We have previously described that resveratrol is toxic to these tumor-derived macrophages and that stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces resveratrol toxicity via a mechanism that involves activation of toll like receptor 4. In the present work, we examined the cellular and molecular effects of resveratrol and the related compound pterostilbene by determining cell viability and caspase 3 activity in control and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with these stilbenes for 24 h. We found that LPS stimulation reduced the cytotoxicity of resveratrol but not of pterostilbene in these cells. When examined for effects on caspase 3 activation after a 24 h incubation, resveratrol and pterostilbene were each found to separately and significantly increase caspase 3 activity in these cells. LPS stimulation prevented caspase 3 activation by pterostilbene and reduced caspase 3 activation by resveratrol in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The data presented here indicate that LPS induces a phenotype switch in tumor-derived RAW 264.7 macrophages in which cells experiencing LPS in the presence of resveratrol or pterostilbene become less likely to activate the pro-apoptotic factor caspase 3. PMID:27277074

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Attenuates the Cytotoxicity of Resveratrol in Transformed Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Achy-Brou, Christelle A Adiabouah; Billack, Blase

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol and pterostilbene are natural products that are present in plants and have been incorporated into various dietary supplements. Numerous beneficial pharmacologic effects have been reported for these stilbenes; however, the mechanism by which these compounds exert a cytotoxic effect in RAW 264.7 macrophages has not been well characterized. We have previously described that resveratrol is toxic to these tumor-derived macrophages and that stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces resveratrol toxicity via a mechanism that involves activation of toll like receptor 4. In the present work, we examined the cellular and molecular effects of resveratrol and the related compound pterostilbene by determining cell viability and caspase 3 activity in control and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with these stilbenes for 24 h. We found that LPS stimulation reduced the cytotoxicity of resveratrol but not of pterostilbene in these cells. When examined for effects on caspase 3 activation after a 24 h incubation, resveratrol and pterostilbene were each found to separately and significantly increase caspase 3 activity in these cells. LPS stimulation prevented caspase 3 activation by pterostilbene and reduced caspase 3 activation by resveratrol in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The data presented here indicate that LPS induces a phenotype switch in tumor-derived RAW 264.7 macrophages in which cells experiencing LPS in the presence of resveratrol or pterostilbene become less likely to activate the pro-apoptotic factor caspase 3.

  8. The effect of lipopolysaccharide on bovine mammary macrophage function.

    PubMed Central

    Politis, I; Zhao, X; McBride, B W; Burton, J H

    1991-01-01

    The effect of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules by bovine mammary macrophages was examined. The ability of LPS-treated mammary macrophages to support antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, as a measure of their antigen presentation ability, was also evaluated. For this purpose, control and LPS-treated macrophages were pulsed with heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus and then cultured with S. aureus-sensitized T-cells. Our data show that LPS had no significant effect on the expression of MHC class II molecules on the surface of mammary macrophages. Furthermore, LPS-induced macrophages were no more active in supporting T-cell proliferation on a per cell basis than unstimulated macrophages. The lack of macrophage response to LPS with respect to expression of MHC class II molecules and the antigen presentation ability is another example of the hyporesponsive nature of macrophages isolated from the bovine mammary gland. PMID:1889031

  9. Deacylation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in rat hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, I.; Tanamoto, K.; Kanegasaki, S.; Yajima, Y.; Goto, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The possible role of liver parenchymal cells in the uptake and degradation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated in vitro by employing radiolabelled LPS as substrate. Hepatocytes obtained from Wistar rats by collagenase treatment were found to take up LPS only when it was not linked to the polysaccharide of O-antigen. The amount of LPS taken up increased with time and after 48 h incubation it increased in a dose-dependent manner up to at least 30 micrograms. When incubated with LPS radiolabelled exclusively in the fatty-acid moiety, cultured hepatocytes released lipophilic materials into the culture medium. These were identified as beta-hydroxytetradecanoic acid and triglyceride, in the ratio of 7:I. These results indicate that the R-form of LPS which lacks the O-antigen polysaccharide is taken up and deacylated in hepatocytes, and the derived fatty acids are released into the culture medium either in the free form or after conversion to triglyceride. Images Fig. 6 PMID:2669923

  10. A method for generating pulmonary neutrophilia using aerosolized lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Roos, Abraham B; Berg, Tove; Ahlgren, Kerstin M; Grunewald, Johan; Nord, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe disease characterized by alveolar neutrophilia, with limited treatment options and high mortality. Experimental models of ALI are key in enhancing our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from gram positive bacteria induces neutrophilic inflammation in the airways and lung parenchyma of mice. Efficient pulmonary delivery of compounds such as LPS is, however, difficult to achieve. In the approach described here, pulmonary delivery in mice is achieved by challenge to aerosolized Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS. Dissolved LPS was aerosolized by a nebulizer connected to compressed air. Mice were exposed to a continuous flow of LPS aerosol in a Plexiglas box for 10 min, followed by 2 min conditioning after the aerosol was discontinued. Tracheal intubation and subsequent bronchoalveolar lavage, followed by formalin perfusion was next performed, which allows for characterization of the sterile pulmonary inflammation. Aerosolized LPS generates a pulmonary inflammation characterized by alveolar neutrophilia, detected in bronchoalveolar lavage and by histological assessment. This technique can be set up at a small cost with few appliances, and requires minimal training and expertise. The exposure system can thus be routinely performed at any laboratory, with the potential to enhance our understanding of lung pathology. PMID:25548888

  11. Adsorption of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist to Alum-Based Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Dampens Pro-T Helper 2 Activities and Enhances Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Juliana; Mirotti, Luciana; Rodriguez, Dunia; Gomes, Eliane; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum salts gels (alum) are TLR-independent adjuvants and have been used to boost antibody responses in alum-based vaccines such as diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT) triple vaccine. However, the pro-Th2 activity of alum-based vaccine formulations has not been fully appreciated. Here we found that alum-based tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine was biased toward a Th-2 profile as shown by TT-induced airway eosinophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production, and high levels of IgE anaphylactic antibodies. The adsorption into alum of prototypic TLR4 agonists such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli consistently dampened TT-induced Th2 activities without inducing IFNγ or Th1-like responses in the lung. Conversely, adsorption of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) extracted from Salmonella minnesota, which is a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β- (TRIF-) biased TLR4 agonist, was less effective in decreasing Th-2 responses. Importantly, in a situation with antigenic competition (OVA plus TT), TT-specific IgG1 or IgG2a was decreased compared with TT sensitization. Notably, LPS increased the production of IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibodies. In conclusion, the addition of LPS induces a more robust IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibody production and concomitantly decreases Th2-cellular and humoral responses, indicating a potential use of alum/TLR-based vaccines. PMID:26380316

  12. Human Fetal Membranes Generate Distinct Cytokine Profiles in Response to Bacterial Toll-Like Receptor and Nod-Like Receptor Agonists1

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Mai; Potter, Julie A.; Gysler, Stefan M.; Han, Christina S.; Guller, Seth; Norwitz, Errol R.; Abrahams, Vikki M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial infection-associated inflammation is thought to be a major cause of preterm premature rupture of membranes. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 1B (IL1B), can weaken fetal membranes (FM) by upregulating matrix metalloproteinases and inducing apoptosis. The mechanism by which infection leads to inflammation at the maternal–fetal interface and subsequent preterm birth is thought to involve innate immune pattern recognition receptors (PRR), such as the Toll-like receptors (TLR) and Nod-like receptors (NLR), which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The objective of this study was to determine the cytokine profile generated by FMs in response to the bacterial TLR and NLR agonists peptidoglycan (PDG; TLR2), lipopolysaccharide (LPS; TLR4), flagellin (TLR5), CpG ODN (TLR9), iE-DAP (Nod1), and MDP (Nod2). PDG, LPS, flagellin, iE-DAP, and MDP triggered FMs to generate an inflammatory response, but the cytokine profiles were distinct for each TLR and NLR agonist, and only IL1B and RANTES were commonly upregulated in response to all five PAMPs. CpG ODN, in contrast, had a mild stimulatory effect only on MCP-1 and primarily downregulated basal FM cytokine production. IL1B secretion induced by PDG, LPS, flagellin, iE-DAP, and MDP was associated with its processing. Furthermore, FM IL1B secretion in response to TLR2, TLR4, and TLR5 activation was caspase 1-dependent, whereas Nod1 and Nod2 induced IL1B secretion independent of caspase 1. These findings demonstrate that FMs respond to different bacterial TLR and NLR PAMPs by generating distinct inflammatory cytokine profiles through distinct mechanisms that are specific to the innate immune PRR activated. PMID:24429216

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity of hydroxycinnamic acid derivtives isolated from corn bran in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated raw 264.7 macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, the effect of the 80 percent ethanolic extract of corn bran (EECB) on inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Raw 264.7 cells was investigated. The EECB inhibited LPS induced NO production...

  14. Cross-reactive polyclonal antibodies to the inner core of lipopolysaccharide from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Svein Rune; Guthrie, Terry; Guile, Geoffrey R; Kolberg, Jan; Hou, Sam; Hyland, Lisa; Wong, Simon Y C

    2002-03-01

    Sera from mice immunized with native or detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicles derived from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant 44/76(Mu-4) of Neisseria meningitidis were analyzed for antibodies to LPS. The carbohydrate portion of 44/76(Mu-4) LPS consists of the complete inner core, Glc beta 1-->4[GlcNAc alpha 1-->2Hep alpha 1-->3]Hep alpha 1-->5KDO[4-->2 alpha KDO]. Immunoblot analysis revealed that some sera contained antibodies to wild-type LPS which has a fully extended carbohydrate chain of immunotype L3,7, as well as to the homologous LPS. Sera reacted only weakly to LPS from 44/76(Mu-3), which lacks the terminal glucose of the inner core. No binding to more truncated LPS was observed. Consequently, the cross-reactive epitopes are expressed mainly by the complete inner core. Dephosphorylation of wild-type LPS abolished antibody binding to LPS in all but one serum. Thus, at least two specificities of cross-reactive antibodies exist: one is dependent on phosphoethanolamine groups in LPS, and one is not. Detection of these cross-reactive antibodies strongly supports the notion that epitopes expressed by meningococcal LPS inner core are also accessible to antibodies when the carbohydrate chain is fully extended. Also, these inner core epitopes are sufficiently immunogenic to induce antibody levels detectable in polyclonal antibody responses. Meningococci can escape being killed by antibodies to LPS that bind only to a specific LPS variant, by altering the carbohydrate chain length. Cross-reactive antibodies may prevent such escape. Therefore, inner core LPS structures may be important antigens in future vaccines against meningococcal disease. PMID:11854213

  15. Membrane Insertion for the Detection of Lipopolysaccharides: Exploring the Dynamics of Amphiphile-in-Lipid Assays

    PubMed Central

    Hengartner, Nicolas W.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Moxley, Rodney A.; Graves, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli is an important cause of foodborne illness, with cases attributable to beef, fresh produce and other sources. Many serotypes of the pathogen cause disease, and differentiating one serotype from another requires specific identification of the O antigen located on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule. The amphiphilic structure of LPS poses a challenge when using classical detection methods, which do not take into account its lipoglycan biochemistry. Typically, detection of LPS requires heat or chemical treatment of samples and relies on bioactivity assays for the conserved lipid A portion of the molecule. Our goal was to develop assays to facilitate the direct and discriminative detection of the entire LPS molecule and its O antigen in complex matrices using minimal sample processing. To perform serogroup identification of LPS, we used a method called membrane insertion on a waveguide biosensor, and tested three serogroups of LPS. The membrane insertion technique allows for the hydrophobic association of LPS with a lipid bilayer, where the exposed O antigen can be targeted for specific detection. Samples of beef lysate were spiked with LPS to perform O antigen specific detection of LPS from E. coli O157. To validate assay performance, we evaluated the biophysical interactions of LPS with lipid bilayers both in- and outside of a flow cell using fluorescence microscopy and fluorescently doped lipids. Our results indicate that membrane insertion allows for the qualitative and reliable identification of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples like beef homogenates. We also demonstrated that LPS-induced hole formation does not occur under the conditions of the membrane insertion assays. Together, these findings describe for the first time the serogroup-specific detection of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples using a membrane insertion assay, and highlight the importance of LPS molecular conformations in detection architectures. PMID

  16. Membrane insertion for the detection of lipopolysaccharides: Exploring the dynamics of amphiphile-in-lipid assays

    DOE PAGES

    Stromberg, Loreen R.; Hengartner, Nicolas W.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Moxley, Rodney A.; Graves, Steven W.; Montano, Gabriel A.; Mukundan, Harshini; Gasset, Maria

    2016-05-26

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli is an important cause of foodborne illness, with cases attributable to beef, fresh produce and other sources. Many serotypes of the pathogen cause disease, and differentiating one serotype from another requires specific identification of the O antigen located on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule. The amphiphilic structure of LPS poses a challenge when using classical detection methods, which do not take into account its lipoglycan biochemistry. Typically, detection of LPS requires heat or chemical treatment of samples and relies on bioactivity assays for the conserved lipid A portion of the molecule. Our goal was to develop assaysmore » to facilitate the direct and discriminative detection of the entire LPS molecule and its O antigen in complex matrices using minimal sample processing. To perform serogroup identification of LPS, we used a method called membrane insertion on a waveguide biosensor, and tested three serogroups of LPS. The membrane insertion technique allows for the hydrophobic association of LPS with a lipid bilayer, where the exposed O antigen can be targeted for specific detection. Samples of beef lysate were spiked with LPS to perform O antigen specific detection of LPS from E. coli O157. To validate assay performance, we evaluated the biophysical interactions of LPS with lipid bilayers both in- and outside of a flow cell using fluorescence microscopy and fluorescently doped lipids. Our results indicate that membrane insertion allows for the qualitative and reliable identification of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples like beef homogenates. In addition, we also demonstrated that LPS-induced hole formation does not occur under the conditions of the membrane insertion assays. Together, these findings describe for the first time the serogroup-specific detection of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples using a membrane insertion assay, and highlight the importance of LPS molecular conformations in detection

  17. The effects of Nigella sativa hydro-alcoholic extract and thymoquinone on lipopolysaccharide - induced depression like behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mahmoud; Zakeri, Samaneh; Khoshdast, Sadieh; Yousefian, Fatemeh T.; Rastegar, Monireh; Vafaee, Farzaneh; Kahdouee, Shamsi; Ghorbani, Fatemeh; Rakhshandeh, Hassan; Kazemi, S. Abolfazl

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neuroimmune factors have been proposed as contributors to the pathogenesis of depression. Beside other therapeutic effects including neuroprotective, antioxidant, anticonvulsant and analgesic effects, Nigella sativa and its main ingredient, thymoquinone (TQ), have been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, the effects of Nigella sativa hydro-alcoholic extract and thymoquinone was investigated on lipopolysaccharide- induced depression like behavior in rats. Materials and Methods: 50 male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: Group 1 (control group) received saline instead of NS extract, thymoquinone or lipopolysaccharide. The animals in group 2 (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) were treated by saline instead of NS extract and were injected LPS (100μg/kg, ip) 2 hours before conducting each forced swimming test. Groups 3 (LPS + NS 200) and 4 (LPS + NS 400) were treated by 200 and 400 mg/kg of NS (ip), respectively, from the day before starting the experiments and before each forced swimming test. These animals were also injected LPS 2hours before conducting each swimming test. The animals in group 5 received TQ instead of NS extract. Forced swimming test was performed 3 times for all groups (in alternative days), and immobility time was recorded. Finally, the animals were placed in an open- field apparatus, and the crossing number on peripheral and central areas was observed. Results: The immobility time in the LPS group was higher than that in the control group in all 3 times (P<0.001). The animals in LPS + NS 200, LPS + NS 400 and LPS + TQ had lower immobility times in comparison with LPS groups (P<0.01, and P<0.01). In the open- field test, the crossing number of peripheral in the LPS group was higher than that of the control one (P<0.01) while the animals of LPS + NS 200, LPS + NS 400 and LPS + TQ groups had lower crossing number of peripheral compared with the LPS group (P <0.05, and P<0.001). Furthermore, in the LPS group, the

  18. A broadband capacitive sensing method for label-free bacterial LPS detection.

    PubMed

    Rydosz, Artur; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Wincza, Krzysztof; Gamian, Andrzej; Gruszczynski, Slawomir

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, the authors present a new type of highly sensitive label-free microwave sensor in a form of interdigital capacitor coated with T4 bacteriophage gp37 adhesin. The adhesin binds Escherichia coli B (E. coli B) by precise recognizing its bacterial host lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The C-terminal part of the adhesin consists of the receptor-binding amino acid residues which are involved in a specific interaction with two terminal glucose residues of the bacterial LPS. The change of the sensors' capacitance and conductance as a subject to LPS presence is an indicator of the detection. The measurements in the frequency range of 0-3GHz utilizing vector network analyzer have been carried out at different concentrations to verify experimentally the proposed method. The measured capacitance change between the reference and the biofunctionalized sensor equals 15% in the entire frequency range and the measured conductance change exceeds 19%. The changes of both parameters can be used as good indicators of the LPS detection. The selectivity has been confirmed by the ELISA experiments and tested by sensor measurements with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli B, E. coli 056, E. coli 0111, Pseudomonas aeruginosa NBRC 13743 and Hafnia alvei 1185. PMID:26339930

  19. LPS inmobilization on porous and non-porous supports as an approach for the isolation of anti-LPS host-defense peptides

    PubMed Central

    López-Abarrategui, Carlos; del Monte-Martínez, Alberto; Reyes-Acosta, Osvaldo; Franco, Octavio L.; Otero-González, Anselmo J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are the major molecular component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. This molecule is recognized as a sign of bacterial infection, responsible for the development of local inflammatory response and, in extreme cases, septic shock. Unfortunately, despite substantial advances in the pathophysiology of sepsis, there is no efficacious therapy against this syndrome yet. As a consequence, septic shock syndrome continues to increase, reaching mortality rates over 50% in some cases. Even though many preclinical studies and clinical trials have been conducted, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved drug yet that interacts directly against LPS. Cationic host-defense peptides (HDPs) could be an alternative solution since they possess both antimicrobial and antiseptic properties. HDPs are small, positively charged peptides which are evolutionarily conserved components of the innate immune response. In fact, binding to diverse chemotypes of LPS and inhibition of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines from macrophages have been demonstrated for different HDPs. Curiously, none of them have been isolated by their affinity to LPS. A diversity of supports could be useful for such biological interaction and suitable for isolating HDPs that recognize LPS. This approach could expand the rational search for anti-LPS HDPs. PMID:24409171

  20. LPS inmobilization on porous and non-porous supports as an approach for the isolation of anti-LPS host-defense peptides.

    PubMed

    López-Abarrategui, Carlos; Del Monte-Martínez, Alberto; Reyes-Acosta, Osvaldo; Franco, Octavio L; Otero-González, Anselmo J

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are the major molecular component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. This molecule is recognized as a sign of bacterial infection, responsible for the development of local inflammatory response and, in extreme cases, septic shock. Unfortunately, despite substantial advances in the pathophysiology of sepsis, there is no efficacious therapy against this syndrome yet. As a consequence, septic shock syndrome continues to increase, reaching mortality rates over 50% in some cases. Even though many preclinical studies and clinical trials have been conducted, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved drug yet that interacts directly against LPS. Cationic host-defense peptides (HDPs) could be an alternative solution since they possess both antimicrobial and antiseptic properties. HDPs are small, positively charged peptides which are evolutionarily conserved components of the innate immune response. In fact, binding to diverse chemotypes of LPS and inhibition of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines from macrophages have been demonstrated for different HDPs. Curiously, none of them have been isolated by their affinity to LPS. A diversity of supports could be useful for such biological interaction and suitable for isolating HDPs that recognize LPS. This approach could expand the rational search for anti-LPS HDPs. PMID:24409171

  1. Treatment with the hyaluronic Acid synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone suppresses LPS-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    McKallip, Robert J; Ban, Hao; Uchakina, Olga N

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to bacterial endotoxins, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), can lead to the induction of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). To date, there are no known effective treatments for LPS-induced inflammation. In the current study, we investigated the potential use of the hyaluronic acid (HA) synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) on LPS-induced acute lung inflammation. Culturing LPS-activated immune cells with 4-MU led to reduced proliferation, reduced cytokine production, and an increase in apoptosis when compared to untreated cells. Treatment of mice with 4-MU led to protection from LPS-induced lung injury. Specifically, 4-MU treatment led to a reduction in LPS-induced hyaluronic acid synthase (HAS) messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, reduction in lung permeability, and reduction in proinflammatory cytokine production. Taken together, these results suggest that use of 4-MU to target HA production may be an effective treatment for the inflammatory response following exposure to LPS.

  2. TSPO ligand PK11195 alleviates neuroinflammation and beta-amyloid generation induced by systemic LPS administration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Na; Wang, Pei-qi; Guo, Wen-zhi; Fu, Qiang; Jiao, Lin-bo; Ma, Ya-qun; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2016-03-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is now an attractive drug target for controlling neuroinflammation. Studies applying TSPO ligands to neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer's disease (AD), were rare. Our study was aimed to evaluate the effect of PK11195, a specific TSPO ligand, in an animal model of neuroinflammation caused by systemic LPS administration. C57/BL6 mice were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 500 μg/kg, i.p.) three days after PK11195 administration (3mg/kg, i.p.). The drugs were not discontinued until the mice were sacrificed. Cognitive function was assessed by Morris water maze (MWM) seven days after LPS injection. Chronic LPS-injection in mice was characterized by cognitive dysfunction, increased expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and TSPO, elevated Aβ content with increased expression of β-site APP cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE-1) and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) as well as decreased brain progesterone and brain-derived neurophic factor (BDNF) level. PK11195 pretreatment protected cognitive function in LPS-injected animals and normalized the inflammatory proteins. Moreover, PK11195 pre-administration decreased elevated hippocampal Aβx-42 levels and increased brain levels of progesterone, allopregnanolone. However, LPS-induced BDNF decrease was not reversed by PK11195 administration. Our data demonstrated that PK11195 could protect cognitive deficits induced by chronic LPS administration. The underling mechanism may involve alleviated neuroinflammation, increased synthesis of neurosteroid and decreased Aβ accumulation accompanied by down-regulation of BACE-1.

  3. Sildenafil (Viagra(®)) prevents and restores LPS-induced inflammation in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    de Santana Nunes, Ana Karolina; Rapôso, Catarina; Björklund, Ulrika; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Peixoto, Christina Alves; Hansson, Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    Astrocytes are effectively involved in the pathophysiological processes in the central nervous system (CNS) and may contribute to or protect against development of inflammatory and degenerative diseases. Sildenafil is a potent and selective phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor, which induces cyclic GMP accumulation. However, the mechanisms of actions on glial cells are not clear. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the role of sildenafil in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated astrocytes. The cytoskeleton integrity and Ca(2+) waves were assessed as indicators of inflammatory state. Two main groups were done: (A) one prevention and (B) one restoration. Each of these groups: A1: control; A2: LPS for 24h; A3: sildenafil 1 or 10μM for 4h and then sildenafil 1 or 10μM+LPS for 24h. B1: control; B2: LPS for 24h; B3: LPS for 24h and then LPS+sildenafil 1 or 10μM for 24h. Cytoskeleton integrity was analyzed through GFAP immunolabeling and actin labeling with an Alexa 488-conjugated phalloidin probe. Calcium responses were assessed through a Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorophore Fura-2/AM. The results show that both preventive and restorative treatments with sildenafil (in both concentrations) reduced the Ca(2+) responses in intensity and induced a more organized actin fiber pattern, compared to LPS treated cells. This work demonstrated for the first time that astrocytes are a key part of the sildenafil protective effects in the CNS. PMID:27466020

  4. Rhizobium meliloti chromosomal loci required for suppression of exopolysaccharide mutations by lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.N.V.; Brzoska, P.M.; Signer, E.R. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1990-11-01

    Mutants of alfalfa symbiont Rhizobium meliloti SU47 that fail to make extracellular polysaccharide (exo mutants) induce the formation of nodules that are devoid of bacteria and consequently do not fix nitrogen. This Fix{sup {minus}} phenotype can be suppressed by an R. meliloti Rm41 gene that affects lipopolysaccharide structure. Here we describe mutations preventing suppression that map at two new chromosomal loci, lpsY and lpsX, present in both strains. Two other lps mutations isolated previously from SU47 also prevented suppression.

