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Sample records for agonist monophosphoryl lipid

  1. Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides lipid A derivatives block in vitro induction of tumor necrosis factor and endotoxin tolerance by smooth lipopolysaccharide and monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, B E; Perera, P Y; Qureshi, N; Takayama, K; Vogel, S N

    1992-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas (Rhodobacter) sphaeroides diphosphoryl lipid A is a relatively inert species of lipid A but has been shown to antagonize the effects of toxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) both in vivo and in vitro. The antagonist and its monophosphoryl derivative were examined for the ability to block tumor necrosis factor synthesis and reverse tolerance induction in vitro in macrophage cultures stimulated with bioactive preparations of smooth LPS, rough LPS, diphosphoryl lipid A, and monophosphoryl lipid A. Inhibition of agonist activity and reversal of tolerance by these novel penta-acylated lipid A antagonists provides new insight into macrophage-LPS interactions. PMID:1398939

  2. ENDOTHELIAL CELL TOLERANCE TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE CHALLENGE IS INDUCED BY MONOPHOSPHORYL LIPID A

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Ryan J.; Choi, Hyehun; Koch, Stephen R.; Fensterheim, Benjamin A.; Lamb, Fred S.; Sherwood, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Prior exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produces a reduced or “tolerant” inflammatory response to subsequent challenges with LPS, however the potent pro-inflammatory effects of LPS limit its clinical benefit. The adjuvant Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) is a weak toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist that induces negligible inflammation but retains potent immunomodulatory properties. We postulated that pre-treatment with MPLA would inhibit the inflammatory response of endothelial cells to secondary LPS challenge. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), were exposed to MPLA (10 µg/ml), LPS (100 ng/ml) or vehicle control. HUVECs were then washed and maintained in culture for 24 hours before being challenged with LPS (100 ng/ml). Supernatants were collected and examined for cytokine production in the presence or absence of siRNA inhibitors of critical TLR4 signaling proteins. Pretreatment with MPLA attenuated IL-6 production to secondary LPS challenge to a similar degree as LPS. The application of MyD88 siRNA dramatically reduced MPLA-induced tolerance while TRIF siRNA had no effect. The tolerant phenotype in endothelial cells was associated with reduced IKK, p38 and JNK phosphorylation and enhanced IRAK-M expression for LPS primed HUVECs, but less so in MPLA primed cells. Instead, MPLA-primed HUVECs demonstrated enhanced ERK phosphorylation. In contrast to leukocytes in which tolerance is largely TRIF-dependent, MyD88 signaling mediated endotoxin tolerance in endothelial cells. Most importantly, MPLA, a vaccine adjuvant with a wide therapeutic window, induced tolerance to LPS in endothelial cells. PMID:26669797

  3. Chemical synthesis and proinflammatory responses of monophosphoryl lipid A adjuvant candidates

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Kaustabh K.; DeCastro, Michael; El-Sayed, Abu-Baker M. Abdel-Aal; Foote, Matthew I.; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which are structural components of the outer surface membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, trigger innate immune responses through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Such responses may be exploited for the development of adjuvants and in particular monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) obtained by controlled hydrolysis of LPS of Salmonella minnesota, exhibits low toxicity yet possesses beneficial immuno-stimulatory properties. We have developed an efficient synthetic approach for the preparation of a major component of MPLA (1), which has as a key feature the use of allyloxycarbonates (Alloc) as permanent protecting groups for the C-3 and C-4 hydroxyls of the proximal glucosamine unit. The latter protecting groups greatly facilitated deprotection of the fully assembled compound. Furthermore, the amino functions were protected as N-2,2,2-trichloroethoxycarbamates (Troc), which performed efficient neighboring group participation to give selectively 1,2-trans-glycosides and could easily be removed under mild conditions without affecting the permanent Alloc carbonates and anomeric dimethylthexylsilyl (TDS) ether. The synthetic methodology was also employed for the preparation of a monophosphoryl lipid A (2) derivative that has the anomeric center of the proximal sugar modified as a methyl glycoside. Compound 1 was not able to induce cytokine production in mouse macrophages whereas methyl glycoside 2 displayed activity, however it has a lower potency and efficacy than lipid A obtained by controlled hydrolysis S. minnesota. This indicates compound 2 is an attractive candidate for adjuvant development and that 1 is not the active substance of MPLA obtained by controlled hydrolysis of LPS. PMID:20228877

  4. Tolerance induction after specific immunotherapy with pollen allergoids adjuvanted by monophosphoryl lipid A in children.

    PubMed

    Rosewich, M; Schulze, J; Eickmeier, O; Telles, T; Rose, M A; Schubert, R; Zielen, S

    2010-06-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is a well-established and clinically effective treatment for allergic diseases. A pollen allergoid formulated with the T helper type 1 (Th1)-inducing adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) facilitates short-term SIT. Little is known about mechanisms of tolerance induction in this setting. In a prospective study, 34 patients allergic to grass pollen (25 male, nine female, median age 10.2 years) received a total of 44 SIT courses (20 in the first, 24 in the second) with MPL-adjuvanted pollen allergoids. Immunogenicity was measured by levels of specific immunoglobulin G (IgG(grass)) and IgG4(grass) by antibody blocking properties on basophil activation, and by induction of CD4(+), CD25(+) and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3(+)) regulatory T cells (T(reg)). Specific IgG and IgG4 levels increased only slightly in the first year of SIT. In the second year these changes reached significance (P < 0.0001). In keeping with these findings, we were able to show an increase of T(reg) cells and a decreased release of leukotrienes after the second year of treatment. In the first year of treatment we found little evidence for immunological changes. A significant antibody induction was seen only after the second course of SIT. Short-course immunotherapy with pollen allergoids formulated with the Th1-inducing adjuvant MPL needs at least two courses to establish tolerance.

  5. Role of Innate Immune Factors in the Adjuvant Activity of Monophosphoryl Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Michael; Michalek, Suzanne M.; Katz, Jannet

    2003-01-01

    Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) is a nontoxic derivative of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that exhibits adjuvant properties similar to those of the parent LPS molecule. However, the mechanism by which MPL initiates its immunostimulatory properties remains unclear. Due to the involvement of Toll-like receptors in recognizing and transducing intracellular signals in response to LPS, the aim of the present study was to determine the ability of MPL to utilize the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4. We provide evidence that MPL differentially utilizes TLR2 and TLR4 for the induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 10 (IL-10), and IL-12 by purified human monocytes as well as by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Assessment of NF-κB activity demonstrated that MPL utilized TLR2 and especially TLR4 for the activation of NF-κB p65 by human monocytes. In addition, stimulation of human monocytes by MPL led to an up-regulation of the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, an effect that could be reduced by pretreatment of cells with a monoclonal antibody to TLR2 or TLR4. Analysis of MPL-induced activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases revealed that MPL utilized both TLR2 and TLR4 for the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, while TLR4 was the predominant receptor involved in the ability of MPL to phosphorylate p38. Moreover, using selective inhibitors for MAP kinase kinase (PD98059) and p38 (SB203580), we show that ERK1/2 exhibited differential effects on production of TNF-α and IL-12 p40 by human monocytes, whereas MPL-induced activation of p38 appeared to be predominantly involved in production of IL-10 and IL-12 p40 by MPL-stimulated monocytes. Taken together, these findings aid in understanding the cellular mechanisms by which MPL induces host cell activation and subsequent adjuvant properties. PMID:12704121

  6. Myocardial protection after monophosphoryl lipid A: studies of delayed anti-ischaemic properties in rabbit heart.

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, G. F.; Goodwin, R. W.; Wright, M. J.; Kerac, M.; Heads, R. J.; Yellon, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA) is a non-pyrogenic derivative of Salmonella lipopolysaccharide. Administration of this agent at high doses to rats and at low doses to dogs was previously shown to confer marked protection against ischaemia-reperfusion 24 h later, although the cellular mechanisms of this delayed protection are obscure. We hypothesized that MLA pretreatment causes the induction of the 70 kDa cytoprotective stress protein HSP70i in the myocardium. If this were the case, protection against ischaemia-reperfusion injury would be observed both in vitro and in vivo. 2. Rabbits were pretreated with MLA 0.035 mg kg-1, i.v. or vehicle solution. For the in vitro study, hearts were isolated 24 h later and Langendorff-perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer at 37 degrees C. Global ischaemia was induced for 20 min followed by 120 min reperfusion. Recovery of post-ischaemic left ventricular function and lactate dehydrogenase efflux was similar in MLA and vehicle pretreated hearts and there was no significant difference in the percentage of infarction of the left ventricle determined by triphenyltetrazolium staining (MLA 22.4 +/- 5.2%, vehicle 24.8 +/- 5.1%). 3. When 30 min regional ischaemia and 120 min reperfusion was instituted in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rabbits 24 h after pretreatment with MLA or vehicle, the percentage infarction within the risk zone was reduced from 42.6 +/- 5.7% in vehicle pretreated animals to 19.6 +/- 4.4% in MLA pretreated animals (P < 0.01). 4. Determination of myocardial HSP70i content by Western blot analysis showed that MLA treatment did not increase HSP70i immunoreactivity. 5. We conclude that MLA at this dose confers protection only against ischaemia-reperfusion injury in vivo and that this protection is not related to induction of HSP70i. Because protection was observed only in vivo it seems possible that the delayed protection conferred by MLA is mediated by effects on humoral or blood-borne factors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2

  7. Differential cytokine induction by doses of lipopolysaccharide and monophosphoryl lipid A that result in equivalent early endotoxin tolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, B E; Benjamin, W R; Vogel, S N

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon of early endotoxin tolerance, which is induced by sublethal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), results in a protracted period of hyporesponsiveness that is most profound at 3 to 4 days after injection and is marked by reduced cytokine production after a challenge injection of LPS. Early endotoxin tolerance is also induced by the nontoxic LPS derivative monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), although much more of the monophosphoryl derivative is required to produce a state of tolerance equivalent to that evoked by LPS. In this study, equivalent tolerance-inducing doses of LPS and MPL were tested, and the levels of cytokines induced by LPS and MPL were compared. Although induced levels of colony-stimulating factor were comparable following doses of LPS and MPL that elicited an equivalent state of early endotoxin tolerance, levels of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, and interferon were significantly lower in MPL-injected animals. These results suggest that the lowered toxicity of MPL may be related to its elicitation of significantly lower levels of potentially toxic intermediaries such as tumor necrosis factor, interferon, and interleukin-6. PMID:1695201

  8. Evaluation of monophosphoryl lipid A as an immune adjuvant for photodynamic therapy in a rat sarcoma model: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucroy, Michael D.; Edwards, Benjamin F.; Griffey, Stephen M.; Madewell, Bruce R.

    1999-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment option for several forms of human cancer, and like traditional chemotherapy and ionizing radiation therapy, PDT alone is not curative for some cases. Recent efforts have aimed at developing strategies for adjuvant therapy for PDT. Given the nature of PDT-mediated cell damage, immunotherapy is a promising adjuvant for long-term control of solid tumors. A candidate immune stimulant for use with PDT is monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA), a non-toxic fraction of the endotoxin molecule. The hypothesis is that adjuvant MLA immunotherapy with PDT will improve local tumor control and prevent growth of subsequently implanted tumor cells when compared to PDT alone. To date, no significant differences in circulating leukocyte populations or tumor infiltrating lymphocyte populations have been identified in 9L tumor-bearing F344 rats after systemic administrations of MLA. Likewise, no significant difference has been identified in local tumor control following PDT of 9L tumors with or without adjuvant MLA. Further results are pending.

  9. Monophosphoryl lipid A stimulated up-regulation of nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide release by human monocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saha, D C; Astiz, M E; Lin, R Y; Rackow, E C; Eales, L J

    1997-10-01

    Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) is a derivative of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with reduced toxicity which has been shown to modulate various immune functions in monocytes. We examined whether human monocytes can be stimulated to produce nitric oxide (NO) and its catalytic enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Monocytes were stimulated with LPS or MPL and both NOS and NO (as nitrite) production were measured. MPL at high doses (> 100 micrograms/ml) stimulated monocytes to release NO that was significantly greater than both the control and LPS-treated monocytes (p < 0.05). NO release by control cells and the LPS treated cells was not significantly different. Both arginase and N-monomethyl arginine (NMLA) inhibited the MPL stimulated release of NO (p < 0.01). MPL significantly increased inducible NOS (iNOS) expression as measured by both fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry (p < 0.05). Similarly, both soluble NOS (sNOS) and particulate NOS (pNOS) activity were significantly up-regulated by MPL (p < 0.05). Significant correlations were found between pNOS expression and sNOS release (r = 0.72, p < 0.0001) and between 12 h NO release and sNOS production (r = 0.44, p < 0.005). These experiments confirm that human monocytes can be stimulated with MPL to produce NO in vitro and suggest that up-regulation of pNOS does not preclude NO release.

  10. Dissociation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inducible gene expression in murine macrophages pretreated with smooth LPS versus monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, B E; Manthey, C L; Perera, P Y; Hamilton, T A; Vogel, S N

    1993-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the nontoxic derivative of lipid A, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), were employed to assess the relationship between expression of LPS-inducible inflammatory genes and the induction of tolerance to LPS in murine macrophages. Both LPS and MPL induced expression (as assessed by increased steady-state mRNA levels) of a panel of seven "early" inflammatory genes including the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta, type 2 TNF receptor (TNFR-2), IP-10, D3, D8, and D2 genes (the last four represent LPS-inducible early genes whose functions remain unknown). In addition, LPS and MPL were both capable of inducing tolerance to LPS. The two stimuli differed in the relative concentration required to induce various outcome measures, with LPS being 100- to 1,000-fold more potent on a mass concentration basis. Characterization of the tolerant state identified three distinct categories of responsiveness. Two genes (IP-10 and D8) exhibited strong desensitization in macrophages pretreated with tolerance-inducing concentrations of either LPS or MPL. In macrophages rendered tolerant by pretreatment with LPS or MPL, a second group of inducible mRNAs (TNF-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and D3) showed moderate suppression of response to secondary stimulation by LPS. The third category of inducible genes (TNFR-2 and D2) showed increased expression in macrophages pretreated with tolerance-inducing concentrations of either LPS or MPL. All of the LPS-inducible genes examined exhibited modest superinduction with less than tolerance-inducing concentrations of either stimulus, suggesting a priming effect of these adjuvants at low concentration. The differential behavior of the members of this panel of endotoxin-responsive genes thus offers insight into molecular events associated with acquisition of transient tolerance to LPS. PMID:8388859

  11. TLR4 ligands lipopolysaccharide and monophosphoryl lipid a differentially regulate effector and memory CD8+ T Cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiguo; Joshi, Nikhil S; Liu, Ying; Meng, Hailong; Kleinstein, Steven H; Kaech, Susan M

    2014-05-01

    Vaccines formulated with nonreplicating pathogens require adjuvants to help bolster immunogenicity. The role of adjuvants in Ab production has been well studied, but how they influence memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation remains poorly defined. In this study we implemented dendritic cell-mediated immunization to study the effects of commonly used adjuvants, TLR ligands, on effector and memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation in mice. Intriguingly, we found that the TLR4 ligand LPS was far more superior to other TLR ligands in generating memory CD8(+) T cells upon immunization. LPS boosted clonal expansion similar to the other adjuvants, but fewer of the activated CD8(+) T cells died during contraction, generating a larger pool of memory cells. Surprisingly, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), another TLR4 ligand, enhanced clonal expansion of effector CD8(+) T cells, but it also promoted their terminal differentiation and contraction; thus, fewer memory CD8(+) T cells formed, and MPLA-primed animals were less protected against secondary infection compared with those primed with LPS. Furthermore, gene expression profiling revealed that LPS-primed effector cells displayed a stronger pro-memory gene expression signature, whereas the gene expression profile of MPLA-primed effector cells aligned closer with terminal effector CD8(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrated that the LPS-TLR4-derived "pro-memory" signals were MyD88, but not Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β, dependent. This study reveals the influential power of adjuvants on the quantity and quality of CD8(+) T cell memory, and that attention to adjuvant selection is crucial because boosting effector cell expansion may not always equate with more memory T cells or greater protection.

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of the Biological Responses of Canine Macrophages Challenged with PLGA Nanoparticles Containing Monophosphoryl Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Guldner, Delphine; Hwang, Julianne K.; Cardieri, Maria Clara D.; Eren, Meaghan; Ziaei, Parissa; Norton, M. Grant; Souza, Cleverson D.

    2016-01-01

    Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs) have been considerably studied as a promising biodegradable delivery system to induce effective immune responses and to improve stability, safety, and cost effectiveness of vaccines. The study aimed at evaluating early inflammatory effects and cellular safety of PLGA NPs, co-encapsulating ovalbumin (PLGA/OVA NPs), as a model antigen and the adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (PLGA/MPLA NPs) as an adjuvant, on primary canine macrophages. The PLGA NPs constructs were prepared following the emulsion-solvent evaporation technique and further physic-chemically characterized. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from canine whole blood by magnetic sorting and further cultured to generate macrophages. The uptake of PLGA NP constructs by macrophages was demonstrated by flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Macrophage viability and morphology were evaluated by trypan blue exclusion and light microscopy. Macrophages were immunophenotyped for the expression of MHC-I and MHC-II and gene expression of Interleukin-10 (IL-10), Interleukin-12 (IL-12p40), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were measured. The results showed that incubation of PLGA NP constructs with macrophages revealed effective early uptake of the PLGA NPs without altering the viability of macrophages. PLGA/OVA/MPLA NPs strongly induced TNF-α and IL-12p40 expression by macrophages as well as increase relative expression of MHC-I but not MHC-II molecules. Taken together, these results indicated that PLGA NPs with addition of MPLA represent a good model, when used as antigen carrier, for further, in vivo, work aiming to evaluate their potential to induce strong, specific, immune responses in dogs. PMID:27835636

  13. Evaluation of hyaluronic acid-based combination adjuvant containing monophosphoryl lipid A and aluminum salt for hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Moon, Se-hee; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Noh, Young-Woock; Lim, Yong Taik

    2015-09-11

    Here, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) and aluminum salt (Alum) were introduced into a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based combination vaccine adjuvant for hepatitis B vaccine (HBV). Although Alum is a well-known hepatitis B vaccine adjuvant that induces an enhanced humoral immune response, it cannot induce the cellular immune responses. On the other hand, MPLA has been generally reported to promote IFN-γ production via antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, but it is not water soluble as a result of its long hydrophobic alkyl chains. To this end, water insoluble MPLA could be solubilized in an aqueous solution with the help of HA, which contains many carboxyl and hydroxyl groups that can be used to attach to the hydroxyl head groups of MPLA via hydrogen bonds. Three groups of mice were treated with either hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) alone, HBsAg_Alum complex, or HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex. The group immunized with the HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex exhibited a high increase in cellular immune response as well as in humoral immune response relative to the other two groups. The antibody, cytokine and T cell levels were most elevated in the group of mice immunized with HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex, even at a 1μg/mice dose, and the magnitude was still maintained even after 8 weeks. Specifically, the antibody value was 120 times larger in mice vaccinated with HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex than in mice vaccinated with HBsAg_Alum complex designed similar to commercially available hepatitis B vaccine, Engerix B. The cytokine and T cell proliferation levels were 2 times and 6 times larger in mice adjuvanted with HBsAg_Alum_MPLA/HA complex than in those vaccinated with HBsAg_Alum. The results therefore indicate that incorporating MPLA and Alum with HA can be a potent strategy to increase both the magnitude and the persistence of HBsAg-specific immune responses to protect hosts against hepatitis B virus infection.

  14. Toll-like receptor-4 agonist in post-haemorrhage pneumonia: role of dendritic and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Roquilly, Antoine; Broquet, Alexis; Jacqueline, Cedric; Gautreau, Laetitia; Segain, Jean Pierre; de Coppet, Pierre; Caillon, Jocelyne; Altare, Frédéric; Josien, Regis; Asehnoune, Karim

    2013-11-01

    Haemorrhage-induced immunosuppression has been linked to nosocomial infections. We assessed the impact of monophosphoryl lipid A, a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon-biased Toll-like receptor-4 agonist currently used as a vaccine adjuvant in humans, on post-haemorrhage susceptibility to infection. We used a mouse model of post-haemorrhage pneumonia induced by methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus. Monophosphoryl lipid A was administered intravenously after haemorrhage and before pneumonia onset. Haemorrhage altered survival rate, increased lung damage (neutrophil accumulation, oedema and cytokine release) and altered the functions of dendritic and natural killer cells. Here, we show that monophosphoryl lipid A decreased systemic dissemination of S. aureus and dampened inflammatory lung lesions. Monophosphoryl lipid A partially restored the capacity for antigen presentation and the transcriptional activity in dendritic cells. Monophosphoryl lipid A did not restore the interferon-γ mRNA but prevented interleukin-10 mRNA overexpression in natural killer cells compared with untreated mice. Ex vivo monophosphoryl lipid A-stimulated dendritic cells or natural killer cells harvested from haemorrhaged animals were adoptively transferred into mice undergoing post-haemorrhage pneumonia. Stimulated dendritic cells (but not stimulated natural killer cells) improved the survival rate compared with mice left untreated. In vivo depletion of natural killer cells decreased survival rate of monophosphoryl lipid A-treated mice. Dendritic and natural killer cells are critically involved in the beneficial effects of monophosphoryl lipid A within post-haemorrhage pneumonia.

  15. Treatment with Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A Removes Disease-Associated Transcriptional Signatures in Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Confers Tolerogenic Features

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Paulina A.; Schinnerling, Katina; Sepúlveda-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Maggi, Jaxaira; Hoyos, Lorena; Morales, Rodrigo A.; Mehdi, Ahmed M.; Nel, Hendrik J.; Soto, Lilian; Pesce, Bárbara; Molina, María Carmen; Cuchacovich, Miguel; Larrondo, Milton L.; Neira, Óscar; Catalán, Diego Francisco; Hilkens, Catharien M.; Thomas, Ranjeny; Verdugo, Ricardo A.; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (TolDCs) are promising tools for therapy of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we characterize monocyte-derived TolDCs from RA patients modulated with dexamethasone and activated with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), referred to as MPLA-tDCs, in terms of gene expression, phenotype, cytokine profile, migratory properties, and T cell-stimulatory capacity in order to explore their suitability for cellular therapy. MPLA-tDCs derived from RA patients displayed an anti-inflammatory profile with reduced expression of co-stimulatory molecules and high IL-10/IL-12 ratio, but were capable of migrating toward the lymphoid chemokines CXCL12 and CCL19. These MPLA-tDCs induced hyporesponsiveness of autologous CD4+ T cells specific for synovial antigens in vitro. Global transcriptome analysis confirmed a unique transcriptional profile of MPLA-tDCs and revealed that RA-associated genes, which were upregulated in untreated DCs from RA patients, returned to expression levels of healthy donor-derived DCs after treatment with dexamethasone and MPLA. Thus, monocyte-derived DCs from RA patients have the capacity to develop tolerogenic features at transcriptional as well as at translational level, when modulated with dexamethasone and MPLA, overcoming disease-related effects. Furthermore, the ability of MPLA-tDCs to impair T cell responses to synovial antigens validates their potential as cellular treatment for RA. PMID:27826300

  16. A preventive immunization approach against insect bite hypersensitivity: Intralymphatic injection with recombinant allergens in Alum or Alum and monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Svansson, Vilhjalmur; Stefansdottir, Sara Bjork; Schüpbach, Gertraud; Rhyner, Claudio; Marti, Eliane; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjorg

    2016-04-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an IgE-mediated dermatitis of horses caused by bites of Culicoides insects, not indigenous to Iceland. Horses born in Iceland and exported to Culicoides-rich areas are frequently affected with IBH. The aims of the study were to compare immunization with recombinant allergens using the adjuvant aluminum hydroxide (Alum) alone or combined with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) for development of a preventive immunization against IBH. Twelve healthy Icelandic horses were vaccinated intralymphatically three times with 10 μg each of four recombinant Culicoides nubeculosus allergens in Alum or in Alum/MPLA. Injection with allergens in both Alum and Alum/MPLA resulted in significant increase in specific IgG subclasses and IgA against all r-allergens with no significant differences between the adjuvant groups. The induced antibodies from both groups could block binding of allergen specific IgE from IBH affected horses to a similar extent. No IgE-mediated reactions were induced. Allergen-stimulated PBMC from Alum/MPLA horses but not from Alum only horses produced significantly more IFNγ and IL-10 than PBMC from non-vaccinated control horses. In conclusion, intralymphatic administration of small amounts of pure allergens in Alum/MPLA induces high IgG antibody levels and Th1/Treg immune response and is a promising approach for immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy against IBH.

  17. Comparative Transcriptome Profiles of Human Blood in Response to the Toll-like Receptor 4 Ligands Lipopolysaccharide and Monophosphoryl Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Liming; Patil, Naeem K.; Guo, Yin; Hernandez, Antonio; Bohannon, Julia K.; Fensterheim, Benjamin A.; Wang, Jingbin; Xu, Yaomin; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Stark, Ryan; Sherwood, Edward R.

    2017-01-01

    Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), a less toxic derivative of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is employed as a vaccine adjuvant and is under investigation as a non-specific immunomodulator. However, the differential response of human leukocytes to MPLA and LPS has not been well characterized. The goal of this study was to compare the differential transcriptomic response of human blood to LPS and MPLA. Venous blood from human volunteers was stimulated with LPS, MPLA or vehicle. Gene expression was determined using microarray analysis. Among 21,103 probes profiled, 136 and 130 genes were differentially regulated by LPS or MPLA, respectively. Seventy four genes were up-regulated and 9 were down-regulated by both ligands. The remaining genes were differentially induced by either agent. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted that LPS and MPLA share similar upstream regulators and have comparable effects on canonical pathways and cellular functions. However, some pro-inflammatory cytokine and inflammasome-associated transcripts were more strongly induced by LPS. In contrast, only the macrophage-regulating chemokine CCL7 was preferentially up-regulated by MPLA. In conclusion, LPS and MPLA induce similar transcriptional profiles. However, LPS more potently induces pro-inflammatory cytokine and inflammasome-linked transcripts. Thus, MPLA is a less potent activator of the pro-inflammatory response but retains effective immunomodulatory activity. PMID:28053314

  18. Safety evaluation of a glutaraldehyde modified tyrosine adsorbed housedust mite extract containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) adjuvant: a new allergy vaccine for dust mite allergy.

    PubMed

    Baldrick, P; Richardson, D; Wheeler, A W

    2001-12-12

    A new allergy vaccine is currently under clinical evaluation for the prevention or relief of symptoms caused by specific housedust mites. It consists of a 50:50 mixture of the mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae protein derived from aqueous extracts of the mites which is chemically modified by glutaraldehyde and adsorbed onto L-tyrosine with addition of the immunostimulatory adjuvant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) "Polymite". A specific preclinical safety testing strategy was developed to support clinical use and comprised single and repeat dose toxicity, reproduction toxicity and local tolerance studies. Dose levels of up to 0.5ml for the mouse and up to 1ml for both the rat and the rabbit were used. Overall, the product was shown to produce no toxicological findings of significance at levels greatly in excess to those proposed for clinical use. A not unexpected, but relatively minor, immunostimulatory effect was seen following repeated dosing (once weekly for 13 weeks) at 1ml per rat; the Polymite formulation also resulted in injection site reaction which can largely be attributed to the presence of tyrosine. No reproduction toxicity was found.

  19. Immunization with the Haemophilus ducreyi Hemoglobin Receptor HgbA with Adjuvant Monophosphoryl Lipid A Protects Swine from a Homologous but Not a Heterologous Challenge▿

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, William G.; Afonina, Galyna; Nepluev, Igor; Cholon, Deborah M.; Choudhary, Neelima; Routh, Patricia A.; Almond, Glenn W.; Orndorff, Paul E.; Staats, Herman; Hobbs, Marcia M.; Leduc, Isabelle; Elkins, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiological agent of chancroid, has a strict requirement for heme, which it acquires from its only natural host, humans. Previously, we showed that a vaccine preparation containing the native hemoglobin receptor HgbA purified from H. ducreyi class I strain 35000HP (nHgbAI) and administered with Freund's adjuvant provided complete protection against a homologous challenge. In the current study, we investigated whether nHgbAI dispensed with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), an adjuvant approved for use in humans, offered protection against a challenge with H. ducreyi strain 35000HP expressing either class I or class II HgbA (35000HPhgbAI and 35000HPhgbAII, respectively). Pigs immunized with the nHgbAI/MPL vaccine were protected against a challenge from homologous H. ducreyi strain 35000HPhgbAI but not heterologous strain 35000HPhgbAII, as evidenced by the isolation of only strain 35000HPhgbAII from nHgbAI-immunized pigs. Furthermore, histological analysis of the lesions showed striking differences between mock-immunized and nHgbAI-immunized animals challenged with strains 35000HPhgbAI but not those challenged with strain 35000HPhgbAII. Mock-immunized pigs were not protected from a challenge by either strain. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) activity of the nHgbAI/MPL antiserum was lower than the activity of antiserum from animals immunized with the nHgbAI/Freund's vaccine; however, anti-nHgbAI from both studies bound whole cells of 35000HPhgbAI better than 35000HPhgbAII and partially blocked hemoglobin binding to nHgbAI. In conclusion, despite eliciting lower antibody ELISA activity than the nHgbAI/Freund's, the nHgbAI/MPL vaccine provided protection against a challenge with homologous but not heterologous H. ducreyi, suggesting that a bivalent HgbA vaccine may be needed. PMID:20584974

  20. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A-Modulated Dendritic Cells Promote Antigen-Specific Tolerogenic Properties on Naive and Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schinnerling, Katina; Pesce, Bárbara; Hilkens, Catharien M.; Catalán, Diego; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are a promising tool to control T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Here, we evaluate the ability of dexamethasone-modulated and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA)-activated DCs [MPLA-tolerogenic DCs (tDCs)] to exert immunomodulatory effects on naive and memory CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. For this purpose, MPLA-tDCs were loaded with purified protein derivative (PPD) as antigen and co-cultured with autologous naive or memory CD4+ T cells. Lymphocytes were re-challenged with autologous PPD-pulsed mature DCs (mDCs), evaluating proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. On primed-naive CD4+ T cells, the expression of regulatory T cell markers was evaluated and their suppressive ability was assessed in autologous co-cultures with CD4+ effector T cells and PPD-pulsed mDCs. We detected that memory CD4+ T cells primed by MPLA-tDCs presented reduced proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in response to PPD and were refractory to subsequent stimulation. Naive CD4+ T cells were instructed by MPLA-tDCs to be hyporesponsive to antigen-specific restimulation and to suppress the induction of T helper cell type 1 and 17 responses. In conclusion, MPLA-tDCs are able to modulate antigen-specific responses of both naive and memory CD4+ T cells and might be a promising strategy to “turn off” self-reactive CD4+ effector T cells in autoimmunity. PMID:27698654

  1. Immunization with the Haemophilus ducreyi hemoglobin receptor HgbA with adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A protects swine from a homologous but not a heterologous challenge.

    PubMed

    Fusco, William G; Afonina, Galyna; Nepluev, Igor; Cholon, Deborah M; Choudhary, Neelima; Routh, Patricia A; Almond, Glenn W; Orndorff, Paul E; Staats, Herman; Hobbs, Marcia M; Leduc, Isabelle; Elkins, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiological agent of chancroid, has a strict requirement for heme, which it acquires from its only natural host, humans. Previously, we showed that a vaccine preparation containing the native hemoglobin receptor HgbA purified from H. ducreyi class I strain 35000HP (nHgbAI) and administered with Freund's adjuvant provided complete protection against a homologous challenge. In the current study, we investigated whether nHgbAI dispensed with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), an adjuvant approved for use in humans, offered protection against a challenge with H. ducreyi strain 35000HP expressing either class I or class II HgbA (35000HPhgbAI and 35000HPhgbAII, respectively). Pigs immunized with the nHgbAI/MPL vaccine were protected against a challenge from homologous H. ducreyi strain 35000HPhgbAI but not heterologous strain 35000HPhgbAII, as evidenced by the isolation of only strain 35000HPhgbAII from nHgbAI-immunized pigs. Furthermore, histological analysis of the lesions showed striking differences between mock-immunized and nHgbAI-immunized animals challenged with strains 35000HPhgbAI but not those challenged with strain 35000HPhgbAII. Mock-immunized pigs were not protected from a challenge by either strain. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) activity of the nHgbAI/MPL antiserum was lower than the activity of antiserum from animals immunized with the nHgbAI/Freund's vaccine; however, anti-nHgbAI from both studies bound whole cells of 35000HPhgbAI better than 35000HPhgbAII and partially blocked hemoglobin binding to nHgbAI. In conclusion, despite eliciting lower antibody ELISA activity than the nHgbAI/Freund's, the nHgbAI/MPL vaccine provided protection against a challenge with homologous but not heterologous H. ducreyi, suggesting that a bivalent HgbA vaccine may be needed.

  2. Vaccination with liposomal leishmanial antigens adjuvanted with monophosphoryl lipid-trehalose dicorynomycolate (MPL-TDM) confers long-term protection against visceral leishmaniasis through a human administrable route.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Rajesh; Maji, Mithun; Ali, Nahid

    2012-01-01

    The development of a long-term protective subunit vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis depends on antigens and adjuvants that can induce an appropriate immune response. The immunization of leishmanial antigens alone shows limited efficacy in the absence of an appropriate adjuvant. Earlier we demonstrated sustained protection against Leishmania donovani with leishmanial antigens entrapped in cationic liposomes through an intraperitoneal route. However, this route is not applicable for human administration. Herein, we therefore evaluated the immune response and protection induced by liposomal soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA) formulated with monophosphoryl lipid-trehalose dicorynomycolate (MPL-TDM) through a subcutaneous route. Subcutaneous immunization of BALB/c mice with SLA entrapped in liposomes or with MPL-TDM elicited partial protection against experimental visceral leishmaniasis. In contrast, liposomal SLA adjuvanted with MPL-TDM induced significantly higher levels of protection in liver and spleen in BALB/c mice challenged 10 days post-vaccination. Protection conferred by this formulation was sustained up to 12 weeks of immunization, and infection was controlled for at least 4 months of the challenge, similar to liposomal SLA immunization administered intraperitoneally. An analysis of cellular immune responses of liposomal SLA + MPL-TDM immunized mice demonstrated the induction of IFN-γ and IgG2a antibody production not only 10 days or 12 weeks post-vaccination but also 4 months after the challenge infection and a down regulation of IL-4 production after infection. Moreover, long-term immunity elicited by this formulation was associated with IFN-γ production also by CD8⁺ T cells. Taken together, our results suggest that liposomal SLA + MPL-TDM represent a good vaccine formulation for the induction of durable protection against L. donovani through a human administrable route.

  3. Contribution of TLR4 and MyD88 for adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) activity in a DNA prime-protein boost HIV-1 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Kimberly; Buglione-Corbett, Rachel; Marty-Roix, Robyn; Montminy-Paquette, Sara; West, Kim; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Lien, Egil

    2014-09-03

    Recombinant protein vaccines are commonly formulated with an immune-stimulatory compound, or adjuvant, to boost immune responses to a particular antigen. Recent studies have shown that, through recognition of molecular motifs, receptors of the innate immune system are involved in the functions of adjuvants to generate and direct adaptive immune responses. However, it is not clear to which degree those receptors are also important when the adjuvant is used as part of a novel heterologous prime-boost immunization process in which the priming and boosting components are not the same type of vaccines. In the current study, we compared the immune responses elicited by a pentavalent HIV-1 DNA prime-protein boost vaccine in mice deficient in either Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) to wildtype mice. HIV gp120 protein administered in the boost phase was formulated with either monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), QS-21, or Al(OH)3. Endpoint antibody titer, serum cytokine response and T-cell memory response were assessed. Neither TLR4 nor MyD88 deficiency had a significant effect on the immune response of mice given vaccine formulated with QS-21 or Al(OH)3. However, TLR4- and MyD88-deficiency decreased both the antibody and T-cell responses in mice administered HIV gp120 formulated with MPLA. These results further our understanding of the activation of TLR4 and MyD88 by MPLA in the context of a DNA prime/protein boost immunization strategy.

  4. A short protocol using dexamethasone and monophosphoryl lipid A generates tolerogenic dendritic cells that display a potent migratory capacity to lymphoid chemokines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Generation of tolerogenic dendritic cells (TolDCs) for therapy is challenging due to its implications for the design of protocols suitable for clinical applications, which means not only using safe products, but also working at defining specific biomarkers for TolDCs identification, developing shorter DCs differentiation methods and obtaining TolDCs with a stable phenotype. We describe here, a short-term protocol for TolDCs generation, which are characterized in terms of phenotypic markers, cytokines secretion profile, CD4+ T cell-stimulatory ability and migratory capacity. Methods TolDCs from healthy donors were generated by modulation with dexamethasone plus monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA-tDCs). We performed an analysis of MPLA-tDCs in terms of yield, viability, morphology, phenotypic markers, cytokines secretion profile, stability, allogeneic and antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell stimulatory ability and migration capacity. Results After a 5-day culture, MPLA-tDCs displayed reduced expression of costimulatory and maturation molecules together to an anti-inflammatory cytokines secretion profile, being able to maintain these tolerogenic features even after the engagement of CD40 by its cognate ligand. In addition, MPLA-tDCs exhibited reduced capabilities to stimulate allogeneic and antigen-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation, and induced an anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion pattern. Among potential tolerogenic markers studied, only TLR-2 was highly expressed in MPLA-tDCs when compared to mature and immature DCs. Remarkable, like mature DCs, MPLA-tDCs displayed a high CCR7 and CXCR4 expression, both chemokine receptors involved in migration to secondary lymphoid organs, and even more, in an in vitro assay they exhibited a high migration response towards CCL19 and CXCL12. Conclusion We describe a short-term protocol for TolDC generation, which confers them a stable phenotype and migratory capacity to lymphoid chemokines, essential features for TolDCs to be used

  5. Modulation of the humoral and cellular immune response in Abeta immunotherapy by the adjuvants monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and E. coli enterotoxin LT(R192G).

    PubMed

    Maier, Marcel; Seabrook, Timothy J; Lemere, Cynthia A

    2005-10-25

    Abeta vaccination or passive transfer of human-specific anti-Abeta antibodies are approaches under investigation to prevent and/or treat Alzheimer's disease (AD). Successful active Abeta vaccination requires a strong and safe adjuvant to induce anti-Abeta antibody formation. We compared the adjuvants monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL)/trehalose dicorynomycolate (TDM), cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin LT(R192G) for their ability to induce a humoral and cellular immune reaction, using fibrillar Abeta1-40/42 as a common immunogen in wildtype B6D2F1 mice. Subcutaneous (s.c.) administration with MPL/TDM resulted in anti-Abeta antibodies levels up to four times higher compared to s.c. LT(R192G). Using MPL/TDM, the anti-Abeta antibodies induced were mainly IgG2b, IgG1 and lower levels of IgG2a and IgM, with a moderate splenocyte proliferation and IFN-gamma production in vitro upon stimulation with Abeta1-40/42. LT(R192G), previously shown by us to induce robust titers of anti-Abeta antibodies, generated predominantly IgG2b and IgG1 anti-Abeta antibodies with very low splenocyte proliferation and IFN-gamma production. Weekly intranasal (i.n.) administration over 11 weeks of Abeta40/42 with CTB induced only moderate levels of antibodies. All immunogens generated antibodies that recognized mainly the Abeta1-7 epitope and specifically detected amyloid plaques on AD brain sections. In conclusion, MPL/TDM, in addition to LT(R192G), is an effective adjuvant when combined with Abeta40/42 and may aid in the design of Abeta immunotherapy.

  6. Monophosphoryl Lipid A Enhances Efficacy of a Francisella tularensis LVS-Catanionic Nanoparticle Subunit Vaccine against F. tularensis Schu S4 Challenge by Augmenting both Humoral and Cellular Immunity.

