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Sample records for agonist lipopolysaccharide lps

  1. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Zeinab G.; Kalansuriya, Pabasara; Capon, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a preliminary investigation of the use the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall constituent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a natural chemical cue to stimulate and alter the expression of fungal secondary metabolism. Integrated high-throughput micro-cultivation and micro-analysis methods determined that 6 of 40 (15%) of fungi tested responded to an optimal exposure to LPS (0.6 ng/mL) by activating, enhancing or accelerating secondary metabolite production. To explore the possible mechanisms behind this effect, we employed light and fluorescent microscopy in conjunction with a nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive fluorescent dye and an NO scavenger to provide evidence that LPS stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism coincided with LPS activation of NO. Several case studies demonstrated that LPS stimulation can be scaled from single microplate well (1.5 mL) to preparative (>400 mL) scale cultures. For example, LPS treatment of Penicillium sp. (ACM-4616) enhanced pseurotin A and activated pseurotin A1 and pseurotin A2 biosynthesis, whereas LPS treatment of Aspergillus sp. (CMB-M81F) substantially accelerated and enhanced the biosynthesis of shornephine A and a series of biosynthetically related ardeemins and activated production of neoasterriquinone. As an indication of broader potential, we provide evidence that cultures of Penicillium sp. (CMB-TF0411), Aspergillus niger (ACM-4993F), Rhizopus oryzae (ACM-165F) and Thanatephorus cucumeris (ACM-194F) were responsive to LPS stimulation, the latter two examples being particular noteworthy as neither are known to produce secondary metabolites. Our results encourage the view that LPS stimulation can be used as a valuable tool to expand the molecular discovery potential of fungal strains that either have been exhaustively studied by or are unresponsive to traditional culture methodology. PMID:25379339

  2. Dissociation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inducible gene expression in murine macrophages pretreated with smooth LPS versus monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, B E; Manthey, C L; Perera, P Y; Hamilton, T A; Vogel, S N

    1993-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the nontoxic derivative of lipid A, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), were employed to assess the relationship between expression of LPS-inducible inflammatory genes and the induction of tolerance to LPS in murine macrophages. Both LPS and MPL induced expression (as assessed by increased steady-state mRNA levels) of a panel of seven "early" inflammatory genes including the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta, type 2 TNF receptor (TNFR-2), IP-10, D3, D8, and D2 genes (the last four represent LPS-inducible early genes whose functions remain unknown). In addition, LPS and MPL were both capable of inducing tolerance to LPS. The two stimuli differed in the relative concentration required to induce various outcome measures, with LPS being 100- to 1,000-fold more potent on a mass concentration basis. Characterization of the tolerant state identified three distinct categories of responsiveness. Two genes (IP-10 and D8) exhibited strong desensitization in macrophages pretreated with tolerance-inducing concentrations of either LPS or MPL. In macrophages rendered tolerant by pretreatment with LPS or MPL, a second group of inducible mRNAs (TNF-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and D3) showed moderate suppression of response to secondary stimulation by LPS. The third category of inducible genes (TNFR-2 and D2) showed increased expression in macrophages pretreated with tolerance-inducing concentrations of either LPS or MPL. All of the LPS-inducible genes examined exhibited modest superinduction with less than tolerance-inducing concentrations of either stimulus, suggesting a priming effect of these adjuvants at low concentration. The differential behavior of the members of this panel of endotoxin-responsive genes thus offers insight into molecular events associated with acquisition of transient tolerance to LPS. PMID:8388859

  3. Effects of PPAR-γ agonist treatment on LPS-induced mastitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mingfeng, Ding; Xiaodong, Ming; Yue, Liu; Taikui, Piao; Lei, Xiao; Ming, Liu

    2014-12-01

    PPAR-γ, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, plays an important role in lipid metabolism and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of synthetic PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis in rats. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by the injection of LPS through the duct of the mammary gland. Rosiglitazone was injected 1 h before the induction of LPS intraperitoneally. The results showed that rosiglitazone attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), and the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, Western blotting showed that rosiglitazone inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65. These results indicated that rosiglitazone has a protective effect on mastitis, and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of rosiglitazone on LPS-induced mastitis in rats may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB signaling pathways. PPAR-γ may be a potential therapeutic target against mastitis.

  4. Bartonella quintana lipopolysaccharide (LPS): structure and characteristics of a potent TLR4 antagonist for in-vitro and in-vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Malgorzata-Miller, Gosia; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; van der Meer, Jos W M; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-09-27

    The pattern recognition receptor TLR4 is well known as a crucial receptor during infection and inflammation. Several TLR4 antagonists have been reported to inhibit the function of TLR4. Both natural occurring antagonists, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria as well as synthetic compounds based on the lipid A structure of LPS have been described as potent inhibitors of TLR4. Here, we have examined the characteristics of a natural TLR4 antagonist, isolated from Bartonella quintana bacterium by elucidating its chemical primary structure. We have found that this TLR4 antagonist is actually a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) instead of a LPS, and that it acts very effective, with a high inhibitory activity against triggering by the LPS-TLR4 system in the presence of a potent TLR4 agonist (E. coli LPS). Furthermore, we demonstrate that B. quintana LPS is not inactivated by polymyxin B, a classical cyclic cationic polypeptide antibiotic that bind the lipid A part of LPS, such as E. coli LPS. Using a murine LPS/D-galactosamine endotoxaemia model we showed that treatment with B. quintana LPS could improve the survival rate significantly. Since endogenous TLR4 ligands have been associated with several inflammatory- and immune-diseases, B. quintana LPS might be a novel therapeutic strategy for TLR4-driven pathologies.

  5. Bartonella quintana lipopolysaccharide (LPS): structure and characteristics of a potent TLR4 antagonist for in-vitro and in-vivo applications

    PubMed Central

    Malgorzata-Miller, Gosia; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The pattern recognition receptor TLR4 is well known as a crucial receptor during infection and inflammation. Several TLR4 antagonists have been reported to inhibit the function of TLR4. Both natural occurring antagonists, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria as well as synthetic compounds based on the lipid A structure of LPS have been described as potent inhibitors of TLR4. Here, we have examined the characteristics of a natural TLR4 antagonist, isolated from Bartonella quintana bacterium by elucidating its chemical primary structure. We have found that this TLR4 antagonist is actually a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) instead of a LPS, and that it acts very effective, with a high inhibitory activity against triggering by the LPS-TLR4 system in the presence of a potent TLR4 agonist (E. coli LPS). Furthermore, we demonstrate that B. quintana LPS is not inactivated by polymyxin B, a classical cyclic cationic polypeptide antibiotic that bind the lipid A part of LPS, such as E. coli LPS. Using a murine LPS/D-galactosamine endotoxaemia model we showed that treatment with B. quintana LPS could improve the survival rate significantly. Since endogenous TLR4 ligands have been associated with several inflammatory- and immune-diseases, B. quintana LPS might be a novel therapeutic strategy for TLR4-driven pathologies. PMID:27670746

  6. Production of antibody to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) after immunization with a LPS-polymyxin B-agarose immunogen.

    PubMed

    Ryan, L K; Karol, M H

    1988-06-01

    A method was devised to produce antibodies to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in guinea-pigs following a single immunization. The antigen was prepared by mixing polymyxin B-agarose with LPS from Escherichia coli O55:B5. Use of the agarose support allowed purification of the complex by simple washing procedures. Twenty-nine days after a single injection of the immunogen mixed with Freund complete adjuvant all animals demonstrated antibody to the LPS portion of the complex. No antibodies were detected to the polymyxin B component. Typical titres of LPS as measured by ELISA were 2(11). After, a booster immunization, titres of LPS antibody were further increased and a greater avidity was noted. In contrast to other methods which have been employed for production of antibody to LPS, use of the polymyxin B-agarose complex has the following advantages: ease of antigen preparation, ready purification of the complex, potent immunostimulation, and under the conditions employed here, LPS-specific antibody production, without accompanying antibody to polymyxin B.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein is carried on lipoproteins and acts as a cofactor in the neutralization of LPS

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Lipoproteins isolated from normal human plasma can bind and neutralize bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and may represent an important mechanism in host defense against gram-negative septic shock. Recent studies have shown that experimentally elevating the levels of circulating high-density lipoproteins (HDL) provides protection against death in animal models of endotoxic shock. We sought to define the components of HDL that are required for neutralization of LPS. To accomplish this we have studied the functional neutralization of LPS by native and reconstituted HDL using a rapid assay that measures the CD14- dependent activation of leukocyte integrins on human neutrophils. We report here that reconstituted HDL particles (R-HDL), prepared from purified apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) combined with phospholipid and free cholesterol, are not sufficient to neutralize the biologic activity of LPS. However, addition of recombinant LPS binding protein (LBP), a protein known to transfer LPS to CD14 and enhance responses of cells to LPS, enabled prompt binding and neutralization of LPS by R- HDL. Thus, LBP appears capable of transferring LPS not only to CD14 but also to lipoprotein particles. In contrast with R-HDL, apoA-I containing lipoproteins (LpA-I) isolated from plasma by selected affinity immunosorption (SAIS) on an anti-apoA-I column, neutralized LPS without addition of exogenous LBP. Several lines of evidence demonstrated that LBP is a constituent of LpA-I in plasma. Passage of plasma over an anti-apoA-I column removed more than 99% of the LBP detectable by ELISA, whereas 31% of the LBP was recovered by elution of the column. Similarly, the ability of plasma to enable activation of neutrophils by LPS (LBP/Septin activity) was depleted and recovered by the same process. Furthermore, an immobilized anti-LBP monoclonal antibody coprecipitated apoA-I. The results described here suggest that in addition to its ability to transfer LPS to CD14, LBP may also transfer LPS to

  8. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alters phosphatidylcholine metabolism in elicited peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, R.I.; Allegretto, N.J.; Kiener, P.A.; Warr, G.A. )

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the effects of LPS on mouse peritoneal macrophage phospholipids using radiolabeled precursors. LPS (200 ng/ml) stimulated incorporation of ({sup 32}P) into all classes of phospholipids within 0.5 hr, and after 2 hr the increase was 60% greater than controls. Separation of the phospholipid classes by thin-layer chromatography revealed a selective increase in incorporation of label into phosphatidylcholine (PC) (90% increase compared to approximately 50% in the other phospholipids). In macrophages labeled with ({sup 3}H)-choline, LPS stimulated both the incorporation of label into PC and the release of incorporated label into the medium. The time dependencies of stimulated ({sup 3}H) release and ({sup 32}P) incorporation were similar. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that LPS activates macrophages via a PC-specific phospholipase-dependent mechanism.

  9. Inhibitory effects of cyclic AMP elevating agents on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microvascular permeability change in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Irie, K; Fujii, E; Ishida, H; Wada, K; Suganuma, T; Nishikori, T; Yoshioka, T; Muraki, T

    2001-05-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of cyclic AMP elevating agents were examined in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microvascular permeability change. Vascular permeability on the back skin was measured by the local accumulation of Pontamine sky blue (PSB) after subcutaneous injection of LPS (400 microg site-1) from Salmonella typhimurium. Dye leakage in the skin was significantly increased 2 h after injection of LPS. This LPS-induced dye leakage was suppressed by phosphodiesterase inhibitors, including pentoxifylline (160 mg kg-1), milrinone (5 - 10 mg kg-1), rolipram (0.5 - 10 mg kg-1) and zaprinast (5 - 10 mg kg-1). The dye leakage was also inhibited by beta-adrenoceptor agonists, including isoproterenol (0.5 - 5 mg kg-1) and salbutamol (0.05 - 5 mg kg-1), an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin (5 mg kg-1), and a cell permeable cyclic AMP analogue, 8-bromo-cyclic AMP (8-Br-cAMP, 10 mg kg-1). LPS caused a transient increase in serum TNF-alpha level peaking at 1 h after the injection. This increase in serum TNF-alpha was completely blocked by a pretreatment with pentoxifylline (160 mg kg-1), milrinone (5 mg kg-1), rolipram (1 mg kg-1), zaprinast (10 mg kg-1), salbutamol (0.5 mg kg-1), forskolin (1 mg kg-1) and 8-Br-cAMP (10 mg kg-1). LPS caused an increase in serum IL-1alpha level peaking at 3 h after injection. This increase in serum IL-1alpha was not significantly suppressed by the cyclic AMP elevating agents. Our study suggests that cyclic AMP elevating agents attenuate LPS-induced microvascular permeability change by suppressing TNF-alpha up regulation.

  10. Optimized Triton X-114 assisted lipopolysaccharide (LPS) removal method reveals the immunomodulatory effect of food proteins

    PubMed Central

    Perdijk, Olaf; Verhoek, Iris; Govers, Coen; Savelkoul, Huub F. J.; Tang, Yongfu; Wichers, Harry; Broersen, Kerensa

    2017-01-01

    Scope Investigations into the immunological response of proteins is often masked by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination. We report an optimized Triton X-114 (TX-114) based LPS extraction method for β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and soy protein extract suitable for cell-based immunological assays. Methods and results Optimization of an existing TX-114 based phase LPS extraction method resulted in >99% reduction of LPS levels. However, remaining TX-114 was found to interfere with LPS and protein concentration assays and decreased viability of THP-1 macrophages and HEK-Blue 293 cells. Upon screening a range of TX-114 extraction procedures, TX-114-binding beads were found to most effectively lower TX-114 levels without affecting protein structural properties. LPS-purified proteins showed reduced capacity to activate TLR4 compared to non-treated proteins. LPS-purified BLG did not induce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from THP-1 macrophages, as non-treated protein did, showing that LPS contamination masks the immunomodulatory effect of BLG. Both HEK293 cells expressing TLR4 and differentiated THP-1 macrophages were shown as a relevant model to screen the protein preparations for biological effects of LPS contamination. Conclusion The reported TX-114 assisted LPS-removal from protein preparations followed by bead based removal of TX-114 allows evaluation of natively folded protein preparations for their immunological potential in cell-based studies. PMID:28355240

  11. The CRTH2 agonist Pyl A prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced fetal death but induces preterm labour

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynne; Herbert, Bronwen R; MacIntyre, David A; Hunte, Emma; Ponnampalam, Sathana; Johnson, Mark R; Teoh, Tiong G; Bennett, Phillip R

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ 12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2) delays inflammation-induced preterm labour in the mouse and improves pup survival through the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by a mechanism yet to be elucidated. 15dPGJ2 is an agonist of the second prostaglandin D2 receptor, chemoattractant receptor homologous to the T helper 2 cell (CRTH2). In human T helper cells CRTH2 agonists induce the production of the anti-inflammatory interleukins IL-10 and IL-4. We hypothesized that CRTH2 is involved in the protective effect of 15dPGJ2 in inflammation-induced preterm labour in the murine model. We therefore studied the effects of a specific small molecule CRTH2 agonist on preterm labour and pup survival. An intrauterine injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to CD1 mice at embryonic day 16, ± CRTH2 agonist/vehicle controls. Mice were killed at 4.5 hr to assess fetal wellbeing and to harvest myometrium and pup brain for analysis of NF-κB, and T helper type 1/2 interleukins. To examine the effects of the CRTH2 agonist on LPS-induced preterm labour, mice were allowed to labour spontaneously. Direct effects of the CRTH2 agonist on uterine contractility were examined ex vivo on contracting myometrial strips. The CRTH2 agonist increased fetal survival from 20 to 100% in LPS-treated mice, and inhibited circular muscle contractility ex vivo. However, it augmented LPS-induced labour and significantly increased myometrial NF-κB, IL-1β, KC-GRO, interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α. This suggests that the action of 15dPGJ2 is not via CRTH2 and therefore small molecule CRTH2 agonists are not likely to be beneficial for the prevention of inflammation-induced preterm labour. PMID:23374103

  12. TLR4/MD-2 activation by a synthetic agonist with no similarity to LPS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Su, Lijing; Morin, Matthew D.; Jones, Brian T.; Whitby, Landon R.; Surakattula, Murali M. R. P.; Huang, Hua; Shi, Hexin; Choi, Jin Huk; Wang, Kuan-wen; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Berger, Michael; Zhan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Boger, Dale L.; Beutler, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Structurally disparate molecules reportedly engage and activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and other TLRs, yet the interactions that mediate binding and activation by dissimilar ligands remain unknown. We describe Neoseptins, chemically synthesized peptidomimetics that bear no structural similarity to the established TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but productively engage the mouse TLR4 (mTLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complex. Neoseptin-3 activates mTLR4/MD-2 independently of CD14 and triggers canonical myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)- and Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF)-dependent signaling. The crystal structure mTLR4/MD-2/Neoseptin-3 at 2.57-Å resolution reveals that Neoseptin-3 binds as an asymmetrical dimer within the hydrophobic pocket of MD-2, inducing an active receptor complex similar to that induced by lipid A. However, Neoseptin-3 and lipid A form dissimilar molecular contacts to achieve receptor activation; hence strong TLR4/MD-2 agonists need not mimic LPS. PMID:26831104

  13. TLR4/MD-2 activation by a synthetic agonist with no similarity to LPS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Su, Lijing; Morin, Matthew D; Jones, Brian T; Whitby, Landon R; Surakattula, Murali M R P; Huang, Hua; Shi, Hexin; Choi, Jin Huk; Wang, Kuan-wen; Moresco, Eva Marie Y; Berger, Michael; Zhan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Boger, Dale L; Beutler, Bruce

    2016-02-16

    Structurally disparate molecules reportedly engage and activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and other TLRs, yet the interactions that mediate binding and activation by dissimilar ligands remain unknown. We describe Neoseptins, chemically synthesized peptidomimetics that bear no structural similarity to the established TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but productively engage the mouse TLR4 (mTLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complex. Neoseptin-3 activates mTLR4/MD-2 independently of CD14 and triggers canonical myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)- and Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF)-dependent signaling. The crystal structure mTLR4/MD-2/Neoseptin-3 at 2.57-Å resolution reveals that Neoseptin-3 binds as an asymmetrical dimer within the hydrophobic pocket of MD-2, inducing an active receptor complex similar to that induced by lipid A. However, Neoseptin-3 and lipid A form dissimilar molecular contacts to achieve receptor activation; hence strong TLR4/MD-2 agonists need not mimic LPS.

  14. Prenatal transportation alters the metabolic response of Brahman bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the metabolic response to a postnatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day 60, 80,...

  15. Effect of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Exposure on the Reproductive Organs of Immature Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Da Kyung; Lee, Sung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin, elicits strong immune responses in mammals. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that LPS challenge profoundly affects female reproductive function. For example, LPS exposure affects steroidogenesis and folliculogenesis, resulting in delayed puberty onset. The present study was conducted to clarify the mechanism underlying the adverse effect of LPS on the delayed puberty in female rats. LPS was daily injected for 5 days (50 μg/kg, PND 25-29) to treated animals and the date at VO was evaluated through daily visual examination. At PND 39, animals were sacrificed, and the tissues were immediately removed and weighed. Among the reproductive organs, the weights of the ovaries and oviduct from LPS-treated animals were significantly lower than those of control animals. There were no changes in the weights of uterus and vagina between the LPS-treated and their control animals. Immunological challenge by LPS delayed VO. Multiple corpora lutea were found in the control ovaries, indicating ovulations were occurred. However, none of corpus luteum was present in the LPS-treated ovary. The transcription level of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), CYP11A1, CYP17A1 and CYP19 were significantly increased by LPS treatment. On the other hand, the levels of 3β- HSD, 17β-HSD and LH receptor were not changed by LPS challenge. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the repeated LPS exposure during the prepubertal period could induce multiple alterations in the steroidogenic machinery in ovary, and in turn, delayed puberty onset. The prepubertal LPS challenge model used in our study is useful to understand the reciprocal regulation of immune (stress) - reproductive function in early life. PMID:27660826

  16. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) processing by Kupffer cells releases a modified LPS with increased hepatocyte binding and decreased tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulatory capacity.

    PubMed

    Treon, S P; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1993-02-01

    Normal physiological clearance of gut-derived endotoxin lipopolysaccharide [LPS] has been described previously; initially, there is uptake by Kupffer cells (KC), then release of modified LPS, followed by hepatocyte uptake. Previous work in our laboratories indicated that LPS is structurally modified with loss of carbohydrate prior to its release by KC. In this study, we functionally characterize KC modified LPS. KC-modified 125I-LPS was prepared from primary rat KC. Escherichia coli 0127:B8 native 125I-LPS or KC-modified 125I-LPS (40 ng) was incubated for 1 hr with 1 x 10E6 primary hepatocytes. The binding of KC-modified LPS was 4.33-fold higher than native LPS (P = 0.0024). Binding analysis studies were conducted to determine the region of KC-modified LPS responsible for enhanced hepatocyte binding. KC-modified Salmonella minnesota LPS was competed with 100-fold excess native or mutant (Ra, Rc, Rd, or Re) strains of LPS or Lipid A with no decrease to hepatocyte binding. S. minnesota-native 125I-LPS was compared with KC-modified 125I-LPS in a study to assess induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-gamma by rat peritoneal macrophages. Native or KC-modified 125I-LPS (100 ng) was presented to 1 x 10E7 peritoneal macrophages for 6 hr. TNF-alpha was measured in supernatants using the WEHI-164 cytotoxicity assay. Native LPS induced 5.7-fold higher TNF-alpha levels than KC-modified LPS (P < 0.0001). The above data suggest that structural alterations in KC-modified LPS are accompanied by functional alterations resulting in enhanced hepatocyte binding and decreased TNF-alpha release. The latter result implies that an early step in LPS detoxification occurs in the KC in which LPS is modified to prevent elicitation of biologically active cytokines.

  17. Dynamic Modulation of Innate Immune Response by Varying Dosages of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Human Monocytic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Gilliam, Elizabeth A.; Button, Julia; Li, Liwu

    2014-01-01

    Innate monocytes and macrophages can be dynamically programmed into distinct states depending upon the strength of external stimuli. Innate programming may bear significant relevance to the pathogenesis and resolution of human inflammatory diseases. However, systems analyses with regard to the dynamic programming of innate leukocytes are lacking. In this study, we focused on the dynamic responses of human promonocytic THP-1 cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We observed that varying dosages of LPS differentially modulate the expression of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory mediators such as IL-6 and IL-33. Super-low dosages of LPS preferentially induced the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-6, while higher dosages of LPS induced both IL-6 and IL-33. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that super-low and high doses of LPS cause differential activation of GSK3 and Akt, as well as the transcription factors FoxO1 and CREB. Inhibition of GSK3 enabled THP-1 cells to express IL-33 when challenged with super-low dose LPS. On the other hand, activation of CREB with adenosine suppressed IL-6 expression. Taken together, our study reveals a dynamic modulation of monocytic cells in response to varying dosages of endotoxin, and may shed light on our understanding of the dynamic balance that controls pathogenesis and resolution of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24970893

  18. Soluble CD14 acts as a shuttle in the neutralization of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by LPS-binding protein and reconstituted high density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have recently shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is a lipid transfer protein that catalyzes two distinct reactions: movement of bacterial LPS (endotoxin) from LPS micelles to soluble CD14 (sCD14) and movement of LPS from micelles to reconstituted high density lipoprotein (R-HDL) particles. Here we show that LBP facilitates a third lipid transfer reaction: movement of LPS from LPS- sCD14 complexes to R-HDL particles. This action of LBP is catalytic, with one molecule of LBP enabling the movement of multiple LPS molecules into R-HDL. LBP-catalyzed movement of LPS from LPS-sCD14 complexes to R-HDL neutralizes the capacity of LPS to stimulate polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Our findings show that LPS may be transferred to R-HDL either by the direct action of LBP or by a two- step reaction in which LPS is first transferred to sCD14 and subsequently to R-HDL. We have observed that the two-step pathway of LPS transfer to R-HDL is strongly favored over direct transfer. Neutralization of LPS by LBP and R-HDL was accelerated more than 30- fold by addition of sCD14. Several observations suggest that sCD14 accelerates this reaction by serving as a shuttle for LPS: addition of LBP and sCD14 to LPS micelles resulted in LPS-sCD14 complexes that could diffuse through a 100-kD cutoff filter; LPS-sCD14 complexes appeared transiently during movement of LPS to R-HDL facilitated by purified LBP; and sCD14 could facilitate transfer of LPS to R-HDL without becoming part of the final LPS-R-HDL complex. Complexes of LPS and sCD14 were formed transiently when LPS was incubated in plasma, suggesting that these complexes may play a role as intermediates in the neutralization of LPS under physiological conditions. These findings detail a new activity for sCD14 and suggest a novel mechanism for lipid transfer by LBP. PMID:7536794

  19. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) disrupts particle transport, cilia function and sperm motility in an ex vivo oviduct model

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, A. M.; Di Fenza, M.; Kölle, S.

    2016-01-01

    The oviduct functions in the transportation of gametes to the site of fertilization (the ampulla) and is the site of early embryonic development. Alterations of this early developmental environment, such as the presence of sexually transmitted pathogens, may affect oviduct function leading to reduced fertilization rates and contribute to compromised embryonic development. In this study, sperm interactions, particle transport speed (PTS) and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the ampulla following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a constituent of the sexually transmitted pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia abortus, was investigated. Three complementary experiments were performed to analyse; (1) bound sperm motility and cilia function (2) transport velocity in the oviduct and (3) the expression of genes related to immune function and inflammatory response (CASP3, CD14, MYD88, TLR4 and TRAF6). The motility of bound sperm was significantly lower in ampullae that were exposed to LPS. CBF and PTS significantly increased after treatment with LPS for 2 hours. Finally, gene expression analysis revealed that CASP3 and CD14 were significantly upregulated and TLR4 trended towards increased expression following treatment with LPS. These findings provide an insight on the impact of LPS on the oviduct sperm interaction, and have implications for both male and female fertility. PMID:27079521

  20. Promotion of Nickel (Ni) Allergy by Anamnestic Sensitization with a Bacterial Component, Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Norimasa; Takayama, Eiji; Adachi, Makoto; Mizuno-Kamiya, Masako; Kawaki, Harumi; Takeuchi, Hiroko; Kubo, Shuri; Ishigami, Hajime; Kurachi, Masakazu; Kondoh, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) promote allergic responses to nickel (Ni) both in the sensitization and elicitation steps. In this study, we examine the effect of pre-sensitization to LPS on the occurrence of Ni allergy using a mouse model. Method: A 100 mg of LPS was injected into C57BL/6J mice intraperitoneally (ip). Three weeks later, the mice were subsequently injected with 0.3 μ moles of nickel dichloride (NiCl2) and 100 μg of CpG-DNA, which acted as an adjuvant. The mice were repeatedly immunized with the 0.3 μg of nickel sulfate (NiSO4), along with 300 μl of the adjuvant, Inject Alum (Pierce, USA). Then we examined the producing capabilities of T helper type 1 (Th1) and 2 (Th2) cytokines (interferon-gamma- (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-10, respectively) from anti CD3 antibody-stimulated spleen cells. Results: Pre-treatment with LPS, followed by repeated challenges with Ni2+ and adjuvants significantly enhanced the IFN-γ-producing capability of spleen cells (n=5, p<0.01); however, that could not enhance the capability of spleen cells by a single challenge with Ni2+ and adjuvants (n=5). In contrast, without LPS treatment, single or even repeated challenges by Ni2+ could not enhance the IFN-γ-producing capability. On the other hand, the IL-10-producing capability of spleen cells was not enhanced even by LPS and repeated challenges with Ni2+ and adjuvants. Conclusion: The solitary pre-sensitization to LPS is essential for the onset of Ni allergy by shifting the Th1/Th2 immune balance toward a Th1 dominant. PMID:27843506

  1. Lipopolysaccharides and trophic factors regulate the LPS receptor complex in nodose and trigeminal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kunda, P E; Cavicchia, J C; Acosta, C G

    2014-11-07

    Binding of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) triggers an innate immunoresponse associated with pain and inflammation. The expression, and to a greater extent the regulation of TLR4 and its auxiliary proteins (myeloid differentiation protein 1 (MD1), myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2) and cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14)), are both poorly understood in trigeminal and nodose neurons. We used a combination of Western blotting, semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), pharmacological manipulation and immunohistochemistry. The expression pattern and regulation by LPS and trophic factors of TLR4/MD2/CD14 and radioprotective protein of 105kDa (RP105)/MD1 were determined in neonatal trigeminal and nodose mice neurons. We found that all these proteins were expressed in both trigeminal and nodose neurons. The trophic factors Artemin and nerve growth factor (NGF) up-regulated MD2 and RP105 mRNA levels in trigeminal neurons. In nodose neurons the trophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) up-regulated MD1 and RP105 mRNA levels. Also we observed that in both neuronal types LPS acutely (within 20 min) down-regulated CD14 and MD2 mRNAs. In addition, LPS increased significantly the proportion of trigeminal and nodose neurons expressing nociceptin/orphanin FQ in culture probably acting via TLR4/MD2. Although the exact mechanisms underlying the regulation by trophic factors and LPS require further elucidation, the findings of this study indicate that LPS acts through its archetypical receptor in trigeminal and nodose neurons.

  2. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) modulate the metabolism of deoxynivalenol (DON) in the pig.

    PubMed

    Dänicke, Sven; Valenta, Hana; Ganter, Martin; Brosig, Bianca; Kersten, Susanne; Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Kahlert, Stefan; Panther, Patricia; Kluess, Jeannette; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef

    2014-08-01

    Pigs might be exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and deoxynivalenol (DON) at the same time, and both toxins are thought to interactively affect the intestinal barrier, the innate immune system, and the xenobiotics metabolism. Hence, we aimed at examining the single and combined effects of both toxins on nutrient digestibility and DON metabolism. For this purpose, barrows (26 ± 4 kg) were fed restrictedly either a control diet (CON) or a diet contaminated with 3.1 mg DON/kg (DON) for 37 days. At day 37 of the experiment, pigs were infused intravenously for 60 min either with 100 μg DON/kg body weight (BW) (CON-DON), 7.5 μg LPS/kg BW (CON-LPS, DON-LPS) or a combination of both substances (CON-DON + LPS), or physiological saline (CON-CON, DON-CON). Blood samples were collected frequently until 3.25 h before the pigs were sacrificed for bile, liver, and kidney collection. The apparent digestibility of N-free extractives was significantly increased by 1 % when the DON-contaminated diet was fed. The total DON content in blood was significantly higher in endotoxemic pigs (34.8 ng/mL; CON-DON + LPS) when compared to the pigs infused with DON alone (18.8 ng/mL; CON-DON) while bile concentrations were not influenced by LPS. DON residue levels in liver and kidney closely reflected the treatment effects as described for blood. In contrast to DON infusion, the LPS challenge resulted in a significantly lower total DON concentration (13.2 vs. 7.5 ng/mL in groups DON-CON and DON-LPS, respectively) when the pigs were exposed to DON through the diet. The conjugation degree for DON in blood and bile was not influenced by treatments. In conclusion, endotoxemic pigs are characterized by higher DON residue levels in blood, liver, and kidney, probably by a compromised elimination.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits steroid production in theca cells of bovine follicles in vitro: distinct effect of LPS on theca cell function in pre- and post-selection follicles.

    PubMed

    Magata, Fumie; Horiuchi, Maya; Miyamoto, Akio; Shimizu, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    In postpartum dairy cows, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli causes uterine inflammation and leads to ovarian dysfunction. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of LPS on steroid production in bovine theca cells at different stages of follicular development. Theca cells isolated from pre- and post-selection follicles (PRFs, <8.5 mm in diameter, and POFs, >8.5 mm in diameter, respectively) of bovine ovaries were exposed to LPS under luteinizing hormone (LH) conditions, estradiol (E2) conditions or both conditions in vitro. Bovine theca cells expressed the LPS receptor gene complex: Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), CD14 and MD2. LPS suppressed progesterone (P4) and androstenedione (A4) production with downregulation of steroidogenic enzyme transcripts when theca cells were stimulated with LH. By contrast, LPS did not affect P4 or A4 production when theca cells were stimulated with E2. P4 and A4 production in theca cells from PRFs was suppressed by LPS as early as at 48 h of culture, whereas the effect of LPS on theca cells from POFs was observed at 96 h of culture. The results demonstrate that LPS inhibits steroid production in theca cells under LH conditions. Moreover, theca cells from POFs showed a slower response to LPS compared with that of theca cells from PRFs, which might imply a distinct effect of LPS on follicles at different developmental stages. These findings suggest a possible mechanism of ovarian dysfunction and subsequent infertility in cows with endometritis.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Inhibits Steroid Production in Theca Cells of Bovine Follicles In Vitro: Distinct Effect of LPS on Theca Cell Function in Pre- and Post-selection Follicles

    PubMed Central

    MAGATA, Fumie; HORIUCHI, Maya; MIYAMOTO, Akio; SHIMIZU, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    In postpartum dairy cows, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli causes uterine inflammation and leads to ovarian dysfunction. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of LPS on steroid production in bovine theca cells at different stages of follicular development. Theca cells isolated from pre- and post-selection follicles (PRFs, <8.5 mm in diameter, and POFs, >8.5 mm in diameter, respectively) of bovine ovaries were exposed to LPS under luteinizing hormone (LH) conditions, estradiol (E2) conditions or both conditions in vitro. Bovine theca cells expressed the LPS receptor gene complex: Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), CD14 and MD2. LPS suppressed progesterone (P4) and androstenedione (A4) production with downregulation of steroidogenic enzyme transcripts when theca cells were stimulated with LH. By contrast, LPS did not affect P4 or A4 production when theca cells were stimulated with E2. P4 and A4 production in theca cells from PRFs was suppressed by LPS as early as at 48 h of culture, whereas the effect of LPS on theca cells from POFs was observed at 96 h of culture. The results demonstrate that LPS inhibits steroid production in theca cells under LH conditions. Moreover, theca cells from POFs showed a slower response to LPS compared with that of theca cells from PRFs, which might imply a distinct effect of LPS on follicles at different developmental stages. These findings suggest a possible mechanism of ovarian dysfunction and subsequent infertility in cows with endometritis. PMID:24769841

  5. Trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid and the PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α production by bovine immune cells.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, M C; Santos, J E; Badinga, L

    2011-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modulates innate immunity through alteration of cytokine production by immune cells. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of exogenous conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and PPAR-γ agonist, rosiglitazone, on LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production by cultured whole blood from prepubertal Holstein heifers (mean age, 5.5 mo). Compared with unstimulated cells, addition of LPS (10 μg/mL) to the culture medium increased (P<0.03) peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation≤2.5-fold. Coincubation with interferon γ (5 ng/mL) further stimulated (P<0.01) the lymphoproliferative response to LPS. Lipopolysaccharide increased (P<0.01) TNF-α concentration in cultured whole blood in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The greatest TNF-α stimulation occurred after 12 h of exposure to 1 μg/mL LPS. Coincubation with trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomer (100 μM) or rosiglitazone (10 μM), a PPAR-γ agonist, decreased (P<0.01) LPS-induced TNF-α production by 13% and 29%, respectively. Linoleic acid and cis-9, trans-11 CLA isomer had no detectable effects on LPS-induced TNF-α production in cultured bovine blood. The PPAR-γ agonist-induced TNF-α attenuation was reversed when blood was treated with both rosiglitazone and GW9662, a selective PPAR-γ antagonist. Addition of rosiglitazone to the culture medium tended to reduce nuclear factor-κ Bp65 concentration in nuclear and cytosolic extracts isolated from cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results show that LPS is a potent inducer of TNF-α production in bovine blood cells and that trans-10, cis-12 CLA and PPAR-γ agonists may attenuate the pro-inflammatory response induced by LPS in growing dairy heifers. Additional studies are needed to fully characterize the involvement of nuclear factor-κ B in LPS signaling in bovine blood cells.

  6. Prenatal transportation alters the acute phase response (APR) of bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the acute phase response (APR) to a postnatal Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day...

  7. Liver X receptor agonist prevents LPS-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yunhe; Tian, Yuan; Wei, Zhengkai; Liu, Hui; Song, Xiaojing; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Liver X receptor-α (LXR-α) which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a ligand-activated transcription factor. Best known for its ability to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, LXRs have recently also been implicated in regulation of inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of synthetic LXR-α agonist T0901317 on LPS-induced mastitis in mice. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. T0901317 was injected 1h before and 12h after induction of LPS intraperitoneally. The results showed that T0901317 significantly attenuated the infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes, and the activation of myeloperoxidase (MPO); down-regulated the level of pro-inflammatory mediators including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and PEG2; inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65, caused by LPS. Moreover, we report for the first time that LXR-α activation impaired LPS-induced mastitis. Taken together, these data indicated that T0901317 had protective effect on mastitis and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of T0901317 on LPS induced mastitis in mice may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB signaling pathway. LXR-α activation can be used as a therapeutic approach to treat mastitis.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner-core phosphates are required for complete LPS synthesis and transport to the outer membrane in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Delucia, Angela M; Six, David A; Caughlan, Ruth E; Gee, Patricia; Hunt, Ian; Lam, Joseph S; Dean, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Gram-negative outer membrane (OM) integrity is maintained in part by Mg(2+) cross-links between phosphates on lipid A and on core sugars of adjacent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules. In contrast to other Gram-negative bacteria, waaP, encoding an inner-core kinase, could not be inactivated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To examine this further, expression of the kinases WaaP or WapP/WapQ/PA5006 was placed under the control of the arabinose-regulated pBAD promoter. Growth of these strains was arabinose dependent, confirming that core phosphorylation is essential in P. aeruginosa. Transmission electron micrographs of kinase-depleted cells revealed marked invaginations of the inner membrane. SDS-PAGE of total LPS from WaaP-depleted cells showed accumulation of a fast-migrating band. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed that LPS from these cells exhibits a unique truncated core consisting of two 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acids (Kdo), two l-glycero-d-manno-heptoses (Hep), and one hexose but completely devoid of phosphates, indicating that phosphorylation by WaaP is necessary for subsequent core phosphorylations. MS analysis of lipid A from WaaP-depleted cells revealed extensive 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose modification. OM prepared from these cells by Sarkosyl extraction of total membranes or by sucrose density gradient centrifugation lacked truncated LPS. Instead, truncated LPS was detected in the inner membrane fractions, consistent with impaired transport/assembly of this species into the OM. IMPORTANCE Gram-negative bacteria have an outer membrane (OM) comprised of a phospholipid inner leaflet and a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer leaflet. The OM protects cells from toxic molecules and is important for survival during infection. The LPS core kinase gene waaP can be deleted in several Gram-negative bacteria but not in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We used a controlled-expression system to deplete WaaP directly in P. aeruginosa cells, which halted growth. WaaP depletion

  9. Cannabidiol (CBD) enhances lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Karmaus, Peer W F; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R; Kaminski, Norbert E; Kaplan, Barbara L F

    2013-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a plant-derived cannabinoid that has been predominantly characterized as anti-inflammatory. However, it is clear that immune effects of cannabinoids can vary with cannabinoid concentration, or type or magnitude of immune stimulus. The present studies demonstrate that oral administration of CBD enhanced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. The enhanced inflammatory cell infiltrate as observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was comprised mainly of neutrophils, with some monocytes. Concomitantly, CBD enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA production, including tumor necrosis factor-α (Tnfa), interleukins (IL)-5 and -23 (Il6, Il23), and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (Gcsf). These results demonstrate that the CBD-mediated enhancement of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation is mediated at the level of transcription of a variety of pro-inflammatory genes. The significance of these studies is that CBD is part of a therapeutic currently in use for spasticity and pain in multiple sclerosis patients, and therefore it is important to further understand mechanisms by which CBD alters immune function.

  10. Cannabidiol (CBD) Enhances Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Karmaus, Peer W. F.; Wagner, James G.; Harkema, Jack R.; Kaminski, Norbert E.; Kaplan, Barbara L.F.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a plant-derived cannabinoid that has been predominantly characterized as anti-inflammatory. However, it is clear that immune effects of cannabinoids can vary with cannabinoid concentration, or type or magnitude of immune stimulus. The present studies demonstrate that oral administration of CBD enhanced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. The enhanced inflammatory cell infiltrate as observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was comprised mainly of neutrophils, with some monocytes. Concomitantly, CBD enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA production, including tumor necrosis factor-α (Tnfa), interleukins (IL) 6 and 23 (Il6, Il23), and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (Gcsf). These results demonstrate that the CBD-mediated enhancement of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation is mediated at the level of transcription of a variety of pro-inflammatory genes. The significance of these studies is that CBD is part of a therapeutic currently in use for spasticity and pain in multiple sclerosis patients, and therefore it is important to further understand mechanisms by which CBD alters immune function. PMID:23173851

  11. Epidural analgesia with morphine or buprenorphine in ponies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced carpal synovitis.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Gabrielle C; Carregaro, Adriano B; Gehrcke, Martielo I; De La Côrte, Flávio D; Lara, Valéria M; Pozzobon, Ricardo; Brass, Karin E

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the analgesia effects of the epidural administration of 0.1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) of morphine or 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine in ponies with radiocarpal joint synovitis. Six ponies were submitted to 3 epidural treatments: the control group (C) received 0.15 mL/kg BW of a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution; group M was administered 0.1 mg/kg BW of morphine; and group B was administered 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine, both diluted in 0.9% NaCl to a total volume of 0.15 mL/kg BW administered epidurally at 10 s/mL. The synovitis model was induced by injecting 0.5 ng of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the left or right radiocarpal joint. An epidural catheter was later introduced in the lumbosacral space and advanced up to the thoracolumbar level. The treatment started 6 h after synovitis induction. Lameness, maximum angle of carpal flexion, heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, and intestinal motility were evaluated before LPS injection (baseline), 6 h after LPS injection (time 0), and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after treatments. Although the model of synovitis produced clear clinical signs of inflammation, the lameness scores in group C were different from the baseline for only up to 12 h. Both morphine and buprenorphine showed a reduction in the degree of lameness starting at 0.5 and 6 h, respectively. Reduced intestinal motility was observed at 0.5 h in group M and at 0.5 to 1 h in group B. Epidural morphine was a more effective analgesic that lasted for more than 12 h and without side effects. It was concluded that morphine would be a valuable analgesic option to alleviate joint pain in the thoracic limbs in ponies.

  12. Epidural analgesia with morphine or buprenorphine in ponies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced carpal synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Gabrielle C.; Carregaro, Adriano B.; Gehrcke, Martielo I.; De La Côrte, Flávio D.; Lara, Valéria M.; Pozzobon, Ricardo; Brass, Karin E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the analgesia effects of the epidural administration of 0.1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) of morphine or 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine in ponies with radiocarpal joint synovitis. Six ponies were submitted to 3 epidural treatments: the control group (C) received 0.15 mL/kg BW of a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution; group M was administered 0.1 mg/kg BW of morphine; and group B was administered 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine, both diluted in 0.9% NaCl to a total volume of 0.15 mL/kg BW administered epidurally at 10 s/mL. The synovitis model was induced by injecting 0.5 ng of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the left or right radiocarpal joint. An epidural catheter was later introduced in the lumbosacral space and advanced up to the thoracolumbar level. The treatment started 6 h after synovitis induction. Lameness, maximum angle of carpal flexion, heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, and intestinal motility were evaluated before LPS injection (baseline), 6 h after LPS injection (time 0), and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after treatments. Although the model of synovitis produced clear clinical signs of inflammation, the lameness scores in group C were different from the baseline for only up to 12 h. Both morphine and buprenorphine showed a reduction in the degree of lameness starting at 0.5 and 6 h, respectively. Reduced intestinal motility was observed at 0.5 h in group M and at 0.5 to 1 h in group B. Epidural morphine was a more effective analgesic that lasted for more than 12 h and without side effects. It was concluded that morphine would be a valuable analgesic option to alleviate joint pain in the thoracic limbs in ponies. PMID:21731186

  13. Supramolecular structure of enterobacterial wild-type lipopolysaccharides (LPS), fractions thereof, and their neutralization by Pep19-2.5.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Klaus; Heinbockel, Lena; Correa, Wilmar; Fukuoka, Satoshi; Gutsmann, Thomas; Zähringer, Ulrich; Koch, Michel H J

    2016-04-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) belong to the strongest immune-modulating compounds known in nature, and are often described as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In particular, at higher concentrations they are responsible for sepsis and the septic shock syndrome associated with high lethality. Since most data are indicative that LPS aggregates are the bioactive units, their supramolecular structures are considered to be of outmost relevance for deciphering the molecular mechanisms of its bioactivity. So far, however, most of the data available addressing this issue, were published only for the lipid part (lipid A) and the core-oligosaccharide containing rough LPS, representing the bioactive unit. By contrast, it is well known that most of the LPS specimen identified in natural habitats contain the smooth-form (S-form) LPS, which carry additionally a high-molecular polysaccharide (O-chain). To fill this lacuna and going into a more natural system, here various wild-type (smooth form) LPS including also some LPS fractions were investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering with synchrotron radiation to analyze their aggregate structure. Furthermore, the influence of a recently designed synthetic anti-LPS peptide (SALP) Pep19-2.5 on the aggregate structure, on the binding thermodynamics, and on the cytokine-inducing activity of LPS were characterized, showing defined aggregate changes, high affinity binding and inhibition of cytokine secretion. The data obtained are suitable to refine our view on the preferences of LPS for non-lamellar structures, representing the highest bioactive forms which can be significantly influenced by the binding with neutralizing peptides such as Pep19-2.5.

  14. On the translocation of bacteria and their lipopolysaccharides between blood and peripheral locations in chronic, inflammatory diseases: the central roles of LPS and LPS-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kell, Douglas B; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-11-01

    We have recently highlighted (and added to) the considerable evidence that blood can contain dormant bacteria. By definition, such bacteria may be resuscitated (and thus proliferate). This may occur under conditions that lead to or exacerbate chronic, inflammatory diseases that are normally considered to lack a microbial component. Bacterial cell wall components, such as the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative strains, are well known as potent inflammatory agents, but should normally be cleared. Thus, their continuing production and replenishment from dormant bacterial reservoirs provides an easy explanation for the continuing, low-grade inflammation (and inflammatory cytokine production) that is characteristic of many such diseases. Although experimental conditions and determinants have varied considerably between investigators, we summarise the evidence that in a great many circumstances LPS can play a central role in all of these processes, including in particular cell death processes that permit translocation between the gut, blood and other tissues. Such localised cell death processes might also contribute strongly to the specific diseases of interest. The bacterial requirement for free iron explains the strong co-existence in these diseases of iron dysregulation, LPS production, and inflammation. Overall this analysis provides an integrative picture, with significant predictive power, that is able to link these processes via the centrality of a dormant blood microbiome that can resuscitate and shed cell wall components.

  15. Rosiglitazone, a Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR)-γ Agonist, Attenuates Inflammation Via NF-κB Inhibition in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Fang; Zou, Xun-Liang; Wu, Jun; Yu, Xue-Qing; Yang, Xiao

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the anti-inflammatory effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonist, rosiglitazone, in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced peritonitis rat model. LPS was intraperitoneally injected into rats to establish peritonitis model. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were assigned to normal saline (the solvent of LPS), LPS, rosiglitazone plus LPS, and rosiglitazone alone. A simple peritoneal equilibrium test was performed with 20 ml 4.25 % peritoneal dialysis fluid. We measured the leukocyte count in dialysate and ultrafiltration volume. Peritoneal membrane histochemical staining was performed, and peritoneal thickness was assessed. CD40 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA (ICAM-1 mRNA) levels in rat visceral peritoneum were detected by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. IL-6 in rat peritoneal dialysis effluent was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 and IκBα was analyzed by Western blot. LPS administration resulted in increased peritoneal thickness and decreased ultrafiltration volume. Rosiglitazone pretreatment significantly decreased peritoneal thickness. In addition to CD40 and ICAM-1 mRNA expression, the IL-6, p-p65, and p-IκBα protein expressions were enhanced in LPS-administered animals. Rosiglitazone pretreatment significantly decreased ICAM-1 mRNA upregulation, secretion of IL-6 protein, and phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 and IκBα without decreasing CD40 mRNA expression. Rosiglitazone has a protective effect in peritonitis, simultaneously decreasing NF-κB phosphorylation, suggesting that NF-κB signaling pathway mediated peritoneal inflammation induced by LPS. PPAR-γ might be considered a potential therapeutic target against peritonitis.

  16. Effect of D-003, a Mixture of High Molecular Weight Aliphatic Acids, on Glucocorticoid- and Lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-Induced Osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Noa, Miriam; Más, Rosa; Valle, Maikel; Mendoza, Sarahí; Mendoza, Nilda

    2012-01-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) is characterized through the impairment of osseous blood flow that leads to the collapse of femur head. Corticoid-induced ON in rats and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced in rabbits are useful models to assess the efficacy of potential treatments on this disease. D-003 inhibits the mevalonate pathway, lipid peroxidation and prevents osteoporosis in rats through increasing the osteoclast apoptosis. This study investigated the effects of D-003 on corticoid- and LPS-induced ON in rats and rabbits. Corticoid-induced ON: Rats were randomized into five groups. A negative control and four groups treated with prednisolone 6 mg/Kg: a positive control and three treated with D-003 (5, 25 and 200 mg/Kg) for 80 days. All positive controls presented ON areas. D-003 significantly reduced the numbers and proportions of ON lesions, as compared to the positive control group. LPS-induced ON in rabbits: Rabbits were randomized into five groups: a negative control and four injected with a single intra-venous injection of LPS (10 μg/Kg) including a positive control and three with D-003 (5, 25 and 200 mg/Kg) for 30 days. ON was seen in all positive controls. The incidence of ON and the number of ON lesions in the groups treated with D-003 (25 and 200 mg/Kg) was significantly lower compared to the positive controls. LPS injection significantly increased the size of bone marrow fat cells in positive controls and such increase was significantly decreased by D-003. In conclusion, D-003 reduced ON lesions in corticoid-and LPS-induced ON and also the size of bone marrow fat cells in rabbits with LPS.

  17. Influence of temperament on inflammatory cytokine responses of cattle to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported that temperament influenced rectal temperature, sickness scores, and cortisol and epinephrine concentrations following an LPS challenge. Temperamental bulls displayed less sickness, fever and less of an epinephrine response 1 hour after an LPS challenge when compared to calm a...

  18. Evaluation of selective cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptor agonists in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide-induced interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Tambaro, Simone; Casu, Maria Antonietta; Mastinu, Andrea; Lazzari, Paolo

    2014-04-15

    Interstitial cystitis is a debilitating bladder inflammation disorder. To date, the understanding of the causes of interstitial cystitis remains largely fragmentary and there is no effective treatment available. Recent experimental results have shown a functional role of the endocannabinoid system in urinary bladder. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of selective cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists in a mouse model of interstitial cystitis. Bladder inflammation was induced in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and whole bladders were removed 24h later. LPS induced a significant increase of the contractile amplitude in spontaneous activity and a hypersensitivity to exogenous acetylcholine-induced contraction of whole-isolated bladder. Next, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of cannabinoidergic compounds by pretreating mice with CB1 or CB2 selective agonist compounds, respectively ACEA and JWH015. Interestingly, JWH015, but not ACEA, antagonized LPS-induced bladder inflammation. Additionally, anti-inflammatory activity was studied by evaluation, leukocytes mucosa infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity, and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL-1α and IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. JWH015 significantly decreased leukocytes infiltration in both submucosa and mucosa, as well as the myeloperoxydase activity, in LPS treated mice. JWH015 reduced mRNA expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, and TNF-α. LPS treatment increased expression of bladder CB2 but not CB1 mRNA. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that modulation of the cannabinoid CB2 receptors might be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of bladder diseases and conditions characterized by inflammation, such as interstitial cystitis.

  19. Soyasaponin Ab ameliorates colitis by inhibiting the binding of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Ah; Park, Young-Jun; Joh, Eun-Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2011-12-28

    Many clinical studies have shown that daily intake of soybean [ Glycine max (L.) Merr., Fabacease] or its foods may reduce the risk of osteoporosis, heart attack, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease, cardiovascular and chronic renal diseases, and cancers, including prostate, colon, and breast cancers. Of the soy constituents, soyasaponins exhibit anti-aging, antioxidant, apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of soyasaponin Ab has not been thoroughly studied. Therefore, we investigated its anti-inflammatory effects in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitic mice and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. Soyasaponin Ab inhibited colon shortening, myeloperoxidase activity, the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Soyasaponin Ab (1, 2, 5, and 10 μM) inhibited the production of NO (IC(50) = 1.6 ± 0.1 μM) and prostaglandin E(2) (IC(50) = 2.0 ± 0.1 ng/mL), the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (IC(50) = 1.3 ± 0.1 ng/mL), interleukin (IL)-1β (IC(50) = 1.5 ± 0.1 pg/mL), and toll-like receptor (TLR)4, and the phosphorylation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-1 in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. Soyasaponin Ab weakly inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38. Soyasaponin Ab significantly reduced the binding of Alexa-Fluor-594-conjugated LPS to peritoneal macrophages. Soyasaponin Ab did not affect TLR4 expression or LPS-induced NF-κB activation in TLR4 siRNA-treated peritoneal macrophages (knockdown efficiency of TLR4 > 94%). On the basis of these findings, soyasaponin Ab may ameliorate colitis by inhibiting the binding of LPS to TLR4 on macrophages.

  20. Evaluation of 5-HT7 Receptor Trafficking on In Vivo and In Vitro Model of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Inflammatory Cell Injury in Rats and LPS-Treated A549 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Gulsen; Halici, Zekai; Albayrak, Abdulmecit; Karakus, Emre; Cadirci, Elif

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of the 5-HT7 receptor agonist (LP44) and antagonist (SB269970) on LPS-induced in vivo tissue damage and cell culture by molecular methods. This study was conducted in two steps. For in vivo studies, 24 female rats were divided into four groups. Group I: healthy; II (2nd h): LPS 5 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally (i.p.); III (4th h): LPS 5 mg/kg administered i.p.; IV (8th h): LPS 5 mg/kg administered i.p. For in vitro studies, we used the A549 cell line. Groups: I control (healthy) (2-4 h); II LPS: 1 µg/ml E. Coli O55:B5 strain (2-4 h); III agonist (LP44) 10(-9) M (2-4 h); IV antagonist (SB269970) 10(-9) M (2-4 h); V LPS+agonist 10(-9) M (LP44 1 µg/ml) (2-4 h); VI LPS+antagonist 10(-9) M (2-4 h). In molecular analyses, we determined increased TNF-α, IL-1β, NF-κB, and 5-HT7 mRNA expressions in rat lung tissues and increased TNF-α, iNOS, and 5-HT7 mRNA expressions in the A549 cell line. In in vitro parameters, LP44 agonist administration-related decrease was observed. Our study showed that lung 5-HT7 receptor expression is increased in LPS-induced endotoxemia. All this data suggest that 5-HT7 receptor overexpression is an important protective mechanism during LPS-induced sepsis-related cell damage.

  1. Chromium supplementation enhances the acute phase response of steers to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty crossbred steers (235±4 kg BW) received 0 ppb (Control; C) or 200 ppb chromium propionate (CHR) for 55 days. Steers were fitted with jugular catheters and rectal temperature (RT) recording...

  2. Chromium supplementation enhances the metabolic response of steers to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) supplementation on the metabolic response to LPS challenge was examined. Steers (n=20; 235±4 kg body weight (BW)) received a premix that added 0 (Con) or 0.2 mg/kg Cr to the total diet (DM (dry matter) basis) for ...

  3. Enhancement of the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in steers supplemented with chromium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty steers received a premix that added 0 (control) or 0.2 mg/kg of chromium (KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) to the total diet on a dry matter basis for 55 d. Steer...

  4. The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on whole blood oxidative response as assessed by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence in dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differences between lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on whole blood oxidative response using luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL) are currently unknown in cattle. Luminol-dependent CL measures the amount of reactive oxygen species released from leukocytes a...

  5. The symbiotic defect of Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharide mutants is suppressed by lpsZ sup + , a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.N.V.; Klein, S.; Signer, E.R. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1990-05-01

    exo mutants of Rhizobium meliloti SU47, which fail to secrete acidic extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), induce Fix{sup {minus}} nodules on alfalfa. However, mutants of R. meliloti Rm41 carrying the same exo lesions induce normal Fix{sup +} nodules. The authors show that such induction is due to a gene from strain Rm41, which they call lpsZ{sup +}, that is missing in strain SU47. lpsZ{sup +} does not restore EPS production but instead alters the composition an structure of lipopolysaccharide. In both SU47 and Rm41, either lpsZ{sup +} or exo{sup +} is sufficient for normal nodulation. This suggests that in R. meliloti EPS and lipopolysaccharide can perform the same function in nodule development.

  6. Lipoteichoic Acid (LTA) and Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Periodontal Pathogenic Bacteria Facilitate Oncogenic Herpesvirus Infection within Primary Oral Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lu; DeFee, Michael R.; Cao, Yueyu; Wen, Jiling; Wen, Xiaofei; Noverr, Mairi C.; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) remains the most common tumor arising in patients with HIV/AIDS, and involvement of the oral cavity represents one of the most common clinical manifestations of this tumor. HIV infection incurs an increased risk for periodontal diseases and oral carriage of a variety of bacteria. Whether interactions involving pathogenic bacteria and oncogenic viruses in the local environment facilitate replication or maintenance of these viruses in the oral cavity remains unknown. In the current study, our data indicate that pretreatment of primary human oral fibroblasts with two prototypical pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) produced by oral pathogenic bacteria–lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), increase KSHV entry and subsequent viral latent gene expression during de novo infection. Further experiments demonstrate that the underlying mechanisms induced by LTA and/or LPS include upregulation of cellular receptor, increasing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activating intracellular signaling pathways such as MAPK and NF-κB, and all of which are closely associated with KSHV entry or gene expression within oral cells. Based on these findings, we hope to provide the framework of developing novel targeted approaches for treatment and prevention of oral KSHV infection and KS development in high-risk HIV-positive patients. PMID:24971655

  7. Apigenin Protects Endothelial Cells from Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Inflammation by Decreasing Caspase-3 Activation and Modulating Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Silvia; Arango, Daniel; Parihar, Arti; Hamel, Patrice; Yasmeen, Rumana; Doseff, Andrea I.

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic inflammation is characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, dysregulation of mitochondrial metabolism and abnormal immune function contributing to cardiovascular diseases and sepsis. Clinical and epidemiological studies suggest potential beneficial effects of dietary interventions in inflammatory diseases but understanding of how nutrients work remains insufficient. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of apigenin, an anti-inflammatory flavonoid abundantly found in our diet, in endothelial cells during inflammation. Here, we show that apigenin reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced apoptosis by decreasing ROS production and the activity of caspase-3 in endothelial cells. Apigenin conferred protection against LPS-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and reestablished normal mitochondrial complex I activity, a major site of electron leakage and superoxide production, suggesting its ability to modulate endothelial cell metabolic function during inflammation. Collectively, these findings indicate that the dietary compound apigenin stabilizes mitochondrial function during inflammation preventing endothelial cell damage and thus provide new translational opportunities for the use of dietary components in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23989609

  8. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Algae-Derived Lipid Extracts on Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Stimulated Human THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ruairi C; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Bahar, Bojlul; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2015-08-20

    Algae contain a number of anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and chlorophyll a, hence as dietary ingredients, their extracts may be effective in chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of lipid extracts from three red seaweeds (Porphyra dioica, Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus) and one microalga (Pavlova lutheri) were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages. Extracts contained 34%-42% total fatty acids as n-3 PUFA and 5%-7% crude extract as pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene and fucoxanthin. Pretreatment of the THP-1 cells with lipid extract from P. palmata inhibited production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 (p < 0.05) and IL-8 (p < 0.05) while that of P. lutheri inhibited IL-6 (p < 0.01) production. Quantitative gene expression analysis of a panel of 92 genes linked to inflammatory signaling pathway revealed down-regulation of the expression of 14 pro-inflammatory genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR8, TRAF5, TRAF6, TNFSF18, IL6R, IL23, CCR1, CCR4, CCL17, STAT3, MAP3K1) by the lipid extracts. The lipid extracts effectively inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated via toll-like receptors, chemokines and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling molecules. These results suggest that lipid extracts from P. lutheri, P. palmata, P. dioica and C. crispus can inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory pathways in human macrophages. Therefore, algal lipid extracts should be further explored as anti-inflammatory ingredients for chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases.

  9. Cytoplasmic bacterial lipopolysaccharide does not induce NFkappaB activation or NFkappaB mediated activation signals in human macrophages and an LPS reporter cell line.

    PubMed

    Seitzer, Ulrike; Gerdes, Johannes

    2003-01-01

    Although many membrane components have been described to be involved in the activation of cells by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the question remains whether LPS, once internalized by target cells, is also capable of interacting with cytoplasmic elements in such a way that activation of cells results independently of receptor engagement. This is an important aspect to consider with respect to the development of strategies aimed at attenuating adverse effects of LPS in the framework of bacterial infections. In this study, human monocyte derived macrophages as representatives of one of the primary target cells activated by LPS, were microinjected with LPS to circumvent exogenous LPS stimulation. Parameters correlating to cytoplasmic activation of the nuclear transcription factor NFkappaB (intracellular calcium mobilization), to nuclear translocation of the NFkappaB p65 subunit and to mRNA-transcription of inflammatory cytokines known to be expressed upon exogenous LPS-stimulation and to require NFkappaB activation (interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha) were investigated. In addition, the LPS-reporter cell line 3E10, which contains a reporter gene under the control of an NFkappaB-inducible promoter was analyzed with respect to NFkappaB nuclear translocation and reporter gene expression. None of the cellular systems used and none of the parameters investigated led to the observation that intracellular LPS leads to activation of the cells in comparison to external LPS stimulation. These experiments allow the conclusion that LPS in the cytoplasmic compartment does not lead to NFkappaB translocation, cytokine mRNA transcription, and NFkappaB dependent protein expression and suggest that these activation parameters require the interaction of LPS with external membrane components.

  10. High-throughput living cell-based optical biosensor for detection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using a red fluorescent protein reporter system

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hui; Jiang, Donglei; Shao, Jingdong; Sun, Xiulan; Wang, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high toxicity of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), resulting in sepsis and septic shock, two major causes of death worldwide, significant effort is directed toward the development of specific trace-level LPS detection systems. Here, we report sensitive, user-friendly, high-throughput LPS detection in a 96-well microplate using a transcriptional biosensor system, based on 293/hTLR4A-MD2-CD14 cells that are transformed by a red fluorescent protein (mCherry) gene under the transcriptional control of an NF-κB response element. The recognition of LPS activates the biosensor cell, TLR4, and the co-receptor-induced NF-κB signaling pathway, which results in the expression of mCherry fluorescent protein. The novel cell-based biosensor detects LPS with specificity at low concentration. The cell-based biosensor was evaluated by testing LPS isolated from 14 bacteria. Of the tested bacteria, 13 isolated Enterobacteraceous LPSs with hexa-acylated structures were found to increase red fluorescence and one penta-acylated LPS from Pseudomonadaceae appeared less potent. The proposed biosensor has potential for use in the LPS detection in foodstuff and biological products, as well as bacteria identification, assisting the control of foodborne diseases. PMID:27841364

  11. Toll-like receptor 2- and 6-mediated stimulation by macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 induces lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cross tolerance in mice, which results in protection from tumor necrosis factor alpha but in only partial protection from lethal LPS doses.

    PubMed

    Deiters, Ursula; Gumenscheimer, Marina; Galanos, Chris; Mühlradt, Peter F

    2003-08-01

    Patients or experimental animals previously exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) become tolerant to further LPS challenge. We investigated the potential of the macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) to induce in vivo cross tolerance to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and LPS. MALP-2-induced tolerance could be of practical interest, as MALP-2 proved much less pyrogenic in rabbits than LPS. Whereas LPS signals via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MALP-2 uses TLR2 and TLR6. LPS-mediated cytokine release was studied in mice pretreated with intraperitoneal injections of MALP-2. No biologically active TNF-alpha could be detected in the serum of MALP-2-treated animals when challenged with LPS 24 or 72 h later, whereas suppression of LPS-dependent interleukin (IL)-6 lasted for only 24 h. Protection from lethal TNF-alpha shock was studied in galactosamine-treated mice. Dose dependently, MALP-2 prevented death from lethal TNF-alpha doses in TLR4(-/-) but not in TLR2(-/-) mice, with protection lasting from 5 to 24 h. To assay protection from LPS, mice were pretreated with MALP-2 doses of up to 10 micro g. Five and 24 h later, the animals were simultaneously sensitized and challenged by intravenous coinjection of galactosamine and a lethal dose of 50 ng of LPS. There was only limited protection (four of seven mice survived) when mice were challenged 5 h after MALP-2 pretreatment, and no protection when mice were challenged at later times. The high effectiveness of MALP-2 in suppressing TNF-alpha, the known ways of biological inactivation, and low pyrogenicity make MALP-2 a potential candidate for clinical use.