  5. Exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 reduces response of human neuroblastoma cells to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yurinskaya, M M; Funikov, S Y; Evgen'ev, M B; Vinokurov, M G

    2016-07-01

    The effect of exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNFα secretion, and mRNA expression by human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. It was shown that exogenous HSP70 protects neuroblastoma cells from the action of LPS. The protection mechanism of HSP70 includes a reduction in the production of ROS and TNFα and a decrease in the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β mRNA in SK-N-SH cells induced by LPS. PMID:27599502

  6. Changes in endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability after systemic lipopolysaccharide administration in the subfornical organ.

    PubMed

    Morita-Takemura, Shoko; Nakahara, Kazuki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Tatsuhide; Isonishi, Ayami; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-09-15

    The subfornical organ (SFO) has highly permeable fenestrated vasculature and is a key site for immune-to-brain communications. Recently, we showed the occurrence of continuous angiogenesis in the SFO. In the present study, we found that systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduced the vascular permeability and endothelial cell proliferation. In LPS-administered mice, the SFO vasculature showed a significant decrease in the immunoreactivity of plasmalemma vesicle associated protein-1, a marker of endothelial fenestral diaphragms. These data suggest that vasculature undergoes structural change to decrease vascular permeability in response to systemic LPS administration. PMID:27609286

  7. Exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 reduces response of human neuroblastoma cells to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yurinskaya, M M; Funikov, S Y; Evgen'ev, M B; Vinokurov, M G

    2016-07-01

    The effect of exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNFα secretion, and mRNA expression by human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. It was shown that exogenous HSP70 protects neuroblastoma cells from the action of LPS. The protection mechanism of HSP70 includes a reduction in the production of ROS and TNFα and a decrease in the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β mRNA in SK-N-SH cells induced by LPS.

  8. Transiently enhanced LPS-induced fever following hyperthermic stress in rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaaki; Uno, Tadashi; Riedel, Walter; Nishimaki, Michiyo; Watanabe, Kaori

    2005-11-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to induce an enhanced febrile response to the bacterial-derived endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the enhanced LPS-induced fever seen in heat stressed (HS) animals is caused by leakage of intestinal bacterial LPS into the circulation. Male rabbits were rendered transiently hyperthermic (a maximum rectal temperature of 43°C) and divided into three groups. They were then allowed to recover in a room at 24°C for 1, 2 or 3 days post-HS. One day after injection with LPS, the post-HS rabbits exhibited significantly higher fevers than the controls, though this was not seen in rabbits at either 2 or 3 days post-HS. The plasma levels of endogenous LPS were significantly increased during the HS as compared to those seen in normothermic rabbits prior to HS. LPS fevers were not induced in these animals. One day post-HS, rabbits that had been pretreated with oral antibiotics exhibited significantly attenuated LPS levels. When challenged with human recombinant interleukin-1β instead of LPS, the 1-day post-HS rabbits did not respond with enhanced fevers. The plasma levels of TNFα increased similarly during LPS-induced fevers in both the control and 1-day post-HS rabbits, while the plasma levels of corticosterone and the osmolality of the 1-day post-HS rabbits showed no significant differences to those seen prior to the HS. These results suggest that the enhanced fever in the 1-day post-HS rabbits is LPS specific, and may be caused by increased leakage of intestinal endotoxin into blood circulation.

  9. Chemical synthesis, docking studies and biological effects of a pan peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonist and cyclooxygenase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Santin, José Roberto; Uchôa, Flávia D T; Lima, Maria do Carmo A; Rabello, Marcelo M; Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Hernandes, Marcelo Z; Amato, Angelica A; Milton, Flora Aparecida; Webb, Paul; Neves, Francisco de Assis Rocha; Galdino, Suely L; Pitta, Ivan Rocha; Farsky, Sandra H P

    2013-03-12

    The compound (5Z)-5-[(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene]-3-(4-chlorobenzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione (LYSO-7) was synthesised in order to obtain a new type of anti-inflammatory drug, designed with hybrid features to inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX) and also to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR). Results obtained from docking (in silico) studies corroborated with experimental data, showing the potential affinity between the studied ligand and targets. The specificity of LYSO-7 for COX-enzymes was detected by the inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 activities by 30% and 20%, respectively. In transactivation reporter gene assays LYSO-07 showed a pan partial agonist effect on the three PPAR subtypes (PPARγ, PPARα and PPARβ/δ). The agonist action on PPARγ was also observed by a pharmacological approach, as the reduction in the Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) secretion and nitric oxide (NO) production by mouse neutrophils was blocked by GW9962, a specific PPARγ antagonist. Additionally, the in vivo effect was measured by reduced carrageenan-induced neutrophil influx into the subcutaneous tissue of mice. Taken together, these data show that LYSO-7 displays a potent in vivo anti-inflammatory effect during the innate acute response, which is dependent on its associated COX inhibitory activities and PPAR activation. PMID:23305993

  10. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) neutralization by innate immunity host-defense peptides. Peptide properties and plausible modes of action.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Yosef; Papo, Niv; Shai, Yechiel

    2006-01-20

    Binding of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to macrophages results in proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In extreme cases it leads to endotoxic shock. A few innate immunity antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) neutralize LPS activity. However, the underlying mechanism and properties of the peptides are not yet clear. Toward meeting this goal we investigated four AMPs and their fluorescently labeled analogs. These AMPs varied in composition, length, structure, and selectivity toward cells. The list included human LL-37 (37-mer), magainin (24-mer), a 15-mer amphipathic alpha-helix, and its D,L-amino acid structurally altered analog. The peptides were investigated for their ability to inhibit LPS-mediated cytokine release from RAW264.7 and bone marrow-derived primary macrophages, to bind LPS in solution, and when LPS is already bound to macrophages (fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy), to compete with LPS for its binding site on the CD14 receptor (flow cytometry) and affect LPS oligomerization. We conclude that a strong binding of a peptide to LPS aggregates accompanied by aggregate dissociation prevents LPS from binding to the carrier protein lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, or alternatively to its receptor, and hence inhibits cytokine secretion.

  11. Heterogeneous Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS modulates immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Herath, Thanuja D. K.; Darveau, Richard P.; Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Yu; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal (gum) disease is a highly prevalent infection and inflammation accounting for the majority of tooth loss in adult population worldwide. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone periodontal pathogen and its lipopolysaccharide (PgLPS) acts as a major virulence attribute to the disease. Herein, we deciphered the overall host response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) to two featured isoforms of tetra-acylated PgLPS1435/1449 and penta-acylated PgLPS1690 with reference to E. coli LPS through quantitative proteomics. This study unraveled differentially expressed novel biomarkers of immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in HGFs. PgLPS1690 greatly upregulated inflammatory proteins (e.g. cyclophilin, inducible nitric oxide synthase, annexins, galectin, cathepsins and heat shock proteins), whereas the anti-inflammatory proteins (e.g. Annexin A2 and Annexin A6) were significantly upregulated by PgLPS1435/1449. Interestingly, the antioxidants proteins such as mitochondrial manganese-containing superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin 5 were only upregulated by PgLPS1690. The cytoskeletal rearrangement-related proteins like myosin were differentially regulated by these PgLPS isoforms. The present study gives new insight into the biological properties of P. gingivalis LPS lipid A moiety that could critically modulate immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in HGFs, and thereby enhances our understanding of periodontal pathogenesis. PMID:27538450

  12. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production. PMID:24577726

  13. Genetics and Proteomics of Aeromonas salmonicida Lipopolysaccharide Core Biosynthesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Natalia; Lacasta, Anna; Vilches, Silvia; Reyes, Mercé; Vazquez, Judit; Aquillini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    Comparison between the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core structures of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A450 and Aeromonas hydrophila AH-3 shows great similarity in the inner LPS core and part of the outer LPS core but some differences in the distal part of the outer LPS core (residues ld-Hep, d-Gal, and d-GalNAc). The three genomic regions encoding LPS core biosynthetic genes in A. salmonicida A450, of which regions 2 and 3 have genes identical to those of A. hydrophila AH-3, were fully sequenced. A. salmonicida A450 region 1 showed seven genes: three identical to those of A. hydrophila AH-3, three similar but not identical to those of A. hydrophila AH-3, and one without any homology to any well-characterized gene. A. salmonicida A450 mutants with alterations in the genes that were not identical to those of A. hydrophila AH-3 were constructed, and their LPS core structures were fully elucidated. At the same time, all the A. salmonicida A450 genes identical to those of A. hydrophila AH-3 were used to complement the previously obtained A. hydrophila AH-3 mutants for each of these genes. Combining the gene sequence and complementation test data with the structural data and phenotypic characterization of the mutant LPSs enabled a presumptive assignment of all LPS core biosynthesis gene functions in A. salmonicida A450. Furthermore, hybridization studies with internal probes for the A. salmonicida-specific genes using different A. salmonicida strains (strains of different subspecies or atypical strains) showed a unique or prevalent LPS core type, which is the one fully characterized for A. salmonicida A450. PMID:19151135

  14. A novel PPARα agonist propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide inhibits inflammation in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Yan, Lu; Luo, Xiu-Mei; Peng, Lu; Guo, Han; Jing, Zuo; Yang, Li-Chao; Hu, Rong; Wang, Xuan; Huang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Yi-Qing; Jin, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Our group synthesized propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide (N15), a novel peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonist. Because PPARα activation is associated with inflammation control, we hypothesize that N15 may have anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the effect of N15 on the regulation of inflammation in THP-1 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In particular, we assessed the production of chemokines, adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokines, three important types of cytokines that are released from monocytes and are involved in the development of atherosclerosis. The results showed that N15 remarkably reduced the mRNA expression of chemokines, such as monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 or CCL2), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10 or CXCL10), and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). N15 also decreased the protein expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and 9. The reduction in the expression of cytokine mRNAs observed following N15 treatment was abrogated in THP-1 cells treated with PPARα siRNA, indicating that the anti-inflammatory effects of N15 are dependent on PPARα activation. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inhibition, which are dependent on PPARα activation, were also involved in the mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of N15. In conclusion, the novel PPARα agonist, N15, exerts notable anti-inflammatory effects, which are mediated via PPARα activation and TLR4/NF-κB and STAT3 inhibition, in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. In our study, N15 exhibits promise for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  15. A novel PPARα agonist propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide inhibits inflammation in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Yan, Lu; Luo, Xiu-Mei; Peng, Lu; Guo, Han; Jing, Zuo; Yang, Li-Chao; Hu, Rong; Wang, Xuan; Huang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Yi-Qing; Jin, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Our group synthesized propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide (N15), a novel peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonist. Because PPARα activation is associated with inflammation control, we hypothesize that N15 may have anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the effect of N15 on the regulation of inflammation in THP-1 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In particular, we assessed the production of chemokines, adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokines, three important types of cytokines that are released from monocytes and are involved in the development of atherosclerosis. The results showed that N15 remarkably reduced the mRNA expression of chemokines, such as monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 or CCL2), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10 or CXCL10), and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). N15 also decreased the protein expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and 9. The reduction in the expression of cytokine mRNAs observed following N15 treatment was abrogated in THP-1 cells treated with PPARα siRNA, indicating that the anti-inflammatory effects of N15 are dependent on PPARα activation. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inhibition, which are dependent on PPARα activation, were also involved in the mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of N15. In conclusion, the novel PPARα agonist, N15, exerts notable anti-inflammatory effects, which are mediated via PPARα activation and TLR4/NF-κB and STAT3 inhibition, in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. In our study, N15 exhibits promise for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27318324

  16. HSF-1 is involved in attenuating the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS through regulating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongyi; Jiang, Bimei; Zhang, Lingli; Liu, Yanjuan; Gao, Min; Jiang, Yu; Li, Yuanbin; Lu, Qinglan; Yao, Yongming; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2014-05-01

    Autophagy plays a protective role in endotoxemic mice. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) also plays a crucial protective role in endotoxemic mice by decreasing inflammatory cytokines. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HSF-1 is involved in attenuating the release of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mice and peritoneal macrophages (PMs) through regulating autophagy activity. Autophagosome formation in HSF-1(+/+) and HSF-1(-/-) mice and PMs stimulated by LPS was examined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Lipopolysaccharide-induced autophagy and inflammatory cytokines were examined in HSF-1(+/+) and HSF-1(-/-) PMs treated with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or rapamycin. Results showed that LPS-induced autophagy was elevated transiently at 12 h but declined at 24 h in the livers and lungs of mice. Higher levels of inflammatory cytokines and lower autophagy activity were detected in HSF-1(-/-) mice and PMs compared with HSF-1(+/+) mice and PMs. Interestingly, LPS-induced release of inflammatory cytokines did not further increase in HSF-1(-/-) PMs treated with 3-MA but aggravated in HSF-1(+/+) PMs. Lipopolysaccharide-induced autophagy did not decrease in HSF-1(-/-) PMs treated with 3-MA but decreased in HSF-1 PMs(+/+). Taken together, our results suggested that HSF-1 attenuated the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS by regulating autophagy activity.

  17. Milk thistle extract and silymarin inhibit lipopolysaccharide induced lamellar separation of hoof explants in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Nicole; Schaumberger, Simone; Nagl, Veronika; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd

    2014-10-01

    The pathogenesis of laminitis is not completely identified and the role of endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) in this process remains unclear. Phytogenic substances, like milk thistle (MT) and silymarin, are known for their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and might therefore have the potential to counteract endotoxin induced effects on the hoof lamellar tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of endotoxins on lamellar tissue integrity and to test if MT and silymarin are capable of inhibiting LPS-induced effects in an in vitro/ex vivo model. In preliminary tests, LPS neutralization efficiency of these phytogenics was determined in an in vitro neutralization assay. Furthermore, tissue explants gained from hooves of slaughter horses were tested for lamellar separation after incubation with different concentrations of LPS. By combined incubation of explants with LPS and either Polymyxin B (PMB; positive control), MT or silymarin, the influence of these substances on LPS-induced effects was assessed. In the in vitro neutralization assay, MT and silymarin reduced LPS concentrations by 64% and 75%, respectively, in comparison PMB reduced 98% of the LPS concentration. In hoof explants, LPS led to a concentration dependent separation. Accordantly, separation force was significantly decreased by 10 µg/mL LPS. PMB, MT and silymarin could significantly improve tissue integrity of explants incubated with 10 µg/mL LPS. This study showed that LPS had a negative influence on the structure of hoof explants in vitro. MT and silymarin reduced endotoxin activity and inhibited LPS-induced effects on the lamellar tissue. Hence, MT and silymarin might be used to support the prevention of laminitis and should be further evaluated for this application.

  18. Investigation of plague lipopolysaccharide complex formation with artificial phospholipid vesicles by elastic laser radiation scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, V. V.; Guseva, N. P.; Tatarintsev, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the investigation of incorporation processes of the plague lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into artificial phospholipid vesicles (PLV) on the basis of elastic laser radiation scattering. For this purpose, the angular light scattering dependencies of PLV suspensions, containing various LPS concentrations (0 - 5 mg/ml), were measured using the polarization nephelometer. The design of the polarization nephelometer and the measurement technique are described in detail. Measuring results are compared with electron microscopy data. The most pronounced variation as a result of LPS incorporation into PLV appeared to be the light scattering integral intensity (LSII) at angles exceeding 100. It is shown that the LPS adding into the PLV suspension causes the LSII to increase by a factor 2 - 6 for a LPS concentration range from 0.5 to 5 mg/ml as compared with `empty' PLV. Proceeding from the electron microscopy data it was found that the LSII increase, in general case, is conditioned by variation of the PLV membrane refraction index and formation of PLV aggregates. It was shown that the LSII measurement for the PLV suspension containing LPS can be used as a qualitative express analysis for the LPS incorporation into PLV as well as procedure for determination of the aggregate formation stage from PLV. The LPS of the plague, which as determinants being common for various gram-negative bacteria, is of great interest from the viewpoint of creating preparations for prophylactic measures against the endotoxin infections. However, the LPS toxicity due to the lipid A presence is a disadvantage of this weak antigen. Incorporation of the LPS int bilayer phospholipid membranes leads to its lower toxicity and higher immunization ability. The immunization ability and toxicity of the LPS complexes with bilayer membranes depend essentially on the LPS quantity sorbed in the membrane, as well as on the shapes and sizes of aggregates formed by the LPS and membranes in water

  19. Milk thistle extract and silymarin inhibit lipopolysaccharide induced lamellar separation of hoof explants in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Nicole; Schaumberger, Simone; Nagl, Veronika; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd

    2014-10-01

    The pathogenesis of laminitis is not completely identified and the role of endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) in this process remains unclear. Phytogenic substances, like milk thistle (MT) and silymarin, are known for their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and might therefore have the potential to counteract endotoxin induced effects on the hoof lamellar tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of endotoxins on lamellar tissue integrity and to test if MT and silymarin are capable of inhibiting LPS-induced effects in an in vitro/ex vivo model. In preliminary tests, LPS neutralization efficiency of these phytogenics was determined in an in vitro neutralization assay. Furthermore, tissue explants gained from hooves of slaughter horses were tested for lamellar separation after incubation with different concentrations of LPS. By combined incubation of explants with LPS and either Polymyxin B (PMB; positive control), MT or silymarin, the influence of these substances on LPS-induced effects was assessed. In the in vitro neutralization assay, MT and silymarin reduced LPS concentrations by 64% and 75%, respectively, in comparison PMB reduced 98% of the LPS concentration. In hoof explants, LPS led to a concentration dependent separation. Accordantly, separation force was significantly decreased by 10 µg/mL LPS. PMB, MT and silymarin could significantly improve tissue integrity of explants incubated with 10 µg/mL LPS. This study showed that LPS had a negative influence on the structure of hoof explants in vitro. MT and silymarin reduced endotoxin activity and inhibited LPS-induced effects on the lamellar tissue. Hence, MT and silymarin might be used to support the prevention of laminitis and should be further evaluated for this application. PMID:25290524

  20. Striking Complexity of Lipopolysaccharide Defects in a Collection of Sinorhizobium meliloti Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Gordon R. O.; Sharypova, Larissa A.; Scheidle, Heiko; Jones, Kathryn M.; Niehaus, Karsten; Becker, Anke; Walker, Graham C.

    2003-01-01

    Although the role that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays in the symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and alfalfa has been studied for over a decade, its function in this process remains controversial and poorly understood. This is largely due to a lack of mutants affected by its synthesis. In one of the definitive studies concerning this issue, Clover et al. (R. H. Clover, J. Kieber, and E. R. Signer, J. Bacteriol. 171:3961-3967, 1989) identified a series of mutants with putative LPS defects, judged them to be symbiotically proficient on Medicago sativa, and concluded that LPS might not have a symbiotic function in S. meliloti. The mutations in these strains were never characterized at the molecular level nor was the LPS from most of them analyzed. We have transduced these mutations from the Rm2011 background from which they were originally isolated into the sequenced strain Rm1021 and have characterized the resulting strains in greater detail. We found the LPS from these mutants to display a striking complexity of phenotypes on polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels, including additional rough LPS bands and alterations in the molecular weight distribution of the smooth LPS. We found that some of the mutants contain insertions in genes that are predicted to be involved in the synthesis of carbohydrate components of LPS, including ddhB, lpsB, lpsC, and lpsE. The majority, however, code for proteins predicted to be involved in a wide variety of functions not previously recognized to play a role in LPS synthesis, including a possible transcription elongation factor (GreA), a possible queuine synthesis protein, and a possible chemotaxis protein. Furthermore, using more extensive assays, we have found that most of these strains have symbiotic deficiencies. These results support more recent findings that alterations in LPS structure can affect the ability of S. meliloti to form an effective symbiosis. PMID:12813079

  1. Effect of Sodium Butyrate on Growth Performance and Response to Lipopolysaccharide in Weanling Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of dietary sodium butyrate on growth performance and response to E. coli. lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in weanling pigs. In the first 28 d experiment, 180 pigs (initial BW 6.3 kg) were fed 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4% sodium butyrate, or 110 mg/kg d...

  2. Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharide inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced production of TNF-α and interleukin-8

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yuan; Sun, Mei; Li, Ke-Shen

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharide (APS) on gene expression and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) transcriptional activity in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). METHODS: IEC were divided into control group, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group, LPS+ 50 μg/mL APS group, LPS+ 100 μg/mL APS group, LPS+ 200 μg/mL APS group, and LPS+ 500 μg/mL APS group. Levels of mRNAs in LPS-induced inflammatory factors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8, were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. MAPK protein level was measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: The levels of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs were significantly higher in IEC with LPS-induced damage than in control cells. APS significantly abrogated the LPS-induced expression of the TNF-α and IL-8 genes. APS did not block the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase or c Jun amino-terminal kinase, but inhibited the activation of p38, suggesting that APS inhibits LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs, possibly by suppressing the p38 signaling pathway. CONCLUSION: APS-modulated bacterial product-mediated p38 signaling represents an attractive strategy for prevention and treatment of intestinal inflammation. PMID:19653348

  3. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: biosynthesis and extraction from the inner membrane

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brent W.; May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The network of charges and sugars provided by the dense packing of LPS molecules in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane interferes with the entry of hydrophobic compounds into the cell, including many antibiotics. In addition, LPS can be recognized by the immune system and plays a crucial role in many interactions between bacteria and their animal hosts. LPS is synthesized in the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, so it must be transported across their cell envelope to assemble at the cell surface. Over the past two decades, much of the research on LPS biogenesis has focused on the discovery and understanding of Lpt, a multi-protein complex that spans the cell envelope and functions to transport LPS from the inner membrane to the outer membrane. This paper focuses on the early steps of the transport of LPS by the Lpt machinery: the extraction of LPS from the inner membrane. The accompanying paper (May JM, Sherman DJ, Simpson BW, Ruiz N, Kahne D. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150027. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0027)) describes the subsequent steps as LPS travels through the periplasm and the outer membrane to its final destination at the cell surface. PMID:26370941

  4. The Aeromonas salmonicida Lipopolysaccharide Core from Different Subspecies: The Unusual subsp. pectinolytica

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Initial hydridization tests using Aeromonas salmonicida typical and atypical strains showed the possibility of different lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer cores among these strains. By chemical structural analysis, LPS-core SDS-PAGE gel migration, and functional and comparative genomics we demonstrated that typical A. salmonicida (subsp. salmonicida) strains and atypical subsp. masoucida and probably smithia strains showed the same LPS outer core. A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes strains show a similar LPS outer core but lack one of the most external residues (a galactose linked α1-6 to heptose), not affecting the O-antigen LPS linkage. A. salmonicida subsp. pectinolytica strains show a rather changed LPS outer core, which is identical to the LPS outer core from the majority of the A. hydrophila strains studied by genomic analyses. The LPS inner core in all tested A. salmonicida strains, typical and atypical, is well-conserved. Furthermore, the LPS inner core seems to be conserved in all the Aeromonas (psychrophilic or mesophilic) strains studied by genomic analyses. PMID:26904002

  5. Induction of the chemotactic S100 protein, CP-10, in monocyte/macrophages by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Hu, S P; Harrison, C; Xu, K; Cornish, C J; Geczy, C L

    1996-05-01

    The murine S100 protein CP-10 is a potent chemotactic factor for murine and human myeloid cells in vivo and in vitro. This is the first report describing regulations of the CP-10 gene by a proinflammatory stimulus, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Murine monocyte/macrophage-like WEHI 265 and RAW 264.7 cells preexposed to 5 to 50 ng/mL LPS expressed significant levels of CP-10 mRNA 4 hours, and maximal at 20 hours, after a secondary LPS challenge. This was accompanied by increasing levels of cell-associated and released CP-10 protein. In contrast, a single dose of LPS upregulated CP-10 mRNA in elicited peritoneal macrophages, whereas mRNA and protein levels decreased following LPS challenge. The state of macrophage differentiation may control responsiveness as LPS had no effect on CP-10 basal levels in bone marrow derived macrophages. LPS-induced CP-10 expression was controlled at the transcriptional level and nuclear run-on and protein synthesis inhibition assays indicated that LPS priming and challenge of RAW cells occurred via distinct pathways. MRP14, another S100 protein generally coordinately expressed with human MRP8, was not induced by LPS under the same conditions. We propose that CP-10 may play a key role in recruitment of leukocytes into tissues in response to gram-negative bacterial infection.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: biosynthesis and extraction from the inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Brent W; May, Janine M; Sherman, David J; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-10-01

    The cell surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The network of charges and sugars provided by the dense packing of LPS molecules in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane interferes with the entry of hydrophobic compounds into the cell, including many antibiotics. In addition, LPS can be recognized by the immune system and plays a crucial role in many interactions between bacteria and their animal hosts. LPS is synthesized in the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, so it must be transported across their cell envelope to assemble at the cell surface. Over the past two decades, much of the research on LPS biogenesis has focused on the discovery and understanding of Lpt, a multi-protein complex that spans the cell envelope and functions to transport LPS from the inner membrane to the outer membrane. This paper focuses on the early steps of the transport of LPS by the Lpt machinery: the extraction of LPS from the inner membrane. The accompanying paper (May JM, Sherman DJ, Simpson BW, Ruiz N, Kahne D. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150027. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0027)) describes the subsequent steps as LPS travels through the periplasm and the outer membrane to its final destination at the cell surface.

