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Sample records for agonist monophosphoryl lipid

  1. Putting endotoxin to work for us: monophosphoryl lipid A as a safe and effective vaccine adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Casella, C R; Mitchell, T C

    2008-10-01

    The development of non-infectious subunit vaccines greatly increases the safety of prophylactic immunization, but also reinforces the need for a new generation of immunostimulatory adjuvants. Because adverse effects are a paramount concern in prophylactic immunization, few new adjuvants have received approval for use anywhere in the developed world. The vaccine adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A is a detoxified form of the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide, and is among the first of a new generation of Toll-like receptor agonists likely to be used as vaccine adjuvants on a mass scale in human populations. Much remains to be learned about this compound's mechanism of action, but recent developments have made clear that it is unlikely to be simply a weak version of lipopolysaccharide. Instead, monophosphoryl lipid A's structure seems to have fortuitously retained several functions needed for stimulation of adaptive immune responses, while shedding those associated with pro-inflammatory side effects.

  2. Safety evaluation of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL): an immunostimulatory adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Baldrick, Paul; Richardson, Derek; Elliott, Gary; Wheeler, Alan W

    2002-06-01

    Animal models have shown the potential use of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a detoxified bacterial lipopolysaccharide, as a vaccine adjuvant. Immunostimulatory activity with diverse effects on the cellular elements of the immune system has been demonstrated and a range of vaccines incorporating MPL, including allergy vaccines, are currently under clinical evaluation. A series of preclinical safety investigations was performed to support clinical use of MPL as used in allergy vaccines and comprised cardiovascular/respiratory assessment in dog (up to 100 microg/kg/day); repeat-dose toxicity in rat, rabbit, and dog (up to 2500 and 1200 microg/kg/day in the rat and dog, respectively); reproduction toxicity in rat and rabbit (up to 100 microg/kg/day); and genotoxicity studies. Overall, repeat-dose toxicity studies in the rat and dog showed expected immunostimulatory effects and/or signs of toxicity associated with overstimulation of the immune system (notably increased spleen weight and white blood cell values). Studies in the rabbit with weekly doses of MPL produced no effects. MPL was shown to have no adverse effects on cardiovascular/respiratory function, reproduction, and genotoxicity.

  3. Monophosphoryl Lipid-A: A Promising Tool for Alzheimer's Disease Toll.

    PubMed

    Rego, Ângela; Viana, Sofia D; Ribeiro, Carlos A Fontes; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Pereira, Frederico C

    2016-04-12

    Neuroinflammation is a two-edged sword in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A certain degree of neuroinflammation is instrumental in the clearance of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides by activated microglia, although a sustained neuroinflammation might accelerate Aβ deposition, thus fostering the neurodegenerative process and functional decline in AD. There is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that the innate immune system via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) finely orchestrates the highly regulated inflammatory cascade that takes place in AD pathology. Herein we critically review pre-clinical (in vitro and in vivo approaches) and clinical studies showing that monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a partial TLR4 agonist, may have beneficial effect on AD physiopathology. The in vivo data elegantly showed that MPL enhanced Aβ plaque phagocytosis thus decreasing the number and the size of Aβ deposits and soluble Aβ in brain from APPswe/PS1 mice. Furthermore, MPL also improved their cognition. The mechanism underlying this MPL effect was proposed to be microglial activation by recruiting TLR4. Additionally, it was demonstrated that MPL increased the Aβ antibody titer and showed a safe profile in mice and primates, when used as a vaccine adjuvant. Clinical studies using MPL as an adjuvant in Aβ immunotherapy are currently ongoing. Overall, we argue that the TLR4 partial agonist MPL is a potentially safe and effective new pharmacological tool in AD.

  4. Immuno-Stimulatory Activity of Escherichia coli Mutants Producing Kdo2-Monophosphoryl-Lipid A or Kdo2-Pentaacyl-Monophosphoryl-Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Biwen; Han, Yaning; Li, Ye; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is the active center of lipopolysaccharide which also known as endotoxin. Monophosphoryl-lipid A (MPLA) has less toxicity but retains potent immunoadjuvant activity; therefore, it can be developed as adjuvant for improving the strength and duration of the immune response to antigens. However, MPLA cannot be chemically synthesized and can only be obtained by hydrolyzing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) purified from Gram-negative bacteria. Purifying LPS is difficult and time-consuming and can damage the structure of MPLA. In this study, Escherichia coli mutant strains HWB01 and HWB02 were constructed by deleting several genes and integrating Francisella novicida gene lpxE into the chromosome of E. coli wild type strain W3110. Compared with W3110, HWB01 and HWB02 synthesized very short LPS, Kdo2-monophosphoryl-lipid A (Kdo2-MPLA) and Kdo2-pentaacyl-monophosphoryl-lipid A (Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA), respectively. Structural changes of LPS in the outer membranes of HWB01 and HWB02 increased their membrane permeability, surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation ability and sensitivity to some antibiotics, but the abilities of these strains to activate the TLR4/MD-2 receptor of HKE-Blue hTLR4 cells were deceased. Importantly, purified Kdo2-MPLA and Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA differed from wild type LPS in their ability to stimulate the mammalian cell lines THP-1 and RAW264.7. The purification of Kdo2-MPLA and Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA from HWB01 and HWB02, respectively, is much easier than the purification of LPS from W3110, and these lipid A derivatives could be important tools for developing future vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26710252

  5. ENDOTHELIAL CELL TOLERANCE TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE CHALLENGE IS INDUCED BY MONOPHOSPHORYL LIPID A

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Ryan J.; Choi, Hyehun; Koch, Stephen R.; Fensterheim, Benjamin A.; Lamb, Fred S.; Sherwood, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Prior exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produces a reduced or “tolerant” inflammatory response to subsequent challenges with LPS, however the potent pro-inflammatory effects of LPS limit its clinical benefit. The adjuvant Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) is a weak toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist that induces negligible inflammation but retains potent immunomodulatory properties. We postulated that pre-treatment with MPLA would inhibit the inflammatory response of endothelial cells to secondary LPS challenge. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), were exposed to MPLA (10 µg/ml), LPS (100 ng/ml) or vehicle control. HUVECs were then washed and maintained in culture for 24 hours before being challenged with LPS (100 ng/ml). Supernatants were collected and examined for cytokine production in the presence or absence of siRNA inhibitors of critical TLR4 signaling proteins. Pretreatment with MPLA attenuated IL-6 production to secondary LPS challenge to a similar degree as LPS. The application of MyD88 siRNA dramatically reduced MPLA-induced tolerance while TRIF siRNA had no effect. The tolerant phenotype in endothelial cells was associated with reduced IKK, p38 and JNK phosphorylation and enhanced IRAK-M expression for LPS primed HUVECs, but less so in MPLA primed cells. Instead, MPLA-primed HUVECs demonstrated enhanced ERK phosphorylation. In contrast to leukocytes in which tolerance is largely TRIF-dependent, MyD88 signaling mediated endotoxin tolerance in endothelial cells. Most importantly, MPLA, a vaccine adjuvant with a wide therapeutic window, induced tolerance to LPS in endothelial cells. PMID:26669797

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of monophosphoryl lipid A derivatives as fully synthetic self-adjuvanting glycoconjugate cancer vaccine carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhifang; Mondal, Mohabul; Liao, Guochao; Guo, Zhongwu

    2014-05-28

    A fully synthetic carbohydrate-based cancer vaccine is an attractive concept, but an important topic in the area is to develop proper vaccine carriers that can improve the immunogenicity and other immunological properties of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). In this context, four monophosphoryl derivatives of Neisseria meningitidis lipid A were synthesized via a highly convergent and effective strategy and evaluated as vaccine carriers and adjuvants. The conjugates of these monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) derivatives with a modified form of the sTn antigen were found to elicit high titers of antigen-specific IgG antibodies, indicating a T cell-dependent immune response, in the absence of an external adjuvant. It was concluded that MPLAs could be utilized as potent vaccine carriers and built-in adjuvants to create fully synthetic self-adjuvanting carbohydrate-based cancer vaccines. The lipid composition and structure of MPLA were shown to have a significant influence on its immunological activity, and among the MPLAs examined, natural N. meningitidis MPLA exhibited the most promising properties. Moreover, Titermax Gold, a conventional vaccine adjuvant, was shown to inhibit, rather than promote, the immunological activity of MPLA conjugates, maybe via interacting with MPLA.

  7. Toll-like receptor 4 stimulation with the detoxified ligand monophosphoryl lipid A improves Alzheimer’s disease-related pathology

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Jean-Philippe; Hallé, Maxime; Lampron, Antoine; Thériault, Peter; Préfontaine, Paul; Filali, Mohammed; Tribout-Jover, Pascale; Lanteigne, Anne-Marie; Jodoin, Rachel; Cluff, Christopher; Brichard, Vincent; Palmantier, Rémi; Pilorget, Anthony; Larocque, Daniel; Rivest, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. The pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disease, currently without curative treatment, is associated with the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) in brain parenchyma and cerebral vasculature. AD patients are unable to clear this toxic peptide, leading to Aβ accumulation in their brains and, presumably, the pathology associated with this devastating disease. Compounds that stimulate the immune system to clear Aβ may therefore have great therapeutic potential in AD patients. Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) is an LPS-derived Toll-like receptor 4 agonist that exhibits unique immunomodulatory properties at doses that are nonpyrogenic. We show here that repeated systemic injections of MPL, but not LPS, significantly improved AD-related pathology in APPswe/PS1 mice. MPL treatment led to a significant reduction in Aβ load in the brain of these mice, as well as enhanced cognitive function. MPL induced a potent phagocytic response by microglia while triggering a moderate inflammatory reaction. Our data suggest that the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist MPL may be a treatment for AD. PMID:23322736

  8. A combined fermentative-chemical approach for the scalable production of pure E. coli monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed

    Pieretti, Giuseppina; Cipolletti, Manuela; D'Alonzo, Daniele; Alfano, Alberto; Cimini, Donatella; Cammarota, Marcella; Palumbo, Giovanni; Giuliano, Mariateresa; De Rosa, Mario; Schiraldi, Chiara; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Bedini, Emiliano; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2014-09-01

    Lipid A is the lipophilic region of lipopolysaccharides and lipooligosaccharides, the major components of the outer leaflet of most part of Gram-negative bacteria. Some lipid As are very promising immunoadjuvants. They are obtained by extraction from bacterial cells or through total chemical synthesis. A novel, semisynthetic approach to lipid As is ongoing in our laboratories, relying upon the chemical modification of a natural lipid A scaffold for the fast obtainment of several other lipid As and derivatives thereof. The first requisite for this strategy is to have this scaffold available in large quantities through a scalable process. Here, we present an optimized fed-batch fermentation procedure for the gram-scale production of lipid A from Escherichia coli K4 and a suitable phenol-free protocol for its purification. A study for regioselective de-O-phosphorylation reaction was then performed to afford pure monophosphoryl lipid A with an attenuated endotoxic activity, as evaluated by cytokine production in human monocytic cell line THP-1 in vitro. The reported method for the large-scale obtainment of monophoshoryl lipid A from the fed-batch fermentation broth of a recombinant strain of E. coli may permit the access to novel semisynthetic lipid A immunoadjuvant candidates.

  9. Detection of liposomal cholesterol and monophosphoryl lipid A by QS-21 saponin and Limulus polyphemus amebocyte lysate.

    PubMed

    Beck, Zoltan; Matyas, Gary R; Alving, Carl R

    2015-03-01

    Liposomes containing cholesterol (Chol) have long been used as an important membrane system for modeling the complex interactions of Chol with adjacent phospholipids or other lipids in a membrane environment. In this study we utilize a probe composed of QS-21, a saponin molecule that recognizes liposomal Chol and causes hemolysis of erythrocytes. The interaction of QS-21 with liposomal Chol results in a stable formulation which, after injection into the tissues of an animal, lacks toxic effects of QS-21 on neighboring cells that contain Chol, such as erythrocytes. Here we have used liposomes containing different saturated phospholipid fatty acyl groups and Chol, with or without monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), as model membranes. QS-21 is then employed as a probe to study the interactions of liposomal lipids on the visibility of membrane Chol. We demonstrate that changes either in the mole fraction of Chol in liposomes, or with different chain lengths of phospholipid fatty acyl groups, can have a substantial impact on the detection of Chol by the QS-21. We further show that liposomal MPLA can partially inhibit detection of the liposomal Chol by QS-21. The Limulus amebocyte lysate assay is used for binding to and detection of MPLA. Previous work has demonstrated that sequestration of MPLA into the liposomal lipid bilayer can block detection by the Limulus assay, but the binding site on the MPLA to which the Limulus protein binds is unknown. Changes in liposomal Chol concentration and phospholipid fatty acyl chain length influenced the detection of the liposome-embedded MPLA. PMID:25511587

  10. Detection of liposomal cholesterol and monophosphoryl lipid A by QS-21 saponin and Limulus polyphemus amebocyte lysate.

    PubMed

    Beck, Zoltan; Matyas, Gary R; Alving, Carl R

    2015-03-01

    Liposomes containing cholesterol (Chol) have long been used as an important membrane system for modeling the complex interactions of Chol with adjacent phospholipids or other lipids in a membrane environment. In this study we utilize a probe composed of QS-21, a saponin molecule that recognizes liposomal Chol and causes hemolysis of erythrocytes. The interaction of QS-21 with liposomal Chol results in a stable formulation which, after injection into the tissues of an animal, lacks toxic effects of QS-21 on neighboring cells that contain Chol, such as erythrocytes. Here we have used liposomes containing different saturated phospholipid fatty acyl groups and Chol, with or without monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), as model membranes. QS-21 is then employed as a probe to study the interactions of liposomal lipids on the visibility of membrane Chol. We demonstrate that changes either in the mole fraction of Chol in liposomes, or with different chain lengths of phospholipid fatty acyl groups, can have a substantial impact on the detection of Chol by the QS-21. We further show that liposomal MPLA can partially inhibit detection of the liposomal Chol by QS-21. The Limulus amebocyte lysate assay is used for binding to and detection of MPLA. Previous work has demonstrated that sequestration of MPLA into the liposomal lipid bilayer can block detection by the Limulus assay, but the binding site on the MPLA to which the Limulus protein binds is unknown. Changes in liposomal Chol concentration and phospholipid fatty acyl chain length influenced the detection of the liposome-embedded MPLA.

  11. Use of adjuvant containing mycobacterial cell-wall skeleton, monophosphoryl lipid A, and squalane in malaria circumsporozoite protein vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rickman, L S; Gordon, D M; Wistar, R; Krzych, U; Gross, M; Hollingdale, M R; Egan, J E; Chulay, J D; Hoffman, S L

    1991-04-27

    Human immune responses to modern synthetic and recombinant peptide vaccines administered with the standard adjuvant, aluminum hydroxide, tend to be poor, hence the search for better adjuvants. Antibody responses to a Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (CS) protein vaccine, R32NS1(81), administered with an adjuvant containing cell-wall skeleton of mycobacteria and monophosphoryl lipid A in squalane (MPL/CWS) have been compared to responses to the same immunogen administered with aluminum hydroxide. 2 weeks after the third dose the following indices were greater in the 5 patients who received MPL/CWS than in controls (p less than 0.05): the geometric mean concentration (2.0 vs 25.4 microgram/ml) and avidity index of antibodies to the P falciparum CS protein by ELISA, the geometric mean titre to P falciparum sporozoites by IFAT (1/115 vs 1/1600), and the geometric mean inhibition of sporozoite invasion of hepatoma cells in vitro (37.6 vs 90.3%). For R32NS1(81) MPL/CWS is superior to aluminum hydroxide as an adjuvant, and the data support the evaluation of this complex as an adjuvant for other vaccines.

  12. Evaluation of monophosphoryl lipid A as an immune adjuvant for photodynamic therapy in a rat sarcoma model: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucroy, Michael D.; Edwards, Benjamin F.; Griffey, Stephen M.; Madewell, Bruce R.

    1999-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment option for several forms of human cancer, and like traditional chemotherapy and ionizing radiation therapy, PDT alone is not curative for some cases. Recent efforts have aimed at developing strategies for adjuvant therapy for PDT. Given the nature of PDT-mediated cell damage, immunotherapy is a promising adjuvant for long-term control of solid tumors. A candidate immune stimulant for use with PDT is monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA), a non-toxic fraction of the endotoxin molecule. The hypothesis is that adjuvant MLA immunotherapy with PDT will improve local tumor control and prevent growth of subsequently implanted tumor cells when compared to PDT alone. To date, no significant differences in circulating leukocyte populations or tumor infiltrating lymphocyte populations have been identified in 9L tumor-bearing F344 rats after systemic administrations of MLA. Likewise, no significant difference has been identified in local tumor control following PDT of 9L tumors with or without adjuvant MLA. Further results are pending.

  13. TLR4 ligands lipopolysaccharide and monophosphoryl lipid a differentially regulate effector and memory CD8+ T Cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiguo; Joshi, Nikhil S; Liu, Ying; Meng, Hailong; Kleinstein, Steven H; Kaech, Susan M

    2014-05-01

    Vaccines formulated with nonreplicating pathogens require adjuvants to help bolster immunogenicity. The role of adjuvants in Ab production has been well studied, but how they influence memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation remains poorly defined. In this study we implemented dendritic cell-mediated immunization to study the effects of commonly used adjuvants, TLR ligands, on effector and memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation in mice. Intriguingly, we found that the TLR4 ligand LPS was far more superior to other TLR ligands in generating memory CD8(+) T cells upon immunization. LPS boosted clonal expansion similar to the other adjuvants, but fewer of the activated CD8(+) T cells died during contraction, generating a larger pool of memory cells. Surprisingly, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), another TLR4 ligand, enhanced clonal expansion of effector CD8(+) T cells, but it also promoted their terminal differentiation and contraction; thus, fewer memory CD8(+) T cells formed, and MPLA-primed animals were less protected against secondary infection compared with those primed with LPS. Furthermore, gene expression profiling revealed that LPS-primed effector cells displayed a stronger pro-memory gene expression signature, whereas the gene expression profile of MPLA-primed effector cells aligned closer with terminal effector CD8(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrated that the LPS-TLR4-derived "pro-memory" signals were MyD88, but not Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β, dependent. This study reveals the influential power of adjuvants on the quantity and quality of CD8(+) T cell memory, and that attention to adjuvant selection is crucial because boosting effector cell expansion may not always equate with more memory T cells or greater protection.

  14. Evaluation of hyaluronic acid-based combination adjuvant containing monophosphoryl lipid A and aluminum salt for hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Moon, Se-hee; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Noh, Young-Woock; Lim, Yong Taik

    2015-09-11

    Here, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) and aluminum salt (Alum) were introduced into a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based combination vaccine adjuvant for hepatitis B vaccine (HBV). Although Alum is a well-known hepatitis B vaccine adjuvant that induces an enhanced humoral immune response, it cannot induce the cellular immune responses. On the other hand, MPLA has been generally reported to promote IFN-γ production via antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, but it is not water soluble as a result of its long hydrophobic alkyl chains. To this end, water insoluble MPLA could be solubilized in an aqueous solution with the help of HA, which contains many carboxyl and hydroxyl groups that can be used to attach to the hydroxyl head groups of MPLA via hydrogen bonds. Three groups of mice were treated with either hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) alone, HBsAg_Alum complex, or HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex. The group immunized with the HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex exhibited a high increase in cellular immune response as well as in humoral immune response relative to the other two groups. The antibody, cytokine and T cell levels were most elevated in the group of mice immunized with HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex, even at a 1μg/mice dose, and the magnitude was still maintained even after 8 weeks. Specifically, the antibody value was 120 times larger in mice vaccinated with HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex than in mice vaccinated with HBsAg_Alum complex designed similar to commercially available hepatitis B vaccine, Engerix B. The cytokine and T cell proliferation levels were 2 times and 6 times larger in mice adjuvanted with HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex than in those vaccinated with HBsAg_Alum. The results therefore indicate that incorporating MPLA and Alum with HA can be a potent strategy to increase both the magnitude and the persistence of HBsAg-specific immune responses to protect hosts against hepatitis B virus infection. PMID:26271830

  15. Triggering role of nitric oxide in the delayed protective effect of monophosphoryl lipid A in rat heart

    PubMed Central

    György, Katalin; Muller, Bernard; Végh, Agnes; Kleschyov, Andrei L; Stoclet, Jean-Claud

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to further evaluate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in delayed cardiac protection against ischaemia-reperfusion injury induced by monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA).For this purpose, rats were administered with either 0.5 or 2.5 mg kg−1 MLA (i.p.). Eight or 24 h later, in vivo NO production in the heart was analysed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping technique. In parallel experiments, hearts were removed and perfused according to Langendorff. Functional ventricular parameters and incidence of ventricular fibrillation (VF) were determined after 30 min global ischaemic insult (37°C) followed by 30 min reperfusion. Vascular reactivity of aortic rings was also assessed.Hearts from rats pretreated with 2.5 mg kg−1 MLA for 24 h (but not those from rats treated with 0.5 mg kg−1 MLA for 8 and 24 h, or with 2.5 mg kg−1 MLA for 8 h) exhibited preservation of ventricular function (LVDP, ±dP/dtmax) and a reduced incidence of VF (25% vs 87.5% in vehicle control) during reperfusion. At the cardioprotective dose of 2.5 mg kg−1 (for 8 or 24 h), MLA did not produce alterations of the contractile response of aortic rings to noradrenaline.An increased formation of NO was detected in hearts removed from rats pretreated with 2.5 mg kg−1 MLA for 8 h, but not in those from rats treated for 24 h (or with 0.5 mg kg−1 MLA).Pretreatment of the animals with the inhibitors of inducible NO-synthase, aminoguanidine (2×300 mg kg−1) or L-N6-(1-Iminoethyl)-lysine (L-NIL, 10 mg kg−1) abolished both MLA (2.5 mg kg−1)-induced rise of NO production (observed 8 h after MLA) and cardioprotection (observed 24 h after MLA). However MLA-induced cardioprotection was not attenuated when the hearts were perfused with aminoguanidine (150 μM) for 30 min before the ischaemic insult.Altogether, the present data suggest that NO acts as a trigger rather then a direct

  16. Evaluation of hyaluronic acid-based combination adjuvant containing monophosphoryl lipid A and aluminum salt for hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Moon, Se-hee; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Noh, Young-Woock; Lim, Yong Taik

    2015-09-11

    Here, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) and aluminum salt (Alum) were introduced into a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based combination vaccine adjuvant for hepatitis B vaccine (HBV). Although Alum is a well-known hepatitis B vaccine adjuvant that induces an enhanced humoral immune response, it cannot induce the cellular immune responses. On the other hand, MPLA has been generally reported to promote IFN-γ production via antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, but it is not water soluble as a result of its long hydrophobic alkyl chains. To this end, water insoluble MPLA could be solubilized in an aqueous solution with the help of HA, which contains many carboxyl and hydroxyl groups that can be used to attach to the hydroxyl head groups of MPLA via hydrogen bonds. Three groups of mice were treated with either hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) alone, HBsAg_Alum complex, or HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex. The group immunized with the HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex exhibited a high increase in cellular immune response as well as in humoral immune response relative to the other two groups. The antibody, cytokine and T cell levels were most elevated in the group of mice immunized with HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex, even at a 1μg/mice dose, and the magnitude was still maintained even after 8 weeks. Specifically, the antibody value was 120 times larger in mice vaccinated with HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex than in mice vaccinated with HBsAg_Alum complex designed similar to commercially available hepatitis B vaccine, Engerix B. The cytokine and T cell proliferation levels were 2 times and 6 times larger in mice adjuvanted with HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex than in those vaccinated with HBsAg_Alum. The results therefore indicate that incorporating MPLA and Alum with HA can be a potent strategy to increase both the magnitude and the persistence of HBsAg-specific immune responses to protect hosts against hepatitis B virus infection.

  17. Enhancing actions of peptides derived from the γ-chain of fetal human hemoglobin on the immunostimulant activities of monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Artur J; Kaconis, Yani; Heinbockel, Lena; Correa, Wilmar; Alexander, Christian; Rietschel, Ernst Th; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Gorczynski, Reginald M; Heini, Adrian; Rössle, Manfred; Richter, Walter; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Hemoglobin and its structures have been described since the 1990s to enhance a variety of biological activities of endotoxins (LPS) in a dose-dependent manner. To investigate the interaction processes in more detail, the system was extended by studying the interactions of newly designed peptides from the γ-chain of human hemoglobin with the adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), a partial structure of lipid A lacking its 1-phosphate. It was found that some selected Hbg peptides, in particular two synthetic substructures designated Hbg32 and Hbg35, considerably increased the bioactivity of MPLA, which alone was only a weak activator of immune cells. These findings hold true for human mononuclar cells, monocytes and T lymphocytes. To understand the mechanisms of action in more detail, biophysical techniques were applied. These showed a peptide-induced change of the MPLA aggregate structure from multilamellar into a non-lamellar, probably inverted, cubic structure. Concomitantly, the peptides incorporated into the tightly packed MPLA aggregates into smaller units down to monomers. The fragmentation of the aggregates was an endothermic process, differing from a complex formation but rather typical for a catalytic reaction. PMID:26921253

  18. A Fusion Protein Consisting of the Vaccine Adjuvant Monophosphoryl Lipid A and the Allergen Ovalbumin Boosts Allergen-Specific Th1, Th2, and Th17 Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Lothar; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Vieths, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The detoxified TLR4-ligand Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA) is the first approved TLR-agonist used as adjuvant in licensed vaccines but has not yet been explored as part of conjugated vaccines. Objective. To investigate the immune-modulating properties of a fusion protein consisting of MPLA and Ovalbumin (MPLA : Ova). Results. MPLA and Ova were chemically coupled by stable carbamate linkage. MPLA : Ova was highly pure without detectable product-related impurities by either noncoupled MPLA or Ova. Light scattering analysis revealed MPLA : Ova to be aggregated. Stimulation of mDC and mDC : DO11.10 CD4+ TC cocultures showed a stronger activation of both mDC and Ova-specific DO11.10 CD4+ TC by MPLA : Ova compared to the mixture of both components. MPLA : Ova induced both strong proinflammatory (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine responses from mDCs while also boosting allergen-specific Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokine secretion. Conclusion. Conjugation of MPLA and antigen enhanced the immune response compared to the mixture of both components. Due to the nonbiased boost of Ova-specific Th2 and Th17 responses while also inducing Th1 responses, this fusion protein may not be a suitable vaccine candidate for allergy treatment but may hold potential for the treatment of other diseases that require a strong stimulation of the host's immune system (e.g., cancer). PMID:27340679

  19. Safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of a malaria sporozoite vaccine administered with monophosphoryl lipid A, cell wall skeleton of mycobacteria, and squalane as adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, S L; Edelman, R; Bryan, J P; Schneider, I; Davis, J; Sedegah, M; Gordon, D; Church, P; Gross, M; Silverman, C

    1994-11-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) recombinant fusion protein, R32NS1(81), formulated with monophosphoryl lipid A, cell wall skeleton of mycobacteria, and squalane (Detox) was administered to 12 volunteers. One volunteer had malaise and self-limited painful induration at the injection site after the second dose and declined further immunization. The other 11 volunteers tolerated the three doses of 1,230 micrograms of vaccine, but most complained of sore arms; in five cases the pain or malaise was severe enough to interfere with work or sleep. Two weeks after the third dose of vaccine, four of the 11 immunized volunteers had > or = 14 micrograms/ml of antibodies to the repeat region of the PfCSP in their serum. Two of these four volunteers did not develop P. falciparum parasitemia when challenged by the bite of five mosquitoes carrying P. falciparum sporozoites. The seven volunteers with lower levels of antibodies and 11 of 11 controls developed parasitemia. These data are consistent with other studies, and indicate that vaccine-induced antibodies against the repeat region of PfCSP can prevent effective sporozoite infection of hepatocytes in humans. The challenge is to improve the immunogenicity of PfCSP-based vaccines, and to develop methods for including PfCSP peptides as components of multitarget malaria vaccines.

  20. A preventive immunization approach against insect bite hypersensitivity: Intralymphatic injection with recombinant allergens in Alum or Alum and monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Svansson, Vilhjalmur; Stefansdottir, Sara Bjork; Schüpbach, Gertraud; Rhyner, Claudio; Marti, Eliane; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjorg

    2016-04-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an IgE-mediated dermatitis of horses caused by bites of Culicoides insects, not indigenous to Iceland. Horses born in Iceland and exported to Culicoides-rich areas are frequently affected with IBH. The aims of the study were to compare immunization with recombinant allergens using the adjuvant aluminum hydroxide (Alum) alone or combined with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) for development of a preventive immunization against IBH. Twelve healthy Icelandic horses were vaccinated intralymphatically three times with 10 μg each of four recombinant Culicoides nubeculosus allergens in Alum or in Alum/MPLA. Injection with allergens in both Alum and Alum/MPLA resulted in significant increase in specific IgG subclasses and IgA against all r-allergens with no significant differences between the adjuvant groups. The induced antibodies from both groups could block binding of allergen specific IgE from IBH affected horses to a similar extent. No IgE-mediated reactions were induced. Allergen-stimulated PBMC from Alum/MPLA horses but not from Alum only horses produced significantly more IFNγ and IL-10 than PBMC from non-vaccinated control horses. In conclusion, intralymphatic administration of small amounts of pure allergens in Alum/MPLA induces high IgG antibody levels and Th1/Treg immune response and is a promising approach for immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy against IBH. PMID:27032498

  1. A preventive immunization approach against insect bite hypersensitivity: Intralymphatic injection with recombinant allergens in Alum or Alum and monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Svansson, Vilhjalmur; Stefansdottir, Sara Bjork; Schüpbach, Gertraud; Rhyner, Claudio; Marti, Eliane; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjorg

    2016-04-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an IgE-mediated dermatitis of horses caused by bites of Culicoides insects, not indigenous to Iceland. Horses born in Iceland and exported to Culicoides-rich areas are frequently affected with IBH. The aims of the study were to compare immunization with recombinant allergens using the adjuvant aluminum hydroxide (Alum) alone or combined with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) for development of a preventive immunization against IBH. Twelve healthy Icelandic horses were vaccinated intralymphatically three times with 10 μg each of four recombinant Culicoides nubeculosus allergens in Alum or in Alum/MPLA. Injection with allergens in both Alum and Alum/MPLA resulted in significant increase in specific IgG subclasses and IgA against all r-allergens with no significant differences between the adjuvant groups. The induced antibodies from both groups could block binding of allergen specific IgE from IBH affected horses to a similar extent. No IgE-mediated reactions were induced. Allergen-stimulated PBMC from Alum/MPLA horses but not from Alum only horses produced significantly more IFNγ and IL-10 than PBMC from non-vaccinated control horses. In conclusion, intralymphatic administration of small amounts of pure allergens in Alum/MPLA induces high IgG antibody levels and Th1/Treg immune response and is a promising approach for immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy against IBH.

  2. Vaccination with liposomal leishmanial antigens adjuvanted with monophosphoryl lipid-trehalose dicorynomycolate (MPL-TDM) confers long-term protection against visceral leishmaniasis through a human administrable route.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Rajesh; Maji, Mithun; Ali, Nahid

    2012-01-01

    The development of a long-term protective subunit vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis depends on antigens and adjuvants that can induce an appropriate immune response. The immunization of leishmanial antigens alone shows limited efficacy in the absence of an appropriate adjuvant. Earlier we demonstrated sustained protection against Leishmania donovani with leishmanial antigens entrapped in cationic liposomes through an intraperitoneal route. However, this route is not applicable for human administration. Herein, we therefore evaluated the immune response and protection induced by liposomal soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA) formulated with monophosphoryl lipid-trehalose dicorynomycolate (MPL-TDM) through a subcutaneous route. Subcutaneous immunization of BALB/c mice with SLA entrapped in liposomes or with MPL-TDM elicited partial protection against experimental visceral leishmaniasis. In contrast, liposomal SLA adjuvanted with MPL-TDM induced significantly higher levels of protection in liver and spleen in BALB/c mice challenged 10 days post-vaccination. Protection conferred by this formulation was sustained up to 12 weeks of immunization, and infection was controlled for at least 4 months of the challenge, similar to liposomal SLA immunization administered intraperitoneally. An analysis of cellular immune responses of liposomal SLA + MPL-TDM immunized mice demonstrated the induction of IFN-γ and IgG2a antibody production not only 10 days or 12 weeks post-vaccination but also 4 months after the challenge infection and a down regulation of IL-4 production after infection. Moreover, long-term immunity elicited by this formulation was associated with IFN-γ production also by CD8⁺ T cells. Taken together, our results suggest that liposomal SLA + MPL-TDM represent a good vaccine formulation for the induction of durable protection against L. donovani through a human administrable route.

  3. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A-Modulated Dendritic Cells Promote Antigen-Specific Tolerogenic Properties on Naive and Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schinnerling, Katina; Pesce, Bárbara; Hilkens, Catharien M.; Catalán, Diego; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are a promising tool to control T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Here, we evaluate the ability of dexamethasone-modulated and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA)-activated DCs [MPLA-tolerogenic DCs (tDCs)] to exert immunomodulatory effects on naive and memory CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. For this purpose, MPLA-tDCs were loaded with purified protein derivative (PPD) as antigen and co-cultured with autologous naive or memory CD4+ T cells. Lymphocytes were re-challenged with autologous PPD-pulsed mature DCs (mDCs), evaluating proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. On primed-naive CD4+ T cells, the expression of regulatory T cell markers was evaluated and their suppressive ability was assessed in autologous co-cultures with CD4+ effector T cells and PPD-pulsed mDCs. We detected that memory CD4+ T cells primed by MPLA-tDCs presented reduced proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in response to PPD and were refractory to subsequent stimulation. Naive CD4+ T cells were instructed by MPLA-tDCs to be hyporesponsive to antigen-specific restimulation and to suppress the induction of T helper cell type 1 and 17 responses. In conclusion, MPLA-tDCs are able to modulate antigen-specific responses of both naive and memory CD4+ T cells and might be a promising strategy to “turn off” self-reactive CD4+ effector T cells in autoimmunity.

  4. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A-Modulated Dendritic Cells Promote Antigen-Specific Tolerogenic Properties on Naive and Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schinnerling, Katina; Pesce, Bárbara; Hilkens, Catharien M.; Catalán, Diego; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are a promising tool to control T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Here, we evaluate the ability of dexamethasone-modulated and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA)-activated DCs [MPLA-tolerogenic DCs (tDCs)] to exert immunomodulatory effects on naive and memory CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. For this purpose, MPLA-tDCs were loaded with purified protein derivative (PPD) as antigen and co-cultured with autologous naive or memory CD4+ T cells. Lymphocytes were re-challenged with autologous PPD-pulsed mature DCs (mDCs), evaluating proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. On primed-naive CD4+ T cells, the expression of regulatory T cell markers was evaluated and their suppressive ability was assessed in autologous co-cultures with CD4+ effector T cells and PPD-pulsed mDCs. We detected that memory CD4+ T cells primed by MPLA-tDCs presented reduced proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in response to PPD and were refractory to subsequent stimulation. Naive CD4+ T cells were instructed by MPLA-tDCs to be hyporesponsive to antigen-specific restimulation and to suppress the induction of T helper cell type 1 and 17 responses. In conclusion, MPLA-tDCs are able to modulate antigen-specific responses of both naive and memory CD4+ T cells and might be a promising strategy to “turn off” self-reactive CD4+ effector T cells in autoimmunity. PMID:27698654

  5. Differential immune responses to HIV-1 envelope protein induced by liposomal adjuvant formulations containing monophosphoryl lipid A with or without QS21.

    PubMed

    Beck, Zoltan; Matyas, Gary R; Jalah, Rashmi; Rao, Mangala; Polonis, Victoria R; Alving, Carl R

    2015-10-13

    Liposomes have shown promise as constituents of adjuvant formulations in vaccines to parasitic and viral diseases. A particular type of liposomal construct, referred to as Army Liposome Formulation (ALF), containing neutral and anionic saturated phospholipids, cholesterol, and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), has been used as an adjuvant for many years. Here we investigated the effects of physical and chemical changes of ALF liposomes on adjuvanted immune responses to CN54 gp140, a recombinant HIV-1 envelope protein. While holding the total amounts of liposomal MPLA and the gp140 antigen constant, different liposome sizes and liposomal MPLA:phospholipid molar ratios, and the effect of adding QS21 to the liposomes were compared for inducing immune responses to the gp140. For liposomes lacking QS21, higher titers of IgG binding antibodies to gp140 were induced by small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) rather than by large multilamellar vesicle (MLV) liposomes, and the highest titers were obtained with SUV having the MPLA:phospholipid ratio of 1:5.6. ALF plus QS21 (ALFQ) liposomes induced the same maximal binding antibody titers regardless of the MPLA:phospholipid ratio. ALF MLV liposomes induced mainly IgG1 and very low IgG2a antibodies, while ALF SUV liposomes induced IgG1≥IgG2a>IgG2b antibodies. Liposomes containing QS21 induced IgG1>IgG2a>IgG2b>IgG3 antibodies. ELISPOT analysis of splenocytes from immunized mice revealed that ALF liposomes induced low levels of IFN-γ, but ALFQ induced high levels. ALF and ALFQ liposomes each induced approximately equivalent high levels of IL-4. Based on antibody subtypes and cytokine secretion, we conclude that ALF liposomes predominantly stimulate Th2, while ALFQ strongly induces both Th1 and Th2 immunity. When CN54 gp140 was adjuvanted with either ALF or ALFQ liposomes, antibodies were induced that neutralized two HIV-1 tier 1 clade C strain pseudoviruses.

  6. Vaccine adjuvant systems containing monophosphoryl lipid A and QS21 induce strong and persistent humoral and T cell responses against hepatitis B surface antigen in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vandepapelière, Pierre; Horsmans, Yves; Moris, Philippe; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Janssens, Michel; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Van Belle, Pascale; Clement, Frédéric; Hanon, Emmanuel; Wettendorff, Martine; Garçon, Nathalie; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2008-03-01

    A randomised, double-blind study assessing the potential of four adjuvants in combination with recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen has been conducted to evaluate humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in healthy adults after three vaccine doses at months 0, 1 and 10. Three Adjuvant Systems (AS) contained 3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and QS21, formulated either with an oil-in-water emulsion (AS02B and AS02V) or with liposomes (AS01B). The fourth adjuvant was CpG oligonucleotide. High levels of antibodies were induced by all adjuvants, whereas cell-mediated immune responses, including cytolytic T cells and strong and persistent CD4(+) T cell response were mainly observed with the three MPL/QS21-containing Adjuvant Systems. The CD4(+) T cell response was characterised in vitro by vigorous lymphoproliferation, high IFN-gamma and moderate IL-5 production. Antigen-specific T cell immune response was further confirmed ex vivo by detection of IL-2- and IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+) T cells, and in vivo by measuring increased levels of IFN-gamma in the serum and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. The CpG adjuvanted vaccine induced consistently lower immune responses for all parameters. All vaccine adjuvants were shown to be safe with acceptable reactogenicity profiles. The majority of subjects reported local reactions at the injection site after vaccination while general reactions were recorded less frequently. No vaccine-related serious adverse event was reported. Importantly, no increase in markers of auto-immunity and allergy was detected over the whole study course. In conclusion, the Adjuvant Systems containing MPL/QS21, in combination with hepatitis B surface antigen, induced very strong humoral and cellular immune responses in healthy adults. The AS01B-adjuvanted vaccine induced the strongest and most durable specific cellular immune responses after two doses. These Adjuvant Systems, when added to recombinant protein antigens, can be

  7. A short protocol using dexamethasone and monophosphoryl lipid A generates tolerogenic dendritic cells that display a potent migratory capacity to lymphoid chemokines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Generation of tolerogenic dendritic cells (TolDCs) for therapy is challenging due to its implications for the design of protocols suitable for clinical applications, which means not only using safe products, but also working at defining specific biomarkers for TolDCs identification, developing shorter DCs differentiation methods and obtaining TolDCs with a stable phenotype. We describe here, a short-term protocol for TolDCs generation, which are characterized in terms of phenotypic markers, cytokines secretion profile, CD4+ T cell-stimulatory ability and migratory capacity. Methods TolDCs from healthy donors were generated by modulation with dexamethasone plus monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA-tDCs). We performed an analysis of MPLA-tDCs in terms of yield, viability, morphology, phenotypic markers, cytokines secretion profile, stability, allogeneic and antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell stimulatory ability and migration capacity. Results After a 5-day culture, MPLA-tDCs displayed reduced expression of costimulatory and maturation molecules together to an anti-inflammatory cytokines secretion profile, being able to maintain these tolerogenic features even after the engagement of CD40 by its cognate ligand. In addition, MPLA-tDCs exhibited reduced capabilities to stimulate allogeneic and antigen-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation, and induced an anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion pattern. Among potential tolerogenic markers studied, only TLR-2 was highly expressed in MPLA-tDCs when compared to mature and immature DCs. Remarkable, like mature DCs, MPLA-tDCs displayed a high CCR7 and CXCR4 expression, both chemokine receptors involved in migration to secondary lymphoid organs, and even more, in an in vitro assay they exhibited a high migration response towards CCL19 and CXCL12. Conclusion We describe a short-term protocol for TolDC generation, which confers them a stable phenotype and migratory capacity to lymphoid chemokines, essential features for TolDCs to be used

  8. Lipid metabolome-wide effects of the PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Steven M; Reifsnyder, Peter R; Pan, Huei-ju; German, J Bruce; Leiter, Edward H

    2002-11-01

    Successful therapy for chronic diseases must normalize a targeted aspect of metabolism without disrupting the regulation of other metabolic pathways essential for maintaining health. Use of a limited number of single molecule surrogates for disease, or biomarkers, to monitor the efficacy of a therapy may fail to predict undesirable side effects. In this study, a comprehensive metabolomic assessment of lipid metabolites was employed to determine the specific effects of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonist rosiglitazone on structural lipid metabolism in a new mouse model of Type 2 diabetes. Dietary supplementation with rosiglitazone (200 mg/kg diet) suppressed Type 2 diabetes in obese (NZO x NON)F1 male mice, but chronic treatment markedly exacerbated hepatic steatosis. The metabolomic data revealed that rosiglitazone i) induced hypolipidemia (by dysregulating liver-plasma lipid exchange), ii) induced de novo fatty acid synthesis, iii) decreased the biosynthesis of lipids within the peroxisome, iv) substantially altered free fatty acid and cardiolipin metabolism in heart, and v) elicited an unusual accumulation of polyunsaturated fatty acids within adipose tissue. These observations suggest that the phenotypes induced by rosiglitazone are mediated by multiple tissue-specific metabolic variables. Because many of the effects of rosiglitazone on tissue metabolism were reflected in the plasma lipid metabolome, metabolomics has excellent potential for developing clinical assessments of metabolic response to drug therapy. PMID:12401879

  9. Comparative analysis of Bacillus subtilis spores and monophosphoryl lipid A as adjuvants of protein-based mycobacterium tuberculosis-based vaccines: partial requirement for interleukin-17a for induction of protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Esparza-Gonzalez, Sandra C; Troy, Amber R; Izzo, Angelo A

    2014-04-01

    The development of adjuvants for vaccines has become an important area of research as the number of protein-based vaccines against infectious pathogens increases. Currently, there are a number of adjuvant-based Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccines in clinical trials that have shown efficacy in animal models. Despite these novel adjuvants, there is still a need to design new and more versatile adjuvants that have minimal adverse side effects but produce robust long-lasting adaptive immune responses. To this end, we hypothesized that Bacillus subtilis spores may provide the appropriate innate signals that are required to generate such vaccine-mediated responses, which would be sufficient to reduce the mycobacterial burden after infection with M. tuberculosis. In addition, we compared the response generated by B. subtilis spores to that generated by monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), which has been used extensively to test tuberculosis vaccines. The well-characterized, 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target of M. tuberculosis (ESAT-6; Rv3875) was used as a test antigen to determine the T cell activation potential of each adjuvant. Inoculated into mice, B. subtilis spores induced a strong proinflammatory response and Th1 immunity, similar to MPL; however, unlike MPL formulated with dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide, it failed to induce significant levels of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) and was unable to significantly reduce the mycobacterial burden after pulmonary infection with M. tuberculosis. Further analysis of the activity of MPL-DDA suggested that IL-17A was required for protective immunity. Taken together, the data emphasize the requirement for a network of cytokines that are essential for protective immunity.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Bacillus subtilis Spores and Monophosphoryl Lipid A as Adjuvants of Protein-Based Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Based Vaccines: Partial Requirement for Interleukin-17A for Induction of Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Esparza-Gonzalez, Sandra C.; Troy, Amber R.

    2014-01-01

    The development of adjuvants for vaccines has become an important area of research as the number of protein-based vaccines against infectious pathogens increases. Currently, there are a number of adjuvant-based Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccines in clinical trials that have shown efficacy in animal models. Despite these novel adjuvants, there is still a need to design new and more versatile adjuvants that have minimal adverse side effects but produce robust long-lasting adaptive immune responses. To this end, we hypothesized that Bacillus subtilis spores may provide the appropriate innate signals that are required to generate such vaccine-mediated responses, which would be sufficient to reduce the mycobacterial burden after infection with M. tuberculosis. In addition, we compared the response generated by B. subtilis spores to that generated by monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), which has been used extensively to test tuberculosis vaccines. The well-characterized, 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target of M. tuberculosis (ESAT-6; Rv3875) was used as a test antigen to determine the T cell activation potential of each adjuvant. Inoculated into mice, B. subtilis spores induced a strong proinflammatory response and Th1 immunity, similar to MPL; however, unlike MPL formulated with dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide, it failed to induce significant levels of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) and was unable to significantly reduce the mycobacterial burden after pulmonary infection with M. tuberculosis. Further analysis of the activity of MPL-DDA suggested that IL-17A was required for protective immunity. Taken together, the data emphasize the requirement for a network of cytokines that are essential for protective immunity. PMID:24477855

  11. Single and combination herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein vaccines adjuvanted with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or monophosphoryl lipid A exhibit differential immunity that is not correlated to protection in animal models.

    PubMed

    Khodai, Tansi; Chappell, Debbie; Christy, Clare; Cockle, Paul; Eyles, Jim; Hammond, Daisy; Gore, Katrina; McCluskie, Michael J; Evans, Dana M; Lang, Susanne; Loudon, Peter T; Townend, Tim; Wright, Paul; West, Kate; Bright, Helen

    2011-10-01

    Despite several attempts to develop an effective prophylactic vaccine for HSV-2, all have failed to show efficacy in the clinic. The most recent of these failures was the GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) subunit vaccine based on the glycoprotein gD with the adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). In a phase 3 clinical trial, this vaccine failed to protect from HSV-2 disease, even though good neutralizing antibody responses were elicited. We aimed to develop a superior, novel HSV-2 vaccine containing either gD or gB alone or in combination, together with the potent adjuvant CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CPG). The immunogenic properties of these vaccines were compared in mice. We show that gB/CPG/alum elicited a neutralizing antibody response similar to that elicited by gD/CPG/alum vaccine but a significantly greater gamma interferon (IFN-γ) T cell response. Furthermore, the combined gB-gD/CPG/alum vaccine elicited significantly greater neutralizing antibody and T cell responses than gD/MPL/alum. The efficacies of these candidate vaccines were compared in the mouse and guinea pig disease models, including a novel male guinea pig genital disease model. These studies demonstrated that increased immune response did not correlate to improved protection. First, despite a lower IFN-γ T cell response, the gD/CPG/alum vaccine was more effective than gB/CPG/alum in mice. Furthermore, the gB-gD/CPG/alum vaccine was no more effective than gD/MPL/alum in mice or male guinea pigs. We conclude that difficulties in correlating immune responses to efficacy in animal models will act as a deterrent to researchers attempting to develop effective HSV vaccines. PMID:21852545

  12. The potential of adjuvants to improve immune responses against TdaP vaccines: A preclinical evaluation of MF59 and monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed

    Agnolon, Valentina; Bruno, Cristina; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Galletti, Bruno; D'Oro, Ugo; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Seubert, Anja; O'Hagan, Derek T; Baudner, Barbara C

    2015-08-15

    The successful approach of combining diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis antigens into a single vaccine has become a cornerstone of immunization programs. Yet, even if vaccination coverage is high, a resurgence of pertussis has been reported in many countries suggesting current vaccines may not provide adequate protection. To induce better tailored and more durable immune responses against pertussis vaccines different approaches have been proposed, including the use of novel adjuvants. Licensed aP vaccines contain aluminum salts, which mainly stimulate humoral immune responses and might not be ideal for protecting against Bordetella pertussis infection. Adjuvants inducing more balanced T-helper profiles or even Th1-prone responses might be more adequate. In this study, two adjuvants already approved for human use have been tested: MF59 emulsion and the combination of aluminum hydroxide with the Toll-Like Receptor 4 agonist MPLA. Adjuvanticity was evaluated in a mouse model using a TdaP vaccine containing three B. pertussis antigens: genetically detoxified pertussis toxin (PT-9K/129G), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) and pertactin (PRN) The physico-chemical compatibility of TdaP antigens with the proposed adjuvants, together with a quicker onset and changed quality of the antibody responses, fully supports the replacement of aluminum salts with a new adjuvant to enhance aP vaccines immunogenicity. PMID:26149936

  13. The potential of adjuvants to improve immune responses against TdaP vaccines: A preclinical evaluation of MF59 and monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed

    Agnolon, Valentina; Bruno, Cristina; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Galletti, Bruno; D'Oro, Ugo; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Seubert, Anja; O'Hagan, Derek T; Baudner, Barbara C

    2015-08-15

    The successful approach of combining diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis antigens into a single vaccine has become a cornerstone of immunization programs. Yet, even if vaccination coverage is high, a resurgence of pertussis has been reported in many countries suggesting current vaccines may not provide adequate protection. To induce better tailored and more durable immune responses against pertussis vaccines different approaches have been proposed, including the use of novel adjuvants. Licensed aP vaccines contain aluminum salts, which mainly stimulate humoral immune responses and might not be ideal for protecting against Bordetella pertussis infection. Adjuvants inducing more balanced T-helper profiles or even Th1-prone responses might be more adequate. In this study, two adjuvants already approved for human use have been tested: MF59 emulsion and the combination of aluminum hydroxide with the Toll-Like Receptor 4 agonist MPLA. Adjuvanticity was evaluated in a mouse model using a TdaP vaccine containing three B. pertussis antigens: genetically detoxified pertussis toxin (PT-9K/129G), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) and pertactin (PRN) The physico-chemical compatibility of TdaP antigens with the proposed adjuvants, together with a quicker onset and changed quality of the antibody responses, fully supports the replacement of aluminum salts with a new adjuvant to enhance aP vaccines immunogenicity.

  14. Serotonergic agonists stimulate inositol lipid metabolism in rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Schaechter, M.; Godfrey, P.P.; Minchin, M.C.W.; McClue, S.J.; Young, M.M.

    1985-10-28

    The metabolism of inositol phospholipids in response to serotonergic agonists was investigated in rabbit platelets. In platelets prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)-inositol, in a medium containing 10 mM LiCl which blocks the enzyme inositol-1-phosphatase, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused a dose-dependent accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP). This suggests a phospholipase-C-mediated breakdown of phosphoinositides. Ketanserin, a selective 5-HT/sub 2/ antagonist, was a potent inhibitor of the 5-HT response, with a Ki of 28 nM, indicating that 5-HT is activating receptors of the 5-HT/sub 2/ type in the platelet. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and quipazine also caused dose-related increases in inositol phosphate levels, though these were considerably less than those produced by 5-HT. These results show that relatively small changes in phosphoinositide metabolism induced by serotonergic agonists can be investigated in the rabbit platelet, and this cell may therefore be a useful model for the study of some 5-HT receptors. 30 references, 4 figures.

  15. Agonistic interactions, cuticular and hemolymphatic lipid variations during the foraging period in spider females Brachypelma albopilosa (Theraphosidae).

    PubMed

    Trabalon, Marie

    2011-06-01

    Agonistic behaviour and lipid state were examined in tarantula Brachypelma albopilosa females during the foraging period. Modulation of the agonistic behaviour of females was not connected to their body size. Results show that the agonistic pattern of females differed significantly from the predation pattern at the behavioural and lipid levels. Aggressive-foraging females had low predation behaviour. Quantitative lipid changes were observed in relation to agonistic behaviour and predation. The total lipid index was studied by colorimetric methods, and lipid compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in cuticle and hemolymph of females. The lipid components were free fatty acids, methyl esters, cholesterol, and long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons. Methyl esters were much more abundant in cuticular lipids; unsaturated free fatty acids (linoleic and oleic acids) and methyl esters (methyl linoleate and methyl stearate) predominated in the hemolymph. Spider aggression was positively correlated with lipid concentration (cholesterol, fatty acids, methyl esters and hydrocarbons) in the hemolymph and the levels of cuticular fatty acids. Lipid levels are hypothesized to have evolved as a regulatory factor of predation and agonistic behaviours in tarantula females. PMID:21338607

  16. Identification of dual PPARα/γ agonists and their effects on lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gao, Quanqing; Hanh, Jacky; Váradi, Linda; Cairns, Rose; Sjöström, Helena; Liao, Vivian W Y; Wood, Peta; Balaban, Seher; Ong, Jennifer Ai; Lin, Hsuan-Yu Jennifer; Lai, Felcia; Hoy, Andrew J; Grewal, Thomas; Groundwater, Paul W; Hibbs, David E

    2015-12-15

    The three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms; PPARα, PPARγ and PPARδ, play central roles in lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis. Dual PPARα/γ agonists, which stimulate both PPARα and PPARγ isoforms to similar extents, are gaining popularity as it is believed that they are able to ameliorate the unwanted side effects of selective PPARα and PPARγ agonists; and may also be used to treat dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus simultaneously. In this study, virtual screening of natural product libraries, using both structure-based and ligand-based drug discovery approaches, identified ten potential dual PPARα/γ agonist lead compounds (9-13 and 16-20). In vitro assays confirmed these compounds to show no statistically significant toxicity to cells, with the exception of compound 12 which inhibited cell growth to 74.5%±3.5 and 54.1%±3.7 at 50μM and 100μM, respectively. In support of their potential as dual PPARα/γ agonists, all ten compounds upregulated the expression of cholesterol transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 in THP-1 macrophages, with indoline derivative 16 producing the greatest elevation (2.3-fold; 3.3-fold, respectively). Furthermore, comparable to the activity of established PPARα and PPARγ agonists, compound 16 stimulated triacylglycerol accumulation during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation as well as fatty acid β-oxidation in HuH7 hepatocytes. PMID:26616289

  17. Modulation Effect of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonists on Lipid Droplet Proteins in Liver.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Ming-Liang; Zhong, Yuan; Wang, Chen; Jia, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists are used for treating hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism of action of these agonists is still under investigation. The lipid droplet-associated proteins FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5, regulated directly by PPARγ and PPARα, are associated with hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity. Here, we evaluated the expression levels of FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5 and the regulation of these proteins by consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) or administration of PPAR agonists. Mice with diet-induced obesity were treated with the PPARγ or PPARα agonist, pioglitazone or fenofibrate, respectively. Liver tissues from db/db diabetic mice and human were also collected. Interestingly, FSP27/CIEDC was expressed in mouse and human livers and was upregulated in obese C57BL/6J mice. Fenofibrate treatment decreased hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD diet. In mice, LSDP5 was not detected, even in the context of insulin resistance or treatment with PPAR agonists. However, LSDP5 was highly expressed in humans, with elevated expression observed in the fatty liver. We concluded that fenofibrate greatly decreased hepatic TG content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD, suggesting a potential regulatory role for fenofibrate in the amelioration of hepatic steatosis.

  18. Adjuvant Activity of Naturally Occurring Monophosphoryl Lipopolysaccharide Preparations from Mucosa-Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Paula M.; Hadel, Diana M.; To, Thao T.

    2013-01-01

    Natural heterogeneity in the structure of the lipid A portion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produces differential effects on the innate immune response. Gram-negative bacterial species produce LPS structures that differ from the classic endotoxic LPS structures. These differences include hypoacylation and hypophosphorylation of the diglucosamine backbone, both differences known to decrease LPS toxicity. The effect of decreased toxicity on the adjuvant properties of many of these LPS structures has not been fully explored. Here we demonstrate that two naturally produced forms of monophosphorylated LPS, from the mucosa-associated bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Prevotella intermedia, function as immunological adjuvants for antigen-specific immune responses. Each form of mucosal LPS increased vaccination-initiated antigen-specific antibody titers in both quantity and quality when given simultaneously with vaccine antigen preparations. Interestingly, adjuvant effects on initial T cell clonal expansion were selective for CD4 T cells. No significant increase in CD8 T cell expansion was detected. MyD88/Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TRIF/TLR4 signaling pathways showed equally decreased signaling with the LPS forms studied here as with endotoxic LPS or detoxified monophosphorylated lipid A (MPLA). Natural monophosphorylated LPS from mucosa-associated bacteria functions as a weak but effective adjuvant for specific immune responses, with preferential effects on antibody and CD4 T cell responses over CD8 T cell responses. PMID:23798540

  19. Methyl Substitution of a Rexinoid Agonist Improves Potency and Reveals Site of Lipid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3′,4′-Dihydro-1′(2′H)-naphthalen-1′-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of these new analogues are reported here along with the X-ray crystal structures of each homologue bound to the ligand binding domain of hRXRα. We demonstrate that each homologue of 9cUAB30 is a more potent agonist, but only the 7-methyl-9cUAB30 caused severe hyperlipidemia in rats. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structures of these new rexinoids and bexarotene (Targretin) bound to hRXRα-LBD, we reveal that each rexinoid, which induced hyperlipidemia, had methyl groups that interacted with helix 7 residues of the LBD. PMID:24801499

  20. Beneficial and Adverse Effects of an LXR Agonist on Human Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism and Circulating Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, Todd G; Sleph, Paul; Ostrowski, Jacek; Lupisella, John; Ryan, Carol S; Liu, Xiaoqin; Fernando, Gayani; Grimm, Denise; Shipkova, Petia; Zhang, Rongan; Garcia, Ricardo; Zhu, Jun; He, Aiqing; Malone, Harold; Martin, Richard; Behnia, Kamelia; Wang, Zhaoqing; Barrett, Yu Chen; Garmise, Robert J; Yuan, Long; Zhang, Jane; Gandhi, Mohit D; Wastall, Philip; Li, Tong; Du, Shuyan; Salvador, Lisa; Mohan, Raju; Cantor, Glenn H; Kick, Ellen; Lee, John; Frost, Robert J A

    2016-08-01

    The development of LXR agonists for the treatment of coronary artery disease has been challenged by undesirable properties in animal models. Here we show the effects of an LXR agonist on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and neutrophils in human subjects. BMS-852927, a novel LXRβ-selective compound, had favorable profiles in animal models with a wide therapeutic index in cynomolgus monkeys and mice. In healthy subjects and hypercholesterolemic patients, reverse cholesterol transport pathways were induced similarly to that in animal models. However, increased plasma and hepatic TG, plasma LDL-C, apoB, apoE, and CETP and decreased circulating neutrophils were also evident. Furthermore, similar increases in LDL-C were observed in normocholesterolemic subjects and statin-treated patients. The primate model markedly underestimated human lipogenic responses and did not predict human neutrophil effects. These studies demonstrate both beneficial and adverse LXR agonist clinical responses and emphasize the importance of further translational research in this area. PMID:27508871

  1. Beneficial and Adverse Effects of an LXR Agonist on Human Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism and Circulating Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, Todd G; Sleph, Paul; Ostrowski, Jacek; Lupisella, John; Ryan, Carol S; Liu, Xiaoqin; Fernando, Gayani; Grimm, Denise; Shipkova, Petia; Zhang, Rongan; Garcia, Ricardo; Zhu, Jun; He, Aiqing; Malone, Harold; Martin, Richard; Behnia, Kamelia; Wang, Zhaoqing; Barrett, Yu Chen; Garmise, Robert J; Yuan, Long; Zhang, Jane; Gandhi, Mohit D; Wastall, Philip; Li, Tong; Du, Shuyan; Salvador, Lisa; Mohan, Raju; Cantor, Glenn H; Kick, Ellen; Lee, John; Frost, Robert J A

    2016-08-01

    The development of LXR agonists for the treatment of coronary artery disease has been challenged by undesirable properties in animal models. Here we show the effects of an LXR agonist on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and neutrophils in human subjects. BMS-852927, a novel LXRβ-selective compound, had favorable profiles in animal models with a wide therapeutic index in cynomolgus monkeys and mice. In healthy subjects and hypercholesterolemic patients, reverse cholesterol transport pathways were induced similarly to that in animal models. However, increased plasma and hepatic TG, plasma LDL-C, apoB, apoE, and CETP and decreased circulating neutrophils were also evident. Furthermore, similar increases in LDL-C were observed in normocholesterolemic subjects and statin-treated patients. The primate model markedly underestimated human lipogenic responses and did not predict human neutrophil effects. These studies demonstrate both beneficial and adverse LXR agonist clinical responses and emphasize the importance of further translational research in this area.

  2. Therapeutic modulation of cannabinoid lipid signaling: metabolic profiling of a novel antinociceptive cannabinoid-2 receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Wood, JodiAnne T.; Smith, Dustin M.; Janero, David R.; Zvonok, Alexander M.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2012-01-01

    Aims AM-1241, a novel, racemic cannabinoid-2 receptor (CB2) ligand, is the primary experimental agonist used to characterize the role of CB2-mediated lipid signaling in health and disease, including substance abuse disorders. In vivo pharmacological effects have been used as indirect proxies for AM-1241 biotransformation processes that could modulate activity. We report the initial pre-clinical characterization of AM-1241 biotransformation and in vivo distribution. Main methods AM-1241 metabolism was characterized in a variety of predictive in vitro systems (Caco-2 cells, mouse, rat and human microsomes) and in the mouse in vivo. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry techniques were used to quantify AM-1241 tissue distribution and metabolic conversion. Key findings AM-1241 bound extensively to plasma protein/albumin. A pharmacological AM-1241 dose (25 mg/kg, i.v.) was administered to mice for direct determination of its plasma half-life (37 min), following which AM-1241 was quantified in brain, spleen, liver, and kidney. After p.o. administration, AM-1241 was detected in plasma, spleen, and kidney; its oral bioavailability was ~21%. From Caco-2 permeability studies and microsomal-based hepatic clearance estimates, in vivo AM-1241 absorption was moderate. Hepatic microsomal metabolism of AM-1241 in vitro generated hydroxylation and demethylation metabolites. Species-dependent differences were discovered in AM-1241’s predicted hepatic clearance. Our data demonstrate that AM-1241 has the following characteristics: a) short plasma half-life; b) limited oral bioavailability; c) extensive plasma/albumin binding; d) metabolic substrate for hepatic hydroxylation and demethylation; e) moderate hepatic clearance. Significance These results should help inform the design, optimization, and pre-clinical profiling of CB2 ligands as pharmacological tools and medicines. PMID:22749867

  3. Signal inhibition by a dynamically regulated pool of monophosphorylated MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Nagiec, Michal J.; McCarter, Patrick C.; Kelley, Joshua B.; Dixit, Gauri; Elston, Timothy C.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases regulate a broad array of cellular processes and do so through the phosphorylation of one or more sites within a given substrate. Many protein kinases are themselves regulated through multisite phosphorylation, and the addition or removal of phosphates can occur in a sequential (processive) or a stepwise (distributive) manner. Here we measured the relative abundance of the monophosphorylated and dual-phosphorylated forms of Fus3, a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family in yeast. We found that upon activation with pheromone, a substantial proportion of Fus3 accumulates in the monophosphorylated state. Introduction of an additional copy of Fus3 lacking either phosphorylation site leads to dampened signaling. Conversely, cells lacking the dual-specificity phosphatase (msg5Δ) or that are deficient in docking to the MAPK-scaffold (Ste5ND) accumulate a greater proportion of dual-phosphorylated Fus3. The double mutant exhibits a synergistic, or “synthetic,” supersensitivity to pheromone. Finally, we present a predictive computational model that combines MAPK scaffold and phosphatase activities and is sufficient to account for the observed MAPK profiles. These results indicate that the monophosphorylated and dual-phosphorylated forms of the MAPK act in opposition to one another. Moreover, they reveal a new mechanism by which the MAPK scaffold acts dynamically to regulate signaling. PMID:26179917

  4. G protein-coupled receptors: signalling and regulation by lipid agonists for improved glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Brian M; Flatt, Peter R; McKillop, Aine M

    2016-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a pivotal role in cell signalling, controlling many processes such as immunity, growth, cellular differentiation, neurological pathways and hormone secretions. Fatty acid agonists are increasingly recognised as having a key role in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis via stimulation of islet and gastrointestinal GPCRs. Downstream cell signalling results in modulation of the biosynthesis, secretion, proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways of islet and enteroendocrine cells. GPR40 and GPR120 are activated by long-chain fatty acids (>C12) with both receptors coupling to the Gαq subunit that activates the Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. GPR41 and GPR43 are stimulated by short-chain fatty acids (C2-C5), and activation results in binding to Gαi that inhibits the adenylyl cyclase pathway attenuating cAMP production. In addition, GPR43 also couples to the Gαq subunit augmenting intracellular Ca(2+) and activating phospholipase C. GPR55 is specific for cannabinoid endogenous agonists (endocannabinoids) and non-cannabinoid fatty acids, which couples to Gα12/13 and Gαq proteins, leading to enhancing intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and Rho kinase. GPR119 is activated by fatty acid ethanolamides and binds to Gαs utilising the adenylate cyclase pathway, which is dependent upon protein kinase A. Current research indicates that GPCR therapies may be approved for clinical use in the near future. This review focuses on the recent advances in preclinical diabetes research in the signalling and regulation of GPCRs on islet and enteroendocrine cells involved in glucose homoeostasis.