  12. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein and soluble CD14 function as accessory molecules for LPS-induced changes in endothelial barrier function, in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Brann, T W; Ding, X; Pugin, J; Tobias, P S

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial LPS induces endothelial cell (EC) injury both in vivo and in vitro. We studied the effect of Escherichia coli 0111:B4 LPS on movement of 14C-BSA across bovine pulmonary artery EC monolayers. In the presence of serum, a 6-h LPS exposure augmented (P < 0.001) transendothelial 14C-BSA flux compared with the media control at concentrations > or = 0.5 ng/ml, and LPS (10 ng/ml) exposures of > or = 2-h increased (P < 0.005) the flux. In the absence of serum, LPS concentrations of up to 10 micrograms/ml failed to increase 14C-BSA flux at 6 h. The addition of 10% serum increased EC sensitivity to the LPS stimulus by > 10,000-fold. LPS (10 ng/ml, 6 h) failed to increase 14C-BSA flux at serum concentrations < 0.5%, and maximum LPS-induced increments could be generated in the presence of > or = 2.5%. LPS-binding protein (LBP) and soluble CD14 (sCD14) could each satisfy this serum requirement; either anti-LBP or anti-CD14 antibody each totally blocked (P < 0.00005) the LPS-induced changes in endothelial barrier function. LPS-LBP had a more rapid onset than did LPS-sCD14. The LPS effect in the presence of both LBP and sCD14 exceeded the effect in the presence of either protein alone. These data suggest that LBP and sCD14 each independently functions as an accessory molecule for LPS presentation to the non-CD14-bearing endothelial surface. However, in the presence of serum both molecules are required. Images PMID:7509346

  13. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 can elicit dose- and time-dependent immune priming in Galleria mellonella larvae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Yi, Yunhong; Lv, Yingying; Li, Mei; Wang, Jia; Qiu, Lihong

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we primed Galleria mellonella larvae by haemocoel injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 to determine whether bacterial LPS can induce enhanced immune protection (recently called immune priming). We also analyzed the relationship between changes in the levels of innate immune elements and the degree of enhanced immune protection in the larvae at designated time points after priming. The larvae that received experimental doses (20.0, 10.0 and 5.0μg per larva) of LPS demonstrated increased resistance against lethal challenge with P. luminescens TT01; the degree and period of protection correlated positively with the priming dose. These results indicated that the P. luminescens TT01 LPS could induce typical immune priming in G. mellonella. Moreover, the levels of innate immune parameters (i.e. haemocyte density, phagocytosis, haemocyte encapsulation ability, and antibacterial activity of cell-free haemolymph) and endogenous enzyme activities (i.e. acid phosphatase, ACP; alkaline phosphatase, AKP; superoxide dismutase, SOD and lysozyme, LSZ) were significantly increased following priming of the larvae with LPS, whereas the activities of peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) were significantly decreased. All of the parameters examined changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that G. mellonella larvae could modulate their immune responses based on different doses of LPS used for priming, and that priming phenomenon in G. mellonella larvae elicited by LPS was mediated by the innate immune elements and enzyme activity.

  14. In-vitro and in-vivo studies on the induction of neopterin biosynthesis by cytokines, alloantigens and lipopolysaccharides (LPS)

    PubMed Central

    Troppmair, J.; Nachbaur, K.; Herold, M.; Aulitzky, W.; Tilg, H.; Gastl, G.; Bieling, P.; Kotlan, B.; Flener, R.; Mull, B.; Aulitzky, W. O.; Rokos, H.; Huber, Ch.

    1988-01-01

    Recently we presented evidence that cellular immune responses are associated with increased in-vitro and in-vivo excretion of neopterin (Huber et al., 1983) and that, in vitro at least, macrophages and IFN-γ play a key role in the induction of this phenomenon (Huber et al., 1984). Although this marker is increasingly applied for monitoring of human disease, there is limited knowledge about the mechanism(s) responsible for its increased biosynthesis during inflammatory states. To further elucidate this question we evaluated neopterin and IFN-levels in culture supernatants of human blood cells and in patients' sera. Cells or patients were exposed to a panel of recombinant cytokines, alloantigens or lipopolysaccharide. To investigate indirect stimulation by induction of production of endogenous IFNs, the impact of neutralization of IFNs by addition of specific antibodies was also studied. The data confirm our previous results which identified the monocyte/macrophage as the main producer cell among human blood cells. They further demonstrate that, at least in vitro, IFN-γ, IFN-α and LPS can all stimulate neopterin release independently from each other. Thirdly, they indicate that stimuli such as alloantigens or TNF-α can indirectly enhance neopterin release by their capacity to induce production of endogenous IFN-γ. On the basis of these data we conclude that enhanced neopterin biosynthesis does not necessarily relate to activation of T cells but can also be caused by non-immune stimuli. PMID:3148378

  15. Lipopolysaccharide engineering in Neisseria meningitidis: structural analysis of different pentaacyl lipid A mutants and comparison of their modified agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Pupo, Elder; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; Meiring, Hugo; van der Ley, Peter

    2014-03-21

    Engineering the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic pathway offers the potential to obtain modified derivatives with optimized adjuvant properties. Neisseria meningitidis strain H44/76 was modified by expression of the pagL gene encoding lipid A 3-O-deacylase from Bordetella bronchiseptica and by inactivation of the lgtB gene encoding the terminal oligosaccharide galactosyltransferase. Mass spectrometry analysis of purified mutant LPS was used for detailed compositional analysis of all present molecular species. This determined that the modified LPS was mainly pentaacylated, demonstrating high efficiency of conversion from the hexaacyl to the 3-O-deacylated form by heterologous lipid A 3-O-deacylase (PagL) expression. MS analyses also provided evidence for expression of only one major oligosaccharide glycoform, which lacked the terminal galactose residue as expected from inactivation of the lgtB gene. The immunomodulatory properties of PagL-deacylated LPS were compared with another pentaacyl form obtained from an lpxL1(-) mutant, which lacks the 2' secondary acyl chain. Although both LPS mutants displayed impaired capacity to induce production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 in the monocytic cell line Mono Mac 6, induction of the Toll-interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β-dependent chemokine interferon-γ-induced protein 10 was largely retained only for the lgtB(-)/pagL(+) mutant. Removal of remaining hexaacyl species exclusively present in lgtB(-)/pagL(+) LPS demonstrated that these minor species potentiate but do not determine the activity of this LPS. These results are the first to indicate a qualitatively different response of human innate cells to pentaacyl lpxL1(-) and pagL(+) LPS and show the importance of detailed structure-function analysis when working with modified lipid A structures. The pagL(+) LPS has significant potential as immune modulator in humans.

  16. Development of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-supplemented adjuvant and its effects on cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in male rats immunized against sperm

    PubMed Central

    NOGUCHI, Junko; WATANABE, Shinya; NGUYEN, Thanh Q. Dang; KIKUCHI, Kazuhiro; KANEKO, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Supplementation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from non-pathogenic Escherichia coli was found to enhance the adjuvant effects of a veterinary vaccine adjuvant (ISA 71VG®). Sperm immunization using 71VG as an adjuvant in the immature period induced infertility in 25% of male rats, whereas this increased to 62.5% after immunization with 71VG + LPS or Freund′s complete adjuvant (FCA). Mean testicular weight of non-sterile males in the 71VG + LPS group was significantly lower than that in the 71VG or FCA group. Histological examination of testicular tissue from sterile males demonstrated severe impairment of spermatogenesis due to experimental autoimmune orchitis, a cell-mediated autoimmune condition. The serum anti-sperm titer was elevated in the three sperm-immunized groups relative to male rats treated with adjuvant alone, but the titer was higher in the 71VG + LPS and FCA groups than in the 71VG group. We consider that this LPS-supplemented adjuvant stimulates both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to an extent comparable to FCA. PMID:27890874

  17. Viscoelastic and ultrastructural characteristics of whole blood and plasma in Alzheimer-type dementia, and the possible role of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS).

    PubMed

    Bester, Janette; Soma, Prashilla; Kell, Douglas B; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-11-03

    Alzheimer-type dementia (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Patients typically present with neuro- and systemic inflammation and iron dysregulation, associated with oxidative damage that reflects in hypercoagulability. Hypercoagulability is closely associated with increased fibrinogen and in AD patients fibrinogen has been implicated in the development of neuroinflammation and memory deficits. There is still no clear reason precisely why (a) this hypercoagulable state, (b) iron dysregulation and (c) increased fibrinogen could together lead to the loss of neuronal structure and cognitive function. Here we suggest an alternative hypothesis based on previous ultrastructural evidence of the presence of a (dormant) blood microbiome in AD. Furthermore, we argue that bacterial cell wall components, such as the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative strains, might be the cause of the continuing and low-grade inflammation, characteristic of AD. Here, we follow an integrated approach, by studying the viscoelastic and ultrastructural properties of AD plasma and whole blood by using scanning electron microscopy, Thromboelastography (TEG®) and the Global Thrombosis Test (GTT®). Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the presence and close proximity of microbes to erythrocytes. TEG® analysis showed a hypercoagulable state in AD. TEG® results where LPS was added to naive blood showed the same trends as were found with the AD patients, while the GTT® results (where only platelet activity is measured), were not affected by the added LPS, suggesting that LPS does not directly impact platelet function. Our findings reinforce the importance of further investigating the role of LPS in AD.

  18. Evolution of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recognition and signaling: fish TLR4 does not recognize LPS and negatively regulates NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Sepulcre, María P; Alcaraz-Pérez, Francisca; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Roca, Francisco J; Meseguer, José; Cayuela, María L; Mulero, Victoriano

    2009-02-15

    It has long been established that lower vertebrates, most notably fish and amphibians, are resistant to the toxic effect of LPS. Furthermore, the lack of a TLR4 ortholog in some fish species and the lack of the essential costimulatory molecules for LPS activation via TLR4 (i.e., myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) and CD14) in all the fish genomes and expressed sequence tag databases available led us to hypothesize that the mechanism of LPS recognition in fish may be different from that of mammals. To shed light on the role of fish TLRs in LPS recognition, a dual-luciferase reporter assay to study NF-kappaB activation in whole zebrafish embryos was developed and three different bony fish models were studied: 1) the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata, Perciformes), an immunological-tractable teleost model in which the presence of a TLR4 ortholog is unknown; 2) the spotted green pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis, Tetraodontiformes), which lacks a TLR4 ortholog; and 3) the zebrafish (Danio rerio, Cypriniformes), which possesses two TLR4 orthologs. Our results show that LPS signaled via a TLR4- and MyD88-independent manner in fish, and, surprisingly, that the zebrafish TLR4 orthologs negatively regulated the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. We think that the identification of TLR4 as a negative regulator of TLR signaling in the zebrafish, together with the absence of this receptor in most fish species, explains the resistance of fish to endotoxic shock and supports the idea that the TLR4 receptor complex for LPS recognition arose after the divergence of fish and tetrapods.

  19. PF-04886847 (an inhibitor of plasma kallikrein) attenuates inflammatory mediators and activation of blood coagulation in rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kolte, D; Bryant, J W; Gibson, G W; Wang, J; Shariat-Madar, Z

    2012-06-01

    The plasma kallikrein-mediated proteolysis regulates both thrombosis and inflammation. Previous study has shown that PF-04886847 is a potent and competitive inhibitor of kallikrein, suggesting that it might be useful for the treatment of kallikrein-kinin mediated inflammatory and thrombotic disorders. In the rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced sepsis used in this study, pretreatment of rats with PF-04886847 (1 mg/kg) prior to LPS (10 mg/kg) prevented endotoxin-induced increase in granulocyte count in the systemic circulation. PF-04886847 significantly reduced the elevated plasma 6-keto PGF1α levels in LPS treated rats, suggesting that PF-04886847 could be useful in preventing hypotensive shock during sepsis. PF-04886847 did not inhibit LPS-induced increase in plasma TNF-α level. Pretreatment of rats with PF-04886847 prior to LPS did not attenuate endotoxin-induced decrease in platelet count and plasma fibrinogen levels as well as increase in plasma D-dimer levels. PF-04886847 did not protect the animals against LPS-mediated acute hepatic and renal injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Since prekallikrein (the zymogen form of plasma kallikrein) deficient patients have prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) without having any bleeding disorder, the anti-thrombotic property and mechanism of action of PF-04886847 was assessed. In a rabbit balloon injury model designed to mimic clinical conditions of acute thrombotic events, PF-04886847 reduced thrombus mass dose-dependently. PF-04886847 (1 mg/kg) prolonged both aPTT and prothrombin time (PT) in a dose-dependent manner. Although the findings of this study indicate that PF-04886847 possesses limited anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects, PF-04886847 may have therapeutic potential in other kallikrein-kinin mediated diseases.

  20. Quercetin-3-O-β-D-Glucuronide Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Induced JNK and ERK Phosphorylation in LPS-Challenged RAW264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Lim, Man-Sup; Kim, Song-In; Lee, Hee Jae; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Chun, Wanjoo

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonol, has been reported to exhibit a wide range of biological properties including anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, pharmacological properties of quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide (QG), a glycoside derivative of quercetin, have not been extensively examined. The objective of this study is to elucidate the anti-inflammatory property and underlying mechanism of QG in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged RAW264.7 macrophage cells in comparison with quercetin. QG significantly suppressed LPS-induced extracellular secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2, and pro-inflammatory protein expressions of iNOS and COX-2. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of the anti-inflammatory property of QG, involvement of MAPK signaling pathways was examined. QG significantly attenuated LPS-induced activation of JNK and ERK in concentration-dependent manners with a negligible effect on p38. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates QG exerts anti-inflammatory activity through the suppression of JNK and ERK signaling pathways in LPS-challenged RAW264.7 macrophage cells. PMID:27257013

  1. Polyphenolic extracts from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) protect colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co cells) from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation--modulation of microRNA 126.

    PubMed

    Ojwang, Leonnard O; Banerjee, Nivedita; Noratto, Giuliana D; Angel-Morales, Gabriela; Hachibamba, Twambo; Awika, Joseph M; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2015-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is a drought tolerant crop with several agronomic advantages over other legumes. This study evaluated varieties from four major cowpea phenotypes (black, red, light brown and white) containing different phenolic profiles for their anti-inflammatory property on non-malignant colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co) cells challenged with an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay on the LPS-stimulated cells revealed antioxidative potential of black and red cowpea varieties. Real-time qRT-PCR analysis in LPS-stimulated cells revealed down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, VCAM-1), transcription factor NF-κB and modulation of microRNA-126 (specific post-transcriptional regulator of VCAM-1) by cowpea polyphenolics. The ability of cowpea polyphenols to modulate miR-126 signaling and its target gene VCAM-1 were studied in LPS-stimulated endothelial cells transfected with a specific inhibitor of miR-126, and treated with 10 mg GAE/L black cowpea extract where the extract in part reversed the effect of the miR-126 inhibitor. This suggests that cowpea may exert their anti-inflammatory activities at least in part through induction of miR-126 that then down-regulate VCAM-1 mRNA and protein expressions. Overall, Cowpea therefore is promising as an anti-inflammatory dietary component.

  2. Hydration, Ionic Valence and Cross-Linking Propensities of Cations Determine the Stability of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Agrinaldo; Pontes, Frederico J.; Lins, Roberto D.; Soares, Thereza A.

    2013-10-29

    The supra-molecular structure of LPS aggregates governs outer membrane permeability and activation of the host immune response during Gram-negative bacterial infections. Molecular dynamics simulations unveil at atomic resolution 10 the subtle balance between cation hydration and cross-link ability in modulating phase transitions of LPS membranes.

  3. Chitosan Oligosaccharide Reduces Intestinal Inflammation That Involves Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Activation in Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Challenged Piglets.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Xiao, Dingfu; Tan, Bie; Xiao, Hao; Wang, Jing; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Huang, Ruilin; Yang, Chenbo; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-13

    Chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) is a degradation product of chitosan with antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial effects. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary COS on the intestinal inflammatory response and the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathways that may be involved using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged piglet model. A total of 40 weaned piglets were used in a 2 × 2 factorial design; the main factors were dietary treatment (basal or 300 μg/kg COS) and inflammatory challenge (LPS or saline). On the morning of days 14 and 21 after the initiation of treatment, the piglets were injected intraperitoneally with Escherichia coli LPS at 60 and 80 μg/kg body weight or the same amount of sterilized saline, respectively. Blood and small intestine samples were collected on day 14 or 21, respectively. The results showed that piglets challenged with LPS have a significant decrease in average daily gain and gain:feed and histopathological injury in the jejunum and ileum, whereas dietary supplementation with COS significantly alleviated intestinal injury induced by LPS. Piglets fed the COS diet had lower serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 6, and IL-8 as well as lower intestinal abundances of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA but higher anti-inflammatory cytokine mRNA compared with piglets fed the basal diet among LPS-challenged piglets (p < 0.05). Dietary COS increased intestinal CaSR and PLCβ2 protein expressions in both saline- and LPS-treated piglets, but decreased p-NF-κB p65, IKKα/β, and IκB protein expressions in LPS-challenged piglets (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that COS has the potential to reduce the intestinal inflammatory response, which is concomitant with the activation of CaSR and the inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathways under an inflammatory stimulus.

  4. Cordycepin inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production via activating amp-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Li; Xu, Ying; Shen, Jie

    2014-07-08

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is elevated during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease (KD), which damages vascular endothelial cells to cause systemic vasculitis. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of cordycepin on TNFα expression in both lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and ex vivo cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of KD patients. We found that cordycepin significantly suppressed LPS-induced TNFα expression and production in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs)). Meanwhile, cordycepin alleviated TNFα production in KD patients' PBMCs. PBMCs from healthy controls had a much lower level of basal TNF-α content than that of KD patients. LPS-induced TNF-α production in healthy controls' PBMCs was also inhibited by cordycepin. For the mechanism study, we discovered that cordycepin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in both KD patients' PBMCs and LPS-stimulated macrophages, which mediated cordycepin-induced inhibition against TNFα production. AMPK inhibition by its inhibitor (compound C) or by siRNA depletion alleviated cordycepin's effect on TNFα production. Further, we found that cordycepin inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation in LPS-stimulate RAW 264.7 cells or healthy controls' PBMCs. PBMCs of KD patients showed higher basal level of ROS and NF-κB activation, which was also inhibited by cordycepin co-treatment. In conclusion, our data showed that cordycepin inhibited TNFα production, which was associated with AMPK activation as well as ROS and NF-κB inhibition. The results of this study should have significant translational relevance in managing this devastating disease.

  5. Transcriptional profiles of Rel/NF-κB, inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB), and lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF) in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and two Vibrio sp.-exposed intertidal copepod, Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-02-01

    The immune system and the role of immunity-related genes have rarely been studied in copepods, even though copepods have a primitive immune response system and also have a potential in pathogen transport higher trophic levels. In this study, we firstly cloned and characterized three core immune genes such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB), and lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF) genes in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus. Several in silico analyses based on conserved domains, motifs, and phylogenetic relationships were supporting their annotations. To investigate the immune-related role of three genes, we exposed lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and two Vibrio sp. to T. japonicus. After exposure of different concentrations of LPS and two Vibrio sp., transcripts of TJ-IκB and TJ-LITAF genes were significantly elevated during the time course in a dose-dependent manner, while TJ-NF-κB transcripts were not significantly changed during exposure. These findings demonstrated that the copepod T. japonicus has a conserved immunity against infection.

  6. WY-14643, a selective agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behaviors by preventing neuroinflammation and oxido-nitrosative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongrong; Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhuo; Hu, Wenfeng; Gong, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Depression is a common disease that afflicts one in six people at some points in life. Numerous hypotheses have been raised in past years, but the exact mechanism that can be used to explain the development of depression remains obscure. Recently, more and more attentions are being focused on neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in depression. WY-14643, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), has been reported to inhibit neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, and one of our previous studies have showed that WY-14643 possesses antidepressive activities. On that account, we investigated the effect of WY-14643 pretreatment on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced depressive-like behaviors, neuroinflammation and oxido-nitrosative stress in mice. Results showed that WY-14643 pretreatment at the doses of 5 and 10mg/kg significantly ameliorated LPS (0.83mg/kg)-induced depressive-like behaviors in the tail suspension test (TST), forced swimming test (FST) and sucrose preference experiment. Further analysis showed that WY-14643 pretreatment not only inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), but also prevented the LPS-induced enhancement of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In addition, the LPS-induced decreases in hippocampal and prefrontal cortical brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were reversed by WY-14643 pretreatment. Taken together, our data provide further evidence to show that WY-14643 could be an agent that can be used to treat depression, and inhibition of neuroinflammation and oxido-nitrosative stress may be the potential mechanism for the antidepressive effect of WY-14643.

  7. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells by the norsesterterpene peroxide, epimuqubilin A.

    PubMed

    Cheenpracha, Sarot; Park, Eun-Jung; Rostama, Bahman; Pezzuto, John M; Chang, Leng Chee

    2010-03-01

    Seven norsesterterpene peroxides: epimuqubilin A (1), muqubilone B (2), unnamed cyclic peroxide ester (3), epimuqubilin B (4), sigmosceptrellin A methyl ester (5), sigmosceptrellin A (6), and sigmosceptrellin B methyl ester (7), isolated from the marine sponge Latrunculia sp., were examined with regard to their effects on nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. The results indicated epimuqubilin A (1) possessed potent NO inhibitory activity against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide release with an IC(50) value of 7.4 microM, a level three times greater than the positive control, L-N(G)-monomethyl arginine citrate, followed by 6 (sigmosceptrellin A, IC(50) = 9.9 microM), whereas other compounds exhibited only modest activity (Table 1). These compounds did not show appreciable cytotoxicity at their IC(50) values for NO-inhibitory activity. The structure-activity upon NO inhibition could be summarized as follows: (1) a monocyclic carbon skeleton framework was essential for activity, (2) free acids gave higher activity, (3) the orientation of H3-22 with an equatorial position increased activity, and (4) a bicyclic structure reduced activity. This is the first report of a norsesterterpene peroxide with NO-inhibitory activity. In addition, compounds 1-7 were also evaluated for their inhibitory activities in the yeast glycogen synthase kinase-3beta assay. In summary, several norsesterterpene peroxides showed novel biological activities of inhibition in NO production, suggesting that these might provide leads for anti-inflammatory or cancer chemopreventive agents.

  8. A low-level diode laser therapy reduces the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced periodontal ligament cell inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T. H.; Chen, C. C.; Liu, S. L.; Lu, Y. C.; Kao, C. T.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytologic effects of inflammatory periodontal ligament cells in vitro after low-level laser therapy. Human periodontal ligament cells were cultured, exposed to lipopolysaccharide and subjected to low-level laser treatment of 5 J cm-2 or 10 J cm-2 using a 920 nm diode laser. A periodontal ligament cell attachment was observed under a microscope, and the cell viability was quantified by a mitochondrial colorimetric assay. Lipopolysaccharide-treated periodontal ligament cells were irradiated with the low-level laser, and the expression levels of several inflammatory markers, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1, and pErk kinase, were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The data were collected and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance; p < 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The low-level laser treatment of periodontal ligament cells increased their ability to attach and survive. After irradiation, the expression levels of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1 in lipopolysaccharide-exposed periodontal ligament cells decreased over time (p < 0.05). In periodontal ligament cells, low-level diode laser treatment increased the cells’ proliferative ability and decreased the expression of the examined inflammatory mediators.

  9. Antibacterial activity of a synthetic peptide that mimics the LPS binding domain of Indian mud crab, Scylla serrata anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (SsALF) also involved in the modulation of vaginal immune functions through NF-kB signaling.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sachin; Yedery, R D; Patgaonkar, M S; Selvaakumar, C; Reddy, K V R

    2011-01-01

    Recently the cDNA coding for anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) has been identified from the Indian mud crab, Scylla serrata and has been named S. serrata anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (SsALF). SsALF protein sequence demonstrated the presence of two highly conserved cystine residues between which the putative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding domain is known to be located. In this study, we have designed and synthesized a 24 amino acid linear (lSsALF24) and a cyclic (cSsALF24) peptides based on this putative LPS binding domain and demonstrated the ability of these peptides to bind to LPS. The peptides were active against vaginal pathogens demonstrated by MIC, CFU and phagocytosis assays. cSsALF24 did not show toxicity to human vaginal epithelial cells (HeLa-S3), macrophages and rabbit erythrocytes even at high concentration (64.64 μM). Flow cytometry results demonstrated that cSsALF24 peptide suppressed LPS induced phagocytosis of FITC labeled E. coli. HeLa cells were stimulated with LPS (10 μg/ml) alone for 6 h or after two washings with PBS, treated for 1 h with cSsALF24 (64.64 μM). After washing, the cells were cultured for 24 h in fresh media. The spent media as well as cells were collected for the determination of cytokine/chemokine levels such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) using ELISA and RT-PCR respectively. Similar results were obtained with LPS stimulated cells treated with c/nSsALF24 or unstimulated cells treated with c/nSsALF24. The expression of cytokine/chemokines and mRNA's coding these proteins were unaffected in c/nSsALF24 treated cells. In contrast, in LPS stimulated cells, the expression levels of these molecules were up-regulated via the induction of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB) levels. However, the expression of these pro-inflammatory markers was decreased in LPS stimulated cells following the treatment with cSsALF24, attributing anti

  10. Garlic (Allium sativum) Extracts Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toll-Like Receptor 4 Dimerization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Garlic has been used as a folk medicine for a long history. Numerous studies demonstrated that garlic extracts and its sulfur-containing compounds inhibit nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) activation induced by various receptor agonist including lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These effects suggest that garl...

  11. Protective Role of Ternatin Anthocyanins and Quercetin Glycosides from Butterfly Pea (Clitoria ternatea Leguminosae) Blue Flower Petals against Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Inflammation in Macrophage Cells.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vimal; Bang, Woo Young; Schreckinger, Elisa; Andarwulan, Nuri; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis

    2015-07-22

    Twelve phenolic metabolites (nine ternatin anthocyanins and three glycosylated quercetins) were identified from the blue flowers of Clitoria ternatea by high-performance liquid chromatography diode array detection and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n)). Three anthocyanins not reported in this species before show fragmentation pattern of the ternatin class. Extracts were fractionated in fractions containing flavonols (F3) and ternatin anthocyanins (F4). In general, C. ternatea polyphenols showed anti-inflammatory properties in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells with distinct molecular targets. Flavonols (F3) showed strong inhibition of COX-2 activity and partial ROS suppression. On the other hand, the ternatin anthocyanins (F4) inhibited nuclear NF-κB translocation, iNOS protein expression, and NO production through a non-ROS suppression mechanism. Accordingly, quercetin glycosides and ternatin anthocyanins from the blue flower petals of C. ternatea may be useful in developing drugs or nutraceuticals for protection against chronic inflammatory diseases by suppressing the excessive production of pro-inflammatory mediators from macrophage cells.

  12. Oolong tea theasinensins attenuate cyclooxygenase-2 expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse macrophages: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Masuzaki, Satoko; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Hashimoto, Fumio; Chen, Jihua; Sogo, Takayuki; Fujii, Makoto

    2010-12-22

    Oolong tea theasinensins are a group of tea polyphenols different from green tea catechins and black tea theaflavins. The present study reports the inhibitory effects of oolong tea theasinensins on the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and underlying molecular mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage RAW264 cells. The structure-activity data revealed that the galloyl moiety of theasinensins played an important role in the inhibitory actions. Theasinensin A, a more potent inhibitor, caused a dose-dependent inhibition of mRNA, protein, and promoter activity of COX-2. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed that theasinensin A reduced the complex of NF-κB- and AP-1-DNA in the promoter of COX-2. Signaling analysis demonstrated that theasinensin A attenuated IκB-α degradation, nuclear p65 accumulation, and c-Jun phosphorylation. Furthermore, theasinensin A suppressed the phosphorylation of MAPKs, IκB kinase α/β (IKKα/β), and TGF-β activated kinase (TAK1). These data demonstrated that the down-regulation of TAK1-mediated MAPKs and NF-κB signaling pathways might be involved in the inhibition of COX-2 expression by theasinensin A. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory properties of oolong tea theasinensins.

  13. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC’s regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9−/−) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9−/−. We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9−/−, which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9−/−. Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  14. Kukoamine B promotes TLR4-independent lipopolysaccharide uptake in murine hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong; Zheng, Xinchuan; Wang, Ning; Fan, Shijun; Yang, Yongjun; Lu, Yongling; Chen, Qian; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Free bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is generally removed from the bloodstream through hepatic uptake via TLR4, the LPS pattern recognition receptor, but mechanisms for internalization and clearance of conjugated LPS are less clear. Kukoamine B (KB) is a novel cationic alkaloid that interferes with LPS binding to TLR4. In this study, KB accelerated blood clearance of LPS. KB also enhanced LPS distribution in the hepatic tissues of C57 BL/6 mice, along with LPS uptake in primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. By contrast, KB inhibited LPS internalization in Kupffer and RAW 264.7 cells. Loss of TLR4 did not affect LPS uptake into KB-treated hepatocytes. We also detected selective upregulation of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) upon KB treatment, and ASGPR colocalized with KB in cultured hepatocytes. Molecular docking showed that KB bound to ASGPR in a manner similar to GalNAc, a known ASGPR agonist. GalNAc dose-dependently reduced KB internalization, suggesting it competes with KB for ASGPR binding, and ASGPR knockdown also impaired LPS uptake into hepatocytes. Finally, while KB enhanced LPS uptake, it was protective against LPS-induced inflammation and hepatocyte injury. Our study provides a new mechanism for conjugated LPS hepatic uptake induced by the LPS neutralizer KB and mediated by membrane ASGPR binding. PMID:27542278

  15. Macrophages exposed continuously to lipopolysaccharide and other agonists that act via toll-like receptors exhibit a sustained and additive activation state

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A; Underhill, David M; Sweet, Matthew J; Ozinsky, Adrian O; Liew, Foo Y; Aderem, Alan

    2001-01-01

    Background Macrophages sense microorganisms through activation of members of the Toll-like receptor family, which initiate signals linked to transcription of many inflammation associated genes. In this paper we examine whether the signal from Toll-like receptors [TLRs] is sustained for as long as the ligand is present, and whether responses to different TLR agonists are additive. Results RAW264 macrophage cells were doubly-transfected with reporter genes in which the IL-12p40, ELAM or IL-6 promoter controls firefly luciferase, and the human IL-1β promoter drives renilla luciferase. The resultant stable lines provide robust assays of macrophage activation by TLR stimuli including LPS [TLR4], lipopeptide [TLR2], and bacterial DNA [TLR9], with each promoter demonstrating its own intrinsic characteristics. With each of the promoters, luciferase activity was induced over an 8 hr period, and thereafter reached a new steady state. Elevated expression required the continued presence of agonist. Sustained responses to different classes of agonist were perfectly additive. This pattern was confirmed by measuring inducible cytokine production in the same cells. While homodimerization of TLR4 mediates responses to LPS, TLR2 appears to require heterodimerization with another receptor such as TLR6. Transient expression of constitutively active forms of TLR4 or TLR2 plus TLR6 stimulated IL-12 promoter activity. The effect of LPS, a TLR4 agonist, was additive with that of TLR2/6 but not TLR4, whilst that of lipopeptide, a TLR2 agonist, was additive with TLR4 but not TLR2/6. Actions of bacterial DNA were additive with either TLR4 or TLR2/6. Conclusions These findings indicate that maximal activation by any one TLR pathway does not preclude further activation by another, suggesting that common downstream regulatory components are not limiting. Upon exposure to a TLR agonist, macrophages enter a state of sustained activation in which they continuously sense the presence of a

  16. The effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on liver and renal tissue inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tissue lipid peroxidation in obstructive jaundice stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

    PubMed

    Cağlikülekci, Mehmet; Pata, Cengiz; Apa, Duygu Dusmez; Dirlik, Musa; Tamer, Lulufer; Yaylak, Faik; Kanik, Arzu; Aydin, Suha

    2004-03-01

    Morbidity and mortality rates are very high in obstructive jaundice when it is associated with sepsis and multiple organ failure. Nitric oxide (NO) formation and increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) also take place in obstructive jaundice (OJ). N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) has a beneficial effect by demonstrating anti-inflammatory activity such as inhibits cytokine expression/release, inhibiting the adhesion molecule expression and inhibiting nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of NAC on liver and renal tissue iNOS, and liver tissue lipid peroxidation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced obstructive jaundice. We randomized 48 rats into six groups. Group A: Sham group; group B: OJ group; group C: OJ+NAC; group D: OJ+LPS (Escherichia coli LPS serotype L-2630, 100mg, Sigma) group E: OJ+NAC+LPS; group F: OJ+LPS+NAC. NAC was started subcutaneously 100mg/kg. LPS was injected intraperitoneally and then at the tenth day we sacrificed the rats. Liver malondialdehyde (MDA) increased and liver ATPase decreased in groups B-D when compared to group A. After the administration of NAC (groups C-E), liver MDA levels decreased, tissue ATPase levels increased as compared to other groups. The liver and renal tissue iNOS expression was increased in groups B, D, and F. After the administration of NAC (groups C-E) the liver and renal tissue iNOS expression were decreased. Our results indicated that NAC prevented the deleterious effects of LPS in OJ by reducing iNOS expression via lipid peroxidation in liver and renal tissue; if it was administrated before LPS. But NAC failed to prevent the iNOS expression and lipid peroxidation if there was established endotoxemia in OJ.

  17. Demethoxycurcumin, a natural derivative of curcumin attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses through down-regulation of intracellular ROS-related MAPK/NF-kappaB signaling pathways in N9 microglia induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijia; Wu, Chunfu; Zhao, Siqi; Yuan, Dan; Lian, Guoning; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Lihui; Yang, Jingyu

    2010-03-01

    Our previous report has showed that demethoxycurcumin (DMC), a natural derivative of curcumin (Cur), exhibited stronger inhibitory activity on nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production compared with Cur in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activated rat primary microglia. In the present study, the effect and possible mechanism of DMC on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators in LPS-activated N9 microglial cells were further investigated. The results showed that DMC significantly suppressed the NO production induced by LPS in N9 microglial cells through inhibiting the protein and mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS). DMC also decreased LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-1beta expression at both transcriptional and protein level in a concentration-dependent manner. Further studies revealed that DMC blocked IkappaBalpha phosphorylation and degradation, inhibited the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Moreover, the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) was significantly increased by LPS, which is mainly mediated by the up-regulated expression of gp91phox, the catalytic subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) oxidase. Both DMC and Cur could markedly decrease iROS production and the expression of NADPH oxidase induced by LPS, with more potent inhibitory activity of DMC. In summary, these data suggest that DMC exerts its in vitro anti-inflammatory effect in LPS-activated N9 microglial cells by blocking nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and MAPKs activation, which may be partly due to its potent down-regulation of the NADPH-derived iROS production.

  18. Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides lipid A derivatives block in vitro induction of tumor necrosis factor and endotoxin tolerance by smooth lipopolysaccharide and monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, B E; Perera, P Y; Qureshi, N; Takayama, K; Vogel, S N

    1992-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas (Rhodobacter) sphaeroides diphosphoryl lipid A is a relatively inert species of lipid A but has been shown to antagonize the effects of toxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) both in vivo and in vitro. The antagonist and its monophosphoryl derivative were examined for the ability to block tumor necrosis factor synthesis and reverse tolerance induction in vitro in macrophage cultures stimulated with bioactive preparations of smooth LPS, rough LPS, diphosphoryl lipid A, and monophosphoryl lipid A. Inhibition of agonist activity and reversal of tolerance by these novel penta-acylated lipid A antagonists provides new insight into macrophage-LPS interactions. PMID:1398939

  19. Intra-amniotic LPS modulation of TLR signaling in lung and blood monocytes of fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Boris W; Kallapur, Suhas G; Moss, Timothy J; Nitsos, Ilias; Newnham, John P; Jobe, Alan H

    2009-04-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that intra-uterine exposure to inflammation may prime postnatal immune responses. In fetal sheep, intra-amniotic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced chorioamnionitis, lung inflammation and maturation, matured lung monocytes to macrophages and initiated systemic tolerance of fetal monocytes to subsequent challenge with LPS. We hypothesized that LPS-mediated chorioamnionitis altered the response of lung and blood monocytes to Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands such as PamCysK4 (TLR2), flagellin (TLR5), and human CpG-DNA (TLR9). Time-mated ewes were given intra-amniotic injections of LPS or saline. Blood and lung monocytes were assessed after 2 days, 7 days and 2 days and 7 days repetitive LPS injections before delivery at 124 days gestational age (term 150 days). Responsiveness of blood and lung monocytes to TLR-ligands in vitro was assessed by interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and hydrogen peroxide. Monocytes from preterm controls had minimal responses. Lipopolysaccharide-mediated chorioamnionitis increased IL-6, TNF- alpha and hydrogen peroxide to all TLR agonists in blood and lung monocytes. Repetitive exposure to antenatal LPS reduced IL-6, TNF- alpha and hydrogen peroxide to TLR-ligands suggesting tolerance. Tolerance to TLR-ligands reduced IL-1 receptor associated kinase-4 expression. Thus, repeated fetal exposure to LPS induced tolerance to other TLR-ligands. These modulations of fetal innate immunity have implications for host defense and injury responses in preterm infants.

  20. Pretreatment of mice with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or IL-1β exerts dose-dependent opposite effects on Shiga toxin-2 lethality

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, M; Alves-Rosa, F; Rubel, C; Fernández, G C; Fernández-Alonso, G; Alberto, F; Rivas, M; Isturiz, M

    2000-01-01

    Haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) has been closely associated with infection with a group of Shiga toxin-producing enterohaemorrhagic Eschericchia coli in young children. Shiga toxins (Stx) have been implicated as pathogenic agents of HUS by binding to the surface receptor of endothelial cells. LPS is a central product of the Gram-negative bacteria and several reports have documented that both LPS and Stx are important for disease development. In this study the reciprocal interactions between LPS and Stx2 are analysed in a mouse model. The results demonstrated that LPS was able to reduce or enhance Stx2 toxicity, depending on the dose and the timing of the injection. The involvement of the main early cytokines induced by LPS, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-1β, in those LPS opposite effects on Stx2 toxicity was evaluated. Stx2 toxicity was enhanced by in vivo injection of murine TNF-α and low doses of murine IL-1β. However, at higher doses of IL-1β which induced corticosteroid increase in serum, Stx2 lethality was decreased. Considering that dexamethasone and IL-1β reproduce the LPS protective effects, it is suggested that endogenous corticosteroids secondary to the inflammatory response induced by LPS, mediate the protection against Stx2. It can be concluded that the fine equilibrium between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory activities strongly influences Stx2 toxicity. PMID:10606967

  1. Reducing the bioactivity of Tannerella forsythia lipopolysaccharide by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sung-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    Tannerella forsythia is considered a pathogen of periodontitis and forms a biofilm with multi-species bacteria in oral cavity. Lipopolysaccharide is a powerful immunostimulator and induces inflammation and shock. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of T. forsythia LPS in its co-cultivation with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Porphyromonas gingivalis. T. forsythia was co-cultured in the presence and absence of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis and then T. forsythia LPS was extracted. The extracts were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and NF-κB reporter CHO cell lines. THP-1 cells were treated with the LPS and evaluated induction of cytokine expression by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. For analysis of the bioactivity of T. forsythia LPS, the binding assay on LPS-binding protein (LBP) and CD14 was processed. The extracts did not contaminate other molecules except LPS and showed TLR4 agonists. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower level of induction of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression than single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum in the conditions of human serum. However, the three T. forsythia LPS did not show difference of cytokine induction in the serum free conditions. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower affinity to LBP and CD14 as binding site of O-antigen and attached at a lower level to THP-1 cells compared to single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum. The virulence of T. forsythia LPS was decreased by co-culturing with P. gingivalis and their affinity to LBP and CD14 was reduced, which may due to modification of O-antigen chain by P. gingivalis.

  2. C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Interferon Gamma-Inducible Protein 10 (IP-10), and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Are Associated with Risk of Tuberculosis after Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Tenforde, Mark W.; Gupte, Nikhil; Dowdy, David W.; Asmuth, David M.; Balagopal, Ashwin; Pollard, Richard B.; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Lama, Javier R.; Pillay, Sandy; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Pawar, Jyoti; Santos, Breno; Riviere, Cynthia; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Hakim, James G.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Bollinger, Robert; Semba, Richard D.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gupta, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association between pre-antiretroviral (ART) inflammation and immune activation and risk for incident tuberculosis (TB) after ART initiation among adults is uncertain. Design Nested case-control study (n = 332) within ACTG PEARLS trial of three ART regimens among 1571 HIV-infected, treatment-naïve adults in 9 countries. We compared cases (participants with incident TB diagnosed by 96 weeks) to a random sample of controls (participants who did not develop TB, stratified by country and treatment arm). Methods We measured pre-ART C-reactive protein (CRP), EndoCab IgM, ferritin, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interferon gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), soluble CD14 (sCD14), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and CD4/DR+/38+ and CD8/DR+/38+ T cells. Markers were defined according to established cutoff definitions when available, 75th percentile of measured values when not, and detectable versus undetectable for LPS. Using logistic regression, we measured associations between biomarkers and incident TB, adjusting for age, sex, study site, treatment arm, baseline CD4 and log10 viral load. We assessed the discriminatory value of biomarkers using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Seventy-seven persons (4.9%) developed incident TB during follow-up. Elevated baseline CRP (aOR 3.25, 95% CI: 1.55–6.81) and IP-10 (aOR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.05–3.39), detectable plasma LPS (aOR 2.39, 95% CI: 1.13–5.06), and the established TB risk factors anemia and hypoalbuminemia were independently associated with incident TB. In ROC analysis, CRP, albumin, and LPS improved discrimination only modestly for TB risk when added to baseline routine patient characteristics including CD4 count, body mass index, and prior TB. Conclusion Incident TB occurs commonly after ART initiation. Although associated with higher post-ART TB risk, baseline CRP, IP-10, and LPS add limited value to routine patient characteristics

  3. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Hongjie; Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli; Xiang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  4. Counteracting interactions between lipopolysaccharide molecules with differential activation of toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Hajishengallis, George; Martin, Michael; Schifferle, Robert E; Genco, Robert J

    2002-12-01

    We investigated counteracting interactions between the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Escherichia coli (Ec-LPS) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg-LPS), which induce cellular activation through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2, respectively. We found that Ec-LPS induced tolerance in THP-1 cells to subsequent tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta) induction by Pg-LPS, though the reverse was not true, and looked for explanatory differential effects on the signal transduction pathway. Cells exposed to Pg-LPS, but not to Ec-LPS, displayed persisting expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase without apparent degradation, presumably allowing prolonged relay of downstream signals. Accordingly, cells pretreated with Pg-LPS, but not with Ec-LPS, were effectively activated in response to subsequent exposure to either LPS molecule, as evidenced by assessing nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activity. In fact, Pg-LPS primed THP-1 cells for enhanced NF-kappaB activation and TNF-alpha release upon restimulation with the same LPS. This was a dose-dependent effect and correlated with upregulation of surface TLR2 expression. Furthermore, we observed inhibition of NF-kappaB-dependent transcription in a reporter cell line pretreated with Ec-LPS and restimulated with Pg-LPS (compared to cells pretreated with medium only and restimulated with Pg-LPS), but not when the reverse treatment was made. Although Pg-LPS could not make cells tolerant to subsequent activation by Ec-LPS, Pg-LPS inhibited Ec-LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 release when the two molecules were added simultaneously into THP-1 cell cultures. Pg-LPS also suppressed P. gingivalis FimA protein-induced NF-kappaB-dependent transcription in the 3E10/huTLR4 reporter cell line, which does not express TLR2. This rules out competition for common signaling intermediates, suggesting that Pg-LPS may block component(s) of the TLR4 receptor complex. Interactions between TLR2 and TLR4 agonists may be

  5. Soluble CD14 Enhances the Response of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells to P. gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Andrukhov, Oleh; Andrukhova, Olena; Özdemir, Burcu; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Moritz, Andreas; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are lacking membrane CD14, which is an important component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling through toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. In the present study we investigated the effect of soluble CD14 on the response of human PDLSCs to LPS of Porphyromonas (P.) gingivalis. Human PDLSCs (hPDLSCs) were stimulated with P. gingivalis LPS in the presence or in the absence of soluble CD14 (sCD14) and the production of interleukin (IL)-6, chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 8 (CXCL8), and chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) was measured. The response to P. gingivalis LPS was compared with that to TLR4 agonist Escherichia coli LPS and TLR2-agonist Pam3CSK4. The response of hPDLSCs to both P. gingivalis LPS and E. coli LPS was significantly enhanced by sCD14. In the absence of sCD14, no significant difference in the hPDLSCs response to two kinds of LPS was observed. These responses were significantly lower compared to that to Pam3CSK4. In the presence of sCD14, the response of hPdLSCs to P. gingivalis LPS was markedly higher than that to E. coli LPS and comparable with that to Pam3CSK4. The response of hPdLSCs to bacterial LPS is strongly augmented by sCD14. Local levels of sCD14 could be an important factor for modulation of the host response against periodontal pathogens. PMID:27504628

  6. Xanthohumol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury via induction of AMPK/GSK3β-Nrf2 signal axis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hongming; Liu, Qinmei; Wen, Zhongmei; Feng, Haihua; Deng, Xuming; Ci, Xinxin

    2017-03-02

    Abundant natural flavonoids can induce nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) and/or AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which play crucial roles in the amelioration of various inflammation- and oxidative stress-induced diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI). Xanthohumol (Xn), a principal prenylflavonoid, possesses anti-inflammation and anti-oxidant activities. However, whether Xn could protect from LPS-induced ALI through inducing AMPK/Nrf2 activation and its downstream signals, are still poorly elucidated. Accordingly, we focused on exploring the protective effect of Xn in the context of ALI and the involvement of underlying molecular mechanisms. Our findings indicated that Xn effectively alleviated lung injury by reduction of lung W/D ratio and protein levels, neutrophil infiltration, MDA and MPO formation, and SOD and GSH depletion. Meanwhile, Xn significantly lessened histopathological changes, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, several cytokines secretion, and iNOS and HMGB1 expression, and inhibited Txnip/NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB signaling pathway activation. Additionally, Xn evidently decreased t-BHP-stimulated cell apoptosis, ROS generation and GSH depletion but increased various anti-oxidative enzymes expression regulated by Keap1-Nrf2/ARE activation, which may be associated with AMPK and GSK3β phosphorylation. However, Xn-mediated inflammatory cytokines and ROS production, histopathological changes, Txnip/NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB signaling pathway in WT mice were remarkably abrogated in Nrf2(-/-) mice. Our experimental results firstly provided a support that Xn effectively protected LPS-induced ALI against oxidative stress and inflammation damage which are largely dependent upon upregulation of the Nrf2 pathway via activation of AMPK/GSK3β, thereby suppressing LPS-activated Txnip/NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB signaling pathway.

  7. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF) of Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD) in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2) from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future. PMID:27213409

  8. Adrenaline stimulates the proliferation and migration of mesenchymal stem cells towards the LPS-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodan; Wang, Zhiming; Qian, Mengjia; Wang, Lingyan; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) could modulate inflammation in experimental lung injury. On the other hand, adrenergic receptor agonists could increase DNA synthesis of stem cells. Therefore, we investigated the therapeutic role of adrenaline-stimulated BMSCs on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. BMSCs were cultured with adrenergic receptor agonists or antagonists. Suspensions of lung cells or sliced lung tissue from animals with or without LPS-induced injury were co-cultured with BMSCs. LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages were co-cultured with BMSCs (with adrenaline stimulation or not) in Transwell for 6 hrs. A preliminary animal experiment was conducted to validate the findings in ex vivo study. We found that adrenaline at 10 μM enhanced proliferation of BMSCs through both α- and β-adrenergic receptors. Adrenaline promoted the migration of BMSCs towards LPS-injured lung cells or lung tissue. Adrenaline-stimulated BMSCs decreased the inflammation of LPS-stimulated macrophages, probably through the expression and secretion of several paracrine factors. Adrenaline reduced the extent of injury in LPS-injured rats. Our data indicate that adrenaline-stimulated BMSCs might contribute to the prevention from acute lung injury through the activation of adrenergic receptors, promotion of proliferation and migration towards injured lung, and modulation of inflammation.

  9. Toll-like receptor agonists Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS and CpG differentially regulate IL-10 competency and frequencies of mouse B10 cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Zhiqiang; HU, Yang; YU, Pei; LIN, Mei; HUANG, Grace; KAWAI, Toshihisa; TAUBMAN, Martin; WANG, Zuomin; Xiaozhe, HAN

    2017-01-01

    Abstract IL-10 expressing regulatory B cells (B10) play a key role in immune system balance by limiting excessive inflammatory responses. Effects of toll-like receptor signaling and co-stimulatory molecules on B10 activity during innate and adaptive immune responses are not fully understood. Objective This study is to determine the effects of P. gingivalis LPS and CpG on B10 cell expansion and IL-10 competency in vitro. Material and Methods Spleen B cells were isolated from C57BL/6J mice with or without formalin-fixed P. gingivalis immunization. B cells were cultured for 48 hours under the following conditions: CD40L, CD40L+LPS, CD40L+CpG, and CD40L+LPS+CpG in the presence or absence of fixed P. gingivalis. Percentages of CD1dhiCD5+ B cells were measured by flow cytometry. IL-10 mRNA expression and secreted IL-10 were measured by real-time quantitative PCR and by ELISA respectively. Results P. gingivalis LPS plus CD40L significantly increased CD1dhiCD5+ B cell percentages and secreted IL-10 levels in both immunized and non-immunized mice B cells in the presence or absence of P. gingivalis, compared with control group. Secreted IL-10 levels were significantly increased in CD40L+LPS treated group compared with CD40L treatment group in the absence of P. gingivalis. CpG plus CD40L significantly decreased CD1dhiCD5+ B cell percentages, but greatly elevated secreted IL-10 levels in immunized and non-immunized mice B cells in the absence of P. gingivalis, compared with CD40L treatment group. Conclusions P. gingivalis LPS and CpG differentially enhance IL-10 secretion and expansion of mouse B10 cells during innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:28198981

  10. Influence of Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide as an adjuvant on the immunogenicity of HPV-16 L1VLP vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Ardestani, Susan Kaboudanian; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Abdoli, Asghar

    2015-04-01

    Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has less toxicity and no pyrogenic properties in comparison with other bacterial LPS. It is a toll-like receptor 4 agonist and has been shown to have the potential use as a vaccine adjuvant. In this study, the immunostimulatory properties of LPS from smooth and rough strains of B. abortus (S19 and RB51) as adjuvants were investigated for the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L1 virus-like particles (L1VLPs) vaccines. C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times either with HPV-16 L1VLPs alone, or in combination with smooth LPS (S-LPS), rough LPS (R-LPS), aluminum hydroxide or a mixture of them as adjuvant. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring the specific and total IgG levels, and also the T-cell immune response of mice was evaluated by measuring different cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17. Results showed that serum anti-HPV16 L1VLP IgG antibody titers was significantly higher in mice immunized with a combination of VLPs and R-LPS or S-LPS compared with other immunized groups. Co-administration of HPV-16 L1VLPs with R-LPS elicited the highest levels of splenocytes cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17 and TNF-α) and also effectively induced improvement of a Th1-type cytokine response characterized with a high ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10. The data indicate that B. abortus LPS particularly RB51-LPS enhances the immune responses to HPV-16 L1VLPs and suggests its potential as an adjuvant for the development of a potent prophylactic HPV vaccine and other candidate vaccines.

  11. ENDOTHELIAL CELL TOLERANCE TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE CHALLENGE IS INDUCED BY MONOPHOSPHORYL LIPID A

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Ryan J.; Choi, Hyehun; Koch, Stephen R.; Fensterheim, Benjamin A.; Lamb, Fred S.; Sherwood, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Prior exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produces a reduced or “tolerant” inflammatory response to subsequent challenges with LPS, however the potent pro-inflammatory effects of LPS limit its clinical benefit. The adjuvant Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) is a weak toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist that induces negligible inflammation but retains potent immunomodulatory properties. We postulated that pre-treatment with MPLA would inhibit the inflammatory response of endothelial cells to secondary LPS challenge. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), were exposed to MPLA (10 µg/ml), LPS (100 ng/ml) or vehicle control. HUVECs were then washed and maintained in culture for 24 hours before being challenged with LPS (100 ng/ml). Supernatants were collected and examined for cytokine production in the presence or absence of siRNA inhibitors of critical TLR4 signaling proteins. Pretreatment with MPLA attenuated IL-6 production to secondary LPS challenge to a similar degree as LPS. The application of MyD88 siRNA dramatically reduced MPLA-induced tolerance while TRIF siRNA had no effect. The tolerant phenotype in endothelial cells was associated with reduced IKK, p38 and JNK phosphorylation and enhanced IRAK-M expression for LPS primed HUVECs, but less so in MPLA primed cells. Instead, MPLA-primed HUVECs demonstrated enhanced ERK phosphorylation. In contrast to leukocytes in which tolerance is largely TRIF-dependent, MyD88 signaling mediated endotoxin tolerance in endothelial cells. Most importantly, MPLA, a vaccine adjuvant with a wide therapeutic window, induced tolerance to LPS in endothelial cells. PMID:26669797

  12. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Jianguo

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  13. NMDA receptor blockade by ketamine abrogates lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Walker, Adam K; Budac, David P; Bisulco, Stephanie; Lee, Anna W; Smith, Robin A; Beenders, Brent; Kelley, Keith W; Dantzer, Robert

    2013-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces depressive-like behavior by activating indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO; O'Connor et al, 2009c). IDO degrades tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway. Using mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of kynurenine metabolites in the brain of mice injected at the periphery with 1 mg/kg LPS, we show that LPS activates the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase pathway that ultimately degrades kynurenine into quinolinic acid. As quinolinic acid acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist, we used the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine to assess the role of NMDA receptor activation in LPS-induced depressive-like behavior. Here, we report that a low dose of ketamine (6 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) immediately before administration of LPS (0.83 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) in C57Bl/6 J mice abrogated the development of LPS-induced depressive-like behavior, without altering LPS-induced sickness measured by body weight loss, decreased motor activity, and reduced food intake. Depressive-like behavior was measured 24 h after LPS by decreased sucrose preference and increased immobility in the forced swim test (FST). Ketamine had no effect on LPS-induced cytokine expression in the liver and brain, IDO activation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) transcripts. The ability of ketamine to abrogate LPS-induced depressive-like behavior independently of a possible interference with LPS-induced inflammatory signaling was confirmed when ketamine was administered 10 h after LPS instead of immediately before LPS. In contrast, ketamine had no effect when administered 24 h before LPS. To confirm that NMDA receptor antagonism by ketamine mediates the antidepressant-like activity of this compound in LPS-treated mice, mice were pretreated with the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX) to block enhanced AMPA

  14. Inhibition of IRAK-4 activity for rescuing endotoxin LPS-induced septic mortality in mice by lonicerae flos extract

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sun Hong; Roh, Eunmiri; Kim, Hyun Soo; Baek, Seung-Il; Choi, Nam Song; Kim, Narae; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •Lonicerae flos extract (HS-23) is a clinical candidate, Phase I for sepsis treatment. •Here, HS-23 or its major constituents rescued LPS-induced septic mortality in mice. •As a mechanism, they directly inhibited IRAK-4-catalyzed kinase activity. •Thus, they suppressed LPS-induced expression of NF-κB/AP-1-target inflammatory genes. -- Abstract: Lonicerae flos extract (HS-23) is a clinical candidate currently undergoing Phase I trial in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected healthy human volunteers, but its molecular basis remains to be defined. Here, we investigated protective effects of HS-23 or its major constituents on Escherichia coli LPS-induced septic mortality in mice. Intravenous treatment with HS-23 rescued LPS-intoxicated C57BL/6J mice under septic conditions, and decreased the levels of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) in the blood. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) and its isomers were assigned as major constituents of HS-23 in the protection against endotoxemia. As a molecular mechanism, HS-23 or CGA isomers inhibited endotoxin LPS-induced autophosphorylation of the IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) in mouse peritoneal macrophages as well as the kinase activity of IRAK-4 in cell-free reactions. HS-23 consequently suppressed downstream pathways critical for LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB or activating protein 1 (AP-1) in the peritoneal macrophages. HS-23 also inhibited various toll-like receptor agonists-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, and down-regulated LPS-induced expression of NF-κB/AP-1-target inflammatory genes in the cells. Taken together, HS-23 or CGA isomers exhibited anti-inflammatory therapy against LPS-induced septic mortality in mice, at least in part, mediated through the inhibition of IRAK-4.

  15. Effect of Adlay ( Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) Testa and its phenolic components on Cu2+-treated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Din-Wen; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Fang-Yi; Lin, Yun-Lian; Chiang, Wenchang

    2009-03-25

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of adlay testa (AT) on Cu(2+)-treated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-scavenging capacity, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophages and determine its active components. The AT ethanolic extract (ATE) was partitioned into four fractions by various solvents as follows: n-hexane (ATE-Hex), ethyl acetate (ATE-Ea), n-butanol (ATE-Bu), and water (ATE-H(2)O). ATE-Ea and ATE-Bu were further fractionated into ATE-Ea-a-ATE-Ea-h and ATE-Bu-A-ATE-Bu-F, respectively, by column chromatography. Results showed that ATE-Ea, ATE-Bu, ATE-Ea-e, and ATE-Bu-C expressed antiradical, antioxidative, and anti-inflammatory activities with respect to the DPPH-scavenging capacity, LDL protection effect, and nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity. Inflammation was further modulated by ATE-Ea, ATE-Bu, ATE-Ea-e, and ATE-Bu-C through downregulating the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) proteins. The following components were found in ATE-Ea-e and ATE-Bu-C after purification and high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis: chlorogenic acid (CGA), vanillic acid (VA), caffeic acid (CA), p-coumaric acid (PCA), ferulic acid (FA), and 2-O-beta-glucopyranosyl-7-methoxy-4((2)H)-benzoxazin-3-one (GMBO). Results showed that CGA, CA, and FA were the major components responsible for the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities of ATE-Ea-e and ATE-Bu-C. Subsequently, each gram of ATE-Bu-C had 30.3 mg of CGA, 9.02 mg of CA, and 189 mg of GMBO, while each gram of ATE-Ea-e had 1.31 mg of VA, 3.89 mg of PCA, and 47.6 microg of FA. In conclusion, ATE has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities, and its effects are partially related to its phenolic components. Thus, ATE has the potential to be developed as a functional food targeting chronic diseases.

  16. Distinct carbohydrate and lipid-based molecular patterns within lipopolysaccharides from Burkholderia cepacia contribute to defense-associated differential gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Madala, Ntakadzeni E; Molinaro, Antonio; Dubery, Ian A

    2012-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharides are structural components within the cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria. The LPSs as microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules can trigger defense-related responses involved in MAMP-triggered immunity and basal resistance in plants, presumably from an initial perception event. LPS from Burkholderia cepacia as well as two fragments, the glycolipid, lipid A and the polysaccharide (OPS-core) chain, were used to treat Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to evaluate the eliciting activities of the individual LPS sub-domains by means of Annealing Control Primer-based Differential Display transcript profiling. Genes found to be up-regulated encode for proteins involved in signal perception and transduction, transcriptional regulation and defense - and stress responses. Furthermore, genes encoding proteins involved in chaperoning, secretion, protein-protein interactions and protein degradation were differentially expressed. It is concluded that intact LPS, as well as the two sub-components, induced the expression of a broad range of genes associated with perception and defense as well as metabolic reprogramming of cellular activities in support of immunity and basal resistance. Whilst the lipid A and OPS moieties were able to up-regulate sub-sets of defense-associated genes over the same spectrum of categories as intact LPS, the up-regulation observed with intact LPS was the more comprehensive, suggesting that the lipid A and glycan molecular patterns of the molecule act as partial agonists, but that the intact LPS structure is required for full agonist activity.

  17. A protease-activated receptor 2 agonist (AC-264613) suppresses interferon regulatory factor 5 and decreases interleukin-12p40 production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages: Role of p53.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has a key role in the production of interleukin (IL)-12 by macrophages. IRF5 is also a central mediator of toll-like receptor signaling and is a direct target of p53. Activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) upregulates p53 and suppresses apoptosis. This study investigated the influence of human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and PAR-2 agonists on expression of IRF5 and IL-12p40 by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophages showed upregulation of IRF5 expression, while HNE reduced expression of p53 and IRF5 in a concentration-dependent manner. HNE also caused a concentration-dependent decrease of IRF5 in macrophages transfected with small interfering RNA to silence p53, while silencing of β-arrestin 2 blunted the reduction of p53 or IRF5 by HNE. Incubation of macrophages with a PAR-2 agonist, AC-264613, caused a decrease of IRF5 expression and also significantly reduced p53 protein expression. HNE upregulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and caused transactivation of TLR4, while AC-264613 did not promote TLR4 transactivation. In conclusion, the PAR-2 agonist AC-264613 attenuated IRF5-associated IL-12p40 production by macrophages.

  18. Comparative airway inflammatory response of normal volunteers to ozone and lipopolysaccharide challenge

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are environmental pollutants with adverse heatth effects noted in both healthy and asthmatic individuals. The authors and others have shown that inhalation of ozone and LPS both induce airway neutrophilia. Based on these similarities, the author...

  19. Activation of α2 adrenoceptor attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Hui; Yu, Gao-Feng; Jin, Shang-Yi; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Lei, Dong-Xu; Zhou, Shao-Li; Song, Xing-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis induces hepatic injury but whether alpha-2 adrenoceptor (α2-AR) modulates the severity of sepsis-induced liver damage remains unclear. The present study used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce hepatic injury and applied α2-AR agonist dexmedetomidine (DEX) and/or antagonist yohimbine to investigate the contribution of α2-AR in LPS-induced liver injury. Our results showed that LPS resulted in histological and functional abnormality of liver tissue (ALT and AST transaminases, lactate), higher mortality, an increase in proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 & TNF-α), as well as a change in oxidative stress (MDA, SOD). Activation of α2-AR by dexmedetomidine (DEX) attenuated LPS-induced deleterious effects on the liver and block of α2-AR by yohimbine aggravated LPS-induced liver damage. Our data suggest that α2-AR plays an important role in sepsis-induced liver damage and activation of α2-AR with DEX could be a novel therapeutic avenue to protect the liver against sepsis-induced injury.

  20. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  1. Fenoterol inhibits LPS-induced AMPK activation and inflammatory cytokine production through β-arrestin-2 in THP-1 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Xu, Ming; Zhang, You-Yi; He, Bei

    2015-06-26

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway is involved in regulating inflammation in several cell lines. We reported that fenoterol, a β{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor (β{sub 2}-AR) agonist, had anti-inflammatory effects in THP-1 cells, a monocytic cell line. Whether the fenoterol anti-inflammatory effect involves the AMPK pathway is unknown. In this study, we explored the mechanism of β{sub 2}-AR stimulation with fenoterol in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine secretion in THP-1 cells. We studied whether fenoterol and β-arrestin-2 or AMPKα1 subunit knockdown could affect LPS-induced AMPK activation, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and inflammatory cytokine secretion. LPS-induced AMPK activation and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) release were reduced with fenoterol pretreatment of THP-1 cells. SiRNA knockdown of β-arrestin-2 abolished the fenoterol inhibition of LPS-induced AMPK activation and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) release, thus β-arrestin-2 mediated the anti-inflammatory effects of fenoterol on LPS-treated THP-1 cells. In addition, siRNA knockdown of AMPKα1 significantly attenuated the LPS-induced NF-κB activation and IL-1β release, so AMPKα1 was a key signaling molecule involved in LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine production. These results suggested the β{sub 2}-AR agonist fenoterol inhibited LPS-induced AMPK activation and IL-1β release via β-arrestin-2 in THP-1 cells. The exploration of these mechanisms may help optimize therapeutic agents targeting these pathways in inflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • β{sub 2}-AR agonist fenoterol exerts its protective effect on LPS-treated THP-1 cells. • Fenoterol inhibits LPS-induced AMPK activation and IL-1β production. • β-arrestin2 mediates fenoterol-inhibited AMPK activation and IL-1β release. • AMPKα1 is involved in LPS-induced NF-κB activation and IL-1β production.

  2. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 modulates calcium oscillation and innate immune response induced by lipopolysaccharide in microglial cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Zhou, R; Yan, H; Yin, H; Wu, X; Tan, Y; Li, L

    2014-12-05

    Microglia, the primary immune cells in the brain, have been implicated as the predominant cells governing inflammation-mediated neuronal damage. In response to immunological challenges such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), microglia are activated and subsequently inflammatory process is initiated as evidenced by the release of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Here we show that Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is involved in LPS-induced microglia activation. LPS triggered a similar pattern of [Ca2+]i oscillation in N9, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mutant EOC 20, TLR4-wild-type and TLR4-deficient primary mouse microglia, suggesting that LPS-induced [Ca2+]i oscillation is independent of TLR4. The characteristics of [Ca2+]i oscillation induced by LPS are consistent with those observed in mGluR5 activation. In addition, mGluR5 antagonist 3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine (MTEP) abolished LPS-induced [Ca2+]i oscillation. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated that LPS colocalizes with mGluR5 in microglia and the direct binding of LPS and mGluR5 was further validated by antibody-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology. Activation of mGluR5 using a selective agonist (RS)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG) significantly expanded LPS-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity and CHPG alone increased NF-κB activity as well. But, mGluR5 antagonist MTEP attenuated the actions of LPS, CHPG and the additive effect of LPS and CHPG in microglia. LPS induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) secretion in N9 microglia, but not in TLR4-mutant EOC 20 and TLR4-deficient primary mouse microglia. CHPG reduced LPS-caused TNF-α production, but MTEP increased LPS-induced TNF-α production and blocked the effect of CHPG in N9 microglia. These data demonstrate that mGluR5 and TLR4 are two critical receptors that mediate microglia activation in response to LPS, suggesting that mGluR5 may represent a novel target for modulating

  3. Dopamine inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production through the formation of dopamine quinone in murine microglia BV-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Yasuhiro; Sugino, Yuta; Tozawa, Azusa; Yamamuro, Akiko; Kasai, Atsushi; Ishimaru, Yuki; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2016-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) has been suggested to modulate functions of glial cells including microglial cells. To reveal the regulatory role of DA in microglial function, in the present study, we investigated the effect of DA on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in murine microglial cell line BV-2. Pretreatment with DA for 24 h concentration-dependently attenuated LPS-induced NO production in BV-2 cells. The inhibitory effect of DA on LPS-induced NO production was not inhibited by SCH-23390 and sulpiride, D1-like and D2-like DA receptor antagonists, respectively. In addition, pretreatment with (-)-(6aR,12bR)-4,6,6a,7,8,12b-Hexahydro-7-methylindolo[4,3-a]phenanthridin (CY 208-243) and bromocriptine, D1-like and D2-like DA receptor agonists, respectively, did not affect the LPS-induced NO production. N-Acetylcysteine, which inhibits DA oxidation, completely inhibited the effect of DA. Tyrosinase, which catalyzes the oxidation of DA to DA quionone (DAQ), accelerated the inhibitory effect of DA on LPS-induced NO production. These results suggest that DA attenuates LPS-induced NO production through the formation of DAQ in BV-2 cells.