  7. The Aeromonas salmonicida Lipopolysaccharide Core from Different Subspecies: The Unusual subsp. pectinolytica.

    PubMed

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Initial hydridization tests using Aeromonas salmonicida typical and atypical strains showed the possibility of different lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer cores among these strains. By chemical structural analysis, LPS-core SDS-PAGE gel migration, and functional and comparative genomics we demonstrated that typical A. salmonicida (subsp. salmonicida) strains and atypical subsp. masoucida and probably smithia strains showed the same LPS outer core. A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes strains show a similar LPS outer core but lack one of the most external residues (a galactose linked α1-6 to heptose), not affecting the O-antigen LPS linkage. A. salmonicida subsp. pectinolytica strains show a rather changed LPS outer core, which is identical to the LPS outer core from the majority of the A. hydrophila strains studied by genomic analyses. The LPS inner core in all tested A. salmonicida strains, typical and atypical, is well-conserved. Furthermore, the LPS inner core seems to be conserved in all the Aeromonas (psychrophilic or mesophilic) strains studied by genomic analyses.

  8. Effects of Citral on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Zhao, Hongfeng; Liu, Jinyang; Fang, Chao; Miao, Renying

    2016-04-01

    Citral is an active compound of lemongrass oil which has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of citral on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in a rat model of peritonitis and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). LPS was intraperitoneally injected into rats to establish a peritonitis model. The HUVECs were treated with citral for 12 h before exposure to LPS. The levels of TNF-α and IL-8 were measured using ELISA. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, NF-κB, and PPAR-γ. The results showed that citral had a protective effect against LPS-induced peritonitis. Citral decreased the levels of WBCs and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. Citral also inhibited LPS-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the peritoneal tissue. Treatment of HUVECs with citral significantly inhibited TNF-α and IL-8 expression induced by LPS. LPS-induced VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression were also suppressed by citral. Meanwhile, we found that citral inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation in HUVECs. Furthermore, we found that citral activated PPAR-γ and the anti-inflammatory effects of citral can be reversed by PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662. In conclusion, citral inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory response via activating PPAR-γ which attenuates NF-κB activation and inflammatory mediator production. PMID:26658749

  9. Synthesis, characterization and immunological properties of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 lipopolysaccharide- diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Rokhsartalab-Azar, Shadi; Shapouri, Reza; Rahnema, Mehdi; Najafzadeh, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Escherichia coli O157:H7, an emerging pathogen, causes severe enteritis and the extraintestinal complication of hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The goal of this study was to evaluate the conjugate of E. coli O157: H7 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with diphtheria toxoid (DT) as a candidate vaccine in mice model. Material and Methods: LPS from E. coli O157:H7 was extracted by hot phenol method and then detoxified. Purified LPS was coupled to DT with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a linker. The coupling molar ratio of LPS to DT was 3:1. Clinical evaluation of E. coli O157:H7 LPS-DT conjugate was also performed. Results: The conjugate was devoid of endotoxin activity and indicated 0.125 U/ml of D-LPS. Mice immunization with D-LPS DT conjugate elicited fourfold higher IgG antibody in comparison to D-LPS. Also, in vivo protection of mice with conjugate provided high protection against the LD50 of E. coli O157:H7, which indicated a good correlation with the IgG titer. Conclusion: Our results showed that the suggested vaccine composed of E. coli O157:H7 LPS and DT had a significant potential to protect against E. coli infections. PMID:26668702

  10. Active hexose correlated compound modulates LPS-induced hypotension and gut injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Liang, Yangyan; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Wakame, Koji; Fujii, Hajime; Takanari, Jun; Devakottai, Sundar; Kulkarni, Anil

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesized that AHCC; (Amino UP Chemical Co., Ltd., Sapporo, Japan), a mushroom mycelium extract obtained from liquid culture of Lentinula edodes, restores immune function in LPS-induced inflammation in the gut, especially when the nitric oxide signaling pathway is impaired. This is the first inter-disciplinary proposal to identify molecular mechanisms involved in LPS-induced immune dysfunction in the gut in conscious animals treated or non-treated with AHCC, a promoter of immune support. Specifically, we have tested the effects of AHCC on LPS-induced deleterious effects on blood pressure and gut injury in conscious rats. The time course of biological markers of innate/acquired immune responses, and inflammation/oxidative stress is fully described in the present manuscript. Rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (N=6 per group). Group 1 received 10% of AHCC in drinking water for 5days; Group 2 received lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Escherichia coli 0111:B4 purchased from Sigma) only at 20mg/kg IV; Group 3 received combined treatments (AHCC + LPS). LPS was administered at 20mg/kg IV, 5days following AHCC treatment. We have demonstrated that AHCC decreased the LPS-deleterious effects of blood pressure and also decreased inflammatory markers e.g., cytokines, nitric oxide and edema formation. Finally, AHCC diminished lymphocyte infiltration, restoring gut architecture. Because AHCC was administered prior to LPS, our results indicate the potential impact of AHCC's prophylactic effects on LPS inflammation. Consequently, additional experiments are warrant to assess its therapeutic effects in sepsis-induced inflammation. PMID:27500458

  11. AS-703026 Inhibits LPS-Induced TNFα Production through MEK/ERK Dependent and Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Wu, Yonghong; Li, Manxiang; Qiu, Xiaojuan; Bai, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by intense lung infiltrations of immune cells (macrophages and monocytes). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates macrophages/monocytes, leading to production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and other cytokines, which cause subsequent lung damages. In the current study, our results demonstrated that AS-703026, a novel MEK/ERK inhibitor, suppressed LPS-induced TNFα mRNA expression and protein secretion in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages, and in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Meanwhile, TNFα production in LPS-stimulated COPD patents’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was also repressed by AS-703026. At the molecular level, we showed that AS-703026 blocked LPS-induced MEK/ERK activation in above macrophages/monocytes. However, restoring ERK activation in AS-703026-treated RAW 264.7 cells by introducing a constitutive-actively (CA)-ERK1 only partially reinstated LPS-mediated TNFα production. Meanwhile, AS-703026 could still inhibit TNFα response in ERK1/2-depleted (by shRNA) RAW 264.7 cells. Significantly, we found that AS-703026 inhibited LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activation in above macrophages and COPD patients’ PBMCs. In vivo, oral administration of AS-703026 inhibited LPS-induced TNFα production and endotoxin shock in BALB/c mice. Together, we show that AS-703026 in vitro inhibits LPS-induced TNFα production in macrophages/monocytes, and in vivo protects mice from LPS-induced endotoxin shock. Thus, it could be further studied as a useful anti-inflammatory therapy for COPD patients. PMID:26381508

  12. AS-703026 Inhibits LPS-Induced TNFα Production through MEK/ERK Dependent and Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Wu, Yonghong; Li, Manxiang; Qiu, Xiaojuan; Bai, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by intense lung infiltrations of immune cells (macrophages and monocytes). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates macrophages/monocytes, leading to production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and other cytokines, which cause subsequent lung damages. In the current study, our results demonstrated that AS-703026, a novel MEK/ERK inhibitor, suppressed LPS-induced TNFα mRNA expression and protein secretion in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages, and in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Meanwhile, TNFα production in LPS-stimulated COPD patents' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was also repressed by AS-703026. At the molecular level, we showed that AS-703026 blocked LPS-induced MEK/ERK activation in above macrophages/monocytes. However, restoring ERK activation in AS-703026-treated RAW 264.7 cells by introducing a constitutive-actively (CA)-ERK1 only partially reinstated LPS-mediated TNFα production. Meanwhile, AS-703026 could still inhibit TNFα response in ERK1/2-depleted (by shRNA) RAW 264.7 cells. Significantly, we found that AS-703026 inhibited LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activation in above macrophages and COPD patients' PBMCs. In vivo, oral administration of AS-703026 inhibited LPS-induced TNFα production and endotoxin shock in BALB/c mice. Together, we show that AS-703026 in vitro inhibits LPS-induced TNFα production in macrophages/monocytes, and in vivo protects mice from LPS-induced endotoxin shock. Thus, it could be further studied as a useful anti-inflammatory therapy for COPD patients. PMID:26381508

  13. Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides from Microcystis on Glutathione-Based Detoxification Pathways in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; Gantar, Miroslav; Mayer, Gregory D.; Gibbs, Patrick D. L.; Berry, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria (“blue-green algae”) are recognized producers of a diverse array of toxic secondary metabolites. Of these, the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), produced by all cyanobacteria, remain to be well investigated. In the current study, we specifically employed the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo to investigate the effects of LPS from geographically diverse strains of the widespread cyanobacterial genus, Microcystis, on several detoxifying enzymes/pathways, including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)/glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), and compared observed effects to those of heterotrophic bacterial (i.e., E. coli) LPS. In agreement with previous studies, cyanobacterial LPS significantly reduced GST in embryos exposed to LPS in all treatments. In contrast, GPx moderately increased in embryos exposed to LPS, with no effect on reciprocal GR activity. Interestingly, total glutathione levels were elevated in embryos exposed to Microcystis LPS, but the relative levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH/GSSG) were, likewise, elevated suggesting that oxidative stress is not involved in the observed effects as typical of heterotrophic bacterial LPS in mammalian systems. In further support of this, no effect was observed with respect to CAT or SOD activity. These findings demonstrate that Microcystis LPS affects glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish embryo, and more generally, that this model is well suited for investigating the apparent toxicophore of cyanobacterial LPS, including possible differences in structure-activity relationships between heterotrophic and cyanobacterial LPS, and teleost fish versus mammalian systems. PMID:22822454

  14. Genomic and Proteomic Studies on Plesiomonas shigelloides Lipopolysaccharide Core Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Regué, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We report here the identification of waa clusters with the genes required for the biosynthesis of the core lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of two Plesiomonas shigelloides strains. Both P. shigelloides waa clusters shared all of the genes besides the ones flanking waaL. In both strains, all of the genes were found in the waa gene cluster, although one common core biosynthetic gene (wapG) was found in a different chromosome location outside the cluster. Since P. shigelloides and Klebsiella pneumoniae share a core LPS carbohydrate backbone extending up at least to the second outer-core residue, the functions of the common P. shigelloides genes were elucidated by genetic complementation studies using well-defined K. pneumoniae mutants. The function of strain-specific inner- or outer-core genes was identified by using as a surrogate acceptor LPS from three well-defined K. pneumoniae core LPS mutants. Using this strategy, we were able to assign a proteomic function to all of the P. shigelloides waa genes identified in the two strains encoding six new glycosyltransferases (WapA, -B, -C, -D, -F, and -G). P. shigelloides demonstrated an important variety of core LPS structures, despite being a single species of the genus, as well as high homologous recombination in housekeeping genes. PMID:24244003

  15. Immobilization and molecular interactions between bacteriophage and lipopolysaccharide bilayers.

    PubMed

    Handa, Hitesh; Gurczynski, Stephen; Jackson, Matthew P; Mao, Guangzhao

    2010-07-20

    The paper describes immobilization methods of bacteriophage P22 and tailspike gp9 proteins isolated from P22 on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes. The paper also reports single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) using AFM of the immobilized P22 (or gp9) interactions with substrate-supported O-antigenic lipopolysaccharides (LPS) bilayers. LPS covers the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, such as Salmonella typhimurium. Evidence from AFM imaging and SMFS shows that immobilized P22 (or gp9) are capable of strong and multivalent binding to supported LPS. The most common rupture forces between P22 and LPS were identified to be 72, 130, 206, and 279 pN at force loading rate of 12,000 pN/s. The quantized unbinding force was found to decrease with decreasing force loading rate as predicted by the Bell model. By fitting the force data with the Bell model, an energy barrier of 55 kJ/mol was obtained. Evidence is also provided that demonstrates the resilience of phage to pH and temperature fluctuation as well as dehydration/rehydration cycles. The biospecific interactions between P22 and the LPS are relevant to cell infection, inflammation, cancer progression and metastasis, food safety, pharmaceuticals, and biosensor development. PMID:20481467

  16. Genomic and proteomic studies on Plesiomonas shigelloides lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M

    2014-02-01

    We report here the identification of waa clusters with the genes required for the biosynthesis of the core lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of two Plesiomonas shigelloides strains. Both P. shigelloides waa clusters shared all of the genes besides the ones flanking waaL. In both strains, all of the genes were found in the waa gene cluster, although one common core biosynthetic gene (wapG) was found in a different chromosome location outside the cluster. Since P. shigelloides and Klebsiella pneumoniae share a core LPS carbohydrate backbone extending up at least to the second outer-core residue, the functions of the common P. shigelloides genes were elucidated by genetic complementation studies using well-defined K. pneumoniae mutants. The function of strain-specific inner- or outer-core genes was identified by using as a surrogate acceptor LPS from three well-defined K. pneumoniae core LPS mutants. Using this strategy, we were able to assign a proteomic function to all of the P. shigelloides waa genes identified in the two strains encoding six new glycosyltransferases (WapA, -B, -C, -D, -F, and -G). P. shigelloides demonstrated an important variety of core LPS structures, despite being a single species of the genus, as well as high homologous recombination in housekeeping genes.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide does not affect acoustic startle reflex in mice.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Blaszczyk, Janusz; Sadowski, Bogdan; Sliwa, Adam T; Wolak, Patrycja; Tymosiak-Zielinska, Agnieszka; Lisowski, Pawel; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) evokes in rodents an adaptive sickness behavior. It also produces changes in stress hormones secretion and activity of brain serotonergic and noradrenergic systems that have been implicated in stress responses, fear, and anxiety. Acoustic startle reflex (ASR) is regarded as a protective behavioral response that is enhanced in threatening situations or following an aversive event, and it can be modulated by physiological and emotional state of an animal. Effects of intraperitoneal injections of LPS on ASR, prepulse inhibition (PPI), locomotor activity in open field, and blood plasma corticosterone concentration were studied in lines of mice that display high (HA line) or low (LA line) swim stress-induced analgesia and also differ in emotional behaviors, including the magnitude of ASR. In both lines LPS produced robust sickness behavior, as evidenced by a decrease in locomotion and body weight, and an increase in corticosterone concentration. However, in neither line LPS injections affected responses to acoustic stimuli as assessed by the ASR and PPI magnitudes. The findings suggest that in sickness behavior induced by LPS the protective responses to salient environmental stimuli are not impaired. The significance of this finding for the concept of sickness behavior is discussed. PMID:17651939

  18. Lipopolysaccharide Pretreatment Protects from Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Heemann, Uwe; Szabo, Attila; Hamar, Peter; Müller, Veronika; Witzke, Oliver; Lutz, Jens; Philipp, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    In vivo administration of low doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to rodents can protect these animals from subsequently administrated, usually lethal doses of endotoxin or LPS. In this study we tested the effects of LPS pretreatment on ischemia/reperfusion injury in the kidney. Male C57/B1 mice were pretreated with different doses of LPS or phosphate-buffered saline on days −4 and −3. The right kidney was removed, and the vessels of the left kidney were clamped for 30 or 45 minutes on day 0. Creatinine levels and survival of animals were monitored. To test the involvement of cytokines, additional animals were harvested before (“time 0”) and 15 minutes, 1, 2, 8, and 16 hours after reperfusion for histology, immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end-labeling assay, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis (including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and interferon (IFN)-γ messenger RNA (mRNA)). In controls, renal ischemia of 30 minutes was nonlethal, whereas 73% of the animals died within 48 ± 18 hours, after 45 minutes of ischemia. All different doses of LPS protected the animals from lethal renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Starting at similar levels, serum creatinine increased significantly in controls but not in LPS-pretreated animals over time. As early as 2 hours after reperfusion, tubular cell damage was significantly more pronounced in controls than in LPS-treated mice. In controls, tubules deteriorated progressively until 8 hours of reperfusion. At this time, more than 50% of tubular cells were destroyed. This destruction was accompanied by a pronounced leukocytic infiltration, predominantly by macrophages. In contrast, LPS pretreatment prevented the destruction of kidney tissue and infiltration by leukocytes. The terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end-labeling assay revealed significantly more apoptotic cells in

  19. Separation and characterization of two chemically distinct lipopolysaccharides in two Pectinatus species.

    PubMed Central

    Helander, I M; Hurme, R; Haikara, A; Moran, A P

    1992-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from the type strains of the anaerobic beer spoilage bacteria Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus and P. frisingensis were extracted with the 5:5:8 volume ratio modification of the phenolchloroform-petroleum ether method (H. Brade and C. Galanos, Eur. J. Biochem. 122:233-237, 1982). Sequential precipitations of LPS with water and acetone from the phenol phase yielded LPS which differed in that water-precipitable material (LPS-H2O; 0.1 to 0.4% of the dry weight of the cells) was rough-type LPS, whereas acetone-precipitable material (LPS-Ac; 4.6 to 5.8% of the dry weight) contained both rough-type LPS and high-molecular-weight material resembling smooth LPS. The LPS were chemically characterized, and they contained D-glucosamine, 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose, 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid, D-fucose, D-galactose, D-glucose, D-mannose, and phosphate. D-Fucose was present mostly in LPS-Ac, suggesting that it is a constituent of the O antigen. The major fatty acids were ester- and amide-linked (R)-3-hydroxytridecanoic and ester-linked undecanoic acids, with minor amounts of ester-linked tridecanoic and (R)-3-hydroxyundecanoic acids. The chemical compositions of LPS-H2O and LPS-Ac suggested that they differ not only in their smooth or rough nature but also in the structure of their core regions. This may explain their different precipitabilities from the extraction mixture. The extraction method was also shown to be applicable to the isolation of smooth-type LPS from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Extraction of two Typhimurium strains carrying chemically different O antigens resulted in high yields (8% of the dry weight) of LPS. Strain SH2183, which contains the relatively hydrophobic O-4,5,12 antigen yielded almost exclusively LPS-Ac, whereas the LPS of strain SH5770, which has a hydrophilic O-6,7 antigen, was exclusively LPS-H2O. No fractionation to smooth and rough LPS occurred with the Typhimurium strains. Images PMID:1577699

  20. Phytoncide Extracted from Pinecone Decreases LPS-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sukyung; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Hai Chon; Petriello, Michael C; Kim, Bae Yong; Do, Jeong Tae; Lim, Dae-Seog; Lee, Hong Gu; Han, Sung Gu

    2016-03-01

    Mastitis is a prevalent inflammatory disease that remains one of the main causes of poor quality of milk. Phytoncides are naturally occurring anti-inflammatory compounds derived from plants and trees. To determine if treatment with phytoncide could decrease the severity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses, mammary alveolar epithelial cells (MAC-T) were pretreated with phytoncide (0.02% and 0.04% (v/v)) followed by LPS treatment (1 and 25 μg/ml). The results demonstrated that phytoncide downregulated LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. Additionally, LPS-induced activation of ERK1/2, p38, and Akt was attenuated by phytoncide. Treatment of cells with known pharmacological inhibitors of ERK1/2 (PD98059), p38 (SB203580), and Akt (LY294002) confirmed the association of these signaling pathways with the observed alterations in COX-2 expression. Moreover, phytoncide attenuated LPS-induced NF-κB activation and superoxide production, and, finally, treatment with phytoncide increased Nrf2 activation. Results suggest that phytoncide can decrease LPS-induced inflammation in MAC-T cells.

  1. Regulated Control of the Assembly and Diversity of LPS by Noncoding sRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gracjana; Raina, Satish

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is asymmetric due to the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) facing the outer leaflet of the OM and phospholipids facing the periplasmic side. LPS is essential for bacterial viability, since it provides a permeability barrier and is a major virulence determinant in pathogenic bacteria. In Escherichia coli, several steps of LPS biosynthesis and assembly are regulated by the RpoE sigma factor and stress responsive two-component systems as well as dedicated small RNAs. LPS composition is highly heterogeneous and dynamically altered upon stress and other challenges in the environment because of the transcriptional activation of RpoE regulon members and posttranslational control by RpoE-regulated Hfq-dependent RybB and MicA sRNAs. The PhoP/Q two-component system further regulates Kdo2-lipid A modification via MgrR sRNA. Some of these structural alterations are critical for antibiotic resistance, OM integrity, virulence, survival in host, and adaptation to specific environmental niches. The heterogeneity arises following the incorporation of nonstoichiometric modifications in the lipid A part and alterations in the composition of inner and outer core of LPS. The biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids is tightly coupled. This requires the availability of metabolic precursors, whose accumulation is controlled by sRNAs like SlrA, GlmZ, and GlmY. PMID:26618164

  2. Ulinastatin attenuates pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx damage and inhibits endothelial heparanase activity in LPS-induced ARDS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lipeng; Huang, Xiao; Kong, Guiqing; Xu, Haixiao; Li, Jiankui; Hao, Dong; Wang, Tao; Han, Shasha; Han, Chunlei; Sun, Yeying; Liu, Xiangyong; Wang, Xiaozhi

    2016-09-16

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome of acute respiratory failure characterized by major pathologic mechanisms of increased microvascular permeability and inflammation. The glycocalyx lines on the endothelial surface, which determines the vascular permeability, and heparanase play pivotal roles in the degradation of heparan sulfate (HS). HS is the major component of the glycocalyx. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of Ulinastatin (UTI) on vascular permeability and pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In our study, C57BL/6 mice and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with LPS to induce injury models. After 6 h of LPS stimulation, pulmonary pathological changes, pulmonary edema, and vascular permeability were notably attenuated by UTI. UTI inhibited LPS-induced endothelial glycocalyx destruction and significantly decreased the production of HS as determined by ELISA and immunofluorescence. UTI also reduced the active form of heparanase (50 kDa) expression and heparanase activity. Moreover, lysosome pH was investigated because heparanase (65 kDa) can be reduced easily in its active form at 50 kDa in a low pH environment within lysosome. Results showed that UTI could inhibit LPS-induced pH elevation in lysosome. In conclusion, UTI protects pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx integrity and inhibits heparanase activity during LPS-induced ARDS.