    PubMed

    Richard, Katharina; Mann, Barbara J; Qin, Aiping; Barry, Eileen M; Ernst, Robert K; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2017-03-01

    Francisella tularensis, a bacterial biothreat agent, has no approved vaccine in the United States. Previously, we showed that incorporating lysates from partially attenuated F. tularensis LVS or fully virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 strains into catanionic surfactant vesicle (V) nanoparticles (LVS-V and Schu S4-V, respectively) protected fully against F. tularensis LVS intraperitoneal (i.p.) challenge in mice. However, we achieved only partial protection against F. tularensis Schu S4 intranasal (i.n.) challenge, even when employing heterologous prime-boost immunization strategies. We now extend these findings to show that both LVS-V and Schu S4-V immunization (i.p./i.p.) elicited similarly high titers of anti-F. tularensis IgG and that the titers could be further increased by adding monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a nontoxic Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) adjuvant that is included in several U.S. FDA-approved vaccines. LVS-V+MPL immune sera also detected more F. tularensis antigens than LVS-V immune sera and, after passive transfer to naive mice, significantly delayed the time to death against F. tularensis Schu S4 subcutaneous (s.c.) but not i.n. challenge. Active immunization with LVS-V+MPL (i.p./i.p.) also increased the frequency of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting activated helper T cells, IFN-γ production, and the ability of splenocytes to control intramacrophage F. tularensis LVS replication ex vivo Active LVS-V+MPL immunization via heterologous routes (i.p./i.n.) significantly elevated IgA and IgG levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and significantly enhanced protection against i.n. F. tularensis Schu S4 challenge (to ∼60%). These data represent a significant step in the development of a subunit vaccine against the highly virulent type A strains.

  7. Identification of dual PPARα/γ agonists and their effects on lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gao, Quanqing; Hanh, Jacky; Váradi, Linda; Cairns, Rose; Sjöström, Helena; Liao, Vivian W Y; Wood, Peta; Balaban, Seher; Ong, Jennifer Ai; Lin, Hsuan-Yu Jennifer; Lai, Felcia; Hoy, Andrew J; Grewal, Thomas; Groundwater, Paul W; Hibbs, David E

    2015-12-15

    The three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms; PPARα, PPARγ and PPARδ, play central roles in lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis. Dual PPARα/γ agonists, which stimulate both PPARα and PPARγ isoforms to similar extents, are gaining popularity as it is believed that they are able to ameliorate the unwanted side effects of selective PPARα and PPARγ agonists; and may also be used to treat dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus simultaneously. In this study, virtual screening of natural product libraries, using both structure-based and ligand-based drug discovery approaches, identified ten potential dual PPARα/γ agonist lead compounds (9-13 and 16-20). In vitro assays confirmed these compounds to show no statistically significant toxicity to cells, with the exception of compound 12 which inhibited cell growth to 74.5%±3.5 and 54.1%±3.7 at 50μM and 100μM, respectively. In support of their potential as dual PPARα/γ agonists, all ten compounds upregulated the expression of cholesterol transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 in THP-1 macrophages, with indoline derivative 16 producing the greatest elevation (2.3-fold; 3.3-fold, respectively). Furthermore, comparable to the activity of established PPARα and PPARγ agonists, compound 16 stimulated triacylglycerol accumulation during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation as well as fatty acid β-oxidation in HuH7 hepatocytes.

  8. Modulation Effect of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonists on Lipid Droplet Proteins in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Ming-Liang; Zhong, Yuan; Wang, Chen; Jia, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists are used for treating hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism of action of these agonists is still under investigation. The lipid droplet-associated proteins FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5, regulated directly by PPARγ and PPARα, are associated with hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity. Here, we evaluated the expression levels of FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5 and the regulation of these proteins by consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) or administration of PPAR agonists. Mice with diet-induced obesity were treated with the PPARγ or PPARα agonist, pioglitazone or fenofibrate, respectively. Liver tissues from db/db diabetic mice and human were also collected. Interestingly, FSP27/CIEDC was expressed in mouse and human livers and was upregulated in obese C57BL/6J mice. Fenofibrate treatment decreased hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD diet. In mice, LSDP5 was not detected, even in the context of insulin resistance or treatment with PPAR agonists. However, LSDP5 was highly expressed in humans, with elevated expression observed in the fatty liver. We concluded that fenofibrate greatly decreased hepatic TG content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD, suggesting a potential regulatory role for fenofibrate in the amelioration of hepatic steatosis. PMID:26770990

  9. Methyl Substitution of a Rexinoid Agonist Improves Potency and Reveals Site of Lipid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3′,4′-Dihydro-1′(2′H)-naphthalen-1′-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of these new analogues are reported here along with the X-ray crystal structures of each homologue bound to the ligand binding domain of hRXRα. We demonstrate that each homologue of 9cUAB30 is a more potent agonist, but only the 7-methyl-9cUAB30 caused severe hyperlipidemia in rats. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structures of these new rexinoids and bexarotene (Targretin) bound to hRXRα-LBD, we reveal that each rexinoid, which induced hyperlipidemia, had methyl groups that interacted with helix 7 residues of the LBD. PMID:24801499

  10. Mimetics of caloric restriction include agonists of lipid-activated nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Corton, J Christopher; Apte, Udayan; Anderson, Steven P; Limaye, Pallavi; Yoon, Lawrence; Latendresse, John; Dunn, Corrie; Everitt, Jeffrey I; Voss, Kenneth A; Swanson, Cynthia; Kimbrough, Carie; Wong, Jean S; Gill, Sarjeet S; Chandraratna, Roshantha A S; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W; Stulnig, Thomas M; Steffensen, Knut R; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Mehendale, Harihara M

    2004-10-29

    The obesity epidemic in industrialized countries is associated with increases in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and certain types of cancer. In animal models, caloric restriction (CR) suppresses these diseases as well as chemical-induced tissue damage. These beneficial effects of CR overlap with those altered by agonists of nuclear receptors (NR) under control of the fasting-responsive transcriptional co-activator, peroxisome proliferator-activated co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha). In a screen for compounds that mimic CR effects in the liver, we found statistically significant overlaps between the CR transcript profile in wild-type mice and the profiles altered by agonists of lipid-activated NR, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), liver X receptor, and their obligate heterodimer partner, retinoid X receptor. The overlapping genes included those involved in CVD (lipid metabolism and inflammation) and cancer (cell fate). Based on this overlap, we hypothesized that some effects of CR are mediated by PPARalpha. As determined by transcript profiling, 19% of all gene expression changes in wild-type mice were dependent on PPARalpha, including Cyp4a10 and Cyp4a14, involved in fatty acid omega-oxidation, acute phase response genes, and epidermal growth factor receptor but not increases in PGC-1alpha. CR protected the livers of wild-type mice from damage induced by thioacetamide, a liver toxicant and hepatocarcinogen. CR protection was lost in PPARalpha-null mice due to inadequate tissue repair. These results demonstrate that PPARalpha mediates some of the effects of CR and indicate that a pharmacological approach to mimicking many of the beneficial effects of CR may be possible.

  11. A novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/gamma dual agonist demonstrates favorable effects on lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiu; Sahoo, Soumya P; Wang, Pei-Ran; Milot, Denise P; Ippolito, Marc C; Wu, Margaret S; Baffic, Joanne; Biswas, Chhabi; Hernandez, Melba; Lam, My-Hanh; Sharma, Neelam; Han, Wei; Kelly, Linda J; MacNaul, Karen L; Zhou, Gaochao; Desai, Ranjit; Heck, James V; Doebber, Thomas W; Berger, Joel P; Moller, David E; Sparrow, Carl P; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Wright, Samuel D

    2004-04-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus exhibit hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia as well as a markedly increased incidence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Here we report the characterization of a novel arylthiazolidinedione capable of lowering both glucose and lipid levels in animal models. This compound, designated TZD18, is a potent agonist with dual human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha/gamma activities. In keeping with its PPARgamma activity, TZD18 caused complete normalization of the elevated glucose in db/db mice and Zucker diabetic fatty rats. TZD18 lowered both cholesterol and triglycerides in hamsters and dogs. TZD18 inhibited cholesterol biosynthesis at steps before mevalonate and reduced hepatic levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity. Moreover, TZD18 significantly suppressed gene expression of fatty acid synthesis and induced expression of genes for fatty acid degradation and triglyceride clearance. Studies on 17 additional PPARalpha or PPARalpha/gamma agonists showed that lipid lowering in hamsters correlated with the magnitude of hepatic gene expression changes. Importantly, the presence of PPARgamma agonism did not affect the relationship between hepatic gene expression and lipid lowering. Taken together, these data suggest that PPARalpha/gamma agonists, such as TZD18, affect lipid homeostasis, leading to an antiatherogenic plasma lipid profile. Agents with these properties may provide favorable means for treatment of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia and the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  12. The PPARα agonist fenofibrate suppresses B-cell lymphoma in mice by modulating lipid metabolism☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianfeng; Das, Suman Kumar; Jha, Pooja; Al Zoughbi, Wael; Schauer, Silvia; Claudel, Thierry; Sexl, Veronika; Vesely, Paul; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Kratky, Dagmar; Trauner, Michael; Hoefler, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for malignant lymphoma development. We used Bcr/Abl transformed B cells to determine the impact of aggressive lymphoma formation on systemic lipid mobilization and turnover. In wild-type mice, tumor size significantly correlated with depletion of white adipose tissues (WAT), resulting in increased serum free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations which promote B-cell proliferation in vitro. Moreover, B-cell tumor development induced hepatic lipid accumulation due to enhanced hepatic fatty acid (FA) uptake and impaired FA oxidation. Serum triglyceride, FFA, phospholipid and cholesterol levels were significantly elevated. Consistently, serum VLDL/LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B levels were drastically increased. These findings suggest that B-cell tumors trigger systemic lipid mobilization from WAT to the liver and increase VLDL/LDL release from the liver to promote tumor growth. Further support for this concept stems from experiments where we used the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist and lipid-lowering drug fenofibrate that significantly suppressed tumor growth independent of angiogenesis and inflammation. In addition to WAT depletion, fenofibrate further stimulated FFA uptake by the liver and restored hepatic FA oxidation capacity, thereby accelerating the clearance of lipids released from WAT. Furthermore, fenofibrate blocked hepatic lipid release induced by the tumors. In contrast, lipid utilization in the tumor tissue itself was not increased by fenofibrate which correlates with extremely low expression levels of PPARα in B-cells. Our data show that fenofibrate associated effects on hepatic lipid metabolism and deprivation of serum lipids are capable to suppress B-cell lymphoma growth which may direct novel treatment strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Lipid Metabolism in Cancer. PMID:23628473

  13. Plasma triglycerides are not related to tissue lipids and insulin sensitivity in elderly following PPARα agonist treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cree, Melanie G.; Newcomer, Bradley R.; Read, Laura K.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Chinkes, David; Aarsland, Asle; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in plasma lipids, tissue triglycerides and decreases in mitochondrial function have been linked to insulin resistance and aging. In animals, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) agonists decrease plasma lipids, intramyocellular fat (IMCL) and liver fat (LFAT) and improve mitochondrial β- oxidative function and insulin sensitivity, but the effects in elderly were not known. Insulin sensitivity was assessed with a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to asses IMCL, LFAT and plasma lipids were measured before and after 6, 11 and 61 days of PPAR-α agonist (fenofibrate) administration in 19 elderly (age 70±1 years) volunteers. Volunteers were stratified into healthy (N=7) and insulin resistant (N=12) groups. The baseline insulin sensitivity index (8.1±1.2 vs. 3.8±0.5, healthy vs. insulin resistant; P<0.001) was significantly higher in the healthy group. Fenofibrate treatment induced significant reductions in plasma triglycerides (P<0.001) and total cholesterol (P<0.001) in both groups. Nonetheless, neither fasted free fatty acids, glucose, insulin, nor insulin sensitivity improved in either group (Day 1 vs. day 61, 8.1±1.2 vs. 8.1±0.9, healthy; and 3.8±0.5 vs. 4.2±0.05, insulin resistant). Furthermore, there was no change in IMCL or LFAT. These results indicate that whereas fenofibrate significantly lowers plasma lipids it does not affect insulin sensitivity nor intracellular lipids in elderly. PMID:17904198

  14. Antiobesity efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide is associated with peripheral tissue-specific modulation of lipid metabolic regulators.

    PubMed

    Decara, Juan; Arrabal, Sergio; Beiroa, Daniel; Rivera, Patricia; Vargas, Antonio; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Ballesteros, Joan; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-11-12

    To investigate the role of glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in peripheral lipid metabolism. Both lean and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity (DIO) rats were used to compare the peripheral effects of the subcutaneous and repeated administration of the GLP-1R agonist liraglutide on the expression of key regulators involved in lipid metabolism, β-oxidation and thermogenesis in liver, abdominal muscle, and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT). We observed that liraglutide reduced caloric intake, body weight, and plasma levels of triglycerides and VLDL in a diet-independent manner. However, changes in liver fat content and the expression of lipid metabolism regulators were produced in a diet and tissue-dependent manner. In lean rats, liraglutide increased the gene/protein expression of elements involved in lipogenesis (ChREBP, Acaca/ACC, Fasn/FAS, Scd1/SCD1, PPARα/γ), β-oxidation (CPT1b), and thermogenesis (Cox4i1, Ucp1/UCP1) in eWAT and muscle, which suggest an increase in fatty-acid flux and utilization to activate energy expenditure. Regarding DIO rats, the specific reduction of liver lipid content by liraglutide was associated with a decreased expression of main elements involved in lipogenesis (phospho-ACC), peroxisomal β-oxidation (ACOX1), and lipid flux/storage (Pparγ/PPARγ) in liver, which suggest a recovery of lipid homeostasis. Interestingly, the muscle of DIO rats treated with liraglutide showed a decreased expression of PPARγ and the thermogenic factor UCP1. These results help us to better understand the peripheral mechanisms regulating lipid metabolism that underlay the effectiveness of GLP-1 analogues for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):600-611, 2016.

  15. Agonistic and antagonistic properties of a Rhizobium sin-1 lipid A modified by an ether-linked lipid

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, Mahalakshmi; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2010-01-01

    LPS from Rhizobium sin-1 (R. sin-1) can antagonize the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by E. coli LPS in human monocytic cells. Therefore these compounds provide interesting leads for the development of therapeutics for the prevention or treatment of septic shock. Detailed structure activity relationship studies have, however, been hampered by the propensity of these compounds to undergo β-elimination to give biological inactive enone derivatives. To address this problem, we have chemically synthesized in a convergent manner a R. sin-1 lipid A derivative in which the β-hydroxy ester at C-3 of the proximal sugar unit has been replaced by an ether linked moiety. As expected, this derivative exhibited a much-improved chemical stability. Furthermore, its ability to antagonize TNF-α production induced by enteric LPS was only slightly smaller than that of the parent ester modified derivative demonstrating that the ether-linked lipids affect biological activities only marginally. Furthermore, it has been shown for the first time that R. sin-1 LPS and the ether modified lipid A are also able to antagonize the production of the cytokine interferon-inducible protein 10, which arises from the TRIF-dependent pathway. The latter pathway was somewhat more potently inhibited than the MyD88-dependent pathway. Furthermore, it was observed that the natural LPS possesses much greater activity than the synthetic and isolated lipid As, which indicates that di-KDO moiety is important for optimal biological activity. It has also been found that isolated R. sin-1 LPS and lipid A agonize a mouse macrophage cell line to induce the production of TNF-α and interferon beta in a Toll-like receptor 4-dependent manner demonstrating species specific properties. PMID:17581652

  16. Trial Watch: Toll-like receptor agonists in oncological indications.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Fernando; Vacchelli, Erika; Obrist, Florine; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle; Henrik Ter Meulen, Jan; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of enzymatically inactive, single membrane-spanning proteins that recognize a wide panel of exogenous and endogenous danger signals. Besides constituting a crucial component of the innate immune response to bacterial and viral pathogens, TLRs appear to play a major role in anticancer immunosurveillance. In line with this notion, several natural and synthetic TLR ligands have been intensively investigated for their ability to boost tumor-targeting immune responses elicited by a variety of immunotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic interventions. Three of these agents are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or equivalent regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients: the so-called bacillus Calmette-Guérin, monophosphoryl lipid A, and imiquimod. However, the number of clinical trials testing the therapeutic potential of both FDA-approved and experimental TLR agonists in cancer patients is stably decreasing, suggesting that drug developers and oncologists are refocusing their interest on alternative immunostimulatory agents. Here, we summarize recent findings on the use of TLR agonists in cancer patients and discuss how the clinical evaluation of FDA-approved and experimental TLR ligands has evolved since the publication of our first Trial Watch dealing with this topic.

  17. G protein-coupled receptors: signalling and regulation by lipid agonists for improved glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Brian M; Flatt, Peter R; McKillop, Aine M

    2016-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a pivotal role in cell signalling, controlling many processes such as immunity, growth, cellular differentiation, neurological pathways and hormone secretions. Fatty acid agonists are increasingly recognised as having a key role in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis via stimulation of islet and gastrointestinal GPCRs. Downstream cell signalling results in modulation of the biosynthesis, secretion, proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways of islet and enteroendocrine cells. GPR40 and GPR120 are activated by long-chain fatty acids (>C12) with both receptors coupling to the Gαq subunit that activates the Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. GPR41 and GPR43 are stimulated by short-chain fatty acids (C2-C5), and activation results in binding to Gαi that inhibits the adenylyl cyclase pathway attenuating cAMP production. In addition, GPR43 also couples to the Gαq subunit augmenting intracellular Ca(2+) and activating phospholipase C. GPR55 is specific for cannabinoid endogenous agonists (endocannabinoids) and non-cannabinoid fatty acids, which couples to Gα12/13 and Gαq proteins, leading to enhancing intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and Rho kinase. GPR119 is activated by fatty acid ethanolamides and binds to Gαs utilising the adenylate cyclase pathway, which is dependent upon protein kinase A. Current research indicates that GPCR therapies may be approved for clinical use in the near future. This review focuses on the recent advances in preclinical diabetes research in the signalling and regulation of GPCRs on islet and enteroendocrine cells involved in glucose homoeostasis.

  18. Development and Evaluation of Biodegradable Particles Coloaded With Antigen and the Toll-Like Receptor Agonist, Pentaerythritol Lipid A, as a Cancer Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kawther K; Geary, Sean M; Salem, Aliasger K

    2016-03-01

    Immune adjuvants are important components of current and prospective cancer vaccines. In this study, we aimed at evaluating the use of a synthetic lipid A derivative, pentaerythritol lipid A (PET lipid A), loaded into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles, as a potential cancer vaccine adjuvant. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles (size range: 250-600 nm) were successfully formulated to include PET lipid A and/or the model tumor antigen, chicken ovalbumin (OVA). It was shown that particulated PET lipid A had a distinct advantage at promoting secretion of the immune potentiating cytokine, IL-12p70, and upregulating key costimulatory surface proteins, CD86 and CD40, in murine dendritic cells in vitro. In a murine tumor model, involving prophylactic vaccination with various permutations of soluble versus particulated formulations of OVA with or without PET lipid A, modest benefit was observed in terms of OVA-specific cell-mediated immune responses when PET lipid A was delivered in particles. These findings translated into a corresponding trend toward increased survival of mice challenged with OVA-expressing tumor cells (E.G7). In terms of translation of safe adjuvants into the clinic, these results promote the concept of delivering toll-like receptor-4 agonists in particles because doing so improves their adjuvant properties, while decreasing the chances of adverse effects due to off-target uptake by nonphagocytic cells.

  19. Cyclin D activates the Rb tumor suppressor by mono-phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Narasimha, Anil M; Kaulich, Manuel; Shapiro, Gary S; Choi, Yoon J; Sicinski, Piotr; Dowdy, Steven F

    2014-06-04

    The widely accepted model of G1 cell cycle progression proposes that cyclin D:Cdk4/6 inactivates the Rb tumor suppressor during early G1 phase by progressive multi-phosphorylation, termed hypo-phosphorylation, to release E2F transcription factors. However, this model remains unproven biochemically and the biologically active form(s) of Rb remains unknown. In this study, we find that Rb is exclusively mono-phosphorylated in early G1 phase by cyclin D:Cdk4/6. Mono-phosphorylated Rb is composed of 14 independent isoforms that are all targeted by the E1a oncoprotein, but show preferential E2F binding patterns. At the late G1 Restriction Point, cyclin E:Cdk2 inactivates Rb by quantum hyper-phosphorylation. Cells undergoing a DNA damage response activate cyclin D:Cdk4/6 to generate mono-phosphorylated Rb that regulates global transcription, whereas cells undergoing differentiation utilize un-phosphorylated Rb. These observations fundamentally change our understanding of G1 cell cycle progression and show that mono-phosphorylated Rb, generated by cyclin D:Cdk4/6, is the only Rb isoform in early G1 phase.

  20. The TLR2 agonist in polysaccharide-K is a structurally distinct lipid which acts synergistically with the protein-bound β-glucan.

    PubMed

    Quayle, Kenneth; Coy, Catherine; Standish, Leanna; Lu, Hailing

    2015-04-01

    Protein-bound polysaccharide-K (Krestin; PSK) is a hot-water extract of Trametes versicolor with immune stimulatory activity. It has been used for the past 30 years and has demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in multiple types of cancer. The ability of PSK to activate dendritic cells and T cells is dependent on its ability to stimulate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), yet it remains unknown which structural component within PSK activates TLR2. The purpose of this study was to identify the TLR2 agonist within PSK and understand its role in the overall mechanism of PSK's immunogenic activity. TLR2 activity was eliminated by treatment with lipoprotein lipase but not by trypsin or lyticase. Rapid centrifugation of PSK can separate the fraction with TLR2 agonist activity from the soluble β-glucan fraction. To study the potential interaction between the β-glucan component and the lipid component, we labeled the soluble β-glucan with fluorescein. Uptake of the labeled β-glucan by J774A macrophages and JAWSII dendritic cells was inhibited by anti-Dectin-1 antibody but not by anti-TLR2 antibody, confirming that Dectin-1 is the receptor for β-glucan. Interestingly, pre-treatment of JAWSII cells with the TLR2-active lipid fraction significantly enhanced the uptake of the soluble β-glucan, indicating the synergy between the TLR2 agonist component and the β-glucan component. Altogether, these results present evidence that PSK has two active components-the well-characterized protein-bound β-glucan and a previously unreported lipid-which work synergistically via the Dectin-1 and TLR2 receptors.

  1. Effects of the PPARα agonist WY-14,643 on plasma lipids, enzymatic activities and mRNA expression of lipid metabolism genes in a marine flatfish, Scophthalmus maximus.

    PubMed

    Urbatzka, R; Galante-Oliveira, S; Rocha, E; Lobo-da-Cunha, A; Castro, L F C; Cunha, I

    2015-07-01

    Fibrates and other lipid regulator drugs are widespread in the aquatic environment including estuaries and coastal zones, but little is known on their chronic effects on non-target organisms as marine fish. In the present study, turbot juveniles were exposed to the PPARα model agonist WY-14,643 for 21 days by repeated injections at the concentrations of 5mg/kg (lo-WY) and 50mg/kg (hi-WY), and samples taken after 7 and 21 days. Enzyme activity and mRNA expression of palmitoyl-CoA oxidase and catalase in the liver were analyzed as first response, which validated the experiment by demonstrating interactions with the peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and oxidative stress pathways in the hi-WY treatment. In order to get mechanistic insights, alterations of plasma lipids (free cholesterol, FC; HDL associated cholesterol, C-HDL; triglycerides, TG; non-esterified fatty acids, NEFA) and hepatic mRNA expression of 17 genes involved in fatty acid and lipid metabolism were studied. The exposure to hi-WY reduced the quantity of plasma FC, C-HDL, and NEFA. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apolipoprotein E mRNA expression were higher in hi-WY, and indicated an increased formation of VLDL particles and energy mobilization from liver. It is speculated that energy depletion by PPARα agonists may contribute to a higher susceptibility to environmental stressors.

  2. The dipeptide H-Trp-Arg-OH (WR) Is a PPARα agonist and reduces hepatic lipid accumulation in lipid-loaded H4IIE cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yaoyao; Kim, Jong-Ho; Nam, Bora; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Ji Hae; Kim, Kyung Ok; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptides absorbed by the intestinal epithelium are delivered to circulation, but their metabolic roles are not yet clearly understood. We investigated the biological activities of a dietary dipeptide, H-Trp-Arg-OH (WR), on the regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α activity. Reporter gene assays revealed that WR dose-dependently induced PPARα transactivation. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that WR interacts directly with the PPARα ligand binding domain, and time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer analyses revealed recruitment of a co-activator peptide, fluorescein-PGC1α, to PPARα, confirming the direct binding of WR to PPARα and occurrence of conformational changes. WR induced cellular fatty acid uptake and the expression of PPARα response genes in fatty acid oxidation, thus reducing intracellular triglyceride accumulation in lipid-loaded hepatocytes. In conclusion, the dietary dipeptide WR activates PPARα and reduces hepatic lipid accumulation in lipid-loaded hepatocytes.

  3. Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant (GLA), a Synthetic TLR4 agonist, promotes potent systemic and mucosal responses to intranasal immunization with HIVgp140.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio A; Van Roey, Griet A; Tregoning, John S; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Coler, Rhea N; Windish, Hillarie P; Reed, Steven G; Carter, Darrick; Shattock, Robin J

    2012-01-01

    Successful vaccine development against HIV will likely require the induction of strong, long-lasting humoral and cellular immune responses in both the systemic and mucosal compartments. Based on the known immunological linkage between the upper-respiratory and urogenital tracts, we explored the potential of nasal adjuvants to boost immunization for the induction of vaginal and systemic immune responses to gp140. Mice were immunized intranasally with HIV gp140 together with micellar and emulsion formulations of a synthetic TLR4 agonist, Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant (GLA) and responses were compared to R848, a TLR7/8 agonist, or chitosan, a non TLR adjuvant. GLA and chitosan but not R848 greatly enhanced serum immunoglobulin levels when compared to antigen alone. Both GLA and chitosan induced high IgG and IgA titers in nasal and vaginal lavage and feces. The high IgA and IgG titers in vaginal lavage were associated with high numbers of gp140-specific antibody secreting cells in the genital tract. Whilst both GLA and chitosan induced T cell responses to immunization, GLA induced a stronger Th17 response and chitosan induced a more Th2 skewed response. Our results show that GLA is a highly potent intranasal adjuvant greatly enhancing humoral and cellular immune responses, both systemically and mucosally.

  4. Cloning and expression characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) with their agonists, dietary lipids, and ambient salinity in rabbitfish Siganus canaliculatus.

    PubMed

    You, Cuihong; Jiang, Danli; Zhang, Qinghao; Xie, Dizhi; Wang, Shuqi; Dong, Yewei; Li, Yuanyou

    2017-04-01

    Rabbitfish Siganus canaliculatus is the first marine teleost reported to have the ability of biosynthesizing C20-22 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) from C18 precursors, and thus provides a model for studying the regulatory mechanisms of LC-PUFA biosynthesis in teleosts. To investigate the possible roles of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), critical transcription factors involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism, in the regulation of LC-PUFA biosynthesis in rabbitfish, the PPAR genes were cloned and their expression characterization with PPAR agonists, dietary lipid resource, and ambient salinity were examined. Three cDNA sequences respectively encoding 477, 516 and 519 amino acids of PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ isoforms were obtained. PPARα exhibited a wide tissue expression with its highest levels in the heart and brain; PPARβ was predominantly expressed in the gills, while PPARγ was highly expressed in the intestine and gills. In rabbitfish primary hepatocytes, both the PPAR agonists 2-bromopalmitate (2-Bro) and fenofibrate (FF) increased the expression of PPARγ, SREBP1c and Elovl5, whereas FF depressed the expression of Δ6/Δ5 Fad. Moreover, a higher hepatic PPARβ expression was observed in fish fed diets with vegetable oils (VO) than that with fish oil (FO), in the former the expression of PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ were increased at the low ambient salinity (10ppt), where an increasing expression of Δ5/Δ6 Fad, Δ4 Fad and Elovl5 genes was previously reported. These results suggest that PPARs might be involved in the upregulation of LC-PUFA biosynthesis with dietary VO and low ambient salinity in rabbitfish.

  5. Proteoliposomal formulations of an HIV-1 gp41-based miniprotein elicit a lipid-dependent immunodominant response overlapping the 2F5 binding motif.

    PubMed

    Molinos-Albert, Luis M; Bilbao, Eneritz; Agulló, Luis; Marfil, Silvia; García, Elisabet; Concepción, Maria Luisa Rodríguez de la; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Vilaplana, Cristina; Nieto-Garai, Jon A; Contreras, F-Xabier; Floor, Martin; Cardona, Pere J; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Clotet, Bonaventura; Villà-Freixa, Jordi; Lorizate, Maier; Carrillo, Jorge; Blanco, Julià

    2017-01-13

    The HIV-1 gp41 Membrane Proximal External Region (MPER) is recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies and represents a promising vaccine target. However, MPER immunogenicity and antibody activity are influenced by membrane lipids. To evaluate lipid modulation of MPER immunogenicity, we generated a 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)-based proteoliposome collection containing combinations of phosphatidylserine (PS), GM3 ganglioside, cholesterol (CHOL), sphingomyelin (SM) and the TLR4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA). A recombinant gp41-derived miniprotein (gp41-MinTT) exposing the MPER and a tetanus toxoid (TT) peptide that favors MHC-II presentation, was successfully incorporated into lipid mixtures (>85%). Immunization of mice with soluble gp41-MinTT exclusively induced responses against the TT peptide, while POPC proteoliposomes generated potent anti-gp41 IgG responses using lower protein doses. The combined addition of PS and GM3 or CHOL/SM to POPC liposomes greatly increased gp41 immunogenicity, which was further enhanced by the addition of MPLA. Responses generated by all proteoliposomes targeted the N-terminal moiety of MPER overlapping the 2F5 neutralizing epitope. Our data show that lipids impact both, the epitope targeted and the magnitude of the response to membrane-dependent antigens, helping to improve MPER-based lipid carriers. Moreover, the identification of immunodominant epitopes allows for the redesign of immunogens targeting MPER neutralizing determinants.

  6. Proteoliposomal formulations of an HIV-1 gp41-based miniprotein elicit a lipid-dependent immunodominant response overlapping the 2F5 binding motif

    PubMed Central

    Molinos-Albert, Luis M.; Bilbao, Eneritz; Agulló, Luis; Marfil, Silvia; García, Elisabet; Concepción, Maria Luisa Rodríguez de la; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Vilaplana, Cristina; Nieto-Garai, Jon A.; Contreras, F.-Xabier; Floor, Martin; Cardona, Pere J.; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Clotet, Bonaventura; Villà-Freixa, Jordi; Lorizate, Maier; Carrillo, Jorge; Blanco, Julià

    2017-01-01

    The HIV-1 gp41 Membrane Proximal External Region (MPER) is recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies and represents a promising vaccine target. However, MPER immunogenicity and antibody activity are influenced by membrane lipids. To evaluate lipid modulation of MPER immunogenicity, we generated a 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)-based proteoliposome collection containing combinations of phosphatidylserine (PS), GM3 ganglioside, cholesterol (CHOL), sphingomyelin (SM) and the TLR4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA). A recombinant gp41-derived miniprotein (gp41-MinTT) exposing the MPER and a tetanus toxoid (TT) peptide that favors MHC-II presentation, was successfully incorporated into lipid mixtures (>85%). Immunization of mice with soluble gp41-MinTT exclusively induced responses against the TT peptide, while POPC proteoliposomes generated potent anti-gp41 IgG responses using lower protein doses. The combined addition of PS and GM3 or CHOL/SM to POPC liposomes greatly increased gp41 immunogenicity, which was further enhanced by the addition of MPLA. Responses generated by all proteoliposomes targeted the N-terminal moiety of MPER overlapping the 2F5 neutralizing epitope. Our data show that lipids impact both, the epitope targeted and the magnitude of the response to membrane-dependent antigens, helping to improve MPER-based lipid carriers. Moreover, the identification of immunodominant epitopes allows for the redesign of immunogens targeting MPER neutralizing determinants. PMID:28084464

  7. Induction of Bronchial Tolerance After 1 Cycle of Monophosphoryl-A-Adjuvanted Specific Immunotherapy in Children With Grass Pollen Allergies

    PubMed Central

    Girod, Katharina; Zielen, Stefan; Schubert, Ralf; Schulze, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (SCIT) is a well-established and clinically effective method to treat allergic diseases, such as rhinitis and asthma. It remains unclear how soon after initiation of an ultra-short course of grass pollen immunotherapy adjuvanted with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL)-specific bronchial tolerance can be induced. Methods In a prospective study of 69 children double-sensitized to birch and grass pollens (51 males, average age 11.1 years), development of bronchial tolerance after 1 cycle of SCIT for grass was evaluated. In all the patients, the bronchial allergen provocation test (BAP) was performed before and after treatment. According to the results of the first BAP, the patients were divided into 2 groups: those showing a negative BAP with a decrease in FEV1 of <20% (seasonal allergic rhinitis [SAR] group, n=47); and those showing a positive BAP with a decrease in FEV1 of ≥20% (SAR with allergic asthma [SAR and Asthma] group, n=22). All the patients received MPL-adjuvanted, ultra-short course immunotherapy for birch, but only those with a positive BAP to grass received MPL-SCIT for grass. Results After the pollen season, the BAP in the SAR group remained unchanged, while it was improved in the SAR and Asthma group (decrease in FEV1 of 28.8% vs 12.5%, P<0.01). The IgG4 levels increased after SCIT (median before SCIT 0.34 to 11.4 after SCIT), whereas the total and specific IgE levels remained unchanged. Conclusions After 1 cycle of MPL-SCIT, specific bronchial tolerance may be significantly induced, whereas in patients without SCIT, bronchial hyperactivity may remain unchanged. PMID:26922936

  8. Adsorption of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist to Alum-Based Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Dampens Pro-T Helper 2 Activities and Enhances Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Juliana; Mirotti, Luciana; Rodriguez, Dunia; Gomes, Eliane; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum salts gels (alum) are TLR-independent adjuvants and have been used to boost antibody responses in alum-based vaccines such as diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT) triple vaccine. However, the pro-Th2 activity of alum-based vaccine formulations has not been fully appreciated. Here we found that alum-based tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine was biased toward a Th-2 profile as shown by TT-induced airway eosinophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production, and high levels of IgE anaphylactic antibodies. The adsorption into alum of prototypic TLR4 agonists such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli consistently dampened TT-induced Th2 activities without inducing IFNγ or Th1-like responses in the lung. Conversely, adsorption of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) extracted from Salmonella minnesota, which is a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β- (TRIF-) biased TLR4 agonist, was less effective in decreasing Th-2 responses. Importantly, in a situation with antigenic competition (OVA plus TT), TT-specific IgG1 or IgG2a was decreased compared with TT sensitization. Notably, LPS increased the production of IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibodies. In conclusion, the addition of LPS induces a more robust IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibody production and concomitantly decreases Th2-cellular and humoral responses, indicating a potential use of alum/TLR-based vaccines.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide engineering in Neisseria meningitidis: structural analysis of different pentaacyl lipid A mutants and comparison of their modified agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Pupo, Elder; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; Meiring, Hugo; van der Ley, Peter

    2014-03-21

    Engineering the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic pathway offers the potential to obtain modified derivatives with optimized adjuvant properties. Neisseria meningitidis strain H44/76 was modified by expression of the pagL gene encoding lipid A 3-O-deacylase from Bordetella bronchiseptica and by inactivation of the lgtB gene encoding the terminal oligosaccharide galactosyltransferase. Mass spectrometry analysis of purified mutant LPS was used for detailed compositional analysis of all present molecular species. This determined that the modified LPS was mainly pentaacylated, demonstrating high efficiency of conversion from the hexaacyl to the 3-O-deacylated form by heterologous lipid A 3-O-deacylase (PagL) expression. MS analyses also provided evidence for expression of only one major oligosaccharide glycoform, which lacked the terminal galactose residue as expected from inactivation of the lgtB gene. The immunomodulatory properties of PagL-deacylated LPS were compared with another pentaacyl form obtained from an lpxL1(-) mutant, which lacks the 2' secondary acyl chain. Although both LPS mutants displayed impaired capacity to induce production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 in the monocytic cell line Mono Mac 6, induction of the Toll-interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β-dependent chemokine interferon-γ-induced protein 10 was largely retained only for the lgtB(-)/pagL(+) mutant. Removal of remaining hexaacyl species exclusively present in lgtB(-)/pagL(+) LPS demonstrated that these minor species potentiate but do not determine the activity of this LPS. These results are the first to indicate a qualitatively different response of human innate cells to pentaacyl lpxL1(-) and pagL(+) LPS and show the importance of detailed structure-function analysis when working with modified lipid A structures. The pagL(+) LPS has significant potential as immune modulator in humans.

  10. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Agonists with Preference for Human over Mouse TLR4 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Heeke, Darren S.; Rao, Eileen; Maynard, Sean K.; Hornigold, David; McCrae, Christopher; Fraser, Neil; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yu, Li; Williams, Nicola; King, Sarah; Cooper, Martin E.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Woo, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    The best-characterized Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands are lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its chemically modified and detoxified variant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Although both molecules are active for human TLR4, they demonstrate a potency preference for mouse TLR4 based on data from transfected cell lines and primary cells of both species. After a high throughput screening process of small molecule libraries, we have discovered a new class of TLR4 agonist with a species preference profile differing from MPL. Products of the 4-component Ugi synthesis reaction were demonstrated to potently trigger human TLR4-transfected HEK cells but not mouse TLR4, although inclusion of the human MD2 with mTLR4 was able to partially recover activity. Co-expression of CD14 was not required for optimal activity of Ugi compounds on transfected cells, as it is for LPS. The species preference profile for the panel of Ugi compounds was found to be strongly active for human and cynomolgus monkey primary cells, with reduced but still substantial activity for most Ugi compounds on guinea pig cells. Mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret, and cotton rat cells displayed little or no activity when exposed to Ugi compounds. However, engineering the human versions of TLR4 and MD2 to be expressed in mTLR4/MD2 deficient mice allowed for robust activity by Ugi compounds both in vitro and in vivo. These findings extend the range of compounds available for development as agonists of TLR4 and identify novel molecules which reverse the TLR4 triggering preference of MPL for mouse TLR4 over human TLR4. Such compounds may be amenable to formulation as more potent human-specific TLR4L-based adjuvants than typical MPL-based adjuvants. PMID:27736941

  11. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Agonists with Preference for Human over Mouse TLR4 Activation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jason D; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Maynard, Sean K; Hornigold, David; McCrae, Christopher; Fraser, Neil; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yu, Li; Williams, Nicola; King, Sarah; Cooper, Martin E; Hajjar, Adeline M; Woo, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    The best-characterized Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands are lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its chemically modified and detoxified variant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Although both molecules are active for human TLR4, they demonstrate a potency preference for mouse TLR4 based on data from transfected cell lines and primary cells of both species. After a high throughput screening process of small molecule libraries, we have discovered a new class of TLR4 agonist with a species preference profile differing from MPL. Products of the 4-component Ugi synthesis reaction were demonstrated to potently trigger human TLR4-transfected HEK cells but not mouse TLR4, although inclusion of the human MD2 with mTLR4 was able to partially recover activity. Co-expression of CD14 was not required for optimal activity of Ugi compounds on transfected cells, as it is for LPS. The species preference profile for the panel of Ugi compounds was found to be strongly active for human and cynomolgus monkey primary cells, with reduced but still substantial activity for most Ugi compounds on guinea pig cells. Mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret, and cotton rat cells displayed little or no activity when exposed to Ugi compounds. However, engineering the human versions of TLR4 and MD2 to be expressed in mTLR4/MD2 deficient mice allowed for robust activity by Ugi compounds both in vitro and in vivo. These findings extend the range of compounds available for development as agonists of TLR4 and identify novel molecules which reverse the TLR4 triggering preference of MPL for mouse TLR4 over human TLR4. Such compounds may be amenable to formulation as more potent human-specific TLR4L-based adjuvants than typical MPL-based adjuvants.