  4. Agonist-stimulated alveolar macrophages: apoptosis and phospholipid signaling.

    PubMed

    Lütjohann, J; Spiess, A N; Gercken, G

    1998-08-01

    Bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) were labeled with [3H]-choline or [3H]-ethanolamine and exposed to quartz dust, metal oxide-coated silica particles, Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor promotor 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (PMA). The activation of phospholipases A2, C and D (PLA2, PLC and PLD) acting on phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation and liquid scintillation counting of water- and lipid-soluble phospholipid metabolites. Exposure of BAM to quartz dust, metal oxide-coated silica particles, and LPS led to a transient PLD activation while treatment with PMA caused a prolonged rise in PLD activity. LPS and quartz dust induced a short-term increase of PLC cleavage products. All agonists caused a transient activation of PLA2. To induce apoptosis, BAM were stimulated with C8-ceramide, calcium-ionophore 23187, or gliotoxin. Apoptosis was investigated by qualitative and quantitative methods like flow cytometry, propidium iodide/Hoechst 33258 double staining, Cell Death Detection ELISA, and electrophoretical detection of DNA fragmentation. All three agonists led to apoptosis of BAM in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. After stimulation with gliotoxin an increase in ceramide and a drastic decrease in sphingosine-1-phosphate levels were observed, suggesting an involvement of these sphingolipids in gliotoxin-mediated apoptosis.

  5. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors in the enteric nervous system modulate gastrointestinal contractility in lipopolysaccharide-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Marnie; Mouihate, Abdeslam; Mackie, Ken; Keenan, Catherine M; Buckley, Nancy E; Davison, Joseph S; Patel, Kamala D; Pittman, Quentin J; Sharkey, Keith A

    2008-07-01

    Enhanced intestinal transit due to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is reversed by cannabinoid (CB)2 receptor agonists in vivo, but the site and mechanism of action are unknown. We have tested the hypothesis that CB2 receptors are expressed in the enteric nervous system and are activated in pathophysiological conditions. Tissues from either saline- or LPS-treated (2 h; 65 microg/kg ip) rats were processed for RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry or were mounted in organ baths where electrical field stimulation was applied in the presence or absence of CB receptor agonists. Whereas the CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 did not affect the electrically evoked twitch response of the ileum under basal conditions, in the LPS-treated tissues JWH133 was able to reduce the enhanced contractile response in a concentration-dependent manner. Rat ileum expressed CB2 receptor mRNA and protein under physiological conditions, and this expression was not affected by LPS treatment. In the myenteric plexus, CB2 receptors were expressed on the majority of neurons, although not on those expressing nitric oxide synthase. LPS did not alter the distribution of CB2 receptor expression in the myenteric plexus. In vivo LPS treatment significantly increased Fos expression in both enteric glia and neurons. This enhanced expression was significantly attenuated by JWH133, whose action was reversed by the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Taking these facts together, we conclude that activation of CB2 receptors in the enteric nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract dampens endotoxin-induced enhanced intestinal contractility.

  6. Intradermally administered TLR4 agonist GLA-SE enhances the capacity of human skin DCs to activate T cells and promotes emigration of Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Laura P; Schoonderwoerd, Antoinet J; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Howard, Randall F; Reed, Steven G; de Jong, Esther C; Teunissen, Marcel B M

    2012-06-13

    The natural TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has notable adjuvant activity. However, it is not useful as a vaccine adjuvant due to its toxicity. Glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) is a synthetic derivative of the lipid A tail of LPS with limited cytotoxicity, but strong potential to induce immune responses in mice, guinea pigs, non-human primates, and humans. In this study we determined how this synthetic TLR4 agonist affects the function of different subsets of human skin dendritic cells (DCs). The effect of GLA in an aqueous formulation (GLA-AF) or in an oil-in-water emulsion (GLA-SE) was compared to that of LPS and TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) using a human skin explant model with intradermal injections for the administration of the agonists. Intradermal injection of GLA-SE or LPS, but not GLA-AF, enhanced the emigration of CD1a(high)/langerin(+) Langerhans cells (LCs), but not dermal DCs (DDCs). LCs and CD14(-) DDCs exhibited an enhanced mature phenotype following intradermal administration of either of the two GLA formulations tested, similar to DCs that emigrated from LPS-injected skin. However, only injection of GLA-SE resulted in a significant increase in the production of the wide range of cytokines that is observed with LPS. Moreover, DCs that emigrated from GLA-SE-injected skin induced stronger CD4(+) T-cell activation, as indicated by a more pronounced T-cell proliferation, than DCs from skin injected with GLA-AF or LPS. Altogether, our data show that GLA-SE has a notable potency to stimulate the function of skin DCs, indicating that GLA-SE may be a good candidate as adjuvant for vaccines administered via the intradermal route.

  7. Iron oxide nanoparticles modulate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in primary human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Susann; Stenvik, Jørgen; Nilsen, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Co-stimulation of the immune system to more than one agent concomitantly is very common in real life, and considering the increasing use of engineered nanoparticles and nanomaterials, it is highly relevant to assess the ability of these materials to modulate key innate immune responses, which has not yet been studied in detail. We investigated the immunomodulatory effects of 10 nm and 30 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) on primary human monocytes in the presence and absence of Toll-like receptor 4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Prior to the cell studies, we characterized the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles in cell culture medium and ensured that the nanoparticles were free from biological contamination. Cellular uptake of the IONPs in monocytes was assessed using transmission electron microscopy. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that the IONPs per se did not induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. However, the IONPs had the ability to suppress LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines in primary human monocytes in an LPS and a particle dose-dependent manner. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled LPS, we showed that the effects correlated with impaired LPS internalization by monocytes in the presence of IONPs, which could be partly explained by LPS adsorption onto the nanoparticle surface. Additionally, the results from particle pretreatment experiments indicate that other cellular mechanisms might also play a role in the observed effects, which warrants further studies to elucidate the additional mechanisms underlying the capacity of IONPs to alter the reactivity of monocytes to LPS and to mount an appropriate cellular response. PMID:27695322

  8. LPS response and tolerance in the zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Novoa, B; Bowman, T V; Zon, L; Figueras, A

    2009-02-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been used in the present work to study the fish response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure and LPS tolerance. These mechanisms are not completely understood in mammals and, presently, are totally unknown in fish. Zebrafish larval survival was assessed following treatment with various types of LPS at a variety of concentrations to determine the sensitivity of zebrafish to LPS-induced immune activation. In addition, fish pretreated with a sublethal concentration of LPS did not die after exposure to a lethal concentration of LPS demonstrating, for the first time that LPS tolerance also happens in fish. The time interval between pretreatment and secondary exposure as well as the type of pretreatment dictated the strength of protection. Since zebrafish are in intimate contact with microorganisms, the high resistance of fish to LPS suggests that there must be a tight control of the LPS receptor cluster in order to avoid an excess of inflammation. One of these components is CXCR4, which has previously been shown to regulate the signal transduced by TLR4. Treating fish with AMD3100, a specific inhibitor of CXCR4, increased LPS treatment associated mortality. Blocking CXCR4 via chemical or genetic inhibition resulted in a reversion of LPS tolerance, thus further supporting the negative regulatory role of CXCR4 in this inflammatory response. In support of an inhibitory role for CXCR4 in the inflammatory cascade, IL-1 transcript levels were elevated in both unstimulated and LPS stimulated zebrafish Odysseus (CXCR4 deficient mutant) larvae.

  9. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effects of β-adrenoceptor agonists on human lung macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sharonjit K; Marriott, Helen M; Suvarna, S Kim; Peachell, Peter T

    2016-12-15

    The principal mechanism by which bronchodilator β-adrenoceptor agonists act is to relax airways smooth muscle although they may also be anti-inflammatory. However, the extent of anti-inflammatory activity and the cell types affected by these agonists are uncertain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether β-adrenoceptor agonists prevent pro-inflammatory cytokine generation from activated human lung macrophages. Macrophages were isolated and purified from human lung. The cells were pre-treated with both short-acting (isoprenaline, salbutamol, terbutaline) and long-acting (formoterol, salmeterol, indacaterol) β-agonists before activation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce cytokine (TNFα, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10) generation. The experiments showed that short-acting β-agonists were poor inhibitors of cytokine generation. Of the long-acting β-agonists studied, formoterol was also a weak inhibitor of cytokine generation whereas only indacaterol and salmeterol showed moderate inhibitory activity. Further experiments using the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI-118,551 suggested that the effects of indacaterol were likely to be mediated by β2-adrenoceptors whereas those of salmeterol were not. These findings were corroborated by functional desensitization studies in which the inhibitory effects of indacaterol appeared to be receptor-mediated whereas those of salmeterol were not. Taken together, the data indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of β-adrenoceptor agonists on human lung macrophages are modest.

  10. Structure and Function of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ralf R.; Leong, Steven R.; Flaggs, Gail W.; Gray, Patrick W.; Wright, Samuel D.; Mathison, John C.; Tobias, Peter S.; Ulevitch, Richard J.

    1990-09-01

    The primary structure of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), a trace plasma protein that binds to the lipid A moiety of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), was deduced by sequencing cloned complementary DNA. LBP shares sequence identity with another LPS binding protein found in granulocytes, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, and with cholesterol ester transport protein of the plasma. LBP may control the response to LPS under physiologic conditions by forming high-affinity complexes with LPS that bind to monocytes and macrophages, which then secrete tumor necrosis factor. The identification of this pathway for LPS-induced monocyte stimulation may aid in the development of treatments for diseases in which Gram-negative sepsis or endotoxemia are involved.

  11. Ultrapotent effects of salvinorin A, a hallucinogenic compound from Salvia divinorum, on LPS-stimulated murine macrophages and its anti-inflammatory action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Aviello, Gabriella; Borrelli, Francesca; Guida, Francesca; Romano, Barbara; Lewellyn, Kevin; De Chiaro, Maria; Luongo, Livio; Zjawiony, Jordan K; Maione, Sabatino; Izzo, Angelo A; Capasso, Raffaele

    2011-09-01

    The hallucinogenic compound, salvinorin A, is a potent κ-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist. However, other target(s) than the KOR, such as the cannabinoid CB1 receptor, have been proposed to explain its multiple pharmacological actions. Here, we have evaluated the effect of salvinorin A in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages as well as in models of inflammation in vivo. Salvinorin A (0.1-10 pM) reduced LPS-stimulated nitrite, TNF-α and IL-10 (but not IL-1β) levels as well as iNOS (but not COX-2) LPS-induced hyperexpression. The effect of salvinorin A on nitrite levels was reverted by the opioid antagonist naloxone, the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine and by the CB1 antagonist rimonabant Salvinorin A also prevented KOR and CB1 hyperexpression induced by LPS. In vivo, salvinorin A reduced the LPS- and the carrageenan-induced paw oedema and formalin-induced inflammatory pain, in a nor-binaltorphimine and rimonabant-sensitive manner. It is concluded that salvinorin A-via KORs and CB1 receptors-exerts ultrapotent actions on macrophages and also shows moderate antinflammatory effects in vivo.

  12. Synthetic LPS-Binding Polymer Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tian

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the principal components of most gram-negative bacteria's outer membrane, is a type of contaminant that can be frequently found in recombinant DNA products. Because of its strong and even lethal biological effects, selective LPS removal from bioproducts solution is of particular importance in the pharmaceutical and health care industries. In this thesis, for the first time, a proof-of-concept study on preparing LPS-binding hydrogel-like NPs through facile one-step free-radical polymerization was presented. With the incorporation of various hydrophobic (TBAm), cationic (APM, GUA) monomers and cross-linkers (BIS, PEG), a small library of NPs was constructed. Their FITC-LPS binding behaviors were investigated and compared with those of commercially available LPS-binding products. Moreover, the LPS binding selectivity of the NPs was also explored by studying the NPs-BSA interactions. The results showed that all NPs obtained generally presented higher FITC-LPS binding capacity in lower ionic strength buffer than higher ionic strength. However, unlike commercial poly-lysine cellulose and polymyxin B agarose beads' nearly linear increase of FITC-LPS binding with particle concentration, NPs exhibited serious aggregation and the binding quickly saturated or even decreased at high particle concentration. Among various types of NPs, higher FITC-LPS binding capacity was observed for those containing more hydrophobic monomers (TBAm). However, surprisingly, more cationic NPs with higher content of APM exhibited decreased FITC-LPS binding in high ionic strength conditions. Additionally, when new cationic monomer and cross-linker, GUA and PEG, were applied to replace APM and BIS, the obtained NPs showed improved FITC-LPS binding capacity at low NP concentration. But compared with APM- and BIS-containing NPs, the FITC-LPS binding capacity of GUA- and PEG-containing NPs saturated earlier. To investigate the NPs' binding to proteins, we tested the NPs

  13. Oxidized low density lipoprotein suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in microglia: Oxidative stress acts through control of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ohn Soon; Lee, Chang Seok; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo . E-mail: jouilo@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-03-31

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is readily oxidized under certain conditions, resulting in the formation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Despite numerous in vitro reports that reveal the pathogenic role of oxidative stress, anti-oxidative strategies have underperformed in the clinic. In this study, we examine the role of oxLDL in brain inflammatory responses using cultured rat brain microglia. We demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in these cells. It also decreases LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and production of nitric oxide, and reduces LPS-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Oxysterols, known components of oxLDL and endogenous agonists of liver X receptor, can simulate the inhibitory effects of oxLDL in LPS-activated microglia. In addition, their inhibitory effects were mimicked by liver X receptor (LXR) agonists and potentiated by a retinoid X receptor agonist, suggesting these molecules heterodimerize to function as oxysterol receptors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in brain microglia and that these inhibitory effects are mediated by oxysterols and, at least in part, by the nuclear receptor LXR. Our results suggest an additional mechanism of action for oxidative stress that acts indirectly via modulation of inflammatory responses. Although further studies are needed, these results answer in part the question of why anti-oxidative strategies have not been successful in clinical situations. Moreover, as brain inflammation participates in the initiation and progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, the present data provide information that should prove a useful guide for designing therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative brain diseases.

  14. Reconstruction of LPS Transfer Cascade Reveals Structural Determinants within LBP, CD14, and TLR4-MD2 for Efficient LPS Recognition and Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Je-Kyung; Kim, Soo Jin; Rah, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Ji In; Jung, Hi Eun; Lee, Dongsun; Lee, Heung Kyu; Lee, Jie-Oh; Park, Beom Seok; Yoon, Tae-Young; Kim, Ho Min

    2017-01-17

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, binds Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-MD2 complex and activates innate immune responses. LPS transfer to TLR4-MD2 is catalyzed by both LPS binding protein (LBP) and CD14. To define the sequential molecular interactions underlying this transfer, we reconstituted in vitro the entire LPS transfer process from LPS micelles to TLR4-MD2. Using electron microscopy and single-molecule approaches, we characterized the dynamic intermediate complexes for LPS transfer: LBP-LPS micelles, CD14-LBP-LPS micelle, and CD14-LPS-TLR4-MD2 complex. A single LBP molecule bound longitudinally to LPS micelles catalyzed multi-rounds of LPS transfer to CD14s that rapidly dissociated from LPB-LPS complex upon LPS transfer via electrostatic interactions. Subsequently, the single LPS molecule bound to CD14 was transferred to TLR4-MD2 in a TLR4-dependent manner. The definition of the structural determinants of the LPS transfer cascade to TLR4 may enable the development of targeted therapeutics for intervention in LPS-induced sepsis.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide fever is initiated via a capsaicin-sensitive mechanism independent of the subtype-1 vanilloid receptor.

    PubMed

    Dogan, M Devrim; Patel, Shreya; Rudaya, Alla Y; Steiner, Alexandre A; Székely, Miklós; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2004-12-01

    As pretreatment with intraperitoneal capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide, CAP), an agonist of the vanilloid receptor known as VR1 or transient receptor potential channel-vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (TRPV-1), has been shown to block the first phase of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) fever in rats, this phase is thought to depend on the TRPV-1-bearing sensory nerve fibers originating in the abdominal cavity. However, our recent studies suggest that CAP blocks the first phase via a non-neural mechanism. In the present work, we studied whether this mechanism involves the TRPV-1. Adult Long-Evans rats implanted with chronic jugular catheters were used. Pretreatment with CAP (5 mg kg(-1), i.p.) 10 days before administration of LPS (10 microg kg(-1), i.v.) resulted in the loss of the entire first phase and a part of the second phase of LPS fever. Pretreatment with the ultrapotent TRPV-1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX; 2, 20, or 200 microg kg(-1), i.p.) 10 days before administration of LPS had no effect on the first and second phases of LPS fever, but it exaggerated the third phase at the highest dose. The latter effect was presumably due to the known ability of high doses of TRPV-1 agonists to cause a loss of warm sensitivity, thus leading to uncontrolled, hyperpyretic responses. Pretreatment with the selective competitive TRPV-1 antagonist capsazepine (N-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-2H-2-benzazepine-2-carbothioamidem, CPZ; 40 mg kg(-1), i.p.) 90 min before administration of LPS (10 microg kg(-1), i.v.) or CAP (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.) did not affect LPS fever, but blocked the immediate hypothermic response to acute administration of CAP. It is concluded that LPS fever is initiated via a non-neural mechanism, which is CAP-sensitive but RTX- and CPZ-insensitive. The action of CAP on this mechanism is likely TRPV-1-independent. It is speculated that this mechanism may be the production of prostaglandin E(2) by macrophages in LPS-processing organs.

  16. 5-HT2A receptors control body temperature in mice during LPS-induced inflammation via regulation of NO production.

    PubMed

    Voronova, Irina P; Khramova, Galina M; Kulikova, Elizabeth A; Petrovskii, Dmitrii V; Bazovkina, Daria V; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the regulation of numerous normal and pathological physiological functions. At the same time, its involvement in the regulation of body temperature (Tb) in normal conditions is obscure. Here we study the effect of the 5-HT2A receptor activation or blockade on Tb in sick animals. The experiments were carried out on adult C57BL/6 mouse males. Systemic inflammation and sickness were produced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg, ip), while the 5-HT2A receptor was stimulated or blocked through the administration of the receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin (1mg/kg), respectively. LPS, DOI or ketanserin alone produced no effect on Tb. However, administration of LPS together with a peripheral or central ketanserin injection reduced Tb (32.2°C). Ketanserin reversed the LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase in the brain. Consequently, an involvement of NO in the mechanism of the hypothermic effect of ketanserin in sick mice was hypothesized. Administration of LPS together with NO synthase inhibitor, l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (60mg/kg, ip) resulted in deep (28.5°C) and prolonged (8h) hypothermia, while administration of l-nitro-arginine methyl ester alone produced no effect on Tb. Thus, 5-HT2A receptors play a key role in Tb control in sick mice. Blockade of this GPCR produces hypothermia in mice with systemic inflammation via attenuation of LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate an unexpected role of 5-HT2A receptors in inflammation and NO production and have a considerable biological impact on understanding the mechanism of animal adaptation to pathogens and parasites. Moreover, adverse side effects of 5-HT2A receptor antagonists in patients with inflammation may be expected.

  17. Proteomic changes in chicken plasma induced by Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are cell wall components of gram-negative bacteria that cause inflammation and sickness through genetic and proteomic activation. The objective of our study was to identify the proteomic changes in plasma associated with inflammation induced by LPS treatment. Five-week-old ...

  18. Proteomic analysis of macrophage activated with salmonella lipopolysaccharide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages play pivotal role in immunity. They are activated by many pathogen derived molecules such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) which trigger the production of various proteins and peptides that drive and resolve inflammation. There are numerous studies on the effect of LPS at the genome level bu...

  19. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors modulate ERK-1/2 kinase signalling and NO release in microglial cells stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Varani, Katia; Simioni, Carolina; Fazzi, Debora; Mirandola, Prisco; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonists have potential utility as anti-inflammatory drugs in chronic immune inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we characterized the signal transduction pathways affected by CB2 receptors in quiescent and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine microglia. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We examined the effects of the synthetic CB2 receptor ligand, JWH-015, on phosphorylation of MAPKs and NO production. KEY RESULTS Stimulation of CB2 receptors by JWH-015 activated JNK-1/2 and ERK-1/2 in quiescent murine microglial cells. Furthermore, CB2 receptor activation increased p-ERK-1/2 at 15 min in LPS-stimulated microglia. Surprisingly, this was reduced after 30 min in the presence of both LPS and JWH-015. The NOS inhibitor l-NAME blocked the ability of JWH-015 to down-regulate the LPS-induced p-ERK increase, indicating that activation of CB2 receptors reduced effects of LPS on ERK-1/2 phosphorylation through NO. JWH-015 increased LPS-induced NO release at 30 min, while at 4 h CB2 receptor stimulation had an inhibitory effect. All the effects of JWH-015 were significantly blocked by the CB2 receptor antagonist AM 630 and, as the inhibition of CB2 receptor expression by siRNA abolished the effects of JWH-015, were shown to be mediated specifically by activation of CB2 receptors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results demonstrate that CB2 receptor stimulation activated the MAPK pathway, but the presence of a second stimulus blocked MAPK signal transduction, inhibiting pro-inflammatory LPS-induced production of NO. Therefore, CB2 receptor agonists may promote anti-inflammatory therapeutic responses in activated microglia. PMID:21951063

  20. [Phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Hrytsaĭ, R V; Iakovleva, L M; Varbanets', L D

    2014-01-01

    The study is dedicated to research of phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides. This causative agent is one of the most dangerous among potato bacterial diseases. It is revealed that the inhibitory effect of LPS solution on seedlings germination is more noticeable on crops susceptible to brown rot. Maximal total phytotoxic properties have been shown by LPS from strains 35, 52b, TX1 and TS3, which were characterized by relatively low rhamnose content. Relative to the control plants LPS may diminish and some ones--increase the root length, height and weight of seedlings, subject to particular strain. But the stimulation revealed is minor.

  1. Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide in Utero Alters the Postnatal Metabolic Response in Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal metabolic response to an LPS challenge in beef heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were assigned to a prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 micrograms/kg BW LPS s...

  2. Epigenetic Alterations Induced by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Coretti, Lorena; Pero, Raffaela; Lembo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the principal bacterial products known to elicit inflammation. Cells of myeloid lineage such as monocytes and macrophages, but also epithelial cells give rise to an inflammatory response upon LPS stimulation. This phenomenon implies reprogramming of cell specific gene expression that can occur through different mechanisms including epigenetic modifications. Given their intrinsic nature, epigenetic modifications may be involved both in the acute response to LPS and in the establishment of a preconditioned genomic state (epigenomic memory) that may potentially influence the host response to further contacts with microorganisms. Information has accumulated during the last years aimed at elucidating the epigenetic mechanisms which underlie the cellular LPS response. These findings, summarized in this chapter, will hopefully be a good basis for a definition of the complete cascade of LPS-induced epigenetic events and their biological significance in different cell types.

  3. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter knock down-mice are more susceptible to inflammation, c-Fos expression and sickness behavior induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Leite, Hércules Ribeiro; Oliveira-Lima, Onésia Cristina de; Pereira, Luciana de Melo; Oliveira, Vinícius Elias de Moura; Prado, Vania Ferreira; Prado, Marco Antônio Máximo; Pereira, Grace Schenatto; Massensini, André Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    In addition to the well-known functions as a neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh) can modulate of the immune system. Nonetheless, how endogenous ACh release inflammatory responses is still not clear. To address this question, we took advantage of an animal model with a decreased ACh release due a reduction (knockdown) in vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) expression (VAChT-KD(HOM)). These animals were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Afterwards, we evaluated sickness behavior and quantified systemic and cerebral inflammation as well as neuronal activation in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC). VAChT-KD(HOM) mice that were injected with LPS (10mg/kg) showed increased mortality rate as compared to control mice. In line with this result, a low dose of LPS (0.1mg/kg) increased the levels of pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in the spleen and brain of VAChT-KD(HOM) mice in comparison with controls. Similarly, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were increased in VAChT-KD(HOM) mice. This excessive cytokine production was completely prevented by administration of a nicotinic receptor agonist (0.4mg/kg) prior to the LPS injection. Three hours after the LPS injection, c-Fos expression increased in the DVC region of VAChT-KD(HOM) mice compared to controls. In addition, VAChT-KD(HOM) mice showed behavioral changes such as lowered locomotor and exploratory activity and reduced social interaction after the LPS challenge, when compared to control mice. Taken together, our results show that the decreased ability to release ACh exacerbates systemic and cerebral inflammation and promotes neural activation and behavioral changes induced by LPS. In conclusion, our findings support the notion that activity of cholinergic pathways, which can be modulated by VAChT expression, controls inflammatory and neural responses to LPS challenge.

  4. Expression of IP-10, a lipopolysaccharide- and interferon-gamma-inducible protein, in murine mesangial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Chiarri, M.; Hamilton, T. A.; Egido, J.; Emancipator, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    IP-10 is an early gene induced in multiple cell types by a variety of proinflammatory agents, notably interferons (IFNs) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To determine whether this protein might play a role in amplifying immune-mediated glomerular injury, we cultured mouse mesangial cells with several stimuli for various times. Increasing amounts of IFN-gamma (to 100 units/ml) elicited increasing levels of IP-10 messenger RNA (mRNA), sustained to 24 hours, but had no effect on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA. LPS induced transient IP-10 mRNA expression that peaked at 8 hours; TNF-alpha mRNA was also increased. TNF-alpha at doses up to 10 ng/ml and soluble immune complexes up to 150 micrograms/ml antibody evoked 3- to 5-fold increases in IP-10 mRNA expression, much less than the 30- to 70-fold increases seen with IFN-gamma and LPS. We conclude that IFN-gamma, LPS, and other agonists can amplify glomerular immune injury, perhaps via elevated expression of IP-10. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8434640

  5. Sitagliptin attenuates inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cardiomyocytes via nuclear factor-κB pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Hung; Lin, Chung-Ching

    2016-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) are responsible for glucose homeostasis, and have been shown to reduce inflammation in preclinical studies. The aim of the present study was to determine whether sitagliptin, an inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), as a GLP-1 receptor agonist, exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on cardiomyoblasts during lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Exposure to LPS increased the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-6 (IL)-6 and IL-1β in H9c2 cells, and also resulted in elevations in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Treatment with the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin dose-dependently downregulated the mRNA levels of IL-6, COX-2 and iNOS in LPS-stimulated H9c2 cells. In addition, sitagliptin inhibited the increased protein expression of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β. NF-κB mRNA expression was reduced and its translocation to the nucleus was suppressed by treatment with sitagliptin. The present results demonstrated that sitagliptin exerts a beneficial effect on cardiomyoblasts exposed to LPS by inhibiting expression of inflammatory mediators and suppressing NF-κB activation. These findings indicate that the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin may serve a function in cardiac remodeling attributed to sepsis-induced inflammation.

  6. Liver X receptor activation protects against inflammation and enhances autophagy in myocardium of neonatal mouse challenged by lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; He, Siyi; Gao, Junwei; Li, Jingwei; Fan, Xiaotang; Xiao, Ying-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) has been emerged as negative regulators of cardiomyocytic inflammation. The cellular process of autophagy is believed to play a protective role in myocardium during the inflammatory status. In this study, we investigated the role of LXRs agonist TO901317 (TO) on lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced myocardial inflammation and autophagy. The results showed that TO pretreatment significantly reduced the LPS-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells, elevation of NF-κB protein, TNF-α, and IL-6 mRNA levels in the myocardium. Moreover, LPS stimulated autophagy in neonatal mice heart, and this effect was further enhanced by TO pretreatment as evidenced by increased LC3-II/GAPDH ratio increment. Furthermore, TUNEL assay revealed LPS stimulation also increased the number of apoptotic cells in the myocardium, and the increment was inhibited by TO pretreatment. Our findings suggested that attenuation of inflammation and apoptosis, and enhancement of autophagy by TO may contribute to the protection of myocardium under inflammatory condition.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Endotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Raetz, Christian R. H.; Whitfield, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Summary Since lipopolysaccharide endotoxins of Gram-negative bacteria were last reviewed in this series in 1990, much has been learned about the assembly and signaling functions of these remarkable glycoconjugates. Lipopolysaccharides typically consist of a hydrophobic domain known as lipid A (or endotoxin), a non-repeating “core” oligosaccharide, and a distal polysaccharide (or O-antigen). The flood of recent genomic data has made it possible to study lipopolysaccharide assembly in diverse Gram-negative bacteria, many of which are human or plant pathogens, and to create mutants or hybrid constructs with novel properties. Unexpectedly, key genes for lipid A biosynthesis have also been found in higher plants, indicating that eucaryotic lipid A-like molecules may exist. The carbohydrate diversity of lipopolysaccharides is better appreciated now than ten years ago, but much remains to be learned about function. Sequence comparisons suggest that extensive lateral transfer of genes for the assembly of O-antigens has occurred among bacteria. The most significant finding in the field of endotoxin biology since 1990 has been the identification of the plasma membrane protein TLR4 as the lipid A signaling receptor of animal cells. The latter belongs to a family of innate immunity receptors, all of which possess a large extracellular domain of leucine-rich repeats, a single trans-membrane segment and a smaller cytoplasmic signaling region that engages the adaptor protein MyD88. The expanding knowledge of TLR4 specificity and its downstream signaling pathways should provide new opportunities for blocking the inflammatory side effects of sepsis. Future progress will require insights into lipopolysaccharide-protein recognition at the atomic level, greater understanding of intra- and inter-cellular lipopolysaccharide trafficking, and incisive biological approaches that combine the tools of bacterial and animal genetics. PMID:12045108

  8. Ephedrine hydrochloride protects mice from LPS challenge by promoting IL-10 secretion and inhibiting proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuejuan; Guo, Ziyi; He, Weigang; Yang, Yang; Li, Yuhu; Zheng, Aoxiang; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Jinzhu; Wen, Mingyue; Yang, Muyi; An, Huazhang; Ji, Guang; Yu, Yizhi

    2012-05-01

    Sepsis and its derivative endotoxic shock are still serious conditions with high mortality in the intensive care unit. The mechanisms that ensure the balance of proinflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokine production are of particular importance. As an active α- and β-adrenergic agonist, ephedrine hydrochloride (EH) is a widely used agent for cardiovascular diseases, especially boosting blood pressure. Here we demonstrate that EH increased Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated production of interleukin 10 (IL-10) through p38 MAPK activation. Simultaneously, EH negatively regulated the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Consistently, EH increased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced serum IL-10 and inhibited tumor necrotic factor-α (TNFα) production in vivo. As a result, EH treatment protected mice from endotoxic shock by lethal LPS challenge. In brief, our data demonstrated that EH could contribute to immune homeostasis by balancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokine in TLR4 signaling. This study provides a potential usage of EH in autoimmunologic diseases or other severe inflammations.

  9. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Mediates Lipopolysaccharide and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Induction of Shiga Toxin 2 Sensitivity in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Matthew K.; Kolling, Glynis L.; Lindner, Matthew H.; Obrig, Tom G.

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), one of the causative agents of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, is toxic to endothelial cells, including primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). This sensitivity of cells to Stx2 can be increased with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The goal of the present study was to identify the intracellular signaling pathway(s) by which LPS and TNF-α sensitize HUVEC to the cytotoxic effects of Stx2. To identify these pathways, specific pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs were tested with cell viability endpoints. A time course and dose response experiment for HUVEC exposure to LPS and TNF-α showed that a relatively short exposure to either agonist was sufficient to sensitize the cells to Stx2 and that both agonists stimulated intracellular signaling pathways within a short time. Cell viability assays indicated that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors SB202190 and SB203580 and the general protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide inhibited both the LPS and TNF-α sensitization of HUVEC to Stx2, while all other inhibitors tested did not inhibit this sensitization. Additionally, SB202190 reduced the cellular globotriaosylceramide content under LPS- and TNF-α-induced conditions. In conclusion, our results show that LPS and TNF-α induction of Stx2 sensitivity in HUVEC is mediated through a pathway that includes p38 MAPK. These results indicate that inhibition of p38 MAPK in endothelial cells may protect a host from the deleterious effects of Stx2. PMID:18086809

  10. Anti-LPS antibodies reduce endotoxemia in whole body Co-60 irradiated primates - A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.T.; Gaffin, S.L.; Wessels, B.C.; Brock-Utne, J.G.; Jordaan, J.P. )

    1990-09-01

    A previously established primate model was used to evaluate the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) in radiation sickness. Vervet monkeys were Co-60 irradiated with an LD100 exposure and had periodic blood samples taken for the determination of LPS and anti-LPS lgG antibodies and for bacteriological studies. On day 2 postirradiation, primates were treated with either sterile 0.9 percent saline, or equine anti-LPS hyperimmune plasma, or tripotassium-dicitrato-bismuthate (Denol). Results indicate that anti-LPS-treated animals survived significantly longer than both the other groups and, since LPS may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, and headaches, it is suggested that Anti-LPS administration may be of value in reducing plasma LPS concentration in humans and improving their performance and survivability. 24 refs.

  11. LPS inhibits caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in RAW264.7 macrophages induced by the AMPK activator AICAR

    SciTech Connect

    Russe, Otto Quintus Möser, Christine V. Kynast, Katharina L. King, Tanya S. Olbrich, Katrin Grösch, Sabine Geisslinger, Gerd Niederberger, Ellen

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • AMPK-activation induces caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. • Apoptosis is associated with decreased mTOR and increased p21 levels. • All effects can be significantly inhibited by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. - Abstract: AMP-activated kinase is a cellular energy sensor which is activated in stages of increased ATP consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decreasing inflammatory processes and the disease progress of diabetes and obesity, respectively. Furthermore, AMPK activation has been linked with induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer and vascular cells, indicating that it might have a therapeutic impact for the treatment of cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the impact of AMPK on the proliferation of macrophages, which also play a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and in inflammatory processes, has not been focused so far. We have assessed the influence of AICAR- and metformin-induced AMPK activation on cell viability of macrophages with and without inflammatory stimulation, respectively. In cells without inflammatory stimulation, we found a strong induction of caspase 3-dependent apoptosis associated with decreased mTOR levels and increased expression of p21. Interestingly, these effects could be inhibited by co-stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by other proinflammatory cytokines suggesting that AICAR induces apoptosis via AMPK in a TLR4-pathway dependent manner. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK activation is not only associated with positive effects but might also contribute to risk factors by disturbing important features of macrophages. The fact that LPS is able to restore AMPK-associated apoptosis might indicate an important role of TLR4 agonists in preventing unfavorable cell death of immune cells.

  12. A(1) and A(3) adenosine receptors inhibit LPS-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 accumulation in murine astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Stefanelli, Angela; Fazzi, Debora; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2013-10-01

    Adenosine (Ado) exerts neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory functions by acting through four receptor subtypes A1, A2A, A2B and A3. Astrocytes are one of its targets in the central nervous system. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis, is induced after hypoxia, ischemia and inflammation and plays an important role in brain injury. HIF-1 is expressed by astrocytes, however the regulatory role played by Ado on HIF-1α modulation induced by inflammatory and hypoxic conditions has not been investigated. Primary murine astrocytes were activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without Ado, Ado receptor agonists, antagonists and receptor silencing, before exposure to normoxia or hypoxia. HIF-1α accumulation and downstream genes regulation were determined. Ado inhibited LPS-increased HIF-1α accumulation under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, through activation of A1 and A3 receptors. In cells incubated with the blockers of p44/42 MAPK and Akt, LPS-induced HIF-1α accumulation was significantly decreased in normoxia and hypoxia, suggesting the involvement of p44/42 MAPK and Akt in this effect and Ado inhibited kinases phosphorylation. A series of angiogenesis and metabolism related genes were modulated by hypoxia in an HIF-1 dependent way, but not further increased by LPS, with the exception of GLUT-1 and hexochinase II that were elevated by LPS only in normoxia and inhibited by Ado receptors. Instead, genes involved in inflammation, like inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and A2B receptors, were increased by LPS in normoxia, strongly stimulated by LPS in concert with hypoxia and inhibited by Ado, through A1 and A3 receptor subtypes. In conclusion A1 and A3 receptors reduce the LPS-mediated HIF-1α accumulation in murine astrocytes, resulting in a downregulation of genes involved in inflammation and hypoxic injury, like iNOS and A2B receptors, in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

  13. Structure and Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of mainly Gram-negative bacteria and cyanobacteria. The LPS molecules from marine and terrestrial bacteria show structural variations, even among strains within the same species living in the same environment. Cyanobacterial LPS has a unique structure, since it lacks heptose and 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (also known as keto-deoxyoctulosonate (KDO)), which are present in the core region of common Gram-negative LPS. In addition, the cyanobacterial lipid A region lacks phosphates and contains odd-chain hydroxylated fatty acids. While the role of Gram-negative lipid A in the regulation of the innate immune response through Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 4 signaling is well characterized, the role of the structurally different cyanobacterial lipid A in TLR4 signaling is not well understood. The uncontrolled inflammatory response of TLR4 leads to autoimmune diseases such as sepsis, and thus the less virulent marine cyanobacterial LPS molecules can be effective to inhibit TLR4 signaling. This review highlights the structural comparison of LPS molecules from marine cyanobacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. We discuss the potential use of marine cyanobacterial LPS as a TLR4 antagonist, and the effects of cyanobacterial LPS on humans and marine organisms. PMID:26198237

  14. Structure and Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-07-07

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of mainly Gram-negative bacteria and cyanobacteria. The LPS molecules from marine and terrestrial bacteria show structural variations, even among strains within the same species living in the same environment. Cyanobacterial LPS has a unique structure, since it lacks heptose and 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (also known as keto-deoxyoctulosonate (KDO)), which are present in the core region of common Gram-negative LPS. In addition, the cyanobacterial lipid A region lacks phosphates and contains odd-chain hydroxylated fatty acids. While the role of Gram-negative lipid A in the regulation of the innate immune response through Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 4 signaling is well characterized, the role of the structurally different cyanobacterial lipid A in TLR4 signaling is not well understood. The uncontrolled inflammatory response of TLR4 leads to autoimmune diseases such as sepsis, and thus the less virulent marine cyanobacterial LPS molecules can be effective to inhibit TLR4 signaling. This review highlights the structural comparison of LPS molecules from marine cyanobacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. We discuss the potential use of marine cyanobacterial LPS as a TLR4 antagonist, and the effects of cyanobacterial LPS on humans and marine organisms.

  15. Serum amyloid P component prevents high-density lipoprotein-mediated neutralization of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    de Haas, C J; Poppelier, M J; van Kessel, K P; van Strijp, J A

    2000-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an amphipathic macromolecule that is highly aggregated in aqueous preparations. LPS-binding protein (LBP) catalyzes the transfer of single LPS molecules, segregated from an LPS aggregate, to high-density lipoproteins (HDL), which results in the neutralization of LPS. When fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled LPS (FITC-LPS) is used, this transfer of LPS monomers to HDL can be measured as an increase in fluorescence due to dequenching of FITC-LPS. Recently, serum amyloid P component (SAP) was shown to neutralize LPS in vitro, although only in the presence of low concentrations of LBP. In this study, we show that SAP prevented HDL-mediated dequenching of FITC-LPS, even in the presence of high concentrations of LBP. Human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), a very potent LPS-binding and -neutralizing protein, also prevented HDL-mediated dequenching of FITC-LPS. Furthermore, SAP inhibited HDL-mediated neutralization of both rough and smooth LPS in a chemiluminescence assay quantifying the LPS-induced priming of neutrophils in human blood. SAP bound both isolated HDL and HDL in serum. Using HDL-coated magnetic beads prebound with SAP, we demonstrated that HDL-bound SAP prevented the binding of LPS to HDL. We suggest that SAP, by preventing LPS binding to HDL, plays a regulatory role, balancing the amount of LPS that, via HDL, is directed to the adrenal glands.

  16. Suppression of Toll-like receptor 4 activation by caffeic acid phenethyl ester is mediated by interference of LPS binding to MD2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Young; Koo, Jung Eun; Seo, Yun Jee; Tyagi, Nisha; Jeong, Eunshil; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lim, Kyung-Min; Park, Zee-Yong; Lee, Joo Young

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in recognizing invading pathogens and endogenous danger signal to induce immune and inflammatory responses. Since dysregulation of TLRs enhances the risk of immune disorders and chronic inflammatory diseases, modulation of TLR activity by phytochemicals could be useful therapeutically. We investigated the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on TLR-mediated inflammation and the underlying regulatory mechanism. Experimental Approach Inhibitory effects of CAPE on TLR4 activation were assessed with in vivo murine skin inflammation model and in vitro production of inflammatory mediators in macrophages. In vitro binding assay, cell-based immunoprecipitation study and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis were performed to determine lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding to MD2 and to identify the direct binding site of CAPE in MD2. Key Results Topical application of CAPE attenuated dermal inflammation and oedema induced by intradermal injection of LPS (a TLR4 agonist). CAPE suppressed production of inflammatory mediators and activation of NFκB and interferon-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in macrophages stimulated with LPS. CAPE interrupted LPS binding to MD2 through formation of adduct specifically with Cys133 located in hydrophobic pocket of MD2. The inhibitory effect on LPS-induced IRF3 activation by CAPE was not observed when 293T cells were reconstituted with MD2 (C133S) mutant. Conclusions and Implications Our results show a novel mechanism for anti-inflammatory activity of CAPE to prevent TLR4 activation by interfering with interaction between ligand (LPS) and receptor complex (TLR4/MD2). These further provide beneficial information for the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:23231684

  17. Biochemical characterization of Campylobacter fetus lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, A P; O'Malley, D T; Kosunen, T U; Helander, I M

    1994-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of five strains of the human and animal pathogen Campylobacter fetus were electrophoretically and chemically characterized. Analysis with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that all the strains produced smooth-form LPS with O side chains of relatively constant chain length. Upon extraction, LPS partitioned into both the water and phenol phases of phenol-water extracts, which showed that two chemical species of LPS were present in each C. fetus strain. Constituents common to all the LPS, though differing in molar ratios, were L-rhamnose, L-fucose, D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose, L-glycero-D-manno-heptose, and D-glycero-D-manno-heptose. L-Acofriose (3-O-methyl-L-rhamnose) was present in only two of the C. fetus strains. On the basis of these differences, it was possible to distinguish between LPS from strains of different serotypes and biotypes. Furthermore, chemical analysis indicated that the phenol phase LPS had a lower level of substitution by certain neutral sugars than did water phase LPS. N-Acetylneuraminic (sialic) acid and D-galactosamine were present in all the C. fetus LPS. Constituents normally found in the core and lipid A regions of LPS, 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid, D-glucosamine, ethanolamine and its phosphorylated derivatives, and fatty acids [14:0, 16:0 14:0(3-OH), and 16:0(3-OH)] were detected. Unlike Campylobacter jejuni, in which 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose occurs as a constituent of the lipid A backbone, this amino sugar was absent from C. fetus LPS, indicating major structural differences in the lipid A's of these species. Images PMID:8063409

  18. Neutrophil adherence induced by lipopolysaccharide in vitro. Role of plasma component interaction with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Vukajlovich, S; Tobias, P S

    1992-01-01

    Endotoxemia results in neutrophil localization within a number of microcirculatory beds, reflecting in part an adhesive interaction between neutrophils and the vascular endothelial cell. In previous studies, endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of rabbits resulted in neutrophil sequestration at LPS concentrations well below those effective at increasing neutrophil adherence in vitro. We hypothesized that LPS-induced neutrophil adherence involved a plasma component. In the absence of plasma, high concentrations of LPS (10 micrograms/ml) were required to increase human neutrophil adherence to endothelial cells in vitro. With the inclusion of as little as 1% plasma or serum, however, the LPS dose-response curve was markedly shifted, resulting in increments in adherence at 10 ng/ml, and the time course of enhanced adherence was accelerated. Pretreatment studies suggested that the effect of LPS was on the neutrophil rather than the endothelial cell. Immunoprecipitation of 0111:B4 LPS paralleled the loss of functional activity, suggesting that LPS was an integral part of the active complex, rather than altering a plasma component to make it active. The incubation of plasma with LPS decreased the apparent molecular mass of LPS from 500-1,000 kD to approximately 100 kD. The disaggregated 0111:B4 LPS eluted in the range of albumin and was able to increase adherence in the absence of additional plasma. Plasma depleted of lipoproteins or heat treated retained activity, suggesting that the interaction of LPS with HDL or complement did not account for the observed findings. An LPS-binding protein isolated from rabbit serum enhanced the adherence-inducing effects of both 0111:B4 and Re595 LPS. Furthermore, the activity of rabbit serum was abolished after incubation with an antibody directed against this LPS-binding protein (LBP). An antibody directed against CD14, the putative receptor of the LPS-LBP complex, prevented the adhesive response to LPS. These data suggest

  19. Primo Vessel Stressed by Lipopolysaccharide in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Rie; Rho, Min-Suk; Hong, Ye-Ji; Ha, Yae-Eun; Kim, Ji-Young; Noh, Young-Il; Park, Do-Young; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jang, In-Ho; Kang, Suk-Yun; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2015-12-01

    For tracking the primo vascular system, we observed the primo vessels in vivo in situ using the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response in the lymphatic vessels of a rabbit. Injection of LPS (200 μg/kg) into the lymph nodes resulted in greatly stained primo vessels, which were swollen in some cases. We were able to obtain comparative images through alcian blue and diaminobenzidine staining, which clearly showed different morphologies of the primo vessels. The mechanism causing the response of the primo vessels to the injected LPS is still unclear; however, these results might be a first attempt at giving an explanation of the function of the primo vascular system and identifying the changes in the structure and function of the primo vascular system in response to an external stimulus such as an injection of LPS.

  20. [Characterization of Pantoea agglomerans lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Varbanets, L D; Brovarskaya, O S; Bulygina, T N; Garkavaya, E G; Zhitkevich, N V

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from seven Pantoea agglomerans strains isolated from various plants were purified and chemically identified. LPS of the studied P. agglomerans strains were heterogeneous in monosaccharide composition. Thus, the LPS of P. agglomerans 8606 differed considerably from the LPSs of other strains, containing mannose as the predominant monosaccharide (69.8%), as well as ribose (15.1%) and xylose (12.6%), while the content of rhamnose, one of the predominant monosaccharides in other LPS samples, was 2.5%. Analysis of the fatty acid composition revealed the presence of C12-C16 acids. In lipids A of all the studied strains, 3-OH-C14:0 was the predominant acid (31.7 to 39.1%, depending on the strain). C12:0 (8.2 to 31.5%), C14:0 (12.9 to 30.8%), and C16:0 acids (3.4 to 16.9%) were also revealed. The studied P. agglomerans strains fell into three groups according to their fatty acid composition. The differences stemmed from the presence or absence of two fatty acids, 2-OH-C14:0 and C16:1. Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion in agar revealed that all the LPS under study exhibited antigenic activity in homologous systems. The results of serological cross reactions indicated immunochemical heterogeneity of the species P. agglomerans. Comparative investigation of the complex of parameters of peripheral blood cells from a healthy donor before and after treatment with LPS solutions showed that the values of no parameters exceeded the normal range.

  1. Bacteriophage PhiX174's Ecological Niche and the Flexibility of Its Escherichia coli Lipopolysaccharide Receptor▿

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Alix; Clermont, Olivier; Denamur, Erick; Tenaillon, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    To determine bacteriophage PhiX174's ecological niche, 783 Escherichia coli isolates were screened for susceptibility. Sensitive strains are diverse regarding their phylogenies and core lipopolysaccharides (LPS), but all have rough phenotypes. Further analysis of E. coli K-12 LPS mutants revealed that PhiX174 can use a wide diversity of LPS structures to initiate its infectious process. PMID:20833781

  2. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide augments febrile-range hyperthermia-induced heat shock protein 70 expression and extracellular release in human THP1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Ramarathnam, Aparna; Hasday, Jeffrey D; Singh, Ishwar S

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, a devastating and often lethal complication of severe infection, is characterized by fever and dysregulated inflammation. While infections activate the inflammatory response in part through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), fever can partially activate the heat shock response with generation of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Since extracellular HSPs, especially HSP70 (eHSP70), are proinflammatory TLR agonists, we investigated how exposure to the TLR4 agonist, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and febrile range hyperthermia (FRH; 39.5°C) modify HSP70 expression and extracellular release. Using differentiated THP1 cells, we found that concurrent exposure to FRH and LPS as well as TLR2 and TLR3 agonists synergized to activate expression of inducible HSP72 (HSPA1A) mRNA and protein via a p38 MAP kinase-requiring mechanism. Treatment with LPS for 6 h stimulated eHSP70 release; levels of eHSP70 released at 39.5°C were higher than at 37°C roughly paralleling the increase in intracellular HSP72 in the 39.5°C cells. By contrast, 6 h exposure to FRH in the absence of LPS failed to promote eHSP70 release. Release of eHSP70 by LPS-treated THP1 cells was inhibited by glibenclamide, but not brefeldin, indicating that eHSP70 secretion occurred via a non-classical protein secretory mechanism. Analysis of eHSP70 levels in exosomes and exosome-depleted culture supernatants from LPS-treated THP1 cells using ELISA demonstrated similar eHSP70 levels in unfractionated and exosome-depleted culture supernatants, indicating that LPS-stimulated eHSP70 release did not occur via the exosome pathway. Immunoblot analysis of the exosome fraction of culture supernatants from these cells showed constitutive HSC70 (HSPA8) to be the predominant HSP70 family member present in exosomes. In summary, we have shown that LPS stimulates macrophages to secrete inducible HSP72 via a non-classical non-exosomal pathway while synergizing with FRH exposure to increase both intracellular and secreted levels

  3. Evidence for a role of the 5-HT2C receptor in central lipopolysaccharide-, interleukin-1 beta-, and leptin-induced anorexia.

    PubMed

    von Meyenburg, Claudia; Langhans, Wolfgang; Hrupka, Brian J

    2003-03-01

    We examined the role of serotonin (5-HT) and the 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors in the anorectic effects of centrally administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and leptin. Food intake was measured in rats after intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of LPS (20 ng), IL-1 beta (10 ng), or leptin (1 microg) at lights out, followed by intraperitoneal (IP) injections of either the 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetraline (8-OH-DPAT) (125 microg/kg) or the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084 (0.3 mg/kg) at the onset of anorexia. SB 242084 significantly attenuated the food intake reduction caused by all compounds (all P<.01). IP 8-OH-DPAT attenuated ICV IL-1 beta-induced anorexia (P<.01). We also tested the involvement of the median raphe 5-HT(1A) receptors in peripheral LPS- and IL-1 beta-induced anorexia. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with either LPS (100 microg/kg) or IL-1 beta (2 microg/kg) at lights out, and 8-OH-DPAT (4 nmol) was administered directly into the median raphe nucleus at the onset of anorexia. Median raphe injections of 8-OH-DPAT significantly attenuated both IL-1 beta- and LPS-induced anorexia (both P<.01). These results implicate the 5-HT(2C) receptors in the mediation of central LPS-, IL-1 beta-, and leptin-induced anorexia. Our results also suggest that the midbrain raphe nuclei play a role in mediating the anorectic response to peripheral LPS and IL-1 beta.

  4. Flow cytometric analysis of crayfish haemocytes activated by lipopolysaccharides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardenas, W.; Dankert, J.R.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria are strong stimulators of white river crayfish, Procambarus zonangulus, haemocytes in vitro. Following haemocyte treatment with LPS and with LPS from rough mutant R5 (LPS Rc) from Salmonella minnesota, flow cytometric analysis revealed a conspicuous and reproducible decrease in cell size as compared to control haemocytes. These LPS molecules also caused a reduction in haemocyte viability as assessed by flow cytometry with the fluorescent dyes calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer. The onset of cell size reduction was gradual and occurred prior to cell death. Haemocytes treated with LPS from S. minnesota without the Lipid A moiety (detoxified LPS) decreased in size without a reduction of viability. The action of LPS on crayfish haemocytes appeared to be related to the activation of the prophenoloxidase system because phenoloxidase (PO)-specific activity in the supernatants from control and detoxified LPS-treated cells was significantly lower than that from LPS and LPS-Rc treated cells (P < 0.05). Furthermore, addition of trypsin inhibitor to the LPS treatments caused noticeable delays in cell size and viability changes. These patterns of cellular activation by LPS formulations indicated that crayfish haemocytes react differently to the polysaccharide and lipid A moieties of LPS, where lipid A is cytotoxic and the polysaccharide portion is stimulatory. These effects concur with the general pattern of mammalian cell activation by LPS, thereby indicting commone innate immune recognition mechanisms to bacterial antigens between cells from mammals and invertebrates. These definitive molecular approaches used to verify and identify mechanisms of invertbrate haemocyte responses to LPS could be applied with other glycoconjugates, soluble mediators, or xenobiotic compounds.

  5. [Modulation of immune response by bacterial lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Aldapa-Vega, Gustavo; Pastelín-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a molecule that is profusely found on the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is also a potent stimulator of the immune response. As the main molecule on the bacterial surface, is also the most biologically active. The immune response of the host is activated by the recognition of LPS through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and this receptor-ligand interaction is closely linked to LPS structure. Microorganisms have evolved systems to control the expression and structure of LPS, producing structural variants that are used for modulating the host immune responses during infection. Examples of this include Helicobacter pylori, Francisella tularensis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella spp. High concentrations of LPS can cause fever, increased heart rate and lead to septic shock and death. However, at relatively low concentrations some LPS are highly active immunomodulators, which can induce non-specific resistance to invading microorganisms. The elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the recognition of LPS and its structural variants has been fundamental to understand inflammation and is currently a pivotal field of research to understand the innate immune response, inflammation, the complex host-pathogen relationship and has important implications for the rational development of new immunomodulators and adjuvants.

  6. Pasteurella multocida Heddleston Serovar 3 and 4 Strains Share a Common Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Locus but Display both Inter- and Intrastrain Lipopolysaccharide Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marina; St. Michael, Frank; John, Marietta; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Steen, Jennifer A.; van Dorsten, Lieke; Steen, Jason A.; Turni, Conny; Blackall, Patrick J.; Adler, Ben; Cox, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a Gram-negative multispecies pathogen and the causative agent of fowl cholera, a serious disease of poultry which can present in both acute and chronic forms. The major outer membrane component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is both an important virulence factor and a major immunogen. Our previous studies determined the LPS structures expressed by different P. multocida strains and revealed that a number of strains belonging to different serovars contain the same LPS biosynthesis locus but express different LPS structures due to mutations within glycosyltransferase genes. In this study, we report the full LPS structure of the serovar 4 type strain, P1662, and reveal that it shares the same LPS outer core biosynthesis locus, L3, with the serovar 3 strains P1059 and Pm70. Using directed mutagenesis, the role of each glycosyltransferase gene in LPS outer core assembly was determined. LPS structural analysis of 23 Australian field isolates that contain the L3 locus revealed that at least six different LPS outer core structures can be produced as a result of mutations within the LPS glycosyltransferase genes. Moreover, some field isolates produce multiple but related LPS glycoforms simultaneously, and three LPS outer core structures are remarkably similar to the globo series of vertebrate glycosphingolipids. Our in-depth analysis showing the genetics and full range of P. multocida lipopolysaccharide structures will facilitate the improvement of typing systems and the prediction of the protective efficacy of vaccines. PMID:23974032

  7. Pasteurella multocida Heddleston serovar 3 and 4 strains share a common lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis locus but display both inter- and intrastrain lipopolysaccharide heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marina; St Michael, Frank; John, Marietta; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Steen, Jennifer A; van Dorsten, Lieke; Steen, Jason A; Turni, Conny; Blackall, Patrick J; Adler, Ben; Cox, Andrew D; Boyce, John D

    2013-11-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a Gram-negative multispecies pathogen and the causative agent of fowl cholera, a serious disease of poultry which can present in both acute and chronic forms. The major outer membrane component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is both an important virulence factor and a major immunogen. Our previous studies determined the LPS structures expressed by different P. multocida strains and revealed that a number of strains belonging to different serovars contain the same LPS biosynthesis locus but express different LPS structures due to mutations within glycosyltransferase genes. In this study, we report the full LPS structure of the serovar 4 type strain, P1662, and reveal that it shares the same LPS outer core biosynthesis locus, L3, with the serovar 3 strains P1059 and Pm70. Using directed mutagenesis, the role of each glycosyltransferase gene in LPS outer core assembly was determined. LPS structural analysis of 23 Australian field isolates that contain the L3 locus revealed that at least six different LPS outer core structures can be produced as a result of mutations within the LPS glycosyltransferase genes. Moreover, some field isolates produce multiple but related LPS glycoforms simultaneously, and three LPS outer core structures are remarkably similar to the globo series of vertebrate glycosphingolipids. Our in-depth analysis showing the genetics and full range of P. multocida lipopolysaccharide structures will facilitate the improvement of typing systems and the prediction of the protective efficacy of vaccines.

  8. [Biological activity of Budvicia aquatica lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Brovarskaia, O S; Varbanets, L D; Pokhil, S I

    2012-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) lipids A of Budvicia aquatica strains (n = 6)--representatives of Enterobacteriaceae new species are studied for the first time. It was established that fatty acids with the length of carbon chains from C12 to C18 are presented. All of B. aquatica strains tested have been found to contain 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (23.1-43.8%, depending on the strain), which was predominat and characteristic of representatives of Enterobacteriaceae family. LPS of the tested strains displayed toxicity and pyrogeneity.

  9. α₁ adrenoceptor activation by norepinephrine inhibits LPS-induced cardiomyocyte TNF-α production via modulating ERK1/2 and NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohui; Jia, Baoyin; Wang, Faqiang; Lv, Xiuxiu; Peng, Xuemei; Wang, Yiyang; Li, Hongmei; Wang, Yanping; Lu, Daxiang; Wang, Huadong

    2014-02-01

    Cardiomyocyte tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production contributes to myocardial depression during sepsis. This study was designed to observe the effect of norepinephrine (NE) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiomyocyte TNF-α expression and to further investigate the underlying mechanisms in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and endotoxaemic mice. In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, NE inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α production in a dose-dependent manner. α₁- adrenoceptor (AR) antagonist (prazosin), but neither β₁- nor β₂-AR antagonist, abrogated the inhibitory effect of NE on LPS-stimulated TNF-α production. Furthermore, phenylephrine (PE), an α₁-AR agonist, also suppressed LPS-induced TNF-α production. NE inhibited p38 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation, but enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and c-Fos expression in LPS-treated cardiomyocytes, all of which were reversed by prazosin pre-treatment. To determine whether ERK1/2 regulates c-Fos expression, p38 phosphorylation, NF-κB activation and TNF-α production, cardiomyocytes were also treated with U0126, a selective ERK1/2 inhibitor. Treatment with U0126 reversed the effects of NE on c-Fos expression, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and TNF-α production, but not NF-κB activation in LPS-challenged cardiomyocytes. In addition, pre-treatment with SB202190, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, partly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α production in cardiomyocytes. In endotoxaemic mice, PE promoted myocardial ERK1/2 phosphorylation and c-Fos expression, inhibited p38 phosphorylation and IκBα degradation, reduced myocardial TNF-α production and prevented LPS-provoked cardiac dysfunction. Altogether, these findings indicate that activation of α₁-AR by NE suppresses LPS-induced cardiomyocyte TNF-α expression and improves cardiac dysfunction during endotoxaemia via promoting myocardial ERK phosphorylation and suppressing NF-κB activation.

  10. Retinoic acid receptor agonist Am80 inhibits CXCL2 production from microglial BV-2 cells via attenuation of NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Moeka; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Shudo, Koichi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that retinoic acid receptor agonists such as Am80 exerts anti-inflammatory actions in the central nervous system, although detailed mechanisms of the action remain largely unknown. Our previous findings suggest that Am80 provides therapeutic effect on intracerebral hemorrhage in mice via suppression of expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2). Here we investigated the mechanisms of inhibitory action of Am80 on expression of CXCL2 and other pro-inflammatory factors in microglial BV-2 cells. Pretreatment with Am80 markedly suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of CXCL2 mRNA and release of CXCL2 protein. Am80 had no effect on LPS-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. On the other hand, Am80 prevented LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 subunit of NF-κB complex. In addition, total expression levels of p65 and IκBα proteins, as well as of mRNAs encoding p65 and IκBα, were lowered by Am80. Dependence of CXCL2 expression on NF-κB was confirmed by the effect of an NF-κB inhibitor caffeic acid phenethyl ester that abolished LPS-induced CXCL2 expression. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester also abolished LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor α, which may be relevant to the inhibitory effect of Am80 on expression of these pro-inflammatory factors. We additionally found that Am80 attenuated LPS-induced up-regulation of CD14, a co-receptor for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). These results suggest that inhibitory effect on TLR4 signaling mediated by NF-κB pathway underlies the anti-inflammatory action of retinoic acid receptor agonists in microglia.

  11. Forming and immunological properties of some lipopolysaccharide-chitosan complexes.

    PubMed

    Yermak, Irina M; Davidova, Viktoria N; Gorbach, Vladimir I; Luk'yanov, Pavel A; Solov'eva, Tamara F; Ulmer, Arthur J; Buwitt-Beckmann, Ute; Rietschel, Ernst T; Ovodov, Yury S

    2006-01-01

    The complex formation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with chitosan (Ch) was demonstrated using sedimentation velocity analysis in the analytical ultracentrifuge, centrifugation in glycerol gradient and isopicnic centrifugation in cesium chloride. An addition of Ch to the Escherichia coli and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis LPS solutions was found to result in formation of the stable LPS-Ch complexes. The interaction is a complicated process and depends on time and reaction temperature, as well as on the molecular weight of chitosan. A stable LPS-Ch complex could be formed only after preliminary incubation of the initial components at an elevated temperature (37 degrees C). It should be noted that process of LPS complexation with Ch is accompanied by additional dissociating of LPS. The complex formation was shown to be a result not only of ionic binding, but also of other types of interactions. The interaction of Ch with LPS was shown to modulate significantly the biological activity of LPS. The LPS-Ch complex (1:5 w/w) was shown to possess much lower toxicity in a comparison with the parent LPS at injection to mice in the similar concentration. The LPS-Ch complex was shown to maintain an ability to induce of IL-8 and TNF, but induction of IL-8 and TNF biosynthesis by the LPS-Ch complex was lower than that by the parent LPS. The complex LPS-Ch, similarly to the parent LPS, was found stimulated the formation of the IL-8 in the dose-dependent manner in the human embryonal kidney cells (HEK 293 cells) transfected with TLR4 in combination with MD2.