  5. Evaluation of agonist selectivity for the NMDA receptor ion channel in bilayer lipid membranes based on integrated single-channel currents.

    PubMed

    Hirano, A; Sugawara, M; Umezawa, Y; Uchino, S; Nakajima-Iijima, S

    2000-06-01

    A new method for evaluating chemical selectivity of agonists to activate the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was presented by using typical agonists NMDA, L-glutamate and (2S, 3R, 4S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-IV) and the mouse epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor incorporated in bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) as an illustrative example. The method was based on the magnitude of an agonist-induced integrated single-channel current corresponding to the number of total ions passed through the open channel. The very magnitudes of the integrated single-channel currents were compared with the different BLMs as a new measure of agonist selectivity. The epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor was partially purified from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor and incorporated in BLMs formed by the tip-dip method. The agonist-induced integrated single-channel currents were obtained at 50 microM agonist concentration, where the integrated current for NMDA was shown to reach its saturated value. The obtained integrated currents were found to be (4.5 +/- 0.55) x 10(-13) C/s for NMDA, (5.8 +/- 0.72) x 10(-13) C/s for L-glutamate and (6.6 +/- 0.61) x 10(-13) C/s for L-CCG-IV, respectively. These results suggest that the agonist selectivity in terms of the total ion flux through the single epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor is in the order of L-CCG-IV approximately = L-glutamate > NMDA.

  6. Exenatide Protects Against Glucose- and Lipid-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Evidence for Direct Vasodilation Effect of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Michelle; Burciu, Camelia; D’Souza, Karen M.; Raravikar, Kalyani; Liu, James; Truran, Seth; Franco, Daniel A.; Schwartz, Eric A.; Schwenke, Dawn C.; D’Alessio, David; Migrino, Raymond Q.; Reaven, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists may improve endothelial function (EF) via metabolic improvement and direct vascular action. The current study determined the effect of GLP-1R agonist exenatide on postprandial EF in type 2 diabetes and the mechanisms underlying GLP-1R agonist–mediated vasodilation. Two crossover studies were conducted: 36 participants with type 2 diabetes received subcutaneous exenatide or placebo for 11 days and EF, and glucose and lipid responses to breakfast and lunch were determined; and 32 participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or diet-controlled type 2 diabetes had EF measured before and after intravenous exenatide, with or without the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-9. Mechanisms of GLP-1R agonist action were studied ex vivo on human subcutaneous adipose tissue arterioles and endothelial cells. Subcutaneous exenatide increased postprandial EF independent of reductions in plasma glucose and triglycerides. Intravenous exenatide increased fasting EF, and exendin-9 abolished this effect. Exenatide elicited eNOS activation and NO production in endothelial cells, and induced dose-dependent vasorelaxation and reduced high-glucose or lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction in arterioles ex vivo. These effects were reduced with AMPK inhibition. In conclusion, exenatide augmented postprandial EF in subjects with diabetes and prevented high-glucose and lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction in human arterioles. These effects were largely direct, via GLP-1R and AMPK activation. PMID:25720388

  7. Development and Evaluation of Biodegradable Particles Coloaded With Antigen and the Toll-Like Receptor Agonist, Pentaerythritol Lipid A, as a Cancer Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kawther K; Geary, Sean M; Salem, Aliasger K

    2016-03-01

    Immune adjuvants are important components of current and prospective cancer vaccines. In this study, we aimed at evaluating the use of a synthetic lipid A derivative, pentaerythritol lipid A (PET lipid A), loaded into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles, as a potential cancer vaccine adjuvant. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles (size range: 250-600 nm) were successfully formulated to include PET lipid A and/or the model tumor antigen, chicken ovalbumin (OVA). It was shown that particulated PET lipid A had a distinct advantage at promoting secretion of the immune potentiating cytokine, IL-12p70, and upregulating key costimulatory surface proteins, CD86 and CD40, in murine dendritic cells in vitro. In a murine tumor model, involving prophylactic vaccination with various permutations of soluble versus particulated formulations of OVA with or without PET lipid A, modest benefit was observed in terms of OVA-specific cell-mediated immune responses when PET lipid A was delivered in particles. These findings translated into a corresponding trend toward increased survival of mice challenged with OVA-expressing tumor cells (E.G7). In terms of translation of safe adjuvants into the clinic, these results promote the concept of delivering toll-like receptor-4 agonists in particles because doing so improves their adjuvant properties, while decreasing the chances of adverse effects due to off-target uptake by nonphagocytic cells. PMID:26886334

  8. Effects of the PPARα agonist WY-14,643 on plasma lipids, enzymatic activities and mRNA expression of lipid metabolism genes in a marine flatfish, Scophthalmus maximus.

    PubMed

    Urbatzka, R; Galante-Oliveira, S; Rocha, E; Lobo-da-Cunha, A; Castro, L F C; Cunha, I

    2015-07-01

    Fibrates and other lipid regulator drugs are widespread in the aquatic environment including estuaries and coastal zones, but little is known on their chronic effects on non-target organisms as marine fish. In the present study, turbot juveniles were exposed to the PPARα model agonist WY-14,643 for 21 days by repeated injections at the concentrations of 5mg/kg (lo-WY) and 50mg/kg (hi-WY), and samples taken after 7 and 21 days. Enzyme activity and mRNA expression of palmitoyl-CoA oxidase and catalase in the liver were analyzed as first response, which validated the experiment by demonstrating interactions with the peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and oxidative stress pathways in the hi-WY treatment. In order to get mechanistic insights, alterations of plasma lipids (free cholesterol, FC; HDL associated cholesterol, C-HDL; triglycerides, TG; non-esterified fatty acids, NEFA) and hepatic mRNA expression of 17 genes involved in fatty acid and lipid metabolism were studied. The exposure to hi-WY reduced the quantity of plasma FC, C-HDL, and NEFA. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apolipoprotein E mRNA expression were higher in hi-WY, and indicated an increased formation of VLDL particles and energy mobilization from liver. It is speculated that energy depletion by PPARα agonists may contribute to a higher susceptibility to environmental stressors.

  9. Cyclin D activates the Rb tumor suppressor by mono-phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Narasimha, Anil M; Kaulich, Manuel; Shapiro, Gary S; Choi, Yoon J; Sicinski, Piotr; Dowdy, Steven F

    2014-01-01

    The widely accepted model of G1 cell cycle progression proposes that cyclin D:Cdk4/6 inactivates the Rb tumor suppressor during early G1 phase by progressive multi-phosphorylation, termed hypo-phosphorylation, to release E2F transcription factors. However, this model remains unproven biochemically and the biologically active form(s) of Rb remains unknown. In this study, we find that Rb is exclusively mono-phosphorylated in early G1 phase by cyclin D:Cdk4/6. Mono-phosphorylated Rb is composed of 14 independent isoforms that are all targeted by the E1a oncoprotein, but show preferential E2F binding patterns. At the late G1 Restriction Point, cyclin E:Cdk2 inactivates Rb by quantum hyper-phosphorylation. Cells undergoing a DNA damage response activate cyclin D:Cdk4/6 to generate mono-phosphorylated Rb that regulates global transcription, whereas cells undergoing differentiation utilize un-phosphorylated Rb. These observations fundamentally change our understanding of G1 cell cycle progression and show that mono-phosphorylated Rb, generated by cyclin D:Cdk4/6, is the only Rb isoform in early G1 phase. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02872.001 PMID:24876129

  10. Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant (GLA), a Synthetic TLR4 Agonist, Promotes Potent Systemic and Mucosal Responses to Intranasal Immunization with HIVgp140

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Mauricio A.; Van Roey, Griet A.; Tregoning, John S.; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Coler, Rhea N.; Windish, Hillarie P.; Reed, Steven G.; Carter, Darrick; Shattock, Robin J.

    2012-01-01

    Successful vaccine development against HIV will likely require the induction of strong, long-lasting humoral and cellular immune responses in both the systemic and mucosal compartments. Based on the known immunological linkage between the upper-respiratory and urogenital tracts, we explored the potential of nasal adjuvants to boost immunization for the induction of vaginal and systemic immune responses to gp140. Mice were immunized intranasally with HIV gp140 together with micellar and emulsion formulations of a synthetic TLR4 agonist, Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant (GLA) and responses were compared to R848, a TLR7/8 agonist, or chitosan, a non TLR adjuvant. GLA and chitosan but not R848 greatly enhanced serum immunoglobulin levels when compared to antigen alone. Both GLA and chitosan induced high IgG and IgA titers in nasal and vaginal lavage and feces. The high IgA and IgG titers in vaginal lavage were associated with high numbers of gp140-specific antibody secreting cells in the genital tract. Whilst both GLA and chitosan induced T cell responses to immunization, GLA induced a stronger Th17 response and chitosan induced a more Th2 skewed response. Our results show that GLA is a highly potent intranasal adjuvant greatly enhancing humoral and cellular immune responses, both systemically and mucosally. PMID:22829921

  11. Insulin sensitivity and lipid profile in prolactinoma patients before and after normalization of prolactin by dopamine agonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Berinder, Katarina; Nyström, Thomas; Höybye, Charlotte; Hall, Kerstin; Hulting, Anna-Lena

    2011-09-01

    Hyperprolactinemia has been associated with impaired metabolism, including insulin resistance. However, the metabolic effects of elevated prolactin (PRL) levels are not completely clarified. The aim of this study was to obtain more insights of metabolic consequences in hyperprolactinemia patients. Fourteen consecutive patients, eight women and six men, aged 39.7 (±13.7) years with prolactinomas (median PRL 72 [49-131] μg/L in women and 1,260 [123-9,600] μg/L in men) were included. Anthropometric data and metabolic values were studied before and after 2 and 6 months on DA agonists (Bromocriptine [5.7 (±3.9) mg/day, n = 13] or Cabergoline [0.5 mg/week, n = 1]). Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps were studied in six patients before and after 6 months of treatment. PRL normalized in all patients. Anthropometric data changed only in males with a significant decrease of median body weight (95.6 [80.7-110.1] to 83.4 [77.8-99.1] kg, P = 0.046), waist circumference and fat percentage after 6 months. LDL cholesterol was positively correlated to PRL at diagnosis (r = 0.62, P = 0.025) and decreased within 2 months (3.4 [±0.9] to 2.9 [±0.6] mmol/L, P = 0.003). Insulin, IGFBP-1 and total adiponectin levels did not change. Insulin sensitivity tended to improve after 6 months; M-value from 5.7 (±1.8) to 7.8 (±2.6) mg/kg/min, P = 0.083 and per cent improvement in M-value was correlated to per cent reduction in PRL levels (r = -0.85, P = 0.034). In conclusion, beneficial metabolic changes were seen in prolactinoma patients after treatment with DA agonists, underscoring the importance of an active treatment approach and to consider the metabolic profile in the clinical management of hyperprolactinemia patients.

  12. Adsorption of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist to Alum-Based Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Dampens Pro-T Helper 2 Activities and Enhances Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Juliana; Mirotti, Luciana; Rodriguez, Dunia; Gomes, Eliane; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum salts gels (alum) are TLR-independent adjuvants and have been used to boost antibody responses in alum-based vaccines such as diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT) triple vaccine. However, the pro-Th2 activity of alum-based vaccine formulations has not been fully appreciated. Here we found that alum-based tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine was biased toward a Th-2 profile as shown by TT-induced airway eosinophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production, and high levels of IgE anaphylactic antibodies. The adsorption into alum of prototypic TLR4 agonists such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli consistently dampened TT-induced Th2 activities without inducing IFNγ or Th1-like responses in the lung. Conversely, adsorption of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) extracted from Salmonella minnesota, which is a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β- (TRIF-) biased TLR4 agonist, was less effective in decreasing Th-2 responses. Importantly, in a situation with antigenic competition (OVA plus TT), TT-specific IgG1 or IgG2a was decreased compared with TT sensitization. Notably, LPS increased the production of IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibodies. In conclusion, the addition of LPS induces a more robust IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibody production and concomitantly decreases Th2-cellular and humoral responses, indicating a potential use of alum/TLR-based vaccines.

  13. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Agonists with Preference for Human over Mouse TLR4 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Heeke, Darren S.; Rao, Eileen; Maynard, Sean K.; Hornigold, David; McCrae, Christopher; Fraser, Neil; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yu, Li; Williams, Nicola; King, Sarah; Cooper, Martin E.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Woo, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    The best-characterized Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands are lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its chemically modified and detoxified variant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Although both molecules are active for human TLR4, they demonstrate a potency preference for mouse TLR4 based on data from transfected cell lines and primary cells of both species. After a high throughput screening process of small molecule libraries, we have discovered a new class of TLR4 agonist with a species preference profile differing from MPL. Products of the 4-component Ugi synthesis reaction were demonstrated to potently trigger human TLR4-transfected HEK cells but not mouse TLR4, although inclusion of the human MD2 with mTLR4 was able to partially recover activity. Co-expression of CD14 was not required for optimal activity of Ugi compounds on transfected cells, as it is for LPS. The species preference profile for the panel of Ugi compounds was found to be strongly active for human and cynomolgus monkey primary cells, with reduced but still substantial activity for most Ugi compounds on guinea pig cells. Mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret, and cotton rat cells displayed little or no activity when exposed to Ugi compounds. However, engineering the human versions of TLR4 and MD2 to be expressed in mTLR4/MD2 deficient mice allowed for robust activity by Ugi compounds both in vitro and in vivo. These findings extend the range of compounds available for development as agonists of TLR4 and identify novel molecules which reverse the TLR4 triggering preference of MPL for mouse TLR4 over human TLR4. Such compounds may be amenable to formulation as more potent human-specific TLR4L-based adjuvants than typical MPL-based adjuvants. PMID:27736941

  14. The Effect of PPARα, PPARδ, PPARγ, and PPARpan Agonists on Body Weight, Body Mass, and Serum Lipid Profiles in Diet-Induced Obese AKR/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, W. Wallace; S. Britt, Christy; G. Wilson, Joan; O. Milliken, Naphtali; G. Binz, Jane; C. Lobe, David; R. Oliver, William; C. Lewis, Michael; M. Ignar, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, δ, and γ subtypes increases expression of genes involved in fatty acid transport and oxidation and alters adiposity in animal models of obesity and type-2 diabetes. PPARpan agonists which activate all three receptor subtypes have antidiabetic activity in animal models without the weight gain associated with selective PPARγ agonists. Herein we report the effects of selective PPAR agonists (GW9578, a PPARα agonist, GW0742, a PPARδ agonist, GW7845, a PPARγ agonist), combination of PPARα and δ agonists, and PPARpan (PPARα/γ/δ) activators (GW4148 or GW9135) on body weight (BW), body composition, food consumption, fatty acid oxidation, and serum chemistry of diet-induced obese AKR/J mice. PPARα or PPARδ agonist treatment induced a slight decrease in fat mass (FM) while a PPARγ agonist increased BW and FM commensurate with increased food consumption. The reduction in BW and food intake after cotreatment with PPARα and δ agonists appeared to be synergistic. GW4148, a PPARpan agonist, induced a significant and sustained reduction in BW and FM similar to an efficacious dose of rimonabant, an antiobesity compound. GW9135, a PPARpan agonist with weak activity at PPARδ, induced weight loss initially followed by rebound weight gain reaching vehicle control levels by the end of the experiment. We conclude that PPARα and PPARδ activations are critical to effective weight loss induction. These results suggest that the PPARpan compounds may be expected to maintain the beneficial insulin sensitization effects of a PPARγ agonist while either maintaining weight or producing weight loss. PMID:17710237

  15. The Effect of PPARalpha, PPARdelta, PPARgamma, and PPARpan Agonists on Body Weight, Body Mass, and Serum Lipid Profiles in Diet-Induced Obese AKR/J Mice.

    PubMed

    Harrington, W Wallace; S Britt, Christy; G Wilson, Joan; O Milliken, Naphtali; G Binz, Jane; C Lobe, David; R Oliver, William; C Lewis, Michael; M Ignar, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha, delta, and gamma subtypes increases expression of genes involved in fatty acid transport and oxidation and alters adiposity in animal models of obesity and type-2 diabetes. PPARpan agonists which activate all three receptor subtypes have antidiabetic activity in animal models without the weight gain associated with selective PPARgamma agonists. Herein we report the effects of selective PPAR agonists (GW9578, a PPARalpha agonist, GW0742, a PPARdelta agonist, GW7845, a PPARgamma agonist), combination of PPARalpha and delta agonists, and PPARpan (PPARalpha/gamma/delta) activators (GW4148 or GW9135) on body weight (BW), body composition, food consumption, fatty acid oxidation, and serum chemistry of diet-induced obese AKR/J mice. PPARalpha or PPARdelta agonist treatment induced a slight decrease in fat mass (FM) while a PPARgamma agonist increased BW and FM commensurate with increased food consumption. The reduction in BW and food intake after cotreatment with PPARalpha and delta agonists appeared to be synergistic. GW4148, a PPARpan agonist, induced a significant and sustained reduction in BW and FM similar to an efficacious dose of rimonabant, an antiobesity compound. GW9135, a PPARpan agonist with weak activity at PPARdelta, induced weight loss initially followed by rebound weight gain reaching vehicle control levels by the end of the experiment. We conclude that PPARalpha and PPARdelta activations are critical to effective weight loss induction. These results suggest that the PPARpan compounds may be expected to maintain the beneficial insulin sensitization effects of a PPARgamma agonist while either maintaining weight or producing weight loss.

  16. Effects of the New Dual PPARα/δ Agonist GFT505 on Lipid and Glucose Homeostasis in Abdominally Obese Patients With Combined Dyslipidemia or Impaired Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cariou, Bertrand; Zaïr, Yassine; Staels, Bart; Bruckert, Eric

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We evaluated the metabolic effects and tolerability of GFT505, a novel dual peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α/δ agonist, in abdominally obese patients with either combined dyslipidemia or prediabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The S1 study was conducted in 94 patients with combined dyslipidemia while the S2 study was conducted in 47 patients with prediabetes. Participants were randomly assigned in a double-blind manner to GFT505 at 80 mg/day or placebo for 28 (S1) or 35 (S2) days. Primary efficacy end points were changes from baseline at week 4 in both fasting plasma triglycerides and HDL cholesterol in the S1 group and 2-h glucose upon oral glucose tolerance test in the S2 group. RESULTS In comparison with placebo, GFT505 significantly reduced fasting plasma triglycerides (S1: least squares means −16.7% [95% one-sided CI −∞ to −5.3], P = 0.005; S2: −24.8% [−∞ to −10.5], P = 0.0003) and increased HDL cholesterol (S1: 7.8% [3.0 to ∞], P = 0.004; S2: 9.3% [1.7 to ∞], P = 0.009) in both studies, whereas LDL cholesterol only decreased in S2 (−11.0% [ −∞ to −3.5], P = 0.002). In S2, GFT505 did not reduce 2-h glucose (−0.52 mmol/L [−∞ to 0.61], P = 0.18) but led to a significant decrease of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (−31.4% [−∞ to 12.5], P = 0.001), fasting plasma glucose (−0.37 mmol/L [−∞ to −0.10], P = 0.01) and fructosamine (−3.6% [−∞ to −0.20], P = 0.02). GFT505 also reduced γ glutamyl transferase levels in both studies (S1: −19.9% [−∞ to −12.8], P < 0.0001; S2: −15.1% [−∞ to −1.1], P = 0.004). No specific adverse safety signals were reported during the studies. CONCLUSIONS GFT505 may be considered a new drug candidate for the treatment of lipid and glucose disorders associated with the metabolic syndrome. PMID:21816979

  17. Adsorption of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist to Alum-Based Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Dampens Pro-T Helper 2 Activities and Enhances Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Juliana; Mirotti, Luciana; Rodriguez, Dunia; Gomes, Eliane; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum salts gels (alum) are TLR-independent adjuvants and have been used to boost antibody responses in alum-based vaccines such as diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT) triple vaccine. However, the pro-Th2 activity of alum-based vaccine formulations has not been fully appreciated. Here we found that alum-based tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine was biased toward a Th-2 profile as shown by TT-induced airway eosinophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production, and high levels of IgE anaphylactic antibodies. The adsorption into alum of prototypic TLR4 agonists such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli consistently dampened TT-induced Th2 activities without inducing IFNγ or Th1-like responses in the lung. Conversely, adsorption of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) extracted from Salmonella minnesota, which is a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β- (TRIF-) biased TLR4 agonist, was less effective in decreasing Th-2 responses. Importantly, in a situation with antigenic competition (OVA plus TT), TT-specific IgG1 or IgG2a was decreased compared with TT sensitization. Notably, LPS increased the production of IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibodies. In conclusion, the addition of LPS induces a more robust IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibody production and concomitantly decreases Th2-cellular and humoral responses, indicating a potential use of alum/TLR-based vaccines. PMID:26380316

  18. Co-administration of α-GalCer analog and TLR4 agonist induces robust CD8+ T-cell responses to PyCS protein and WT-1 antigen and activates memory-like effector NKT cells

    PubMed Central

    Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G.; Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Pereira, Felipe V.; Funakoshi, Ryota; Nakajima, Hiroko; Sugiyama, Haruo; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combined adjuvant effect of 7DW8-5, a potent α-GalCer-analog, and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4 agonist, on the induction of vaccine-induced CD8+ T-cell responses and protective immunity was evaluated. Mice were immunized with peptides corresponding to the CD8+ T-cell epitopes of a malaria antigen, a circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium yoelii, and a tumor antigen, a Wilms Tumor antigen-1 (WT-1), together with 7DW8-5 and MPLA, as an adjuvant. These immunization regimens were able to induce higher levels of CD8+ T-cell responses and, ultimately, enhanced levels of protection against malaria and tumor challenges compared to the levels induced by immunization with peptides mixed with 7DW8-5 or MPLA alone. Co-administration of 7DW8-5 and MPLA induces activation of memory-like effector natural killer T (NKT) cells, i.e. CD44+CD62L−NKT cells. Our study indicates that 7DW8-5 greatly enhances important synergistic pathways associated to memory immune responses when co-administered with MPLA, thus rendering this combination of adjuvants a novel vaccine adjuvant formulation. PMID:27132023

  19. Co-administration of α-GalCer analog and TLR4 agonist induces robust CD8(+) T-cell responses to PyCS protein and WT-1 antigen and activates memory-like effector NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Coelho-Dos-Reis, Jordana G; Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Pereira, Felipe V; Funakoshi, Ryota; Nakajima, Hiroko; Sugiyama, Haruo; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the combined adjuvant effect of 7DW8-5, a potent α-GalCer-analog, and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4 agonist, on the induction of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T-cell responses and protective immunity was evaluated. Mice were immunized with peptides corresponding to the CD8(+) T-cell epitopes of a malaria antigen, a circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium yoelii, and a tumor antigen, a Wilms Tumor antigen-1 (WT-1), together with 7DW8-5 and MPLA, as an adjuvant. These immunization regimens were able to induce higher levels of CD8(+) T-cell responses and, ultimately, enhanced levels of protection against malaria and tumor challenges compared to the levels induced by immunization with peptides mixed with 7DW8-5 or MPLA alone. Co-administration of 7DW8-5 and MPLA induces activation of memory-like effector natural killer T (NKT) cells, i.e. CD44(+)CD62L(-)NKT cells. Our study indicates that 7DW8-5 greatly enhances important synergistic pathways associated to memory immune responses when co-administered with MPLA, thus rendering this combination of adjuvants a novel vaccine adjuvant formulation. PMID:27132023

  20. Combined Mitigation of the Gastrointestinal and Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndromes by a Novel LPA2 Receptor-specific Non-lipid Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Renukadevi; Szabó, Erzsébet; Fells, James I.; Balogh, Andrea; Lim, Keng G.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Norman, Derek B.; Lee, Sue-Chin; Balazs, Louisa; Thomas, Fridtjof; Patil, Shivaputra; Emmons-Thompson, Karin; Boler, Alyssa; Strobos, Jur; McCool, Shannon W.; Yates, C. Ryan; Stabenow, Jennifer; Byrne, Gerrald I.; Miller, Duane D.; Tigyi, Gábor J.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological mitigation of injuries caused by high-dose ionizing radiation is an unsolved medical problem. A specific nonlipid agonists of the type 2 GPCR for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA2) 2-[4-(1,3-Dioxo-1H,3H-benzoisoquinolin-2-yl)butylsulfamoyl]benzoic acid (DBIBB) when administered with a postirradiation delay up to 72 hours reduced mortality of C57BL/6 mice but not in LPA2 KO mice. DBIBB mitigated the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome, increased intestinal crypt survival and enterocyte proliferation, and reduced apoptosis. DBIBB enhanced DNA repair by augmenting the resolution of γ–H2AX foci, increased clonogenic survival of irradiated IEC-6 cells, attenuated the radiation-induced death of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors and enhanced the survival of the granulocyte/macrophage lineage. DBIBB also increased the survival of mice suffering of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome after total body irradiation. DBIBB represents the first drug candidate capable of mitigating acute radiation syndrome caused by high-dose γ-radiation to the hematopoietic and gastrointestinal system. PMID:25619933

  1. AZ 242, a novel PPARalpha/gamma agonist with beneficial effects on insulin resistance and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in ob/ob mice and obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Ljung, Bengt; Bamberg, Krister; Dahllöf, Björn; Kjellstedt, Ann; Oakes, Nicholas D; Ostling, Jörgen; Svensson, Lennart; Camejo, Germán

    2002-11-01

    Abnormalities in fatty acid (FA) metabolism underlie the development of insulin resistance and alterations in glucose metabolism, features characteristic of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes that can result in an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We present pharmacodynamic effects of AZ 242, a novel peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)alpha/gamma agonist. AZ 242 dose-dependently reduced the hypertriglyceridemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperglycemia of ob/ob diabetic mice. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies showed that treatment with AZ 242 (1 micromol/kg/d) restored insulin sensitivity of obese Zucker rats and decreased insulin secretion. In vitro, in reporter gene assays, AZ 242 activated human PPARalpha and PPARgamma with EC(50) in the micro molar range. It also induced differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells, an established PPARgamma effect, and caused up-regulation of liver fatty acid binding protein in HepG-2 cells, a PPARalpha-mediated effect. PPARalpha-mediated effects of AZ 242 in vivo were documented by induction of hepatic cytochrome P 450-4A in mice. The results indicate that the dual PPARalpha/gamma agonism of AZ 242 reduces insulin resistance and has beneficial effects on FA and glucose metabolism. This effect profile could provide a suitable therapeutic approach to the treatment of type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and associated vascular risk factors. PMID:12401884

  2. The effects of lipid A on gamma-irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubničková, M.; Kuzmina, E. A.; Chausov, V. N.; Ravnachka, I.; Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The modulatory effects of lipid A (diphosphoryl lipid A (DLA) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA)) on apoptosis induction and DNA structure damage (single and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs, respectively)) in peripheral human blood lymphocytes are studied for 60Co gamma-irradiation. It is shown that in the presence of these agents the amount of apoptotic cells increases compared with the irradiated control samples. The effect is most strongly pronounced for DLA. In its presence, a significant increase is observed in the number of radiation-induced DNA SSBs and DSBs. Possible mechanisms are discussed of the modifying influence of the used agents on radiation-induced cell reactions

  3. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Thomas, Merlin C

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARalpha agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARgamma agonists, and more recently dual PPARalpha/gamma coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARgamma receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  4. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna C.; Thomas, Merlin C.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARα agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARγ agonists, and more recently dual PPARα/γ coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARγ receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:18288280

  5. Diphosphorylated but not monophosphorylated myosin II regulatory light chain localizes to the midzone without its heavy chain during cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tomo; Isoda, Rieko; Uchimura, Takashi; Sugiyama, Mutsumi; Hamao, Kozue; Hosoya, Hiroshi

    2012-01-13

    Myosin II is activated by the monophosphorylation of its regulatory light chain (MRLC) at Ser19 (1P-MRLC). Its ATPase activity is further enhanced by MRLC diphosphorylation at Thr18/Ser19 (2P-MRLC). As these phosphorylated MRLCs are colocalized with their heavy chains at the contractile ring in dividing cells, we believe that the phosphorylated MRLC acts as a subunit of the activated myosin II during cytokinesis. However, the distinct role(s) of 1P- and 2P-MRLC during cytokinesis has not been elucidated. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (4F12) specific for 2P-MRLC was raised and used to examine the roles of 2P-MRLC in cultured mammalian cells. Our confocal microscopic observations using 4F12 revealed that 2P-MRLC localized to the contractile ring, and, unexpectedly, to the midzone also. Interestingly, 2P-MRLC did not colocalize with 1P-MRLC, myosin II heavy chain, and F-actin at the midzone. These results suggest that 2P-MRLC has a role different from that of 1P-MRLC at the midzone, and is not a subunit of myosin II. PMID:22166199

  6. The Lipidated Peptidomimetic Lau-((S)-Aoc)-(Lys-βNphe)6-NH2 Is a Novel Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 Agonist That Activates Both Human and Mouse Neutrophil NADPH Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Holdfeldt, André; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Winther, Malene; Gabl, Michael; Nielsen, Christina; Perez-Gassol, Iris; Larsen, Camilla Josephine; Wang, Ji Ming; Karlsson, Anna; Dahlgren, Claes; Forsman, Huamei; Franzyk, Henrik

    2016-09-16

    Neutrophils expressing formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) play key roles in host defense, immune regulation, and resolution of inflammation. Consequently, the search for FPR2-specific modulators has attracted much attention due to its therapeutic potential. Earlier described agonists for this receptor display potent activity for the human receptor (FPR2) but low activity for the mouse receptor orthologue (Fpr2), rendering them inapplicable in murine models of human disease. Here we describe a novel FPR2 agonist, the proteolytically stable α-peptide/β-peptoid hybrid Lau-((S)-Aoc)-(Lys-βNphe)6-NH2 (F2M2), showing comparable potency in activating human and mouse neutrophils by inducing a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and assembly of the superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase. This FPR2/Fpr2 agonist contains a headgroup consisting of a 2-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc) residue acylated with lauric acid (C12 fatty acid), which is linked to a peptide/peptoid repeat ((Lys-βNphe)6-NH2). Both the fatty acid moiety and the (S)-Aoc residue were required for FPR2/Fpr2 activation. This type of proteolytically stable FPR2-specific peptidomimetics may serve as valuable tools for future analysis of FPR2 signaling as well as for development of prophylactic immunomodulatory therapy. This novel class of cross-species FPR2/Fpr2 agonists should enable translation of results obtained with mouse neutrophils (and disease models) into enhanced understanding of human inflammatory and immune diseases. PMID:27422818

  7. The Immunobiology of TLR4 Agonists: From Endotoxin Tolerance to Immunoadjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Bohannon, Julia K.; Hernandez, Antonio; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Adams, William L.; Sherwood, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is a structural component of the Gram negative outer membrane. The lipid A moiety of LPS binds to the LPS receptor complex expressed by leukocytes, endothelial cells and parenchymal cells and is the primary component of Gram negative bacteria that is recognized by the immune system. Activation of the LPS receptor complex by native lipid A induces robust cytokine production, leukocyte activation and inflammation, which is beneficial for clearing bacterial infections at the local level but can cause severe systemic inflammation and shock at higher challenge doses. Interestingly, prior exposure to LPS renders the host resistant to shock caused by subsequent LPS challenge, a phenomenon known as endotoxin tolerance. Treatment with lipid A has also been shown to augment the host response to infection and to serve as a potent vaccine adjuvant. However, the side effects associated with the pronounced inflammatory response limits the use of native lipid A as a clinical immunomodulator. More recently, analogs of lipid A have been developed that possess attenuated pro-inflammatory activity but retain attractive immunomodulatory properties. The lipid A analog monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) exhibits approximately 1/1000th of the toxicity of native lipid A but retains potent immunoadjuvant activity. As such, MPLA is currently employed as an adjuvant in several human vaccine preparations. Due to the potency of lipid A analogs as immunoadjuvants, numerous laboratories are actively working to identify and develop new lipid A mimetics and to optimize their efficacy and safety. Based on those characteristics, lipid A analogs represent an attractive family of immunomodulators. PMID:23989337

  8. [PPAR receptors and insulin sensitivity: new agonists in development].

    PubMed

    Pégorier, J-P

    2005-04-01

    Thiazolidinediones (or glitazones) are synthetic PPARgamma (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors gamma) ligands with well recognized effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The clinical use of these PPARgamma agonists in type 2 diabetic patients leads to an improved glycemic control and an inhanced insulin sensitivity, and at least in animal models, to a protective effect on pancreatic beta-cell function. However, they can produce adverse effects, generally mild or moderate, but some of them (mainly peripheral edema and weight gain) may conduct to treatment cessation. Several pharmacological classes are currently in pre-clinical or clinical development, with the objective to retain the beneficial metabolic properties of PPARgamma agonists, either alone or in association with the PPARalpha agonists (fibrates) benefit on lipid profile, but devoid of the side-effects on weight gain and fluid retention. These new pharmacological classes: partial PPARgamma agonists, PPARgamma antagonists, dual PPARalpha/PPARgamma agonists, pan PPARalpha/beta(delta)/gamma agonists, RXR receptor agonists (rexinoids), are presented in this review. Main results from in vitro cell experiments and animal model studies are discussed, as well as the few published short-term studies in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:15959400

  9. Radioprotective properties of detoxified lipid A from Salmonella minnesota R595

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.L.; Walden, T.L.; Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Fuchs, P.

    1986-07-01

    In the past, the toxicity of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or its principal bioactive component, lipid A, has detracted from their potential use as radioprotectants. Recently, a relatively nontoxic monophosphoryl Lipid A (LAM) that retains many of the immunobiologic properties of LPS has been isolated from a polysaccharide deficient Re mutant strain of Salmonella minnesota (R595). The ability of the native endotoxic glycolipid (GL) from S. minnesota (R595) as well as diphosphoryl lipid A (LAD) and nontoxic monophosphoryl lipid A (LAM) derived from GL to protect LPS responsive (CD2F1 or C3H/HeN) and nonresponsive (C3H/HeJ) mice from 60Co gamma irradiation has been studied. Administration of GL, LAD, or LAM to CD2F1 or C3H/HeN mice (400 micrograms/kg) 24 h prior to exposure provided significant radioprotection. No protection was afforded to C3H/HeJ mice. Experiments were also conducted to determine the relative abilities of GL, LAD, and LAM to stimulate hematopoiesis as reflected by the endogenous spleen colony (E-CFU) assay. Protection was not correlated with the ability of these substances to increase E-CFUs or to induce colony-stimulating activity (CSA).

  10. Biosynthesis of pentosyl lipids by pea membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, T; Maclachlan, G

    1984-01-01

    Pea membranes were incubated with UDP-[14C]xylose or UDP-[14C]arabinose and sequentially extracted with chloroform/methanol/water (10:10:3, by vol.) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (2%, w/v). An active epimerase in the membranes rapidly interconverted the two pentosyl nucleotides. Chromatographic analysis of the lipid extract revealed that both substrates gave rise to xylose- and arabinose-containing neutral lipids, xylolipid with properties similar to a polyisoprenol monophosphoryl derivative, and highly charged lipid-linked arabinosyl oligosaccharide. When UDP-[14C]pentose or the extracted lipid-linked [14C]arabinosyl oligosaccharide were used as substrates, their 14C was also incorporating into sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble and -insoluble fractions as major end products. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble products indicated the formation of mobile components with Mr values between 40 000 and 200 000 (Sepharose CL-6B). The lipid-linked [14C]arabinosyl oligosaccharide possessed properties comparable with those of unsaturated polyisoprenyl pyrophosphoryl derivatives. It was hydrolysed by dilute acid to a charged product (apparent Mr 2300) that could be fractionated in alkali. It was degraded to shorter labelled oligosaccharides by slightly more concentrated acid and eventually to [14C]arabinose as the only labelled component. Susceptibility to acid hydrolysis, and methylation analysis, indicated that the oligosaccharide contained approximately seven sequential alpha-1,5-linked arabinofuranosyl units at the non-reducing end. Several acidic residues appear to be interposed between the terminal arabinosyl units and the charged lipid. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 8. PMID:6712596

  11. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C.; Konger, Raymond L.; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  12. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Harrison, Kathleen A; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C; Konger, Raymond L; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-04-12

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  13. The adsorption of allergoids and 3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL®) to microcrystalline tyrosine (MCT) in formulations for use in allergy immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bell, A J; Heath, M D; Hewings, S J; Skinner, M A

    2015-11-01

    Infectious disease vaccine potency is affected by antigen adjuvant adsorption. WHO and EMA guidelines recommend limits and experimental monitoring of adsorption in vaccines and allergy immunotherapies. Adsorbed allergoids and MPL® in MATA-MPL allergy immunotherapy formulations effectively treat IgE mitigated allergy. Understanding vaccine antigen adjuvant adsorption allows optimisation of potency and should be seen as good practice; however current understanding is seldom applied to allergy immunotherapies. The allergoid and MPL® adsorption to MCT in MATA-MPL allergy immunotherapy formulations was experimental determination using specific allergen IgE allerginicity and MPL® content methods. Binding forces between MPL® and MCT were investigated by competition binding experiments. MATA-MPL samples with different allergoids gave results within 100-104% of the theoretical 50μg/mL MPL® content. Unmodified drug substance samples showed significant desirable IgE antigenicity, 1040-170 QAU/mL. MATA-MPL supernatant samples with different allergoids gave results of ≤2 μg/mL MPL® and ≤0.1-1.4 QAU/mL IgE antigenicity, demonstrating approximately ≥96 & 99% adsorption respectively. Allergoid and MPL® adsorption in different MATA-MPL allergy immunotherapy formulations is consistent and meets guideline recommendations. MCT formulations treated to disrupt electrostatic, hydrophobic and ligand exchange interactions, gave an MPL® content of ≤2 μg/mL in supernatant samples. MCT formulations treated to disrupt aromatic interactions, gave an MPL® content of 73-92 μg/mL in supernatant samples. MPL® adsorption to l-tyrosine in MCT formulations is based on interactions between the 2-deoxy-2-aminoglucose backbone on MPL® and aromatic ring of l-tyrosine in MCT, such as C-H⋯π interaction. MCT could be an alternative adjuvant depot for some infectious disease antigens.

  14. A natural history of "agonist".

    PubMed

    Russo, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    This paper constructs a brief history of the biochemical term agonist by exploring the multiple meanings of the root agôn in ancient Greek literature and describing how agonist first appeared in the scientific literature of the 20th century in the context of neurophysiologists' debates about the existence and properties of cellular receptors. While the narrow scientific definition of agonist may appear colorless and dead when compared with the web of allusions spun by the ancient Greek agôn, the scientific power and creativity of agonist actually resides precisely in its exact, restricted meaning for biomedical researchers.

  15. A Semisynthetic Approach to New Immunoadjuvant Candidates: Site-Selective Chemical Manipulation of Escherichia coli Monophosphoryl Lipid A.

    PubMed

    D'Alonzo, Daniele; Cipolletti, Manuela; Tarantino, Giulia; Ziaco, Marcello; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Iadonisi, Alfonso; Palumbo, Giovanni; Alfano, Alberto; Giuliano, Mariateresa; De Rosa, Mario; Schiraldi, Chiara; Cammarota, Marcella; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Bedini, Emiliano; Corsaro, Maria M

    2016-07-25

    A semisynthetic approach to novel lipid A derivatives from Escherichia coli (E. coli) lipid A is reported. This methodology stands as an alternative to common approaches based exclusively on either total synthesis or extraction from bacterial sources. It relies upon the purification of the lipid A fraction from fed-batch fermentation of E. coli, followed by its structural modification through tailored, site-selective chemical reactions. In particular, modification of the lipid pattern and functionalization of the phosphate group as well as of the sole primary hydroxyl group were accomplished, highlighting the unusual reactivity of the molecule. Preliminary investigations of the immunostimulating activity of the new semisynthetic lipid A derivatives show that some of them stand out as promising, new immunoadjuvant candidates.

  16. Dissociated sterol-based liver X receptor agonists as therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Li, Sijia; Henke, Adam; Muse, Evan D; Cheng, Bo; Welzel, Gustav; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Wang, Danling; Roland, Jason; Glass, Christopher K; Tremblay, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR), a nuclear hormone receptor, is an essential regulator of immune responses. Activation of LXR-mediated transcription by synthetic agonists, such as T0901317 and GW3965, attenuates progression of inflammatory disease in animal models. However, the adverse effects of these conventional LXR agonists in elevating liver lipids have impeded exploitation of this intriguing mechanism for chronic therapy. Here, we explore the ability of a series of sterol-based LXR agonists to alleviate inflammatory conditions in mice without hepatotoxicity. We show that oral treatment with sterol-based LXR agonists in mice significantly reduces dextran sulfate sodium colitis-induced body weight loss, which is accompanied by reduced expression of inflammatory markers in the large intestine. The anti-inflammatory property of these agonists is recapitulated in vitro in mouse lamina propria mononuclear cells, human colonic epithelial cells, and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, treatment with LXR agonists dramatically suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression in a model of traumatic brain injury. Importantly, in both disease models, the sterol-based agonists do not affect the liver, and the conventional agonist T0901317 results in significant liver lipid accumulation and injury. Overall, these results provide evidence for the development of sterol-based LXR agonists as novel therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases.-Yu, S., Li, S., Henke, A., Muse, E. D., Cheng, B., Welzel, G., Chatterjee, A. K., Wang, D., Roland, J., Glass, C. K., Tremblay, M. Dissociated sterol-based liver X receptor agonists as therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27025962

  17. Agonist-trafficking and hallucinogens.

    PubMed

    González-Maeso, Javier; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2009-01-01

    Seven transmembrane domain receptors, also termed G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represent the most common molecular target for therapeutic drugs. The generally accepted pharmacological model for GPCR activation is the ternary complex model, in which GPCRs exist in a dynamic equilibrium between the active and inactive conformational states. However, the demonstration that different agonists sometimes elicit a different relative activation of two signaling pathways downstream of the same receptor has led to a revision of the ternary complex model. According to this agonist- trafficking model, agonists stabilize distinct activated receptor conformations that preferentially activate specific signaling pathways. Hallucinogenic drugs and non-hallucinogenic drugs represent an attractive experimental system with which to study agonist-trafficking of receptor signaling. Thus many of the behavioral responses induced by hallucinogenic drugs, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin or mescaline, depend on activation of serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT2ARs). In contrast, this neuropsychological state in humans is not induced by closely related chemicals, such as lisuride or ergotamine, despite their similar in vitro activity at the 5-HT2AR. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, as well as unresolved questions, regarding agonist-trafficking and the mechanism of action of hallucinogenic drugs.

  18. Lipid IVa incompletely activates MyD88-independent Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in mouse macrophage cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Norihiko; Muroi, Masashi; Sugiura, Yuka; Tanamoto, Ken-ichi

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the difference in the effect of synthetic lipid A compounds on MyD88-dependent and -independent Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in mouse macrophage cells. At higher concentrations, Escherichia coli-type hexa-acylated lipid A 506, Salmonella-type hepta-acylated lipid A 516, the lipid A precursor lipid IVa and monophosphoryl lipid A induced similar levels of production of the MyD88-dependent cytokine IL-1β although their potencies varied, whereas the maximum production of the MyD88-independent cytokine RANTES induced by lipid IVa was less than 50% that of other lipid A compounds. A maximum level of NF-κB activation, which is involved in IL-1β gene transcription, was also induced to a similar level by these four lipid A compounds, while the maximum level of IFN-β promoter activity induced during MyD88-independent signaling was also less than 50% for lipid IVa stimulation compared with other lipid A compounds. Early IκBα phosphorylation activated by MyD88-dependent signaling was similarly induced by 506 and lipid IVa, whereas lipid IVa barely stimulated the phosphorylation of IRF3, a MyD88-independent transcription factor, although efficient phosphorylation was observed with 506 stimulation. These results indicate that lipid IVa has limited activity toward MyD88-independent signaling of TLR4, in macrophage cell lines, despite having efficient activity in the MyD88-dependent pathway.

  19. Full-Length Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein Administered with Long-Chain Poly(I·C) or the Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion Elicits Potent Antibody and CD4+ T Cell Immunity and Protection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kastenmüller, Kathrin; Espinosa, Diego A.; Trager, Lauren; Stoyanov, Cristina; Salazar, Andres M.; Pokalwar, Santosh; Singh, Sanjay; Dutta, Sheetij; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Zavala, Fidel

    2013-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (CS) protein (CSP) is a major vaccine target for preventing malaria infection. Thus, developing strong and durable antibody and T cell responses against CSP with novel immunogens and potent adjuvants may improve upon the success of current approaches. Here, we compare four distinct full-length P. falciparum CS proteins expressed in Escherichia coli or Pichia pastoris for their ability to induce immunity and protection in mice when administered with long-chain poly(I·C) [poly(I·C)LC] as an adjuvant. CS proteins expressed in E. coli induced high-titer antibody responses against the NANP repeat region and potent CSP-specific CD4+ T cell responses. Moreover, E. coli-derived CS proteins in combination with poly(I·C)LC induced potent multifunctional (interleukin 2-positive [IL-2+], tumor necrosis factor alpha-positive [TNF-α+], gamma interferon-positive [IFN-γ+]) CD4+ effector T cell responses in blood, in spleen, and particularly in liver. Using transgenic Plasmodium berghei expressing the repeat region of P. falciparum CSP [Pb-CS(Pf)], we showed that there was a 1- to 4-log decrease in malaria rRNA in the liver following a high-dose challenge and ∼50% sterilizing protection with a low-dose challenge compared to control levels. Protection was directly correlated with high-level antibody titers but not CD4+ T cell responses. Finally, protective immunity was also induced using the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant-stable emulsion (GLA-SE) as the adjuvant, which also correlated with high antibody titers yet CD4+ T cell immunity that was significantly less potent than that with poly(I·C)LC. Overall, these data suggest that full-length CS proteins and poly(I·C)LC or GLA-SE offer a simple vaccine formulation to be used alone or in combination with other vaccines for preventing malaria infection. PMID:23275094

  20. PPARγ AGONISTS AS THERAPEUTICS FOR THE TREATMENT OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Landreth, Gary; Jiang, Qingguang; Mandrekar, Shweta; Heneka, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease is characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid within the brain parenchyma and is accompanied by the impairment of neuronal metabolism and function, leading to extensive neuronal loss. The disease involves the perturbation of synaptic function, energy and lipid metabolism. The development of amyloid plaques results in the induction of microglial-mediated inflammatory response. The nuclear receptor PPARγ is a ligand-activated transcription factor whose biological actions are to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism and suppress inflammatory gene expression. Thus, agonists of this receptor represent an attractive therapeutic target for AD. There is now an extensive body of evidence that has demonstrated the efficacy of PPARγ agonists in ameliorating disease–related pathology and improved learning and memory in animal models of AD. Recent clinical trials of the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone have shown significant improvement in memory and cognition in AD patients. Thus, PPARγ represents an important new therapeutic target in treating AD. PMID:18625459

  1. Molecular Recognition of Agonist and Antagonist for Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengyuan; Wang, Lushan; Zhao, Xian; Sun, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) is a ligand-activated transcription factor which plays important roles in lipid and glucose metabolism. The aim of this work is to find residues which selectively recognize PPAR-α agonists and antagonists. To achieve this aim, PPAR-α/13M and PPAR-α/471 complexes were subjected to perform molecular dynamics simulations. This research suggests that several key residues only participate in agonist recognition, while some other key residues only contribute to antagonist recognition. It is hoped that such work is useful for medicinal chemists to design novel PPAR-α agonists and antagonists. PMID:24837836

  2. A Lipid Gate for the Peripheral Control of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Andrea G.; Seybold, Virginia; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Cells in injured and inflamed tissues produce a number of proalgesic lipid-derived mediators, which excite nociceptive neurons by activating selective G-protein-coupled receptors or ligand-gated ion channels. Recent work has shown that these proalgesic factors are counteracted by a distinct group of lipid molecules that lower nociceptor excitability and attenuate nociception in peripheral tissues. Analgesic lipid mediators include endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors (endocannabinoids), lipid-amide agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, and products of oxidative metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids via cytochrome P450 and other enzyme pathways. Evidence indicates that these lipid messengers are produced and act at different stages of inflammation and the response to tissue injury, and may be part of a peripheral gating mechanism that regulates the access of nociceptive information to the spinal cord and the brain. Growing knowledge about this peripheral control system may be used to discover safer medicines for pain. PMID:25392487

  3. Novel diazabicycloalkane delta opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Loriga, Giovanni; Lazzari, Paolo; Manca, Ilaria; Ruiu, Stefania; Falzoi, Matteo; Murineddu, Gabriele; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Pinna, Giovanni; Pinna, Gérard Aimè

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the investigation of diazabicycloalkane cores as potential new scaffolds for the development of novel analogues of the previously reported diazatricyclodecane selective delta (δ) opioid agonists, as conformationally constrained homologues of the reference δ agonist (+)-4-[(αR)-α((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80). In particular, we have simplified the diazatricyclodecane motif of δ opioid agonist prototype 1a with bridged bicyclic cores. 3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptane, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane, and 3,10-diazabicyclo[4.3.1]decane were adopted as core motifs of the novel derivatives. The compounds were synthesized and biologically assayed as racemic (3-5) or diastereoisomeric (6,7) mixtures. All the novel compounds 3-7 showed δ agonism behaviour and remarkable affinity to δ receptors. Amongst the novel derivatives, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane based compound 4 evidenced improved δ affinity and selectivity relative to SNC80.

  4. The antagonist activity of lipid IVa on the stimulation by lipid A of TNF-alpha production from canine blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Takasawa, Kenji; Kano, Rui; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2011-09-15

    Lipid A, the active component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), exists in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and binds to the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex. On the other hand, the synthetic precursor of Escherichia coli lipid A, tetraacylated lipid IVa, is an agonist for TLR4 and MD-2 complex in murine, equine and feline cells but is an antagonist for lipid A in human cells. The aim of the study was to examine the function of canine Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex on canine blood mononuclear cells (BMC), by analyzing lipid A- or lipid IVa-induction of TNF-α production from these cells in order to understand canine innate immune system. After 5-h culture of canine BMC with lipid A (lipid A culture) or lipid IVa (lipid IVa culture), the TNF-α, as determined by ELISA, had increased in the supernatants of the lipid A cultures in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the TNF-α was undetectable in supernatant of lipid IVa-treated cultures. The TNF-α was statistically significantly different between the lipid A and lipid IVa cultures (100 and 1000 ng/ml). TNF-α production from canine BMC was inhibited, in a lipid IVa-dose-dependent manner, when the BMC were pre-cultured with lipid IVa for 60 min and then cultured with lipid A for 5h, while in control BMC cultures production if TNF-α was unchanged. These results indicate that the TNF-α production stimulated by lipid A was competed out by pre-exposing the BMC to lipid IVa. Thus, lipid A is an agonist for TNF-α production in canine BMC, whereas lipid IVa appears to be an antagonist against this lipid A stimulation of canine BMC.

  5. Find novel dual-agonist drugs for treating type 2 diabetes by means of cheminformatics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Ma, Ying; Wang, Run-Ling; Xu, Wei-Ren; Wang, Shu-Qing; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the world as well as the increasing reports about the adverse side effects of the existing diabetes treatment drugs have made developing new and effective drugs against the disease a very high priority. In this study, we report ten novel compounds found by targeting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) using virtual screening and core hopping approaches. PPARs have drawn increasing attention for developing novel drugs to treat diabetes due to their unique functions in regulating glucose, lipid, and cholesterol metabolism. The reported compounds are featured with dual functions, and hence belong to the category of dual agonists. Compared with the single PPAR agonists, the dual PPAR agonists, formed by combining the lipid benefit of PPARα agonists (such as fibrates) and the glycemic advantages of the PPARγ agonists (such as thiazolidinediones), are much more powerful in treating diabetes because they can enhance metabolic effects while minimizing the side effects. This was observed in the studies on molecular dynamics simulations, as well as on absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, that these novel dual agonists not only possessed the same function as ragaglitazar (an investigational drug developed by Novo Nordisk for treating type 2 diabetes) did in activating PPARα and PPARγ, but they also had more favorable conformation for binding to the two receptors. Moreover, the residues involved in forming the binding pockets of PPARα and PPARγ among the top ten compounds are explicitly presented, and this will be very useful for the in-depth conduction of mutagenesis experiments. It is anticipated that the ten compounds may become potential drug candidates, or at the very least, the findings reported here may stimulate new strategies or provide useful insights for designing new and more powerful dual-agonist drugs for treating type 2 diabetes. PMID:23630413

  6. Inhibitory effects of bile acids and synthetic farnesoid X receptor agonists on rotavirus replication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunjeong; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2011-12-01

    Rotaviruses (group A rotaviruses) are the most important cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and children worldwide. Currently, an antiviral drug is not available and information on therapeutic targets for antiviral development is limited for rotavirus infection. Previously, it was shown that lipid homeostasis is important in rotavirus replication. Since farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and its natural ligands bile acids (such as chenodeoxycholic acid [CDCA]) play major roles in cholesterol and lipid homeostasis, we examined the effects of bile acids and synthetic FXR agonists on rotavirus replication in association with cellular lipid levels. In a mouse model of rotavirus infection, effects of oral administration of CDCA on fecal rotavirus shedding were investigated. The results demonstrate the following. First, the intracellular contents of triglycerides were significantly increased by rotavirus infection. Second, CDCA, deoxycholic acid (DCA), and other synthetic FXR agonists, such as GW4064, significantly reduced rotavirus replication in cell culture in a dose-dependent manner. The reduction of virus replication correlated positively with activation of the FXR pathway and reduction of cellular triglyceride contents (r(2) = 0.95). Third, oral administration of CDCA significantly reduced fecal virus shedding in mice (P < 0.05). We conclude that bile acids and FXR agonists play important roles in the suppression of rotavirus replication. The inhibition mechanism is proposed to be the downregulation of lipid synthesis induced by rotavirus infection.

  7. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  8. Amyloid-β Pathology and APOE Genotype Modulate Retinoid X Receptor Agonist Activity in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Leon M.; Koster, Kevin P.; Luo, Jia; Lee, Sue H.; Wang, Yue-ting; Collins, Nicole C.; Ben Aissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.; LaDu, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    Previous data demonstrate that bexarotene (Bex), retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist, reduces soluble and insoluble amyloid-β (Aβ) in Alzheimer disease (AD)-transgenic mice either by increasing the levels of mouse apolipoprotein E (apoE) or increasing ABCA1/ABCG1-induced apoE lipoprotein association/lipidation. However, although the mechanism of action of RXR agonists remains unclear, a major concern for their use is human (h)-APOE4, the greatest AD genetic risk factor. If APOE4 imparts a toxic gain-of-function, then increasing apoE4 may increase soluble Aβ, likely the proximal AD neurotoxin. If the APOE4 loss-of-function is lipidation of apoE4, then induction of ABCA1/ABCG1 may be beneficial. In novel EFAD-Tg mice (overexpressing h-Aβ42 with h-APOE), levels of soluble Aβ (Aβ42 and oligomeric Aβ) are highest in E4FAD hippocampus (HP) > E3FAD-HP > E4FAD cortex (CX) > E3FAD-CX, whereas levels of lipoprotein-associated/lipidated apoE have the opposite pattern (6 months). In E4FAD-HP, short-term RXR agonist treatment (Bex or LG100268; 5.75–6 months) increased ABCA1, apoE4 lipoprotein-association/lipidation, and apoE4/Aβ complex, decreased soluble Aβ, and increased PSD95. In addition, hydrogel delivery, which mimics low sustained release, was equally effective as gavage for Bex and LG100268. RXR agonists induced no beneficial effects in the E4FAD-HP in a prevention protocol (5–6 months) and actually increased soluble Aβ levels in E3FAD-CX and E4FAD-CX with the short-term protocol, possibly the result of systemic hepatomegaly. Thus, RXR agonists address the loss-of-function associated with APOE4 and exacerbated by Aβ pathology, i.e. low levels of apoE4 lipoprotein association/lipidation. Further studies are vital to address whether RXR agonists are an APOE4-specific AD therapeutic and the systemic side effects that limit translational application. PMID:25217640

  9. Beta-agonists and animal welfare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of beta-agonists in animal feed is a high profile topic within the U.S. as consumers and activist groups continue to question its safety. The only beta-agonist currently available for use in swine is ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC). This is available as Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health – FDA a...

  10. [Adrenergic beta-agonist intoxication].

    PubMed

    Carrola, Paulo; Devesa, Nuno; Silva, José Manuel; Ramos, Fernando; Alexandrino, Mário B; Moura, José J

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe two clinical cases (father and daughter), observed in the Hospital Urgency with distal tremors, anxiety, palpitations, nausea, headaches and dizziness, two hours after ingestión of cow liver. They also had leucocytosis (with neutrophylia), hypokalemia and hyperglycaemia. After treatment with potassium i.v. and propranolol, the symptoms disappeared. The symptoms recurred at home because the patients didn't take the prescribed medication and persisted for five days, with spontaneous disappearance. The serum of both patients revealed the presence of clenbuterol (65 hg/ml - father and 58 hg/ml - daughter). The animal's liver had a concentration of 1,42 mg/kg. Clenbuterol is a ß-adrenergic agonist with low specificity, with some veterinary indications. However, this substance has been illegally used as a growth's promotor. We intend to alert doctors for this problem, particularly those that work in the Urgency.

  11. β2-agonist therapy in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Page, Clive P; Rogliani, Paola; Matera, M Gabriella

    2013-04-01

    β2-Agonists are effective bronchodilators due primarily to their ability to relax airway smooth muscle (ASM). They exert their effects via their binding to the active site of β2-adrenoceptors on ASM, which triggers a signaling cascade that results in a number of events, all of which contribute to relaxation of ASM. There are some differences between β2-agonists. Traditional inhaled short-acting β2-agonists albuterol, fenoterol, and terbutaline provide rapid as-needed symptom relief and short-term prophylactic protection against bronchoconstriction induced by exercise or other stimuli. The twice-daily β2-agonists formoterol and salmeterol represent important advances. Their effective bronchodilating properties and long-term improvement in lung function offer considerable clinical benefits to patients. More recently, a newer β2-agonist (indacaterol) with a longer pharmacodynamic half-life has been discovered, with the hopes of achieving once-daily dosing. In general, β2-agonists have an acceptable safety profile, although there is still controversy as to whether long-acting β2-agonists may increase the risk of asthma mortality. In any case, they can induce adverse effects, such as increased heart rate, palpitations, transient decrease in PaO2, and tremor. Desensitization of β2-adrenoceptors that occurs during the first few days of regular use of β2-agonist treatment may account for the commonly observed resolution of the majority of these adverse events after the first few doses. Nevertheless, it can also induce tolerance to bronchoprotective effects of β2-agonists and has the potential to reduce bronchodilator sensitivity to them. Some novel once-daily β2-agonists (olodaterol, vilanterol, abediterol) are under development, mainly in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid or a long-acting antimuscarinic agent. PMID:23348973

  12. Lipid nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Mashaghi, Samaneh; Jadidi, Tayebeh; Koenderink, Gijsje; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that covers a vast and diverse array of devices and machines derived from engineering, physics, materials science, chemistry and biology. These devices have found applications in biomedical sciences, such as targeted drug delivery, bio-imaging, sensing and diagnosis of pathologies at early stages. In these applications, nano-devices typically interface with the plasma membrane of cells. On the other hand, naturally occurring nanostructures in biology have been a source of inspiration for new nanotechnological designs and hybrid nanostructures made of biological and non-biological, organic and inorganic building blocks. Lipids, with their amphiphilicity, diversity of head and tail chemistry, and antifouling properties that block nonspecific binding to lipid-coated surfaces, provide a powerful toolbox for nanotechnology. This review discusses the progress in the emerging field of lipid nanotechnology. PMID:23429269

  13. Lipid Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mashaghi, Samaneh; Jadidi, Tayebeh; Koenderink, Gijsje; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that covers a vast and diverse array of devices and machines derived from engineering, physics, materials science, chemistry and biology. These devices have found applications in biomedical sciences, such as targeted drug delivery, bio-imaging, sensing and diagnosis of pathologies at early stages. In these applications, nano-devices typically interface with the plasma membrane of cells. On the other hand, naturally occurring nanostructures in biology have been a source of inspiration for new nanotechnological designs and hybrid nanostructures made of biological and non-biological, organic and inorganic building blocks. Lipids, with their amphiphilicity, diversity of head and tail chemistry, and antifouling properties that block nonspecific binding to lipid-coated surfaces, provide a powerful toolbox for nanotechnology. This review discusses the progress in the emerging field of lipid nanotechnology. PMID:23429269

  14. Antigen-displaying lipid-enveloped PLGA nanoparticles as delivery agents for a Plasmodium vivax malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    Moon, James J; Suh, Heikyung; Polhemus, Mark E; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Yadava, Anjali; Irvine, Darrell J

    2012-01-01

    The parasite Plasmodium vivax is the most frequent cause of malaria outside of sub-Saharan Africa, but efforts to develop viable vaccines against P. vivax so far have been inadequate. We recently developed pathogen-mimicking polymeric vaccine nanoparticles composed of the FDA-approved biodegradable polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) "enveloped" by a lipid membrane. In this study, we sought to determine whether this vaccine delivery platform could be applied to enhance the immune response against P. vivax sporozoites. A candidate malaria antigen, VMP001, was conjugated to the lipid membrane of the particles, and an immunostimulatory molecule, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), was incorporated into the lipid membranes, creating pathogen-mimicking nanoparticle vaccines (VMP001-NPs). Vaccination with VMP001-NPs promoted germinal center formation and elicited durable antigen-specific antibodies with significantly higher titers and more balanced Th1/Th2 responses in vivo, compared with vaccines composed of soluble protein mixed with MPLA. Antibodies raised by NP vaccinations also exhibited enhanced avidity and affinity toward the domains within the circumsporozoite protein implicated in protection and were able to agglutinate live P. vivax sporozoites. These results demonstrate that these VMP001-NPs are promising vaccines candidates that may elicit protective immunity against P. vivax sporozoites.

  15. Agonist self-inhibition at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor a nonspecific action

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Firestone, L.L.; Miller, K.W.

    1987-05-19

    Agonist concentration-response relationships at nicotinic postsynaptic receptors were established by measuring /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from acetylcholine receptor rich native Torpedo membrane vesicles under three different conditions: (1) integrated net ion efflux (in 10 s) from untreated vesicles, (2) integrated net efflux from vesicles in which most acetylcholine sites were irreversibly blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin, and (3) initial rates of efflux (5-100 ms) from vesicles that were partially blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin. Exposure to acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine, phenyltrimethylammonium, or (-)-nicotine over 10/sup 8/-fold concentration ranges results in bell-shaped ion flux response curves due to stimulation of acetylcholine receptor channel opening at low concentrations and inhibition of channel function at 60-2000 times higher concentrations. Concentrations of agonists that inhibit their own maximum /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux by 50% (K/sub B/ values) are 110, 211, 3.0, 39, and 8.9 mM, respectively, for the agonists listed above. For acetylcholine and carbamylcholine, K/sub B/ values determined from both 10-s and 15-ms efflux measurements are the same, indicating that the rate of agonist-induced desensitization increases to maximum at concentrations lower than those causing self-inhibition. For all partial and full agonists studied, Hill coefficients for self-inhibition are close to 1.0. Concentrations of agonists up to 8 times K/sub B/ did not change the order parameter reported by a spin-labeled fatty acid incorporated in Torpedo membranes. The authors conclude that agonist self-inhibition cannot be attributed to a general nonspecific membrane perturbation. Instead, these results are consistent with a saturable site of action either at the lipid-protein interface or on the acetylcholine receptor protein itself.

  16. CAR and PXR agonists stimulate hepatic bile acid and bilirubin detoxification and elimination pathways in mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Halilbasic, Emina; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Zollner, Gernot; Fickert, Peter; Langner, Cord; Zatloukal, Kurt; Denk, Helmut; Trauner, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Induction of hepatic phase I/II detoxification enzymes and alternative excretory pumps may limit hepatocellular accumulation of toxic biliary compounds in cholestasis. Because the nuclear xenobiotic receptors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulate involved enzymes and transporters, we aimed to induce adaptive alternative pathways with different CAR and PXR agonists in vivo. Mice were treated with the CAR agonists phenobarbital and 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichlorpyridyloxy)]benzene, as well as the PXR agonists atorvastatin and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile. Hepatic bile acid and bilirubin-metabolizing/detoxifying enzymes (Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Sult2a1), their regulatory nuclear receptors (CAR, PXR, farnesoid X receptor), and bile acid/organic anion and lipid transporters (Ntcp, Oatp1,2,4, Bsep, Mrp2-4, Mdr2, Abcg5/8, Asbt) in the liver and kidney were analyzed via reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Potential functional relevance was tested in common bile duct ligation (CBDL). CAR agonists induced Mrp2-4 and Oatp2; PXR agonists induced only Mrp3 and Oatp2. Both PXR and CAR agonists profoundly stimulated bile acid-hydroxylating/detoxifying enzymes Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10. In addition, CAR agonists upregulated bile acid-sulfating Sult2a1 and bilirubin-glucuronidating Ugt1a1. These changes were accompanied by reduced serum levels of bilirubin and bile acids in healthy and CBDL mice and by increased levels of polyhydroxylated bile acids in serum and urine of cholestatic mice. Atorvastatin significantly increased Oatp2, Mdr2, and Asbt, while other transporters and enzymes were moderately affected. In conclusion, administration of specific CAR or PXR ligands results in coordinated stimulation of major hepatic bile acid/bilirubin metabolizing and detoxifying enzymes and hepatic key alternative efflux systems, effects that are predicted to counteract cholestasis. PMID:15986414

  17. The evolution of beta2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Sears, M R

    2001-08-01

    Beta-agonists have been widely used in the treatment of asthma for many years Although concerns have been expressed over their safety based largely upon epidemics of increased mortality in asthmatics associated with high doses of isoprenaline in the 1960s and fenoterol in the 1970s and 1980s, the specific beta2-agonists are vital drugs in asthma management. The short-acting beta2-agonists have an important prophylactic role in the prevention of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and are essential in the emergency treatment of severe asthma. However, little if any benefit seems to be derived from regular use of short-acting beta2-agonists and regular or frequent use can increase the severity of the condition. The development of beta2-agonists with long-acting properties, such as salmeterol and formoterol, has provided advantages over short-acting beta-agonists, such as prolonged bronchodilation, reduced day- and night-time symptoms and improved quality of sleep, and has reduced the requirement for short-acting beta2-agonists as relief medication. Both drugs are well tolerated and, when added to inhaled corticosteroids, produce greater mprovement in lung function than increased steroid dose alone. Because of its rapid onset of action, formoterol also has the potential to be used for as-needed bronchodilator therapy in asthma.