  12. A new synthetic TLR4 agonist, GLA, allows dendritic cells targeted with antigen to elicit Th1 T-cell immunity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pantel, Austin; Cheong, Cheolho; Dandamudi, Durga; Shrestha, Elina; Mehandru, Saurabh; Brane, Luke; Ruane, Darren; Teixeira, Angela; Bozzacco, Leonia; Steinman, Ralph M; Longhi, M Paula

    2012-01-01

    Protein-based vaccines offer safety and cost advantages but require adjuvants to induce immunity. Here we examined the adjuvant capacity of glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA), a new synthetic non-toxic analogue of lipopolysaccharide. In mice, in comparison with non-formulated LPS and monophosphoryl lipid A, formulated GLA induced higher antibody titers and generated Type 1 T-cell responses to HIV gag-p24 protein in spleen and lymph nodes, which was dependent on TLR4 expression. Immunization was greatly improved by targeting HIV gag p24 to DCs with an antibody to DEC-205, a DC receptor for antigen uptake and processing. Subcutaneous immunization induced antigen-specific T-cell responses in the intestinal lamina propria. Immunity did not develop in mice transiently depleted of DCs. To understand how GLA works, we studied DCs directly from vaccinated mice. Within 4 h, GLA caused DCs to upregulate CD86 and CD40 and produce cytokines including IL-12p70 in vivo. Importantly, DCs removed from mice 4 h after vaccination became immunogenic, capable of inducing T-cell immunity upon injection into naïve mice. These data indicate that a synthetic and clinically feasible TLR4 agonist rapidly stimulates full maturation of DCs in vivo, allowing for adaptive immunity to develop many weeks to months later.

  13. Stearic acid-induced cardiac lipotoxicity is independent of cellular lipid and is mitigated by the fatty acids oleic and capric acid but not by the PPAR agonist troglitazone.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, Simon W; Lodhia, Parth; Lodha, Parth

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the potential of stearic acid to induce cardiomyocyte cell death and the hypothesis that the amount of cellular lipid is a determinant of cell death. In cardiomyocytes from embryonic chick heart, stearic acid (SA) produced a significant (P < 0.001) concentration-dependent increase in cell death with an ED(50) of 71 microM. In contrast, capric (C10:0) or oleic acid (OA; C18:1), at < 200 microM, did not alter cell viability. Stearic acid-induced cell death was significantly reduced by OA and to a lesser extent by capric acid. Neither OA nor capric acid altered cell death produced by potassium cyanide and deoxyglucose. Stearic acid (100 microM) induced a significant (P < 0.05) twofold increase in cellular lipid as assessed by Nile blue and Sudan Black staining. A role for cellular lipid in cardiomyocyte death was excluded because OA increased cellular lipid, at concentrations that did not induce cell death; OA did not alter SA-induced cellular fat stores but reduced cell death; and the PPARgamma; agonist troglitazone at concentrations that reduced cellular lipid content did not alter cell death. High concentrations of troglitazone, however, induced cell death. In summary, SA is a potent inducer of cardiac cell death and intracellular lipid accumulation. The amount of intracellular lipid, however, is not a determinant of cardiomyocyte cell death. Troglitazone has potential cardiotoxicity at high doses but, at lower concentrations, does not prevent cardiac lipotoxicity, which can be completely prevented by low concentrations of oleic acid.

  14. Adsorption of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist to Alum-Based Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Dampens Pro-T Helper 2 Activities and Enhances Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bortolatto, Juliana; Mirotti, Luciana; Rodriguez, Dunia; Gomes, Eliane; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum salts gels (alum) are TLR-independent adjuvants and have been used to boost antibody responses in alum-based vaccines such as diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT) triple vaccine. However, the pro-Th2 activity of alum-based vaccine formulations has not been fully appreciated. Here we found that alum-based tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine was biased toward a Th-2 profile as shown by TT-induced airway eosinophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production, and high levels of IgE anaphylactic antibodies. The adsorption into alum of prototypic TLR4 agonists such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli consistently dampened TT-induced Th2 activities without inducing IFNγ or Th1-like responses in the lung. Conversely, adsorption of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) extracted from Salmonella minnesota, which is a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β- (TRIF-) biased TLR4 agonist, was less effective in decreasing Th-2 responses. Importantly, in a situation with antigenic competition (OVA plus TT), TT-specific IgG1 or IgG2a was decreased compared with TT sensitization. Notably, LPS increased the production of IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibodies. In conclusion, the addition of LPS induces a more robust IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibody production and concomitantly decreases Th2-cellular and humoral responses, indicating a potential use of alum/TLR-based vaccines. PMID:26380316

  15. Cell Density-Dependent Increase in Tyrosine-Monophosphorylated ERK2 in MDCK Cells Expressing Active Ras or Raf

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Noriyuki; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is one of the principal hub proteins that transmit growth signals from upstream oncogene products including Ras and BRaf to downstream effector proteins. However, there are both reports supporting and refuting the increase in ERK activity in cancer tissues expressing the active Ras and BRaf proteins. We considered that the cell density might account for this discrepancy. To examine this possibility, we prepared Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells that expressed an active HRas, NRas, KRas, or BRaf and an ERK biosensor based on the principle of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). As we anticipated, expression of the active Ras or BRaf increased ERK activity at low cell densities. However, the ERK activity was markedly suppressed at high cell densities irrespective of the expression of the active Ras or BRaf. Western blotting analysis with Phos-tag gel revealed the decrease of tyrosine and threonine-diphosphorylated active ERK and the increase of tyrosine-monophosphorylated inactive ERK at high cell density. In addition, we found that calyculin A, an inhibitor for PPP-subfamily protein serine/threonine phosphatases, decreased the tyrosine-monophosphorylated ERK. Our study suggests that PPP-subfamily phosphatases may be responsible for cell density-dependent ERK dephosphorylation in cancer cells expressing active Ras or BRaf protein. PMID:27936234

  16. The dipeptide H-Trp-Glu-OH (WE) shows agonistic activity to peroxisome proliferator-activated protein-α and reduces hepatic lipid accumulation in lipid-loaded H4IIE cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yaoyao; Kim, Jong-Ho; Nam, Bora; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Ji Hae; Hwang, Kwang-Yeon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2014-07-01

    Dipeptides digested from dietary proteins can be directly absorbed by the intestine and delivered to the circulatory system. However, the dipeptides' metabolic roles and biological activities are largely unknown. Lipid-loaded HII4E cells stimulated with H-Trp-Glu-OH (WE) exhibited reduced lipid accumulation, of which the effect was abolished by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α gene knock down. A luciferase assay showed that the WE dipeptide induced PPARα transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. Surface plasmon resonance and time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses demonstrated that WE interacts directly with the PPARα ligand binding domain (KD, 120 μM; EC50, 83 μM). Cells stimulated with WE induced PPARα and its responsive genes and increased cellular fatty acid uptake. In conclusion, WE reduces hepatic lipid accumulation in lipid-loaded hepatocytes via the activation of PPARα by a direct interaction.

  17. Combined Mitigation of the Gastrointestinal and Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndromes by a Novel LPA2 Receptor-specific Non-lipid Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Renukadevi; Szabó, Erzsébet; Fells, James I.; Balogh, Andrea; Lim, Keng G.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Norman, Derek B.; Lee, Sue-Chin; Balazs, Louisa; Thomas, Fridtjof; Patil, Shivaputra; Emmons-Thompson, Karin; Boler, Alyssa; Strobos, Jur; McCool, Shannon W.; Yates, C. Ryan; Stabenow, Jennifer; Byrne, Gerrald I.; Miller, Duane D.; Tigyi, Gábor J.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological mitigation of injuries caused by high-dose ionizing radiation is an unsolved medical problem. A specific nonlipid agonists of the type 2 GPCR for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA2) 2-[4-(1,3-Dioxo-1H,3H-benzoisoquinolin-2-yl)butylsulfamoyl]benzoic acid (DBIBB) when administered with a postirradiation delay up to 72 hours reduced mortality of C57BL/6 mice but not in LPA2 KO mice. DBIBB mitigated the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome, increased intestinal crypt survival and enterocyte proliferation, and reduced apoptosis. DBIBB enhanced DNA repair by augmenting the resolution of γ–H2AX foci, increased clonogenic survival of irradiated IEC-6 cells, attenuated the radiation-induced death of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors and enhanced the survival of the granulocyte/macrophage lineage. DBIBB also increased the survival of mice suffering of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome after total body irradiation. DBIBB represents the first drug candidate capable of mitigating acute radiation syndrome caused by high-dose γ-radiation to the hematopoietic and gastrointestinal system. PMID:25619933

  18. Rosiglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist, fails to attenuate CLA-induced milk fat depression and hepatic lipid accumulation in lactating mice.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Diwakar; Teter, Beverly B; Delmonte, Pierluigi; Erdman, Richard A

    2014-07-01

    Our objective was to investigate the combination of rosiglitazone (ROSI) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on mammary and hepatic lipogenesis in lactating C57Bl/6 J mice. Twenty-four lactating mice were randomly assigned to one of four treatments applied from postpartum day 6 to day 10. Treatments included: (1) control diet, (2) control plus 1.5 % dietary CLA (CLA) substituted for soybean oil, (3) control plus daily intra-peritoneal (IP) rosiglitazone injections (10 mg/kg body weight) (ROSI), and (4) CLA plus ROSI (CLA-ROSI). Dam food intake and milk fat concentration were depressed with CLA. However, no effects were observed with ROSI. The CLA-induced milk fat depression was due to reduced expression for mammary lipogenic genes involved in de-novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis, FA uptake and desaturation, and triacyglycerol synthesis. Liver weight (g/100 g body weight) was increased by CLA due to an increase in lipid accumulation triggering a compensatory reduction in mRNA abundance of hepatic lipogenic enzymes, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase I and stearoyl-CoA desaturase I. On the contrary, no effects were observed with ROSI on hepatic and mammary lipogenic gene and enzyme expression. Overall, feeding CLA to lactating mice induced milk fat depression and increased hepatic lipid accumulation, probably due to the presence of trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomer, while ROSI failed to significantly attenuate both hepatic steatosis and reduction in milk fat content.

  19. The effects of lipid A on gamma-irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubničková, M.; Kuzmina, E. A.; Chausov, V. N.; Ravnachka, I.; Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The modulatory effects of lipid A (diphosphoryl lipid A (DLA) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA)) on apoptosis induction and DNA structure damage (single and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs, respectively)) in peripheral human blood lymphocytes are studied for 60Co gamma-irradiation. It is shown that in the presence of these agents the amount of apoptotic cells increases compared with the irradiated control samples. The effect is most strongly pronounced for DLA. In its presence, a significant increase is observed in the number of radiation-induced DNA SSBs and DSBs. Possible mechanisms are discussed of the modifying influence of the used agents on radiation-induced cell reactions

  20. AS04, an aluminum salt- and TLR4 agonist-based adjuvant system, induces a transient localized innate immune response leading to enhanced adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Didierlaurent, Arnaud M; Morel, Sandra; Lockman, Laurence; Giannini, Sandra L; Bisteau, Michel; Carlsen, Harald; Kielland, Anders; Vosters, Olivier; Vanderheyde, Nathalie; Schiavetti, Francesca; Larocque, Daniel; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Garçon, Nathalie

    2009-11-15

    Adjuvant System 04 (AS04) combines the TLR4 agonist MPL (3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A) and aluminum salt. It is a new generation TLR-based adjuvant licensed for use in human vaccines. One of these vaccines, the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Cervarix, is used in this study to elucidate the mechanism of action of AS04 in human cells and in mice. The adjuvant activity of AS04 was found to be strictly dependent on AS04 and the HPV Ags being injected at the same i.m. site within 24 h of each other. During this period, AS04 transiently induced local NF-kappaB activity and cytokine production. This led to an increased number of activated Ag-loaded dendritic cells and monocytes in the lymph node draining the injection site, which further increased the activation of Ag-specific T cells. AS04 was also found to directly stimulate those APCs in vitro but not directly stimulate CD4(+) T or B lymphocytes. These AS04-induced innate responses were primarily due to MPL. Aluminum salt appeared not to synergize with or inhibit MPL, but rather it prolonged the cytokine responses to MPL at the injection site. Altogether these results support a model in which the addition of MPL to aluminum salt enhances the vaccine response by rapidly triggering a local cytokine response leading to an optimal activation of APCs. The transient and confined nature of these responses provides further supporting evidence for the favorable safety profile of AS04 adjuvanted vaccines.

  1. Saroglitazar, a novel PPARα/γ agonist with predominant PPARα activity, shows lipid-lowering and insulin-sensitizing effects in preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Mukul R; Giri, Suresh R; Trivedi, Chitrang; Bhoi, Bibhuti; Rath, Akshyaya; Vanage, Geeta; Vyas, Purvi; Ranvir, Ramchandra; Patel, Pankaj R

    2015-01-01

    Saroglitazar is a novel nonthiazolidinediones (TZD) and nonfibric acid derivative designed to act as dual regulator of lipids and glucose metabolism by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). These studies evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of Saroglitazar in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models. The EC50 values of Saroglitazar assessed in HepG2 cells using PPAR transactivation assay for hPPARα and hPPARγ were 0.65 pmol/L and 3 nmol/L, respectively. In db/db mice, 12-day treatment with Saroglitazar (0.01–3 mg/kg per day, orally) caused dose-dependent reductions in serum triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids (FFA), and glucose. The ED50 for these effects was found to be 0.05, 0.19, and 0.19 mg/kg, respectively with highly significant (91%) reduction in serum insulin and AUC-glucose following oral glucose administration (59%) at 1 mg/kg dose. Significant reduction in serum TG (upto 90%) was also observed in Zucker fa/fa rats, Swiss albino mice, and in high fat -high cholesterol (HF-HC)-fed Golden Syrian hamsters. LDL cholesterol was significantly lowered in hApoB100/hCETP double transgenic mice and HF-HC diet fed Golden Syrian Hamsters. Hyperinsulinemic-Euglycemic clamp study in Zucker fa/fa rats demonstrated potent insulin-sensitizing activity. Saroglitazar also showed a significant decrease in SBP (22 mmHg) and increase (62.1%) in serum adiponectin levels in Zucker fa/fa rats. A 90-day repeated dose comparative study in Wistar rats and marmosets confirmed efficacy (TG lowering) potential of Saroglitazar and has indicated low risk of PPAR-associated side effects in humans. Based on efficacy and safety profile, Saroglitazar appears to have good potential as novel therapeutic agent for treatment of dyslipidemia and diabetes. PMID:26171220

  2. Influence of fine structure of lipid A on Limulus amebocyte lysate clotting and toxic activities.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, K; Qureshi, N; Raetz, C R; Ribi, E; Peterson, J; Cantrell, J L; Pearson, F C; Wiggins, J; Johnson, A G

    1984-01-01

    We examined the relationship between the fine structure of lipid A and the toxicity of endotoxin or lipopolysaccharides as measured by the Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL), rabbit pyrogenicity, chicken embryo lethal dose, and dermal Shwartzman reaction tests. Lipid A and lipid A-like compounds obtained from deep-rough mutants of Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli had a wide range of structural variations. These compounds included native lipopolysaccharides, diphosphoryl and monophosphoryl lipid A's, and lipid X (a monosaccharide). The LAL test was positive for all lipids tested with lysates from Travenol Laboratories and from Associates of Cape Cod (2.9 X 10(3) to 2.6 X 10(7) endotoxin units per mg), except for O-deacylated and dephosphorylated lipid X, which were negative. The Mallinckrodt lysate gave negative tests for lipid X. In the rabbit pyrogenicity and chicken embryo lethal dose tests, only native lipopolysaccharide and diphosphoryl lipid A's were judged toxic. The Shwartzman reaction was positive for a specific purified diphosphoryl lipid A (thin-layer chromatography-3 fraction) but negative for the purified monophosphoryl lipid A (also a thin-layer chromatography-3 fraction). These results show that the LAL test is not a valid measure of all parameters of toxicity of a lipid A or lipid A-like compound and can yield false-positive results. However, these findings are not in conflict with the widespread use of the LAL assay for pyrogens in the pharmaceutical industry since a good correlation exists between LAL results and pyrogenicity when undegraded endotoxin is evaluated in parallel assays. Images PMID:6378795

  3. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna C.; Thomas, Merlin C.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARα agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARγ agonists, and more recently dual PPARα/γ coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARγ receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:18288280

  4. Radioprotective properties of detoxified lipid A from Salmonella minnesota R595

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.L.; Walden, T.L.; Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Fuchs, P.

    1986-07-01

    In the past, the toxicity of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or its principal bioactive component, lipid A, has detracted from their potential use as radioprotectants. Recently, a relatively nontoxic monophosphoryl Lipid A (LAM) that retains many of the immunobiologic properties of LPS has been isolated from a polysaccharide deficient Re mutant strain of Salmonella minnesota (R595). The ability of the native endotoxic glycolipid (GL) from S. minnesota (R595) as well as diphosphoryl lipid A (LAD) and nontoxic monophosphoryl lipid A (LAM) derived from GL to protect LPS responsive (CD2F1 or C3H/HeN) and nonresponsive (C3H/HeJ) mice from 60Co gamma irradiation has been studied. Administration of GL, LAD, or LAM to CD2F1 or C3H/HeN mice (400 micrograms/kg) 24 h prior to exposure provided significant radioprotection. No protection was afforded to C3H/HeJ mice. Experiments were also conducted to determine the relative abilities of GL, LAD, and LAM to stimulate hematopoiesis as reflected by the endogenous spleen colony (E-CFU) assay. Protection was not correlated with the ability of these substances to increase E-CFUs or to induce colony-stimulating activity (CSA).

  5. Liposomes containing lipid A: an effective, safe, generic adjuvant system for synthetic vaccines.

    PubMed

    Alving, Carl R; Rao, Mangala; Steers, Nicholas J; Matyas, Gary R; Mayorov, Alexander V

    2012-06-01

    Liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) have previously exhibited considerable potency and safety in human trials with a variety of candidate vaccines, including vaccines to malaria, HIV-1 and several different types of cancer. The long history of research and development of MPLA and liposomal MPLA as vaccine adjuvants reveals that there are numerous opportunities for creation and development of generic (nonproprietary) adjuvant system formulations with these materials that are not only highly potent and safe, but also readily available as native materials or as synthetic compounds. They are easily manufactured as potentially inexpensive and easy to use adjuvant systems and might be effective even with synthetic peptides as antigens.

  6. [Melatonin receptor agonist].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland and is involved in the regulation of human sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms. The melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus play a pivotal role in the sleep-wake regulation. Based on the fact that MT1 receptors are involved in human sleep onset process, melatonin receptor agonists have been developed to treat insomnia. In this article, we first reviewed functions of melatonin receptors with special reference to MT1 and MT2, and properties and clinical application of melatonin receptor agonists as hypnotics.

  7. PADMA-28, a traditional tibetan herbal preparation inhibits the respiratory burst in human neutrophils, the killing of epithelial cells by mixtures of oxidants and pro-inflammatory agonists and peroxidation of lipids.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, I; Sadovnik, M; Sallon, S; Milo-Goldzweig, I; Mechoulam, R; Breuer, A; Gibbs, D; Varani, J; Roberts, S; Cleator, E; Singh, N

    1999-01-01

    Both aqueous and methanolic fractions derived from the Tibetan preparation PADMA-28 (a mixture of 22 plants) used as an anti-atherosclerotic agent, and which is non-cytolytic to a variety of mammalian cells, were found to strongly inhibit (1) the killing of epithelial cells in culture induced by 'cocktails' comprising oxidants, membrane perforating agents and proteinases; (2) the generation of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence in human neutrophils stimulated by opsonized bacteria; (3) the peroxidation of intralipid (a preparation rich in phopholipids) induced in the presence of copper; and (4) the activity of neutrophil elastase. It is proposed that PADMA-28 might prove beneficial for the prevention of cell damage induced by synergism among pro-inflammatory agonists which is central in the initiation of tissue destruction in inflammatory and infectious conditions.

  8. Melatonin agonists and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sally A; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Dawson, Drew

    2010-02-01

    The ability of melatonin to shift biological rhythms is well known. As a result, melatonin has been used in the treatment of various circadian rhythm sleep disorders, such as advanced and delayed sleep phase disorders, jet lag and shiftwork disorder. The current evidence for melatonin being efficacious in the treatment of primary insomnia is less compelling. The development of agents that are selective for melatonin receptors provides opportunity to further elucidate the actions of melatonin and its receptors and to develop novel treatments for specific types of sleep disorders. The agonists reviewed here - ramelteon, tasimelteon and agomelatine - all appear to be efficacious in the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders and some types of insomnia. However, further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of action, particularly for insomnia. Clinical application of the agonists requires a good understanding of their phase-dependent properties. Long-term effects of melatonin should be evaluated in large-scale, independent randomized controlled trials.

  9. Beta-Adrenergic Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Barisione, Giovanni; Baroffio, Michele; Crimi, Emanuele; Brusasco, Vito

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonists are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptoms-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. In this article, we first review the basic mechanisms by which the β2-adrenergic system contributes to the control of airway smooth muscle tone. Then, we go on describing the structural characteristics of β2-AR and the molecular basis of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and mechanisms of its desensitization/ dysfunction. In particular, phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A and β-adrenergic receptor kinase are examined in detail. Finally, we discuss the pivotal role of inhaled β2-AR agonists in the treatment of asthma and the concerns about their safety that have been recently raised. PMID:27713285

  10. Ethyl 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzoate is an agonistic ligand for liver X receptor that induces cholesterol efflux from macrophages without affecting lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Minh-Hien; Jia, Yaoyao; Jun, Hee-jin; Lee, Ji-Hae; Lee, Dong-Ho; Hwang, Bang-Yeon; Kim, Woo-Jin; Lee, Hak-Ju; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-06-15

    The present study reports a novel liver X receptor (LXR) activator, ethyl 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzoate (ETB), isolated from Celtis biondii. Using a reporter gene assay, time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we showed that ETB directly bound to and stimulated the transcriptional activity of LXR-α and LXR-β. In macrophages, hepatocytes, and intestinal cells, ETB suppressed cellular cholesterol accumulation in a dose-dependent manner and induced the transcriptional activation of LXR-α/-β-responsive genes. Notably, ETB did not induce lipogenic gene expression or cellular triglyceride accumulation in hepatocytes. These results suggest that ETB is a dual-LXR modulator that regulates the expression of key genes in cholesterol homeostasis in multiple cells without inducing lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells.

  11. Lipid IVa incompletely activates MyD88-independent Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in mouse macrophage cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Norihiko; Muroi, Masashi; Sugiura, Yuka; Tanamoto, Ken-ichi

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the difference in the effect of synthetic lipid A compounds on MyD88-dependent and -independent Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in mouse macrophage cells. At higher concentrations, Escherichia coli-type hexa-acylated lipid A 506, Salmonella-type hepta-acylated lipid A 516, the lipid A precursor lipid IVa and monophosphoryl lipid A induced similar levels of production of the MyD88-dependent cytokine IL-1β although their potencies varied, whereas the maximum production of the MyD88-independent cytokine RANTES induced by lipid IVa was less than 50% that of other lipid A compounds. A maximum level of NF-κB activation, which is involved in IL-1β gene transcription, was also induced to a similar level by these four lipid A compounds, while the maximum level of IFN-β promoter activity induced during MyD88-independent signaling was also less than 50% for lipid IVa stimulation compared with other lipid A compounds. Early IκBα phosphorylation activated by MyD88-dependent signaling was similarly induced by 506 and lipid IVa, whereas lipid IVa barely stimulated the phosphorylation of IRF3, a MyD88-independent transcription factor, although efficient phosphorylation was observed with 506 stimulation. These results indicate that lipid IVa has limited activity toward MyD88-independent signaling of TLR4, in macrophage cell lines, despite having efficient activity in the MyD88-dependent pathway.

  12. Agonist-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper looks at ion channels as an example of the pharmacologist's stock in trade, the action of an agonist on a receptor to produce a response. Looked at in this way, ion channels have been helpful because they are still the only system which is simple enough for quantitative investigation of transduction mechanisms. A short history is given of attempts to elucidate what happens between the time when agonist first binds, and the time when the channel opens. PMID:16402101

  13. Chemical Structure of Lipid A Isolated from Flavobacterium meningosepticum Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hitomi; Haishima, Yuji; Iida, Takatoshi; Tanaka, Akira; Tanamoto, Ken-ichi

    1998-01-01

    The chemical structure of the lipid A of the lipopolysaccharide component isolated from Flavobacterium meningosepticum IFO 12535 was elucidated. Methylation and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses showed that two kinds of hydrophilic backbone exist in the free lipid A: a β (1→6)-linked 2-amino-2-deoxy-d-glucose, which is usually present in enterobacterial lipid A’s, and a 2-amino-6-O-(2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-β-d-glucopyranosyl)-2-deoxy-d-glucose, in a molar ratio of 1.00:0.35. Both backbones were α-glycosidically phosphorylated in position 1, and the hydroxyl groups at positions 4, 4′, and 6′ were unsubstituted. Liquid secondary ion-mass spectrometry revealed a pseudomolecular ion at m/z 1673 [M-H]− as a major monophosphoryl lipid A component carrying five acyl groups. Fatty acid analysis showed that the lipid A contained 1 mol each of amide-linked (R)-3-OH iC17:0, ester-linked (R)-3-OH iC15:0, amide-linked (R)-3-O-(iC15:0)-iC17:0, and both amide- and ester-linked (R)-3-OH C16:0. Fatty acid distribution analyses using several mass spectrometry determinations demonstrated that the former two constituents were distributed on positions 2 and 3 of the reducing terminal unit of the backbones and that the latter two were attached to the 2′ and 3′ positions in the nonreducing terminal residue. PMID:9683486

  14. Prophylactic Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Vaccines Adjuvanted with Stable Emulsion and Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist Induce a Robust HSV-2-Specific Cell-Mediated Immune Response, Protect against Symptomatic Disease, and Reduce the Latent Viral Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Michael T; Marshall, Jason D; Dorwart, Michael R; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Tummala, Padmaja; Yu, Li; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Sloan, Derek D

    2017-02-22

    Several prophylactic vaccines targeting HSV-2 have failed in the clinic to demonstrate a sustained depression in viral shedding or protection from recurrences. Although these vaccines have generated high titers of neutralizing antibodies, their induction of robust CD8 T cells has largely been unreported, even though evidence for the importance of HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cells is mounting in animal models and in translational studies involving subjects with active HSV-2-specific immune responses. We developed a subunit vaccine composed of the neutralizing antibody (nAb) targets gD and gB, the novel T cell antigen and tegument protein UL40, and we compared this to a whole-inactivated virus vaccine (FI-HSV-2). We evaluated different formulations in combination with several Th1-inducing TLR agonists in vivo. In mice, the TLR9 agonist cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotide formulated in a squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion promoted the most robust, functional HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cell responses and high neutralizing antibodies, demonstrating superiority to vaccines adjuvanted by monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL)/alum. We further established that FI-HSV-2 alone or in combination with adjuvants as well as adjuvanted subunit vaccines were successful in the induction of nAbs and T cell responses in guinea pigs. These immunological responses were coincident with a suppression of vaginal HSV-2 shedding, low lesion scores, and a reduction in latent HSV-2 DNA in dorsal root ganglia to undetectable levels. These data support the further preclinical and clinical development of prophylactic HSV-2 vaccines that contain appropriate antigen and adjuvant components responsible for programming elevated CD8 T cell responses.IMPORTANCE Millions of people worldwide are infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and to date, an efficacious prophylactic vaccine has not met the rigors of clinical trials. Attempts to develop a vaccine have focused primarily on

  15. PPARgamma agonists as therapeutics for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Landreth, Gary; Jiang, Qingguang; Mandrekar, Shweta; Heneka, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of beta-amyloid within the brain parenchyma and is accompanied by the impairment of neuronal metabolism and function, leading to extensive neuronal loss. The disease involves the perturbation of synaptic function, energy, and lipid metabolism. The development of amyloid plaques results in the induction of a microglial-mediated inflammatory response. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is a ligand-activated transcription factor whose biological actions are to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism and suppress inflammatory gene expression. Thus, agonists of this receptor represent an attractive therapeutic target for AD. There is now an extensive body of evidence that has demonstrated the efficacy of PPARgamma agonists in ameliorating disease-related pathology and improved learning and memory in animal models of AD. Recent clinical trials of the PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone have shown significant improvement in memory and cognition in AD patients. Thus, PPARgamma represents an important new therapeutic target in treating AD.

  16. A Lipid Gate for the Peripheral Control of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Andrea G.; Seybold, Virginia; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Cells in injured and inflamed tissues produce a number of proalgesic lipid-derived mediators, which excite nociceptive neurons by activating selective G-protein-coupled receptors or ligand-gated ion channels. Recent work has shown that these proalgesic factors are counteracted by a distinct group of lipid molecules that lower nociceptor excitability and attenuate nociception in peripheral tissues. Analgesic lipid mediators include endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors (endocannabinoids), lipid-amide agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, and products of oxidative metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids via cytochrome P450 and other enzyme pathways. Evidence indicates that these lipid messengers are produced and act at different stages of inflammation and the response to tissue injury, and may be part of a peripheral gating mechanism that regulates the access of nociceptive information to the spinal cord and the brain. Growing knowledge about this peripheral control system may be used to discover safer medicines for pain. PMID:25392487

  17. The antagonist activity of lipid IVa on the stimulation by lipid A of TNF-alpha production from canine blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Takasawa, Kenji; Kano, Rui; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2011-09-15

    Lipid A, the active component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), exists in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and binds to the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex. On the other hand, the synthetic precursor of Escherichia coli lipid A, tetraacylated lipid IVa, is an agonist for TLR4 and MD-2 complex in murine, equine and feline cells but is an antagonist for lipid A in human cells. The aim of the study was to examine the function of canine Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex on canine blood mononuclear cells (BMC), by analyzing lipid A- or lipid IVa-induction of TNF-α production from these cells in order to understand canine innate immune system. After 5-h culture of canine BMC with lipid A (lipid A culture) or lipid IVa (lipid IVa culture), the TNF-α, as determined by ELISA, had increased in the supernatants of the lipid A cultures in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the TNF-α was undetectable in supernatant of lipid IVa-treated cultures. The TNF-α was statistically significantly different between the lipid A and lipid IVa cultures (100 and 1000 ng/ml). TNF-α production from canine BMC was inhibited, in a lipid IVa-dose-dependent manner, when the BMC were pre-cultured with lipid IVa for 60 min and then cultured with lipid A for 5h, while in control BMC cultures production if TNF-α was unchanged. These results indicate that the TNF-α production stimulated by lipid A was competed out by pre-exposing the BMC to lipid IVa. Thus, lipid A is an agonist for TNF-α production in canine BMC, whereas lipid IVa appears to be an antagonist against this lipid A stimulation of canine BMC.

  18. Retinoic Acid Receptor β2 Agonists Restore Glycemic Control In Diabetes and Reduce Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Trasino, Steven E.; Tang, Xiao-Han; Jessurun, Jose; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Retinoids (vitamin A (retinol), and structurally related molecules) possess metabolic modulating properties, prompting new interest in their role in the treatment of diabetes and fatty liver disease, but little is known about the effects of specific retinoic acid receptor (RAR) agonists in these diseases. Materials and Methods Synthetic agonists for retinoic acid receptor RARβ2 were administered to wild type (wt) mice in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced type 2 diabetes (T2D) and to ob/ob and db/db mice (genetic models of obesity-associated T2D). Results We demonstrate that administration of synthetic agonists for the retinoic acid receptor RARβ2 to either wild type (wt) mice in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced type 2 diabetes (T2D) or to ob/ob and db/db mice (genetic models of obesity-associated T2D) reduces hyperglycemia, peripheral insulin resistance, and body weight. Furthermore, RARβ2 agonists dramatically reduce steatosis, lipid peroxidation, and oxidative stress in the liver, pancreas, and kidneys of obese, diabetic mice. RARβ2 agonists also lower levels of mRNAs involved in lipogenesis, such as SREBP1 and FASN (fatty acid synthase), and increase mRNAs that mediate mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation, such as CPT1α, in these organs. RARβ2 agonists lower triglyceride levels in these organs, and in muscle. Conclusions Collectively, our data show that orally active, rapidly acting, high affinity pharmacological agonists for RARβ2 improve the diabetic phenotype while reducing lipid levels in key insulin target tissues. We suggest that RARβ2 agonists should be useful drugs for T2D therapy and for treatment of hepatic steatosis. PMID:26462866

  19. Dopamine agonist therapy in hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Webster, J

    1999-12-01

    Introduction of the dopamine agonist bromocriptine heralded a major advance in the management of hyperprolactinemic disorders. Although its side effects of nausea, dizziness and headache and its short elimination half-life are limiting factors, its efficacy established it as a reference compound against the activity of which several dopamine agonists, like pergolide, lysuride, metergoline, terguride and dihydroergocristine, fell by the wayside. More recently, two new agents, cabergoline and quinagolide, have been introduced and appear to offer considerable advantages over bromocriptine. Cabergoline, an ergoline D2 agonist, has a long plasma half-life that enables once- or twice-weekly administration. Quinagolide, in contrast, is a nonergot D2 agonist with an elimination half-life intermediate between those of bromocriptine and cabergoline, allowing the drug to be administered once daily. Comparative studies indicate that cabergoline is clearly superior to bromocriptine in efficacy (prolactin suppression, restoration of gonadal function) and in tolerability. In similar studies, quinagolide appeared to have similar efficacy and superior tolerability to that of bromocriptine. Results of a small crossover study indicate that cabergoline is better tolerated, with a trend toward activity superior to that of quinagolide. In hyperprolactinemic men and in women not seeking to become pregnant, cabergoline may be regarded as the treatment of choice.

  20. Lxr-driven enterocyte lipid droplet formation delays transport of ingested lipids.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Schlegel, Amnon

    2014-09-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrs) are master regulators of cholesterol catabolism, driving the elimination of cholesterol from the periphery to the lumen of the intestine. Development of pharmacological agents to activate Lxrs has been hindered by synthetic Lxr agonists' induction of hepatic lipogenesis and hypertriglyceridemia. Elucidating the function of Lxrs in regulating enterocyte lipid handling might identify novel aspects of lipid metabolism that are pharmacologically amenable. We took a genetic approach centered on the single Lxr gene nr1h3 in zebrafish to study the role of Lxr in enterocyte lipid metabolism. Loss of nr1h3 function causes anticipated gene regulatory changes and cholesterol intolerance, collectively reflecting high evolutionary conservation of zebrafish Lxra function. Intestinal nr1h3 activation delays transport of absorbed neutral lipids, with accumulation of neutral lipids in enterocyte cytoplasmic droplets. This delay in transport of ingested neutral lipids protects animals from hypercholesterolemia and hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet. On a gene regulatory level, Lxra induces expression of acsl3a, which encodes acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 3a, a lipid droplet-anchored protein that directs fatty acyl chains into lipids. Forced overexpression of acls3a in enterocytes delays, in part, the appearance of neutral lipids in the vasculature of zebrafish larvae. Activation of Lxr in the intestine cell-autonomously regulates the rate of delivery of absorbed lipids by inducting a temporary lipid intestinal droplet storage depot.

  1. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-06-18

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca(2+) dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved.

  2. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-01-01

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca2+ dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved. PMID:23778582

  3. Identification and in Vivo Evaluation of Liver X Receptor β-Selective Agonists for the Potential Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Stachel, Shawn J; Zerbinatti, Celina; Rudd, Michael T; Cosden, Mali; Suon, Sokreine; Nanda, Kausik K; Wessner, Keith; DiMuzio, Jillian; Maxwell, Jill; Wu, Zhenhua; Uslaner, Jason M; Michener, Maria S; Szczerba, Peter; Brnardic, Edward; Rada, Vanessa; Kim, Yuntae; Meissner, Robert; Wuelfing, Peter; Yuan, Yang; Ballard, Jeanine; Holahan, Marie; Klein, Daniel J; Lu, Jun; Fradera, Xavier; Parthasarathy, Gopal; Uebele, Victor N; Chen, Zhongguo; Li, Yingjie; Li, Jian; Cooke, Andrew J; Bennett, D Jonathan; Bilodeau, Mark T; Renger, John

    2016-04-14

    Herein, we describe the development of a functionally selective liver X receptor β (LXRβ) agonist series optimized for Emax selectivity, solubility, and physical properties to allow efficacy and safety studies in vivo. Compound 9 showed central pharmacodynamic effects in rodent models, evidenced by statistically significant increases in apolipoprotein E (apoE) and ATP-binding cassette transporter levels in the brain, along with a greatly improved peripheral lipid safety profile when compared to those of full dual agonists. These findings were replicated by subchronic dosing studies in non-human primates, where cerebrospinal fluid levels of apoE and amyloid-β peptides were increased concomitantly with an improved peripheral lipid profile relative to that of nonselective compounds. These results suggest that optimization of LXR agonists for Emax selectivity may have the potential to circumvent the adverse lipid-related effects of hepatic LXR activity.

  4. Releasable layer-by-layer assembly of stabilized lipid nanocapsules on microneedles for enhanced transcutaneous vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    DeMuth, Peter C; Moon, James J; Suh, Heikyung; Hammond, Paula T; Irvine, Darrell J

    2012-09-25

    Here we introduce a new approach for transcutaneous drug delivery, using microneedles coated with stabilized lipid nanocapsules, for delivery of a model vaccine formulation. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microneedle arrays were coated with multilayer films via layer-by-layer assembly of a biodegradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) and negatively charged interbilayer-cross-linked multilamellar lipid vesicles (ICMVs). To test the potential of these nanocapsule-coated microneedles for vaccine delivery, we loaded ICMVs with a protein antigen and the molecular adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A. Following application of microneedle arrays to the skin of mice for 5 min, (PBAE/ICMV) films were rapidly transferred from microneedle surfaces into the cutaneous tissue and remained in the skin following removal of the microneedle arrays. Multilayer films implanted in the skin dispersed ICMV cargos in the treated tissue over the course of 24 h in vivo, allowing for uptake of the lipid nanocapsules by antigen presenting cells in the local tissue and triggering their activation in situ. Microneedle-mediated transcutaneous vaccination with ICMV-carrying multilayers promoted robust antigen-specific humoral immune responses with a balanced generation of multiple IgG isotypes, whereas bolus delivery of soluble or vesicle-loaded antigen via intradermal injection or transcutaneous vaccination with microneedles encapsulating soluble protein elicited weak, IgG(1)-biased humoral immune responses. These results highlight the potential of lipid nanocapsules delivered by microneedles as a promising platform for noninvasive vaccine delivery applications.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of pyrimidine derivatives with diverse azabicyclic ether/amine as novel GPR119 agonist.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zunhua; Fang, Yuanying; Park, Haeil

    2017-04-02

    A class of novel pyrimidine derivatives bearing diverse conformationally restricted azabicyclic ether/amine were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their GPR119 agonist activities against type 2 diabetes. Most compounds exhibited superior hEC50 values to endogenous lipid oleoylethanolamide (OEA). Analogs with 2-fluoro substitution in the aryl ring showed more potent GPR119 activation than those without fluorine. Especially compound 27m synthesized from endo-azabicyclic alcohol was observed to have the best EC50 value (1.2nM) and quite good agonistic activity (112.2% max) as a full agonist.

  6. Agonistic sounds signal male quality in the Lusitanian toadfish.

    PubMed

    Amorim, M Clara P; Conti, Carlotta; Modesto, Teresa; Gonçalves, Amparo; Fonseca, Paulo J

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic communication during agonistic behaviour is widespread in fishes. Yet, compared to other taxa, little is known on the information content of fish agonistic calls and their effect on territorial defence. Lusitanian toadfish males (Halobatrachus didactylus) are highly territorial during the breeding season and use sounds (boatwhistles, BW) to defend nests from intruders. BW present most energy in either the fundamental frequency, set by the contraction rate of the sonic muscles attached to the swimbladder, or in the harmonics, which are multiples of the fundamental frequency. Here we investigated if temporal and spectral features of BW produced during territorial defence reflect aspects of male quality that may be important in resolving disputes. We found that higher mean pulse period (i.e. lower fundamental frequency) reflected higher levels of 11-ketotestosterone (11KT), the main teleost androgen which, in turn, was significantly related with male condition (relative body mass and glycogen content). BW dominant harmonic mean and variability decreased with sonic muscle lipid content. We found no association between BW duration and male quality. Taken together, these results suggest that the spectral content of fish agonistic sounds may signal male features that are key in fight outcome.