  3. Caffeine prevents LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Kui-Jin; Ryu, Su-Jung; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2016-03-25

    Caffeine is a white crystalline xanthine alkaloid found in the seeds of coffee plants and leaves of the tea bush. In this study, we evaluated whether caffeine exerts anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. RAW264.7 cells were treated with various concentrations of caffeine in the presence or absence of LPS. Caffeine decreased the LPS-induced inflammatory mediator, nitric oxide (NO). Caffeine treatment also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-3, IL-6 and IL-12, and decreased both IL-6 secretion and phosphorylated p38MAPK expression in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Caffeine inhibited nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) via IκBα phosphorylation. In addition, caffeine inhibited LPS-induced NO production in zebrafish. These results suggest that caffeine may suppress LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells by regulating NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation.

  4. LPS-induced microvascular leukocytosis can be assessed by blue-field entoptic phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kolodjaschna, Julia; Berisha, Fatmire; Lung, Solveig; Schaller, Georg; Polska, Elzbieta; Jilma, Bernd; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2004-08-01

    Administration of low doses of Escherichia coli endotoxin [a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] to humans enables the study of inflammatory mechanisms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the blue-field entoptic technique may be used to quantify the increase in circulating leukocytes in the ocular microvasculature after LPS infusion. In addition, combined laser Doppler velocimetry and retinal vessel size measurement were used to study red blood cell movement. Twelve healthy male volunteers received 20 IU/kg iv LPS as a bolus infusion. Outcome parameters were measured at baseline and 4 h after LPS administration. In the first protocol (n = 6 subjects), ocular hemodynamic effects were assessed with the blue-field entoptic technique, the retinal vessel analyzer, and laser Doppler velocimetry. In the second protocol (n = 6 subjects), white blood cell (WBC) counts from peripheral blood samples and blue-field entoptic technique measurements were performed. LPS caused peripheral blood leukocytosis and increased WBC density in ocular microvessels (by 49%; P = 0.036) but did not change WBC velocity. In addition, retinal venous diameter was increased (by 9%; P = 0.008), but red blood cell velocity remained unchanged. The LPS-induced changes in retinal WBC density and leukocyte counts were significantly correlated (r = 0.87). The present study indicates that the blue-field entoptic technique can be used to assess microvascular leukocyte recruitment in vivo. In addition, our data indicate retinal venous dilation in response to endotoxin.

  5. The anti-inflammatory effect of TR6 on LPS-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Fu, Yunhe; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Zecai; Zhang, Wenlong; Gao, Xuejiao; Lu, Xiaojie; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2016-01-01

    [TRIAP]-derived decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRIAP-derived decoy peptide (TR6) containing, the N-terminal portion of the third helical region of the [TIRAP] TIR domain (sequence "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK and -KPGFLRDPWCKYQML-"C"). We evaluated the effects of TR6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, the mastitis model was induced by LPS administration for 24h, and TR6 treatment was initiated 1h before or after induction of LPS. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells and neutrophils were used to investigate the effects of TR6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TR6 significantly inhibited mammary gland hisopathologic changes, MPO activity, and LPS-induced production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. In vitro, TR6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production and phosphorylation of NF-κB and MAPKs. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of TR6 against LPS-induced mastitis may be due to its ability to inhibit TLR4-mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. TR6 may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment.

  6. LPS promote the odontoblastic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells via MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    He, Wenxi; Wang, Zhihua; Luo, Zhirong; Yu, Qing; Jiang, Yong; Zhang, Yaqing; Zhou, Zeyuan; Smith, Anthony J; Cooper, Paul R

    2015-03-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) show significant potential for exploitation in novel regeneration strategies, although lack of understanding of their responses to bacterial challenge constrains their application. The present study aimed to investigate whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major pathogenic factor of Gram-negative bacteria, regulates the differentiation of hDPSCs and which intracellular signaling pathways may be involved. LPS treatment significantly promoted the differentiation of hDPSCs demonstrable by increased mineralized nodule formation and mRNA expression of several odontoblastic markers in a dose-dependent manner. While inhibition of TLR4, p38, and ERK signaling markedly antagonized LPS-mediated differentiation of hDPSCs. The inhibition of JNK and NF-κB signaling had no detectable effect on LPS activation of hDPSCs. LPS stimulation resulted in phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, IκB-α, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in DPSCs in a time-dependent manner, which was markedly suppressed by their specific inhibitors, respectively. Data demonstrated that LPS promoted odontoblastic differentiation of hDPSCs via TLR4, ERK, and P38 MAPK signaling pathways, but not NF-κB signaling.

  7. Nrf2-dependent protection from LPS induced inflammatory response and mortality by CDDO-Imidazolide.

    PubMed

    Thimmulappa, Rajesh K; Scollick, Catherine; Traore, Kassim; Yates, Melinda; Trush, Michael A; Liby, Karen T; Sporn, Michael B; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Kensler, Thomas W; Biswal, Shyam

    2006-12-29

    Sepsis induced lethality is characterized by amplified host innate immune response. Nrf2, a bZIP transcription factor, regulates a battery of cellular antioxidative genes and maintains cellular redox homeostasis. This study demonstrates that increasing Nrf2 activity by a potent small molecule activator, CDDO-Im (1-[2-cyano-3-,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oyl]imidazole), protects from deregulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced innate immune response. In response to LPS stimuli, nrf2-deficient (nrf2 -/-) peritoneal neutrophils showed increased NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation, proinflammatory cytokines (Tnf-alpha and Il-6) and chemokines (Mip2 and Mcp-1) relative to wild-type (nrf2 +/+) cells. Pretreatment of peritoneal neutrophils with CDDO-Im induced antioxidative genes (Ho-1, Gclc, Gclm, and Nqo1) and attenuated LPS induced ROS generation as well as expression of proinflammatory cytokines exclusively in nrf2 +/+ neutrophils but not in nrf2 -/- cells. In corroboration with in vitro studies, pretreatment with CDDO-Im induced Nrf2-dependent antioxidative genes, attenuated LPS induced proinflammatory cytokine expression, and decreased mortality specifically in the nrf2 +/+ mice. In conclusion, the results suggest that Nrf2 is associated with oxidative regulation of LPS induced innate immune response in neutrophils. Activation of Nrf2-dependent compensatory antioxidative pathways by CDDO-Im protects from LPS induced inflammatory response and mortality.

  8. The anti-inflammatory effect of TR6 on LPS-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Fu, Yunhe; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Zecai; Zhang, Wenlong; Gao, Xuejiao; Lu, Xiaojie; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2016-01-01

    [TRIAP]-derived decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRIAP-derived decoy peptide (TR6) containing, the N-terminal portion of the third helical region of the [TIRAP] TIR domain (sequence "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK and -KPGFLRDPWCKYQML-"C"). We evaluated the effects of TR6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, the mastitis model was induced by LPS administration for 24h, and TR6 treatment was initiated 1h before or after induction of LPS. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells and neutrophils were used to investigate the effects of TR6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TR6 significantly inhibited mammary gland hisopathologic changes, MPO activity, and LPS-induced production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. In vitro, TR6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production and phosphorylation of NF-κB and MAPKs. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of TR6 against LPS-induced mastitis may be due to its ability to inhibit TLR4-mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. TR6 may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment. PMID:26679677

  9. Caffeine prevents LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Kui-Jin; Ryu, Su-Jung; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2016-03-25

    Caffeine is a white crystalline xanthine alkaloid found in the seeds of coffee plants and leaves of the tea bush. In this study, we evaluated whether caffeine exerts anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. RAW264.7 cells were treated with various concentrations of caffeine in the presence or absence of LPS. Caffeine decreased the LPS-induced inflammatory mediator, nitric oxide (NO). Caffeine treatment also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-3, IL-6 and IL-12, and decreased both IL-6 secretion and phosphorylated p38MAPK expression in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Caffeine inhibited nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) via IκBα phosphorylation. In addition, caffeine inhibited LPS-induced NO production in zebrafish. These results suggest that caffeine may suppress LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells by regulating NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. PMID:26852703

  10. Modulation of macrophage Ia expression by lipopolysaccharide: Stem cell requirements, accessory lymphocyte involvement, and IA-inducing factor production

    SciTech Connect

    Wentworth, P.A.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1989-07-01

    The mechanism of induction of murine macrophage Ia expression by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was studied. Intraperitoneal injection of 1 microgram of LPS resulted in a 3- to 10-fold increase in the number of IA-positive peritoneal macrophages (flow cytometry and immunofluorescence) and a 6-to 16-fold increase by radioimmunoassay. The isolated lipid A moiety of LPS was a potent inducer of macrophage Ia expression. Ia induction required a functional myelopoietic system as indicated by the finding that the response to LPS was eliminated in irradiated (900 rads) mice and reinstated by reconstitution with bone marrow cells. Comparison of LPS-induced Ia expression in normal and LPS-primed mice revealed a faster secondary response to LPS. The memory response could be adoptively transferred to normal mice with nonadherent spleen cells prepared 60 days after LPS injection. Spleen cells prepared 5 days after LPS injection caused Ia induction in LPS-nonresponder mice; such induction was not observed in irradiated (900 rads) recipients. The cell responsible for this phenomenon was identified as a Thy-1+, immunoglobulin-negative nonadherent cell. The biosynthesis and expression of Ia were not increased by direct exposure of macrophages to LPS in vitro. Small amounts of LPS inhibited Ia induction by gamma interferon. LPS showed positive regulatory effects on Ia expression by delaying the loss of Ia expression on cultured macrophages and by stimulating the production of Ia-inducing factors. Supernatants from cultured spleen cells stimulated with LPS in vitro contained antiviral and Ia-inducing activity that was acid labile, indicating that the active factor is gamma interferon. We conclude that induction of Ia expression by LPS in vivo is a bone-marrow-dependent, radiation-sensitive process which involves the stimulation of a gamma interferon-producing accessory lymphocyte and a delay in Ia turnover.

  11. Transcriptional activation of MMP-13 by periodontal pathogenic LPS requires p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Rossa, Carlos; Liu, Min; Bronson, Paul; Kirkwood, Keith L

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloprotease-13 (MMP-13) is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased expression is associated with a number of pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal diseases. MMP-13 gene regulation and the signal transduction pathways activated in response to bacterial LPS are largely unknown. In these studies, the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in the regulation of MMP-13 induced by lipopolysaccharide was investigated. Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans significantly (P < 0.05) increased MMP-13 steady-state mRNA (average of 27% and 46% increase, respectively) in murine periodontal ligament fibroblasts. MMP-13 mRNA induction was significantly reduced by inhibition of p38 MAP kinase. Immunoblot analysis indicated that p38 signaling was required for LPS-induced MMP-13 expression. Lipopolysaccharide induced proximal promoter reporter (-660/+32 mMMP-13) gene activity required p38 signaling. Collectively, these results indicate that lipopolysaccharide-induced murine MMP-13 is regulated by p38 signaling through a transcriptional mechanism.

  12. Febuxostat protects rats against lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Alaa N A; Shehatou, George S G; Shebl, Abdelhadi M; Salem, Hatem A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate possible protective effects of febuxostat, a highly potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor, against acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups, as follows: (i) vehicle control group; (ii) and (iii) febuxostat 10 and febuxostat 15 groups, drug-treated controls; (iv) LPS group, receiving an intraperitoneal injection of LPS (7.5 mg/kg); (v) and (vi) febuxostat 10-LPS and febuxostat 15-LPS groups, receiving oral treatment of febuxostat (10 and 15 mg/kg/day, respectively) for 7 days before LPS. After 18 h administration of LPS, blood was collected for C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was examined for leukocyte infiltration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, protein content, and total nitrate/nitrite. Lung weight gain was determined, and lung tissue homogenate was prepared and evaluated for oxidative stress. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was assessed in BALF and lung homogenate. Moreover, histological changes of lung tissues were evaluated. LPS elicited lung injury characterized by increased lung water content (by 1.2 fold), leukocyte infiltration (by 13 fold), inflammation and oxidative stress (indicated by increased malondialdehyde (MDA), by 3.4 fold), and reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity (by 34 %). Febuxostat dose-dependently decreased LPS-induced lung edema and elevations in BALF protein content, infiltration of leukocytes, and LDH activity. Moreover, the elevated levels of TNF-α in BALF and lung tissue of LPS-treated rats were attenuated by febuxostat pretreatment. Febuxostat also displayed a potent antioxidant activity by decreasing lung tissue levels of MDA and enhancing SOD activity. Histological analysis of lung tissue further demonstrated that febuxostat dose-dependently reversed LPS-induced histopathological changes. These findings demonstrate a significant dose

  13. Movement-evoked hyperalgesia induced by lipopolysaccharides is not suppressed by glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Katalin J.; Papic, Jonathan C.; Larson, Alice A.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) produces a variety of effects, including movement-evoked hyperalgesia that can be measured using the grip force assay in mice. Because both lethality and enhanced sensitivity to cutaneous pain following exposure to endotoxins have each been attributed to inflammatory mediators, we explored the possibility that LPS-induced movement-evoked hyperalgesia is also sensitive to manipulations of glucocorticoids that regulate these other LPS responses. We found that the hyperalgesic effect of LPS (5 mg/kg s.c.) in mice that were adrenalectomized did not differ from that in control mice that were sham-operated, even though mortality after LPS was potentiated by adrenalectomy. The development of tolerance to the movement-evoked hyperalgesic effect of LPS also did not differ between adrenalectomized and sham-operated control mice. In addition, mifepristone (25 mg/kg s.c.), a glucocorticoid antagonist, did not attenuate the hyperalgesic effect of LPS (2 mg/kg s.c.), yet this dose of mifepristone was sufficient to enhance the incidence of lethality induced by LPS. Enhancement of glucocorticoid activity by two injections of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg s.c.) had no effect on the degree of hyperalgesia in mice injected with LPS (5 mg/kg s.c.), yet this dose of dexamethasone was sufficient to attenuate the incidence of mortality induced by LPS in adrenalectomized mice. Finally, morphine (10 mg/kg i.p.) reversed the decrease in grip force caused by LPS (5 mg/kg i.p.), supporting the interpretation that decreases in grip force produced by LPS reflect muscle hyperalgesia that is not sensitive to glucocorticoids. PMID:17686584

  14. Sickness behaviour after lipopolysaccharide treatment in ghrelin deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Éva; Krueger, James M

    2014-02-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced mainly by the gastrointestinal system and the brain. Much evidence also indicates a role for ghrelin in sleep and thermoregulation. Further, ghrelin was recently implicated in immune system modulation. Administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces fever, anorexia, and increased non-rapid-eye movement sleep (NREMS) and these actions are mediated primarily by proinflammatory cytokines. Ghrelin reduces LPS-induced fever, suppresses circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and reduces the severity and mortality of various models of experimental endotoxemia. In the present study, we determined the role of intact ghrelin signaling in LPS-induced sleep, feeding, and thermoregulatory responses in mice. Sleep-wake activity was determined after intraperitoneal, dark onset administration of 0.4, 2 and 10 μg LPS in preproghrelin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, body temperature, motor activity and changes in 24-h food intake and body weight were measured. LPS induced dose-dependent increases in NREMS, and suppressed rapid-eye movement sleep, electroencephalographic slow-wave activity, motor activity, food intake and body weight in both Ppg KO and WT mice. Body temperature changes showed a biphasic pattern with a decrease during the dark period followed by an increase in the light phase. The effects of the low and middle doses of LPS were indistinguishable between the two genotypes. Administration of 10 μg LPS, however, induced significantly larger changes in NREMS and wakefulness amounts, body temperature, food intake and body weight in the Ppg KO mice. These findings support a role for ghrelin as an endogenous modulator of inflammatory responses and a central component of arousal and feeding circuits.

  15. Intermittent fasting attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation and memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic bacterial infections often result in enduring cognitive impairment and are a risk factor for dementia. There are currently no effective treatments for infection-induced cognitive impairment. Previous studies have shown that intermittent fasting (IF) can increase the resistance of neurons to injury and disease by stimulating adaptive cellular stress responses. However, the impact of IF on the cognitive sequelae of systemic and brain inflammation is unknown. Methods Rats on IF for 30 days received 1 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline intravenously. Half of the rats were subjected to behavioral tests and the other half were euthanized two hours after LPS administration and the hippocampus was dissected and frozen for analyses. Results Here, we report that IF ameliorates cognitive deficits in a rat model of sepsis by a mechanism involving NF-κB activation, suppression of the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and enhancement of neurotrophic support. Treatment of rats with LPS resulted in deficits in cognitive performance in the Barnes maze and inhibitory avoidance tests, without changing locomotor activity, that were ameliorated in rats that had been maintained on the IF diet. IF also resulted in reduced levels of mRNAs encoding the LPS receptor TLR4 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the hippocampus. Moreover, IF prevented LPS-induced elevation of IL-1α, IL-1β and TNF-α levels, and prevented the LPS-induced reduction of BDNF levels in the hippocampus. IF also significantly attenuated LPS-induced elevations of serum IL-1β, IFN-γ, RANTES, TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that IF induces adaptive responses in the brain and periphery that can suppress inflammation and preserve cognitive function in an animal model of systemic bacterial infection. PMID:24886300

  16. Sickness behaviour after lipopolysaccharide treatment in ghrelin deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Éva; Krueger, James M

    2014-02-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced mainly by the gastrointestinal system and the brain. Much evidence also indicates a role for ghrelin in sleep and thermoregulation. Further, ghrelin was recently implicated in immune system modulation. Administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces fever, anorexia, and increased non-rapid-eye movement sleep (NREMS) and these actions are mediated primarily by proinflammatory cytokines. Ghrelin reduces LPS-induced fever, suppresses circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and reduces the severity and mortality of various models of experimental endotoxemia. In the present study, we determined the role of intact ghrelin signaling in LPS-induced sleep, feeding, and thermoregulatory responses in mice. Sleep-wake activity was determined after intraperitoneal, dark onset administration of 0.4, 2 and 10 μg LPS in preproghrelin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, body temperature, motor activity and changes in 24-h food intake and body weight were measured. LPS induced dose-dependent increases in NREMS, and suppressed rapid-eye movement sleep, electroencephalographic slow-wave activity, motor activity, food intake and body weight in both Ppg KO and WT mice. Body temperature changes showed a biphasic pattern with a decrease during the dark period followed by an increase in the light phase. The effects of the low and middle doses of LPS were indistinguishable between the two genotypes. Administration of 10 μg LPS, however, induced significantly larger changes in NREMS and wakefulness amounts, body temperature, food intake and body weight in the Ppg KO mice. These findings support a role for ghrelin as an endogenous modulator of inflammatory responses and a central component of arousal and feeding circuits. PMID:24309634

  17. Theophylline potentiates lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Mizue; Takano, Katsura; Kawabe, Kenji; Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Ihara, Hideshi; Nakamura, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the functions of astrocytes is important for understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of various neurodegenerative diseases. Theophylline is a common drug for bronchial asthma and occasionally develops side-effects, such as acute encephalopathy; although the pathogenic mechanism of the side-effects is unknown. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitricoxide (NO) production is generally used for an index of the activation of astrocyte in vitro. In this study, in order to elucidate the effect of theophylline on the astrocytic functions, we examined the LPS-induced NO production and the expression of iNOS in cultured rat cortex astrocytes.Theophylline alone could not induce the NO production; however, NO production induced by LPS was enhanced by theophylline in a dose-dependent manner; and by isobutylmethylxanthine, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. The theophylline enhancement of LPS-induced NO production was further increased by dibutyryl cyclic AMP, a membrane-permeable cAMP analog; and by forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator. When the cells were preincubated with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, an inhibitor of protein kinase A, the theophylline enhancement of LPS-induced NO production was decreased. The extent of iNOS protein expression induced by LPS was also enhanced by theophylline.It is likely that phosphodiesterase inhibition is a major action mechanism for the theophylline enhancement of LPS-induced NO production in astrocytes. Theophylline-induced acute encephalopathy might be due to the hyper-activation of astrocytes via cAMP signaling to produce excess amount of NO.

  18. Phylogenomic analysis supports the ancestral presence of LPS-outer membranes in the Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Luisa Cs; Poppleton, Daniel; Klingl, Andreas; Criscuolo, Alexis; Dupuy, Bruno; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Beloin, Christophe; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2016-01-01

    One of the major unanswered questions in evolutionary biology is when and how the transition between diderm (two membranes) and monoderm (one membrane) cell envelopes occurred in Bacteria. The Negativicutes and the Halanaerobiales belong to the classically monoderm Firmicutes, but possess outer membranes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS-OM). Here, we show that they form two phylogenetically distinct lineages, each close to different monoderm relatives. In contrast, their core LPS biosynthesis enzymes were inherited vertically, as in the majority of bacterial phyla. Finally, annotation of key OM systems in the Halanaerobiales and the Negativicutes shows a puzzling combination of monoderm and diderm features. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the LPS-OMs of Negativicutes and Halanaerobiales are remnants of an ancient diderm cell envelope that was present in the ancestor of the Firmicutes, and that the monoderm phenotype in this phylum is a derived character that arose multiple times independently through OM loss. PMID:27580370

  19. Trans-basement membrane migration of eosinophils induced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils from human peripheral blood in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Fuyumi; Kobayashi, Takehito; Noguchi, Toru; Araki, Ryuichiro; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Soma, Tomoyuki; Nagata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    In the airways of severe asthmatics, an increase of neutrophils and eosinophils is often observed despite high-dose corticosteroid therapy. We previously reported that interleukin-8-stimulated neutrophils induced trans-basement membrane migration (TBM) of eosinophils, suggesting the link between neutrophils and eosinophils. Concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the airway increase in severe asthma. As neutrophils express Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and can release chemoattractants for eosinophils, we investigated whether LPS-stimulated neutrophils modify eosinophil TBM. Neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and severe asthmatics. Eosinophil TBM was examined using a modified Boyden's chamber technique. Eosinophils were added to the upper compartment, and neutrophils and LPS were added to the lower compartment. Migrated eosinophils were measured by eosinophil peroxidase assays. LPS-stimulated neutrophils induced eosinophil TBM (about 10-fold increase), although LPS or neutrophils alone did not. A leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist, a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist or an anti-TLR4 antibody decreased eosinophil TBM enhanced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils by almost half. Neutrophils from severe asthmatics induced eosinophil TBM and lower concentrations of LPS augmented neutrophil-induced eosinophil TBM. These results suggest that the combination of neutrophils and LPS leads eosinophils to accumulate in the airways, possibly involved the pathogenesis of severe asthma. PMID:27730145

  20. Selective Exposure of the Fetal Lung and Skin/Amnion (but Not Gastro-Intestinal Tract) to LPS Elicits Acute Systemic Inflammation in Fetal Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P.; Cox, Tom; Jobe, Alan H.; Kramer, Boris W.; Kallapur, Suhas G.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of the uterine environment (commonly as a result of microbial colonisation of the fetal membranes, amniotic fluid and fetus) is strongly associated with preterm labour and birth. Both preterm birth and fetal inflammation are independently associated with elevated risks of subsequent short- and long-term respiratory, gastro-intestinal and neurological complications. Despite numerous clinical and experimental studies to investigate localised and systemic fetal inflammation following exposure to microbial agonists, there is minimal data to describe which fetal organ(s) drive systemic fetal inflammation. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E.coli in an instrumented ovine model of fetal inflammation and conducted a series of experiments to assess the systemic pro-inflammatory capacity of the three major fetal surfaces exposed to inflammatory mediators in pregnancy (the lung, gastro-intestinal tract and skin/amnion). Exposure of the fetal lung and fetal skin/amnion (but not gastro-intestinal tract) caused a significant acute systemic inflammatory response characterised by altered leucocytosis, neutrophilia, elevated plasma MCP-1 levels and inflammation of the fetal liver and spleen. These novel findings reveal differential fetal organ responses to pro-inflammatory stimulation and shed light on the pathogenesis of fetal systemic inflammation after exposure to chorioamnionitis. PMID:23691033

  1. Coexposure of lead- and lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in rats: involvement of nitric oxide-initiated oxidative stress and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Yie; Cheng, Yu-Jung; Chen, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Bei-Chang

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the interaction between lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lead (Pb) and the involvement of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and oxidative stress in Pb-plus-LPS (Pb/LPS)-induced liver damage in rats. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), TNF-alpha, nitric oxide (NO), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were determined in rats treated with Pb and/or LPS. Pb ranging from 0 to 15 mg/kg dose dependently increased AST, ALT, NO, or LPO in LPS-treated rats. Pretreatment with iNOS inhibitor 1400W reduced NO, LPO, TNF-alpha, AST, and ALT in Pb/LPS-treated rats. Thus, Pb increased LPS-induced liver damage, which might be associated with increased NO-initiated oxidative stress and TNF-alpha in rats.