  18. [Impact of anti-diabetic therapy based on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on the cardiovascular risk of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Camafort-Babkowski, Miguel

    2013-08-17

    Anti-diabetic drugs have, in addition to their well-known glucose lowering-effect, different effects in the rest of cardiovascular factors that are associated with diabetes mellitus. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been incorporated to the therapeutic arsenal of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonists on different cardiovascular risk factors, mediated by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on the control of hyperglycaemia and the GLP-1 receptor agonists effect on other cardiovascular risk factors (weight control, blood pressure control, lipid profile and all other cardiovascular risk biomarkers). In addition, we present the emerging evidence with regards to the impact that GLP-1 receptor agonists therapy could have in the reduction of cardiovascular events and the currently ongoing studies addressing this issue.

  19. [Impact of anti-diabetic therapy based on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on the cardiovascular risk of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Camafort-Babkowski, Miguel

    2013-08-17

    Anti-diabetic drugs have, in addition to their well-known glucose lowering-effect, different effects in the rest of cardiovascular factors that are associated with diabetes mellitus. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been incorporated to the therapeutic arsenal of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonists on different cardiovascular risk factors, mediated by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on the control of hyperglycaemia and the GLP-1 receptor agonists effect on other cardiovascular risk factors (weight control, blood pressure control, lipid profile and all other cardiovascular risk biomarkers). In addition, we present the emerging evidence with regards to the impact that GLP-1 receptor agonists therapy could have in the reduction of cardiovascular events and the currently ongoing studies addressing this issue. PMID:23332622

  20. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  1. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Lipid Storage Diseases Information Page Condensed from Lipid Storage ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Lipid Storage Diseases? Lipid storage diseases are a group ...

  2. Monoterpenoid agonists of TRPV3

    PubMed Central

    Vogt-Eisele, A K; Weber, K; Sherkheli, M A; Vielhaber, G; Panten, J; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transient receptor potential (TRP) V3 is a thermosensitive ion channel expressed predominantly in the skin and neural tissues. It is activated by warmth and the monoterpene camphor and has been hypothesized to be involved in skin sensitization. A selection of monoterpenoid compounds was tested for TRPV3 activation to establish a structure-function relationship. The related channel TRPM8 is activated by cool temperatures and a number of chemicals, among them the monoterpene (-)-menthol. The overlap of the receptor pharmacology between the two channels was investigated. Experimental approach: Transfected HEK293 cells were superfused with the test substances. Evoked currents were measured in whole cell patch clamp measurements. Dose-response curves for the most potent agonists were obtained in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Key results: Six monoterpenes significantly more potent than camphor were identified: 6-tert-butyl-m-cresol, carvacrol, dihydrocarveol, thymol, carveol and (+)-borneol. Their EC50 is up to 16 times lower than that of camphor. All of these compounds carry a ring-located hydroxyl group and neither activates TRPM8 to a major extent. Conclusions and implications: Terpenoids have long been recognized as medically and pharmacologically active compounds, although their molecular targets have only partially been identified. TRPV3 activation may be responsible for several of the described effects of terpenoids. We show here that TRPV3 is activated by a number of monoterpenes and that a secondary hydroxyl-group is a structural requirement. PMID:17420775

  3. [Safety of beta-agonists in asthma].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa, Teodoro J

    2014-01-01

    Beta 2 agonist bronchodilators (β2A) are very important part in the pharmacotherapy of bronchial asthma, a disease that progresses in the world in an epidemic way. The β2A are prescribed to millions of people around the world, therefore the safety aspects is of public interest. Short-Acting β2 Agonists (SABAs), such as albuterol inhaler, according to current evidence, confirming its safety when used as a quick-relief or rescue medication. The long-acting β2 agonists (LABAs) The long-acting bronchodilators β2A (Long acting β2 Agonists or LABAs) are used associated with inhaled corticosteroids as controller drugs for asthma exacerbationsaccess, for safety reasons LABAs are not recommended for use as monotherapy.

  4. Dopamine receptor partial agonists and addiction.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fabricio A; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2015-04-01

    Many drugs abused by humans acutely facilitate, either directly or indirectly, dopamine neurotransmission in the mesolimbic pathway. As a consequence dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists have been widely investigated as putative pharmacological therapies for addiction. This general strategy, however, has had only limited success due in part to poor treatment adherence and efficacy and the significant adverse effects of dopaminergic medications. In this perspective, we discuss the potential therapeutic use of dopamine receptor partial agonists in addiction, developed initially as antipsychotic agents. Recent research indicates that the dopamine D2 receptor partial agonists, such as aripiprazole, also shows useful ancillary efficacy in several animal models of psychostimulant and opioid addiction. Notably, these findings suggest that unlike full dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists these compounds have low abuse liability and are generally well tolerated. Indeed, partial dopamine agonists attenuate the rewarding properties of opioids without interfering with their analgesic effects. Herein we discuss the utility and potential of dopamine receptor partial agonists as treatments for both stimulant and non-stimulant drug addiction.

  5. [Pathophysiological relevance of peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPAR) to joint diseases - the pro and con of agonists].

    PubMed

    Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Moulin, David; Koufany, Meriem; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Bianchi, Arnaud; Netter, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPAR) are ligand-inducible nuclear transacting factors comprising three subtypes, PPARalpha, PPARbeta/delta and PPARgamma, which play a key role in lipids and glucose homeostasis. All PPAR subtypes have been identified in joint or inflammatory cells and their activation resulted in a transcriptional repression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, TNFalpha), early inflammatory genes (NOS(2), COX-2, mPGES-1) or matrix metalloproteases (MMP-1, MMP-13), at least for the gamma subtype. PPAR full agonists were also shown to stimulate IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) production by cytokine-stimulated articular cells in a subtype-dependent manner. These anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic properties were confirmed in animal models of joint diseases where PPAR agonists reduced synovial inflammation while preventing cartilage destruction or inflammatory bone loss, although many effects required much higher doses than needed to restore insulin sensitivity or to lower circulating lipid levels. However, these promising effects of PPAR full agonists were hampered by their ability to reduce the growth factor-dependent synthesis of extracellular matrix components or to induce chondrocyte apoptosis, by the possible contribution of immunosuppressive properties to their anti-arthritic effects, by the increased adipocyte differentiation secondary to prolonged stimulation of PPARgamma, and by a variable contribution of PPAR subtypes depending on the system. Clinical data are scarce in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients whereas thousands of patients worldwilde, treated with PPAR agonists for type 2 diabetes or dyslipidemia, are paradoxically prone to suffer from osteoarthritis (OA). Whereas high dosage of full agonists may expose RA patients to cardiovascular adverse effects, the proof of concept that PPAR agonists have therapeutical relevance to OA may benefit from an epidemiological follow-up of joint lesions in diabetic or

  6. Identification of a novel selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist, 2-methyl-2-(4-{3-[1-(4-methylbenzyl)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]propyl}phenoxy)propanoic acid (LY518674), that produces marked changes in serum lipids and apolipoprotein A-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jai Pal; Kauffman, Raymond; Bensch, William; Wang, Guoming; McClelland, Pam; Bean, James; Montrose, Chahrzad; Mantlo, Nathan; Wagle, Asavari

    2005-09-01

    Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) is an important risk factor of coronary artery disease (CAD). Optimum therapy for raising HDL-c is still not available. Identification of novel HDL-raising agents would produce a major impact on CAD. In this study, we have identified a potent (IC50 approximately 24 nM) and selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonist, 2-methyl-2-(4-{3-[1-(4-methylbenzyl)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]propyl}phenoxy)propanoic acid (LY518674). In human apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-1) transgenic mice, LY518674 produced a dose-dependent increase in serum HDL-c, resulting in 208 +/- 15% elevation at optimum dose. A new synthesis of apoA-1 contributed to the increase in HDL-c. LY518674 increased apoA-1 mRNA levels in liver. Moreover, liver slices from animals treated with LY518674 secreted 3- to 6-fold more apoA-1 than control liver slices. In cultured hepatocytes, LY518674 produced 50% higher apoA-1 secretion, which was associated with increase in radiolabeled methionine incorporation in apoA-1. Thus, LY518674 is a potent and selective PPARalpha agonist that produced a much greater increase in serum HDL-c than the known fibrate drugs. The increase in HDL-c was associated with de novo synthesis of apoA-1. PMID:15933217

  7. Estrogen receptor agonists alleviate cardiac and renal oxidative injury in rats with renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Özdemir Kumral, Zarife Nigâr; Kolgazi, Meltem; Üstünova, Savaş; Kasımay Çakır, Özgür; Çevik, Özge Dağdeviren; Şener, Göksel; Yeğen, Berrak Ç

    2016-01-01

    Although endogenous estrogen is known to offer cardiac and vascular protection, the involvement of estrogen receptors in mediating the protective effect of estrogen on hypertension-induced cardiovascular and renal injury is not fully explained. We aimed to investigate the effects of estrogen receptor (ER) agonists on oxidative injury, cardiovascular and renal functions of rats with renovascular hypertension (RVH). Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided as control and RVH groups, and RVH groups had either ovariectomy (OVX) or sham-OVX. Sham-OVX-RVH and OVX-RVH groups received either ERβ agonist diarylpropiolnitrile (1 mg/kg/day) or ERα agonist propyl pyrazole triol (1 mg/kg/day) for 6 weeks starting at the third week following the surgery. At the end of the 9(th) week, systolic blood pressures were recorded, cardiac functions were determined, and the contraction/relaxation responses of aortic rings were obtained. Serum creatinine levels, tissue malondialdehyde, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase levels, and myeloperoxidase activity in heart and kidney samples were analyzed, and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity was measured in kidney samples. In both sham-OVX and OVX rats, both agonists reduced blood pressure and reversed the impaired contractile performance of the heart, while ERβ agonist improved renal functions in both the OVX and non-OVX rats. Both agonists reduced neutrophil infiltration, lipid peroxidation, and elevated antioxidant levels in the heart, but a more ERβ-mediated protective effect was observed in the kidney. Our data suggest that activation of ERβ might play a role in preserving the function of the stenotic kidney and delaying the progression of renal injury, while both receptors mediate similar cardioprotective effects. PMID:27399230

  8. Lipid14: The Amber Lipid Force Field.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Callum J; Madej, Benjamin D; Skjevik, Age A; Betz, Robin M; Teigen, Knut; Gould, Ian R; Walker, Ross C

    2014-02-11

    The AMBER lipid force field has been updated to create Lipid14, allowing tensionless simulation of a number of lipid types with the AMBER MD package. The modular nature of this force field allows numerous combinations of head and tail groups to create different lipid types, enabling the easy insertion of new lipid species. The Lennard-Jones and torsion parameters of both the head and tail groups have been revised and updated partial charges calculated. The force field has been validated by simulating bilayers of six different lipid types for a total of 0.5 μs each without applying a surface tension; with favorable comparison to experiment for properties such as area per lipid, volume per lipid, bilayer thickness, NMR order parameters, scattering data, and lipid lateral diffusion. As the derivation of this force field is consistent with the AMBER development philosophy, Lipid14 is compatible with the AMBER protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrate, and small molecule force fields.

  9. Identification of key residues in the A-Raf kinase important for phosphoinositide lipid binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lindsey M; James, Kristy M; Chamberlain, M Dean; Anderson, Deborah H

    2005-03-01

    Raf kinases are involved in regulating cellular signal transduction pathways in response to a wide variety of external stimuli. Upstream signals generate activated Ras-GTP, important for the relocalization of Raf kinases to the membrane. Upon full activation, Raf kinases phosphorylate and activate downstream kinase in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. The Raf family of kinases has three members, Raf-1, B-Raf, and A-Raf. The ability of Raf-1 and B-Raf to bind phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidic acid (PA) has been show to facilitate Raf membrane associations and regulate Raf kinase activity. We have characterized the lipid binding properties of A-Raf, as well as further characterized those of Raf-1. Both A-Raf and Raf-1 were found to bind to 3-, 4-, and 5-monophosphorylated phosphoinositides [PI(3)P, PI(4)P, and PI(5)P] as well as phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PI(3,5)P(2)]. In addition, A-Raf also bound specifically to phosphatidylinositol 4,5- and 3,4-bisphosphates [PI(4,5)P(2) and PI(3,4)P(2)] and to PA. A mutational analysis of A-Raf localized the PI(4,5)P(2) binding site to two basic residues (K50 and R52) within the Ras binding domain. Additionally, an A-Raf mutant lacking the first 199 residues [i.e., the entire conserved region 1 (CR1) domain] bound the same phospholipids as full-length Raf-1. This suggests that a second region of A-Raf between amino acids 200 and 606 was responsible for interactions with the monophosphorylated PIs and PI(3,5)P(2). These results raise the possibility that Raf-1 and A-Raf bind to specific phosphoinositides as a mechanism to localize them to particular membrane microdomains rich in these phospholipids. Moreover, the differences in their lipid binding profiles could contribute to their proposed isoform-specific Raf functions.

  10. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-lipid interactions: Mechanistic insight and biological function.

    PubMed

    Baenziger, John E; Hénault, Camille M; Therien, J P Daniel; Sun, Jiayin

    2015-09-01

    Membrane lipids are potent modulators of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo. Lipids influence nAChR function by both conformational selection and kinetic mechanisms, stabilizing varying proportions of activatable versus non-activatable conformations, as well as influencing the transitions between these conformational states. Of note, some membranes stabilize an electrically silent uncoupled conformation that binds agonist but does not undergo agonist-induced conformational transitions. The uncoupled nAChR, however, does transition to activatable conformations in relatively thick lipid bilayers, such as those found in lipid rafts. In this review, we discuss current understanding of lipid-nAChR interactions in the context of increasingly available high resolution structural and functional data. These data highlight different sites of lipid action, including the lipid-exposed M4 transmembrane α-helix. Current evidence suggests that lipids alter nAChR function by modulating interactions between M4 and the adjacent transmembrane α-helices, M1 and M3. These interactions have also been implicated in both the folding and trafficking of nAChRs to the cell surface. We review current mechanistic understanding of lipid-nAChR interactions, and highlight potential biological roles for lipid-nAChR interactions in modulating the synaptic response. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:25791350

  11. [Cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment: focus on liraglutide].

    PubMed

    Haluzík, Martin; Trachta, Pavel; Mráz, Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk reduction is the major aim of type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment. The effects of various antidiabetics on the cardiovascular complications are currently under careful scrutiny. Incretin-based therapy that utilizes the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) or stimulation of its receptor by GLP-1 receptor agonists represents one of the most promising approaches from the potential cardiovascular risk reduction point of view. Experimental studies have shown that the GLP-1 and GLP-1 agonists treatment improves endothelial function, decrease blood pressure and protects myocardium during experimentally-induced ischemia. Clinical studies with GLP-1 receptor agonists consistently show that, in addition to good antidiabetic efficacy, its long-term administration decreases blood pressure, body weight and improves circulating lipid levels while slightly increasing heart rate. In this paper, we focus on the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide. Preliminary analyses of cardiovascular complications in phase III trials with liraglutide indicate its good cardiovascular safety. A possibility of cardioprotective effects of liraglutide remains still open and is currently studied within a prospective cardiovascular trial LEADER. PMID:26375689

  12. [Cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment: focus on liraglutide].

    PubMed

    Haluzík, Martin; Trachta, Pavel; Mráz, Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk reduction is the major aim of type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment. The effects of various antidiabetics on the cardiovascular complications are currently under careful scrutiny. Incretin-based therapy that utilizes the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) or stimulation of its receptor by GLP-1 receptor agonists represents one of the most promising approaches from the potential cardiovascular risk reduction point of view. Experimental studies have shown that the GLP-1 and GLP-1 agonists treatment improves endothelial function, decrease blood pressure and protects myocardium during experimentally-induced ischemia. Clinical studies with GLP-1 receptor agonists consistently show that, in addition to good antidiabetic efficacy, its long-term administration decreases blood pressure, body weight and improves circulating lipid levels while slightly increasing heart rate. In this paper, we focus on the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide. Preliminary analyses of cardiovascular complications in phase III trials with liraglutide indicate its good cardiovascular safety. A possibility of cardioprotective effects of liraglutide remains still open and is currently studied within a prospective cardiovascular trial LEADER.

  13. Immunological evaluation of colonic delivered Hepatitis B surface antigen loaded TLR-4 agonist modified solid fat nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Kantrol Kumar; Pandey, Ravi Shankar

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B is one of the leading liver diseases and remains a major global health problem. Currently available vaccines provide protection but often results in weaker/minimal mucosal immunity. Thus the present study is devoted to the development and in-vivo exploration of the colonically delivered biomimetic nanoparticles which capably enhance humoral as well as cellular immune response. In present work, Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) entrapped nanoparticles containing Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) (HB+L-NP) were prepared by solvent evaporation method and characterized for particle size (~210nm), shape, zeta potential (-24mV±0.68), entrapment efficiency (58.45±1.68%), in-vitro release and antigen integrity. Dose escalation study was done to confirm prophylactic immune response following defined doses of prepared nanoparticulate formulations with or without MPLA. Intramuscular administered alum based marketed HBsAg (Genevac B) was used as standard (10μg) and were able to induce significant systemic (IgG) but remarkably low mucosal immune (IgA) response. Notably, HB+L-NP (0.5ml-10μg) induced strong systemic and robust mucosal immunity (510 and 470 mIU/ml respectively, p<0.001) from which mucosal was more significant due to the involvement of Common Mucosal Immune System (CMIS). Likewise, significant cellular immune response was elicited by HB+L-NP through T-cell activation (mixed Th1 and Th2) as confirmed by significantly increased cytokines level (IL-2 and Interferon-γ) in spleen homogenates. This study supports that delivery of HBsAg to the colon may open new vista in designing oral vaccines later being one of most accepted route for potential vaccines in future. PMID:27526270

  14. Immunological evaluation of colonic delivered Hepatitis B surface antigen loaded TLR-4 agonist modified solid fat nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Kantrol Kumar; Pandey, Ravi Shankar

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B is one of the leading liver diseases and remains a major global health problem. Currently available vaccines provide protection but often results in weaker/minimal mucosal immunity. Thus the present study is devoted to the development and in-vivo exploration of the colonically delivered biomimetic nanoparticles which capably enhance humoral as well as cellular immune response. In present work, Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) entrapped nanoparticles containing Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) (HB+L-NP) were prepared by solvent evaporation method and characterized for particle size (~210nm), shape, zeta potential (-24mV±0.68), entrapment efficiency (58.45±1.68%), in-vitro release and antigen integrity. Dose escalation study was done to confirm prophylactic immune response following defined doses of prepared nanoparticulate formulations with or without MPLA. Intramuscular administered alum based marketed HBsAg (Genevac B) was used as standard (10μg) and were able to induce significant systemic (IgG) but remarkably low mucosal immune (IgA) response. Notably, HB+L-NP (0.5ml-10μg) induced strong systemic and robust mucosal immunity (510 and 470 mIU/ml respectively, p<0.001) from which mucosal was more significant due to the involvement of Common Mucosal Immune System (CMIS). Likewise, significant cellular immune response was elicited by HB+L-NP through T-cell activation (mixed Th1 and Th2) as confirmed by significantly increased cytokines level (IL-2 and Interferon-γ) in spleen homogenates. This study supports that delivery of HBsAg to the colon may open new vista in designing oral vaccines later being one of most accepted route for potential vaccines in future.

  15. beta2-Agonists at the Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Kenneth D

    2006-01-01

    The different approaches that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) had adopted to beta2-agonists and the implications for athletes are reviewed by a former Olympic team physician who later became a member of the Medical Commission of the IOC (IOC-MC). Steadily increasing knowledge of the effects of inhaled beta2-agonists on health, is concerned with the fact that oral beta2-agonists may be anabolic, and rapid increased use of inhaled beta2-agonists by elite athletes has contributed to the changes to the IOC rules. Since 2001, the necessity for athletes to meet IOC criteria (i.e., that they have asthma and/or exercise-induced asthma [EIA]) has resulted in improved management of athletes. The prevalence of beta2-agonist use by athletes mirrors the known prevalence of asthma symptoms in each country, although athletes in endurance events have the highest prevalence. The age-of-onset of asthma/EIA in elite winter athletes may be atypical. Of the 193 athletes at the 2006 Winter Olympics who met th IOC's criteria, only 32.1% had childhood asthma and 48.7% of athletes reported onset at age 20 yr or older. These findings lead to speculation that years of intense endurance training may be a causative factor in bronchial hyperreactivity. The distinction between oral (prohibited in sports) and inhaled salbutamol is possible, but athletes must be warned that excessive use of inhaled salbutamol can lead to urinary concentrations similar to those observed after oral administration. This article provides justification that athletes should provide evidence of asthma or EIA before being permitted to use inhaled beta2-agonists. PMID:17085798

  16. A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist and other constituents from Chromolaena odorata.

    PubMed

    Dat, Nguyen Tien; Lee, Kyeong; Hong, Young-Soo; Kim, Young Ho; Minh, Chau Van; Lee, Jung Joon

    2009-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are key regulators of lipid and glucose metabolism and have become important therapeutic targets for various diseases. The phytochemical investigation of the chloroform-soluble extract of Chromolaena odorata led to the isolation of a PPAR-gamma agonist, (9 S,13 R)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (1), together with 12 other compounds. The structures of chromomoric acid G (2), a new dehydrogenated derivative of 1, and chromolanone (3) were elucidated based on spectroscopic methods. Compound 1 showed a significant effect on PPAR-gamma activation in comparison with rosiglitazone. However, compound 2 was inactive, suggesting that the dehydrogenation of the prostaglandin-like structure in 1 abrogates its PPAR-gamma agonistic activity.

  17. Synthesis, activity, and docking study of phenylthiazole acids as potential agonists of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Taijin; Shi, Min; Ye, Haoyu

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-mediated transcription factor playing key roles in glucose and lipid homeostasis, and PPARγ ligands possess therapeutic potential in these as well as other areas. In this study, a series of phenylthiazole acids have been synthesized and evaluated for agonistic activity by a convenient fluorescence polarization-based PPARγ ligand screening assay. Compound 4t, as a potential PPARγ agonist with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) 0.75±0.20 μM, exhibited in vitro potency comparable with a 0.83±0.14 μM of the positive control rosiglitazone. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicated that phenylthiazole acid 4t interacted with the amino acid residues of the active site of the PPARγ complex in a stable manner, consistent with the result of the in vitro ligand assay. PMID:27313447

  18. Three-dimensional common-feature hypotheses for octopamine agonist arylethanolamines.

    PubMed

    Hirashim, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Eiji; Eto, Morifusa

    2002-10-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 12 octopamine (OA) agonist arylethanolamines (AEAs). Among the 10 common-featured models generated by program catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond donor (HBD) and a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid (HBA1) features was considered to be important in evaluating the OA activity. OA mapped well onto all the HBD and HBA1 features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, for some inactive compounds, their lack of affinity is primarily due to their inability to achieve an energetically favorable conformation shared by the active compounds. Taken together, structures of a 4-OH-Ph, alpha-OH, and a primary amine are important for OA activities. The present studies on OA agonists demonstrate that an HBD and an HBA1 sites located on the molecule seem to be essential for OA activity. PMID:12398339

  19. Three-dimensional common-feature hypotheses for octopamine agonist arylethanolamines.

    PubMed

    Hirashim, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Eiji; Eto, Morifusa

    2002-10-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 12 octopamine (OA) agonist arylethanolamines (AEAs). Among the 10 common-featured models generated by program catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond donor (HBD) and a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid (HBA1) features was considered to be important in evaluating the OA activity. OA mapped well onto all the HBD and HBA1 features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, for some inactive compounds, their lack of affinity is primarily due to their inability to achieve an energetically favorable conformation shared by the active compounds. Taken together, structures of a 4-OH-Ph, alpha-OH, and a primary amine are important for OA activities. The present studies on OA agonists demonstrate that an HBD and an HBA1 sites located on the molecule seem to be essential for OA activity.

  20. Development of novel silicon-containing inverse agonists of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hirozumi; Nakamura, Masaharu; Nakamura, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Yotaro; Nakagomi, Madoka; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2014-03-15

    Retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-related orphan receptors (RORs) regulate a variety of physiological processes, including hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm and immune function. The RAR agonist: all-trans retinoic acid was reported to be an RORβ inverse agonist, but no information is available regarding ROR activity of its synthetic analogue Am580. Therefore, we screened Am580 and some related tetramethyltetrahydronaphthalene derivatives and carried out structural development studies, including substitution of carbon atoms with silicon, with the aim of creating a potent ROR transcriptional inhibitor. The phenyl amide disila compound 22 showed the most potent ROR-inhibitory activity among the compounds examined. Its activity towards RORα, RORβ and RORγ was increased compared to that of Am580. The IC₅₀ values for RORα, RORβ and RORγ are 1.3, >10 and 4.5 μM, respectively.

  1. Recent advances in the development of farnesoid X receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Elizabeth J.; Lindor, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are nuclear hormone receptors expressed in high amounts in body tissues that participate in bilirubin metabolism including the liver, intestines, and kidneys. Bile acids (BAs) are the natural ligands of the FXRs. FXRs regulate the expression of the gene encoding for cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase, which is the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis. In addition, FXRs play a critical role in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and regulation of insulin sensitivity. FXRs also modulate live growth and regeneration during liver injury. Preclinical studies have shown that FXR activation protects against cholestasis-induced liver injury. Moreover, FXR activation protects against fatty liver injury in animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and improved hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin sensitivity. Obeticholic acid (OCA), a 6α-ethyl derivative of the natural human BA chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) is the first-in-class selective FXR agonist that is ~100-fold more potent than CDCA. Preliminary human clinical trials have shown that OCA is safe and effective. In a phase II clinical trial, administration of OCA was well-tolerated, increased insulin sensitivity and reduced markers of liver inflammation and fibrosis in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and NAFLD. In two clinical trials of OCA in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a progressive cholestatic liver disease, OCA significantly reduced serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, an important disease marker that correlates well with clinical outcomes of patients with PBC. Together, these studies suggest that FXR agonists could potentially be used as therapeutic tools in patients suffering from nonalcoholic fatty and cholestatic liver diseases. Larger and Longer-term studies are currently ongoing. PMID:25705637

  2. Cannabinomimetic lipid from a marine cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Pereira, Alban R; Debonsi, Hosana M; Ligresti, Alessia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Gerwick, William H

    2011-10-28

    NMR-guided fractionation of two independent collections of the marine cyanobacteria Lyngbya majuscula obtained from Papua New Guinea and Oscillatoria sp. collected in Panama led to the isolation of the new lipids serinolamide A (3) and propenediester (4). Their structures were determined by NMR and MS data analysis. Serinolamide A (3) exhibited a moderate agonist effect and selectivity for the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (Ki=1.3 μM, >5-fold) and represents the newest addition to the known cannabinomimetic natural products of marine origin.

  3. PPAR agonists reduce steatosis in oleic acid-overloaded HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Anthérieu, Sébastien; Vluggens, Aurore; Umbdenstock, Thierry; Claude, Nancy; Moureyre-Spire, Catherine de la; Weaver, Richard J.; Guillouzo, André

    2014-04-01

    Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common form of chronic liver disease there is no pharmacological agent approved for its treatment. Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are closely associated with hepatic lipid metabolism, they seem to play important roles in NAFLD. However, the effects of PPAR agonists on steatosis that is a common pathology associated with NAFLD, remain largely controversial. In this study, the effects of various PPAR agonists, i.e. fenofibrate, bezafibrate, troglitazone, rosiglitazone, muraglitazar and tesaglitazar on oleic acid-induced steatotic HepaRG cells were investigated after a single 24-hour or 2-week repeat treatment. Lipid vesicles stained by Oil-Red O and triglycerides accumulation caused by oleic acid overload, were decreased, by up to 50%, while fatty acid oxidation was induced after 2-week co-treatment with PPAR agonists. The greatest effects on reduction of steatosis were obtained with the dual PPARα/γ agonist muraglitazar. Such improvement of steatosis was associated with up-regulation of genes related to fatty acid oxidation activity and down-regulation of many genes involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, modulation of expression of some nuclear receptor genes, such as FXR, LXRα and CAR, which are potent actors in the control of lipogenesis, was observed and might explain repression of de novo lipogenesis. Conclusion: Altogether, our in vitro data on steatotic HepaRG cells treated with PPAR agonists correlated well with clinical investigations, bringing a proof of concept that drug-induced reversal of steatosis in human can be evaluated in in vitro before conducting long-term and costly in vivo studies in animals and patients. - Highlights: • There is no pharmacological agent approved for the treatment of NAFLD. • This study demonstrates that PPAR agonists can reduce fatty acid-induced steatosis. • Some nuclear receptors appear to be potent actors in the control

  4. Lipid Agonism, The PIP2 Paradigm of Ligand-Gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    The past decade, membrane signaling lipids emerged as major regulators of ion channel function. However, the molecular nature of lipid binding to ion channels remained poorly described due to a lack of structural information and assays to quantify and measure lipid binding in a membrane. How does a lipid-ligand bind to a membrane protein in the plasma membrane and what does it mean for a lipid to activate or regulate an ion channel? How does lipid-binding compare to activation by soluble neurotransmitter? And how does the cell control lipid agonism? This review focuses on lipids and their interactions with membrane proteins, in particular ion channels. I discuss the intersection of membrane lipid biology and ion channel biophysics. A picture emerges of membrane lipids as bona fide agonists of ligand-gated ion channels. These freely diffusing signals reside in the plasma membrane, bind to the transmembrane domain of protein, and cause a conformational change that allosterically gates an ion channel. The system employs a catalog of diverse signaling lipids ultimately controlled by lipid enzymes and raft localization. I draw upon pharmacology, recent protein structure, and electrophysiological data to understand lipid regulation and define inward rectifying potassium channels (Kir) as a new class of PIP2 lipid-gated ion channels. PMID:25633344

  5. Identification of Selective ERRγ Inverse Agonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jina; Im, Chun Young; Yoo, Eun Kyung; Ma, Min Jung; Kim, Sang-Bum; Hong, Eunmi; Chin, Jungwook; Hwang, Hayoung; Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Nam Doo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Lee, In-Kyu; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin

    2016-01-12

    GSK5182 (4) is currently one of the lead compounds for the development of estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) inverse agonists. Here, we report the design, synthesis, pharmacological and in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity (ADMET) properties of a series of compounds related to 4. Starting from 4, a series of analogs were structurally modified and their ERRγ inverse agonist activity was measured. A key pharmacophore feature of this novel class of ligands is the introduction of a heterocyclic group for A-ring substitution in the core scaffold. Among the tested compounds, several of them are potent ERRγ inverse agonists as determined by binding and functional assays. The most promising compound, 15g, had excellent binding selectivity over related subtypes (IC50 = 0.44, >10, >10, and 10 μM at the ERRγ, ERRα, ERRβ, and ERα subtypes, respectively). Compound 15g also resulted in 95% transcriptional repression at a concentration of 10 μM, while still maintaining an acceptable in vitro ADMET profile. This novel class of ERRγ inverse agonists shows promise in the development of drugs targeting ERRγ-related diseases.

  6. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  7. Antineoplastic Effects of PPARγ Agonists, with a Special Focus on Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated nuclear hormone receptor that functions as transcription factor and plays an important role in lipid metabolism and insulin sensitization. Recent studies have shown that PPARγ is overexpressed in many tumor types, including cancers of breast, lung, pancreas, colon, glioblastoma, prostate and thyroid differentiated/anaplastic cancers. These data suggest a role of PPARγ in tumor development and/or progression. PPARγ is emerging as a growth-limiting and differentiation-promoting factor, and it exerts a tumor suppressor role. Moreover, naturally-occurring and synthetic PPARγ agonists promote growth inhibition and apoptosis. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic agonists of PPARγ that were developed to treat type II diabetes. These compounds also display anticancer effects which appear mainly to be independent of their PPARγ agonist activity. Various preclinical and clinical studies strongly suggest a role for TZDs both alone and in combination with existing chemotherapeutic agents, for the treatment of cancer. Differentiation therapy involves the use of agents with the ability to induce differentiation in cells that have lost this ability, i.e. cancer cells, targeting pathways capable of re-activating blocked terminal differentiation programs. PPARγ agonists have been shown to induce differentiation in solid tumors such as thyroid differentiated/ anaplastic cancers and sarcomas. However, emerging data suggest that chronic use of TZDs is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The exploration of newer PPARγ agonists can help in unveiling the underlying mechanisms of these drugs, providing new molecules that are able to treat cancer, without increasing the cardiovascular risk of neoplastic patients.

  8. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064

    SciTech Connect

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Navas, III, Frank; Parks, Derek J.; Spearing, Paul K.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  9. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064.

    PubMed

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Navas, Frank; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Bruce Wisely, G

    2009-08-15

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  10. Water exposure assessment of aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists in Three Gorges Reservoir, China using SPMD-based virtual organisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Bernhöft, Silke; Pfister, Gerd; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-10-15

    SPMD-based virtual organisms (VOs) were deployed at five to eight sites in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China for five periods in 2008, 2009 and 2011. The water exposure of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists was assessed by the VOs. The chosen bioassay response for the extracts of the VOs, the induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) was assayed using a rat hepatoma cell line (H4IIE). The results show that the extracts from the VOs could induce AhR activity significantly, whereas the chemically derived 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) equivalent (TEQcal) accounted for <11% of the observed AhR responses (TEQbio). Unidentified AhR-active compounds represented a greater proportion of the TCDD equivalent in VOs from TGR. High TEQbio value in diluted extract and low TEQbio in concentrated extract of the same sample was observed suggesting potential non-additive effects in the mixture. The levels of AhR agonists in VOs from upstream TGR were in general higher than those from downstream reservoir, indicating urbanization effect on AhR agonist pollution. The temporal variation showed that levels of AhR agonists in 2009 and 2011 were higher than those in 2008, and the potential non-additive effects in the area close to the dam were also obviously higher in 2009 and 2011 than in 2008, indicating big changes in the composition of pollutants in the area after water level reached a maximum of 175 m. Although the aqueous concentration of AhR agonists of 0.8-4.8 pg TCDDL(-1) in TGR was not alarming, the tendency of accumulating high concentration of AhR agonists in VO lipid and existence of possible synergism or antagonism in the water may exhibit a potential hazard to local biota being exposed to AhR agonists.

  11. Water exposure assessment of aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists in Three Gorges Reservoir, China using SPMD-based virtual organisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Bernhöft, Silke; Pfister, Gerd; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-10-15

    SPMD-based virtual organisms (VOs) were deployed at five to eight sites in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China for five periods in 2008, 2009 and 2011. The water exposure of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists was assessed by the VOs. The chosen bioassay response for the extracts of the VOs, the induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) was assayed using a rat hepatoma cell line (H4IIE). The results show that the extracts from the VOs could induce AhR activity significantly, whereas the chemically derived 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) equivalent (TEQcal) accounted for <11% of the observed AhR responses (TEQbio). Unidentified AhR-active compounds represented a greater proportion of the TCDD equivalent in VOs from TGR. High TEQbio value in diluted extract and low TEQbio in concentrated extract of the same sample was observed suggesting potential non-additive effects in the mixture. The levels of AhR agonists in VOs from upstream TGR were in general higher than those from downstream reservoir, indicating urbanization effect on AhR agonist pollution. The temporal variation showed that levels of AhR agonists in 2009 and 2011 were higher than those in 2008, and the potential non-additive effects in the area close to the dam were also obviously higher in 2009 and 2011 than in 2008, indicating big changes in the composition of pollutants in the area after water level reached a maximum of 175 m. Although the aqueous concentration of AhR agonists of 0.8-4.8 pg TCDDL(-1) in TGR was not alarming, the tendency of accumulating high concentration of AhR agonists in VO lipid and existence of possible synergism or antagonism in the water may exhibit a potential hazard to local biota being exposed to AhR agonists. PMID:25058931

  12. Metabolic mapping of A3 adenosine receptor agonist MRS5980.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Tosh, Dilip K; Tanaka, Naoki; Wang, Haina; Krausz, Kristopher W; O'Connor, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-09-15

    (1S,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(2-((5-Chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethynyl)-6-(methylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-1-carboxamide (MRS5980) is an A3AR selective agonist containing multiple receptor affinity- and selectivity-enhancing modifications and a therapeutic candidate drug for many inflammatory diseases. Metabolism-related poor pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicities are a major reason for drug R&D failure. Metabolomics with UPLC-MS was employed to profile the metabolism of MRS5980 and MRS5980-induced disruption of endogenous compounds. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes screening experiment were used to determine the enzymes involved in MRS5980 metabolism. Analysis of lipid metabolism-related genes was performed to investigate the reason for MRS5980-induced lipid metabolic disorders. Unsupervised principal components analysis separated the control and MRS5980 treatment groups in feces, urine, and liver samples, but not in bile and serum. The major ions mainly contributing to the separation of feces and urine were oxidized MRS5980, glutathione (GSH) conjugates and cysteine conjugate (degradation product of the GSH conjugates) of MRS5980. The major ions contributing to the group separation of liver samples were phosphatidylcholines. In vitro incubation experiments showed the involvement of CYP3A enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of MRS5980 and direct GSH reactivity of MRS5980. The electrophilic attack by MRS5980 is a minor pathway and did not alter GSH levels in liver or liver histology, and thus may be of minor clinical consequence. Gene expression analysis further showed decreased expression of PC biosynthetic genes choline kinase a and b, which further accelerated conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholines through increasing the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3. These data will be useful to guide rational design of drugs targeting A3AR, considering efficacy, metabolic elimination, and

  13. Metabolic mapping of A3 adenosine receptor agonist MRS5980

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Tosh, Dilip K.; Tanaka, Naoki; Wang, Haina; Krausz, Kristopher W.; O'Connor, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    (1S,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(2-((5-Chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethynyl)-6-(methylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-1-carboxamide (MRS5980) is an A3AR selective agonist containing multiple receptor affinity- and selectivity-enhancing modifications and a therapeutic candidate drug for many inflammatory diseases. Metabolism-related poor pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicities are a major reason of drug R&D failure. Metabolomics with UPLC-MS was employed to profile the metabolism of MRS5980 and MRS5980-induced disruption of endogenous compounds. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes screening experiment were used to determine the enzymes involved in MRS5980 metabolism. Analysis of lipid metabolism-related genes was performed to investigate the reason for MRS5980-induced lipid metabolic disorders. Unsupervised principal components analysis separated the control and MRS5980 treatment group in feces, urine, and liver samples, but not in bile and serum. The major ions mainly contributing to the separation for feces and urine were oxidized MRS5980, glutathione (GSH) conjugates and cysteine conjugate (degradation product of the GSH conjugates) of MRS5980. The major ions contributing to the group separation of liver samples were phosphatidylcholines. In vitro incubation experiments showed the major involvement of CYP3A enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of MRS5980 and direct GSH reactivity of MRS5980. The electrophilic attack by MRS5980 is a minor pathway and did not alter GSH levels in liver or liver histology, and thus may be of minor clinical consequence. Gene expression analysis further showed decreased expression of PC biosynthetic genes choline kinase a and b, which further accelerated conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholines through increasing the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3. These data will be useful to guide rational design of drugs targeting A3AR, considering efficacy, metabolic elimination, and

  14. Lipid14: The Amber Lipid Force Field.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Callum J; Madej, Benjamin D; Skjevik, Age A; Betz, Robin M; Teigen, Knut; Gould, Ian R; Walker, Ross C

    2014-02-11

    The AMBER lipid force field has been updated to create Lipid14, allowing tensionless simulation of a number of lipid types with the AMBER MD package. The modular nature of this force field allows numerous combinations of head and tail groups to create different lipid types, enabling the easy insertion of new lipid species. The Lennard-Jones and torsion parameters of both the head and tail groups have been revised and updated partial charges calculated. The force field has been validated by simulating bilayers of six different lipid types for a total of 0.5 μs each without applying a surface tension; with favorable comparison to experiment for properties such as area per lipid, volume per lipid, bilayer thickness, NMR order parameters, scattering data, and lipid lateral diffusion. As the derivation of this force field is consistent with the AMBER development philosophy, Lipid14 is compatible with the AMBER protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrate, and small molecule force fields. PMID:24803855

  15. beta3-adrenoceptor agonist prevents alterations of muscle diacylglycerol and adipose tissue phospholipids induced by a cafeteria diet.

    PubMed

    Darimont, Christian; Turini, Marco; Epitaux, Micheline; Zbinden, Irène; Richelle, Myriam; Montell, Eulàlia; Ferrer-Martinez, Andreu; Macé, Katherine

    2004-08-17

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet has been associated with alterations in lipid content and composition in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Administration of beta3-adrenoceptor (beta3-AR) agonists was recently reported to prevent insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet, such as the cafeteria diet. The objective of the present study was to determine whether a selective beta3-AR agonist (ZD7114) could prevent alterations of the lipid profile of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue lipids induced by a cafeteria diet. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a cafeteria diet were treated orally with either the beta3-AR agonist ZD7114 (1 mg/kg per day) or the vehicle for 60 days. Rats fed a chow diet were used as a reference group. In addition to the determination of body weight and insulin plasma level, lipid content and fatty acid composition in gastronemius and in epididymal adipose tissue were measured by gas-liquid chromatography, at the end of the study. RESULTS: In addition to higher body weights and plasma insulin concentrations, rats fed a cafeteria diet had greater triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation in skeletal muscle, contrary to animals fed a chow diet. As expected, ZD7114 treatment prevented the excessive weight gain and hyperinsulinemia induced by the cafeteria diet. Furthermore, in ZD7114 treated rats, intramyocellular DAG levels were lower and the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly arachidonic acid, in adipose tissue phospholipids was higher than in animals fed a cafeteria diet. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that activation of the beta3-AR was able to prevent lipid alterations in muscle and adipose tissue associated with insulin resistance induced by the cafeteria diet. These changes in intramyocellular DAG levels and adipose tissue PL composition may contribute to the improved insulin sensitivity associated with beta3-AR activation. PMID:15507149

  16. β3-adrenoceptor agonist prevents alterations of muscle diacylglycerol and adipose tissue phospholipids induced by a cafeteria diet

    PubMed Central

    Darimont, Christian; Turini, Marco; Epitaux, Micheline; Zbinden, Irène; Richelle, Myriam; Montell, Eulàlia; Ferrer-Martinez, Andreu; Macé, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet has been associated with alterations in lipid content and composition in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Administration of β3-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) agonists was recently reported to prevent insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet, such as the cafeteria diet. The objective of the present study was to determine whether a selective β3-AR agonist (ZD7114) could prevent alterations of the lipid profile of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue lipids induced by a cafeteria diet. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a cafeteria diet were treated orally with either the β3-AR agonist ZD7114 (1 mg/kg per day) or the vehicle for 60 days. Rats fed a chow diet were used as a reference group. In addition to the determination of body weight and insulin plasma level, lipid content and fatty acid composition in gastronemius and in epididymal adipose tissue were measured by gas-liquid chromatography, at the end of the study. Results In addition to higher body weights and plasma insulin concentrations, rats fed a cafeteria diet had greater triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation in skeletal muscle, contrary to animals fed a chow diet. As expected, ZD7114 treatment prevented the excessive weight gain and hyperinsulinemia induced by the cafeteria diet. Furthermore, in ZD7114 treated rats, intramyocellular DAG levels were lower and the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly arachidonic acid, in adipose tissue phospholipids was higher than in animals fed a cafeteria diet. Conclusions These results show that activation of the β3-AR was able to prevent lipid alterations in muscle and adipose tissue associated with insulin resistance induced by the cafeteria diet. These changes in intramyocellular DAG levels and adipose tissue PL composition may contribute to the improved insulin sensitivity associated with β3-AR activation. PMID:15507149

  17. Recent advances in the discovery of alpha1-adrenoceptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The alpha(1) adrenoceptors are three of nine well-characterized receptors that are activated by epinephrine and norepinephrine. Agonists acting at the alpha(1) adrenoceptors produce numerous physiological effects, and are used therapeutically for several indications. Many known alpha(1) adrenoceptor agonists are alpha(1A) selective, but the discovery of highly selective alpha(1B) and alpha(1D) adrenoceptor agonists has proven to be an extremely difficult goal to achieve. This review will focus on recent advances in the discovery, development and clinical utility of subtype-specific alpha(1) agonists as well as contributions to our understanding of agonist-receptor interactions.

  18. Increased agonist affinity at the mu-opioid receptor induced by prolonged agonist exposure

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Clark, Mary J.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.; Traynor, John R.; Williams, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to high-efficacy agonists results in desensitization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Desensitized receptors are thought to be unable to couple to G-proteins, preventing downstream signaling, however the changes to the receptor itself are not well characterized. In the current study, confocal imaging was used to determine whether desensitizing conditions cause a change in agonist-receptor interactions. Using rapid solution exchange, the binding kinetics of fluorescently labeled opioid agonist, dermorphin Alexa594 (derm A594), to MORs was measured in live cells. The affinity of derm A594 binding increased following prolonged treatment of cells with multiple agonists that are known to cause receptor desensitization. In contrast, binding of a fluorescent antagonist, naltrexamine Alexa 594, was unaffected by similar agonist pre-treatment. The increased affinity of derm A594 for the receptor was long-lived and partially reversed after a 45 min wash. Treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin did not alter the increase in affinity of the derm A594 for MOR. Likewise the affinity of derm A594 for MORs expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from arrestin 1 and 2 knockout animals increased following treatment of the cells with the desensitization protocol. Thus, opioid receptors were “imprinted” with a memory of prior agonist exposure that was independent of G-protein activation or arrestin binding that altered subsequent agonist-receptor interactions. The increased affinity suggests that acute desensitization results in a long lasting but reversible conformational change in the receptor. PMID:23447620

  19. Agonistic and reproductive interactions in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, P M

    1984-12-01

    Reproductive and agonistic behaviors in Siamese fighting fish were investigated in eight experiments, and some consequences and determinants of these sequences were isolated. First, fights and the formation of dominance-subordinancy relations were studied. Second, it was determined that large body size as well as males' prior residency in a tank produced an agonistic advantage; the magnitude of this advantage was positively related to the duration of residency. Third, the prior-residency effect in Bettas was determined by males' familiarity with visual and/or tactile cues in their home tanks. Fourth, dominant males had greater access to living space and were more likely to display at a mirror, build nests, and approach females than were subordinates. Finally, it was discovered that chemical cues associated with presumedly inert plastic tank dividers influence Bettas' social behavior.

  20. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits. PMID:26832440

  1. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits.

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists as insulin sensitizers: from the discovery to recent progress.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nobuo; Momose, Yu

    2008-01-01

    An epidemic of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and obesity is undermining the health of people living in industrialized societies. There is an urgent need to develop innovative therapeutics. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is one of the ligand-activated transcription factors in the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and a pivotal regulator of glucose and lipid homeostasis. The discovery of PPARgamma as a target of multimodal insulin sensitizers, represented by thiazolidinediones (TZDs), has attracted remarkable scientific interest and had a great impact on the pharmaceutical industry. With the clinical success of the PPARgamma agonists, pioglitazone (Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia), development of novel and potent insulin-sensitizing agents with diverse clinical profiles has been accelerated. Currently, a number of PPARgamma agonists from different chemical classes and with varying pharmacological profiles are being developed. Despite quite a few obstacles to the development of PPAR-related drugs, PPARgamma-targeted agents still hold promise. There are new concepts and encouraging evidence emerging that suggest this class can yield improved anti-diabetic agents. This review covers the discovery of TZDs, provides an overview of PPARgamma including the significance of PPARgamma as a drug target, describes the current status of a wide variety of novel PPARgamma ligands including PPAR dual and pan agonists and selective PPARgamma modulators (SPPARgammaMs), and highlights new approaches for identifying agents targeting PPARgamma in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19075761

  3. Identification of Darmstoff analogs as selective agonists and antagonists of lysophosphatidic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Gududuru, Veeresa; Zeng, Kui; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Makarova, Natalia; Fujiwara, Yuko; Pigg, Kathryn R; Baker, Daniel L; Tigyi, Gabor; Miller, Duane D

    2006-01-15

    Darmstoff describes a family of gut smooth muscle-stimulating acetal phosphatidic acids initially isolated and characterized from the bath fluid of stimulated gut over 50 years ago. Despite similar structural and biological profiles, Darmstoff analogs have not previously been examined as potential LPA mimetics. Here, we report a facile method for the synthesis of potassium salts of Darmstoff analogs. To understand the effect of stereochemistry on lysophosphatidic acid mimetic activity, synthesis of optically pure stereoisomers of selected Darmstoff analogs was achieved starting with chiral methyl glycerates. Each Darmstoff analog was evaluated for subtype-specific LPA receptor agonist/antagonist activity, PPARgamma activation, and autotaxin inhibition. From this study we identified compound 12 as a pan-antagonist and several pan-agonists for the LPA(1-3) receptors. Introduction of an aromatic ring in the lipid chain such as analog 22 produced a subtype-specific LPA(3) agonist with an EC(50) of 692 nM. Interestingly, regardless of their LPA(1/2/3) ligand properties all of the Darmstoff analogs tested activated PPARgamma. However, these compounds are weak inhibitors of autotaxin. The results indicate that Darmstoff analogs constitute a novel class of lysophosphatidic acid mimetics. PMID:16290140

  4. Suppression of interleukin-6-induced C-reactive protein expression by FXR agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Songwen Liu Qiangyuan; Wang Juan; Harnish, Douglas C.

    2009-02-06

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a human acute-phase protein, is a risk factor for future cardiovascular events and exerts direct pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic properties. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, plays an essential role in the regulation of enterohepatic circulation and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we report that two synthetic FXR agonists, WAY-362450 and GW4064, suppressed interleukin-6-induced CRP expression in human Hep3B hepatoma cells. Knockdown of FXR by short interfering RNA attenuated the inhibitory effect of the FXR agonists and also increased the ability of interleukin-6 to induce CRP production. Furthermore, treatment of wild type C57BL/6 mice with the FXR agonist, WAY-362450, attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced serum amyloid P component and serum amyloid A3 mRNA levels in the liver, whereas no effect was observed in FXR knockout mice. These data provide new evidence for direct anti-inflammatory properties of FXR.

  5. Identification of Darmstoff analogs as selective agonists and antagonists of lysophosphatidic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Gududuru, Veeresa; Zeng, Kui; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Makarova, Natalia; Fujiwara, Yuko; Pigg, Kathryn R; Baker, Daniel L; Tigyi, Gabor; Miller, Duane D

    2006-01-15

    Darmstoff describes a family of gut smooth muscle-stimulating acetal phosphatidic acids initially isolated and characterized from the bath fluid of stimulated gut over 50 years ago. Despite similar structural and biological profiles, Darmstoff analogs have not previously been examined as potential LPA mimetics. Here, we report a facile method for the synthesis of potassium salts of Darmstoff analogs. To understand the effect of stereochemistry on lysophosphatidic acid mimetic activity, synthesis of optically pure stereoisomers of selected Darmstoff analogs was achieved starting with chiral methyl glycerates. Each Darmstoff analog was evaluated for subtype-specific LPA receptor agonist/antagonist activity, PPARgamma activation, and autotaxin inhibition. From this study we identified compound 12 as a pan-antagonist and several pan-agonists for the LPA(1-3) receptors. Introduction of an aromatic ring in the lipid chain such as analog 22 produced a subtype-specific LPA(3) agonist with an EC(50) of 692 nM. Interestingly, regardless of their LPA(1/2/3) ligand properties all of the Darmstoff analogs tested activated PPARgamma. However, these compounds are weak inhibitors of autotaxin. The results indicate that Darmstoff analogs constitute a novel class of lysophosphatidic acid mimetics.

  6. Picrasidine N Is a Subtype-Selective PPARβ/δ Agonist.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuai; Kanno, Yuichiro; Li, Wei; Wakatabi, Honami; Sasaki, Tatsunori; Koike, Kazuo; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Li, Huicheng

    2016-04-22

    Recently, growing evidence of the pivotal roles of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ in various physiological functions, including lipid homeostasis, cancer, and inflammation, has raised interest in this receptor. In this study, the naturally occurring dimeric alkaloid picrasidine N (1) from Picrasma quassioides was identified as a novel PPARβ/δ agonist from a library consisting of plant extracts and natural compounds using a mammalian one-hybrid assay, and this compound was characterized. Compound 1 activated PPARβ/δ but did not activate or slightly activated PPARα and PPARγ. Furthermore, a peroxisome proliferator response element-driven luciferase reporter gene assay demonstrated that 1 enhanced PPARβ/δ transcriptional activity. Moreover, 1 selectively induced mRNA expression of ANGPTL4, which is a PPAR target gene. This observation is quite different from previously identified synthetic PPARβ/δ agonists, which can induce the expression of not only ANGPTL4 but also other PPAR target genes, such as ADRP, PDK4, and CPT-1. These results demonstrate that 1 is a potent subtype-selective and gene-selective PPARβ/δ agonist, suggesting its potential as a lead compound for further drug development. This compound would also be a useful chemical tool for elucidating the mechanism of PPARβ/δ-regulated specific gene expression and the biological significance of PPARβ/δ.

  7. C-type lectin like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) signals independently of lipid raft microdomains in platelets.

    PubMed

    Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Badolia, Rachit; Dangelmaier, Carol A; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2015-01-15

    C-type lectin like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) has been reported to activate platelets through a lipid raft-dependent manner. Secreted ADP potentiates CLEC-2-mediated platelet aggregation. We have investigated whether the decrease in CLEC-2-mediated platelet aggregation, previously reported in platelets with disrupted rafts, is a result of the loss of agonist potentiation by ADP. We disrupted platelet lipid rafts with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and measured signaling events downstream of CLEC-2 activation. Lipid raft disruption decreases platelet aggregation induced by CLEC-2 agonists. The inhibition of platelet aggregation by the disruption of lipid rafts was rescued by the exogenous addition of epinephrine but not 2-methylthioadenosine diphosphate (2MeSADP), which suggests that lipid raft disruption effects P2Y12-mediated Gi activation but not Gz. Phosphorylation of Syk (Y525/526) and PLCγ2 (Y759), were not affected by raft disruption in CLEC-2 agonist-stimulated platelets. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of the CLEC-2 hemi-ITAM was not effected when MβCD disrupts lipid rafts. Lipid rafts do not directly contribute to CLEC-2 receptor activation in platelets. The effects of disruption of lipid rafts in in vitro assays can be attributed to inhibition of ADP feedback that potentiates CLEC-2 signaling.

  8. Identification of 6-octadecynoic acid from a methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist.

    PubMed

    Ohtera, Anna; Miyamae, Yusaku; Nakai, Naomi; Kawachi, Atsushi; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko; Neffati, Mohamed; Akita, Toru; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Mori, Naoki; Irie, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Masaya

    2013-10-18

    6-Octadecynoic acid (6-ODA), a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified in the methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Fibrogenesis caused by hepatic stellate cells is inhibited by PPARγ whose ligands are clinically used for the treatment of diabetes. Plant extracts of Marrubium vulgare L., were screened for activity to inhibit fibrosis in the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6 using Oil Red-O staining, which detects lipids that typically accumulate in quiescent hepatic stellate cells. A methanol extract with activity to stimulate accumulation of lipids was obtained. This extract was found to have PPARγ agonist activity using a luciferase reporter assay. After purification using several chromatographic methods, 6-ODA, a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified as a candidate of PPARγ agonist. Synthesized 6-ODA and its derivative 9-octadecynoic acid (9-ODA), which both have a triple bond but in different positions, activated PPARγ in a luciferase reporter assay and increased lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a PPARγ-dependent manner. There is little information about the biological activity of fatty acids with a triple bond, and to our knowledge, this is the first report that 6-ODA and 9-ODA function as PPARγ agonists.

  9. Berberine is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huarong; Li, Changqing; Yang, Junqing; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    Although berberine has hypolipidemic effects with a high affinity to nuclear proteins, the underlying molecular mechanism for this effect remains unclear. Here, we determine whether berberine is an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), with a lipid-lowering effect. The cell-based reporter gene analysis showed that berberine selectively activates PPARalpha (EC50 =0.58 mM, Emax =102.4). The radioligand binding assay shows that berberine binds directly to the ligand-binding domain of PPARalpha (Ki=0.73 mM) with similar affinity to fenofibrate. The mRNA and protein levels of CPT-Ialpha gene from HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic rat liver are remarkably up-regulated by berberine, and this effect can be blocked by MK886, a non-competitive antagonist of PPARalpha. A comparison assay in which berberine and fenofibrate were used to treat hyperlipidaemic rats for three months shows that these drugs produce similar lipid-lowering effects, except that berberine increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol more effectively than fenofibrate. These findings provide the first evidence that berberine is a potent agonist of PPARalpha and seems to be superior to fenofibrate for treating hyperlipidemia. PMID:27100490

  10. Identification of 6-octadecynoic acid from a methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtera, Anna; Miyamae, Yusaku; Nakai, Naomi; Kawachi, Atsushi; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko; Neffati, Mohamed; Akita, Toru; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Mori, Naoki; Irie, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Masaya

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •6-ODA, a rare fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified from Marrubium vulgare. •6-ODA was synthesized from petroselinic acid as a starting material. •6-ODA stimulated lipid accumulation in HSC-T6 and 3T3-L1 cells. •The first report of a fatty acid with a triple bond functioning as a PPARγ agonist. •This study sheds light on novel functions of a fatty acid with a triple bond. -- Abstract: 6-Octadecynoic acid (6-ODA), a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified in the methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Fibrogenesis caused by hepatic stellate cells is inhibited by PPARγ whose ligands are clinically used for the treatment of diabetes. Plant extracts of Marrubium vulgare L., were screened for activity to inhibit fibrosis in the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6 using Oil Red-O staining, which detects lipids that typically accumulate in quiescent hepatic stellate cells. A methanol extract with activity to stimulate accumulation of lipids was obtained. This extract was found to have PPARγ agonist activity using a luciferase reporter assay. After purification using several chromatographic methods, 6-ODA, a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified as a candidate of PPARγ agonist. Synthesized 6-ODA and its derivative 9-octadecynoic acid (9-ODA), which both have a triple bond but in different positions, activated PPARγ in a luciferase reporter assay and increased lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a PPARγ-dependent manner. There is little information about the biological activity of fatty acids with a triple bond, and to our knowledge, this is the first report that 6-ODA and 9-ODA function as PPARγ agonists.

  11. Disorders of Lipid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Fats (lipids) are ... carbohydrates and low in fats. Supplements of the amino acid carnitine may be helpful. The long-term outcome ...

  12. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread to other parts of ... after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic medications called ...

  13. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer of the ... two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called vinca ...

  14. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to grow on ... related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called anthracyclines. ...

  15. Cytarabine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cytarabine lipid complex is used to treat lymphomatous meningitis (a type of cancer in the covering of the spinal cord and brain). Cytarabine lipid complex is in a class of medications called antimetabolites. ...

  16. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  17. Agonist-induced production of 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid in intact resistance arteries. Evidence that accumulation of diacylglycerol is not a prerequisite for contraction.

    PubMed

    Ohanian, J; Ollerenshaw, J; Collins, P; Heagerty, A

    1990-05-25

    The production of total amounts of 1,2-diacylglycerol as well as those specifically derived from inositol lipid hydrolysis was studied in intact rat resistance arteries stimulated with either noradrenaline, vasopressin, or angiotensin II at 20 s when the onset of contraction would be nearing its maximum, and at 5 min during the sustained phase of contraction. Total amounts of 1,2-diacylglycerol were not altered by any agonist at 20 s, or at 5 min. However, arachidonate-containing species of 1,2-diacylglycerol were differentially influenced being increased at 5 min by noradrenaline, and decreased at 20 s and 5 min by vasopressin. Only angiotensin II produced substantial increases in this class of 1,2-diacylglycerol at both time points. In order to investigate the fate of this second messenger total and inositol lipid derived phosphatidic acids were then measured at both 20 s and 5 min. Noradrenaline induced a rise in both total and arachidonate-containing phosphatidic acid at both times as did vasopressin. Only small increases were induced by angiotensin II at 20 s. These data demonstrate that the accumulation of 1,2-diacylglycerol generated from inositol lipid breakdown is only observed with activation by angiotensin II. Other agonists produced phosphatidic acids with time and the rate of generation of these lipids is agonist-specific. Thus phosphatidic acid may play a more prominent role during the sustained phase of contraction than previously anticipated.

  18. Agonist-Directed Desensitization of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Vasiliy; Jin, Yan; Sun, Haiyan; Ferrie, Ann M.; Wu, Qi; Fang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists with reduced tachyphylaxis may offer new therapeutic agents with improved tolerance profile. However, receptor desensitization assays are often inferred at the single signaling molecule level, thus ligand-directed desensitization is poorly understood. Here we report a label-free biosensor whole cell assay with microfluidics to determine ligand-directed desensitization of the β2AR. Together with mechanistic deconvolution using small molecule inhibitors, the receptor desensitization and resensitization patterns under the short-term agonist exposure manifested the long-acting agonism of salmeterol, and differentiated the mechanisms of agonist-directed desensitization between a full agonist epinephrine and a partial agonist pindolol. This study reveals the cellular mechanisms of agonist-selective β2AR desensitization at the whole cell level. PMID:21541288

  19. Sports doping: emerging designer and therapeutic β2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Georgakopoulos, C; Sterk, S; Nielen, M W F

    2013-10-21

    Beta2-adrenergic agonists, or β2-agonists, are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptom-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. The use of β2-agonists is prohibited in sports by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) due to claimed anabolic effects, and also, is prohibited as growth promoters in cattle fattening in the European Union. This paper reviews the last seven-year (2006-2012) literature concerning the development of novel β2-agonists molecules either by modifying the molecule of known β2-agonists or by introducing moieties producing indole-, adamantyl- or phenyl urea derivatives. New emerging β2-agonists molecules for future therapeutic use are also presented, intending to emphasize their potential use for doping purposes or as growth promoters in the near future.

  20. Modulation of Innate Immune Responses via Covalently Linked TLR Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the synthesis of novel adjuvants for vaccine development using multivalent scaffolds and bioconjugation chemistry to spatially manipulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. TLRs are primary receptors for activation of the innate immune system during vaccination. Vaccines that contain a combination of small and macromolecule TLR agonists elicit more directed immune responses and prolong responses against foreign pathogens. In addition, immune activation is enhanced upon stimulation of two distinct TLRs. Here, we synthesized combinations of TLR agonists as spatially defined tri- and di-agonists to understand how specific TLR agonist combinations contribute to the overall immune response. We covalently conjugated three TLR agonists (TLR4, 7, and 9) to a small molecule core to probe the spatial arrangement of the agonists. Treating immune cells with the linked agonists increased activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and enhanced and directed immune related cytokine production and gene expression beyond cells treated with an unconjugated mixture of the same three agonists. The use of TLR signaling inhibitors and knockout studies confirmed that the tri-agonist molecule activated multiple signaling pathways leading to the observed higher activity. To validate that the TLR4, 7, and 9 agonist combination would activate the immune response to a greater extent, we performed in vivo studies using a vaccinia vaccination model. Mice vaccinated with the linked TLR agonists showed an increase in antibody depth and breadth compared to mice vaccinated with the unconjugated mixture. These studies demonstrate how activation of multiple TLRs through chemically and spatially defined organization assists in guiding immune responses, providing the potential to use chemical tools to design and develop more effective vaccines. PMID:26640818

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist inhibits collagen synthesis in human hypertrophic scar fibroblasts by targeting Smad3 via miR-145

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hua-Yu; Li, Chao; Zheng, Zhao; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Hao; Su, Lin-Lin; Han, Jun-Tao; Zhu, Xiong-Xiang; Wang, Shu-yue; Li, Jun Hu, Da-Hai

    2015-03-27

    The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) functions to regulate cell differentiation and lipid metabolism. Recently, its agonist has been documented to regulate extracellular matrix production in human dermal fibroblasts. This study explored the underlying molecular mechanisms and gene interactions in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFBs) in vitro. HSFBs were cultured and treated with or without PPAR-γ agonist or antagonist for gene expression. Bioinformatical analysis predicted that miR-145 could target Smad3 expression. Luciferase assay was used to confirm such an interaction. The data showed that PPAR-γ agonist troglitazone suppressed expression of Smad3 and Col1 in HSFBs. PPAR-γ agonist induced miR-145 at the gene transcriptional level, which in turn inhibited Smad3 expression and Col1 level in HSFBs. Furthermore, ELISA data showed that Col1 level in HSFBs was controlled by a feedback regulation mechanism involved in PPAR-γ agonist and antagonist-regulated expression of miR-145 and Smad3 in HSFBs. These findings indicate that PPAR-γ-miR-145-Smad3 axis plays a role in regulation of collagen synthesis in HSFBs. - Highlights: • PPAR-γ agonist inhibits collagen synthesis in HSFBs. • Smad3 and type I collagen expression are decreased by PPAR-γ agonist. • miR-145 expression is increased by PPAR-γ agonist in HSFBs. • Increased miR-145 inhibits collagen synthesis by targeting Smad3. • miR-145 regulates collagen synthesis.