  7. Novel diazabicycloalkane delta opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Loriga, Giovanni; Lazzari, Paolo; Manca, Ilaria; Ruiu, Stefania; Falzoi, Matteo; Murineddu, Gabriele; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Pinna, Giovanni; Pinna, Gérard Aimè

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the investigation of diazabicycloalkane cores as potential new scaffolds for the development of novel analogues of the previously reported diazatricyclodecane selective delta (δ) opioid agonists, as conformationally constrained homologues of the reference δ agonist (+)-4-[(αR)-α((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80). In particular, we have simplified the diazatricyclodecane motif of δ opioid agonist prototype 1a with bridged bicyclic cores. 3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptane, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane, and 3,10-diazabicyclo[4.3.1]decane were adopted as core motifs of the novel derivatives. The compounds were synthesized and biologically assayed as racemic (3-5) or diastereoisomeric (6,7) mixtures. All the novel compounds 3-7 showed δ agonism behaviour and remarkable affinity to δ receptors. Amongst the novel derivatives, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane based compound 4 evidenced improved δ affinity and selectivity relative to SNC80.

  8. Lipid Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mashaghi, Samaneh; Jadidi, Tayebeh; Koenderink, Gijsje; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that covers a vast and diverse array of devices and machines derived from engineering, physics, materials science, chemistry and biology. These devices have found applications in biomedical sciences, such as targeted drug delivery, bio-imaging, sensing and diagnosis of pathologies at early stages. In these applications, nano-devices typically interface with the plasma membrane of cells. On the other hand, naturally occurring nanostructures in biology have been a source of inspiration for new nanotechnological designs and hybrid nanostructures made of biological and non-biological, organic and inorganic building blocks. Lipids, with their amphiphilicity, diversity of head and tail chemistry, and antifouling properties that block nonspecific binding to lipid-coated surfaces, provide a powerful toolbox for nanotechnology. This review discusses the progress in the emerging field of lipid nanotechnology. PMID:23429269

  9. Regulation of membrane cholecystokinin-2 receptor by agonists enables classification of partial agonists as biased agonists.

    PubMed

    Magnan, Rémi; Masri, Bernard; Escrieut, Chantal; Foucaud, Magali; Cordelier, Pierre; Fourmy, Daniel

    2011-02-25

    Given the importance of G-protein-coupled receptors as pharmacological targets in medicine, efforts directed at understanding the molecular mechanism by which pharmacological compounds regulate their presence at the cell surface is of paramount importance. In this context, using confocal microscopy and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, we have investigated internalization and intracellular trafficking of the cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R) in response to both natural and synthetic ligands with different pharmacological features. We found that CCK and gastrin, which are full agonists on CCK2R-induced inositol phosphate production, rapidly and abundantly stimulate internalization. Internalized CCK2R did not rapidly recycle to plasma membrane but instead was directed to late endosomes/lysosomes. CCK2R endocytosis involves clathrin-coated pits and dynamin and high affinity and prolonged binding of β-arrestin1 or -2. Partial agonists and antagonists on CCK2R-induced inositol phosphate formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation did not stimulate CCK2R internalization or β-arrestin recruitment to the CCK2R but blocked full agonist-induced internalization and β-arrestin recruitment. The extreme C-terminal region of the CCK2R (and more precisely phosphorylatable residues Ser(437)-Xaa(438)-Thr(439)-Thr(440)-Xaa(441)-Ser(442)-Thr(443)) were critical for β-arrestin recruitment. However, this region and β-arrestins were dispensable for CCK2R internalization. In conclusion, this study allowed us to classify the human CCK2R as a member of class B G-protein-coupled receptors with regard to its endocytosis features and identified biased agonists of the CCK2R. These new important insights will allow us to investigate the role of internalized CCK2R·β-arrestin complexes in cancers expressing this receptor and to develop new diagnosis and therapeutic strategies targeting this receptor.

  10. Substrate specificity of the agonist-stimulated release of polyunsaturated fatty acids from vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Garcia, M.C.; Sprecher, H. )

    1989-11-01

    Stimulation of vascular endothelial cells with agonists such as histamine and thrombin results in release of arachidonic acid from membrane lipids and subsequent eicosanoid synthesis. As shown previously, the agonist-stimulated deacylation is specific for arachidonate, eicosapentaenoate, and 5,8,11-eicosatrienoate. This study has utilized radiolabeled fatty acids differing in chain length and position of double bonds to further elucidate the fatty acyl specificity of agonist-stimulated deacylation. Replicate wells of confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 14C-labeled fatty acids and then challenged with histamine, thrombin, or the calcium ionophore A23187. Comparison of the results obtained with isomeric eicosatetraenoic fatty acids with initial double bonds at carbons 4, 5, or 6 indicated that the deacylation induced by all three agonists exhibited marked specificity for the cis-5 double bond. Lack of stringent chain length specificity was indicated by agonist-stimulated release of 5,8,11,14- tetraenoic fatty acids with 18, 19, 20, and 21 carbons. Release of 5,8,14-(14C)eicosatrienoate was two-to threefold that of 5,11,14-(14C)eicosatrienoate, thus indicating that the cis-8 double bond may also contribute to the stringent recognition by the agonist-sensitive phospholipase. The present study has also demonstrated that histamine, thrombin, and A23187 do not stimulate release of docosahexaenoate from endothelial cells.

  11. Reproduction and juvenile animal toxicology studies in the rat with a new allergy vaccine adjuvanted with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL(®)) for the treatment of grass pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Baldrick, Paul; Hewings, Simon; Skinner, Murray

    2011-11-01

    Pollinex(®) Quattro Grass has been developed for the prevention or relief of allergic symptoms caused by pollen in both adults and children. Reproduction and juvenile animal toxicology studies have been performed. Subcutaneous injection on Day 14 prior to pairing and on Days 6 and 13 of gestation to pregnant rats at 2000SU/0.5 mL elicited no signs of maternal or embryo-foetal toxicity. Mating, fertility, fecundity and pup parameters were all unaffected by treatment. Once-weekly subcutaneous administration at ascending doses of 300, 800, 2000 and 2000SU/0.5 mL followed by a 4 week non-dose period to juvenile rats from 3 weeks of age showed no signs of obvious toxicity. As in a previously performed adult animal toxicology study with the vaccine, not unexpected, but relatively minor, immuno-stimulatory effects were seen in this study along with injection site reaction which can largely be attributed to the presence of tyrosine in the formulation.

  12. Antigen-Displaying Lipid-Enveloped PLGA Nanoparticles as Delivery Agents for a Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Moon, James J.; Suh, Heikyung; Polhemus, Mark E.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Yadava, Anjali; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2012-01-01

    The parasite Plasmodium vivax is the most frequent cause of malaria outside of sub-Saharan Africa, but efforts to develop viable vaccines against P. vivax so far have been inadequate. We recently developed pathogen-mimicking polymeric vaccine nanoparticles composed of the FDA-approved biodegradable polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) “enveloped” by a lipid membrane. In this study, we sought to determine whether this vaccine delivery platform could be applied to enhance the immune response against P. vivax sporozoites. A candidate malaria antigen, VMP001, was conjugated to the lipid membrane of the particles, and an immunostimulatory molecule, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), was incorporated into the lipid membranes, creating pathogen-mimicking nanoparticle vaccines (VMP001-NPs). Vaccination with VMP001-NPs promoted germinal center formation and elicited durable antigen-specific antibodies with significantly higher titers and more balanced Th1/Th2 responses in vivo, compared with vaccines composed of soluble protein mixed with MPLA. Antibodies raised by NP vaccinations also exhibited enhanced avidity and affinity toward the domains within the circumsporozoite protein implicated in protection and were able to agglutinate live P. vivax sporozoites. These results demonstrate that these VMP001-NPs are promising vaccines candidates that may elicit protective immunity against P. vivax sporozoites. PMID:22328935

  13. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  14. Dopamine receptor agonists, partial agonists and psychostimulant addiction.

    PubMed

    Pulvirenti, L; Koob, G F

    1994-10-01

    Despite the epidemic growth of psychostimulant addiction over the past years, few pharmacological means of intervention are available to date for clinical treatment. This is of importance since the withdrawal syndrome that follows abstinence from drugs such as cocaine and the amphetamines is characterized, among other symptoms, by intense craving for the abused drug, and this is considered a critical factor leading into relapse of drug use. In this article, Luigi Pulvirenti and George Koob focus on the modulatory role shown by drugs acting at the dopamine receptor on the various phases of psychostimulant dependence in preclinical models and in human studies, and suggest that a class of compounds with partial agonist properties at the dopamine receptor may have therapeutic potential.

  15. Beta-agonists and animal welfare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of beta-agonists in animal feed is a high profile topic within the U.S. as consumers and activist groups continue to question its safety. The only beta-agonist currently available for use in swine is ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC). This is available as Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health – FDA a...

  16. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride.

  17. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  18. Identification of a novel selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist, 2-methyl-2-(4-{3-[1-(4-methylbenzyl)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]propyl}phenoxy)propanoic acid (LY518674), that produces marked changes in serum lipids and apolipoprotein A-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jai Pal; Kauffman, Raymond; Bensch, William; Wang, Guoming; McClelland, Pam; Bean, James; Montrose, Chahrzad; Mantlo, Nathan; Wagle, Asavari

    2005-09-01

    Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) is an important risk factor of coronary artery disease (CAD). Optimum therapy for raising HDL-c is still not available. Identification of novel HDL-raising agents would produce a major impact on CAD. In this study, we have identified a potent (IC50 approximately 24 nM) and selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonist, 2-methyl-2-(4-{3-[1-(4-methylbenzyl)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]propyl}phenoxy)propanoic acid (LY518674). In human apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-1) transgenic mice, LY518674 produced a dose-dependent increase in serum HDL-c, resulting in 208 +/- 15% elevation at optimum dose. A new synthesis of apoA-1 contributed to the increase in HDL-c. LY518674 increased apoA-1 mRNA levels in liver. Moreover, liver slices from animals treated with LY518674 secreted 3- to 6-fold more apoA-1 than control liver slices. In cultured hepatocytes, LY518674 produced 50% higher apoA-1 secretion, which was associated with increase in radiolabeled methionine incorporation in apoA-1. Thus, LY518674 is a potent and selective PPARalpha agonist that produced a much greater increase in serum HDL-c than the known fibrate drugs. The increase in HDL-c was associated with de novo synthesis of apoA-1.

  19. Agonist-stimulated alveolar macrophages: apoptosis and phospholipid signaling.

    PubMed

    Lütjohann, J; Spiess, A N; Gercken, G

    1998-08-01

    Bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) were labeled with [3H]-choline or [3H]-ethanolamine and exposed to quartz dust, metal oxide-coated silica particles, Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor promotor 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (PMA). The activation of phospholipases A2, C and D (PLA2, PLC and PLD) acting on phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation and liquid scintillation counting of water- and lipid-soluble phospholipid metabolites. Exposure of BAM to quartz dust, metal oxide-coated silica particles, and LPS led to a transient PLD activation while treatment with PMA caused a prolonged rise in PLD activity. LPS and quartz dust induced a short-term increase of PLC cleavage products. All agonists caused a transient activation of PLA2. To induce apoptosis, BAM were stimulated with C8-ceramide, calcium-ionophore 23187, or gliotoxin. Apoptosis was investigated by qualitative and quantitative methods like flow cytometry, propidium iodide/Hoechst 33258 double staining, Cell Death Detection ELISA, and electrophoretical detection of DNA fragmentation. All three agonists led to apoptosis of BAM in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. After stimulation with gliotoxin an increase in ceramide and a drastic decrease in sphingosine-1-phosphate levels were observed, suggesting an involvement of these sphingolipids in gliotoxin-mediated apoptosis.

  20. [Impact of anti-diabetic therapy based on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on the cardiovascular risk of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Camafort-Babkowski, Miguel

    2013-08-17

    Anti-diabetic drugs have, in addition to their well-known glucose lowering-effect, different effects in the rest of cardiovascular factors that are associated with diabetes mellitus. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been incorporated to the therapeutic arsenal of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonists on different cardiovascular risk factors, mediated by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on the control of hyperglycaemia and the GLP-1 receptor agonists effect on other cardiovascular risk factors (weight control, blood pressure control, lipid profile and all other cardiovascular risk biomarkers). In addition, we present the emerging evidence with regards to the impact that GLP-1 receptor agonists therapy could have in the reduction of cardiovascular events and the currently ongoing studies addressing this issue.

  1. Investigation of the mechanism of agonist and inverse agonist action at D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Lin, Hong; Strange, Philip G

    2004-05-01

    This study investigated, for the D2 dopamine receptor, the relation between the ability of agonists and inverse agonists to stabilise different states of the receptor and their relative efficacies. Ki values for agonists were determined in competition versus the binding of the antagonist [3H]spiperone. Competition data were fitted best by a two-binding site model (with the exception of bromocriptine, for which a one-binding site model provided the best fit) and agonist affinities for the higher (Kh) (G protein-coupled) and lower affinity (Kl) (G protein-uncoupled) sites determined. Ki values for agonists were also determined in competition versus the binding of the agonist [3H]N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) to provide a second estimate of Kh. Maximal agonist effects (Emax) and their potencies (EC50) were determined from concentration-response curves for agonist stimulation of guanosine-5'-O-(3-[32S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding. The ability of agonists to stabilise the G protein-coupled state of the receptor (Kl/Kh determined from ligand-binding assays) did not correlate with either of two measures of relative efficacy (relative Emax, Kl/EC50) of agonists determined in [35S]GTPgammaS-binding assays, when the data for all of the compounds tested were analysed. For a subset of compounds, however, there was a relation between Kl/Kh and Emax. Competition-binding data versus [3H]spiperone and [3H]NPA for a range of inverse agonists were fitted best by a one-binding site model. Ki values for the inverse agonists tested were slightly lower in competition versus [3H]NPA compared to [3H]spiperone. These data do not provide support for the idea that inverse agonists act by binding preferentially to the ground state of the receptor.

  2. Characterization of complex, heterogeneous lipid A samples using HPLC-MS/MS technique I. Overall analysis with respect to acylation, phosphorylation and isobaric distribution.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Viktor; Dörnyei, Ágnes; Makszin, Lilla; Kilár, Ferenc; Péterfi, Zoltán; Kocsis, Béla; Kilár, Anikó

    2016-11-01

    We established a new reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography method combined with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination and structural characterization of different lipid A types in bacteria (Escherichia coli O111, Salmonella adelaide O35 and Proteus morganii O34) showing serological cross-reactivity. The complex lipid A mixtures (obtained by simple extraction and acid hydrolysis of the outer membrane lipopolysaccharides) were separated and detected without phosphate derivatization. Several previously unidentified ions were detected, which differed in the number and type of acyl chains and number of phosphate groups. In several cases, we observed the different retention of isobaric lipid A species, which had different secondary fatty acyl distribution at the C2' or the C3' sites. The fragmentation of the various, C4' monophosphorylated lipid A species in deprotonated forms provided structural assignment for each component. Fragmentation pathways of the tri-acylated, tetra-acylated, penta-acylated, hexa-acylated and hepta-acylated lipid A components and of the lipid A partial structures are suggested. As standards, the hexa-acylated ion at m/z 1716 with the E. coli-type acyl distribution and the hepta-acylated ion at m/z 1954 with the Salmonella-type acyl distribution were used. The results confirmed the presence of multiple forms of lipid A in all strains analyzed. In addition, the negative-ion mode MS permitted efficient detection for non-phosphorylated lipid A components, too. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Intestinal Lipid Absorption and Lipoprotein Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to summarize evidence for the presence of two pathways of lipid absorption and their regulation. Recent findings Lipid absorption involves hydrolysis of dietary fat in the lumen of the intestine followed by the uptake of hydrolyzed products by enterocytes. Lipids are re-synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and are either secreted with chylomicrons and high density lipoproteins or stored as cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Lipids in the droplets are hydrolyzed and are secreted at a later time. Secretion of lipids by the chylomicron and HDL pathways are critically dependent on MTP and ABCA1, respectively, and are regulated independently. Gene ablation studies showed that MTP function and chylomicron assembly is essential for the absorption of triglyceride and retinyl esters. Ablation of MTP abolishes triglyceride absorption and results in massive triglyceride accumulation in enterocytes. Although majority of phospholipid, cholesterol and vitamin E are absorbed through the chylomicron pathway, a significant amount of these lipids are also absorbed via the HDL pathway. Chylomicron assembly and secretion is increased by the enhanced availability of fatty acids, whereas HDL pathway is upregulated by LXR agonists. Intestinal insulin resistance increases chylomicron and might reduce HDL production. Summary Triglycerides are exclusively transported via the chylomicron pathway and this process is critically dependent on MTP. Besides chylomicrons, absorption of phospholipids, free cholesterol, retinol, and vitamin E also involves high density lipoproteins. These two pathways are complementary and are regulated independently. They may be targeted to lower lipid absorption in order to control hyperlipidemia, obesity, metabolic syndrome, steatosis, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis and other disorders. PMID:24751933

  4. [Safety of beta-agonists in asthma].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa, Teodoro J

    2014-01-01

    Beta 2 agonist bronchodilators (β2A) are very important part in the pharmacotherapy of bronchial asthma, a disease that progresses in the world in an epidemic way. The β2A are prescribed to millions of people around the world, therefore the safety aspects is of public interest. Short-Acting β2 Agonists (SABAs), such as albuterol inhaler, according to current evidence, confirming its safety when used as a quick-relief or rescue medication. The long-acting β2 agonists (LABAs) The long-acting bronchodilators β2A (Long acting β2 Agonists or LABAs) are used associated with inhaled corticosteroids as controller drugs for asthma exacerbationsaccess, for safety reasons LABAs are not recommended for use as monotherapy.

  5. [Pathophysiological relevance of peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPAR) to joint diseases - the pro and con of agonists].

    PubMed

    Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Moulin, David; Koufany, Meriem; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Bianchi, Arnaud; Netter, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPAR) are ligand-inducible nuclear transacting factors comprising three subtypes, PPARalpha, PPARbeta/delta and PPARgamma, which play a key role in lipids and glucose homeostasis. All PPAR subtypes have been identified in joint or inflammatory cells and their activation resulted in a transcriptional repression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, TNFalpha), early inflammatory genes (NOS(2), COX-2, mPGES-1) or matrix metalloproteases (MMP-1, MMP-13), at least for the gamma subtype. PPAR full agonists were also shown to stimulate IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) production by cytokine-stimulated articular cells in a subtype-dependent manner. These anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic properties were confirmed in animal models of joint diseases where PPAR agonists reduced synovial inflammation while preventing cartilage destruction or inflammatory bone loss, although many effects required much higher doses than needed to restore insulin sensitivity or to lower circulating lipid levels. However, these promising effects of PPAR full agonists were hampered by their ability to reduce the growth factor-dependent synthesis of extracellular matrix components or to induce chondrocyte apoptosis, by the possible contribution of immunosuppressive properties to their anti-arthritic effects, by the increased adipocyte differentiation secondary to prolonged stimulation of PPARgamma, and by a variable contribution of PPAR subtypes depending on the system. Clinical data are scarce in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients whereas thousands of patients worldwilde, treated with PPAR agonists for type 2 diabetes or dyslipidemia, are paradoxically prone to suffer from osteoarthritis (OA). Whereas high dosage of full agonists may expose RA patients to cardiovascular adverse effects, the proof of concept that PPAR agonists have therapeutical relevance to OA may benefit from an epidemiological follow-up of joint lesions in diabetic or

  6. Long-term studies of dopamine agonists.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Jean P

    2002-02-26

    Dopamine agonists have long been used as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). In more recent years these drugs have also been proved safe and effective as initial therapy in lieu of levodopa in the treatment of PD. Long-term levodopa therapy is associated with motor complications, including fluctuating response patterns and dyskinesia. By initially introducing a dopamine agonist as symptomatic drug therapy, it may be possible to postpone the use of levodopa and delay or prevent the development of motor complications. Recently, four clinical trials have explored this hypothesis by comparing the long-term response and side effects of levodopa with dopamine agonist therapy. The drugs studied have included ropinirole, pramipexole, cabergoline, and pergolide. In each of these projects, the occurrence of motor complications, such as wearing off and dyskinesia, was significantly less in the subjects assigned to initiation of therapy with a dopamine agonist. The addition of levodopa could be postponed by many months or even several years. Therefore, these long-term studies of dopamine agonists support the initiation of a dopamine agonist instead of levodopa in an effort to postpone levodopa-related motor complications. This therapeutic approach may be particularly appropriate in PD patients with a long treatment horizon on the basis of age and general good health. The extension phase of the long-term study comparing pramipexole with levodopa is ongoing, and follow-up information may help to establish the value of this treatment strategy.

  7. Immunological evaluation of colonic delivered Hepatitis B surface antigen loaded TLR-4 agonist modified solid fat nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Kantrol Kumar; Pandey, Ravi Shankar

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B is one of the leading liver diseases and remains a major global health problem. Currently available vaccines provide protection but often results in weaker/minimal mucosal immunity. Thus the present study is devoted to the development and in-vivo exploration of the colonically delivered biomimetic nanoparticles which capably enhance humoral as well as cellular immune response. In present work, Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) entrapped nanoparticles containing Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) (HB+L-NP) were prepared by solvent evaporation method and characterized for particle size (~210nm), shape, zeta potential (-24mV±0.68), entrapment efficiency (58.45±1.68%), in-vitro release and antigen integrity. Dose escalation study was done to confirm prophylactic immune response following defined doses of prepared nanoparticulate formulations with or without MPLA. Intramuscular administered alum based marketed HBsAg (Genevac B) was used as standard (10μg) and were able to induce significant systemic (IgG) but remarkably low mucosal immune (IgA) response. Notably, HB+L-NP (0.5ml-10μg) induced strong systemic and robust mucosal immunity (510 and 470 mIU/ml respectively, p<0.001) from which mucosal was more significant due to the involvement of Common Mucosal Immune System (CMIS). Likewise, significant cellular immune response was elicited by HB+L-NP through T-cell activation (mixed Th1 and Th2) as confirmed by significantly increased cytokines level (IL-2 and Interferon-γ) in spleen homogenates. This study supports that delivery of HBsAg to the colon may open new vista in designing oral vaccines later being one of most accepted route for potential vaccines in future.

  8. Releasable Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Stabilized Lipid Nanocapsules on Microneedles for Enhanced Transcutaneous Vaccine Delivery

    PubMed Central

    DeMuth, Peter C.; Moon, James J.; Suh, Heikyung; Hammond, Paula T.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2012-01-01

    Here we introduce a new approach for transcutaneous drug delivery, using microneedles coated with stabilized lipid nanocapsules for delivery of a model vaccine formulation. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microneedle arrays were coated with multilayer films via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of a biodegradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) and negatively-charged interbilayer-crosslinked multilamellar lipid vesicles (ICMVs). To test the potential of these nanocapsule-coated microneedles for vaccine delivery, we loaded ICMVs with a protein antigen and the molecular adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA). Following application of microneedle arrays to the skin of mice for 5 minutes, (PBAE/ICMV) films were rapidly transferred from microneedle surfaces into the cutaneous tissue, and remained in the skin following removal of the microneedle arrays. Multilayer films implanted in the skin dispersed ICMV cargos in the treated tissue over the course of 24 hours in vivo, allowing for uptake of the lipid nanocapsules by antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the local tissue and triggering their activation in situ. Microneedle-mediated transcutaneous vaccination with ICMV-carrying multilayers promoted robust antigen-specific humoral immune responses with a balanced generation of multiple IgG isotypes, whereas bolus delivery of soluble or vesicle-loaded antigen via intradermal injection or transcutaneous vaccination with microneedles encapsulating soluble protein elicited weak, IgG1-biased humoral immune responses. These results highlight the potential of lipid nanocapsules delivered by microneedles as a promising platform for non-invasive vaccine delivery applications. PMID:22920601

  9. Nanoparticles Containing a Liver X Receptor Agonist Inhibit Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Qing; Even-Or, Orli; Xu, Xiaoyang; van Rosmalen, Mariska; Lim, Lucas; Gadde, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR) signaling pathways regulate lipid metabolism and inflammation, which has generated widespread interest in developing synthetic LXR agonists as potential therapeutics for the management of atherosclerosis. In this study, we demonstrate that nanoparticles (NPs) containing the synthetic LXR agonist GW3965 (NP-LXR) exert anti-inflammatory effects and inhibit the development of atherosclerosis without causing hepatic steatosis. These NPs were engineered through self-assembly of a biodegradable diblock poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) copolymer. NP-LXR was significantly more effective than free GW3965 at inducing LXR target gene expression and suppressing inflammatory factors in macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Addtionally, the NPs elicited negligible lipogenic gene stimulation in the liver. Using the Ldlr−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis, we saw abundant co-localization of fluorescently labeled NPs within plaque macrophages following systemic administration. Notably, six intravenous injections of NP-LXR over two weeks markedly reduced the CD68-positive cell (macrophage) content of plaques (by 50%) without increasing total cholesterol or triglycerides in the liver and plasma. Together, these findings identify GW3965-encapsulated PLGA-b-PEG NPs as a promising nanotherapeutic approach to combat atherosclerosis, providing the benefits of LXR agonists without their adverse effects on hepatic and plasma lipid metabolism. PMID:25156796

  10. Lipid agonism: The PIP2 paradigm of ligand-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Scott B

    2015-05-01

    The past decade, membrane signaling lipids emerged as major regulators of ion channel function. However, the molecular nature of lipid binding to ion channels remained poorly described due to a lack of structural information and assays to quantify and measure lipid binding in a membrane. How does a lipid-ligand bind to a membrane protein in the plasma membrane, and what does it mean for a lipid to activate or regulate an ion channel? How does lipid binding compare to activation by soluble neurotransmitter? And how does the cell control lipid agonism? This review focuses on lipids and their interactions with membrane proteins, in particular, ion channels. I discuss the intersection of membrane lipid biology and ion channel biophysics. A picture emerges of membrane lipids as bona fide agonists of ligand-gated ion channels. These freely diffusing signals reside in the plasma membrane, bind to the transmembrane domain of protein, and cause a conformational change that allosterically gates an ion channel. The system employs a catalog of diverse signaling lipids ultimately controlled by lipid enzymes and raft localization. I draw upon pharmacology, recent protein structure, and electrophysiological data to understand lipid regulation and define inward rectifying potassium channels (Kir) as a new class of PIP2 lipid-gated ion channels.

  11. The structural basis for agonist and partial agonist action on a β(1)-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Warne, Tony; Moukhametzianov, Rouslan; Baker, Jillian G; Nehmé, Rony; Edwards, Patricia C; Leslie, Andrew G W; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Tate, Christopher G

    2011-01-13

    β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that activate intracellular G proteins upon binding catecholamine agonist ligands such as adrenaline and noradrenaline. Synthetic ligands have been developed that either activate or inhibit βARs for the treatment of asthma, hypertension or cardiac dysfunction. These ligands are classified as either full agonists, partial agonists or antagonists, depending on whether the cellular response is similar to that of the native ligand, reduced or inhibited, respectively. However, the structural basis for these different ligand efficacies is unknown. Here we present four crystal structures of the thermostabilized turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) β(1)-adrenergic receptor (β(1)AR-m23) bound to the full agonists carmoterol and isoprenaline and the partial agonists salbutamol and dobutamine. In each case, agonist binding induces a 1 Å contraction of the catecholamine-binding pocket relative to the antagonist bound receptor. Full agonists can form hydrogen bonds with two conserved serine residues in transmembrane helix 5 (Ser(5.42) and Ser(5.46)), but partial agonists only interact with Ser(5.42) (superscripts refer to Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering). The structures provide an understanding of the pharmacological differences between different ligand classes, illuminating how GPCRs function and providing a solid foundation for the structure-based design of novel ligands with predictable efficacies.

  12. [Cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment: focus on liraglutide].

    PubMed

    Haluzík, Martin; Trachta, Pavel; Mráz, Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk reduction is the major aim of type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment. The effects of various antidiabetics on the cardiovascular complications are currently under careful scrutiny. Incretin-based therapy that utilizes the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) or stimulation of its receptor by GLP-1 receptor agonists represents one of the most promising approaches from the potential cardiovascular risk reduction point of view. Experimental studies have shown that the GLP-1 and GLP-1 agonists treatment improves endothelial function, decrease blood pressure and protects myocardium during experimentally-induced ischemia. Clinical studies with GLP-1 receptor agonists consistently show that, in addition to good antidiabetic efficacy, its long-term administration decreases blood pressure, body weight and improves circulating lipid levels while slightly increasing heart rate. In this paper, we focus on the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide. Preliminary analyses of cardiovascular complications in phase III trials with liraglutide indicate its good cardiovascular safety. A possibility of cardioprotective effects of liraglutide remains still open and is currently studied within a prospective cardiovascular trial LEADER.

  13. Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel zwitterionic compounds as PPARα/γ dual agonists (1).

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yoshihiro; Kagechika, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Mitsuhiro; Kubo, Hideo; Usui, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    We describe here the design, syntheses and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of novel zwitterionic compounds as non-thiazolidinedion (TZD) based peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) α/γ dual agonists. We commenced the medicinal research with compound 1 originated by Eli Lilly, which was reported to possess PPAR α/γ dual agonist activity. We incorporated an amine linker and optimized it on the nitrogen of the linker, thereby envisioning the enhancement of the PPAR α/γ dual agonist activity together with altering the physicochemical properties. As a result, we could generate compounds showing the PPAR α/γ dual activity, especially among which compound 22e had a franylmethyl group on the linker and 2,6-dimethyl phenyl ring at the carboxylic acid head group furnishing a highly potent dual agonist activity, together with a great glucose lowering effect. Moreover, it remedied the lipid profile, that is, triglyceride without body weight gain in the db/db mice model.

  14. Lipid14: The Amber Lipid Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The AMBER lipid force field has been updated to create Lipid14, allowing tensionless simulation of a number of lipid types with the AMBER MD package. The modular nature of this force field allows numerous combinations of head and tail groups to create different lipid types, enabling the easy insertion of new lipid species. The Lennard-Jones and torsion parameters of both the head and tail groups have been revised and updated partial charges calculated. The force field has been validated by simulating bilayers of six different lipid types for a total of 0.5 μs each without applying a surface tension; with favorable comparison to experiment for properties such as area per lipid, volume per lipid, bilayer thickness, NMR order parameters, scattering data, and lipid lateral diffusion. As the derivation of this force field is consistent with the AMBER development philosophy, Lipid14 is compatible with the AMBER protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrate, and small molecule force fields. PMID:24803855

  15. Synthesis, activity, and docking study of phenylthiazole acids as potential agonists of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Taijin; Shi, Min; Ye, Haoyu

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-mediated transcription factor playing key roles in glucose and lipid homeostasis, and PPARγ ligands possess therapeutic potential in these as well as other areas. In this study, a series of phenylthiazole acids have been synthesized and evaluated for agonistic activity by a convenient fluorescence polarization-based PPARγ ligand screening assay. Compound 4t, as a potential PPARγ agonist with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) 0.75±0.20 μM, exhibited in vitro potency comparable with a 0.83±0.14 μM of the positive control rosiglitazone. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicated that phenylthiazole acid 4t interacted with the amino acid residues of the active site of the PPARγ complex in a stable manner, consistent with the result of the in vitro ligand assay. PMID:27313447

  16. Recent advances in the development of farnesoid X receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Elizabeth J.; Lindor, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are nuclear hormone receptors expressed in high amounts in body tissues that participate in bilirubin metabolism including the liver, intestines, and kidneys. Bile acids (BAs) are the natural ligands of the FXRs. FXRs regulate the expression of the gene encoding for cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase, which is the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis. In addition, FXRs play a critical role in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and regulation of insulin sensitivity. FXRs also modulate live growth and regeneration during liver injury. Preclinical studies have shown that FXR activation protects against cholestasis-induced liver injury. Moreover, FXR activation protects against fatty liver injury in animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and improved hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin sensitivity. Obeticholic acid (OCA), a 6α-ethyl derivative of the natural human BA chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) is the first-in-class selective FXR agonist that is ~100-fold more potent than CDCA. Preliminary human clinical trials have shown that OCA is safe and effective. In a phase II clinical trial, administration of OCA was well-tolerated, increased insulin sensitivity and reduced markers of liver inflammation and fibrosis in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and NAFLD. In two clinical trials of OCA in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a progressive cholestatic liver disease, OCA significantly reduced serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, an important disease marker that correlates well with clinical outcomes of patients with PBC. Together, these studies suggest that FXR agonists could potentially be used as therapeutic tools in patients suffering from nonalcoholic fatty and cholestatic liver diseases. Larger and Longer-term studies are currently ongoing. PMID:25705637

  17. Muscimol as an ionotropic GABA receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Graham A R

    2014-10-01

    Muscimol, a psychoactive isoxazole from Amanita muscaria and related mushrooms, has proved to be a remarkably selective agonist at ionotropic receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. This historic overview highlights the discovery and development of muscimol and related compounds as a GABA agonist by Danish and Australian neurochemists. Muscimol is widely used as a ligand to probe GABA receptors and was the lead compound in the development of a range of GABAergic agents including nipecotic acid, tiagabine, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol, (Gaboxadol(®)) and 4-PIOL.

  18. Optimization of a novel class of benzimidazole-based farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists to improve physicochemical and ADME properties.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hans G F; Benson, G M; Bleicher, K H; Blum, D; Chaput, E; Clemann, N; Feng, S; Gardes, C; Grether, U; Hartman, P; Kuhn, B; Martin, R E; Plancher, J-M; Rudolph, M G; Schuler, F; Taylor, S

    2011-02-15

    Structure-guided lead optimization of recently described benzimidazolyl acetamides addressed the key liabilities of the previous lead compound 1. These efforts culminated in the discovery of 4-{(S)-2-[2-(4-chloro-phenyl)-5,6-difluoro-benzoimidazol-1-yl]-2-cyclohexyl-acetylamino}-3-fluoro-benzoic acid 7g, a highly potent and selective FXR agonist with excellent physicochemical and ADME properties and potent lipid lowering activity after oral administration to LDL receptor deficient mice.

  19. PPAR agonists reduce steatosis in oleic acid-overloaded HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Anthérieu, Sébastien; Vluggens, Aurore; Umbdenstock, Thierry; Claude, Nancy; Moureyre-Spire, Catherine de la; Weaver, Richard J.; Guillouzo, André

    2014-04-01

    Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common form of chronic liver disease there is no pharmacological agent approved for its treatment. Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are closely associated with hepatic lipid metabolism, they seem to play important roles in NAFLD. However, the effects of PPAR agonists on steatosis that is a common pathology associated with NAFLD, remain largely controversial. In this study, the effects of various PPAR agonists, i.e. fenofibrate, bezafibrate, troglitazone, rosiglitazone, muraglitazar and tesaglitazar on oleic acid-induced steatotic HepaRG cells were investigated after a single 24-hour or 2-week repeat treatment. Lipid vesicles stained by Oil-Red O and triglycerides accumulation caused by oleic acid overload, were decreased, by up to 50%, while fatty acid oxidation was induced after 2-week co-treatment with PPAR agonists. The greatest effects on reduction of steatosis were obtained with the dual PPARα/γ agonist muraglitazar. Such improvement of steatosis was associated with up-regulation of genes related to fatty acid oxidation activity and down-regulation of many genes involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, modulation of expression of some nuclear receptor genes, such as FXR, LXRα and CAR, which are potent actors in the control of lipogenesis, was observed and might explain repression of de novo lipogenesis. Conclusion: Altogether, our in vitro data on steatotic HepaRG cells treated with PPAR agonists correlated well with clinical investigations, bringing a proof of concept that drug-induced reversal of steatosis in human can be evaluated in in vitro before conducting long-term and costly in vivo studies in animals and patients. - Highlights: • There is no pharmacological agent approved for the treatment of NAFLD. • This study demonstrates that PPAR agonists can reduce fatty acid-induced steatosis. • Some nuclear receptors appear to be potent actors in the control

  20. PPAR agonists for the treatment of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wilding, J P H

    2012-11-01

    Diabetes is a complex disease defined by hyperglycaemia; however, strong associations with abdominal obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia contribute to the high risk of cardiovascular disease. Although aggressive glycaemic control reduces microvascular complications, the evidence for macrovascular complications is less certain. The theoretical benefits of the mode of action of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists are clear. In clinical practice, PPAR-α agonists such as fibrates improve dyslipidaemia, while PPAR-γ agonists such as thiazolidinediones improve insulin resistance and diabetes control. However, although these agents are traditionally classed according to their target, they have different and sometimes conflicting clinical benefit and adverse event profiles. It is speculated that this is because of differing properties and specificities for the PPAR receptors (each of which targets specific genes). This is most obvious in the impact on cardiovascular outcomes--in clinical trials pioglitazone appeared to reduce cardiovascular events, whereas rosiglitazone potentially increased the risk of myocardial infarction. The development of a dual PPAR-α/γ agonist may prove beneficial in effectively managing glycaemic control and improving dyslipidaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Yet, development of agents such as muraglitazar and tesaglitazar has been hindered by various serious adverse events. Aleglitazar, a balanced dual PPAR-α/γ agonist, is currently the most advanced in clinical development and has shown promising results in phase II clinical trials with beneficial effects on glucose and lipid variables. A phase III study, ALECARDIO, is ongoing and will establish whether improvements in laboratory test profiles translate into an improvement in cardiovascular outcomes.

  1. Development and Characterization of Pepducins as Gs-biased Allosteric Agonists*♦

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Richard; Du, Yang; Quoyer, Julie; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Janz, Jay M.; Bouvier, Michel; Kobilka, Brian K.; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) is a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor that mediates many hormonal responses, including cardiovascular and pulmonary function. β-Agonists used to combat hypercontractility in airway smooth muscle stimulate β2AR-dependent cAMP production that ultimately promotes airway relaxation. Chronic stimulation of the β2AR by long acting β-agonists used in the treatment of asthma can promote attenuated responsiveness to agonists and an increased frequency of fatal asthmatic attacks. β2AR desensitization to β-agonists is primarily mediated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases and β-arrestins that attenuate receptor-Gs coupling and promote β2AR internalization and degradation. A biased agonist that can selectively stimulate Gs signaling without promoting receptor interaction with G protein-coupled receptor kinases and β-arrestins should serve as an advantageous asthma therapeutic. To identify such molecules, we screened ∼50 lipidated peptides derived from the intracellular loops of the β2AR, known as pepducins. This screen revealed two classes of Gs-biased pepducins, receptor-independent and receptor-dependent, as well as several β-arrestin-biased pepducins. The receptor-independent Gs-biased pepducins operate by directly stimulating G protein activation. In contrast, receptor-dependent Gs-biased pepducins appear to stabilize a Gs-biased conformation of the β2AR that couples to Gs but does not undergo G protein-coupled receptor kinase-mediated phosphorylation or β-arrestin-mediated internalization. Functional studies in primary human airway smooth muscle cells demonstrate that Gs-biased pepducins are not subject to conventional desensitization and thus may be good candidates for the development of next generation asthma therapeutics. Our study reports the first Gs-biased activator of the β2AR and provides valuable tools for the study of β2AR function. PMID:25395624

  2. Corepressors of agonist-bound nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, Igor; Aneskievich, Brian J.

    2007-09-15

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) rely on coregulator proteins to modulate transcription of target genes. NR coregulators can be broadly subdivided into coactivators which potentiate transcription and corepressors which silence gene expression. The prevailing view of coregulator action holds that in the absence of agonist the receptor interacts with a corepressor via the corepressor nuclear receptor (CoRNR, 'corner') box motifs within the corepressor. Upon agonist binding, a conformational change in the receptor causes the shedding of corepressor and the binding of a coactivator which interacts with the receptor via NR boxes within the coregulator. This view was challenged with the discovery of RIP140 which acts as a NR corepressor in the presence of agonist and utilizes NR boxes. Since then a number of other corepressors of agonist-bound NRs have been discovered. Among them are LCoR, PRAME, REA, MTA1, NSD1, and COPR1 Although they exhibit a great diversity of structure, mechanism of repression and pathophysiological function, these corepressors frequently have one or more NR boxes and often recruit histone deacetylases to exert their repressive effects. This review highlights these more recently discovered corepressors and addresses their potential functions in transcription regulation, disease pharmacologic responses and xenobiotic metabolism.