  12. β-Adrenoceptor activation depresses brain inflammation and is neuroprotective in lipopolysaccharide-induced sensitization to oxygen-glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammation acting in synergy with brain ischemia aggravates perinatal ischemic brain damage. The sensitizing effect of pro-inflammatory exposure prior to hypoxia is dependent on signaling by TNF-α through TNF receptor (TNFR) 1. Adrenoceptor (AR) activation is known to modulate the immune response and synaptic transmission. The possible protective effect of α˜ and β˜AR activation against neuronal damage caused by tissue ischemia and inflammation, acting in concert, was evaluated in murine hippocampal organotypic slices treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and subsequently subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Method Hippocampal slices from mice were obtained at P6, and were grown in vitro for 9 days on nitrocellulose membranes. Slices were treated with β1(dobutamine)-, β2(terbutaline)-, α1(phenylephrine)- and α2(clonidine)-AR agonists (5 and 50 μM, respectively) during LPS (1 μg/mL, 24 h) -exposure followed by exposure to OGD (15 min) in a hypoxic chamber. Cell death in the slice CA1 region was assessed by propidium iodide staining of dead cells. Results Exposure to LPS + OGD caused extensive cell death from 4 up to 48 h after reoxygenation. Co-incubation with β1-agonist (50 μM) during LPS exposure before OGD conferred complete protection from cell death (P < 0.001) whereas the β2-agonist (50 μM) was partially protective (p < 0.01). Phenylephrine was weakly protective while no protection was attained by clonidine. Exposure to both β1- and β2-agonist during LPS exposure decreased the levels of secreted TNF-α, IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and prevented microglia activation in the slices. Dobutamine remained neuroprotective in slices exposed to pure OGD as well as in TNFR1-/- and TNFR2-/- slices exposed to LPS followed by OGD. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that activation of both β1- and β2-receptors is neuroprotective and may offer mechanistic insights valuable for development of neuro-protective strategies

  13. Activation of AMPK attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury by upregulation of PGC1α and SOD1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guizuo; Song, Yang; Feng, Wei; Liu, Lu; Zhu, Yanting; Xie, Xinming; Pan, Yilin; Ke, Rui; Li, Shaojun; Li, Fangwei; Yang, Lan; Li, Manxiang

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that an imbalance between oxidation and antioxidation is involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been shown to inhibit the occurrence of ALI/ARDS. However, it is unknown whether activation of AMPK benefits ALI/ARDS by restoration of the oxidant and antioxidant balance, and which mechanisms are responsible for this process. The present study aimed to address these issues. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced pronounced pathological changes of ALI in mice; these were accompanied by elevated production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) compared with control mice. Prior treatment of mice with the AMPK agonist metformin significantly suppressed the LPS-induced development of ALI, reduced the elevation of MDA and increased the activity of SOD. Further analysis indicated that activation of AMPK also stimulated the protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). This study suggests that activation of AMPK by metformin inhibits oxidative stress by upregulation of PGC1α and SOD1, thereby suppressing the development of ALI/ARDS, and has potential value in the clinical treatment of such conditions. PMID:27602077

  14. Lipopolysaccharides induce changes in the visceral pigmentation of Eupemphix nattereri (Anura: Leiuperidae).

    PubMed

    Franco-Belussi, Lilian; de Oliveira, Classius

    2011-10-01

    Amphibians have an extracutaneous pigmentary system composed of melanin-containing cells in various tissues and organs. The functional role of these pigment cells in visceral organs has not yet been determined, although several hypotheses have been proposed. Our aim was to describe the visceral pigmentation in the frog Eupemphix nattereri under conditions of endotoxemia induced experimentally with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Escherichia coli and to analyze the pigmentation on the organs' surface. We used 60 adult males of E. nattereri and analyzed the visceral pigmentation 2 (LPS 2h), 6 (LPS 6h), 12 (LPS 12h), 24 (LPS 24h) or 48 h (LPS 48 h) after the LPS inoculation. We observed pigmentation on the surface of several abdominal organs. The highest degree of pigmentation was found only on the testes of the animals in the LPS 2h, LPS 6h and LPS 12h groups. The pigmentation decreased in the animals of the LPS 24h and LPS 48 h groups. The LPS administration produced no changes in the pigmentation of the cardio-respiratory and digestive systems. Thus, the cells appear to have responded to LPS intoxication, producing a rapid increase of pigmentation on the surface of the testes and a subsequent decrease in the pigmentation. These changes are most likely related to the bactericidal role of melanin, which neutralizes the effects of LPS.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    PubMed

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  16. Immunoreactivity and bioactivity of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein in normal and heat-inactivated sera.

    PubMed Central

    Mészáros, K; Aberle, S; White, M; Parent, J B

    1995-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-potentiating effect of serum is due to LPS-binding protein (LBP), which facilitates the binding of LPS to CD14 receptors. We observed a remarkable heat sensitivity of recombinant LBP and various sera with respect to both immunoreactivity (measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and bioactivity (potentiation of LPS induction of tumor necrosis factor in monocytes). Human sera were more active and more heat sensitive than fetal bovine sera. The commonly practiced heat inactivation of human serum (56 degrees C, 30 min) resulted in a 70% loss of bioactivity, which caused an apparent decrease in the potency of LPS. PMID:7806380

  17. In Utero Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Alters the Postnatal Acute Phase Response in Beef Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the potential effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal acute phase response (APR) to an LPS challenge in heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were separated into prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 microgr...

  18. EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXERCISE CONDITIONING ON THERMAL RESPONSES TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE AND TURPENTINE ABSCESS IN FEMALE RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exercise conditioning has been shown to alter basal thermoregulatory processes as well as the response to inflammatory agents. Two such agents, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and turpentine (TPT) are inducers of fever in rats. LPS, given intraperitoneally (i.p.), involves a sys...

  19. Photodegradation of lipopolysaccharides and the inhibition of macrophage activation by anthraquinone-boronic acid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Miura, Takuya; Toshima, Kazunobu

    2012-08-07

    Target-selective photodegradation of 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulopyranosonic acid (KDO) was achieved without additives and under neutral conditions using a designed anthraquinone-boronic acid hybrid and long wavelength UV light irradiation. The hybrid can photodegrade lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and inhibit macrophage activation induced by LPS.

  20. Roles of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor in lipopolysaccharide-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, S N; Henricson, B E; Neta, R

    1991-01-01

    In this study, hypoglycemia induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the recombinant cytokine interleukin-1 alpha or tumor necrosis factor alpha (administered alone or in combination) was compared. LPS-induced hypoglycemia was reversed significantly by recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. PMID:1828792

  1. Lipopolysaccharide induces a fibrotic-like phenotype in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, César; Montorfano, Ignacio; Sarmiento, Daniela; Becerra, Alvaro; Nuñez-Villena, Felipe; Figueroa, Xavier F; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Simon, Felipe

    2013-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is crucial in endotoxaemia-derived sepsis syndrome pathogenesis. It is well accepted that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces endothelial dysfunction through immune system activation. However, LPS can also directly generate actions in endothelial cells (ECs) in the absence of participation by immune cells. Although interactions between LPS and ECs evoke endothelial death, a significant portion of ECs are resistant to LPS challenge. However, the mechanism that confers endothelial resistance to LPS is not known. LPS-resistant ECs exhibit a fibroblast-like morphology, suggesting that these ECs enter a fibrotic programme in response to LPS. Thus, our aim was to investigate whether LPS is able to induce endothelial fibrosis in the absence of immune cells and explore the underlying mechanism. Using primary cultures of ECs and culturing intact blood vessels, we demonstrated that LPS is a crucial factor to induce endothelial fibrosis. We demonstrated that LPS was able and sufficient to promote endothelial fibrosis, in the absence of immune cells through an activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) activity-dependent mechanism. LPS-challenged ECs showed an up-regulation of both fibroblast-specific protein expression and extracellular matrix proteins secretion, as well as a down-regulation of endothelial markers. These results demonstrate that LPS is a crucial factor in inducing endothelial fibrosis in the absence of immune cells through an ALK5-dependent mechanism. It is noteworthy that LPS-induced endothelial fibrosis perpetuates endothelial dysfunction as a maladaptive process rather than a survival mechanism for protection against LPS. These findings are useful in improving current treatment against endotoxaemia-derived sepsis syndrome and other inflammatory diseases.

  2. Phase 1 testing of detoxified LPS/group B meningococcal outer membrane protein vaccine with and without synthetic CPG 7909 adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Alan S.; Greenberg, Nancy; Billington, Melissa; Zhang, Lei; DeFilippi, Christopher; May, Ryan C.; Bajwa, Kanwaldeep K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) are a leading cause of nosocomial infection and sepsis. Increasing multi-antibiotic resistance has left clinicians with fewer therapeutic options. Antibodies to GNB lipopolysaccharide (LPS, or endotoxin) have reduced morbidity and mortality as a result of infection and are not subject to the resistance mechanisms deployed by bacteria against antibiotics. In this phase 1 study, we administered a vaccine that elicits antibodies against a highly conserved portion of LPS with and without a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) TLR9 agonist as adjuvant. Methods A vaccine composed of the detoxified LPS (dLPS) from E. coli O111:B4 (J5 mutant) non-covalently complexed to group B meningococcal outer membrane protein (OMP). Twenty healthy adult subjects received three doses at 0, 29 and 59 days of antigen (10 μg dLPS) with or without CPG 7909 (250 or 500 μg). Subjects were evaluated for local and systemic adverse effects and laboratory findings. Anti-J5 LPS IgG and IgM antibody levels were measured by electrochemiluminesence. Due to premature study termination, not all subjects received all three doses. Results All vaccine formulations were well-tolerated with no local or systemic events of greater than moderate severity. The vaccine alone group achieved a ≥4-fold “responder” response in IgG and IgM antibody in only one of 6 subjects. In contrast, the vaccine plus CPG 7909 groups appeared to have earlier and more sustained (to 180 days) responses, greater mean-fold increases, and a higher proportion of “responders” achieving ≥4-fold increases over baseline. Conclusions Although the study was halted before all enrolled subjects received all three doses, the J5dLPS/OMP vaccine, with or without CpG adjuvant, was safe and well-tolerated. The inclusion of CpG increased the number of subjects with a ≥4-fold antibody response, evident even after the second of three planned doses. A vaccine comprising J5dLPS/OMP antigen with Cp

  3. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  4. HYDROGEN-RICH MEDIUM AMELIORATES LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED BARRIER DYSFUNCTION VIA RHOA-MDIA1 SIGNALING IN CACO-2 CELLS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Wang, Lu; Sun, Ruiqiang; Chen, Hongguang; Zhang, Hongtao; Yu, Yang; Wang, Yanyan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao; Xie, Keliang

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal barrier dysfunction is associated with the severity and prognosis of sepsis. Hydrogen gas (H2) can ameliorate multiple organ damage in septic animals. Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) and mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 (mDia1) are important to regulate tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ), both of which determine the integrity of the intestinal barrier. This study was aimed to investigate whether H2 could modulate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated dysfunction of the intestinal barrier and whether RhoA-mDia1 signaling is involved. Caco-2 cells were exposed to different concentrations of LPS (1 μg/mL-1 mg/mL). The permeability of the intestinal barrier was evaluated by transepithelial resistance (TER) and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-dextran flux. Expression and distribution of occludin and E-cadherin were analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence. RhoA activity was measured by G-Lisa assay, and mDia1 expression was assessed by Western blot. LPS (100 μg/mL) decreased TER and increased fluorescein-isothiocyanate-dextran flux, which were alleviated by H2-rich medium. Also, H2 down-regulated LPS-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, H2 improved the down-regulated expression and redistribution of occludin and E-cadherin caused by LPS. Additionally, H2 alleviated LPS-caused RhoA activation, and the beneficial effects of H2 on barrier were counteracted by RhoA agonist CN03. Rho inhibitor C3 exoenzyme mitigated LPS-induced barrier breakdown. Furthermore, H2-rich medium increased mDia1 expression, and mDia1 knockdown abolished protections of H2 on barrier permeability. mDia1 knockdown eliminated H2-induced benefits for occludin and E-cadherin. These findings suggest that H2 improves LPS-induced hyperpermeability of the intestinal barrier and disruptions of TJ and AJ by moderating RhoA-mDia1 signaling.

  5. Diverse action of lipoteichoic acid and lipopolysaccharide on neuroinflammation, blood-brain barrier disruption, and anxiety in mice.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Fröhlich, Esther E; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak; Kogelnik, Nora; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Sattler, Wolfgang; Holzer, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Microbial metabolites are known to affect immune system, brain, and behavior via activation of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Unlike the effect of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the role of other TLR agonists in immune-brain communication is insufficiently understood. We therefore hypothesized that the TLR2 agonist lipoteichoic acid (LTA) causes immune activation in the periphery and brain, stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and has an adverse effect on blood-brain barrier (BBB) and emotional behavior. Since LTA preparations may be contaminated by LPS, an extract of LTA (LTAextract), purified LTA (LTApure), and pure LPS (LPSultrapure) were compared with each other in their effects on molecular and behavioral parameters 3h after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection to male C57BL/6N mice. The LTAextract (20mg/kg) induced anxiety-related behavior in the open field test, enhanced the circulating levels of particular cytokines and the cerebral expression of cytokine mRNA, and blunted the cerebral expression of tight junction protein mRNA. A dose of LPSultrapure matching the amount of endotoxin/LPS contaminating the LTAextract reproduced several of the molecular and behavioral effects of LTAextract. LTApure (20mg/kg) increased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 and interferon-γ, and enhanced the transcription of TNF-α, interleukin-1β and other cytokines in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex. These neuroinflammatory effects of LTApure were associated with transcriptional down-regulation of tight junction-associated proteins (claudin 5, occludin) in the brain. LTApure also enhanced circulating corticosterone, but failed to alter locomotor and anxiety-related behavior in the open field test. These data disclose that TLR2 agonism by LTA causes peripheral immune activation and initiates neuroinflammatory processes in the brain that are associated with down-regulation of BBB

  6. Anti-inflammatory properties of a dual PPARgamma/alpha agonist muraglitazar in in vitro and in vivo models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists are widely used drugs in the treatment of diabetes and dyslipidemia. In addition to their metabolic effects, PPAR isoforms PPARα and PPARγ are also involved in the regulation of immune responses and inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a dual PPARγ/α agonist muraglitazar on inflammatory gene expression in activated macrophages and on carrageenan-induced inflammation in the mouse. Methods J774 murine macrophages were activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and treated with dual PPARγ/α agonist muraglitazar, PPARγ agonist GW1929 or PPARα agonist fenofibrate. The effects of PPAR agonists on cytokine production and the activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) pathway were investigated by ELISA, Griess method, Western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR. Nuclear translocation, DNA-binding activity and reporter gene assays were used to assess the activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) transcription factor. Carrageenan-induced paw oedema was used as an in vivo model of acute inflammation. Results Muraglitazar as well as PPARγ agonist GW1929 and PPARα agonist fenofibrate inhibited LPS-induced iNOS expression and NO production in activated macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of iNOS expression by muraglitazar included both transcriptional and post-transcriptional components; the former being shared by GW1929 and the latter by fenofibrate. All tested PPAR agonists also inhibited IL-6 production, while TNFα production was reduced by muraglitazar and GW1929, but not by fenofibrate. Interestingly, the anti-inflammatory properties of muraglitazar were also translated in vivo. This was evidenced by the finding that muraglitazar inhibited carrageenan-induced paw inflammation in a dose-dependent manner in mice as did iNOS inhibitor L-NIL and anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone. Conclusions These results show that muraglitazar has anti

  7. Deletion of Monoglyceride Lipase in Astrocytes Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Neuroinflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Grabner, Gernot F.; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Wagner, Bernhard; Gao, Yuanqing; Farzi, Aitak; Taschler, Ulrike; Radner, Franz P. W.; Schweiger, Martina; Lass, Achim; Holzer, Peter; Zinser, Erwin; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Yi, Chun-Xia; Zimmermann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) is required for efficient hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglyerol (2-AG) in the brain generating arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol. This metabolic function makes MGL an interesting target for the treatment of neuroinflammation, since 2-AG exhibits anti-inflammatory properties and AA is a precursor for pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Astrocytes are an important source of AA and 2-AG, and highly express MGL. In the present study, we dissected the distinct contribution of MGL in astrocytes on brain 2-AG and AA metabolism by generating a mouse model with genetic deletion of MGL specifically in astrocytes (MKOGFAP). MKOGFAP mice exhibit moderately increased 2-AG and reduced AA levels in brain. Minor accumulation of 2-AG in the brain of MKOGFAP mice does not cause cannabinoid receptor desensitization as previously observed in mice globally lacking MGL. Importantly, MKOGFAP mice exhibit reduced brain prostaglandin E2 and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels upon peripheral lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. These observations indicate that MGL-mediated degradation of 2-AG in astrocytes provides AA for prostaglandin synthesis promoting LPS-induced neuroinflammation. The beneficial effect of astrocyte-specific MGL-deficiency is not fully abrogated by the inverse cannabinoid receptor 1 agonist SR141716 (Rimonabant) suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects are rather caused by reduced prostaglandin synthesis than by activation of cannabinoid receptors. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that MGL in astrocytes is an important regulator of 2-AG levels, AA availability, and neuroinflammation. PMID:26565024

  8. Mechanistic study of macrophage activation by LPS stimulation using fluorescence imaging techinques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of the outer membrane of gram negative bacteria, has been suggested that stimulates macrophages secrete a wide variety of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO). However, the cellular mechanisms of NO generation in macrophage by LPS stimulation are not well known. In this study, LPS stimulated NO generation in macrophage was determined by measuring fluorescence changes with a NO specific probe DAF-FM DA. Using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, we found an increase of protein kinase C (PKC) activation was dynamically monitored in macrophages treated with LPS. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in macrophage was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, the PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 inhibited LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation and NO production. These results indicated that LPS stimulated NF-κB mediated NO production by activating PKC.

  9. Mechanistic study of macrophage activation by LPS stimulation using fluorescence imaging techinques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of the outer membrane of gram negative bacteria, has been suggested that stimulates macrophages secrete a wide variety of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO). However, the cellular mechanisms of NO generation in macrophage by LPS stimulation are not well known. In this study, LPS stimulated NO generation in macrophage was determined by measuring fluorescence changes with a NO specific probe DAF-FM DA. Using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, we found an increase of protein kinase C (PKC) activation was dynamically monitored in macrophages treated with LPS. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in macrophage was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, the PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 inhibited LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation and NO production. These results indicated that LPS stimulated NF-κB mediated NO production by activating PKC.

  10. LPS-TLR4 Pathway Mediates Ductular Cell Expansion in Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Odena, Gemma; Chen, Jiegen; Lozano, Juan Jose; Altamirano, Jose; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Affo, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Matsushita, Hiroshi; Zou, Jian; Dumitru, Raluca; Caballeria, Juan; Gines, Pere; Arroyo, Vicente; You, Min; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Valla, Dominique; Crews, Fulton; Seki, Ekihiro; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Bataller, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is the most severe form of alcoholic liver disease for which there are no effective therapies. Patients with AH show impaired hepatocyte proliferation, expansion of inefficient ductular cells and high lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels. It is unknown whether LPS mediates ductular cell expansion. We performed transcriptome studies and identified keratin 23 (KRT23) as a new ductular cell marker. KRT23 expression correlated with mortality and LPS serum levels. LPS-TLR4 pathway role in ductular cell expansion was assessed in human and mouse progenitor cells, liver slices and liver injured TLR4 KO mice. In AH patients, ductular cell expansion correlated with portal hypertension and collagen expression. Functional studies in ductular cells showed that KRT23 regulates collagen expression. These results support a role for LPS-TLR4 pathway in promoting ductular reaction in AH. Maneuvers aimed at decreasing LPS serum levels in AH patients could have beneficial effects by preventing ductular reaction development. PMID:27752144

  11. LPS-protein aggregation influences protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Lopes, André Moreni; Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria de Carvalho; Novaes, Leticia Celia de Lencastre; Molino, João Vitor Dutra; Barbosa, Leandro Ramos Souza; Pessoa, Adalberto; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota de Oliveira

    2013-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide endotoxins (LPS) are the most common pyrogenic substances in recombinant peptides and proteins purified from Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli. In this respect, aqueous two-phase micellar systems (ATPMS) have already proven to be a good strategy to purify recombinant proteins of pharmaceutical interest and remove high LPS concentrations. In this paper, we review our recent experimental work in protein partitioning in Triton X-114 ATPMS altogether with some new results and show that LPS-protein aggregation can influence both protein and LPS partitioning. Green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) was employed as a model protein. The ATPMS technology proved to be effective for high loads of LPS removal into the micelle-rich phase (%REM(LPS) > 98 %) while GFPuv partitioned preferentially to the micelle-poor phase (K GFP(uv) < 1.00) due to the excluded-volume interactions. However, theoretically predicted protein partition coefficient values were compared with experimentally obtained ones, and good agreement was found only in the absence of LPS. Dynamic light scattering measurements showed that protein-LPS interactions were taking place and influenced the partitioning process. We believe that this phenomenon should be considered in LPS removal employing any kind of aqueous two-phase system. Nonetheless, ATPMS can still be considered as an efficient strategy for high loads of LPS removal, but being aware that the excluded-volume partitioning theory available might overestimate partition coefficient values due to the presence of protein-LPS aggregation.

  12. Neuroprotective Activity of (−)-Epigallocatechin Gallate against Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Biao; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) mediated systemic inflammation plays a critical role in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major component in green tea, on LPS-mediated inflammation and neurotoxicity. LPS treatment of macrophages induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6). However, EGCG pretreatment of macrophages significantly inhibited LPS-mediated induction of these cytokines. In addition, EGCG significantly diminished LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines in the peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMCs). Supernatant from EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures was found to be less cytotoxic to neurons than that from non-EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures. Furthermore, EGCG treatment of neurons could inhibit LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus EGCG represents a potent and useful neuroprotective agent for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders. PMID:27191001

  13. Deciphering the dual effect of lipopolysaccharides from plant pathogenic Pectobacterium.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Kettani-Halabi; Daniel, Tran; Aurélien, Dauphin; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Rafik, Errakhi; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Florence, Val; Mustapha, Ennaji Moulay; François, Bouteau

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a component of the outer cell surface of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and play an essential role for bacterial growth and survival. Lipopolysaccharides represent typical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules and have been reported to induce defense-related responses, including the expression of defense genes and the suppression of the hypersensitive response in plants. However, depending on their origin and the challenged plant, LPS were shown to have complex and different roles. In this study we showed that LPS from plant pathogens Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum induce common and different responses in A. thaliana cells when compared to those induced by LPS from non-phytopathogens Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among common responses to both types of LPS are the transcription of defense genes and their ability to limit of cell death induced by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum. However, the differential kinetics and amplitude in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation seemed to regulate defense gene transcription and be determinant to induce programmed cell death in response to LPS from the plant pathogenic Pectobacterium. These data suggest that different signaling pathways could be activated by LPS in A. thaliana cells.

  14. Adsorption of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist to Alum-Based Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Dampens Pro-T Helper 2 Activities and Enhances Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Juliana; Mirotti, Luciana; Rodriguez, Dunia; Gomes, Eliane; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum salts gels (alum) are TLR-independent adjuvants and have been used to boost antibody responses in alum-based vaccines such as diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT) triple vaccine. However, the pro-Th2 activity of alum-based vaccine formulations has not been fully appreciated. Here we found that alum-based tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine was biased toward a Th-2 profile as shown by TT-induced airway eosinophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production, and high levels of IgE anaphylactic antibodies. The adsorption into alum of prototypic TLR4 agonists such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli consistently dampened TT-induced Th2 activities without inducing IFNγ or Th1-like responses in the lung. Conversely, adsorption of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) extracted from Salmonella minnesota, which is a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β- (TRIF-) biased TLR4 agonist, was less effective in decreasing Th-2 responses. Importantly, in a situation with antigenic competition (OVA plus TT), TT-specific IgG1 or IgG2a was decreased compared with TT sensitization. Notably, LPS increased the production of IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibodies. In conclusion, the addition of LPS induces a more robust IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibody production and concomitantly decreases Th2-cellular and humoral responses, indicating a potential use of alum/TLR-based vaccines.

  15. Revisiting the Interaction between the Chaperone Skp and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Burmann, Björn M.; Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function. PMID:25809264

  16. Inflammatory Effects of Edwardsiella ictaluri Lipopolysaccharide Modifications in Catfish Gut

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Park, Jie-Yeun; Martin, Taylor; Loh, Amanda; Diaz, Ignacia; Rojas, Robert; Segovia, Cristopher; DeNardo, Dale; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are structural components of the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and also are potent inducers of inflammation in mammals. Higher vertebrates are extremely sensitive to LPS, but lower vertebrates, like fish, are resistant to their systemic toxic effects. However, the effects of LPS on the fish intestinal mucosa remain unknown. Edwardsiella ictaluri is a primitive member of the Enterobacteriaceae family that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). E. ictaluri infects and colonizes deep lymphoid tissues upon oral or immersion infection. Both gut and olfactory organs are the primary sites of invasion. At the systemic level, E. ictaluri pathogenesis is relatively well characterized, but our knowledge about E. ictaluri intestinal interaction is limited. Recently, we observed that E. ictaluri oligo-polysaccharide (O-PS) LPS mutants have differential effects on the intestinal epithelia of orally inoculated catfish. Here we evaluate the effects of E. ictaluri O-PS LPS mutants by using a novel catfish intestinal loop model and compare it to the rabbit ileal loop model inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LPS. We found evident differences in rabbit ileal loop and catfish ileal loop responses to E. ictaluri and S. Typhimurium LPS. We determined that catfish respond to E. ictaluri LPS but not to S. Typhimurium LPS. We also determined that E. ictaluri inhibits cytokine production and induces disruption of the intestinal fish epithelia in an O-PS-dependent fashion. The E. ictaluri wild type and ΔwibT LPS mutant caused intestinal tissue damage and inhibited proinflammatory cytokine synthesis, in contrast to E. ictaluri Δgne and Δugd LPS mutants. We concluded that the E. ictaluri O-PS subunits play a major role during pathogenesis, since they influence the recognition of the LPS by the intestinal mucosal immune system of the catfish. The LPS structure of E. ictaluri mutants is needed to

  17. Isolation and characterization of the lipopolysaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, M; Bhat, U R; Reuhs, B; Carlson, R W

    1990-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Bradyrhizobium japonicum 61A123 was isolated and partially characterized. Phenol-water extraction of strain 61A123 yielded LPS exclusively in the phenol phase. The water phase contained low-molecular-weight glucans and extracellular or capsular polysaccharides. The LPSs from B. japonicum 61A76, 61A135, and 61A101C were also extracted exclusively into the phenol phase. The LPSs from strain USDA 110 and its Nod- mutant HS123 were found in both the phenol and water phases. The LPS from strain 61A123 was further characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, composition analysis, and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Analysis of the LPS by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that it was present in both high- and low-molecular-weight forms (LPS I and LPS II, respectively). Composition analysis was also performed on the isolated lipid A and polysaccharide portions of the LPS, which were purified by mild acid hydrolysis and gel filtration chromatography. The major components of the polysaccharide portion were fucose, fucosamine, glucose, and mannose. The intact LPS had small amounts of 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid. Other minor components were quinovosamine, glucosamine, 4-O-methylmannose, heptose, and 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxyhexose. The lipid A portion of the LPS contained 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxyhexose as the only sugar component. The major fatty acids were beta-hydroxymyristic, lauric, and oleic acids. A long-chain fatty acid, 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid, was also present in this lipid A. Separation and analysis of LPS I and LPS II indicated that glucose, mannose, 4-O-methylmannose, and small amounts of 2,2-diamino-2,3-dideozyhexose and heptose were components of the core region of the LPS, whereas fucose, fucosmine, mannose, and small amounts of quinovosamine and glucosamine were components of the LPS O-chain region. Images FIG. 1 PMID:2318801

  18. Visualization and analysis of lipopolysaccharide distribution in binary phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Maria Florencia; Sanchez, Susana; Bakas, Laura

    2009-05-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria during infections. It have been reported that LPS may play a role in the outer membrane of bacteria similar to that of cholesterol in eukaryotic plasma membranes. In this article we compare the effect of introducing LPS or cholesterol in liposomes made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine on the solubilization process by Triton X-100. The results show that liposomes containing LPS or cholesterol are more resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 than the binary phospholipid mixtures at 4 {sup o}C. The LPS distribution was analyzed on GUVs of DPPC:DOPC using FITC-LPS. Solid and liquid-crystalline domains were visualized labeling the GUVs with LAURDAN and GP images were acquired using a two-photon microscope. The images show a selective distribution of LPS in gel domains. Our results support the hypothesis that LPS could aggregate and concentrate selectively in biological membranes providing a mechanism to bring together several components of the LPS-sensing machinery.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-induced hemolysis: Evidence for direct membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brauckmann, Stephan; Effenberger-Neidnicht, Katharina; de Groot, Herbert; Nagel, Michael; Mayer, Christian; Peters, Jürgen; Hartmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    While hemolysis in patients with sepsis is associated with increased mortality its mechanisms are unknown and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 mediated effects, complement-mediated hemolysis, or direct cell membrane effects are all conceivable mechanisms. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that toxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as non-toxic RS-LPS evokes hemolysis (1) by direct membrane effects, and (2) independent of the complement system and TLR-4 activation. We found, that incubation with LPS resulted in a marked time and concentration dependent increase of free hemoglobin concentration and LDH activity in whole blood and washed red cells. Red cell integrity was diminished as shown by decreased osmotic resistance, formation of schistocytes and rolls, and a decrease in red cell membrane stiffness. Non-toxic RS-LPS inhibited the LPS-evoked increase in TNF-α concentration demonstrating its TLR-4 antagonism, but augmented LPS-induced increase in supernatant hemoglobin concentration and membrane disturbances. Removal of plasma components in washed red cell assays failed to attenuate hemolysis. In summary, this study demonstrates direct physicochemical interactions of LPS with red cell membranes resulting in hemolysis under in vitro conditions. It might thus be hypothesized, that not all effects of LPS are mediated by TLR and may explain LPS toxicity in cells missing TLR. PMID:27759044

  20. Roles of different forms of lipopolysaccharides in Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Hui; Wang, Kuan-Chung; Hong, Yu-Hau; Chu, Tai-Hsiang; Chu, Yu-Ju; Chou, I-Chun; Lu, Der-Kang; Chen, Chiao-Yen; Yang, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Mei; Cheng, Chiu-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are critical components for the fitness of most gram-negative bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum causes a deadly wilting disease in many crops; however, the pathogenic roles of different forms of LPS and their pathways of biogenesis remain unknown. By screening for phage-resistant mutants of R. solanacearum Pss4, whose genome sequence is unavailable, mutants with various types of structural defects in LPS were isolated. Pathogenesis assays of the mutants revealed that production of rough LPS (R-LPS), which does not contain O-polysaccharides, was sufficient to cause necrosis on Nicotiana benthamiana and induce the hypersensitive response on N. tabacum. However, biosynthesis of smooth LPS (S-LPS), which contains O-polysaccharides, was required for bacterial proliferation at infection sites on N. benthamiana leaves and for proliferation and causing wilt on tomato. Complementation tests confirmed the involvement of the previously unidentified cluster RSc2201 to RSc2204 in the formation of R. solanacearum S-LPS. With these data and the availability of the annotated genomic sequence of strain GMI1000, certain loci involved in key steps of R. solanacearum LPS biosynthesis were identified. The strategy of this work could be useful for similar studies in other bacteria without available genome sequences.

  1. Innate immunity probed by lipopolysaccharides affinity strategy and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, Chiara; Colarusso, Lucia; Lanzetta, Rosa; Molinaro, Antonio; Pucci, Piero; Amoresano, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are ubiquitous and vital components of the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria that have been shown to play a relevant role in the induction of the immune-system response. In animal and plant cells, innate immune defenses toward microorganisms are triggered by the perception of pathogen associated molecular patterns. These are conserved and generally indispensable microbial structures such as LPSs that are fundamental in the Gram-negative immunity recognition. This paper reports the development of an integrated strategy based on lipopolysaccharide affinity methodology that represents a new starting point to elucidate the molecular mechanisms elicited by bacterial LPS and involved in the different steps of innate immunity response. Biotin-tagged LPS was immobilized on streptavidin column and used as a bait in an affinity capture procedure to identify protein partners from human serum specifically interacting with this effector. The complex proteins/lipopolysaccharide was isolated and the protein partners were fractionated by gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. This procedure proved to be very effective in specifically binding proteins functionally correlated with the biological role of LPS. Proteins specifically bound to LPS essentially gathered within two functional groups, regulation of the complement system (factor H, C4b, C4BP, and alpha 2 macroglobulin) and inhibition of LPS-induced inflammation (HRG and Apolipoproteins). The reported strategy might have important applications in the elucidation of biological mechanisms involved in the LPSs-mediated molecular recognition and anti-infection responses.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide modulation of a CD14-like molecule on porcine alveolar macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielian, T. L.; Ross, C. R.; McVey, D. S.; Chapes, S. K.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation antigen 14 (CD14) functions as a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) LPS-binding protein (LBP) complexes. Because LPS has varying effects on CD14 expression in vitro, we evaluated CD14 expression in response to LPS with a fully differentiated macrophage phenotype, the alveolar macrophage. By using flow microfluorometric analysis and a radioimmunoassay with an anti-human CD14 monoclonal antibody (My4) that cross-reacts with porcine CD14, we found that macrophages stimulated with LPS for 24 h exhibited a two- to fivefold increase in CD14-like antigen compared with unstimulated cells. At low concentrations of LPS, up-regulation of the CD14-like antigen was dependent on serum; at higher concentrations of LPS, serum was not required. In the absence of serum a 10-fold higher dose of LPS (10 ng/ml) was required to increase CD14-like expression. In addition, LPS-induced CD14-like up-regulation correlated with secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, regardless of serum concentration. Blockade with My4 antibody significantly inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion at 1 ng/ml of LPS. However, inhibition decreased as we increased the LPS concentration, suggesting the existence of CD14-independent pathways of macrophage activation in response to LPS. Alternatively, My4 may have a lower affinity for the porcine CD14 antigen than LPS, which may have only partially blocked the LPS-LBP binding site at high concentrations of LPS. Therefore, these data suggest that LPS activation of porcine alveolar macrophages for 24 h increased CD14-like receptor expression. The degree of CD14-like up-regulation was related to LPS concentration, however, activation did not require the presence of serum at high concentrations of LPS.

  3. The effects of Nigella sativa on sickness behavior induced by lipopolysaccharide in male Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Fatemeh; Abareshi, Azam; Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Gholamnezhad, Zahra; Saeedjalali, Mohsen; Mohebbati, Reza; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neuroimmune factors contribute on the pathogenesis of sickness behaviors. Nigella sativa (NS) has anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety and anti-depressive effects. In the present study, the effect of NS hydro-alcoholic extract on sickness behavior induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided into five groups (n=10 in each): (1) control (saline), (2) LPS (1 mg/kg, administered two hours before behavioral tests), (3-5) LPS-Nigella sativa 100 , 200 and 400 mg/kg (LPS-NS 100, LPS-NS 200 and LPS-NS 400, respectively). Open- field (OF), elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swimming test (FST) were performed. Results: In OF, LPS reduced the peripheral crossing, peripheral distance, total crossing and total distance compared to control (p<0.01- p<0.001). The central crossing, central distance and central time in LPS-NS 100, LPS-NS200 and LPS-NS 400 groups were higher than LPS (p<0.01- p<0.001). In EPM, LPS decreased the open arm entries, open arm time and closed arm entries while increased the closed time compared to control (p<0.001). Pretreatment by NS extract reversed the effects of LPS (p<0.05- p<0.001). In FST, LPS increased the immobility time while, decreased the climbing and active times compared to control (p<0.05- p<0.001). In LPS-NS 100, LPS-NS 200 and LPS-NS 400 groups the immobility time was less while, the active and climbing times were more than those of LPS (p<0.05- p<0.001). Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the hydro-alcoholic extract of NS reduced the LPS-induced sickness behaviors in rats. Further investigations are required for better understanding the responsible compound (s) and the underlying mechanism(s). PMID:27247927

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium.

  5. A central role for the mammalian target of rapamycin in LPS-induced anorexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yunshuang; Wang, Yi; Li, Dan; Song, Zhigang; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), also known as endotoxin, induces profound anorexia. However, the LPS-provoked pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and the neural mechanisms underlying the development of anorexia are not clear. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of metabolism, cell growth, and protein synthesis. This study aimed to determine whether the mTOR pathway is involved in LPS-induced anorexia. Effects of LPS on hypothalamic gene/protein expression in mice were measured by RT-PCR or western blotting analysis. To determine whether inhibition of mTOR signaling could attenuate LPS-induced anorexia, we administered an i.c.v. injection of rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, on LPS-treated male mice. In this study, we showed that LPS stimulates the mTOR signaling pathway through the enhanced phosphorylation of mTOR(Ser2448) and p70S6K(Thr389). We also showed that LPS administration increased the phosphorylation of FOXO1(Ser256), the p65 subunit of nuclear factor kappa B (P<0.05), and FOXO1/3a(Thr) (24) (/) (32) (P<0.01). Blocking the mTOR pathway significantly attenuated the LPS-induced anorexia by decreasing the phosphorylation of p70S6K(Thr389), FOXO1(Ser256), and FOXO1/3a(Thr) (24) (/) (32). These results suggest promising approaches for the prevention and treatment of LPS-induced anorexia.

  6. LPS priming potentiates and prolongs proinflammatory cytokine response to the trichothecene deoxynivalenol in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahidul; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-02-15

    Simultaneous exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) markedly amplifies induction of proinflammatory cytokine expression as well as IL-1-driven lymphocyte apoptosis by trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) in the mouse. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that LPS priming will sensitize a host to DON-induced proinflammatory cytokine induction and apoptosis. In mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg bw) ip. and treated 8 h later with DON po., the minimum DON doses for inducing IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha} serum proteins and splenic mRNAs were significantly lower than the DON doses required for vehicle-primed mice. LPS priming also decreased onset time and dramatically increased magnitude and duration of cytokine responses. LPS-primed mice maintained heightened sensitivity to DON for up to 24 h. LPS priming doses as low as 50 {mu}g/kg bw evoked sensitization. DNA fragmentation analysis and flow cytometry also revealed that mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg) for 8 h and exposed to DON (12.5 mg/kg) exhibited massive thymocyte loss by apoptosis 12 h later compared to mice exposed to DON or LPS alone. LPS priming decreased DON-induced p38 and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation was not involved in increased cytokine responses. Taken together, exposure to LPS rendered mice highly susceptible to DON induction of cytokine expression and this correlated with increased apoptosis in the thymus.

  7. T4 Phage Tail Adhesin Gp12 Counteracts LPS-Induced Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Kłopot, Anna; Soluch, Ryszard; Szkuta, Piotr; Kęska, Weronika; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Konopka, Agnieszka; Nowak, Marcin; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages that infect Gram-negative bacteria often bind to the bacterial surface by interaction of specific proteins with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Short tail fiber proteins (tail adhesin, gp12) mediate adsorption of T4-like bacteriophages to Escherichia coli, binding surface proteins or LPS. Produced as a recombinant protein, gp12 retains its ability to bind LPS. Since LPS is able to exert a major impact on the immune response in animals and in humans, we have tested LPS-binding phage protein gp12 as a potential modulator of the LPS-induced immune response. We have produced tail adhesin gp12 in a bacterial expression system and confirmed its ability to form trimers and to bind LPS in vitro by dynamic light scattering. This product had no negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation in vitro. Further, no harmful effects of this protein were observed in mice. Thus, gp12 was used in combination with LPS in a murine model, and it decreased the inflammatory response to LPS in vivo, as assessed by serum levels of cytokines IL-1 alpha and IL-6 and by histopathological analysis of spleen, liver, kidney and lungs. Thus, in future studies gp12 may be considered as a potential tool for modulating and specifically for counteracting LPS-related physiological effects in vivo. PMID:27471503

  8. Dual labeling of lipopolysaccharides for SPECT-CT imaging and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duheron, Vincent; Moreau, Mathieu; Collin, Bertrand; Sali, Wahib; Bernhard, Claire; Goze, Christine; Gautier, Thomas; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Deckert, Valérie; Brunotte, François; Lagrost, Laurent; Denat, Franck

    2014-03-21

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or endotoxins are amphipathic, pro-inflammatory components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. In the host, LPS can trigger a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. To bring insight into in vivo tissue distribution and cellular uptake of LPS, dual labeling was performed with a bimodal molecular probe designed for fluorescence and nuclear imaging. LPS were labeled with DOTA-Bodipy-NCS, and pro-inflammatory properties were controlled after each labeling step. LPS were then radiolabeled with (111)In and subsequently injected intravenously into wild-type, C57B16 mice, and their in vivo behavior was followed by single photon emission computed tomography coupled with X-ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) and fluorescence microscopy. Time course of liver uptake of radiolabeled LPS ((111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS) was visualized over a 24-h period in the whole animal by SPECT-CT. In complementary histological analyses with fluorescent microscopy, the bulk of injected (111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS was found to localize early within the liver. Serum kinetics of unlabeled and DOTA-Bodipy-labeled LPS in mouse plasma were similar as ascertained by direct quantitation of β-hydroxymyristate, and DOTA-Bodipy-LPS was found to retain the potent, pro-inflammatory property of the unlabeled molecule as assessed by serum cytokine assays. It is concluded that the dual labeling process, involving the formation of covalent bonds between a DOTA-Bodipy-NCS probe and LPS molecules is relevant for imaging and kinetic analysis of LPS biodistribution, both in vivo and ex vivo. Data of the present study come in direct and visual support of a lipopolysaccharide transport through which pro-inflammatory LPS can be transported from the periphery to the liver for detoxification. The (111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS probe arises here as a relevant tool to identify key components of LPS detoxification in vivo.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Spatial Memory and Synaptic Plasticity Impairment Is Preventable by Captopril

    PubMed Central

    Abareshi, Azam; Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Norouzi, Fatemeh; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Khazaei, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Renin-angiotensin system has a role in inflammation and also is involved in many brain functions such as learning, memory, and emotion. Neuroimmune factors have been proposed as the contributors to the pathogenesis of memory impairments. In the present study, the effect of captopril on spatial memory and synaptic plasticity impairments induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. Methods. The rats were divided and treated into control (saline), LPS (1 mg/kg), LPS-captopril (LPS-Capto; 50 mg/kg captopril before LPS), and captopril groups (50 mg/kg) before saline. Morris water maze was done. Long-term potentiation (LTP) from CA1 area of hippocampus was assessed by 100 Hz stimulation in the ipsilateral Schaffer collateral pathway. Results. In the LPS group, the spent time and traveled path to reach the platform were longer than those in the control, while, in the LPS-Capto group, they were shorter than those in the LPS group. Moreover, the slope and amplitude of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) decreased in the LPS group, as compared to the control group, whereas, in the LPS-Capto group, they increased compared to the LPS group. Conclusion. The results of the present study showed that captopril improved the LPS-induced memory and LTP impairments induced by LPS in rats. Further investigations are required in order to better understand the exact responsible mechanism(s). PMID:27830176

  10. Lipopolysaccharide-induced memory impairment in rats is preventable using 7-nitroindazole.

    PubMed

    Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Reisi, Parham; Beheshti, Farimah; Mohebbati, Reza; Mousavi, Seyed Mojtaba; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress have important roles in memory impairment. The effect of 7-nitroindazole (7NI) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced memory impairment was investigated. Rats were used, divided into four groups that were treated as follows: (1) control (saline); (2) LPS; (3) 7NI-LPS; and (4) 7NI before passive avoidance (PA). In the LPS group, the latency for entering the dark compartment was shorter than in the controls (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001); while in the 7NI-LPS group, it was longer than in the LPS group (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001). Malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) metabolite concentrations in the brain tissues of the LPS group were higher than in the controls (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05); while in the 7NI-LPS group, they were lower than in the LPS group (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively). The thiol content in the brain of the LPS group was lower than in the controls (p < 0.001); while in the 7NI-LPS group, it was higher than in the LPS group (p < 0.001). It is suggested that brain tissue oxidative damage and NO elevation have a role in the deleterious effects of LPS on memory retention that are preventable using 7NI.

  11. Analysis of cellular senescence induced by lipopolysaccharide in pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Oh; Huh, Ae Jung; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, June Myung

    2012-01-01

    In this work, it was examined the possibility of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) causing cellular senescence in lung alveolar epithelial cells. Then, it was clarified how this cellular senescence phenomenon is associated with oxidative stress effect induced by LPS and whether antioxidants could inhibit reduced cellular viability by oxidant stress effect of LPS. In cell viability using cell counting kit-8, exposure to LPS decreased cellular viability and induced growth arrest in a concentration-dependent manner. The pre-apoptotic concentration of LPS was determined by caspase activation using a Caspase-Glo 3/7 luminescence assay kit. This concentration of LPS caused morphologic characteristics shown in senescent cells and elevated senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. In addition, lysosomal content associated with senescence was increased by LPS at the pre-apoptotic concentration. However, this concentration of LPS did not shorten the telomere length. Exposure to LPS resulted in the formation of hydrogen peroxide in a concentration-dependent manner. The ability of LPS to reduce cellular viability was inhibited by the presence of glutathione. This study revealed that LPS could induce cellular senescence in lung alveloar epithelial cells, and these phenomena were closely associated with hydrogen peroxide production by LPS. Taken together, it is suggested that LPS-induced cellular senescence may play an important role in limiting the tissue repair response after sepsis.

  12. Lipopolysaccharide and histaminergic systems interact to mediate food intake in broilers.

    PubMed

    Zendehdel, M; Baghbanzadeh, A; Aghelkohan, P; Hassanpour, S

    2015-09-25

    1. The aim of the current study was to investigate the interaction of the lipopolysaccharide and histaminergic systems on appetite regulation in broilers. The effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH, histidine decarboxylase inhibitor), chlorpheniramine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist), famotidine (histamine H2 receptor antagonist) and thioperamide (histamine H3 receptor antagonist) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hypophagia in broilers were studied. 2. A total of 128 broilers were randomly allocated into 4 experiments (4 groups and 8 replications in each experiment). A cannula was surgically implanted into the lateral ventricle. In Experiment 1, broilers were ICV injected with LPS (20 ng) prior to α-FMH (250 nmol). In Experiment 2, chickens were ICV injected with LPS followed by chlorpheniramine (300 nmol). In Experiment 3, broilers were ICV injected with famotidine (82 nmol) after LPS (20 ng). In Experiment 4, ICV injection of LPS was followed by thioperamide (300 nmol). The cumulative food intake was recorded until 4 h post injection. 3. LPS decreased food intake; chlorpheniramine amplified food intake and LPS-induced hypophagia was lessened by injection of chlorpheniramine. α-FMH, famotidine and thioperamide had no effect on LPS-induced hypophagia. 4. The results suggest that there is an interaction between central LPS and the histaminergic system where LPS-induced hypophagia is presumably mediated by H1 histamine receptors in 3 h food-deprived broilers.

  13. Hypoxia augments lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine expression in periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Jian, Congxiang; Li, Chenjun; Ren, Yu; He, Yong; Li, Yunming; Feng, Xiaodan; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Yinghui

    2014-10-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Hypoxia, the mainly changes of the plateau environment, can induce severe periodontitis by animal experiments. There is, however, very little information on hypoxia and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced cytokine expression in periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. In this article, we characterized hypoxia or P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (Pg LPS) induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 expression by human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells. We found that hypoxia augmented Pg LPS induced TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression in hPDL cells. We also demonstrated that nuclear factor kappa B pathway was involved in hypoxia augmenting Pg LPS induced cytokine expression in hPDL cells. Thus, our results suggest that the hypoxic environment may enhance the immune function of hPDL cells that is induced by Pg LPS.

  14. The role of bacterial lipopolysaccharides as immune modulator in vaccine and drug development.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Jesús

    2012-09-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is the major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. LPS can cause a variety of immune- and cellular disorders that lead to lethal effects and clinical manifestations of infectious diseases. Several molecular and cellular in vitro techniques, besides synthesis of analogous molecules of the LPS active region, have provided insight in the molecular mechanisms of LPS bioactivity in cellular systems. These advances have facilitated the application of diverse LPS-based molecules in relevant areas such as vaccine technology, allergen immunotherapy, treatment of immune-related diseases/disorders, LPS-related inflammatory processes and sepsis. The purpose of this review is to examine the progress in the generation of new LPS-based molecules and their therapeutic potential.

  15. TLR4 mediates LPS-induced VEGF expression in odontoblasts.

    PubMed

    Botero, Tatiana M; Shelburne, Charles E; Holland, G Rex; Hanks, Carl T; Nör, Jacques E

    2006-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria cell walls such as Prevotella intermedia and Escherichia coli induce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in odontoblasts, but not in undifferentiated dental pulp cells. CD14 and TLR4 are responsible for LPS signaling in macrophages, but their expression levels and function in dental pulp cells are unknown. We showed here that murine odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23) express CD14 and TLR4 by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. In contrast, undifferentiated dental pulp cells (OD-21) presented low or no expression of these two receptors. MDPC-23 cells showed CD14 and TLR4 up-regulation upon exposure to LPS, as determined by real time PCR. Dominant negative murine TLR4 (DN-mTLR4) transfected MDPC-23 cells did not show upregulated VEGF expression in response to LPS stimulation. These results demonstrate that odontoblast-like cells express CD14 and TLR4, and that LPS-induced VEGF expression is mediated, at least in part, by TLR4 signaling.

  16. Bone repair: Effects of physical exercise and LPS systemic exposition.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Jonatas E; Branco, Luiz G S; Issa, João Paulo M

    2016-08-01

    Bone repair can be facilitated by grafting, biochemical and physical stimulation. Conversely, it may be delayed lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Physical exercise exerts beneficial effects on the bone, but its effect on bone repair is not known. We investigated the effect of exercise on the LPS action on bone healing through bone densitometry, quantitative histological analysis for bone formation rate and immunohistochemical markers in sedentary and exercised animals. Rats ran on the treadmill for four weeks. After training the rats were submitted to a surgical procedure (bone defect in the right tibia) and 24h after the surgery LPS was administered at a dose of 100μg/kg i.p., whereas the control rats received a saline injection (1ml/kg, i.p.). Right tibias were obtained for analysis after 10days during which rats were not submitted to physical training. Physical exercise had a positive effect on bone repair, increasing bone mineral density, bone mineral content, bone formation rate, type I collagen and osteocalcin expression. These parameters were not affected by systemic administration of LPS. Our data indicate that physical exercise has an important osteogenic effect, which is maintained during acute systemic inflammation induced by exposure to a single dose of LPS.

  17. Tyrosol exhibits negative regulatory effects on LPS response and endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Huang, Guoren; Wang, Zhenning; Zhuang, Shuang; Xu, Linli; Song, Bocui; Xiong, Ying; Guan, Shuang

    2013-12-01

    Tyrosol, a phenolic compound, was isolated from wine, olive oil and other plant-derived products. In the present study, we first investigated the negative regulatory effects of tyrosol on cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages in vitro, and the results showed that tyrosol reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion. This inspired us to further study the effects of tyrosol in vivo. Tyrosol significantly attenuated TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production in serum from mice challenged with LPS, and consistent with the results in vitro. In the murine model of endotoxemia, mice were treated with tyrosol prior to or after LPS challenge. The results showed that tyrosol significantly increased mice survival. We further investigated signal transduction ways to determine how tyrosol works. The data revealed that tyrosol shocked LPS-induced mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB) signal transduction pathways in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These observations indicated that tyrosol exerted negative regulatory effects on LPS response in vitro and in vivo through suppressing NF-κB and p38/ERK MAPK signaling pathways.

  18. Intact rough- and smooth-form lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli separated by preparative gel electrophoresis exhibit differential biologic activity in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pupo, Elder; Lindner, Buko; Brade, Helmut; Schromm, Andra B

    2013-02-01

    We established a new preparative separation procedure, based on DOC/PAGE, to isolate intact lipopolysaccharide (LPS) fractions from natural LPS preparations of Escherichia coli. Analysis of the chemical integrity of LPS fractions by MS showed that no significant chemical modifications were introduced by the procedure. Contamination with toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-reactive cell-wall components present in the natural LPS mixture was effectively removed by the procedure, as determined by the absence of reactivity of the purified fractions in a HEK293-TLR2 cell line. Biologic analysis of LPS fractions derived from E. coli O111 in human macrophages demonstrated that the rough (R), semirough (SR) and smooth (S) LPS fractions were highly active at inducing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the presence of human serum; however, on a weight basis the R-LPS and SR-LPS fractions were more active, by a factor of 10-100, than was the S-LPS fraction. Under serum-free conditions, the natural LPS mixture, as well as the R-LPS and SR-LPS fractions, showed dose-dependent activation of macrophages, although the response was attenuated by about 10- to 100-fold. In contrast, the S-LPS fraction failed to induce TNF-α. Remarkably, the dose-response of the natural LPS mixture resembled that of the R-LPS and SR-LPS fractions, supporting that short-chain (R and SR) forms of LPS dominate the innate immune response of human macrophages to LPS in vitro. Biologic activity to the S-LPS fraction under serum-free conditions could be restored by the addition of recombinant lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP). In contrast, soluble cluster of differentiation antigen 14 was not able to confer activity of the S-LPS fraction, indicating a crucial role of LBP in the recognition of S-LPS by human macrophages.

  19. CD14 mediates binding of high doses of LPS but is dispensable for TNF-α production.

    PubMed

    Borzęcka, Kinga; Płóciennikowska, Agnieszka; Björkelund, Hanna; Sobota, Andrzej; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Activation of macrophages with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) involves a sequential engagement of serum LPS-binding protein (LBP), plasma membrane CD14, and TLR4/MD-2 signaling complex. We analyzed participation of CD14 in TNF-α production stimulated with 1-1000 ng/mL of smooth or rough LPS (sLPS or rLPS) and in sLPS binding to RAW264 and J744 cells. CD14 was indispensable for TNF-α generation induced by a low concentration, 1 ng/mL, of sLPS and rLPS. At higher doses of both LPS forms (100-1000 ng/mL), TNF-α release required CD14 to much lower extent. Among the two forms of LPS, rLPS-induced TNF-α production was less CD14-dependent and could proceed in the absence of serum as an LBP source. On the other hand, the involvement of CD14 was crucial for the binding of 1000 ng/mL of sLPS judging from an inhibitory effect of the anti-CD14 antibody. The binding of sLPS was also strongly inhibited by dextran sulfate, a competitive ligand of scavenger receptors (SR). In the presence of dextran sulfate, sLPS-induced production of TNF-α was upregulated about 1.6-fold. The data indicate that CD14 together with SR participates in the binding of high doses of sLPS. However, CD14 contribution to TNF α production induced by high concentrations of sLPS and rLPS can be limited.

  20. Meningococcal lipopolysaccharides: virulence factor and potential vaccine component.

    PubMed Central

    Verheul, A F; Snippe, H; Poolman, J T

    1993-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are surface components of the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis. Today, 12 different types of meningococcal LPS (immunotypes) are known, of which 3 are prevalent in the western world. The differences between these immunotypes are in the oligosaccharide part of the LPS molecule and consist of small differences in the oligosaccharide structure, the amount and location of phosphoethanolamine groups, and the degree of O acetylation of individual monosaccharides. Although the differences between the various immunotypes are small, they have a profound influence on the immunochemical and immunological properties of these molecules. Furthermore, each individual strain synthesizes a number of different LPS molecules. The expression of the various components (protective epitopes) is influenced by growth conditions and growth phase. Meningococci can endogenously sialyate their LPS, which constitutes one of the mechanisms by which N. meningitidis can evade the response of the human host. Meningococcal LPS play a key role in the induction of septic shock and can probably enhance the invasiveness of meningococcal strains and shield protective epitopes. Therefore, incorporation of (detoxified) LPS or oligosaccharide components derived therefrom might be very beneficial for the efficacy of a vaccine against group B meningococci. An overview of the development of vaccines against group B meningococci is given, and the status and potential of meningococcal LPS-derived (synthetic) oligosaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines are discussed. PMID:8464406

  1. Human CAP18: a novel antimicrobial lipopolysaccharide-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, J W; Hirata, M; Balint, R F; Lee, J; Zhong, J; Wright, S C

    1995-01-01

    CAP18 (18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein) is a protein originally identified and purified from rabbit leukocytes on the basis of its capacity to bind and inhibit various activities of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we report the cloning of human CAP18 and characterize the anti-LPS activity of the C-terminal fragment. Oligonucleotide probes designed from the rabbit CAP18 cDNA were used to identify human CAP18 from a bone marrow cDNA library. The cDNA encodes a protein composed of a 30-amino-acid signal peptide, a 103-amino-acid N-terminal domain of unknown function, and a C-terminal domain of 37 amino acids homologous to the LPS-binding antimicrobial domain of rabbit CAP18, designated CAP18(104-140). A human CAP18-specific antiserum was generated by using CAP18 expressed as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein. Western blots (immunoblots) with this antiserum showed specific expression of human CAP18 in granulocytes. Synthetic human CAP18(104-140) and a more active truncated fragment, CAP18(104-135), were shown to (i) bind to erythrocytes coated with diverse strains of LPS, (ii) inhibit LPS-induced release of nitric oxide from macrophages, (iii) inhibit LPS-induced generation of tissue factor, and (iv) protect mice from LPS lethality. CAP18(104-140) may have therapeutic utility for conditions associated with elevated concentrations of LPS. PMID:7890387

  2. Chemical, biological, and immunochemical properties of the Chlamydia psittaci lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Brade, L; Schramek, S; Schade, U; Brade, H

    1986-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Chlamydia psittaci was extracted from yolk sac-grown elementary bodies, purified, and characterized chemically, immunochemically, and biologically. The LPS contained D-galactosamine, D-glucosamine, phosphorus, long-chain fatty acids, and 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid in the molar ratio of approximately 1:2:2:6:5. The antigenic properties of the isolated LPS were compared with those of the LPS from Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella minnesota Re by the passive hemolysis and passive hemolysis inhibition tests, absorption, hydrolysis kinetics, and Western blot analysis with rabbit polyclonal antisera against chlamydiae and with a mouse monoclonal antibody recognizing a genus-specific epitope of chlamydial LPS. Two antigenic determinants were identified, one of which was chlamydia specific and the other of which was cross-reactive with Re LPS. Both determinants were destroyed during acid hydrolysis, whereby a third antigen specificity was exposed which was indistinguishable from the lipid A antigenicity. In rabbit polyclonal antisera prepared against Formalin-killed elementary bodies or detergent-solubilized membranes, two antibody specificities were differentiated. One of these was chlamydia specific, and the other was cross-reactive with Re LPS. The LPS of C. psittaci was inactive within typical endotoxin parameters (lethal toxicity, pyrogenicity, local Shwartzman reactivity); it was, however, active in some in vitro assays, such as those testing for mouse B-cell mitogenicity and the induction of prostaglandin E2 in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Images PMID:3770953

  3. Melatonin Receptor Agonists as the “Perioceutics” Agents for Periodontal Disease through Modulation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Virulence and Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cai-Lian; He, Zhi-Yan; Liang, Jing-Ping; Song, Zhong-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Aim “Perioceutics” including antimicrobial therapy and host modulatory therapy has emerged as a vital adjunctive treatment of periodontal disease. Melatonin level was significantly reduced in patients with periodontal diseases suggesting melatonin could be applied as a potential “perioceutics” treatment of periodontal diseases. This study aims to investigate the effects of melatonin receptor agonists (melatonin and ramelteon) on Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence and Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS)-induced inflammation. Methods Effects of melatonin receptor agonists on Porphyromonas gingivalis planktonic cultures were determined by microplate dilution assays. Formation, reduction, and viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms were detected by crystal violet staining and MTT assays, respectively. Meanwhile, biofilms formation was also observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The effects on gingipains and hemolytic activities of Porphyromonas gingivalis were evaluated using chromogenic peptides and sheep erythrocytes. The mRNA expression of virulence and iron/heme utilization was assessed using RT-PCR. In addition, cell viability of melatonin receptor agonists on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was evaluated by MTT assays. After pretreatment of melatonin receptor agonists, HGFs were stimulated with Pg-LPS and then release of cytokines (IL-6 and lL-8) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Melatonin and ramelteon did exhibit antimicrobial effects against planktonic culture. Importantly, they inhibited biofilm formation, reduced the established biofilms, and decreased biofilm viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Furthermore, they at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) concentrations markedly inhibited the proteinase activities of gingipains and hemolysis in a dose-dependent manner. They at sub-MIC concentrations significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of virulence

  4. β-Glucan Reverses the Epigenetic State of LPS-Induced Immunological Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Boris; Habibi, Ehsan; Wang, Shuang-Yin; Arts, Rob J W; Davar, Robab; Megchelenbrink, Wout; Kim, Bowon; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Kox, Matthijs; Zwaag, Jelle; Matarese, Filomena; van Heeringen, Simon J; Janssen-Megens, Eva M; Sharifi, Nilofar; Wang, Cheng; Keramati, Farid; Schoonenberg, Vivien; Flicek, Paul; Clarke, Laura; Pickkers, Peter; Heath, Simon; Gut, Ivo; Netea, Mihai G; Martens, Joost H A; Logie, Colin; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G

    2016-11-17

    Innate immune memory is the phenomenon whereby innate immune cells such as monocytes or macrophages undergo functional reprogramming after exposure to microbial components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We apply an integrated epigenomic approach to characterize the molecular events involved in LPS-induced tolerance in a time-dependent manner. Mechanistically, LPS-treated monocytes fail to accumulate active histone marks at promoter and enhancers of genes in the lipid metabolism and phagocytic pathways. Transcriptional inactivity in response to a second LPS exposure in tolerized macrophages is accompanied by failure to deposit active histone marks at promoters of tolerized genes. In contrast, β-glucan partially reverses the LPS-induced tolerance in vitro. Importantly, ex vivo β-glucan treatment of monocytes from volunteers with experimental endotoxemia re-instates their capacity for cytokine production. Tolerance is reversed at the level of distal element histone modification and transcriptional reactivation of otherwise unresponsive genes. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  5. Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide loaded chitosan nanoparticle could save life by induction of specific immunoglobulin isotype.

    PubMed

    Fasihi-Ramandi, Mahdi; Ghobadi-Ghadikolaee, Hamideh; Ahmadi-Renani, Sajjad; Taheri, Ramezan Ali; Ahmadi, Kazem

    2017-02-28

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae) plays an important role in cholera disease and the induction of primary protection. In this study, we evaluate mice humoral immune response in intranasal and intraperitoneal administrated V. cholerae LPS. The results showed that the intranasal administration of LPS-chitosan nanoparticle induced the high level of antibodies compared to intraperitoneal injection of antigen without chitosan (P < .001). These results indicated that intranasal and intraperitoneal administration of LPS has been able to induce the high level of antibodies both in the sera and lavage fluid and confirmed our strategy for using intranasal administration of antigen.

  6. Heat production, respiratory quotient, and methane loss subsequent to LPS challenge in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiration calorimetry was used to measure energy utilization during an acute phase response (APR) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Eight Angus heifers (208 +/- 29.2 kg) were randomly assigned to one of two calorimeters in four 2-day periods for measurement of heat production (HP), methane (CH4), and r...

  7. ROLE OF CELL SIGNALING IN PROTECTION FROM DIESEL AND LPS INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously demonstrated in CD-1 mice that pre-administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor (SB203580) reduces acute lung injury and inflammation following pulmonary exposures to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here ...

  8. Peptide-perylene diimide functionalized magnetic nano-platforms for fluorescence turn-on detection and clearance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Mu, Jing; Wu, Xiangyang; Bhattacharjya, Surajit; Yeow, Edwin Kok Lee; Xing, Bengang

    2014-06-14

    A simple and unique strategy has been successfully designed for sensitive detection and rapid clearance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) by integration of core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 magnetic nanoparticles with a perylene-diimide (PDI) conjugated LPS-recognition peptide.

  9. Reduced Frequency of a CD14+ CD16+ Monocyte Subset with High Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression in Cord Blood Compared to Adult Blood Contributes to Lipopolysaccharide Hyporesponsiveness in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Hise, Amy G.; Ramachandra, Lakshmi; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    The human innate immune response to pathogens is not fully effective and mature until well into childhood, as exemplified by various responses to Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in newborns compared to adults. To better understand the mechanistic basis for this age-related difference in innate immunity, we compared tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production by monocytes from cord blood (CB) and adult blood (AB) in response to LAM (lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a TLR2 ligand) and LPS (lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli, a TLR4 ligand). LPS or LAM-induced TNF-α production was 5 to 18 times higher in AB than in CB monocytes, whereas interleukin-1α (IL-1α) stimulated similar levels of TNF-α in both groups, suggesting that decreased responses to LPS or LAM in CB are unlikely to be due to differences in the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. This impaired signaling was attributable, in part, to lower functional TLR4 expression, especially on CD14+ CD16+ monocytes, which are the primary cell subset for LPS-induced TNF-α production. Importantly, the frequency of CD14+ CD16+ monocytes in CB was 2.5-fold lower than in AB (P < 0.01). CB from Kenyan newborns sensitized to parasite antigens in utero had more CD14+ CD16+ monocytes (P = 0.02) and produced higher levels of TNF-α in response to LPS (P = 0.004) than CB from unsensitized Kenyan or North American newborns. Thus, a reduced CD14+ CD16+ activated/differentiated monocyte subset and a correspondingly lower level of functional TLR4 on monocytes contributes to the relatively low TNF-α response to LPS observed in immunologically naive newborns compared to the response in adults. PMID:23595503

  10. Brucella spp noncanonical LPS: structure, biosynthesis, and interaction with host immune system.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Patrícia Gomes; Macedo, Gilson Costa; Azevedo, Vasco; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2006-03-23

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens that have the ability to survive and multiply in professional and non-professional phagocytes, and cause abortion in domestic animals and undulant fever in humans. Several species are recognized within the genus Brucella and this classification is mainly based on the difference in pathogenicity and in host preference. Brucella strains may occur as either smooth or rough, expressing smooth LPS (S-LPS) or rough LPS (R-LPS) as major surface antigen. This bacterium possesses an unconventional non-endotoxic lipopolysaccharide that confers resistance to anti-microbial attacks and modulates the host immune response. The strains that are pathogenic for humans (B. abortus, B. suis, B. melitensis) carry a smooth LPS involved in the virulence of these bacteria. The LPS O-chain protects the bacteria from cellular cationic peptides, oxygen metabolites and complement-mediated lysis and it is a key molecule for Brucella survival and replication in the host. Here, we review i) Brucella LPS structure; ii) Brucella genome, iii) genes involved in LPS biosynthesis; iv) the interaction between LPS and innate immunity.