  2. SILAC-MS Based Characterization of LPS and Resveratrol Induced Changes in Adipocyte Proteomics - Resveratrol as Ameliorating Factor on LPS Induced Changes.

    PubMed

    Nøhr, Mark K; Kroager, Toke P; Sanggaard, Kristian W; Knudsen, Anders D; Stensballe, Allan; Enghild, Jan J; Ølholm, Jens; Richelsen, Bjørn; Pedersen, Steen B

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation is believed to play a pivotal role in the development obesity-related morbidities such as insulin resistance. However, it is not known how this (low-grade) inflammatory state develops. It has been proposed that the leakage of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), originating from the gut microbiota, through the gut epithelium could drive initiation of inflammation. To get a better understanding of which proteins and intracellular pathways are affected by LPS in adipocytes, we performed SILAC proteomic analysis and identified proteins that were altered in expression. Furthermore, we tested the anti-inflammatory compound resveratrol. A total of 927 proteins were quantified by the SILAC method and of these 57- and 64 were significantly up- and downregulated by LPS, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis (GO analysis) revealed that the upregulated proteins were especially involved in the pathways of respiratory electron transport chain and inflammation. The downregulated proteins were especially involved in protein glycosylation. One of the latter proteins, GALNT2, has previously been described to regulate the expression of liver lipases such as ANGPTL3 and apoC-III affecting lipid metabolism. Furthermore, LPS treatment reduced the protein levels of the insulin sensitizing adipokine, adiponectin, and proteins participating in the final steps of triglyceride- and cholesterol synthesis. Generally, resveratrol opposed the effect induced by LPS and, as such, functioning as an ameliorating factor in disease state. Using an unbiased proteomic approach, we present novel insight of how the proteome is altered in adipocytes in response to LPS as seen in obesity. We suggest that LPS partly exerts its detrimental effects by altering glycosylation processes of the cell, which is starting to emerge as important posttranscriptional regulators of protein expression. Furthermore, resveratrol could be a prime candidate in ameliorating dysfunctioning adipose tissue

  3. SILAC-MS Based Characterization of LPS and Resveratrol Induced Changes in Adipocyte Proteomics – Resveratrol as Ameliorating Factor on LPS Induced Changes

    PubMed Central

    Kroager, Toke P.; Sanggaard, Kristian W.; Knudsen, Anders D.; Stensballe, Allan; Enghild, Jan J.; Ølholm, Jens; Richelsen, Bjørn; Pedersen, Steen B.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation is believed to play a pivotal role in the development obesity-related morbidities such as insulin resistance. However, it is not known how this (low-grade) inflammatory state develops. It has been proposed that the leakage of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), originating from the gut microbiota, through the gut epithelium could drive initiation of inflammation. To get a better understanding of which proteins and intracellular pathways are affected by LPS in adipocytes, we performed SILAC proteomic analysis and identified proteins that were altered in expression. Furthermore, we tested the anti-inflammatory compound resveratrol. A total of 927 proteins were quantified by the SILAC method and of these 57- and 64 were significantly up- and downregulated by LPS, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis (GO analysis) revealed that the upregulated proteins were especially involved in the pathways of respiratory electron transport chain and inflammation. The downregulated proteins were especially involved in protein glycosylation. One of the latter proteins, GALNT2, has previously been described to regulate the expression of liver lipases such as ANGPTL3 and apoC-III affecting lipid metabolism. Furthermore, LPS treatment reduced the protein levels of the insulin sensitizing adipokine, adiponectin, and proteins participating in the final steps of triglyceride- and cholesterol synthesis. Generally, resveratrol opposed the effect induced by LPS and, as such, functioning as an ameliorating factor in disease state. Using an unbiased proteomic approach, we present novel insight of how the proteome is altered in adipocytes in response to LPS as seen in obesity. We suggest that LPS partly exerts its detrimental effects by altering glycosylation processes of the cell, which is starting to emerge as important posttranscriptional regulators of protein expression. Furthermore, resveratrol could be a prime candidate in ameliorating dysfunctioning adipose tissue

  4. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. Methods The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups 2–2.5 h prior to hyperthermic seizures (HT) induced by hair dryer or heat lamp. To determine whether simulation of infection enhances neuronal excitability, latency to seizure onset, threshold temperature and total number of seizures were quantified. Behavioral seizures were correlated with electroencephalographic changes in rat pups. Seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was assessed in blood samples at various time points after HT. Seizure-induced microglia activation in the hippocampus was quantified using Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice. Results Lipopolysaccharide priming increased susceptibility of rats and mice to hyperthemic seizures and enhanced seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. Conclusions Peripheral inflammation appears to work synergistically with hyperthermia to potentiate seizures and to exacerbate seizure-induced immune responses. By simulating fever, a regulated increase in body temperature from an immune challenge, we developed a more clinically relevant animal model of prolonged FS. PMID:26357586

  5. Silencing of Paralemmin-3 Protects Mice from lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoying; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Yunfeng; Qian, Pin; Lv, Xuejun; Qian, Lanlan; Wang, Qin; Qian, Guisheng; Yao, Wei; Wu, Xueling

    2016-02-01

    Excessive inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a critical role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI). Paralemmin-3 (PALM3) is a novel protein that can modulate LPS-stimulated inflammatory responses in alveolar epithelial A549 cells. However, it remains unclear whether it is involved in the progression of ALI in vivo. Therefore, we studied the role of PALM3 in the pathogenesis of ALI induced by LPS. ALI was induced by LPS peritoneal injection in C57BL/6J mice. Lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the mouse PALM3 gene and a negative control siRNA were intranasally administered to the mice. We found that the expression of PALM3 was up-regulated in the lung tissues obtained from the mouse model of LPS-induced ALI. The LPS-evoked inflammatory response (neutrophils and the concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines [IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, MIP-2] in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid [BALF]), histologic lung injury (lung injury score), permeability of the alveolar capillary barrier (lung wet/dry weight ratio and BALF protein concentration) and mortality rates were attenuated in the PALM3 siRNA-treated mice. These results indicate that PALM3 contributes to the development of ALI in mice challenged with LPS. Inhibiting PALM3 through the intranasal application of specific siRNA protected against LPS-induced ALI.

  6. THE ABILITY OF BACTERIAL LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE TO MODULATE THE INDUCTION OF UNRESPONSIVENESS TO A STATE OF IMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Louis, J. A.; Chiller, J. M.; Weigle, W. O.

    1973-01-01

    Studies were performed to define the cellular parameters involved in the interference with the induction of immunologic unresponsiveness to human gamma globulin (HGG) by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice which were injected with deaggregated HGG (tolerogen) and with LPS did not become tolerant to that antigen, but rather became primed to a subsequent challenge with immunogen. The ability to prime with tolerogen and LPS was also demonstrated in an adoptive transfer system. The temporal relationship between the injection of tolerogen and that of LPS was critical for priming to occur. The injection of tolerogen and LPS not only primed mice to HGG, but also resulted in a primary antibody response to HGG. The capacity of LPS to interfere with the induction of tolerance was restricted to B cells and did not affect the ability to induce unresponsiveness in T cells. The secondary response to HGG in mice primed by tolerogen and LPS was found to be T-cell independent. These observations are interpreted and discussed from the standpoint of the ability of LPS to circumvent required T-cell cooperation and to modulate to tolerogenic stimulus into an immunogenic signal. PMID:4128441

  7. Minocycline blocks lipopolysaccharide induced hyperalgesia by suppression of microglia but not astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoon, S-Y; Patel, D; Dougherty, P M

    2012-09-27

    Systemic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a robust immune response as well as thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. Spinal and peripheral glial cells have been implicated as important mediators in this hyperalgesia but the specific contributions of microglia versus astrocytes are not entirely clear. To better define these mechanisms, this study examined the febrile response, nociceptive sensitivity, glial cell reactivity and cytokine production in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord in rats following systemic treatment with LPS and the effects of minocycline in countering these responses. Intraperitoneal LPS injection resulted in an increase in core body temperature and produced hyperalgesia to heat and mechanical stimuli. Western blot studies revealed increased expression of microgial cell, macrophage and satellite cell markers in DRG and microglial and astrocyte markers in spinal cord following LPS treatment. Real-time RT-PCR indicated that LPS treatment increased cytokine mRNA expression levels in both the DRG and the spinal cord. Minocycline suppressed all LPS-induced behavioral effects but not the febrile response. Moreover, minocycline prevented LPS-induced microglia/macrophage activation and cytokine responses in spinal cord and DRG, but did not affect the activation of astrocytes/satellite cells. These data demonstrate that LPS-induced changes in nociceptive sensitivity are likely mediated by activation of microglial cells and/or macrophages in the spinal cord and DRG.

  8. Systemic lipopolysaccharide induces cochlear inflammation and exacerbates the synergistic ototoxicity of kanamycin and furosemide.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Keiko; Li, Song-Zhe; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2014-08-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are highly effective agents against gram-negative bacterial infections, but they cause adverse effects on hearing and balance dysfunction as a result of toxicity to hair cells of the cochlea and vestibular organs. While ototoxicity has been comprehensively studied, the contributions of the immune system, which controls the host response to infection, have not been studied in antibiotic ototoxicity. Recently, it has been shown that an inflammatory response is induced by hair cell injury. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an important component of bacterial endotoxin, when given in combination with kanamycin and furosemide, augmented the inflammatory response to hair cell injury and exacerbated hearing loss and hair cell injury. LPS injected into the peritoneum of experimental mice induced a brisk cochlear inflammatory response with recruitment of mononuclear phagocytes into the spiral ligament, even in the absence of ototoxic agents. While LPS alone did not affect hearing, animals that received LPS prior to ototoxic agents had worse hearing loss compared to those that did not receive LPS pretreatment. The poorer hearing outcome in LPS-treated mice did not correlate to changes in endocochlear potential. However, LPS-treated mice demonstrated an increased number of CCR2(+) inflammatory monocytes in the inner ear when compared with mice treated with ototoxic agents alone. We conclude that LPS and its associated inflammatory response are harmful to the inner ear when coupled with ototoxic medications and that the immune system may contribute to the final hearing outcome in subjects treated with ototoxic agents.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Human Pulmonary Micro-Vascular Endothelial Apoptosis via the YAP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lei; Huang, Xiaoqin; Guo, Feng; Zhou, Zengding; Chang, Mengling; Tang, Jiajun; Huan, Jingning

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a pathologic increase in lung vascular leakage under septic conditions. LPS-induced human pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cell (HPMEC) apoptosis launches and aggravates micro-vascular hyper-permeability and acute lung injury (ALI). Previous studies show that the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway is vital for LPS-induced EC apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP) has been reported to positively regulate intrinsic apoptotic pathway in tumor cells apoptosis. However, the potential role of YAP protein in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis has not been determined. In this study, we found that LPS-induced activation and nuclear accumulation of YAP accelerated HPMECs apoptosis. LPS-induced YAP translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus by the increased phosphorylation on Y357 resulted in the interaction between YAP and transcription factor P73. Furthermore, inhibition of YAP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) not only suppressed the LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis but also regulated P73-mediated up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of the YAP/P73/(BAX and BCL-2)/caspase-3 signaling pathway played a critical role in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis. Inhibition of the YAP might be a potential therapeutic strategy for lung injury under sepsis. PMID:27807512

  10. Lipopolysaccharide Inhibits the Channel Activity of the P2X7 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Coddou, Claudio; Rodríguez, Felipe E.; Penna, Antonello; Lopez, Ximena; Neira, Tanya; Fernández, Ricardo; Imarai, Mónica; Rios, Miguel; Escobar, Jorge; Montoya, Margarita; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo; Escobar, Alejandro; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays an important role during the immune response, participating in several events such as cytokine release, apoptosis, and necrosis. The bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the strongest stimuli of the immune response, and it has been shown that P2X7R activation can modulate LPS-induced responses. Moreover, a C-terminal binding site for LPS has been proposed. In order to evaluate if LPS can directly modulate the activity of the P2X7R, we tested several signaling pathways associated with P2X7R activation in HEK293 cells that do not express the TLR-4 receptor. We found that LPS alone was unable to induce any P2X7R-related activity, suggesting that the P2X7R is not directly activated by the endotoxin. On the other hand, preapplication of LPS inhibited ATP-induced currents, intracellular calcium increase, and ethidium bromide uptake and had no effect on ERK activation in HEK293 cells. In splenocytes-derived T-regulatory cells, in which ATP-induced apoptosis is driven by the P2X7R, LPS inhibited ATP-induced apoptosis. Altogether, these results demonstrate that LPS modulates the activity of the P2X7R and suggest that this effect could be of physiological relevance. PMID:21941410

  11. Interactions between chensinin-1, a natural antimicrobial peptide derived from Rana chensinensis, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weibing; Sun, Yue; Shang, Dejing

    2015-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of sepsis caused by gram-negative bacterial infections. Therefore, LPS-neutralizing molecules would have important clinical applications. Chensinin-1, a novel antimicrobial peptide with atypical structural features, was found in the skin secretions of the Chinese brown frog Rana chensinensis. To understand the role of LPS in the bacterial susceptibility to chensinin-1 and to investigate its anti-endotoxin effects, the interactions of chensinin-1 with LPS were investigated in this study using circular dichroism, in situ IR, isothermal titration calorimetry, and zeta potential. This study is the first to use in situ IR spectroscopy to evaluate the secondary structural changes of this peptide. The capacity of chensinin-1 to block the LPS-dependent cytokine secretion of macrophages was also investigated. Our results show that chensinin-1 can form α-helical structures in LPS suspensions. LPS can affect the antimicrobial activity of chensinin-1, and chensinin-1 was able to mitigate the effects of LPS. These data may facilitate the development of antimicrobial peptides with potent antimicrobial and anti-endotoxin activities. PMID:26340228

  12. Protective effects of melatonin on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guoxi; Tian, Yinggang; Wang, Haiyu; Liu, Fangning; Xie, Guanghong

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin, a secretory product of the pineal gland, has been reported to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the protective effects of melatonin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects and the underlying mechanisms of melatonin on LPS-induced mastitis both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, our results showed that melatonin attenuated LPS-induced mammary histopathologic changes and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Melatonin also inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in mammary tissues. In vitro, melatonin was found to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in mouse mammary epithelial cells. Melatonin also suppressed LPS-induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, melatonin was found to up-regulate the expression of PPAR-γ. Inhibition of PPAR-γ by GW9662 reduced the anti-inflammatory effects of melatonin. In conclusion, we found that melatonin, for the first time, had protective effects on LPS-induced mastitis in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of melatonin was through activating PPAR-γ which subsequently inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory responses.

  13. Infrared spectroscopy studies of cation effects on lipopolysaccharides in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sanjai J; Chorover, Jon

    2007-04-01

    The conformation of amphiphilic lipopolysaccharides (LPS) influences the behavior of free and cell-bound LPS in aqueous environments, including their adhesion to surfaces. Conformational changes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype 10 LPS aggregates resulting from changes in solution pH (3, 6, and 9), ionic strength [I] 1, 10, and 100 mmol L(-1), and electrolyte composition (NaCl and CaCl(2)) were investigated via attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. ATR-FTIR data indicate that LPS forms more stable aggregates in NaCl relative to CaCl(2) solutions. Time- and cation-dependent changes in ATR-FTIR data suggest that LPS aggregates are perturbed by Ca(2+) complexation at lipid A phosphoryl groups, which leads to reorientation of the lipid A at the surface of a ZnSe ATR internal reflection element (IRE). Polarized ATR-FTIR investigations reveal orientation of LPS dipoles approximately perpendicular to the IRE plane for both Na- and Ca-LPS. The results indicate that changes in solution chemistry strongly impact the conformation, intermolecular and interfacial behavior of LPS in aqueous systems.

  14. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  15. Associations of Escherichia coli K-12 OmpF trimers with rough and smooth lipopolysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Diedrich, D.L.; Stein, M.A.; Schnaitman, C.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The associations of both rough and smooth lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with the OmpF porin of Escherichia coli K-12 were examined in galE strains deleted for ompC. Transformation with pSS37 and growth with galactose conferred the ability to assemble a Shigella dysenteriae O antigen onto the core oligosaccharide of E. coli K-12 LPS. The association of LPS with OmpF trimers was assessed by staining, autoradiography of LPS specifically labeled with (1-14C)galactose, and Western immunoblotting with a monoclonal antibody specific for OmpF trimers. These techniques revealed that the migration distances and multiple banding patterns of OmpF porin trimers in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels were dictated by the chemotype of associated LPS. Expression of smooth LPS caused almost all of the trimeric OmpF to run in gels with a slower mobility than trimers from rough strains. The LPS associated with trimers from a smooth strain differed from the bulk-phase LPS by consisting almost exclusively of molecules with O antigen.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide variation in Coxiella burnetti: intrastrain heterogeneity in structure and antigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Hackstadt, T; Peacock, M G; Hitchcock, P J; Cole, R L

    1985-01-01

    We isolated lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from phase variants of Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile and compared the isolated LPS and C. burnetii cells by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. The LPSs were found to be the predominant component which varied structurally and antigenically between virulent phase I and avirulent phase II. A comparison of techniques historically used to extract the phase I antigenic component revealed that the aqueous phase of phenol-water, trichloroacetic acid, and dimethyl sulfoxide extractions of phase I C. burnettii cells all contained phase I LPS, although the efficiency and specificity of extraction varied. Our studies provide additional evidence that phase variation in C. burnetii is analogous to the smooth-to-rough LPS variation of gram-negative enteric bacteria, with phase I LPS being equivalent to smooth LPS and phase II being equivalent to rough LPS. In addition, we identified a variant with a third LPS chemotype with appears to have a structural complexity intermediate to phase I and II LPSs. All three C. burnetii LPS contain a 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid-like substance, heptose, and gel Limulus amoebocyte lysates in subnanogram amounts. The C. burnetii LPSs were nontoxic to chicken embryos at doses of over 80 micrograms per embryo, in contrast to Salmonella typhimurium smooth- and rough-type LPSs, which were toxic in nanogram amounts. Images PMID:3988339

  17. Pentosan polysulfate protects brain endothelial cells against bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Veszelka, Szilvia; Pásztói, Mária; Farkas, Attila E; Krizbai, István; Ngo, Thi Khue Dung; Niwa, Masami; Abrahám, Csongor S; Deli, Mária A

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation can aggravate local brain inflammation and neuronal death. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key player in the event. On a relevant in vitro model of primary rat brain endothelial cells co-cultured with primary rat astroglia cells lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced changes in several BBB functions have been investigated. LPS-treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the integrity of endothelial monolayers: transendothelial electrical resistance dropped, while flux of permeability markers fluorescein and albumin significantly increased. Immunostaining for junctional proteins ZO-1, claudin-5 and beta-catenin was significantly weaker in LPS-treated endothelial cells than in control monolayers. LPS also reduced the intensity and changed the pattern of ZO-1 immunostaining in freshly isolated rat brain microvessels. The activity of P-glycoprotein, an important efflux pump at the BBB, was also inhibited by LPS. At the same time production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide was increased in brain endothelial cells treated with LPS. Pentosan polysulfate, a polyanionic polysaccharide could reduce the deleterious effects of LPS on BBB permeability, and P-glycoprotein activity. LPS-stimulated increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide was also decreased by pentosan treatment. The protective effect of pentosan for brain endothelium can be of therapeutical significance in bacterial infections affecting the BBB.

  18. Protective effects of melatonin on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guoxi; Tian, Yinggang; Wang, Haiyu; Liu, Fangning; Xie, Guanghong

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin, a secretory product of the pineal gland, has been reported to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the protective effects of melatonin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects and the underlying mechanisms of melatonin on LPS-induced mastitis both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, our results showed that melatonin attenuated LPS-induced mammary histopathologic changes and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Melatonin also inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in mammary tissues. In vitro, melatonin was found to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in mouse mammary epithelial cells. Melatonin also suppressed LPS-induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, melatonin was found to up-regulate the expression of PPAR-γ. Inhibition of PPAR-γ by GW9662 reduced the anti-inflammatory effects of melatonin. In conclusion, we found that melatonin, for the first time, had protective effects on LPS-induced mastitis in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of melatonin was through activating PPAR-γ which subsequently inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory responses. PMID:26590117

  19. The effects of Pasteurella haemolytica lipopolysaccharide on bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    This study examined the potential role of Pasteurella haemolytica Al lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the pathogenesis of the vascular lesions of pneumonic pasteurellosis. Bovine pulmonary artery endothelia cells (BPAEC) were the test model. The direct toxic potential of P. Haemolytica LPS on BPAEC was examined by cell detachment assays, morphologic alterations, and membrane damage as reflected in the leakage of large internal molecules such as LDH and {sup 51}Cr-labeled molecules. LPS-induced effects having potential for causing indirect vascular damage were studied and included neutrophil-adherence to and arachidonic acid-release from BPAEC. Several substances were examined for their ability to inhibit the LPS-induced cytotoxicity. Pasteurella haemolytica LPS caused direct toxic effects in BPAEC. Cell-detachment, LDH-leakage, {sup 51}Cr-leakage, and {sup 3}H-arachidonic acid-release proceeded with similar time- and dose-dependency after exposure of BPAEC to LPS. Morphologic alterations were observed as early as one-half hour after LPS-exposure and became collectively more severe with time. Neutrophil adherence to BPAEC was increased by LPS through independent effects on both cells types. The adherence required protein synthesis in both cell types.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide inhibits the channel activity of the P2X7 receptor.