  3. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  4. A new class of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists with a novel binding epitope shows antidiabetic effects.

    PubMed

    Ostberg, Tove; Svensson, Stefan; Selén, Göran; Uppenberg, Jonas; Thor, Markus; Sundbom, Maj; Sydow-Bäckman, Mona; Gustavsson, Anna-Lena; Jendeberg, Lena

    2004-09-24

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the NR1 subfamily of nuclear receptors. The PPARs play key roles in the control of glucose and lipid homeostasis, and the synthetic isoform-specific PPAR agonists are used clinically to improve insulin sensitivity and to lower serum triglyceride levels. All of the previously reported PPAR agonists form the same characteristic interactions with the receptor, which have been postulated to be important for the induction of agonistic activity. Here we describe a new class of PPARalpha/gamma modulators, the 5-substituted 2-benzoylaminobenzoic acids (2-BABAs). As shown by x-ray crystallography, the representative compounds BVT.13, BVT.762, and BVT.763, utilize a novel binding epitope and lack the agonist-characteristic interactions. Despite this, some compounds within the 2-BABA family are potent agonists in a cell-based reporter gene assay. Furthermore, BVT.13 displays antidiabetic effects in ob/ob mice. We concluded that the 2-BABA binding mode can be used to design isoform-specific PPAR modulators with biological activity in vivo.

  5. PPAR{gamma} agonists prevent TGF{beta}1/Smad3-signaling in human hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Caiyan; Chen, Wei; Yang Liu; Chen Lihong; Stimpson, Stephen A.; Diehl, Anna Mae . E-mail: annamae.diehl@duke.edu

    2006-11-17

    PPAR{gamma} agonists inhibit liver fibrosis, but the mechanisms involved are uncertain. We hypothesized that PPAR{gamma} agonists inhibit transforming growth factor (TGF){beta}1-activation of TGF{beta} receptor (TGF{beta}R)-1 signaling in quiescent stellate cells, thereby abrogating Smad3-dependent induction of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes, such as PAI-1 and collagen-1{alpha}I. To test this, human HSC were cultured to induce a quiescent phenotype, characterized by lipid accumulation and PPAR{gamma} expression and transcriptional activity. These adipocytic HSC were then treated with TGF{beta}1 {+-} a TGF{beta}R-1 kinase inhibitor (SB431542) or a PPAR{gamma} agonist (GW7845). TGF{beta}1 caused dose- and time-dependent increases in Smad3 phosphorylation, followed by induction of collagen and PAI-1 expression. Like the TGF{beta}R-1 kinase inhibitor, the PPAR{gamma} agonist caused dose-dependent inhibition of all of these responses without effecting HSC proliferation or viability. Thus, the anti-fibrotic actions of PPAR{gamma} agonists reflect their ability to inhibit TGF{beta}1-TGF{beta}R1 signaling that initiates ECM gene expression in quiescent HSC.

  6. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma ( ...

  7. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to ... body) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  8. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread to other ... worsened after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic medications ...

  9. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type ... at least two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications ...

  10. Serotonergic agonists behave as partial agonists at the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Rinken, A; Ferré, S; Terasmaa, A; Owman, C; Fuxe, K

    1999-02-25

    RAT dopamine D2short receptors expressed in CHO cells were characterized by activation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding. There were no significant differences between the maximal effects seen in activation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding caused by dopaminergic agonists, but the effects of 5-HT, 8OH-DPAT and 5-methoxytryptamine amounted to 47 +/- 7%, 43 +/- 5% and 70 +/- 7% of the dopamine effect, respectively. The dopaminergic antagonist (+)butaclamol inhibited activations of both types of ligands with equal potency (pA2 = 8.9 +/- 0.1), indicating that only one type of receptor is involved. In competition with [3H]raclopride binding, dopaminergic agonists showed 53 +/- 2% of the binding sites in the GTP-dependent high-affinity state, whereas 5-HT showed only 20 +/- 3%. Taken together, the results indicate that serotonergic agonists behave as typical partial agonists for D2 receptors with potential antiparkinsonian activity.

  11. Metabolic mapping of A3 adenosine receptor agonist MRS5980

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Tosh, Dilip K.; Tanaka, Naoki; Wang, Haina; Krausz, Kristopher W.; O'Connor, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    (1S,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(2-((5-Chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethynyl)-6-(methylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-1-carboxamide (MRS5980) is an A3AR selective agonist containing multiple receptor affinity- and selectivity-enhancing modifications and a therapeutic candidate drug for many inflammatory diseases. Metabolism-related poor pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicities are a major reason of drug R&D failure. Metabolomics with UPLC-MS was employed to profile the metabolism of MRS5980 and MRS5980-induced disruption of endogenous compounds. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes screening experiment were used to determine the enzymes involved in MRS5980 metabolism. Analysis of lipid metabolism-related genes was performed to investigate the reason for MRS5980-induced lipid metabolic disorders. Unsupervised principal components analysis separated the control and MRS5980 treatment group in feces, urine, and liver samples, but not in bile and serum. The major ions mainly contributing to the separation for feces and urine were oxidized MRS5980, glutathione (GSH) conjugates and cysteine conjugate (degradation product of the GSH conjugates) of MRS5980. The major ions contributing to the group separation of liver samples were phosphatidylcholines. In vitro incubation experiments showed the major involvement of CYP3A enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of MRS5980 and direct GSH reactivity of MRS5980. The electrophilic attack by MRS5980 is a minor pathway and did not alter GSH levels in liver or liver histology, and thus may be of minor clinical consequence. Gene expression analysis further showed decreased expression of PC biosynthetic genes choline kinase a and b, which further accelerated conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholines through increasing the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3. These data will be useful to guide rational design of drugs targeting A3AR, considering efficacy, metabolic elimination, and

  12. Metabolic mapping of A3 adenosine receptor agonist MRS5980.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Tosh, Dilip K; Tanaka, Naoki; Wang, Haina; Krausz, Kristopher W; O'Connor, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-09-15

    (1S,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(2-((5-Chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethynyl)-6-(methylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-1-carboxamide (MRS5980) is an A3AR selective agonist containing multiple receptor affinity- and selectivity-enhancing modifications and a therapeutic candidate drug for many inflammatory diseases. Metabolism-related poor pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicities are a major reason for drug R&D failure. Metabolomics with UPLC-MS was employed to profile the metabolism of MRS5980 and MRS5980-induced disruption of endogenous compounds. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes screening experiment were used to determine the enzymes involved in MRS5980 metabolism. Analysis of lipid metabolism-related genes was performed to investigate the reason for MRS5980-induced lipid metabolic disorders. Unsupervised principal components analysis separated the control and MRS5980 treatment groups in feces, urine, and liver samples, but not in bile and serum. The major ions mainly contributing to the separation of feces and urine were oxidized MRS5980, glutathione (GSH) conjugates and cysteine conjugate (degradation product of the GSH conjugates) of MRS5980. The major ions contributing to the group separation of liver samples were phosphatidylcholines. In vitro incubation experiments showed the involvement of CYP3A enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of MRS5980 and direct GSH reactivity of MRS5980. The electrophilic attack by MRS5980 is a minor pathway and did not alter GSH levels in liver or liver histology, and thus may be of minor clinical consequence. Gene expression analysis further showed decreased expression of PC biosynthetic genes choline kinase a and b, which further accelerated conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholines through increasing the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3. These data will be useful to guide rational design of drugs targeting A3AR, considering efficacy, metabolic elimination, and

  13. Co-agonist of glucagon and GLP-1 reduces cholesterol and improves insulin sensitivity independent of its effect on appetite and body weight in diet-induced obese C57 mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vishal; Joharapurkar, Amit; Dhanesha, Nirav; Kshirsagar, Samadhan; Patel, Kartik; Bahekar, Rajesh; Shah, Gaurang; Jain, Mukul

    2013-12-01

    Dual agonism of glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors reduce body weight without inducing hyperglycemia in rodents. However, the effect of a co-agonist on insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism has not been thoroughly assessed. Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice received 0.5 mg·kg(-1) of co-agonist or 2.5 mg·kg(-1) of glucagon or 8 μg·kg(-1) of exendin-4 by subcutaneous route, twice daily, for 28 days. A separate group of mice was pair-fed to the co-agonist-treated group for 28 days. Co-agonist treatment reduced food intake and reduced body weight up to 28 days. In addition, it reduced leptin levels and increased fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) levels in plasma, when compared with control and pair-fed groups. Co-agonist treatment decreased triglyceride levels in serum and liver and reduced serum cholesterol, mainly due to reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. These changes were not seen with pair-fed controls. Co-agonist treatment improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin sensitivity, as observed during glucose and insulin-tolerance test, hyperinsulinemic clamp, and reduced gluconeogenesis, as observed in pyruvate-tolerance test. The effects on insulin sensitivity and lipid levels are mostly independent of the food intake or body weight lowering effect of the co-agonist.

  14. Nutrients and neurodevelopment: lipids.

    PubMed

    González, Horacio F; Visentin, Silvana

    2016-10-01

    Nutrients, lipids in particular, make up the central nervous system structure and play major functional roles: they stimulate development, migration, and nerve cell differentiation. They are part of gray matter, white matter, nerve nuclei, and synaptogenesis. Breast milk contains lipids which are crucial for infant brain development. The lipid profile of breast milk was used as a guideline for the development of breast milk substitutes. However, to date, no substitute has matched it. Complementary feeding should include docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, other polyunsaturated fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, and complex lipids found in milk fat. The lipid composition of breast milk depends on maternal intake and nutritional status during pregnancy and breast-feeding. It has a great impact on development. Our goal is to review scientific literature regarding the role of lipids on infant brain development and the importance of breast milk lipid composition, maternal diet, and complementary feeding.

  15. Lipids and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suburu, Janel; Chen, Yong Q.

    2012-01-01

    The role of lipid metabolism has gained particular interest in prostate cancer research. A large body of literature has outlined the unique upregulation of de novo lipid synthesis in prostate cancer. Concordant with this lipogenic phenotype is a metabolic shift, in which cancer cells use alternative enzymes and pathways to facilitate the production of fatty acids. These newly synthesized lipids may support a number of cellular processes to promote cancer cell proliferation and survival. Hence, de novo lipogenesis is under intense investigation as a therapeutic target. Epidemiologic studies suggest dietary fat may also contribute to prostate cancer; however, whether dietary lipids and de novo synthesized lipids are differentially metabolized remains unclear. Here, we highlight the lipogenic nature of prostate cancer, especially the promotion of de novo lipid synthesis, and the significance of various dietary lipids in prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:22503963

  16. Agonistic and reproductive interactions in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, P M

    1984-12-01

    Reproductive and agonistic behaviors in Siamese fighting fish were investigated in eight experiments, and some consequences and determinants of these sequences were isolated. First, fights and the formation of dominance-subordinancy relations were studied. Second, it was determined that large body size as well as males' prior residency in a tank produced an agonistic advantage; the magnitude of this advantage was positively related to the duration of residency. Third, the prior-residency effect in Bettas was determined by males' familiarity with visual and/or tactile cues in their home tanks. Fourth, dominant males had greater access to living space and were more likely to display at a mirror, build nests, and approach females than were subordinates. Finally, it was discovered that chemical cues associated with presumedly inert plastic tank dividers influence Bettas' social behavior.

  17. Agonists block currents through acetylcholine receptor channels.

    PubMed Central

    Sine, S M; Steinbach, J H

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the effects of high concentrations of cholinergic agonists on currents through single acetylcholine receptor (AChR) channels on clonal BC3H1 cells. We find that raised concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh; above 300 microM) or carbamylcholine (Carb; above 1,000 microM) produce a voltage- and concentration-dependent reduction in the mean single-channel current. Raised concentrations of suberyldicholine (Sub; above 3 microM) produce a voltage- and concentration-dependent increase in the number of brief duration low-conductance interruptions of open-channel currents. These observations can be quantitatively described by a model in which agonist molecules enter and transiently occlude the ion-channel of the AChR. PMID:6478036

  18. Ropinirole, a non-ergoline dopamine agonist.

    PubMed

    Jost, Wolfgang H; Angersbach, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    Dopamine agonists have become indispensable in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. In every-day practice, however, the decision to select the best compound for an individual patient is rendered difficult because of the large number of substances available on the market. This review article provides a closer look at the experimental and clinical studies with ropinirole published so far. Ropinirole is a non-ergoline dopamine agonist which has been proven to be effective in both, monotherapy and combination therapy of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. In addition to ameliorating bradykinesia, rigor, and tremor, ropinirole facilitates the daily life and improves depressive moods of patients with Parkinson's disease. The long-term complications of levodopa are avoided, and problems commonly associated with levodopa treatment are reduced. Ropinirole appears to have a neuroprotective effect. In addition to Parkinson's disease, ropinirole has also been used successfully in the treatment of restless legs syndrome.

  19. The identification of orally bioavailable thrombopoietin agonists.

    PubMed

    Munchhof, Michael J; Antipas, Amy S; Blumberg, Laura C; Brissette, William H; Brown, Matthew F; Casavant, Jeffrey M; Doty, Jonathan L; Driscoll, James; Harris, Thomas M; Wolf-Gouveia, Lilli A; Jones, Christopher S; Li, Qifang; Linde, Robert G; Lira, Paul D; Marfat, Anthony; McElroy, Eric; Mitton-Fry, Mark; McCurdy, Sandra P; Reiter, Lawrence A; Ripp, Sharon L; Shavnya, Andrei; Thomasco, Lisa M; Trevena, Kristen A

    2009-03-01

    Recently, we disclosed a series of potent pyrimidine benzamide-based thrombopoietin receptor agonists. Unfortunately, the structural features required for the desired activity conferred physicochemical properties that were not favorable for the development of an oral agent. The physical properties of the series were improved by replacing the aminopyrimidinyl group with a piperidine-4-carboxylic acid moiety. The resulting compounds possessed favorable in vivo pharmacokinetic properties, including good bioavailability.

  20. Identification of Darmstoff analogs as selective agonists and antagonists of lysophosphatidic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Gududuru, Veeresa; Zeng, Kui; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Makarova, Natalia; Fujiwara, Yuko; Pigg, Kathryn R; Baker, Daniel L; Tigyi, Gabor; Miller, Duane D

    2006-01-15

    Darmstoff describes a family of gut smooth muscle-stimulating acetal phosphatidic acids initially isolated and characterized from the bath fluid of stimulated gut over 50 years ago. Despite similar structural and biological profiles, Darmstoff analogs have not previously been examined as potential LPA mimetics. Here, we report a facile method for the synthesis of potassium salts of Darmstoff analogs. To understand the effect of stereochemistry on lysophosphatidic acid mimetic activity, synthesis of optically pure stereoisomers of selected Darmstoff analogs was achieved starting with chiral methyl glycerates. Each Darmstoff analog was evaluated for subtype-specific LPA receptor agonist/antagonist activity, PPARgamma activation, and autotaxin inhibition. From this study we identified compound 12 as a pan-antagonist and several pan-agonists for the LPA(1-3) receptors. Introduction of an aromatic ring in the lipid chain such as analog 22 produced a subtype-specific LPA(3) agonist with an EC(50) of 692 nM. Interestingly, regardless of their LPA(1/2/3) ligand properties all of the Darmstoff analogs tested activated PPARgamma. However, these compounds are weak inhibitors of autotaxin. The results indicate that Darmstoff analogs constitute a novel class of lysophosphatidic acid mimetics.

  1. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-08

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits.

  2. Epidermal surface lipids.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Apostolos

    2009-03-01

    A layer of lipids, which are of both sebaceous and keratinocyte origin, covers the surface of the skin. The apparent composition of surface lipids varies depending on the selected method of sampling. Lipids produced by the epidermal cells are an insignificant fraction of the total extractable surface lipid on areas rich in sebaceous glands. Due to the holocrine activity of the sebaceous gland, its product of secretion (sebum) is eventually released to the surface of the skin and coats the fur as well. Lipids of epidermal origin fill the spaces between the cells, like mortar or cement. The sebaceous lipids are primarily non polar lipids as triglycerides, wax esters and squalene, while epidermal lipids are a mixture of ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol. The composition of the sebaceous lipids is unique and intriguing and elevated sebum excretion is a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of acne. Recent studies have elucidated the roles that epidermal surface lipids have on normal skin functions and acne.

  3. Epidermal surface lipids

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A layer of lipids, which are of both sebaceous and keratinocyte origin, covers the surface of the skin. The apparent composition of surface lipids varies depending on the selected method of sampling. Lipids produced by the epidermal cells are an insignificant fraction of the total extractable surface lipid on areas rich in sebaceous glands. Due to the holocrine activity of the sebaceous gland, its product of secretion (sebum) is eventually released to the surface of the skin and coats the fur as well. Lipids of epidermal origin fill the spaces between the cells, like mortar or cement. The sebaceous lipids are primarily non polar lipids as triglycerides, wax esters and squalene, while epidermal lipids are a mixture of ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol. The composition of the sebaceous lipids is unique and intriguing and elevated sebum excretion is a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of acne. Recent studies have elucidated the roles that epidermal surface lipids have on normal skin functions and acne. PMID:20224687

  4. Toll-like receptor agonists promote prolonged triglyceride storage in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-ling; Morales-Rosado, Joel; Ray, Jessica; Myers, Timothy G; Kho, Terry; Lu, Mingfang; Munford, Robert S

    2014-01-31

    Macrophages in infected tissues may sense microbial molecules that significantly alter their metabolism. In a seeming paradox, these critical host defense cells often respond by increasing glucose catabolism while simultaneously storing fatty acids (FA) as triglycerides (TAG) in lipid droplets. We used a load-chase strategy to study the mechanisms that promote long term retention of TAG in murine and human macrophages. Toll-like receptor (TLR)1/2, TLR3, and TLR4 agonists all induced the cells to retain TAG for ≥3 days. Prolonged TAG retention was accompanied by the following: (a) enhanced FA uptake and FA incorporation into TAG, with long lasting increases in acyl-CoA synthetase long 1 (ACSL1) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 (DGAT2), and (b) decreases in lipolysis and FA β-oxidation that paralleled a prolonged drop in adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). TLR agonist-induced TAG storage is a multifaceted process that persists long after most early pro-inflammatory responses have subsided and may contribute to the formation of "lipid-laden" macrophages in infected tissues.

  5. Identification of 6-octadecynoic acid from a methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtera, Anna; Miyamae, Yusaku; Nakai, Naomi; Kawachi, Atsushi; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko; Neffati, Mohamed; Akita, Toru; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Mori, Naoki; Irie, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Masaya

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •6-ODA, a rare fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified from Marrubium vulgare. •6-ODA was synthesized from petroselinic acid as a starting material. •6-ODA stimulated lipid accumulation in HSC-T6 and 3T3-L1 cells. •The first report of a fatty acid with a triple bond functioning as a PPARγ agonist. •This study sheds light on novel functions of a fatty acid with a triple bond. -- Abstract: 6-Octadecynoic acid (6-ODA), a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified in the methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Fibrogenesis caused by hepatic stellate cells is inhibited by PPARγ whose ligands are clinically used for the treatment of diabetes. Plant extracts of Marrubium vulgare L., were screened for activity to inhibit fibrosis in the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6 using Oil Red-O staining, which detects lipids that typically accumulate in quiescent hepatic stellate cells. A methanol extract with activity to stimulate accumulation of lipids was obtained. This extract was found to have PPARγ agonist activity using a luciferase reporter assay. After purification using several chromatographic methods, 6-ODA, a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified as a candidate of PPARγ agonist. Synthesized 6-ODA and its derivative 9-octadecynoic acid (9-ODA), which both have a triple bond but in different positions, activated PPARγ in a luciferase reporter assay and increased lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a PPARγ-dependent manner. There is little information about the biological activity of fatty acids with a triple bond, and to our knowledge, this is the first report that 6-ODA and 9-ODA function as PPARγ agonists.

  6. Lipids of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Susanne E; Daum, Günther

    2013-10-01

    A unique organelle for studying membrane biochemistry is the mitochondrion whose functionality depends on a coordinated supply of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria are capable of synthesizing several lipids autonomously such as phosphatidylglycerol, cardiolipin and in part phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid and CDP-diacylglycerol. Other mitochondrial membrane lipids such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sterols and sphingolipids have to be imported. The mitochondrial lipid composition, the biosynthesis and the import of mitochondrial lipids as well as the regulation of these processes will be main issues of this review article. Furthermore, interactions of lipids and mitochondrial proteins which are highly important for various mitochondrial processes will be discussed. Malfunction or loss of enzymes involved in mitochondrial phospholipid biosynthesis lead to dysfunction of cell respiration, affect the assembly and stability of the mitochondrial protein import machinery and cause abnormal mitochondrial morphology or even lethality. Molecular aspects of these processes as well as diseases related to defects in the formation of mitochondrial membranes will be described.

  7. LXR agonist treatment of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm restores cholesterol efflux and triggers apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ceroi, Adam; Masson, David; Roggy, Anne; Roumier, Christophe; Chagué, Cécile; Gauthier, Thierry; Philippe, Laure; Lamarthée, Baptiste; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Bonnefoy, Francis; Perruche, Sylvain; Biichle, Sabeha; Preudhomme, Claude; Macintyre, Elisabeth; Lagrost, Laurent; Garnache-Ottou, Francine

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) neoplasm (BPDCN) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with a poor prognosis that derives from PDCs. No consensus for optimal treatment modalities is available today and the full characterization of this leukemia is still emerging. We identified here a BPDCN-specific transcriptomic profile when compared with those of acute myeloid leukemia and T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as well as the transcriptomic signature of primary PDCs. This BPDCN gene signature identified a dysregulation of genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis, some of them being liver X receptor (LXR) target genes. LXR agonist treatment of primary BPDCN cells and BPDCN cell lines restored LXR target gene expression and increased cholesterol efflux via the upregulation of adenosine triphosphate–binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. LXR agonist treatment was responsible for limiting BPDCN cell proliferation and inducing intrinsic apoptotic cell death. LXR activation in BPDCN cells was shown to interfere with 3 signaling pathways associated with leukemic cell survival, namely: NF-κB activation, as well as Akt and STAT5 phosphorylation in response to the BPDCN growth/survival factor interleukin-3. These effects were increased by the stimulation of cholesterol efflux through a lipid acceptor, the apolipoprotein A1. In vivo experiments using a mouse model of BPDCN cell xenograft revealed a decrease of leukemic cell infiltration and BPDCN-induced cytopenia associated with increased survival after LXR agonist treatment. This demonstrates that cholesterol homeostasis is modified in BPDCN and can be normalized by treatment with LXR agonists which can be proposed as a new therapeutic approach. PMID:27702801

  8. Agonist-induced production of 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid in intact resistance arteries. Evidence that accumulation of diacylglycerol is not a prerequisite for contraction.

    PubMed

    Ohanian, J; Ollerenshaw, J; Collins, P; Heagerty, A

    1990-05-25

    The production of total amounts of 1,2-diacylglycerol as well as those specifically derived from inositol lipid hydrolysis was studied in intact rat resistance arteries stimulated with either noradrenaline, vasopressin, or angiotensin II at 20 s when the onset of contraction would be nearing its maximum, and at 5 min during the sustained phase of contraction. Total amounts of 1,2-diacylglycerol were not altered by any agonist at 20 s, or at 5 min. However, arachidonate-containing species of 1,2-diacylglycerol were differentially influenced being increased at 5 min by noradrenaline, and decreased at 20 s and 5 min by vasopressin. Only angiotensin II produced substantial increases in this class of 1,2-diacylglycerol at both time points. In order to investigate the fate of this second messenger total and inositol lipid derived phosphatidic acids were then measured at both 20 s and 5 min. Noradrenaline induced a rise in both total and arachidonate-containing phosphatidic acid at both times as did vasopressin. Only small increases were induced by angiotensin II at 20 s. These data demonstrate that the accumulation of 1,2-diacylglycerol generated from inositol lipid breakdown is only observed with activation by angiotensin II. Other agonists produced phosphatidic acids with time and the rate of generation of these lipids is agonist-specific. Thus phosphatidic acid may play a more prominent role during the sustained phase of contraction than previously anticipated.

  9. Targeting thyroid hormone receptor-β agonists to the liver reduces cholesterol and triglycerides and improves the therapeutic index

    PubMed Central

    Erion, Mark D.; Cable, Edward E.; Ito, Bruce R.; Jiang, Hongjian; Fujitaki, James M.; Finn, Patricia D.; Zhang, Bao-Hong; Hou, Jinzhao; Boyer, Serge H.; van Poelje, Paul D.; Linemeyer, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Despite efforts spanning four decades, the therapeutic potential of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) agonists as lipid-lowering and anti-obesity agents remains largely unexplored in humans because of dose-limiting cardiac effects and effects on the thyroid hormone axis (THA), muscle metabolism, and bone turnover. TR agonists selective for the TRβ isoform exhibit modest cardiac sparing in rodents and primates but are unable to lower lipids without inducing TRβ-mediated suppression of the THA. Herein, we describe a cytochrome P450-activated prodrug of a phosphonate-containing TR agonist that exhibits increased TR activation in the liver relative to extrahepatic tissues and an improved therapeutic index. Pharmacokinetic studies in rats demonstrated that the prodrug (2R,4S)-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-[(3,5-dimethyl-4-(4′-hydroxy-3′-isopropylbenzyl)phenoxy)methyl]-2-oxido-[1,3,2]-dioxaphosphonane (MB07811) undergoes first-pass hepatic extraction and that cleavage of the prodrug generates the negatively charged TR agonist (3,5-dimethyl-4-(4′-hydroxy-3′-isopropylbenzyl)phenoxy)methylphosphonic acid (MB07344), which distributes poorly into most tissues and is rapidly eliminated in the bile. Enhanced liver targeting was further demonstrated by comparing the effects of MB07811 with 3,5,3′-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) and a non-liver-targeted TR agonist, 3,5-dichloro-4-(4-hydroxy-3-isopropylphenoxy)phenylacetic acid (KB-141) on the expression of TR agonist-responsive genes in the liver and six extrahepatic tissues. The pharmacologic effects of liver targeting were evident in the normal rat, where MB07811 exhibited increased cardiac sparing, and in the diet-induced obese mouse, where, unlike KB-141, MB07811 reduced cholesterol and both serum and hepatic triglycerides at doses devoid of effects on body weight, glycemia, and the THA. These results indicate that targeting TR agonists to the liver has the potential to lower both cholesterol and triglyceride levels with an

  10. Lipids and lipid metabolism in eukaryotic algae.

    PubMed

    Guschina, Irina A; Harwood, John L

    2006-03-01

    Eukaryotic algae are a very diverse group of organisms which inhabit a huge range of ecosystems from the Antarctic to deserts. They account for over half the primary productivity at the base of the food chain. In recent years studies on the lipid biochemistry of algae has shifted from experiments with a few model organisms to encompass a much larger number of, often unusual, algae. This has led to the discovery of new compounds, including major membrane components, as well as the elucidation of lipid signalling pathways. A major drive in recent research have been attempts to discover genes that code for expression of the various proteins involved in the production of very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. Such work is described here together with information about how environmental factors, such as light, temperature or minerals, can change algal lipid metabolism and how adaptation may take place.

  11. Cannabinoid receptor agonists reduce the short-term mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress linked to excitotoxicity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rangel-López, E; Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Pinzón, E; Torres, I; Serratos, I N; Castellanos, P; Wajner, M; Souza, D O; Santamaría, A

    2015-01-29

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is involved in a considerable number of physiological processes in the Central Nervous System. Recently, a modulatory role of cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists on the reduction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation has been demonstrated. Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous analog of glutamate and excitotoxic metabolite produced in the kynurenine pathway (KP), selectively activates NMDAr and has been shown to participate in different neurodegenerative disorders. Since the early pattern of toxicity exerted by this metabolite is relevant to explain the extent of damage that it can produce in the brain, in this work we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and other agonists (anandamide or AEA, and CP 55,940 or CP) on early markers of QUIN-induced toxicity in rat striatal cultured cells and rat brain synaptosomes. WIN, AEA and CP exerted protective effects on the QUIN-induced loss of cell viability. WIN also preserved the immunofluorescent signals for neurons and CBr labeling that were decreased by QUIN. The QUIN-induced early mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation were also partially or completely prevented by WIN pretreatment, but not when this CBr agonist was added simultaneously with QUIN to brain synaptosomes. These findings support a neuroprotective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by agents inducing excitotoxic processes.

  12. Discovery of G Protein-Biased EP2 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To identify G protein-biased and highly subtype-selective EP2 receptor agonists, a series of bicyclic prostaglandin analogues were designed and synthesized. Structural hybridization of EP2/4 dual agonist 5 and prostacyclin analogue 6, followed by simplification of the ω chain enabled us to discover novel EP2 agonists with a unique prostacyclin-like scaffold. Further optimization of the ω chain was performed to improve EP2 agonist activity and subtype selectivity. Phenoxy derivative 18a showed potent agonist activity and excellent subtype selectivity. Furthermore, a series of compounds were identified as G protein-biased EP2 receptor agonists. These are the first examples of biased ligands of prostanoid receptors. PMID:26985320

  13. Sports doping: emerging designer and therapeutic β2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Georgakopoulos, C; Sterk, S; Nielen, M W F

    2013-10-21

    Beta2-adrenergic agonists, or β2-agonists, are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptom-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. The use of β2-agonists is prohibited in sports by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) due to claimed anabolic effects, and also, is prohibited as growth promoters in cattle fattening in the European Union. This paper reviews the last seven-year (2006-2012) literature concerning the development of novel β2-agonists molecules either by modifying the molecule of known β2-agonists or by introducing moieties producing indole-, adamantyl- or phenyl urea derivatives. New emerging β2-agonists molecules for future therapeutic use are also presented, intending to emphasize their potential use for doping purposes or as growth promoters in the near future.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist inhibits collagen synthesis in human hypertrophic scar fibroblasts by targeting Smad3 via miR-145

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hua-Yu; Li, Chao; Zheng, Zhao; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Hao; Su, Lin-Lin; Han, Jun-Tao; Zhu, Xiong-Xiang; Wang, Shu-yue; Li, Jun Hu, Da-Hai

    2015-03-27

    The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) functions to regulate cell differentiation and lipid metabolism. Recently, its agonist has been documented to regulate extracellular matrix production in human dermal fibroblasts. This study explored the underlying molecular mechanisms and gene interactions in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFBs) in vitro. HSFBs were cultured and treated with or without PPAR-γ agonist or antagonist for gene expression. Bioinformatical analysis predicted that miR-145 could target Smad3 expression. Luciferase assay was used to confirm such an interaction. The data showed that PPAR-γ agonist troglitazone suppressed expression of Smad3 and Col1 in HSFBs. PPAR-γ agonist induced miR-145 at the gene transcriptional level, which in turn inhibited Smad3 expression and Col1 level in HSFBs. Furthermore, ELISA data showed that Col1 level in HSFBs was controlled by a feedback regulation mechanism involved in PPAR-γ agonist and antagonist-regulated expression of miR-145 and Smad3 in HSFBs. These findings indicate that PPAR-γ-miR-145-Smad3 axis plays a role in regulation of collagen synthesis in HSFBs. - Highlights: • PPAR-γ agonist inhibits collagen synthesis in HSFBs. • Smad3 and type I collagen expression are decreased by PPAR-γ agonist. • miR-145 expression is increased by PPAR-γ agonist in HSFBs. • Increased miR-145 inhibits collagen synthesis by targeting Smad3. • miR-145 regulates collagen synthesis.

  15. Introduction to membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes are composed largely of lipids and proteins. The most common arrangement of lipids in biological membranes is as a bilayer. This arrangement spontaneously forms a barrier for the passage of polar materials. The bilayer is thin but can have a large area in the dimension perpendicular to its thickness. The physical nature of the bilayer membrane will vary according to the conditions of the environment as well as the chemical structure of the lipid constituents of the bilayer. These physical properties determine the function of the membrane together with specific structural features of the lipids that allow them to have signaling properties. The lipids of the membrane are not uniformly distributed. There is an intrinsic asymmetry between the two monolayers that constitute the bilayer. In addition, some lipids tend to be enriched in particular regions of the membrane, termed domains. There is evidence that certain domains recruit specific proteins into that domain. This has been suggested to be important for allowing interaction among different proteins involved in certain signal transduction pathways. Membrane lipids have important roles in determining the physical properties of the membrane, in modulating the activity of membrane-bound proteins and in certain cases being specific secondary messengers that can interact with specific proteins. A large variety of lipids present in biological membranes result in them possessing many functions.

  16. Lipids in DDGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distillers dried grains with soluble (DDGS) are one of the main coproducts of ethanol production from using the dry-grinding process. The lipids from corn or sorghum are not utilized in ethanol production, and are thus concentrated in DDGS. The main lipid components in corn and sorghum DDGS are tr...

  17. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid has long been recognized as an important dietary component. Dietary lipid (fat) is a critical source of metabolic energy and a substrate for the synthesis of metabolically active compounds (essential fatty acids), and serves as a carrier for other nutrients such as the fat-soluble vitamins A, ...

  18. Agonist-receptor-arrestin, an alternative ternary complex with high agonist affinity.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V V; Pals-Rylaarsdam, R; Benovic, J L; Hosey, M M; Onorato, J J

    1997-11-14

    The rapid decrease of a response to a persistent stimulus, often termed desensitization, is a widespread biological phenomenon. Signal transduction by numerous G protein-coupled receptors appears to be terminated by a strikingly uniform two-step mechanism, most extensively characterized for the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR), m2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor (m2 mAChR), and rhodopsin. The model predicts that activated receptor is initially phosphorylated and then tightly binds an arrestin protein that effectively blocks further G protein interaction. Here we report that complexes of beta2AR-arrestin and m2 mAChR-arrestin have a higher affinity for agonists (but not antagonists) than do receptors not complexed with arrestin. The percentage of phosphorylated beta2AR in this high affinity state in the presence of full agonists varied with different arrestins and was enhanced by selective mutations in arrestins. The percentage of high affinity sites also was proportional to the intrinsic activity of an agonist, and the coefficient of proportionality varies for different arrestin proteins. Certain mutant arrestins can form these high affinity complexes with unphosphorylated receptors. Mutations that enhance formation of the agonist-receptor-arrestin complexes should provide useful tools for manipulating both the efficiency of signaling and rate and specificity of receptor internalization.

  19. Idiopathic bilateral lipid keratopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, E.; Arrellanes, L.; Boruchoff, S. A.; Ormerod, L. D.; Albert, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A 52-year-old Mexican man presented with asymptomatic, bilaterally symmetrical lipid infiltrates of the cornea and adjacent limbus. No evidence of previous ocular disease or systemic disorder of lipid metabolism could be detected. Penetrating keratoplasty of the right eye was required. The cornea was rigid and thick, with posterior bulging into the anterior chamber. Light microscopy revealed deep corneal lipid granules, foamy histiocytes, vascularisation, and chronic non-granulomatous inflammation. Transmission electron microscopy showed extracellular lipid spaces and numerous intracytoplasmic lipid vacuoles in histiocytes, keratocytes, conjunctival epithelium, and the endothelium of blood vessels in the corneal stroma and adjacent limbal conjunctiva. Histochemical analysis revealed the presence of neutral fats, free fatty acids, cholesterol, and phospholipids. Images PMID:3395592

  20. Mitochondrial lipids in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Aufschnaiter, Andreas; Kohler, Verena; Diessl, Jutta; Peselj, Carlotta; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Keller, Walter; Büttner, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including proteinopathies such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, which are characterized by the deposition of aggregated proteins in the form of insoluble fibrils or plaques. The distinct molecular processes that eventually result in mitochondrial dysfunction during neurodegeneration are well studied but still not fully understood. However, defects in mitochondrial fission and fusion, mitophagy, oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial bioenergetics have been linked to cellular demise. These processes are influenced by the lipid environment within mitochondrial membranes as, besides membrane structure and curvature, recruitment and activity of different proteins also largely depend on the respective lipid composition. Hence, the interaction of neurotoxic proteins with certain lipids and the modification of lipid composition in different cell compartments, in particular mitochondria, decisively impact cell death associated with neurodegeneration. Here, we discuss the relevance of mitochondrial lipids in the pathological alterations that result in neuronal demise, focussing on proteinopathies.

  1. Agonistic behavior in food animals: review of research and techniques.

    PubMed

    McGlone, J J

    1986-04-01

    One type of social behavior--agonistic behavior--is commonly observed among food animals. Agonistic behaviors are those behaviors which cause, threaten to cause or seek to reduce physical damage. Agonistic behavior is comprised of threats, aggression and submission. While any one of these divisions of agonistic behavior may be observed alone, they usually are found, in sequence, from the start to the end of an interaction. Food animals may show interspecific or intraspecific agonistic behaviors. Interspecific agonistic behavior has not been extensively studied but it is agriculturally important because farm workers may become injured or killed by aggressive food animals. Types of intraspecific agonistic behavior are: when animals are brought together, intermale fighting, resource defense, inter-gender fighting and aberrant aggression. Common pitfalls in research on agonistic behavior among food animals include too few replicates to detect a biological difference, the assumptions of the analysis are not met, only aggression and not submission or other agonistic behavior components are measured, incomplete description of the behaviors are reported and a complete, quantitive ethogram did not form the basis for selecting behavioral measures.

  2. Computational modeling toward understanding agonist binding on dopamine 3.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaxue; Lu, Xuefeng; Yang, Chao-Yie; Huang, Zhimin; Fu, Wei; Hou, Tingjun; Zhang, Jian

    2010-09-27

    The dopamine 3 (D3) receptor is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of nervous system disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, and current research interests primarily focus on the discovery/design of potent D3 agonists. Herein, a well-designed computational protocol, which combines pharmacophore identification, homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was employed to understand the agonist binding on D3 aiming to provide insights into the development of novel potent D3 agonists. We (1) identified the chemical features required in effective D3 agonists by pharmacophore modeling based upon 18 known diverse D3 agonists; (2) constructed the three-dimensional (3D) structure of D3 based on homology modeling and the pharmacophore hypothesis; (3) identified the binding modes of the agonists to D3 by the correlation between the predicted binding free energies and the experimental values; and (4) investigated the induced fit of D3 upon agonist binding through MD simulations. The pharmacophore models of the D3 agonists and the 3D structure of D3 can be used for either ligand- or receptor-based drug design. Furthermore, the MD simulations further give the insight that the long and flexible EL2 acts as a "door" for agonist binding, and the "ionic lock" at the bottom of TM3 and TM6 is essential to transduce the activation signal.

  3. D-Cycloserine: Agonist turned antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lanthorn, T H

    1994-10-01

    D-Cycloserine can enhance activation of the NMDA receptor complex and could enhance the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). In animals and humans, D-cycloserine can enhance performance in learning and memory tasks. This enhancing effect can disappear during repeated administration. The enhancing effects are also lost when higher doses are used, and replaced by behavioral and biochemical effects like those produced by NMDA antagonists. It has been reported that NMDA agonists, applied before or after tetanic stimulation, can block the induction of LTP. This may be the result of feedback inhibition of second messenger pathways stimulated by receptor activation. This may explain the antagonist-like effects of glycine partial agonists like D-cycloserine. In clinical trials of D-cycloserine in age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) and Alzheimer's disease, chronic treatment provided few positive effects on learning and memory. This may be due to inhibition of second messenger pathways following chronic stimulation of the receptor complex.