  2. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation, impairs signal transduction associated with muscarinic acetylcholine and metabotropic glutamate receptors: possible action on G alpha(q/11).

    PubMed

    Blanc, E M; Kelly, J F; Mark, R J; Waeg, G; Mattson, M P

    1997-08-01

    Considerable data indicate that oxidative stress and membrane lipid peroxidation contribute to neuronal degeneration in an array of age-related neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast, the impact of subtoxic levels of membrane lipid peroxidation on neuronal function is largely unknown. We now report that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation, disrupts coupling of muscarinic cholinergic receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors to phospholipase C-linked GTP-binding proteins in cultured rat cerebrocortical neurons. At subtoxic concentrations, HNE markedly inhibited GTPase activity, inositol phosphate release, and elevation of intracellular calcium levels induced by carbachol (muscarinic agonist) and (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenyl glycine (metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist). Maximal impairment of agonist-induced responses occurred within 30 min of exposure to HNE. Other aldehydes, including malondialdehyde, had little effect on agonist-induced responses. Antioxidants that suppress lipid peroxidation did not prevent impairment of agonist-induced responses by HNE, whereas glutathione, which is known to bind and detoxify HNE, did prevent impairment of agonist-induced responses. HNE itself did not induce oxidative stress. Immunoprecipitation-western blot analysis using an antibody to HNE-protein conjugates showed that HNE can bind to G alpha(q/11). HNE also significantly suppressed inositol phosphate release induced by aluminum fluoride. Collectively, our data suggest that HNE plays a role in altering receptor-G protein coupling in neurons under conditions of oxidative stress that may occur both normally, and before cell degeneration and death in pathological settings. PMID:9231714

  3. Identification of a novel selective agonist of PPARγ with no promotion of adipogenesis and less inhibition of osteoblastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Feng, Tingting; Zhu, Ningyu; Liu, Peng; Han, Xiaowan; Chen, Minghua; Wang, Xiao; Li, Ni; Li, Yongzhen; Xu, Yanni; Si, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) plays an important role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. However, current PPARγ-targeting drugs such as thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are associated with undesirable side effects. We identified a small molecular compound, F12016, as a selective PPARγ agonist by virtual screening, which showed moderate PPARγ agonistic activity and binding ability for PPARγ. F12016 did not activate other PPAR subtypes at 30 μM and selectively modulated PPARγ target gene expression. In diabetic KKAy mice, F12016 had insulin-sensitizing and glucose-lowering properties, and suppressed weight gain. In vitro, F12016 effectively increased glucose uptake and blocked cyclin-dependent kinase 5-mediated phosphorylation of PPARγ at Ser273, but slightly triggered adipogenesis and less inhibited osteoblastogenesis than rosiglitazone. Moreover, compared with the full agonist rosiglitazone, F12016 had a distinct group of coregulators and a different predicted binding mode for the PPARγ ligand-binding domain. A site mutation assay confirmed the key epitopes, especially Tyr473 in AF-2. In summary, our study shows that F12016 is a non-TZD, novel selective PPARγ agonist without the classical lipogenic side effects, which may provide a new structural strategy for designing PPARγ ligands with advantages over TZDs. PMID:25827822

  4. Cannabinoid receptor agonists reduce the short-term mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress linked to excitotoxicity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rangel-López, E; Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Pinzón, E; Torres, I; Serratos, I N; Castellanos, P; Wajner, M; Souza, D O; Santamaría, A

    2015-01-29

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is involved in a considerable number of physiological processes in the Central Nervous System. Recently, a modulatory role of cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists on the reduction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation has been demonstrated. Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous analog of glutamate and excitotoxic metabolite produced in the kynurenine pathway (KP), selectively activates NMDAr and has been shown to participate in different neurodegenerative disorders. Since the early pattern of toxicity exerted by this metabolite is relevant to explain the extent of damage that it can produce in the brain, in this work we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and other agonists (anandamide or AEA, and CP 55,940 or CP) on early markers of QUIN-induced toxicity in rat striatal cultured cells and rat brain synaptosomes. WIN, AEA and CP exerted protective effects on the QUIN-induced loss of cell viability. WIN also preserved the immunofluorescent signals for neurons and CBr labeling that were decreased by QUIN. The QUIN-induced early mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation were also partially or completely prevented by WIN pretreatment, but not when this CBr agonist was added simultaneously with QUIN to brain synaptosomes. These findings support a neuroprotective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by agents inducing excitotoxic processes.

  5. Small Molecule Bax Agonists for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Meiguo; Li, Rui; Xie, Maohua; Park, Dongkyoo; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Sica, Gabriel L.; Corsino, Patrick E.; Zhou, Jia; Ding, Chunyong; White, Mark A.; Magis, Andrew T.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Curran, Walter J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Deng, Xingming

    2014-01-01

    Bax, a central death regulator, is required at the decisional stage of apoptosis. We recently identified serine 184 (S184) of Bax as a critical functional switch controlling its proapoptotic activity. Here, we employed the structural pocket around S184 as a docking site to screen the NCI library of small molecules using the UCSF-DOCK program suite. Three compounds, small molecule Bax agonists SMBA1, SMBA2 and SMBA3, induce conformational changes in Bax by blocking S184 phosphorylation, facilitating Bax insertion into mitochondrial membranes and forming Bax oligomers. The latter leads to cytochrome c release and apoptosis in human lung cancer cells, which occurs in a Bax- but not Bak-dependent fashion. SMBA1 potently suppresses lung tumor growth via apoptosis by selectively activating Bax in vivo without significant normal tissue toxicity. Development of Bax agonists as a new class of anti-cancer drugs offers a strategy for the treatment of lung cancer and other Bax-expressing malignancies. PMID:25230299

  6. Nutrients and neurodevelopment: lipids.

    PubMed

    González, Horacio F; Visentin, Silvana

    2016-10-01

    Nutrients, lipids in particular, make up the central nervous system structure and play major functional roles: they stimulate development, migration, and nerve cell differentiation. They are part of gray matter, white matter, nerve nuclei, and synaptogenesis. Breast milk contains lipids which are crucial for infant brain development. The lipid profile of breast milk was used as a guideline for the development of breast milk substitutes. However, to date, no substitute has matched it. Complementary feeding should include docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, other polyunsaturated fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, and complex lipids found in milk fat. The lipid composition of breast milk depends on maternal intake and nutritional status during pregnancy and breast-feeding. It has a great impact on development. Our goal is to review scientific literature regarding the role of lipids on infant brain development and the importance of breast milk lipid composition, maternal diet, and complementary feeding. PMID:27606648

  7. Nutrients and neurodevelopment: lipids.

    PubMed

    González, Horacio F; Visentin, Silvana

    2016-10-01

    Nutrients, lipids in particular, make up the central nervous system structure and play major functional roles: they stimulate development, migration, and nerve cell differentiation. They are part of gray matter, white matter, nerve nuclei, and synaptogenesis. Breast milk contains lipids which are crucial for infant brain development. The lipid profile of breast milk was used as a guideline for the development of breast milk substitutes. However, to date, no substitute has matched it. Complementary feeding should include docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, other polyunsaturated fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, and complex lipids found in milk fat. The lipid composition of breast milk depends on maternal intake and nutritional status during pregnancy and breast-feeding. It has a great impact on development. Our goal is to review scientific literature regarding the role of lipids on infant brain development and the importance of breast milk lipid composition, maternal diet, and complementary feeding.

  8. Design, synthesis and pharmacology of 1,1-bistrifluoromethylcarbinol derivatives as liver X receptor β-selective agonists.

    PubMed

    Koura, Minoru; Matsuda, Takayuki; Okuda, Ayumu; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Kurobuchi, Sayaka; Matsumoto, Yuuki; Shibuya, Kimiyuki

    2015-07-01

    A novel series of 1,3-bistrifluoromethylcarbinol derivatives that act as liver X receptor (LXR) β-selective agonists was discovered. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the identification of molecule 62, which was more effective (Emax) and selective toward LXRβ than T0901317 and GW3965. Furthermore, 62 decreased LDL-C without elevating the plasma TG level and significantly suppressed the lipid-accumulation area in the aortic arch in a Bio F1B hamster fed a diet high in fat and cholesterol. We demonstrated that our LXRβ agonist would be potentially useful as a hypolipidemic and anti-atherosclerotic agent. In this manuscript, we report the design, synthesis and pharmacology of 1,3-bistrifluoromethylcarbinol derivatives.

  9. Epidermal surface lipids

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A layer of lipids, which are of both sebaceous and keratinocyte origin, covers the surface of the skin. The apparent composition of surface lipids varies depending on the selected method of sampling. Lipids produced by the epidermal cells are an insignificant fraction of the total extractable surface lipid on areas rich in sebaceous glands. Due to the holocrine activity of the sebaceous gland, its product of secretion (sebum) is eventually released to the surface of the skin and coats the fur as well. Lipids of epidermal origin fill the spaces between the cells, like mortar or cement. The sebaceous lipids are primarily non polar lipids as triglycerides, wax esters and squalene, while epidermal lipids are a mixture of ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol. The composition of the sebaceous lipids is unique and intriguing and elevated sebum excretion is a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of acne. Recent studies have elucidated the roles that epidermal surface lipids have on normal skin functions and acne. PMID:20224687

  10. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  11. GLP-1 agonist treatment: implications for diabetic retinopathy screening.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, Lakshminarayanan; Humphreys, Tracy; Hariman, Christian; Walker, Adrian B; Varughese, George I

    2011-12-01

    Rapid improvement in glycaemic control induced by GLP-1 agonist therapy could be yet another illustration of transient or permanent progression of diabetic retinopathy, similar to documented examples such as pregnancy and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Specific guidelines would be needed to monitor this paradoxical phenomenon during treatment with GLP-1 agonists. PMID:21906831

  12. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  13. Lipids of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Susanne E; Daum, Günther

    2013-10-01

    A unique organelle for studying membrane biochemistry is the mitochondrion whose functionality depends on a coordinated supply of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria are capable of synthesizing several lipids autonomously such as phosphatidylglycerol, cardiolipin and in part phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid and CDP-diacylglycerol. Other mitochondrial membrane lipids such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sterols and sphingolipids have to be imported. The mitochondrial lipid composition, the biosynthesis and the import of mitochondrial lipids as well as the regulation of these processes will be main issues of this review article. Furthermore, interactions of lipids and mitochondrial proteins which are highly important for various mitochondrial processes will be discussed. Malfunction or loss of enzymes involved in mitochondrial phospholipid biosynthesis lead to dysfunction of cell respiration, affect the assembly and stability of the mitochondrial protein import machinery and cause abnormal mitochondrial morphology or even lethality. Molecular aspects of these processes as well as diseases related to defects in the formation of mitochondrial membranes will be described.

  14. Dopaminergic D2-like agonists produce yawning in the myelin mutant taiep and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Eguibar, Jose R; Cortes, Ma del Carmen; Lara-Lozano, Manuel; Mendiola, Diana M

    2012-07-01

    Systemic administration of D2-like dopaminergic-receptor agonists increases yawning behavior. However, only a few studies have been done in animals with pathological conditions. The taiep rat is a myelin mutant with an initial hypomyelination followed by progressive demyelination, being the brainstem one of the most affected areas. In our experiments, we analyzed the effects of systemic administration of the D2-family agonists and antagonists on yawning behavior, and correlated them with the lipid myelin content in the brainstem and other areas in the central nervous system (CNS) in 8 month old male taiep and Sprague-Dawley rats. Subjects were maintained under standard conditions in Plexiglas cages with a 12:12 light-dark cycle, lights on at 0700 and free access to rodent pellets and tap water. Drugs were freshly prepared injected ip at 0800 and subjects were observed for 60 min. When antagonists were used it was administered 15 min before the agonist. Sprague-Dawley and taiep rats significantly increased their yawning frequency after systemic injection of (-)-quinpirole hydrochloride, R(+)-7-Hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (7-OH-DPAT) or trans-(±)-3,4,4a,10b-tetrahydro-4-propyl-2H,5H-[1]benzopyrano [4,3-b]-1,4-oxazin-9-ol hydrochloride ((±)-PD 128,907). Among D2-like agonists used higher effects are obtained with (-)-quinpirole. The effects caused by (-)-quinpirole can be reduced by (-)-sulpiride; and yawning caused by 7-OH-DPAT was decreased by tiapride only in taiep rats. In Sprague-Dawley only (-)-sulpiride is able to decrease (-)-quinpirole-caused yawning. In conclusion, dopaminergic D2-like agonists are still able to cause yawning despite the severe myelin loss in taiep rats. Similarly, patients with various CNS illnesses that affect myelin, such as stroke or multiple sclerosis, are able to yawn suggesting that trigger neurons are still able to command this innate behavior.

  15. Interactions between cannabinoid receptor agonists and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys discriminating fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) enhance some (antinociceptive) but not other (positive reinforcing) effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, suggesting that cannabinoids might be combined with opioids to treat pain without increasing, and possibly decreasing, abuse. The degree to which cannabinoids enhance antinociceptive effects of opioids varies across drugs insofar as Δ(9)-THC and the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 increase the potency of some mu opioid receptor agonists (e.g., fentanyl) more than others (e.g., nalbuphine). It is not known whether interactions between cannabinoids and opioids vary similarly for other (abuse-related) effects. This study examined whether Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 differentially impact the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine in monkeys (n=4) discriminating 0.01mg/kg of fentanyl (s.c.) from saline. Fentanyl (0.00178-0.0178mg/kg) and nalbuphine (0.01-0.32mg/kg) dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding. Neither Δ(9)-THC (0.032-1.0mg/kg) nor CP55940 (0.0032-0.032mg/kg) enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl or nalbuphine; however, doses of Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 that shifted the nalbuphine dose-effect curve markedly to the right and/or down were less effective or ineffective in shifting the fentanyl dose-effect curve. The mu opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.032mg/kg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine similarly. These data indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine are more sensitive to attenuation by cannabinoids than those of fentanyl. That the discriminative stimulus effects of some opioids are more susceptible to modification by drugs from other classes has implications for developing maximally effective therapeutic drug mixtures with reduced abuse liability. PMID:27184925

  16. Microalgae lipid characterization.

    PubMed

    Yao, Linxing; Gerde, Jose A; Lee, Show-Ling; Wang, Tong; Harrata, Kamel A

    2015-02-18

    To meet the growing interest of utilizing microalgae biomass in the production of biofuels and nutraceutical and pharmaceutical lipids, we need suitable analytical methods and a comprehensive database for their lipid components. The objective of the present work was to demonstrate methodology and provide data on fatty acid composition, lipid class content and composition, characteristics of the unsaponifiables, and type of chlorophylls of five microalgae. Microalgae lipids were fractionated into TAG, FFA, and polar lipids using TLC, and the composition of fatty acids in total lipids and in each lipid class, hydrocarbons, and sterols were determined by GC-MS. Glyco- and phospholipids were profiled by LC/ESI-MS. Chlorophylls and their related metabolites were qualified by LC/APCI-MS. The melting and crystallization profiles of microalgae total lipids and their esters were analyzed by DSC to evaluate their potential biofuel applications. Significant differences and complexities of lipid composition among the algae tested were observed. The compositional information is valuable for strain selection, downstream biomass fractionation, and utilization.

  17. Multifunctional lipid multilayer stamping.

    PubMed

    Nafday, Omkar A; Lowry, Troy W; Lenhert, Steven

    2012-04-10

    Nanostructured lipid multilayers on surfaces are a promising biofunctional nanomaterial. For example, surface-supported lipid multilayer diffraction gratings with optical properties that depend on the microscale spacing of the grating lines and the nanometer thickness of the lipid multilayers have been fabricated previously by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN), with immediate applications as label-free biosensors. The innate biocompatibility of such gratings makes them promising as biological sensor elements, model cellular systems, and construction materials for nanotechnology. Here a method is described that combines the lateral patterning capabilities and scalability of microcontact printing with the topographical control of nanoimprint lithography and the multimaterial integration aspects of dip-pen nanolithography in order to create nanostructured lipid multilayer arrays. This approach is denoted multilayer stamping. The distinguishing characteristic of this method is that it allows control of the lipid multilayer thickness, which is a crucial nanoscale dimension that determines the optical properties of lipid multilayer nanostructures. The ability to integrate multiple lipid materials on the same surface is also demonstrated by multi-ink spotting onto a polydimethoxysilane stamp, as well as higher-throughput patterning (on the order of 2 cm(2) s(-1) for grating fabrication) and the ability to pattern lipid materials that could not previously be patterned with high resolution by lipid DPN, for example, the gel-phase phospholipid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or the steroid cholesterol. PMID:22307810

  18. Lipid Droplets And Cellular Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2013-01-01

    Among organelles, lipid droplets (LDs) uniquely constitute a hydrophobic phase in the aqueous environment of the cytosol. Their hydrophobic core of neutral lipids stores metabolic energy and membrane components, making LDs hubs for lipid metabolism. In addition, LDs are implicated in a number of other cellular functions, ranging from protein storage and degradation to viral replication. These processes are functionally linked to many physiological and pathological conditions, including obesity and related metabolic diseases. Despite their important functions and nearly ubiquitous presence in cells, many aspects of LD biology are unknown. In the past few years, the pace of LD investigation has increased, providing new insights. Here, we review the current knowledge of LD cell biology and its translation to physiology. PMID:22524315

  19. Hepatic AQP9 expression in male rats is reduced in response to PPARα agonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Lebeck, Janne; Cheema, Muhammad Umar; Skowronski, Mariusz T; Nielsen, Søren; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2015-02-01

    The peroxisome proliferator receptor α (PPARα) is a key regulator of the hepatic response to fasting with effects on both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. A role in hepatic glycerol metabolism has also been found; however, the results are somewhat contradictive. Aquaporin 9 (AQP9) is a pore-forming transmembrane protein that facilitates hepatic uptake of glycerol. Its expression is inversely regulated by insulin in male rodents, with increased expression during fasting. Previous results indicate that PPARα plays a crucial role in the induction of AQP9 mRNA during fasting. In the present study, we use PPARα agonists to explore the effect of PPARα activation on hepatic AQP9 expression and on the abundance of enzymes involved in glycerol metabolism using both in vivo and in vitro systems. In male rats with free access to food, treatment with the PPARα agonist WY 14643 (3 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) caused a 50% reduction in hepatic AQP9 abundance with the effect being restricted to AQP9 expressed in periportal hepatocytes. The pharmacological activation of PPARα had no effect on the abundance of GlyK, whereas it caused an increased expression of hepatic GPD1, GPAT1, and L-FABP protein. In WIF-B9 and HepG2 hepatocytes, both WY 14643 and another PPARα agonist GW 7647 reduced the abundance of AQP9 protein. In conclusion, pharmacological PPARα activation results in a marked reduction in the abundance of AQP9 in periportal hepatocytes. Together with the effect on the enzymatic apparatus for glycerol metabolism, our results suggest that PPARα activation in the fed state directs glycerol into glycerolipid synthesis rather than into de novo synthesis of glucose. PMID:25477377

  20. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation. PMID:22269613

  1. Novel Piperine Derivatives with Antidiabetic Effect as PPAR-γ Agonists.

    PubMed

    Kharbanda, Chetna; Alam, Mohammad Sarwar; Hamid, Hinna; Javed, Kalim; Bano, Sameena; Ali, Yakub; Dhulap, Abhijeet; Alam, Perwez; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2016-09-01

    Piperine is an alkaloid responsible for the pungency of black pepper. In this study, piperine isolated from Piper nigrum L. was hydrolyzed under basic condition to obtain piperic acid and was used as precursor to carry out the synthesis of twenty piperine derivatives containing benzothiazole moiety. All the benzothiazole derivatives were evaluated for their antidiabetic potential by OGT test followed by assessment of active derivatives on STZ-induced diabetic model. It was observed that nine of twenty novel piperine analogues (5b, 6a-h), showed significantly higher antidiabetic activity in comparison with rosiglitazone (standard). Furthermore, these active derivatives were evaluated for their action as PPAR-γ agonists demonstrating their mechanism of action. The effects on body weight, lipid peroxidation, and hepatotoxicity after administration with active derivatives were also studied to further establish these derivatives as lead molecules for treatment of diabetes with lesser side-effects. PMID:27037532

  2. ICI D7114: a novel selective adrenoceptor agonist of brown fat and thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Holloway, B R; Howe, R; Rao, B S; Stribling, D

    1992-01-01

    Increasing energy expenditure by treatment with thermogenic drugs is not new, but available drugs have suffered from the problem of lack of selectivity. In the last decade two key findings have allowed the development of selective thermogenic drugs that have promise in the treatment of obesity. 1) The recognition that brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a role in compensatory increases in energy expenditure has allowed an approach directed at a target organ. 2) The demonstration showing that increases in the activity of BAT may be modulated by an atypical (beta 3) adrenoceptor has led to the development of a new peripherally acting beta-adrenoceptor agonist ICI D7114, which stimulates thermogenesis at doses that have little effect on beta 1 or beta 2 adrenoceptors. Treatment with the compound activates BAT and thermogenesis even in species and situations where the intrinsic capacity is low. 3) The compound has beneficial effects in animal models of obesity and disturbed glucose and lipid homeostasis. PMID:1345891

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterizations of Chiglitazar, a Newly Identified PPAR Pan-Agonist

    PubMed Central

    He, B. K.; Ning, Z. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Shan, S.; Pan, D. S.; Ko, B. C. B.; Li, P. P.; Shen, Z. F.; Dou, G. F.; Zhang, B. L.; Lu, X. P.; Gao, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Solid rationales are still present for the identification of synthetic ligands to simultaneously target multiple PPAR subtypes for the treatment of T2DM. The purpose of this study was to characterize the in vitro and in vivo differential effects of chiglitazar, a non-TZD type of PPAR pan-agonist currently in phase III clinic development in China, from PPARγ-selective agonist like rosiglitazone. Chiglitazar showed transactivating activity in each PPARα, γ, and δ subtype and upregulated the expression of PPARα and/or PPARδ downstream genes involved in the key processes of lipid metabolism and thermogenesis. Comparable blood glucose lowering effect was observed between chiglitazar and rosiglitazone, but chiglitazar did not significantly increase the body weight in KKAy and fat pad weight in db/db mice. Chiglitazar had high distribution in liver, pancreas, and skeleton muscles but was less present in kidney, heart, and adipose in rats. Heart weight increase was not observed in rats treated with chiglitazar for 6 months at a dose as high as 45 mg kg−1. The in vitro and in vivo differential features of chiglitazar are informative and encouraging for the further development of this synthetic ligand for the potential use in T2DM. PMID:23150725

  4. Measuring relative acetylcholine receptor agonist binding by selective proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Behling, R W; Yamane, T; Navon, G; Sammon, M J; Jelinski, L W

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented that uses selective proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements of nicotine in the presence of the acetylcholine receptor to obtain relative binding constants for acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and muscarine. For receptors from Torpedo californica the results show that (a) the binding constants are in the order acetylcholine greater than nicotine greater than carbamylcholine greater than muscarine; (b) selective NMR measurements provide a rapid and direct method for monitoring both the specific and nonspecific binding of agonists to these receptors and to the lipid; (c) alpha-bungarotoxin can be used to distinguish between specific and nonspecific binding to the receptor; (d) the receptor--substrate interaction causes a large change in the selective relaxation time of the agonists even at concentrations 100x greater than that of the receptor. This last observation means that these measurements provide a rapid method to monitor drug binding when only small amounts of receptor are available. Furthermore, the binding strategies presented here may be useful for the NMR determination of the conformation of the ligand in its bound state. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3395661

  5. [Discovery of potential nicotinic acid receptor agonists from Chinese herbal medicines based on molecular simulation].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lu-Di; He, Yu-Su; Zhang, Yan-Ling

    2014-12-01

    Nicotinic acid could increase high density lipoprotein and reduce serum total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides in human bodies, thus is frequently applied in treating low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and hypertriglyceridemia in clinic. However, according to the findings, nicotinic acid could also cause adverse effects, such as skin flush, beside its curative effects. In this study, bioisosterism, fragment-based search and Lipinski's Rule of Five were used to preliminarily screen out potential TCM ingredients that may have similar pharmacological effects with nicotinic acid from Traditional Chinese medicine database (TCMD). Afterwards, homology modeling and flexible docking were used to further screen out potential nicotinic acid receptor agonists. As a result, eleven candidate compounds were derived from eight commonly used traditional Chinese medicines. Specifically, all of the candidate compounds' interaction with nicotinic acid receptor was similar to nicotinic acid, and their docking scores were all higher than that of nicotinic acid, but their druggability remained to be further studied. Some of the eight source traditional Chinese medicines were used to lower lipid according to literature studies, implying that they may show effect through above means. In summary, this study provides basis and reference for extracting new nicotinic acid receptor agonists from traditional Chinese medicines and improving the medication status of hyperlipidemia.

  6. Effects of PPARγ Agonist Pioglitazone on Redox-Sensitive Cellular Signaling in Young Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dovinová, Ima; Barancik, Miroslav; Zorad, Stefan; Gajdosechová, Lucia; Gresová, Linda; Cacanyiova, Sona; Kristek, Frantisek; Balis, Peter; Chan, Julie Y. H.

    2013-01-01

    PPARγ receptor plays an important role in oxidative stress response. Its agonists can influence vascular contractility in experimental hypertension. Our study was focused on the effects of a PPARγ agonist pioglitazone (PIO) on blood pressure regulation, vasoactivity of vessels, and redox-sensitive signaling at the central (brainstem, BS) and peripheral (left ventricle, LV) levels in young prehypertensive rats. 5-week-old SHR were treated either with PIO (10 mg/kg/day, 2 weeks) or with saline using gastric gavage. Administration of PIO significantly slowed down blood pressure increase and improved lipid profile and aortic relaxation after insulin stimulation. A significant increase in PPARγ expression was found only in BS, not in LV. PIO treatment did not influence NOS changes, but had tissue-dependent effect on SOD regulation and increased SOD activity, observed in LV. The treatment with PIO differentially affected also the levels of other intracellular signaling components: Akt kinase increased in the the BS, while β-catenin level was down-regulated in the BS and up-regulated in the LV. We found that the lowering of blood pressure in young SHR can be connected with insulin sensitivity of vessels and that β-catenin and SOD levels are important agents mediating PIO effects in the BS and LV. PMID:24454335

  7. PPARγ Agonists in Adaptive Immunity: What Do Immune Disorders and Their Models Have to Tell Us?

    PubMed

    da Rocha Junior, Laurindo Ferreira; Dantas, Andréa Tavares; Duarte, Angela Luzia Branco Pinto; de Melo Rego, Moacyr Jesus Barreto; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha; Pitta, Maira Galdino da Rocha

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive immunity has evolved as a very powerful and highly specialized tool of host defense. Its classical protagonists are lymphocytes of the T- and B-cell lineage. Cytokines and chemokines play a key role as effector mechanisms of the adaptive immunity. Some autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are caused by disturbance of the adaptive immune system. Recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases have led to research on new molecular and therapeutic targets. PPAR γ are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily and are transcription factors involved in lipid metabolism as well as innate and adaptive immunity. PPAR γ is activated by synthetic and endogenous ligands. Previous studies have shown that PPAR agonists regulate T-cell survival, activation and T helper cell differentiation into effector subsets: Th1, Th2, Th17, and Tregs. PPAR γ has also been associated with B cells. The present review addresses these issues by placing PPAR γ agonists in the context of adaptive immune responses and the relation of the activation of these receptors with the expression of cytokines involved in adaptive immunity. PMID:23983678

  8. Catalposide is a natural agonistic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji Hae; Jun, Hee-jin; Hoang, Minh-Hien; Jia, Yaoyao; Han, Xiang Hua; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Hak-Ju; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposide is a novel ligand for PPAR{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell stimulated with catalposide improved fatty acid uptake, regulated target genes in fatty acid {beta}-oxidation and synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposdie reduces hepatic triacylglycerides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theses demonstrate catalposide could ameliorate hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes related to cellular lipid uptake and oxidation. Thus, PPAR{alpha} agonists may be important in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. In this study, we demonstrated that catalposide is a novel natural PPAR{alpha} agonist, identified from reporter gene assay-based activity screening with approximately 900 natural plant and seaweed extracts. Results of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses suggested that the compound interacted directly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR{alpha}. Cultured hepatocytes stimulated with catalposide exhibited significantly reduced cellular triglyceride concentrations, by 21%, while cellular uptake of fatty acids was increased, by 70% (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the increase in cellular fatty acid uptake was due to upregulation of fatty acid transporter protein-4 (+19% vs. the control) in cells stimulated with catalposide. Additionally, expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation and high-density lipoprotein metabolism were upregulated, while that of genes related to fatty acid synthesis were suppressed. In conclusion, catalposide is hypolipidemic by activation of PPAR{alpha} via a ligand-mediated mechanism that modulates the expression of in lipid metabolism genes in hepatocytes.

  9. Fermented Ginseng Contains an Agonist of Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors α and γ.

    PubMed

    Igami, Kentaro; Shimojo, Yosuke; Ito, Hisatomi; Miyazaki, Toshitsugu; Nakano, Fusako; Kashiwada, Yoshiki

    2016-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) is a nuclear receptor that is one of the transcription factors regulating lipid and glucose metabolism. Fermented ginseng (FG) is a ginseng fermented by Lactobacillus paracasei A221 containing minor ginsenosides and metabolites of fermentation. DNA microarray analysis of rat liver treated with FG indicated that FG affects on lipid metabolism are mediated by PPAR-α. To identify a PPAR-α agonist in FG, PPAR-α transcription reporter assay-guided fractionation was performed. The fraction obtained from the MeOH extract of FG, which showed potent transcription activity of PPAR-α, was fractionated by silica gel column chromatography into 16 subfractions, and further separation and crystallization gave compound 1 together with four known constituents of ginseng, including 20(R)- and 20(S)-protopanaxadiol, and 20(R)- and 20(S)-ginsenoside Rh1. The structure of compound 1 was identified as 10-hydroxy-octadecanoic acid by (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra and by EI-MS analysis of the methyl ester of 1. Compound 1 demonstrated much higher transcription activity of PPAR-α than the other isolated compounds. In addition, compound 1 also showed 5.5-fold higher transcription activity of PPAR-γ than vehicle at the dose of 20 μg/mL. In the present study, we identified 10-hydroxy-octadecanoic acid as a dual PPAR-α/γ agonist in FG. Our study suggested that metabolites of fermentation, in addition to ginsenosides, contribute to the health benefits of FG. PMID:27627700

  10. Antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists.

    PubMed

    Labrie, F; Bélanger, A; Kelly, P A; Séguin, C; Cusan, L; Lefebvre, F A; Reeves, J J; Lemay, A; Faure, N; Gourdeau, Y; Raynaud, J P

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms responsible for the antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists. Large doses of the LHRH agonist LHRH-EA lead to a marked reduction of testicular and secondary sex organ weight, LH receptor levels, and plasma testosterone concentration. A marked inhibition of basal testicular and testosterone concentrations is obtained after daily administration of the LHRH agonists at doses greater than 10 ng. Treatment with low doses of the LHRH agonist can lead to an increased steroidogenic response to LH. Treatment with low doses of LHRH agonists could stimulate Leydig cell function while high doses are history. A study of the effects of longterm treatment with an LHRH agonsist on spermatogenesis revelaed that testis, prostate, and seminal vesicle weight decreased and plasma LH and FSH levels increased over 12 weeks. Comparison of the effects of increasing doses of LHRH agonist on testicular and ovarian gonadotropin receptors and steroidogenesis in male rats indicates that single or repeated administration of LHRH agonists can lead to loss of testicular LH receptors in the absence of the pituitary gland. The loss of ovarian gonadotropin receptors in female rats is also investigated. Antifertility effects of LHRH ethylamide are accompanied by a marked loss of LH/hCG and FSH receptors in ovarian tissue. The injection of 1,3, or 10 ng LHRH-EA in intact rats has no significant effect on ovarian LH receptor levels. A study of the direct action of LHRH agonists at the ovarian level demonstrates a close relationship between the binding activity of a large series of LHRH agonists and antagonists in the anterior pituitary gland and the ovary. Inhibition of testicular steroidogenesis in man by treatment with a potent LHRH agonist is also demonstrated. Intranasal administration of LHRH ethylamide has luteolytic effects in normal women. Daily administration of LHRH-EA inhibited ovulation in all but 2 of 89 treatment

  11. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  12. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  13. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  14. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25437461

  15. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25326839

  16. PPAR dual agonists: are they opening Pandora's Box?

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Rose, Madhankumar; Ganti, Subrahmanya S; Krishan, Pawan; Singh, Manjeet

    2007-08-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the major cause of mortality in patients of diabetes mellitus. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of nuclear hormone receptor superfamily comprising of three subtypes such as PPARalpha, PPARgamma and PPARdelta/beta. Activation of PPARalpha reduces triglycerides and involves in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPARgamma causes insulin sensitization and enhances glucose metabolism, whereas activation of PPARdelta enhances fatty acid metabolism. Current therapeutic strategies available for the treatment of diabetes do not inhibit the associated secondary cardiovascular complications. Hence, the development of multimodal drugs which can reduce hyperglycemia and concomitantly inhibit the progression of secondary cardiovascular complications may offer valuable therapeutic option. Several basic and clinical studies have exemplified the beneficial effects of PPARalpha and PPARgamma ligands in preventing the cardiovascular risks. The PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists are developed to increase insulin sensitivity and simultaneously prevent diabetic cardiovascular complications. Such compounds are under clinical trials and proposed for treatment of Type II diabetes with secondary cardiovascular complications. However, PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists such as muraglitazar, tesaglitazar and ragaglitazar have been noted to produce several cardiovascular risks and carcinogenicity, which raised number of questions about the clinical applications of dual agonists in diabetes and its associated complications. The ongoing basic studies have elucidated the cardio protective role of PPARdelta. Therefore, further studies are on the track to develop PPARalpha/delta and PPAR gamma/delta dual agonists and PPARalpha/gamma/delta pan agonists for the treatment of diabetic cardiovascular complications. The present review critically analyzes the protective and detrimental effect of PPAR agonists in

  17. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  18. Pharmacogenetics of beta2 adrenergic receptor agonists in asthma management.

    PubMed

    Ortega, V E

    2014-07-01

    Beta2 (β2) adrenergic receptor agonists (beta agonists) are a commonly prescribed treatment for asthma despite the small increase in risk for life-threatening adverse responses associated with long-acting beta agonist (LABA). The concern for life-threatening adverse effects associated with LABA and the inter-individual variability of therapeutic responsiveness to LABA-containing combination therapies provide the rationale for pharmacogenetic studies of beta agonists. These studies primarily evaluated genes within the β2-adrenergic receptor and related pathways; however, recent genome-wide studies have identified novel loci for beta agonist response. Recent studies have identified a role for rare genetic variants in determining beta agonist response and, potentially, the risk for rare, adverse responses to LABA. Before genomics research can be applied to the development of genetic profiles for personalized medicine, it will be necessary to continue adapting to the analysis of an increasing volume of genetic data in larger cohorts with a combination of analytical methods and in vitro studies.

  19. Pairwise agonist scanning predicts cellular signaling responses to combinatorial stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Manash S; Purvis, Jeremy E; Brass, Lawrence F; Diamond, Scott L

    2010-07-01

    Prediction of cellular response to multiple stimuli is central to evaluating patient-specific clinical status and to basic understanding of cell biology. Cross-talk between signaling pathways cannot be predicted by studying them in isolation and the combinatorial complexity of multiple agonists acting together prohibits an exhaustive exploration of the complete experimental space. Here we describe pairwise agonist scanning (PAS), a strategy that trains a neural network model based on measurements of cellular responses to individual and all pairwise combinations of input signals. We apply PAS to predict calcium signaling responses of human platelets in EDTA-treated plasma to six different agonists (ADP, convulxin, U46619, SFLLRN, AYPGKF and PGE(2)) at three concentrations (0.1, 1 and 10 x EC(50)). The model predicted responses to sequentially added agonists, to ternary combinations of agonists and to 45 different combinations of four to six agonists (R = 0.88). Furthermore, we use PAS to distinguish between the phenotypic responses of platelets from ten donors. Training neural networks with pairs of stimuli across the dose-response regime represents an efficient approach for predicting complex signal integration in a patient-specific disease milieu. PMID:20562863

  20. Perception of specific trigeminal chemosensory agonists

    PubMed Central

    Frasnelli, J; Albrecht, J; Bryant, B; Lundström, JN

    2011-01-01

    The intranasal trigeminal system is a third chemical sense in addition to olfaction and gustation. As opposed to smell and taste, we still lack knowledge on the relationship between receptor binding and perception for the trigeminal system. We therefore investigated the sensitivity of the intranasal trigeminal system towards agonists of the trigeminal receptors TRPM8 and TRPA1 by assessing subjects’ ability to identify which nostril has been stimulated in a monorhinal stimulation design. We summed the number of correct identifications resulting in a lateralization score. Stimuli were menthol (activating TRPM8 receptors), eucalyptol (TRPM8), mustard oil (TRPA1) and two mixtures thereof (menthol/eucalyptol and menthol/mustard oil). In addition, we examined the relationship between intensity and lateralization scores and investigated whether intensity evaluation and lateralization scores of the mixtures show additive effects. All stimuli were correctly lateralized significantly above chance. Across subjects the lateralization scores for single compounds activating the same receptor showed a stronger correlation than stimuli activating different receptors. Although single compounds were isointense, the mixture of menthol and eucalyptol (activating only TRPM8) was perceived as weaker and was lateralized less accurately than the mixture of menthol and mustard oil (activating both TRPM8 and TRPA1) suggesting suppression effects in the former mixture. In conclusion, sensitivity of different subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons seems to be related, but only to a certain degree. The large coherence in sensitivity between various intranasal trigeminal stimuli suggests that measuring sensitivity to one single trigeminal chemical stimulus may be sufficient to generally assess the trigeminal system’s chemosensitivity. Further, for stimuli activating the same receptor a mixture suppression effect appears to occur similar to that observed in the other chemosensory

  1. Serotonin (5-HT) and 5-HT2A receptor agonists suppress lipolysis in primary rat adipose cells.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Björn; Medina, Anya; Fryklund, Claes; Fex, Malin; Stenkula, Karin G

    2016-05-27

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a biogenic monoamine that functions both as a neurotransmitter and a circulating hormone. Recently, the metabolic effects of 5-HT have gained interest and peripheral 5-HT has been proposed to influence lipid metabolism in various ways. Here, we investigated the metabolic effects of 5-HT in isolated, primary rat adipose cells. Incubation with 5-HT suppressed β-adrenergically stimulated glycerol release and decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent substrates, hormone sensitive lipase (Ser563) and perilipin (Ser522). The inhibitory effect of 5-HT on lipolysis enhanced the anti-lipolytic effect of insulin, but sustained in the presence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, OPC3911 and isobuthylmethylxanthine (IBMX). The relative expression of 5-HT1A, -2B and -4 receptor class family were significantly higher in adipose tissue compared to adipose cells, whereas 5-HT1D, -2A and -7 were highly expressed in isolated adipose cells. Similar to 5-HT, 5-HT2 receptor agonists reduced lipolysis while 5-HT1 receptor agonists rather decreased non-stimulated and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Together, these data provide evidence of a direct effect of 5-HT on adipose cells, where 5-HT suppresses lipolysis and glucose uptake, which could contribute to altered systemic lipid- and glucose metabolism. PMID:27109474

  2. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  3. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  4. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  5. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  6. Acyl-lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; Debono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P; Franke, Rochus B; Graham, Ian A; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  7. TLR4/MD-2 activation by a synthetic agonist with no similarity to LPS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Su, Lijing; Morin, Matthew D.; Jones, Brian T.; Whitby, Landon R.; Surakattula, Murali M. R. P.; Huang, Hua; Shi, Hexin; Choi, Jin Huk; Wang, Kuan-wen; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Berger, Michael; Zhan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Boger, Dale L.; Beutler, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Structurally disparate molecules reportedly engage and activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and other TLRs, yet the interactions that mediate binding and activation by dissimilar ligands remain unknown. We describe Neoseptins, chemically synthesized peptidomimetics that bear no structural similarity to the established TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but productively engage the mouse TLR4 (mTLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complex. Neoseptin-3 activates mTLR4/MD-2 independently of CD14 and triggers canonical myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)- and Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF)-dependent signaling. The crystal structure mTLR4/MD-2/Neoseptin-3 at 2.57-Å resolution reveals that Neoseptin-3 binds as an asymmetrical dimer within the hydrophobic pocket of MD-2, inducing an active receptor complex similar to that induced by lipid A. However, Neoseptin-3 and lipid A form dissimilar molecular contacts to achieve receptor activation; hence strong TLR4/MD-2 agonists need not mimic LPS. PMID:26831104

  8. Statins and PPAR{alpha} agonists induce myotoxicity in differentiated rat skeletal muscle cultures but do not exhibit synergy with co-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy E. . E-mail: Timothy_Johnson@merck.com; Zhang, Xiaohua; Shi, Shu; Umbenhauer, Diane R.

    2005-11-01

    Statins and fibrates (weak PPAR{alpha} agonists) are prescribed for the treatment of lipid disorders. Both drugs cause myopathy, but with a low incidence, 0.1-0.5%. However, combined statin and fibrate therapy can enhance myopathy risk. We tested the myotoxic potential of PPAR subtype selective agonists alone and in combination with statins in a differentiated rat myotube model. A pharmacologically potent experimental PPAR{alpha} agonist, Compound A, induced myotoxicity as assessed by TUNEL staining at a minimum concentration of 1 nM, while other weaker PPAR{alpha} compounds, for example, WY-14643, Gemfibrozil and Bezafibrate increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, the PPAR{gamma} agonist Rosiglitazone caused little or no cell death at up to 10 {mu}M and the PPAR{delta} ligand GW-501516 exhibited comparatively less myotoxicity than that seen with Compound A. An experimental statin (Compound B) and Atorvastatin also increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei and co-treatment with WY-14643, Gemfibrozil or Bezafibrate had less than a full additive effect on statin-induced cell killing. The mechanism of PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced cell death was different from that of statins. Unlike statins, Compound A and WY-14643 did not activate caspase 3/7. In addition, mevalonate and geranylgeraniol reversed the toxicity caused by statins, but did not prevent the cell killing induced by WY-14643. Furthermore, unlike statins, Compound A did not inhibit the isoprenylation of rab4 or rap1a. Interestingly, Compound A and Compound B had differential effects on ATP levels. Taken together, these observations support the hypothesis that in rat myotube cultures, PPAR{alpha} agonism mediates in part the toxicity response to PPAR{alpha} compounds. Furthermore, PPAR{alpha} agonists and statins cause myotoxicity through distinct and independent pathways.

  9. Effect of postnatal age and a beta(3)-adrenergic agonist (Zeneca D7114) administration on uncoupling protein-1 abundance in the lamb.

    PubMed

    Bird, J A; Mostyn, A; Clarke, L; Juniper, D T; Budge, H; Stephenson, T; Symonds, M E

    2001-01-01

    We examined the effect of time after birth and beta(3)-adrenergic agonist (Zeneca D7114) administration on uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) abundance and thermoregulation in the lamb. Forty twin lambs, all born normally at term, were maintained at a cold ambient temperature of between 3 and 8 degrees C. At 0.5, 1.75, 5.25, 11.25 and 23.25 h after birth eight sets of twins were fed 20 ml of formula milk +/- 10 mg kg(-1) of beta(3)-adrenergic agonist, and 45 min after feeding brown adipose tissue (BAT) was sampled. Colonic temperature was measured and BAT analysed for UCP1 abundance, GDP-binding to mitochondrial protein (i.e. thermogenic activity) and catecholamine content. Colonic temperature declined between 1.25 and 6 h from 40.2 degrees C to 39.2 degrees C and then increased to 39.8 degrees C at 12 h, but increased after feeding at all ages. UCP1 abundance increased from 1.25 h after birth, to peak at 2 h after birth in controls, compared with 6 h after birth in beta(3)-adrenergic agonist-treated lambs. The level of GDP-binding to mitochondrial protein did not change significantly with age but was increased by beta(3)-adrenergic agonist treatment. The noradrenaline (norepinephrine) content of BAT increased between 1.25 and 12 h after birth, irrespective of beta(3)-adrenergic agonist administration. The total weight of perirenal BAT plus its lipid, protein and mitochondrial protein content declined over the first 6 h of life. UCP1 development continues over the first 24 h of neonatal life, and can be manipulated by beta(3)-adrenergic agonist administration. This may represent one method of improving thermoregulation in newborn lambs. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.1, 65-70. PMID:11429621

  10. Polyacetylenes from Notopterygium incisum–New Selective Partial Agonists of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-Gamma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Noha, Stefan M.; Malainer, Clemens; Kramer, Matthias P.; Cocic, Amina; Kunert, Olaf; Schinkovitz, Andreas; Heiss, Elke H.; Schuster, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a key regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism and therefore an important pharmacological target to combat metabolic diseases. Since the currently used full PPARγ agonists display serious side effects, identification of novel ligands, particularly partial agonists, is highly relevant. Searching for new active compounds, we investigated extracts of the underground parts of Notopterygium incisum, a medicinal plant used in traditional Chinese medicine, and observed significant PPARγ activation using a PPARγ-driven luciferase reporter model. Activity-guided fractionation of the dichloromethane extract led to the isolation of six polyacetylenes, which displayed properties of selective partial PPARγ agonists in the luciferase reporter model. Since PPARγ activation by this class of compounds has so far not been reported, we have chosen the prototypical polyacetylene falcarindiol for further investigation. The effect of falcarindiol (10 µM) in the luciferase reporter model was blocked upon co-treatment with the PPARγ antagonist T0070907 (1 µM). Falcarindiol bound to the purified human PPARγ receptor with a Ki of 3.07 µM. In silico docking studies suggested a binding mode within the ligand binding site, where hydrogen bonds to Cys285 and Glu295 are predicted to be formed in addition to extensive hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, falcarindiol further induced 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and enhanced the insulin-induced glucose uptake in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes confirming effectiveness in cell models with endogenous PPARγ expression. In conclusion, we identified falcarindiol-type polyacetylenes as a novel class of natural partial PPARγ agonists, having potential to be further explored as pharmaceutical leads or dietary supplements. PMID:23630612

  11. RXR Partial Agonist CBt-PMN Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Type 2 Diabetes without the Side Effects of RXR Full Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treating insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in rodents, currently known retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonists induce significant adverse effects. Here we introduce a novel RXR partial agonist CBt-PMN (11b), which shows a potent glucose-lowering effect and improvements of insulin secretion and glucose tolerance without the serious adverse effects caused by RXR full agonists. We suggest that RXR partial agonists may be a new class of antitype 2 diabetes drug candidates. PMID:24900488

  12. Dihydrocodeine/Agonists for Alcohol Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, Albrecht; Müller, Markus; Frietsch, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol addiction too often remains insufficiently treated. It shows the same profile as severe chronic diseases, but no comparable, effective basic treatment has been established up to now. Especially patients with repeated relapses, despite all therapeutic approaches, and patients who are not able to attain an essential abstinence to alcohol, need a basic medication. It seems necessary to acknowledge that parts of them need any agonistic substance, for years, possibly lifelong. For >14 years, we have prescribed such substances with own addictive character for these patients. Methods: We present a documented best possible practice, no designed study. Since 1997, we prescribed Dihydrocodeine (DHC) to 102 heavily alcohol addicted patients, later, also Buprenorphine, Clomethiazole (>6 weeks), Baclofen, and in one case Amphetamine, each on individual indication. This paper focuses on the data with DHC, especially. The Clomethiazole-data has been submitted to a German journal. The number of treatments with the other substances is still low. Results: The 102 patients with the DHC treatment had 1367 medically assisted detoxifications and specialized therapies before! The 4 years-retention rate was 26.4%, including 2.8% successfully terminated treatments. In our 12-steps scale on clinical impression, we noticed a significant improvement from mean 3.7 to 8.4 after 2 years. The demand for medically assisted detoxifications in the 2 years remaining patients was reduced by 65.5%. Mean GGT improved from 206.6 U/l at baseline to 66.8 U/l after 2 years. Experiences with the other substances are similar but different in details. Conclusion: Similar to the Italian studies with GHB and Baclofen, we present a new approach, not only with new substances, but also with a new setting and much more trusting attitude. We observe a huge improvement, reaching an almost optimal, stable, long term status in around 1/4 of the patients already. Many further

  13. Treatment with PPARα Agonist Clofibrate Inhibits the Transcription and Activation of SREBPs and Reduces Triglyceride and Cholesterol Levels in Liver of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijun; Li, Chunyan; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Shenghua; Shangguan, Mingjun; Xue, Lina; Zhang, Bianying; Ding, Fuxiang; Hui, Dequan; Liang, Aihua; He, Dongchang

    2015-01-01

    PPARα agonist clofibrate reduces cholesterol and fatty acid concentrations in rodent liver by an inhibition of SREBP-dependent gene expression. In present study we investigated the regulation mechanisms of the triglyceride- and cholesterol-lowering effect of the PPARα agonist clofibrate in broiler chickens. We observed that PPARα agonist clofibrate decreases the mRNA and protein levels of LXRα and the mRNA and both precursor and nuclear protein levels of SREBP1 and SREBP2 as well as the mRNA levels of the SREBP1 (FASN and GPAM) and SREBP2 (HMGCR and LDLR) target genes in the liver of treated broiler chickens compared to control group, whereas the mRNA level of INSIG2, which inhibits SREBP activation, was increased in the liver of treated broiler chickens compared to control group. Taken together, the effects of PPARα agonist clofibrate on lipid metabolism in liver of broiler chickens involve inhibiting transcription and activation of SREBPs and SREBP-dependent lipogenic and cholesterologenic gene expression, thereby resulting in a reduction of the triglyceride and cholesterol levels in liver of broiler chickens. PMID:26693219

  14. Cannabinoid and lipid-mediated vasorelaxation in retinal microvasculature.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, Jessica; Dong, Alex; Straiker, Alex; Zhu, Jiequan; Howlett, Susan E; Bagher, Amina; Denovan-Wright, Eileen; Yu, Dao-Yi; Kelly, Melanie E M

    2014-07-15

    The endocannabinoid system plays a role in regulation of vasoactivity in the peripheral vasculature; however, little is known about its role in regulation of the CNS microvasculature. This study investigated the pharmacology of cannabinoids and cannabimimetic lipids in the retinal microvasculature, a CNS vascular bed that is autoregulated. Vessel diameter (edge detector) and calcium transients (fura-2) were recorded from segments of retinal microvasculature isolated from adult, male Fischer 344 rats. Results showed that abnormal cannabidiol (Abn-CBD), an agonist at the putative endothelial cannabinoid receptor, CBe, inhibited endothelin 1 (ET-1) induced vasoconstriction in retinal arterioles. These actions of Abn-CBD were independent of CB1/CB2 receptors and were not mediated by agonists for GPR55 or affected by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition. However, the vasorelaxant effects of Abn-CBD were abolished when the endothelium was removed and were inhibited by the small Ca(2+)-sensitive K channel (SKCa) blocker, apamin. The effects of the endogenous endocannabinoid metabolite, N-arachidonyl glycine (NAGly), a putative agonist for GPR18, were virtually identical to those of Abn-CBD. GPR18 mRNA and protein were present in the retina, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that GPR18 was localized to the endothelium of retinal vessels. These findings demonstrate that Abn-CBD and NAGly inhibit ET-1 induced vasoconstriction in retinal arterioles by an endothelium-dependent signaling mechanism that involves SKCa channels. The endothelial localization of GPR18 suggests that GPR18 could contribute to cannabinoid and lipid-mediated retinal vasoactivity.

  15. Biliary lipid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hişmioğullari, Adnan Adil; Bozdayi, A Mithat; Rahman, Khalid

    2007-06-01

    The liver has many biochemical functions, of which one of the most important is bile formation. Bile is both a secretory and an excretory fluid and two of its most important functions are the delivery to the intestinal tract of: (i) bile acids to assist in fat digestion and absorption; and (ii) liver-derived metabolites of potentially toxic materials prior to their elimination from the body in the feces. Bile contains numerous solutes, including bile acids, phospholipids and cholesterol. Biliary lipids mainly consist of cholesterol and phospholipids and their secretion into bile is affected by the secretion of bile acids. Phospholipids and cholesterol are synthesized in the hepatocytes and are thought to be transferred via vesicle- and non-vesicle-mediated mechanisms into the bile canaliculus. Hepatocytes acquire biliary lipid by three pathways, which are biosynthesis, lipoproteins and existing molecules drawn from intracellular membranes, with the newly synthesized biliary lipid accounting for less than 20% of the total lipids. The hepatic determinants of biliary cholesterol elimination are not limited to total cholesterol homeostasis, but also concern biliary disease conditions, since excess biliary cholesterol secretion is involved in cholesterol gallstone formation, as well as being a major risk factor for gallbladder cancer. The purpose of this review was to highlight some of the major mechanisms involved in biliary lipid secretion.

  16. Honokiol: A non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist from nature☆

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Atanas G.; Wang, Jian N.; Gu, Shi P.; Bu, Jing; Kramer, Matthias P.; Baumgartner, Lisa; Fakhrudin, Nanang; Ladurner, Angela; Malainer, Clemens; Vuorinen, Anna; Noha, Stefan M.; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Schuster, Daniela; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M.; Heiss, Elke H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are clinically used to counteract hyperglycemia. However, so far experienced unwanted side effects, such as weight gain, promote the search for new PPARγ activators. Methods We used a combination of in silico, in vitro, cell-based and in vivo models to identify and validate natural products as promising leads for partial novel PPARγ agonists. Results The natural product honokiol from the traditional Chinese herbal drug Magnolia bark was in silico predicted to bind into the PPARγ ligand binding pocket as dimer. Honokiol indeed directly bound to purified PPARγ ligand-binding domain (LBD) and acted as partial agonist in a PPARγ-mediated luciferase reporter assay. Honokiol was then directly compared to the clinically used full agonist pioglitazone with regard to stimulation of glucose uptake in adipocytes as well as adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. While honokiol stimulated basal glucose uptake to a similar extent as pioglitazone, it did not induce adipogenesis in contrast to pioglitazone. In diabetic KKAy mice oral application of honokiol prevented hyperglycemia and suppressed weight gain. Conclusion We identified honokiol as a partial non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist in vitro which prevented hyperglycemia and weight gain in vivo. General significance This observed activity profile suggests honokiol as promising new pharmaceutical lead or dietary supplement to combat metabolic disease, and provides a molecular explanation for the use of Magnolia in traditional medicine. PMID:23811337

  17. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  18. Sound production during agonistic behavior of male Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Thorin; Kravitz, Edward A

    2011-01-01

    Male Drosophila fruit flies acquire and defend territories in order to attract females for reproduction. Both, male-directed agonistic behavior and female-directed courtship consist of series of recurrent stereotypical components. Various studies demonstrated the importance of species-specific sound patterns generated by wing vibration as being critical for male courtship success. In this study we analyzed the patterns and importance of sound signals generated during agonistic interactions of male Drosophila melanogaster. In contrast to acoustic courtship signals that consist of sine and pulse patterns and are generated by one extended wing, agonistic signals lack sine-like components and are generally produced by simultaneous movements of both wings. Though intra-pulse oscillation frequencies (carrier frequency) are identical, inter-pulse intervals are twice as long and more variable in aggression signals than in courtship songs, where their precise temporal pattern serves species recognition. Acoustic signals accompany male agonistic interactions over their entire course but occur particularly often after tapping behavior which is a major way to identify the gender of the interaction partner. Since similar wing movements may either be silent or generate sound and wing movements with sound have a greater impact on the subsequent behavior of a receiver, sound producing wing movements seem to be generated intentionally to serve as a specific signal during fruit fly agonistic encounters. PMID:20953152

  19. Tolerance with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists: time for reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Grove, A; Lipworth, B J

    1995-01-01

    1. In spite of the widespread use of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of asthma controversy continues regarding their possible role in increasing asthma mortality and morbidity. There is however no evidence available to suggest that tolerance to the bronchodilator or anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs is responsible for the deleterious effects reported with the regular use of bronchodilators. 2. There is no conclusive evidence to suggest that tolerance develops to the bronchodilator effects of short-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. Tolerance does however appear to develop to the anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs. 3. With regard to the long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, there is evidence to suggest that tolerance develops both to their anti-bronchoconstrictor, and bronchodilator effects. Tolerance was however demonstrated in the presence of improved symptom control, therefore the clinical relevance of this phenomenon is uncertain. 4. Systemic corticosteroids can modulate lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor function both preventing, and reversing tolerance. The situation regarding the effects of systemic or inhaled corticosteroids on modulating bronchodilator responses in asthmatics is less clear. There is some evidence to suggest that inhaled corticosteroids are unable to prevent bronchodilator or systemic tolerance to long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. 5. On the basis of the current evidence, the British Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of asthma appear appropriate with regard to their recommendations for the use of long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:7742147

  20. Current issues with beta2-adrenoceptor agonists: historical background.

    PubMed

    Tattersfield, Anne E

    2006-01-01

    The discovery that dessicated adrenal glands had beneficial effects in asthma arose in 1900 following a vogue for studying organotherapy at the end of the 19th century. The adrenal hormone adrenaline was found to have sympathomimetic properties and was isolated and synthesized in 1901. The first nonselective beta-agonist, isoproterenol, was isolated in 1940, followed by the development of selective beta2-agonists in the 1960s and the introduction of the long-acting beta2-agonists in the 1990s. The introduction of beta2-selectivity reduced adverse effects, as did developments in inhaler technology that allowed subjects to inhale much smaller doses of drug selectively to the airways. The beta2-agonists are some of the more important drugs to have been developed in the 20th century. Excessive doses can cause problems, and attempts to maximize the benefit from beta2-agonists and to reduce adverse effects has led to considerable epidemiological, clinical, and mechanistic research over the last 50 yr.

  1. The interaction of cannabinoid receptor agonists, CP55940 and WIN55212-2 with membranes using solid state 2H NMR

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Pavlopoulos, Spiro; Yang, De-Ping; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Two key commonly used cannabinergic agonists, CP55940 and WIN55212-2, are investigated for their effects on the lipid membrane bilayer using 2H solid state NMR, and the results are compared with our earlier work with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). To study the effects of these ligands we used hydrated bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) deuterated at the 2′ and 16′ positions of both acyl chains with deuterium atoms serving as probes for the dynamic and phase changes at the membrane interface and at the bilayer center respectively. All three cannabinergic ligands lower the phospholipid membrane phase transition temperature, increase the lipid sn-2 chain order parameter at the membrane interface and decrease the order at the center of the bilayer. Our studies show that the cannabinoid ligands induce lateral phase separation in the lipid membrane at physiological temperatures. During the lipid membrane phase transition, the cooperative dynamic process whereby the C-2H segments at the interface and center of the bilayer spontaneously reach the fast exchange regime (2H NMR timescale) is distinctively modulated by the two cannabinoids. Specifically, CP55940 is slightly more efficient at inducing liquid crystalline-type 2H NMR spectral features at the membrane interface compared to WIN55212-2. In contrast, WIN55212-2 has a far superior ability to induce liquid crystalline-type spectral features at the center of the bilayer, and it increases the order parameter of the sn-1 chain in addition to the sn-2 chain of the lipids. These observations suggest the cannabinoid ligands may influence lipid membrane domain formations and there may be contributions to their cannabinergic activities through lipid membrane microdomain related mechanisms. Our work demonstrates that experimental design strategies utilizing specifically deuterium labeled lipids yield more detailed insights concerning the properties of lipid bilayers. PMID:21129361

  2. The conjugated linoleic acid isomer trans-9,trans-11 is a dietary occurring agonist of liver X receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Josef; Liebisch, Gerhard; Patsch, Wolfgang; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-10-30

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers are dietary fatty acids that modulate gene expression in many cell types. We have previously reported that specifically trans-9,trans-11 (t9,t11)-CLA induces expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism of human macrophages. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this transcriptional activation, we asked whether t9,t11-CLA affects activity of liver X receptor (LXR) {alpha}, a major regulator of macrophage lipid metabolism. Here we show that t9,t11-CLA is a regulator of LXR{alpha}. We further demonstrate that the CLA isomer induces expression of direct LXR{alpha} target genes in human primary macrophages. Knockdown of LXR{alpha} with RNA interference in THP-1 cells inhibited t9,t11-CLA mediated activation of LXR{alpha} including its target genes. To evaluate the effective concentration range of t9,t11-CLA, human primary macrophages were treated with various doses of CLA and well known natural and synthetic LXR agonists and mRNA expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 was analyzed. Incubation of human macrophages with 10 {mu}M t9,t11-CLA led to a significant modulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 transcription and caused enhanced cholesterol efflux to high density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein AI. In summary, these data show that t9,t11-CLA is an agonist of LXR{alpha} in human macrophages and that its effects on macrophage lipid metabolism can be attributed to transcriptional regulations associated with this nuclear receptor.

  3. Lipid Production from Nannochloropsis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Nian; Chen, Tian-Peng; Yang, Bo; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are sunlight-driven green cell factories for the production of potential bioactive products and biofuels. Nannochloropsis represents a genus of marine microalgae with high photosynthetic efficiency and can convert carbon dioxide to storage lipids mainly in the form of triacylglycerols and to the ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Recently, Nannochloropsis has received ever-increasing interests of both research and public communities. This review aims to provide an overview of biology and biotechnological potential of Nannochloropsis, with the emphasis on lipid production. The path forward for the further exploration of Nannochloropsis for lipid production with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed. PMID:27023568

  4. Lipid Production from Nannochloropsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Nian; Chen, Tian-Peng; Yang, Bo; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Microalgae are sunlight-driven green cell factories for the production of potential bioactive products and biofuels. Nannochloropsis represents a genus of marine microalgae with high photosynthetic efficiency and can convert carbon dioxide to storage lipids mainly in the form of triacylglycerols and to the ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Recently, Nannochloropsis has received ever-increasing interests of both research and public communities. This review aims to provide an overview of biology and biotechnological potential of Nannochloropsis, with the emphasis on lipid production. The path forward for the further exploration of Nannochloropsis for lipid production with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed. PMID:27023568

  5. Confounding of the Comparative Safety of Prenatal Opioid Agonist Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brogly, Susan B; Hahn, Kristen A; Diaz, Sonia Hernandez; Werler, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal opioid agonist therapy with methadone or buprenorphine prevents maternal illicit opioid use and withdrawal and improves pregnancy outcomes compared to heroin use alone. Historically, methadone has been the first-line opioid agonist therapy for pregnant opioid dependent women; in recent years buprenorphine has become first-line treatment for some opioid dependent pregnant women. While there is some evidence of better outcomes in neonates exposed to buprenorphine vs. methadone, the effect of confounding from differences in women who use buprenorphine and methadone has not been carefully examined in most studies. This review explores mechanisms by which confounding can arise in measuring associations between prenatal buprenorphine vs. methadone exposure on neonatal outcomes using a graphical approach, directed acyclic graphs. The goal of this paper is to facilitate better understanding of the factors influencing neonatal abstinence syndrome and accurate assessment of the comparative safety of opioid agonist therapies on the neonate. PMID:27547489

  6. Adenosine receptor agonists for promotion of dermal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Valls, María D.; Cronstein, Bruce N.; Montesinos, M. Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex process that involves a well coordinated, highly regulated series of events including inflammation, tissue formation, revascularization and tissue remodeling. However, this orderly sequence is impaired in certain pathophysiological conditions such as diabetes mellitus, venous insufficiency, chronic glucocorticoid use, aging and malnutrition. Together with proper wound care, promotion of the healing process is the primary objective in the management of chronic poorly healing wounds. Recent studies have demonstrated that A2A adenosine receptor agonists promote wound healing in normal and diabetic animals and one such agonist, Sonedenoson, is currently being evaluated as a prospective new therapy of diabetic foot ulcers. We will review the mechanisms by which adenosine receptor activation affects the function of the cells and tissues that participate in wound healing, emphasizing the potential beneficial impact of adenosine receptor agonists in diabetic impaired healing. PMID:19041853

  7. Ethanol and membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Sun, G Y; Sun, A Y

    1985-01-01

    Although ethanol is known to exert its primary mode of action on the central nervous system, the exact molecular interaction underlying the behavioral and physiological manifestations of alcohol intoxication has not been elucidated. Chronic ethanol administration results in changes in organ functions. These changes are reflective of the adaptive mechanisms in response to the acute effects of ethanol. Biophysical studies have shown that ethanol in vitro disorders the membrane and perturbs the fine structural arrangement of the membrane lipids. In the chronic state, these membranes develop resistance to the disordering effects. Tolerance development is also accompanied by biochemical changes. Although ethanol-induced changes in membrane lipids have been implicated in both biophysical and biochemical studies, measurements of membrane lipids, such as cholesterol content, fatty acid unsaturation, phospholipid distribution, and ganglioside profiles, have not produced conclusive evidence that any of these parameters are directly involved in the action of ethanol. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence indicating that although ethanol in vitro produces a membrane-fluidizing effect, the chronic response to this effect is not to change the membrane bulk lipid composition. Instead, changes in membrane lipids may pertain to small metabolically active pools located in certain subcellular fractions. Most likely, these lipids are involved in important membrane functions. For example, the increase in PS in brain plasma membranes may provide an explanation for the adaptive increase in synaptic membrane ion transport activity, especially (Na,K)-ATPase. There is also evidence that the lipid pool involved in the deacylation-reacylation mechanism (i.e., PI and PC with 20:4 groups) is altered after ethanol administration. An increase in metabolic turnover of these phospholipid pools may have important implications for the membrane functional changes. Obviously, there are other

  8. Design, evaluation, and comparison of ghrelin receptor agonists and inverse agonists as suitable radiotracers for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Constance; Bergmann, Ralf; Pietzsch, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-04-18

    Ghrelin agonist and inverse agonist radiotracers, suitable for positron emission tomography (PET), were developed to study the behavior of ghrelin receptor ligands in vivo and for further design of druggable peptides. The target peptides were synthesized on solid support and conjugated to the bifunctional chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane,1-glutaric acid-4,7-acetic acid (NODAGA), which is known to form a stable complex with Ga(3+). Complexation with (68)Ga could be achieved under mild conditions and led to radiotracers with high radiochemical purity and specific activity. The biological activity of the radiotracers was evaluated in vitro by an inositol phosphate turnover assay. Pharmacokinetic profile and metabolic stability of the (68)Ga-NODAGA-radiotracers were investigated by small animal PET in rodent. Ghrelin derived agonists presented very high kidney accumulation, negligible tissue distribution, fast blood clearance, and poor stability in blood. Contrarily, the inverse agonist radiotracer exhibited very high stability in blood, large diffusion in tissues, reasonable kidney and liver metabolism, and slow blood clearance. This pharmacokinetic profile makes the ghrelin inverse agonist motif KwFwLL-CONH(2) suitable for further development of radiotracers and a promising lead to design peptide-based therapeutics against obesity. PMID:22372770

  9. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Loy, Douglas A.; Yamanaka, Stacey A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  10. The challenge of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Pike, Linda J

    2009-04-01

    The Singer-Nicholson model of membranes postulated a uniform lipid bilayer randomly studded with floating proteins. However, it became clear almost immediately that membranes were not uniform and that clusters of lipids in a more ordered state existed within the generally disorder lipid milieu of the membrane. These clusters of ordered lipids are now referred to as lipid rafts. This review summarizes current thinking on the nature of lipid rafts focusing on the role of proteomics and lipidomics in understanding the structure of these domains. It also outlines the contribution of single-molecule methods in defining the forces that drive the formation and dynamics of these membrane domains. PMID:18955730

  11. Acetylcholine receptor in planar lipid bilayers. Characterization of the channel properties of the purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Labarca, P; Lindstrom, J; Montal, M

    1984-04-01

    The properties of the channel of the purified acetylcholine receptor (AChR) were investigated after reconstitution in planar lipid bilayers. The time course of the agonist-induced conductance exhibits a transient peak that relaxes to a steady state value. The macroscopic steady state membrane conductance increases with agonist concentration, reaching saturation at 10(-5) M for carbamylcholine (CCh). The agonist-induced membrane conductance was inhibited by d-tubocurarine (50% inhibition, IC50, at approximately 10(-6) M) and hexamethonium (IC50 approximately 10(-5) M). The single channel conductance, gamma, is ohmic and independent of the agonist. At 0.3 M monovalent salt concentrations, gamma = 28 pS for Na+, 30 pS for Rb+, 38 pS for Cs+, and 50 pS for NH+4. The distribution of channel open times was fit by a sum of two exponentials, reflecting the existence of two distinct open states. tau o1 and tau o2, the fast and slow components of the distribution of open times, are independent of the agonist concentration: for CCh this was verified in the range of 10(-6) M less than C less than 10(-3)M. tau 01 and tau o2 are approximately three times longer for suberyldicholine ( SubCh ) than for CCh. tau o1 and tau o2 are moderately voltage dependent, increasing as the applied voltage in the compartment containing agonist is made more positive with respect to the other. At desensitizing concentrations of agonist, the AChR channel openings occurred in a characteristic pattern of sudden paroxysms of channel activity followed by quiescent periods. A local anesthetic derivative of lidocaine ( QX -222) reduced both tau o1 and tau o2. This effect was dependent on both the concentration of QX -222 and the applied voltage. Thus, the AChR purified from Torpedo electric organ and reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers exhibits ion conduction and kinetic and pharmacological properties similar to AChR in intact muscle postsynaptic membranes.