  11. Ambroxol reduces LPS toxicity mediated by induction of alkaline phosphatases in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Iwao; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Harada, Tsuyoshi; Kikuno, Akira; Hokari, Shigeru; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2004-08-01

    Alkaline phosphatases (APs) have been suggested to detoxify lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by dephosphorylation. Ambroxol, a bronchial expectorant, is known to accelerate the secretion of pulmonary surfactant particles including AP molecules as a pharmacological action. In the present study, some beneficial effects of ambroxol on LPS toxicity in the rat lung were investigated. In an experiment using the rat lung organ culture, AP activities were enhanced in a time-dependent manner by incubation with 25 microM of ambroxol in both the tissue and the medium. Western blot analysis indicated that AP activity was elevated by the treatment with ambroxol, due to the induction of surfactant proteins (SPs) and AP molecules. In the in vivo experiment, the serum LPS content was markedly increased after LPS administration to rats by intratracheal instillation of 20 mg/kg. However, when the rats were pretreated with oral ambroxol (1.0 mg/kg) at 1 h before LPS challenge, the area under the concentration--time curve (AUC) of serum LPS was significantly decreased. These results suggest that ambroxol inhibits the translocation of LPS from the lung into the circulation as well as its detoxification effect via the elevation of AP activity. Bromhexine, another expectorant, is less effective than ambroxol as an LPS detoxificant. Maintenance of high AP activity level in the lung suggests APs to have physiological significant effects against the inflammatory events induced by LPS.

  12. RAGE Plays a Role in LPS-Induced NF-κB Activation and Endothelial Hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Wu, Jie; Guo, Xiaohua; Huang, Xuliang; Huang, Qiaobing

    2017-03-30

    Endothelial functional dysregulation and barrier disruption contribute to the initiation and development of sepsis. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis. The present study aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in endothelial cells and the consequent endothelial hyperpermeability. LPS-induced upregulation of RAGE protein expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was detected by western blotting. Activation of NF-κB was revealed using western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. LPS-elicited endothelial hyperpermeability was explored by transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) assay and endothelial monolayer permeability assay. The blocking antibody specific to RAGE was used to confirm the role of RAGE in LPS-mediated NF-κB activation and endothelial barrier disruption. We found that LPS upregulated the protein expression of RAGE in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HUVECs. Moreover, LPS triggered a significant phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, as well as NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Moreover, we observed a significant increase in endothelial permeability after LPS treatment. However, the RAGE blocking antibody attenuated LPS-evoked NF-κB activation and endothelial hyperpermeability. Our results suggest that RAGE plays an important role in LPS-induced NF-κB activation and endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  13. Granzymes A and K differentially potentiate LPS-induced cytokine response

    PubMed Central

    Wensink, Annette C; Kok, Helena M; Meeldijk, Jan; Fermie, Job; Froelich, Christopher J; Hack, C Erik; Bovenschen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Granzymes are serine proteases that, upon release from cytotoxic cells, induce apoptosis in tumor cells and virally infected cells. In addition, a role of granzymes in inflammation is emerging. Recently, we have demonstrated that extracellular granzyme K (GrK) potentiates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine response from monocytes. GrK interacts with LPS, disaggregates LPS micelles, and stimulates LPS-CD14 binding and Toll-like receptor signaling. Here we show that human GrA also potentiates cytokine responses in human monocytes initiated by LPS or Gram-negative bacteria. Similar to GrK, this effect is independent of GrA catalytic activity. Unlike GrK, however, GrA does not bind to LPS, has little influence on LPS micelle disaggregation, and does not augment LPS-CD14 complex formation. We conclude that GrA and GrK differentially modulate LPS-Toll-like receptor signaling in monocytes, suggesting functional redundancy among cytotoxic lymphocyte proteases in the anti-bacterial innate immune response. PMID:28028441

  14. Effect of chocolate and Propolfenol on rabbit spermatogenesis and sperm quality following bacterial lipopolysaccharide treatment.

    PubMed

    Collodel, Giulia; Moretti, Elena; Del Vecchio, Maria Teresa; Biagi, Marco; Cardinali, Raffaella; Mazzi, Lucia; Brecchia, Gabriele; Maranesi, Margherita; Manca, Daniela; Castellini, Cesare

    2014-08-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the effects of chocolate and propolis-enriched diets on rabbit spermatogenesis, sperm motility, and ultrastructure following bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. Thirty-two New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups. The LPS-Propolfenol(®) group received propolis (500 mg/kg/day) in their diet for 15 days, while the LPS-chocolate group was fed 70% cacao chocolate (1 g/1 kg/day) for the same period. Following the diet treatments, rabbits in the LPS-Propolfenol(®) and LPS-chocolate groups, and an LPS group received a single intraperitoneal dose of 50 μg/kg LPS, and the control group received only saline. Kinematic sperm traits were evaluated with a computer assisted sperm analyzer (CASA) system, and ultrastructural characteristics were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Testicular and epididymal tissues were observed by light microscopy and TEM and multiplex real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was used to detect and quantify toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) gene expression. The values of the analyzed semen parameters of rabbits treated with LPS-Propolfenol(®) and LPS-chocolate did not show any variations compared with the control group, but they were lower in rabbits treated only with LPS. Alterations observed in the testicular tissue of LPS treated-rabbits were not detected in specimens from the LPS-chocolate and LPS-Propolfenol(®) groups, which showed normal spermatogenesis. The TLR-4 mRNA expression was similar in controls, in LPS treated, and in LPS-chocolate groups, but it was significantly (p < 0.01) decreased in LPS-Propolfenol(®) rabbits. In conclusion, a chocolate and propolis-enriched diet showed a protective effect on the spermatogenetic process of buck rabbits following LPS treatment.

  15. Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Casillo, Angela; Ziaco, Marcello; Lindner, Buko; Merino, Susana; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Tomás, Juan M.; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2017-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora (E. amylovora) is the first bacterial plant pathogen described and demonstrated to cause fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of species including a wide variety of Rosaceae. In this study, we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core structure from E. amylovora strain CFBP1430, the first one for an E. amylovora highly pathogenic strain. The chemical characterization was performed on the mutants waaL (lacking only the O-antigen LPS with a complete LPS-core), wabH and wabG (outer-LPS core mutants). The LPSs were isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, they were subjected to a mild acid hydrolysis and/or a hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by one and two dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ElectroSpray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. PMID:28273861

  16. Galangin dampens mice lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yu-Sheng; Tao, Wei; Miao, Qian-Bing; Lu, Shi-Chun; Zhu, Ya-Bing

    2014-10-01

    Galangin, an active ingredient of Alpinia galangal, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital effect in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, we determined whether galangin exerts lung protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Male BALB/c mice were randomized to receive galangin or vehicle intraperitoneal injection 3 h after LPS challenge. Samples were harvested 24 h post LPS administration. Galangin administration decreased biochemical parameters of oxidative stress and inflammation, and improved oxygenation and lung edema in a dose-dependent manner. These protective effects of galangin were associated with inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and upregulation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Galangin reduces LPS-induced ALI by inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  17. Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Casillo, Angela; Ziaco, Marcello; Lindner, Buko; Merino, Susana; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Tomás, Juan M; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2017-03-04

    Erwinia amylovora (E. amylovora) is the first bacterial plant pathogen described and demonstrated to cause fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of species including a wide variety of Rosaceae. In this study, we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core structure from E. amylovora strain CFBP1430, the first one for an E. amylovora highly pathogenic strain. The chemical characterization was performed on the mutants waaL (lacking only the O-antigen LPS with a complete LPS-core), wabH and wabG (outer-LPS core mutants). The LPSs were isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, they were subjected to a mild acid hydrolysis and/or a hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by one and two dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ElectroSpray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry.

  18. Identification and Characterization of a Glycosyltransferase Involved in Acinetobacter baumannii Lipopolysaccharide Core Biosynthesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Nicole R.; Sauberan, Shauna L.; Russo, Thomas A.; Beanan, Janet M.; Olson, Ruth; Loehfelm, Thomas W.; Cox, Andrew D.; St. Michael, Frank; Vinogradov, Evgeny V.; Campagnari, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Although Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a significant cause of nosocomial infections worldwide, there have been few investigations describing the factors important for A. baumannii persistence and pathogenesis. This paper describes the first reported identification of a glycosyltransferase, LpsB, involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis in A. baumannii. Mutational, structural, and complementation analyses indicated that LpsB is a core oligosaccharide glycosyl transferase. Using a genetic approach, lpsB was compared with the lpsB homologues of several A. baumannii strains. These analyses indicated that LpsB is highly conserved among A. baumannii isolates. Furthermore, we developed a monoclonal antibody, monoclonal antibody 13C11, which reacts to an LPS core epitope expressed by approximately one-third of the A. baumannii clinical isolates evaluated to date. Previous studies describing the heterogeneity of A. baumannii LPS were limited primarily to structural analyses; therefore, studies evaluating the correlation between these surface glycolipids and pathogenesis were warranted. Our data from an evaluation of LpsB mutant 307::TN17, which expresses a deeply truncated LPS glycoform consisting of only two 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid residues and lipid A, suggest that A. baumannii LPS is important for resistance to normal human serum and confers a competitive advantage for survival in vivo. These results have important implications for the role of LPS in A. baumannii infections. PMID:20194587

  19. Implication of antigenic conversion of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharides that involve interaction with surfactant protein D.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shin-ichi; Amano, Ken-ichi; Nishitani, Chiaki; Ariki, Shigeru; Kuroki, Yoshio; Fujii, Nobuhiro

    2012-08-01

    We propose two antigenic types of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharides (LPS): highly antigenic epitope-carrying LPS (HA-LPS) and weakly antigenic epitope-carrying LPS (WA-LPS) based on human serum reactivity. Strains carrying WA-LPS are highly prevalent in isolates from gastric cancer patients. WA-LPS exhibits more potent biological activities compared to HA-LPS, namely, upregulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and induction of enhanced epithelial cell proliferation. The results of competitive binding assays using monosaccharides and methylglycosides, as well as binding assays using glycosidase-treated LPS, suggested that β-linked N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and β-linked D-galactose residues largely contributed to the highly antigenic epitope and the weakly antigenic epitope, respectively. WA-LPS exhibited greater binding activity to surfactant protein D (SP-D) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, and this interaction was inhibited by methyl-β-D-galactoside. The biological activities of WA-LPS were markedly enhanced by the addition of SP-D. Lines of evidence suggested that removal of β-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residue, which comprises the highly antigenic epitope, results in exposure of the weakly antigenic epitope. The weakly antigenic epitope interacted preferentially with SP-D, and SP-D enhanced the biological activity of WA-LPS.

  20. Genetics of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Schnaitman, C A; Klena, J D

    1993-01-01

    From a historical perspective, the study of both the biochemistry and the genetics of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis began with the enteric bacteria. These organisms have again come to the forefront as the blocks of genes involved in LPS synthesis have been sequenced and analyzed. A number of new and unanticipated genes were found in these clusters, indicating a complexity of the biochemical pathways which was not predicted from the older studies. One of the most dramatic areas of LPS research has been the elucidation of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway. Four of the genes in this pathway have now been identified and sequenced, and three of them are located in a complex operon which also contains genes involved in DNA and phospholipid synthesis. The rfa gene cluster, which contains many of the genes for LPS core synthesis, includes at least 17 genes. One of the remarkable findings in this cluster is a group of several genes which appear to be involved in the synthesis of alternate rough core species which are modified so that they cannot be acceptors for O-specific polysaccharides. The rfb gene clusters which encode O-antigen synthesis have been sequenced from a number of serotypes and exhibit the genetic polymorphism anticipated on the basis of the chemical complexity of the O antigens. These clusters appear to have originated by the exchange of blocks of genes among ancestral organisms. Among the large number of LPS genes which have now been sequenced from these rfa and rfb clusters, there are none which encode proteins that appear to be secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane and surprisingly few which encode integral membrane proteins or proteins with extensive hydrophobic domains. These data, together with sequence comparison and complementation experiments across strain and species lines, suggest that the LPS biosynthetic enzymes may be organized into clusters on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane which are organized around a few key membrane

  1. Lipopolysaccharide induced conversion of recombinant prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Fozia; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Ladner, Carol L; Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Ametaj, Burim N; Wishart, David S

    2014-01-01

    The conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to the β-rich infectious isoform PrPSc is considered a critical and central feature in prion pathology. Although PrPSc is the critical component of the infectious agent, as proposed in the “protein-only” prion hypothesis, cellular components have been identified as important cofactors in triggering and enhancing the conversion of PrPC to proteinase K resistant PrPSc. A number of in vitro systems using various chemical and/or physical agents such as guanidine hydrochloride, urea, SDS, high temperature, and low pH, have been developed that cause PrPC conversion, their amplification, and amyloid fibril formation often under non-physiological conditions. In our ongoing efforts to look for endogenous and exogenous chemical mediators that might initiate, influence, or result in the natural conversion of PrPC to PrPSc, we discovered that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacterial membranes interacts with recombinant prion proteins and induces conversion to an isoform richer in β sheet at near physiological conditions as long as the LPS concentration remains above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). More significant was the LPS mediated conversion that was observed even at sub-molar ratios of LPS to recombinant ShPrP (90–232). PMID:24819168

  2. Activation of the adenosine A3 receptor in RAW 264.7 cells inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha release by reducing calcium-dependent activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lynn; Pingle, Sandeep C; Hallam, Daniel M; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates the immune system and promotes inflammation via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, which regulates the synthesis and release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and other inflammatory cytokines. Previous studies have shown that the nucleoside adenosine suppresses LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha release in human UB939 macrophages by activating an adenosine A(3) receptor (A(3)AR) subtype on these cells. In this study, we examined the mechanism(s) underlying A(3)AR-dependent inhibition of TNF-alpha release in a mouse (RAW 264.7) cell line. Treatment of RAW 264.7 cells with LPS (3 mug/ml) increased TNF-alpha release, which was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by adenosine analogs N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and R-phenylisopropyladenosine and reversed by selective A(3)AR blockade. The increase in TNF-alpha release was preceded by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release by IB-MECA, a selective agonist of the A(3)AR, or with BAPTA-AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, reduced LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha release. Activation of the A(3)AR or inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release also reduced LPS-stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Similar inhibition by A(3)AR was observed for LPS-stimulated inducible nitric-oxide synthase. These data support the contention that inhibition of LPS-stimulated release of inflammatory molecules, such as TNF-alpha and NO via the A(3)AR, involves suppression of intracellular Ca(2+)signaling, leading to suppression of NF-kappaB and ERK1/2 pathways.

  3. SIRT2 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Dal; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Knockout of SIRT2 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression. • Lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production is decreased in SIRT2 KO macrophage. • SIRT2 deficiency suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced ROS production in macrophage. • M1-macrophage related factors are decreased in SIRT2 deficient cells. • SIRT2 deficiency decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NFκB. - Abstract: Introduction: SIRT2 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases and associated with numerous processes such as infection, carcinogenesis, DNA damage and cell cycle regulation. However, the role of SIRT2 in inflammatory process in macrophage remains unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, we have evaluated the regulatory effects of SIRT2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages isolated from SIRT2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice or Raw264.7 macrophage cells. As inflammatory parameters, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the productions of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and M1-macrophage-related factors were evaluated. We also examined the effects of SIRT2 on activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) signaling. Results: SIRT2 deficiency inhibits LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. SIRT2-siRNA transfection also suppressed LPS-induced iNOS expression in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from SIRT2 KO mice produced lower nitric oxide and expressed lower levels of M1-macrophage related markers including iNOS and CD86 in response to LPS than WT mice. Decrease of SIRT2 reduced the LPS-induced reactive oxygen species production. Deficiency of SIRT2 resulted in inhibition of NFκB activation through reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. The phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 was significantly decreased in SIRT2-deficient macrophages after LPS stimulation. Discussion: Our data suggested that

  4. Selective pressures and lipopolysaccharide subunits as determinants of resistance of clinical isolates of gram-negative bacilli to human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Porat, R; Johns, M A; McCabe, W R

    1987-01-01

    Differences in molecular composition of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) between serum-sensitive (S) clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and serum-resistant (R) clones derived by serial passage in serum were demonstrated to determine sensitivity or resistance to killing by normal human serum (NHS). LPS from R clones had a greater proportion of higher-molecular-weight, more highly O-antigen-substituted subunits than LPS from their serum S parents. Utilization of a liposomal model with inserted LPS simulating bacterial cell walls established LPS as the site of serum bactericidal action. Liposomes containing S LPS were lysed, while liposomes containing R LPS were unaffected by NHS. R and S LPS were fractionated into higher (F1)- and lower (F2)-molecular-weight fractions. Liposomes containing R LPS or the F1 fraction of S and R LPS were not lysed by serum. Liposomes containing the F2 fraction of S or R LPS were lysed by serum analogous to that observed with liposomes containing intact S LPS. These findings establish LPS to be one site of serum bactericidal activity and demonstrate that the higher-molecular-weight, highly O-antigen-substituted LPS subunits mediate resistance to killing by NHS. Images PMID:3804440

  5. The Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) modulates the LPS induced acute phase reaction in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dänicke, Sven; Brosig, Bianca; Kersten, Susanne; Kluess, Jeannette; Kahlert, Stefan; Panther, Patricia; Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef

    2013-07-04

    The systemic effects of the Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) and of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were studied in male castrated pigs (40.4 ± 3.7 kg) infused intravenously with either DON or LPS alone (100 μg DON/kg/h, 7.5 μg/LPS/kg/h), or together (100 μg DON plus 7.5 μg/LPS/kg/h). The Control group received a saline infusion (n=6/treatment, 24h observation period). An additional DON infusion did not exacerbate the clinical signs observed in LPS-infused pigs. For example, rectal temperature climaxed after 4h (40.4 ± 0.2°C) and 5h (40.1 ± 0.3°C), in the LPS and LPS+DON group, respectively. Saline and DON alone did not induce an acute phase reaction as indicated by unaltered plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) while LPS caused a significant rise of both cytokines. TNF-alpha plasma peak concentrations were significantly higher in the LPS compared to the DON+LPS group (94.3 ± 17.2 ng/mL vs. 79.2 ± 15.7 ng/mL) while IL-6 climaxed earlier in the latter group (3h p.i. vs. 2h p.i.). From the tested clinical-chemical plasma characteristics the total bilirubin concentration and the ASAT activity were strongly elevated by the LPS infusion and additionally increased and decreased by DON, respectively. In conclusion, the LPS-induced effects were only marginally modified by DON.

  6. Maternal LPS exposure during pregnancy impairs testicular development, steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in male offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Yang, Lu-Lu; Hu, Yong-Fang; Wang, Bi-Wei; Huang, Yin-Yin; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, De-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with adverse developmental outcomes including embryonic resorption, fetal death, congenital teratogenesis and fetal growth retardation. Here, we explored the effects of maternal LPS exposure during pregnancy on testicular development, steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in male offspring. The pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (50 µg/kg) daily from gestational day (GD) 13 to GD 17. At fetal period, a significant decrease in body weight and abnormal Leydig cell aggregations were observed in males whose mothers were exposed to LPS during pregnancy. At postnatal day (PND) 26, anogenital distance (AGD), a sensitive index of altered androgen action, was markedly reduced in male pups whose mothers were exposed to LPS daily from GD13 to GD 17. At PND35, the weight of testes, prostates and seminal vesicles, and serum testosterone (T) level were significantly decreased in LPS-treated male pups. At adulthood, the number of sperm was significantly decreased in male offspring whose mothers were exposed to LPS on GD 13-17. Maternal LPS exposure during gestation obviously diminished the percent of seminiferous tubules in stages I-VI, increased the percent of seminiferous tubules in stages IX-XII, and caused massive sloughing of germ cells in seminiferous tubules in mouse testes. Moreover, maternal LPS exposure significantly reduced serum T level in male mice whose mothers were exposed to LPS challenge during pregnancy. Taken together, these results suggest that maternal LPS exposure during pregnancy disrupts T production. The decreased T synthesis might be associated with LPS-induced impairments for spermatogenesis in male offspring.

  7. Maternal LPS Exposure during Pregnancy Impairs Testicular Development, Steroidogenesis and Spermatogenesis in Male Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yong-Fang; Wang, Bi-Wei; Huang, Yin-Yin; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, De-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with adverse developmental outcomes including embryonic resorption, fetal death, congenital teratogenesis and fetal growth retardation. Here, we explored the effects of maternal LPS exposure during pregnancy on testicular development, steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in male offspring. The pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (50 µg/kg) daily from gestational day (GD) 13 to GD 17. At fetal period, a significant decrease in body weight and abnormal Leydig cell aggregations were observed in males whose mothers were exposed to LPS during pregnancy. At postnatal day (PND) 26, anogenital distance (AGD), a sensitive index of altered androgen action, was markedly reduced in male pups whose mothers were exposed to LPS daily from GD13 to GD 17. At PND35, the weight of testes, prostates and seminal vesicles, and serum testosterone (T) level were significantly decreased in LPS-treated male pups. At adulthood, the number of sperm was significantly decreased in male offspring whose mothers were exposed to LPS on GD 13–17. Maternal LPS exposure during gestation obviously diminished the percent of seminiferous tubules in stages I–VI, increased the percent of seminiferous tubules in stages IX–XII, and caused massive sloughing of germ cells in seminiferous tubules in mouse testes. Moreover, maternal LPS exposure significantly reduced serum T level in male mice whose mothers were exposed to LPS challenge during pregnancy. Taken together, these results suggest that maternal LPS exposure during pregnancy disrupts T production. The decreased T synthesis might be associated with LPS-induced impairments for spermatogenesis in male offspring. PMID:25255222

  8. Development of Immunoassays for Burkholderia pseudomallei Typical and Atypical Lipopolysaccharide Strain Typing

    PubMed Central

    Nualnoi, Teerapat; Norris, Michael H.; Tuanyok, Apichai; Brett, Paul J.; Burtnick, Mary N.; Keim, Paul S.; Settles, Erik W.; Allender, Christopher J.; AuCoin, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe infection endemic to many tropical regions. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is recognized as an important virulence factor used by B. pseudomallei. Isolates of B. pseudomallei have been shown to express one of four different types of LPS (typical LPS, atypical LPS types B and B2, and rough LPS) and in vitro studies have demonstrated that LPS types may impact disease severity. The association between LPS types and clinical manifestations, however, is still unknown, in part because an effective method for LPS type identification is not available. Thus, we developed antigen capture immunoassays capable of distinguishing between the LPS types. Mice were injected with B or B2 LPS for atypical LPS–specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) isolation; only two mAbs (3A2 and 5B4) were isolated from mice immunized with B2 LPS. Immunoblot analysis and surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that 3A2 and 5B4 are reactive with both B2 and B LPS where 3A2 was shown to possess higher affinity. Assays were then developed using capsular polysaccharide–specific mAb 4C4 for bacterial capture and 4C7 (previously shown to bind typical LPS) or 3A2 mAbs for typical or atypical LPS strain detection, respectively. The evaluations performed with 197 strains of Burkholderia and non-Burkholderia species showed that the assays are reactive to B. pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei strains and have an accuracy of 98.8% (zero false positives and two false negatives) for LPS typing. The results suggest that the assays are effective and applicable for B. pseudomallei LPS typing. PMID:27994103

  9. Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide activates the classical complement pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C S; Schultz, D R; Arnold, P I; Johnson, W

    1992-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterium capable of entering and growing in alveolar macrophages and monocytes. Complement and complement receptors are important in the uptake of L. pneumophila by human mononuclear phagocytes. The surface molecules of L. pneumophila that activate the complement system are unknown. To identify these factors, we investigated the effects of L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the classical and alternative complement pathways of normal human serum by functional hemolytic assays. Although incubation of LPS in normal human serum at 37 degrees C resulted in the activation of both pathways, complement activation proceeded primarily through the classical pathway. Activation of the classical pathway by LPS was dependent on natural antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class that were present in various quantities in sera from different normal individuals but were absent in an immunoglobulin-deficient serum obtained from an agammaglobulinemic patient. Additional studies using sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS suggested that the antibodies recognized antigenic sites in the carbohydrate portion of LPS. The ability of LPS to interact with the complement system suggests a role for LPS in the uptake of L. pneumophila by mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:1612744

  10. Lipopolysaccharide induced acute red eye and corneal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Schultz, C L; Morck, D W; McKay, S G; Olson, M E; Buret, A

    1997-01-01

    Using a new animal model, the aims of this study were to assess the role played by purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of acute red-eye reactions (ARE) and corneal ulcers. In addition, IL-1 alpha was assessed for its implications in the formation of corneal ulcers. Following corneal abrasion, eyes of rabbits underwent single or double exposures to various doses of LPS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Serratia marcescens. This protocol induced ARE symptoms, and their severity depended on the dosage, number of LPS exposures, and type of LPS used (LPS from S. marcescens showing highest virulence). Corneal ulcers were induced by delivering a high dose of Serratia LPS (100 micrograms) followed by a low dose (10 micrograms). Histopathological examination revealed that both ARE and corneal ulceration were associated with prominent neutrophil infiltration. In addition, many lymphocytes and other monocytic cells infiltrated ulcerated ocular tissue. Tear fluids obtained from ulcerated eyes contained high concentrations of a protein recognized by anti-rabbit IL-1 alpha antibodies as demonstrated by immunoblotting studies. The results indicate that LPS can induce ARE and corneal ulceration in the absence of any live bacteria. Moreover, the findings implicate the accumulation of neutrophils and IL-1 alpha-related proteins in the pathogenesis of ARE and corneal ulcers.

  11. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the hemocyte apoptosis of Eriocheir sinensis *

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai-sheng; Lyu, Sun-jian; Xu, Jie-hao; Lu, Bin-jie; Zhao, Jing; Li, Song; Li, Yi-qun; Chen, Yu-yin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the possible toxicity mechanism of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from Gram-negative bacteria in Eriocheir sinensis hemocytes. Apoptotic hemocytes and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by the LPS were monitored by the combination of flow cytometry and microscope observation. It was shown that LPS induced serious damage on the DNA and morphological changes in hemocytes, including cell shrinkage, fracture of nucleus membrane, margination, condensation and fragmentation of chromatin, and formation of apoptotic bodies indicating obvious hemocyte apoptosis. As compared with the control group, the apoptotic cell ratio increased to 30.61% and 39.01% after 1-h exposure and 57.72% and 75.01% after 2-h exposure to 1 and 10 μg/ml LPS, respectively (P<0.05). Significant outburst of ROS production was observed in LPS-treated hemocytes with approximately 176.6% of relative dichlorofluorescein mean fluorescence at 1-h exposure, followed by a drastic decline (P<0.05). These results indicated that LPS would induce oxidative stress on hemocytes from E. sinensis and cause ROS burst, DNA damage, and subsequently apoptosis. The process of ROS-mediated apoptosis might be one of the potential toxicity mechanisms of LPS on crustacean hemocytes. PMID:26642180

  12. Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Promotes Destabilization of Lung Surfactant-Like Films

    PubMed Central

    Cañadas, Olga; Keough, Kevin M.W.; Casals, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The airspaces are lined with a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)-rich film called pulmonary surfactant, which is named for its ability to maintain normal respiratory mechanics by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Inhaled airborne particles containing bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may incorporate into the surfactant monolayer. In this study, we evaluated the effect of smooth LPS (S-LPS), containing the entire core oligosaccharide region and the O-antigen, on the biophysical properties of lung surfactant-like films composed of either DPPC or DPPC/palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG)/palmitic acid (PA) (28:9:5.6, w/w/w). Our results show that low amounts of S-LPS fluidized DPPC monolayers, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and changes in the compressibility modulus. This promoted early collapse and prevented the attainment of high surface pressures. These destabilizing effects could not be relieved by repeated compression-expansion cycles. Similar effects were observed with surfactant-like films composed of DPPC/POPG/PA. On the other hand, the interaction of SP-A, a surfactant membrane-associated alveolar protein that also binds to LPS, with surfactant-like films containing S-LPS increased monolayer destabilization due to the extraction of lipid molecules from the monolayer, leading to the dissolution of monolayer material in the aqueous subphase. This suggests that SP-A may act as an LPS scavenger. PMID:21190662

  13. [Extraction and characterization of the lipopolysaccharide of Bartonella quintana

    PubMed

    Matera, G.; Liberto, M.C.; Pollio, A.; Diana, R.; Martucci, M.; Parlato, G.; Gulletta, E.; Foca', A.

    1999-01-01

    Bartonella quintana has been reported as the cause of trench fever, persistent endocarditis, bacteriaemia and has been isolated with an increasing incidence in clinical specimens from AIDS patients. One of the main pathogenic factors of gram-negative bacteria, including B. quintana, is the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, very little information is available on the features of Bartonella LPS. The aim of the present study was to extract, purify and characterise B. quintana LPS. The effect of the LPS under scrutiny was also evaluated on TNFa release by means of the "in vitro" human whole blood model of sepsis. The Oklahoma strain of B. quintana was grown on sheep blood agar, at 37 C, in a moist atmosphere containing 5% carbon dioxide. Cells were harvested and washed in sterile and apyrogenic saline solution and LPS extracted following the procedure of Westphal e Jann (1965), modified by Minnick (1994). The LPS of B. quintana showed the migration pattern of a deep rough chemotype, and the chromogenic limulus amoebocyte lysate test (LAL test) revealed strong reactivity at low concentrations (6.2 pg/ml). Samples of human whole blood stimulated by 1000 ng/ml of B. quintana LPS released 1707 378 pg/ml of TNFa.

  14. Redefining the requisite lipopolysaccharide structure in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Timothy C; Aggarwal, Parag; Mamat, Uwe; Lindner, Buko; Woodard, Ronald W

    2006-02-17

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an asymmetric lipid bilayer surrounding the cell wall, the outer membrane (OM). The OM inner leaflet is primarily composed of various glycerophospholipids, whereas the outer leaflet predominantly contains the unique amphiphilic macromolecule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS or endotoxin). The majority of all gram-negative bacteria elaborate LPS containing at least one 2-keto 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate (Kdo) molecule. The minimal LPS structure required for growth of Escherichia coli has long been recognized as two Kdo residues attached to lipid A, inextricably linking viability to toxicity. Here we report the construction and characterization of the nonconditional E. coli K-12 suppressor strain KPM22 that lacks Kdo and is viable despite predominantly elaborating the endotoxically inactive LPS precursor lipid IV(A). Our results challenge the established E. coli Kdo2-lipid A dogma, indicating that the previously observed and well-documented dependence of cell viability on the synthesis of Kdo stems from a lethal pleiotropy precipitated after the depletion of the carbohydrate, rather than an inherent need for the Kdo molecule itself as an indispensable structural component of the OM LPS layer. Inclusion of the inner membrane LPS transporter MsbA on a multicopy plasmid partially suppresses the lethal deltaKdo phenotype directly in the auxotrophic parent strain, suggesting increased rates of nonglycosylated lipid A transport can, in part, compensate for Kdo depletion. The unprecedented nature of a lipid IV(A) OM redefines the requisite LPS structure for viability in E. coli.

  15. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  16. Inhibition of Neuroinflammation in LPS-Activated Microglia by Cryptolepine

    PubMed Central

    Olajide, Olumayokun A.; Bhatia, Harsharan S.; de Oliveira, Antonio C. P.; Wright, Colin W.; Fiebich, Bernd L.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptolepine, an indoloquinoline alkaloid in Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, has anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of cryptolepine on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- induced neuroinflammation in rat microglia and its potential mechanisms. Microglial activation was induced by stimulation with LPS, and the effects of cryptolepine pretreatment on microglial activation and production of proinflammatory mediators, PGE2/COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase and nitric oxide/iNOS were investigated. We further elucidated the role of Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases in the antiinflammatory actions of cryptolepine in LPS-stimulated microglia. Our results showed that cryptolepine significantly inhibited LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), nitric oxide, and PGE2. Protein and mRNA levels of COX-2 and iNOS were also attenuated by cryptolepine. Further experiments on intracellular signalling mechanisms show that IκB-independent inhibition of NF-κB nuclear translocation contributes to the anti-neuroinflammatory actions of cryptolepine. Results also show that cryptolepine inhibited LPS-induced p38 and MAPKAPK2 phosphorylation in the microglia. Cell viability experiments revealed that cryptolepine (2.5 and 5 μM) did not produce cytotoxicity in microglia. Taken together, our results suggest that cryptolepine inhibits LPS-induced microglial inflammation by partial targeting of NF-κB signalling and attenuation of p38/MAPKAPK2. PMID:23737832

  17. Bacteriophage adhesin-coated long-period gratings for bacterial lipopolysaccharide recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Mikulic, Predrag; Bock, Wojtek J.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report an application of the optical fiber long-period gratings (LPGs) working near the dispersion turning point of higher order cladding modes for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recognition. We show that when the LPG is functionalized with the bacteriophage adhesin, it is capable of very specific LPS detection. Thus, we compare label-free binding effect for specific to the adhesin LPS-positive and non-specific LPS-negative. The resonance wavelength shift induced by the LPS-positive reaches 2.9 nm, while for LPS-negative the shift is negligible. The LPG-based sensing structure allows for monitoring of the binding phenomenon in real time and with good accuracy.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide smooth-rough phase variation in bacteria of the genus Chlamydia.

    PubMed Central

    Lukácová, M; Baumann, M; Brade, L; Mamat, U; Brade, H

    1994-01-01

    In two strains of Chlamydia psittaci and in Chlamydia trachomatis serotype L1, we have detected a so-far-unknown antigen which (i) is resistant to heat and proteolytic digestion, (ii) can be extracted with phenol-water into the water phase, (iii) gives a ladder-like banding pattern in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, (iv) is immunogenic in rabbits and mice, and (v) contains immunoreactivity of lipid A, a common and characteristic component of gram-negative lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Thus, chlamydiae contain, in addition to the known rough-type LPS, another LPS type which is phenotypically smooth (S-LPS). S-LPS was observed preferentially in chlamydiae grown in the yolk sac of embryonated eggs; it was, however, also detected by immunofluorescence in tissue culture-grown chlamydiae with a monoclonal antibody against S-LPS. Images PMID:8188348

  19. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses.

  20. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4+ T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. PMID:21631497

  1. Folic acid supplementation during pregnancy protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mei; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Chen, Xue; Dong, Xu-Ting; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Hua; Wu, Shu-Xian; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, De-Xiang

    2014-01-13

    Folic acid is a water-soluble B-complex vitamin. Increasing evidence demonstrates that physiological supply of folic acid during pregnancy prevents folic acid deficiency-related neural tube defects (NTDs). Previous studies showed that maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure caused NTDs in rodents. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of high-dose folic acid supplementation during pregnancy on LPS-induced NTDs. Pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (20 μg/kg/d) from gestational day (GD) 8 to GD12. As expected, a five-day LPS injection resulted in 19.96% of fetuses with NTDs. Interestingly, supplementation with folic acid (3mg/kg/d) during pregnancy significantly alleviated LPS-induced NTDs. Additionally, folic acid significantly attenuated LPS-induced fetal growth restriction and skeletal malformations. Additional experiment showed that folic acid attenuated LPS-induced glutathione (GSH) depletion in maternal liver and placentas. Moreover, folic acid significantly attenuated LPS-induced expression of placental MyD88. Additionally, folic acid inhibited LPS-induced c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation in placentas. Correspondingly, folic acid significantly attenuated LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in placentas, maternal serum and amniotic fluid. In conclusion, supplementation with high-dose folic acid during pregnancy protects against LPS-induced NTDs through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Is Cleared from the Circulation by Hepatocytes via the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Elena; Cirstea, Mihai; Kong, HyeJin Julia; Boyd, John H.; Wang, Yingjin; Russell, James A.; Walley, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. While decreased Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) function improves clinical outcomes in murine and human sepsis, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major Gram-negative bacteria endotoxin, is cleared from the circulation by hepatocyte Low Density Lipoprotein Receptors (LDLR)—receptors downregulated by PCSK9. We directly visualized LPS uptake and found that LPS is rapidly taken up by hepatocytes into the cell periphery. Over the course of 4 hours LPS is transported towards the cell center. We next found that clearance of injected LPS from the blood was reduced substantially in Ldlr knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice compared to wild type controls and, simultaneously, hepatic uptake of LPS was also reduced in Ldlr-/- mice. Specifically examining the role of hepatocytes, we further found that primary hepatocytes isolated from Ldlr-/- mice had greatly decreased LPS uptake. In the HepG2 immortalized human hepatocyte cell line, LDLR silencing similarly resulted in decreased LPS uptake. PCSK9 treatment reduces LDLR density on hepatocytes and, therefore, was another independent strategy to test our hypothesis. Incubation with PCSK9 reduced LPS uptake by hepatocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that hepatocytes clear LPS from the circulation via the LDLR and PCSK9 regulates LPS clearance from the circulation during sepsis by downregulation of hepatic LDLR. PMID:27171436

  3. Molecular modelling of the three-dimensional structure and conformational flexibility of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Kastowsky, M; Gutberlet, T; Bradaczek, H

    1992-01-01

    Molecular modelling techniques have been applied to calculate the three-dimensional architecture and the conformational flexibility of a complete bacterial S-form lipopolysaccharide (LPS) consisting of a hexaacyl lipid A identical to Escherichia coli lipid A, a complete Salmonella typhimurium core oligosaccharide portion, and four repeating units of the Salmonella serogroup B O-specific chain. X-ray powder diffraction experiments on dried samples of LPS were carried out to obtain information on the dimensions of the various LPS partial structures. Up to the Ra-LPS structure, the calculated model dimensions were in good agreement with experimental data and were 2.4 nm for lipid A, 2.8 nm for Re-LPS, 3.5 nm for Rd-LPS, and 4.4 nm for Ra-LPS. The maximum length of a stretched S-form LPS model bearing four repeating units was evaluated to be 9.6 nm; however, energetically favored LPS conformations showed the O-specific chain bent with respect to the Ra-LPS portion and significantly smaller dimensions (about 5.0 to 5.5 nm). According to the calculations, the Ra-LPS moiety has an approximately cylindrical shape and is conformationally well defined, in contrast to the O-specific chain, which was found to be the most flexible portion within the molecule. PMID:1624466

  4. Influence of capsaicin on fluctuation of digoxin pharmacokinetics in lipopolysaccharide-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ryuji; Higashitani, Akina; Irie, Takako; Kusukawa, Yugo; Yamamoto, Yu; Nakagawa, Machiko; Urashima, Yoko; Nagata, Makoto; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Ijiri, Yoshio; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-08-01

    In the present study, we investigated the influence of Cap on digoxin pharmacokinetics in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated rats. After the oral administration of digoxin (0.1 mg/kg), the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of digoxin increased significantly until day 3 after LPS treatment. In the LPS + Cap group, the recovery period of AUC was shortened to 3 days. On days 5 and 7, the maximum plasma concentrations decreased significantly as compared to the control group. The bioavailability of digoxin in LPS group was higher than that in the LPS + Cap group. The hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A2 content decreased significantly until day 5 after LPS administration, but it returned to the control level until 5 days in the LPS + Cap group. Hepatic CYP3A2 mRNA expression of LPS group decreased significantly until day 3, but it returned to the control level on day 3 and increased significantly until day 7 in the LPS + Cap group. The DNA-binding activity of pregnane X receptor (PXR) was increased on days 3-7 in the Cap and LPS + Cap group. Cap decreased the absorption of digoxin by inducing CYP3A2 mRNA expression via indirect activation of PXR in LPS-treated rats.

  5. Oral administration of lipopolysaccharides for the prevention of various diseases: benefit and usefulness.

    PubMed

    Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Kohchi, Chie; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2011-07-01

    It is well known that intravenous administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces severe toxicity in mammals. The maximum tolerated dose of intravenous administration of LPS in humans is reported to be only 1 to 4 ng/kg body weight. However, oral administration of a high dose of LPS caused no toxicity or systemic inflammation in other mammals, birds, or fish. Two weeks of oral administration of a high dose of LPS (2 mg/kg) did not induce toxicity in a rat experiment. Moreover, several experiments have reported that oral administration of LPS had preventative and curative properties against various diseases, including allergic, and lifestyle-related diseases. These results demonstrate that mucosal administration of LPS acts via a different regulatory mechanism in biological responses from that of parenteral administration. Mucosal administration of LPS is thought to be quite promising for prevention of diseases, but LPS is rarely used. In order to expand the usage of oral administration of LPS for preventing lifestyle and allergic diseases, it will be necessary to clarify the mechanisms that arouse immune responses after oral administration of LPS. This short review presents a recent observation of the usefulness of orally administered LPS.

  6. Preservation of renal blood flow by the antioxidant EUK-134 in LPS-treated pigs.

    PubMed

    Magder, Sheldon; Parthenis, Dimitrios G; Ghouleh, Imad Al

    2015-03-25

    Sepsis is associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, the precise role of ROS in the septic process remains unknown. We hypothesized that treatment with EUK-134 (manganese-3-methoxy N,N'-bis(salicyclidene)ethylene-diamine chloride), a compound with superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, attenuates the vascular manifestations of sepsis in vivo. Pigs were instrumented to measure cardiac output and blood flow in renal, superior mesenteric and femoral arteries, and portal vein. Animals were treated with saline (control), lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 µg·kg-1·h-1), EUK-134, or EUK-134 plus LPS. Results show that an LPS-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) as well as a trend towards lower blood pressure (BP) were both attenuated by EUK-134. Renal blood flow decreased with LPS whereas superior mesenteric, portal and femoral flows did not change. Importantly, EUK-134 decreased the LPS-induced fall in renal blood flow and this was associated with a corresponding decrease in LPS-induced protein nitrotyrosinylation in the kidney. PO2, pH, base excess and systemic vascular resistance fell with LPS and were unaltered by EUK-134. EUK-134 also had no effect on LPS-associated increase in CO. Interestingly, EUK-134 alone resulted in higher CO, BP, PAP, mean circulatory filling pressure, and portal flow than controls. Taken together, these data support a protective role for EUK-134 in the renal circulation in sepsis.

  7. Preservation of Renal Blood Flow by the Antioxidant EUK-134 in LPS-Treated Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Magder, Sheldon; Parthenis, Dimitrios G.; Al Ghouleh, Imad

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, the precise role of ROS in the septic process remains unknown. We hypothesized that treatment with EUK-134 (manganese-3-methoxy N,N'-bis(salicyclidene)ethylene-diamine chloride), a compound with superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, attenuates the vascular manifestations of sepsis in vivo. Pigs were instrumented to measure cardiac output and blood flow in renal, superior mesenteric and femoral arteries, and portal vein. Animals were treated with saline (control), lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 µg·kg−1·h−1), EUK-134, or EUK-134 plus LPS. Results show that an LPS-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) as well as a trend towards lower blood pressure (BP) were both attenuated by EUK-134. Renal blood flow decreased with LPS whereas superior mesenteric, portal and femoral flows did not change. Importantly, EUK-134 decreased the LPS-induced fall in renal blood flow and this was associated with a corresponding decrease in LPS-induced protein nitrotyrosinylation in the kidney. PO2, pH, base excess and systemic vascular resistance fell with LPS and were unaltered by EUK-134. EUK-134 also had no effect on LPS-associated increase in CO. Interestingly, EUK-134 alone resulted in higher CO, BP, PAP, mean circulatory filling pressure, and portal flow than controls. Taken together, these data support a protective role for EUK-134 in the renal circulation in sepsis. PMID:25815596

  8. Enteric glial reactivity to systemic LPS administration: Changes in GFAP and S100B protein.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Franceschi, Raphaela; Nardin, Patrícia; Machado, Clivia Valle; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Martinez-Pereira, Malcon Andrei; Zanotto, Caroline; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Zancan, Denise Maria

    2017-01-04

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is used to induce inflammation and promotes nervous system activation. Different regions of the brain present heterogeneous glial responses; thus, in order to verify whether systemic LPS-induced inflammation affects the enteric glia differently across the intestinal segments, we evaluated the expressions of two glial activity markers, GFAP and S100B protein, in different intestine segments, at 1h, 24h and 7days after acute systemic LPS administration (0.25 or 2.5mgkg(-1)) in rats. Histological inflammatory analysis indicated that the cecum was most affected when compared to the duodenum and proximal colon at the highest doses of LPS. LPS induced an increased S100B content after 24h in all three regions, which decreased at 7days after the highest dose in all regions. Moreover, at 24h, this dose of LPS increased ex-vivo S100B secretion only in the cecum. The highest dose of LPS also increased GFAP in all regions at 24h, but earlier in the cecum, where LPS-induced enteric S100B and GFAP alterations were dependent on dose, time and intestine region. No associated changes in serum S100B were observed. Our results indicate heterogeneous enteric glial responses to inflammatory insult, as observed in distinct brain areas.

  9. LPS infusion suppresses serum FGF21 levels in healthy adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Rittig, Nikolaj; Bach, Ermina; Møller, Niels; Bjerre, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Context During the inflammatory acute phase response, plasma glucose and serum triglycerides are increased in humans. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21 has plasma glucose and lipid-reducing actions, but its role in the acute inflammatory response in human is unknown. Objective To investigate circulating levels of FGF21 after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion. Design Two randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled crossover trials were used. Setting The studies were performed at a university hospital clinical research center. Patients and interventions Study 1 (LPS bolus): Eight young, healthy, lean males were investigated two times: (1) after isotonic saline injection and (2) after LPS injection (bolus of 1 ng/kg). Each study day lasted 4 h. Study 2 (continuous LPS infusion): Eight, healthy males were investigated two times: (1) during continuously isotonic saline infusion and (2) during continuous LPS infusion (0.06 ng/kg/h). Each study day lasted 4 h. Circulating FGF21 levels were quantified every second hour by an immunoassay. Results A LPS bolus resulted in a late suppression (t = 240 min) of serum FGF21 (P = 0.035). Continuous LPS infusion revealed no significant effects on FGF21 levels (P = 0.82). Conclusions Our studies show that a bolus of LPS results in decreased FGF21 levels 4 h from exposure. PMID:28069899

  10. Gram-negative trimeric porins have specific LPS binding sites that are essential for porin biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arunmanee, Wanatchaporn; Pathania, Monisha; Solovyova, Alexandra S.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ridley, Helen; Baslé, Arnaud; van den Berg, Bert; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2016-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is an unusual asymmetric bilayer with an external monolayer of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and an inner layer of phospholipids. The LPS layer is rigid and stabilized by divalent cation cross-links between phosphate groups on the core oligosaccharide regions. This means that the OM is robust and highly impermeable to toxins and antibiotics. During their biogenesis, OM proteins (OMPs), which function as transporters and receptors, must integrate into this ordered monolayer while preserving its impermeability. Here we reveal the specific interactions between the trimeric porins of Enterobacteriaceae and LPS. Isolated porins form complexes with variable numbers of LPS molecules, which are stabilized by calcium ions. In earlier studies, two high-affinity sites were predicted to contain groups of positively charged side chains. Mutation of these residues led to the loss of LPS binding and, in one site, also prevented trimerization of the porin, explaining the previously observed effect of LPS mutants on porin folding. The high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a trimeric porin–LPS complex not only helps to explain the mutagenesis results but also reveals more complex, subtle porin–LPS interactions and a bridging calcium ion. PMID:27493217

  11. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide affects human gingival fibroblast cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina

    2008-04-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that plays a key role in maintaining cell morphology and function. This study investigates the effect of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a strong inflammatory agent, on the dynamics and organization of actin, tubulin, vimentin, and vinculin proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). A time-dependent study showed a noticeable change in actin architecture after 1.5 h of incubation with LPS (1 microg/ml) with the formation of orthogonal fibers and further accumulation of actin filament at the cell periphery by 24 h. When 0.01-10 microg/ml of LPS was added to human gingival fibroblast cultures, cells acquired a round, flat shape and gradually developed cytoplasmic ruffling. Lipopolysaccharides extracted from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans periodontopathogenic bacteria promoted alterations in F-actin stress fibres of human gingival cells. Normally, human gingival cells have F-actin fibres that are organized in linear distribution throughout the cells, extending along the cell's length. LPS-treated cells exhibited changes in cytoskeletal protein organization, and F-actin was reorganized by the formation of bundles underneath and parallel to the cell membrane. We also found the reorganization of the vimentin network into vimentin bundling after 1.5 h of treatment. HGF cells exhibited diffuse and granular gamma-tubulin stain. There was no change in LPS-treated HGF. However, vinculin plaques distributed in the cell body diminished after LPS treatment. We conclude that the dynamic and structured organization of cytoskeletal filaments and actin assembly in human gingival fibroblasts is altered by LPS treatment and is accompanied by a decrease in F-actin pools.

  12. Sensitization of human aortic endothelial cells to lipopolysaccharide via regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 by bacterial fimbria-dependent invasion.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Hiromichi; Chou, Hsin-Hua; Takahashi, Yusuke; Davey, Michael; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2005-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are differentially up-regulated in response to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Epidemiological data support the idea that periodontal disease may be a risk factor for acceleration of atherosclerosis. Porphyromonas gingivalis, the etiological agent of periodontal disease, invades endothelium, has been detected in human atheromatous tissue, and accelerates atheroma formation in apolipoprotein E-/- mice with concurrent induction of TLRs in the aorta. As endothelial cells can present antigen via TLRs and play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, we examined TLR expression in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) cultured with wild-type P. gingivalis, a fimbria-deficient mutant, and purified antigens. We observed increased TLR expression in HAEC infected with wild-type P. gingivalis by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, but not with noninvasive, fimbria-deficient mutant or purified P. gingivalis antigens. Following a wild-type P. gingivalis challenge, functional TLR2 and TLR4 activation was assessed by subsequent stimulation with TLR agonists Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid (SLTA; TLR2 ligand) and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS; TLR4 ligand). Unchallenged HAEC failed to elicit monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) in response to LPS or SLTA but did so when cultured with wild-type P. gingivalis. P. gingivalis-induced TLR2 and -4 expression on HAEC functionally reacted to SLTA and E. coli LPS as measured by a further increase in MCP-1 production. Furthermore, MCP-1 expression elicited by E. coli LPS was inhibitable with TLR4-specific antibody and polymyxin B. These results indicate that invasive P. gingivalis stimulates TLR expression on the surface of endothelium and these primed cells respond to defined TLR-specific ligands.

  13. CD36 Differently Regulates Macrophage Responses to Smooth and Rough Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Biedroń, Rafał; Peruń, Angelika; Józefowski, Szczepan

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major pathogen-associated molecular pattern of Gram-negative bacterial infections, and includes smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) chemotypes. Upon activation by LPS through CD14, TLR4/MD-2 heterodimers sequentially induce two waves of intracellular signaling for macrophage activation: the MyD88-dependent pathway from the plasma membrane and, following internalization, the TRIF-dependent pathway from endosomes. We sought to better define the role of scavenger receptors CD36 and CD204/SR-A as accessory LPS receptors that can contribute to pro-inflammatory and microbicidal activation of macrophages. We have found that CD36 differently regulates activation of mouse macrophages by S-LPS versus R-LPS. The ability of CD36 to substitute for CD14 in loading R-LPS, but not S-LPS onto TLR4/MD-2 allows CD14-independent macrophage responses to R-LPS. Conversely, S-LPS, but not R-LPS effectively stimulates CD14 binding to CD36, which favors S-LPS transfer from CD14 onto TLR4/MD-2 under conditions of low CD14 occupancy with S-LPS in serum-free medium. In contrast, in the presence of serum, CD36 reduces S-LPS binding to TLR4/MD-2 and the subsequent MyD88-dependent signaling, by mediating internalization of S-LPS/CD14 complexes. Additionally, CD36 positively regulates activation of TRIF-dependent signaling by both S-LPS and R-LPS, by promoting TLR4/MD-2 endocytosis. In contrast, we have found that SR-A does not function as a S-LPS receptor. Thus, by co-operating with CD14 in both R- and S-LPS loading onto TLR4/MD-2, CD36 can enhance the sensitivity of tissue-resident macrophages in detecting infections by Gram-negative bacteria. However, in later phases, following influx of serum to the infection site, the CD36-mediated negative regulation of MyD88-dependent branch of S-LPS-induced TLR4 signaling might constitute a mechanism to prevent an excessive inflammatory response, while preserving the adjuvant effect of S-LPS for adaptive immunity. PMID

  14. Comparison of Biological and Immunological Characterization of Lipopolysaccharides From Brucella abortus RB51 and S19

    PubMed Central

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Kaboudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Alamian, Saeed; Ahmadian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brucella abortus RB51 is a rough stable mutant strain, which has been widely used as a live vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in cattle instead of B. abortus strain S19. B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has unique properties in comparison to other bacterial LPS. Objectives: In the current study, two types of LPS, smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) were purified from B. abortus S19 and RB51, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate biological and immunological properties of purified LPS as an immunogenical determinant. Materials and Methods: Primarily, S19 and RB51 LPS were extracted and purified by two different modifications of the phenol water method. The final purity of LPS was determined by chemical analysis (2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO), glycan, phosphate and protein content) and different staining methods, following sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times at biweekly intervals with the same amount of purified LPSs. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring specific IgG levels and also different cytokine levels, such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10, were determined for assessing T-cell immune response. Results: Biochemical analysis data and SDS-PAGE profile showed that the chemical nature of S19 LPS is different from RB51 LPS. Both S and R-LPS induce an immune response. T-cell immune response induced by both S and R-LPS had almost the same pattern whereas S19 LPS elicited humoral immunity, which was higher than RB51 LPS. Conclusions: Purified LPS can be considered as a safe adjuvant and can be used as a component in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines targeting infectious disease, cancer and allergies. PMID:26862376

  15. Usefulness of ELISA Methods for Assessing LPS Interactions with Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sernández, Victoria; Orbegozo-Medina, Ricardo A.; Romarís, Fernanda; Paniagua, Esperanza; Ubeira, Florencio M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, can trigger severe inflammatory responses during bacterial infections, possibly leading to septic shock. One approach to combatting endotoxic shock is to neutralize the most conserved part and major mediator of LPS activity (lipid A) with LPS-binding proteins or peptides. Although several available assays evaluate the biological activity of these molecules on LPS (e.g. inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-α production in macrophages), the development of simple and cost-effective methods that would enable preliminary screening of large numbers of potential candidate molecules is of great interest. Moreover, it would be also desirable that such methods could provide information about the possible biological relevance of the interactions between proteins and LPS, which may enhance or neutralize LPS-induced inflammatory responses. In this study, we designed and evaluated different types of ELISA that could be used to study possible interactions between LPS and any protein or peptide. We also analysed the usefulness and limitations of the different ELISAs. Specifically, we tested the capacity of several proteins and peptides to bind FITC-labeled LPSs from Escherichia coli serotypes O111:B4 and O55:B5 in an indirect ELISA and in two competitive ELISAs including casein hydrolysate (hCAS) and biotinylated polymyxin B (captured by deglycosylated avidin; PMX) as LPS-binding agents in the solid phase. We also examined the influence of pH, detergents and different blocking agents on LPS binding. Our results showed that the competitive hCAS-ELISA performed under mildly acidic conditions can be used as a general method for studying LPS interactions, while the more restrictive PMX-ELISA may help to identify proteins/peptides that are likely to have neutralizing properties in vitro or in vivo. PMID:27249227

  16. Fimbriae and lipopolysaccharides are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Furukawa, Soichi; Usui, Yumi; Ishiba, Madoka; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Cells of Lactobacilli co-aggregated with Escherichia coli K-12 cells to form co-aggregates under mixed-culture conditions at 37 °C for 24 h. Co-aggregation was inhibited by sodium dodecyl sulfate but not by protease. E. coli deletion mutants of fimbriae formation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation did not co-aggregate with Lactobacilli. These results showed that fimbriae and LPS are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and E. coli.

  17. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Agonists with Preference for Human over Mouse TLR4 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Heeke, Darren S.; Rao, Eileen; Maynard, Sean K.; Hornigold, David; McCrae, Christopher; Fraser, Neil; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yu, Li; Williams, Nicola; King, Sarah; Cooper, Martin E.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Woo, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    The best-characterized Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands are lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its chemically modified and detoxified variant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Although both molecules are active for human TLR4, they demonstrate a potency preference for mouse TLR4 based on data from transfected cell lines and primary cells of both species. After a high throughput screening process of small molecule libraries, we have discovered a new class of TLR4 agonist with a species preference profile differing from MPL. Products of the 4-component Ugi synthesis reaction were demonstrated to potently trigger human TLR4-transfected HEK cells but not mouse TLR4, although inclusion of the human MD2 with mTLR4 was able to partially recover activity. Co-expression of CD14 was not required for optimal activity of Ugi compounds on transfected cells, as it is for LPS. The species preference profile for the panel of Ugi compounds was found to be strongly active for human and cynomolgus monkey primary cells, with reduced but still substantial activity for most Ugi compounds on guinea pig cells. Mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret, and cotton rat cells displayed little or no activity when exposed to Ugi compounds. However, engineering the human versions of TLR4 and MD2 to be expressed in mTLR4/MD2 deficient mice allowed for robust activity by Ugi compounds both in vitro and in vivo. These findings extend the range of compounds available for development as agonists of TLR4 and identify novel molecules which reverse the TLR4 triggering preference of MPL for mouse TLR4 over human TLR4. Such compounds may be amenable to formulation as more potent human-specific TLR4L-based adjuvants than typical MPL-based adjuvants. PMID:27736941

  18. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Agonists with Preference for Human over Mouse TLR4 Activation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jason D; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Maynard, Sean K; Hornigold, David; McCrae, Christopher; Fraser, Neil; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yu, Li; Williams, Nicola; King, Sarah; Cooper, Martin E; Hajjar, Adeline M; Woo, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    The best-characterized Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands are lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its chemically modified and detoxified variant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Although both molecules are active for human TLR4, they demonstrate a potency preference for mouse TLR4 based on data from transfected cell lines and primary cells of both species. After a high throughput screening process of small molecule libraries, we have discovered a new class of TLR4 agonist with a species preference profile differing from MPL. Products of the 4-component Ugi synthesis reaction were demonstrated to potently trigger human TLR4-transfected HEK cells but not mouse TLR4, although inclusion of the human MD2 with mTLR4 was able to partially recover activity. Co-expression of CD14 was not required for optimal activity of Ugi compounds on transfected cells, as it is for LPS. The species preference profile for the panel of Ugi compounds was found to be strongly active for human and cynomolgus monkey primary cells, with reduced but still substantial activity for most Ugi compounds on guinea pig cells. Mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret, and cotton rat cells displayed little or no activity when exposed to Ugi compounds. However, engineering the human versions of TLR4 and MD2 to be expressed in mTLR4/MD2 deficient mice allowed for robust activity by Ugi compounds both in vitro and in vivo. These findings extend the range of compounds available for development as agonists of TLR4 and identify novel molecules which reverse the TLR4 triggering preference of MPL for mouse TLR4 over human TLR4. Such compounds may be amenable to formulation as more potent human-specific TLR4L-based adjuvants than typical MPL-based adjuvants.

  19. Intrathecal injection of adenosine 2A receptor agonists reversed neuropathic allodynia through protein kinase (PK)A/PKC signaling.

    PubMed

    Loram, Lisa C; Taylor, Frederick R; Strand, Keith A; Harrison, Jacqueline A; Rzasalynn, Rachael; Sholar, Paige; Rieger, Jayson; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2013-10-01

    A single intrathecal dose of adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR) agonist was previously reported to produce a multi-week reversal of allodynia in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain. We aimed to determine if this long-term reversal was induced by A2AR agonism versus more generalized across adenosine receptor subtypes, and begin to explore the intracellular signaling cascades involved. In addition, we sought to identify whether the enduring effect could be extended to other models of neuropathic pain. We tested an A1R and A2BR agonist in CCI and found the same long duration effect with A2BR but not A1R agonism. An A2AR agonist (ATL313) produced a significant long-duration reversal of mechanical allodynia induced by long established CCI (administered 6 weeks after surgery), spinal nerve ligation and sciatic inflammatory neuropathy. To determine if ATL313 had a direct effect on glia, ATL313 was coadministered with lipopolysaccharide to neonatal microglia and astrocytes in vitro. ATL313 significantly attenuated TNFα production in both microglia and astrocytes but had no effect on LPS induced IL-10. Protein kinase C significantly reversed the ATL313 effects on TNFα in vitro in microglia and astrocytes, while a protein kinase A inhibitor only effected microglia. Both intrathecal PKA and PKC inhibitors significantly reversed the effect of the A2AR agonist on neuropathic allodynia. Therefore, A2AR agonists administered IT remain an exciting novel target for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  20. LPS-Stimulated Human Skin-Derived Stem Cells Enhance Neo-Vascularization during Dermal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Daniel H.; Kruse, Charli; Schumann, Sandra; Stang, Felix H.; Siemers, Frank; Matthießen, Anna E.