  4. Inverse agonist properties of atypical antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Akam, Elizabeth; Strange, Philip G

    2004-06-01

    Mechanisms of action of several atypical antipsychotic drugs have been examined at the D(2) dopamine receptor expressed in CHO cells. The drugs tested were found to exhibit inverse agonist activity at the D(2) dopamine receptor based on their effects to potentiate forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. Each of the antipsychotic drugs tested (clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone) increased cAMP accumulation to the same extent. The increase in cAMP was also similar to that seen with typical antipsychotic drugs. Inverse agonism at the D(2) dopamine receptor seems, therefore, to be a property common to all classes of antipsychotic drugs. The effect of sodium ions on the binding of the drugs to the receptor was also assessed. Each of the atypical antipsychotic drugs tested here bound with higher affinity in the absence of sodium ions. Previous studies have shown that some antipsychotic drugs are insensitive to sodium ions and some bind with higher affinity in the presence of sodium ions. Given that all of these antipsychotic drugs are inverse agonists, it may be concluded that this sodium ion sensitivity is unrelated to mechanisms of inverse agonism.

  5. Design, synthesis and pharmacology of 1,1-bistrifluoromethylcarbinol derivatives as liver X receptor β-selective agonists.

    PubMed

    Koura, Minoru; Matsuda, Takayuki; Okuda, Ayumu; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Kurobuchi, Sayaka; Matsumoto, Yuuki; Shibuya, Kimiyuki

    2015-07-01

    A novel series of 1,3-bistrifluoromethylcarbinol derivatives that act as liver X receptor (LXR) β-selective agonists was discovered. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the identification of molecule 62, which was more effective (Emax) and selective toward LXRβ than T0901317 and GW3965. Furthermore, 62 decreased LDL-C without elevating the plasma TG level and significantly suppressed the lipid-accumulation area in the aortic arch in a Bio F1B hamster fed a diet high in fat and cholesterol. We demonstrated that our LXRβ agonist would be potentially useful as a hypolipidemic and anti-atherosclerotic agent. In this manuscript, we report the design, synthesis and pharmacology of 1,3-bistrifluoromethylcarbinol derivatives.

  6. Obesity and gastrointestinal hormones-dual effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade and a partial agonist of PPAR-γ.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-03-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, which is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. It is now clear that gut hormones play a role in the regulation of body weight and represent therapeutic targets for the future treatment of obesity. Recent evidence demonstrated that dysregulation of adipocytokine functions seen in abdominal obesity may be involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Angiotensinogen, the precursor of angiotensin (Ang) II, is produced primarily in the liver, but also in adipose tissue, where it is up-regulated during the development of obesity and involved in blood pressure regulation and adipose tissue growth. Importantly, blockade of the RAS attenuates weight gain and adiposity by enhanced energy expenditure. The favorable metabolic effects of telmisartan have been related to its Ang II receptor blockade and action as a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. PPARγ plays an important role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ligands for PPARγ can improve insulin sensitivity and reduce triglyceride levels. We designed a comparative study of telmisartan and losartan in ApoE-deficient mice. Treatment with telmisartan or losartan significantly reduced the development of lipid-rich plaque. However, treatment with telmisartan significantly improved endothelial dysfunction and inhibited lipid accumulation in the liver. These favorable characteristics of telmisartan might be due to its action as a partial agonist of PPAR-γ, beyond its blood pressure-lowering effect, through Ang II blockade, which may be called "metabosartan".

  7. Fates of endocytosed somatostatin sst2 receptors and associated agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, J A; Kaur, R; Dodgeon, I; Edwardson, J M; Humphrey, P P

    1998-01-01

    Somatostatin agonists are rapidly and efficiently internalized with the somatostatin sst2 receptor. The fate of internalized agonists and receptors is of critical importance because the rate of ligand recycling back to the cell surface can limit the amount of radioligand accumulated inside the cells, whereas receptor recycling might be of vital importance in providing the cell surface with dephosphorylated, resensitized receptors. Furthermore the accumulation of radioisotope-conjugated somatostatin agonists inside cancer cells resulting from receptor-mediated internalization has been used as a treatment for cancers that overexpress somatostatin receptors. In the present study, radio-iodinated agonists at the sst2 somatostatin receptor were employed to allow quantitative analysis of the fate of endocytosed agonist. After endocytosis, recycling back to the cell surface was the main pathway for both 125I-labelled somatostatin-14 (SRIF-14) and the more stable agonist 125I-labelled cyclo(N-Me-Ala-Tyr-d-Trp-Lys-Abu-Phe) (BIM-23027; Abu stands for aminobutyric acid), accounting for 75-85% of internalized ligand when re-endocytosis of radioligand was prevented. We have shown that there is a dynamic cycling of both somatostatin agonist ligands and receptors between the cell surface and internal compartments both during agonist treatment and after surface-bound agonist has been removed, unless steps are taken to prevent the re-activation of receptors by recycled agonist. Internalization leads to increased degradation of 125I-labelled SRIF-14 but not 125I-labelled BIM-23027. The concentration of recycled agonist accumulating in the extracellular medium was sufficient to re-activate the receptor, as measured both by the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase and the recovery of surface receptor number after internalization. PMID:9820803

  8. Lake Superior lipids

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fish chemistry data (d13C, d15N, C:N, lipid content) published in Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2015, 29, 2069??2077 DOI: 10.1002/rcm.7367This dataset is associated with the following publication:Hoffman , J., M. Sierszen , and A. Cotter. Fish tissue lipid-C:N relationships for correcting ä13C values and estimating lipid content in aquatic food web studies. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry. Wiley InterScience, Silver Spring, MD, USA, 29(21): 2069–2077, (2015).

  9. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  10. [Lipid formulations of amphotericin].

    PubMed

    Botero, Martha C; Puentes-Herrera, Marcela; Cortés, Jorge A

    2014-10-01

    Amphotericin B deoxycholate use has increased during the past years in parallel with the increase in the number of immunosuppressed patients suffering invasive fungal infections. This drug is associated with a high rate of side effects, especially renal toxicity. Lipid formulations (liposomal, lipid complex, colloidal suspension and the Indian liposomal formulation) have been developed, which share the same antifungal spectrum but differ in efficacy and toxicity. A review of amphotericin lipid formulations is presented, focusing on differences in efficacy and, especially renal toxicity. The main problem for use of these formulations in Latin America is their highcost.

  11. Estrogen receptor agonists for attenuation of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Haque, Azizul; Banik, Naren L.; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Ray, Swapan K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent results from laboratory investigations and clinical trials indicate important roles for estrogen receptor (ER) agonists in protecting the central nervous system (CNS) from noxious consequences of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative processes in several CNS disorders including spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are associated with activation of microglia and astrocytes, which drive the resident neuroinflammatory response. During neurodegenerative processes, activated microglia and astrocytes cause deleterious effects on surrounding neurons. The inhibitory activity of ER agonists on microglia activation might be a beneficial therapeutic option for delaying the onset or progression of neurodegenerative injuries and diseases. Recent studies suggest that ER agonists can provide neuroprotection by modulation of cell survival mechanisms, synaptic reorganization, regenerative responses to axonal injury, and neurogenesis process. The anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions of ER agonists are mediated mainly via two ERs known as ERα and ERβ. Although some studies have suggested that ER agonists may be deleterious to some neuronal populations, the potential clinical benefits of ER agonists for augmenting cognitive function may triumph over the associated side effects. Also, understanding the modulatory activities of ER agonists on inflammatory pathways will possibly lead to the development of selective anti-inflammatory molecules with neuroprotective roles in different CNS disorders such as SCI, MS, PD, and AD in humans. Future studies should be concentrated on finding the most plausible molecular pathways for enhancing protective functions of ER agonists in treating neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative injuries and diseases in the CNS. PMID:25245209

  12. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  13. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  14. Dopaminergic D2-like agonists produce yawning in the myelin mutant taiep and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Eguibar, Jose R; Cortes, Ma del Carmen; Lara-Lozano, Manuel; Mendiola, Diana M

    2012-07-01

    Systemic administration of D2-like dopaminergic-receptor agonists increases yawning behavior. However, only a few studies have been done in animals with pathological conditions. The taiep rat is a myelin mutant with an initial hypomyelination followed by progressive demyelination, being the brainstem one of the most affected areas. In our experiments, we analyzed the effects of systemic administration of the D2-family agonists and antagonists on yawning behavior, and correlated them with the lipid myelin content in the brainstem and other areas in the central nervous system (CNS) in 8 month old male taiep and Sprague-Dawley rats. Subjects were maintained under standard conditions in Plexiglas cages with a 12:12 light-dark cycle, lights on at 0700 and free access to rodent pellets and tap water. Drugs were freshly prepared injected ip at 0800 and subjects were observed for 60 min. When antagonists were used it was administered 15 min before the agonist. Sprague-Dawley and taiep rats significantly increased their yawning frequency after systemic injection of (-)-quinpirole hydrochloride, R(+)-7-Hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (7-OH-DPAT) or trans-(±)-3,4,4a,10b-tetrahydro-4-propyl-2H,5H-[1]benzopyrano [4,3-b]-1,4-oxazin-9-ol hydrochloride ((±)-PD 128,907). Among D2-like agonists used higher effects are obtained with (-)-quinpirole. The effects caused by (-)-quinpirole can be reduced by (-)-sulpiride; and yawning caused by 7-OH-DPAT was decreased by tiapride only in taiep rats. In Sprague-Dawley only (-)-sulpiride is able to decrease (-)-quinpirole-caused yawning. In conclusion, dopaminergic D2-like agonists are still able to cause yawning despite the severe myelin loss in taiep rats. Similarly, patients with various CNS illnesses that affect myelin, such as stroke or multiple sclerosis, are able to yawn suggesting that trigger neurons are still able to command this innate behavior.

  15. Lipid-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ewers, Helge; Helenius, Ari

    2011-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is used by a number of viruses and toxins to gain entry into cells. Some have evolved to use specific lipids in the plasma membrane as their receptors. They include bacterial toxins such as Shiga and Cholera toxin and viruses such as mouse polyoma virus and simian virus 40. Through multivalent binding to glycosphingolipids, they induce lipid clustering and changes in membrane properties. Internalization occurs by unusual endocytic mechanisms involving lipid rafts, induction of membrane curvature, trans-bilayer coupling, and activation of signaling pathways. Once delivered to early endosomes, they follow diverse intracellular routes to the lumen of the ER, from which they penetrate into the cytosol. The role of the lipid receptors is central in these well-studied processes. PMID:21576253

  16. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  17. Neuroprotection by Alpha 2-Adrenergic Agonists in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghua; Kimelberg, Harold K.

    2005-01-01

    Ischemic brain injury is implicated in the pathophysiology of stroke and brain trauma, which are among the top killers worldwide, and intensive studies have been performed to reduce neural cell death after cerebral ischemia. Alpha 2-adrenergic agonists have been shown to improve the histomorphological and neurological outcome after cerebral ischemic injury when administered during ischemia, and recent studies have provided considerable evidence that alpha 2-adrenergic agonists can protect the brain from ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, alpha 2-adrenergic agonists are promising potential drugs in preventing cerebral ischemic injury, but the mechanisms by which alpha 2-adrenergic agonists exert their neuroprotective effect are unclear. Activation of both the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor and imidazoline receptor may be involved. This mini review examines the recent progress in alpha 2-adrenergic agonists - induced neuroprotection and its proposed mechanisms in cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:18369397

  18. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  19. Measuring brain lipids.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Glyn

    2015-08-01

    The rapid development of analytical technology has made lipidomics an exciting new area and this review will focus more on modern approaches to lipidomics than on earlier technology. Although not fully comprehensive for all possible brain lipids, the intent is to at least provide a reference for the analysis of classes of lipids found in brain and nervous tissue. We will discuss problems posed by the brain because of its structural and functional heterogeneity, the development changes it undergoes (myelination, aging, pathology etc.) and its cellular heterogeneity (neurons, glia etc.). Section 2 will discuss the various ways in which brain tissue can be extracted to yield lipids for analysis and section 3 will cover a wide range of techniques used to analyze brain lipids such as chromatography and mass-spectrometry. In Section 4 we will discuss ways of analyzing some of the specific biologically active brain lipids found in very small amounts except in pathological conditions and section 5 looks to the future of experimental lipidomic modification in the brain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids.

  20. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  1. Quantifying agonist activity at G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Frederick J; Suga, Hinako; Griffin, Michael T

    2011-12-26

    When an agonist activates a population of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), it elicits a signaling pathway that culminates in the response of the cell or tissue. This process can be analyzed at the level of a single receptor, a population of receptors, or a downstream response. Here we describe how to analyze the downstream response to obtain an estimate of the agonist affinity constant for the active state of single receptors. Receptors behave as quantal switches that alternate between active and inactive states (Figure 1). The active state interacts with specific G proteins or other signaling partners. In the absence of ligands, the inactive state predominates. The binding of agonist increases the probability that the receptor will switch into the active state because its affinity constant for the active state (K(b)) is much greater than that for the inactive state (K(a)). The summation of the random outputs of all of the receptors in the population yields a constant level of receptor activation in time. The reciprocal of the concentration of agonist eliciting half-maximal receptor activation is equivalent to the observed affinity constant (K(obs)), and the fraction of agonist-receptor complexes in the active state is defined as efficacy (ε) (Figure 2). Methods for analyzing the downstream responses of GPCRs have been developed that enable the estimation of the K(obs) and relative efficacy of an agonist. In this report, we show how to modify this analysis to estimate the agonist K(b) value relative to that of another agonist. For assays that exhibit constitutive activity, we show how to estimate K(b) in absolute units of M(-1). Our method of analyzing agonist concentration-response curves consists of global nonlinear regression using the operational model. We describe a procedure using the software application, Prism (GraphPad Software, Inc., San Diego, CA). The analysis yields an estimate of the product of K(obs) and a parameter proportional to efficacy (

  2. Agonistic behavior in males and females: effects of an estrogen receptor beta agonist in gonadectomized and gonadally intact mice

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Amy E. Clipperton; Cragg, Cheryl L.; Wood, Alexis J.; Pfaff, Donald W.; Choleris, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Summary Affiliative and agonistic social interactions are mediated by gonadal hormones. Research with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) or beta (ERβ) knockout (KO) mice show that long-term inactivation of ERα decreases, while inactivation of ERβ increases, male aggression. Opposite effects were found in female αERKO and βERKO mice. The role of acute activation of ERα or ERβ in the agonistic responses of adult non-KO mice is unknown. We report here the effects of the ERβ selective agonist WAY-200070 on agonistic and social behavior in gonadally intact and gonadectomized (gonadex) male and female CD-1 mice towards a gonadex, same-sex intruder. All 15 min resident-intruder tests were videotaped for comprehensive behavioral analysis. Separate analyses assessed: 1) effects of WAY-200070 on each sex and gonadal condition; 2) differences between sexes, and between gonadally intact and gonadex mice, in untreated animals. Results show that in gonadally intact male and female mice WAY-200070 increased agonistic behaviors such as pushing down and aggressive grooming, while leaving attacks unaffected. In untreated mice, males attacked more than females, and gonadex animals showed less agonistic behavior than same-sex, gonadally intact mice. Overall, our detailed behavioral analysis suggested that in gonadally intact male and female mice, ERβ mediates patterns of agonistic behavior that are not directly involved in attacks. This suggests that specific aspects of aggressive behavior are acutely mediated by ERβ in adult mice. Our results also showed that, in resident-intruder tests, female mice spend as much time in intrasexual agonistic interactions as males, but use agonistic behaviors that involve extremely low levels of direct attacks. This non-attack aggression in females is increased by acute activation of ERβ. Thus, acute activation of ERβ similarly mediates agonistic behavior in adult male and female CD-1 mice. PMID:20129736

  3. PPARγ agonists promote differentiation of cancer stem cells by restraining YAP transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Rattanakorn, Kirk; Gadi, Abhilash; Verma, Narendra; Maurizi, Giulia; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Coarfa, Cristian; Kennedy, Oran D.; Garabedian, Michael J.; Basilico, Claudio; Mansukhani, Alka

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a highly aggressive pediatric bone cancer in which most tumor cells remain immature and fail to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. However, OS cells readily respond to adipogenic stimuli suggesting they retain mesenchymal stem cell-like properties. Here we demonstrate that nuclear receptor PPARγ agonists such as the anti-diabetic, thiazolidinedione (TZD) drugs induce growth arrest and cause adipogenic differentiation in human, mouse and canine OS cells as well as in tumors in mice. Gene expression analysis reveals that TZDs induce lipid metabolism pathways while suppressing targets of the Hippo-YAP pathway, Wnt signaling and cancer-related proliferation pathways. Significantly, TZD action appears to be restricted to the high Sox2 expressing cancer stem cell population and is dependent on PPARγ expression. TZDs also affect growth and cell fate by causing the cytoplasmic sequestration of the transcription factors SOX2 and YAP that are required for tumorigenicity. Finally, we identify a TZD-regulated gene signature based on Wnt/Hippo target genes and PPARγ that predicts patient outcomes. Together, this work highlights a novel connection between PPARγ agonist in inducing adipogenesis and mimicking the tumor suppressive hippo pathway. It also illustrates the potential of drug repurposing for TZD-based differentiation therapy for osteosarcoma. PMID:27528232

  4. Effects of PPARγ Agonist Pioglitazone on Redox-Sensitive Cellular Signaling in Young Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dovinová, Ima; Barancik, Miroslav; Zorad, Stefan; Gajdosechová, Lucia; Gresová, Linda; Cacanyiova, Sona; Kristek, Frantisek; Balis, Peter; Chan, Julie Y. H.

    2013-01-01

    PPARγ receptor plays an important role in oxidative stress response. Its agonists can influence vascular contractility in experimental hypertension. Our study was focused on the effects of a PPARγ agonist pioglitazone (PIO) on blood pressure regulation, vasoactivity of vessels, and redox-sensitive signaling at the central (brainstem, BS) and peripheral (left ventricle, LV) levels in young prehypertensive rats. 5-week-old SHR were treated either with PIO (10 mg/kg/day, 2 weeks) or with saline using gastric gavage. Administration of PIO significantly slowed down blood pressure increase and improved lipid profile and aortic relaxation after insulin stimulation. A significant increase in PPARγ expression was found only in BS, not in LV. PIO treatment did not influence NOS changes, but had tissue-dependent effect on SOD regulation and increased SOD activity, observed in LV. The treatment with PIO differentially affected also the levels of other intracellular signaling components: Akt kinase increased in the the BS, while β-catenin level was down-regulated in the BS and up-regulated in the LV. We found that the lowering of blood pressure in young SHR can be connected with insulin sensitivity of vessels and that β-catenin and SOD levels are important agents mediating PIO effects in the BS and LV. PMID:24454335

  5. GLP-1 receptor agonists: effects on the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Guang; Jia, Yumei; Xu, Yuan

    2015-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, and its incidence has been increasing recently. In addition to hepatic complications, NAFLD is also recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, the current therapies for NAFLD display variable efficacy; a novel and effective drug is urgently needed. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a receptor agonist is a new drug approved for treating type 2 diabetes. Recently, these types of agents have shown a novel therapeutic effect on NAFLD. However, the mechanisms of GLP-1 receptor agonists on the treatment of NAFLD have not yet been explained precisely. Recent studies have demonstrated that GLP-1 reverses the progression of NAFLD not only indirectly through an incretin effect that improves key parameters involved in NAFLD, but also a direct effect on lipid metabolism of hepatocytes and inflammation in liver. In this review, we provided an overview of the role and mechanisms of GLP-1 in the therapy of NAFLD.

  6. Mechanisms of Action of Compounds That Enhance Storage Lipid Accumulation in Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of storage lipids in the crustacean Daphnia magna can be altered by a number of exogenous and endogenous compounds, like 20-hydroxyecdysone (natural ligand of the ecdysone receptor, EcR), methyl farnesoate, pyrirproxyfen (agonists of the methyl farnesoate receptor, MfR), and tributyltin (agonist of the retinoid X acid receptor, RXR). This effect, analogous to the obesogenic disruption in mammals, alters Daphnia’s growth and reproductive investment. Here we propose that storage lipid accumulation in droplets is regulated in Daphnia by the interaction between the nuclear receptor heterodimer EcR:RXR and MfR. The model was tested by determining changes in storage lipid accumulation and on gene transcription in animals exposed to different effectors of RXR, EcR, and MfR signaling pathways, either individually or in combination. RXR, EcR, and MfR agonists increased storage lipid accumulation, whereas fenarimol and testosterone (reported inhibitors of ecdysteroid synthesis and an EcR antagonist, respectively) decreased it. Joint effects of mixtures with fenarimol, testosterone, and ecdysone were antagonistic, mixtures of juvenoids showed additive effects following a concentration addition model, and combinations of tributyltin with juvenoids resulted in greater than additive effects. Co-exposures of ecdysone with juvenoids resulted in deregulation of ecdysone- and farnesoid-regulated genes, accordingly with the observed changes in lipid accumulation These results indicate the requirement of ecdysone binding to the EcR:RXR:MfR complex to regulate lipid storage and that an excess of ecdysone disrupts the whole process, probably by triggering negative feedback mechanisms. PMID:27993043

  7. Catalposide is a natural agonistic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji Hae; Jun, Hee-jin; Hoang, Minh-Hien; Jia, Yaoyao; Han, Xiang Hua; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Hak-Ju; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposide is a novel ligand for PPAR{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell stimulated with catalposide improved fatty acid uptake, regulated target genes in fatty acid {beta}-oxidation and synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposdie reduces hepatic triacylglycerides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theses demonstrate catalposide could ameliorate hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes related to cellular lipid uptake and oxidation. Thus, PPAR{alpha} agonists may be important in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. In this study, we demonstrated that catalposide is a novel natural PPAR{alpha} agonist, identified from reporter gene assay-based activity screening with approximately 900 natural plant and seaweed extracts. Results of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses suggested that the compound interacted directly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR{alpha}. Cultured hepatocytes stimulated with catalposide exhibited significantly reduced cellular triglyceride concentrations, by 21%, while cellular uptake of fatty acids was increased, by 70% (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the increase in cellular fatty acid uptake was due to upregulation of fatty acid transporter protein-4 (+19% vs. the control) in cells stimulated with catalposide. Additionally, expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation and high-density lipoprotein metabolism were upregulated, while that of genes related to fatty acid synthesis were suppressed. In conclusion, catalposide is hypolipidemic by activation of PPAR{alpha} via a ligand-mediated mechanism that modulates the expression of in lipid metabolism genes in hepatocytes.

  8. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation.

  9. Synthetic RORγ agonists regulate multiple pathways to enhance antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Liu, Xikui; Moisan, Jacques; Wang, Yahong; Lesch, Charles A.; Spooner, Chauncey; Morgan, Rodney W.; Zawidzka, Elizabeth M.; Mertz, David; Bousley, Dick; Majchrzak, Kinga; Kryczek, Ilona; Taylor, Clarke; Van Huis, Chad; Skalitzky, Don; Hurd, Alexander; Aicher, Thomas D.; Toogood, Peter L.; Glick, Gary D.; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Zou, Weiping; Carter, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RORγt is the key transcription factor controlling the development and function of CD4+ Th17 and CD8+ Tc17 cells. Across a range of human tumors, about 15% of the CD4+ T cell fraction in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are RORγ+ cells. To evaluate the role of RORγ in antitumor immunity, we have identified synthetic, small molecule agonists that selectively activate RORγ to a greater extent than the endogenous agonist desmosterol. These RORγ agonists enhance effector function of Type 17 cells by increasing the production of cytokines/chemokines such as IL-17A and GM-CSF, augmenting expression of co-stimulatory receptors like CD137, CD226, and improving survival and cytotoxic activity. RORγ agonists also attenuate immunosuppressive mechanisms by curtailing Treg formation, diminishing CD39 and CD73 expression, and decreasing levels of co-inhibitory receptors including PD-1 and TIGIT on tumor-reactive lymphocytes. The effects of RORγ agonists were not observed in RORγ−/− T cells, underscoring the selective on-target activity of the compounds. In vitro treatment of tumor-specific T cells with RORγ agonists, followed by adoptive transfer to tumor-bearing mice is highly effective at controlling tumor growth while improving T cell survival and maintaining enhanced IL-17A and reduced PD-1 in vivo. The in vitro effects of RORγ agonists translate into single agent, immune system-dependent, antitumor efficacy when compounds are administered orally in syngeneic tumor models. RORγ agonists integrate multiple antitumor mechanisms into a single therapeutic that both increases immune activation and decreases immune suppression resulting in robust inhibition of tumor growth. Thus, RORγ agonists represent a novel immunotherapy approach for cancer. PMID:28123897

  10. Sebaceous gland lipids

    PubMed Central

    Ottaviani, Monica; Camera, Emanuela; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna

    2009-01-01

    The principal activity of mature sebaceous glands is producing and secreting sebum, which is a complex mixture of lipids. Sebum composition is different among species and this difference is probably due to the function that sebum has to absolve. In human sebum there are unique lipids, such as squalene and wax esters not found anywhere else in the body nor among the epidermal surface lipids. Moreover, they correspond to major components supplying the skin with protection. However, the ultimate role of human sebum, as well the metabolic pathways regulating its composition and secretion rate, are far from a complete understanding. Increased sebum secretion is considered, among all features, the major one involved in the pathophysiology of acne. Along with increased sebum secretion rate, quali- and quantitative modifications of sebum are likely to occur in this pathology. Understanding the factors and mechanisms that regulate sebum production is needed in order to identify new targets that can be addressed to achieve a selective modulation of lipid biosynthesis as a novel therapeutic strategy to correct lipid disregulations in acne and other disorders of the pilosebaceous unit. PMID:20224686

  11. [Histrelin acetate--the first once yearly LHRH agonist].

    PubMed

    Altarac, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    Long-acting synthetic luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonists have become the mainstay for androgen-deprivation therapy, because they avoid the physical and psychological discomfort associated with orchidectomy and lack the potential cardiotoxicity associated with estrogens such as diethylstilbestrol. Currently available luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonist analogues include leuprolide, goserelin, triptorelin, degarelix and buserelin were administered as either intramuscular or subcutaneous depot injections on a 1, 2, 3 or 6 months basis. Histrelin acetate is the first long-acting luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonist available as a once-yearly subcutaneous implant.

  12. Toll-like receptor agonists in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors related to the Drosophila Toll protein. TLR activation alerts the immune system to microbial products and initiates innate and adaptive immune responses. The naturally powerful immunostimulatory property of TLR agonists can be exploited for active immunotherapy against cancer. Antitumor activity has been demonstrated in several cancers, and TLR agonists are now undergoing extensive clinical investigation. This review discusses recent advances in the field and highlights potential opportunities for the clinical development of TLR agonists as single agent immunomodulators, vaccine adjuvants and in combination with conventional cancer therapies. PMID:20563267

  13. Cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous agonist, anandamide.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, J; Felder, C C

    1998-05-01

    Cannabinoids are a class of compound found in marijuana which have been known for their therapeutic and psychoactive properties for at least 4000 years. Isolation of the active principle in marijuana, delta9-THC, provided the lead structure in the development of highly potent congeners which were used to probe for the mechanism of marijuana action. Cannabinoids were shown to bind to selective binding sites in brain tissue thereby regulating second messenger formation. Such studies led to the cloning of three cannabinoid receptor subtypes, CB1, CB2, and CB1A all of which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled plasma membrane receptors. Analogous to the discovery of endogenous opiates, isolation of cannabinoid receptors provided the appropriate tool to isolate an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, anandamide, from porcine brain. Recent studies indicate that anandamide is a member of a family of fatty acid ethanolamides that may represent a novel class of lipid neurotransmitters. This review discusses recent progress in cannabinoid research with a focus on the receptors for delta9-THC, their coupling to second messenger responses, and the endogenous lipid cannabimimetic, anandamide.

  14. Lipid Production from Nannochloropsis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Nian; Chen, Tian-Peng; Yang, Bo; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are sunlight-driven green cell factories for the production of potential bioactive products and biofuels. Nannochloropsis represents a genus of marine microalgae with high photosynthetic efficiency and can convert carbon dioxide to storage lipids mainly in the form of triacylglycerols and to the ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Recently, Nannochloropsis has received ever-increasing interests of both research and public communities. This review aims to provide an overview of biology and biotechnological potential of Nannochloropsis, with the emphasis on lipid production. The path forward for the further exploration of Nannochloropsis for lipid production with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed. PMID:27023568

  15. Characterization of a novel bivalent morphinan possessing kappa agonist and micro agonist/antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuemei; Xiong, Wennan; Zhang, Ao; Negus, S Stevens; Neumeyer, John L; Bidlack, Jean M

    2005-11-01

    Previous research has shown that compounds with mixed kappa and mu activity may have utility for the treatment of cocaine abuse and dependence. The present study characterizes the pharmacological profile of a bivalent morphinan that was shown to be a kappa opioid receptor agonist and a mu opioid receptor agonist/antagonist. MCL-145 [bis(N-cyclobutylmethylmorphinan) fumarate] is related to the morphinan cyclorphan and its N-cyclobutylmethyl derivative MCL-101 [3-hydroxy-N-cyclobutylmethyl morphinan S-(+)-mandelate]. MCL-145 consists of two morphinans connected by a spacer at the 3-hydroxy position. This compound had K(i) values of 0.078 and 0.20 nM for the kappa and mu opioid receptors, respectively, using radioligand binding assays as shown by Neumeyer et al. in 2003. In the guanosine 5'-O -(3-[(35) S]thiotriphosphate) binding assay, MCL-145 produced an E(max) value of 80% for the kappa opioid receptor and 42% for the mu opioid receptor. The EC(50) values obtained for this compound were 4.3 and 3.1 nM for the kappa and mu opioid receptors, respectively. In vivo MCL-145 produced a full dose-response curve in the 55 degrees C warm water tail-flick test and was equipotent to morphine. The agonist properties of MCL-145 were antagonized by the mu-selective antagonist beta-funaltrexamine and the kappa-selective antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. MCL-145 also acted as a mu antagonist, as measured by the inhibition of morphine-induced antinociception.

  16. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Loy, Douglas A.; Yamanaka, Stacey A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  17. Octopaminergic agonists for the cockroach neuronal octopamine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Eto, Morifusa

    2003-01-01

    The compounds 1-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine-2-thione and 2-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine showed the almost same activity as octopamine in stimulating adenylate cyclase of cockroach thoracic nervous system among 70 octopamine agonists, suggesting that only these compounds are full octopamine agonists and other compounds are partial octopamine agonists. The quantitative structure-activity relationship of a set of 22 octopamine agonists against receptor 2 in cockroach nervous tissue, was analyzed using receptor surface modeling. Three-dimensional energetics descriptors were calculated from receptor surface model/ligand interaction and these three-dimensional descriptors were used in quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis. A receptor surface model was generated using some subset of the most active structures and the results provided useful information in the characterization and differentiation of octopaminergic receptor.

  18. (R)-(-)-10-methyl-11-hydroxyaporphine: a highly selective serotonergic agonist.

    PubMed

    Cannon, J G; Mohan, P; Bojarski, J; Long, J P; Bhatnagar, R K; Leonard, P A; Flynn, J R; Chatterjee, T K

    1988-02-01

    Prior work in these laboratories identified (+/-)-5-hydroxy-6-methyl-2- (di-n-propylamino)tetralin as a dopaminergic agonist prodrug. The ortho methyl hydroxy aromatic substitution pattern in this molecule has now been incorporated into the aporphine ring system to give a congener of the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine in which the position 10 OH group has been replaced by methyl. Preparation of the target compound involved acid-catalyzed rearrangement of the 3-(1-phenyltetrazolyl) ether of morphine and subsequent molecular modification of the product, the 10-(1-phenyltetrazolyl) ether of (R)-(-)-apomorphine. Surprisingly, the target compound elicited no responses in any assays for effects at dopamine receptors, but rather it displayed pharmacological properties consistent with its being a serotonergic agonist with a high degree of selectivity for 5-HT1A receptors similar to the serotonergic agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin.

  19. Partial agonist therapy in schizophrenia: relevance to diminished criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Gavaudan, Gilles; Magalon, David; Cohen, Julien; Lançon, Christophe; Léonetti, Georges; Pélissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure

    2010-11-01

    Pathological gambling (PG), classified in the DSM-IV among impulse control disorders, is defined as inappropriate, persistent gaming for money with serious personal, family, and social consequences. Offenses are frequently committed to obtain money for gambling. Pathological gambling, a planned and structured behavioral disorder, has often been described as a complication of dopamine agonist treatment in patients with Parkinson's disease. It has never been described in patients with schizophrenia receiving dopamine agonists. We present two patients with schizophrenia, previously treated with antipsychotic drugs without any suggestion of PG, who a short time after starting aripiprazole, a dopamine partial agonist, developed PG and criminal behavior, which totally resolved when aripiprazole was discontinued. Based on recent advances in research on PG and adverse drug reactions to dopamine agonists in Parkinson's disease, we postulate a link between aripiprazole and PG in both our patients with schizophrenia and raise the question of criminal responsibility.

  20. Agonist Replacement for Stimulant Dependence: A Review of Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Rush, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Stimulant use disorders are an unrelenting public health concern worldwide. Agonist replacement therapy is among the most effective strategies for managing substance use disorders including nicotine and opioid dependence. The present paper reviewed clinical data from human laboratory self-administration studies and clinical trials to determine whether agonist replacement therapy is a viable strategy for managing cocaine and/or amphetamine use disorders. The extant literature suggests that agonist replacement therapy may be effective for managing stimulant use disorders, however, the clinical selection of an agonist replacement medication likely needs to be based on the pharmacological mechanism of the medication and the stimulant abused by patients. Specifically, dopamine releasers appear most effective for reducing cocaine use whereas dopamine reuptake inhibitors appear most effective for reducing amphetamine use. PMID:23574440

  1. Selecting agonists from single cells infected with combinatorial antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Yea, Kyungmoo; Xie, Jia; Ruiz, Diana; Wilson, Ian A; Lerner, Richard A

    2013-05-23

    We describe a system for direct selection of antibodies that are receptor agonists. Combinatorial antibody libraries in lentiviruses are used to infect eukaryotic cells that contain a fluorescent reporter system coupled to the receptor for which receptor agonist antibodies are sought. In this embodiment of the method, very large numbers of candidate antibodies expressing lentivirus and eukaryotic reporter cells are packaged together in a format where each is capable of replication, thereby forging a direct link between genotype and phenotype. Following infection, cells that fluoresce are sorted and the integrated genes encoding the agonist antibodies recovered. We validated the system by illustrating its ability to generate rapidly potent antibody agonists that are complete thrombopoietin phenocopies. The system should be generalizable to any pathway where its activation can be linked to production of a selectable phenotype.

  2. Agonist pharmacology of two Drosophila GABA receptor splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The Drosophila melanogaster gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunits, RDLac and DRC 17-1-2, form functional homo-oligomeric receptors when heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The subunits differ in only 17 amino acids, principally in regions of the N-terminal domain which determine agonist pharmacology in vertebrate ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors. A range of conformationally restricted GABA analogues were tested on the two homo-oligomers and their agonists pharmacology compared with that of insect and vertebrate iontropic GABA receptors. 2. The actions of GABA, isoguvacine and isonipecotic acid on RDLac and DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers were compared, by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp. All three compounds were full agonists of both receptors, but were 4-6 fold less potent agonists of DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers than of RDLac. However, the relative potencies of these agonists on each receptor were very similar. 3. A more complete agonist profile was established for RDLac homo-oligomers. The most potent agonists of these receptors were GABA, muscimol and trans-aminocrotonic acid (TACA), which were approximately equipotent. RDLac homo-oligomers were fully activated by a range of GABA analogues, with the order of potency: GABA > ZAPA ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid) > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid > or = isonipecotic acid > or = cis-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) > beta-alanine. 3-Aminopropane sulphonic acid (3-APS), a partial agonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, was the weakest agonist tested and 100 fold less potent than GABA. 4. SR95531, an antagonist of vertebrate GABAA receptors, competitively inhibited the GABA responses of RDLac homo-oligomers, which have previously been found to insensitive to bicuculline. However, its potency (IC50 500 microM) was much reduced when compared to GABAA receptors. 5. The agonist pharmacology of Drosophila RDLac homo-oligomers exhibits aspects of the characteristic pharmacology of

  3. Discovery and characterization of GSK256073, a non-flushing hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptor 2 (HCA2) agonist.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, Dennis; Maxwell, Miles; Goodman, Joanne; White, Brian; Tang, Chi-Man; Boullay, Valerie; de Gouville, Anne-Charlotte

    2015-06-05

    Niacin has been used for many years in the treatment of dyslipidemia due to its ability to decrease serum levels of triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and to increase levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, niacin causes severe flushing resulting in poor patient compliance. The discovery of hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptor 2 (HCA2) as a high affinity receptor for niacin has opened avenues to investigate the mechanism of action of niacin, and to potentially discover agonists which maintain the antilipolytic effects of niacin accessed by a decrease in circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and thereby perhaps the lipid/lipoprotein effects, but avoid the flushing effects. Here we describe the strategy we implemented to identify such compounds. This approach resulted in the discovery of GSK256073, a highly potent HCA2 agonist, which produced similar NEFA lowering effects to niacin in preclinical models (rat and guinea pig). A guinea pig model was used to predict flushing, via an increase in ear temperature, and GSK256073 was found to have a minimal effect in this model. These preclinical models appeared to be predictive of human response, since in a first-time-in-human study, GSK256073 displayed long lasting NEFA and triglyceride lowering effects in healthy male subjects, which were not associated with flushing. GSK256073 can be used as a pharmacological tool to better understand the role of HCA2 in lipid metabolism.

  4. Hyodeoxycholic acid derivatives as liver X receptor α and G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    De Marino, Simona; Carino, Adriana; Masullo, Dario; Finamore, Claudia; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Catalanotti, Bruno; Novellino, Ettore; Limongelli, Vittorio; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are extensively investigated for their potential in the treatment of human disorders. The liver X receptors (LXRs), activated by oxysterols and by a secondary bile acid named hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA), have been found essential in the regulation of lipid homeostasis in mammals. Unfortunately, LXRα activates lipogenic enzymes causing accumulation of lipid in the liver. In addition to LXRs, HDCA has been also shown to function as ligand for GPBAR1, a G protein coupled receptor for secondary bile acids whose activation represents a promising approach to liver steatosis. In the present study, we report a library of HDCA derivatives endowed with modulatory activity on the two receptors. The lead optimization of HDCA moiety was rationally driven by the structural information on the binding site of the two targets and results from pharmacological characterization allowed the identification of hyodeoxycholane derivatives with selective agonistic activity toward LXRα and GPBAR1 and notably to the identification of the first example of potent dual LXRα/GPBAR1 agonists. The new chemical entities might hold utility in the treatment of dyslipidemic disorders. PMID:28233865

  5. Hyodeoxycholic acid derivatives as liver X receptor α and G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Marino, Simona; Carino, Adriana; Masullo, Dario; Finamore, Claudia; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Catalanotti, Bruno; Novellino, Ettore; Limongelli, Vittorio; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Bile acids are extensively investigated for their potential in the treatment of human disorders. The liver X receptors (LXRs), activated by oxysterols and by a secondary bile acid named hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA), have been found essential in the regulation of lipid homeostasis in mammals. Unfortunately, LXRα activates lipogenic enzymes causing accumulation of lipid in the liver. In addition to LXRs, HDCA has been also shown to function as ligand for GPBAR1, a G protein coupled receptor for secondary bile acids whose activation represents a promising approach to liver steatosis. In the present study, we report a library of HDCA derivatives endowed with modulatory activity on the two receptors. The lead optimization of HDCA moiety was rationally driven by the structural information on the binding site of the two targets and results from pharmacological characterization allowed the identification of hyodeoxycholane derivatives with selective agonistic activity toward LXRα and GPBAR1 and notably to the identification of the first example of potent dual LXRα/GPBAR1 agonists. The new chemical entities might hold utility in the treatment of dyslipidemic disorders.