  12. Agonist treatment in opioid use: advances and controversy.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Biju; Chand, Prabhat; Benegal, Vivek; Murthy, Pratima

    2012-06-01

    Opioid dependence is a chronic relapsing condition which requires comprehensive care; pharmacological agents form the mainstay of its long term treatment. The two most popular approaches are the harm reduction method using agonists and the complete abstinence method using antagonists. Currently, particularly from the harm minimization perspective and the low feasibility of an abstinence based approach, there is an increasing trend toward agonist treatment. The use of buprenorphine has gained popularity in view of its safety profile and the availability of the buprenorphine-naloxone combination has made it popular as a take-home treatment. This review outlines the pharmacological advances and controversies in this area. PMID:22813654

  13. Insect Nicotinic Receptor Agonists as Flea Adulticides in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dai Tan; Hsu, Walter H.; Martin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Fleas are significant ectoparasites of small animals. They can be a severe irritant to animals and serve as a vector for a number of infectious diseases. In this article, we discuss the pharmacological characteristics of four insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists used as fleacides in dogs and cats, which include three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, nitenpyram, and dinotefuran) and spinosad. Insect nAChR agonists are one of the most important new classes of insecticides, which are used to control sucking insects both on plants and on companion animals. These new compounds provide a new approach for practitioners to safely and effectively eliminate fleas. PMID:20646191

  14. Beta2-agonist extraction procedures for chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    dos Ramos, F J

    2000-06-01

    Normally, different procedures were necessary to prepare sample matrices for chromatographic determination of beta2-agonists. The present review includes sampling, pre-treatment and extraction/purification for urine, plasma, liver, meat, feeds, hair and milk powder, as previous steps for chromatographic analysis of beta2-agonists. Six methodologies were especially revised for extraction/purification namely, liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction (SPE), matrix solid-phase dispersion, immunoaffinity chromatography, dialysis and supercritical fluid extraction. SPE was discussed in detail and five mechanisms were described: adsorption, apolar, polar, ion-exchange and mixed phase. A brief conclusion in this field was also outlined.

  15. High-resolution structure of the human GPR40 receptor bound to allosteric agonist TAK-875.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ankita; Yano, Jason; Hirozane, Yoshihiko; Kefala, Georgia; Gruswitz, Franz; Snell, Gyorgy; Lane, Weston; Ivetac, Anthony; Aertgeerts, Kathleen; Nguyen, Jasmine; Jennings, Andy; Okada, Kengo

    2014-09-01

    Human GPR40 receptor (hGPR40), also known as free fatty-acid receptor 1 (FFAR1), is a G-protein-coupled receptor that binds long-chain free fatty acids to enhance glucose-dependent insulin secretion. Novel treatments for type-2 diabetes mellitus are therefore possible by targeting hGPR40 with partial or full agonists. TAK-875, or fasiglifam, is an orally available, potent and selective partial agonist of hGPR40 receptor, which reached phase III clinical trials for the potential treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Data from clinical studies indicate that TAK-875, which is an ago-allosteric modulator of hGPR40 (ref. 3), demonstrates improved glycaemic control and low hypoglycaemic risk in diabetic patients. Here we report the crystal structure of hGPR40 receptor bound to TAK-875 at 2.3 Å resolution. The co-complex structure reveals a unique binding mode of TAK-875 and suggests that entry to the non-canonical binding pocket most probably occurs via the lipid bilayer. The atomic details of the extensive charge network in the ligand binding pocket reveal additional interactions not identified in previous studies and contribute to a clear understanding of TAK-875 binding to the receptor. The hGPR40-TAK-875 structure also provides insights into the plausible binding of multiple ligands to the receptor, which has been observed in radioligand binding and Ca(2+) influx assay studies. Comparison of the transmembrane helix architecture with other G-protein-coupled receptors suggests that the crystallized TAK-875-bound hGPR40 complex is in an inactive-like state.

  16. The liver X receptor agonist TO901317 protects mice against cisplatin-induced kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Wang, Rong; Sun, Jing; Yu, Kezhou; Chen, Bing; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Liver X receptors are in the nuclear receptor superfamily and are contained in the regulation of lipid and cholesterol metabolism. Besides, liver X receptors are considered crucial regulators of the inflammatory response and innate immunity. The current study evaluates the in vivo effects that the synthetic liver X receptor agonist TO901317 protects against cisplatin-induced kidney injury in mice. Mice received cisplatin administration through a single intraperitoneal injection (20 mg/kg in saline). And then the mice were treated with the TO901317 by daily gavage (10 mg/kg/day) 12 h postcisplatin administration, and cisplatin nephrotoxicity was evaluated. At 72 h after cisplatin treatment, elevated plasma urea and creatinine levels (P < 0.05) were evidenced which indicates the renal dysfunction of the vehicle-treated mice, consistent with tubular necrosis, protein cast, dilation of renal tubules, and desquamation of epithelial cells in renal tubules. In contrast, the severity of renal dysfunction and histological damage was reduced in TO901317 treated mice (P < 0.05). In accordance, circulating tumor necrosis factor alpha levels, renal tumor necrosis factor alpha, p47phox, gp91phox, and protein expression levels and COX-2 mRNA, renal monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, VACAM-1 mRNA and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 contents, and renal prostaglandin E2 amounts, were higher in samples from cisplatin-treated mice in comparison with controls (P < 0.05) but attenuated in the TO901317 treatment group (P < 0.05). Taken together, treatment with the liver X receptor agonist TO901317 ameliorated the inflammatory response and oxidative stress in cisplatin-induced kidney injury in mice. PMID:26062799

  17. Expanding roles for lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Welte, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid droplets are the intracellular sites for neutral lipid storage. They are critical for lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis, and their dysfunction has been linked to many diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that the roles lipid droplets play in biology are significantly broader than previously anticipated. Lipid droplets are the source of molecules important in the nucleus: they can sequester transcription factors and chromatin components and generate the lipid ligands for certain nuclear receptors. Lipid droplets have also emerged as important nodes for fatty acid trafficking, both inside the cell and between cells. In immunity, new roles for droplets, not directly linked to lipid metabolism, have been uncovered, as assembly platforms for specific viruses and as reservoirs for proteins that fight intracellular pathogens. Until recently, knowledge about droplets in the nervous system has been minimal, but now there are multiple links between lipid droplets and neurodegeneration: Many candidate genes for Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia also have central roles in lipid-droplet formation and maintenance, and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons can lead to transient accumulating of lipid droplets in neighboring glial cells, an event that may, in turn, contribute to neuronal damage. As the cell biology and biochemistry of lipid droplets are increasingly well understood, the next few years should yield many new mechanistic insights into these novel functions of lipid droplets. PMID:26035793

  18. Keratinocyte differentiation and upregulation of ceramide synthesis induced by an oat lipid extract via the activation of PPAR pathways.

    PubMed

    Chon, Su-Hyoun; Tannahill, Ruth; Yao, Xiang; Southall, Michael D; Pappas, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) has been shown to have an important role in skin barrier function by regulating differentiation and lipid synthesis in keratinocytes. Oat (Avena sativa) has long been used as a soothing agent to relieve skin irritations, and the clinical benefits of topical oat formulations have been proven; however, the mechanistic understanding of oat's mode of action remains unknown. We investigated whether an oat lipid extract could activate PPARs and subsequently increase epidermal lipid synthesis and differentiation markers. Primary human epidermal keratinocytes and transformed cell lines were treated with PPAR agonists and oat lipid extracts to investigate the PPAR agonism. PPAR target genes and epidermal differentiation markers were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR and HPTLC analysis. Oat lipid extract demonstrated robust dual agonism for PPARα and PPARβ/δ, and increased direct PPAR target gene induction in primary human keratinocytes. In addition, oat oil treatment increased both receptor expression and, consistent with the literature on PPARs, oat oil treatment resulted in a significant upregulation of differentiation genes (involucrin, SPRRs and transglutaminase 1) and ceramide processing genes (β-glucocerebrosidase, sphingomyelinases 3 and ABCA12). Further, oat oil treatment in keratinocytes significantly increased ceramide levels (70%), suggesting a functional translation of PPAR activation by oat oil in keratinocytes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that oat lipids possess robust dual agonistic activities for PPARα and PPARβ/δ, increase their gene expression and induce differentiation and ceramide synthesis in keratinocytes, which can collectively improve skin barrier function.

  19. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic nature of lipids, dietary fat is handled differently than protein or carbohydrate with respect with digestion and absorption. Dietary fats are broken down throughout the gastrointestinal system. A unique group of enzymes and cofactors allows this process to proceed in an eff...

  20. Lipids in cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids are present in cheese at levels above 20 percent and are analyzed by several techniques. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy are used to examine the microstructure, gas chromatography is employed to look at fatty acid composition, and differential scanning cal...

  1. Lipid droplets go nuclear.

    PubMed

    Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are sometimes found in the nucleus of some cells. In this issue, Ohsaki et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201507122) show that the nuclear membrane, promyelocytic leukemia bodies, and the protein PML-II play a role in nuclear LD formation, suggesting functional relationships between these structures. PMID:26728852

  2. A Toll-like receptor 2 agonist-fused antigen enhanced antitumor immunity by increasing antigen presentation and the CD8 memory T cells population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiao-Chieh; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Shen, Kuan-Yin; Leng, Chih-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    The induction of long-lived effector CD8+ T cells is key to the development of efficient cancer vaccines. In this study, we demonstrated that a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist-fused antigen increased antigen presentation via TLR2 signaling and induced effector memory-like CD8+ T cells against cancer after immunization. The N-terminus of ovalbumin (OVA) was biologically fused with a bacterial lipid moiety TLR2 agonist to produce a recombinant lipidated ovalbumin (rlipo-OVA). We demonstrated that rlipo-OVA activated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) maturation and increased antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I via TLR2. After immunization, rlipo-OVA skewed the immune response towards T helper (Th) 1 and induced OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Moreover, immunization with rlipo-OVA induced higher numbers of effector memory (CD44+CD62L−) CD8+ T cells compared with recombinant ovalbumin (rOVA) alone or rOVA mixed with the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4. Accordingly, the CD27+CD43+ effector memory CD8+ T cells expressed high levels of the long-lived CD127 marker. The administration of rlipo-OVA could inhibit tumor growth, but the anti-tumor effects were lost after the depletion of CD8 or CD127 cells in vivo. These findings suggested that the TLR2 agonist-fused antigen induced long-lived memory CD8+ T cells for efficient cancer therapy. PMID:27127171

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 gene regulation by a PPAR alpha agonist in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Souissi, Imen Jguirim; Billiet, Ludivine; Cuaz-Perolin, Clarisse; Rouis, Mustapha

    2008-11-01

    suggest that PPAR{alpha} agonists may be used therapeutically, not only for lipid disorders, but also to prevent inflammation and atheromatous plaque rupture, where their ability to inhibit MMP-12 expression in HMDM may be beneficial.

  4. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  5. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2010-06-29

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  6. Sphingolipid symmetry governs membrane lipid raft structure.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Lipid domain formation in membranes underlies the concept of rafts but their structure is controversial because the key role of cholesterol has been challenged. The configuration of glycosphingolipid receptors for agonists, bacterial toxins and enveloped viruses in plasma membrane rafts appears to be an important factor governing ligand binding and infectivity but the details are as yet unresolved. I have used X-ray diffraction methods to examine how cholesterol affects the distribution of glycosphingolipid in aqueous dispersions of an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and egg-sphingomyelin containing different proportions of glucosylceramide from human extracts. Three coexisting liquid-ordered bilayer structures are observed at 37°C in mixtures containing up to 20mol% glycosphingolipid. All the cholesterol was sequestered in one bilayer with the minimum amount of sphingomyelin (33mol%) to prevent formation of cholesterol crystals. The other two bilayers consisted of sphingomyelin and glucosylceramide. Asymmetric molecular species of glucosylceramide with N-acyl chains longer than 20 carbons form an equimolar complex with sphingomyelin in which the glycosidic residues are arranged in hexagonal array. Symmetric molecular species mix with sphingomyelin in proportions less than equimolar to form quasicrystalline bilayers. When the glycosphingolipid exceeds equimolar proportions with sphingomyelin cholesterol is incorporated into the structure and formation of a gel phase of glucosylceramide is prevented. The demonstration of particular structural features of ceramide molecular species combined with the diversity of sugar residues of glycosphingolipid classes paves the way for a rational approach to understanding the functional specificity of lipid rafts and how they are coupled across cell membranes.

  7. Lipids, fatty acids, and more

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy is the most expensive component in livestock diets. Lipids are concentrated energy sources and are known to affect growth, feed efficiency, feed dust, and diet palatability. A large majority of research evaluating lipids in livestock has utilized lipids of high quality, dealt mainly with anim...

  8. The emerging therapeutic roles of κ-opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark R; Kaye, Alan D; Kaye, Aaron J; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The current practice of μ-opioid receptor agonists such as morphine as the primary means of acute and chronic pain relief has several dangerous consequences that limit their effectiveness, including respiratory depression, gastrointestinal motility inhibition, addiction, tolerance, and abuse. Several other opioid receptors, notably the μ-opioid (KOP) receptor, have long been known to play a role in pain relief. Recent discoveries and advancements in laboratory techniques have allowed significant developments of KOP agonists as potential novel therapies for pain relief and other pathological processes. These drugs exhibit none of the classic opioid adverse effects and have displayed pronounced analgesia in several different scenarios. New formulations since 2014 have unveiled increased oral bioavailability, exceptional peripheral versus central selectivity, and a positive safety profile. Continued refinements of established μ-opioid agonist formulations have virtually eliminated the centrally mediated side effects of dysphoria and sedation that limited the applicability of previous KOP agonists. Further research is required to better elucidate the potential of these compounds in pain management, as well as in the mediation or modulation of other complex pathophysiological processes as therapeutic agents. PMID:27194194

  9. Systemic cancer immunotherapy with Toll-like receptor 7 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Hotz, Christian; Bourquin, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists represent a promising strategy for the immunotherapy of cancer. We have recently investigated the influence of TLR tolerance on the efficacy of systemic tumor treatment with TLR7 ligands. We propose that considering the kinetics of receptor sensitivity highly improves the outcome of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22720251

  10. Synthesis and immunostimulatory activity of substituted TLR7 agonists.

    PubMed

    Akinbobuyi, Babatope; Wang, Lei; Upchurch, Katherine C; Byrd, Matthew R; Chang, Charles A; Quintana, Jeremy M; Petersen, Rachel E; Seifert, Zacharie J; Boquin, José R; Oh, SangKon; Kane, Robert R

    2016-09-01

    Fifteen new substituted adenines were synthesized as potential TLR7 agonists. These compounds, along with 9 previously reported compounds, were analyzed for TLR7 activity and for the selective stimulation of B cell proliferation. Several functionalized derivatives exhibit significant activity, suggesting their potential for use as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27476423

  11. The emerging therapeutic roles of κ-opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark R; Kaye, Alan D; Kaye, Aaron J; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The current practice of μ-opioid receptor agonists such as morphine as the primary means of acute and chronic pain relief has several dangerous consequences that limit their effectiveness, including respiratory depression, gastrointestinal motility inhibition, addiction, tolerance, and abuse. Several other opioid receptors, notably the μ-opioid (KOP) receptor, have long been known to play a role in pain relief. Recent discoveries and advancements in laboratory techniques have allowed significant developments of KOP agonists as potential novel therapies for pain relief and other pathological processes. These drugs exhibit none of the classic opioid adverse effects and have displayed pronounced analgesia in several different scenarios. New formulations since 2014 have unveiled increased oral bioavailability, exceptional peripheral versus central selectivity, and a positive safety profile. Continued refinements of established μ-opioid agonist formulations have virtually eliminated the centrally mediated side effects of dysphoria and sedation that limited the applicability of previous KOP agonists. Further research is required to better elucidate the potential of these compounds in pain management, as well as in the mediation or modulation of other complex pathophysiological processes as therapeutic agents.

  12. Synthesis and immunostimulatory activity of substituted TLR7 agonists.

    PubMed

    Akinbobuyi, Babatope; Wang, Lei; Upchurch, Katherine C; Byrd, Matthew R; Chang, Charles A; Quintana, Jeremy M; Petersen, Rachel E; Seifert, Zacharie J; Boquin, José R; Oh, SangKon; Kane, Robert R

    2016-09-01

    Fifteen new substituted adenines were synthesized as potential TLR7 agonists. These compounds, along with 9 previously reported compounds, were analyzed for TLR7 activity and for the selective stimulation of B cell proliferation. Several functionalized derivatives exhibit significant activity, suggesting their potential for use as vaccine adjuvants.

  13. PPAR Agonist-Induced Reduction of Mcp1 in Atherosclerotic Plaques of Obese, Insulin-Resistant Mice Depends on Adiponectin-Induced Irak3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Arnould, Thierry; Tsatsanis, Christos; Holvoet, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists are used to treat dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. In this study, we examined molecular mechanisms that explain differential effects of a PPARα agonist (fenofibrate) and a PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) on macrophages during obesity-induced atherogenesis. Twelve-week-old mice with combined leptin and LDL-receptor deficiency (DKO) were treated with fenofibrate, rosiglitazone or placebo for 12 weeks. Only rosiglitazone improved adipocyte function, restored insulin sensitivity, and inhibited atherosclerosis by decreasing lipid-loaded macrophages. In addition, it increased interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-3 (Irak3) and decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (Mcp1) expressions, indicative of a switch from M1 to M2 macrophages. The differences between fenofibrate and rosiglitazone were independent of Pparγ expression. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), we identified the rosiglitazone-associated increase in adiponectin as cause of the increase in Irak3. Interestingly, the deletion of Irak3 in BMDM (IRAK3−/− BMDM) resulted in activation of the canonical NFκB signaling pathway and increased Mcp1 protein secretion. Rosiglitazone could not decrease the elevated Mcp1 secretion in IRAK3−/− BMDM directly and fenofibrate even increased the secretion, possibly due to increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. Furthermore, aortic extracts of high-fat insulin-resistant LDL-receptor deficient mice, with lower adiponectin and Irak3 and higher Mcp1, showed accelerated atherosclerosis. In aggregate, our results emphasize an interaction between PPAR agonist-mediated increase in adiponectin and macrophage-associated Irak3 in the protection against atherosclerosis by PPAR agonists. PMID:23620818

  14. A GPBAR1 (TGR5) small molecule agonist shows specific inhibitory effects on myeloid cell activation in vitro and reduces experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nuruddeen D; Patnaude, Lori A; Pelletier, Josephine; Souza, Donald J; Lukas, Susan M; King, F James; Hill, Jonathan D; Stefanopoulos, Dimitria E; Ryan, Kelli; Desai, Sudha; Skow, Donna; Kauschke, Stefan G; Broermann, Andre; Kuzmich, Daniel; Harcken, Christian; Hickey, Eugene R; Modis, Louise K

    2014-01-01

    GPBAR1 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by certain bile acids and plays an important role in the regulation of bile acid synthesis, lipid metabolism, and energy homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that GPBAR1 may also have important effects in reducing the inflammatory response through its expression on monocytes and macrophages. To further understand the role of GPBAR1 in inflammation, we generated a novel, selective, proprietary GPBAR1 agonist and tested its effectiveness at reducing monocyte and macrophage activation in vitro and in vivo. We have used this agonist, together with previously described agonists to study agonism of GPBAR1, and shown that they can all induce cAMP and reduce TLR activation-induced cytokine production in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. Additionally, through the usage of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we identified a select set of genes that are regulated by GPBAR1 agonism during LPS activation. To further define the in vivo role of GPBAR1 in inflammation, we assessed GPBAR1 expression and found high levels on circulating mouse monocytes. Agonism of GPBAR1 reduced LPS-induced cytokine production in mouse monocytes ex vivo and serum cytokine levels in vivo. Agonism of GPBAR1 also had profound effects in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of multiple sclerosis, where monocytes play an important role. Mice treated with the GPBAR1 agonist exhibited a significant reduction in the EAE clinical score which correlated with reduced monocyte and microglial activation and reduced trafficking of monocytes and T cells into the CNS. These data confirm the importance of GPBAR1 in controlling monocyte and macrophage activation in vivo and support the rationale for selective agonists of GPBAR1 in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  15. Synthesis of Lipid Mediators during UVB-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Angioni, Carlo; Ferreiros, Nerea; Schuh, Claus-Dieter; Suo, Jing; Schreiber, Yannick; Dawes, John M.; Antunes-Martins, Ana; Bennett, David L. H.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral sensitization during inflammatory pain is mediated by a variety of endogenous proalgesic mediators including a number of oxidized lipids, some of which serve endogenous modulators of sensory TRP-channels. These lipids are eicosanoids of the arachidonic acid and linoleic acid pathway, as well as lysophophatidic acids (LPAs). However, their regulation pattern during inflammatory pain and their contribution to peripheral sensitization is still unclear. Here, we used the UVB-model for inflammatory pain to investigate alterations of lipid concentrations at the site of inflammation, the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) as well as the spinal dorsal horn and quantified 21 lipid species from five different lipid families at the peak of inflammation 48 hours post irradiation. We found that known proinflammatory lipids as well as lipids with unknown roles in inflammatory pain to be strongly increased in the skin, whereas surprisingly little changes of lipid levels were seen in DRGs or the dorsal horn. Importantly, although there are profound differences between the number of cytochrome (CYP) genes between mice and rats, CYP-derived lipids were regulated similarly in both species. Since TRPV1 agonists such as LPA 18∶1, 9- and 13-HODE, 5- and 12-HETE were elevated in the skin, they may contribute to thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia during UVB-induced inflammatory pain. These results may explain why some studies show relatively weak analgesic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors in UVB-induced skin inflammation, as they do not inhibit synthesis of other proalgesic lipids such as LPA 18∶1, 9-and 13-HODE and HETEs. PMID:24349046

  16. Assessing the lipid requirements of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Sauls, Daniel; Machu, Tina K; Blanton, Michael P

    2006-04-01

    The lipid requirements of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) were assessed by reconstituting purified receptors into lipid vesicles of defined composition and by using photolabeling with 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine ([125I]TID) to determine functionality. Earlier studies demonstrated that nAChRs reconstituted into membranes containing phosphatidylcholine (PC), the anionic lipid phosphatidic acid (PA), and cholesterol (CH) are particularly effective at stabilizing the nAChR in the resting (closed) state that is capable of undergoing agonist-induced conformational transitions (i.e., functionality). The present studies demonstrate that (1) there is no obligatory requirement for PC, (2) increasing the CH content serves to increase the degree to which nAChRs are stabilized in the resting state, and this effect saturates at approximately 35 mol % (molar lipid percentage), and (3) the effect of increasing levels of PA saturates at approximately 12 mol % and in the absence of PA nAChRs are stabilized in the desensitized state (i.e., nonfunctional). Native Torpedo membranes contain approximately 35 mol % CH but less than 1 mol % PA, suggesting that other anionic lipids may substitute for PA. We report that (1) phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), anionic lipids that are abundant in native Torpedo membranes, also stabilize the receptor in the resting state although with reduced efficacy (approximately 50-60%) compared to PA, and (2) for nAChRs reconstituted into PA/CH membranes at different lipid-protein molar ratios, receptor functionality decreases rapidly below approximately 65 lipids per receptor. Collectively, these results are consistent with a functional requirement of a single shell of lipids surrounding the nAChR and specific anionic lipid- and sterol (CH)-protein interactions.

  17. Activation of endplate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by agonists.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of a small molecule made in one cell with a large receptor made in another is the signature event of cell signaling. Understanding the structure and energy changes associated with agonist activation is important for engineering drugs, receptors and synapses. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a ∼300kD ion channel that binds the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists to elicit electrical responses in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This mini-review is in two sections. First, general concepts of skeletal muscle AChR operation are discussed in terms of energy landscapes for conformational change. Second, adult vs. fetal AChRs are compared with regard to interaction energies between ACh and agonist-site side chains, measured by single-channel electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations. The five aromatic residues that form the core of each agonist binding site can be divided into two working groups, a triad (led by αY190) that behaves similarly at all sites and a coupled pair (led by γW55) that has a large influence on affinity only in fetal AChRs. Each endplate AChR has 5 homologous subunits, two of α(1) and one each of β, δ, and either γ (fetal) or ϵ (adult). These nicotinic AChRs have only 2 functional agonist binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αγ or αϵ subunit interfaces. The receptor undergoes a reversible, global isomerization between structures called C and O. The C shape does not conduct ions and has a relatively low affinity for ACh, whereas O conducts cations and has a higher affinity. When both agonist sites are empty (filled only with water) the probability of taking on the O conformation (PO) is low, <10(-6). When ACh molecules occupy the agonist sites the C→O opening rate constant and C↔O gating equilibrium constant increase dramatically. Following a pulse of ACh at the nerve-muscle synapse, the endplate current rises rapidly

  18. Therapeutic potential of aleglitazar, a new dual PPAR-α/γ agonist: implications for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cavender, Matthew A; Lincoff, A Michael

    2010-01-01

    Preventing morbidity and mortality from diabetes mellitus is of paramount importance as the incidence of this disease is increasing across the world. While microvascular complications of diabetes such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy are reduced with intensive glycemic control, treatment of hyperglycemia has not been consistently shown to have effects on the macrovascular complications of diabetes such as coronary artery, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular disease. Preventive efforts have accordingly shifted toward the modification of other cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients. Agonism of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) has long been an attractive target for antidiabetic therapy due to the role of PPARs in glycemic control and lipid metabolism. PPAR-α agonists such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are used in clinical practice for the treatment of diabetes, and there is some evidence that pioglitazone may have positive effects on cardiovascular complications by virtue of its favorable effects on lipid profiles. However, they have not been shown to reduce macrovascular events. PPAR-α agonism is the mechanism of action in the fibrate class of medications; these agents have been shown to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, reduce triglyceride levels, and improve cardiovascular outcomes. Given the prevalence of lipid abnormalities in patients with diabetes, dual PPAR-α/γ agonists (glitazars) could potentially benefit patients with diabetes. A phase II trial examining a novel dual PPAR agonist, aleglitazar, showed that therapy with this agent reduced hyperglycemia and favorably modified levels of HDL-C and triglycerides with an acceptable safety profile. Aleglitazar is currently being studied in large-scale clinical trials to assess whether it will reduce the risk of major cardiovascular endpoints (death, myocardial infarction, or stroke) among patients with diabetes and coronary artery

  19. Detection of novel intracellular agonist responsive pools of phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate using the TAPP1 pleckstrin homology domain in immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Watt, Stephen A; Kimber, Wendy A; Fleming, Ian N; Leslie, Nick R; Downes, C Peter; Lucocq, John M

    2004-02-01

    PtdIns(3,4) P (2), a breakdown product of the lipid second messenger PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3), is a key signalling molecule in pathways controlling various cellular events. Cellular levels of PtdIns(3,4) P (2) are elevated upon agonist stimulation, mediating downstream signalling pathways by recruiting proteins containing specialized lipid-binding modules, such as the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. A recently identified protein, TAPP1 (tandem-PH-domain-containing protein 1), has been shown to interact in vitro with high affinity and specificity with PtdIns(3,4) P (2) through its C-terminal PH domain. In the present study, we have utilized this PH domain tagged with glutathione S-transferase (GST-TAPP1-PH) as a probe in an on-section immunoelectron microscopy labelling procedure, mapping the subcellular distribution of PtdIns(3,4) P (2). As expected, we found accumulation of PtdIns(3,4) P (2) at the plasma membrane in response to the agonists platelet-derived growth factor and hydrogen peroxide. Importantly, however, we also found agonist stimulated PtdIns(3,4) P (2) labelling of intracellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and multivesicular endosomes. Expression of the 3-phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) in PTEN-null U87MG cells revealed differential sensitivity of these lipid pools to the enzyme. These data suggest a role for PtdIns(3,4) P (2) in endomembrane function.

  20. The SwissLipids knowledgebase for lipid biology

    PubMed Central

    Liechti, Robin; Hyka-Nouspikel, Nevila; Niknejad, Anne; Gleizes, Anne; Götz, Lou; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; David, Fabrice P.A.; van der Goot, F. Gisou; Riezman, Howard; Bougueleret, Lydie; Xenarios, Ioannis; Bridge, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Lipids are a large and diverse group of biological molecules with roles in membrane formation, energy storage and signaling. Cellular lipidomes may contain tens of thousands of structures, a staggering degree of complexity whose significance is not yet fully understood. High-throughput mass spectrometry-based platforms provide a means to study this complexity, but the interpretation of lipidomic data and its integration with prior knowledge of lipid biology suffers from a lack of appropriate tools to manage the data and extract knowledge from it. Results: To facilitate the description and exploration of lipidomic data and its integration with prior biological knowledge, we have developed a knowledge resource for lipids and their biology—SwissLipids. SwissLipids provides curated knowledge of lipid structures and metabolism which is used to generate an in silico library of feasible lipid structures. These are arranged in a hierarchical classification that links mass spectrometry analytical outputs to all possible lipid structures, metabolic reactions and enzymes. SwissLipids provides a reference namespace for lipidomic data publication, data exploration and hypothesis generation. The current version of SwissLipids includes over 244 000 known and theoretically possible lipid structures, over 800 proteins, and curated links to published knowledge from over 620 peer-reviewed publications. We are continually updating the SwissLipids hierarchy with new lipid categories and new expert curated knowledge. Availability: SwissLipids is freely available at http://www.swisslipids.org/. Contact: alan.bridge@isb-sib.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25943471

  1. Sex differences in opioid antinociception: kappa and 'mixed action' agonists.

    PubMed

    Craft, R M; Bernal, S A

    2001-08-01

    A number of investigators have shown that male animals are more sensitive than females to the antinociceptive effects of mu-opioid agonists. The present study was conducted to examine sex differences in opioid antinociception in the rat using agonists known to differ in selectivity for and efficacy at kappa- versus mu-receptors. Dose- and time-effect curves were obtained for s.c. U69593, U50488, ethylketazocine, (-)-bremazocine, (-)-pentazocine, butorphanol and nalbuphine on the 50 or 54 degrees C hotplate and warm water tail withdrawal assays; spontaneous locomotor activity was measured 32-52 min post-injection in the same rats. On the hotplate assay, only butorphanol (54 degrees C) and nalbuphine (50 degrees C) were significantly more potent in males than females. On the tail withdrawal assay, all agonists were significantly more potent or efficacious in males than females at one or both temperatures. In contrast, no agonist was consistently more potent in one sex or the other in decreasing locomotor activity. Estrous stage in female rats only slightly influenced opioid effects, accounting for an average of 2.6% of the variance in females' antinociceptive and locomotor responses to drug (50 degrees C experiment). These results suggest that (1) sex differences in antinociceptive effects of opioids are not mu-receptor-dependent, as they may occur with opioids known to have significant kappa-receptor-mediated activity; (2) the mechanisms underlying sex differences in kappa-opioid antinociception may be primarily spinal rather than supraspinal; (3) sex differences in antinociceptive effects of opioid agonists are not secondary to sex differences in their sedative effects. PMID:11418226

  2. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Stec, David E; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W; Baum, Justin; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  3. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Stec, David E.; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J.; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W.; Baum, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  4. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel indazolyl glucocorticoid receptor partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, John L; Sheppeck, James E; Wang, Jim; Dhar, T G Murali; Cavallaro, Cullen; Doweyko, Arthur M; Mckay, Lorraine; Cunningham, Mark D; Habte, Sium F; Nadler, Steven G; Dodd, John H; Somerville, John E; Barrish, Joel C

    2013-10-01

    SAR was used to further develop an indazole class of non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor agonists aided by a GR LBD (ligand-binding domain)-agonist co-crystal structure described in the accompanying paper. Progress towards discovering a dissociated GR agonist guided by human in vitro assays biased the optimization of this compound series towards partial agonists that possessed excellent selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors. PMID:23916594

  5. Pharmacogenomics of cardiovascular pharmacology: development of an informatics system for analysis of DNA microarray data with a focus on lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Takemoto, Kazuhisa; Adachi, Tetsuya; Osaki, Ken; Kawahara, Kozo; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2008-05-01

    Genome-wide gene-expression data from DNA-microarray technology and molecular-network data from computational text-mining have led to a paradigm shift in biological research. However, interpretation of the huge amount of data is a bottleneck. We have developed an informatics system, which we refer to as bioSpace Explorer, that can extract pathways and molecules of interest from genome-wide data and show the mutual relationships among these pathways and molecules. Differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells into adipocytes and the action of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonist or alpha-linolenic acid on this process was analyzed with bioSpace Explorer. The results suggested a biological basis for adipocyte differentiation and a strategy to enhance lipid oxidation in adipocytes. Clustered changes of molecules were apparent in the insulin, Wnt, and PPARgamma signaling pathways and in the lipogenesis, lipid oxidation, and lipid transport pathways during cell differentiation. A PPARgamma agonist enhanced lipid oxidation in adipocytes and alpha-linolenic acid gave similar results to the PPARgamma agonist. An analysis of sex hormone and thyroid hormone, in addition to PPARgamma signaling, suggested that these molecules are important for enhancement of lipid oxidation in adipocytes. The results indicate the utility of bioSpace Explorer for biological research on genome-wide molecular networks.

  6. Synthesis and SAR of potent LXR agonists containing an indole pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Campobasso, Nino; Smallwood, Angela; Parks, Derek J.; Webb, Christine L.; Frank, Kelly A.; Nord, Melanie; Duraiswami, Chaya; Evans, Christopher; Jaye, Michael; Thompson, Scott K.

    2009-03-27

    A novel series of 1H-indol-1-yl tertiary amine LXR agonists has been designed. Compounds from this series were potent agonists with good rat pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, the crystal structure of an LXR agonist bound to LXR{alpha} will be disclosed.

  7. Reviewing and identifying amino acids of human, murine, canine and equine TLR4 / MD-2 receptor complexes conferring endotoxic innate immunity activation by LPS/lipid A, or antagonistic effects by Eritoran, in contrast to species-dependent modulation by lipid IVa

    PubMed Central

    Scior, Thomas; Alexander, Christian; Zaehringer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    There is literature evidence gathered throughout the last two decades reflecting unexpected species differences concerning the immune response to lipid IVa which provides the opportunity to gain more detailed insight by the molecular modeling approach described in this study. Lipid IVa is a tetra-acylated precursor of lipid A in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Gram-negative bacteria. Lipid A of the prototypic E. coli-type is a hexa-acylated structure that acts as an agonist in all tested mammalian species by innate immunorecognition via the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) receptor complex. In contrast, lipid IVa is proinflammatory in mouse cells (agonism) but it remains inactive to human macrophages and even antagonizes the action of potent agonists like E. coli-type lipid A. This particular ambivalent activity profile of lipid IVa has been confirmed in other mammalian species: in equine cells Lipid IVa also acts in a weak agonistic manner, whereas being inactive and antagonizing the lipid A-induced activation of canine TLR4/MD-2. Intriguingly, the respective TLR4 amino acid sequences of the latter species are more identical to the human (67%, 68%) than to the murine (62%, 58%) ortholog. In order to address the unpaired activity-sequence dualism for human, murine, canine and equine species regarding the activity of lipid IVa as compared to LPS and lipid A and, we review the literature and computationally pinpoint the differential biological effects of lipid IVa versus LPS and lipid A to specific amino acid residues. In contrast to lipid IVa the structurally related synthetic compound Eritoran (E5564) acts consistently in an antagonistic manner in these mammalian species and serves as a reference ligand for molecular modeling in this study. The combined evaluation of data sets provided by prior studies and in silico homology mapping of differential residues of TLR4/MD-2 complexes lends detailed insight into the

  8. Reviewing and identifying amino acids of human, murine, canine and equine TLR4 / MD-2 receptor complexes conferring endotoxic innate immunity activation by LPS/lipid A, or antagonistic effects by Eritoran, in contrast to species-dependent modulation by lipid IVa.

    PubMed

    Scior, Thomas; Alexander, Christian; Zaehringer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    There is literature evidence gathered throughout the last two decades reflecting unexpected species differences concerning the immune response to lipid IVa which provides the opportunity to gain more detailed insight by the molecular modeling approach described in this study. Lipid IVa is a tetra-acylated precursor of lipid A in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Gram-negative bacteria. Lipid A of the prototypic E. coli-type is a hexa-acylated structure that acts as an agonist in all tested mammalian species by innate immunorecognition via the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) receptor complex. In contrast, lipid IVa is proinflammatory in mouse cells (agonism) but it remains inactive to human macrophages and even antagonizes the action of potent agonists like E. coli-type lipid A. This particular ambivalent activity profile of lipid IVa has been confirmed in other mammalian species: in equine cells Lipid IVa also acts in a weak agonistic manner, whereas being inactive and antagonizing the lipid A-induced activation of canine TLR4/MD-2. Intriguingly, the respective TLR4 amino acid sequences of the latter species are more identical to the human (67%, 68%) than to the murine (62%, 58%) ortholog. In order to address the unpaired activity-sequence dualism for human, murine, canine and equine species regarding the activity of lipid IVa as compared to LPS and lipid A and, we review the literature and computationally pinpoint the differential biological effects of lipid IVa versus LPS and lipid A to specific amino acid residues. In contrast to lipid IVa the structurally related synthetic compound Eritoran (E5564) acts consistently in an antagonistic manner in these mammalian species and serves as a reference ligand for molecular modeling in this study. The combined evaluation of data sets provided by prior studies and in silico homology mapping of differential residues of TLR4/MD-2 complexes lends detailed insight into the

  9. Agonists and partial agonists of rhodopsin: retinal polyene methylation affects receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Reiner; Lüdeke, Steffen; Siebert, Friedrich; Sakmar, Thomas P; Hirshfeld, Amiram; Sheves, Mordechai

    2006-02-14

    Using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy, we have studied the impact of sites and extent of methylation of the retinal polyene with respect to position and thermodynamic parameters of the conformational equilibrium between the Meta I and Meta II photoproducts of rhodopsin. Deletion of methyl groups to form 9-demethyl and 13-demethyl analogues, as well as addition of a methyl group at C10 or C12, shifted the Meta I/Meta II equilibrium toward Meta I, such that the retinal analogues behaved like partial agonists. This equilibrium shift resulted from an apparent reduction of the entropy gain of the transition of up to 65%, which was only partially offset by a concomitant reduction of the enthalpy increase. The analogues produced Meta II photoproducts with relatively small alterations, while their Meta I states were significantly altered, which accounted for the aberrant transitions to Meta II. Addition of a methyl group at C14 influenced the thermodynamic parameters but had little impact on the position of the Meta I/Meta II equilibrium. Neutralization of the residue 134 in the E134Q opsin mutant increased the Meta II content of the 13-demethyl analogue, but not of the 9-demethyl analogue, indicating a severe impairment of the allosteric coupling between the conserved cytoplasmic ERY motif involved in proton uptake and the Schiff base/Glu 113 microdomain in the 9-demethyl analogue. The 9-methyl group appears therefore essential for the correct positioning of retinal to link protonation of the cytoplasmic motif with protonation of Glu 113 during receptor activation.

  10. Tear Film Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A.

    2013-01-01

    Human meibomian gland secretions (MGS, or meibum) are formed from a complex mixture of lipids of different classes such as wax esters, cholesteryl esters, (O-acyl)-ω-hydroxy fatty acids (OAHFA) and their esters, acylglycerols, diacylated diols, free fatty acids, cholesterol, and a smaller amount of other polar and nonpolar lipids, whose chemical nature and the very presence in MGS have been a matter of intense debates. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent results that were obtained using different experimental techniques, estimate limitations of their usability, and discuss their biochemical, biophysical, and physiological implications. To create a lipid map of MGS and tears, the results obtained in the author’s laboratory were integrated with available information on chemical composition of MGS and tears. The most informative approaches that are available today to researchers, such as HPLC-MS, GC-MS, and proton NMR, are discussed in details. A map of the meibomian lipidome (as it is seen in reverse phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry experiments) is presented. Directions of future efforts in the area are outlined. PMID:23769846

  11. Painted supported lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Florin, E.-L.; Gaub, H. E.

    1993-01-01

    We report herein measurements on a novel type of supported lipid films, which we call painted supported membranes (PSM). These membranes are formed in a self-assembly process on alkylated gold films from an organic solution. The formation process was investigated with surface plasmon resonance microscopy. The optical and electrical properties of the films were determined for various types of lipids and as a function of temperature by means of cyclic voltammetry and potential relaxation after charge injection. We could show that these films exhibit an extraordinarily high specific resistivity which, depending on the lipid, may be as high as 109 ohm/cm2. We could also show that due to this low conductivity, an electrical polarization across the PSM relaxes with characteristic time constants of up to 20 min. The electrical properties together with their high mechanical stability and accessibility to surface sensitive techniques make these films well suitable model membranes for optical and electrical investigations. Examples for such applications are given in the subsequent article by Seifert et al. ImagesFIGURE 3FIGURE 4 PMID:19431873

  12. [Phosphoinositides: lipidic essential actors in the intracellular traffic].

    PubMed

    Bertazzi, Dimitri L; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Sanjuan-Vazquez, Myriam; Raess, Matthieu A; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PPIn) are lipids involved in the vesicular transport of proteins between the different intracellular compartments. They act by recruiting and/or activating effector proteins and are thus involved in crucial cellular functions including vesicle budding, fusion and dynamics of membranes and regulation of the cytoskeleton. Although they are present in low concentrations in membranes, their activity is essential for cell survival and needs to be tightly controlled. Therefore, phosphatases and kinases specific of the various cellular membranes can phosphorylate/dephosphorylate their inositol ring on the positions D3, D4 and/or D5. The differential phosphorylation determines the intracellular localisation and the activity of the PPIn. Indeed, non-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) is the basic component of the PPIn and can be found in all eukaryotic cells at the cytoplasmic face of the ER, the Golgi, mitochondria and microsomes. It can get phosphorylated on position D4 to obtain PtdIns4P, a PPIn enriched in the Golgi compartment and involved in the maintenance of this organelle as well as anterograde and retrograde transport to and from the Golgi. PtdIns phosphorylation on position D3 results in PtdIns3P that is required for endosomal transport and multivesicular body (MVB) formation and sorting. These monophosphorylated PtdIns can be further phosphorylated to produce bisphophorylated PtdIns. Thus, PtdIns(4,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation, is enriched in the plasma membrane and involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis. PtdIns(3,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns3P phosphorylation, is enriched in late endosomes, MVBs and the lysosome/vacuole and plays a role in endosome to vacuole transport. PtdIns(3,4)P2 is absent in yeast, cells and mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation in human cells; PtdIns(3,4)P2 is localised in the plasma membrane and plays an important role as a second messenger by recruiting

  13. [Phosphoinositides: lipidic essential actors in the intracellular traffic].

    PubMed

    Bertazzi, Dimitri L; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Sanjuan-Vazquez, Myriam; Raess, Matthieu A; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PPIn) are lipids involved in the vesicular transport of proteins between the different intracellular compartments. They act by recruiting and/or activating effector proteins and are thus involved in crucial cellular functions including vesicle budding, fusion and dynamics of membranes and regulation of the cytoskeleton. Although they are present in low concentrations in membranes, their activity is essential for cell survival and needs to be tightly controlled. Therefore, phosphatases and kinases specific of the various cellular membranes can phosphorylate/dephosphorylate their inositol ring on the positions D3, D4 and/or D5. The differential phosphorylation determines the intracellular localisation and the activity of the PPIn. Indeed, non-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) is the basic component of the PPIn and can be found in all eukaryotic cells at the cytoplasmic face of the ER, the Golgi, mitochondria and microsomes. It can get phosphorylated on position D4 to obtain PtdIns4P, a PPIn enriched in the Golgi compartment and involved in the maintenance of this organelle as well as anterograde and retrograde transport to and from the Golgi. PtdIns phosphorylation on position D3 results in PtdIns3P that is required for endosomal transport and multivesicular body (MVB) formation and sorting. These monophosphorylated PtdIns can be further phosphorylated to produce bisphophorylated PtdIns. Thus, PtdIns(4,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation, is enriched in the plasma membrane and involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis. PtdIns(3,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns3P phosphorylation, is enriched in late endosomes, MVBs and the lysosome/vacuole and plays a role in endosome to vacuole transport. PtdIns(3,4)P2 is absent in yeast, cells and mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation in human cells; PtdIns(3,4)P2 is localised in the plasma membrane and plays an important role as a second messenger by recruiting

  14. Neural effects of gut- and brain-derived glucagon-like peptide-1 and its receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Kenichi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is derived from both the enteroendocrine L cells and preproglucagon-expressing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem. As GLP-1 is cleaved by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 yielding a half-life of less than 2 min, it is plausible that the gut-derived GLP-1, released postprandially, exerts its effects on the brain mainly by interacting with vagal afferent neurons located at the intestinal or hepatic portal area. GLP-1 neurons in the NTS widely project in the central nervous system and act as a neurotransmitter. One of the physiological roles of brain-derived GLP-1 is restriction of feeding. GLP-1 receptor agonists have recently been used to treat type 2 diabetic patients, and have been shown to exhibit pleiotropic effects beyond incretin action, which involve brain functions. GLP-1 receptor agonist administered in the periphery is stable because of its resistance to dipeptidyl peptidase-4, and is highly likely to act on the brain by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as well as interacting with vagal afferent nerves. Central actions of GLP-1 have various roles including regulation of feeding, weight, glucose and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular functions, cognitive functions, and stress and emotional responses. In the present review, we focus on the source of GLP-1 and the pathway by which peripheral GLP-1 informs the brain, and then discuss recent findings on the central effects of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor agonists. PMID:27186358

  15. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Fat in the Setting of PPARγ Agonist Treatment in Female C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Styner, Maya; Pagnotti, Gabriel M; Galior, Kornelia; Wu, Xin; Thompson, William R; Uzer, Gunes; Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Horowitz, Mark C; Styner, Martin A; Rubin, Clinton; Rubin, Janet

    2015-08-01

    The contribution of marrow adipose tissue (MAT) to skeletal fragility is poorly understood. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ agonists, associated with increased fractures in diabetic patients, increase MAT. Here, we asked whether exercise could limit the MAT accrual and increase bone formation in the setting of PPARγ agonist treatment. Eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were treated with 20-mg/kg · d rosiglitazone (Rosi) and compared with control (CTL) animals. Exercise groups ran 12 km/d when provided access to running wheels (CTL exercise [CTL-E], Rosi-E). After 6 weeks, femoral MAT (volume of lipid binder osmium) and tibial bone morphology were assessed by microcomputer tomography. Rosi was associated with 40% higher femur MAT volume compared with CTL (P < .0001). Exercise suppressed MAT volume by half in CTL-E mice compared with CTL (P < .01) and 19% in Rosi-E compared with Rosi (P < .0001). Rosi treatment increased fat markers perilipin and fatty acid synthase mRNA by 4-fold (P < .01). Exercise was associated with increased uncoupling protein 1 mRNA expression in both CTL-E and Rosi-E groups (P < .05), suggestive of increased brown fat. Rosi increased cortical porosity (P < .0001) but did not significantly impact trabecular or cortical bone quantity. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume was not prevented by Rosi (CTL-E 21% > CTL, P < .05; Rosi-E 26% > Rosi, P < .01). In summary, despite the Rosi induction of MAT extending well into the femoral diaphysis, exercise was able to significantly suppress MAT volume and induce bone formation. Our results suggest that the impact of PPARγ agonists on bone and marrow health can be partially mitigated by exercise. PMID:26052898

  16. Omega-3 fatty acids and other FFA4 agonists inhibit growth factor signaling in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze; Hopkins, Mandi M; Zhang, Zhihong; Quisenberry, Chrystal B; Fix, Louise C; Galvan, Brianna M; Meier, Kathryn E

    2015-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) are proposed to have many beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanisms underlying their potential cancer preventative effects are unclear. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1/GPR40 and FFA4/GPR120, specifically bind n-3 FAs as agonist ligands. In this study, we examined the effects of n-3 FAs in human prostate cancer cell lines. Initial studies established that the long-chain n-3 FAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, inhibit proliferation of DU145 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogenic lipid mediator. When added alone to serum-starved DU145 cells, EPA transiently activates signaling events, including p70S6K phosphorylation. However, when added 15 minutes prior to LPA, EPA suppresses LPA-induced activating phosphorylations of ERK, FAK, and p70S6K, and expression of the matricellular protein CCN1. The rapid onset of the inhibitory action of EPA suggested involvement of a GPCR. Further studies showed that DU145 and PC-3 cells express mRNA and protein for both FFA4 and FFA1. TUG-891 (4-[(4-fluoro-4'-methyl[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy]-benzenepropanoic acid), a selective agonist for FFA4, exerts inhibitory effects on LPA- and epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation and migration, similar to EPA, in DU145 and PC-3 cells. The effects of TUG-891 and EPA are readily reversible. The FFA1/FFA4 agonist GW9508 (4-[[(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl]amino]-benzenepropranoic acid) likewise inhibits proliferation at doses that block FFA4. Knockdown of FFA4 expression prevents EPA- and TUG-891-induced inhibition of growth and migration. Together, these results indicate that activation of FFA4 initiates signaling events that can inhibit growth factor-induced signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppression of cancer cell proliferation.

  17. Selective PPAR modulators, dual and pan PPAR agonists: multimodal drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pourcet, Benoit; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart; Glineur, Corine

    2006-09-01

    More than 70% of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) die because of cardiovascular diseases. Current therapeutic strategies are based on separate treatment of insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Development of drugs with multimodal activities should improve management of the global cardiovascular risk of T2DM patients and result in better patient compliance. New therapeutic strategies are aimed at targeting the entire spectrum of dysfunctioning organs, cells and regulatory pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of T2DM, dyslipidaemia and atherosclerosis. PPAR family members play major roles in the regulation of lipid metabolism, glucose homeostasis and inflammatory processes, making these transcription factors ideal targets for therapeutic strategies against these diseases. This review discusses why PPARs and development of novel selective PPAR modulators, dual and pan PPAR agonists constitute promising approaches for the treatment of diabetes, dyslipidaemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:16939380

  18. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of the octopamine receptor using GPUs: discovery of an alternate agonist-binding position.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Kevin W; Izaguirre, Jesús A

    2016-10-01

    Octopamine receptors (OARs) perform key biological functions in invertebrates, making this class of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) worth considering for insecticide development. However, no crystal structures and very little research exists for OARs. Furthermore, GPCRs are large proteins, are suspended in a lipid bilayer, and are activated on the millisecond timescale, all of which make conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations infeasible, even if run on large supercomputers. However, accelerated Molecular Dynamics (aMD) simulations can reduce this timescale to even hundreds of nanoseconds, while running the simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs) would enable even small clusters of GPUs to have processing power equivalent to hundreds of CPUs. Our results show that aMD simulations run on GPUs can successfully obtain the active and inactive state conformations of a GPCR on this reduced timescale. Furthermore, we discovered a potential alternate active-state agonist-binding position in the octopamine receptor which has yet to be observed and may be a novel GPCR agonist-binding position. These results demonstrate that a complex biological system with an activation process on the millisecond timescale can be successfully simulated on the nanosecond timescale using a simple computing system consisting of a small number of GPUs. Proteins 2016; 84:1480-1489. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27318014

  19. Identification of isosilybin a from milk thistle seeds as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Atanasov, Atanas G; Malainer, Clemens; Noha, Stefan M; Kunert, Olaf; Schuster, Daniela; Heiss, Elke H; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Wagner, Hildebert; Bauer, Rudolf; Dirsch, Verena M

    2014-04-25

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a key regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism. Agonists of this nuclear receptor are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and are also studied as a potential treatment of other metabolic diseases, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Silymarin, a concentrated phenolic mixture from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) seeds, is used widely as a supportive agent in the treatment of a variety of liver diseases. In this study, the PPARγ activation potential of silymarin and its main constituents was investigated. Isosilybin A (3) caused transactivation of a PPARγ-dependent luciferase reporter in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect could be reversed upon co-treatment with the PPARγ antagonist T0070907. In silico docking studies suggested a binding mode for 3 distinct from that of the inactive silymarin constituents, with one additional hydrogen bond to Ser342 in the entrance region of the ligand-binding domain of the receptor. Hence, isosilybin A (3) has been identified as the first flavonolignan PPARγ agonist, suggesting its further investigation as a modulator of this nuclear receptor.

  20. A formulation-enabled preclinical efficacy assessment of a farnesoid X receptor agonist, GW4064, in hamsters and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Thompson, David C; Ghosh, Sarbani; Heitmeier, Monique R

    2011-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to one of the human nuclear receptor superfamilies that regulate gene transcription. FXR is widely expressed in liver, gall bladder, intestine, kidney, and adrenal glands. It serves as a key controller of bile acid homeostasis through its regulation of bile acid synthesis, conjugation, secretion, and absorption. FXR is also known to play a role in lipid regulation, triglyceride synthesis, and lipoprotein metabolism and clearance. We used a commercially available FXR agonist, GW4064, as a model compound to assess preclinical efficacy in two species (hamster and cynomolgus monkey). The crystalline GW4064, however, was found to have limited solubility, which resulted in poor oral bioavailability. This made it difficult to assess in vivo efficacy at the exposure levels desired. The physiochemical properties of GW4064 were assessed and both salt and self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) formulation were developed and tested. The SEDDS formulation was found to greatly improve the oral bioavailability of GW4064, and permitted the evaluation of FXR agonist target efficacy.

  1. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of the octopamine receptor using GPUs: discovery of an alternate agonist-binding position.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Kevin W; Izaguirre, Jesús A

    2016-10-01

    Octopamine receptors (OARs) perform key biological functions in invertebrates, making this class of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) worth considering for insecticide development. However, no crystal structures and very little research exists for OARs. Furthermore, GPCRs are large proteins, are suspended in a lipid bilayer, and are activated on the millisecond timescale, all of which make conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations infeasible, even if run on large supercomputers. However, accelerated Molecular Dynamics (aMD) simulations can reduce this timescale to even hundreds of nanoseconds, while running the simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs) would enable even small clusters of GPUs to have processing power equivalent to hundreds of CPUs. Our results show that aMD simulations run on GPUs can successfully obtain the active and inactive state conformations of a GPCR on this reduced timescale. Furthermore, we discovered a potential alternate active-state agonist-binding position in the octopamine receptor which has yet to be observed and may be a novel GPCR agonist-binding position. These results demonstrate that a complex biological system with an activation process on the millisecond timescale can be successfully simulated on the nanosecond timescale using a simple computing system consisting of a small number of GPUs. Proteins 2016; 84:1480-1489. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The TLR4 Agonist Vaccine Adjuvant, GLA-SE, Requires Canonical and Atypical Mechanisms of Action for TH1 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Cauwelaert, Natasha Dubois; Desbien, Anthony L.; Hudson, Thomas E.; Pine, Samuel O.; Reed, Steven G.; Coler, Rhea N.; Orr, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor 4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant formulated in a stable emulsion (GLA-SE) promotes strong TH1 and balanced IgG1/IgG2 responses to protein vaccine antigens. This enhanced immunity is sufficient to provide protection against many diseases including tuberculosis and leishmaniasis. To better characterize the adjuvant action it is important to understand how the different cytokines and transcription factors contribute to the initiation of immunity. In the present study using T-bet-/- and IL-12-/- mice and a blocking anti-IFNαR1 monoclonal antibody, we define mechanisms of adjuvant activity of GLA-SE. In accordance with previous studies of TLR4 agonist based adjuvants, we found that TH1 induction via GLA-SE was completely dependent upon T-bet, a key transcription factor for IFNγ production and TH1 differentiation. Consistent with this, deficiency of IL-12, a cytokine canonical to TH1 induction, ablated TH1 induction via GLA-SE. Finally we demonstrate that the innate immune response to GLA-SE, including rapid IFNγ production by memory CD8+ T cells and NK cells, was contingent on type I interferon, a cytokine group whose association with TH1 induction is contextual, and that they contributed to the adjuvant activity of GLA-SE. PMID:26731269

  3. The association of thromboxane A2 receptor with lipid rafts is a determinant for platelet functional responses.

    PubMed

    Moscardó, A; Vallés, J; Latorre, A; Santos, M T

    2014-08-25

    We have investigated the presence of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) receptor associated with lipid rafts in human platelets and the regulation of platelet function in response to TXA2 receptor agonists when lipid rafts are disrupted by cholesterol extraction. Platelet aggregation with TXA2 analogs U46619 and IBOP was almost blunted in cholesterol-depleted platelets, as well as αIIbβ3 integrin activation and P-selectin exposure. Raft disruption also inhibited TXA2-induced cytosolic calcium increase and nucleotide release, ruling out an implication of P2Y12 receptor. An important proportion of TXA2 receptor (40%) was colocalized at lipid rafts. The presence of the TXA2 receptor associated with lipid rafts in platelets is important for functional platelet responses to TXA2.

  4. Illegal use of beta-adrenergic agonists: European Community.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, H A; Noordam, M Y; van Dooren-Flipsen, M M; Schilt, R; Roos, A H

    1998-01-01

    The use of veterinary medicinal products within the European Community is governed by a series of directives and regulations that describe the requirements for safety, quality, and efficacy of these products. Veterinary therapeutic use of beta-agonists has only been approved in the case of clenbuterol for bronchodilatation in horses and calves and for tocolysis in cows. No beta-agonists have been permitted in the European Community for growth-promoting purposes in farm animals. Surveillance for the presence of residues of veterinary agents in food-producing animals and meat is regulated by the Directive 86/469/EEC containing specific guidelines for sampling procedures on farms and in slaughterhouses. The level and frequency of sampling is dependent on the category of compounds and animal species. When positive samples have been identified (above certain action levels), sampling intensity is increased. Results of monitoring programs in EU member states during 1992 and 1993 for the occurrence of residues of beta-agonists in food-producing animals vary substantially with respect to the percentages of positive samples, ranging from 0 to 7%. The variability is partly explained by differences in sampling strategies, detection methods, and action levels applied. Identification of the proper matrices for sampling and detection of beta-agonists is important. In the case of clenbuterol, hair and choroid retinal tissue are appropriate tissues because clenbuterol accumulates in these matrices. A clear decrease in the use of clenbuterol in cattle has been observed in The Netherlands, Germany, Northern Ireland, and Spanish Basque Country over the last 3 yr. This is partly due to intensified surveillance activities at farms and slaughterhouses by governmental agencies and production sector organizations. There are data on human intoxication following consumption of liver or meat from cattle treated with beta-agonists. At the concentrations of clenbuterol measured in contaminated

  5. Characterization of TRIF Selectivity in the AGP Class of Lipid A Mimetics: Role of Secondary Lipid Chains

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Juhienah K.; Bowen, William S.; Bazin, Hélène G.; Ryter, Kendal T.; Livesay, Mark T.; Ward, Jon R.; Evans, Jay T.; Johnson, David A.

    2014-01-01

    TLR4 agonists that favor TRIF-dependent signaling and the induction of type 1 interferons may have potential as vaccine adjuvants with reduced toxicity. CRX-547 (4), a member of the aminoalkyl glucosaminide 4-phosphate (AGP) class of lipid A mimetics possessing three (R)-3-decanoyloxytetradecanoyl groups and D-relative configuration in the aglycon, selectively reduces MyD88-dependent signaling resulting in TRIF-selective signaling, whereas the corresponding secondary ether lipid 6a containing (R)-3-decyloxytetradecanoyl groups does not. In order to determine which secondary acyl groups are important for the reduction in MyD88-dependent signaling activity of 4, the six possible ester/ether hybrid derivatives of 4 and 6a were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to induce NF-κB in a HEK293 cell reporter assay. An (R)-3-decanoyloxytetradecanoyl group on the 3-position of the D-glucosamine unit was found to be indispensable for maintaining low NF-κB activity irrespective of the substitutions (decyl or decanoyl) on the other two secondary positions. These results suggest that the carbonyl group of the 3-secondary lipid chain may impede homodimerization and/or conformational changes in the TLR4–MD2 complex necessary for MyD88 binding and pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. PMID:25553892

  6. Cell type and gene-specific activity of the retinoid inverse agonist AGN 193109: divergent effects from agonist at retinoic acid receptor gamma in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Thacher, S M; Nagpal, S; Klein, E S; Arefieg, T; Krasinski, G; DiSepio, D; Agarwal, C; Johnson, A; Eckert, R L; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-04-01

    Retinoids are important regulators of epithelial differentiation. AGN 193109 is a high-affinity antagonist and inverse agonist for the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Paradoxically, both AGN 193109 and retinoid agonists inhibit the expression of the differentiation marker MRP-8 in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). TTNPB, an RAR agonist, and AGN 193109 mutually antagonize MRP-8 inhibition at both mRNA and protein levels. We find that this antagonism, which is greatest at an AGN 193109:TTNPB ratio of about 10:1, is absent when either compound is in significant excess. The potent RARalpha-specific agonist, AGN 193836, has no effect on MRP-8 regulation. These data indicate that inverse agonists and agonists suppress MRP-8 in NHKs through RARgamma using distinct and mutually inhibitory mechanisms. The activity of AGN 193109 on MRP-8 is cell type specific. In differentiating ECE16-1 cervical cells, TTNPB inhibits while AGN 193109 induces MRP-8 mRNA levels. The effect of AGN 193109 on genes inhibited by retinoid agonists in NHKs is also selective; expression of the differentiation markers transglutaminase 1 and keratin 6 is not down-regulated by AGN 193109 whereas stromelysin-1 expression is suppressed. These results show a complex gene and cell context-specific interplay between agonist and inverse agonist for the regulation of gene expression.

  7. Liver X receptor agonist prevents LPS-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yunhe; Tian, Yuan; Wei, Zhengkai; Liu, Hui; Song, Xiaojing; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Liver X receptor-α (LXR-α) which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a ligand-activated transcription factor. Best known for its ability to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, LXRs have recently also been implicated in regulation of inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of synthetic LXR-α agonist T0901317 on LPS-induced mastitis in mice. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. T0901317 was injected 1h before and 12h after induction of LPS intraperitoneally. The results showed that T0901317 significantly attenuated the infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes, and the activation of myeloperoxidase (MPO); down-regulated the level of pro-inflammatory mediators including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and PEG2; inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65, caused by LPS. Moreover, we report for the first time that LXR-α activation impaired LPS-induced mastitis. Taken together, these data indicated that T0901317 had protective effect on mastitis and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of T0901317 on LPS induced mastitis in mice may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB signaling pathway. LXR-α activation can be used as a therapeutic approach to treat mastitis.