    PubMed

    Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Coddou, Claudio; Rodríguez, Felipe E; Penna, Antonello; Lopez, Ximena; Neira, Tanya; Fernández, Ricardo; Imarai, Mónica; Rios, Miguel; Escobar, Jorge; Montoya, Margarita; Huidobro-Toro, J Pablo; Escobar, Alejandro; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays an important role during the immune response, participating in several events such as cytokine release, apoptosis, and necrosis. The bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the strongest stimuli of the immune response, and it has been shown that P2X7R activation can modulate LPS-induced responses. Moreover, a C-terminal binding site for LPS has been proposed. In order to evaluate if LPS can directly modulate the activity of the P2X7R, we tested several signaling pathways associated with P2X7R activation in HEK293 cells that do not express the TLR-4 receptor. We found that LPS alone was unable to induce any P2X7R-related activity, suggesting that the P2X7R is not directly activated by the endotoxin. On the other hand, preapplication of LPS inhibited ATP-induced currents, intracellular calcium increase, and ethidium bromide uptake and had no effect on ERK activation in HEK293 cells. In splenocytes-derived T-regulatory cells, in which ATP-induced apoptosis is driven by the P2X7R, LPS inhibited ATP-induced apoptosis. Altogether, these results demonstrate that LPS modulates the activity of the P2X7R and suggest that this effect could be of physiological relevance. PMID:21941410

  1. Enhanced Biofilm Formation by Escherichia coli LPS Mutants Defective in Hep Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Ryoma; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major component of the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and its polysaccharide portion is situated at the outermost region. We investigated the relationship between the polysaccharide portion of LPS and biofilm formation using a series of Escherichia coli mutants defective in genes earlier shown to affect the LPS sugar compositions. Biofilm formation by a deep rough LPS mutant, the hldE strain, was strongly enhanced in comparison with the parental strain and other LPS mutants. The hldE strain also showed a phenotype of increased auto-aggregation and stronger cell surface hydrophobicity compared to the wild-type. Similar results were obtained with another deep rough LPS mutant, the waaC strain whose LPS showed same molecular mass as that of the hldE strain. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and biofilm formation assay using DNase I revealed that biofilm formation by the hldE strain was dependent on extracellular DNA. Furthermore, a loss of flagella and an increase in amount of outer membrane vesicles in case of the hldE strain were also observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. In addition, we demonstrated that a mutation in the hldE locus, which alters the LPS structure, caused changes in both expression and properties of several surface bacterial factors involved in biofilm formation and virulence. We suggest that the implication of these results should be considered in the context of biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces, which is frequently associated with nosocominal infections such as the catheter-associated infections. PMID:23284671

  2. Enhanced biofilm formation by Escherichia coli LPS mutants defective in Hep biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Ryoma; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major component of the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and its polysaccharide portion is situated at the outermost region. We investigated the relationship between the polysaccharide portion of LPS and biofilm formation using a series of Escherichia coli mutants defective in genes earlier shown to affect the LPS sugar compositions. Biofilm formation by a deep rough LPS mutant, the hldE strain, was strongly enhanced in comparison with the parental strain and other LPS mutants. The hldE strain also showed a phenotype of increased auto-aggregation and stronger cell surface hydrophobicity compared to the wild-type. Similar results were obtained with another deep rough LPS mutant, the waaC strain whose LPS showed same molecular mass as that of the hldE strain. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and biofilm formation assay using DNase I revealed that biofilm formation by the hldE strain was dependent on extracellular DNA. Furthermore, a loss of flagella and an increase in amount of outer membrane vesicles in case of the hldE strain were also observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. In addition, we demonstrated that a mutation in the hldE locus, which alters the LPS structure, caused changes in both expression and properties of several surface bacterial factors involved in biofilm formation and virulence. We suggest that the implication of these results should be considered in the context of biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces, which is frequently associated with nosocominal infections such as the catheter-associated infections.

  3. Haemorrhagic shock in mice--intracellular signalling and immunomodulation of peritoneal macrophages' LPS response.

    PubMed

    Rani, Meenakshi; Husain, Baher; Lendemans, Sven; Schade, Fritz U; Flohé, Sascha

    2006-01-01

    Haemorrhagic shock leads to decreased proinflammatory cytokine response which is associated with an increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. In the present study, the effect of GM-CSF on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF-alpha release and MAPkinase activation was analysed on the background of a possible immunostimulating activity of this substance. Male BALB/c mice were bled to a mean arterial blood pressure of 50 mmHg for 45 min followed by resuscitation. Peritoneal macrophages were isolated 20 h after haemorrhage and incubated with 10 ng/ml GM-CSF for 6h before LPS stimulation. TNF-alpha synthesis was studied in the culture supernatants using ELISA. Phosphorylation of ERK, p38MAPK and IkappaBalpha was detected by Western blotting. LPS-induced TNF-alpha production of peritoneal macrophages was significantly decreased 20 h after haemorrhage in comparison to the corresponding cells of sham-operated mice. In parallel the phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha was less in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages from haemorrhagic mice. LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was also decreased in peritoneal macrophages isolated after haemorrhagic shock. In contrast, p38MAPK was phosphorylated more intensely after LPS-stimulation in macrophages collected from shocked mice. GM-CSF incubation elevated LPS-induced TNF-alpha response of macrophages from both sham-operated and shocked mice which was accompanied by an elevated IkappaB and ERK phosphorylation. In general, GM-CSF treatment in vitro enhanced peritoneal macrophages LPS-response both in terms of TNF-alpha synthesis and IkappaB and MAPK signalling, but the levels always stayed lower than those of GM-CSF-treated cells from sham-operated animals. In conclusion, GM-CSF preincubation could partly reactivate the depressed functions of peritoneal macrophages and may therefore exert immunostimulating properties after shock or trauma.

  4. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib prevents lung injury and death after intravenous LPS in mice

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, R Scott; Johnston, Laura; Servinsky, Laura; Kim, Bo S; Damarla, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are frequent causes of the acute respiratory distress syndrome, and important sources of human mortality. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls, plays a major role in the pathogenesis of severe sepsis and septic shock. LPS exposure induces the production of harmful reactive oxygen species, and the resultant oxidant injury has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both severe sepsis and ARDS. We previously showed that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib increases lung endothelial antioxidant enzymes and protects against pulmonary endothelial antioxidant injury. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that imatinib would protect against lung injury and systemic inflammation caused by intravenous LPS in an intact mouse model of endotoxemia mimicking early sepsis. We found that intravenous LPS induced a significant increase in the activity of lung xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), an enzyme which is a major source of reactive oxygen species and implicated in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. Imatinib had no effect of LPS-induced XOR activity. However, pretreatment of mice with imatinib increased lung catalase activity and decreased intravenous LPS-induced lung oxidant injury as measured by γ-H2AX, a marker of oxidant-induced DNA damage, lung apoptosis, and pulmonary edema. Imatinib also attenuated systemic cytokine expression after intravenous LPS exposure. Finally, imatinib completely prevented mortality in an in vivo, intravenous LPS mouse model of endotoxemia and lung injury. These results support the testing of imatinib as a novel pharmacologic agent in the treatment of Gram-negative sepsis and sepsis-induced ARDS. PMID:26620257

  5. Cyclical DNA Methylation and Histone Changes Are Induced by LPS to Activate COX-2 in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brancaccio, Mariarita; Coretti, Lorena; Florio, Ermanno; Pezone, Antonio; Calabrò, Viola; Falco, Geppino; Keller, Simona; Lembo, Francesca; Avvedimento, Vittorio Enrico; Chiariotti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces release of inflammatory mediators both in immune and epithelial cells. We investigated whether changes of epigenetic marks, including selected histone modification and DNA methylation, may drive or accompany the activation of COX-2 gene in HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells upon exposure to LPS. Here we describe cyclical histone acetylation (H3), methylation (H3K4, H3K9, H3K27) and DNA methylation changes occurring at COX-2 gene promoter overtime after LPS stimulation. Histone K27 methylation changes are carried out by the H3 demethylase JMJD3 and are essential for COX-2 induction by LPS. The changes of the histone code are associated with cyclical methylation signatures at the promoter and gene body of COX-2 gene. PMID:27253528

  6. Expression of Rhizobium leguminosarum CFN42 genes for lipopolysaccharide in strains derived from different R. leguminosarum soil isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, B.A.; Noel, K.D. ); Miller, J.; Carlson, R.W. )

    1990-02-01

    Two mutant derivatives of Rhizobium leguminosarum ANU843 defective in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were isolated. The LPSs of both mutants lacked O antigen and some sugar residues of the LPS core oligosaccharides. Genetic regions previously cloned from another Rhizobium leguminosarum wild-type isolate, strain CFN42, were used to complement these mutants. One mutant was complemented to give LPS that was apparently identical to the LPS of strain ANU843 in antigenicity, electrophoretic mobility, and sugar composition. The other mutant was complemented by a second CFN42lps genetic region. In this case the resulting LPS contained O-antigen sugars characteristic of donor strain CFN42 and reacted weakly with antiserum against CFN42 cells, but did not react detectably with antiserum against ANU843 cells. Therefore, one of the CFN42 lps genetic regions specifies a function that is conserved between the two R. leguminosarum wild-type isolates, whereas the other region, at least in part, specifies a strain-specific LPS structure. Transfer of these two genetic regions into wild-type strains derived from R. leguminosarum ANU843 and 128C53 gave results consistent with this conclusion. The mutants derived from strain ANU843 elicited incompletely developed clover nodules that exhibited low bacterial populations and very low nitrogenase activity. Both mutants elicited normally developed, nitrogen-fixing clover nodules when they carried CFN42 lps DNA that permitted synthesis of O-antigen-containing LPS, regardless of whether the O antigen was the one originally made by strain ANU843.

  7. Radiation induced gram negative bacteremia and endotoxemia in rabbits: modification by anti-lipopolysaccharide hyperimmune equine plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Well, M.T.; Gaffin, S.L.; Jordaan, J.P.

    1987-06-29

    Lethal whole-body irradiation damages the gut mucosa and leads to leakage of endotoxin or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) into the systemic circulation. Sixteen rabbits, irradiated with 900 rads /sup 60/Co, were randomly divided on day 4 into 2 groups, one of which received an intraperitoneal injection of normal saline (control) and the other (experimental) an equal volume of anti-LPS hyperimmune plasma. The time course of endotoxemia and bacteremia were determined for the duration of the experiment. While rabbits in both groups died within 13 days after irradiation, rabbits given saline died on average 2 days earlier, than rabbits given anti-LPS plasma. Plasma LPS concentrations rose to a small peak on day 2 prior to treatment. Thereafter plasma LPS in rabbits given saline increased forty fold by day 9. In contrast, in rabbits given anti-LPS plasma, LPS concentrations in the plasma remained within pretreatment limits. By day 12 after irradiation, plasma anti-LPS IgG had declined to 5.8% of pretreatment levels in rabbits given saline as compared to 46% in rabbits given anti-LPS plasma (p 0.005). While both groups developed gram-positive bacteremia, rabbits given saline in addition also developed gram-negative bacteremia. No rabbits treated with Anti-LPS showed gram-negative bacteremia.

  8. Protective Effect of SAHA against LPS-induced Liver Damage in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yili; Zhou, Peter; Liu, Baoling; Bambakidis, Ted; Mazitschek, Ralph; Alam, Hasan B.; Li, Yongqing

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has a deleterious effect on several organs including the liver and eventually leads to endotoxic shock and death. LPS-induced hepatotoxicity is characterized by disturbed intracellular redox balance and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, leading to liver injury. We have shown that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), improves survival in a murine model of LPS-induced shock, but the protective effect of SAHA against liver damage remains unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying SAHA action in murine livers. METHOD Male C57BL/6J mice (6-8 weeks) weighing 20-25 g were randomly divided into three groups: (A) a sham group was given isotonic sodium chloride solution (10 μL/g body weight, intraperitoneal, i.p.) with DMSO (1 μl/g body weight, i.p.); (B) a LPS group was challenged with LPS (20 mg/kg, i.p.) dissolved in isotonic sodium chloride solution with DMSO; (C) a LPS plus SAHA group was treated with SAHA (50 mg/kg, i.p.) dissolved in DMSO immediately after injection of LPS (20 mg/kg, i.p.). Mice were anesthetized, and their livers were harvested 6 or 24 hours after injection to analyze whether SAHA affected production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of apoptotic proteins in the liver cells of challenged mice. RESULTS SAHA counteracted LPS-induced production of ROS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and nitrite) and reversed an LPS-induced decrease in antioxidant enzyme, glutathione (GSH). SAHA also attenuated LPS-induced hepatic apoptosis. Moreover, SAHA inhibited activation of the redox-sensitive kinase, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (ASK1), and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). CONCLUSION Our data indicates, for the first time, that SAHA is capable of alleviating LPS-induced hepatotoxicity and suggests that a blockade of the upstream

  9. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF{kappa}B in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong | Alexis, Neil E. |; Chen Xian |; Bromberg, Philip A. |; Peden, David B. ||

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF{kappa}B were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NF{kappa}B activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NF{kappa}B activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NF{kappa}B.

  10. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NFkappaB in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weidong; Alexis, Neil E; Chen, Xian; Bromberg, Philip A; Peden, David B

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NFkappaB were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NFkappaB activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NFkappaB activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NFkappaB activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NFkappaB activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NFkappaB.

  11. The OVLT initiates the fall in arterial pressure evoked by high dose lipopolysaccharide: Evidence that dichotomous, dose-related mechanisms mediate endotoxic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Feleder, Carlos; Yilmaz, M. Sertac; Peng, Jianya; Göktalay, Gökhan; Millington, William R.

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) lowers arterial pressure through two different mechanisms depending on the dose. Previously, we found that a low hypotensive dose of LPS (1 mg/kg) lowers arterial pressure by activating vagus nerve afferents. Here we report that hypotension evoked by high dose LPS (15 mg/kg) can be prevented by injecting lidocaine into the OVLT but not by vagotomy or inactivation of the NTS. The hypotension produced by both LPS doses was correlated with elevated extracellular norepinephrine concentrations in the POA and prevented by blocking alpha-adrenergic receptors. Thus, initiation of endotoxic hypotension is dose-related, mechanistically. PMID:26198924

  12. Acetate supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Reisenauer, Chris J; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Mitteness, Dane J; Slanczka, Evan R; Gienger, Heidi M; Watt, John A; Rosenberger, Thad A

    2011-04-01

    Glyceryl triacetate (GTA), a compound effective at increasing circulating and tissue levels of acetate was used to treat rats subjected to a continual 28 day intra-ventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This model produces a neuroinflammatory injury characterized by global neuroglial activation and a decrease in choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity in the basal forebrain. During the LPS infusion, rats were given a daily treatment of either water or GTA at a dose of 6 g/kg by oral gavage. In parallel experiments, free-CoA and acetyl-CoA levels were measured in microwave fixed brains and flash frozen heart, liver, kidney and muscle following a single oral dose of GTA. We found that a single oral dose of GTA significantly increased plasma acetate levels by 15 min and remained elevated for up to 4 h. At 30 min the acetyl-CoA levels in microwave-fixed brain and flash frozen heart and liver were increased at least 2.2-fold. The concentrations of brain acetyl-CoA was significantly increased between 30 and 45 min following treatment and remained elevated for up to 4 h. The concentration of free-CoA in brain was significantly decreased compared to controls at 240 min. Immunohistochemical and morphological analysis demonstrated that a daily treatment with GTA significantly reduced the percentage of reactive glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes and activated CD11b-positive microglia by 40-50% in rats subjected to LPS-induced neuroinflammation. Further, in rats subjected to neuroinflammation, GTA significantly increased the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive cells by 40% in the basal forebrain compared to untreated controls. These data suggest that acetate supplementation increases intermediary short chain acetyl-CoA metabolism and that treatment is potentially anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective with regards to attenuating neuroglial activation and increasing ChAT immunoreactivity in this model. PMID:21272004

  13. Toll-like receptor-4-dependence of the lipopolysaccharide-mediated inhibition of osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y H; Huang, D; Li, Z J; Li, X H; Wang, X; Yang, H P; Tian, S P; Mao, Y; Liu, M F; Wang, Y F; Wu6, Y; Han7, X F

    2016-01-01

    Bone fractures or bones subjected to open conduction and internal fixation are easily infected by bacteria; bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been recognized as an important pathogenic factor affecting bone fracture healing. Therefore, the effect of LPS on bone metabolism is relevant for bone healing. In this study, we investigated the effect of LPS on the expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 (an LPS receptor) by using real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting. We also examined the regulatory role of LPS in osteoblast differentiation by measuring the ALP activity, matrix mineralization, and ALP, OCN, and Runx2 mRNA (essential factors affecting osteoblast differentiation) expression in LPS-treated mouse osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells. We also evaluated the effect of TLR-4 on LPS-mediated inhibition of osteoblast differentiation using RNA interference. LPS promotes TLR-4 mRNA and protein expression in MC3T3-E1 cells (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 or P < 0.001), and inhibits osteoblast differentiation by downregulating matrix mineralization and ALP activity (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 or P < 0.001), and suppressing the expression ALP, OCN, and Runx2 mRNA in MC3T3-E1 cells (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Conversely, RNAi-mediated TLR-4 knockdown abrogates the LPS-mediated inhibition of osteoblast differentiation (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). In summary, LPS was shown to inhibit osteoblast differentiation by suppressing the expression of ALP, OCN, and Runx2 in a TLR-4-dependent manner. The results of this study may provide insights into the signal pathway of LPS-induced bone loss or delayed bone fracture healing. PMID:27173231

  14. Galantamine protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Zhou, C L; Zhou, Q S; Zou, H D

    2016-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia triggers the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and can cause acute lung injury (ALI). The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein plays an important role as a late mediator of sepsis and ALI. Galantamine (GAL) is a central acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that inhibits the expression of HMGB1. This study evaluated the effects of GAL by measuring levels of inflammatory mediators and observing histopathological features associated with LPS-induced ALI. Sixty 8-10 week old male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-240 g) were randomized into three groups as follows: control group, LPS group (7.5 mg/kg LPS), and LPS+GAL group (5 mg/kg GAL before LPS administration). Histopathological examination of lung specimens obtained 12 h after LPS administration was performed to analyze changes in wet-to-dry (W/D) weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and HMGB1 expression level. Additionally, plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and HMGB1 were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 0 (baseline), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h after LPS administration. Mortality in the three groups was recorded at 72 h. LPS-induced ALI was characterized by distortion of pulmonary architecture and elevation of MPO activity, W/D weight ratio, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and HMGB1. Pretreatment with GAL significantly reduced the LPS-induced lung pathological changes, W/D weight ratio, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and MPO activity (ANOVA). Moreover, GAL treatment significantly decreased the mortality rate (ANOVA). In conclusion, we demonstrated that GAL exerted a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in rats.

  15. Galantamine protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, G.; Zhou, CL.; Zhou, QS.; Zou, HD.

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia triggers the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and can cause acute lung injury (ALI). The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein plays an important role as a late mediator of sepsis and ALI. Galantamine (GAL) is a central acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that inhibits the expression of HMGB1. This study evaluated the effects of GAL by measuring levels of inflammatory mediators and observing histopathological features associated with LPS-induced ALI. Sixty 8-10 week old male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-240 g) were randomized into three groups as follows: control group, LPS group (7.5 mg/kg LPS), and LPS+GAL group (5 mg/kg GAL before LPS administration). Histopathological examination of lung specimens obtained 12 h after LPS administration was performed to analyze changes in wet-to-dry (W/D) weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and HMGB1 expression level. Additionally, plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and HMGB1 were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 0 (baseline), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h after LPS administration. Mortality in the three groups was recorded at 72 h. LPS-induced ALI was characterized by distortion of pulmonary architecture and elevation of MPO activity, W/D weight ratio, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and HMGB1. Pretreatment with GAL significantly reduced the LPS-induced lung pathological changes, W/D weight ratio, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and MPO activity (ANOVA). Moreover, GAL treatment significantly decreased the mortality rate (ANOVA). In conclusion, we demonstrated that GAL exerted a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in rats. PMID:26648090

  16. Maternal molecular hydrogen treatment attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced rat fetal lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Y; Kotani, T; Tsuda, H; Mano, Y; Tu, L; Li, H; Hirako, S; Ushida, T; Imai, K; Nakano, T; Sato, Y; Miki, R; Sumigama, S; Iwase, A; Toyokuni, S; Kikkawa, F

    2015-01-01

    Maternal inflammation is associated with spontaneous preterm birth and respiratory impairment among premature infants. Recently, molecular hydrogen (H2) has been reported to have a suppressive effect on oxidative stress and inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of H2 on fetal lung injury caused by maternal inflammation. Cell viability and the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined by treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contained in ordinal or H2-rich medium (HM) using a human lung epithelial cell line, A549. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Control, LPS, and HW + LPS groups. Rats were injected with phosphate-buffered saline (Control) or LPS intraperitoneally (LPS) on gestational day 19 and provided H2 water (HW) ad libitum for 24 h before LPS injection (HW + LPS). Fetal lung samples were collected on day 20, and the levels of apoptosis, oxidative damage, IL-6, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. The number of apoptotic cells, and levels of ROS and IL-6 were significantly increased by LPS treatment, and repressed following cultured with HM in A549 cells. In the rat models, the population positive for cleaved caspase-3, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, IL-6, and VEGF was significantly increased in the LPS group compared with that observed in the Control group and significantly decreased in the HW + LPS group. In this study, LPS administration induced apoptosis and oxidative damage in fetal lung cells that was ameliorated by maternal H2 intake. Antenatal H2 administration may decrease the pulmonary mobility associated with inflammation in premature infants.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide promotes lipid accumulation in human adventitial fibroblasts via TLR4-NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic degenerative disease of the arteries and is thought to be one of the most common causes of death globally. In recent years, the functions of adventitial fibroblasts in the development of atherosclerosis and tissue repair have gained increased interests. LPS can increase the morbidity and mortality of atherosclerosis-associated cardiovascular disease. Although LPS increases neointimal via TLR4 activation has been reported, how LPS augments atherogenesis through acting on adventitial fibroblasts is still unknown. Here we explored lipid deposition within adventitial fibroblasts mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to imitate inflammatory conditions. Results In our study, LPS enhanced lipid deposition by the up-regulated expression of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) as the silencing of ADRP abrogated lipid deposition in LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts. In addition, pre-treatment with anti-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antibody diminished the LPS-induced lipid deposition and ADRP expression. Moreover, LPS induced translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which could markedly up-regulate lipid deposition as pre-treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, PDTC, significantly reduced lipid droplets. In addition, the lowering lipid accumulation was accompanied with the decreased ADRP expression. Furthermore, LPS-induced adventitial fibroblasts secreted more monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), compared with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that LPS promotes lipid accumulation via the up-regulation of ADRP expression through TLR4 activated downstream of NF-κB in adventitial fibroblasts. Increased levels of MCP-1 released from LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts and lipid accumulation may accelerate monocytes recruitment and lipid-laden macrophage foam cells formation. Here, our study provides a new explanation as to how bacterial infection contributes to

  18. Vitamin D3 pretreatment regulates renal inflammatory responses during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Tan, Zhu-Xia; Xie, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Hui; Yu, De-Xin; Xu, De-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is highly expressed in human and mouse kidneys. Nevertheless, its functions remain obscure. This study investigated the effects of vitamin D3 (VitD3) pretreatment on renal inflammation during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS. In VitD3 + LPS group, mice were pretreated with VitD3 (25 μg/kg) at 48, 24 and 1 h before LPS injection. As expected, an obvious reduction of renal function and pathological damage was observed in LPS-treated mice. VitD3 pretreatment significantly alleviated LPS-induced reduction of renal function and pathological damage. Moreover, VitD3 pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced renal inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In addition, pretreatment with 1,25(OH)2D3, the active form of VitD3, alleviated LPS-induced up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human HK-2 cells, a renal tubular epithelial cell line, in a VDR-dependent manner. Further analysis showed that VitD3, which activated renal VDR, specifically repressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 subunit in the renal tubules. LPS, which activated renal NF-κB, reciprocally suppressed renal VDR and its target gene. Moreover, VitD3 reinforced the physical interaction between renal VDR and NF-κB p65 subunit. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for VitD3-mediated anti-inflammatory activity during LPS-induced acute kidney injury. PMID:26691774