    2015-01-01

    High numbers of adult stem cells are still required to improve the formation of new vessels in scaffolds to accelerate dermal regeneration. Recent data indicate a benefit for vascularization capacity by stimulating stem cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, stem cells derived from human skin (SDSC) were activated with LPS and seeded in a commercially available dermal substitute to examine vascularization in vivo. Besides, in vitro assays were performed to evaluate angiogenic factor release and tube formation ability. Results showed that LPS-activated SDSC significantly enhanced vascularization of the scaffolds, compared to unstimulated stem cells in vivo. Further, in vitro assays confirmed higher secretion rates of proangiogenic as well as proinflammatoric factors in the presence of LPS-activated SDSC. Our results suggest that combining activated stem cells and a dermal substitute is a promising option to enhance vascularization in scaffold-mediated dermal regeneration. PMID:26565617

  1. The binding capability of plasma phospholipid transfer protein, but not HDL pool size, is critical to repress LPS induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Cui, Yingjie; Zhao, Yanan; Liu, Shuai; Song, Guohua; Jiao, Peng; Li, Bin; Luo, Tian; Guo, Shoudong; Zhang, Xiangjian; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Qin, Shucun

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) participates in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Increased plasma PLTP activity was observed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggered acute inflammatory diseases. This study aimed to determine the exact role of PLTP in LPS induced inflammation. HDL pool size was shrunk both in PLTP deficient mice (PLTP−/−) and PLTP transgenic mice (PLTP-Tg). PLTP displayed a strong protective effect on lethal endotoxemia in mice survival study. Furthermore, after LPS stimulation, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines were increased in bone marrow derived macrophage (BMDM) from PLTP−/−, while decreased in BMDM from PLTP-Tg compared with BMDM from wild-type mice (WT). Moreover, LPS induced nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB) activation was enhanced in PLTP−/− BMDM or PLTP knockdown RAW264.7. Conversely, PLTP overexpression countered the NFκB activation in LPS challenged BMDM. Additionally, the activation of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) induced by LPS showed no alteration in PLTP−/− BMDM. Finally, PLTP could bind to LPS, attenuate the pro-inflammatory effects of LPS, and improve the cell viability in vitro. To sum up, these findings elucidated that PLTP repressed LPS induced inflammation due to extracellular LPS binding capability, and the protective effects were not related to HDL pool size in mice. PMID:26857615

  2. Inhibition of LPS toxicity by hepatic argininosuccinate synthase (ASS): novel roles for ASS in innate immune responses to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Prima, Victor; Wang, Alvin; Molina, Gabriel; Wang, Kevin K W; Svetlov, Stanislav I

    2011-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of Gram-negative bacteria, is implicated in the pathogenesis of endotoxemia/sepsis and multi-organ injury, including liver damage. We have shown that argininosuccinate synthase (ASS), a hepatic enzyme of the urea cycle, accumulates in circulation within 1h after treatment with both LPS alone and hepatotoxic combination of LPS and D-Galactosamine. These findings indicate ASS as a sensitive biomarker of liver responses to bacterial endotoxin. Furthermore, we suggest that the ASS release represents a potential counteracting liver reaction to LPS, and demonstrates anti-LPS activity of recombinant ASS (rASS) in vitro and in rodent models of endotoxemia in vivo. rASS physically bound to LPS, as indicated by a gel shift assay, and suppressed Escherichia coli growth in cultures consistent with direct antimicrobial properties of ASS. rASS reduced LPS cytotoxicity, TNF-α production, and increased cell viability in cultured mouse macrophages, even when added one hour following LPS challenge. Intraperitoneal injection of rASS (5 mg/kg) after treatment with a high dose of LPS remarkably increased survival of rodents, with a concomitant decrease of sepsis markers TNF-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in blood. These results suggest that the endogenous ASS constitutes a novel liver-derived component of the innate immune response to bacterial LPS, and that recombinant ASS could mitigate the lethal effects of bacterial endotoxins during sepsis.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatic injury is enhanced by polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A P; Schultze, A E; Holdan, W L; Buchweitz, J P; Roth, R A; Ganey, P E

    1996-01-01

    After intravenous administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to rats, polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) rapidly accumulate in the liver, and midzonal hepatic necrosis is prominent by 6 hr. PMNs are required for the development of hepatic injury in rats. Certain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can activate PMNs, resulting in production of superoxide anion (O2-.) and release of cytolytic factors from granules. This raises the possibility that PCB exposure might enhance PMN-mediated tissue injury, such as LPS-induced hepatotoxicity. We treated female Sprague-Dawley rats with a minimally toxic dose of LPS in saline (2 mg/kg, intravenous) and 90 min later exposed them to Aroclor 1248 (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), a mixture of PCBs. The animals were killed 6 hr after LPS administration, and hepatic injury was assessed. Neither LPS nor Aroclor 1248 alone produced liver injury. Co-treatment with LPS and Aroclor 1248 resulted in pronounced liver injury as demonstrated from increased activities of alanine aminotransferase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in plasma. Histological evaluation indicated increased severity of hepatic necrosis in rats receiving both LPS and Aroclor 1248. Hepatic accumulation of PMNs, normally observed after LPS, was not altered by co-exposure to PCBs. Aroclor 1248 stimulated rat PMNs in vitro to produce O2-. and to degranulate. In addition, PMN-mediated cytotoxicity to isolated rat hepatocytes in culture was increased upon addition of Aroclor 1248. PCBs activate PMNs in vitro and increase PMN-dependent hepatocellular damage in vitro and after LPS treatment in vivo. PCBs may act in vivo as an additional inflammatory stimulus to activate PMNs to become cytotoxic, resulting in increased tissue injury. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 3. Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:8793352

  4. Resveratrol ameliorates LPS-induced acute lung injury via NLRP3 inflammasome modulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Kai; Fei, Dongsheng; Gong, Rui; Cao, Yanhui; Pan, Shangha; Zhao, Mingran; Zhao, Mingyan

    2016-12-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome plays a pivotal role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI), accelerating IL-1β and IL-18 release and inducing lung inflammation. Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin, has anti-inflammatory properties via inhibition of oxidation, leukocyte priming, and production of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of resveratrol on NLRP3 inflammasome in lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI. Mice were intratracheally instilled with 3mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce ALI. Resveratrol treatment alleviated the LPS-induced lung pathological damage, lung edema and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, resveratrol reversed the LPS-mediated elevation of IL-1β and IL-18 level in the BAL fluids. In lung tissue, resveratrol also inhibited the LPS-induced NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1 mRNA and protein expression, and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, resveratrol administration not only suppressed the NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, NF-κB activity and ROS production in the LPS-treated mice, but also inhibited the LPS-induced thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) protein expression and interaction of TXNIP-NLRP3 in lung tissue. Meanwhile, resveratrol obviously induced SIRT1 mRNA and protein expression in the LPS-challenged mice. Taken together, our study suggests that resveratrol protects against LPS-induced lung injury by NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition. These findings further suggest that resveratrol may be of great value in the treatment of ALI and a potential and an effective pharmacological agent for inflammasome-relevant diseases.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating LPS-Induced Inflammation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lykhmus, Olena; Mishra, Nibha; Koval, Lyudmyla; Kalashnyk, Olena; Gergalova, Galyna; Uspenska, Kateryna; Komisarenko, Serghiy; Soreq, Hermona; Skok, Maryna

    2016-01-01

    Neuro-inflammation, one of the pathogenic causes of neurodegenerative diseases, is regulated through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway via the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR). We previously showed that either bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or immunization with the α7(1–208) nAChR fragment decrease α7 nAChRs density in the mouse brain, exacerbating chronic inflammation, beta-amyloid accumulation and episodic memory decline, which mimic the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To study the molecular mechanisms underlying the LPS and antibody effects in the brain, we employed an in vivo model of acute LPS-induced inflammation and an in vitro model of cultured glioblastoma U373 cells. Here, we report that LPS challenge decreased the levels of α7 nAChR RNA and protein and of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) RNA and activity in distinct mouse brain regions, sensitized brain mitochondria to the apoptogenic effect of Ca2+ and modified brain microRNA profiles, including the cholinergic-regulatory CholinomiRs-132/212, in favor of anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic ones. Adding α7(1–208)-specific antibodies to the LPS challenge prevented elevation of both the anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic miRNAs while supporting the resistance of brain mitochondria to Ca2+ and maintaining α7 nAChR/AChE decreases. In U373 cells, α7-specific antibodies and LPS both stimulated interleukin-6 production through the p38/Src-dependent pathway. Our findings demonstrate that acute LPS-induced inflammation induces the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the brain, that α7 nAChR down-regulation limits this pathway, and that α7-specific antibodies aggravate neuroinflammation by inducing the pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 and dampening anti-inflammatory miRNAs; however, these antibodies may protect brain mitochondria and decrease the levels of pro-apoptotic miRNAs, preventing LPS-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:27013966

  6. Use of mice tolerant to lipopolysaccharide to demonstrate requirement of cooperation between macrophages and lymphocytes to generate lipopolysaccharide-induced colony-stimulating factor in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Z; Hertogs, C F; Pluznik, D H

    1983-01-01

    Injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into mice was followed by a rapid elevation of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in the serum. A second, challenging injection of LPS given 3 to 4 days later failed to induce elevated levels of CSF in the serum. Such mice tolerant to LPS were used as an experimental tool to identify the CSF-producing cells which respond to LPS. We observed that generation of LPS-induced CSF in mice tolerant to LPS could be restored by an intraperitoneal injection of spleen cells 24 h before the challenging injection of LPS. Depletion of the adherent cells from the spleen cells reduced the ability of the splenic lymphocytes to restore the capacity of the mice tolerant to LPS to generate serum CSF. Reconstitution of the splenic lymphocytes with 5% thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, however, reestablished the restorative capacity of these cells, whereas almost no restoration was observed after direct injection of elicited peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that the spleen cells are active in generating CSF, provided that macrophages are present and can interact with the splenic lymphocytes to generate LPS-induced CSF in the serum. PMID:6602767

  7. Interaction between tachyplesin I, an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Takahiro; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kikukawa, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Demura, Makoto; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Kawano, Keiichi

    2014-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is the very first site of interactions with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to gain better insight into the interaction between LPS and AMPs, we determined the structure of tachyplesin I (TP I), an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, in its bound state with LPS and proposed the complex structure of TP I and LPS using a docking program. CD and NMR measurements revealed that binding to LPS slightly extends the two β-strands of TP I and stabilizes the whole structure of TP I. The fluorescence wavelength of an intrinsic tryptophan of TP I and fluorescence quenching in the presence or absence of LPS indicated that a tryptophan residue is incorporated into the hydrophobic environment of LPS. Finally, we succeeded in proposing a structural model for the complex of TP I and LPS by using a docking program. The calculated model structure suggested that the cationic residues of TP I interact with phosphate groups and saccharides of LPS, whereas hydrophobic residues interact with the acyl chains of LPS.

  8. Single low-dose lipopolysaccharide preconditioning: neuroprotective against axonal injury and modulates glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Ryan C.; Naser, Zachary J.; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Vangilder, Reyna L.; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.

    2017-01-01

    Aim Over 7 million traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are reported each year in the United States. However, treatments and neuroprotection following TBI are limited because secondary injury cascades are poorly understood. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration before controlled cortical impact can contribute to neuroprotection. However, the underlying mechanisms and whether LPS preconditioning confers neuroprotection against closed-head injuries remains unclear. Methods The authors hypothesized that preconditioning with a low dose of LPS (0.2 mg/kg) would regulate glial reactivity and protect against diffuse axonal injury induced by weight drop. LPS was administered 7 days prior to TBI. LPS administration reduced locomotion, which recovered completely by time of injury. Results LPS preconditioning significantly reduced the post-injury gliosis response near the corpus callosum, possibly by downregulating the oncostatin M receptor. These novel findings demonstrate a protective role of LPS preconditioning against diffuse axonal injury. LPS preconditioning successfully prevented neurodegeneration near the corpus callosum, as measured by fluorojade B. Conclusion Further work is required to elucidate whether LPS preconditioning confers long-term protection against behavioral deficits and to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms responsible for LPS-induced neuroprotective effects. PMID:28164149

  9. Peptide-assembled graphene oxide as a fluorescent turn-on sensor for lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) detection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seng Koon; Chen, Peng; Lee, Fook Loy; Moochhala, Shabbir; Liedberg, Bo

    2015-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a toxic inflammatory stimulator released from the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, known to be directly related to, for example, septic shock, that causes millions of casualties annually. This number could potentially be lowered significantly if specific, sensitive, and more simply applicable LPS biosensors existed. In this work, we present a facile, sensitive and selective LPS sensor, developed by assembling tetramethylrhodamine-labeled LPS-binding peptides on graphene oxide (GO). The fluorescence of the dye-labeled peptide is quenched upon interaction with GO. Specific binding to LPS triggers the release of the peptide-LPS complex from GO, resulting in fluorescence recovery. This fluorescent turn-on sensor offers an estimated limit of detection of 130 pM, which is the lowest ever reported among all synthetic LPS sensors to date. Importantly, this sensor is applicable for detection of LPS in commonly used clinical injectable fluids, and it enables selective detection of LPS from different bacterial strains as well as LPS on the membrane of living E. coli.

  10. Synergistic effects of pyrrolizidine alkaloids and lipopolysaccharide on preterm delivery and intrauterine fetal death in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Ma, Zhenguo; Kou, Hao; Sun, Rongze; Yang, Hanxiao; Smith, Charles Vincent; Zheng, Jiang; Wang, Hui

    2013-08-29

    Preterm birth is the leading cause of death for newborn infants, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is commonly used to induce preterm delivery in experimental animals. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are widespread and occur in foods, herbs, and other plants. This study was to investigate the synergistic effects of LPS and two representative PAs, retrorsine (RTS) and monocrotaline (MCT), on preterm delivery and fetal death. Pregnant Kunming mice were divided into seven groups: control, RTS, MCT, LPS, RTS+LPS and two MCT+LPS groups. Animals in PAs and PAs+LPS groups were dosed intragastrically with RTS (10mg/kg) or MCT (20 mg/kg or 60 mg/kg) from gestational day (GD) 9 to GD16; mice given LPS were injected intraperitoneally with 150 μg/kg on GD15.5. Latencies to delivery, numbers of pups live and dead at birth were recorded, and livers of live neonates were collected. The incidence of LPS-induced preterm birth was enhanced in dams pretreated with MCT, and combination of PAs and LPS increased fetal mortality from PAs. The enhancement of LPS-induced preterm delivery and fetal demise in animals exposed chronically to PAs and other substances found in foods and beverages consumed widely by humans merits further focused investigation.

  11. Reciprocal interaction between the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the immune system tunes down the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Vargas, Natalí N; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Basualdo, María Del Carmen; García, Joselyn; Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara; Carrero, Julio C; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2014-08-15

    Several studies have shown circadian variations in the response of the immune system suggesting a role of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Here we show that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration in the beginning of the active period induced more severe responses in temperature and cytokines than LPS given in the rest period. Moreover night administered LPS increased SCN basal neuronal activity indicating a direct influence of inflammation on the SCN. Bilateral lesions of the SCN resulted in an increased inflammatory response to LPS demonstrating that an interaction between the SCN and the immune system modulates the intensity of the inflammatory response.

  12. Classification of Proteus penneri lipopolysaccharides into core region serotypes.

    PubMed

    Palusiak, Agata

    2016-12-01

    The frequency of P. penneri isolation from hospital patients, mostly from urine and wounds, keeps on growing, and numerous isolates are multi-drug resistant. P. penneri rods produce lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which may lead to the septic shock. Until now, O-specific polysaccharide has been the best structurally and serologically characterized region of P. penneri LPS. It is worth having an insight into the serological specificity of both poly- and oligosaccharide parts of P. penneri LPS. The P. penneri core region is less structurally diverse than OPS, but still, among other enterobacterial LPS core regions, it is characterized by structural variability. In the present study, the serological reactivity of 25 P. penneri LPS core regions was analyzed by ELISA, passive immunohemolysis and Western blot technique using five polyclonal P. penneri antisera after or without their adsorption with the respective LPSs. The results allowed the assignment of the tested strains to five new core serotypes, which together with published serological studies led to the creation of the first serotyping scheme based on LPS core reactivities of 35 P. penneri and three P. mirabilis strains. Together with the O types scheme, it will facilitate assigning Proteus LPSs of clinical isolates into appropriate O and R serotypes.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide Attenuates the Cytotoxicity of Resveratrol in Transformed Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Achy-Brou, Christelle A Adiabouah; Billack, Blase

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol and pterostilbene are natural products that are present in plants and have been incorporated into various dietary supplements. Numerous beneficial pharmacologic effects have been reported for these stilbenes; however, the mechanism by which these compounds exert a cytotoxic effect in RAW 264.7 macrophages has not been well characterized. We have previously described that resveratrol is toxic to these tumor-derived macrophages and that stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces resveratrol toxicity via a mechanism that involves activation of toll like receptor 4. In the present work, we examined the cellular and molecular effects of resveratrol and the related compound pterostilbene by determining cell viability and caspase 3 activity in control and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with these stilbenes for 24 h. We found that LPS stimulation reduced the cytotoxicity of resveratrol but not of pterostilbene in these cells. When examined for effects on caspase 3 activation after a 24 h incubation, resveratrol and pterostilbene were each found to separately and significantly increase caspase 3 activity in these cells. LPS stimulation prevented caspase 3 activation by pterostilbene and reduced caspase 3 activation by resveratrol in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The data presented here indicate that LPS induces a phenotype switch in tumor-derived RAW 264.7 macrophages in which cells experiencing LPS in the presence of resveratrol or pterostilbene become less likely to activate the pro-apoptotic factor caspase 3.

  14. Resurrecting inactive antimicrobial peptides from the lipopolysaccharide trap.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2014-01-01

    Host defense antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a promising source of antibiotics for the treatment of multiple-drug-resistant pathogens. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major component of the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, functions as a permeability barrier against a variety of molecules, including AMPs. Further, LPS or endotoxin is the causative agent of sepsis killing 100,000 people per year in the United States alone. LPS can restrict the activity of AMPs inducing aggregations at the outer membrane, as observed for frog AMPs, temporins, and also in model AMPs. Aggregated AMPs, "trapped" by the outer membrane, are unable to traverse the cell wall, causing their inactivation. In this work, we show that these inactive AMPs can overcome LPS-induced aggregations while conjugated with a short LPS binding β-boomerang peptide motif and become highly bactericidal. The generated hybrid peptides exhibit activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in high-salt conditions and detoxify endotoxin. Structural and biophysical studies establish the mechanism of action of these peptides in LPS outer membrane. Most importantly, this study provides a new concept for the development of a potent broad-spectrum antibiotic with efficient outer membrane disruption as the mode of action.

  15. Compositional analysis of Helicobacter pylori rough-form lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, A P; Helander, I M; Kosunen, T U

    1992-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the macromolecular heterogeneity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from seven fresh clinical isolates and three culture collection strains of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori. All the clinical isolates produced smooth-form LPS with O side chains of relatively homogeneous chain length, whereas the culture collection strains yielded rough-form LPS. A better yield of the latter LPS was obtained when combined protease pretreatment and hot phenol-water extraction were used than when the conventional phenol-water technique alone was used for extraction. The LPS of the three culture collection strains (S-24, C-5437, and NCTC 11637) were chemically characterized. Constituents common to all the LPS were fucose, D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose, D-glycero-D-manno-heptose, L-glycero-D-manno-heptose, and 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid. The molar ratios of the hexoses differed between different strains, thereby reflecting structural differences. Phosphate, phosphorylethanolamine, and pyrophosphorylethanolamine were present also. Free lipid A contained D-glucosamine and fatty acids, with phosphate and a minor amount of ethanolamine. The major fatty acids were ester- and amide-bound 3-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid and ester-bound octadecanioc and 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acids, with minor amounts of ester-bound tetradecanoic and hexadecanoic acids. In addition to the uncommonly long 3-hydroxy fatty acids, an unusual phosphorylation pattern was deduced to be present in the lipid A. Images PMID:1735724

  16. Alpinetin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Zhou, Li-shan; Yan, Li; Ren, Juan; Zhou, Dai-xing; Li, Shu-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Alpinetin, a novel plant flavonoid isolated from Alpinia katsumadai Hayata, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the effects of alpinetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury have not been reported. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects and the underlying mechanism of alpinetin against LPS-induced acute kidney injury in mice. The results showed that alpinetin inhibited LPS-induced kidney histopathologic changes, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine levels. Alpinetin also inhibited LPS-induced ROS, MDA, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production in kidney tissues. Meanwhile, Western blot analysis showed that alpinetin suppressed LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation in kidney tissues. In addition, alpinetin was found to up-regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, alpinetin protected LPS-induced kidney injury through activating Nrf2 and inhibiting TLR4 expression.

  17. Identification of lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins in porcine milk

    PubMed Central

    Shahriar, Farshid; Gordon, John R.; Simko, Elemir

    2006-01-01

    Septicemia and endotoxemia initiated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are relatively common in suckling and weaned piglets. Maternal milk is a source of both nutrition and immune protection for piglets. Passive transfer of colostral antibodies is necessary for protection of neonatal piglets against diseases, but the concentration of immunoglobulins in milk rapidly declines during the 1st wk of lactation in all mammals. We hypothesized, therefore, that nonimmunoglobulin substances in milk contribute to the innate protection of neonates against septicemia during the suckling period. Using LPS-affinity chromatography for isolation of LPS-binding proteins and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry for their identification, we identified in porcine milk the following proteins with LPS-binding capacity: lactoferrin, soluble CD14, serum amyloid A, α-S1 casein, β-casein, and κ-casein. For lactoferrin, α-S1 casein, and κ-casein, in vitro pepsin digestion did not inhibit LPS-binding activity, whereas combined digestion with pepsin and pancreatin abolished it. The biologic functions of these LPS-binding proteins and peptides were not determined. PMID:17042375

  18. THE EMBRYOLETHALITY OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE IN CD-1 AND METALLOTHIONEIN I-II NULL MICE: LACK OF A ROLE FOR INDUCED ZINC DEFICIENCY OR METALLOTHIONEIN INDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is embryolethal in CD-1 mice. LPS induces metallothionein (MT) via cytokines, including TNF-, IL-1 and IL-6, which initiate and maintain the acute phase response. Maternal hepatic MT induction in pregnant rats, by diverse toxicants, can ...

  19. Anti-inflammatory activity of hydroxycinnamic acid derivtives isolated from corn bran in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated raw 264.7 macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, the effect of the 80 percent ethanolic extract of corn bran (EECB) on inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Raw 264.7 cells was investigated. The EECB inhibited LPS induced NO production...

  20. Application of bacterial lipopolysaccharide to improve survival of the black tiger shrimp after Vibrio harveyi exposure.

    PubMed

    Rungrassamee, Wanilada; Maibunkaew, Sawarot; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates an effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as feed supplement to improve immunity of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon). LPS was coated to commercial feed pellets and given to the shrimp once or twice a day for 10 days before an exposure with shrimp pathogenic bacterium Vibrio harveyi. The growth rates, percent weight gains, total hemocyte and granulocyte counts and survival rates of shrimp between the LPS-coated pellet fed groups and a control group where shrimp fed with commercial feed pellets were compared. After 10 days of the feeding trials, growth rates were not significantly different in all groups, suggesting no toxicity from LPS supplement. To determine beneficial effect of LPS diets, each group was subsequently exposed to V. harveyi by immersion method and the survival rates were recorded for seven days after the immersion. Regardless of the dosages of LPS, the shrimp groups fed with LPS-coated pellets showed higher survival rates than the control group. There was no significant difference in survival rates between the two LPS dosages groups. In addition to survival under pathogen challenge, we also determine effect of LPS on immune-related genes after 10-day feeding trial. Gene expression analysis in the P. monodon intestines revealed that antilipopolysaccharide factor isoform 3 (ALF3), C-type lectin, and mucine-like peritrophin (mucin-like PM) were expressed significantly higher in a group fed with LPS supplemental diet once or twice a day than in a control group. The transcript levels of C-type lectin and mucin-like PM had increased significantly when LPS was given once a day, while significant induction of ALF3 transcripts was observed when shrimp were fed with LPS twice a day. The up-regulation of the immune gene levels in intestines and higher resistance to V. harveyi of the shrimp fed with LPS provide the evidence for potential application of LPS as an immunostimulant in P. monodon farming.

  1. Membrane Insertion for the Detection of Lipopolysaccharides: Exploring the Dynamics of Amphiphile-in-Lipid Assays

    PubMed Central

    Hengartner, Nicolas W.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Moxley, Rodney A.; Graves, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli is an important cause of foodborne illness, with cases attributable to beef, fresh produce and other sources. Many serotypes of the pathogen cause disease, and differentiating one serotype from another requires specific identification of the O antigen located on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule. The amphiphilic structure of LPS poses a challenge when using classical detection methods, which do not take into account its lipoglycan biochemistry. Typically, detection of LPS requires heat or chemical treatment of samples and relies on bioactivity assays for the conserved lipid A portion of the molecule. Our goal was to develop assays to facilitate the direct and discriminative detection of the entire LPS molecule and its O antigen in complex matrices using minimal sample processing. To perform serogroup identification of LPS, we used a method called membrane insertion on a waveguide biosensor, and tested three serogroups of LPS. The membrane insertion technique allows for the hydrophobic association of LPS with a lipid bilayer, where the exposed O antigen can be targeted for specific detection. Samples of beef lysate were spiked with LPS to perform O antigen specific detection of LPS from E. coli O157. To validate assay performance, we evaluated the biophysical interactions of LPS with lipid bilayers both in- and outside of a flow cell using fluorescence microscopy and fluorescently doped lipids. Our results indicate that membrane insertion allows for the qualitative and reliable identification of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples like beef homogenates. We also demonstrated that LPS-induced hole formation does not occur under the conditions of the membrane insertion assays. Together, these findings describe for the first time the serogroup-specific detection of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples using a membrane insertion assay, and highlight the importance of LPS molecular conformations in detection architectures. PMID

  2. Dietary alpha-ketoglutarate supplementation ameliorates intestinal injury in lipopolysaccharide-challenged piglets.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yongqing; Wang, Lei; Ding, Binying; Liu, Yulan; Zhu, Huiling; Liu, Jian; Li, Yongtang; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2010-07-01

    Neonates are at increased risk for inflammatory bowel disease, but effective prevention and treatments are currently limited. This study was conducted with the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged piglet model to determine the effects of dietary supplementation with alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) on the intestinal morphology and function. Eighteen 24-day-old pigs (weaned at 21 days of age) were assigned randomly to control, LPS, and LPS + AKG groups. The piglets in the control and LPS groups were fed a corn- and soybean meal-based diet, whereas the LPS + AKG group was fed the basal diet supplemented with 1% AKG. On days 10, 12, 14, and 16, piglets in the LPS and LPS + AKG groups received intraperitoneal administration of LPS (80 microg/kg BW), whereas piglets in the control group received the same volume of saline. On day 16, D-xylose was orally administrated to all pigs at the dose of 0.1 g/kg BW, 2 h after LPS or saline injection, and blood samples were collected 3 h thereafter. Twenty-four hours post-administration of LPS or saline, pigs were killed to obtain intestinal mucosae for analysis. Compared with the control group, LPS challenge reduced (P < 0.05) protein levels, the ratio of villus height to crypt depth, and the ratio of phosphorylated mTOR to total mTOR in duodenal, jejunal, and ileal mucosa. These adverse effects of LPS were attenuated (P < 0.05) by AKG supplementation. Moreover, AKG prevented the LPS-induced increase in intestinal HSP70 expression. Collectively, these novel results indicate that dietary supplementation with 1% AKG activates the mTOR signaling, alleviates the mucosal damage, and improves the absorptive function of the small intestine in LPS-challenged piglets. The findings not only help understand the mode of AKGs actions in the neonatal gut but also have important implications for infant nutrition under inflammatory conditions.

  3. Instillation of coarse ash particulate matter and lipopolysaccharide produces a systemic inflammatory response in mice.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Katie; Choi, Ji-Eun; Lau, Alexandria; Davis-Gorman, Grace; Diven, Conrad; Seaver, Norma; Linak, William P; Witten, Mark; McDonagh, Paul F

    2007-12-01

    Coronary ischemic events increase significantly following a "bad air" day. Ambient particulate matter (PM10) is the pollutant most strongly associated with these events. PM10 produces inflammatory injury to the lower airways. It is not clear, however, whether pulmonary inflammation translates to a systemic response. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a proinflammatory molecule often associated with the coarse fraction of PM. It was hypothesized that PM>2.5 from coal plus LPS induce pulmonary inflammation leading to a systemic inflammatory response. Mice were intratracheally instilled with saline, PM (200 microg), PM + LPS10 (PM + 10 microg LPS), or PM + LPS100 (PM + 100 microg LPS). Eighteen hours later, histologic analysis was performed on lungs from each group. Pulmonary and systemic inflammation were assessed by measuring the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 in the pulmonary supernatant and plasma. In a follow-up study, the effects of LPS alone were assessed. Histologic analysis revealed a dose-dependent elevation in pulmonary inflammation with all treatments. Pulmonary TNF-alpha and IL-6 both increased significantly with PM + LPS100 treatment. Regarding plasma, TNF-alpha significantly increased in both PM + LPS10 and PM + LPS100 treatments. For plasma IL-6, all groups tended to rise with a significant increase in the PM + LPS100 group. The results of the follow-up study indicate that the responses to PM + LPS were not due to LPS alone. These results suggest that coarse coal fly ash PM>2.5 combined with LPS produced pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses. The resulting low-level systemic inflammation may contribute to the increased severity of ischemic heart disease observed immediately following a bad air day.

  4. Membrane insertion for the detection of lipopolysaccharides: Exploring the dynamics of amphiphile-in-lipid assays

    DOE PAGES

    Stromberg, Loreen R.; Hengartner, Nicolas W.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; ...

    2016-05-26

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli is an important cause of foodborne illness, with cases attributable to beef, fresh produce and other sources. Many serotypes of the pathogen cause disease, and differentiating one serotype from another requires specific identification of the O antigen located on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule. The amphiphilic structure of LPS poses a challenge when using classical detection methods, which do not take into account its lipoglycan biochemistry. Typically, detection of LPS requires heat or chemical treatment of samples and relies on bioactivity assays for the conserved lipid A portion of the molecule. Our goal was to develop assaysmore » to facilitate the direct and discriminative detection of the entire LPS molecule and its O antigen in complex matrices using minimal sample processing. To perform serogroup identification of LPS, we used a method called membrane insertion on a waveguide biosensor, and tested three serogroups of LPS. The membrane insertion technique allows for the hydrophobic association of LPS with a lipid bilayer, where the exposed O antigen can be targeted for specific detection. Samples of beef lysate were spiked with LPS to perform O antigen specific detection of LPS from E. coli O157. To validate assay performance, we evaluated the biophysical interactions of LPS with lipid bilayers both in- and outside of a flow cell using fluorescence microscopy and fluorescently doped lipids. Our results indicate that membrane insertion allows for the qualitative and reliable identification of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples like beef homogenates. In addition, we also demonstrated that LPS-induced hole formation does not occur under the conditions of the membrane insertion assays. Together, these findings describe for the first time the serogroup-specific detection of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples using a membrane insertion assay, and highlight the importance of LPS molecular conformations in detection

  5. Membrane insertion for the detection of lipopolysaccharides: Exploring the dynamics of amphiphile-in-lipid assays

    SciTech Connect

    Stromberg, Loreen R.; Hengartner, Nicolas W.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Moxley, Rodney A.; Graves, Steven W.; Montano, Gabriel A.; Mukundan, Harshini; Gasset, Maria

    2016-05-26

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli is an important cause of foodborne illness, with cases attributable to beef, fresh produce and other sources. Many serotypes of the pathogen cause disease, and differentiating one serotype from another requires specific identification of the O antigen located on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule. The amphiphilic structure of LPS poses a challenge when using classical detection methods, which do not take into account its lipoglycan biochemistry. Typically, detection of LPS requires heat or chemical treatment of samples and relies on bioactivity assays for the conserved lipid A portion of the molecule. Our goal was to develop assays to facilitate the direct and discriminative detection of the entire LPS molecule and its O antigen in complex matrices using minimal sample processing. To perform serogroup identification of LPS, we used a method called membrane insertion on a waveguide biosensor, and tested three serogroups of LPS. The membrane insertion technique allows for the hydrophobic association of LPS with a lipid bilayer, where the exposed O antigen can be targeted for specific detection. Samples of beef lysate were spiked with LPS to perform O antigen specific detection of LPS from E. coli O157. To validate assay performance, we evaluated the biophysical interactions of LPS with lipid bilayers both in- and outside of a flow cell using fluorescence microscopy and fluorescently doped lipids. Our results indicate that membrane insertion allows for the qualitative and reliable identification of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples like beef homogenates. In addition, we also demonstrated that LPS-induced hole formation does not occur under the conditions of the membrane insertion assays. Together, these findings describe for the first time the serogroup-specific detection of amphiphilic LPS in complex samples using a membrane insertion assay, and highlight the importance of LPS molecular conformations in detection

  6. The effects of Nigella sativa hydro-alcoholic extract and thymoquinone on lipopolysaccharide - induced depression like behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mahmoud; Zakeri, Samaneh; Khoshdast, Sadieh; Yousefian, Fatemeh T.; Rastegar, Monireh; Vafaee, Farzaneh; Kahdouee, Shamsi; Ghorbani, Fatemeh; Rakhshandeh, Hassan; Kazemi, S. Abolfazl

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neuroimmune factors have been proposed as contributors to the pathogenesis of depression. Beside other therapeutic effects including neuroprotective, antioxidant, anticonvulsant and analgesic effects, Nigella sativa and its main ingredient, thymoquinone (TQ), have been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, the effects of Nigella sativa hydro-alcoholic extract and thymoquinone was investigated on lipopolysaccharide- induced depression like behavior in rats. Materials and Methods: 50 male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: Group 1 (control group) received saline instead of NS extract, thymoquinone or lipopolysaccharide. The animals in group 2 (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) were treated by saline instead of NS extract and were injected LPS (100μg/kg, ip) 2 hours before conducting each forced swimming test. Groups 3 (LPS + NS 200) and 4 (LPS + NS 400) were treated by 200 and 400 mg/kg of NS (ip), respectively, from the day before starting the experiments and before each forced swimming test. These animals were also injected LPS 2hours before conducting each swimming test. The animals in group 5 received TQ instead of NS extract. Forced swimming test was performed 3 times for all groups (in alternative days), and immobility time was recorded. Finally, the animals were placed in an open- field apparatus, and the crossing number on peripheral and central areas was observed. Results: The immobility time in the LPS group was higher than that in the control group in all 3 times (P<0.001). The animals in LPS + NS 200, LPS + NS 400 and LPS + TQ had lower immobility times in comparison with LPS groups (P<0.01, and P<0.01). In the open- field test, the crossing number of peripheral in the LPS group was higher than that of the control one (P<0.01) while the animals of LPS + NS 200, LPS + NS 400 and LPS + TQ groups had lower crossing number of peripheral compared with the LPS group (P <0.05, and P<0.001). Furthermore, in the LPS group, the

  7. Stimulation of peritoneal cell arginase by bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J L; Yohe, W B; Morrison, D C

    1980-05-01

    The conditions under which bacterial endotoxins stimulate arginase production in mouse peritoneal macrophages have been defined. Both lipid-A and lipid-A-associated protein are potent activators. Fetal calf serum and normal mouse serum enhance macrophage arginase levels in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS in the amount of 10(-1) microgram/ml represents a maximal stimulus for macrophage arginase production and release. Thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal cells have increased arginase activity, compared with resident cells. This activity can be stimulated further by the addition of LPS. Arginase levels may alter the outcome of in vitro immunologic processes by depleting arginine and may also serve as a useful indicator of the state of activation of macrophages.

  8. Intra-amniotic LPS and antenatal betamethasone: inflammation and maturation in preterm lamb lungs

    PubMed Central

    Kuypers, Elke; Collins, Jennifer J. P.; Kramer, Boris W.; Ofman, Gaston; Nitsos, Ilias; Pillow, J. Jane; Polglase, Graeme R.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Newnham, John P.; Gavilanes, Antonio W. D.; Nowacki, Relana; Ikegami, Machiko; Jobe, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    The proinflammatory stimulus of chorioamnionitis is commonly associated with preterm delivery. Women at risk of preterm delivery receive antenatal glucocorticoids to functionally mature the fetal lung. However, the effects of the combined exposures of chorioamnionitis and antenatal glucocorticoids on the fetus are poorly understood. Time-mated ewes with singleton fetuses received an intra-amniotic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) either preceding or following maternal intramuscular betamethasone 7 or 14 days before delivery, and the fetuses were delivered at 120 days gestational age (GA) (term = 150 days GA). Gestation matched controls received intra-amniotic and maternal intramuscular saline. Compared with saline controls, intra-amniotic LPS increased inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage and myeloperoxidase, Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 mRNA, PU.1, CD3, and Foxp3-positive cells in the fetal lung. LPS-induced lung maturation measured as increased airway surfactant and improved lung gas volumes. Intra-amniotic LPS-induced inflammation persisted until 14 days after exposure. Betamethasone treatment alone induced modest lung maturation but, when administered before intra-amniotic LPS, suppressed lung inflammation. Interestingly, betamethasone treatment after LPS did not counteract inflammation but enhanced lung maturation. We conclude that the order of exposures of intra-amniotic LPS or maternal betamethasone had large effects on fetal lung inflammation and maturation. PMID:22160306

  9. Treatment with the hyaluronic Acid synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone suppresses LPS-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    McKallip, Robert J; Ban, Hao; Uchakina, Olga N

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to bacterial endotoxins, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), can lead to the induction of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). To date, there are no known effective treatments for LPS-induced inflammation. In the current study, we investigated the potential use of the hyaluronic acid (HA) synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) on LPS-induced acute lung inflammation. Culturing LPS-activated immune cells with 4-MU led to reduced proliferation, reduced cytokine production, and an increase in apoptosis when compared to untreated cells. Treatment of mice with 4-MU led to protection from LPS-induced lung injury. Specifically, 4-MU treatment led to a reduction in LPS-induced hyaluronic acid synthase (HAS) messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, reduction in lung permeability, and reduction in proinflammatory cytokine production. Taken together, these results suggest that use of 4-MU to target HA production may be an effective treatment for the inflammatory response following exposure to LPS.

  10. Immunogenic peptide mimotopes from an epitope of Escherichia coli O157 LPS.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Armando; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Licona-Moreno, Delia; Zenteno, Edgar; Cravioto, Alejandro; Eslava-Campos, Carlos A

    2016-11-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a subtype of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli that is associated with haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Studies of populations in endemic areas have reported that the presence of specific antibodies against the O157 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with a lower incidence of diarrhoea and HUS. Phage display and IgG anti-O157 LPS antibodies were used in the present study to select peptide mimotopes of O157 LPS expressed in protein III of the M13 phage. Synthetic peptides (SP) were designed using the derived amino acid sequences obtained from DNA nucleotides of 63 selected phagotopes. The LxP/YP/SxL motif was identified in five of the phagotope amino acid sequences. Antibody responses against the phagotopes and their corresponding SPs were evaluated. SP12, one of the designed SP, induced the production of antibodies against the homologous peptide (1:800) and O157 LPS (1:200). The specificity of anti-SP12 antiserum was confirmed by analyzing its response to SP3, an SP with a different amino acid sequence than that of SP12, as well as against an E. coli LPS different from O157. Competitive studies with SP12 and O157 LPS showed a significant decrease in anti-SP12 and anti-LPS O157 antiserum responses against SP12 and O157 LPS, respectively. Eighteen (82%) of the 22 human serum samples with positive reactivity against E coli O157 LPS reacted with SP12 SP (cut-off >0.4). These results support the idea that SP12 is an immunogenic mimotope of O157 LPS.

  11. Transiently enhanced LPS-induced fever following hyperthermic stress in rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaaki; Uno, Tadashi; Riedel, Walter; Nishimaki, Michiyo; Watanabe, Kaori

    2005-11-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to induce an enhanced febrile response to the bacterial-derived endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the enhanced LPS-induced fever seen in heat stressed (HS) animals is caused by leakage of intestinal bacterial LPS into the circulation. Male rabbits were rendered transiently hyperthermic (a maximum rectal temperature of 43°C) and divided into three groups. They were then allowed to recover in a room at 24°C for 1, 2 or 3 days post-HS. One day after injection with LPS, the post-HS rabbits exhibited significantly higher fevers than the controls, though this was not seen in rabbits at either 2 or 3 days post-HS. The plasma levels of endogenous LPS were significantly increased during the HS as compared to those seen in normothermic rabbits prior to HS. LPS fevers were not induced in these animals. One day post-HS, rabbits that had been pretreated with oral antibiotics exhibited significantly attenuated LPS levels. When challenged with human recombinant interleukin-1β instead of LPS, the 1-day post-HS rabbits did not respond with enhanced fevers. The plasma levels of TNFα increased similarly during LPS-induced fevers in both the control and 1-day post-HS rabbits, while the plasma levels of corticosterone and the osmolality of the 1-day post-HS rabbits showed no significant differences to those seen prior to the HS. These results suggest that the enhanced fever in the 1-day post-HS rabbits is LPS specific, and may be caused by increased leakage of intestinal endotoxin into blood circulation.

  12. Rhizobium meliloti chromosomal loci required for suppression of exopolysaccharide mutations by lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.N.V.; Brzoska, P.M.; Signer, E.R. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1990-11-01

    Mutants of alfalfa symbiont Rhizobium meliloti SU47 that fail to make extracellular polysaccharide (exo mutants) induce the formation of nodules that are devoid of bacteria and consequently do not fix nitrogen. This Fix{sup {minus}} phenotype can be suppressed by an R. meliloti Rm41 gene that affects lipopolysaccharide structure. Here we describe mutations preventing suppression that map at two new chromosomal loci, lpsY and lpsX, present in both strains. Two other lps mutations isolated previously from SU47 also prevented suppression.

  13. Heterogeneous Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS modulates immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Herath, Thanuja D. K.; Darveau, Richard P.; Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Yu; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal (gum) disease is a highly prevalent infection and inflammation accounting for the majority of tooth loss in adult population worldwide. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone periodontal pathogen and its lipopolysaccharide (PgLPS) acts as a major virulence attribute to the disease. Herein, we deciphered the overall host response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) to two featured isoforms of tetra-acylated PgLPS1435/1449 and penta-acylated PgLPS1690 with reference to E. coli LPS through quantitative proteomics. This study unraveled differentially expressed novel biomarkers of immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in HGFs. PgLPS1690 greatly upregulated inflammatory proteins (e.g. cyclophilin, inducible nitric oxide synthase, annexins, galectin, cathepsins and heat shock proteins), whereas the anti-inflammatory proteins (e.g. Annexin A2 and Annexin A6) were significantly upregulated by PgLPS1435/1449. Interestingly, the antioxidants proteins such as mitochondrial manganese-containing superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin 5 were only upregulated by PgLPS1690. The cytoskeletal rearrangement-related proteins like myosin were differentially regulated by these PgLPS isoforms. The present study gives new insight into the biological properties of P. gingivalis LPS lipid A moiety that could critically modulate immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in HGFs, and thereby enhances our understanding of periodontal pathogenesis. PMID:27538450

  14. Probucol via inhibition of NHE1 attenuates LPS-accelerated atherosclerosis and promotes plaque stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Fei; Chen, Song; Feng, Jun-Duo; Zhang, Ming-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Xia

    2014-04-01

    Activation of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) via Ca(2+)/calpain is responsible in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis and to the process of atherosclerosis. Probucol is a lipid-lowering drug which has an anti-atherosclerosis effect. The mechanism remains poorly understood. Here we hypothesized that probucol via inhibition of NHE1 in VSMCs attenuates LPS-accelerated atherosclerosis and promotes plaque stability. Our results revealed that treatment of VSMCs with LPS increased the NHE1 activity in a time-dependent manner, associated with the increased Ca(2+)i. Probucol inhibited the LPS-induced increase of NHE1 activity in a dose-dependent manner in VSMCs for 24-hour co-incubation, as well as the change of Ca(2+)i. In addition, LPS enhanced the calpain activity. Both probucol and calcium chelation of Ca(2+) abolished the LPS-induced increase of calpain activity. Treatment of VSMCs with LPS reduced the expression of Bcl-2 without altering the mRNA level. Probucol inhibited the LPS-reduced expression of Bcl-2 protein in VSMCs. Animal studies indicated administration of probucol suppressed LPS-accelerated apoptosis, atherosclerosis and plaque instability in Apoe(-/-) mice. In conclusion, probucol via inhibition of NHE1 attenuates atherosclerosis lesion growth and promotes plaque stability.

  15. HSF-1 is involved in attenuating the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS through regulating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongyi; Jiang, Bimei; Zhang, Lingli; Liu, Yanjuan; Gao, Min; Jiang, Yu; Li, Yuanbin; Lu, Qinglan; Yao, Yongming; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2014-05-01

    Autophagy plays a protective role in endotoxemic mice. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) also plays a crucial protective role in endotoxemic mice by decreasing inflammatory cytokines. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HSF-1 is involved in attenuating the release of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mice and peritoneal macrophages (PMs) through regulating autophagy activity. Autophagosome formation in HSF-1(+/+) and HSF-1(-/-) mice and PMs stimulated by LPS was examined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Lipopolysaccharide-induced autophagy and inflammatory cytokines were examined in HSF-1(+/+) and HSF-1(-/-) PMs treated with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or rapamycin. Results showed that LPS-induced autophagy was elevated transiently at 12 h but declined at 24 h in the livers and lungs of mice. Higher levels of inflammatory cytokines and lower autophagy activity were detected in HSF-1(-/-) mice and PMs compared with HSF-1(+/+) mice and PMs. Interestingly, LPS-induced release of inflammatory cytokines did not further increase in HSF-1(-/-) PMs treated with 3-MA but aggravated in HSF-1(+/+) PMs. Lipopolysaccharide-induced autophagy did not decrease in HSF-1(-/-) PMs treated with 3-MA but decreased in HSF-1 PMs(+/+). Taken together, our results suggested that HSF-1 attenuated the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS by regulating autophagy activity.

  16. Luteolin inhibits lipopolysaccharide actions on human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Kawasaki-Cárdenas, Perla; Arroyo-Cruz, Santa Rita; Maldonado-Frías, Silvia

    2006-07-10

    Periodontal disease comprises a group of infections that lead to inflammation of the gingiva, periodontal tissue destruction, and in severe cases is accompanied by alveolar bone loss with tooth exfoliation. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative microorganism, which possesses and produces lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules that play a key role in disease development. Human gingival fibroblasts are the major constituents of gingival connective tissue and may interact directly with bacteria and bacterial products including LPS. Flavonoids possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that reduce inflammatory molecule expression in macrophages and monocytes. In this study, we evaluated the ability of diverse flavonoids to regulate nitric oxide production of LPS-stimulated human gingival fibroblasts, and studied the effect of luteolin on diminish phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members as well as in protein kinase B (Akt), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation, inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression, and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. We also found that pretreatment with three flavonoids, including quercetin, genistein, and luteolin, blocked nitric oxide synthesis in a dose-dependent fashion. Luteolin exerted the strongest blocking action on expression of this inflammatory mediator. Luteolin pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and Akt phosphorylation. LPS treatment of human gingival fibroblasts resulted in NF-kappaB translocation. Cell pretreatment with luteolin abolished LPS effects on NF-kappaB translocation. In addition, luteolin treatment blocked LPS-induced cellular proliferation inhibition without affecting genetic material integrity. We concluded that luteolin interferes with LPS signaling pathways, reducing activation of several mitogen-activated protein kinase family members, and inhibits inflammatory mediator expression.

  17. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production.

  18. Follistatin-like protein 1 suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokines expression during neuroinflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Liu, Yi; Han, Ying-Guang; Li, Jing-Kun; Jia, Jia-Lin; Chen, Bin; Yao, Zhi-Xiao; Nie, Lin; Cheng, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Follistain-like protein 1 (FSTL1), has been recently demonstrated to be involved in the embryo development of nervous system and glioblastoma. However, the role of FSTL1 in neuroinflammation remains unexplored. In this study, the expression of FSTL1 in astrocytes was verified and its role was studied in neuroinflammation induced by in vivo intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or LPS treatment to astrocytes in vitro. FSTL1 was significantly induced after ICV LPS injection or LPS treatment. FSTL1 suppressed upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in astrocytes after LPS treatment. Moreover, FSTL1 downregulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines through suppressing MAPK/p-ERK1/2 pathway in astrocytes. Our results suggest that FSTL1 may play an anti-inflammatory role in neuroinflammation mediated by astrocytes.

  19. Adsorption of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist to Alum-Based Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Dampens Pro-T Helper 2 Activities and Enhances Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bortolatto, Juliana; Mirotti, Luciana; Rodriguez, Dunia; Gomes, Eliane; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum salts gels (alum) are TLR-independent adjuvants and have been used to boost antibody responses in alum-based vaccines such as diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT) triple vaccine. However, the pro-Th2 activity of alum-based vaccine formulations has not been fully appreciated. Here we found that alum-based tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine was biased toward a Th-2 profile as shown by TT-induced airway eosinophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production, and high levels of IgE anaphylactic antibodies. The adsorption into alum of prototypic TLR4 agonists such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli consistently dampened TT-induced Th2 activities without inducing IFNγ or Th1-like responses in the lung. Conversely, adsorption of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) extracted from Salmonella minnesota, which is a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β- (TRIF-) biased TLR4 agonist, was less effective in decreasing Th-2 responses. Importantly, in a situation with antigenic competition (OVA plus TT), TT-specific IgG1 or IgG2a was decreased compared with TT sensitization. Notably, LPS increased the production of IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibodies. In conclusion, the addition of LPS induces a more robust IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibody production and concomitantly decreases Th2-cellular and humoral responses, indicating a potential use of alum/TLR-based vaccines. PMID:26380316

  20. Arginine supplementation does not alter nitrogen metabolism of beef steers during a lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for Arg is reported to increase during immune challenge. This study evaluated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and abomasal Arg infusion on N metabolism and immune response of 20 ruminally cannulated steers (369 ± 46 kg BW) in a randomized block design. Each block was 20 d and consiste...

  1. Arginine supplementation does not alter nitrogen metabolism of beef steers during a lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for arginine (Arg) is reported to increase during immune challenges. This study evaluated effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and abomasal Arg infusion on nitrogen (N) metabolism and immune response of 20 ruminally cannulated steers (369 ± 46 kg BW) in a randomized block design. Each block co...

  2. Effect of prenatal stress on subsequent response to mixing stress and a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sows subjected to prenatal stress have been found to produce offspring that alter the manner in which they respond to stress. Our objective was to determine if exposing a sow to stress altered the response of the offspring to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at 2 mo of age or their response to mixing stres...

  3. Effect of Sodium Butyrate on Growth Performance and Response to Lipopolysaccharide in Weanling Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of dietary sodium butyrate on growth performance and response to E. coli. lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in weanling pigs. In the first 28 d experiment, 180 pigs (initial BW 6.3 kg) were fed 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4% sodium butyrate, or 110 mg/kg d...

  4. Identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seulggie; Baik, Jung Eun; Jeon, Jun Ho; Cho, Kun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2011-09-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis causes periodontal diseases and its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is considered as a major virulence factor responsible for pathogenesis. Since initial recognition of P. gingivalis LPS (Pg.LPS) in the oral cavity might be crucial for the host response, we identified Pg.LPS-binding proteins (Pg.LPS-BPs) using Pg.LPS-immobilized beads and a high-resolution mass spectrometry. LPS purified from P. gingivalis was conjugated onto N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-Sepharose(®) 4 Fast Flow beads. Notably, Pg.LPS-conjugated beads could stimulate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) as determined by a TLR2-depdendent reporter expression system using CHO/CD14/TLR2. In addition, the Pg.LPS-conjugated beads induced the production of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide and interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 in the macrophage cell-line, RAW 264.7. These results imply that Pg.LPS retained its immunological properties during the conjugation process. Then, the Pg.LPS-conjugated beads were mixed with a pool of saliva obtained from nine human subjects to capture Pg.LPS-BPs and molecular identities were determined by LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid fourier transform mass spectrometry. Pg.LPS-BPs captured at high frequencies included alpha-amylase, cystatin, prolactin-inducible protein, lysozyme C, immunoglobulin components, serum albumin, lipocalin-1, and submaxillary gland androgen-regulated protein 3B. These proteins are known to be involved in bacterial adhesion and colonization, anti-microbial functions or modulation of immune responses.

  5. Milk Thistle Extract and Silymarin Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide Induced Lamellar Separation of Hoof Explants in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Reisinger, Nicole; Schaumberger, Simone; Nagl, Veronika; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of laminitis is not completely identified and the role of endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) in this process remains unclear. Phytogenic substances, like milk thistle (MT) and silymarin, are known for their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and might therefore have the potential to counteract endotoxin induced effects on the hoof lamellar tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of endotoxins on lamellar tissue integrity and to test if MT and silymarin are capable of inhibiting LPS-induced effects in an in vitro/ex vivo model. In preliminary tests, LPS neutralization efficiency of these phytogenics was determined in an in vitro neutralization assay. Furthermore, tissue explants gained from hooves of slaughter horses were tested for lamellar separation after incubation with different concentrations of LPS. By combined incubation of explants with LPS and either Polymyxin B (PMB; positive control), MT or silymarin, the influence of these substances on LPS-induced effects was assessed. In the in vitro neutralization assay, MT and silymarin reduced LPS concentrations by 64% and 75%, respectively, in comparison PMB reduced 98% of the LPS concentration. In hoof explants, LPS led to a concentration dependent separation. Accordantly, separation force was significantly decreased by 10 µg/mL LPS. PMB, MT and silymarin could significantly improve tissue integrity of explants incubated with 10 µg/mL LPS. This study showed that LPS had a negative influence on the structure of hoof explants in vitro. MT and silymarin reduced endotoxin activity and inhibited LPS-induced effects on the lamellar tissue. Hence, MT and silymarin might be used to support the prevention of laminitis and should be further evaluated for this application. PMID:25290524

  6. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Chun-Hua; Hsu, Pei-Chien; Sun, Yu-Yo; Huang, Yu-Jie; Zhuo, Jiun-Horng; Wang, Chen-Yu; Gan, Yu-Ling; Hung, Chia-Chi; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Shie, Feng-Shiun

    2015-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulates peripheral immunity; but its role in microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in the brain remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AhR mediates both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia. Activation of AhR by its ligands, formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) or 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), attenuated LPS-induced microglial immune responses. AhR also showed proinflammatory effects, as evidenced by the findings that genetic silence of AhR ameliorated the LPS-induced microglial immune responses and LPS-activated microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. Similarly, LPS-induced expressions of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were reduced in the cerebral cortex of AhR-deficient mice. Intriguingly, LPS upregulated and activated AhR in the absence of AhR ligands via the MEK1/2 signaling pathway, which effects were associated with a transient inhibition of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). Although AhR ligands synergistically enhance LPS-induced AhR activation, leading to suppression of LPS-induced microglial immune responses, they cannot do so on their own in microglia. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results further revealed that LPS-FICZ co-treatment, but not LPS alone, not only resulted in co-recruitment of both AhR and NFκB onto the κB site of TNFα gene promoter but also reduced LPS-induced AhR binding to the DRE site of iNOS gene promoter. Together, we provide evidence showing that microglial AhR, which can be activated by LPS, exerts bi-directional effects on the regulation of LPS-induced neuroinflammation, depending on the availability of external AhR ligands. These findings confer further insights into the potential link between environmental factors and the inflammatory brain disorders.

  7. Inhibition of Osteoblastic Cell Differentiation by Lipopolysaccharide Extract from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Kadono, Hiroyuki; Kido, Jun-Ichi; Kataoka, Masatoshi; Yamauchi, Noriyuki; Nagata, Toshihiko

    1999-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P-LPS), an important pathogenic bacterium, is closely associated with inflammatory destruction of periodontal tissues. P-LPS induces the release of cytokines and local factors from inflammatory cells, stimulates osteoclastic-cell differentiation, and causes alveolar bone resorption. However, the effect of P-LPS on osteoblastic-cell differentiation remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of P-LPS extract prepared by the hot-phenol–water method, on the differentiation of primary fetal rat calvaria (RC) cells, which contain a subpopulation of osteoprogenitor cells, into osteoblastic cells. P-LPS extract significantly inhibited bone nodule (BN) formation and the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALPase), an osteoblastic marker, in a dose-dependent manner (0 to 100 ng of P-LPS extract per ml). P-LPS extract (100 ng/ml) significantly decreased BN formation to 27% of the control value and inhibited ALPase activity to approximately 60% of the control level on days 10 to 21 but did not affect RC cell proliferation and viability. P-LPS extract time-dependently suppressed the expression of ALPase mRNA, with an inhibitory pattern similar to that of enzyme activity. The expression of mRNAs for osteocalcin and osteopontin, matrix proteins related to bone metabolism, was markedly suppressed by P-LPS extract. Furthermore, P-LPS extract increased the expression of mRNAs for CD14, LPS receptor, and interleukin-1β in RC cells. These results indicate that P-LPS inhibits osteoblastic-cell differentiation and suggest that LPS-induced bone resorption in periodontal disease may be mediated by effects on osteoblastic as well as osteoclastic cells. PMID:10338489

  8. Lipopolysaccharide heterogeneity in the atypical group of novel emerging Brucella species.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, Michel S; Jacques, Isabelle; Bernardet, Nelly; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2012-09-01

    Recently, novel Brucella strains with phenotypic characteristics that were atypical for strains belonging to the genus Brucella have been reported. Phenotypically many of these strains were initially misidentified as Ochrobactrum spp. Two novel species have been described so far for these strains, i.e., B. microti and B. inopinata, and other strains genetically related to B. inopinata may constitute other novel species as well. In this study, we analyzed the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) (smooth LPS [S-LPS] and rough LPS [R-LPS]) of these atypical strains using different methods and a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against several epitopes of the Brucella O-polysaccharide (O-PS) and R-LPS. Among the most striking results, Brucella sp. strain BO2, isolated from a patient with chronic destructive pneumonia, showed a completely distinct S-LPS profile in silver stain gels that looked more similar to that of enterobacterial S-LPS. This strain also failed to react with MAbs against Brucella O-PS epitopes and showed weak reactivity with anti-R-LPS MAbs. B. inopinata reference strain BO1 displayed an M-dominant S-LPS type with some heterogeneity relative to the classical M-dominant Brucella S-LPS type. Australian wild rodent strains belonging also to the B. inopinata group showed a classical A-dominant S-LPS but lacked the O-PS common (C) epitopes, as previously reported for B. suis biovar 2 strains. Interestingly, some strains also failed to react with anti-R-LPS MAbs, such as the B. microti reference strain and B. inopinata BO1, suggesting modifications in the core-lipid A moieties of these strains. These results have several implications for serological typing and serological diagnosis and underline the need for novel tools for detection and correct identification of such novel emerging Brucella spp.

  9. Dissection of LPS-induced signaling pathways in murine macrophages using LPS analogs, LPS mimetics, and agents unrelated to LPS.

    PubMed

    Vogel, S N; Manthey, C L; Perera, P Y; Li, Z Y; Henricson, B E

    1995-01-01

    The model in Figure 3 summarizes the data presented above. Using the induction of the select panel of LPS-inducible genes and the phosphorylation on tyrosine of specific MAP kinases, we have been able to dissociate three signaling pathways shared by LPS and its analogs and mimetics: a pathway that leads to tyrosine phosphorylation, one that leads to the induction of a gene subset including TNF alpha, TNFR-2, and IL-1 beta, and a pathway that results in induction of IP-10, D3, and D8 gene expression. It is still unclear if macrophage activation by non-LPS products occurs entirely through distinct yet redundant pathways or if other signaling receptors ultimately tie into the same intermediate pathways. This approach may identify particular stimuli as tools to induce specific pathways leading to select gene subsets and/or tyrosine kinase activation and, perhaps, identify a pathway deficient in C3H/HeJ macrophages.

  10. Circulating leptin mediates lipopolysaccharide-induced anorexia and fever in rats.

    PubMed

    Sachot, Christelle; Poole, Stephen; Luheshi, Giamal N

    2004-11-15

    Anorexia and fever are important features of the host's response to inflammation that can be triggered by the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the appetite suppressant leptin. Previous studies have demonstrated that LPS induces leptin synthesis and secretion in the periphery, and that the action of leptin on appetite suppression and fever are dependent on brain interleukin (IL)-1beta. However, the role of leptin as a neuroimmune mediator of LPS-induced inflammation has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we neutralized circulating leptin using a leptin antiserum (LAS) and determined how this neutralization affected LPS-induced anorexia, fever and hypothalamic IL-1beta. Adult male rats were separated into four treatment groups, namely LPS + normal sheep serum (NSS), LPS + LAS, saline + LAS and saline + NSS. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS (100 microg kg(-1)) induced a significant reduction in food intake and body weight, which were significantly reversed in the presence of LAS (1 ml kg(-1)), 8 and 24 h after treatment. In addition, LPS-induced fever was significantly attenuated by LAS over the duration of the fever response (8 h). Lipopolysaccharide induced an increase of circulating IL-6, another potential circulating pyrogen, which was not affected by neutralization of leptin at 2 h. Interleukin-1beta mRNA at 1 and 8 h, and IL-1 receptor antagonist (ra) at 2 h were significantly upregulated in the hypothalamus of LPS-treated animals. The induction of these cytokines was attenuated in the presence of LAS. These results are the first to demonstrate that leptin is a circulating mediator of LPS-induced anorexia and fever, probably through a hypothalamic IL-1beta-dependent mechanism.

  11. Evidence that the anorexia induced by lipopolysaccharide is mediated by the 5-HT2C receptor.

    PubMed

    von Meyenburg, Claudia; Langhans, Wolfgang; Hrupka, Brian J

    2003-01-01

    Rats consistently reduce their food intake following injections of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Because inhibition of serotonergic (5-HT) activity by 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT(1A) activation) attenuates LPS-induced anorexia, we conducted a series of studies to examine whether other 5-HT-receptors are involved in the mediation of peripheral LPS-induced anorexia. In all experiments, rats were injected with LPS (100 microg/kg body weight [BW] ip) at lights out (hour 0). Antagonists were administered peripherally at hour 4, shortly after the onset of anorexia, which presumably follows the enhanced cytokine production after LPS. Food intake was then recorded during the subsequent 2 h or longer. 5-HT receptor antagonists cyanopindolol and SB 224289 (5-HT(1B)), ketanserin (5-HT(2A)), RS-102221 (5-HT(2C)), and metoclopramide (5-HT(3)) failed to attenuate LPS-induced anorexia. In contrast, both ritanserin (5-HT(2A/C)-receptor antagonist) (0.5 mg/kg BW) and SB 242084 (5-HT(2C)) (0.3 mg/kg BW) attenuated LPS-induced anorexia at doses that did not alter food intake in non-LPS-treated rats (all P<.01). Our results suggest that at least part of the anorexia following peripheral LPS administration is mediated through an enhanced 5-HT-ergic activity and the 5-HT(2C) receptor.

  12. Activation of human and mouse Kupffer cells by lipopolysaccharide is mediated by CD14.

    PubMed

    Su, Grace L; Goyert, Sanna M; Fan, Ming-Hui; Aminlari, Alireza; Gong, Ke Qin; Klein, Richard D; Myc, Andrzej; Alarcon, William H; Steinstraesser, Lars; Remick, Daniel G; Wang, Stewart C

    2002-09-01

    Upregulation of CD14 in Kupffer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several forms of liver injury, including alcoholic liver disease. However, it remains unclear whether CD14 mediates lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling in this specialized liver macrophage population. In this series of experiments, we determined the role of CD14 in LPS activation of Kupffer cells by using several complementary approaches. First, we isolated Kupffer cells from human livers and studied the effects of anti-CD14 antibodies on LPS activation of these cells. Kupffer cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of LPS in the presence and absence of recombinant human LPS binding protein (LBP). With increasing concentrations of LPS, human Kupffer cell tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production (a marker for Kupffer cell activation) increased in a dose-dependent manner in the presence and absence of LBP. In the presence of anti-human CD14 antibodies, the production of TNF-alpha was significantly diminished. Second, we compared LPS activation of Kupffer cells isolated from wild-type and CD14 knockout mice. Kupffer cells from CD14 knockout mice produced significantly less TNF-alpha in response to the same amount of LPS. Together, these data strongly support a critical role for CD14 in Kupffer cell responses to LPS.

  13. The Aeromonas salmonicida Lipopolysaccharide Core from Different Subspecies: The Unusual subsp. pectinolytica.

    PubMed

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Initial hydridization tests using Aeromonas salmonicida typical and atypical strains showed the possibility of different lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer cores among these strains. By chemical structural analysis, LPS-core SDS-PAGE gel migration, and functional and comparative genomics we demonstrated that typical A. salmonicida (subsp. salmonicida) strains and atypical subsp. masoucida and probably smithia strains showed the same LPS outer core. A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes strains show a similar LPS outer core but lack one of the most external residues (a galactose linked α1-6 to heptose), not affecting the O-antigen LPS linkage. A. salmonicida subsp. pectinolytica strains show a rather changed LPS outer core, which is identical to the LPS outer core from the majority of the A. hydrophila strains studied by genomic analyses. The LPS inner core in all tested A. salmonicida strains, typical and atypical, is well-conserved. Furthermore, the LPS inner core seems to be conserved in all the Aeromonas (psychrophilic or mesophilic) strains studied by genomic analyses.

  14. The Characteristics and Function of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides and Their Endotoxic Potential in Humans.

    PubMed

    Gnauck, Anne; Lentle, Roger G; Kruger, Marlena C

    2016-05-03

    Cross-talk between enteral microbiota and human host is essential for the development and maintenance of the human gastrointestinal and systemic immune systems. The presence of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) lysed from the cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria in the gut lumen is thought to promote the development of a balanced gut immune response whilst the entry of the same LPS into systemic circulation may lead to a deleterious pro-inflammatory systemic immune response. Recent data suggest that chronically low levels of circulating LPS may be associated with the development of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. This review focuses on the cross-talk between enteral commensal bacteria and the human immune system via LPS. We explain the structural characterisation of the LPS molecule and its function in the bacteria. We then examine how LPS is recognised by various elements of the human immune system and the signalling pathways that are activated by the structure of the LPS molecule and the effect of various concentrations. Further, we discuss the sequelae of this signalling in the gut-associated and systemic immune systems i.e. the neutralisation of LPS and the development of tolerance to LPS.

  15. Maintenance of the enteric stem cell niche by bacterial lipopolysaccharides? Evidence and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Anne; Klotz, Markus; Schwab, Tanja; Di Liddo, Rosa; Bertalot, Thomas; Schrenk, Sandra; Martin, Monika; Nguyen, The Duy; Nguyen, Thi Nha Quyen; Gries, Manuela; Faßbender, Klaus; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2014-07-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) has to respond to continuously changing microenvironmental challenges within the gut and is therefore dependent on a neural stem cell niche to keep the ENS functional throughout life. In this study, we hypothesize that this stem cell niche is also affected during inflammation and therefore investigated lipopolysaccharides (LPS) effects on enteric neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). NSPCs were derived from the ENS and cultured under the influence of different LPS concentrations. LPS effects upon proliferation and differentiation of enteric NSPC cultures were assessed using immunochemistry, flow cytometry, western blot, Multiplex ELISA and real-time PCR. LPS enhances the proliferation of enteric NSPCs in a dose-dependent manner. It delays and modifies the differentiation of these cells. The expression of the LPS receptor toll-like receptor 4 on NSPCs could be demonstrated. Moreover, LPS induces the secretion of several cytokines. Flow cytometry data gives evidence for individual subgroups within the NSPC population. ENS-derived NSPCs respond to LPS in maintaining at least partially their stem cell character. In the case of inflammatory disease or trauma where the liberation and exposure to LPS will be increased, the expansion of NSPCs could be a first step towards regeneration of the ENS. The reduced and altered differentiation, as well as the induction of cytokine signalling, demonstrates that the stem cell niche may take part in the LPS-transmitted inflammatory processes in a direct and defined way.

  16. Inverse effects of lipopolysaccharides on anxiety in pregnant mice and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Solati, Jalal; Kleehaupt, Eva; Kratz, Oliver; Moll, Gunther H; Golub, Yulia

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure during early pregnancy on anxiety-related behaviour of both pregnant female mice and their male offspring. Pregnant NMRI mice were treated with subcutaneous injections of LPS (30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 μg/kg) on the tenth gestational day of pregnancy. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and corticosterone levels, were measured in maternal serum 1.5h following the LPS injections. Baseline anxiety levels of pregnant mice (1.5h after LPS administration) and their male offspring (at postnatal days 60-70) were investigated with the elevated plus maze (EPM) test. In addition, anxiety levels in the offspring were measured after 2h restraint stress or TNF-α (10 μg/kg) administration. Our results demonstrate that LPS administration induces anxiety-like behaviour and a significant increase in cytokines and corticosterone levels in maternal serum. However, in male offspring, prenatal LPS administration has no significant effects on serum cytokines and corticosterone secretion with an exception of the lowest LPS dose that slightly reduced corticosterone levels. Interestingly, prenatal LPS treatment seemed to decrease the baseline anxiety levels, while pretreatment with restraint stress or TNF-α abolished this anxiolytic effects. In summary, our results suggest that prenatal exposure to LPS during early pregnancy may result in reduced baseline anxiety in adult male offspring.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: biosynthesis and extraction from the inner membrane

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brent W.; May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The network of charges and sugars provided by the dense packing of LPS molecules in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane interferes with the entry of hydrophobic compounds into the cell, including many antibiotics. In addition, LPS can be recognized by the immune system and plays a crucial role in many interactions between bacteria and their animal hosts. LPS is synthesized in the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, so it must be transported across their cell envelope to assemble at the cell surface. Over the past two decades, much of the research on LPS biogenesis has focused on the discovery and understanding of Lpt, a multi-protein complex that spans the cell envelope and functions to transport LPS from the inner membrane to the outer membrane. This paper focuses on the early steps of the transport of LPS by the Lpt machinery: the extraction of LPS from the inner membrane. The accompanying paper (May JM, Sherman DJ, Simpson BW, Ruiz N, Kahne D. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150027. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0027)) describes the subsequent steps as LPS travels through the periplasm and the outer membrane to its final destination at the cell surface. PMID:26370941

  18. Modifications of Bordetella bronchiseptica core lipopolysaccharide influence immune response without affecting protective activity.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Federico; Fernández, Julieta; Cordero, Andrés; Casabuono, Adriana; Couto, Alicia; Hozbor, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica produces respiratory disease primarily in mammals including humans. Although a considerably amount of research has been generated regarding lipopolysaccharide (LPS) role during infection and stimulating innate and adaptive immune response, mechanisms involved in LPS synthesis are still unknown. In this context we searched in B. bronchiseptica genome for putative glycosyltransferases. We found possible genes codifying for enzymes involved in sugar substitution of the LPS structure. We decided to analyse BB3394 to BB3400 genes, closed to a previously described LPS biosynthetic locus in B. pertussis. Particularly, conservation of BB3394 in sequenced B. bronchiseptica genomes suggests the importance of this gene for bacteria normal physiology. Deletion of BB3394 abolished resistance to naive serum as described for other LPS mutants. When purified LPS was analyzed, differences in the LPS core structure were found. Particularly, a GalNA branched sugar substitution in the core was absent in the LPS obtained from BB3394 deletion mutant. Absence of GalNA in core LPS alters immune response in vivo but is able to induce protective response against B. bronchiseptica infection.