  8. Effects of PPAR-γ agonist treatment on LPS-induced mastitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mingfeng, Ding; Xiaodong, Ming; Yue, Liu; Taikui, Piao; Lei, Xiao; Ming, Liu

    2014-12-01

    PPAR-γ, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, plays an important role in lipid metabolism and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of synthetic PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis in rats. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by the injection of LPS through the duct of the mammary gland. Rosiglitazone was injected 1 h before the induction of LPS intraperitoneally. The results showed that rosiglitazone attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), and the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, Western blotting showed that rosiglitazone inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65. These results indicated that rosiglitazone has a protective effect on mastitis, and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of rosiglitazone on LPS-induced mastitis in rats may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB signaling pathways. PPAR-γ may be a potential therapeutic target against mastitis.

  9. Generalized Concentration Addition Modeling Predicts Mixture Effects of Environmental PPARγ Agonists.

    PubMed

    Watt, James; Webster, Thomas F; Schlezinger, Jennifer J

    2016-09-01

    The vast array of potential environmental toxicant combinations necessitates the development of efficient strategies for predicting toxic effects of mixtures. Current practices emphasize the use of concentration addition to predict joint effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals in coexposures. Generalized concentration addition (GCA) is one such method for predicting joint effects of coexposures to chemicals and has the advantage of allowing for mixture components to have differences in efficacy (ie, dose-response curve maxima). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor that plays a central role in regulating lipid homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, and bone quality and is the target of an increasing number of environmental toxicants. Here, we tested the applicability of GCA in predicting mixture effects of therapeutic (rosiglitazone and nonthiazolidinedione partial agonist) and environmental PPARγ ligands (phthalate compounds identified using EPA's ToxCast database). Transcriptional activation of human PPARγ1 by individual compounds and mixtures was assessed using a peroxisome proliferator response element-driven luciferase reporter. Using individual dose-response parameters and GCA, we generated predictions of PPARγ activation by the mixtures, and we compared these predictions with the empirical data. At high concentrations, GCA provided a better estimation of the experimental response compared with 3 alternative models: toxic equivalency factor, effect summation and independent action. These alternatives provided reasonable fits to the data at low concentrations in this system. These experiments support the implementation of GCA in mixtures analysis with endocrine disrupting compounds and establish PPARγ as an important target for further studies of chemical mixtures.

  10. RORα and 25-Hydroxycholesterol Crosstalk Regulates Lipid Droplet Homeostasis in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tuong, Zewen Kelvin; Lau, Patrick; Du, Ximing; Condon, Nicholas D.; Goode, Joel M.; Oh, Tae Gyu; Yeo, Jeremy C.; Muscat, George E. O.; Stow, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors have important roles in the regulation of metabolic and inflammatory pathways. The retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha (Rorα)-deficient staggerer (sg/sg) mice display several phenotypes indicative of aberrant lipid metabolism, including dyslipidemia, and increased susceptibility to atherosclerosis. In this study we demonstrate that macrophages from sg/sg mice have increased ability to accumulate lipids and accordingly exhibit larger lipid droplets (LD). We have previously shown that BMMs from sg/sg mice have significantly decreased expression of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (Ch25h) mRNA, the enzyme that produces the oxysterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), and now confirm this at the protein level. 25HC functions as an inverse agonist for RORα. siRNA knockdown of Ch25h in macrophages up-regulates Vldlr mRNA expression and causes increased accumulation of LDs. Treatment with physiological concentrations of 25HC in sg/sg macrophages restored lipid accumulation back to normal levels. Thus, 25HC and RORα signify a new pathway involved in the regulation of lipid homeostasis in macrophages, potentially via increased uptake of lipid which is suggested by mRNA expression changes in Vldlr and other related genes. PMID:26812621

  11. Lipid nanocarriers: influence of lipids on product development and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Kamla; Keshri, Lav; Shah, Mayank

    2011-01-01

    Lipid nanocarriers are on the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery. Owing to their size-dependent properties, lipid nanoparticles offer the possibility for development of new therapeutics and an alternative system to other colloidal counterparts for drug administration. An important point to be considered in the selection of a lipid for the carrier system is its effect on the properties of the nanocarrier and also its intended use, as different types of lipids differ in their nature. Researchers around the globe have tapped the potential of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) in developing formulation(s) that can be administered by various routes such as oral, ocular, parenteral, topical, and pulmonary. Since the start of this millennium, a new generation of lipid nanoparticles, namely nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), lipid drug conjugates (LDCs), and pharmacosomes, has evolved that have the potential to overcome the limitations of SLNs. The current review article presents broad considerations on the influence of various types of lipids on the diverse characteristics of nanocarriers, encompassing their physicochemical, formulation, pharmacokinetic, and cytotoxic aspects. PMID:21967401

  12. Agonist-antagonist combinations in opioid dependence: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The potential therapeutic benefits of co-administering opiate agonist and antagonist agents remain largely to be investigated. This paper focuses on the mechanisms of very low doses of naltrexone that help modulate the effects of methadone withdrawal and review pharmacological properties of the buprenorphine/naltrexone combination that support its clinical investigation. The bench-to-bedside development of the very low dose naltrexone treatment can serve as a translational paradigm to investigate and treat drug addiction. Further research on putative mechanisms elicited by the use of opioid agonist-antagonist combinations may lead to effective pharmacological alternatives to the gold standard methadone treatment, also useful for the management of the abuse of non opioid drugs and alcohol. PMID:22448305

  13. Orvinols with Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonist Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [35S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile. PMID:23438330

  14. Orvinols with mixed kappa/mu opioid receptor agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Greedy, Benjamin M; Bradbury, Faye; Thomas, Mark P; Grivas, Konstantinos; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Archambeau, Ashley; Bosse, Kelly; Clark, Mary J; Aceto, Mario; Lewis, John W; Traynor, John R; Husbands, Stephen M

    2013-04-25

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [(35)S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile.

  15. Grooming, rank, and agonistic support in tufted capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schino, Gabriele; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Visalberghi, Elisabetta

    2009-02-01

    Studies investigating the relation between allogrooming and social rank in capuchin monkeys (genus Cebus) have yielded inconsistent results. In this study, we investigated the relation between grooming, agonistic support, aggression and social rank in a captive group of tufted capuchin monkeys (C. apella). Differently from most previous studies, we based our analyses on a relatively large database and studied a group with known genealogical relationships. Tufted capuchin females did not exchange grooming for rank-related benefits such as agonistic support or reduced aggression. Coherently with this picture, they did not groom up the hierarchy and did not compete for accessing high-ranking grooming partners. It is suggested that a small group size, coupled with a strong kin bias, may make the exchange of grooming for rank-related benefits impossible or unprofitable, thus eliminating the advantages of grooming up the hierarchy. We provide several possible explanations for the heterogeneity of results across capuchin studies that have addressed similar questions.

  16. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site.

  17. Dopamine Agonists and the Suppression of Impulsive Motor Actions in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, S.A.; Claassen, D.O.; Huizenga, H.M.; Schewel, K.D.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Bashore, T.R.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The suppression of spontaneous motor impulses is an essential facet of cognitive control that is linked to frontal-basal ganglia circuitry. Basal ganglia dysfunction caused by Parkinson’s disease (PD) disrupts the proficiency of action suppression, but how pharmacotherapy for PD impacts impulsive motor control is poorly understood. Dopamine agonists improve motor symptoms of PD, but can also provoke impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICB). We investigated whether dopamine agonist medication has a beneficial or detrimental effect on impulsive action control in thirty-eight PD patients, half of whom had current ICB. Participants performed the Simon conflict task, which measures susceptibility to acting on spontaneous action impulses as well as the proficiency of suppressing these impulses. Compared to an off agonist state, patients on their agonist were no more susceptible to reacting impulsively, but were less proficient at suppressing the interference from the activation of impulsive actions. Importantly, agonist effects depended on baseline performance in the off agonist state; more proficient suppressors off agonist experienced a reduction in suppression on agonist, whereas less proficient suppressors off agonist showed improved suppression on agonist. Patients with active ICB were actually less susceptible to making fast, impulsive response errors than patients without ICB, suggesting that behavioral problems in this subset of patients may be less related to impulsivity in motor control. Our findings provide further evidence that dopamine agonist medication impacts specific cognitive control processes and that the direction of its effects depends on individual differences in performance off medication. PMID:22571461

  18. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site. PMID:27298318

  19. Observational study of effects of Saroglitazar on glycaemic and lipid parameters on Indian patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sanjay; Majumder, Anirban; Ray, Subir

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk reduction is an important issue in the management of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) agonists favourably influence glycaemic and lipid parameters in patients with Type 2 diabetes and a dual PPAR agonist is expected to have favourable effect on both parameters. In this study we have analyzed the effect of Saroglitazar, a novel dual PPAR alpha &gamma agonist, on glycaemic and lipid parameters in Indian patients with Type 2 diabetes. After a mean follow-up period of 14 weeks in 34 patients, treatment with Saroglitazar, in a dose of 4 mg daily, resulted in significant improvement in both glycaemic and lipid parameters. There were significant mean reductions of fasting plasma glucose (36.71 mg/dl; p = 0.0007), post-prandial plasma glucose (66.29 mg/dl; p = 0.0005), glycosylated haemoglobin (1.13%; p < 0.0001), total cholesterol (48.16 mg/dl; p < 0.0001), low- density lipoprotein cholesterol (24.04 mg/dl; p = 0.0048), triglyceride (192.78 mg/dl; p = 0.0001), non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (48.72 mg/dl; p < 0.0001) and the ratio of triglyceride and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (5.30; p = 0.0006). There was no significant change in body weight, blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and serum creatinine. PMID:25573251

  20. Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonists: The 6β-Naltrexamines

    PubMed Central

    Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Neal, Adrian P.; Bradbury, Faye A.; Purington, Lauren C.; Aceto, Mario D.; Harris, Louis S.; Lewis, John W.; Traynor, John R.; Husbands, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Ligands from the naltrexamine series have consistently demonstrated agonist activity at kappa opioid receptors (KOR), with varying activity at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Various 6β-cinnamoylamino derivatives were made with the aim of generating ligands with a KOR agonist/MOR partial agonist profile, as ligands with this activity may be of interest as treatment agents for cocaine abuse. The ligands all displayed the desired high affinity, non-selective binding in vitro and in the functional assays were high efficacy KOR agonists with some partial agonist activity at MOR. Two of the new ligands (12a, 12b) have been evaluated in vivo, with 12a acting as a KOR agonist, and therefore somewhat similar to the previously evaluated analogues 3–6, while 12b displayed predominant MOR agonist activity. PMID:19253970

  1. Octopaminergic agonists for the cockroach neuronal octopamine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Eto, Morifusa

    2003-01-01

    The compounds 1-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine-2-thione and 2-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine showed the almost same activity as octopamine in stimulating adenylate cyclase of cockroach thoracic nervous system among 70 octopamine agonists, suggesting that only these compounds are full octopamine agonists and other compounds are partial octopamine agonists. The quantitative structure-activity relationship of a set of 22 octopamine agonists against receptor 2 in cockroach nervous tissue, was analyzed using receptor surface modeling. Three-dimensional energetics descriptors were calculated from receptor surface model/ligand interaction and these three-dimensional descriptors were used in quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis. A receptor surface model was generated using some subset of the most active structures and the results provided useful information in the characterization and differentiation of octopaminergic receptor. Abbreviation: AEA arylethanolamine AII 2-(arylimino)imidazolidine AIO 2-(arylimino)oxazolidine AIT 2-(arylimino)thiazolidine APAT 2-(α-phenylethylamino)-2-thiazoline BPAT 2-(β-phenylethylamino)-2-thiazoline CAO 2-(3-chlorobenzylamino)-2-oxazoline DCAO 2-(3,5-dichlorobenzylamino)-2-oxazoline DET5 2-(2,6-diethylphenylimino)-5-methylthiazolidine DET6 2-(2,6-diethylphenylimino)thiazine EGTA ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid GFA genetic function approximation G/PLS genetic partial least squares IND 2-aminomethyl-2-indanol LAH lithium aluminum hydride MCSG maximum common subgroup MCT6 2-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenylimino)thiazine OA octopamine PLS partial least squares QSAR quantitative structure-activity relationship SBAT 2-(substituted benzylamino)-2-thiazoline SD the sum of squared deviations of the dependent variable values from their mean SPIT 3-(substituted phenyl)imidazolidine-2-thione THI 2-amino-1-(2-thiazoyl)ethanol TMS tetramethyl silane PMID:15841226

  2. Newspapers and newspaper ink contain agonists for the ah receptor.

    PubMed

    Bohonowych, Jessica E S; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T; Denison, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  3. Synthesis of fluorinated agonist of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Aliouane, Lucie; Chao, Sovy; Brizuela, Leyre; Pfund, Emmanuel; Cuvillier, Olivier; Jean, Ludovic; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Lequeux, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The bioactive metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a product of sphingosine kinases (SphKs), mediates diverse biological processes such as cell differentiation, proliferation, survival and angiogenesis. A fluorinated analogue of S1P receptor agonist has been synthesized by utilizing a ring opening reaction of oxacycles by a lithiated difluoromethylphosphonate anion as the key reaction. In vitro activity of this S1P analogue is also reported.

  4. A human platelet calcium calculator trained by pairwise agonist scanning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-02-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide.

  5. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline.

  6. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline. PMID:20030735

  7. Antipsychotic Induced Symptomatic Hyperprolactinemia: Are Dopamine Agonists Safe?

    PubMed Central

    Lertxundi, Unax; Domingo-Echaburu, Saioa; Peral, Javier; García, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Published literature shows that dopamine agonists can reverse antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia without worsening psychotic symptoms in the majority of schizophrenic patients. However, psychiatrists have been reluctant to use drugs with dopaminergic properties for fear of exacerbating psychiatric symptoms. There are reported cases of psychosis worsening published for both cabergoline and bromocriptine. Cabergoline has proven to be more effective and safe when used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but whether cabergoline is also safer than bromocriptine in antipsychotic induced hyperprolactinemia remains unproven.

  8. A human platelet calcium calculator trained by pairwise agonist scanning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-02-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide. PMID:25723389

  9. Improving the developability profile of pyrrolidine progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Kallander, Lara S.; Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Frazee, James S.; Stoy, Patrick; Johnson, Latisha; Lu, Qing; Hammond, Marlys; Barton, Linda S.; Patterson, Jaclyn R.; Azzarano, Leonard M.; Nagilla, Rakesh; Madauss, Kevin P.; Williams, Shawn P.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Duraiswami, Chaya; Grygielko, Eugene T.; Xu, Xiaoping; Laping, Nicholas J.; Bray, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Scott K.

    2010-09-17

    The previously reported pyrrolidine class of progesterone receptor partial agonists demonstrated excellent potency but suffered from serious liabilities including hERG blockade and high volume of distribution in the rat. The basic pyrrolidine amine was intentionally converted to a sulfonamide, carbamate, or amide to address these liabilities. The evaluation of the degree of partial agonism for these non-basic pyrrolidine derivatives and demonstration of their efficacy in an in vivo model of endometriosis is disclosed herein.

  10. A Human Platelet Calcium Calculator Trained by Pairwise Agonist Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide. PMID:25723389

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  12. Lipid classification, structures and tools☆

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Sud, Manish; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2012-01-01

    The study of lipids has developed into a research field of increasing importance as their multiple biological roles in cell biology, physiology and pathology are becoming better understood. The Lipid Metabolites and Pathways Strategy (LIPID MAPS) consortium is actively involved in an integrated approach for the detection, quantitation and pathway reconstruction of lipids and related genes and proteins at a systems-biology level. A key component of this approach is a bioinformatics infrastructure involving a clearly defined classification of lipids, a state-of-the-art database system for molecular species and experimental data and a suite of user-friendly tools to assist lipidomics researchers. Herein, we discuss a number of recent developments by the LIPID MAPS bioinformatics core in pursuit of these objectives. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Lipodomics and Imaging Mass Spectrometry. PMID:21704189

  13. Lipid Biomembrane in Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Brian; Jing, Benxin; Shah, Jindal; Maginn, Ed; Zhu, Y. Elaine; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Team

    2014-03-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been recently explored as new ``green'' chemicals in several chemical and biomedical processes. In our pursuit of understanding their toxicities towards aquatic and terrestrial organisms, we have examined the IL interaction with lipid bilayers as model cell membranes. Experimentally by fluorescence microscopy, we have directly observed the disruption of lipid bilayer by added ILs. Depending on the concentration, alkyl chain length, and anion hydrophobicity of ILs, the interaction of ILs with lipid bilayers leads to the formation of micelles, fibrils, and multi-lamellar vesicles for IL-lipid complexes. By MD computer simulations, we have confirmed the insertion of ILs into lipid bilayers to modify the spatial organization of lipids in the membrane. The combined experimental and simulation results correlate well with the bioassay results of IL-induced suppression in bacteria growth, thereby suggesting a possible mechanism behind the IL toxicity. National Science Foundation, Center for Research Computing at Notre Dame.

  14. Lipid-transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Ye, Xiujuan

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are basic proteins found in abundance in higher plants. LTPs play lots of roles in plants such as participation in cutin formation, embryogenesis, defense reactions against phytopathogens, symbiosis, and the adaptation of plants to various environmental conditions. In addition, LTPs from field mustard and Chinese daffodil exhibit antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells. LTPs from chili pepper and coffee manifest inhibitory activity against fungi pathogenic to humans such as Candida species. The intent of this article is to review LTPs in the plant kingdom. PMID:23193591

  15. Mannosylerythritol lipids: a review.

    PubMed

    Arutchelvi, Joseph Irudayaraj; Bhaduri, Sumit; Uppara, Parasu Veera; Doble, Mukesh

    2008-12-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are surface active compounds that belong to the glycolipid class of biosurfactants (BSs). MELs are produced by Pseudozyma sp. as a major component while Ustilago sp. produces them as a minor component. Although MELs have been known for over five decades, they recently regained attention due to their environmental compatibility, mild production conditions, structural diversity, self-assembling properties and versatile biochemical functions. In this review, the MEL producing microorganisms, the production conditions, their applications, their diverse structures and self-assembling properties are discussed. The biosynthetic pathways and the regulatory mechanisms involved in the production of MEL are also explained here. PMID:18716809

  16. Increased flow precedes remote arteriolar dilations for some microapplied agonists.

    PubMed

    Frame, M D

    2000-04-01

    This study asks which occurs first in time for remote responses: a dilation or a remote change in flow. Arteriolar diameter (approximately 20 microm) and fluorescently labeled red blood cell (RBC) velocity were measured in the cremaster muscle of anesthetized (pentobarbital sodium, 70 mg/kg) hamsters (n = 51). Arterioles were locally stimulated for 60 s with micropipette-applied 10 microg/ml LM-609 (alpha(v)beta(3)-integrin agonist), 10(-3) M adenosine, or 10(-3) M 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1, nitric oxide donor) as remote response agonists or with 10(-3) M papaverine, which dilates only locally. Observations were made at a remote site 1,200 microm upstream. With LM-609 or adenosine, the RBC velocity increased first (within 5 s), and the remote dilation followed 5-7 s later. N-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM) blocked the LM-609 (100%) and adenosine (60%) remote dilations. SIN-1 induced a concurrent remote dilation and decrease in RBC velocity (approximately 10 s), suggesting the primary signal was to dilate. Papaverine had no remote effects. This study suggests that, although remote responses to some agonists are induced by primary signals to dilate, additionally, network changes in flow can stimulate extensive remote changes in diameter.

  17. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  18. Emerging strategies for exploiting cannabinoid receptor agonists as medicines.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2009-02-01

    Medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptor are already in the clinic. These are Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) and Sativex (Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol with cannabidiol). The first two of these medicines can be prescribed to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Marinol can also be prescribed to stimulate appetite, while Sativex is prescribed for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in adults with multiple sclerosis and as an adjunctive analgesic treatment for adult patients with advanced cancer. One challenge now is to identify additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a number of potential clinical applications for such agonists are mentioned in this review. A second challenge is to develop strategies that will improve the efficacy and/or the benefit-to-risk ratio of a cannabinoid receptor agonist. This review focuses on five strategies that have the potential to meet either or both of these objectives. These are strategies that involve: (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier; (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue; (iii) targeting up-regulated cannabinoid receptors; (iv) targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors; or (v) 'multi-targeting'. Preclinical data that justify additional research directed at evaluating the clinical importance of each of these strategies are also discussed. PMID:19226257

  19. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes. PMID:24038158

  20. Structure of the agonist-bound neurotensin receptor.

    PubMed

    White, Jim F; Noinaj, Nicholas; Shibata, Yoko; Love, James; Kloss, Brian; Xu, Feng; Gvozdenovic-Jeremic, Jelena; Shah, Priyanka; Shiloach, Joseph; Tate, Christopher G; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2012-10-25

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13-amino-acid peptide that functions as both a neurotransmitter and a hormone through the activation of the neurotensin receptor NTSR1, a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In the brain, NTS modulates the activity of dopaminergic systems, opioid-independent analgesia, and the inhibition of food intake; in the gut, NTS regulates a range of digestive processes. Here we present the structure at 2.8 Å resolution of Rattus norvegicus NTSR1 in an active-like state, bound to NTS(8-13), the carboxy-terminal portion of NTS responsible for agonist-induced activation of the receptor. The peptide agonist binds to NTSR1 in an extended conformation nearly perpendicular to the membrane plane, with the C terminus oriented towards the receptor core. Our findings provide, to our knowledge, the first insight into the binding mode of a peptide agonist to a GPCR and may support the development of non-peptide ligands that could be useful in the treatment of neurological disorders, cancer and obesity.

  1. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes.

  2. Lipids and Membrane Lateral Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sonnino, Sandro; Prinetti, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Shortly after the elucidation of the very basic structure and properties of cellular membranes, it became evident that cellular membranes are highly organized structures with multiple and multi-dimensional levels of order. Very early observations suggested that the lipid components of biological membranes might be active players in the creation of these levels of order. In the late 1980s, several different and diverse experimental pieces of evidence coalesced together giving rise to the lipid raft hypothesis. Lipid rafts became enormously (and, in the opinion of these authors, sometimes acritically) popular, surprisingly not just within the lipidologist community (who is supposed to be naturally sensitive to the fascination of lipid rafts). Today, a PubMed search using the key word “lipid rafts” returned a list of 3767 papers, including 690 reviews (as a term of comparison, searching over the same time span for a very hot lipid-related key word, “ceramide” returned 6187 hits with 799 reviews), and a tremendous number of different cellular functions have been described as “lipid raft-dependent.” However, a clear consensus definition of lipid raft has been proposed only in recent times, and the basic properties, the ruling forces, and even the existence of lipid rafts in living cells has been recently matter of intense debate. The scenario that is gradually emerging from the controversies elicited by the lipid raft hypothesis emphasizes multiple roles for membrane lipids in determining membrane order, that encompass their tendency to phase separation but are clearly not limited to this. In this review, we would like to re-focus the attention of the readers on the importance of lipids in organizing the fine structure of cellular membranes. PMID:21423393

  3. Discovery of 4-(phenyl)thio-1H-pyrazole derivatives as agonists of GPR109A, a high affinity niacin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Young; Jadhav, Vithal B; Jeong, Dae Young; Park, Woo Kyu; Song, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Sunkyung; Cho, Heeyeong

    2015-06-01

    Even though nicotinic acid (niacin) appears to have beneficial effects on human lipid profiles, niacin-induced cutaneous vasodilatation called flushing limits its remedy to patient. GPR109A is activated by niacin and mediates the anti-lipolytic effects. Based on the hypothesis that β-arrestin signaling mediates niacin-induced flushing, but not its anti-lipolytic effect, we tried to find GPR109A agonists which selectively elicit Gi-protein-biased signaling devoid of β-arrestin internalization using a β-lactamase assay. We identified a 4-(phenyl)thio-1H-pyrazole as a novel scaffold for GPR109A agonist in a high throughput screen, which has no carboxylic acid moiety known to be important for binding. While 1-nicotinoyl derivatives (5a-g, 6a-e) induced β-arrestin recruitment, 1-(pyrazin-2-oyl) derivatives were found to play as G-protein-biased agonists without GPR109A receptor internalization. The activity of compound 5a (EC50 = 45 nM) was similar to niacin (EC50 = 52 nM) and MK-6892 (EC50 = 74 nM) on calcium mobilization assay, but its activity at 10 μM on β-arrestin recruitment were around two and five times weaker than niacin and MK-6892, respectively. The development of G-protein biased GPR109A ligands over β-arrestin pathway is attainable and might be important in differentiation of pharmacological efficacy.

  4. Dietary regulation of adiponectin by direct and indirect lipid activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rühl, R; Landrier, J F

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine mainly secreted by adipocytes that presents antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic functions. Therefore, modulation of adiponectin expression represents a promising target for prevention or treatment of several diseases including insulin resistance and type II diabetes. Pharmacological agents such as the nuclear hormone receptor synthetic agonists like peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonists are of particular interest in therapeutic strategies due to their ability to increase the plasma adiponectin concentration. Nutritional approaches are also of particular interest, especially in primary prevention, since some active compounds of our diet (notably vitamins, carotenoids, or other essential nutrients) are direct or indirect lipid-activators of nuclear hormone receptors and are modifiers of adiponectin expression and secretion. The aim of the present review is to summarize current knowledge about the nutritional regulation of adiponectin by derivatives of active compounds naturally present in the diet acting as indirect or direct activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

  5. Lipid-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, Mfon; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2013-09-01

    The role of lipid lowering in reducing the risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established. Treatment particularly aimed at decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is effective in reducing the risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Statins form the cornerstone of treatment. However, in some individuals with a high risk of CVD who are unable to achieve their target LDL-C due to either intolerance or lack of efficacy, there is the need for alternative therapies. This review provides an overview of the different classes of currently available lipid-lowering medications including statins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants (resins), and omega-3 fatty acids. Data are presented on their indications, pharmacology, and the relevant end point clinical trial data with these drugs. It also discusses the human trial data on some novel therapeutic agents that are being developed including those for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia--the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen and the microsomal transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide. Data are presented on phase II and III trials on agents with potentially wider applications, cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 inhibitors. The data on a licensed gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency are also presented. PMID:23811423

  6. Lipid-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, Mfon; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2013-09-01

    The role of lipid lowering in reducing the risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established. Treatment particularly aimed at decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is effective in reducing the risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Statins form the cornerstone of treatment. However, in some individuals with a high risk of CVD who are unable to achieve their target LDL-C due to either intolerance or lack of efficacy, there is the need for alternative therapies. This review provides an overview of the different classes of currently available lipid-lowering medications including statins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants (resins), and omega-3 fatty acids. Data are presented on their indications, pharmacology, and the relevant end point clinical trial data with these drugs. It also discusses the human trial data on some novel therapeutic agents that are being developed including those for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia--the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen and the microsomal transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide. Data are presented on phase II and III trials on agents with potentially wider applications, cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 inhibitors. The data on a licensed gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency are also presented.

  7. Changes of the Membrane Lipid Organization Characterized by Means of a New Cholesterol-Pyrene Probe

    PubMed Central

    Le Guyader, Laurent; Le Roux, Christophe; Mazères, Serge; Gaspard-Iloughmane, Hafida; Gornitzka, Heinz; Millot, Claire; Mingotaud, Christophe; Lopez, André

    2007-01-01

    We synthesized 3β-hydroxy-pregn-5-ene-21-(1-methylpyrenyl)-20-methylidene (Py-met-chol), consisting of cholesterol steroid rings connected to a pyrene group via a linker without polar atoms. This compound has interesting spectroscopic properties when probing membranes: 1), The pyrene has hypochromic properties resulting from probe self-association processes in membranes. Using liposomes of various lipid compositions, we determined the association constants of the probe (K): KDOPC ≫ KPOPC ≫ KDMPC > KDMPC/15 mol % Chol > KDMPC/30 mol % Chol. This indicates a better probe solvation in saturated than in unsaturated lipids, and this effect is enhanced as the cholesterol concentration increases. 2), The pyrene fluorophore is characterized by monomer (I1–I5) and excimer (IE) emission bands. In model membranes, I1/I3 and IE/I3 ratios revealed a correlation between the polarity of the lipid core of the membrane and the amount of cholesterol. 3), Using this probe, we monitored the first steps of the signaling pathway of the mouse δ-opioid receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The thickness of the membrane around this receptor is known to change after agonist binding. Fluorescence spectra of living Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing mouse δ-opioid receptor specifically revealed the agonist binding. These results indicate that Py-met-chol may be useful for screening ligands of this family of receptors. PMID:17766338

  8. Meclizine is an agonist ligand for mouse constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and an inverse agonist for human CAR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wendong; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Ping; Schrader, William T; Moore, David D

    2004-10-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is a key regulator of xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. The ligand-binding domains of murine (m) and human (h) CAR are divergent relative to other nuclear hormone receptors, resulting in species-specific differences in xenobiotic responses. Here we identify the widely used antiemetic meclizine (Antivert; Bonine) as both an agonist ligand for mCAR and an inverse agonist for hCAR. Meclizine increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. Like the mCAR agonist 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, meclizine stimulates binding of steroid receptor coactivator 1 to the murine receptor in vitro. Meclizine administration to mice increases expression of CAR target genes in a CAR-dependent manner. In contrast, meclizine suppresses hCAR transactivation and inhibits the phenobarbital-induced expression of the CAR target genes, cytochrome p450 monooxygenase (CYP)2B10, CYP3A11, and CYP1A2, in primary hepatocytes derived from mice expressing hCAR, but not mCAR. The inhibitory effect of meclizine also suppresses acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in humanized CAR mice. These results demonstrate that a single compound can induce opposite xenobiotic responses via orthologous receptors in rodents and humans. PMID:15272053

  9. Additive antinociceptive effects of mixtures of the κ-opioid receptor agonist spiradoline and the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 in rats.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a significant clinical problem, and there is a need for pharmacotherapies that are more effective with fewer adverse effects than currently available medications. Cannabinoid receptor agonists enhance the antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists; it is unclear whether they impact the effects of agonists acting at other opioid receptors. κ-Opioid receptor agonists have antinociceptive effects, but their clinical use is precluded by adverse effects; however, their therapeutic potential might be realized if antinociceptive effects could be selectively enhanced. In this study, the antinociceptive effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 and the κ-opioid receptor agonist spiradoline, alone and in combination, were studied in rats (n=7) using a warm water tail-withdrawal procedure. When administered alone, CP55940 (0.032-1.0 mg/kg) and spiradoline (1.0-32.0 mg/kg) increased tail-withdrawal latency, and mixtures of CP55940 and spiradoline (ratios of 1 : 3, 1 : 1, and 3 : 1) produced additive effects. It remains to be determined whether this additive interaction between a κ-opioid receptor agonist and a cannabinoid receptor agonist is selective for antinociception and whether it can be generalized to other drugs. PMID:26292184

  10. The PPARβ/δ Agonist GW0742 Induces Early Neuronal Maturation of Cortical Post-Mitotic Neurons: Role of PPARβ/δ in Neuronal Maturation.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Elisabetta; Di Loreto, Silvia; D'Angelo, Barbara; Cristiano, Loredana; d'Angelo, Michele; Antonosante, Andrea; Fidoamore, Alessia; Golini, Raffaella; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Cimini, Annamaria

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidences support that signaling lipids participate in synaptic plasticity and cell survival, and that the lipid signaling is closely associated with neuronal differentiation, learning, and memory and with pathologic events, such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease. The Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPAR) are strongly involved in the fatty acid cell signaling, as many of the natural lypophylic compounds are PPAR ligands. We have previously shown that PPARβ/δ is the main isotype present in cortical neuron primary cultures and that during neuronal maturation, PPARβ/δ is gradually increased and activated. To get more insight into the molecular mechanism by which PPARβ/δ may be involved in neuronal maturation processes, in this work a specific PPARβ/δ agonist, GW0742 was used administered alone or in association with a specific PPARβ/δ antagonist, the GSK0660, and the parameters involved in neuronal differentiation and maturation were assayed. The data obtained demonstrated the strong involvement of PPARβ/δ in neuronal maturation, triggering the agonist an anticipation of neuronal differentiation, and the antagonist abolishing the observed effects. These effects appear to be mediated by the activation of BDNF pathway.

  11. Lipid mobility in supported lipid bilayers by single molecule tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohram, Maryam; Shi, Xiaojun; Smith, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Phospholipid bilayers are the main component of cell membranes and their interaction with biomolecules in their immediate environment is critical for cellular functions. These interactions include the binding of polycationic polymers to lipid bilayers which affects many cell membrane events. As an alternative method of studying live cell membranes, we assemble a supported lipid bilayer and investigate its binding with polycationic polymers in vitro by fluorescently labeling the molecules of the supported lipid bilayer and tracking their mobility. In this work, we use single molecule tracking total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) to study phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids with and without an adsorbed polycationic polymer, quaternized polyvinylpyridine (QPVP). Individual molecular trajectories are obtained from the experiment, and a Brownian diffusion model is used to determine diffusion coefficients through mean square displacements. Our results indicate a smaller diffusion coefficient for the supported lipid bilayers in the presence of QPVP in comparison to its absence, revealing that their binding causes a decrease in lateral mobility.

  12. Analysis of lipid profile in lipid storage myopathy.

    PubMed

    Aguennouz, M'hammed; Beccaria, Marco; Purcaro, Giorgia; Oteri, Marianna; Micalizzi, Giuseppe; Musumesci, Olimpia; Ciranni, Annmaria; Di Giorgio, Rosa Maria; Toscano, Antonio; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    Lipid dysmetabolism disease is a condition in which lipids are stored abnormally in organs and tissues throughout the body, causing muscle weakness (myopathy). Usually, the diagnosis of this disease and its characterization goes through dosage of Acyl CoA in plasma accompanied with evidence of droplets of intra-fibrils lipids in the patient muscle biopsy. However, to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of lipid storage diseases, it is useful to identify the nature of lipids deposited in muscle fiber. In this work fatty acids and triglycerides profile of lipid accumulated in the muscle of people suffering from myopathies syndromes was characterized. In particular, the analyses were carried out on the muscle biopsy of people afflicted by lipid storage myopathy, such as multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, and neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy, and by the intramitochondrial lipid storage dysfunctions, such as deficiencies of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II enzyme. A single step extraction and derivatization procedure was applied to analyze fatty acids from muscle tissues by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector and with an electronic impact mass spectrometer. Triglycerides, extracted by using n-hexane, were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface. The most representative fatty acids in all samples were: C16:0 in the 13-24% range, C18:1n9 in the 20-52% range, and C18:2n6 in the 10-25% range. These fatty acids were part of the most representative triglycerides in all samples. The data obtained was statistically elaborated performing a principal component analysis. A satisfactory discrimination was obtained among the different diseases. Using component 1 vs component 3 a 43.3% of total variance was explained. Such results suggest the important role that lipid profile characterization can have in supporting a correct

  13. Different serotonin receptor agonists have distinct effects on sound-evoked responses in inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M

    2006-11-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin has a complex set of effects on the auditory responses of neurons within the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain auditory nucleus that integrates a wide range of inputs from auditory and nonauditory sources. To determine whether activation of different types of serotonin receptors is a source of the variability in serotonergic effects, four selective agonists of serotonin receptors in the serotonin (5-HT) 1 and 5-HT2 families were iontophoretically applied to IC neurons, which were monitored for changes in their responses to auditory stimuli. Different agonists had different effects on neural responses. The 5-HT1A agonist had mixed facilitatory and depressive effects, whereas 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C agonists were both largely facilitatory. Different agonists changed threshold and frequency tuning in ways that reflected their effects on spike count. When pairs of agonists were applied sequentially to the same neurons, selective agonists sometimes affected neurons in ways that were similar to serotonin, but not to other selective agonists tested. Different agonists also differentially affected groups of neurons classified by the shapes of their frequency-tuning curves, with serotonin and the 5-HT1 receptors affecting proportionally more non-V-type neurons relative to the other agonists tested. In all, evidence suggests that the diversity of serotonin receptor subtypes in the IC is likely to account for at least some of the variability of the effects of serotonin and that receptor subtypes fulfill specialized roles in auditory processing. PMID:16870843

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist therapeutics for total diabetes management: assessment of composite end-points.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Daisuke; Kuwata, Hitoshi; Usui, Ryota; Kurose, Takeshi; Seino, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the benefits of anti-diabetic drugs for type 2 diabetes requires analysis of composite end-points, taking HbA1c, bodyweight, hypoglycemia and other metabolic parameters into consideration; continuous, optimal glycemic control as well as bodyweight, blood pressure and lipid levels are critical to prevent micro- and macro-vascular complications. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are now established as an important total treatment strategy for type 2 diabetes, exerting glucose-lowering effects with little hypoglycemia risk and also ameliorating bodyweight, blood pressure and lipid levels, which are therapeutic targets for prevention of complications of the disease. The available data strongly suggest only beneficial effects of GLP-1RAs; however, long-term evaluation of the relevant composite end-points including health-related quality of life and cost-effectiveness remain to be investigated in adequately powered, prospective, controlled clinical trials. In the meantime, healthcare professionals need to be scrupulously attentive for potential, rare adverse events in patients using GLP-1RAs. PMID:25916903

  15. Prolonged treatment with the beta3-adrenergic agonist CL 316243 induces adipose tissue remodeling in rat but not in guinea pig: 1) fat store depletion and desensitization of beta-adrenergic responses.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, C; Redonnet, A; Prévot, D; Carpéné, C; Atgié, C

    2006-06-01

    Beta3-adrenergic agonists have been considered as potent antiobesity and antidiabetic agents mainly on the basis of their beneficial actions discovered twenty years ago in obese and diabetic rodents. The aim of this work was to verify whether prolonged treatment with a beta3-adrenergic agonist known to stimulate lipid mobilisation, could promote desensitization of beta-adrenergic responses. Wistar rats and guinea pigs were treated during one week with CL 316243 (CL, 1 mg/kg/d) by implanted osmotic minipumps. In control animals, beta3-adrenergic agonists were lipolytic in rat but not in guinea pig adipocytes. CL-treatment did not alter body weight gain in both species, but reduced fat stores in rats. Lipolysis stimulation by forskolin was unmodified but responses to beta1-, beta2- and beta3-agonists were reduced in visceral or subcutaneous white adipose tissues of CL-treated rats. Similarly, the beta3-adrenergic-dependent impairment of insulin action on glucose transport and lipogenesis in rat adipocytes was diminished after CL-treatment. In rat adipocytes, [125I]ICYP binding and beta3-adrenoceptor mRNA levels were reduced after sustained CL administration. These findings show that CL 316243 exerts (beta3-adrenergic lipolytic and antilipogenic effects in rat adipocytes. These actions, which are likely involved in the fat depletion observed in rat, also lead to the desensitization of all beta-adrenergic responses. Therefore this desensitization, together with the lack of slimming action in guinea pig, seriously attenuates the usefulness of beta3-agonists as antiobesity agents, and may explain why such agonists have not been conducted to a widespread clinical use.

  16. Lipid-lowering therapies, glucose control and incident diabetes: evidence, mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Zafrir, Barak; Jain, Mohit

    2014-08-01

    Lipid-lowering therapies constitute an essential part in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases and are consistently shown to reduce adverse cardiovascular outcomes in wide-scale populations. Recently, there is increased awareness of the possibility that lipid-lowering drugs may affect glucose control and insulin resistance. This phenomenon is reported in all classes of lipid-modifying agents, with differential effects of distinct drugs. Since the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes is rising, and lipid-modifying therapies are widely used to reduce the cardiovascular burden in these populations, it is of importance to examine the relationship between lipid-lowering drugs, glycemic control and incident diabetes. In the current review we discuss the evidence, ranging from experimental studies to randomized controlled clinical trials and meta-analyses, of how lipid-modifying therapies affect glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. Cumulative data suggest that both statins and niacin are associated with increased risk of impaired glucose control and development of new-onset diabetes, as opposed to bile-acid sequestrants which display concomitant moderate lipid and glucose lowering effects, and fibrates (particularly the pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate) which may produce beneficial effects on glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Ezetimibe is implied to ameliorate metabolic markers such as hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, with yet little support from clinical trials, while fish oils which in experimental studies produce favorable effects on insulin sensitivity, although studied extensively, continue to show inconclusive effects on glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes. Suggested mechanisms of how lipid-modifying agents affect glucose control and their clinical implications in this context, are summarized. PMID:24952127

  17. A novel class of endotoxin receptor agonists with simplified structure, toll-like receptor 4-dependent immunostimulatory action, and adjuvant activity.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Lynn D; Ishizaka, Sally T; McGuinness, Pamela; Zhang, Huiming; Gavin, Wendy; DeCosta, Bruce; Meng, Zhaoyang; Yang, Hu; Mullarkey, Maureen; Young, Donna W; Yang, Hua; Rossignol, Daniel P; Nault, Anneliese; Rose, Jeffrey; Przetak, Melinda; Chow, Jesse C; Gusovsky, Fabian

    2002-02-01

    A series of novel, synthetic compounds containing lipids linked to a phosphate-containing acyclic backbone are shown to have similar biological properties to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These compounds showed intrinsic agonistic properties when tested for their ability to stimulate tumor necrosis factor-alpha in human whole blood and interleukin-6 in U373 human glioblastoma cells without added LPS coreceptor CD14. The presence of the LPS antagonist E5564 completely blocked responses, suggesting that the novel compounds and LPS share a common mechanism of cell activation. Stereoselectivity of the molecules was observed in vitro; compounds with an R,R,R,R-configuration were strongly agonistic, whereas compounds with an R,S,S,R-configuration were much weaker in their activity on human whole blood and U373 cells. We also tested the effect of the compounds in cells transfected with the LPS receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), with similar results, further supporting a shared mechanism with LPS. This was confirmed in vivo where the agonists failed to elicit cytokine responses in C3H/HeJ mice lacking TLR4 signaling. Because LPS-like molecules enhance immune responses, the compounds were mixed with tetanus toxoid and administered to mice in an immunization protocol to test for adjuvant activity. They enhanced the generation of specific antibodies against tetanus toxoid. Our results indicate that these unique compounds behave as agonists of TLR4, resulting in responses similar to those elicited by LPS. They display adjuvant activity in vivo and may be useful for the development of vaccine therapies.

  18. Variable tilt on lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, P.; Steigmann, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    A continuum theory for lipid membranes is developed that accounts for mechanical interactions between lipid tilt and membrane shape. For planar membranes, a linear version of the theory is used to predict tilt variations similar to those observed in experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:25484606

  19. Lipid mediators in life science.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    "Lipid mediators" represent a class of bioactive lipids that are produced locally through specific biosynthetic pathways in response to extracellular stimuli. They are exported extracellularly, bind to their cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to transmit signals to target cells, and are then sequestered rapidly through specific enzymatic or non-enzymatic processes. Because of these properties, lipid mediators can be regarded as local hormones or autacoids. Unlike proteins, whose information can be readily obtained from the genome, we cannot directly read out the information of lipids from the genome since they are not genome-encoded. However, we can indirectly follow up the dynamics and functions of lipid mediators by manipulating the genes encoding a particular set of proteins that are essential for their biosynthesis (enzymes), transport (transporters), and signal transduction (receptors). Lipid mediators are involved in many physiological processes, and their dysregulations have been often linked to various diseases such as inflammation, infertility, atherosclerosis, ischemia, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. In this article, I will give an overview of the basic knowledge of various lipid mediators, and then provide an example of how research using mice, gene-manipulated for a lipid mediator-biosynthetic enzyme, contributes to life science and clinical applications.

  20. The Flexibility of Ectopic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Loher, Hannah; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris; Christ, Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the subcutaneous and the visceral fat tissue, lipids can also be stored in non-adipose tissue such as in hepatocytes (intrahepatocellular lipids; IHCL), skeletal (intramyocellular lipids; IMCL) or cardiac muscle cells (intracardiomyocellular lipids; ICCL). Ectopic lipids are flexible fuel stores that can be depleted by physical exercise and repleted by diet. They are related to obesity and insulin resistance. Quantification of IMCL was initially performed invasively, using muscle biopsies with biochemical and/or histological analysis. 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) is now a validated method that allows for not only quantifying IMCL non-invasively and repeatedly, but also assessing IHCL and ICCL. This review summarizes the current available knowledge on the flexibility of ectopic lipids. The available evidence suggests a complex interplay between quantitative and qualitative diet, fat availability (fat mass), insulin action, and physical exercise, all important factors that influence the flexibility of ectopic lipids. Furthermore, the time frame of the intervention on these parameters (short-term vs. long-term) appears to be critical. Consequently, standardization of physical activity and diet are critical when assessing ectopic lipids in predefined clinical situations. PMID:27649157

  1. Lipids in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hüsing, Anna; Kabar, Iyad; Schmidt, Hartmut H

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is very common after liver transplantation and can be observed in up to 71% of patients. The etiology of lipid disorders in these patients is multifactorial, with different lipid profiles observed depending on the immunosuppressive agents administered and the presence of additional risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and nutrition. Due to recent improvements in survival of liver transplant recipients, the prevention of cardiovascular events has become more important, especially as approximately 64% of liver transplant recipients present with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Management of dyslipidemia and of other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, has therefore become essential in these patients. Treatment of hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation consists of life style modification, modifying the dose or type of immunosuppressive agents and use of lipid lowering agents. At the start of administration of lipid lowering medications, it is important to monitor drug-drug interactions, especially between lipid lowering agents and immunosuppressive drugs. Furthermore, as combinations of various lipid lowering drugs can lead to severe side effects, such as myopathies and rhabdomyolysis, these combinations should therefore be avoided. To our knowledge, there are no current guidelines targeting the management of lipid metabolism disorders in liver transplant recipients. This paper therefore recommends an approach of managing lipid abnormalities occurring after liver transplantation. PMID:27022213

  2. Amphotericin B Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is used to treat serious, possibly life-threatening fungal infections in people who did not respond or are ... tolerate conventional amphotericin B therapy. Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is in a class of medications called ...

  3. Neuroimaging of Lipid Storage Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Deborah; Auerbach, Sarah; Robinson, Paul; Gropman, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Lipid storage diseases, also known as the lipidoses, are a group of inherited metabolic disorders in which there is lipid accumulation in various cell types, including the central nervous system, because of the deficiency of a variety of enzymes. Over time, excessive storage can cause permanent cellular and tissue damage. The brain is particularly…

  4. The Flexibility of Ectopic Lipids.

    PubMed

    Loher, Hannah; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris; Christ, Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the subcutaneous and the visceral fat tissue, lipids can also be stored in non-adipose tissue such as in hepatocytes (intrahepatocellular lipids; IHCL), skeletal (intramyocellular lipids; IMCL) or cardiac muscle cells (intracardiomyocellular lipids; ICCL). Ectopic lipids are flexible fuel stores that can be depleted by physical exercise and repleted by diet. They are related to obesity and insulin resistance. Quantification of IMCL was initially performed invasively, using muscle biopsies with biochemical and/or histological analysis. ¹H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-MRS) is now a validated method that allows for not only quantifying IMCL non-invasively and repeatedly, but also assessing IHCL and ICCL. This review summarizes the current available knowledge on the flexibility of ectopic lipids. The available evidence suggests a complex interplay between quantitative and qualitative diet, fat availability (fat mass), insulin action, and physical exercise, all important factors that influence the flexibility of ectopic lipids. Furthermore, the time frame of the intervention on these parameters (short-term vs. long-term) appears to be critical. Consequently, standardization of physical activity and diet are critical when assessing ectopic lipids in predefined clinical situations. PMID:27649157

  5. Roles of Lipids in Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Endo, Kaichiro; Wada, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes in cyanobacterial cells and chloroplasts of algae and higher plants are the sites of oxygenic photosynthesis. The lipid composition of the thylakoid membrane is unique and highly conserved among oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Major lipids in thylakoid membranes are glycolipids, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, and the phospholipid, phosphatidylglycerol. The identification of almost all genes involved in the biosynthesis of each lipid class over the past decade has allowed the generation and isolation of mutants of various photosynthetic organisms incapable of synthesizing specific lipids. Numerous studies using such mutants have revealed that these lipids play important roles not only in the formation of the lipid bilayers of thylakoid membranes but also in the folding and assembly of the protein subunits in photosynthetic complexes. In addition to the studies with the mutants, recent X-ray crystallography studies of photosynthetic complexes in thylakoid membranes have also provided critical information on the association of lipids with photosynthetic complexes and their activities. In this chapter, we summarize our current understanding about the structural and functional involvement of thylakoid lipids in oxygenic photosynthesis.

  6. Lipids in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Hüsing, Anna; Kabar, Iyad; Schmidt, Hartmut H

    2016-03-28

    Hyperlipidemia is very common after liver transplantation and can be observed in up to 71% of patients. The etiology of lipid disorders in these patients is multifactorial, with different lipid profiles observed depending on the immunosuppressive agents administered and the presence of additional risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and nutrition. Due to recent improvements in survival of liver transplant recipients, the prevention of cardiovascular events has become more important, especially as approximately 64% of liver transplant recipients present with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Management of dyslipidemia and of other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, has therefore become essential in these patients. Treatment of hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation consists of life style modification, modifying the dose or type of immunosuppressive agents and use of lipid lowering agents. At the start of administration of lipid lowering medications, it is important to monitor drug-drug interactions, especially between lipid lowering agents and immunosuppressive drugs. Furthermore, as combinations of various lipid lowering drugs can lead to severe side effects, such as myopathies and rhabdomyolysis, these combinations should therefore be avoided. To our knowledge, there are no current guidelines targeting the management of lipid metabolism disorders in liver transplant recipients. This paper therefore recommends an approach of managing lipid abnormalities occurring after liver transplantation. PMID:27022213

  7. Membrane lipid alterations in hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Frans A

    2007-01-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) membrane is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins. Hundreds of phospholipid molecular species spontaneously arrange themselves in a lipid bilayer and move rapidly in the plane as well as across the bilayer in a dynamic but highly organized fashion. Areas enriched in certain lipids determine proper protein function. Phospholipids are asymmetrically distributed across the lipid bilayer with phosphatidylserine (PS) exclusively on the inside. Both the composition and organization of the RBC membrane is well maintained. Alterations lead to apoptosis during erythropoiesis or early demise of the cell in the circulation. The mechanisms that govern the maintenance of the lipid bilayer are only recently being unraveled at the individual protein level. Oxidized lipids are rapidly repaired using fatty acids taken up from plasma to maintain membrane integrity. Several isoforms of a RBC acyl-Coenzyme A (CoA) synthase have been reported, as well as the first member of a family of lysophospholipid acylCoA acyltransferases. Phospholipid asymmetry is maintained by the recently identified RBC amino-phospholipid translocase. These enzymes, essential in maintaining membrane lipid organization, are affected by oxidant stress or an increase in cytosolic calcium. Normal lipid composition and organization is lost in subpopulations of RBC in hemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Despite elaborate antioxidant systems, lipids and membrane proteins, including those that maintain lipid organization, are damaged in these cells. This in turn leads to improper repair of damaged RBC membranes and altered interactions of RBCs with other blood cells and plasma components that play a role in the pathology that defines these disorders. The altered lipid bilayer in RBCs in hemoglobinopathies leads to premature removal (anemia) and imbalance in hemostasis, and plays a role in vaso-occlusive crisis in sickle cell disease. Lipid breakdown products of PS

  8. Lipid Regulation of Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    D'Avanzo, N

    2016-01-01

    The lipid landscapes of cellular membranes are complex and dynamic, are tissue dependent, and can change with the age and the development of a variety of diseases. Researchers are now gaining new appreciation for the regulation of ion channel proteins by the membrane lipids in which they are embedded. Thus, as membrane lipids change, for example, during the development of disease, it is likely that the ionic currents that conduct through the ion channels embedded in these membranes will also be altered. This chapter provides an overview of the complex regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic voltage-dependent sodium (Nav) channels by fatty acids, sterols, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cannabinoids. The impact of lipid regulation on channel gating kinetics, voltage-dependence, trafficking, toxin binding, and structure are explored for Nav channels that have been examined in heterologous expression systems, native tissue, and reconstituted into artificial membranes. Putative mechanisms for Nav regulation by lipids are also discussed. PMID:27586290

  9. Lipids changes in liver cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing-ting; Xu, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-ying; Wu, Chang-ping

    2007-01-01

    Liver is one of the most important organs in energy metabolism. Most plasma apolipoproteins and endogenous lipids and lipoproteins are synthesized in the liver. It depends on the integrity of liver cellular function, which ensures homeostasis of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. When liver cancer occurs, these processes are impaired and the plasma lipid and lipoprotein patterns may be changed. Liver cancer is the fifth common malignant tumor worldwide, and is closely related to the infections of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). HBV and HCV infections are quite common in China and other Southeast Asian countries. In addition, liver cancer is often followed by a procession of chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, so that hepatic function is damaged obviously on these bases, which may significantly influence lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in vivo. In this review we summarize the clinical significance of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism under liver cancer. PMID:17565510

  10. Immunopharmacology of lipid A mimetics.

    PubMed

    Bowen, William S; Gandhapudi, Siva K; Kolb, Joseph P; Mitchell, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    The structural core of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, lipid A, has played a role in medicine since the 1890s when William Coley sought to harness its immunostimulatory properties in the form of a crude bacterial extract. Recent decades have brought remarkable clarity to the structure of lipid A and the multicomponent endotoxin receptor system that evolved to detect it. A range of therapeutically useful versions of lipid A now exists, including preparations of detoxified lipid A, synthetic copies of naturally occurring biological intermediates such as lipid IVa, and synthetic mimetics. These agents are finding use as vaccine adjuvants, antagonists and immunostimulants whose structural features have been refined to potentiate efficacy while decreasing the risk of inflammatory side effects.

  11. Lipid Informed Quantitation and Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crowell, PNNL

    2014-07-21

    LIQUID (Lipid Informed Quantitation and Identification) is a software program that has been developed to enable users to conduct both informed and high-throughput global liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based lipidomics analysis. This newly designed desktop application can quickly identify and quantify lipids from LC-MS/MS datasets while providing a friendly graphical user interface for users to fully explore the data. Informed data analysis simply involves the user specifying an electrospray ionization mode, lipid common name (i.e. PE(16:0/18:2)), and associated charge carrier. A stemplot of the isotopic profile and a line plot of the extracted ion chromatogram are also provided to show the MS-level evidence of the identified lipid. In addition to plots, other information such as intensity, mass measurement error, and elution time are also provided. Typically, a global analysis for 15,000 lipid targets

  12. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Dustin; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen; Hargreaves, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids . Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain.

  13. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical and thermal allodynia after burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Green, Dustin P; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids. Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain. PMID:27411353

  14. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Dustin; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen; Hargreaves, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids . Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain. PMID:27411353

  15. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases. A Host Lipid Screen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dianfan; Lee, Jean; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-11-30

    The default lipid for the bulk of the crystallogenesis studies performed to date using the cubic mesophase method is monoolein. There is no good reason, however, why this 18-carbon, cis-monounsaturated monoacylglycerol should be the preferred lipid for all target membrane proteins. The latter come from an array of biomembrane types with varying properties that include hydrophobic thickness, intrinsic curvature, lateral pressure profile, lipid and protein makeup, and compositional asymmetry. Thus, it seems reasonable that screening for crystallizability based on the identity of the lipid creating the hosting mesophase would be worthwhile. For this, monoacylglycerols with differing acyl chain characteristics, such as length and olefinic bond position, must be available. A lipid synthesis and purification program is in place in the author's laboratory to serve this need. In the current study with the outer membrane sugar transporter, OprB, we demonstrate the utility of host lipid screening as a means for generating diffraction-quality crystals. Host lipid screening is likely to prove a generally useful strategy for mesophase-based crystallization of membrane proteins.

  16. Defining Nicotinic Agonist Binding Surfaces through Photoaffinity Labeling†

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Maltby, David; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Zhang, Nanjing; Durkin, Kathleen A.; Presley, Jack; Talley, Todd T.; Taylor, Palmer; Burlingame, Alma L.; Casida, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChR) agonists are potential therapeutic agents for neurological dysfunction. In the present study, the homopentameric mollusk ACh binding protein (AChBP), used as a surrogate for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the nAChR, was specifically derivatized by the highly potent agonist azidoepibatidine (AzEPI) prepared as a photoaffinity probe and radioligand. One EPI-nitrene photoactivated molecule was incorporated in each subunit interface binding site based on analysis of the intact derivatized protein. Tryptic fragments of the modified AChBP were analyzed by collision-induced dissociation and Edman sequencing of radiolabeled peptides. Each specific EPI-nitrene-modified site involved either Tyr195 of loop C on the principal or (+)-face or Met116 of loop E on the complementary or (−)-face. The two derivatization sites were observed in similar frequency, providing evidence of the reactivity of the azido/nitrene probe substituent and close proximity to both residues. [3H]AzEPI binds to the α4β2 nAChR at a single high-affinity site and photoaffinity-labels only the α4 subunit, presumably modifying Tyr225 spatially corresponding to Tyr195 of AChBP. Phe137 of the β2 nAChR subunit, equivalent to Met116 of AChBP, conceivably lacks sufficient reactivity with the nitrene generated from the probe. The present photoaffinity labeling in a physiologically relevant condition combined with the crystal structure of AChBP allows development of precise structural models for the AzEPI interactions with AChBP and α4β2 nAChR. These findings enabled us to use AChBP as a structural surrogate to define the nAChR agonist site. PMID:17614369

  17. One-Photon Lithography for High-Quality Lipid Bilayer Micropatterns.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, M Florencia; Dodes Traian, Martín M; Levi, Valeria; Carrer, Dolores C

    2015-11-01

    A relevant question in cell biology with broad implications in biomedicine is how the organization and dynamics of interacting membranes modulate signaling cascades that involve cell-cell contact. The functionalization of surfaces with supported lipid bilayers containing tethered proteins is a particularly useful method to present ligands with membrane-like mobility to cells. Here, we present a method to generate micrometer-sized patches of lipid bilayers decorated with proteins. The method uses an economic microcontact printing technique based on one-photon lithography that can be easily implemented in a commercial laser scanning microscope. We verified that both proteins and lipids freely diffuse within the patterned bilayer, as assessed by z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. These results suggest that the supported lipid bilayer patterns constitute an optimal system to explore processes involving direct interactions between cells. We also illustrate possible applications of this method by exploring the interaction of cells expressing the Fas receptor and patterns of lipid bilayers containing an agonist antibody against Fas. PMID:26452154

  18. Antithrombotic lipid minor constituents from vegetable oils. Comparison between olive oils and others.

    PubMed

    Karantonis, Haralabos C; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2002-02-27

    Many epidemiological studies suggest that vegetable oils and especially olive oil present a protective effect against atherosclerosis. In this study, total lipids (TL) of Greek olive oils and seed oils of four kinds, namely, soybean, corn, sunflower, and sesame oil, were separated into total polar lipids (TPL) and total neutral lipids (TNL) via a novel extraction procedure. TPL and TNL of olive oil were fractionated by HPLC for further study. Each lipid fraction from HPLC separation along with TL, TPL, and TNL lipid samples from oils were tested in vitro for their capacity to induce or to inhibit washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Comparison between olive and seed oils supports the superiority of olive oil as high levels of platelet activating factor (PAF) antagonists have been detected, mainly in TPL. In addition, the structure of the most active fraction from olive oil was elucidated, as a glycerol-glycolipid. Because it has already been reported that PAF plays a pivotal role in atherogenesis, the existence of PAF agonists and antagonists in vegetable oils may explain their protective role against atherosclerosis.

  19. Effects of coumestrol on lipid and glucose metabolism as a farnesoid X receptor ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Miki; Kanayama, Tomohiko; Yashiro, Takuya; Kondo, Hidehiko; Murase, Takatoshi; Hase, Tadashi; Tokimitsu, Ichiro; Nishikawa, Jun-ichi; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2008-08-01

    In the course of an effort to identify novel agonists of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), coumestrol was determined to be one such ligand. Reporter and in vitro coactivator interaction assays revealed that coumestrol bound and activated FXR. Treatment of Hep G2 cells with coumestrol stimulated the expression of FXR target genes, thereby regulating the expression of target genes of the liver X receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factor-4{alpha}. Through these actions, coumestrol is expected to exert beneficial effects on lipid and glucose metabolism.

  20. Precocious puberty due to a lipid-cell tumour of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Dengg, K; Fink, F M; Heitger, A; Tabarelli, M; Kreczy, A; Glatzl, J; Berger, H

    1993-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl with a lipid cell tumour of the ovary showed isosexual precocious pseudopuberty. The endocrine activity of the tumour led to elevated plasma levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, oestradiol, testosterone and androstenedione. After tumour resection the clinical signs of abnormal hormonal stimulation disappeared within 10 months. The girl developed precocious puberty again 2 years later without any sign of relapse. Therapy with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonist was effective although premature activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis could not clearly be demonstrated by hormonal investigations.

  1. INSIGHT AGONISTES: A READING OF SOPHOCLES'S OEDIPUS THE KING.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Eugene J

    2015-07-01

    In this reading of Sophocles's Oedipus the King, the author suggests that insight can be thought of as the main protagonist of the tragedy. He personifies this depiction of insight, calling it Insight Agonistes, as if it were the sole conflicted character on the stage, albeit masquerading at times as several other characters, including gods, sphinxes, and oracles. This psychoanalytic reading of the text lends itself to an analogy between psychoanalytic process and Sophocles's tragic hero. The author views insight as always transgressing against, always at war with a conservative, societal, or intrapsychic chorus of structured elements. A clinical vignette is presented to illustrate this view of insight.

  2. Narrow SAR in odorant sensing Orco receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Romaine, Ian M; Taylor, Robert W; Saidu, Samsudeen P; Kim, Kwangho; Sulikowski, Gary A; Zwiebel, Laurence J; Waterson, Alex G

    2014-06-15

    The systematic exploration of a series of triazole-based agonists of the cation channel insect odorant receptor is reported. The structure-activity relationships of independent sections of the molecules are examined. Very small changes to the compound structure were found to exert a large impact on compound activity. Optimal substitutions were combined using a 'mix-and-match' strategy to produce best-in-class compounds that are capable of potently agonizing odorant receptor activity and may form the basis for the identification of a new mode of insect behavior modification. PMID:24813736

  3. Clenbuterol, a beta(2)-agonist, retards atrophy in denervated muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2) agonist, clenbuterol, on the protein content as well as on the contractile strength and the muscle fiber cross-sectional area of various denervated muscles from rats were investigated. It was found that denervated soleus, anterior tibialis, and gastrocnemius muscles, but not the extensor digitorum longus, of rats treated for 2-3 weeks with clenbuterol contained 95-110 percent more protein than denervated controls. The twofold difference in the protein content of denervated solei was paralleled by similar changes in contractile strength and muscle fiber cross-sectional area.

  4. INSIGHT AGONISTES: A READING OF SOPHOCLES'S OEDIPUS THE KING.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Eugene J

    2015-07-01

    In this reading of Sophocles's Oedipus the King, the author suggests that insight can be thought of as the main protagonist of the tragedy. He personifies this depiction of insight, calling it Insight Agonistes, as if it were the sole conflicted character on the stage, albeit masquerading at times as several other characters, including gods, sphinxes, and oracles. This psychoanalytic reading of the text lends itself to an analogy between psychoanalytic process and Sophocles's tragic hero. The author views insight as always transgressing against, always at war with a conservative, societal, or intrapsychic chorus of structured elements. A clinical vignette is presented to illustrate this view of insight. PMID:26198605

  5. Induction of depersonalization by the serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine.

    PubMed

    Simeon, D; Hollander, E; Stein, D J; DeCaria, C; Cohen, L J; Saoud, J B; Islam, N; Hwang, M

    1995-09-29

    Sixty-seven subjects, including normal volunteers and patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, and borderline personality disorder, received ratings of depersonalization after double-blind, placebo-controlled challenges with the partial serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP). Challenge with m-CPP induced depersonalization significantly more than did placebo. Subjects who became depersonalized did not differ in age, sex, or diagnosis from those who did not experience depersonalization. There was a significant correlation between the induction of depersonalization and increase in panic, but not nervousness, anxiety, sadness, depression, or drowsiness. This report suggests that serotonergic dysregulation may in part underlie depersonalization.

  6. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter. PMID:26585147

  7. Discovery of a potent and selective GPR120 agonist.

    PubMed

    Shimpukade, Bharat; Hudson, Brian D; Hovgaard, Christine Kiel; Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond

    2012-05-10

    GPR120 is a receptor of unsaturated long-chain fatty acids reported to mediate GLP-1 secretion, insulin sensitization, anti-inflammatory, and anti-obesity effects and is therefore emerging as a new potential target for treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic diseases. Further investigation is however hindered by the lack of suitable receptor modulators. Screening of FFA1 ligands provided a lead with moderate activity on GPR120 and moderate selectivity over FFA1. Optimization led to the discovery of the first potent and selective GPR120 agonist.