  6. Beta2-agonists and exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sandra D; Caillaud, Corinne; Brannan, John D

    2006-01-01

    Beta2-agonists taken immediately before exercise provide significant protection against exercise- induced asthma (EIA) in most patients. However, when they are taken daily, there are some negative aspects regarding severity, control, and recovery from EIA. First, there is a significant minority (15-20%) of asthmatics whose EIA is not prevented by beta2-agonists, even when inhaled corticosteroids are used concomitantly. Second, with daily use, there is a decline in duration of the protective effect of long-acting beta2-agonists. Third, if breakthrough EIA occurs, recovery of lung function is slower in response to a beta2-agonist, and additional doses are often required to achieve pre-exercise values. If a person who takes a beta2-agonist daily experiences problems with exercise, then the physician should consider changing the treatment regimen to achieve better control of EIA. These problems likely result from desensitization of the beta2-receptor on the mast cell, which enhances mediator release, and on the bronchial smooth muscle, which enhances the bronchoconstrictor response and delays recovery from EIA. These effects are reversed within 72 h after cessation of a beta2-agonists. The important clinical question is: Are we actually compromising the beneficial effects of beta2-agonists on the prevention and recovery from EIA by prescribing them daily? Patients with EIA need to ensure that their doses of inhaled corticosteroid or other anti-inflammatory therapy are optimized so that, if necessary, a beta2-agonist can be used intermittently as prophylactic medication with greater confidence in the outcome.

  7. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  8. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  9. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    DOEpatents

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  10. Opioid receptor agonists reduce brain edema in stroke.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Hezhen; Shah, Kaushik; Karamyan, Vardan T; Abbruscato, Thomas J

    2011-04-06

    Cerebral edema is a leading cause of mortality in stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to assess a non-selective opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, in decreasing reducing brain edema formation using both in vitro and in vivo models of stroke. For the in situ model of ischemia, hippocampal slices were exposed to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) conditions and we observed that hippocampal water content was increased, compared to normoxia. Treatment with the mu agonist, Tyr-D-Ala', N-CH, -Phe4, Glyol-Enkephalin (DAMGO), delta opioid agonists, D-pen(2), D-phe(5) enkephalin (DPDPE), and kappa agonist, U50 488, all significantly decreased brain slice water gain. Interestingly, the non-selective agonist, biphalin, exhibited a statistically significant (P<0.01) greater effect in decreasing water content in OGD-exposed hippocampal slices, compared with mu, delta, and kappa selective opioid agonists. Moreover, biphalin exhibited anti-edematous effects in a dose responsive manner. The non-selective opioid antagonist, naloxone, returned the water content nearly back to original OGD values for all opioid agonist treatments, supporting that these effects were mediated by an opioid receptor pathway. Furthermore, biphalin significantly decreased edema (53%) and infarct (48%) ratios, and neuronal recovery from stroke, compared with the vehicle-treated groups in a 12h permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of focal ischemia. Biphalin also significantly decreased the cell volume increase in primary neuronal cells exposed to OGD condition. These data suggest that opioid receptor activation may provide neuroprotection during stroke and further investigations are needed in the development of novel opioid agonist as efficacious treatments for brain ischemia.

  11. Expanding roles for lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Welte, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid droplets are the intracellular sites for neutral lipid storage. They are critical for lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis, and their dysfunction has been linked to many diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that the roles lipid droplets play in biology are significantly broader than previously anticipated. Lipid droplets are the source of molecules important in the nucleus: they can sequester transcription factors and chromatin components and generate the lipid ligands for certain nuclear receptors. Lipid droplets have also emerged as important nodes for fatty acid trafficking, both inside the cell and between cells. In immunity, new roles for droplets, not directly linked to lipid metabolism, have been uncovered, as assembly platforms for specific viruses and as reservoirs for proteins that fight intracellular pathogens. Until recently, knowledge about droplets in the nervous system has been minimal, but now there are multiple links between lipid droplets and neurodegeneration: Many candidate genes for Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia also have central roles in lipid-droplet formation and maintenance, and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons can lead to transient accumulating of lipid droplets in neighboring glial cells, an event that may, in turn, contribute to neuronal damage. As the cell biology and biochemistry of lipid droplets are increasingly well understood, the next few years should yield many new mechanistic insights into these novel functions of lipid droplets. PMID:26035793

  12. Behavioural effects of selective tachykinin agonists in midbrain dopamine regions.

    PubMed

    Stoessl, A J; Szczutkowski, E; Glenn, B; Watson, I

    1991-11-29

    The effects of selective NK-1, NK-2 and NK-3 tachykinin agonists in midbrain dopamine cell containing regions were investigated in the rat. The NK-3 agonist senktide induced locomotion, rearing and sniffing following infusion into the substantia nigra pars compacta, and to a lesser extent in the ventral tegmental area. These behavioural responses were not seen following infusion of the selective NK-1 agonist [Sar9,Met (O2)11]SP or the NK-2 agonist [N1e10]NKA4-10. In contrast, grooming was induced only by the NK-1 agonist administered into the substantia nigra. Yawning, chewing mouth movements and wet dog shakes were all seen following infusion of senktide into the ventral tegmental area. These findings suggest that (i) dopamine-mediated behavioural responses seen following tachykinin administration into the midbrain are dependent upon stimulation of NK-3 tachykinin receptors, (ii) tachykinin-induced grooming is mediated by stimulation of NK-1 receptors and (iii) some of the previously described 5-HT mediated behaviours seen following administration of NK-3 tachykinin agonists are probably generated by stimulation of 5-HT cell bodies in the ventral tegmental area.

  13. Histamine H3-receptor inverse agonists as novel antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Ito, Chihiro

    2009-06-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) that is resistant to treatment with dopamine (DA) D2 antagonists may involve changes other than those in the dopaminergic system. Recently, histamine (HA), which regulates arousal and cognitive functions, has been suggested to act as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Four HA receptors-H1, H2, H3, and H4-have been identified. Our recent basic and clinical studies revealed that brain HA improved the symptoms of SZ. The H3 receptor is primarily localized in the central nervous system, and it acts not only as a presynaptic autoreceptor that modulates the HA release but also as a presynaptic heteroreceptor that regulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as monoamines and amino acids. H3-receptor inverse agonists have been considered to improve cognitive functions. Many atypical antipsychotics are H3-receptor antagonists. Imidazole-containing H3-receptor inverse agonists inhibit not only cytochrome P450 but also hERG potassium channels (encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene). Several imidazole H3-receptor inverse agonists also have high affinity for H4 receptors, which are expressed at high levels in mast cells and leukocytes. Clozapine is an H4-receptor agonist; this agonist activity may be related to the serious side effect of agranulocytosis caused by clozapine. Therefore, selective non-imidazole H3-receptor inverse agonists can be considered as novel antipsychotics that may improve refractory SZ.

  14. Lipids in cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids are present in cheese at levels above 20 percent and are analyzed by several techniques. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy are used to examine the microstructure, gas chromatography is employed to look at fatty acid composition, and differential scanning cal...

  15. Lipid composition of cyanidium.

    PubMed

    Allen, C F; Good, P; Holton, R W

    1970-11-01

    The major lipids in Cyanidium caldarium Geitler are monogalactosyl diglyceride, digalactosyl diglyceride, plant sulfolipid, lecithin, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl inositol, and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Fatty acid composition varies appreciably among the lipids, but the major ones are palmitic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and moderate amounts of stearic acid. Trace amounts of other acids in the C(14) to C(20) range were also present. Moderate amounts of linolenic acid were found in two strains, but not in a third. The proportion of saturated acid is relatively high in all lipids ranging from about a third in monogalactosyl diglyceride to three-fourths in sulfolipid. This may be a result of the high growth temperature. Lipases forming lysosulfolipid, and lysophosphatidyl glycerol are active in ruptured cells; galactolipid is degraded with loss of both acyl residues. Thus the lipid and fatty acid composition of Cyanidium more closely resembles that of green algae than that of the blue-green algae, although there are differences of possible phylogenetic interest.

  16. Human Milk Lipids.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Human milk lipids provide the infant with energy and essential vitamins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and bioactive components. Adding complex lipids and milk fat globule membranes to vegetable oil-based infant formula has the potential to enhance infant development and reduce infections. Cholesterol provision with breastfeeding modulates infant sterol metabolism and may induce long-term benefits. Some 98-99% of milk lipids are comprised by triacylglycerols, whose properties depend on incorporated fatty acids. Attention has been devoted to the roles of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids docosahexaenoic (DHA) and arachidonic (ARA) acids. Recent studies on gene-diet interaction (Mendelian randomization) show that breastfeeding providing DHA and ARA improves cognitive development and reduces asthma risk at school age particularly in those children with a genetically determined lower activity of DHA and ARA synthesis. It appears prudent to follow the biological model of human milk in the design of infant formula as far as feasible, unless conclusive evidence for the suitability and safety of other choices is available. The recent European Union legislative stipulation of a high formula DHA content without required ARA deviates from this concept, and such a novel formula composition has not been adequately evaluated. Great future opportunities arise with significant methodological progress for example in lipidomic analyses and their bioinformatic evaluation, which should enhance understanding of the biology of human milk lipids. Such knowledge might lead to improved dietary advice to lactating mothers as well as to further opportunities to enhance infant formula composition.

  17. Cytarabine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat lymphomatous meningitis (a type of cancer in the covering of the spinal cord and brain). Cytarabine lipid complex is in a class of medications called antimetabolites. It works by slowing or stopping the growth of cancer cells in your body.

  18. TLR4/MD-2 activation by a synthetic agonist with no similarity to LPS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Su, Lijing; Morin, Matthew D.; Jones, Brian T.; Whitby, Landon R.; Surakattula, Murali M. R. P.; Huang, Hua; Shi, Hexin; Choi, Jin Huk; Wang, Kuan-wen; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Berger, Michael; Zhan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Boger, Dale L.; Beutler, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Structurally disparate molecules reportedly engage and activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and other TLRs, yet the interactions that mediate binding and activation by dissimilar ligands remain unknown. We describe Neoseptins, chemically synthesized peptidomimetics that bear no structural similarity to the established TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but productively engage the mouse TLR4 (mTLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complex. Neoseptin-3 activates mTLR4/MD-2 independently of CD14 and triggers canonical myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)- and Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF)-dependent signaling. The crystal structure mTLR4/MD-2/Neoseptin-3 at 2.57-Å resolution reveals that Neoseptin-3 binds as an asymmetrical dimer within the hydrophobic pocket of MD-2, inducing an active receptor complex similar to that induced by lipid A. However, Neoseptin-3 and lipid A form dissimilar molecular contacts to achieve receptor activation; hence strong TLR4/MD-2 agonists need not mimic LPS. PMID:26831104

  19. TLR4/MD-2 activation by a synthetic agonist with no similarity to LPS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Su, Lijing; Morin, Matthew D; Jones, Brian T; Whitby, Landon R; Surakattula, Murali M R P; Huang, Hua; Shi, Hexin; Choi, Jin Huk; Wang, Kuan-wen; Moresco, Eva Marie Y; Berger, Michael; Zhan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Boger, Dale L; Beutler, Bruce

    2016-02-16

    Structurally disparate molecules reportedly engage and activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and other TLRs, yet the interactions that mediate binding and activation by dissimilar ligands remain unknown. We describe Neoseptins, chemically synthesized peptidomimetics that bear no structural similarity to the established TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but productively engage the mouse TLR4 (mTLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complex. Neoseptin-3 activates mTLR4/MD-2 independently of CD14 and triggers canonical myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)- and Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF)-dependent signaling. The crystal structure mTLR4/MD-2/Neoseptin-3 at 2.57-Å resolution reveals that Neoseptin-3 binds as an asymmetrical dimer within the hydrophobic pocket of MD-2, inducing an active receptor complex similar to that induced by lipid A. However, Neoseptin-3 and lipid A form dissimilar molecular contacts to achieve receptor activation; hence strong TLR4/MD-2 agonists need not mimic LPS.

  20. Amphotericin B Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is used to treat serious, possibly life-threatening fungal infections in people who did ... respond or are unable to tolerate conventional amphotericin B therapy. Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is in ...

  1. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  2. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2010-06-29

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  3. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  4. Statins and PPAR{alpha} agonists induce myotoxicity in differentiated rat skeletal muscle cultures but do not exhibit synergy with co-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy E. . E-mail: Timothy_Johnson@merck.com; Zhang, Xiaohua; Shi, Shu; Umbenhauer, Diane R.

    2005-11-01

    Statins and fibrates (weak PPAR{alpha} agonists) are prescribed for the treatment of lipid disorders. Both drugs cause myopathy, but with a low incidence, 0.1-0.5%. However, combined statin and fibrate therapy can enhance myopathy risk. We tested the myotoxic potential of PPAR subtype selective agonists alone and in combination with statins in a differentiated rat myotube model. A pharmacologically potent experimental PPAR{alpha} agonist, Compound A, induced myotoxicity as assessed by TUNEL staining at a minimum concentration of 1 nM, while other weaker PPAR{alpha} compounds, for example, WY-14643, Gemfibrozil and Bezafibrate increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, the PPAR{gamma} agonist Rosiglitazone caused little or no cell death at up to 10 {mu}M and the PPAR{delta} ligand GW-501516 exhibited comparatively less myotoxicity than that seen with Compound A. An experimental statin (Compound B) and Atorvastatin also increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei and co-treatment with WY-14643, Gemfibrozil or Bezafibrate had less than a full additive effect on statin-induced cell killing. The mechanism of PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced cell death was different from that of statins. Unlike statins, Compound A and WY-14643 did not activate caspase 3/7. In addition, mevalonate and geranylgeraniol reversed the toxicity caused by statins, but did not prevent the cell killing induced by WY-14643. Furthermore, unlike statins, Compound A did not inhibit the isoprenylation of rab4 or rap1a. Interestingly, Compound A and Compound B had differential effects on ATP levels. Taken together, these observations support the hypothesis that in rat myotube cultures, PPAR{alpha} agonism mediates in part the toxicity response to PPAR{alpha} compounds. Furthermore, PPAR{alpha} agonists and statins cause myotoxicity through distinct and independent pathways.

  5. Yhhu4488, a novel GPR40 agonist, promotes GLP-1 secretion and exerts anti-diabetic effect in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan-yang; Li, De-wen; Ning, Meng-meng; Dang, Xiang-yu; Zhang, Li-na; Zeng, Li-min; Hu, You-hong; Leng, Ying

    2015-10-30

    G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) is predominantly expressed in pancreatic β-cells and activated by long-chain fatty acids. GPR40 has drawn considerable interest as a potential therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) due to its important role in enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Encouragingly, GPR40 is also proven to be highly expressed in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-producing enteroendocrine cells afterwards, which opens a potential role of GPR40 in enhancing GLP-1 secretion to exert additional anti-diabetic efficacy. In the present study, we discovered a novel GPR40 agonist, yhhu4488, which is structurally different from other reported GPR40 agonists. Yhhu4488 showed potent agonist activity with EC50 of 49.96 nM, 70.83 nM and 58.68 nM in HEK293 cells stably expressing human, rat and mouse GPR40, respectively. Yhhu4488 stimulated GLP-1 secretion from fetal rat intestinal cells (FRIC) via triggering endogenous calcium store mobilization and extracellular calcium influx. The effect of yhhu4488 on GLP-1 secretion was further confirmed in type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Yhhu4488 exhibited satisfactory potency in in vivo studies. Single administration of yhhu4488 improved glucose tolerance in SD rats. Chronic administration of yhhu4488 effectively decreased fasting blood glucose level, improved β-cell function and lipid homeostasis in type 2 diabetic ob/ob mice. Taken together, yhhu4488 is a novel GPR40 agonist that enhances GLP-1 secretion, improves metabolic control and β-cell function, suggesting its promising potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  6. Polyacetylenes from Notopterygium incisum–New Selective Partial Agonists of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-Gamma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Noha, Stefan M.; Malainer, Clemens; Kramer, Matthias P.; Cocic, Amina; Kunert, Olaf; Schinkovitz, Andreas; Heiss, Elke H.; Schuster, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a key regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism and therefore an important pharmacological target to combat metabolic diseases. Since the currently used full PPARγ agonists display serious side effects, identification of novel ligands, particularly partial agonists, is highly relevant. Searching for new active compounds, we investigated extracts of the underground parts of Notopterygium incisum, a medicinal plant used in traditional Chinese medicine, and observed significant PPARγ activation using a PPARγ-driven luciferase reporter model. Activity-guided fractionation of the dichloromethane extract led to the isolation of six polyacetylenes, which displayed properties of selective partial PPARγ agonists in the luciferase reporter model. Since PPARγ activation by this class of compounds has so far not been reported, we have chosen the prototypical polyacetylene falcarindiol for further investigation. The effect of falcarindiol (10 µM) in the luciferase reporter model was blocked upon co-treatment with the PPARγ antagonist T0070907 (1 µM). Falcarindiol bound to the purified human PPARγ receptor with a Ki of 3.07 µM. In silico docking studies suggested a binding mode within the ligand binding site, where hydrogen bonds to Cys285 and Glu295 are predicted to be formed in addition to extensive hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, falcarindiol further induced 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and enhanced the insulin-induced glucose uptake in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes confirming effectiveness in cell models with endogenous PPARγ expression. In conclusion, we identified falcarindiol-type polyacetylenes as a novel class of natural partial PPARγ agonists, having potential to be further explored as pharmaceutical leads or dietary supplements. PMID:23630612

  7. Lipid topogenesis--35years on.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Neha; Farine, Luce; Pandey, Kalpana; Menon, Anant K; Bütikofer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Glycerophospholipids are the principal fabric of cellular membranes. The pathways by which these lipids are synthesized were elucidated mainly through the work of Kennedy and colleagues in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Subsequently, attention turned to cell biological aspects of lipids: Where in the cell are lipids synthesized? How are lipids integrated into membranes to form a bilayer? How are they sorted and transported from their site of synthesis to other cellular destinations? These topics, collectively termed 'lipid topogenesis', were the subject of a review article in 1981 by Bell, Ballas and Coleman. We now assess what has been learned about early events of lipid topogenesis, i.e. "lipid synthesis, the integration of lipids into membranes, and lipid translocation across membranes", in the 35 years since the publication of this important review. We highlight the recent elucidation of the X-ray structures of key membrane enzymes of glycerophospholipid synthesis, progress on identifying lipid scramblase proteins needed to equilibrate lipids across membranes, and new complexities in the subcellular location and membrane topology of phosphatidylinositol synthesis revealed through a comparison of two unicellular model eukaryotes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  8. Lipids, fatty acids, and more

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy is the most expensive component in livestock diets. Lipids are concentrated energy sources and are known to affect growth, feed efficiency, feed dust, and diet palatability. A large majority of research evaluating lipids in livestock has utilized lipids of high quality, dealt mainly with anim...

  9. Distinct lipid a moieties contribute to pathogen-induced site-specific vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Connie; Coats, Stephen R; Hua, Ning; Kramer, Carolyn; Papadopoulos, George; Weinberg, Ellen O; Gudino, Cynthia V; Hamilton, James A; Darveau, Richard P; Genco, Caroline A

    2014-07-01

    Several successful pathogens have evolved mechanisms to evade host defense, resulting in the establishment of persistent and chronic infections. One such pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, induces chronic low-grade inflammation associated with local inflammatory bone loss and systemic inflammation manifested as atherosclerosis. P. gingivalis expresses an atypical lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure containing heterogeneous lipid A species, that exhibit Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) agonist or antagonist activity, or are non-activating at TLR4. In this study, we utilized a series of P. gingivalis lipid A mutants to demonstrate that antagonistic lipid A structures enable the pathogen to evade TLR4-mediated bactericidal activity in macrophages resulting in systemic inflammation. Production of antagonistic lipid A was associated with the induction of low levels of TLR4-dependent proinflammatory mediators, failed activation of the inflammasome and increased bacterial survival in macrophages. Oral infection of ApoE(-/-) mice with the P. gingivalis strain expressing antagonistic lipid A resulted in vascular inflammation, macrophage accumulation and atherosclerosis progression. In contrast, a P. gingivalis strain producing exclusively agonistic lipid A augmented levels of proinflammatory mediators and activated the inflammasome in a caspase-11-dependent manner, resulting in host cell lysis and decreased bacterial survival. ApoE(-/-) mice infected with this strain exhibited diminished vascular inflammation, macrophage accumulation, and atherosclerosis progression. Notably, the ability of P. gingivalis to induce local inflammatory bone loss was independent of lipid A expression, indicative of distinct mechanisms for induction of local versus systemic inflammation by this pathogen. Collectively, our results point to a pivotal role for activation of the non-canonical inflammasome in P. gingivalis infection and demonstrate that P. gingivalis evades immune detection at TLR4

  10. Keratinocyte differentiation and upregulation of ceramide synthesis induced by an oat lipid extract via the activation of PPAR pathways.

    PubMed

    Chon, Su-Hyoun; Tannahill, Ruth; Yao, Xiang; Southall, Michael D; Pappas, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) has been shown to have an important role in skin barrier function by regulating differentiation and lipid synthesis in keratinocytes. Oat (Avena sativa) has long been used as a soothing agent to relieve skin irritations, and the clinical benefits of topical oat formulations have been proven; however, the mechanistic understanding of oat's mode of action remains unknown. We investigated whether an oat lipid extract could activate PPARs and subsequently increase epidermal lipid synthesis and differentiation markers. Primary human epidermal keratinocytes and transformed cell lines were treated with PPAR agonists and oat lipid extracts to investigate the PPAR agonism. PPAR target genes and epidermal differentiation markers were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR and HPTLC analysis. Oat lipid extract demonstrated robust dual agonism for PPARα and PPARβ/δ, and increased direct PPAR target gene induction in primary human keratinocytes. In addition, oat oil treatment increased both receptor expression and, consistent with the literature on PPARs, oat oil treatment resulted in a significant upregulation of differentiation genes (involucrin, SPRRs and transglutaminase 1) and ceramide processing genes (β-glucocerebrosidase, sphingomyelinases 3 and ABCA12). Further, oat oil treatment in keratinocytes significantly increased ceramide levels (70%), suggesting a functional translation of PPAR activation by oat oil in keratinocytes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that oat lipids possess robust dual agonistic activities for PPARα and PPARβ/δ, increase their gene expression and induce differentiation and ceramide synthesis in keratinocytes, which can collectively improve skin barrier function.

  11. The antilipolytic agent 3,5-dimethylpyrazole inhibits insulin release in response to both nutrient secretagogues and cyclic adenosine monophosphate agonists in isolated rat islets.

    PubMed

    Masiello, P; Novelli, M; Bombara, M; Fierabracci, V; Vittorini, S; Prentki, M; Bergamini, E

    2002-01-01

    This study intended to test the hypothesis that intracellular lipolysis in the pancreatic beta cells is implicated in the regulation of insulin secretion stimulated by nutrient secretagogues or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) agonists. Indeed, although lipid signaling molecules were repeatedly reported to influence beta-cell function, the contribution of intracellular triglycerides to the generation of these molecules has remained elusive. Thus, we have studied insulin secretion of isolated rat pancreatic islets in response to various secretagogues in the presence or absence of 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (DMP), a water-soluble and highly effective antilipolytic agent, as previously shown in vivo. In vitro exposure of islets to DMP resulted in an inhibition (by approximately 50%) of the insulin release stimulated not only by high glucose, but also by another nutrient secretagogue, 2-ketoisocaproate, as well as the cAMP agonists 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and glucagon. The inhibitory effect of DMP, which was not due to alteration of islet glucose oxidation, could be reversed upon addition of sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, a synthetic diglyceride, which activates protein kinase C. The results provide direct pharmacologic evidence supporting the concept that endogenous beta-cell lipolysis plays an important role in the generation of lipid signaling molecules involved in the control of insulin secretion in response to both fuel stimuli and cAMP agonists.

  12. Dihydrocodeine/Agonists for Alcohol Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, Albrecht; Müller, Markus; Frietsch, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol addiction too often remains insufficiently treated. It shows the same profile as severe chronic diseases, but no comparable, effective basic treatment has been established up to now. Especially patients with repeated relapses, despite all therapeutic approaches, and patients who are not able to attain an essential abstinence to alcohol, need a basic medication. It seems necessary to acknowledge that parts of them need any agonistic substance, for years, possibly lifelong. For >14 years, we have prescribed such substances with own addictive character for these patients. Methods: We present a documented best possible practice, no designed study. Since 1997, we prescribed Dihydrocodeine (DHC) to 102 heavily alcohol addicted patients, later, also Buprenorphine, Clomethiazole (>6 weeks), Baclofen, and in one case Amphetamine, each on individual indication. This paper focuses on the data with DHC, especially. The Clomethiazole-data has been submitted to a German journal. The number of treatments with the other substances is still low. Results: The 102 patients with the DHC treatment had 1367 medically assisted detoxifications and specialized therapies before! The 4 years-retention rate was 26.4%, including 2.8% successfully terminated treatments. In our 12-steps scale on clinical impression, we noticed a significant improvement from mean 3.7 to 8.4 after 2 years. The demand for medically assisted detoxifications in the 2 years remaining patients was reduced by 65.5%. Mean GGT improved from 206.6 U/l at baseline to 66.8 U/l after 2 years. Experiences with the other substances are similar but different in details. Conclusion: Similar to the Italian studies with GHB and Baclofen, we present a new approach, not only with new substances, but also with a new setting and much more trusting attitude. We observe a huge improvement, reaching an almost optimal, stable, long term status in around 1/4 of the patients already. Many further

  13. Lipid mediators of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Holland, William L; Knotts, Trina A; Chavez, Jose A; Wang, Li-Ping; Hoehn, Kyle L; Summers, Scott A

    2007-06-01

    Lipid abnormalities such as obesity, increased circulating free fatty acid levels, and excess intramyocellular lipid accumulation are frequently associated with insulin resistance. These observations have prompted investigators to speculate that the accumulation of lipids in tissues not suited for fat storage (e.g., skeletal muscle and liver) is an underlying component of insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. We review the metabolic fates of lipids in insulin-responsive tissues and discuss the roles of specific lipid metabolites (e.g., ceramides, GM3 ganglioside, and diacylglycerol) as antagonists of insulin signaling and action.

  14. Anti-nociception mediated by a κ opioid receptor agonist is blocked by a δ receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A M W; Roberts, K W; Pradhan, A A; Akbari, H A; Walwyn, W; Lutfy, K; Carroll, F I; Cahill, C M; Evans, C J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The opioid receptor family comprises four structurally homologous but functionally distinct sub-groups, the μ (MOP), δ (DOP), κ (KOP) and nociceptin (NOP) receptors. As most opioid agonists are selective but not specific, a broad spectrum of behaviours due to activation of different opioid receptors is expected. In this study, we examine whether other opioid receptor systems influenced KOP-mediated antinociception. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used a tail withdrawal assay in C57Bl/6 mice to assay the antinociceptive effect of systemically administered opioid agonists with varying selectivity at KOP receptors. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to analyse the interactions of the other opioid receptors in modulating KOP-mediated antinociception. KEY RESULTS Etorphine, a potent agonist at all four opioid receptors, was not anti-nociceptive in MOP knockout (KO) mice, although etorphine is an efficacious KOP receptor agonist and specific KOP receptor agonists remain analgesic in MOP KO mice. As KOP receptor agonists are aversive, we considered KOP-mediated antinociception might be a form of stress-induced analgesia that is blocked by the anxiolytic effects of DOP receptor agonists. In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with the DOP antagonist, naltrindole (10 mg·kg−1), unmasked etorphine (3 mg·kg−1) antinociception in MOP KO mice. Further, in wild-type mice, KOP-mediated antinociception by systemic U50,488H (10 mg·kg−1) was blocked by pretreatment with the DOP agonist SNC80 (5 mg·kg−1) and diazepam (1 mg·kg−1). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Systemic DOP receptor agonists blocked systemic KOP antinociception, and these results identify DOP receptor agonists as potential agents for reversing stress-driven addictive and depressive behaviours mediated through KOP receptor activation. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles

  15. Treatment with PPARα Agonist Clofibrate Inhibits the Transcription and Activation of SREBPs and Reduces Triglyceride and Cholesterol Levels in Liver of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijun; Li, Chunyan; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Shenghua; Shangguan, Mingjun; Xue, Lina; Zhang, Bianying; Ding, Fuxiang; Hui, Dequan; Liang, Aihua; He, Dongchang

    2015-01-01

    PPARα agonist clofibrate reduces cholesterol and fatty acid concentrations in rodent liver by an inhibition of SREBP-dependent gene expression. In present study we investigated the regulation mechanisms of the triglyceride- and cholesterol-lowering effect of the PPARα agonist clofibrate in broiler chickens. We observed that PPARα agonist clofibrate decreases the mRNA and protein levels of LXRα and the mRNA and both precursor and nuclear protein levels of SREBP1 and SREBP2 as well as the mRNA levels of the SREBP1 (FASN and GPAM) and SREBP2 (HMGCR and LDLR) target genes in the liver of treated broiler chickens compared to control group, whereas the mRNA level of INSIG2, which inhibits SREBP activation, was increased in the liver of treated broiler chickens compared to control group. Taken together, the effects of PPARα agonist clofibrate on lipid metabolism in liver of broiler chickens involve inhibiting transcription and activation of SREBPs and SREBP-dependent lipogenic and cholesterologenic gene expression, thereby resulting in a reduction of the triglyceride and cholesterol levels in liver of broiler chickens. PMID:26693219

  16. The conjugated linoleic acid isomer trans-9,trans-11 is a dietary occurring agonist of liver X receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Josef; Liebisch, Gerhard; Patsch, Wolfgang; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-10-30

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers are dietary fatty acids that modulate gene expression in many cell types. We have previously reported that specifically trans-9,trans-11 (t9,t11)-CLA induces expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism of human macrophages. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this transcriptional activation, we asked whether t9,t11-CLA affects activity of liver X receptor (LXR) {alpha}, a major regulator of macrophage lipid metabolism. Here we show that t9,t11-CLA is a regulator of LXR{alpha}. We further demonstrate that the CLA isomer induces expression of direct LXR{alpha} target genes in human primary macrophages. Knockdown of LXR{alpha} with RNA interference in THP-1 cells inhibited t9,t11-CLA mediated activation of LXR{alpha} including its target genes. To evaluate the effective concentration range of t9,t11-CLA, human primary macrophages were treated with various doses of CLA and well known natural and synthetic LXR agonists and mRNA expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 was analyzed. Incubation of human macrophages with 10 {mu}M t9,t11-CLA led to a significant modulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 transcription and caused enhanced cholesterol efflux to high density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein AI. In summary, these data show that t9,t11-CLA is an agonist of LXR{alpha} in human macrophages and that its effects on macrophage lipid metabolism can be attributed to transcriptional regulations associated with this nuclear receptor.

  17. Synthesis of Lipid Mediators during UVB-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Angioni, Carlo; Ferreiros, Nerea; Schuh, Claus-Dieter; Suo, Jing; Schreiber, Yannick; Dawes, John M.; Antunes-Martins, Ana; Bennett, David L. H.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral sensitization during inflammatory pain is mediated by a variety of endogenous proalgesic mediators including a number of oxidized lipids, some of which serve endogenous modulators of sensory TRP-channels. These lipids are eicosanoids of the arachidonic acid and linoleic acid pathway, as well as lysophophatidic acids (LPAs). However, their regulation pattern during inflammatory pain and their contribution to peripheral sensitization is still unclear. Here, we used the UVB-model for inflammatory pain to investigate alterations of lipid concentrations at the site of inflammation, the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) as well as the spinal dorsal horn and quantified 21 lipid species from five different lipid families at the peak of inflammation 48 hours post irradiation. We found that known proinflammatory lipids as well as lipids with unknown roles in inflammatory pain to be strongly increased in the skin, whereas surprisingly little changes of lipid levels were seen in DRGs or the dorsal horn. Importantly, although there are profound differences between the number of cytochrome (CYP) genes between mice and rats, CYP-derived lipids were regulated similarly in both species. Since TRPV1 agonists such as LPA 18∶1, 9- and 13-HODE, 5- and 12-HETE were elevated in the skin, they may contribute to thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia during UVB-induced inflammatory pain. These results may explain why some studies show relatively weak analgesic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors in UVB-induced skin inflammation, as they do not inhibit synthesis of other proalgesic lipids such as LPA 18∶1, 9-and 13-HODE and HETEs. PMID:24349046

  18. Lipids and immune function.

    PubMed

    Vitale, J J; Broitman, S A

    1981-09-01

    There is in vitro and in vivo evidence to suggest that dietary lipids play a role in modulating immune function. A review of the current literature on the interrelationships among dietary lipids, blood cholesterol levels, immunosuppression, and tumorigenesis makes for a very strong argument that (a) immunosuppression may be causally related to lymphoproliferative disorders, as well as to tumorigenesis and (b) diets high in polyunsaturated fat, relative to diets high in saturated fat, are more immunosuppressive and are better promotors of tumorigenesis. The effects of dietary fat on immune function seem to be mediated though its component parts, the unsaturated fatty acids, specially linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic. It is not clear how these components affect immune function. Several studies suggest that one effect is mediated by altering the lipid component of the cell membrane and thus its fluidity; the more fluid the membrane, the less responsive it is. Thus, fluidity of both immune cells and those to be destroyed or protected may be affected. The effects of saturated as well as unsaturated fatty acids may be mediated by modulating serum lipoprotein levels, prostaglandin metabolism, and cholesterol concentrations and metabolism.

  19. Tear Film Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A.

    2013-01-01

    Human meibomian gland secretions (MGS, or meibum) are formed from a complex mixture of lipids of different classes such as wax esters, cholesteryl esters, (O-acyl)-ω-hydroxy fatty acids (OAHFA) and their esters, acylglycerols, diacylated diols, free fatty acids, cholesterol, and a smaller amount of other polar and nonpolar lipids, whose chemical nature and the very presence in MGS have been a matter of intense debates. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent results that were obtained using different experimental techniques, estimate limitations of their usability, and discuss their biochemical, biophysical, and physiological implications. To create a lipid map of MGS and tears, the results obtained in the author’s laboratory were integrated with available information on chemical composition of MGS and tears. The most informative approaches that are available today to researchers, such as HPLC-MS, GC-MS, and proton NMR, are discussed in details. A map of the meibomian lipidome (as it is seen in reverse phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry experiments) is presented. Directions of future efforts in the area are outlined. PMID:23769846

  20. GABA receptor agonists: pharmacological spectrum and therapeutic actions.

    PubMed

    Bartholini, G

    1985-01-01

    From the data discussed in this review it appears that GABA receptor agonists exhibit a variety of actions in the central nervous system, some of which are therapeutically useful (Table V). GABA receptor agonists, by changing the firing rate of the corresponding neurons accelerate noradrenaline turnover without changes in postsynaptic receptor density and diminish serotonin liberation with an up-regulation of 5HT2 receptors. These effects differ from those of tricyclic antidepressants which primarily block monoamine re-uptake and cause down-regulation of beta-adrenergic and 5HT2 receptors. The GABA receptor agonist progabide has been shown to exert an antidepressant action which is indistinguishable from that of imipramine in patients with major affective disorders. The fact that: (a) GABA receptor agonists and tricyclic antidepressants affect noradrenergic and serotonergic transmission differently; and (b) tricyclic antidepressants alter GABA-related parameters challenges the classical monoamine hypothesis of depression and suggests that GABA-mediated mechanisms play a role in mood disorders. Decreases in cellular excitability produced by GABAergic stimulation leads to control of seizures in practically all animal models of epilepsy. GABA receptor agonists have a wide spectrum as they antagonize not only seizures which are dependent on decreased GABA synaptic activity but also convulsant states which are apparently independent of alterations in GABA-mediated events. These results in animals are confirmed in a wide range of human epileptic syndromes. GABA receptor agonists decrease dopamine turnover in the basal ganglia and antagonize neuroleptic-induced increase in dopamine release. On repeated treatment, progabide prevents or reverses the neuroleptic-induced up-regulation of dopamine receptors in the rat striatum and antagonizes the concomitant supersensitivity to dopaminomimetics. Behaviorally, GABA receptor agonists diminish the stereotypies induced by

  1. Topological regulation of lipid balance in cells.

    PubMed

    Drin, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are unevenly distributed within and between cell membranes, thus defining organelle identity. Such distribution relies on local metabolic branches and mechanisms that move lipids. These processes are regulated by feedback mechanisms that decipher topographical information in organelle membranes and then regulate lipid levels or flows. In the endoplasmic reticulum, the major lipid source, transcriptional regulators and enzymes sense changes in membrane features to modulate lipid production. At the Golgi apparatus, lipid-synthesizing, lipid-flippase, and lipid-transport proteins (LTPs) collaborate to control lipid balance and distribution within the membrane to guarantee remodeling processes crucial for vesicular trafficking. Open questions exist regarding LTPs, which are thought to be lipid sensors that regulate lipid synthesis or carriers that transfer lipids between organelles across long distances or in contact sites. A novel model is that LTPs, by exchanging two different lipids, exploit one lipid gradient between two distinct membranes to build a second lipid gradient.

  2. Benzodiazepine agonist and inverse agonist actions on GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. II. Chronic effects of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, K.J.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Mice were made tolerant to and dependent on ethanol by administration of a liquid diet. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-dependent uptake of 36Cl- by mouse cortical microsacs was used to study the actions of benzodiazepine (BZ) agonists and inverse agonists. Chronic exposure to ethanol attenuated the ability of a BZ agonist, flunitrazepam, to augment muscimol-stimulated uptake of 36Cl- and enhanced the actions of BZ inverse agonists, Ro15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,4)-benzodiazepine - 3-carboxylate) and DMCM (methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate), to inhibit GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. Augmentation of chloride flux by pentobarbital was not reduced by chronic ethanol exposure. Attenuation of flunitrazepam efficacy was transient and returned to control levels within 6 to 24 hr after withdrawal from ethanol, but increased sensitivity to Ro15-4513 was observed as long as 8 days after withdrawal. Chronic exposure to ethanol did not alter (3H)SR 95531 (2-(3'-carbethoxy-2'propyl)-3-amino-6-p-methoxyphenylpyridazinium bromide) binding to low-affinity GABAA receptors or muscimol stimulation of chloride flux; and did not alter (3H)Ro15-4513 or (3H)flunitrazepam binding to central BZ receptors or allosteric modulation of this binding by muscimol (i.e., muscimol-shift). These results suggest that chronic exposure to ethanol reduces coupling between BZ agonist sites and the chloride channel, and may be responsible for the development of cross-tolerance between ethanol and BZ agonists. In contrast, coupling between BZ inverse agonist sites and the chloride channel is increased.

  3. Intracerebroventricular administration of kappa-agonists induces convulsions in mice.

    PubMed

    Bansinath, M; Ramabadran, K; Turndorf, H; Shukla, V K

    1991-07-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of kappa-agonists (PD 117302, U-50488H and U-69593) induced convulsions in a dose-related manner in mice. The dose at which 50% of animals convulsed (CD50) was in nmol ranges for all opioids. Among the opioids used, PD 117302 was the most potent convulsant. ICV administration of either vehicle alone or U-53445E, a non-kappa-opioid (+) enantiomer of U-50488H did not induce convulsions. The convulsive response of kappa-agonists was differentially susceptible for antagonism by naloxone and/or MR 2266. Collectively, these findings support the view that convulsions induced by kappa-agonists in mice involve stereospecific opioid receptor mechanisms. Furthermore, the convulsant effect of kappa-agonists could not be modified by pretreatment with MK-801, ketamine, muscimol or baclofen. It is concluded that kappa-opioid but not NMDA or GABA receptor mechanisms are involved in convulsions induced by kappa-agonists. These results are the first experimental evidence implicating stereospecific kappa-receptor mechanisms in opioid-induced convulsions in mice.

  4. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  5. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Stec, David E.; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J.; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W.; Baum, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  6. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Stec, David E; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W; Baum, Justin; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin.