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Dynamic Lipid Membrane Reorganization: Tubules, Perforations, and Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Peter G.; Lamoureux, Loreen; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a unique lipoglycan, with two major physiological roles: 1), as a major structural component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and 2), as a highly potent mammalian toxin when released from cells into solution (endotoxin). LPS is an amphiphile that spontaneously inserts into the outer leaflet of lipid bilayers to bury its hydrophobic lipidic domain, leaving the hydrophilic polysaccharide chain exposed to the exterior polar solvent. Divalent cations have long been known to neutralize and stabilize LPS in the outer membrane, whereas LPS in the presence of monovalent cations forms highly mobile negatively-charged aggregates. Yet, much of our understanding of LPS and its interactions with the cell membrane does not take into account its amphiphilic biochemistry and charge polarization. Herein, we report fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis of the interaction between LPS and fluid-phase supported lipid bilayer assemblies (sLBAs), as model membranes. Depending on cation availability, LPS induces three remarkably different effects on simple sLBAs. Net-negative LPS-Na+ leads to the formation of 100-μm-long flexible lipid tubules from surface-associated lipid vesicles and the destabilization of the sLBA resulting in micron-size hole formation. Neutral LPS-Ca2+ gives rise to 100-μm-wide single- or multilamellar planar sheets of lipid and LPS formed from surface-associated lipid vesicles. Our findings have important implications about the physical interactions between LPS and lipids and demonstrate that sLBAs can be useful platforms to study the interactions of amphiphilic virulence factors with cell membranes. Additionally, our study supports the general phenomenon that lipids with highly charged or bulky headgroups can promote highly curved membrane architectures due to electrostatic and/or steric repulsions. PMID:24896118

  20. Galantamine protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Zhou, C L; Zhou, Q S; Zou, H D

    2016-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia triggers the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and can cause acute lung injury (ALI). The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein plays an important role as a late mediator of sepsis and ALI. Galantamine (GAL) is a central acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that inhibits the expression of HMGB1. This study evaluated the effects of GAL by measuring levels of inflammatory mediators and observing histopathological features associated with LPS-induced ALI. Sixty 8-10 week old male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-240 g) were randomized into three groups as follows: control group, LPS group (7.5 mg/kg LPS), and LPS+GAL group (5 mg/kg GAL before LPS administration). Histopathological examination of lung specimens obtained 12 h after LPS administration was performed to analyze changes in wet-to-dry (W/D) weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and HMGB1 expression level. Additionally, plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and HMGB1 were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 0 (baseline), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h after LPS administration. Mortality in the three groups was recorded at 72 h. LPS-induced ALI was characterized by distortion of pulmonary architecture and elevation of MPO activity, W/D weight ratio, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and HMGB1. Pretreatment with GAL significantly reduced the LPS-induced lung pathological changes, W/D weight ratio, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and MPO activity (ANOVA). Moreover, GAL treatment significantly decreased the mortality rate (ANOVA). In conclusion, we demonstrated that GAL exerted a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in rats. PMID:26648090

  1. Reviewing and identifying amino acids of human, murine, canine and equine TLR4 / MD-2 receptor complexes conferring endotoxic innate immunity activation by LPS/lipid A, or antagonistic effects by Eritoran, in contrast to species-dependent modulation by lipid IVa

    PubMed Central

    Scior, Thomas; Alexander, Christian; Zaehringer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    There is literature evidence gathered throughout the last two decades reflecting unexpected species differences concerning the immune response to lipid IVa which provides the opportunity to gain more detailed insight by the molecular modeling approach described in this study. Lipid IVa is a tetra-acylated precursor of lipid A in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Gram-negative bacteria. Lipid A of the prototypic E. coli-type is a hexa-acylated structure that acts as an agonist in all tested mammalian species by innate immunorecognition via the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) receptor complex. In contrast, lipid IVa is proinflammatory in mouse cells (agonism) but it remains inactive to human macrophages and even antagonizes the action of potent agonists like E. coli-type lipid A. This particular ambivalent activity profile of lipid IVa has been confirmed in other mammalian species: in equine cells Lipid IVa also acts in a weak agonistic manner, whereas being inactive and antagonizing the lipid A-induced activation of canine TLR4/MD-2. Intriguingly, the respective TLR4 amino acid sequences of the latter species are more identical to the human (67%, 68%) than to the murine (62%, 58%) ortholog. In order to address the unpaired activity-sequence dualism for human, murine, canine and equine species regarding the activity of lipid IVa as compared to LPS and lipid A and, we review the literature and computationally pinpoint the differential biological effects of lipid IVa versus LPS and lipid A to specific amino acid residues. In contrast to lipid IVa the structurally related synthetic compound Eritoran (E5564) acts consistently in an antagonistic manner in these mammalian species and serves as a reference ligand for molecular modeling in this study. The combined evaluation of data sets provided by prior studies and in silico homology mapping of differential residues of TLR4/MD-2 complexes lends detailed insight into the

  2. Reviewing and identifying amino acids of human, murine, canine and equine TLR4 / MD-2 receptor complexes conferring endotoxic innate immunity activation by LPS/lipid A, or antagonistic effects by Eritoran, in contrast to species-dependent modulation by lipid IVa.

    PubMed

    Scior, Thomas; Alexander, Christian; Zaehringer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    There is literature evidence gathered throughout the last two decades reflecting unexpected species differences concerning the immune response to lipid IVa which provides the opportunity to gain more detailed insight by the molecular modeling approach described in this study. Lipid IVa is a tetra-acylated precursor of lipid A in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Gram-negative bacteria. Lipid A of the prototypic E. coli-type is a hexa-acylated structure that acts as an agonist in all tested mammalian species by innate immunorecognition via the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) receptor complex. In contrast, lipid IVa is proinflammatory in mouse cells (agonism) but it remains inactive to human macrophages and even antagonizes the action of potent agonists like E. coli-type lipid A. This particular ambivalent activity profile of lipid IVa has been confirmed in other mammalian species: in equine cells Lipid IVa also acts in a weak agonistic manner, whereas being inactive and antagonizing the lipid A-induced activation of canine TLR4/MD-2. Intriguingly, the respective TLR4 amino acid sequences of the latter species are more identical to the human (67%, 68%) than to the murine (62%, 58%) ortholog. In order to address the unpaired activity-sequence dualism for human, murine, canine and equine species regarding the activity of lipid IVa as compared to LPS and lipid A and, we review the literature and computationally pinpoint the differential biological effects of lipid IVa versus LPS and lipid A to specific amino acid residues. In contrast to lipid IVa the structurally related synthetic compound Eritoran (E5564) acts consistently in an antagonistic manner in these mammalian species and serves as a reference ligand for molecular modeling in this study. The combined evaluation of data sets provided by prior studies and in silico homology mapping of differential residues of TLR4/MD-2 complexes lends detailed insight into the

  3. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory bone resorption, and protects against alveolar bone loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Watanabe, Kenta; Hirata, Michiko; Grundler, Florian M W; Miyaura, Chisato; Inada, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenol in green tea, possesses antioxidant properties and regulates various cell functions. Here, we examined the function of EGCG in inflammatory bone resorption. In calvarial organ cultures, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone resorption was clearly suppressed by EGCG. In osteoblasts, EGCG suppressed the LPS-induced expression of COX-2 and mPGES-1 mRNAs, as well as prostaglandin E2 production, and also suppressed RANKL expression, which is essential for osteoclast differentiation. LPS-induced bone resorption of mandibular alveolar bones was attenuated by EGCG in vitro, and the loss of mouse alveolar bone mass was inhibited by the catechin in vivo.

  4. Polymethoxy flavonoids, nobiletin and tangeretin, prevent lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory bone loss in an experimental model for periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Tominari, Tsukasa; Hirata, Michiko; Matsumoto, Chiho; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2012-01-01

    Nobiletin, a polymethoxy flavonoid (PMF), inhibits systemic bone resorption and maintains bone mass in estrogen-deficient ovariectomized mice. This study examined the anti-inflammatory effects of PMFs, nobiletin, and tangeretin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone resorption. Nobiletin and tangeretin suppressed LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption and suppressed the receptor activator of NFκB ligand-induced osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 macrophages. Nobiletin clearly restored the alveolar bone mass in a mouse experimental model for periodontitis by inhibiting LPS-induced bone resorption. PMFs may therefore provide a new therapeutic approach for periodontal bone loss.

  5. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory bone resorption, and protects against alveolar bone loss in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Watanabe, Kenta; Hirata, Michiko; Grundler, Florian M.W.; Miyaura, Chisato; Inada, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenol in green tea, possesses antioxidant properties and regulates various cell functions. Here, we examined the function of EGCG in inflammatory bone resorption. In calvarial organ cultures, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone resorption was clearly suppressed by EGCG. In osteoblasts, EGCG suppressed the LPS-induced expression of COX-2 and mPGES-1 mRNAs, as well as prostaglandin E2 production, and also suppressed RANKL expression, which is essential for osteoclast differentiation. LPS-induced bone resorption of mandibular alveolar bones was attenuated by EGCG in vitro, and the loss of mouse alveolar bone mass was inhibited by the catechin in vivo. PMID:26155460

  6. Nonradiolabeling Assay for WaaP, an Essential Sugar Kinase Involved in Biosynthesis of Core Lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Wenzel, Cory Q.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2002-01-01

    waaP is present in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core gene clusters of a wide range of gram-negative bacteria, and is an essential gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The WaaP protein is a sugar kinase that adds phosphate to heptose I in the core oligosaccharide. This study describes the standardization and utility of a chemiluminescence-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of WaaP kinase activity. Important features of the assay include high sensitivity, the preparation of dephosphorylated LPS as a substrate, and the use of monoclonal antibody 7-4 that specifically recognizes phosphate substituents in the LPS core. PMID:12019135

  7. Nonradiolabeling assay for WaaP, an essential sugar kinase involved in biosynthesis of core lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Wenzel, Cory Q; Lam, Joseph S

    2002-06-01

    waaP is present in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core gene clusters of a wide range of gram-negative bacteria, and is an essential gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The WaaP protein is a sugar kinase that adds phosphate to heptose I in the core oligosaccharide. This study describes the standardization and utility of a chemiluminescence-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of WaaP kinase activity. Important features of the assay include high sensitivity, the preparation of dephosphorylated LPS as a substrate, and the use of monoclonal antibody 7-4 that specifically recognizes phosphate substituents in the LPS core.

  8. The core and O-polysaccharide structure of the Caulobacter crescentus lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael D; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Nomellini, John F; Smit, John

    2015-01-30

    Here we describe the analysis of the structure of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Caulobacter crescentus strain JS1025, a derivative of C. crescentus CB15 NA1000 with an engineered amber mutation in rsaA, leading to the loss of the protein S-layer and gene CCNA_00471 encoding a putative GDP-L-fucose synthase. LPS was isolated using an aqueous membrane disruption method. Polysaccharide and core oligosaccharide were produced by mild acid hydrolysis and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemical methods. Spectra revealed the presence of two polysaccharides, one of them, a rhamnan, could be removed using periodate oxidation. Another polymer, built from 4-amino-4-deoxy-D-rhamnose (perosamine), mannose, and 3-O-methyl-glucose, should be the O-chain of the LPS according to genetic data. The attribution of the rhamnan as a part of LPS or a separate polymer was not possible.

  9. Effects of citrulline malate on bacterial lipopolysaccharide induced endotoxemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Verleye, M; Heulard, I; Stephens, J R; Levy, R H; Gillardin, J M

    1995-06-01

    The administration of endotoxins to rats as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces a state of exhaustion, in which the main symptoms are febrile hyperthermia, reduced food intake, decreased body weight, and reduced muscle performance in treadmill tests. Underlying the physiological and behavioral disturbances due to the LPS is the activation of macrophages that release cytokines (interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor a) and NO. The cellular responses are intended to maintain homeostasis. Provision of citrulline as citrulline malate (CAS 54940-97-5, Stimol), an antifatigue substance, improved muscle performance, but had no effect on the body temperature or on the body weight of these animals weakened by LPS. The presence of citrulline in the NO synthesis pathway, or its participation in the speeded up elimination of ammonia and lactates, the main products of muscle metabolism, might explain the effects of citrulline malate in rats treated with LPS. PMID:7646577

  10. A cross-disciplinary perspective on the innate immune responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yunhao; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    The study of innate immunity to bacteria has focused heavily on the mechanisms by which mammalian cells detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the conserved surface component of gram-negative bacteria. While Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) is responsible for all the host transcriptional responses to LPS, recent discoveries have revealed the existence of several TLR4-independent responses to LPS. These discoveries not only broaden our view of the means by which mammalian cells interact with bacteria, but also highlight new selective pressures that may have promoted the evolution of bacterial immune evasion strategies. In this review, we highlight past and recent discoveries on host LPS sensing mechanisms and discuss bacterial countermeasures that promote infection. By looking at both sides of the host-pathogen interaction equation, we hope to provide comprehensive insights into host defense mechanisms and bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24766885

  11. Efficacy of lipopolysaccharide antigen of Yersinia ruckeri in rainbow trout by intraperitoneal and bath immersion administration.

    PubMed

    Ispir, Unal; Dorucu, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    In this study, Intraperitoneal (IP) and bath immersion (BI) vaccine trials were conducted in fish with a mean weight of 6.3 g. Rainbow trout vaccinated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was 50 mg/L protein concentration and challenged by IP injection with 9.8 × 10(6) cell/ml of Yersinia ruckeri at 45 days post-immunization had a relative percent survival (RPS). To obtain an effective bath immersion vaccine against yersiniosis, LPS preparation was obtained from the Y. ruckeri and with the LPS antigen. After 28 and 60 days vaccinated fish with first and second immunizations by LPS were challenged via intraperitoneal injection with 9.8 × 10(6) cell/ml of Y. ruckeri for evaluating the mortality rates and calculating the relative percentage of survival (RPS). RPS value of experimental groups, which was significantly (P < 0.05) larger than that of the control group.

  12. Genetic linkage analysis to identify a gene required for the addition of phosphoethanolamine to meningococcal lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christoph M; Stroud, Dave; Mackinnon, Fiona; Makepeace, Katherine; Plested, Joyce; Moxon, E Richard; Chalmers, Ronald

    2002-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is important for the virulence of Neisseria meningitidis, and is the target of immune responses. We took advantage of a monoclonal antibody (Mab B5) that recognises phosphoethanolamine (PEtn) attached to the inner core of meningococcal LPS to identify genes required for the addition of PEtn to LPS. Insertional mutants that lost Mab B5 reactivity were isolated and characterised, but failed to yield genes directly responsible for PEtn substitution. Subsequent genetic linkage analysis was used to define a region of DNA containing a single intact open reading frame which is sufficient to confer B5 reactivity to a B5 negative meningococcal isolate. The results provide an initial characterisation of the genetic basis of a key, immunodominant epitope of meningococcal LPS.

  13. Gram-Negative Marine Bacteria: Structural Features of Lipopolysaccharides and Their Relevance for Economically Important Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative marine bacteria can thrive in harsh oceanic conditions, partly because of the structural diversity of the cell wall and its components, particularly lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is composed of three main parts, an O-antigen, lipid A, and a core region, all of which display immense structural variations among different bacterial species. These components not only provide cell integrity but also elicit an immune response in the host, which ranges from other marine organisms to humans. Toll-like receptor 4 and its homologs are the dedicated receptors that detect LPS and trigger the immune system to respond, often causing a wide variety of inflammatory diseases and even death. This review describes the structural organization of selected LPSes and their association with economically important diseases in marine organisms. In addition, the potential therapeutic use of LPS as an immune adjuvant in different diseases is highlighted. PMID:24796306

  14. Iron potentiates bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide formation in animal organs.

    PubMed

    Kubrina, L N; Mikoyan, V D; Mordvintcev, P I; Vanin, A F

    1993-04-16

    Administration of an Fe(2+)-citrate complex to mongrel mice pretreated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Salmonella typhosa increased LPS-induced NO formation in vivo in the liver, intestine, lung, heart, kidney and spleen by 10-20-fold. This process was monitored by the intensity of the EPR signal due to mononitrosyl iron complex (MNIC) formation with exogenous diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC) recorded in the tissues. The NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine, prevented this complex formation in the liver of mice treated with both LPS and Fe(2+)-citrate complex. Thus, administration of LPS and Fe(2+)-citrate complex to mice induced NO biosynthesis in this tissue via an L-arginine-dependent pathway, presumably by facilitating the entry of Ca2+ ions into NO-producing cells through Fe(2+)-induced cell membrane lesions. PMID:7682442

  15. Sepsis progression to multiple organ dysfunction in carotid chemo/baro-denervated rats treated with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, Gino; Martin, Aldo; Abarzúa, Sebastián; Rodríguez, Jorge; Simon, Felipe; Reyes, Edison P; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Navarro, Cristina; Cortes, Paula P; Fernández, Ricardo

    2015-01-15

    Sepsis progresses to multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) due to the uncontrolled release of inflammatory mediators. Carotid chemo/baro-receptors could play a protective role during sepsis. In anesthetized male rats, we measured cardiorespiratory variables and plasma TNF-α, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, and MOD marker levels 90min after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration in control (SHAM surgery) and bilateral carotid chemo/baro-denervated (BCN) rats. BCN prior to LPS blunted the tachypneic response and enhanced tachycardia and hypotension. BCN-LPS rats also showed blunted plasma glucocorticoid responses, boosted epinephrine and TNF-α responses, and earlier MOD onset with a lower survival time compared with SHAM-LPS rats. Consequently, the complete absence of carotid chemo/baro-sensory function modified the neural, endocrine and inflammatory responses to sepsis. Thus, carotid chemo/baro-receptors play a protective role in sepsis.

  16. In search of secreted protein biomarkers for the anti-inflammatory effect of beta2-adrenergic receptor agonists: application of DIGE technology in combination with multivariate and univariate data analysis tools.

    PubMed

    Verhoeckx, Kitty C M; Gaspari, Marco; Bijlsma, Sabina; van der Greef, Jan; Witkamp, Renger F; Doornbos, Robert P; Rodenburg, Richard J T

    2005-01-01

    Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) in combination with univariate (Student's t-test) and multivariate data analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to study the anti-inflammatory effects of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)-AR) agonist zilpaterol. U937 macrophages were exposed to the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce an inflammatory reaction, which was inhibited by the addition of zilpaterol (LZ). This inhibition was counteracted by addition of the beta(2)-AR antagonist propranolol (LZP). The extracellular proteome of the U937 cells induced by the three treatments were examined by DIGE. PCA was used as an explorative tool to investigate the clustering of the proteome dataset. Using this tool, the dataset obtained from cells treated with LPS and LZP were separated from those obtained from LZ treated cells. PLS-DA, a multivariate data analysis tool that also takes correlations between protein spots and class assignment into account, correctly classified the different extracellular proteomes and showed that many proteins were differentially expressed between the proteome of inflamed cells (LPS and LZP) and cells in which the inflammatory response was inhibited (LZ). The Student's t-test revealed 8 potential protein biomarkers, each of which was expressed at a similar level in the LPS and LZP treated cells, but differently expressed in the LZ treated cells. Two of the identified proteins, macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta (MIP-1beta) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) are known secreted proteins. The inhibition of MIP-1beta by zilpaterol and the involvement of the beta(2)-AR and cAMP were confirmed using a specific immunoassay.

  17. Structural investigation of the antagonist LPS from the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria planktothrix FP1.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Bedini, Emiliano; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Lanzetta, Rosa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2014-03-31

    Cyanobacteria are aquatic and photosynthetic microorganisms, which contribute up to 30% of the yearly oxygen production on the earth. They have the distinction of being the oldest known fossils, more than 3.5 billion years old, and are one of the largest and most important groups of bacteria on earth. Cyanobacteria are an emerging source of potentially pharmacologically active products and, among these, there are the lipopolysaccharides. Despite their significant and well documented activity, very little is known about the cyanobacteria lipopolysaccharides (LPS) structure. The aim of this work is to investigate the structure of the highly TLR4-antagonist lipopolysaccharide from the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria plankthotrix FP1. The LPS was purified and analysed by means of chemical analysis and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The LPS was then degraded by Smith degradation, HF and acetic acid hydrolyses. All the obtained products were investigated in detail by chemical analysis, NMR spectroscopy and by mass spectrometry. The LPS consists of a high molecular mass and very complex molecule lacking Kdo and heptose residues, where the polysaccharide chain is mainly constituted by a backbone of 3-substituted α-l-rhamnose units. The core region is rich in galacturonic acid and mannose residues. Moreover a glycolipid portion, similar to Gram-negative lipid A, was identified. This was built up of a non phosphorylated (1'→6) linked glucosamine disaccharide, acylated with 3-hydroxylated fatty acids. In particular 3-hydroxypentadecanoic and 3-hydroxyesadecanoic acids were found, together with esadecanoic and tetradecanoic ones. Finally the presence of a galacturonic acid residue at 6-position of the distal glucosamine in place of the Kdo residue is suggested.

  18. Functional Identification of the Proteus mirabilis Core Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Azevedo, Joana; Jimenez, Natalia; Bouamama, Lamiaa; Tomás, Juan M.; Regué, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we report the identification of genes required for the biosynthesis of the core lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of two strains of Proteus mirabilis. Since P. mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae share a core LPS carbohydrate backbone extending up to the second outer-core residue, the functions of the common P. mirabilis genes was elucidated by genetic complementation studies using well-defined mutants of K. pneumoniae. The functions of strain-specific outer-core genes were identified by using as surrogate acceptors LPSs from two well-defined K. pneumoniae core LPS mutants. This approach allowed the identification of two new heptosyltransferases (WamA and WamC), a galactosyltransferase (WamB), and an N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (WamD). In both strains, most of these genes were found in the so-called waa gene cluster, although one common core biosynthetic gene (wabO) was found outside this cluster. PMID:20622068

  19. Macrophage cytokine response to particles and lipopolysaccharide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A U; Barnes, F H; Charlebois, S J; Smith, R A

    2000-03-15

    Several investigators have suggested that biologic molecules adsorbed onto particles may play a key role in determining macrophage response. Adsorbed endotoxins (bacterial debris) may be of particular importance since they are widely present exogenously and endogenously and adhere strongly to many materials. Murine-transformed peritoneal macrophages (IC-21) were used in this in vitro study. Secretions of IL-1 beta, TNF alpha, and IL-6 were used as a measure of macrophage response to micron-range particles of high-density polyethylene and Co-Cr-Mo alloy, with and without adsorbed lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin. Little cytokine secretion was measured in response to particles (and to polypropylene experimental chambers) cleaned with ethanol and saline and not exposed to LPS. The lack of macrophage response to cleaned particles has been reported by others and may help reconcile conflicting reports in the literature. Cytokine secretion levels were high in all cases if the chambers (with or without particles) were exposed to LPS (and rinsed to minimize nonbound LPS). Secretion patterns were different with particles present and for polymer versus metal particles. Overall, these results suggest that (1) adsorbed molecules on material surfaces strongly affect macrophage response and (2) particle surface chemistry and microstructure affect the concentration and configuration of adsorbed molecules, further influencing particle interaction with macrophage surface receptors. PMID:10602080

  20. Proteomic Changes in Chicken Plasma Induced by Salmonella typhimurium Lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O.; Makkar, Sarbjeet K.; Rath, Narayan C.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are cell wall components of Gram-negative bacteria that produce inflammation and sickness in higher animals. The objective was to identify plasma proteomic changes in an avian model of inflammation. Chickens were treated with either saline or LPS, and blood was collected at 24 hours postinjection. The pooled plasma samples were depleted of high-abundant proteins and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). MALDI analyses showed an increase in fibrinogen beta-derived peptide and a decrease in apolipoprotein-AII-derived peptide in LPS samples. Label-free quantitation of LC–MS/MS spectra revealed an increase in the levels of α1-acid glycoprotein, a chemokine CCLI10, and cathelicidin-2, but a decrease in an interferon-stimulated gene-12-2 protein in the LPS group. These differentially expressed proteins are associated with immunomodulation, cytokine changes, and defense mechanisms, which may be useful as candidate biomarkers of infection and inflammation. PMID:27053921

  1. Passive transfer of leishmania lipopolysaccharide confers parasite survival in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Handman, E.; Schnur, L.F.; Spithill, T.W.; Mitchell, G.F.