  8. Contamination with retinoic acid receptor agonists in two rivers in the Kinki region of Japan.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nakama, Koki; Sawada, Kazuko; Watanabe, Taro; Takagi, Mai; Sei, Kazunari; Yang, Min; Hirotsuji, Junji; Hu, Jianying; Nishikawa, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the agonistic activity against human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha in the Lake Biwa-Yodo River and the Ina River in the Kinki region of Japan. To accomplish this, a yeast two-hybrid assay was used to elucidate the spatial and temporal variations and potential sources of RARalpha agonist contamination in the river basins. RARalpha agonistic activity was commonly detected in the surface water samples collected along two rivers at different periods, with maximum all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) equivalents of 47.6 ng-atRA/L and 23.5 ng-atRA/L being observed in Lake Biwa-Yodo River and Ina River, respectively. The results indicated that RARalpha agonists are always present and widespread in the rivers. Comparative investigation of RARalpha and estrogen receptor alpha agonistic activities at 20 stations along each river revealed that the spatial variation pattern of RARalpha agonist contamination was entirely different from that of the estrogenic compound contamination. This suggests that the effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants, a primary source of estrogenic compounds, seemed not to be the cause of RARalpha agonist contamination in the rivers. Fractionation using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) directed by the bioassay found two bioactive fractions from river water samples, suggesting the presence of at least two RARalpha agonists in the rivers. Although a trial conducted to identify RARalpha agonists in the major bioactive fraction was not completed as part of this study, comparison of retention times in HPLC analysis and quantification with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the major causative contaminants responsible for the RARalpha agonistic activity were not RAs (natural RAR ligands) and 4-oxo-RAs, while 4-oxo-RAs were identified as the major RAR agonists in sewage in Beijing, China. These findings suggest that there are unknown RARalpha agonists with high

  9. Substituted isoxazole analogs of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist GW4064

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Parks, Derek J.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of alternately 3,5-substituted isoxazoles was prepared. Several of these analogs were potent full FXR agonists. A subset of this series, with a tether between the isoxazole ring and the 3-position aryl substituent, were equipotent FXR agonists to GW 4064 1a, with the 2,6-dimethyl phenol analog 1t having greater FRET FXR potency than GW 4064 1a.

  10. Substituted isoxazole analogs of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist GW4064.

    PubMed

    Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Parks, Derek J; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Wisely, G Bruce

    2009-06-01

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of alternately 3,5-substituted isoxazoles was prepared. Several of these analogs were potent full FXR agonists. A subset of this series, with a tether between the isoxazole ring and the 3-position aryl substituent, were equipotent FXR agonists to GW 4064 1a, with the 2,6-dimethyl phenol analog 1t having greater FRET FXR potency than GW 4064 1a.

  11. Discovery of potent and selective nonsteroidal indazolyl amide glucocorticoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sheppeck, James E; Gilmore, John L; Xiao, Hai-Yun; Dhar, T G Murali; Nirschl, David; Doweyko, Arthur M; Sack, Jack S; Corbett, Martin J; Malley, Mary F; Gougoutas, Jack Z; Mckay, Lorraine; Cunningham, Mark D; Habte, Sium F; Dodd, John H; Nadler, Steven G; Somerville, John E; Barrish, Joel C

    2013-10-01

    Modification of a phenolic lead structure based on lessons learned from increasing the potency of steroidal glucocorticoid agonists lead to the discovery of exceptionally potent, nonsteroidal, indazole GR agonists. SAR was developed to achieve good selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors with the ultimate goal of achieving a dissociated GR agonist as measured by human in vitro assays. The specific interactions by which this class of compounds inhibits GR was elucidated by solving an X-ray co-crystal structure. PMID:23953070

  12. Indanylacetic acid derivatives carrying 4-thiazolyl-phenoxy tail groups, a new class of potent PPAR alpha/gamma/delta pan agonists: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Joachim; Chen, Libing; Majumdar, Dyuti; Bullock, William H; Burns, Michael; Claus, Thomas; Dela Cruz, Fernando E; Daly, Michelle; Ehrgott, Frederick J; Johnson, Jeffrey S; Livingston, James N; Schoenleber, Robert W; Shapiro, Jeffrey; Yang, Ling; Tsutsumi, Manami; Ma, Xin

    2007-03-01

    Compounds that simultaneously activate the three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes alpha, gamma, and delta hold potential to address the adverse metabolic and cardiovascular conditions associated with diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. We recently identified the indanylacetic acid moiety as a well-tunable PPAR agonist head group. Here we report the synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of novel aryl tail group derivatives that led to a new class of potent PPAR pan agonists. While most of the tail group modifications imparted potent PPAR delta agonist activity, improvement of PPAR alpha and gamma activity required the introduction of new heterocyclic substituents that were not known in the PPAR literature. Systematic optimization led to the discovery of 4-thiazolyl-phenyl derivatives with potent PPAR alpha/gamma/delta pan agonistic activity. The lead candidate from this series was found to exhibit excellent ADME properties and superior therapeutic potential compared to known PPAR gamma activating agents by favorably modulating lipid levels in hApoA1 mice and hyperlipidemic hamsters, while normalizing glucose levels in diabetic rodent models. PMID:17274610

  13. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of a potent opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, compared to subtype-selective opioid receptor agonists for stroke treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Islam, Mohammad R; Karamyan, Vardan T.; Abbruscato, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    To meet the challenge of identification of new treatments for stroke, this study was designed to evaluate a potent, nonselective opioid receptor (OR) agonist, biphalin, in comparison to subtype selective OR agonists, as a potential neuroprotective drug candidate using in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. Our in vitro approach included mouse primary neuronal cells that were challenged with glutamate and hypoxic/aglycemic (H/A) conditions. We observed that 10 nM biphalin, exerted a statistically significant neuroprotective effect after glutamate challenge, compared to all selective opioid agonists, according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Moreover, 10 nM biphalin provided superior neuroprotection after H/A-reoxygenation compared to selective opioid agonists in all cases. Our in vitro investigations were supported by in vivo studies which indicate that the nonselective opioid agonist, biphalin, achieves enhanced neuroprotective potency compared to any of the selective opioid agonists, evidenced by reduced edema and infarct ratios. Reduction of edema and infarction was accompanied by neurological improvement of the animals in two independent behavioral tests. Collectively these data strongly suggest that concurrent agonist stimulation of mu, kappa and delta ORs with biphalin is neuroprotective and superior to neuroprotection by activation of any single OR subtype. PMID:25801116

  14. Lipid mediators in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The implications of lipid lowering drugs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy have been considered. At the same time, the clinical efficacy of lipid lowering drugs has resulted in improvement in the cardiovascular functions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with or without diabetes, but no remarkable improvement has been observed in the kidney outcome. Earlier lipid mediators have been shown to cause accumulative effects in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Here, we attempt to analyze the involvement of lipid mediators in DN. The hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of diacyglycerol (DAG) is one of the causes for the activation of protein kinase C (PKCs), which is responsible for the activation of pathways, including the production of VEGF, TGFβ1, PAI-1, NADPH oxidases, and NFҟB signaling, accelerating the development of DN. Additionally, current studies on the role of ceramide are one of the major fields of study in DN. Researchers have reported excessive ceramide formation in the pathobiological conditions of DN. There is less report on the effect of lipid lowering drugs on the reduction of PKC activation and ceramide synthesis. Regulating PKC activation and ceramide biosynthesis could be a protective measure in the therapeutic potential of DN. Lipid lowering drugs also upregulate anti-fibrotic microRNAs, which could hint at the effects of lipid lowering drugs in DN. PMID:25206927

  15. Lipid synthesis in chick epidermis.

    PubMed

    Lavker, R M

    1975-07-01

    Lipid synthesis in newborn chick epidermis was studied by electron microscopic autoradiography after injection of tritiated palmitate. The labeled lipid product in the tissue was identified as mostly triglyceride. At the earliest time after injection (6 hr), the radioactive precursor was taken up by all viable cells of the epidermis. Grain density was heaviest over basal cells, moderate over spinous cells, and slight over granular cells; thus lipid incorporation is highest in the basal and spinous regions of the chick epidermis. As time after injection progressed, the increasing amounts of grains over the granular and horny cells and decreasing amounts over the basal and spinous cells reflected the continuous upward displacement of cells from one layer into the next. From the distribution of silver grains within the epidermal cells, it has been concluded that, with the passage of time, triglycerides synthesized by the epidermal cells were mainly located in lipid droplets. The numerous grains associated with the elements of the endoplasmic reticulum indicated that this organelle is involved in aggregating triglyceride molecules into lipid droplets. The fact that grains were seen within the horny cells indicated that part of the horny cell consists of lipid probably derived from the lipid droplets retained by the cells during keratinization. PMID:1151110

  16. Neuroimaging of lipid storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Deborah; Auerbach, Sarah; Robinson, Paul; Gropman, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Lipid storage diseases, also known as the lipidoses, are a group of inherited metabolic disorders in which there is lipid accumulation in various cell types, including the central nervous system, because of the deficiency of a variety of enzymes. Over time, excessive storage can cause permanent cellular and tissue damage. The brain is particularly sensitive to lipid storage as the contents of the central nervous system must occupy uniform volume, and any increases in fluids or deposits will lead to pressure changes and interference with normal neurological function. In addition to primary lipid storage diseases, lysosomal storage diseases include the mucolipidoses (in which excessive amounts of lipids and carbohydrates are stored in the cells and tissues) and the mucopolysaccharidoses (in which abnormal glycosylated proteins cannot be broken down because of enzyme deficiency). Neurological dysfunction can be a manifestation of these conditions due to substrate deposition as well. This review will explore the modalities of neuroimaging that may have particular relevance to the study of the lipid storage disorder and their impact on elucidating aspects of brain function. First, the techniques will be reviewed. Next, the neuropathology of a few selected lipid storage disorders will be reviewed and the use of neuroimaging to define disease characteristics discussed in further detail. Examples of studies using these techniques will be discussed in the text.

  17. Effects of LAAM and methadone utilization in an opiate agonist treatment program.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, J F; Khattak, S

    2000-01-01

    The development and approval of levo-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) as a pharmacotherapeutic agent in opioid agonist therapy provided an alternative to methadone. Clinicians recognized the potential benefits that LAAM, a synthetic mu agonist with pharmacological properties which differ from those of methadone,could have in the treatment management of addicts in opioid agonist therapy. We report our experience utilizing LAAM from 1995 to 1999 at the Hines VA opioid agonist therapy clinic. The addition of LAAM to the clinic's treatment armamentarium has resulted in management options that have improved the areas of patient recruitment, patient retention, patient traffic, take-home medication, detoxification, and treatment outcomes.

  18. Trial Watch: Immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor agonists in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Iribarren, Kristina; Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Cremer, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Špíšek, Radek; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulating preclinical evidence indicates that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists efficiently boost tumor-targeting immune responses (re)initiated by most, if not all, paradigms of anticancer immunotherapy. Moreover, TLR agonists have been successfully employed to ameliorate the efficacy of various chemotherapeutics and targeted anticancer agents, at least in rodent tumor models. So far, only three TLR agonists have been approved by regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients. Moreover, over the past decade, the interest of scientists and clinicians in these immunostimulatory agents has been fluctuating. Here, we summarize recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of TLR agonists for cancer therapy. PMID:27141345

  19. Dopamine agonist-induced substance addiction: the next piece of the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    Traditional antiparkinson treatment strategies strive to balance the antiparkinson effects of dopaminergic drugs with the avoidance of motor response complications. Dopamine agonists have an established role in delaying the emergence of motor response complications or reducing motor "off" periods. The recent recognition of a range of "behavioural addictions" that are linked to dopamine agonist use has highlighted the role of dopamine in brain reward function and addiction disorders in general. Dopamine agonists have now even been linked occasionally to new substance addictions. The challenge now for the Parkinsonologist is to also balance the net benefits of using dopamine agonists for their motor effects with avoiding the harm from behavioural compulsions. PMID:20980151

  20. Analysis of agonist dissociation constants as assessed by functional antagonism in guinea pig left atria

    SciTech Connect

    Molenaar, P.; Malta, E.

    1986-04-01

    In electrically driven guinea pig left atria, positive inotropic responses to (-)-isoprenaline and the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist RO363 were obtained in the absence and in the presence of the functional antagonists adenosine, carbachol, gallopamil, nifedipine, and Ro 03-7894. Each of the functional antagonists reduced the maximum response to both agonists and produced nonparallel rightward shifts in the cumulative concentration effect curves. For both agonists, dissociation constants (KA) were calculated using the equation described by Furchgott (1966) for irreversible antagonism. For RO363, which is a partial agonist with high agonist activity, the equations outlined for functional interaction by Mackay (1981) were also employed to calculate KA values. The KA values obtained by each method were compared with the dissociation constants (KD) for the two agonists determined from their ability to displace the radioligand (-)-(/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol from beta 1-adrenoceptors in guinea pig left atrial membrane preparations. The estimates of KA varied substantially from KD values. The KD values were taken as more accurate estimates of the true values for the dissociation constants because a high degree of correlation exists between pKD and pD2 values for a number of other beta-adrenoceptor agonists that behave as partial agonists and between pKD and pKB values for a number of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. Thus, it appears that there are serious limitations in the current theory for using functional antagonism as a means of obtaining agonist dissociation constants.

  1. Lipid metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Terry K.; Bütikofer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei membranes consist of all major eukaryotic glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid classes. These are de novo synthesized from precursors obtained either from the host or from catabolised endocytosed lipids. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in the molecular and biochemical characterisation of several of these lipid biosynthetic pathways, using gene knockout or RNA interference strategies or by enzymatic characterization of individual reactions. Together with the completed genome, these studies have highlighted several possible differences between mammalian and trypanosome lipid biosynthesis that could be exploited for the development of drugs against the diseases caused by these parasites. PMID:20382188

  2. Structural complexes of the agonist, inverse agonist and antagonist bound C5a receptor: insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    PubMed

    Rana, Soumendra; Sahoo, Amita Rani; Majhi, Bharat Kumar

    2016-04-26

    The C5a receptor (C5aR) is a pharmacologically important G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that interacts with (h)C5a, by recruiting both the "orthosteric" sites (site1 at the N-terminus and site2 at the ECS, extra cellular surface) on C5aR in a two site-binding model. However, the complex pharmacological landscape and the distinguishing chemistry operating either at the "orthosteric" site1 or at the functionally important "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR are still not clear, which greatly limits the understanding of C5aR pharmacology. One of the major bottlenecks is the lack of an experimental structure or a refined model structure of C5aR with appropriately defined active sites. The study attempts to understand the pharmacology at the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR rationally by generating a highly refined full-blown model structure of C5aR through advanced molecular modeling techniques, and further subjecting it to automated docking and molecular dynamics (MD) studies in the POPC bilayer. The first series of structural complexes of C5aR respectively bound to a linear native peptide agonist ((h)C5a-CT), a small molecule inverse agonist (NDT) and a cyclic peptide antagonist (PMX53) are reported, apparently establishing the unique pharmacological landscape of the "orthosteric" site2, which also illustrates an energetically distinct but coherent competitive chemistry ("cation-π" vs. "π-π" interactions) involved in distinguishing the established ligands known for targeting the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR. Over a total of 1 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in the POPC bilayer, it is evidenced that while the agonist prefers a "cation-π" interaction, the inverse agonist prefers a "cogwheel/L-shaped" interaction in contrast to the "edge-to-face/T-shaped" type π-π interactions demonstrated by the antagonist by engaging the F275(7.28) of the C5aR. In the absence of a NMR or crystallographically guided model structure of C5aR, the computational model complexes not only

  3. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John M.; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O.; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A.; Milner, Joshua D.; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K.; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  4. Agonistic induction of PPARγ reverses cigarette smoke–induced emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Ming; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Frazier, Michael V.; Porter, Paul; Seryshev, Alexander; Hong, Jeong-Soo; Song, Li-zhen; Zhang, Yiqun; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Whitehead, Lawrence; Zarinkamar, Nazanin; Perusich, Sarah; Corry, David B.; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    The development of emphysema in humans and mice exposed to cigarette smoke is promoted by activation of an adaptive immune response. Lung myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) derived from cigarette smokers activate autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cells. mDC-dependent activation of T cell subsets requires expression of the SPP1 gene, which encodes osteopontin (OPN), a pleiotropic cytokine implicated in autoimmune responses. The upstream molecular events that promote SPP1 expression and activate mDCs in response to smoke remain unknown. Here, we show that peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARG/Pparg) expression was downregulated in mDCs of smokers with emphysema and mice exposed to chronic smoke. Conditional knockout of PPARγ in APCs using Cd11c-Cre Ppargflox/flox mice led to spontaneous lung inflammation and emphysema that resembled the phenotype of smoke-exposed mice. The inflammatory phenotype of Cd11c-Cre Ppargflox/flox mice required OPN, suggesting an antiinflammatory mechanism in which PPARγ negatively regulates Spp1 expression in the lung. A 2-month treatment with a PPARγ agonist reversed emphysema in WT mice despite continual smoke exposure. Furthermore, endogenous PPARγ agonists were reduced in the plasma of smokers with emphysema. These findings reveal a proinflammatory pathway, in which reduced PPARγ activity promotes emphysema, and suggest that targeting this pathway in smokers could prevent and reverse emphysema. PMID:24569375

  5. A novel PPARgamma agonist monascin's potential application in diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2014-07-25

    Edible fungi of the Monascus species have been used as traditional Chinese medicine in eastern Asia for several centuries. Monascus-fermented products possess a number of functional secondary metabolites, including the anti-inflammatory pigments monascin and ankaflavin. Monascin has been shown to prevent or ameliorate several conditions, including hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and obesity. Recently, monascin has been shown to improve hyperglycemia, attenuate oxidative stress, inhibit insulin resistance, and suppress inflammatory cytokine production. In our recent study, we have found that monascin is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) agonist. The PPARgamma agonist activity had been investigated and its exerted benefits are inhibition of inflammation in methylglyoxal (MG)-treated rats, prevention of pancreas impairment causing advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), promotion of insulin expression in vivo and in vitro, and attenuated carboxymethyllysine (CML)-induced hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation in the past several years. Moreover, our studies also demonstrated that monascin also activated nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in pancreatic RIN-m5F cell line thereby invading methylglyoxal induced pancreas dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the chemo-preventive properties of monascin against metabolic syndrome through PPARgamma and Nrf2 pathways. PMID:24752777

  6. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist attenuates ILC2-dependent airway hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Galle-Treger, Lauriane; Suzuki, Yuzo; Patel, Nisheel; Sankaranarayanan, Ishwarya; Aron, Jennifer L.; Maazi, Hadi; Chen, Lin; Akbari, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a complex and chronic inflammatory disorder that is associated with airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and driven by Th2 cytokine secretion. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) produce large amounts of Th2 cytokines and contribute to the development of AHR. Here, we show that ILC2s express the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR), which is thought to have an anti-inflammatory role in several inflammatory diseases. We show that engagement of a specific agonist with α7nAChR on ILC2s reduces ILC2 effector function and represses ILC2-dependent AHR, while decreasing expression of ILC2 key transcription factor GATA-3 and critical inflammatory modulator NF-κB, and reducing phosphorylation of upstream kinase IKKα/β. Additionally, the specific α7nAChR agonist reduces cytokine production and AHR in a humanized ILC2 mouse model. Collectively, our data suggest that α7nAChR expressed by ILC2s is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ILC2-mediated asthma. PMID:27752043

  7. A novel PPARgamma agonist monascin's potential application in diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2014-07-25

    Edible fungi of the Monascus species have been used as traditional Chinese medicine in eastern Asia for several centuries. Monascus-fermented products possess a number of functional secondary metabolites, including the anti-inflammatory pigments monascin and ankaflavin. Monascin has been shown to prevent or ameliorate several conditions, including hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and obesity. Recently, monascin has been shown to improve hyperglycemia, attenuate oxidative stress, inhibit insulin resistance, and suppress inflammatory cytokine production. In our recent study, we have found that monascin is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) agonist. The PPARgamma agonist activity had been investigated and its exerted benefits are inhibition of inflammation in methylglyoxal (MG)-treated rats, prevention of pancreas impairment causing advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), promotion of insulin expression in vivo and in vitro, and attenuated carboxymethyllysine (CML)-induced hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation in the past several years. Moreover, our studies also demonstrated that monascin also activated nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in pancreatic RIN-m5F cell line thereby invading methylglyoxal induced pancreas dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the chemo-preventive properties of monascin against metabolic syndrome through PPARgamma and Nrf2 pathways.

  8. Mood disorders, circadian rhythms, melatonin and melatonin agonists.

    PubMed

    Quera Salva, M A; Hartley, S

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of circadian rhythms have led to an interest in the treatment of major depressive disorder with chronobiotic agents. Many tissues have autonomous circadian rhythms, which are orchestrated by the master clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNC). Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine) is secreted from the pineal gland during darkness. Melatonin acts mainly on MT1 and MT2 receptors, which are present in the SNC, regulating physiological and neuroendocrine functions, including circadian entrainment, referred to as the chronobiotic effet. Circadian rhythms has been shown to be either misaligned or phase shifted or decreased in amplitude in both acute episodes and relapse of major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder. Manipulation of circadian rhythms either using physical treatments (such as high intensity light) or behavioral therapy has shown promise in improving symptoms. Pharmacotherapy using melatonin and pure melatonin receptor agonists, while improving sleep, has not been shown to improve symptoms of depression. A novel antidepressant, agomelatine, combines 5HT2c antagonist and melatonin agonist action, and has shown promise in both acute treatment of MDD and in preventing relapse.

  9. Pindolol--the pharmacology of a partial agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, B J; Menninger, K; Bertholet, A

    1982-01-01

    1 Pindolol is a non-selective beta-adrenoceptor blocking agent; its affinity to adrenoceptors in guinea pig atria (beta 1) is not significantly different from that in guinea pig trachea (beta 1 + beta 2) and canine vascular smooth muscle (beta 2). 2 Pindolol displays a striking diversity of agonist activities in isolated tissues. Stimulant effects correspond to 40--50% of the maximum effects of isoprenaline in isolated kitten atria and guinea pig trachea and to only 10% in guinea pig atria. Effects in canine isolated mesenteric vessels are those of a full agonist, maximum responses equaling those of isoprenaline. These findings suggest that the stimulant effects of pindolol are exerted principally on beta 2-adrenoceptors. 3 Cardiac stimulation produced by pindolol in the dog is sufficient to compensate for the cardiac depression resulting from blockade of beta-adrenoceptors in the heart. Reductions in cardiac output and compensatory increases in total peripheral resistance do not occur or are much smaller than those produced by beta-adrenoceptor blocking agents lacking sympathomimetic activity. 4 Pindolol-induced relaxation of bronchial smooth muscle prevents or minimizes the bronchoconstrictor effects of injected spasmogens in the cat. 5 Pindolol has marked vasodilator activity, small doses reducing femoral and mesenteric vascular resistance by approximately 30%. Doses comparable to those used in hypertensive patients lower blood pressure by 20 mmHg in non-anaesthetized dogs. PMID:7049208

  10. Pharmacology and toxicology of Cannabis derivatives and endocannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Zaimovic, Amir; Gerra, Maria L; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cippitelli, Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Somaini, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    For centuries Cannabis sativa and cannabis extracts have been used in natural medicine. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main active ingredient of Cannabis. THC seems to be responsible for most of the pharmacological and therapeutic actions of cannabis. In a few countries THC extracts (i.e. Sativex) or THC derivatives such as nabilone, and dronabinol are used in the clinic for the treatment of several pathological conditions like chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. On the other hand the severe side effects and the high abuse liability of these agents represent a serious limitation in their medical use. In addition, diversion in the use of these active ingredients for recreational purpose is a concern. Over recent years, alternative approaches using synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists or agents acting as activators of the endocannabinoid systems are under scrutiny with the hope to develop more effective and safer clinical applications. Likely, in the near future few of these new molecules will be available for clinical use. The present article review recent study and patents with focus on the cannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of central nervous system disorders with emphasis on agonists. PMID:19832688

  11. Pharmacology and toxicology of Cannabis derivatives and endocannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Zaimovic, Amir; Gerra, Maria L; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cippitelli, Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Somaini, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    For centuries Cannabis sativa and cannabis extracts have been used in natural medicine. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main active ingredient of Cannabis. THC seems to be responsible for most of the pharmacological and therapeutic actions of cannabis. In a few countries THC extracts (i.e. Sativex) or THC derivatives such as nabilone, and dronabinol are used in the clinic for the treatment of several pathological conditions like chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. On the other hand the severe side effects and the high abuse liability of these agents represent a serious limitation in their medical use. In addition, diversion in the use of these active ingredients for recreational purpose is a concern. Over recent years, alternative approaches using synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists or agents acting as activators of the endocannabinoid systems are under scrutiny with the hope to develop more effective and safer clinical applications. Likely, in the near future few of these new molecules will be available for clinical use. The present article review recent study and patents with focus on the cannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of central nervous system disorders with emphasis on agonists.

  12. Identification of agonists for a group of human odorant receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Kristeller, Daniela C.; do Nascimento, João B. P.; Galante, Pedro A. F.; Malnic, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction plays a critical role in several aspects of the human life. Odorants are detected by hundreds of odorant receptors (ORs) which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are expressed in the olfactory sensory neurons of the nose. The information provided by the activation of different combinations of ORs in the nose is transmitted to the brain, leading to odorant perception and emotional and behavioral responses. There are ~400 intact human ORs, and to date only a small percentage of these receptors (~10%) have known agonists. The determination of the specificity of the human ORs will contribute to a better understanding of how odorants are discriminated by the olfactory system. In this work, we aimed to identify human specific ORs, that is, ORs that are present in humans but absent from other species, and their corresponding agonists. To do this, we first selected 22 OR gene sequences from the human genome with no counterparts in the mouse, rat or dog genomes. Then we used a heterologous expression system to screen a subset of these human ORs against a panel of odorants of biological relevance, including foodborne aroma volatiles. We found that different types of odorants are able to activate some of these previously uncharacterized human ORs. PMID:25784876

  13. How does agonistic behaviour differ in albino and pigmented fish?

    PubMed Central

    Horký, Pavel; Wackermannová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    In addition to hypopigmentation of the skin and red iris colouration, albino animals also display distinct physiological and behavioural alterations. However, information on the social interactions of albino animals is rare and has mostly been limited to specially bred strains of albino rodents and animals from unique environments in caves. Differentiating between the effects of albinism and domestication on behaviour in rodents can be difficult, and social behaviour in cave fish changes according to species-specific adaptations to conditions of permanent darkness. The agonistic behaviours of albino offspring of pigmented parents have yet to be described. In this study, we observed agonistic behaviour in albino and pigmented juvenile Silurus glanis catfish. We found that the total number of aggressive interactions was lower in albinos than in pigmented catfish. The distance between conspecifics was also analysed, and albinos showed a tendency towards greater separation from their same-coloured conspecifics compared with pigmented catfish. These results demonstrate that albinism can be associated with lower aggressiveness and with reduced shoaling behaviour preference, as demonstrated by a tendency towards greater separation of albinos from conspecifics. PMID:27114883

  14. Hybrid lipid-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayani, Yasaman

    Biological membranes serve several important roles, such as structural support of cells and organelles, regulation of ionic and molecular transport, barriers to non-mediated transport, contact between cells within tissues, and accommodation of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins and other vital biomolecules incorporated into the membrane need a lipid membrane to function. Due to importance of lipid bilayers and their vital function in governing many processes in the cell, the development of various models as artificial lipid membranes that can mimic cell membranes has become a subject of great interest. Using different models of artificial lipid membranes, such as liposomes, planar lipid bilayers and supported or tethered lipid bilayers, we are able to study many biophysical processes in biological membranes. The ability of different molecules to interact with and change the structure of lipid membranes can be also investigated in artificial lipid membranes. An important application of lipid bilayer-containing interfaces is characterization of novel membrane proteins for high throughput drug screening studies to investigate receptor-drug interactions and develop biosensor systems. Membrane proteins need a lipid bilayer environment to preserve their stability and functionality. Fabrication of materials that can interact with biomolecules like proteins necessitates the use of lipid bilayers as a mimic of cell membranes. The objective of this research is to develop novel hybrid lipid-based nanostructures mimicking biological membranes. Toward this aim, two hybrid biocompatible structures are introduced: lipid bilayer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and hydrogel-anchored liposomes with double-stranded DNA anchors. These structures have potential applications in biosensing, drug targeting, drug delivery, and biophysical studies of cell membranes. In the first developed nanostructure, lipid molecules are covalently attached to the surfaces of MWCNTs, and

  15. Lipid phosphate phosphatases regulate lysophosphatidic acid production and signaling in platelets: studies using chemical inhibitors of lipid phosphate phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Susan S; Sciorra, Vicki A; Sigal, Yury J; Pamuklar, Zehra; Wang, Zuncai; Xu, Yong; Prestwich, Glenn D; Morris, Andrew J

    2003-10-31

    Blood platelets play an essential role in ischemic heart disease and stroke contributing to acute thrombotic events by release of potent inflammatory agents within the vasculature. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator produced by platelets and found in the blood and atherosclerotic plaques. LPA receptors on platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells regulate growth, differentiation, survival, motility, and contractile activity. Definition of the opposing pathways of synthesis and degradation that control extracellular LPA levels is critical to understanding how LPA bioactivity is regulated. We show that intact platelets and platelet membranes actively dephosphorylate LPA and identify the major enzyme responsible as lipid phosphate phosphatase 1 (LPP1). Localization of LPP1 to the platelet surface is increased by exposure to LPA. A novel receptor-inactive sn-3-substituted difluoromethylenephosphonate analog of phosphatidic acid that is a potent competitive inhibitor of LPP1 activity potentiates platelet aggregation and shape change responses to LPA and amplifies LPA production by agonist-stimulated platelets. Our results identify LPP1 as a pivotal regulator of LPA signaling in the cardiovascular system. These findings are consistent with genetic and cell biological evidence implicating LPPs as negative regulators of lysophospholipid signaling and suggest that the mechanisms involve both attenuation of lysophospholipid actions at cell surface receptors and opposition of lysophospholipid production. PMID:12909631

  16. Lipid exchange between membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jähnig, F

    1984-01-01

    The exchange of lipid molecules between vesicle bilayers in water and a monolayer forming at the water surface was investigated theoretically within the framework of thermodynamics. The total number of exchanged molecules was found to depend on the bilayer curvature as expressed by the vesicle radius and on the boundary condition for exchange, i.e., whether during exchange the radius or the packing density of the vesicles remains constant. The boundary condition is determined by the rate of flip-flop within the bilayer relative to the rate of exchange between bi- and monolayer. If flip-flop is fast, exchange is independent of the vesicle radius; if flip-flop is slow, exchange increases with the vesicle radius. Available experimental results agree with the detailed form of this dependence. When the theory was extended to exchange between two bilayers of different curvature, the direction of exchange was also determined by the curvatures and the boundary conditions for exchange. Due to the dependence of the boundary conditions on flip-flop and, consequently, on membrane fluidity, exchange between membranes may partially be regulated by membrane fluidity. PMID:6518251

  17. Generalized Concentration Addition Modeling Predicts Mixture Effects of Environmental PPARγ Agonists.

    PubMed

    Watt, James; Webster, Thomas F; Schlezinger, Jennifer J

    2016-09-01

    The vast array of potential environmental toxicant combinations necessitates the development of efficient strategies for predicting toxic effects of mixtures. Current practices emphasize the use of concentration addition to predict joint effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals in coexposures. Generalized concentration addition (GCA) is one such method for predicting joint effects of coexposures to chemicals and has the advantage of allowing for mixture components to have differences in efficacy (ie, dose-response curve maxima). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor that plays a central role in regulating lipid homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, and bone quality and is the target of an increasing number of environmental toxicants. Here, we tested the applicability of GCA in predicting mixture effects of therapeutic (rosiglitazone and nonthiazolidinedione partial agonist) and environmental PPARγ ligands (phthalate compounds identified using EPA's ToxCast database). Transcriptional activation of human PPARγ1 by individual compounds and mixtures was assessed using a peroxisome proliferator response element-driven luciferase reporter. Using individual dose-response parameters and GCA, we generated predictions of PPARγ activation by the mixtures, and we compared these predictions with the empirical data. At high concentrations, GCA provided a better estimation of the experimental response compared with 3 alternative models: toxic equivalency factor, effect summation and independent action. These alternatives provided reasonable fits to the data at low concentrations in this system. These experiments support the implementation of GCA in mixtures analysis with endocrine disrupting compounds and establish PPARγ as an important target for further studies of chemical mixtures. PMID:27255385

  18. Melatonin and Its Agonist Ramelteon in Alzheimer's Disease: Possible Therapeutic Value

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Kaur, Charanjit; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu; Brown, Gregory M.; Cardinali, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of cognitive function, loss of memory and insomnia, and abnormal behavioral signs and symptoms. Among the various theories that have been put forth to explain the pathophysiology of AD, the oxidative stress induced by amyloid β-protein (Aβ) deposition has received great attention. Studies undertaken on postmortem brain samples of AD patients have consistently shown extensive lipid, protein, and DNA oxidation. Presence of abnormal tau protein, mitochondrial dysfunction, and protein hyperphosphorylation all have been demonstrated in neural tissues of AD patients. Moreover, AD patients exhibit severe sleep/wake disturbances and insomnia and these are associated with more rapid cognitive decline and memory impairment. On this basis, the successful management of AD patients requires an ideal drug that besides antagonizing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity could also correct the disturbed sleep-wake rhythm and improve sleep quality. Melatonin is an effective chronobiotic agent and has significant neuroprotective properties preventing Aβ-induced neurotoxic effects in a number of animal experimental models. Since melatonin levels in AD patients are greatly reduced, melatonin replacement has the potential value to be used as a therapeutic agent for treating AD, particularly at the early phases of the disease and especially in those in whom the relevant melatonin receptors are intact. As sleep deprivation has been shown to produce oxidative damage, impaired mitochondrial function, neurodegenerative inflammation, and altered proteosomal processing with abnormal activation of enzymes, treatment of sleep disturbances may be a priority for arresting the progression of AD. In this context the newly introduced melatonin agonist ramelteon can be of much therapeutic value because of its highly selective action on melatonin MT1/MT2 receptors in promoting sleep. PMID:21197086

  19. Recognition of lipid A variants by the TLR4-MD-2 receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Maeshima, Nina; Fernandez, Rachel C.

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and consists of lipid A, core sugars, and O-antigen. LPS is recognized by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 on host innate immune cells and can signal to activate the transcription factor NFκB, leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that initiate and shape the adaptive immune response. Most of what is known about how LPS is recognized by the TLR4-MD-2 receptor complex on animal cells has been studied using Escherichia coli lipid A, which is a strong agonist of TLR4 signaling. Recent work from several groups, including our own, has shown that several important pathogenic bacteria can modify their LPS or lipid A molecules in ways that significantly alter TLR4 signaling to NFκB. Thus, it has been hypothesized that expression of lipid A variants is one mechanism by which pathogens modulate or evade the host immune response. Additionally, several key differences in the amino acid sequences of human and mouse TLR4-MD-2 receptors have been shown to alter the ability to recognize these variations in lipid A, suggesting a host-specific effect on the immune response to these pathogens. In this review, we provide an overview of lipid A variants from several human pathogens, how the basic structure of lipid A is recognized by mouse and human TLR4-MD-2 receptor complexes, as well as how alteration of this pattern affects its recognition by TLR4 and impacts the downstream immune response. PMID:23408095

  20. Lipid dynamics at dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Dotti, Carlos Gerardo; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the structure and composition of the membrane protrusions forming dendritic spines underlie memory and learning processes. In recent years a great effort has been made to characterize in detail the protein machinery that controls spine plasticity. However, we know much less about the involvement of lipids, despite being major membrane components and structure determinants. Moreover, protein complexes that regulate spine plasticity depend on specific interactions with membrane lipids for proper function and accurate intracellular signaling. In this review we gather information available on the lipid composition at dendritic spine membranes and on its dynamics. We pay particular attention to the influence that spine lipid dynamism has on glutamate receptors, which are key regulators of synaptic plasticity.

  1. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R.; Harroun, Thad A.; Katsaras, John

    2016-04-04

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown – at least in some bilayers – to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in themore » vicinity of the lipid–water interface. In this study we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies.« less

  2. Electronic polymers in lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Patrik K.; Jullesson, David; Elfwing, Anders; Liin, Sara I.; Musumeci, Chiara; Zeglio, Erica; Elinder, Fredrik; Solin, Niclas; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Electrical interfaces between biological cells and man-made electrical devices exist in many forms, but it remains a challenge to bridge the different mechanical and chemical environments of electronic conductors (metals, semiconductors) and biosystems. Here we demonstrate soft electrical interfaces, by integrating the metallic polymer PEDOT-S into lipid membranes. By preparing complexes between alkyl-ammonium salts and PEDOT-S we were able to integrate PEDOT-S into both liposomes and in lipid bilayers on solid surfaces. This is a step towards efficient electronic conduction within lipid membranes. We also demonstrate that the PEDOT-S@alkyl-ammonium:lipid hybrid structures created in this work affect ion channels in the membrane of Xenopus oocytes, which shows the possibility to access and control cell membrane structures with conductive polyelectrolytes. PMID:26059023

  3. Modulation of PPAR subtype selectivity. Part 2: Transforming PPARα/γ dual agonist into α selective PPAR agonist through bioisosteric modification.

    PubMed

    Zaware, Pandurang; Shah, Shailesh R; Pingali, Harikishore; Makadia, Pankaj; Thube, Baban; Pola, Suresh; Patel, Darshit; Priyadarshini, Priyanka; Suthar, Dinesh; Shah, Maanan; Jamili, Jeevankumar; Sairam, Kalapatapu V V M; Giri, Suresh; Patel, Lala; Patel, Harilal; Sudani, Hareshkumar; Patel, Hiren; Jain, Mukul; Patel, Pankaj; Bahekar, Rajesh

    2011-01-15

    A novel series of oxime containing benzyl-1,3-dioxane-r-2-carboxylic acid derivatives (6a-k) were designed as selective PPARα agonists, through bioisosteric modification in the lipophilic tail region of PPARα/γ dual agonist. Some of the test compounds (6a, 6b, 6c and 6f) showed high selectivity towards PPARα over PPARγ in vitro. Further, highly potent and selective PPARα agonist 6c exhibited significant antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic activity in vivo, along with its improved pharmacokinetic profile. Favorable in-silico interaction of 6c with PPARα binding pocket correlate its in vitro selectivity profile toward PPARα over PPARγ. Together, these results confirm discovery of novel series of oxime based selective PPARα agonists for the safe and effective treatment of various metabolic disorders. PMID:21195611

  4. LIPIDS OF SARCINA LUTEA I.

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Charles K.; Albro, Phillip W.

    1964-01-01

    Huston, Charles K. (U.S. Army Biological Laboratories, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.), and Phillip W. Albro. Lipids of Sarcina lutea. I. Fatty acid composition of the extractable lipids. J. Bacteriol. 88:425–432. 1964.—The extractable lipids of Sarcina lutea were separated into several fractions by a combination of column and thin-layer chromatography. Qualitative and quantitative characterization of the fatty acid content of these lipid fractions was accomplished by means of gas-liquid chromatography and infrared analyses. Of the total extract, the lipids consisted of 2.1% free fatty acids, 51.0% glycerides, and 22.7% complex lipids; they had a fatty acid content with a complete spectrum of carbon numbers from C8 to C22. The fatty acids included a large component of branched-acids in addition to the normal straight-chain acids. The branched-acids, comprising 40% of the fatty acids analyzed, constituted a homologous series of iso-acids from C12 to C19. Two 18-carbon unsaturates were found cis-9-octadecenoate and cis-11-octadecenoate. A relatively high percentage (20.5%) of the extractable material from S. lutea was found to be hydrocarbon. This material was not further characterized. PMID:14203360

  5. Dynamic Heterogeneity in Lipid Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othon, Christina; Dadashvand, Neda

    2015-03-01

    We have characterized the temperature and pressure dependent scaling of dynamic heterogeneity in a homogenous liquid phase of a lipid monolayer using time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (TRFA) microscopy. Rotational diffusion is far more sensitive to highly correlated motions than translational diffusion due to the enhanced influence of nearest neighbor interactions. Highly correlated motion results in regions of high-density, low mobility lipids, and low-density, high mobility lipids; and are observed as the bimodal distribution of rotational correlation times. For biological lipid membranes the presence of highly correlated motion will greatly influence the rates of protein sorting and self-assembly, as particles suspended in the fluid can become kinetically trapped. Rotational diffusion timescales (~ ns) are far shorter than the lifetime of dynamic clusters and lipid raft-like structures (~ 10 μs), and thus the distribution of rotational correlation times can provide critical insight into the presence of these structures. We have characterized rotational dynamic distributions for a variety of phosphocholine moieties, and found dynamics consistent with highly correlated motion. Using the proximity to the phase transition, and the scaling of the temperature dependence of the heterogeneity we apply theoretical models developed for other condensed matter systems help us define limits on the size and lifetime of dynamic clusters in lipid structures. corresponding author

  6. NMR spectroscopy for evaluation of lipid oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During storage and use of edible oils and other lipid-containing foods, reactions between lipids and oxygen occur, resulting in lipid oxidation and the subsequent development of off-flavors and odors. Accurate and timely assessment of lipid oxidation is critical for effective quality control of food...

  7. Interactions of Lipidic Cubic Phase Nanoparticles with Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Nazaruk, Ewa; Matyszewska, Dorota; Speziale, Chiara; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Landau, Ehud M; Bilewicz, Renata

    2016-09-20

    The interactions of liquid-crystalline monoolein (GMO) cubic phase nanoparticles with various model lipid membranes spread at the air-solution interface by the Langmuir technique were investigated. Cubosomes have attracted attention as potential biocompatible drug delivery systems, and thus understanding their mode of interaction with membranes is of special interest. Cubosomes spreading at the air-water interface as well as interactions with a monolayer of 1, 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) compressed to different surface pressures were studied by monitoring surface pressure-time dependencies at constant area. Progressive incorporation of the nanoparticles was shown to lead to mixed monolayer formation. The concentration of cubosomes influenced the mechanism of incorporation, as well as the fluidity and permeability of the resulting lipid membranes. Brewster angle microscopy images reflected the dependence of the monolayer structure on the cubosomes presence in the subphase. A parameter Csat was introduced to indicate the point of saturation of the lipid membrane with the cubosomal material. This parameter was found to depend on the surface pressure showing that the cubosomes disintegrate in prolonged contact with the membrane, filling available voids in the lipid membrane. At highest surface pressures when the layer is most compact, the penetration of cubosomal material is not possible and only some exchange with the membrane lipid becomes the route of including GMO into the layer. Finally, comparative studies of the interactions between lipids with various headgroup charges with cubosomes suggest that at high surface pressure an exchange of lipid component between the monolayer and the cubosome in its intact form may occur. PMID:27550742

  8. Interactions of Lipidic Cubic Phase Nanoparticles with Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Nazaruk, Ewa; Matyszewska, Dorota; Speziale, Chiara; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Landau, Ehud M; Bilewicz, Renata

    2016-09-20

    The interactions of liquid-crystalline monoolein (GMO) cubic phase nanoparticles with various model lipid membranes spread at the air-solution interface by the Langmuir technique were investigated. Cubosomes have attracted attention as potential biocompatible drug delivery systems, and thus understanding their mode of interaction with membranes is of special interest. Cubosomes spreading at the air-water interface as well as interactions with a monolayer of 1, 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) compressed to different surface pressures were studied by monitoring surface pressure-time dependencies at constant area. Progressive incorporation of the nanoparticles was shown to lead to mixed monolayer formation. The concentration of cubosomes influenced the mechanism of incorporation, as well as the fluidity and permeability of the resulting lipid membranes. Brewster angle microscopy images reflected the dependence of the monolayer structure on the cubosomes presence in the subphase. A parameter Csat was introduced to indicate the point of saturation of the lipid membrane with the cubosomal material. This parameter was found to depend on the surface pressure showing that the cubosomes disintegrate in prolonged contact with the membrane, filling available voids in the lipid membrane. At highest surface pressures when the layer is most compact, the penetration of cubosomal material is not possible and only some exchange with the membrane lipid becomes the route of including GMO into the layer. Finally, comparative studies of the interactions between lipids with various headgroup charges with cubosomes suggest that at high surface pressure an exchange of lipid component between the monolayer and the cubosome in its intact form may occur.

  9. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by downregulation of lipid transporter expression via PPAR-α dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Kondaiah, Palsa; Palika, Ravindranadh; Ghosh, Sudip; Nair, Madhavan K; Raghu, Pullakhandam

    2016-01-15

    The involvement of lipid transporters, the scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) and Niemann-Pick type C1 Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) in carotenoid absorption is demonstrated in intestinal cells and animal models. Dietary ω-3 fatty acids are known to possess antilipidemic properties, which could be mediated by activation of PPAR family transcription factors. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), on intestinal β-carotene absorption. β-carotene uptake in Caco-2/TC7 cells was inhibited by EPA (p < 0.01) and PPARα agonist (P < 0.01), but not by DHA, PPARγ or PPARδ agonists. Despite unaltered β-carotene uptake, both DHA and PPARδ agonists inhibited the NPC1L1 expression. Further, EPA also induced the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A) expression, a PPARα target gene. Interestingly, EPA induced inhibition of β-carotene uptake and SR B1 expression were abrogated by specific PPARα antagonist, but not by PPARδ antagonist. EPA and PPARα agonist also inhibited the basolateral secretion of β-carotene from Caco-2 cells grown on permeable supports. These results suggest that EPA inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by down regulation of SR B1 expression via PPARα dependent mechanism and provide an evidence for dietary modulation of intestinal β-carotene absorption. PMID:26577021

  10. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by downregulation of lipid transporter expression via PPAR-α dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Kondaiah, Palsa; Palika, Ravindranadh; Ghosh, Sudip; Nair, Madhavan K; Raghu, Pullakhandam

    2016-01-15

    The involvement of lipid transporters, the scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) and Niemann-Pick type C1 Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) in carotenoid absorption is demonstrated in intestinal cells and animal models. Dietary ω-3 fatty acids are known to possess antilipidemic properties, which could be mediated by activation of PPAR family transcription factors. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), on intestinal β-carotene absorption. β-carotene uptake in Caco-2/TC7 cells was inhibited by EPA (p < 0.01) and PPARα agonist (P < 0.01), but not by DHA, PPARγ or PPARδ agonists. Despite unaltered β-carotene uptake, both DHA and PPARδ agonists inhibited the NPC1L1 expression. Further, EPA also induced the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A) expression, a PPARα target gene. Interestingly, EPA induced inhibition of β-carotene uptake and SR B1 expression were abrogated by specific PPARα antagonist, but not by PPARδ antagonist. EPA and PPARα agonist also inhibited the basolateral secretion of β-carotene from Caco-2 cells grown on permeable supports. These results suggest that EPA inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by down regulation of SR B1 expression via PPARα dependent mechanism and provide an evidence for dietary modulation of intestinal β-carotene absorption.

  11. Benzodiazepine Site Agonists Differentially Alter Acetylcholine Release in Rat Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Hambrecht-Wiedbusch, Viviane S.; Mitchell, Melinda F.; Firn, Kelsie A.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Background Agonist binding at the benzodiazepine site of γ-aminobutric acid type A receptors diminishes anxiety and insomnia by actions in the amygdala. The neurochemical effects of benzodiazepine-site agonists remain incompletely understood. Cholinergic neurotransmission modulates amygdala function, and in this study we tested the hypothesis that benzodiazepine-site agonists alter acetylcholine (ACh) release in the amygdala. Methods Microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography quantified ACh release in the amygdala of Sprague-Dawley rats (n=33). ACh was measured before and after IV administration (3 mg/kg) of midazolam or eszopiclone, with and without anesthesia. ACh in isoflurane-anesthetized rats during dialysis with Ringer’s solution(control) was compared to ACh release during dialysis with Ringer’s solution containing (100 μM) midazolam, diazepam, eszopiclone, or zolpidem. Results In unanesthetized rats, ACh in the amygdala was decreased by IV midazolam (−51.1%; P=0.0029; 95% CI= −73.0% to −29.2%) and eszopiclone (−39.6%; P=0.0222; 95% CI= −69.8% to −9.3%). In anesthetized rats, ACh in the amygdala was decreased by IV administration of midazolam (−46.2%; P=0.0041; 95% CI= −67.9% to −24.5%) and eszopiclone (−34.0%; P=0.0009; 95% CI= −44.7% to −23.3%), and increased by amygdala delivery of diazepam (43.2%; P=0.0434; 95% CI= 2.1% to 84.3%), and eszopiclone (222.2%; P=0.0159; 95% CI= 68.5% to 375.8%). Conclusions ACh release in the amygdala was decreased by IV delivery of midazolam and eszopiclone. Dialysis delivery directly into the amygdala caused either increased (eszopiclone and diazepam) or likely no significant change (midazolam and zolpidem) in ACh release. These contrasting effects of delivery route on ACh release support the interpretation that systemically administered midazolam and eszopiclone decrease ACh release in the amygdala by acting on neuronal systems outside of the amygdala. PMID:24842176

  12. Discriminative stimulus properties of indorenate, a serotonin agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Martínez, D N; López Cabrera, M; Sánchez, H; Ramírez, J I; Hong, E

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether indorenate, a serotonin-receptor agonist, can exert discriminative control over operant responses, to establish the temporal course of discriminative control and to compare its stimulus properties to a (5-HT)IA receptor agonist. [3H]-8-hydroxy-2-(di-N-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). DESIGN: Prospective animal study. ANIMALS: Ten male Wistar rats. INTERVENTIONS: Rats were trained to press either of 2 levers for sucrose solution according to a fixed ratio schedule, which was gradually increased. Rats were given injections of either indorenate or saline solution during discrimination training. Once they had achieved an 83% accuracy rate, rats underwent generalization tests after having received a different dose of indorenate, the training dose of indorenate at various intervals before the test, various doses of 8-OH-DPT, or NAN-190 administered before indorenate or 8-OH-DPAT. OUTCOME MEASURES: Distribution of responses between the 2 levers before the first reinforcer of the session, response rate for all the responses in the session, and a discrimination index that expressed the drug-appropriate responses as a proportion of the total responses. RESULTS: Indorenate administration resulted in discriminative control over operant responses, maintained at fixed ratio 10, at a dose of 10.0 mg/kg (but not 3.0 mg/kg). When the interval between the administration of indorenate and the start of the session was varied, the time course of its cue properties followed that of its described effects on 5-HT turnover. In generalization tests, the discrimination index was a function of the dose of indorenate employed; moreover, administration of 8-OH-DPAT (from 0.1 to 1.0 mg/kg) fully mimicked the stimulus properties of indorenate in a dose-dependent way. The (5-HT)IA antagonist NAN-190 prevented the stimulus generalization from indorenate to 8-OH-DPAT. Also, NAN-190 antagonized the stimulus control of indorenate when administered 45 minutes before

  13. Impact of Efficacy at the μ-Opioid Receptor on Antinociceptive Effects of Combinations of μ-Opioid Receptor Agonists and Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), enhance the antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists, which suggests that combining cannabinoids with opioids would improve pain treatment. Combinations with lower efficacy agonists might be preferred and could avoid adverse effects associated with large doses; however, it is unclear whether interactions between opioids and cannabinoids vary across drugs with different efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists alone and in combination with cannabinoid receptor agonists were studied in rhesus monkeys (n = 4) using a warm water tail withdrawal procedure. Etorphine, fentanyl, morphine, buprenorphine, nalbuphine, Δ9-THC, and CP 55,940 (2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol) each increased tail withdrawal latency. Pretreatment with doses of Δ9-THC (1.0 mg/kg) or CP 55,940 (0.032 mg/kg) that were ineffective alone shifted the fentanyl dose-effect curve leftward 20.6- and 52.9-fold, respectively, and the etorphine dose-effect curve leftward 12.4- and 19.6-fold, respectively. Δ9-THC and CP 55,940 shifted the morphine dose-effect curve leftward only 3.4- and 7.9-fold, respectively, and the buprenorphine curve only 5.4- and 4.1-fold, respectively. Neither Δ9-THC nor CP 55,940 significantly altered the effects of nalbuphine. Cannabinoid receptor agonists increase the antinociceptive potency of higher efficacy opioid receptor agonists more than lower efficacy agonists; however, because much smaller doses of each drug can be administered in combinations while achieving adequate pain relief and that other (e.g., abuse-related) effects of opioids do not appear to be enhanced by cannabinoids, these results provide additional support for combining opioids with cannabinoids to treat pain. PMID:25194020

  14. Ligand-regulated oligomerization of β2-adrenoceptors in a model lipid bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Juan José; Deupi, Xavier; Pardo, Leonardo; Yao, Xiao Jie; Velez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; DeVree, Brian T; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K

    2009-01-01

    The β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR) was one of the first Family A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) shown to form oligomers in cellular membranes, yet we still know little about the number and arrangement of protomers in oligomers, the influence of ligands on the organization or stability of oligomers, or the requirement for other proteins to promote oligomerization. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to characterize the oligomerization of purified β2AR site-specifically labelled at three different positions with fluorophores and reconstituted into a model lipid bilayer. Our results suggest that the β2AR is predominantly tetrameric following reconstitution into phospholipid vesicles. Agonists and antagonists have little effect on the relative orientation of protomers in oligomeric complexes. In contrast, binding of inverse agonists leads to significant increases in FRET efficiencies for most labelling pairs, suggesting that this class of ligand promotes tighter packing of protomers and/or the formation of more complex oligomers by reducing conformational fluctuations in individual protomers. The results provide new structural insights into β2AR oligomerization and suggest a possible mechanism for the functional effects of inverse agonists. PMID:19763081

  15. Lipid nanoparticles for parenteral delivery of actives.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Medha D; Müller, Rainer H

    2009-02-01

    The present review compiles the applications of lipid nanoparticles mainly solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and lipid drug conjugates (LDC) in parenteral delivery of pharmaceutical actives. The attempts to incorporate anticancer agents, imaging agents, antiparasitics, antiarthritics, genes for transfection, agents for liver, cardiovascular and central nervous system targeting have been summarized. The utility of lipid nanoparticles as adjuvant has been discussed separately. A special focus of this review is on toxicity caused by these kinds of lipid nanoparticles with a glance on the fate of lipid nanoparticles after their parenteral delivery in vivo viz the protein adsorption patterns. PMID:18824097

  16. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Other FFA4 Agonists Inhibit Growth Factor Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ze; Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Quisenberry, Chrystal B.; Fix, Louise C.; Galvan, Brianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) are proposed to have many beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanisms underlying their potential cancer preventative effects are unclear. G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1/GPR40 and FFA4/GPR120, specifically bind n-3 FAs as agonist ligands. In this study, we examined the effects of n-3 FAs in human prostate cancer cell lines. Initial studies established that the long-chain n-3 FAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, inhibit proliferation of DU145 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogenic lipid mediator. When added alone to serum-starved DU145 cells, EPA transiently activates signaling events, including p70S6K phosphorylation. However, when added 15 minutes prior to LPA, EPA suppresses LPA-induced activating phosphorylations of ERK, FAK, and p70S6K, and expression of the matricellular protein CCN1. The rapid onset of the inhibitory action of EPA suggested involvement of a GPCR. Further studies showed that DU145 and PC-3 cells express mRNA and protein for both FFA4 and FFA1. TUG-891 (4-[(4-fluoro-4′-methyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy]-benzenepropanoic acid), a selective agonist for FFA4, exerts inhibitory effects on LPA- and epidermal growth factor–induced proliferation and migration, similar to EPA, in DU145 and PC-3 cells. The effects of TUG-891 and EPA are readily reversible. The FFA1/FFA4 agonist GW9508 (4-[[(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl]amino]-benzenepropranoic acid) likewise inhibits proliferation at doses that block FFA4. Knockdown of FFA4 expression prevents EPA- and TUG-891–induced inhibition of growth and migration. Together, these results indicate that activation of FFA4 initiates signaling events that can inhibit growth factor–induced signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppression of cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25491146

  17. Phase structure of liposome in lipid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianxi; Li, Yuzhuo; Mueller, Anja

    2011-11-01

    Gas microbubbles present in ultrasound imaging contrast agents are stabilized by lipid aggregates that typically contain a mixture of lipids. In this study, the phase structure of the lipid mixtures that contained two or three lipids was investigated using three different methods: dynamic light scattering, (1)H NMR, and microfluidity measurements with fluorescence probes. Three lipids that are commonly present in imaging agents (DPPC, DPPE-PEG, and DPPA) were used. Two types of systems, two-lipid model systems and simulated imaging systems were investigated. The results show that liposomes were the dominant aggregates in all the samples studied. The polar PEG side chains from the PEGylated lipid lead to the formation of micelles and micellar aggregates in small sizes. In the ternary lipid systems, almost all the lipids were present in bilayers with micelles absent and free lipids at very low concentration. These results suggest that liposomes, not micelles, contribute to the stabilization of microbubbles in an ultrasound imaging contrast agent.

  18. Yawning and locomotor behavior induced by dopamine receptor agonists in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Min; Collins, Gregory T; Paul, Noel M; Grundt, Peter; Newman, Amy H; Xu, Ming; Grandy, David K; Woods, James H; Katz, Jonathan L

    2010-05-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) agonist-induced yawning in rats seems to be mediated by DA D3 receptors, and low doses of several DA agonists decrease locomotor activity, an effect attributed to presynaptic D2 receptors. Effects of several DA agonists on yawning and locomotor activity were examined in rats and mice. Yawning was reliably produced in rats, and by the cholinergic agonist, physostigmine, in both the species. However, DA agonists were ineffective in producing yawning in Swiss-Webster or DA D2R and DA D3R knockout or wild-type mice. The drugs significantly decreased locomotor activity in rats at one or two low doses, with activity returning to control levels at higher doses. In mice, the drugs decreased locomotion across a 1000-10 000-fold range of doses, with activity at control levels (U-91356A) or above control levels [(+/-)-7-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin HBr, quinpirole] at the highest doses. Low doses of agonists decreased locomotion in all mice except the DA D2R knockout mice, but were not antagonized by DA D2R or D3R antagonists (L-741 626, BP 897, or PG01037). Yawning does not provide a selective in-vivo indicator of DA D3R agonist activity in mice. Decreases in mouse locomotor activity by the DA agonists seem to be mediated by D2 DA receptors.

  19. Prolonging Survival of Corneal Transplantation by Selective Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Yang; Han, Gencheng; Jia, Liang; Wang, Liqiang; Lei, Tian; Huang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most used therapy for eye disorders. Although the cornea is somewhat an immune privileged organ, immune rejection is still the major problem that reduces the success rate. Therefore, effective chemical drugs that regulate immunoreactions are needed to improve the outcome of corneal transplantations. Here, a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) selective agonist was systematically evaluated in mouse allogeneic corneal transplantation and compared with the commonly used immunosuppressive agents. Compared with CsA and the non-selective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist FTY720, the S1P1 selective agonist can prolong the survival corneal transplantation for more than 30 days with a low immune response. More importantly, the optimal dose of the S1P1 selective agonist was much less than non-selective S1P receptor agonist FTY720, which would reduce the dose-dependent toxicity in drug application. Then we analyzed the mechanisms of the selected S1P1 selective agonist on the immunosuppression. The results shown that the S1P1 selective agonist could regulate the distribution of the immune cells with less CD4+ T cells and enhanced Treg cells in the allograft, moreover the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines TGF-β1 and IL-10 unregulated which can reduce the immunoreactions. These findings suggest that S1P1 selective agonist may be a more appropriate immunosuppressive compound to effectively prolong mouse allogeneic corneal grafts survival. PMID:25216235

  20. Conformationally constrained farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists: Naphthoic acid-based analogs of GW 4064.

    PubMed

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Jones, Stacey A; Kaldor, Istvan; Liu, Yaping; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Iii, Frank Navas; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Wisely, G Bruce

    2008-08-01

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of stilbene replacements were prepared. The 6-substituted 1-naphthoic acid 1b was an equipotent FXR agonist with improved developability parameters relative to 1a. Analog 1b also reduced the severity of cholestasis in the ANIT acute cholestatic rat model.

  1. Agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity requires shear and a Rac1-dependent signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Michael Keegan; Liu, Junling; Kim, Kyungho; Shen, Bo; Stojanovic-Terpo, Aleksandra; Zheng, Yi; Cho, Jaehyung

    2014-01-01

    Activated platelets facilitate blood coagulation by exposing phosphatidylserine (PS) and releasing microvesicles (MVs). However, the potent physiological agonists thrombin and collagen poorly induce PS exposure when a single agonist is used. To obtain a greater procoagulant response, thrombin is commonly used in combination with glycoprotein VI agonists. However, even under these conditions, only a percentage of platelets express procoagulant activity. To date, it remains unclear why platelets poorly expose PS even when stimulated with multiple agonists and what the signaling pathways are of soluble agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity. Here we show that physiological levels of shear present in blood significantly enhance agonist-induced platelet PS exposure and MV release, enabling low doses of a single agonist to induce full-scale platelet procoagulant activity. PS exposed on the platelet surface was immediately released as MVs, revealing a tight coupling between the 2 processes under shear. Using platelet-specific Rac1−/− mice, we discovered that Rac1 plays a common role in mediating the low-dose agonist-induced procoagulant response independent of platelet aggregation, secretion, and the apoptosis pathway. Platelet-specific Rac1 function was not only important for coagulation in vitro but also for fibrin accumulation in vivo following laser-induced arteriolar injury. PMID:25079357

  2. Lipid bilayers on nano-templates

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Bakajin, Olgica; Stoeve, Pieter

    2009-08-04

    A lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising a nanotube or nanowire and a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire. One embodiment provides a method of fabricating a lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising the steps of providing a nanotube or nanowire and forming a lipid bilayer around the polymer cushion. One embodiment provides a protein pore in the lipid bilayer. In one embodiment the protein pore is sensitive to specific agents

  3. Nanoparticle-lipid bilayer interactions studied with lipid bilayer arrays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Smith, Tyler; Schmidt, Jacob J

    2015-05-01

    The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which can provide insight into the nature of the particle-membrane interaction through variation of membrane and solution properties not possible with cell-based assays. However, the scope of these studies can be limited because of the low throughput characteristic of lipid bilayer platforms. We have recently described an easy to use, parallel lipid bilayer platform which we have used to electrically investigate the activity of 60 nm diameter amine and carboxyl modified polystyrene nanoparticles (NH2-NP and COOH-NP) with over 1000 lipid bilayers while varying lipid composition, bilayer charge, ionic strength, pH, voltage, serum, particle concentration, and particle charge. Our results confirm recent studies finding activity of NH2-NP but not COOH-NP. Detailed analysis shows that NH2-NP formed pores 0.3-2.3 nm in radius, dependent on bilayer and solution composition. These interactions appear to be electrostatic, as they are regulated by NH2-NP surface charge, solution ionic strength, and bilayer charge. The ability to rapidly measure a large number of nanoparticle and membrane parameters indicates strong potential of this bilayer array platform for additional nanoparticle bilayer studies.

  4. TSH and Thyrotropic Agonists: Key Actors in Thyroid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Johannes W.; Landgrafe, Gabi; Fotiadou, Elisavet H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the reader with an overview of our current knowledge of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid feedback from a cybernetic standpoint. Over the past decades we have gained a plethora of information from biochemical, clinical, and epidemiological investigation, especially on the role of TSH and other thyrotropic agonists as critical components of this complex relationship. Integrating these data into a systems perspective delivers new insights into static and dynamic behaviour of thyroid homeostasis. Explicit usage of this information with mathematical methods promises to deliver a better understanding of thyrotropic feedback control and new options for personalised diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and targeted therapy, also by permitting a new perspective on the conundrum of the TSH reference range. PMID:23365787

  5. Proopiomelanocortin Deficiency Treated with a Melanocortin-4 Receptor Agonist.

    PubMed

    Kühnen, Peter; Clément, Karine; Wiegand, Susanna; Blankenstein, Oliver; Gottesdiener, Keith; Martini, Lea L; Mai, Knut; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko

    2016-07-21

    Patients with rare defects in the gene encoding proopiomelanocortin (POMC) have extreme early-onset obesity, hyperphagia, hypopigmentation, and hypocortisolism, resulting from the lack of the proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides melanocyte-stimulating hormone and corticotropin. In such patients, adrenal insufficiency must be treated with hydrocortisone early in life. No effective pharmacologic treatments have been available for the hyperphagia and obesity that characterize the condition. In this investigator-initiated, open-label study, two patients with proopiomelanocortin deficiency were treated with setmelanotide, a new melanocortin-4 receptor agonist. The patients had a sustainable reduction in hunger and substantial weight loss (51.0 kg after 42 weeks in Patient 1 and 20.5 kg after 12 weeks in Patient 2). PMID:27468060

  6. [Safety and tolerability of GLP-1 receptor agonists].

    PubMed

    Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1ra) are a new group of drugs with a glucose-lowering action due to their incretin effect. The GLP-1 receptor is expressed in various human tissues, which could be related to the pleiotropic effects of human GLP-1, as well as to the adverse effects described in patients treated with GLP-1ra. The risk of hypoglycaemia is low, which is one of the main considerations in the safety of this family of compounds and is also important to patients with diabetes. The most frequent adverse effect is nausea, which usually occurs at the start of treatment and is transient in 20-60% of affected patients. This article also reviews the information available on antibody formation, the potential effect on the thyroid gland, and the controversial association between this group of drugs with pancreatitis and cancer.

  7. [Safety and tolerability of GLP-1 receptor agonists].

    PubMed

    Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1ra) are a new group of drugs with a glucose-lowering action due to their incretin effect. The GLP-1 receptor is expressed in various human tissues, which could be related to the pleiotropic effects of human GLP-1, as well as to the adverse effects described in patients treated with GLP-1ra. The risk of hypoglycaemia is low, which is one of the main considerations in the safety of this family of compounds and is also important to patients with diabetes. The most frequent adverse effect is nausea, which usually occurs at the start of treatment and is transient in 20-60% of affected patients. This article also reviews the information available on antibody formation, the potential effect on the thyroid gland, and the controversial association between this group of drugs with pancreatitis and cancer.

  8. Locomotion induced by ventral tegmental microinjections of a nicotinic agonist.

    PubMed

    Museo, E; Wise, R A

    1990-03-01

    Bilateral microinjections of the nicotinic agonist cytisine (0.1, 1 or 10 nanomoles per side) into the ventral tegmental area increased locomotor activity. This increase in locomotion was antagonized by mecamylamine (2 mg/kg, IP), a nicotinic antagonist that readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, and by pimozide (0.3 mg/kg, IP), a central dopaminergic antagonist. Hexamethonium (2 mg/kg, IP), a nicotinic antagonist that, unlike mecamylamine, does not cross the blood-brain barrier, had no effect; this suggests that mecamylamine's attenuation of cytisine-induced locomotor activity resulted from a blockade of central and not peripheral nicotinic receptors. The data support the notion that nicotinic and dopaminergic substrates interact at the level of the VTA to produce increases in locomotor activity.