  19. AS-703026 Inhibits LPS-Induced TNFα Production through MEK/ERK Dependent and Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Wu, Yonghong; Li, Manxiang; Qiu, Xiaojuan; Bai, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by intense lung infiltrations of immune cells (macrophages and monocytes). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates macrophages/monocytes, leading to production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and other cytokines, which cause subsequent lung damages. In the current study, our results demonstrated that AS-703026, a novel MEK/ERK inhibitor, suppressed LPS-induced TNFα mRNA expression and protein secretion in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages, and in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Meanwhile, TNFα production in LPS-stimulated COPD patents’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was also repressed by AS-703026. At the molecular level, we showed that AS-703026 blocked LPS-induced MEK/ERK activation in above macrophages/monocytes. However, restoring ERK activation in AS-703026-treated RAW 264.7 cells by introducing a constitutive-actively (CA)-ERK1 only partially reinstated LPS-mediated TNFα production. Meanwhile, AS-703026 could still inhibit TNFα response in ERK1/2-depleted (by shRNA) RAW 264.7 cells. Significantly, we found that AS-703026 inhibited LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activation in above macrophages and COPD patients’ PBMCs. In vivo, oral administration of AS-703026 inhibited LPS-induced TNFα production and endotoxin shock in BALB/c mice. Together, we show that AS-703026 in vitro inhibits LPS-induced TNFα production in macrophages/monocytes, and in vivo protects mice from LPS-induced endotoxin shock. Thus, it could be further studied as a useful anti-inflammatory therapy for COPD patients. PMID:26381508

  20. Identification of a novel compound that inhibits iNOS and COX-2 expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages from Schisandra chinensis.

    PubMed

    Lee, You Jin; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Sun Gun; Park, Da Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Lee, Sang Joon; Yoon, Sik; Kim, Young Hun; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Choi, Young-Whan

    2010-01-22

    A novel alpha-iso-cubebenol, which has anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages, was isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis. alpha-iso-cubebenolinhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production. Consistent with these findings, alpha-iso-cubebenol also reduced the LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 at the protein and mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent manner. alpha-iso-cubebenol also inhibited LPS-induced nuclear translocation of the NF-kappaB p65 subunit. Furthermore, alpha-iso-cubebenol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 kinase induced by LPS. Since the novel alpha-iso-cubebenol blocked the production of several pro-inflammatory mediators induced by LPS in macrophages, the molecule can be useful material for the development of anti-inflammatory agents against bacterial infections or endotoxin.

  1. Effects of cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharides from microcystis on glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo.

    PubMed

    Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; Gantar, Miroslav; Mayer, Gregory D; Gibbs, Patrick D L; Berry, John P

    2012-06-01

    Cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae") are recognized producers of a diverse array of toxic secondary metabolites. Of these, the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), produced by all cyanobacteria, remain to be well investigated. In the current study, we specifically employed the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo to investigate the effects of LPS from geographically diverse strains of the widespread cyanobacterial genus, Microcystis, on several detoxifying enzymes/pathways, including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)/glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), and compared observed effects to those of heterotrophic bacterial (i.e., E. coli) LPS. In agreement with previous studies, cyanobacterial LPS significantly reduced GST in embryos exposed to LPS in all treatments. In contrast, GPx moderately increased in embryos exposed to LPS, with no effect on reciprocal GR activity. Interestingly, total glutathione levels were elevated in embryos exposed to Microcystis LPS, but the relative levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH/GSSG) were, likewise, elevated suggesting that oxidative stress is not involved in the observed effects as typical of heterotrophic bacterial LPS in mammalian systems. In further support of this, no effect was observed with respect to CAT or SOD activity. These findings demonstrate that Microcystis LPS affects glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish embryo, and more generally, that this model is well suited for investigating the apparent toxicophore of cyanobacterial LPS, including possible differences in structure-activity relationships between heterotrophic and cyanobacterial LPS, and teleost fish versus mammalian systems.

  2. Supplementation with vitamin D3 during pregnancy protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced neural tube defects through improving placental folate transportation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Hua; Yu, Zhen; Fu, Lin; Xia, Mi-Zhen; Zhao, Mei; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Hu, Yong-Fang; Tao, Fang-Biao; Xu, De-Xiang

    2015-05-01

    Several reports demonstrated that maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure at middle gestational stage caused neural tube defects (NTDs). This study investigated the effects of supplementation with vitamin D3 (VitD3) during pregnancy on LPS-induced NTDs. Pregnant mice except controls were ip injected with LPS (25 μg/kg) daily from gestational day (GD)8 to GD12. In LPS+VitD3 group, pregnant mice were orally administered with VitD3 (25 μg/kg) before LPS injection. As expected, a 5-day LPS injection resulted in 62.5% (10/16) of dams and 20.3% of fetuses with NTDs. Additional experiment showed that a 5-day LPS injection downregulated placental proton-coupled folate transporter (pcft) and reduced folate carrier 1 (rfc1), 2 major folate transporters in placentas. Consistent with downregulation of placental folate transporters, folate transport from maternal circulation into embryos was disturbed in LPS-treated mice. Interestingly, VitD3 not only inhibited placental inflammation but also attenuated LPS-induced downregulation of placental folate transporters. Correspondingly, VitD3 markedly improved folate transport from maternal circulation into the embryos. Importantly, supplementation with VitD3 during pregnancy protected mice from LPS-induced NTDs. Taken together, these results suggest that supplementation with VitD3 during pregnancy prevents LPS-induced NTDs through inhibiting placental inflammation and improving folate transport from maternal circulation into the embryos.

  3. Surfactant-assisted lipopolysaccharide conjugation employing a cyanopyridinium agent and its application to a competitive assay.

    PubMed

    Pallarola, Diego; Battaglini, Fernando

    2009-05-15

    The activation of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) in the presence of a surfactant allows an efficient conjugation with dansyl hydrazine or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in an aqueous medium maintaining its biological activity. In order to promote the reaction a series of amphiphilic compounds were tested, sodium deoxycholate being the most suitable. The method presents several advantages: it is carried out in a mild environment, good conjugation ratios are obtained, it is suitable for any label bearing amino, hydrazine, or hydrazide groups, and the LPS endotoxic and HRP enzymatic activities are preserved. The HRP conjugate is applied in an amperometric competitive assay for the detection of lipopolysaccharides in an electrode array combined with a multipotentiostat able to carry out simultaneous determinations. The system is able to detect samples in concentrations as low as 100 pg mL(-1) of LPS.

  4. The N-terminal half of membrane CD14 is a functional cellular lipopolysaccharide receptor.

    PubMed

    Viriyakosol, S; Kirkland, T N

    1996-02-01

    CD14, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein on the surface of monocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, is a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It was recently reported that an N-terminal 152-amino-acid fragment of soluble CD14 was an active soluble lipopolysaccharide receptor (T. S. -C. Juan, M. J. Kelley, D. A. Johnson, L. A. Busse, E. Hailman, S. D. Wright, and H. S. Lichenstein, J. Biol. Chem. 270:1382-1387, 1995). To determine whether the N-terminal half of the membrane CD14 was a functional LPS receptor on the cell membrane, we engineered a chimeric gene coding for amino acids 1 to 151 of CD14 fused to the C-terminal region of decay-accelerating factor and expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells and 70Z/3 cells. We found that the chimeric, truncated CD14 is a fully functional LPS receptor in both cell lines.

  5. Computer simulation of the rough lipopolysaccharide membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Lins, R D; Straatsma, T P

    2001-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) form the major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and are believed to play a key role in processes that govern microbial metal binding, microbial adsorption to mineral surfaces, and microbe-mediated oxidation/reduction reactions at the bacterial exterior surface. A computational modeling capability is being developed for the study of geochemical reactions at the outer bacterial envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. A molecular model for the rough LPS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been designed based on experimentally determined structural information. An electrostatic model was developed based on Hartree-Fock SCF calculations of the complete LPS molecule to obtain partial atomic charges. The exterior of the bacterial membrane was assembled by replication of a single LPS molecule and a single phospholipid molecule. Molecular dynamics simulations of the rough LPS membrane of P. aeruginosa were carried out and trajectories were analyzed for the energetic and structural factors that determine the role of LPS in processes at the cell surface. PMID:11463645

  6. Preventive Effects of Carnosine on Lipopolysaccharide-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Sugizaki, Toshifumi; Kanda, Yuki; Tamura, Fumiya; Niino, Tomomi; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute lung injury, which involves neutrophilic inflammation and pulmonary cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in ARDS development. New compounds for inhibiting the onset and progression of ARDS are required. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a small di-peptide with numerous activities, including antioxidant effects, metal chelation, proton buffering capacity and the inhibition of protein carbonylation and glycoxidation. We have examined the preventive effects of carnosine on tissue injury, oedema and inflammation in a murine model for ARDS. Oral administration of carnosine suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular permeability, tissue injury and inflammation in the lung. In vivo imaging analysis revealed that LPS administration increased the level of ROS and that this increase was inhibited by carnosine administration. Carnosine also suppressed LPS-induced neutrophilic inflammation (evaluated by activation of myeloperoxidase in the lung and increased extracellular DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid). Furthermore, carnosine administration suppressed the LPS-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress response in vivo. These results suggest that the oral administration of carnosine suppresses LPS-induced lung injury via carnosine’s ROS-reducing activity. Therefore, carnosine may be beneficial for suppressing the onset and progression of ARDS. PMID:28205623

  7. Lack of TCRalphabeta+ CD8+ and TCRgammadelta+ lymphocytes ameliorates LPS induced orchitis in mice--preliminary histological observations.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, Leopold; Macura, Barbara; Majewska-Szczepanik, Monika; Szczepanik, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The inflammation of the reproductive system can affect reproduction causing partial or complete infertility. It is well known that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggers an inflammatory response in the whole organism, including immunologically privileged organs, e.g. the testicles. Adult male TCRalpha-/-, TCRdelta-/-, CD1d-/- and beta2m-/- on B10.PL (H-2(u)) and B10.PL control mice were intraperitonealy (i.p.) injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The animals were killed 24h and 10 days post LPS treatment and their gonads were prepared for microscopic examination. Histological changes in the testes after LPS injection were found only in control B10PL and CD1d-/- mice. The experiments revealed disturbances in Leydig's glands structure, blood vessel dilatation in the interstitial tissue as well as degeneration of seminal tubule epithelium, disruption ofspermatogenesis and subsequent decrease of sperm cell number in the tubule lumen. These changes were noticed mainly 10 days after LPS treatment. Lack of either TCRalphabeta+ CD8+ or TCRgammadelta+ lymphocytes diminishes the response of testicular macrophages to LPS whereas the absence of CD1d-dependent NKT cells does not affect macrophage reactivity.

  8. A novel PPARα agonist propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide inhibits inflammation in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Yan, Lu; Luo, Xiu-Mei; Peng, Lu; Guo, Han; Jing, Zuo; Yang, Li-Chao; Hu, Rong; Wang, Xuan; Huang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Yi-Qing; Jin, Xin

    2016-10-05

    Our group synthesized propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide (N15), a novel peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonist. Because PPARα activation is associated with inflammation control, we hypothesize that N15 may have anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the effect of N15 on the regulation of inflammation in THP-1 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In particular, we assessed the production of chemokines, adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokines, three important types of cytokines that are released from monocytes and are involved in the development of atherosclerosis. The results showed that N15 remarkably reduced the mRNA expression of chemokines, such as monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 or CCL2), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10 or CXCL10), and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). N15 also decreased the protein expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and 9. The reduction in the expression of cytokine mRNAs observed following N15 treatment was abrogated in THP-1 cells treated with PPARα siRNA, indicating that the anti-inflammatory effects of N15 are dependent on PPARα activation. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inhibition, which are dependent on PPARα activation, were also involved in the mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of N15. In conclusion, the novel PPARα agonist, N15, exerts notable anti-inflammatory effects, which are mediated via PPARα activation and TLR4/NF-κB and STAT3 inhibition, in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. In our study, N15 exhibits promise for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  9. Augmentation of autologous T cell reactivity with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts by Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists.

    PubMed

    Zhong, RuiKun; Li, Hongying; Messer, Karen; Lane, Thomas A; Zhou, Jiehua; Ball, Edward D

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated whether TNF-α, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7/8 agonist resiquimod (R848), the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and their combinations can enhance autologous AML-reactive T cell generation in an in vitro culture. AML peripheral blood or bone marrow mononuclear cells were cultured in medium supplemented with GM-CSF/IL-4 to induce dendritic cell (DC) differentiation of AML blasts (AML-DC). The impact of TNF-α, LPS, R848 and their combinations on AML-DC cultures was analyzed. Significantly enhanced CD80, CD40, CD83, CD54, HLA-DR and CD86 expression of AML cells was observed by addition of TNF-α, LPS, R848 alone or combinations. Induced CD80 expression of AML cells was significantly higher through the combination of TNF-α, LPS and R848 (T + L + R) than that by T alone. CTL induced from T + L + R, T + R, T + L, L + R and R, but not T, L alone stimulated cultures showed significantly higher IFN-γ release than the medium control in response to autologous AML cells. IFN-γ release by T + L + R was significantly higher than T or L alone, and T + R was significantly higher than T alone. CTL generated from T + L + R, T + L, T + R, L + R and L alone exerted significantly higher AML cell killing than medium control. AML cell killing by T + L + R and T + R was significantly higher than T or R alone. These results indicate that the combination of T + L + R induces a significantly enhanced antigen presentation effect of AML-DC. We speculate that the complementary effects of reagent combinations may better address the heterogeneity of responses to any single agent in AML cells from different patients.

  10. LPS-induced microvascular leukocytosis can be assessed by blue-field entoptic phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kolodjaschna, Julia; Berisha, Fatmire; Lung, Solveig; Schaller, Georg; Polska, Elzbieta; Jilma, Bernd; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2004-08-01

    Administration of low doses of Escherichia coli endotoxin [a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] to humans enables the study of inflammatory mechanisms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the blue-field entoptic technique may be used to quantify the increase in circulating leukocytes in the ocular microvasculature after LPS infusion. In addition, combined laser Doppler velocimetry and retinal vessel size measurement were used to study red blood cell movement. Twelve healthy male volunteers received 20 IU/kg iv LPS as a bolus infusion. Outcome parameters were measured at baseline and 4 h after LPS administration. In the first protocol (n = 6 subjects), ocular hemodynamic effects were assessed with the blue-field entoptic technique, the retinal vessel analyzer, and laser Doppler velocimetry. In the second protocol (n = 6 subjects), white blood cell (WBC) counts from peripheral blood samples and blue-field entoptic technique measurements were performed. LPS caused peripheral blood leukocytosis and increased WBC density in ocular microvessels (by 49%; P = 0.036) but did not change WBC velocity. In addition, retinal venous diameter was increased (by 9%; P = 0.008), but red blood cell velocity remained unchanged. The LPS-induced changes in retinal WBC density and leukocyte counts were significantly correlated (r = 0.87). The present study indicates that the blue-field entoptic technique can be used to assess microvascular leukocyte recruitment in vivo. In addition, our data indicate retinal venous dilation in response to endotoxin.

  11. Inhibition of nitric oxide production rescues LPS-induced fetal abortion in mice.

    PubMed

    Athanassakis, I; Aifantis, I; Ranella, A; Giouremou, K; Vassiliadis, S

    1999-06-01

    In this report, we examined the involvement of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-10 as well as nitric oxide (NO) in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced experimental abortion model in BALB/c mice. Although in vivo administration of LPS in pregnant mice showed a 72% decrease of serum IL-10, no significant difference in serum TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and IL-4 levels, compared to controls, could be detected. At the same time, a correlation of fetal abortion and maternal splenomegaly with an important increase of NO synthesis in the serum was obtained. Simultaneous administration of LPS and aminoguanidine (AG; an inhibitor to NO synthase) rescued the LPS-induced fetal abortion, reduced maternal spleen weight to physiological levels, and decreased serum NO concentration to control levels. In vitro experiments showed that LPS directly induced NO production in primary placental cells and the TPOPHO-1 trophoblast cell line by stimulating the inducible isoform of NO synthase, which ultimately could be blocked by the NO synthase inhibitors AG and L-NAME. The results indicate that LPS, despite its beneficial involvement in intracellular infections, participates in inflammatory/autoimmune damage during pregnancy, leading to embryotoxicity, which is closely linked to the NO pathway.

  12. Caffeine prevents LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Kui-Jin; Ryu, Su-Jung; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2016-03-25

    Caffeine is a white crystalline xanthine alkaloid found in the seeds of coffee plants and leaves of the tea bush. In this study, we evaluated whether caffeine exerts anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. RAW264.7 cells were treated with various concentrations of caffeine in the presence or absence of LPS. Caffeine decreased the LPS-induced inflammatory mediator, nitric oxide (NO). Caffeine treatment also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-3, IL-6 and IL-12, and decreased both IL-6 secretion and phosphorylated p38MAPK expression in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Caffeine inhibited nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) via IκBα phosphorylation. In addition, caffeine inhibited LPS-induced NO production in zebrafish. These results suggest that caffeine may suppress LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells by regulating NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation.

  13. Pulmonary epithelial CCR3 promotes LPS-induced lung inflammation by mediating release of IL-8.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Dong, Chunling; Wang, Guifang; Zheng, Huiru; Wang, Xiangdong; Bai, Chunxue

    2011-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 from pulmonary epithelial cells has been suggested to play an important role in the airway inflammation, although the mechanism remains unclear. We envisioned a possibility that pulmonary epithelial CCR3 could be involved in secretion and regulation of IL-8 and promote lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung inflammation. Human bronchial epithelial cell line NCI-H292 and alveolar type II epithelial cell line A549 were used to test role of CCR3 in production of IL-8 at cellular level. In vivo studies were performed on C57/BL6 mice instilled intratracheally with LPS in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). The activity of a CCR3-specific inhibitor (SB-328437) was measured in both in vitro and in vivo systems. We found that expression of CCR3 in NCI-H292 and A549 cells were increased by 23% and 16%, respectively, 24 h after the challenge with LPS. LPS increased the expression of CCR3 in NCI-H292 and A549 cells in a time-dependent manner, which was inhibited significantly by SB-328437. SB-328437 also diminished neutrophil recruitment in alveolar airspaces and improved LPS-induced ALI and production of IL-8 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These results suggest that pulmonary epithelial CCR3 be involved in progression of LPS-induced lung inflammation by mediating release of IL-8. CCR3 in pulmonary epithelia may be an attractive target for development of therapies for ALI.

  14. Exogenous rhTRX reduces lipid accumulation under LPS-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gi-Yeon; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Park, Hey-won; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2014-01-01

    Redox-regulating molecule, recombinant human thioredoxin (rhTRX) which shows anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative effects against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammation and regulate protein expression levels. LPS-induced reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and NO production were inhibited by exogenous rhTRX. We identified up/downregulated intracellular proteins under the LPS-treated condition in exogenous rhTRX-treated A375 cells compared with non-LPS-treated cells via 2-DE proteomic analysis. Also, we quantitatively measured cytokines of in vivo mouse inflammation models using cytometry bead array. Exogenous rhTRX inhibited LPS-stimulated production of ROI and NO levels. TIP47 and ATP synthase may influence the inflammation-related lipid accumulation by affecting lipid metabolism. The modulation of skin redox environments during inflammation is most likely to prevent alterations in lipid metabolism through upregulation of TIP47 and ATP synthase and downregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Our results demonstrate that exogenous rhTRX has anti-inflammatory properties and intracellular regulatory activity in vivo and in vitro. Monitoring of LPS-stimulated pro-inflammatory conditions treated with rhTRX in A375 cells could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up of inflammation reduction related with candidate proteins. These results have a therapeutic role in skin inflammation therapy. PMID:24406320

  15. The anti-inflammatory effect of TR6 on LPS-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Fu, Yunhe; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Zecai; Zhang, Wenlong; Gao, Xuejiao; Lu, Xiaojie; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2016-01-01

    [TRIAP]-derived decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRIAP-derived decoy peptide (TR6) containing, the N-terminal portion of the third helical region of the [TIRAP] TIR domain (sequence "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK and -KPGFLRDPWCKYQML-"C"). We evaluated the effects of TR6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, the mastitis model was induced by LPS administration for 24h, and TR6 treatment was initiated 1h before or after induction of LPS. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells and neutrophils were used to investigate the effects of TR6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TR6 significantly inhibited mammary gland hisopathologic changes, MPO activity, and LPS-induced production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. In vitro, TR6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production and phosphorylation of NF-κB and MAPKs. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of TR6 against LPS-induced mastitis may be due to its ability to inhibit TLR4-mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. TR6 may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment.

  16. Heterotrimeric G proteins physically associated with the lipopolysaccharide receptor CD14 modulate both in vivo and in vitro responses to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Kurt-Jones, E A; Saladino, R A; Stack, A M; Dunn, I F; Ferretti, M; Golenbock, D; Fleisher, G R; Finberg, R W

    1998-01-01

    Septic shock induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggering of cytokine production from monocytes/macrophages is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The major monocyte/macrophage LPS receptor is the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein CD14. Here we demonstrate that CD14 coimmunoprecipitates with Gi/Go heterotrimeric G proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that heterotrimeric G proteins specifically regulate CD14-mediated, LPS-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and cytokine production in normal human monocytes and cultured cells. We report here that a G protein binding peptide protects rats from LPS-induced mortality, suggesting a functional linkage between a GPI-anchored receptor and the intracellular signaling molecules with which it is physically associated. PMID:9835628

  17. Deletion of Cmu genes in mouse B lymphocytes upon stimulation with LPS.

    PubMed

    Radbruch, A; Sablitzky, F

    1983-01-01

    Mouse B lymphocytes can be activated polyclonally by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to differentiate into plasmablasts. Within several days many cells perform immunoglobulin (Ig) class switching in vitro. We have purified LPS blasts expressing IgM or only IgG3 on the cell surface and analysed the DNA of these cells by Southern hybridisation blotting to detect rearrangement or deletion of CH genes. Quantitative evaluation of the Southern blots suggests that populations of surface IgG3+ (sIgG3+) cells from 6-day and sIgM+ cells from 8-day-old cultures contain only about half as many Cmu genes as spleen cells. Cmu deletion is nearly complete in populations of sIgG3+ cells from 9-day-old cultures. Therefore, upon stimulation with LPS, within a few days Cmu is deleted in most sIgG3+ cells from both chromosomes.

  18. Extraction, Purification and Characterization of Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Simin; Amirmozaffari, Noor; Tabarraei, Bahman; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Zarei, Omid; Alizadeh, Reza; Masjedian, Faramarz; Zarnani, Amir Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important structural component of the outer cell membrane complex of gram negative microorganisms. Its causative role in gram negative bacteria-induced diseases and broad applications in different kinds of cell stimulation experiments provided a conceptual basis for studies directed at the isolation, purification, and detailed chemical characterization of LPS. The main problem with LPS purification protocols is the contamination of the end product with nucleic acids and proteins in variable proportions which could potentially interfere with downstream applications. In this study, a simple procedure for purification of LPS from Escherichia coli (E.coli) and Salmonella typhi (S.typhi) with high purity and very low contaminating nucleic acids and proteins based on the hot phenol-water extraction protocol has been introduced. The purity of extracted LPS was evaluated by silver and coomassie blue staining of SDS-PAGE gels and HPLC analysis. Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) coagulation activity and rabbit pyrogen assay were exploited to monitor the functionality of purified LPS. The results showed that DNase and RNase treatment of the sample is essential after the sonication step to eliminate nucleic acid contamination in the LPS fraction. Silver staining demonstrated ladder pattern which is characteristic of LPS. No contaminating protein was found as assessed by coomassie blue staining. HPLC fractionation revealed high degree of purity comparable with commercial LPS. Parenteral administration of purified LPS resulted in substantial increase of rabbits' body temperature (mean: 1.45°C). LAL coagulation assay confirmed the functional activity of the purified LPS. In conclusion, the protocol presented here could be employed for isolation of LPS with high purity and functional activity.

  19. The Role of IL-17 in a Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Rhinitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jun-Sang; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Eun Hee

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria and important for pro-inflammatory mediators. This study aimed to establish a rhinitis model using ovalbumin (OVA) and LPS in order to evaluate the role of interleukin (IL)-17 in the pathogenesis of an LPS-induced non-eosionophilic rhinitis model. Methods Mice were divided into 4 groups and each group consisted of 10 mice (negative control group, allergic rhinitis model group, 1-µg LPS treatment group, and 10-µg LPS treatment group). BALB/c mice were sensitized with OVA and 1 or 10 µg of LPS, and challenged intranasally with OVA. Multiple parameters of rhinitis were also evaluated to establish the LPS-induced rhinitis model. IL-17 knockout mice were used to check if the LPS-induced rhinitis model were dependent on IL-17. Eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration, and mRNA and protein expression profiles of cytokine in nasal mucosa or spleen cell culture were evaluated using molecular, biochemical, histopathological, and immunohistological methods. Results In the LPS-induced rhinitis model, neutrophil infiltration increased in the nasal mucosa, and systemic and nasal IL-17 and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) levels also increased as compared with the OVA-induced allergic rhinitis model. These findings were LPS-dose-dependent. In IL-17 knockout mice, those phenotypes (neutrophil infiltration, IL-17, and IFN-γ) were reversed, showing IL-17 dependency of LPS-induced rhinitis. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important mediator for inflammation and angiogenesis, decreased in IL-17 knockout mice, showing the relationship between IL-17 and VEGF. Conclusions This study established an LPS-induced rhinitis model dependent on IL-17, characterized by neutrophil infiltration and increased expression of IL-17. PMID:28102062

  20. Protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum NDC 75017 against lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinyan; Jiang, Yujun

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the protective effect of Lactobacillus plantarum NDC 75017 (L. plantarum NDC 75017) against acute liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Thirty male mice were randomly divided into the control, LPS, and LPS + L. plantarum NDC 75017 groups. In the LPS + L. plantarum group, the mice were orally pretreated with L. plantarum NDC 75017 for 15 days. At 16 days, the mice in the LPS and LPS + L. plantarum NDC 75017 groups were intraperitoneally injected with LPS at 4 mg/kg body weight, whereas the control mice were treated with an equal amount of saline. After 8 h, the serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and histology changes were examined. The oxidative stress markers and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the liver were also examined. Meanwhile, the expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) mRNA and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the liver was determined by qRT-PCR. The LPS group showed an increase in ALT and AST, whereas the LPS + L. plantarum NDC 75017 group showed a significant decrease. In addition, pretreatment with L. plantarum NDC 75017 can attenuate LPS-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Furthermore, the increase of hepatic NF-κB and TLR4 mRNA induced by LPS was significantly downregulated by the pretreatment with L. plantarum NDC 75017. These data show that pretreatment with L. plantarum NDC 75017 protects against LPS-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory injury in the liver of mice, which may be attributed to the inhibition of the TLR4-NF-κB pathway.

  1. Movement-evoked hyperalgesia induced by lipopolysaccharides is not suppressed by glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Katalin J.; Papic, Jonathan C.; Larson, Alice A.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) produces a variety of effects, including movement-evoked hyperalgesia that can be measured using the grip force assay in mice. Because both lethality and enhanced sensitivity to cutaneous pain following exposure to endotoxins have each been attributed to inflammatory mediators, we explored the possibility that LPS-induced movement-evoked hyperalgesia is also sensitive to manipulations of glucocorticoids that regulate these other LPS responses. We found that the hyperalgesic effect of LPS (5 mg/kg s.c.) in mice that were adrenalectomized did not differ from that in control mice that were sham-operated, even though mortality after LPS was potentiated by adrenalectomy. The development of tolerance to the movement-evoked hyperalgesic effect of LPS also did not differ between adrenalectomized and sham-operated control mice. In addition, mifepristone (25 mg/kg s.c.), a glucocorticoid antagonist, did not attenuate the hyperalgesic effect of LPS (2 mg/kg s.c.), yet this dose of mifepristone was sufficient to enhance the incidence of lethality induced by LPS. Enhancement of glucocorticoid activity by two injections of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg s.c.) had no effect on the degree of hyperalgesia in mice injected with LPS (5 mg/kg s.c.), yet this dose of dexamethasone was sufficient to attenuate the incidence of mortality induced by LPS in adrenalectomized mice. Finally, morphine (10 mg/kg i.p.) reversed the decrease in grip force caused by LPS (5 mg/kg i.p.), supporting the interpretation that decreases in grip force produced by LPS reflect muscle hyperalgesia that is not sensitive to glucocorticoids. PMID:17686584

  2. Trans-basement membrane migration of eosinophils induced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils from human peripheral blood in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Fuyumi; Kobayashi, Takehito; Noguchi, Toru; Araki, Ryuichiro; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Soma, Tomoyuki; Nagata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    In the airways of severe asthmatics, an increase of neutrophils and eosinophils is often observed despite high-dose corticosteroid therapy. We previously reported that interleukin-8-stimulated neutrophils induced trans-basement membrane migration (TBM) of eosinophils, suggesting the link between neutrophils and eosinophils. Concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the airway increase in severe asthma. As neutrophils express Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and can release chemoattractants for eosinophils, we investigated whether LPS-stimulated neutrophils modify eosinophil TBM. Neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and severe asthmatics. Eosinophil TBM was examined using a modified Boyden's chamber technique. Eosinophils were added to the upper compartment, and neutrophils and LPS were added to the lower compartment. Migrated eosinophils were measured by eosinophil peroxidase assays. LPS-stimulated neutrophils induced eosinophil TBM (about 10-fold increase), although LPS or neutrophils alone did not. A leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist, a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist or an anti-TLR4 antibody decreased eosinophil TBM enhanced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils by almost half. Neutrophils from severe asthmatics induced eosinophil TBM and lower concentrations of LPS augmented neutrophil-induced eosinophil TBM. These results suggest that the combination of neutrophils and LPS leads eosinophils to accumulate in the airways, possibly involved the pathogenesis of severe asthma. PMID:27730145

  3. Comparison of the effect of recombinant bovine wild and mutant lipopolysaccharide-binding protein in lipopolysaccharide-challenged bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; Li, Lian; Sun, Yu; Wu, Jie; Wang, Genlin

    2016-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) plays a crucial role in the recognition of bacterial components, such as LPS that causes an immune response. The aim of this study was to compare the different effects of recombinant bovine wild LBP and mutant LBP (67 Ala → Thr) on the LPS-induced inflammatory response of bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). When BMECs were treated with various concentrations of recombinant bovine lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (RBLBP) (1, 5, 10, and 15 μg/mL) for 12 h, RBLBP of 5 μg/mL increased the apoptosis of BMECs induced by LPS without cytotoxicity, and mutant LBP resulted in a higher cell apoptosis than wild LBP did. By gene-chip microarray and bioinformatics, the data identified 2306 differentially expressed genes that were changed significantly between the LPS-induced inflamed BMECs treated with 5 μg/mL of mutant LBP and the BMECs only treated with 10 μg/mL of LPS (fold change ≥2). Meanwhile, 1585 genes were differently expressed between the inflamed BMECs treated with 5 μg/mL of wild LBP and 10 μg/mL of LPS-treated BMECs. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses showed that these differentially expressed genes were involved in different pathways that regulate the inflammation response. It predicted that carriers of this mutation increase the risk for a more severe inflammatory response. Our study provides an overview of the gene expression profile between wild LBP and mutant LBP on the LPS-induced inflammatory response of BMECs, which will lead to further understanding of the potential effects of LBP mutations on bovine mammary glands.

  4. Effects of tylosin on serum cytokine levels in healthy and lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Er, Ayse; Yazar, Enver; Uney, Kamil; Elmas, Muammer; Altan, Feray; Cetin, Gul

    2010-03-01

    The effects of different doses of tylosin on serum cytokine concentrations were investigated in healthy and lipopolysaccharide-treated mice. The mice were divided into seven groups. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected into the positive control group. The other six groups received three different tylosin doses concurrently without or with LPS: 10 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg + LPS, 100 mg/kg + LPS and 500 mg/kg + LPS. After treatment, serum samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours. Serum tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta) and IL10 levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Tylosin doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg induced no cytokine production in the healthy mice. Tylosin at 500 mg/kg had no effect on TNFalpha or IL1beta production, but it induced IL10 production in healthy mice. All doses of tylosin reduced the elevated TNFalpha and IL1beta in LPS-treated mice but increased their IL10 levels. In conclusion, these data suggest that tylosin has an immunomodulatory effect at the dose recommended for use against infection.

  5. Effects of Lipopolysaccharide and Progesterone Exposures on Embryonic Cerebral Cortex Development in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tronnes, Ashlie A; Koschnitzky, Jenna; Daza, Ray; Hitti, Jane; Ramirez, Jan Marino; Hevner, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Our objective was to determine if progesterone pretreatment could ameliorate the detrimental effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation on cortical neurogenesis. Timed pregnant mouse dams (n = 8) were given intraperitoneal injections of progesterone (42 mg/kg) or vehicle on embryonic day 17.5. Two hours later, mice were given intraperitoneal LPS (140 μg/kg) or vehicle. Mice were sacrificed 16 hours later on embryonic day 18. Two-color immunofluorescence was performed with primary antibodies T-box transcription factor 2 (Tbr2), ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1), cleaved caspase 3 (CC3), and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Cells were counted, and statistical analysis was determined using analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer method. The Tbr2 intermediate neural progenitor cell density decreased after LPS exposure (P = .0022). Pre-exposure to progesterone statistically increased Tbr2 intermediate neural progenitors compared to LPS treatment alone and was similar to controls (P = .0022). After LPS exposure, microglia displayed an activated phenotype, and cell density was increased (P < .001). Cell death rates were low among study groups but was increased in LPS exposure groups compared to progesterone alone (P = .0015). Lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation reduces prenatal neurogenesis in mice. Pre-exposure with progesterone is associated with increased neurogenesis. Progesterone may protect the preterm brain from defects of neurogenesis induced by inflammation.

  6. Induction of lethal shock and tolerance by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide in D-galactosamine-sensitized C3H/HeJ mice.

    PubMed

    Tanamoto, K

    1999-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) obtained from Porphyromonas gingivalis was found to exhibit marked lethal toxicity in galactosamine-sensitized C3H/HeJ mice. Although no lethality was observed in mice intraperitoneally challenged with 1 mg of P. gingivalis LPS without galactosamine, when they were sensitized with 30 mg of galactosamine, challenge with 1 and 10 micrograms of LPS resulted in 67 and 100% lethality, respectively. The lethal dose of LPS was almost the same in LPS-responsive C57BL/6 mice and non-LPS-responsive C3H/HeJ mice. Furthermore, when 1 microgram of P. gingivalis LPS was administered to each mouse 90 min before the challenge with the same LPS with galactosamine, tolerance to the lethal action of LPS was induced, and the mice were completely protected from death, even at a dose 100-fold greater than the lethal dose of LPS. Neither a lethal effect nor induction of tolerance to the lethality of P. gingivalis LPS was exhibited by Salmonella LPS in galactosamine-sensitized C3H/HeJ mice. A protein-LPS complex derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which exhibited strong lethality and induced tolerance to a subsequent challenge with a lethal dose of LPS in galactosamine-sensitized LPS-responsive mice, did not exhibit lethal toxicity in galactosamine-sensitized C3H/HeJ mice and failed to induce tolerance in these mice to the lethality of P. gingivalis LPS. These results indicate that P. gingivalis LPS plays the central role in the activation of non-LPS-responsive C3H/HeJ mice.

  7. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide Induced MCP-1 Expression in Primary Astrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Faez Abdelgawad, Amro

    2017-01-01

    Background. Neuroinflammation which presents as a possible mechanism of delirium is associated with MCP-1, an important proinflammatory factor which is expressed on astrocytes. It is known that dexmedetomidine (DEX) possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate the potential effects of DEX on the production of MCP-1 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes. Materials and Methods. Astrocytes were treated with LPS (10 ng/ml, 50 ng/ml, 100 ng/ml, and 1000 ng/ml), DEX (500 ng/mL), LPS (100 ng/ml), and DEX (10, 100, and 500 ng/mL) for a duration of three hours; expression levels of MCP-1 were measured by real-time PCR. The double immunofluorescence staining protocol was utilized to determine the expression of α2-adrenoceptors (α2AR) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) on astrocytes. Results. Expressions of MCP-1 mRNA in astrocytes were induced dose-dependently by LPS. Administration of DEX significantly inhibited the expression of MCP-1 mRNA (P < 0.001). Double immunofluorescence assay showed that α2AR colocalize with GFAP, which indicates the expression of α2-adrenoceptors in astrocytes. Conclusions. DEX is a potent suppressor of MCP-1 in astrocytes induced with lipopolysaccharide through α2A-adrenergic receptors, which potentially explains its beneficial effects in the treatment of delirium by attenuating neuroinflammation. PMID:28286770

  8. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide Induced MCP-1 Expression in Primary Astrocyte.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Davis, Jacques R J; Wu, Zhi-Lin; Faez Abdelgawad, Amro

    2017-01-01

    Background. Neuroinflammation which presents as a possible mechanism of delirium is associated with MCP-1, an important proinflammatory factor which is expressed on astrocytes. It is known that dexmedetomidine (DEX) possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate the potential effects of DEX on the production of MCP-1 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes. Materials and Methods. Astrocytes were treated with LPS (10 ng/ml, 50 ng/ml, 100 ng/ml, and 1000 ng/ml), DEX (500 ng/mL), LPS (100 ng/ml), and DEX (10, 100, and 500 ng/mL) for a duration of three hours; expression levels of MCP-1 were measured by real-time PCR. The double immunofluorescence staining protocol was utilized to determine the expression of α2-adrenoceptors (α2AR) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) on astrocytes. Results. Expressions of MCP-1 mRNA in astrocytes were induced dose-dependently by LPS. Administration of DEX significantly inhibited the expression of MCP-1 mRNA (P < 0.001). Double immunofluorescence assay showed that α2AR colocalize with GFAP, which indicates the expression of α2-adrenoceptors in astrocytes. Conclusions. DEX is a potent suppressor of MCP-1 in astrocytes induced with lipopolysaccharide through α2A-adrenergic receptors, which potentially explains its beneficial effects in the treatment of delirium by attenuating neuroinflammation.

  9. SILAC-MS Based Characterization of LPS and Resveratrol Induced Changes in Adipocyte Proteomics – Resveratrol as Ameliorating Factor on LPS Induced Changes

    PubMed Central

    Kroager, Toke P.; Sanggaard, Kristian W.; Knudsen, Anders D.; Stensballe, Allan; Enghild, Jan J.; Ølholm, Jens; Richelsen, Bjørn; Pedersen, Steen B.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation is believed to play a pivotal role in the development obesity-related morbidities such as insulin resistance. However, it is not known how this (low-grade) inflammatory state develops. It has been proposed that the leakage of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), originating from the gut microbiota, through the gut epithelium could drive initiation of inflammation. To get a better understanding of which proteins and intracellular pathways are affected by LPS in adipocytes, we performed SILAC proteomic analysis and identified proteins that were altered in expression. Furthermore, we tested the anti-inflammatory compound resveratrol. A total of 927 proteins were quantified by the SILAC method and of these 57- and 64 were significantly up- and downregulated by LPS, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis (GO analysis) revealed that the upregulated proteins were especially involved in the pathways of respiratory electron transport chain and inflammation. The downregulated proteins were especially involved in protein glycosylation. One of the latter proteins, GALNT2, has previously been described to regulate the expression of liver lipases such as ANGPTL3 and apoC-III affecting lipid metabolism. Furthermore, LPS treatment reduced the protein levels of the insulin sensitizing adipokine, adiponectin, and proteins participating in the final steps of triglyceride- and cholesterol synthesis. Generally, resveratrol opposed the effect induced by LPS and, as such, functioning as an ameliorating factor in disease state. Using an unbiased proteomic approach, we present novel insight of how the proteome is altered in adipocytes in response to LPS as seen in obesity. We suggest that LPS partly exerts its detrimental effects by altering glycosylation processes of the cell, which is starting to emerge as important posttranscriptional regulators of protein expression. Furthermore, resveratrol could be a prime candidate in ameliorating dysfunctioning adipose tissue

  10. [Biological activity of lipopolysaccharides from clinical Bacteroides fragilis strains isolated in Poland determined in reaction with limulus amoebocyte lysate].

    PubMed

    Rokosz, Alicja; Górska, Paulina; Michałkiewicz, Jacek; Łuczak, Miroslaw

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a biological activity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from clinical Bacterioides fragilis strains isolated in Poland by means of quantitative, photometric BET (LAL) method with Limulus polyphemus amoebocyte lysate and chromogenic substrate S-2423. Lipopolysaccharides were extracted from nine clinical B. fragilis strains by the procedure of Westphal and Jann (1965). Crude LPS preparations were purified with ultracentrifugation. Biological activities of bacterial endotoxins were determined by quantitative BET method with chromogenic substrate S-2423 (ENDOCHROME kit). Tests were performed according to the recommendations of the producer (Charles River Endosafe Ltd., USA). E. coli O55:B5 LPS and LPS preparations from reference B. fragilis strains were applied to compare the results of examinations. Activities of endotoxins from clinical B. fragilis strains isolated in Poland determined in reaction with Limulus amoebocyte lysate were differentiated. Among endotoxins of clinical B. fragilis strains the most active was the preparation from strain cultured in the case of pancreatic ulcer (B. fragilis 80/81 LPS). Lipopolysaccharides of examined B. fragilis strains were less active in BET test than E. coli O55:B5 LPS.

  11. [Characterization of the Lipopolysaccharides of Pseudomonas chlororaphis].

    PubMed

    Varbanets, L D; Zdorovenko, E L; Kiprianova, E A; Avdeeva, L V; Brovarskaya, O S; Rybalko, S L

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from two strains ot Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens,UCM B-111 and UCM B-306, were isolated and characterized. The LPS preparations exhibited low toxicity, high pyrogenicity and high antiviral activity. Mild acid hydrolysis was used to obtain the O-specific polysaccharides. Their structures were established by monosaccharide analysis and determination of absolute configurations, as well as by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The O-polysaccharides were shown to contain the linear tri- or tetrasaccharide repeating units. Both O-polysaccharides were structurally heterogeneous: P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens UCM B-111--> 4)-αD-GalpNAc6Ac-(1 --> 3)-β-D-QuipNAc-(1 --> 6)-αD-GlcpNAc-(l --> βD-GlcpNAc-(l --> 3)] GalNAc -60%; degree of the non-stoichiometric 6-O-acetylation of GalNAc -60%; P. chlorophis subsp. aureofaciens UCM B-306 --> 3)-α-D-Rhap-(1 --> 4)-α-D-GalpNAcAN-(1 --> 3)-αD-QuipNAc4NAc-(1 -->, where GalNAcAN is 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galacturonamide, the degree of non-stoichiometric amidation of the GalNAcA residue -60%.

  12. A Fermented Whole Grain Prevents Lipopolysaccharides-Induced Dysfunction in Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Morena; Del Prato, Stefano; Pucci, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous signals derived by the gut microbiota such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) orchestrate inflammatory responses contributing to development of the endothelial dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), bone marrow derived stem cells, promote recovery of damaged endothelium playing a pivotal role in cardiovascular repair. Since healthy nutrition improves EPCs functions, we evaluated the effect of a fermented grain, Lisosan G (LG), on early EPCs exposed to LPS. The potential protective effect of LG against LPS-induced alterations was evaluated as cell viability, adhesiveness, ROS production, gene expression, and NF-kB signaling pathway activation. Our results showed that LPS treatment did not affect EPCs viability and adhesiveness but induced endothelial alterations via activation of NF-kB signaling. LG protects EPCs from inflammation as well as from LPS-induced oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress reducing ROS levels, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defense. Moreover, LG pretreatment prevented NF-kB translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus caused by LPS exposure. In human EPCs, LPS increases ROS and upregulates proinflammatory tone, proapoptotic factors, and antioxidants. LG protects EPCs exposed to LPS reducing ROS, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defenses possibly by inhibiting NF-κB nuclear translocation. PMID:28386305

  13. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide Inhibits the Channel Activity of the P2X7 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Coddou, Claudio; Rodríguez, Felipe E.; Penna, Antonello; Lopez, Ximena; Neira, Tanya; Fernández, Ricardo; Imarai, Mónica; Rios, Miguel; Escobar, Jorge; Montoya, Margarita; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo; Escobar, Alejandro; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays an important role during the immune response, participating in several events such as cytokine release, apoptosis, and necrosis. The bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the strongest stimuli of the immune response, and it has been shown that P2X7R activation can modulate LPS-induced responses. Moreover, a C-terminal binding site for LPS has been proposed. In order to evaluate if LPS can directly modulate the activity of the P2X7R, we tested several signaling pathways associated with P2X7R activation in HEK293 cells that do not express the TLR-4 receptor. We found that LPS alone was unable to induce any P2X7R-related activity, suggesting that the P2X7R is not directly activated by the endotoxin. On the other hand, preapplication of LPS inhibited ATP-induced currents, intracellular calcium increase, and ethidium bromide uptake and had no effect on ERK activation in HEK293 cells. In splenocytes-derived T-regulatory cells, in which ATP-induced apoptosis is driven by the P2X7R, LPS inhibited ATP-induced apoptosis. Altogether, these results demonstrate that LPS modulates the activity of the P2X7R and suggest that this effect could be of physiological relevance. PMID:21941410

  15. Lipopolysaccharide reduces food passage rate from the crop by a prostaglandin-independent mechanism in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, T.; Ogino, M.; Makino, R.; Khan, M. S. I.; Cline, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1. We examined the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacteria, on food passage in the digestive tract of chickens (Gallus gallus) in order to clarify whether bacterial infection affects food passage in birds. 2. Food passage in the crop was significantly reduced by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of LPS while it did not affect the number of defecations, suggesting that LPS may affect food passage only in the upper digestive tract. 3. Similar to LPS, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the mediators of LPS, also reduced crop-emptying rate in chickens while it had no effect on the number of defecations. 4. Pretreatment with indomethacin, which is an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX), a prostaglandin synthase, had no effect on LPS-induced inhibition of crop emptying. 5. IP injection of LPS did not affect the mRNA expression of COX2 in the upper digestive tract of chickens. 6. It is therefore likely that LPS and PGE2 reduced food passage rate in the crop by a prostaglandin-independent pathway in chickens. PMID:27871194

  16. Systemic lipopolysaccharide induces cochlear inflammation and exacerbates the synergistic ototoxicity of kanamycin and furosemide.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Keiko; Li, Song-Zhe; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2014-08-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are highly effective agents against gram-negative bacterial infections, but they cause adverse effects on hearing and balance dysfunction as a result of toxicity to hair cells of the cochlea and vestibular organs. While ototoxicity has been comprehensively studied, the contributions of the immune system, which controls the host response to infection, have not been studied in antibiotic ototoxicity. Recently, it has been shown that an inflammatory response is induced by hair cell injury. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an important component of bacterial endotoxin, when given in combination with kanamycin and furosemide, augmented the inflammatory response to hair cell injury and exacerbated hearing loss and hair cell injury. LPS injected into the peritoneum of experimental mice induced a brisk cochlear inflammatory response with recruitment of mononuclear phagocytes into the spiral ligament, even in the absence of ototoxic agents. While LPS alone did not affect hearing, animals that received LPS prior to ototoxic agents had worse hearing loss compared to those that did not receive LPS pretreatment. The poorer hearing outcome in LPS-treated mice did not correlate to changes in endocochlear potential. However, LPS-treated mice demonstrated an increased number of CCR2(+) inflammatory monocytes in the inner ear when compared with mice treated with ototoxic agents alone. We conclude that LPS and its associated inflammatory response are harmful to the inner ear when coupled with ototoxic medications and that the immune system may contribute to the final hearing outcome in subjects treated with ototoxic agents.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Human Pulmonary Micro-Vascular Endothelial Apoptosis via the YAP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lei; Huang, Xiaoqin; Guo, Feng; Zhou, Zengding; Chang, Mengling; Tang, Jiajun; Huan, Jingning

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a pathologic increase in lung vascular leakage under septic conditions. LPS-induced human pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cell (HPMEC) apoptosis launches and aggravates micro-vascular hyper-permeability and acute lung injury (ALI). Previous studies show that the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway is vital for LPS-induced EC apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP) has been reported to positively regulate intrinsic apoptotic pathway in tumor cells apoptosis. However, the potential role of YAP protein in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis has not been determined. In this study, we found that LPS-induced activation and nuclear accumulation of YAP accelerated HPMECs apoptosis. LPS-induced YAP translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus by the increased phosphorylation on Y357 resulted in the interaction between YAP and transcription factor P73. Furthermore, inhibition of YAP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) not only suppressed the LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis but also regulated P73-mediated up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of the YAP/P73/(BAX and BCL-2)/caspase-3 signaling pathway played a critical role in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis. Inhibition of the YAP might be a potential therapeutic strategy for lung injury under sepsis. PMID:27807512

  18. Effect of azithromycin on Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-6 in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Young; Jin, Ji-Young; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key proinflammatory cytokine which plays a central role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Host modulatory agents targeting at inhibiting IL-6, therefore, appear to be beneficial in slowing the progression of periodontal disease and potentially reducing destructive aspects of the host response. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin on IL-6 generation in murine macrophages treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen implicated in inflammatory periodontal disease, and its mechanisms of action. Azithromycin significantly suppressed IL-6 production as well as its mRNA expression in P. intermedia LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. LPS-induced activation of JNK and p38 was not affected by azithromycin treatment. Azithromycin failed to prevent P. intermedia LPS from degrading IκB-α. Instead, azithromycin significantly diminished nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB p50 subunit induced with LPS. Azithromycin inhibited P. intermedia LPS-induced STAT1 and STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, azithromycin up-regulated the mRNA level of SOCS1 in cells treated with LPS. In conclusion, azithromycin significantly attenuated P. intermedia LPS-induced production of IL-6 in murine macrophages via inhibition of NF-κB, STAT1 and STAT3 activation, which is possibly related to the activation of SOCS1 signaling. Further in vivo studies are required to better evaluate the potential of azithromycin in the treatment of periodontal disease.

  19. Paclitaxel inhibits the hyper-activation of spleen cells by lipopolysaccharide and induces cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel was isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia, and used as an anticancer agent. Paclitaxel prevents cancer cell division by inhibiting spindle fiber function, inducing cell death. A recent study demonstrated that paclitaxel binds to myeloid differentiation protein-2 of Toll-like receptor 4 and prevents the signal transduction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Paclitaxel converts immune cells hypo-responsive to LPS. In this study, we investigated whether paclitaxel can inhibit the phenotype and function of immune cells. To accomplish this, we used spleen cells, a major type of immune cell, LPS, a representative inflammatory agent and a mitogen for B lymphocytes. LPS profoundly increased the activation and cytokine production of spleen cells. However, paclitaxel significantly inhibited LPS-induced hyper-activation of spleen cells. Furthermore, we found that paclitaxel induced cell death of LPS-treated spleen cells. These results suggest that paclitaxel can inhibit the hyper-immune response of LPS in spleen cells via a variety of mechanisms. These findings suggest that paclitaxel can be used as a modulating agent for diseases induced by hyper-activation of B lymphocytes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that paclitaxel inhibits the function of spleen cells activated by LPS, and further induces cell death. PMID:27030196

  20. Altered in vivo activity of liposome-incorporated lipopolysaccharide and lipid A.

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, J; Mellors, J W; Ryan, J L

    1989-01-01

    We compared the abilities of free and liposome-incorporated Salmonella minnesota wild-type lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipid A to activate peritoneal macrophages and induce lethal toxicity in mice. Incorporation of lipid A into multilamellar vesicles resulted in a 100-fold-decreased potency to prime macrophages for phorbol myristate acetate-triggered release of H2O2. In addition, liposome incorporation reduced the lethality of LPS and lipid A at least 10-fold in dactinomycin-sensitized mice. Similar results were obtained with multilamellar liposomes delivered intravenously and when small unilamellar vesicles were employed. The observed difference in toxicity was not dependent on dactinomycin treatment, since a similar decrease was obtained with large doses of liposomal LPS in unsensitized mice. Control liposomes, prepared without LPS and lipid A, did not reduce the activities of the free compounds. The administration of a sublethal amount of liposomal LPS induced within 20 days, but not during the first week, tolerance to a subsequently injected lethal dose of free endotoxin. The latter observation suggests that early-phase tolerance is not the mechanism responsible for the reduced toxicity of liposomal LPS. These data show that liposomal LPS and lipid A have reduced endotoxic activity in vivo and are consistent with our hypothesis that a direct interaction of lipid A with appropriate plasma membrane components is necessary to efficiently trigger biologic responses. This interaction, however, is prevented by the stable insertion of LPS into the liposomal membrane. PMID:2807528

  1. Melatonin treatment counteracts the hyperthermic effect of lipopolysaccharide injection in the Syrian hamster.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Verónica A; Scacchi, Pablo A; Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Esquifino, Ana I; Cardinali, Daniel P; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2005-12-09

    The present study examined the acute response in body temperature to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection to Syrian hamsters at two time intervals during the light-dark cycle. Its modification by melatonin (MT) administration in the drinking water was also assessed. Hamsters were intraperitoneally (i.p.) implanted with a transmitter to measure core body temperature. MT was administered from day 8 post-surgery until the end of experiment. On day 16 after surgery, LPS or saline was injected i.p. at the beginning of the light phase (ZT 0) or of the scotophase (ZT 14). At ZT 0, LPS increased core body temperature, an effect that persisted for at least 5h and that was blunted by MT administration. At ZT 14, the hyperthermic effect of LPS was absent. Rather, at ZT 14 the animals showed increases in core body temperature following saline or LPS during the first 2h after injection only, which were significantly less intense in LPS-treated animals. MT administration blunted this difference. Five days after injection, hamsters that had received LPS at ZT 0 showed an increase in the mesor of core body temperature rhythm as compared to saline. This effect was suppressed by MT administration. The results demonstrate that MT prevents body temperature increase after LPS at ZT 0.

  2. Ameliorative Effect of Ginsenoside Rg1 on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Cognitive Impairment: Role of Cholinergic System.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yang; Peng, Jian; Wang, Xiaona; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Tianyin

    2017-01-11

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can induce systemic inflammation, and therefore disrupt learning and memory processes. Ginsenoside Rg1, a major bioactive component of ginseng, is shown to greatly improve cognitive function. The present study was designed to further investigate whether administration of ginsenoside Rg1 can ameliorate LPS-induced cognitive impairment in the Y-maze and Morris water maze (MWM) task, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Results showed that exposure to LPS (500 μg/kg) significantly impaired working and spatial memory and that repeated treatment with ginsenoside Rg1 (200 mg/kg/day, for 30 days) could effectively alleviate the LPS-induced cognitive decline as indicated by increased working and spatial memory in the Y-maze and MWM tests. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rg1 treatment prevented LPS-induced decrease of acetylcholine (ACh) levels and increase of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Ginsenoside Rg1 treatment also reverted the decrease of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) protein expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of LPS-treated rats. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg1 has protective effect against LPS-induced cognitive deficit and that prevention of LPS-induced changes in cholinergic system is crucial to this ameliorating effect.

  3. Interactions between magainin 2 and Salmonella typhimurium outer membranes: Effect of lipopolysaccharide structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, F.R.; Macias, E.A.; Sultany, C.M.; Modzrakowski, M.C.; Blazyk, J. )

    1991-06-18

    The role of the outer membrane and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the interaction between the small cationic antimicrobial peptide magainin 2 and the Gram-negative cell envelope was studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. Magainin 2 alters the thermotropic properties of the outer membrane-peptidoglycan complexes from wild-type Salmonella typhimurium and a series of LPS mutants which display differential susceptibility to the bactericidal activity of cationic antibiotics. These results are correlated with the LPS phosphorylation pattern and charge (characterized by high-resolution {sup 31}P NMR) and outer membrane lipid composition, and are compared to the bactericidal susceptibility. LPS mutants show a progressive loss of resistance to killing by magainin 2 as the length of the LPS polysaccharide moiety decreases. Disordering of the outer membrane lipid fatty acyl chains by magainin 2, however, depends primarily upon the magnitude of PLS charge rather than the length of the LPS polysaccharide. While disruption of outer membrane structure most likely is not the primary factor leading to cell death, the susceptibility of Gram-negative cells to magainin 2 is associated with factors that facilitate the transport of the peptide across the outer membrane, such as the magnitude and location of LPS charge, and concentration of LPS in the outer membrane, outer membrane molecular architecture, and the presence or absence of the O-antigen side chain.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide reduces food passage rate from the crop by a prostaglandin-independent mechanism in chickens.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, T; Ogino, M; Makino, R; Khan, M S I; Cline, M A

    2017-02-01

    1. We examined the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacteria, on food passage in the digestive tract of chickens (Gallus gallus) in order to clarify whether bacterial infection affects food passage in birds. 2. Food passage in the crop was significantly reduced by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of LPS while it did not affect the number of defecations, suggesting that LPS may affect food passage only in the upper digestive tract. 3. Similar to LPS, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the mediators of LPS, also reduced crop-emptying rate in chickens while it had no effect on the number of defecations. 4. Pretreatment with indomethacin, which is an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX), a prostaglandin synthase, had no effect on LPS-induced inhibition of crop emptying. 5. IP injection of LPS did not affect the mRNA expression of COX2 in the upper digestive tract of chickens. 6. It is therefore likely that LPS and PGE2 reduced food passage rate in the crop by a prostaglandin-independent pathway in chickens.

  5. Protective effects of melatonin on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guoxi; Tian, Yinggang; Wang, Haiyu; Liu, Fangning; Xie, Guanghong

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin, a secretory product of the pineal gland, has been reported to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the protective effects of melatonin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects and the underlying mechanisms of melatonin on LPS-induced mastitis both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, our results showed that melatonin attenuated LPS-induced mammary histopathologic changes and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Melatonin also inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in mammary tissues. In vitro, melatonin was found to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in mouse mammary epithelial cells. Melatonin also suppressed LPS-induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, melatonin was found to up-regulate the expression of PPAR-γ. Inhibition of PPAR-γ by GW9662 reduced the anti-inflammatory effects of melatonin. In conclusion, we found that melatonin, for the first time, had protective effects on LPS-induced mastitis in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of melatonin was through activating PPAR-γ which subsequently inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory responses.

  6. Lipopolysaccharides-mediated increase in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion: involvement of the GLP-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh Thoai; Mandard, Stéphane; Dray, Cédric; Deckert, Valérie; Valet, Philippe; Besnard, Philippe; Drucker, Daniel J; Lagrost, Laurent; Grober, Jacques

    2014-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria trigger inflammation, which is associated with marked changes in glucose metabolism. Hyperglycemia is frequently observed during bacterial infection and it is a marker of a poor clinical outcome in critically ill patients. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of an acute injection or continuous infusion of LPS on experimentally induced hyperglycemia in wild-type and genetically engineered mice. The acute injection of a single dose of LPS produced an increase in glucose disposal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Continuous infusion of LPS through mini-osmotic pumps was also associated with increased GSIS. Finally, manipulation of LPS detoxification by knocking out the plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) led to increased glucose disposal and GSIS. Overall, glucose tolerance and GSIS tests supported the hypothesis that mice treated with LPS develop glucose-induced hyperinsulinemia. The effects of LPS on glucose metabolism were significantly altered as a result of either the accumulation or antagonism of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Complementary studies in wild-type and GLP-1 receptor knockout mice further implicated the GLP-1 receptor-dependent pathway in mediating the LPS-mediated changes in glucose metabolism. Hence, enhanced GLP-1 secretion and action underlies the development of glucose-mediated hyperinsulinemia associated with endotoxemia.

  7. Sialylation of Helicobacter bizzozeronii lipopolysaccharides modulates Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 mediated response.

    PubMed

    Kondadi, Pradeep Kumar; Revez, Joana; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa; Rossi, Mirko

    2015-01-21

    Sialic acid in lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of mucosal pathogens is known to be an important virulence factor. Few strains of Helicobacter pylori express sialyl-Lewis-X and we have reported that human and canine Helicobacter bizzozeronii strains express sialyl-lactoseamine in their LPS. However, the role of sialyation of Helicobacter LPS in the interaction with the host cells is still unknown. In this study H. bizzozeronii LPS is shown to activate the TLR2 in a dose and strain dependent manner in the in vitro HEK-293 cells model expressing TLR2, but not the cells expressing TLR4. These results indicate that TLR2 is the specific receptor for H. bizzozzeronii LPS, as previously described for H. pylori. To further explore the role of sialylation of H. bizzozeronii LPS on TLR2 response, H. bizzozeronii Δhbs2 mutant strains deficient in sialyltransferase activity were constructed by homologous recombination. LPS from H. bizzozeronii Δhbs2 strains enhanced the NF-ĸB induction via TLR2 compared to the respective wild types, leading to the conclusion that the sialylation of H. bizzozeronii LPS in wild-type strains may modulate host immune response.

  8. LPS may enhance expression and release of HMGB1 in human nasal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Bellussi, L M; Passali, D; Chen, L

    2013-12-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is a common disease with still unclear pathophysiologic mechanisms. The airway epithelial barrier has been shown to be involved in different chronic disorders, including rhinitis, nasal polyposis and asthma. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a primarily nuclear protein, is involved in the induction of airway inflammation in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis, allergy, asthma and COPD. Pathogen-derived lipopolysaccharide is widely used as a trigger for inflammation. However, the molecular dialogue between LPS and HMGB1 in the delayed inflammatory processes remains to be explored, and the regulation of HMGB1 release through LPS from epithelial cells has not been extensively studied in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relocation of HMGB1 in LPS-induced human nasal epithelial cells in vitro. We obtained epithelial cells of nasal polyps from 10 patients requiring surgery for sinusitis at the ENT Department of the Chinese PLA General Hospital. The primary cultured human nasal epithelial (HNE) cells were stimulated with LPS. The expression and translocation of HMGB1 in intracellular and culture supernatants were determined using Western blot and immunofluorescence assay. HMGB1 protein was released in a time-dependent fashion in culture supernatants: in fact, expression of HMGB1 protein in HNE cells showed no significant changes at 0-24 h after exposure to 100 μg/ml LPS, but increased significantly at 48 and 72 hr. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed the transfer of HMGB1 from nuclei to cytoplasm in response to LPS exposure after 24 hr. These data reveal a hitherto unrecognized association between HMGB1 and LPS in human nasal epithelial cells. LPS can affect HMGB1 translocation and release, suggesting the involvement of HMGB1, through inflammatory mediators, in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps.