    1986-12-01

    Infection of macrophages by the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania involves specific attachment to the host membrane, followed by phagocytosis and intracellular survival and growth. Two parasite molecules have been implicated in the attachment event: Leishmania lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS) and a glycoprotein (gp63). This study was designed to clarify the role of L-LPS in infection and the stage in the process of infection at which it operates. The authors have recently identified a Leishmania major strain (LRC-L119) which lacks the L-LPS molecule and is not infective for hamsters or mice. This parasite was isolated from a gerbil in Kenya and was identified phenotypically as L. major by isoenzyme and fatty acid analysis. In this study they have confirmed at the genotype level that LRC-L119 is L. major by analyzing and comparing the organization of cloned DNA sequences in the genome of different strains of L. major. Here they show that LRC-L119 promastigotes are phagocytosed rapidly by macrophages in vitro, but in contrast to virulent strains of L. major, they are then killed over a period of 18 hr. In addition, they show that transfer of purified L-LPS from a virulent clone of L. major (V121) into LRC-L119 promastigotes confers on them the ability to survive in macrophages in vitro.

  2. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  3. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25008149

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Antimicrobial Peptides on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Shang, Dejing

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are usually small molecule peptides, which display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, high efficiency, and stability. For the multiple-antibiotic-resistant strains, AMPs play a significant role in the development of novel antibiotics because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and specific antimicrobial mechanism. Besides broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, AMPs also have anti-inflammatory activity. The neutralization of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) plays a key role in anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. On the one hand, AMPs can readily penetrate the cell wall barrier by neutralizing LPS to remove Gram-negative bacteria that can lead to infection. On the contrary, AMPs can also inhibit the production of biological inflammatory cytokines to reduce the inflammatory response through neutralizing circulating LPS. In addition, AMPs also modulate the host immune system by chemotaxis of leukocytes, to promote immune cell proliferation, epithelialization, and angiogenesis and thus play a protective role. This review summarizes some recent researches about anti-inflammatory AMPs, with a focus on the interaction of AMPs and LPS on the past decade. PMID:26612970

  5. Protective effect of Jolkinolide B on LPS-induced mouse acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hailing; Li, Yan; Huo, Pengfei; Li, Xiao-Ou; Kong, Daliang; Mu, Wei; Fang, Wei; Li, Lingxia; Liu, Ning; Fang, Ling; Li, Hongjun; He, Chengyan

    2015-05-01

    Jolkinolide B (JB), an ent-abietane diterpenoid, isolated from the dried root of Euphorbia fischeriana, has been reported to have potent anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of JB on acute lung injury (ALI) and underlying molecular mechanisms have not been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of JB on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with dexamethasone or JB 1h before intranasal instillation of LPS. The results showed that JB markedly attenuated LPS-induced histological alterations, lung edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity as well as the production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. Furthermore, JB also significantly inhibited LPS-induced the degradation of IκBα and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and MAPK. Therefore, our study provides the first line of evidence that pretreatment of JB has a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of JB may be attributed to its suppression of NF-κB and MAPK activation.

  6. Nicotine ameliorates schizophrenia-like cognitive deficits induced by maternal LPS exposure: a study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Waterhouse, Uta; Roper, Vic E.; Brennan, Katharine A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Maternal exposure to infectious agents is a predisposing factor for schizophrenia with associated cognitive deficits in offspring. A high incidence of smoking in these individuals in adulthood might be, at least in part, due to the cognitive-enhancing effects of nicotine. Here, we have used prenatal exposure to maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS, bacterial endotoxin) at different time points as a model for cognitive deficits in schizophrenia to determine whether nicotine reverses any associated impairments. Pregnant rats were treated subcutaneously with LPS (0.5 mg/kg) at one of three neurodevelopmental time periods [gestation days (GD) 10-11, 15-16, 18-19]. Cognitive assessment in male offspring commenced in early adulthood [postnatal day (PND) 60] and included: prepulse inhibition (PPI), latent inhibition (LI) and delayed non-matching to sample (DNMTS). Following PND 100, daily nicotine injections (0.6 mg/kg, subcutaneously) were administered, and animals were re-tested in the same tasks (PND 110). Only maternal LPS exposure early during fetal neurodevelopment (GD 10-11) resulted in deficits in all tests compared to animals that had been prenatally exposed to saline at the same gestational time point. Repeated nicotine treatment led to global (PPI) and selective (LI) improvements in performance. Early but not later prenatal LPS exposure induced consistent deficits in cognitive tests with relevance for schizophrenia. Nicotine reversed the LPS-induced deficits in selective attention (LI) and induced a global enhancement of sensorimotor gating (PPI). PMID:27483346

  7. Reduction Impairs the Antibacterial Activity but Benefits the LPS Neutralization Ability of Human Enteric Defensin 5

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Shen, Mingqiang; Zhang, Naixin; Wang, Song; Xu, Yang; Chen, Shilei; Chen, Fang; Yang, Ke; He, Ting; Wang, Aiping; Su, Yongping; Cheng, Tianmin; Zhao, Jinghong; Wang, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized human defensin 5 (HD5OX), a Paneth cell-secreted antibacterial peptide with three characteristic disulfide bonds, protects the host from invasion by morbigenous microbes in the small intestine. HD5OX can be reduced by thioredoxin (Trx) in vitro, while the biochemical properties of the reduced linear peptide, HD5RED, remain unclear. Here, we first confirm that HD5RED does exist in vivo. Furthermore, we reveal that the recruitment of HD5RED to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and to the anionic lipid A is lower than that of HD5OX, and HD5RED is less efficient in penetrating bacterial outer and inner membranes and inducing membrane depolarization, which confers an attenuated antibacterial activity to HD5RED. However, due to its higher structural flexibility, the binding of HD5RED to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is markedly stronger than that of HD5OX. Consequently, HD5RED is more effective in suppressing the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in LPS-stimulated macrophages by blocking the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein, thus suggesting that HD5RED might act as a scavenger to neutralize LPS in the gut. This study provides insights into the antibacterial and immunoregulatory effects of HD5RED and expands the known repertoire of the enteric defensins. PMID:26960718

  8. Low-Level Laser Therapy Attenuates LPS-Induced Rats Mastitis by Inhibiting Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Yueqiang; HE, Xianjing; HAO, Dandan; YU, Debin; LIANG, Jianbin; QU, Yanpeng; SUN, Dongbo; YANG, Bin; YANG, Keli; WU, Rui; WANG, Jianfa

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on a rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis and its underlying molecular mechanisms. The rat model of mastitis was induced by inoculation of LPS through the canals of the mammary gland. The results showed that LPS-induced secretion of IL-1β and IL-8 significantly decreased after LLLT (650 nm, 2.5 mW, 30 mW/cm2). LLLT also inhibited intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and attenuated the LPS-induced decrease of the expression of CD62L and increase of the expression of CD11b. Moreover, LLLT also suppressed LPS-induced polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) entering the alveoli of the mammary gland. The number of PMNs in the mammary alveolus and the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were decreased after LLLT. These results suggested that LLLT therapy is beneficial in decreasing the somatic cell count and improving milk nutritional quality in cows with an intramammary infection. PMID:25452258

  9. Oligodendrogenesis in the fornix of adult mouse brain; the effect of LPS-induced inflammatory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kazunori; Furube, Eriko; Muneoka, Shiori; Ono, Katsuhiko; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Miyata, Seiji

    2015-11-19

    Evidence have been accumulated that continuous oligodendrogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain. The fornix, projection and commissure pathway of hippocampal neurons, carries signals from the hippocampus to other parts of the brain and has critical role in memory and learning. However, basic characterization of adult oligodendrogenesis in this brain region is not well understood. In the present study, therefore, we aimed to examine the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and the effect of acute inflammatory stimulation on oligodendrogenesis in the fornix of adult mouse. We demonstrated the proliferation of OPCs and a new generation of mature oligodendrocytes by using bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Oligodendrogenesis of adult fornix was also demonstrated by using oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 transgenic mouse. A single systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) attenuated proliferation of OPCs in the fornix together with reduced proliferation of hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells. Time course analysis showed that a single administration of LPS attenuated the proliferation of OPCs during 24-48 h. On the other hand, consecutive administration of LPS did not suppress proliferation of OPCs. The treatment of LPS did not affect differentiation of OPCs into mature oligodendrocytes. Treatment of a microglia inhibitor minocycline significantly attenuated basal proliferation of OPCs under normal condition. In conclusion, the present study indicates that continuous oligodendrogenesis occurs and a single administration of LPS transiently attenuates proliferation of OPCs without changing differentiation in the fornix of the adult mouse brains.

  10. Prenatal LPS exposure reduces olfactory perception in neonatal and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, Thiago Berti; Chaves, Gabriela Pena; Taricano, Marina; Martins, Daniel Oliveira; Flório, Jorge Camilo; Britto, Luiz Roberto Giorgetti de; Torrão, Andrea da Silva; Palermo-Neto, João; Bernardi, Maria Martha

    2011-09-01

    Prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure causes reproductive, behavioral and neurochemical defects in both dams and pups. The present study evaluated male rats prenatally treated with LPS for behavioral and neurological effects related to the olfactory system, which is the main sensorial path in rodents. Pregnant Wistar rats received 100 μg/kg of LPS intraperitoneally (i.p.) on gestational day (GD) 9.5, and maternal behavior was evaluated. Pups were evaluated for (1) maternal odor preference, (2) aversion to cat odor, (3) monoamine levels and turnover in the olfactory bulb (OB) and (4) protein expression (via immunoblotting) within the OB dopaminergic system and glial cells. Results showed that prenatal LPS exposure impaired maternal preference and cat odor aversion and decreased dopamine (DA) levels in the OB. This dopaminergic impairment may have been due to defects in another brain area given that protein expression of the first enzyme in the DA biosynthetic pathway was unchanged in the OB. Moreover, there was no change in the protein expression of the DA receptors. The fact that the number of astrocytes and microglia was not increased suggests that prenatal LPS did not induce neuroinflammation in the OB. Furthermore, given that maternal care was not impaired, abnormalities in the offspring were not the result of reduced maternal care.

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide Delays LPS-Induced Preterm Birth in Mice via Anti-Inflammatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weina; Xu, Chen; You, Xingji; Olson, David M.; Chemtob, Sylvain; Gao, Lu; Ni, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A major cause of preterm labor in pregnant women is intra-amniotic infection, which is mediated by an inflammatory process. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous transmitter, has been implicated to be involved in inflammatory responses. We sought to investigate whether H2S affects infectious preterm birth using the mouse model of lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced preterm birth. Administration of LPS at 0.4 mg/kg with two injections intraperitoneally (i.p.) on gestational day 14.5 induced preterm labor. LPS significantly increased leukocyte infiltration in uterus, stimulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), CCL2 and CXCL15 in myometrium. Administration of NaHS (i.p.) delayed the onset of labor induced by LPS in a dose-dependent manner. NaHS prevented leukocyte infiltration into intrauterine tissues and inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in myometrium and decreased the levels of these cytokines in maternal circulation. H2S also decreased LPS-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2/ nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways in myometrium. This study provides new in vivo evidence for the roles of H2S in attenuating inflammation, and a potential novel therapeutic strategy for infection-related preterm labor. PMID:27035826

  12. Reduction Impairs the Antibacterial Activity but Benefits the LPS Neutralization Ability of Human Enteric Defensin 5.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Shen, Mingqiang; Zhang, Naixin; Wang, Song; Xu, Yang; Chen, Shilei; Chen, Fang; Yang, Ke; He, Ting; Wang, Aiping; Su, Yongping; Cheng, Tianmin; Zhao, Jinghong; Wang, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized human defensin 5 (HD5OX), a Paneth cell-secreted antibacterial peptide with three characteristic disulfide bonds, protects the host from invasion by morbigenous microbes in the small intestine. HD5OX can be reduced by thioredoxin (Trx) in vitro, while the biochemical properties of the reduced linear peptide, HD5RED, remain unclear. Here, we first confirm that HD5RED does exist in vivo. Furthermore, we reveal that the recruitment of HD5RED to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and to the anionic lipid A is lower than that of HD5OX, and HD5RED is less efficient in penetrating bacterial outer and inner membranes and inducing membrane depolarization, which confers an attenuated antibacterial activity to HD5RED. However, due to its higher structural flexibility, the binding of HD5RED to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is markedly stronger than that of HD5OX. Consequently, HD5RED is more effective in suppressing the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in LPS-stimulated macrophages by blocking the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein, thus suggesting that HD5RED might act as a scavenger to neutralize LPS in the gut. This study provides insights into the antibacterial and immunoregulatory effects of HD5RED and expands the known repertoire of the enteric defensins. PMID:26960718

  13. Acute systemic LPS-mediated inflammation induces lasting changes in mouse cortical neuromodulation and behavior.

    PubMed

    Ming, Z; Sawicki, G; Bekar, L K

    2015-03-17

    Systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is widely used to induce a neuroinflammatory response that is associated with short-term 'sickness'-behavior that can include fever, loss of activity, loss of appetite, impaired cognition, anxiety and depression. If large enough or left unchecked, this neuroinflammatory response can become self-perpetuating and lead to long-term neurodegenerative processes. In this study, we assess the longer-term effects of a single systemic LPS injection on electrophysiological neuromodulator effects and basic behavioral analysis in mice. Five months after LPS injection, we find a mild reduction in cortical inhibition and altered temporal dynamics of acetylcholine but not norepinephrine or serotonin neuromodulator effects. Consistent with electrophysiological findings, LPS treated mice showed a deficit in memory performance in the novel object recognition test with no effect on measures of anxiety or despair as measured in the open field test and tail suspension test, respectively. Furthermore, LPS-treated mice showed an increase in acetylcholinesterase activity. As increased acetylcholinesterase activity is associated with reduced acetylcholine signaling and impaired cognitive ability, these studies demonstrate the potential for a single inflammatory event to initiate processes that may lead to long-term neurodegeneration. PMID:25650524

  14. Resistance of LPS-activated bone marrow derived macrophages to apoptosis mediated by dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Haim, Yasmin Ohana; Unger, Naamit Deshet; Souroujon, Miriam C.; Mittelman, Moshe; Neumann, Drorit

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) display pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Macrophages are a major target for GC action. Here we show that dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic GC, decreased viability of naïve bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), involving an apoptotic mechanism. Administration of DEX together with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) protected BMDM against DEX-mediated cell death, suggesting that activated BMDM respond to DEX differently than naïve BMDM. An insight to the molecular basis of LPS actions was provided by a 7 fold increase in mRNA levels of glucocorticoid receptor beta (GRβ), a GR dominant-negative splice variant which inhibits GRα's transcriptional activity. LPS did not inhibit all DEX-mediated effects on BMDM; DEX significantly reduced the percentage of BMDM expressing high levels of the cell surface markers F4/80 and CD11b and led to a decrease in macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP1-α) mRNA and protein levels. These two DEX-mediated effects were not prevented by LPS. Our finding that LPS did not reduce the DEX-induced elevation of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a mediator of GCs anti-inflammatory actions, may provide an underlying mechanism. These findings enable a better understanding of clinical states, such as sepsis, in which macrophages are activated by endotoxins and treatment by GCs is considered. PMID:24608810

  15. Ulinastatin attenuates LPS-induced human endothelial cells oxidative damage through suppressing JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunping; Ma, Dandan; Chen, Man; Zhang, Linlin; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Jicheng; Qu, Xin; Wang, Chunting

    2016-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress is a main feature observed in the sepsis by increasing endothelial oxidative damage. Many studies have demonstrated that Ulinastatin (UTI) can inhibit pro-inflammatory proteases, decrease inflammatory cytokine levels and suppress oxidative stress. However, the potential molecular mechanism underlying UTI which exerts its antioxidant effect is not well understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of UTI on the LPS-induced oxidative stress and the underlying mechanisms using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). After oxidative stress induced By LPS in HUVECs, the cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cytoplasm were measured. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were examined. We found that LPS resulted in a profound elevation of ROS production and MDA levels. The decrease in Cu/Zn-SOD protein and increased in Mn-SOD protein were observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner. These responses were suppressed by an addition of UTI. The increase in c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylation by LPS in HUVECs was markedly blocked by UTI or JNK inhibitor SP600125. Our results suggest that UTI exerts its anti-oxidant effects by decreasing overproduction of ROS induced by LPS via suppressing JNK/c-Jun phosphorylation. Therefore UTI may play a protective role in vascular endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress such as sepsis. This study may provide insight into a possible molecular mechanism by which Ulinastatin inhibits LPS-induced oxidative stress.

  16. Differential Regulation of Proinflammatory Mediators following LPS- and ATP-Induced Activation of Monocytes from Patients with Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Anush; Petrek, Martin; Navratilova, Zdenka; Blbulyan, Armen; Boyajyan, Anna; Manukyan, Gayane

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in association with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Growing evidence supports the involvement of monocytes in APS pathogenesis. Inflammatory activation of monocytes promotes thrombus formation and other APS complications. However, mechanisms underlying their activation are poorly investigated. We aimed to determine transcriptional activity of monocytes after exposing them to low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and LPS + adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using comparative qRT-PCR. The results showed that LPS significantly increased transcriptional levels of TLR2, IL-23, CCL2, CXCL10, IL-1β, and IL-6 in APS cells, while, in cells from healthy donors, LPS resulted in IL-6 and STAT3 elevated mRNAs. Double stimulation of the cells resulted in decreased mRNA levels of NLRP3 in monocytes isolated from healthy donors and CCL2, IL-1β in APS cells. By contrast, TLR2 mRNAs were elevated in both investigated groups after culture of the cells with LPS + ATP. Thus, the findings indicate increased sensitivity of APS cells to LPS that may contribute to thrombus formation and enhance development or progression of autoimmune processes. Low concentrations of ATP diminish LPS-induced inflammatory state of APS monocytes which might be a potential mechanism which regulates inflammatory state of the cells. PMID:25785264

  17. c-Abl mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin regulates LPS-induced endothelial dysfunction and lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Usatyuk, Peter V.; Lele, Abhishek; Harijith, Anantha; Gregorio, Carol C.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Salgia, Ravi; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    Paxillin is phosphorylated at multiple residues; however, the role of tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin in endothelial barrier dysfunction and acute lung injury (ALI) remains unclear. We used siRNA and site-specific nonphosphorylable mutants of paxillin to abrogate the function of paxillin to determine its role in lung endothelial permeability and ALI. In vitro, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge of human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs) resulted in enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin at Y31 and Y118 with no significant change in Y181 and significant barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of paxillin with siRNA attenuated LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction and destabilization of VE-cadherin. LPS-induced paxillin phosphorylation at Y31 and Y118 was mediated by c-Abl tyrosine kinase, but not by Src and focal adhesion kinase. c-Abl siRNA significantly reduced LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction. Transfection of HLMVECs with paxillin Y31F, Y118F, and Y31/118F double mutants mitigated LPS-induced barrier dysfunction and VE-cadherin destabilization. In vivo, the c-Abl inhibitor AG957 attenuated LPS-induced pulmonary permeability in mice. Together, these results suggest that c-Abl mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin at Y31 and Y118 regulates LPS-mediated pulmonary vascular permeability and injury. PMID:25795725

  18. G-CSF pretreatment aggravates LPS-associated microcirculatory dysfunction and acute liver injury after partial hepatectomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anding; Fang, Haoshu; Wei, Weiwei; Kan, Chunyi; Xie, Chichi; Dahmen, Uta; Dirsch, Olaf

    2014-12-01

    Liver dysfunction is a serious complication in the early phase following major liver resection or liver transplantation and might be aggravated by the translocation of bacteria and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). As a preventive strategy, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is prophylactically applied in patients who are subjected to major surgery. However, we previously demonstrated that G-CSF can induce LPS sensitization. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of G-CSF pretreatment on hepatic microcirculatory disturbances and postoperative liver dysfunction after 70 % partial hepatectomy (PH) in rats. PH alone was well tolerated by all animals (100 % survival rate, slight liver damage and inflammation). LPS application after 70 % PH caused moderate inflammation, microcirculatory disturbances and hepatic damage and led to a 24-h survival rate of 30 % after the operations. In the G-CSF-LPS-PH group, all of the rats died within 4 h with severe inflammatory responses and liver damage (i.e., pronounced erythrocyte congestion and neutrophil infiltration). Portal hypertension and microcirculatory disorders (i.e., inhomogeneous perfusion, sinusoidal dilatation and reductions on functional capillary density) were more pronounced in the G-CSF-LPS-PH group. In conclusion, increased circulating LPS levels were associated with an imbalanced inflammatory response and microcirculatory dysfunction that preceded liver damage and subsequent dysfunction following surgery. G-CSF-pretreatment aggravated microcirculatory disturbances and liver damage, which might have been related to G-CSF-induced LPS sensitization.

  19. First identification of Toll-like receptor-4 in avian brain: evolution of lipopolysaccharide recognition and inflammation-dependent responses.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Concetta; Cianciulli, Antonia; Calvello, Rosa; Cavallo, Pasqua; Mitolo, Vincenzo; Panaro, Maria Antonietta

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we examine the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment on nerve cells of chick embryo used as a universal avian model. We demonstrate that LPS leads to a dramatic cell loss in primary cultures of both glia and neurons, isolated from chick embryos. Toxic effects appear to be mediated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 complex, expressed in both glial and neuronal cells, since after TLR-4 silencing by RNA interference experiments LPS-induced cytotoxicity was prevented. The role of nitric oxide in LPS-induced cell damage has also been investigated. These results demonstrate, for the first time in avian nerve cells, the surface expression of TLR-4 and its role as a pattern recognition receptor involved in LPS-induced cell responses in a similar manner to that observed in mammals.

  20. The role of IL-1β and glutamate in the effects of lipopolysaccharide on the hippocampal electrical kindling of seizures.

    PubMed

    Kołosowska, Karolina; Maciejak, Piotr; Szyndler, Janusz; Turzyńska, Danuta; Sobolewska, Alicja; Płaźnik, Adam

    2016-09-15

    In our study, we used rapid electrical hippocampal kindling and in vivo microdialysis methods to assess the involvement of inflammatory mediators: lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and proinflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in mechanisms of epileptogenesis. We observed, that both, LPS and IL-1β, administered into stimulated hippocampus, accelerated kindling process. LPS also increased the expression of IL-1β in stimulated hippocampus in kindled rats. In vivo acute LPS perfusion, via a microdialysis cannula implanted into the naïve rat's hippocampus, produced an increase in extracellular glutamate release. We suppose, that particularly IL-1β action and increased glutamate concentration may significantly contribute to LPS effects on kindling development. PMID:27609288

  1. Transcriptional profiling of macrophages derived from monocytes and iPS cells identifies a conserved response to LPS and novel alternative transcription

    PubMed Central

    Alasoo, Kaur; Martinez, Fernando O.; Hale, Christine; Gordon, Siamon; Powrie, Fiona; Dougan, Gordon; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Gaffney, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSDMs) are a potentially valuable new tool for linking genotype to phenotype in functiona