  9. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity.

    PubMed

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  10. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  11. Effects of dopamine agonists on hypothalamic defensive attack in cats.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Sato, T; Maki, S

    1985-07-01

    The effects of methamphetamine (MAT) and apomorphine (APO), dopamine agonists, were studied in 16 cats to evaluate their effects on threshold for defensive attack behavior elicited by electrical stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH). Directed attack and hissing were selected from elementary responses as constituting a defensive attack. Hissing threshold was measured in two situations, one with human provocation and the other without provocation. MAT administered systemically lowered the thresholds for all three types of responses in a dose-related manner (0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg). The effects of 1.0 mg/kg of APO were almost identical to those observed with 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg of MAT. These results suggest that MAT-induced aggressive behavior may be mediated by a dopamine-induced increase in the excitability of the VMH. PMID:4059404

  12. Antiinfective applications of toll-like receptor 9 agonists.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Arthur M

    2007-07-01

    The innate immune system detects pathogens by the presence of highly conserved pathogen-expressed molecules, which trigger host immune defenses. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 detects unmethylated CpG dinucleotides in bacterial or viral DNA, and can be stimulated for therapeutic applications with synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing immune stimulatory "CpG motifs." TLR9 activation induces both innate and adaptive immunity. The TLR9-induced innate immune activation can be applied in the prevention or treatment of infectious diseases, and the adaptive immune-enhancing effects can be harnessed for improving vaccines. This article highlights the current understanding of the mechanism of action of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, and provides an overview of the preclinical data and early human clinical trial results, applying these TLR9 agonists in the field of infectious diseases. PMID:17607015

  13. Effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist treatment on elemental and biomolecular content and distribution in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, J.; Gajda, M.; Jawień, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Appel, K.; Dumas, P.

    2013-12-01

    Gene-targeted apolipoprotein E-knockout (apoE-KO) mice display early and highly progressive vascular lesions containing lipid deposits and they became a reliable animal model to study atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist on the distribution of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory elements as well as biomolecules in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and Fourier Transform Infrared (micro-FTIR) microspectroscopies were applied. Two-month-old apoE-KO mice were fed for following four months diet supplemented with AVE 0991 (0.58 μmol/kg b.w. per day). Histological sections of ascending aortas were analyzed spectroscopically. The distribution of P, Ca, Fe and Zn were found to correspond with histological structure of the lesion. Significantly lower contents of P, Ca, Zn and significantly higher content of Fe were observed in animals treated with AVE 0991. Biomolecular analysis showed lower lipids saturation level and lower lipid to protein ratio in AVE 0991 treated group. Protein secondary structure was studied according to the composition of amide I band (1660 cm-1) and it demonstrated higher proportion of β-sheet structure as compared to α-helix in both studied groups.

  14. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    Novel liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) provide a biologically inspired route for designing multifunctional bionanotheranostics. LNAs combine the benefits of lipids and liposomes to encapsulate, transport, and protect hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutics with functional nanoparticles. Functional nanoparticles endow LNAs with additional capabilities, including the ability to target diseases, triggered drug release, controlled therapeutic output, and diagnostic capabilities to produce a drug delivery system that can effectively and efficiently deliver therapeutics while reducing side effects. Not only could LNAs make existing drugs better, they could also provide an avenue to allow once promising non-approved drugs (rejected due to harmful side effects, inadequate pharmacokinetics, and poor efficacy) to be safely used through targeted and controlled delivery directly to the diseased site. LNAs have the potential to be stimuli responsive, delivering drugs on command by external (ultrasound, RF heating, etc.) or internal (pH, blood sugar, heart rate, etc.) stimuli. Individually, lipids and nanoparticles have been clinically approved for therapy, such as Doxil (a liposomal doxorubicin for cancer treatment), and diagnosis, such as Feridex (an iron oxide nanoparticle an MRI contrast enhancement agent for liver tumors). In order to engineer these multifunctional LNAs for theranostic applications, the interactions between nanoparticles and lipids must be better understood. This research sought to explore the formation, design, structures, characteristics, and functions of LNAs. To achieve this goal, different types of LNAs were formed, specifically magnetoliposomes, bilayer decorated LNAs (DLNAs), and lipid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). A fluorescent probe was embedded in the lipid bilayer of magnetoliposomes allowing the local temperature and membrane fluidity to be observed. When subjected to an electromagnetic field that heated the encapsulated iron

  15. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  16. Asimadoline, a κ-Opioid Agonist, and Visceral Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Asimadoline is a potent κ-opioid receptor agonist with a diaryl acetamide structure. It has high affinity for the κ receptor, with IC50 of 5.6 nM (guinea pig) and 1.2 nM (human recombinant), and high selectively with κ: μ: δ binding ratios of 1:501:498 in human recombinant receptors. It acts as a complete agonist in in vitro assay. Asimadoline reduced sensation in response to colonic distension at subnoxious pressures in healthy volunteers and in IBS patients without alteration of colonic compliance. Asimadoline reduced satiation and enhanced the postprandial gastric volume (in female volunteers). However, there were no significant effects on gastrointestinal transit, colonic compliance, fasting or postprandial colonic tone. In a clinical trial in 40 patients with functional dyspepsia (Rome II), asimadoline did not significantly alter satiation or symptoms over 8 weeks. However, asimadoline, 0.5 mg, significantly decreased satiation in patients with higher postprandial fullness scores, and daily postprandial fullness severity (over 8 weeks); the asimadoline 1.0 mg group was borderline significant. In a clinical trial in patients with IBS, average pain 2 hours post-on-demand treatment with asimadoline was not significantly reduced. Post-hoc analyses suggest asimadoline was effective in mixed IBS. In a 12-week study in 596 patients, chronic treatment with asimadoline, 0.5 mg and 1.0 mg, was associated with adequate relief of pain and discomfort, improvement in pain score and number of pain free days in patients with IBS-D. The 1.0 mg dose was also efficacious in IBS-alternating. There were also weeks with significant reduction in bowel frequency and urgency. Asimadoline has been well tolerated in human trials to date. PMID:18715494

  17. Theory of partial agonist activity of steroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Carson C.; Ong, Karen M.; Kagan, Benjamin; Simons, S. Stoney

    2015-01-01

    The different amounts of residual partial agonist activity (PAA) of antisteroids under assorted conditions have long been useful in clinical applications but remain largely unexplained. Not only does a given antagonist often afford unequal induction for multiple genes in the same cell but also the activity of the same antisteroid with the same gene changes with variations in concentration of numerous cofactors. Using glucocorticoid receptors as a model system, we have recently succeeded in constructing from first principles a theory that accurately describes how cofactors can modulate the ability of agonist steroids to regulate both gene induction and gene repression. We now extend this framework to the actions of antisteroids in gene induction. The theory shows why changes in PAA cannot be explained simply by differences in ligand affinity for receptor and requires action at a second step or site in the overall sequence of reactions. The theory also provides a method for locating the position of this second site, relative to a concentration limited step (CLS), which is a previously identified step in glucocorticoid-regulated transactivation that always occurs at the same position in the overall sequence of events of gene induction. Finally, the theory predicts that classes of antagonist ligands may be grouped on the basis of their maximal PAA with excess added cofactor and that the members of each class differ by how they act at the same step in the overall gene induction process. Thus, this theory now makes it possible to predict how different cofactors modulate antisteroid PAA, which should be invaluable in developing more selective antagonists. PMID:25984562

  18. Agonistic and antagonistic estrogens in licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra).

    PubMed

    Simons, Rudy; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Mol, Loes A M; The, Susan A M; Bovee, Toine F H; Luijendijk, Teus J C; Verbruggen, Marian A; Gruppen, Harry

    2011-07-01

    The roots of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) are a rich source of flavonoids, in particular, prenylated flavonoids, such as the isoflavan glabridin and the isoflavene glabrene. Fractionation of an ethyl acetate extract from licorice root by centrifugal partitioning chromatography yielded 51 fractions, which were characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and screened for activity in yeast estrogen bioassays. One third of the fractions displayed estrogenic activity towards either one or both estrogen receptors (ERs; ERα and ERβ). Glabrene-rich fractions displayed an estrogenic response, predominantly to the ERα. Surprisingly, glabridin did not exert agonistic activity to both ER subtypes. Several fractions displayed higher responses than the maximum response obtained with the reference compound, the natural hormone 17β-estradiol (E(2)). The estrogenic activities of all fractions, including this so-called superinduction, were clearly ER-mediated, as the estrogenic response was inhibited by 20-60% by known ER antagonists, and no activity was found in yeast cells that did not express the ERα or ERβ subtype. Prolonged exposure of the yeast to the estrogenic fractions that showed superinduction did, contrary to E(2), not result in a decrease of the fluorescent response. Therefore, the superinduction was most likely the result of stabilization of the ER, yeast-enhanced green fluorescent protein, or a combination of both. Most fractions displaying superinduction were rich in flavonoids with single prenylation. Glabridin displayed ERα-selective antagonism, similar to the ERα-selective antagonist RU 58668. Whereas glabridin was able to reduce the estrogenic response of E(2) by approximately 80% at 6 × 10(-6) M, glabrene-rich fractions only exhibited agonistic responses, preferentially on ERα.

  19. The lipids of Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, E S

    1998-01-01

    Information about a number of Pneumocystis carinii lipids obtained by the analyses of organisms isolated and purified from infected lungs of corticosteroid-immunosuppressed rats has been reported in recent years. Of the common opportunistic protists associated with AIDS (Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, and the microsporidia), more is currently known about the lipids of P. carinii than the others. Lipids that are synthesized by the organism but not by humans are attractive targets for drug development. Thus, the elucidation of delta 7C-24-alykylated sterol and cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid biosyntheses in P. carinii is currently being examined in detail, since these have been identified as P. carinii-specific lipids. The development of low-toxicity drugs that prevent sterol C-24 alkylation and the specific inhibition of the lipoxygenase that forms cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid might prove fruitful. Although humans can synthesize coenzyme Q10, the anti-P. carinii activity and low toxicity of ubiquinone analogs such as atovaquone suggest that the electron transport chain in the pathogen may differ importantly from that in the host. Although resistance to atovaquone has been observed, development of other naphthoquinone drugs would provide a broader armamentarium of drugs to treat patients with P. carinii pneumonia. Studies of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and of infected lungs have demonstrated that the infection causes a number of chemical abnormalities. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained after the removal of lung cellular material and the organisms has been shown to contain larger amounts of surfactant proteins and smaller amounts of phospholipids than do comparable samples from P. carinii-free lungs. Increased phospholipase activity, inhibition of surfactant secretion by type II cells, and uptake and catabolism of lipids by the pathogen may explain this phenomenon related to P. carinii pneumonia. Although not yet thoroughly examined, initial studies on the uptake and

  20. A comprehensive classification system for lipids.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Eoin; Subramaniam, Shankar; Brown, H Alex; Glass, Christopher K; Merrill, Alfred H; Murphy, Robert C; Raetz, Christian R H; Russell, David W; Seyama, Yousuke; Shaw, Walter; Shimizu, Takao; Spener, Friedrich; van Meer, Gerrit; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S; White, Stephen H; Witztum, Joseph L; Dennis, Edward A

    2005-05-01

    Lipids are produced, transported, and recognized by the concerted actions of numerous enzymes, binding proteins, and receptors. A comprehensive analysis of lipid molecules, "lipidomics," in the context of genomics and proteomics is crucial to understanding cellular physiology and pathology; consequently, lipid biology has become a major research target of the postgenomic revolution and systems biology. To facilitate international communication about lipids, a comprehensive classification of lipids with a common platform that is compatible with informatics requirements has been developed to deal with the massive amounts of data that will be generated by our lipid community. As an initial step in this development, we divide lipids into eight categories (fatty acyls, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, sterol lipids, prenol lipids, saccharolipids, and polyketides) containing distinct classes and subclasses of molecules, devise a common manner of representing the chemical structures of individual lipids and their derivatives, and provide a 12 digit identifier for each unique lipid molecule. The lipid classification scheme is chemically based and driven by the distinct hydrophobic and hydrophilic elements that compose the lipid. This structured vocabulary will facilitate the systematization of lipid biology and enable the cataloging of lipids and their properties in a way that is compatible with other macromolecular databases.

  1. KR-62980 suppresses lipid metabolism through inhibition of cytosolic NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chun, Hang-Suk; Shin, Sun Hye; Ahn, Sunjoo; Shin, Dae-Seop; Choi, Sun-Sil; Ahn, Jin Hee; Bae, Myung Ae

    2014-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a target of antidiabetic drugs. However, many PPARγ activators, including rosiglitazone, show unwanted side effects, such as weight gain. The KR-62980 [1-(trans-methylimino-N-oxy)-3-phenyl-6-(3-phenylpropoxy)-1H-indene-2-carboxylic acid ethyl ester], a novel partial agonist of PPARγ, is a new compound for diabetes with antihyperglycemic activity and weak antiadipogenic activity. This study was performed to elucidate the mechanism of the weak adipogenesis induced by KR-62980 despite its being a PPARγ agonist in zebrafish. We elucidated the mechanism of KR-62980 in lipid metabolism using adipocytes and zebrafish. Since NADPH is a critical cofactor in fat metabolism, we investigated effect of KR-62980 on NADPH-producing enzymes such as cytosolic NADP(+) isocitrate dehydrogenase (cICDH). We found that the mRNA expression of cICDH was significantly decreased by KR-62980 in 3T3-L1 cells. KR-62980 inhibited lipase activity and lipid metabolism in zebrafish. Further, KR-62980 substantially suppressed cICDH in adipocytes and zebrafish. These results suggest that cICDH may be one of the targets of KR-62980 responsible for weight gain and adipogenesis.

  2. Effect of tramadol on behavioral alterations and lipid peroxidation after transient forebrain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagakannan, Pandian; Shivasharan, Basavaraj D; Thippeswamy, Boreddy S; Veerapur, Veeresh P

    2012-11-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists are proven protective in various animal models of ischemic brain damage. Tramadol, a centrally acting opioid analgesic reportedly possesses NMDA antagonistic and GABA agonistic properties, with additional ion channel blocking activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible neuroprotective effect of tramadol hydrochloride in a rat model of transient forebrain ischemia. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with tramadol hydrochloride at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg b.w. intraperitoneally for 4 days and were subjected to 30 min occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries followed by reperfusion for 24 h. Impairment in sensorimotor functions was evaluated by beam walking task, spontaneous locomotor activity and hanging wire test. Animals were sacrificed and the brain homogenates were used for estimating the levels of lipid peroxidation, a marker for extent of oxidative stress. Ischemic rats exhibited a significant decrease in locomotion, grip strength and increase in beam walking latency. Tramadol attenuated the post ischemic motor impairment evidenced by improvement in the performance in sensorimotor tests. The extent of lipid peroxidation was significantly (p < 0.001) reduced by tramadol pretreatment which was higher in ischemic control. This study demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of tramadol against transient forebrain ischemia in rats. PMID:22871232

  3. Agonist-specific behaviour of the intracellular Ca2+ response in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chatton, J Y; Cao, Y; Stucki, J W

    1997-01-01

    A variety of agonists stimulate in hepatocytes a response that takes the shape of repetitive cytosolic free Ca2+ transients called Ca2+ oscillations. The shape of spikes and the pattern of oscillations in a given cell differ depending on the agonist of the phosphoinositide pathway that is applied. In this study, the response of individual rat hepatocytes to maximal stimulation by arginine vasopressin (AVP), phenylephrine and ADP was investigated by fluorescence microscopy and flash photolysis. Hepatocytes loaded with Ca2+-sensitive probes were stimulated with a first agonist to evoke a maximal response, and then a second agonist was added. When phenylephrine or ADP was used as the first agonist, AVP applied subsequently could elicit an additional response, which did not happen when AVP was first applied and phenylephrine or ADP was applied later. Cells microinjected with caged myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) were challenged with the different agonists and, when a maximal response was obtained, photorelease of IP3 was triggered. Cells maximally stimulated with AVP did not respond to IP3 photorelease, whereas those stimulated with phenylephrine or ADP responded with a fast Ca2+ spike above the elevated steady-state level, which was followed by an undershoot. In contrast, with all three agonists, IP3 photorelease triggered at the top of an oscillatory Ca2+ transient was able to mobilize additional Ca2+. These experiments indicate that the differential response of cells to agonists is found not only during Ca2+ oscillations but also during maximal agonist stimulation and that potency and efficacy differences exist among agonists. PMID:9371717

  4. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    PubMed

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  5. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities.

  6. Detergent-free Isolation of Functional G Protein-Coupled Receptors into Nanometric Lipid Particles.

    PubMed

    Logez, Christel; Damian, Marjorie; Legros, Céline; Dupré, Clémence; Guéry, Mélody; Mary, Sophie; Wagner, Renaud; M'Kadmi, Céline; Nosjean, Olivier; Fould, Benjamin; Marie, Jacky; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Ferry, Gilles; Boutin, Jean A; Banères, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-12

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are integral membrane proteins that play a pivotal role in signal transduction. Understanding their dynamics is absolutely required to get a clear picture of how signaling proceeds. Molecular characterization of GPCRs isolated in detergents nevertheless stumbles over the deleterious effect of these compounds on receptor function and stability. We explored here the potential of a styrene-maleic acid polymer to solubilize receptors directly from their lipid environment. To this end, we used two GPCRs, the melatonin and ghrelin receptors, embedded in two membrane systems of increasing complexity, liposomes and membranes from Pichia pastoris. The styrene-maleic acid polymer was able, in both cases, to extract membrane patches of a well-defined size. GPCRs in SMA-stabilized lipid discs not only recognized their ligand but also transmitted a signal, as evidenced by their ability to activate their cognate G proteins and recruit arrestins in an agonist-dependent manner. Besides, the purified receptor in lipid discs undergoes all specific changes in conformation associated with ligand-mediated activation, as demonstrated in the case of the ghrelin receptor with fluorescent conformational reporters and compounds from distinct pharmacological classes. Altogether, these data highlight the potential of styrene-maleic stabilized lipid discs for analyzing the molecular bases of GPCR-mediated signaling in a well-controlled membrane-like environment. PMID:26701065

  7. Anti-endotoxin activity of a novel synthetic lipid A analog.

    PubMed

    Kawata, T; Bristol, J R; Rose, J R; Rossignol, D P; Christ, W J; Asano, O; Dubuc, G R; Gavin, W E; Hawkins, L D; Kishi, Y

    1995-01-01

    Lipid As from non-toxic bacteria such as Rhodobacter capsulatus and Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been shown to antagonize the immunostimulatory effects of lipid A and LPS from pathogenic bacteria. We have biologically characterized a series of synthetic LPS antagonists including the proposed structures of the lipid A and R. sphaeroides containing fatty acid side chains ester-linked to the disaccharide backbone, as well as an analog of R. capsulatus lipid A containing ether-linked alkyloxy side chains (E5531). In vitro assays utilizing LPS-stimulated human monocytes or whole blood demonstrated that low nanomolar concentrations of E5531 inhibited cellular activation as indicated by decreased release of the cytokines TNF-a, and interleukins-1, 6, and 8. E5531 also inhibited LPS-induced release of cytokines and nitric oxide from murine macrophages. Synthetic antagonists at up to 100 microM were devoid of agonistic activity in murine and human in vitro systems. In vivo, E5531 blocked induction of TNF-a by LPS and reduced LPS-induced lethality in mice. These in vitro and in vivo results indicate that E5531 may have clinical therapeutic utility as an antagonist of endotoxin-mediated morbidity and mortality.

  8. Lipids and the malarial parasite*

    PubMed Central

    Holz, George G.

    1977-01-01

    Merozoite endocytosis initiates Plasmodium development in a vacuole bounded by an erythrocyte-derived membrane, whose asymmetrical distribution of lipids and proteins is reversed in its orientation with respect to the parasite plasma membrane. Reorientation may accompany the proliferation of the membrane associated with the parasite's growth and phagocytic and pinocytic feeding. Increases in the membrane surface area of the parasite, and in some cases of the erythrocyte, parallel parasite growth and segmentation. Augmentation of all the membrane systems of the infected erythrocyte causes the lipid content to rise rapidly, but the parasite lipid composition differs from that of the erythrocyte in many respects: it is higher in diacyl phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, polyglycerol phosphatides, diacylglycerols, unesterified fatty acids, triacylglycerols, and hexadecanoic and octadecenoic fatty acids and lower in sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine, alkoxy phosphatidylethanolamine, cholesterol, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Active lipid metabolism accompanies the membrane proliferation associated with feeding, growth, and reproduction. Plasmodium is incapable of de novo biosynthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol; however, it can fabricate its glycerides and phosphoglycerides with host-supplied fatty acids, nitrogenous bases, alcohols, ATP, and coenzyme A, and can generate the glyceryl moiety during glycolysis. Cholesterol is obtained from the host but nothing is known of sphingolipid origins. Lipid metabolism of the parasite may be associated with alterations in the amounts of octadecenoic fatty acids and cholesterol in the erythrocyte plasma membrane, which in turn are responsible for changes in permeability and fragility. PMID:412602

  9. Hybrid Lipid as Biological Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewster, Robert; Pincus, Phil; Safran, Sam

    2009-03-01

    Systems capable of forming finite-sized, equilibrium domains are of biological interest in the context of membrane rafts where it has been observed that certain cellular functions are mediated by small (nanometric to tens of nanometers) domains with specific lipid composition that differs from the average composition of the membrane. These small domains are composed mainly of lipids with completely saturated hydrocarbon tails that show good orientational order in the membrane. The surrounding phase consists mostly of lipids with at least one unsaturated bond in the hydrocarbon tails which forces a ``kink'' in the chain and inhibits ordering. In vitro, this phase separation can be replicated; however, the finite domains coarsen into macroscopic domains with time. We have extended a model for the interactions of lipids in the membrane, akin to that developed in the group of Schick (Elliott et al., PRL 2006 and Garbes Putzel and Schick, Biophys. J. 2008), which depends entirely on the local ordering of hydrocarbon tails. We generalize this model to an additional species and identify a biologically relevant component, a lipid with one fully saturated hydrocarbon chain and one chain with at least one unsaturated bond, that may serve as a line-active component, capable of reducing the line tension between domains to zero, thus stabilizing finite sized domains in equilibrium.

  10. Pulmonary intravascular lipid in neonatal necropsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Puntis, J W; Rushton, D I

    1991-01-01

    The lungs of 482 liveborn infants were examined at necropsy for the presence of intravascular lipid. Forty one patients had received parenteral feeding (including lipid emulsion in 30), and 441 had died before starting feeds or had received enteral feeds alone. Tissue was processed into wax and then stained with Sudan black; intravascular lipid was found in 15 of 30 infants who had received intravenous fat (Intralipid), but in no others. Those patients with positive lipid staining had received significantly more fat during parenteral nutrition than those in whom intravascular lipid was not found but the two groups were otherwise clinically indistinguishable. Using this staining technique intravascular lipid can be shown relatively often, although only in patients who have received intravenous lipid emulsion. The location of fat, predominantly in small pulmonary capillaries, and the absence of lipid emboli in other organs, suggests that lipid coalescence takes place before death and is not a postmortem artefact. The clinical relevance remains uncertain. PMID:1899990

  11. Pulmonary intravascular lipid in neonatal necropsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Puntis, J W; Rushton, D I

    1991-01-01

    The lungs of 482 liveborn infants were examined at necropsy for the presence of intravascular lipid. Forty one patients had received parenteral feeding (including lipid emulsion in 30), and 441 had died before starting feeds or had received enteral feeds alone. Tissue was processed into wax and then stained with Sudan black; intravascular lipid was found in 15 of 30 infants who had received intravenous fat (Intralipid), but in no others. Those patients with positive lipid staining had received significantly more fat during parenteral nutrition than those in whom intravascular lipid was not found but the two groups were otherwise clinically indistinguishable. Using this staining technique intravascular lipid can be shown relatively often, although only in patients who have received intravenous lipid emulsion. The location of fat, predominantly in small pulmonary capillaries, and the absence of lipid emboli in other organs, suggests that lipid coalescence takes place before death and is not a postmortem artefact. The clinical relevance remains uncertain.

  12. Lipid Metabolism, Apoptosis and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunfa; Freter, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:25561239

  13. Nonvesicular Lipid Transfer from the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Sima

    2012-01-01

    The transport of lipids from their synthesis site at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to different target membranes could be mediated by both vesicular and nonvesicular transport mechanisms. Nonvesicular lipid transport appears to be the major transport route of certain lipid species, and could be mediated by either spontaneous lipid transport or by lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs). Although nonvesicular lipid transport has been extensively studied for more than four decades, its underlying mechanism, advantage and regulation, have not been fully explored. In particular, the function of LTPs and their involvement in intracellular lipid movement remain largely controversial. In this article, we describe the pathways by which lipids are synthesized at the ER and delivered to different cellular membranes, and discuss the role of LTPs in lipid transport both in vitro and in intact cells. PMID:23028121

  14. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have long been known for their ability to initiate innate immune responses upon exposure to conserved microbial components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and double-stranded RNA. More recently, this family of pattern recognition receptors has been attributed a critical role in the elicitation of anticancer immune responses, raising interest in the development of immunochemotherapeutic regimens based on natural or synthetic TLR agonists. In spite of such an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation, only three TLR agonists are currently licensed by FDA for use in cancer patients: bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that operates as a mixed TLR2/TLR4 agonist; monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a derivative of Salmonella minnesota that functions as a potent agonist of TLR4; and imiquimod, a synthetic imidazoquinoline that activates TLR7. One year ago, in the August and September issues of OncoImmunology, we described the main biological features of TLRs and discussed the progress of clinical studies evaluating the safety and therapeutic potential of TLR agonists in cancer patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this exciting area of research, focusing on preclinical studies that have been published during the last 13 mo and clinical trials launched in the same period to investigate the antineoplastic activity of TLR agonists. PMID:24083080

  15. Fuel from microalgae lipid products

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, A.M.; Feinberg, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    The large-scale production of microalgae is a promising method of producing a renewable feedstock for a wide variety of fuel products currently refined from crude petroleum. These microalgae-derived products include lipid extraction products (triglycerides, fatty acids, and hydrocarbons) and catalytic conversion products (paraffins and olefins). Microalgal biomass productivity and lipid composition of current experimental systems are estimated at 66.0 metric tons per hectare year and 30% lipid content. Similar yields in a large-scale facility indicate that production costs are approximately six times higher than the average domestic price for crude, well-head petroleum. Based on achievable targets for productivity and production costs, the potential for microalgae as a fuel feedstock is presented in context with selected process refining routes and is compared with conventional and alternative feedstocks (e.g., oilseeds) with which microalgae must compete. 24 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

  16. Crystallization modifiers in lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Masuchi, Monise Helen; Miyasaki, Eriksen Koji; Domingues, Maria Aliciane Fontenele; Stroppa, Valter Luís Zuliani; de Oliveira, Glazieli Marangoni; Kieckbusch, Theo Guenter

    2015-07-01

    Crystallization of fats is a determinant physical event affecting the structure and properties of fat-based products. The stability of these processed foods is regulated by changes in the physical state of fats and alterations in their crystallization behavior. Problems like polymorphic transitions, oil migration, fat bloom development, slow crystallization and formation of crystalline aggregates stand out. The change of the crystallization behavior of lipid systems has been a strategic issue for the processing of foods, aiming at taylor made products, reducing costs, improving quality, and increasing the applicability and stability of different industrial fats. In this connection, advances in understanding the complex mechanisms that govern fat crystallization led to the development of strategies in order to modulate the conventional processes of fat structuration, based on the use of crystallization modifiers. Different components have been evaluated, such as specific triacyglycerols, partial glycerides (monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols), free fatty acids, phospholipids and emulsifiers. The knowledge and expertise on the influence of these specific additives or minor lipids on the crystallization behavior of fat systems represents a focus of current interest for the industrial processing of oils and fats. This article presents a comprehensive review on the use of crystallization modifiers in lipid systems, especially for palm oil, cocoa butter and general purpose fats, highlighting: i) the removal, addition or fractionation of minor lipids in fat bases; ii) the use of nucleating agents to modify the crystallization process; iii) control of crystallization in lipid bases by using emulsifiers. The addition of these components into lipid systems is discussed in relation to the phenomena of nucleation, crystal growth, morphology, thermal behavior and polymorphism, with the intention of providing the reader with a complete panorama of the associated mechanisms

  17. Lipid Regulation of Acrosome Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Roy; Mukai, Chinatsu; Travis, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are critical regulators of mammalian sperm function, first helping prevent premature acrosome exocytosis, then enabling sperm to become competent to fertilize at the right place/time through the process of capacitation, and ultimately triggering acrosome exocytosis. Yet because they do not fit neatly into the "DNA--RNA-protein" synthetic pathway, they are understudied and poorly understood. Here, we focus on three lipids or lipid classes-cholesterol, phospholipids, and the ganglioside G(M1)--in context of the modern paradigm of acrosome exocytosis. We describe how these various- species are precisely segregated into membrane macrodomains and microdomains, simultaneously preventing premature exocytosis while acting as foci for organizing regulatory and effector molecules that will enable exocytosis. Although the mechanisms responsible for these domains are poorly defined, there is substantial evidence for their composition and functions. We present diverse ways that lipids and lipid modifications regulate capacitation and acrosome exocytosis, describing in more detail how removal of cholesterol plays a master regulatory role in enabling exocytosis through at least two complementary pathways. First, cholesterol efflux leads to proteolytic activation of phospholipase B, which cleaves both phospholipid tails. The resultant changes in membrane curvature provide a mechanism for the point fusions now known to occur far before a sperm physically interacts with the zona pellucida. Cholesterol efflux also enables G(M1) to regulate the voltage-dependent cation channel, Ca(V)2.3, triggering focal calcium transients required for acrosome exocytosis in response to subsequent whole-cell calcium rises. We close with a model integrating functions for lipids in regulating acrosome exocytosis. PMID:27194352

  18. Fracture healing and lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, J Patrick; Manigrasso, Michaele B; Kim, Brian D; Subramanian, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Lipid mediators regulate bone regeneration during fracture healing. Prostaglandins and leukotrienes are well-known lipid mediators that regulate inflammation and are synthesized from the Ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid. Cyclooxygenase (COX-1 or COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyze the initial enzymatic steps in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes, respectively. Inhibition or genetic ablation of COX-2 activity impairs fracture healing in animal models. Genetic ablation of COX-1 does not affect the fracture callus strength in mice, suggesting that COX-2 activity is primarily responsible for regulating fracture healing. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is performed clinically to reduce heterotopic ossification, although clinical evidence that NSAID treatment impairs fracture healing remains controversial. In contrast, inhibition or genetic ablation of 5-LO activity accelerates fracture healing in animal models. Even though prostaglandins and leukotrienes regulate inflammation, loss of COX-2 or 5-LO activity appears to primarily affect chondrogenesis during fracture healing. Prostaglandin or prostaglandin analog treatment, prostaglandin-specific synthase inhibition and prostaglandin or leukotriene receptor antagonism also affect callus chondrogenesis. Unlike the Ω-6-derived lipid mediators, lipid mediators derived from Ω-3 fatty acids, such as resolvin E1 (RvE1), have anti-inflammatory activity. In vivo, RvE1 can inhibit osteoclastogenesis and limit bone resorption. Although Ω-6 and Ω-3 lipid mediators have clear-cut effects on inflammation, the role of these lipid mediators in bone regeneration is more complex, with apparent effects on callus chondrogenesis and bone remodeling. PMID:24795811

  19. Plasma membrane cholesterol level and agonist-induced internalization of δ-opioid receptors; colocalization study with intracellular membrane markers of Rab family.

    PubMed

    Brejchova, Jana; Vosahlikova, Miroslava; Roubalova, Lenka; Parenti, Marco; Mauri, Mario; Chernyavskiy, Oleksandr; Svoboda, Petr

    2016-08-01

    Decrease of cholesterol level in plasma membrane of living HEK293 cells transiently expressing FLAG-δ-OR by β-cyclodextrin (β-CDX) resulted in a slight internalization of δ-OR. Massive internalization of δ-OR induced by specific agonist DADLE was diminished in cholesterol-depleted cells. These results suggest that agonist-induced internalization of δ-OR, which has been traditionally attributed exclusively to clathrin-mediated pathway, proceeds at least partially via membrane domains. Identification of internalized pools of FLAG-δ-OR by colocalization studies with proteins of Rab family indicated the decreased presence of receptors in early endosomes (Rab5), late endosomes and lysosomes (Rab7) and fast recycling vesicles (Rab4). Slow type of recycling (Rab11) was unchanged by cholesterol depletion. As expected, agonist-induced internalization of oxytocin receptors was totally suppressed in β-CDX-treated cells. Determination of average fluorescence lifetime of TMA-DPH, the polar derivative of hydrophobic membrane probe diphenylhexatriene, in live cells by FLIM indicated a significant alteration of the overall PM structure which may be interpreted as an increased "water-accessible space" within PM area. Data obtained by studies of HEK293 cells transiently expressing FLAG-δ-OR by "antibody feeding" method were extended by analysis of the effect of cholesterol depletion on distribution of FLAG-δ-OR in sucrose density gradients prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing FLAG-δ-OR. Major part of FLAG-δ-OR was co-localized with plasma membrane marker Na,K-ATPase and β-CDX treatment resulted in shift of PM fragments containing both FLAG-δ-OR and Na,K-ATPase to higher density. Thus, the decrease in content of the major lipid constituent of PM resulted in increased density of resulting PM fragments.

  20. Α-galactosylceramide analogs with weak agonist activity for human iNKT cells define new candidate anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Bricard, Gabriel; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Yu, Karl O A; Im, Jin S; Ndonye, Rachel M; Howell, Amy R; Veerapen, Natacha; Illarionov, Petr A; Besra, Gurdyal S; Li, Qian; Chang, Young-Tae; Porcelli, Steven A

    2010-12-17

    CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells with invariant T cell receptor α chains (iNKT cells) are a unique lymphocyte subset that responds to recognition of specific lipid and glycolipid antigens. They are conserved between mice and humans and exert various immunoregulatory functions through their rapid secretion of a variety of cytokines and secondary activation of dendritic cells, B cells and NK cells. In the current study, we analyzed the range of functional activation states of human iNKT cells using a library of novel analogs of α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), the prototypical iNKT cell antigen. Measurement of cytokines secreted by human iNKT cell clones over a wide range of glycolipid concentrations revealed that iNKT cell ligands could be classified into functional groups, correlating with weak versus strong agonistic activity. The findings established a hierarchy for induction of different cytokines, with thresholds for secretion being consistently lowest for IL-13, higher for interferon-γ (IFNγ), and even higher for IL-4. These findings suggested that human iNKT cells can be intrinsically polarized to selective production of IL-13 by maintaining a low level of activation using weak agonists, whereas selective polarization to IL-4 production cannot be achieved through modulating the strength of the activating ligand. In addition, using a newly designed in vitro system to assess the ability of human iNKT cells to transactivate NK cells, we found that robust secondary induction of interferon-γ secretion by NK cells was associated with strong but not weak agonist ligands of iNKT cells. These results indicate that polarization of human iNKT cell responses to Th2-like or anti-inflammatory effects may best be achieved through selective induction of IL-13 and suggest potential discrepancies with findings from mouse models that may be important in designing iNKT cell-based therapies in humans.

  1. Computational and Biological Evaluation of N-octadecyl-N′-propylsulfamide, a Selective PPARα Agonist Structurally Related to N-acylethanolamines

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Antonia; Cano, Carolina; Suardíaz, Margarita; Decara, Juan; Suarez, Juan; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Macías-González, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    To further understand the pharmacological properties of N-oleoylethanolamine (OEA), a naturally occurring lipid that activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), we designed sulfamoyl analogs based on its structure. Among the compounds tested, N-octadecyl-N′-propylsulfamide (CC7) was selected for functional comparison with OEA. The performed studies include the following computational and biological approaches: 1) molecular docking analyses; 2) molecular biology studies with PPARα; 3) pharmacological studies on feeding behavior and visceral analgesia. For the docking studies, we compared OEA and CC7 data with crystallization data obtained with the reference PPARα agonist GW409544. OEA and CC7 interacted with the ligand-binding domain of PPARα in a similar manner to GW409544. Both compounds produced similar transcriptional activation by in vitro assays, including the GST pull-down assay and reporter gene analysis. In addition, CC7 and OEA induced the mRNA expression of CPT1a in HpeG2 cells through PPARα and the induction was avoided with PPARα-specific siRNA. In vivo studies in rats showed that OEA and CC7 had anorectic and antiobesity activity and induced both lipopenia and decreases in hepatic fat content. However, different effects were observed when measuring visceral pain; OEA produced visceral analgesia whereas CC7 showed no effects. These results suggest that OEA activity on the PPARα receptor (e.g., lipid metabolism and feeding behavior) may be dissociated from other actions at alternative targets (e.g., pain) because other non cannabimimetic ligands that interact with PPARα, such as CC7, do not reproduce the full spectrum of the pharmacological activity of OEA. These results provide new opportunities for the development of specific PPARα-activating drugs focused on sulfamide derivatives with a long alkyl chain for the treatment of metabolic dysfunction. PMID:24651609

  2. Computational and biological evaluation of N-octadecyl-N'-propylsulfamide, a selective PPARα agonist structurally related to N-acylethanolamines.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Santos, Inmaculada; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Romero-Cuevas, Miguel; Serrano, Antonia; Cano, Carolina; Suardíaz, Margarita; Decara, Juan; Suarez, Juan; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Macías-González, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    To further understand the pharmacological properties of N-oleoylethanolamine (OEA), a naturally occurring lipid that activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), we designed sulfamoyl analogs based on its structure. Among the compounds tested, N-octadecyl-N'-propylsulfamide (CC7) was selected for functional comparison with OEA. The performed studies include the following computational and biological approaches: 1) molecular docking analyses; 2) molecular biology studies with PPARα; 3) pharmacological studies on feeding behavior and visceral analgesia. For the docking studies, we compared OEA and CC7 data with crystallization data obtained with the reference PPARα agonist GW409544. OEA and CC7 interacted with the ligand-binding domain of PPARα in a similar manner to GW409544. Both compounds produced similar transcriptional activation by in vitro assays, including the GST pull-down assay and reporter gene analysis. In addition, CC7 and OEA induced the mRNA expression of CPT1a in HpeG2 cells through PPARα and the induction was avoided with PPARα-specific siRNA. In vivo studies in rats showed that OEA and CC7 had anorectic and antiobesity activity and induced both lipopenia and decreases in hepatic fat content. However, different effects were observed when measuring visceral pain; OEA produced visceral analgesia whereas CC7 showed no effects. These results suggest that OEA activity on the PPARα receptor (e.g., lipid metabolism and feeding behavior) may be dissociated from other actions at alternative targets (e.g., pain) because other non cannabimimetic ligands that interact with PPARα, such as CC7, do not reproduce the full spectrum of the pharmacological activity of OEA. These results provide new opportunities for the development of specific PPARα-activating drugs focused on sulfamide derivatives with a long alkyl chain for the treatment of metabolic dysfunction.

  3. Fish oil and the pan-PPAR agonist tetradecylthioacetic acid affect the amino acid and carnitine metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Bjørndal, Bodil; Brattelid, Trond; Strand, Elin; Vigerust, Natalya Filipchuk; Svingen, Gard Frodahl Tveitevåg; Svardal, Asbjørn; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are important in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Recent studies have shown that PPARα-activation by WY 14,643 regulates the metabolism of amino acids. We investigated the effect of PPAR activation on plasma amino acid levels using two PPARα activators with different ligand binding properties, tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) and fish oil, where the pan-PPAR agonist TTA is a more potent ligand than omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. In addition, plasma L-carnitine esters were investigated to reflect cellular fatty acid catabolism. Male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) were fed a high-fat (25% w/w) diet including TTA (0.375%, w/w), fish oil (10%, w/w) or a combination of both. The rats were fed for 50 weeks, and although TTA and fish oil had hypotriglyceridemic effects in these animals, only TTA lowered the body weight gain compared to high fat control animals. Distinct dietary effects of fish oil and TTA were observed on plasma amino acid composition. Administration of TTA led to increased plasma levels of the majority of amino acids, except arginine and lysine, which were reduced. Fish oil however, increased plasma levels of only a few amino acids, and the combination showed an intermediate or TTA-dominated effect. On the other hand, TTA and fish oil additively reduced plasma levels of the L-carnitine precursor γ-butyrobetaine, as well as the carnitine esters acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, valeryl/isovalerylcarnitine, and octanoylcarnitine. These data suggest that while both fish oil and TTA affect lipid metabolism, strong PPARα activation is required to obtain effects on amino acid plasma levels. TTA and fish oil may influence amino acid metabolism through different metabolic mechanisms. PMID:23826175

  4. Lipid signals and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Klett, Eric L; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2013-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of metabolic derangements that include obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance has been proposed to be the common feature that links obesity to the metabolic syndrome, but the mechanism remains obscure. Although the excess content of triacylglycerol in muscle and liver is highly associated with insulin resistance in these tissues, triacylglycerol itself is not causal but merely a marker. Thus, attention has turned to the accumulation of cellular lipids known to have signaling roles. This review will discuss recent progress in understanding how glycerolipids and related lipid intermediates may impair insulin signaling. PMID:24533033

  5. Lipid signals and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Klett, Eric L; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2013-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of metabolic derangements that include obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance has been proposed to be the common feature that links obesity to the metabolic syndrome, but the mechanism remains obscure. Although the excess content of triacylglycerol in muscle and liver is highly associated with insulin resistance in these tissues, triacylglycerol itself is not causal but merely a marker. Thus, attention has turned to the accumulation of cellular lipids known to have signaling roles. This review will discuss recent progress in understanding how glycerolipids and related lipid intermediates may impair insulin signaling.

  6. Mimicking corticosterone's daily rhythm with specific receptor agonists: effects on food, water, and sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Devenport, L; Stith, R

    1992-06-01

    The endogenous pattern of type I and II corticosteroid receptor stimulation was systematically assembled from specific agonists in order to detect any unique receptor interactions in the control of ingestive behavior. The type II agonists dexamethasone (0, 5, or 25 micrograms/kg) or RU28362 (0, 5, or 25 micrograms/kg) were injected daily in the final hour of the light phase of the illumination cycle of adrenalectomized rats. This was carried out in the presence or absence of continuous aldosterone (type I agonist) infusion. Additional comparisons were made with sham-operated groups and animals receiving type II agonists by continuous infusion. Type II agonists increased the intake of 2% saline and the proportion of food taken at night, but had negligible effects on total food intake. Type II agonists did not interact with the type I agonist. Type II effects were greatly potentiated by continuous infusion, though administered at the same doses as acute injection. When the effects of type II receptor stimulation emerged, they always consisted of an exacerbation of the adrenalectomy syndrome, not a return to normal quantities or patterns. In contrast, type I receptor stimulation restored both the quantities and unique day-night patterns of saline, water, and food intake to values matching intact animals. The findings suggest that the behavioral significance of corticosterone's nocturnal peak of type II stimulation is small, and that its most important function may lie in the metabolic processes it instigates during its steady rise in the light phase.

  7. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist use in men without a cancer registry diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yong-fang; Goodwin, James S; Shahinian, Vahakn B

    2008-01-01

    Background Use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists has become popular for virtually all stages of prostate cancer. We hypothesized that some men receive these agents after only a limited work-up for their cancer. Such cases may be missed by tumor registries, leading to underestimates of the total extent of GnRH agonist use. Methods We used linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare data from 1993 through 2001 to identify GnRH agonist use in men with either a diagnosis of prostate cancer registered in SEER, or with a diagnosis of prostate cancer based only on Medicare claims (from the 5% control sample of Medicare beneficiaries residing in SEER areas without a registered diagnosis of cancer). The proportion of incident GnRH agonist users without a registry diagnosis of prostate cancer was calculated. Factors associated with lack of a registry diagnosis were examined in multivariable analyses. Results Of incident GnRH agonist users, 8.9% had no diagnosis of prostate cancer registered in SEER. In a multivariable logistic regression model, lack of a registry diagnosis of prostate cancer in GnRH agonist users was significantly more likely with increasing comorbidity, whereas it was less likely in men who had undergone either inpatient admission or procedures such as radical prostatectomy, prostate biopsy, or transurethral resection of the prostate. Conclusion Reliance solely on tumor registry data may underestimate the rate of GnRH agonist use in men with prostate cancer. PMID:18620606

  8. Cholesterol lipids and cholesterol-containing lipid rafts in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; London, Erwin

    2016-09-01

    Sterols are important components of eukaryotic membranes, but rare in bacteria. Some bacteria obtain sterols from their host or environment. In some cases, these sterols form membrane domains analogous the lipid rafts proposed to exist in eukaryotic membranes. This review describes the properties and roles of sterols in Borrelia and Helicobacter.

  9. Lipids of Sarcina lutea III. Composition of the Complex Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Charles K.; Albro, Phillip W.; Grindey, Gerald B.

    1965-01-01

    Huston, Charles K. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.), Phillip W. Albro, and Gerald B. Grindey. Lipids of Sarcina lutea. III. Composition of the complex lipids. J. Bacteriol. 89:768–775. 1965.—The complex lipids from a strain of Sarcina lutea were isolated and separated into fractions on diethylaminoethyl cellulose acetate and silicic acid columns. These fractions were monitored in several thin-layer chromatography systems. The various lipid types were characterized by their behavior in thin-layer systems and by an analysis of their hydrolysis products. The fatty acid composition of the column fractions was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. A number of components (13) were separated by thin-layer chromatography and characterized. The major components were polyglycerol phosphatide (17.0%), lipoamino acids (15.1%), phosphatidyl glycerol (13.8%), and an incompletely characterized substance (15.0%). Minor constituents included phosphatidyl inositol (5.5%), phosphatidic acid (4.2%), phosphatidyl serine (2.0%), and phosphatidyl choline (1.0%). No phosphatidyl ethanolamine was observed. PMID:14273659

  10. Chemical and structural investigation of lipid nanoparticles: drug-lipid interaction and molecular distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantachaisilp, Suranan; Meejoo Smith, Siwaporn; Treetong, Alongkot; Pratontep, Sirapat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Rungsardthong Ruktanonchai, Uracha

    2010-03-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are a promising alternative to existing carriers in chemical or drug delivery systems. A key challenge is to determine how chemicals are incorporated and distributed inside nanoparticles, which assists in controlling chemical retention and release characteristics. This study reports the chemical and structural investigation of γ-oryzanol loading inside a model lipid nanoparticle drug delivery system composed of cetyl palmitate as solid lipid and Miglyol 812® as liquid lipid. The lipid nanoparticles were prepared by high pressure homogenization at varying liquid lipid content, in comparison with the γ-oryzanol free systems. The size of the lipid nanoparticles, as measured by the photon correlation spectroscopy, was found to decrease with increased liquid lipid content from 200 to 160 nm. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements of the medium chain triglyceride of the liquid lipid has confirmed successful incorporation of the liquid lipid in the lipid nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetric and powder x-ray diffraction measurements provide complementary results to the 1H-NMR, whereby the crystallinity of the lipid nanoparticles diminishes with an increase in the liquid lipid content. For the distribution of γ-oryzanol inside the lipid nanoparticles, the 1H-NMR revealed that the chemical shifts of the liquid lipid in γ-oryzanol loaded systems were found at rather higher field than those in γ-oryzanol free systems, suggesting incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid lipid. In addition, the phase-separated structure was observed by atomic force microscopy for lipid nanoparticles with 0% liquid lipid, but not for lipid nanoparticles with 5 and 10% liquid lipid. Raman spectroscopic and mapping measurements further revealed preferential incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid part rather than the solid part of in the lipid nanoparticles. Simple models representing the distribution of γ-oryzanol and

  11. Nanoparticle-lipid bilayer interactions studied with lipid bilayer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bin; Smith, Tyler; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2015-04-01

    The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which can provide insight into the nature of the particle-membrane interaction through variation of membrane and solution properties not possible with cell-based assays. However, the scope of these studies can be limited because of the low throughput characteristic of lipid bilayer platforms. We have recently described an easy to use, parallel lipid bilayer platform which we have used to electrically investigate the activity of 60 nm diameter amine and carboxyl modified polystyrene nanoparticles (NH2-NP and COOH-NP) with over 1000 lipid bilayers while varying lipid composition, bilayer charge, ionic strength, pH, voltage, serum, particle concentration, and particle charge. Our results confirm recent studies finding activity of NH2-NP but not COOH-NP. Detailed analysis shows that NH2-NP formed pores 0.3-2.3 nm in radius, dependent on bilayer and solution composition. These interactions appear to be electrostatic, as they are regulated by NH2-NP surface charge, solution ionic strength, and bilayer charge. The ability to rapidly measure a large number of nanoparticle and membrane parameters indicates strong potential of this bilayer array platform for additional nanoparticle bilayer studies.The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which

  12. Anandamide and analogous endocannabinoids: a lipid self-assembly study

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Krodkiewska, Irena; Mulet, Xavier; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    Anandamide, the endogenous agonist of the cannabinoid receptors, has been widely studied for its interesting biological and medicinal properties and is recognized as a highly significant lipid signaling molecule within the nervous system. Few studies have, however, examined the effect of the physical conformation of anandamide on its function. The study presented herein has focused on characterizing the self-assembly behaviour of anandamide and four other endocannabinoid analogues of anandamide, viz., 2-arachidonyl glycerol, arachidonyl dopamine, 2-arachidonyl glycerol ether (noladin ether), and o-arachidonyl ethanolamide (virodhamine). Molecular modeling of the five endocannabinoid lipids indicates that the highly unsaturated arachidonyl chain has a preference for a U or J shaped conformation. Thermal phase studies of the neat amphiphiles showed that a glass transition was observed for all of the endocannabinoids at {approx} -110 C with the exception of anandamide, with a second glass transition occurring for 2-arachidonyl glycerol, 2-arachidonyl glycerol ether, and virodhamine (-86 C, -95 C, -46 C respectively). Both anandamide and arachidonyl dopamine displayed a crystal-isotropic melting point (-4.8 and -20.4 C respectively), while a liquid crystal-isotropic melting transition was seen for 2-arachidonyl glycerol (-40.7 C) and 2-arachidonyl glycerol ether (-71.2 C). No additional transitions were observed for virodhamine. Small angle X-ray scattering and cross polarized optical microscopy studies as a function of temperature indicated that in the presence of excess water, both 2-arachidonyl glycerol and anandamide form co-existing Q{sub II}{sup G} (gyroid) and Q{sub II}{sup D} (diamond) bicontinuous cubic phases from 0 C to 20 C, which are kinetically stable over a period of weeks but may not represent true thermodynamic equilibrium. Similarly, 2-arachidonyl glycerol ether acquired an inverse hexagonal (HII) phase in excess water from 0 C to 40 C, while

  13. Use of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists in controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Muasher, S J

    1992-01-01

    The aim of ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) is the recruitment of multiple fertilizable healthy oocytes. Transfer of multiple embryos yields a better success rate than single-embryo transfers. Moreover, cryopreservation of excess pre-embryos allows patients an added opportunity to achieve a pregnancy without undergoing a repeat stimulated cycle. In the last 4 years, gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) agonists have been used widely as adjuncts to gonadotrophins for ovarian hyperstimulation. Advantages of Gn-RH agonist use include prevention of a premature luteinising hormone (LH) surge, suppression of endogenous basal LH levels and recruitment of a larger cohort of follicles. Gn-RH agonists can be used in a long (suppression) or a short (stimulatory, flare-up) protocol. In our clinic, the use of Gn-RH agonist suppression (starting in the mid-luteal phase) prior to ovarian hyperstimulation was demonstrated to be extremely beneficial in intermediate and high responder patients but not in low responders (defined endocrinologically as patients with a basal follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH]: LH ratio of 1:1 and a basal LH:FSH ratio of greater than or equal to 1.5, respectively). We have not been able to demonstrate any beneficial effects from the use of Gn-RH agonist suppression in low responder patients (defined endocrinologically as patients with a basal FSH greater than or equal to 15 mIU/ml). In such low responder patients, the use of a 'flare-up' Gn-RH agonist protocol (Gn-RH agonist starting on day 2 of the cycle, followed by gonadotrophins on day 4 of the cycle), taking advantage of the initial agonistic stimulatory effect of Gn-RH agonists on endogenous FSH and LH secretion, has provided significant improvements in stimulation characteristics and better pregnancy results. It should be emphasised that comparisons of results cannot be attempted due to the selective use of each protocol in different patient populations.

  14. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •TRPA1 agonists inhibited compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves. •This inhibition was not mediated by TRPA1 channels. •This efficacy was comparable to those of lidocaine and cocaine. •We found for the first time an ability of TRPA1 agonists to inhibit nerve conduction. -- Abstract: Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC{sub 50} values of 1.2 and 1.5 mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-α-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC{sub 50} = 0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other.

  15. Utility of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists in programs of ovarian hyperstimulation with intrauterine insemination.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, C L

    1993-09-01

    The GnRH agonists have practical and theoretic advantages for adjunctive use in ovulation induction. The IVF cycles demonstrate a decrease in the cancellation rate, an increase in the ease of scheduling, and an increase in the number of oocytes obtained per retrieval when GnRH agonists are employed. Other advantages, such as an improvement in the fertilization and cleavage rate, an increased length of the luteal phase, and an increased pregnancy rate, are suggested but not universally accepted. The utility of adding GnRH agonists to human menopausal gonadotropin-intrauterine insemination cycles is similarly in dispute. Although controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with both human menopausal gonadotropins alone and in conjunction with GnRH agonists have produced pregnancies when coupled with intrauterine insemination, it was demonstrated that there was a significantly greater pregnancy rate per cycle with the use of a GnRH agonist in a recalcitrant infertile population. Others did not substantiate this improvement in pregnancy rate per cycle in their patient population of regularly ovulating women undergoing their first controlled ovarian stimulation cycle either with or without GnRH agonist therapy. This suggests that women with ovulatory dysfunction, and particularly women who previously have not responded to therapy with human menopausal gonadotropin therapy, will reap the most benefits from the addition of a GnRH agonist to their ovulation induction regimen. The addition of a GnRH agonist to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation is a highly effective method of inducing pregnancy in a recalcitrant infertile population. Patients who did not conceive with human menopausal gonadotropins-intrauterine insemination may conceive with GnRH agonist-human menopausal gonadotropins-intrauterine insemination therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8403617

  16. Pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) measures inside-out signaling and patient-specific response to combinatorial platelet agonists.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Daniel T L; Diamond, Scott L

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the response of cells to multiple stimuli is vital for predicting donor specific responses and better understanding the signaling pathways involved. This is of particular importance in platelets because exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) occurs upon costimulation but not with a single agonist. Here, we describe a multiplexed pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) method of measuring platelet inside-out responses to all pairs of six platelet agonists (convulxin, SFLLRN, AYPGKF, ADP, U46619, and PGE(2)) used at their EC(50) concentrations. These agonists allowed exploration of platelet signaling downstream of GPVI, PAR-1, PAR-4, P2Y(1), P2Y(12), TP, and IP receptors. The three-color flow cytometry method simultaneously measured integrin α(IIb)β(3) activation with PAC-1 antibody, P-selectin exposure (via α granule release) with anti-P-selectin, and PS exposure with annexin V. These responses were consistent across a healthy male donor pool. In duplicate measurements with each donor, 4 of the 10 donors had a sufficiently unique 45-parameter (15 pairs × 3 colors) phenotype to self-cluster (P < 0.001). This method has the potential for efficiently scanning for patient specific responses across a broad agonist-receptor space.

  17. Pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) measures inside-out signaling and patient-specific response to combinatorial platelet agonists.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Daniel T L; Diamond, Scott L

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the response of cells to multiple stimuli is vital for predicting donor specific responses and better understanding the signaling pathways involved. This is of particular importance in platelets because exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) occurs upon costimulation but not with a single agonist. Here, we describe a multiplexed pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) method of measuring platelet inside-out responses to all pairs of six platelet agonists (convulxin, SFLLRN, AYPGKF, ADP, U46619, and PGE(2)) used at their EC(50) concentrations. These agonists allowed exploration of platelet signaling downstream of GPVI, PAR-1, PAR-4, P2Y(1), P2Y(12), TP, and IP receptors. The three-color flow cytometry method simultaneously measured integrin α(IIb)β(3) activation with PAC-1 antibody, P-selectin exposure (via α granule release) with anti-P-selectin, and PS exposure with annexin V. These responses were consistent across a healthy male donor pool. In duplicate measurements with each donor, 4 of the 10 donors had a sufficiently unique 45-parameter (15 pairs × 3 colors) phenotype to self-cluster (P < 0.001). This method has the potential for efficiently scanning for patient specific responses across a broad agonist-receptor space. PMID:23662898

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists versus insulin glargine for type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Xin; Gou, Jian-Feng; Tian, Jin-Hui; Yan, Xiang; Yang, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new class of hypoglycemic drugs, including exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, lixisenatide, and taspoglutide. Insulin glargine is a standard agent used to supplement basal insulin in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Objective: The aim of this study was to review the efficacy and safety profiles of GLP-1 receptor agonists versus insulin glargine in type 2 diabetic patients who have not achieved treatment goals with oral hypoglycemic agents. Methods: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and the database of ongoing trials were searched from inception through April 2010. Additional data were sought from relevant Web sites, the American Diabetes Association, reference lists of included trials and related (systematic) reviews, and industry. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were selected if they were ≥3 months in duration, compared GLP-1 receptor agonists with insulin glargine in patients with T2DM, and included ≥1 of the following outcomes: mortality, complications of T2DM, glycemie control, weight, lipids, blood pressure, adverse effects, and health-related quality of life. Quasirandomized controlled trials were excluded. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed on the basis of the following aspects: randomization procedure, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcome data (intent-to-treat [ITT] analysis), selective outcome reporting, and publication bias. Results: A total of 410 citations were retrieved; 5 multicenter RCTs that met the inclusion criteria were identified. They were all open-label designs with an insulin glargine arm, predefined outcomes reported, and ITT analysis. One trial had an unclear randomization procedure and allocation concealment. Publication bias was not able to be determined. No data wete found with regard to mortality or diabetes-associated complications, and few data were found on quality of life. The results of

  19. Agonist/antagonist modulation in a series of 2-aryl benzimidazole H4 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Savall, Brad M; Edwards, James P; Venable, Jennifer D; Buzard, Daniel J; Thurmond, Robin; Hack, Michael; McGovern, Patricia

    2010-06-01

    The present work details the transformation of a series of human histamine H(4) agonists into potent functional antagonists. Replacement of the aminopyrrolidine diamine functionality with a 5,6-fused pyrrolopiperidine ring system led to an antagonist. The dissection of this fused diamine led to the eventual replacement with heterocycles. The incorporation of histamine as the terminal amine led to a very potent and selective histamine H(4) agonist; whereas incorporation of the constrained histamine analog, spinacamine, modulated the functional activity to give a partial agonist. In two separate series, we demonstrate that constraining the terminal amino portion modulated the spectrum of functional activity of histamine H(4) ligands.

  20. Agonist-Specific Recruitment of Arrestin Isoforms Differentially Modify Delta Opioid Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Perroy, Julie; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Smith, Monique L.; Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Bana, Alia; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-specific recruitment of arrestins facilitates functional selectivity of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. Here, we describe agonist-selective recruitment of different arrestin isoforms to the delta opioid receptor in mice. A high-internalizing delta opioid receptor agonist (SNC80) preferentially recruited arrestin 2 and, in arrestin 2 knock-outs (KOs), we observed a significant increase in the potency of SNC80 to inhibit mechanical hyperalgesia and decreased acute tolerance. In contrast, the low-internalizing delta agonists (ARM390, JNJ20788560) preferentially recruited arrestin 3 with unaltered behavioral effects in arrestin 2 KOs. Surprisingly, arrestin 3 KO revealed an acute tolerance to these low-internalizing agonists, an effect never observed in wild-type animals. Furthermore, we examined delta opioid receptor–Ca2+ channel coupling in dorsal root ganglia desensitized by ARM390 and the rate of resensitization was correspondingly decreased in arrestin 3 KOs. Live-cell imaging in HEK293 cells revealed that delta opioid receptors are in pre-engaged complexes with arrestin 3 at the cell membrane and that ARM390 strengthens this membrane interaction. The disruption of these complexes in arrestin 3 KOs likely accounts for the altered responses to low-internalizing agonists. Together, our results show agonist-selective recruitment of arrestin isoforms and reveal a novel endogenous role of arrestin 3 as a facilitator of resensitization and an inhibitor of tolerance mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Agonists that bind to the same receptor can produce highly distinct signaling events and arrestins are a major mediator of this ligand bias. Here, we demonstrate that delta opioid receptor agonists differentially recruit arrestin isoforms. We found that the high-internalizing agonist SNC80 preferentially recruits arrestin 2 and knock-out (KO) of this protein results in increased efficacy of SNC80. In contrast, low-internalizing agonists (ARM390 and JNJ20788560

  1. Synthesis and characterization of photoactivatable peptide agonists of the human thrombin receptor.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, R; Cordier, Y; Rasmussen, U B; Schlesinger, Y; Gachet, C; Jaquinod, M; Tripet, B; Chong, P C; Pavirani, A

    1994-08-01

    Chemical synthesis and biochemical analysis of modified agonist peptides of the human thrombin receptor derived from the sequence SFLLRNP containing photoactivatable azido groups and biotin for sensitive detection is described. Substitution of leucine in position three with p-azidophenylalanine and extension of the C-terminus with a KGGK spacer containing biotin covalently linked to the side chain of the C-terminal lysine residue resulted in an active receptor agonist as determined by intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells. In contrast, substitution of phenylalanine in position two with p-azidophenylalanine reduced agonist activity significantly. PMID:8050586

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists (PPARs): a promising prospect in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Emerson de Andrade; Lima, Mariana Modesto Dantas de Andrade; Marques, Cláudia Diniz Lopes; Duarte, Angela Luzia Branco Pinto; Pita, Ivan da Rocha; Pita, Maira Galdino da Rocha

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a polygenic, inflammatory and progressive disease, characterized by an abnormal differentiation and hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, associated with impaired immunologic activation and systemic disorders, while psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory articular disease. Pathophysiology of psoriasis comprises a dysfunction of the immune system cells with an interactive network between cells and cytokines supporting the initiation and perpetuation of disease and leading to inflammation of skin, enthesis and joints. Recent studies have shown an important role of systemic inflammation in the development of atherosclerosis. Corroborating these findings, patients with severe Psoriasis have marked incidence of psoriatic arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetes mellitus, showing an increased risk for acute myocardial infarction, which suggests that the condition is not restricted to the skin. Nuclear receptors are ligand-dependent transcription factors, whose activation affects genes that control vital processes. Among them the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor is responsible for establishing the relationship between lipids, metabolic diseases and innate immunity. In the skin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors have an important effect in keratinocyte homeostasis, suggesting a role in diseases such as psoriasis. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors agonists represent a relevant source of research in the treatment of skin conditions, however more clinical studies are needed to define the potential response of these drugs in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

  3. Thymol, a dietary monoterpene phenol abrogates mitochondrial dysfunction in β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarcted rats by inhibiting oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nagoor Meeran, M F; Jagadeesh, G S; Selvaraj, P

    2016-01-25

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested to be one of the important pathological events in isoproterenol (ISO), a synthetic catecholamine and β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarction (MI). In this context, we have evaluated the impact of thymol against ISO induced oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction involved in the pathology of mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pre and co-treated with thymol (7.5 mg/kg body weight) daily for 7 days. Isoproterenol (100 mg/kg body weight) was subcutaneously injected into rats on 6th and 7th day to induce MI. To explore the extent of cardiac mitochondrial damage, the activities/levels of cardiac marker enzymes, mitochondrial lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants, lipids, calcium, adenosine triphosphate and multi marker enzymes were evaluated. Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats showed a significant increase in the activities of cardiac diagnostic markers, heart mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, lipids, calcium, and a significant decrease in the activities/levels of heart mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, isocitrate, malate, α-ketoglutarate and NADH-dehydrogenases, cytochrome-C-oxidase, and adenosine triphosphate. Thymol pre and co-treatment showed near normalized effects on all the biochemical parameters studied. Transmission electron microscopic findings and mitochondrial swelling studies confirmed our biochemical findings. The in vitro study also revealed the potent free-radical scavenging activity of thymol. Thus, thymol attenuates the involvement of ISO against oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. PMID:26721194

  4. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  5. Lipid membranes on nanostructured silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, Andrea Lynn; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Ista, Linnea K.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bisong, Paul; Zeineldin, Reema R.; Last, Julie A.; Brueck, Stephen R. J.

    2004-12-01

    A unique composite nanoscale architecture that combines the self-organization and molecular dynamics of lipid membranes with a corrugated nanotextured silicon wafer was prepared and characterized with fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The goal of this project was to understand how such structures can be assembled for supported membrane research and how the interfacial interactions between the solid substrate and the soft, self-assembled material create unique physical and mechanical behavior through the confinement of phases in the membrane. The nanometer scale structure of the silicon wafer was produced through interference lithography followed by anisotropic wet etching. For the present study, a line pattern with 100 nm line widths, 200 nm depth and a pitch of 360 nm pitch was fabricated. Lipid membranes were successfully adsorbed on the structured silicon surface via membrane fusion techniques. The surface topology of the bilayer-Si structure was imaged using in situ tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The membrane was observed to drape over the silicon structure producing an undulated topology with amplitude of 40 nm that matched the 360 nm pitch of the silicon structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments found that on the microscale those same structures exhibit anisotropic lipid mobility that was coincident with the silico