  9. Endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency attenuates LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension☆

    PubMed Central

    Chuaiphichai, Surawee; Starr, Anna; Nandi, Manasi; Channon, Keith M.; McNeill, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be a key mediator of the vascular dysfunction and severe hypotension in patients with endotoxaemia and septic shock. The contribution of NO produced directly in the vasculature by endothelial cells to the hypotension seen in these conditions, vs. the broader systemic increase in NO, is unclear. To determine the specific role of endothelium derived NO in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular dysfunction we administered LPS to mice deficient in endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), the essential co-factor for NO production by NOS enzymes. Mice deficient in endothelial BH4 production, through loss of the essential biosynthesis enzyme Gch1 (Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice) received a 24 hour challenge with LPS or saline control. In vivo LPS treatment increased vascular GTP cyclohydrolase and BH4 levels in aortas, lungs and hearts, but this increase was significantly attenuated in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice, which were also partially protected from the LPS-induced hypotension. In isometric tension studies, in vivo LPS treatment reduced the vasoconstriction response and impaired endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilatations in mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice, but not in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mesenteric arteries. Ex vivo LPS treatment decreased vasoconstriction response to phenylephrine in aortic rings from wild-type and not in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice, even in the context of significant eNOS and iNOS upregulation. These data provide direct evidence that endothelial cell NO has a significant contribution to LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension and may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of systemic inflammation and patients with septic shock. PMID:26276526

  10. Enhanced Biofilm Formation by Escherichia coli LPS Mutants Defective in Hep Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Ryoma; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major component of the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and its polysaccharide portion is situated at the outermost region. We investigated the relationship between the polysaccharide portion of LPS and biofilm formation using a series of Escherichia coli mutants defective in genes earlier shown to affect the LPS sugar compositions. Biofilm formation by a deep rough LPS mutant, the hldE strain, was strongly enhanced in comparison with the parental strain and other LPS mutants. The hldE strain also showed a phenotype of increased auto-aggregation and stronger cell surface hydrophobicity compared to the wild-type. Similar results were obtained with another deep rough LPS mutant, the waaC strain whose LPS showed same molecular mass as that of the hldE strain. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and biofilm formation assay using DNase I revealed that biofilm formation by the hldE strain was dependent on extracellular DNA. Furthermore, a loss of flagella and an increase in amount of outer membrane vesicles in case of the hldE strain were also observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. In addition, we demonstrated that a mutation in the hldE locus, which alters the LPS structure, caused changes in both expression and properties of several surface bacterial factors involved in biofilm formation and virulence. We suggest that the implication of these results should be considered in the context of biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces, which is frequently associated with nosocominal infections such as the catheter-associated infections. PMID:23284671

  11. Endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency attenuates LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Chuaiphichai, Surawee; Starr, Anna; Nandi, Manasi; Channon, Keith M; McNeill, Eileen

    2016-02-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be a key mediator of the vascular dysfunction and severe hypotension in patients with endotoxaemia and septic shock. The contribution of NO produced directly in the vasculature by endothelial cells to the hypotension seen in these conditions, vs. the broader systemic increase in NO, is unclear. To determine the specific role of endothelium derived NO in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular dysfunction we administered LPS to mice deficient in endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), the essential co-factor for NO production by NOS enzymes. Mice deficient in endothelial BH4 production, through loss of the essential biosynthesis enzyme Gch1 (Gch1(fl/fl)Tie2cre mice) received a 24hour challenge with LPS or saline control. In vivo LPS treatment increased vascular GTP cyclohydrolase and BH4 levels in aortas, lungs and hearts, but this increase was significantly attenuated in Gch1(fl/fl)Tie2cre mice, which were also partially protected from the LPS-induced hypotension. In isometric tension studies, in vivo LPS treatment reduced the vasoconstriction response and impaired endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilatations in mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice, but not in Gch1(fl/fl)Tie2cre mesenteric arteries. Ex vivo LPS treatment decreased vasoconstriction response to phenylephrine in aortic rings from wild-type and not in Gch1(fl/fl)Tie2cre mice, even in the context of significant eNOS and iNOS upregulation. These data provide direct evidence that endothelial cell NO has a significant contribution to LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension and may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of systemic inflammation and patients with septic shock.

  12. Cyclical DNA Methylation and Histone Changes Are Induced by LPS to Activate COX-2 in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brancaccio, Mariarita; Coretti, Lorena; Florio, Ermanno; Pezone, Antonio; Calabrò, Viola; Falco, Geppino; Keller, Simona; Lembo, Francesca; Avvedimento, Vittorio Enrico; Chiariotti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces release of inflammatory mediators both in immune and epithelial cells. We investigated whether changes of epigenetic marks, including selected histone modification and DNA methylation, may drive or accompany the activation of COX-2 gene in HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells upon exposure to LPS. Here we describe cyclical histone acetylation (H3), methylation (H3K4, H3K9, H3K27) and DNA methylation changes occurring at COX-2 gene promoter overtime after LPS stimulation. Histone K27 methylation changes are carried out by the H3 demethylase JMJD3 and are essential for COX-2 induction by LPS. The changes of the histone code are associated with cyclical methylation signatures at the promoter and gene body of COX-2 gene. PMID:27253528

  13. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF{kappa}B in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong | Alexis, Neil E. |; Chen Xian |; Bromberg, Philip A. |; Peden, David B. ||

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF{kappa}B were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NF{kappa}B activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NF{kappa}B activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NF{kappa}B.

  14. Acetate supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Reisenauer, Chris J; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Mitteness, Dane J; Slanczka, Evan R; Gienger, Heidi M; Watt, John A; Rosenberger, Thad A

    2011-04-01

    Glyceryl triacetate (GTA), a compound effective at increasing circulating and tissue levels of acetate was used to treat rats subjected to a continual 28 day intra-ventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This model produces a neuroinflammatory injury characterized by global neuroglial activation and a decrease in choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity in the basal forebrain. During the LPS infusion, rats were given a daily treatment of either water or GTA at a dose of 6 g/kg by oral gavage. In parallel experiments, free-CoA and acetyl-CoA levels were measured in microwave fixed brains and flash frozen heart, liver, kidney and muscle following a single oral dose of GTA. We found that a single oral dose of GTA significantly increased plasma acetate levels by 15 min and remained elevated for up to 4 h. At 30 min the acetyl-CoA levels in microwave-fixed brain and flash frozen heart and liver were increased at least 2.2-fold. The concentrations of brain acetyl-CoA was significantly increased between 30 and 45 min following treatment and remained elevated for up to 4 h. The concentration of free-CoA in brain was significantly decreased compared to controls at 240 min. Immunohistochemical and morphological analysis demonstrated that a daily treatment with GTA significantly reduced the percentage of reactive glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes and activated CD11b-positive microglia by 40-50% in rats subjected to LPS-induced neuroinflammation. Further, in rats subjected to neuroinflammation, GTA significantly increased the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive cells by 40% in the basal forebrain compared to untreated controls. These data suggest that acetate supplementation increases intermediary short chain acetyl-CoA metabolism and that treatment is potentially anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective with regards to attenuating neuroglial activation and increasing ChAT immunoreactivity in this model.

  15. Effects of coenzyme Q10 on the antioxidant system in SD rats exposed to lipopolysaccharide-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Hae; Kim, Ha-Na; Lim, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The study was performed to see the effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on blood biochemical components and hepatic antioxidant system in rats exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced toxicity. A total of 24 rats were allocated to four groups: control (CON), 100 mg/kg BW of LPS (LPS), 100 mg of CoQ10/kg BW with LPS (LCQI) and 300 mg of CoQ10/kg BW with LPS (LCQII). The LPS and LCQI groups showed a significant (P<0.05) increase in the relative spleen weight compared with the CON group without affecting body and liver weights. The blood alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level in the LPS group was significantly (P<0.05) greater than that in the CON group, while supplementation with 100 or 300 mg CoQ10 to rats injected with LPS normalized the ALT level in the CON group. In antioxidant systems, the LPS group showed a significantly (P<0.05) higher mRNA and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) than the CON group. The supplementation with CoQ10 to the LPS-treated group normalized the level of SOD, which was comparable to the level of the CON group. Both the mRNA expression and activity of glutathione peroxidase in the LCQI and LCQII groups were higher (P<0.05) than that of the LPS group. However, administration of LPS or CoQ10 unaffected the level of catalase and total antioxidant power. The level of lipid peroxidation in the LCQII group was lower (P<0.05) than that in the LPS group. In conclusion, CoQ10 exerted its favorable effect against liver damage by modulation of antioxidant enzymes in LPS treated rats.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Dynamic Lipid Membrane Reorganization: Tubules, Perforations, and Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Peter G.; Lamoureux, Loreen; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a unique lipoglycan, with two major physiological roles: 1), as a major structural component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and 2), as a highly potent mammalian toxin when released from cells into solution (endotoxin). LPS is an amphiphile that spontaneously inserts into the outer leaflet of lipid bilayers to bury its hydrophobic lipidic domain, leaving the hydrophilic polysaccharide chain exposed to the exterior polar solvent. Divalent cations have long been known to neutralize and stabilize LPS in the outer membrane, whereas LPS in the presence of monovalent cations forms highly mobile negatively-charged aggregates. Yet, much of our understanding of LPS and its interactions with the cell membrane does not take into account its amphiphilic biochemistry and charge polarization. Herein, we report fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis of the interaction between LPS and fluid-phase supported lipid bilayer assemblies (sLBAs), as model membranes. Depending on cation availability, LPS induces three remarkably different effects on simple sLBAs. Net-negative LPS-Na+ leads to the formation of 100-μm-long flexible lipid tubules from surface-associated lipid vesicles and the destabilization of the sLBA resulting in micron-size hole formation. Neutral LPS-Ca2+ gives rise to 100-μm-wide single- or multilamellar planar sheets of lipid and LPS formed from surface-associated lipid vesicles. Our findings have important implications about the physical interactions between LPS and lipids and demonstrate that sLBAs can be useful platforms to study the interactions of amphiphilic virulence factors with cell membranes. Additionally, our study supports the general phenomenon that lipids with highly charged or bulky headgroups can promote highly curved membrane architectures due to electrostatic and/or steric repulsions. PMID:24896118

  17. Vitamin D3 pretreatment alleviates renal oxidative stress in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Tan, Zhu-Xia; Xie, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Cheng; Xia, Mi-Zhen; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Hui; Xu, De-Xiang; Yu, De-Xin

    2015-08-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that reactive oxygen species plays important roles in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. This study investigated the effects of VitD3 pretreatment on renal oxidative stress in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2.0mg/kg) to establish an animal model of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. In VitD3+LPS group, mice were orally pretreated with three doses of VitD3 (25 μg/kg) at 1, 24 and 48 h before LPS injection. As expected, oral pretreatment with three daily recommended doses of VitD3 markedly elevated serum 25(OH)D concentration and efficiently activated renal VDR signaling. Interestingly, LPS-induced renal GSH depletion and lipid peroxidation were markedly alleviated in VitD3-pretreated mice. LPS-induced serum and renal nitric oxide (NO) production was obviously suppressed by VitD3 pretreatment. In addition, LPS-induced renal protein nitration, as determined by 3-nitrotyrosine residue, was obviously attenuated by VitD3 pretreatment. Further analysis showed that LPS-induced up-regulation of renal inducible nitric oxide synthase (inos) was repressed in VitD3-pretreated mice. LPS-induced up-regulation of renal p47phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were normalized by VitD3 pretreatment. In addition, LPS-induced down-regulation of renal superoxide dismutase (sod) 1 and sod2, two antioxidant enzyme genes, was reversed in VitD3-pretreated mice. Finally, LPS-induced tubular epithelial cell apoptosis, as determined by TUNEL, was alleviated by VitD3 pretreatment. Taken together, these results suggest that VitD3 pretreatment alleviates LPS-induced renal oxidative stress through regulating oxidant and antioxidant enzyme genes.

  18. Vitamin D3 pretreatment regulates renal inflammatory responses during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Tan, Zhu-Xia; Xie, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Hui; Yu, De-Xin; Xu, De-Xiang

    2015-12-22

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is highly expressed in human and mouse kidneys. Nevertheless, its functions remain obscure. This study investigated the effects of vitamin D3 (VitD3) pretreatment on renal inflammation during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS. In VitD3 + LPS group, mice were pretreated with VitD3 (25 μg/kg) at 48, 24 and 1 h before LPS injection. As expected, an obvious reduction of renal function and pathological damage was observed in LPS-treated mice. VitD3 pretreatment significantly alleviated LPS-induced reduction of renal function and pathological damage. Moreover, VitD3 pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced renal inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In addition, pretreatment with 1,25(OH)2D3, the active form of VitD3, alleviated LPS-induced up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human HK-2 cells, a renal tubular epithelial cell line, in a VDR-dependent manner. Further analysis showed that VitD3, which activated renal VDR, specifically repressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 subunit in the renal tubules. LPS, which activated renal NF-κB, reciprocally suppressed renal VDR and its target gene. Moreover, VitD3 reinforced the physical interaction between renal VDR and NF-κB p65 subunit. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for VitD3-mediated anti-inflammatory activity during LPS-induced acute kidney injury.

  19. Monolayer film behavior of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Thomas; Schooling, Sarah R; Beveridge, Terry J; Katsaras, John

    2008-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an essential biomacromolecule making up approximately 50% of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. LPS chemistry facilitates cellular barrier and permeability functions and mediates interactions between the cell and its environment. To better understand the local interactions within LPS membranes, the monolayer film behavior of LPS extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen of medical importance, was investigated by Langmuir film balance. LPS formed stable monolayers at the air-water interface and the measured lateral stresses and modulus (rigidity) of the LPS film in the compressed monolayer region were found to be appreciable. Scaling theories for two-dimensional (2D) polymer chain conformations were used to describe the pi-A profile, in particular, the high lateral stress region suggested that the polysaccharide segments reside at the 2D air-water interface. Although the addition of monovalent and divalent salts caused LPS molecules to adopt a compact conformation at the air-water interface, they did not appear to have any influence on the modulus (rigidity) of the LPS monolayer film under biologically relevant stressed conditions. With increasing divalent salt (CaCl2) content in the subphase, however, there is a progressive reduction of the LPS monolayer's collapse pressure, signifying that, at high concentrations, divalent salts weaken the ability of the membrane to withstand elevated stress. Finally, based on the measured viscoelastic response of the LPS films, we hypothesize that this property of LPS-rich outer membranes of bacteria permits the deformation of the membrane and may consequently protect bacteria from catastrophic structural failure when under mechanical-stress.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide promotes lipid accumulation in human adventitial fibroblasts via TLR4-NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic degenerative disease of the arteries and is thought to be one of the most common causes of death globally. In recent years, the functions of adventitial fibroblasts in the development of atherosclerosis and tissue repair have gained increased interests. LPS can increase the morbidity and mortality of atherosclerosis-associated cardiovascular disease. Although LPS increases neointimal via TLR4 activation has been reported, how LPS augments atherogenesis through acting on adventitial fibroblasts is still unknown. Here we explored lipid deposition within adventitial fibroblasts mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to imitate inflammatory conditions. Results In our study, LPS enhanced lipid deposition by the up-regulated expression of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) as the silencing of ADRP abrogated lipid deposition in LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts. In addition, pre-treatment with anti-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antibody diminished the LPS-induced lipid deposition and ADRP expression. Moreover, LPS induced translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which could markedly up-regulate lipid deposition as pre-treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, PDTC, significantly reduced lipid droplets. In addition, the lowering lipid accumulation was accompanied with the decreased ADRP expression. Furthermore, LPS-induced adventitial fibroblasts secreted more monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), compared with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that LPS promotes lipid accumulation via the up-regulation of ADRP expression through TLR4 activated downstream of NF-κB in adventitial fibroblasts. Increased levels of MCP-1 released from LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts and lipid accumulation may accelerate monocytes recruitment and lipid-laden macrophage foam cells formation. Here, our study provides a new explanation as to how bacterial infection contributes to

  1. Gram-Negative Marine Bacteria: Structural Features of Lipopolysaccharides and Their Relevance for Economically Important Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative marine bacteria can thrive in harsh oceanic conditions, partly because of the structural diversity of the cell wall and its components, particularly lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is composed of three main parts, an O-antigen, lipid A, and a core region, all of which display immense structural variations among different bacterial species. These components not only provide cell integrity but also elicit an immune response in the host, which ranges from other marine organisms to humans. Toll-like receptor 4 and its homologs are the dedicated receptors that detect LPS and trigger the immune system to respond, often causing a wide variety of inflammatory diseases and even death. This review describes the structural organization of selected LPSes and their association with economically important diseases in marine organisms. In addition, the potential therapeutic use of LPS as an immune adjuvant in different diseases is highlighted. PMID:24796306

  2. A cross-disciplinary perspective on the innate immune responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yunhao; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    The study of innate immunity to bacteria has focused heavily on the mechanisms by which mammalian cells detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the conserved surface component of gram-negative bacteria. While Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) is responsible for all the host transcriptional responses to LPS, recent discoveries have revealed the existence of several TLR4-independent responses to LPS. These discoveries not only broaden our view of the means by which mammalian cells interact with bacteria, but also highlight new selective pressures that may have promoted the evolution of bacterial immune evasion strategies. In this review, we highlight past and recent discoveries on host LPS sensing mechanisms and discuss bacterial countermeasures that promote infection. By looking at both sides of the host-pathogen interaction equation, we hope to provide comprehensive insights into host defense mechanisms and bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24766885

  3. Systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide increases the expression of aquaporin-4 in the rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara-Otani, Sachi; Maeda, Seishi; Tanaka, Koichi; Hayakawa, Tetsu; Seki, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia on the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in the rat anterior pituitary gland, using the real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. After intraperitoneal injection of LPS, the level of AQP4 mRNA doubled at 2, 4 and 8 hr. Immunohistochemical analysis showed an increase with time in AQP4 immunostaining in folliculo-stellate cells following LPS injection; the intensity of immunoreactivity peaked at 8 hr. At the same time, some cyst-like structures, formed by AQP4-positive cells, were observed. These findings indicate that LPS induces the expression of AQP4 in the anterior pituitary gland. The present results should provide an important key to elucidate the pathogenesis of the anterior pituitary gland during endotoxemia.

  4. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins promote cytosolic lipopolysaccharide detection by caspase-11.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria is a classical pathogen-associated molecular pattern and a strong inducer of immune responses. While the detection of LPS on the cell surface and in the endosome by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been studied for some time, it has only recently been discovered that LPS can also be sensed in the cytosol of cells by a noncanonical inflammasome pathway, resulting in the activation of the cysteine protease caspase-11. Intriguingly, activation of this pathway requires the production of interferons (IFNs) and the induction of a class of IFN-induced GTPases called guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), which have previously been linked to cell-autonomous killing of intracellular microbes. In this study, we review the recent advances in our understanding of cytosolic LPS sensing and the function of mammalian GBPs.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide can induce errors in anatomical measures of neuronal plasticity by increasing tracing efficacy.

    PubMed

    Weishaupt, Nina; Krajacic, Aleksandra; Fouad, Karim

    2013-11-27

    Evidence suggests that activating certain components of the immune system may increase regeneration and plasticity in the injured central nervous system. Investigating the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent endotoxin and immune activator, on neuronal plasticity in rat models of spinal cord injury, we discovered that systemic administration of LPS can increase the number of descending motor axons that transport neuronal tracers anterogradely to the spinal cord. This effect of LPS was not observed across all motor tracts traced in two different experiments, but was significant for two different tracers administered to corticospinal tract neurons. Densitometry measurement of traced corticospinal axons within the cervical gray matter revealed that normalization to the number of traced axons is crucial to avoid false-positive reports of increased plasticity following LPS injection. These findings indicate that assessments of neuronal growth based on neuronal tracing techniques should be normalized when inflammation or immune activation is an experimental variable.

  6. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Detoxifies Lipopolysaccharide and Prevents Inflammation in Response to the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Jennifer M.; Akerlund, Janie; Mittge, Erika; Guillemin, Karen

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrates harbor abundant lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or endotoxin in their gut microbiota. Here we demonstrate that the brush border enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphatase (Iap), which dephosphorylates LPS, is induced during establishment of the microbiota and plays a crucial role in promoting mucosal tolerance to gut bacteria in zebrafish. We demonstrate that Iap deficient animals are hypersensitive to LPS toxicity through a mechanism mediated by Myd88 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor (Tnfr). We further show that the endogenous microbiota establish the normal homeostatic level of neutrophils in the intestine through a process involving Myd88 and Tnfr. Iap deficient animals exhibit excessive intestinal neutrophil influx, similar to wild type animals exposed to LPS. When reared germ-free, however, the intestines of Iap deficient animals are devoid of neutrophils, demonstrating that Iap functions to prevent inflammatory responses to resident gut bacteria. PMID:18078689

  7. Gene expression profiles in the intestine of lipopolysaccharide-challenged piglets.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dan; Hou, Yongqing; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Di; Ding, Binying; Wu, Tao; Chen, Hongbo; Liu, Yulan; Kang, Ping; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    Bowel diseases are common in human and animals and are characterized by intestinal dysfunction and injury. A well-established porcine model of intestinal injury can be induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin released from the cell wall of pathogenic bacteria. LPS affects the expression of genes associated with intestinal immune response, mucosal growth, energy metabolism, absorption, mucosal barrier function, and antiviral function. Transcriptional analysis of intestinal genes reveals that the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon respond to LPS challenge in a similar pattern. Moreover, the jejunum and ileum exhibit greater responses to LPS challenge than the duodenum and colon with regard to gene expression. Additionally, over 85% of genes are co-expressed along the small and large intestines and there is a clear distinction in gene expression patterns amongst the different intestinal segments in pigs. These findings have important implications for underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for endotoxin-induced intestinal injury and dysfunction.

  8. The intracerebroventricular injection of rimonabant inhibits systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arnold; Neumann, Paul H; Peng, Jianya; James, Janey; Russo, Vincenzo; MacDonald, Hunter; Gertzberg, Nancy; Feleder, Carlos

    2015-09-15

    We investigated the role of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of rimonabant (500ng), a CB1 antagonist, on lipopolysaccharide ((LPS) 5mg/kg)-induced pulmonary inflammation in rats in an isolated perfused lung model. There were decreases in pulmonary capillary pressure (Ppc) and increases in the ((Wet-Dry)/Dry lung weight)/(Ppc) ratio in the ICV-vehicle/LPS group at 4h. There were decreases in TLR4 pathway markers, such as interleukin receptor-associated kinase-1, IκBα, Raf1 and phospho-SFK (Tyr416) at 30min and at 4h increases in IL-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and myeloperoxidase in lung homogenate. Intracerebroventricular rimonabant attenuated these LPS-induced responses, indicating that ICV rimonabant modulates LPS-initiated pulmonary inflammation.

  9. Fish Oil Prevents Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior by Inhibiting Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhe; Ren, Huixia; Huang, Zhijian; Peng, Yu; He, Baixuan; Yao, Xiaoli; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Su, Huanxing

    2016-11-04

    Depression is associated with somatic immune changes, and neuroinflammation is now recognized as hallmark for depressive disorders. N-3 (or omega-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are well known to suppress neuroinflammation, reduce oxidative stress, and protect neuron from injury. We pretreated animals with fish oil and induced acute depression-like behaviors with systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. The levels of cytokines and stress hormones were determined from plasma and different brain areas. The results showed that fish oil treatment prevent LPS-induce depressive behavior by suppression of neuroinflammation. LPS induced acute neuroinflammation in different brain regions, which were prevented in fish oil fed mice. However, neither LPS administration nor fish oil treatment has strong effect on stress hormone secretion in the hypothalamus and adrenal. Fish oil might provide a useful therapy against inflammation-associated depression.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide impairs hepatocyte ureagenesis from ammonia: involvement of mitochondrial aquaporin-8.

    PubMed

    Soria, Leandro R; Marrone, Julieta; Molinas, Sara M; Lehmann, Guillermo L; Calamita, Giuseppe; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2014-05-02

    We recently reported that hepatocyte mitochondrial aquaporin-8 (mtAQP8) channels facilitate the uptake of ammonia and its metabolism into urea. Here we studied the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on ammonia-derived ureagenesis. In LPS-treated rats, hepatic mtAQP8 protein expression and diffusional ammonia permeability (measured utilizing ammonia analogues) of liver inner mitochondrial membranes were downregulated. NMR studies using 15N-labeled ammonia indicated that basal and glucagon-induced ureagenesis from ammonia were significantly reduced in hepatocytes from LPS-treated rats. Our data suggest that hepatocyte mtAQP8-mediated ammonia removal via ureagenesis is impaired by LPS, a mechanism potentially relevant to the molecular pathogenesis of defective hepatic ammonia detoxification in sepsis.

  11. Gram-negative marine bacteria: structural features of lipopolysaccharides and their relevance for economically important diseases.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2014-04-30

    Gram-negative marine bacteria can thrive in harsh oceanic conditions, partly because of the structural diversity of the cell wall and its components, particularly lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is composed of three main parts, an O-antigen, lipid A, and a core region, all of which display immense structural variations among different bacterial species. These components not only provide cell integrity but also elicit an immune response in the host, which ranges from other marine organisms to humans. Toll-like receptor 4 and its homologs are the dedicated receptors that detect LPS and trigger the immune system to respond, often causing a wide variety of inflammatory diseases and even death. This review describes the structural organization of selected LPSes and their association with economically important diseases in marine organisms. In addition, the potential therapeutic use of LPS as an immune adjuvant in different diseases is highlighted.

  12. Use of a bilayer stacking gel to improve resolution of lipopolysaccharides and lipooligosaccharides in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Inzana, T J; Apicella, M A

    1999-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipooligosaccharide (LOS) are important antigenic and integral components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Alteration or heterogeneity of LPS/LOS structure is most often assessed by alteration of electrophoretic band profiles using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In order to discern minor differences in the electrophoretic profile of closely spaced bands, particularly the low molecular weight bands of LOS, optimum resolution is required. Unfortunately, many publications of LPS/LOS in polyacrylamide gels show a diffuse, smeared pattern without discernible bands. We report here a formulation for polyacrylamide gels that reproducibly yields LPS/LOS bands with sharp resolution. A key feature of this formulation is the use of a separate comb gel containing electrode buffer layered on top of the conventional stacking gel.

  13. Effect of Radix Isatidis on the expression of moesin mRNA induced by LPS in the tissues of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Liu, Yunhai; Fang, Jianguo; Chen, Xin; Xie, Wei

    2007-04-01

    To investigate the effect of the anti-endotoxic part of Radix Isatidis on the expression of moesin mRNA in murine tissues induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the sample solution of F(022) part from Radix Isatidis was intraperitoneally administered to experimental mice, and the lipopoly-saccharide (LPS) were injected into the tail vein, and then the tissues of liver, kidney and spleen were colleted and cut into slices. The mRNA was detected by moesin mRNA hybridization in situ. The staining results were observed under microscope. It was found that moesin mRNA expression was increased in the tissues of liver, kidndy and spleen in mice treated with LPS, while in the mice pre-treated with F(022) part from Radix Isatidis, the LPS-induced moesin mRNA expressions in these tissues were inhibited in a dose-dependant manner. Our study showed that F(022) part from Radix Isatidis can inhibit the LPS-induced expression of moesin mRNA in the tissues of liver, kidney and spleen in mice.

  14. Reviewing and identifying amino acids of human, murine, canine and equine TLR4 / MD-2 receptor complexes conferring endotoxic innate immunity activation by LPS/lipid A, or antagonistic effects by Eritoran, in contrast to species-dependent modulation by lipid IVa.

    PubMed

    Scior, Thomas; Alexander, Christian; Zaehringer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    There is literature evidence gathered throughout the last two decades reflecting unexpected species differences concerning the immune response to lipid IVa which provides the opportunity to gain more detailed insight by the molecular modeling approach described in this study. Lipid IVa is a tetra-acylated precursor of lipid A in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Gram-negative bacteria. Lipid A of the prototypic E. coli-type is a hexa-acylated structure that acts as an agonist in all tested mammalian species by innate immunorecognition via the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) receptor complex. In contrast, lipid IVa is proinflammatory in mouse cells (agonism) but it remains inactive to human macrophages and even antagonizes the action of potent agonists like E. coli-type lipid A. This particular ambivalent activity profile of lipid IVa has been confirmed in other mammalian species: in equine cells Lipid IVa also acts in a weak agonistic manner, whereas being inactive and antagonizing the lipid A-induced activation of canine TLR4/MD-2. Intriguingly, the respective TLR4 amino acid sequences of the latter species are more identical to the human (67%, 68%) than to the murine (62%, 58%) ortholog. In order to address the unpaired activity-sequence dualism for human, murine, canine and equine species regarding the activity of lipid IVa as compared to LPS and lipid A and, we review the literature and computationally pinpoint the differential biological effects of lipid IVa versus LPS and lipid A to specific amino acid residues. In contrast to lipid IVa the structurally related synthetic compound Eritoran (E5564) acts consistently in an antagonistic manner in these mammalian species and serves as a reference ligand for molecular modeling in this study. The combined evaluation of data sets provided by prior studies and in silico homology mapping of differential residues of TLR4/MD-2 complexes lends detailed insight into the

  15. Exenatide (a GLP-1 agonist) improves the antioxidative potential of in vitro cultured human monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bułdak, Łukasz; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Bułdak, Rafał Jakub; Machnik, Grzegorz; Bołdys, Aleksandra; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages are dominant cells in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. They are also a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress, which is particularly high in subjects with diabetes, is responsible for accelerated atherosclerosis. Novel antidiabetic drugs (e.g., glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists) were shown to reduce ROS level. Therefore, we conceived a study to evaluate the influence of exenatide, a GLP-1 agonist, on redox status in human monocytes/macrophages cultured in vitro, which may explain the beneficial effects of incretin-based antidiabetic treatment. Human macrophages obtained from 10 healthy volunteers were in vitro subjected to the treatment with GLP-1 agonist (exenatide) in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), antagonist of GLP-1 receptors (exendin 9-39), or protein kinase A inhibitor (H89). Afterwards, reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde level, NADPH oxidase, and antioxidative enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase] expression was evaluated. Finally, we estimated the activity of the abovementioned enzymes in the presence of H89. According to our findings, exenatide reduced ROS and malondialdyhyde (MDA) level by decreasing the expression of ROS-generating NADPH oxidase and by increasing the expression and activities of SOD and GSH-Px. We also showed that this effect was significantly inhibited by exendin 9-39 (a GLP-1 antagonist) and blocked by H89. Exenatide improved the antioxidative potential and reduced oxidative stress in cultured human monocytes/macrophages, and this finding may be responsible for the pleiotropic effects of incretin-based therapies. This effect relied on the stimulation of GLP-1 receptor.

  16. Alleviation of severe inflammatory responses in LPS-exposed mice by Schisantherin A.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Ci, Xinxin; Li, Yang; Liu, Chaoying; Wen, Zhongmei; Jie, Jing; Peng, Liping

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate our hypothesis starting that Schisantherin A (SchA), which exerts significant anti-inflammatory effects in vitro, could reduce the pulmonary inflammatory response in an acute lung injury (ALI) model. ALI was induced in mice by exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 20 mg/kg), and the inflammatory mediator production, neutrophil infiltration, and histopathological changes were evaluated. SchA at a dose of 100 mg/kg significantly improved survival rate of mice injected with LPS. The levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the histopathological changes due to the injury were significantly inhibited when SchA was administered before or after LPS insult, and the infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages in lung tissues induced by LPS were suppressed by SchA. Additionally, pretreatment with SchA notably blocked the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Taken together, SchA showed obvious anti-inflammatory effects in an LPS-induced ALI model via blockage of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Thus, SchA may be an innovative therapy for inflammatory diseases.

  17. LPS promotes Th2 dependent sensitisation leading to anaphylaxis in a Pru p 3 mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Maria J.; Aranda, Ana; Fernandez, Tahia D.; Cubells-Baeza, Nuria; Torres, Maria J.; Gomez, Francisca; Palomares, Francisca; Perkins, James R.; Rojo, Javier; Diaz-Perales, Araceli; Mayorga, Cristobalina

    2017-01-01

    Pru p 3 is the major peach allergen in the Mediterranean area. It frequently elicits severe reactions, limiting its study in humans, raising the need for animal models to investigate the immunological mechanisms involved. However, no anaphylaxis model exists for Pru p 3. We aimed to develop a model of peach anaphylaxis by sensitising mice with Pru p 3 in combination with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an adjuvant. Four groups of mice were sensitised intranasally: untreated; treated with Pru p 3; treated with LPS; treated with Pru p 3 + LPS. After sensitisation mice were intraperitoneally challenged with Pru p 3 and in vivo and in vitro parameters were evaluated. Only mice in the Pru p 3 + LPS group showed anaphylaxis symptoms, including a decrease in temperature. Determination of in vitro parameters showed a Th2 response with an increase of Pru p 3-specific IgE and IgG1. Moreover, at the cellular level, we found increased levels of IgE and IgG1 secreting Pru p 3-specific cells and a proliferative CD4+ T-cell response. These results demonstrate that Pru p 3-specific anaphylaxis can be generated after nasal sensitisation to Pru p 3 in combination with LPS. This is a promising model for evaluating food allergy immunotherapies. PMID:28084419

  18. Granzyme K synergistically potentiates LPS-induced cytokine responses in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wensink, Annette C.; Kemp, Vera; Fermie, Job; García Laorden, M. Isabel; van der Poll, Tom; Hack, C. Erik; Bovenschen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Granzymes are serine proteases released by cytotoxic lymphocytes to induce apoptosis in virus-infected cells and tumor cells. Evidence is emerging that granzymes also play a role in controlling inflammation. Granzyme serum levels are elevated in patients with autoimmune diseases and infections, including sepsis. However, the function of extracellular granzymes in inflammation largely remains unknown. Here, we show that granzyme K (GrK) binds to Gram-negative bacteria and their cell-wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GrK synergistically enhances LPS-induced cytokine release in vitro from primary human monocytes and in vivo in a mouse model of LPS challenge. Intriguingly, these extracellular effects are independent of GrK catalytic activity. GrK disaggregates LPS from micelles and augments LPS–CD14 complex formation, thereby likely boosting monocyte activation by LPS. We conclude that extracellular GrK is an unexpected direct modulator of LPS–TLR4 signaling during the antimicrobial innate immune response. PMID:24711407

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide Delays LPS-Induced Preterm Birth in Mice via Anti-Inflammatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weina; Xu, Chen; You, Xingji; Olson, David M.; Chemtob, Sylvain; Gao, Lu; Ni, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A major cause of preterm labor in pregnant women is intra-amniotic infection, which is mediated by an inflammatory process. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous transmitter, has been implicated to be involved in inflammatory responses. We sought to investigate whether H2S affects infectious preterm birth using the mouse model of lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced preterm birth. Administration of LPS at 0.4 mg/kg with two injections intraperitoneally (i.p.) on gestational day 14.5 induced preterm labor. LPS significantly increased leukocyte infiltration in uterus, stimulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), CCL2 and CXCL15 in myometrium. Administration of NaHS (i.p.) delayed the onset of labor induced by LPS in a dose-dependent manner. NaHS prevented leukocyte infiltration into intrauterine tissues and inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in myometrium and decreased the levels of these cytokines in maternal circulation. H2S also decreased LPS-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2/ nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways in myometrium. This study provides new in vivo evidence for the roles of H2S in attenuating inflammation, and a potential novel therapeutic strategy for infection-related preterm labor. PMID:27035826

  20. Nicotine ameliorates schizophrenia-like cognitive deficits induced by maternal LPS exposure: a study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Waterhouse, Uta; Roper, Vic E.; Brennan, Katharine A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Maternal exposure to infectious agents is a predisposing factor for schizophrenia with associated cognitive deficits in offspring. A high incidence of smoking in these individuals in adulthood might be, at least in part, due to the cognitive-enhancing effects of nicotine. Here, we have used prenatal exposure to maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS, bacterial endotoxin) at different time points as a model for cognitive deficits in schizophrenia to determine whether nicotine reverses any associated impairments. Pregnant rats were treated subcutaneously with LPS (0.5 mg/kg) at one of three neurodevelopmental time periods [gestation days (GD) 10-11, 15-16, 18-19]. Cognitive assessment in male offspring commenced in early adulthood [postnatal day (PND) 60] and included: prepulse inhibition (PPI), latent inhibition (LI) and delayed non-matching to sample (DNMTS). Following PND 100, daily nicotine injections (0.6 mg/kg, subcutaneously) were administered, and animals were re-tested in the same tasks (PND 110). Only maternal LPS exposure early during fetal neurodevelopment (GD 10-11) resulted in deficits in all tests compared to animals that had been prenatally exposed to saline at the same gestational time point. Repeated nicotine treatment led to global (PPI) and selective (LI) improvements in performance. Early but not later prenatal LPS exposure induced consistent deficits in cognitive tests with relevance for schizophrenia. Nicotine reversed the LPS-induced deficits in selective attention (LI) and induced a global enhancement of sensorimotor gating (PPI). PMID:27483346

  1. LPS-induced renal inflammation is prevented by (-)-epicatechin in rats.

    PubMed

    Prince, Paula Denise; Fischerman, Laura; Toblli, Jorge E; Fraga, Cesar G; Galleano, Monica

    2017-04-01

    This work investigated the capacity of (-)-epicatechin to prevent the renal damage induced by LPS administration in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed for 4 days a diet without or with supplementation with (-)-epicatechin (80mg/kg BW/d), and subsequently i.p. injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six hours after injection, LPS-treated rats exhibited increased plasma creatinine and urea levels as indicators of impaired renal function. The renal cortex of the LPS-treated rats showed: i) increased expression of inflammatory molecules (TNF-α, iNOS and IL-6); ii) activation of several steps of NF-κB pathway; iii) overexpression of TLR4, and iv) higher superoxide anion production and lipid peroxidation index in association with increased levels of gp91(phox) and p47(phox) (NOX2) and NOX4. Pretreatment with dietary (-)-epicatechin prevented the adverse effects of LPS challenge essentially by inhibiting TLR4 upregulation and NOX activation and the consequent downstream events, e.g. NF-kB activation.

  2. Effect of LPS treatment on tyrosine hydroxylase expression and Parkinson-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Girard-Joyal, Olivier; Ismail, Nafissa

    2016-12-24

    Puberty is a critical period of development during which the brain undergoes reorganizing and remodeling. Exposure to stress during this period is thought to interfere with normal brain development and increase susceptibility to mental illnesses. In female mice, pubertal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial endotoxin, has been shown to alter sexual, anxiety-like, and depression-like behaviors and cognition in an enduring manner. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unknown. The present study examined age and sex difference in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine-dependent and Parkinson-like behaviors following LPS treatment. The results show that LPS treatment during adulthood causes an enduring increase in TH expression in many of the brain regions examined. In contrast, there is no change in TH expression following LPS treatment during puberty. However, pubertal LPS treatment induces enduring behavioral deficits in tests of Parkinson-like behaviors, more so in male than in female mice. These results suggest that the low levels of TH following exposure to pubertal immune challenge may predispose mice to Parkinson-like behavior. These findings add to our understanding of stress and immune responses during puberty and their impact on mental health later in life.

  3. Screening and biological activities of pedopeptins, novel inhibitors of LPS produced by soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kozuma, Shiho; Hirota-Takahata, Yuki; Fukuda, Daisuke; Kuraya, Nahoki; Nakajima, Mutsuo; Ando, Osamu

    2014-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a strong endotoxin and is delivered to the cell surface signaling receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 and MD-2 complex, via soluble cluster of differentiation (CD) 14 or membranous CD14, resulting in the induction of the inflammatory response. To obtain new compounds that block LPS binding to CD14, we designed a high-throughput screening based on time-resolved intermolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer. This cell-free screening system successfully led to the discovery of novel inhibitors of LPS-CD14 interaction from the library of the secondary metabolites of microorganisms. We identified the novel compounds pedopeptin A, B and C from a culture broth of Pedobacter sp. SANK 72003. Pedopeptins blocked LPS binding to CD14 in vitro with IC50 values of 20, 11 and 47 nM, respectively, and also inhibited LPS binding to the cells expressing CD14, leading to the suppression of cytokine production. Moreover, they showed antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli with minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 2 to 4 μg ml(-1).

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Delays LPS-Induced Preterm Birth in Mice via Anti-Inflammatory Pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weina; Xu, Chen; You, Xingji; Olson, David M; Chemtob, Sylvain; Gao, Lu; Ni, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A major cause of preterm labor in pregnant women is intra-amniotic infection, which is mediated by an inflammatory process. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous transmitter, has been implicated to be involved in inflammatory responses. We sought to investigate whether H2S affects infectious preterm birth using the mouse model of lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced preterm birth. Administration of LPS at 0.4 mg/kg with two injections intraperitoneally (i.p.) on gestational day 14.5 induced preterm labor. LPS significantly increased leukocyte infiltration in uterus, stimulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), CCL2 and CXCL15 in myometrium. Administration of NaHS (i.p.) delayed the onset of labor induced by LPS in a dose-dependent manner. NaHS prevented leukocyte infiltration into intrauterine tissues and inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in myometrium and decreased the levels of these cytokines in maternal circulation. H2S also decreased LPS-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2/ nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways in myometrium. This study provides new in vivo evidence for the roles of H2S in attenuating inflammation, and a potential novel therapeutic strategy for infection-related preterm labor.

  5. Eriodictyol, a plant flavonoid, attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury through its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, GUANG-FA; GUO, HONG-JUAN; HUANG, YAN; WU, CHUN-TING; ZHANG, XIANG-FENG

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by excessive inflammatory responses and oxidative injury in the lung tissue. It has been suggested that anti-inflammatory or antioxidative agents could have therapeutic effects in ALI, and eriodictyol has been reported to exhibit antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of eriodictyol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in a mouse model. The mice were divided into four groups: Phosphate-buffered saline-treated healthy control, LPS-induced ALI, vehicle-treated ALI (LPS + vehicle) and eriodictyol-treated ALI (LPS + eriodictyol). Eriodictyol (30 mg/kg) was administered orally once, 2 days before the induction of ALI. The data showed that eriodictyol pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced ALI through its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity. Furthermore, the eriodictyol pretreatment activated the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in the ALI mouse model, which attenuated the oxidative injury and inhibited the inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. In combination, the results of the present study demonstrated that eriodictyol could alleviate the LPS-induced lung injury in mice by regulating the Nrf2 pathway and inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting that eriodictyol could be used as a potential drug for the treatment of LPS-induced lung injury. PMID:26668626

  6. Effects of Lutein and Zeaxanthin on LPS-Induced Secretion of IL-8 by Uveal Melanocytes and Relevant Signal Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chao, Shih-Chun; Vagaggini, Tommaso; Nien, Chan-Wei; Huang, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lutein and zeaxanthin on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced secretion of IL-8 by uveal melanocytes (UM) were tested in cultured human UM. MTT assay revealed that LPS (0.01-1 μg/mL) and lutein and zeaxanthin (1-10 μM) did not influence the cell viability of cultured UM. LPS caused a dose-dependent increase of secretion of IL-8 by cultured UM. Lutein and zeaxanthin did not affect the constitutive secretion of IL-8. However, lutein and zeaxanthin decreased LPS-induced secretion of IL-8 in cultured UM in a dose-dependent manner. LPS significantly increased NF-κB levels in cell nuclear extracts and p-JNK levels in the cell lysates from UM, but not p-p38 MAPK and p-ERG. Lutein or zeaxanthin significantly reduced LPS-induced increase of NF-κB and p-JNK levels, but not p38 MAPK and ERG levels. The present study demonstrated that lutein and zeaxanthin inhibited LPS-induced secretion of IL-8 in cultured UM via JNK and NF-κB signal pathways. The anti-inflammatory effects of lutein and zeaxanthin might be explored as a therapeutic approach in the management of uveitis and other inflammatory diseases of the eye.

  7. Effects of Lutein and Zeaxanthin on LPS-Induced Secretion of IL-8 by Uveal Melanocytes and Relevant Signal Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Shih-Chun; Vagaggini, Tommaso; Nien, Chan-Wei; Huang, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lutein and zeaxanthin on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced secretion of IL-8 by uveal melanocytes (UM) were tested in cultured human UM. MTT assay revealed that LPS (0.01–1 μg/mL) and lutein and zeaxanthin (1–10 μM) did not influence the cell viability of cultured UM. LPS caused a dose-dependent increase of secretion of IL-8 by cultured UM. Lutein and zeaxanthin did not affect the constitutive secretion of IL-8. However, lutein and zeaxanthin decreased LPS-induced secretion of IL-8 in cultured UM in a dose-dependent manner. LPS significantly increased NF-κB levels in cell nuclear extracts and p-JNK levels in the cell lysates from UM, but not p-p38 MAPK and p-ERG. Lutein or zeaxanthin significantly reduced LPS-induced increase of NF-κB and p-JNK levels, but not p38 MAPK and ERG levels. The present study demonstrated that lutein and zeaxanthin inhibited LPS-induced secretion of IL-8 in cultured UM via JNK and NF-κB signal pathways. The anti-inflammatory effects of lutein and zeaxanthin might be explored as a therapeutic approach in the management of uveitis and other inflammatory diseases of the eye. PMID:26609426

  8. Trapa japonica Pericarp Extract Reduces LPS-Induced Inflammation in Macrophages and Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yon-Suk; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Son, Sangkeun; Seo, Il-Bok; Jeong, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ee-Hwa; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2016-03-21

    In this study, we found that chloroform fraction (CF) from TJP ethanolic extract inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular ROS in RAW264.7 cells. In addition, expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) genes was reduced, as evidenced by western blot. Our results indicate that CF exerts anti-inflammatory effects by down-regulating expression of iNOS and COX-2 genes through inhibition of MAPK (ERK, JNK and p38) and NF-κB signaling. Similarly we also evaluated the effects of CF on LPS-induced acute lung injury. Male Balb/c mice were pretreated with dexamethasone or CF 1 h before intranasal instillation of LPS. Eight hours after LPS administration, the inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined. The results indicated that CF inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in a dose dependent manner. It was also observed that CF attenuated LPS-induced lung histopathologic changes. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the protective effect of CF on LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice might relate to the suppression of excessive inflammatory responses in lung tissue. Thus, it can be suggested that CF might be a potential therapeutic agent for ALI.

  9. Passive transfer of leishmania lipopolysaccharide confers parasite survival in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Handman, E.; Schnur, L.F.; Spithill, T.W.; Mitchell, G.F.

    1986-12-01

    Infection of macrophages by the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania involves specific attachment to the host membrane, followed by phagocytosis and intracellular survival and growth. Two parasite molecules have been implicated in the attachment event: Leishmania lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS) and a glycoprotein (gp63). This study was designed to clarify the role of L-LPS in infection and the stage in the process of infection at which it operates. The authors have recently identified a Leishmania major strain (LRC-L119) which lacks the L-LPS molecule and is not infective for hamsters or mice. This parasite was isolated from a gerbil in Kenya and was identified phenotypically as L. major by isoenzyme and fatty acid analysis. In this study they have confirmed at the genotype level that LRC-L119 is L. major by analyzing and comparing the organization of cloned DNA sequences in the genome of different strains of L. major. Here they show that LRC-L119 promastigotes are phagocytosed rapidly by macrophages in vitro, but in contrast to virulent strains of L. major, they are then killed over a period of 18 hr. In addition, they show that transfer of purified L-LPS from a virulent clone of L. major (V121) into LRC-L119 promastigotes confers on them the ability to survive in macrophages in vitro.

  10. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  11. Proteomic Changes in Chicken Plasma Induced by Salmonella typhimurium Lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O.; Makkar, Sarbjeet K.; Rath, Narayan C.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are cell wall components of Gram-negative bacteria that produce inflammation and sickness in higher animals. The objective was to identify plasma proteomic changes in an avian model of inflammation. Chickens were treated with either saline or LPS, and blood was collected at 24 hours postinjection. The pooled plasma samples were depleted of high-abundant proteins and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). MALDI analyses showed an increase in fibrinogen beta-derived peptide and a decrease in apolipoprotein-AII-derived peptide in LPS samples. Label-free quantitation of LC–MS/MS spectra revealed an increase in the levels of α1-acid glycoprotein, a chemokine CCLI10, and cathelicidin-2, but a decrease in an interferon-stimulated gene-12-2 protein in the LPS group. These differentially expressed proteins are associated with immunomodulation, cytokine changes, and defense mechanisms, which may be useful as candidate biomarkers of infection and inflammation. PMID:27053921

  12. Bitter gourd suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Masuko; Nakayama, Hirosuke; Fukushima, Kenji; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Ono, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Tatsunobu; Akimoto, Yukari; Masumoto, Saeko; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Hoshi, Yoshikazu; Deguchi, Tomoaki; Yoshida, Mitsuru

    2008-06-11

    Bitter gourd ( Momordica charantia L.) is a popular tropical vegetable in Asian countries. Previously it was shown that bitter gourd placenta extract suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNFalpha production in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. Here it is shown that the butanol-soluble fraction of bitter gourd placenta extract strongly suppresses LPS-induced TNFalpha production in RAW 264.7 cells. Gene expression analysis using a fibrous DNA microarray showed that the bitter gourd butanol fraction suppressed expression of various LPS-induced inflammatory genes, such as those for TNF, IL1alpha, IL1beta, G1p2, and Ccl5. The butanol fraction significantly suppressed NFkappaB DNA binding activity and phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. Components in the active fraction from bitter gourd were identified as 1-alpha-linolenoyl-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), 2-alpha-linolenoyl-LPC, 1-lynoleoyl-LPC, and 2-linoleoyl-LPC. Purified 1-alpha-linolenoyl-LPC and 1-linoleoyl-LPC suppressed the LPS-induced TNFalpha production of RAW 264.7 cells at a concentration of 10 microg/mL.

  13. [SEROLOGICAL PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF PANTOEA AGGLOMERANS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES].

    PubMed

    Bulygina, T V; Yakovleva, L M; Brovarska, O S; Varbanets, L D

    2015-01-01

    The serological and phytotoxic properties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of plant pathogens--Pantoea agglomerans were studied. It is known that the thin variations in the structure of the O-specific polysaccharides determining serological specificity of gram- negative bacteria and used as a molecular basis of serological classification schemes. For P. agglomerans still does not exist a classification scheme based on serology specificity of their LPS. The results of cross serological tests demonstrate immunochemical heterogeneity of species P agglomerans. Only three strains of the 8488, 8490 and 7969 according to the agglutination of O-antigens and direct hemagglutination and inhibition direct hemagglutination can be attributed to a single serogroup. Other strains--each separate group, although some have a relationship. Compared with control plants under the influence of seed treatment of LPS in plants may be reduced, and in some cases increased root length, height and weight sprout, depending on the strain from which the selected LPS. Dive seedlings of tomatoes in the solutions of the studied preparations FSC caused the loss, and after some time, restore turgor.

  14. Early LPS-induced ERK activation in retinal pigment epithelium cells is dependent on PIP 2 -PLC.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Melina V; Kamerbeek, Constanza B; Giusto, Norma M; Salvador, Gabriela A

    2016-06-01

    This article presents additional data regarding the study "The phospholipase D pathway mediates the inflammatory response of the retinal pigment epithelium" [1]. The new data presented here show that short exposure of RPE cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces an early and transient activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). This early ERK1/2 activation is dependent on phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate-phospholipase C (PIP2-PLC). On the contrary, neither the phospholipase D 1 (PLD1) nor the PLD2 inhibition is able to modulate the early ERK1/2 activation induced by LPS in RPE cells.

  15. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells

  16. Lipopolysaccharide-induced lethality and cytokine production in aged mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tateda, K; Matsumoto, T; Miyazaki, S; Yamaguchi, K

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to define the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensitivity of aged mice in terms of lethality and cytokine production and to determine down-regulating responses of corticosterone and interleukin 10 (IL-10). The 50% lethal doses of LPS in young (6- to 7-week-old) and aged (98- to 102-week-old) mice were 601 and 93 microg per mouse (25.6 and 1.6 mg per kg of body weight), respectively. Aged mice were approximately 6.5-fold more sensitive to the lethal toxicity of LPS in micrograms per mouse (16-fold more sensitive in milligrams per kilogram) than young mice. Levels in sera of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) IL-1alpha, and IL-6 after intraperitoneal injection of 100 microg of LPS peaked at 1.5, 3, and 3 h, respectively, and declined thereafter in both groups of mice. However, the peak values of these cytokines were significantly higher in aged than in young mice (P < 0.05). Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detectable at 3 h, and sustained high levels were still detected after 12 h in both age groups. Although there were no significant differences in levels of IFN-gamma in sera from both groups, aged mice showed higher IFN-gamma levels throughout the 3- to 12-h study period. Administration of increasing doses of LPS revealed that aged mice had a lower threshold to IL-1alpha production than young mice. In addition, aged mice were approximately 4-fold more sensitive to the lethal toxicity of exogenous TNF in units per mouse (10-fold more sensitive in units per kilogram) than young mice. With regard to down-regulating factors, corticosterone amounts were similar at basal levels and no differences in kinetics after the LPS challenge were observed, whereas IL-10 levels in sera were significantly higher in aged mice at 1.5 and 3 h than in young mice (P < 0.01). These results indicate that aged mice are more sensitive to the lethal toxicities of LPS and TNF than young mice. We conclude that a relatively activated, or primed, state for LPS

  17. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides form physically cross-linked, two-dimensional gels in the presence of divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Moritz; Schneck, Emanuel; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-08-14

    We established a bacterial membrane model with monolayers of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS Re and LPS Ra) and quantified their viscoelastic properties by using an interfacial stress rheometer coupled to a Langmuir film balance. LPS Re monolayers exhibited purely viscous behaviour in the absence of calcium ions, while the same monolayers underwent a viscous-to-elastic transition upon compression in the presence of Ca(2+). Our results demonstrated for the first time that LPSs in bacterial outer membranes can form two-dimensional elastic networks in the presence of Ca(2+). Different from LPS Re monolayers, the LPS Ra monolayers showed a very similar rheological transition both in the presence and absence of Ca(2+), suggesting that longer saccharide chains can form 2D physical gels even in the absence of Ca(2+). By exposure of the monolayers to the antimicrobial peptide protamine, we could directly monitor the differences in resistance of bacterial membranes according to the presence of calcium.

  18. Effects of dietary humic and butyric acid on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide in young pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humic acid (MFG) and fat protected butyric acid (BA) has been shown to modulate energy metabolism and inflammation. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effects of MFG and BA, alone and in combination, on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced in...

  19. Supplementation with a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product alters the metabolic response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would alter the metabolic response following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n=30; 6.4+/-0.1 kg BW) were housed individually with ad libitum access to feed and water. Pigs were...

  20. Supplementation of Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product can attenuate the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce stress and acute phase responses (APR) following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n=30; 6.4±0.1 kilograms body weight) were housed individually in pens with ad libi...

  1. Fetal lipopolysaccharide exposure modulates diet-dependent gut maturation and sensitivity to necrotising enterocolitis in pre-term pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uterine infections during pregnancy predispose to pre-term birth and postnatal morbidity, but it is unknown how prenatal bacterial exposure affects maturation of the immature gut. We hypothesised that a prenatal exposure to gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has immunomodulatory effects that imp...

  2. Inhibitory effect of BMAP-28 on Leptospiral Lipopolysaccharide-Induced TLR2-Dependent Immune Response in Bovine Cells

    PubMed Central

    GUO, Yijie; Ding, Cuiping; Zhang, Bo; XU, Jun; XUN, Meng; XU, Jiru

    2016-01-01

    Background Bovine leptospirosis is a widespread zoonotic disease, leading to serious economic losses in animal production and causing potential hazards to human health. Leptospiral lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS) plays an important role in leptospirosis pathogenicity. Objectives With respect to L-LPS endotoxin-like activity, we examined bovine immune response to L-LPS and the inhibitory ability of bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-28 (BMAP-28) against L-LPS-induced immune activation in bovine cells. Materials and Methods In this study, L-LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in bovine cells was quantitatively measured with real-time PCR and ELISA, and we determined which cell membrane receptors (toll-like receptor [TLR]2 and TLR4) played a major role. In addition, the ability of BMAP-28 to inhibit L-LPS-induced endotoxin-like immune activation in bovine cells was determined by the decrease in cytokine secretion. Results L-LPS showed the ability to induce cytokine production in bovine cells, and its induction was TLR2-dependent. BMAP-28 was used to inhibit L-LPS-induced endotoxin-like activity. The function of BMAP-28 was to inhibit LPS-induced TLR2 expression and cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, the L-LPS immune response of bovine cells was significant, indicating that TLR2 is the predominant receptor for L-LPS. Due to L-LPS endotoxin-like activity, we found a strategy through using BMAP-28 to prevent L-LPS-induced TLR2-dependent immune activation in bovine cells. PMID:27635213

  3. Protective efficacy afforded by live Pasteurella multocida vaccines in chickens is independent of lipopolysaccharide outer core structure.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marina; John, Marietta; Edmunds, Mark; Wright, Amy; Ford, Mark; Turni, Conny; Blackall, P J; Cox, Andrew; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2016-03-29

    Pasteurella multocida is a major animal pathogen that causes a range of diseases including fowl cholera. P. multocida infections result in considerable losses to layer and breeder flocks in poultry industries worldwide. Both killed whole-cell and live-attenuated vaccines are available; these vaccines vary in their protective efficacy, particularly against heterologous strains. Moreover, until recently there was no knowledge of P. multocida LPS genetics and structure to determine precisely how LPS structure affects the protective capacity of these vaccines. In this study we show that defined lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants presented as killed whole-cell vaccines elicited solid protective immunity only against P. multocida challenge strains expressing highly similar or identical LPS structures. This finding indicates that vaccination of commercial flocks with P. multocida killed cell formulations will not protect against strains producing an LPS structure different to that produced by strains included in the vaccine formulation. Conversely, protective immunity conferred by vaccination with live P. multocida strains was found to be largely independent of LPS structure. Birds vaccinated with a range of live mutants belonging to the L1 and L3 LPS genotypes, each expressing a specific truncated LPS structure, were protected against challenge with the parent strain. Moreover, birds vaccinated with any of the five LPS mutants belonging to the L1 LPS genotype were also protected against challenge with an unrelated strain and two of the five groups vaccinated with live LPS mutants belonging to the L3 genotype were protected against challenge with an unrelated strain. In summary, vaccination with live P. multocida aroA mutants producing full-length L1 or L3 LPS or vaccination with live strains producing shortened L1 LPS elicited strong protective immunity against both homologous and heterologous challenge.

  4. Piracetam Attenuates LPS-Induced Neuroinflammation and Cognitive Impairment in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Alok; Paliwal, Pankaj; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2017-02-07

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of piracetam on neuroinflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and resulting changes in cognitive behavior. Neuroinflammation was induced by a single dose of LPS solution infused into each of the lateral cerebral ventricles in concentrations of 1 μg/μl, at a rate of 1 μl/min over a 5-min period, with a 5-min waiting period between the two infusions. Piracetam in doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg i.p. was administered 30 min before LPS infusion and continued for 9 days. On ninth day, the behavioral test for memory and anxiety was done followed by blood collection and microdissection of the hippocampus (HIP) and prefrontal cortex brain regions. Piracetam attenuated the LPS-induced decrease in coping strategy to novel environment indicating anxiolytic activity. It also reversed the LPS-induced changes in the known arm and novel arm entries in the Y-maze test indicating amelioration of spatial memory impairment. Further, piracetam moderated LPS-induced decrease in the mitochondrial complex enzyme activities (I, II, IV, and V) and mitochondrial membrane potential. It ameliorated changes in hippocampal lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels including the activity of superoxide dismutase. Piracetam region specifically ameliorated LPS-induced increase in the level of IL-6 in HIP indicating anti-neuroinflammatory effect. Further, piracetam reduced HIP Aβ (1-40) and increased blood Aβ level suggesting efflux of Aβ from HIP to blood. Therefore, the present study indicates preclinical evidence for the use of piracetam in the treatment of neuroinflammatory disorders.

  5. Cloning and analysis of gene regulation of a novel LPS-inducible cDNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, C G; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; O'Brien, W E

    1995-01-01

    The expression of many genes is altered upon the activation of macrophages by bacterial LPS. These genes play a crucial role in the orchestration of various responses to protect the host against infection. A novel 2.3 kilobase (kb) cDNA, designated IRG1, was obtained from a cDNA library prepared with RNA isolated from RAW 264.7 following lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Sequence analysis of the clone revealed no identity to any known genes but showed the presence of many potential phosphorylation sites suggesting that IRG1 protein product may be regulated at this level. Furthermore, IRG1 contains the motif for glycosaminoglycan attachment site, implying that IRG1 may be a proteoglycan. By interspecific back-cross analysis, Irg1 was mapped to mouse chromosome 14 linked to Tyrp2 and Rap2a. The IRG1 message appears 1.5 h following LPS exposure and its induction was not dependent on new protein synthesis. In fact, cycloheximide induced the expression of IRG1, suggesting that a protein repressor prevents the expression of IRG1 when uninduced. The role of the protein kinase A pathway in regulating the induction of IRG1 by LPS is questionable, because although forskolin inhibited its induction, neither dibutyrl-cAMP nor 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP had much effect on its expression. In contrast, activation of protein kinase C potentiated the LPS response. Chelation of extracellular calcium inhibited IRG1 4 h after LPS induction, while increasing intracellular calcium had little effect on the levels of the IRG1 transcript. Inhibiting tyrosine phosphorylation abrogated the induction of IRG1 by LPS. Hence, the induction of IRG1 by LPS is mediated by tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C pathway.

  6. Cloning and analysis of gene regulation of a novel LPS-inducible cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.G.L.; O`Brien, W.E.; Jenkins, N.A.; Gilbert, D.J.; Copeland, N.G.

    1995-03-01

    The expression of many genes is altered upon the activation of macrophages by bacterial LPS. These genes play a crucial role in the orchestration of various responses to protect the host against infection. A novel 2.3 kilobase (kb) cDNA, designated IRG1, was obtained from a cDNA library prepared with RNA isolated from RAW 264.7 following lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Sequence analysis of the clone revealed no identity to any known genes but showed the presence of many potential phosphorylation sites suggesting that IRG1 protein product may be regulated at this level. Furthermore, IRG1 contains the motif for glycosaminoglycan attachment site, implying that IRG1 may be a proteoglycan. By interspecific backcross analysis, IRG1 was mapped to mouse chromosome 14 linked to Tyrp2 and Rap2a. The IRG1 message appears 1.5 h following LPS exposure and its induction was not dependent on new protein synthesis. In fact, cycloheximide induced the expression of IRG1, suggesting that a protein repressor prevents the expression of IRG1 when uninduced. The role of the protein kinase A pathway in regulating the induction of IRG1 by LPS is questionable, because although forskolin inhibited its induction, neither dibutyrl-cAMP nor 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP had much effect on its expression. In contrast, activation of protein kinase C potentiated the LPS response. Chelation of extracellular calcium inhibited IRG1 4 h after LPS induction, while increasing intracellular calcium had little effect on the levels of the IRG1 transcript. Inhibiting tyrosine phosphorylation abrogated the induction of IRG1 by LPS. Hence, the induction of IRG1 by LPS is mediated by tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C pathway. 80 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Anti-inflammatory mechanism of lonchocarpine in LPS- or poly(I:C)-induced neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeon-Hui; Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kang, Jihee Lee; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2017-03-10

    Neuroinflammation plays an important role in the progression of various neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of lonchocarpine, a natural compound isolated from Abrus precatorius, under in vitro and in vivo neuroinflammatory conditions induced by challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)). Lonchocarpine suppressed the expression of iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines in LPS or poly(I:C)-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. These anti-inflammatory effects were verified in brains of mice with systemic inflammation induced by administration of LPS or poly(I:C). Lonchocarpine reduced the number of Iba-1-positive activated microglia, and suppressed the mRNA expression of various proinflammatory markers in the cortex of LPS- or poly(I:C)-injected mice. Molecular mechanistic experiments showed that lonchocarpine inhibited NF-κB activity by reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα in LPS- or poly(I:C)-stimulated BV2 cells. Analysis of further upstream signaling pathways in LPS-stimulated microglia showed that lonchocarpine inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB kinase and TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1). Moreover, lonchocarpine suppressed the interaction of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and intereleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK4). These data suggest that toll-like receptor 4 downstream signals such as MyD88/IRAK4-TAK1-NF-κB are at least partly involved in the anti-inflammatory mechanism of lonchocarpine in LPS-stimulated microglia. Its strong anti-inflammatory effects may make lonchocarpine an effective preventative drug for neuroinflammatory disorders that are associated with systemic inflammation.

  8. Effect of methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus Willd. on lipopolysaccharide induced-oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad Parwez; Hussain, Arshad; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Wahab, Shadma; Adak, Manoranjan

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress and impairment of normal physiological function generally categorized by increased anxiety and reduced mobility. Therefore, the present study was to find out the effect Methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus (MEAR ) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress in rats . LPS-induced oxidative stress in rats was measured by locomotor activity by photoactometer test, anxiety with elevated plus maze test and also studied the oxidative stress markers, nitric oxide and cytokines. The obtained data shows that LPS markedly exhausted (p<0.001) brain- reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) significantly increased (p<0.001) the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide and the activity of cytokines in the brain. MEAR supplementation resulted in normalization of brain GSH and CAT and SOD and decreases in the levels of MDA with reduction of nitric oxide and cytokines in the brain. The action of the extract at dose of 200 mg/kg was almost similar to the standard drug, quercetin (100mg/kg, p.o.). These present study conclude that MEAR administration significantly (P<0.05) reduced LPS- induced oxidative-stress and intensely suggest that Asparagus racemosus Willd. is a functionally newer type of cerebroprotective agent.

  9. LPS and Taxol activate Lyn kinase autophosphorylation in Lps(n), but not in Lpsd), macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, B. E.; Carboni, J. M.; Burkhardt, A. L.; Vogel, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The anti-tumor agent, Taxol, has been shown in murine macrophages to stimulate tumor necrosis factor (TNF), modulate TNF receptors, induce a large panel of immediate-early genes, and induce protein tyrosine phosphorylation indistinguishably from LPS. These data, coupled with the finding that lipid A antagonists block Taxol-induced stimulation, support the hypothesis that these two structurally unrelated compounds activate a common, receptor-associated signaling apparatus. A very early event in LPS signaling of human monocytes is activation of lyn kinase activity. We therefore sought to evaluate the activation of lyn kinase by LPS and Taxol in LPS-responsive (Lps(n)) and LPS-hyporesponsive (Lps(d)) macrophages. MATERIALS AND METHODS: C3H/OuJ (Lps(n)) and C3H/HeJ (Lps(d)) macrophages were stimulated by LPS or Taxol. Cell lysates were subjected to immunoprecipitation with anti-lyn antibody, gel electrophoresis, and in vitro kinase assays. Autoradiography and Phosphor-Imager analysis were carried out to detect incorporation of 32P into lyn protein. RESULTS: Within seconds of stimulation, LPS and Taxol induce in Lps(n) macrophages a depression of autophosphorylation, followed within minutes by autophosphorylation of both p53 and p56 lyn species. Lps(d) macrophages respond to LPS and Taxol with the initial decreas