  7. Novel nonsecosteroidal VDR agonists with phenyl-pyrrolyl pentane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Xue, Jingwei; Zhao, Zekai; Zhang, Can

    2013-11-01

    In order to find the vitamin D receptor (VDR) ligand whose VDR agonistic activity is separated from the calcemic activity sufficiently, novel nonsecosteroidal analogs with phenyl-pyrrolyl pentane skeleton were synthesized and evaluated for the VDR binding affinity, antiproliferative activity in vitro and serum calcium raising ability in vivo (tacalcitol used as control). Among them, several compounds showed varying degrees of VDR agonistic and growth inhibition activities of the tested cell lines. The most effective compound 2g (EC₅₀: 1.06 nM) exhibited stronger VDR agonistic activity than tacalcitol (EC₅₀: 7.05 nM), inhibited the proliferations of HaCaT and MCF-7 cells with IC₅₀ of 2.06 μM and 0.307 μM (tacalcitol: 2.07 μM and 0.057 μM) and showed no significant effect on serum calcium.

  8. Compulsive eating and weight gain related to dopamine agonist use.

    PubMed

    Nirenberg, Melissa J; Waters, Cheryl

    2006-04-01

    Dopamine agonists have been implicated in causing compulsive behaviors in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). These have included gambling, hypersexuality, hobbyism, and other repetitive, purposeless behaviors ("punding"). In this report, we describe 7 patients in whom compulsive eating developed in the context of pramipexole use. All of the affected patients had significant, undesired weight gain; 4 had other comorbid compulsive behaviors. In the 5 patients who lowered the dose of pramipexole or discontinued dopamine agonist treatment, the behavior remitted and no further weight gain occurred. Physicians should be aware that compulsive eating resulting in significant weight gain may occur in PD as a side-effect of dopamine agonist medications such as pramipexole. Given the known risks of the associated weight gain and obesity, further investigation is warranted.

  9. Liver X receptor agonist downregulates hepatic apoM expression in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaoying; Zhu Zhaojin; Luo Guanghua; Zheng Lu; Nilsson-Ehle, Peter; Xu Ning

    2008-06-20

    It has been demonstrated that apolipoprotein M (apoM), a recently discovered HDL apolipoprotein, has antiatherosclerotic properties, which may be mediated by the enhancement of reversed cholesterol transportation and/or hepatic cholesterol catabolism. The detailed mechanisms are unknown yet. Liver X receptor (LXR) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism and inflammation. Activation of LXR in the cell cultures results in an enhancement of cholesterol efflux to apoAI. In the present study, we investigated effects of the LXR agonist, T0901317 on hepatic apoM expression in vivo and in vitro. Serum apoM levels in mice given T0901317 at 10 mg or 100 mg/kg for 7 days were reduced by 12-17% (P < 0.05). In HepG2 cell cultures, apoM mRNA levels were significantly lower in presence of 25 {mu}M T0901317 (37.1%) than in control cells (P < 0.001). A similar reduction was found by the addition of 9-cis retinoic acid (RA). Twenty-five micromolar T0901317 together with 100 nM RA decreased apoM mRNA expression by 65% (P < 0.001). Thus, the LXR agonist T0901317 significantly downregulates apoM mRNA expression in vivo and in vitro, which indicates that apoM is another novel target gene regulated by the LXR. The combination of RA and T0901317 showed additive effects, which suggests that apoM expression can be modulated by LXR/RXR pathway.

  10. Studying the binding interactions of allosteric agonists and antagonists of the CXCR4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Planesas, Jesús M; Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I; Borrell, José I; Teixidó, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    Several examples of allosteric modulators of GPCRs have been reported recently in the literature, but understanding their molecular mechanism presents a new challenge for medicinal chemistry. For the specific case of the cellular receptor CXCR4, it is known that pepducins (lipidated fragments of intracellular GPCR loops) such as ATI-2341 modulate CXCR4 activity agonistically via an allosteric mechanism. Moreover, there are also examples of small organic molecules such as AMD11070 and GSK812397 which may also act as allosteric antagonists. However, incomplete knowledge of the ligand-binding sites has hampered a detailed molecular understanding of how these inhibitors work. Here, we attempt to answer this question by analysing the binding interactions between the CXCR4 receptor and the above-mentioned allosteric modulators. We propose two different allosteric binding sites, one located in the intracellular loops 1, 2 and 3 (ICL1, ICL2 and ICL3) which binds the pepducin agonist ATI-2341, and the other at a subsite of the main extracellular orthosteric binding pocket between extracellular loops 1 and 2 and the N-terminus, which binds the antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397. Allosteric interactions between the CXCR4 and ATI-2341 were predicted by combining different modeling approaches. First, a rotational blind docking search was applied and the best poses were subsequently refined using flexible docking methods and molecular dynamic simulations. For the AMD11070 and GSK812397 antagonists, the entire CXCR4 protein surface was explored by blind docking in order to define the binding region. A second docking analysis by subsites was then performed to refine the allosteric interactions. Finally, we identified the binding residues that appear to be essential for CXCR4 allosteric modulators.

  11. Oxysterols are agonist ligands of RORγt and drive Th17 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Soroosh, Pejman; Wu, Jiejun; Xue, Xiaohua; Song, Jiao; Sutton, Steven W.; Sablad, Marciano; Yu, Jingxue; Nelen, Marina I.; Liu, Xuejun; Castro, Glenda; Luna, Rosa; Crawford, Shelby; Banie, Homayon; Dandridge, Rose A.; Deng, Xiaohu; Bittner, Anton; Kuei, Chester; Tootoonchi, Mandana; Rozenkrants, Natasha; Herman, Krystal; Gao, Jingjin; Yang, Xia V.; Sachen, Kacey; Ngo, Karen; Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping; Nguyen, Steven; de Leon-Tabaldo, Aimee; Blevitt, Jonathan; Zhang, Yan; Cummings, Maxwell D.; Rao, Tadimeti; Mani, Neelakandha S.; Liu, Changlu; McKinnon, Murray; Milla, Marcos E.; Fourie, Anne M.; Sun, Siquan

    2014-01-01

    The RAR-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) is a nuclear receptor required for generating IL-17–producing CD4+ Th17 T cells, which are essential in host defense and may play key pathogenic roles in autoimmune diseases. Oxysterols elicit profound effects on immune and inflammatory responses as well as on cholesterol and lipid metabolism. Here, we describe the identification of several naturally occurring oxysterols as RORγt agonists. The most potent and selective activator for RORγt is 7β, 27-dihydroxycholesterol (7β, 27-OHC). We show that these oxysterols reverse the inhibitory effect of an RORγt antagonist, ursolic acid, in RORγ- or RORγt-dependent cell-based reporter assays. These ligands bind directly to recombinant RORγ ligand binding domain (LBD), promote recruitment of a coactivator peptide, and reduce binding of a corepressor peptide to RORγ LBD. In primary cells, 7β, 27-OHC and 7α, 27-OHC enhance the differentiation of murine and human IL-17–producing Th17 cells in an RORγt-dependent manner. Importantly, we showed that Th17, but not Th1 cells, preferentially produce these two oxysterols. In vivo, administration of 7β, 27-OHC in mice enhanced IL-17 production. Mice deficient in CYP27A1, a key enzyme in generating these oxysterols, showed significant reduction of IL-17–producing cells, including CD4+ and γδ+ T cells, similar to the deficiency observed in RORγt knockout mice. Our results reveal a previously unknown mechanism for selected oxysterols as immune modulators and a direct role for CYP27A1 in generating these RORγt agonist ligands, which we propose as RORγt endogenous ligands, driving both innate and adaptive IL-17–dependent immune responses. PMID:25092323

  12. Reviewing and identifying amino acids of human, murine, canine and equine TLR4 / MD-2 receptor complexes conferring endotoxic innate immunity activation by LPS/lipid A, or antagonistic effects by Eritoran, in contrast to species-dependent modulation by lipid IVa.

    PubMed

    Scior, Thomas; Alexander, Christian; Zaehringer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    There is literature evidence gathered throughout the last two decades reflecting unexpected species differences concerning the immune response to lipid IVa which provides the opportunity to gain more detailed insight by the molecular modeling approach described in this study. Lipid IVa is a tetra-acylated precursor of lipid A in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Gram-negative bacteria. Lipid A of the prototypic E. coli-type is a hexa-acylated structure that acts as an agonist in all tested mammalian species by innate immunorecognition via the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) receptor complex. In contrast, lipid IVa is proinflammatory in mouse cells (agonism) but it remains inactive to human macrophages and even antagonizes the action of potent agonists like E. coli-type lipid A. This particular ambivalent activity profile of lipid IVa has been confirmed in other mammalian species: in equine cells Lipid IVa also acts in a weak agonistic manner, whereas being inactive and antagonizing the lipid A-induced activation of canine TLR4/MD-2. Intriguingly, the respective TLR4 amino acid sequences of the latter species are more identical to the human (67%, 68%) than to the murine (62%, 58%) ortholog. In order to address the unpaired activity-sequence dualism for human, murine, canine and equine species regarding the activity of lipid IVa as compared to LPS and lipid A and, we review the literature and computationally pinpoint the differential biological effects of lipid IVa versus LPS and lipid A to specific amino acid residues. In contrast to lipid IVa the structurally related synthetic compound Eritoran (E5564) acts consistently in an antagonistic manner in these mammalian species and serves as a reference ligand for molecular modeling in this study. The combined evaluation of data sets provided by prior studies and in silico homology mapping of differential residues of TLR4/MD-2 complexes lends detailed insight into the

  13. Captive female gorilla agonistic relationships with clumped defendable food resources.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jennifer; Lockard, Joan S

    2006-07-01

    Minimal feeding competition among female mountain gorillas (Gorilla gorilla beringei) has resulted in egalitarian social relationships with poorly defined agonistic dominance hierarchies. Thus, gorillas are generally viewed as non-competitive egalitarian folivores that have had little need to develop effective competitive strategies to access food resources. However, this generalization is inconsistent with more recent research indicating that most gorillas are frugivorous, feeding on patchily distributed food resources. The current study at Howletts Wild Animal Park, Kent, England, explores the effects of clumped and defendable foods on female gorilla agonistic relationships among three groups of western lowland gorillas (G. g. gorilla), conditions that are predicted to lead to well-differentiated agonistic dominance hierarchies among female primates. The Howletts gorillas foraged all day on low-energy/-nutrient, high-fiber foods widely distributed around their enclosure by the keepers. However, they also had periodic access to high-energy foods (e.g., nuts, raisins, strawberries, etc.) that the keepers would spread in a clumped and defendable patch. Frequencies of agonistic and submissive behaviors between females and proximity data were gathered. High-status females were found to monopolize the food patch and kept the low-status females at bay with cough-grunt threat vocalizations or by chasing them away. Agonistic interactions were initiated mostly by females of high status; these were directed towards females of low status and were generally not reciprocal. In addition, females of low status engaged in submissive behaviors the most often, which they directed primarily at females of high status, especially in response to aggression by the latter. Agonistic interactions between high- and low-status females had decided outcomes more often than not, with low-status females the losers. Competition over highly desirable foods distributed in defendable clumps at

  14. Lipid nanocarriers: influence of lipids on product development and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Kamla; Keshri, Lav; Shah, Mayank

    2011-01-01

    Lipid nanocarriers are on the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery. Owing to their size-dependent properties, lipid nanoparticles offer the possibility for development of new therapeutics and an alternative system to other colloidal counterparts for drug administration. An important point to be considered in the selection of a lipid for the carrier system is its effect on the properties of the nanocarrier and also its intended use, as different types of lipids differ in their nature. Researchers around the globe have tapped the potential of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) in developing formulation(s) that can be administered by various routes such as oral, ocular, parenteral, topical, and pulmonary. Since the start of this millennium, a new generation of lipid nanoparticles, namely nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), lipid drug conjugates (LDCs), and pharmacosomes, has evolved that have the potential to overcome the limitations of SLNs. The current review article presents broad considerations on the influence of various types of lipids on the diverse characteristics of nanocarriers, encompassing their physicochemical, formulation, pharmacokinetic, and cytotoxic aspects.

  15. Switching cannabinoid response from CB(2) agonists to FAAH inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tourteau, Aurélien; Leleu-Chavain, Natascha; Body-Malapel, Mathilde; Andrzejak, Virginie; Barczyk, Amélie; Djouina, Madjid; Rigo, Benoit; Desreumaux, Pierre; Chavatte, Philippe; Millet, Régis

    2014-03-01

    A series of 3-carboxamido-5-aryl-isoxazoles designed as CB2 agonists were evaluated as FAAH inhibitors. The pharmacological results led to identify structure-activity relationships enabling to switch cannabinoid response from CB2 agonists to FAAH inhibitors. Two compounds were selected for their FAAH and/or CB2 activity, and evaluated in a colitis model for their anti-inflammatory activity. Results showed that compounds 10 and 11 inhibit the development of DSS-induced acute colitis in mice and then, are interesting leads to explore new drug candidates for IBD.

  16. Partial agonistic action of endomorphins in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Wu, H E; Narita, M

    2001-09-07

    The partial agonistic properties of endogenous mu-opioid peptides endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 for G-protein activation were determined in the mouse spinal cord, monitoring the increases in guanosine-5'-o-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding. The G-protein activation induced by endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin in the spinal cord was significantly, but partially, attenuated by co-incubation with endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2. The data indicates that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 are endogenous partial agonists for mu-opioid receptor in the mouse spinal cord.

  17. Synthesis and activity of small molecule GPR40 agonists.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Dulce M; Corbett, David F; Dwornik, Kate A; Goetz, Aaron S; Littleton, Thomas R; McKeown, Steve C; Mills, Wendy Y; Smalley, Terrence L; Briscoe, Celia P; Peat, Andrew J

    2006-04-01

    The first report on the identification and structure-activity relationships of a novel series of GPR40 agonists based on a 3-(4-{[N-alkyl]amino}phenyl)propanoic acid template is described. Structural modifications to the original screening hit yielded compounds with a 100-fold increase in potency at the human GPR40 receptor and pEC(50)s in the low nanomolar range. The carboxylic acid moiety is not critical for activity but typically elicits an agonistic response higher than those observed with carboxamide replacements. These compounds may prove useful in unraveling the therapeutic potential of this receptor for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes.

  18. Intradermally administered TLR4 agonist GLA-SE enhances the capacity of human skin DCs to activate T cells and promotes emigration of Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Laura P; Schoonderwoerd, Antoinet J; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Howard, Randall F; Reed, Steven G; de Jong, Esther C; Teunissen, Marcel B M

    2012-06-13

    The natural TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has notable adjuvant activity. However, it is not useful as a vaccine adjuvant due to its toxicity. Glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) is a synthetic derivative of the lipid A tail of LPS with limited cytotoxicity, but strong potential to induce immune responses in mice, guinea pigs, non-human primates, and humans. In this study we determined how this synthetic TLR4 agonist affects the function of different subsets of human skin dendritic cells (DCs). The effect of GLA in an aqueous formulation (GLA-AF) or in an oil-in-water emulsion (GLA-SE) was compared to that of LPS and TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) using a human skin explant model with intradermal injections for the administration of the agonists. Intradermal injection of GLA-SE or LPS, but not GLA-AF, enhanced the emigration of CD1a(high)/langerin(+) Langerhans cells (LCs), but not dermal DCs (DDCs). LCs and CD14(-) DDCs exhibited an enhanced mature phenotype following intradermal administration of either of the two GLA formulations tested, similar to DCs that emigrated from LPS-injected skin. However, only injection of GLA-SE resulted in a significant increase in the production of the wide range of cytokines that is observed with LPS. Moreover, DCs that emigrated from GLA-SE-injected skin induced stronger CD4(+) T-cell activation, as indicated by a more pronounced T-cell proliferation, than DCs from skin injected with GLA-AF or LPS. Altogether, our data show that GLA-SE has a notable potency to stimulate the function of skin DCs, indicating that GLA-SE may be a good candidate as adjuvant for vaccines administered via the intradermal route.

  19. A Toll-like receptor 2 agonist-fused antigen enhanced antitumor immunity by increasing antigen presentation and the CD8 memory T cells population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiao-Chieh; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Shen, Kuan-Yin; Leng, Chih-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    The induction of long-lived effector CD8+ T cells is key to the development of efficient cancer vaccines. In this study, we demonstrated that a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist-fused antigen increased antigen presentation via TLR2 signaling and induced effector memory-like CD8+ T cells against cancer after immunization. The N-terminus of ovalbumin (OVA) was biologically fused with a bacterial lipid moiety TLR2 agonist to produce a recombinant lipidated ovalbumin (rlipo-OVA). We demonstrated that rlipo-OVA activated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) maturation and increased antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I via TLR2. After immunization, rlipo-OVA skewed the immune response towards T helper (Th) 1 and induced OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Moreover, immunization with rlipo-OVA induced higher numbers of effector memory (CD44+CD62L−) CD8+ T cells compared with recombinant ovalbumin (rOVA) alone or rOVA mixed with the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4. Accordingly, the CD27+CD43+ effector memory CD8+ T cells expressed high levels of the long-lived CD127 marker. The administration of rlipo-OVA could inhibit tumor growth, but the anti-tumor effects were lost after the depletion of CD8 or CD127 cells in vivo. These findings suggested that the TLR2 agonist-fused antigen induced long-lived memory CD8+ T cells for efficient cancer therapy. PMID:27127171

  20. Nuclear receptors regulate lipid metabolism and oxidative stress markers in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ratneswaran, Anusha; Sun, Margaret Man-Ger; Dupuis, Holly; Sawyez, Cynthia; Borradaile, Nica; Beier, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Joint homeostasis failure can result in osteoarthritis (OA). Currently, there are no treatments to alter disease progression in OA, but targeting early changes in cellular behavior has great potential. Recent data show that nuclear receptors contribute to the pathogenesis of OA and could be viable therapeutic targets, but their molecular mechanisms in cartilage are incompletely understood. This study examines global changes in gene expression after treatment with agonists for four nuclear receptor implicated in OA (LXR, PPARδ, PPARγ, and RXR). Murine articular chondrocytes were treated with agonists for LXR, PPARδ, PPARγ, or RXR and underwent microarray, qPCR, and cellular lipid analyses to evaluate changes in gene expression and lipid profile. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to compare two differentially expressed targets (Txnip, Gsta4) in control and cartilage-specific PPARδ knockout mice subjected to surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). Nuclear receptor agonists induced different gene expression profiles with many responses affecting lipid metabolism. LXR activation downregulated gene expression of proteases involved in OA, whereas RXR agonism decreased expression of ECM components and increased expression of Mmp13. Functional assays indicate increases in cell triglyceride accumulation after PPARγ, LXR, and RXR agonism but a decrease after PPARδ agonism. PPARδ and RXR downregulate the antioxidant Gsta4, and PPARδ upregulates Txnip. Wild-type, but not PPARδ-deficient mice, display increased staining for Txnip after DMM. Collectively, these data demonstrate that nuclear receptor activation in chondrocytes primarily affects lipid metabolism. In the case of PPARδ, this change might lead to increased oxidative stress, possibly contributing to OA-associated changes.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 gene regulation by a PPAR alpha agonist in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Souissi, Imen Jguirim; Billiet, Ludivine; Cuaz-Perolin, Clarisse; Rouis, Mustapha

    2008-11-01

    suggest that PPAR{alpha} agonists may be used therapeutically, not only for lipid disorders, but also to prevent inflammation and atheromatous plaque rupture, where their ability to inhibit MMP-12 expression in HMDM may be beneficial.

  2. RF Microalgal lipid content characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman; Taher, Hanifa; Hilal-Alnaqbi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Most conventional techniques for the determination of microalgae lipid content are time consuming and in most cases are indirect and require excessive sample preparations. This work presents a new technique that utilizes radio frequency (RF) for rapid lipid quantification, without the need for sample preparation. Tests showed that a shift in the resonance frequency of a RF open-ended coaxial resonator and a gradual increase in its resonance magnitude may occur as the lipids content of microalgae cells increases. These response parameters can be then calibrated against actual cellular lipid contents and used for rapid determination of the cellular lipids. The average duration of lipid quantification using the proposed technique was of about 1 minute, which is significantly less than all other conventional techniques, and was achieved without the need for any time consuming treatment steps. PMID:24870372

  3. Pyrrolo- and pyridomorphinans: non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Clark, M J; Traynor, J R; Lewis, J W; Husbands, S M

    2014-08-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse.

  4. Proteomic analysis of proteins associated with lipid droplets of basal and lipolytically stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Brasaemle, Dawn L; Dolios, Georgia; Shapiro, Lawrence; Wang, Rong

    2004-11-05

    Adipocytes hold the body's major energy reserve as triacylglycerols packaged in large lipid droplets. Perilipins, the most abundant proteins on these lipid droplets, play a critical role in facilitating both triacylglycerol storage and hydrolysis. The stimulation of lipolysis by beta-adrenergic agonists triggers rapid phosphorylation of perilipin and translocation of hormone-sensitive lipase to the surfaces of lipid droplets and more gradual fragmentation and dispersion of micro-lipid droplets. Because few lipid droplet-associated proteins have been identified in adipocytes, we isolated lipid droplets from basal and lipolytically stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes and identified the component proteins by mass spectrometry. Structural proteins identified in both preparations include perilipin, S3-12, vimentin, and TIP47; in contrast, adipophilin, caveolin-1, and tubulin selectively localized to droplets in lipolytically stimulated cells. Lipid metabolic enzymes identified in both preparations include hormone-sensitive lipase, lanosterol synthase, NAD(P)-dependent steroid dehydrogenase-like protein, acyl-CoA synthetase, long chain family member (ACSL) 1, and CGI-58. 17-beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, type 7, was identified only in basal preparations, whereas ACSL3 and 4 and two short-chain reductase/dehydrogenases were identified on droplets from lipolytically stimulated cells. Additionally, both preparations contained FSP27, ribophorin I, EHD2, diaphorase I, and ancient ubiquitous protein. Basal preparations contained CGI-49, whereas lipid droplets from lipolytically stimulated cells contained several Rab GTPases and tumor protein D54. A close association of mitochondria with lipid droplets was suggested by the identification of pyruvate carboxylase, prohibitin, and a subunit of ATP synthase in the preparations. Thus, adipocyte lipid droplets contain specific structural proteins as well as lipid metabolic enzymes; the structural reorganization of lipid droplets in

  5. RORα and 25-Hydroxycholesterol Crosstalk Regulates Lipid Droplet Homeostasis in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tuong, Zewen Kelvin; Lau, Patrick; Du, Ximing; Condon, Nicholas D.; Goode, Joel M.; Oh, Tae Gyu; Yeo, Jeremy C.; Muscat, George E. O.; Stow, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors have important roles in the regulation of metabolic and inflammatory pathways. The retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha (Rorα)-deficient staggerer (sg/sg) mice display several phenotypes indicative of aberrant lipid metabolism, including dyslipidemia, and increased susceptibility to atherosclerosis. In this study we demonstrate that macrophages from sg/sg mice have increased ability to accumulate lipids and accordingly exhibit larger lipid droplets (LD). We have previously shown that BMMs from sg/sg mice have significantly decreased expression of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (Ch25h) mRNA, the enzyme that produces the oxysterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), and now confirm this at the protein level. 25HC functions as an inverse agonist for RORα. siRNA knockdown of Ch25h in macrophages up-regulates Vldlr mRNA expression and causes increased accumulation of LDs. Treatment with physiological concentrations of 25HC in sg/sg macrophages restored lipid accumulation back to normal levels. Thus, 25HC and RORα signify a new pathway involved in the regulation of lipid homeostasis in macrophages, potentially via increased uptake of lipid which is suggested by mRNA expression changes in Vldlr and other related genes. PMID:26812621

  6. The life of lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2009-01-01

    Lipid droplets are the least characterized of cellular organelles. Long considered simple lipid storage depots, these dynamic and remarkable organelles have recently been implicated in many biological processes, and we are only now beginning to gain insights into their fascinating lives in cells. Here we examine what we know of the life of lipid droplets. We review emerging data concerning their cellular biology and present our thoughts on some of the most salient questions for investigation. PMID:19041421

  7. Lipids and Membrane Lateral Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sonnino, Sandro; Prinetti, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Shortly after the elucidation of the very basic structure and properties of cellular membranes, it became evident that cellular membranes are highly organized structures with multiple and multi-dimensional levels of order. Very early observations suggested that the lipid components of biological membranes might be active players in the creation of these levels of order. In the late 1980s, several different and diverse experimental pieces of evidence coalesced together giving rise to the lipid raft hypothesis. Lipid rafts became enormously (and, in the opinion of these authors, sometimes acritically) popular, surprisingly not just within the lipidologist community (who is supposed to be naturally sensitive to the fascination of lipid rafts). Today, a PubMed search using the key word “lipid rafts” returned a list of 3767 papers, including 690 reviews (as a term of comparison, searching over the same time span for a very hot lipid-related key word, “ceramide” returned 6187 hits with 799 reviews), and a tremendous number of different cellular functions have been described as “lipid raft-dependent.” However, a clear consensus definition of lipid raft has been proposed only in recent times, and the basic properties, the ruling forces, and even the existence of lipid rafts in living cells has been recently matter of intense debate. The scenario that is gradually emerging from the controversies elicited by the lipid raft hypothesis emphasizes multiple roles for membrane lipids in determining membrane order, that encompass their tendency to phase separation but are clearly not limited to this. In this review, we would like to re-focus the attention of the readers on the importance of lipids in organizing the fine structure of cellular membranes. PMID:21423393

  8. Liver X receptor agonist treatment significantly affects phenotype and transcriptome of APOE3 and APOE4 Abca1 haplo-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fitz, Nicholas F.; Mounier, Anais; Wolfe, Cody M.; Nam, Kyong Nyon; Reeves, Valerie L.; Kamboh, Hafsa; Koldamova, Radosveta

    2017-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) controls cholesterol and phospholipid efflux to lipid-poor apolipoprotein E (APOE) and is transcriptionally controlled by Liver X receptors (LXRs) and Retinoic X Receptors (RXRs). In APP transgenic mice, lack of Abca1 increased Aβ deposition and cognitive deficits. Abca1 haplo-deficiency in mice expressing human APOE isoforms, increased level of Aβ oligomers and worsened memory deficits, preferentially in APOE4 mice. In contrast upregulation of Abca1 by LXR/RXR agonists significantly ameliorated pathological phenotype of those mice. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of LXR agonist T0901317 (T0) on the phenotype and brain transcriptome of APP/E3 and APP/E4 Abca1 haplo-deficient (APP/E3/Abca1+/- and APP/E4/Abca1+/-) mice. Our data demonstrate that activated LXRs/RXR ameliorated APOE4-driven pathological phenotype and significantly affected brain transcriptome. We show that in mice expressing either APOE isoform, T0 treatment increased mRNA level of genes known to affect brain APOE lipidation such as Abca1 and Abcg1. In both APP/E3/Abca1+/- and APP/E4/Abca1+/- mice, the application of LXR agonist significantly increased ABCA1 protein level accompanied by an increased APOE lipidation, and was associated with restoration of APOE4 cognitive deficits, reduced levels of Aβ oligomers, but unchanged amyloid load. Finally, using Gene set enrichment analysis we show a significant APOE isoform specific response to LXR agonist treatment: Gene Ontology categories “Microtubule Based Process” and “Synapse Organization” were differentially affected in T0-treated APP/E4/Abca1+/- mice. Altogether, the results are suggesting that treatment of APP/E4/Abca1+/- mice with LXR agonist T0 ameliorates APOE4-induced AD-like pathology and therefore targeting the LXR-ABCA1-APOE regulatory axis could be effective as a potential therapeutic approach in AD patients, carriers of APOEε4. PMID:28241068

  9. Detection of novel intracellular agonist responsive pools of phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate using the TAPP1 pleckstrin homology domain in immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Stephen A; Kimber, Wendy A; Fleming, Ian N; Leslie, Nick R; Downes, C Peter; Lucocq, John M

    2004-01-01

    PtdIns(3,4) P (2), a breakdown product of the lipid second messenger PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3), is a key signalling molecule in pathways controlling various cellular events. Cellular levels of PtdIns(3,4) P (2) are elevated upon agonist stimulation, mediating downstream signalling pathways by recruiting proteins containing specialized lipid-binding modules, such as the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. A recently identified protein, TAPP1 (tandem-PH-domain-containing protein 1), has been shown to interact in vitro with high affinity and specificity with PtdIns(3,4) P (2) through its C-terminal PH domain. In the present study, we have utilized this PH domain tagged with glutathione S-transferase (GST-TAPP1-PH) as a probe in an on-section immunoelectron microscopy labelling procedure, mapping the subcellular distribution of PtdIns(3,4) P (2). As expected, we found accumulation of PtdIns(3,4) P (2) at the plasma membrane in response to the agonists platelet-derived growth factor and hydrogen peroxide. Importantly, however, we also found agonist stimulated PtdIns(3,4) P (2) labelling of intracellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and multivesicular endosomes. Expression of the 3-phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) in PTEN-null U87MG cells revealed differential sensitivity of these lipid pools to the enzyme. These data suggest a role for PtdIns(3,4) P (2) in endomembrane function. PMID:14604433

  10. Circadian regulation of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gooley, Joshua J

    2016-11-01

    The circadian system temporally coordinates daily rhythms in feeding behaviour and energy metabolism. The objective of the present paper is to review the mechanisms that underlie circadian regulation of lipid metabolic pathways. Circadian rhythms in behaviour and physiology are generated by master clock neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN and its efferent targets in the hypothalamus integrate light and feeding signals to entrain behavioural rhythms as well as clock cells located in peripheral tissues, including the liver, adipose tissue and muscle. Circadian rhythms in gene expression are regulated at the cellular level by a molecular clock comprising a core set of clock genes/proteins. In peripheral tissues, hundreds of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and fatty acid oxidation are rhythmically activated and repressed by clock proteins, hence providing a direct mechanism for circadian regulation of lipids. Disruption of clock gene function results in abnormal metabolic phenotypes and impaired lipid absorption, demonstrating that the circadian system is essential for normal energy metabolism. The composition and timing of meals influence diurnal regulation of metabolic pathways, with food intake during the usual rest phase associated with dysregulation of lipid metabolism. Recent studies using metabolomics and lipidomics platforms have shown that hundreds of lipid species are circadian-regulated in human plasma, including but not limited to fatty acids, TAG, glycerophospholipids, sterol lipids and sphingolipids. In future work, these lipid profiling approaches can be used to understand better the interaction between diet, mealtimes and circadian rhythms on lipid metabolism and risk for obesity and metabolic diseases.

  11. Lipid hydroperoxides in plants.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, G; Leverentz, M; Silkowski, H; Gill, N; Sánchez-Serrano, J J

    2000-12-01

    Hydroperoxides are the primary oxygenated products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and were determined spectrophotometrically based on their reaction with an excess of Fe2+ at low pH in the presence of the dye Xylenol Orange. Triphenylphosphine-mediated hydroxide formation was used to authenticate the signal generated by the hydroperoxides. The method readily detected lipid peroxidation in a range of plant tissues including Phaseolus hypocotyls (26 +/- 5 nmol.g of fresh weight(-1); mean +/- S.D.), Alstroemeria floral tissues (sepals, 66+/-13 nmol.g of fresh weight(-1); petals, 49+/-6 nmol.g of fresh weight(-1)), potato leaves (334+/-75 nmol.g of fresh weight(-1)), broccoli florets (568+/-68 nmol.g of fresh weight(-1)) and Chlamydomonas cells (602+/-40 nmol.g of wet weight(-1)). Relative to the total fatty acid content of the tissues, the percentage hydroperoxide content was within the range of 0.6-1.7% for all tissue types (photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic) and represents the basal oxidation level of membrane fatty acids in plant cells. Leaves of transgenic potato with the fatty acid hydroperoxide lyase enzyme expressed in the antisense orientation were elevated by 38%, indicating a role for this enzyme in the maintenance of cellular levels of lipid hydroperoxides.

  12. Pharmacological Characterization of a Novel Beta 3 Adrenergic Agonist, Vibegron: Evaluation of Antimuscarinic Receptor Selectivity for Combination Therapy for Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, J; Nagabukuro, H; Wickham, L A; Abbadie, C; DeMartino, J A; Fitzmaurice, A; Gichuru, L; Kulick, A; Donnelly, M J; Jochnowitz, N; Hurley, A L; Pereira, A; Sanfiz, A; Veronin, G; Villa, K; Woods, J; Zamlynny, B; Zycband, E; Salituro, G M; Frenkl, T; Weber, A E; Edmondson, S D; Struthers, M

    2017-02-01

    Although the physiologic role of muscarinic receptors in bladder function and the therapeutic efficacy of muscarinic antagonists for the treatment of overactive bladder are well established, the role of β3-adrenergic receptors (β3ARs) and their potential as therapeutics is just emerging. In this manuscript, we characterized the pharmacology of a novel β3AR agonist vibegron (MK-4618, KRP-114V) and explored mechanistic interactions of β3AR agonism and muscarinic antagonism in urinary bladder function. Vibegron is a potent, selective full β3AR agonist across species, and it dose dependently increased bladder capacity, decreased micturition pressure, and increased bladder compliance in rhesus monkeys. The relaxation effect of vibegron was enhanced when combined with muscarinic antagonists, but differentially influenced by muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity. The effect was greater when vibegron was co-administered with tolterodine, a nonselective antagonist, compared with coadministration with darifenacin, a selective M3 antagonist. Furthermore, a synergistic effect for bladder strip relaxation was observed with the combination of a β3AR agonist and tolterodine in contrast to simple additivity with darifenacin. To determine expression in rhesus bladder, we employed a novel β3AR agonist probe, [(3)H]MRL-037, that selectively labels β3 receptors in both urothelium and detrusor smooth muscle. Vibegron administration caused a dose-dependent increase in circulating glycerol and fatty acid levels in rhesus and rat in vivo, suggesting these circulating lipids can be surrogate biomarkers. The translation of our observation to the clinic has yet to be determined, but the combination of β3AR agonists with M2/M3 antimuscarinics has the potential to redefine the standard of care for the pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder.

  13. A GPBAR1 (TGR5) Small Molecule Agonist Shows Specific Inhibitory Effects on Myeloid Cell Activation In Vitro and Reduces Experimental Autoimmune Encephalitis (EAE) In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nuruddeen D.; Patnaude, Lori A.; Pelletier, Josephine; Souza, Donald J.; Lukas, Susan M.; King, F. James; Hill, Jonathan D.; Stefanopoulos, Dimitria E.; Ryan, Kelli; Desai, Sudha; Skow, Donna; Kauschke, Stefan G.; Broermann, Andre; Kuzmich, Daniel; Harcken, Christian; Hickey, Eugene R.; Modis, Louise K.

    2014-01-01

    GPBAR1 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by certain bile acids and plays an important role in the regulation of bile acid synthesis, lipid metabolism, and energy homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that GPBAR1 may also have important effects in reducing the inflammatory response through its expression on monocytes and macrophages. To further understand the role of GPBAR1 in inflammation, we generated a novel, selective, proprietary GPBAR1 agonist and tested its effectiveness at reducing monocyte and macrophage activation in vitro and in vivo. We have used this agonist, together with previously described agonists to study agonism of GPBAR1, and shown that they can all induce cAMP and reduce TLR activation-induced cytokine production in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. Additionally, through the usage of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we identified a select set of genes that are regulated by GPBAR1 agonism during LPS activation. To further define the in vivo role of GPBAR1 in inflammation, we assessed GPBAR1 expression and found high levels on circulating mouse monocytes. Agonism of GPBAR1 reduced LPS-induced cytokine production in mouse monocytes ex vivo and serum cytokine levels in vivo. Agonism of GPBAR1 also had profound effects in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of multiple sclerosis, where monocytes play an important role. Mice treated with the GPBAR1 agonist exhibited a significant reduction in the EAE clinical score which correlated with reduced monocyte and microglial activation and reduced trafficking of monocytes and T cells into the CNS. These data confirm the importance of GPBAR1 in controlling monocyte and macrophage activation in vivo and support the rationale for selective agonists of GPBAR1 in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24967665

  14. Interaction of Daptomycin with Lipid Bilayers: A Lipid Extracting Effect

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Daptomycin is the first approved member of a new structural class of antibiotics, the cyclic lipopeptides. The peptide interacts with the lipid matrix of cell membranes, inducing permeability of the membrane to ions, but its molecular mechanism has been a puzzle. Unlike the ubiquitous membrane-acting host-defense antimicrobial peptides, daptomycin does not induce pores in the cell membranes. Thus, how it affects the permeability of a membrane to ions is not clear. We studied its interaction with giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and discovered a lipid-extracting phenomenon that correlates with the direct action of daptomycin on bacterial membranes observed in a recent fluorescence microscopy study. Lipid extraction occurred only when the GUV lipid composition included phosphatidylglycerol and in the presence of Ca2+ ions, the same condition found to be necessary for daptomycin to be effective against bacteria. Furthermore, it occurred only when the peptide/lipid ratio exceeded a threshold value, which could be the basis of the minimal inhibitory concentration of daptomycin. In this first publication on the lipid extracting effect, we characterize its dependence on ions and lipid compositions. We also discuss possibilities for connecting the lipid extracting effect to the antibacterial activity of daptomycin. PMID:25093761

  15. Lipid domains in supported lipid bilayer for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Chen; Blanchette, Craig D; Ratto, Timothy V; Longo, Marjorie L

    2007-01-01

    Phase-separated supported lipid bilayers have been widely used to study the phase behavior of multicomponent lipid mixtures. One of the primary advantages of using supported lipid bilayers is that the two-dimensional platform of this model membrane system readily allows lipid-phase separation to be characterized by high-resolution imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). In addition, when supported lipid bilayers have been functionalized with a specific ligand, protein-membrane interactions can also be imaged and characterized through AFM. It has been recently demonstrated that when the technique of vesicle fusion is used to prepare supported lipid bilayers, the thermal history of the vesicles before deposition and the supported lipid bilayers after formation will have significant effects on the final phase-separated domain structures. In this chapter, three methods of vesicle preparations as well as three deposition conditions will be presented. Also, the techniques and strategies of using AFM to image multicomponent phase-separated supported lipid bilayers and protein binding will be discussed.

  16. The Agonistic Approach: Reframing Resistance in Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitus, Kathrine

    2008-01-01

    The agonistic approach--aimed at embracing opposing perspectives as part of a qualitative research process and acknowledging that process as fundamentally political--sheds light on both the construction of and the resistance to research identities. This approach involves reflexively embedding interview situations into the ethnographic context as a…

  17. Once-weekly glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2015-07-01

    The once-weekly glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (QW GLP1RA) represent a major advancement in diabetes pharmaco-therapeutics. This review describes the basic, clinical, and comparative pharmacology of this novel class of drugs. It highlights the clinical placement and posology of these drugs.

  18. Use of ß-adrenergic agonists in hybrid catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ractopamine hydrochloride (RH) is a potent ß-adrenergic agonist that has been used in some species of fish to improve growth performance and dress out characteristics. While this metabolic modifier has been shown to have positive effects on growth of fish, little research has focused on the mechani...

  19. Dopamine agonists in prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Vrčić, Hrvoje; Stanić, Patrik; Ježek, Davor; Orešković, Slavko; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Pekez, Marijeta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to analyze the efficacy of different dopamine agonists in the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Cabergoline, quinagolide and bromocriptine are the most common dopamine agonists used. There are wide clinical variations among the trials in the starting time (from the day of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) to the day following oocyte retrieval); the duration of the treatment (4-21 days), the dose of cabergoline (0.5 mg or 0.25 mg orally) and in the regimens used. At present, the best known effective regimen is 0.5 mg of cabergoline for 8 days or rectal bromocriptine at a daily dose of 2.5 mg for 16 days. Dopamine agonists have shown significant evidences of their efficacy in the prevention of moderate and early-onset OHSS (9.41%), compared with a placebo (21.45%), which cannot be confirmed for the treatment of late OHSS. It would be advisable to start with the treatment on the day of hCG injection or preferably a few hours earlier. The use of dopamine agonists should be indicated in patients at high risk of OHSS, as well as in patients with a history of previous OHSS even without evident signs of the syndrome.

  20. [Alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists for the treatment of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Kulka, P J

    1996-04-25

    The antinociceptive effect of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists is mediated by activation of descending inhibiting noradrenergic systems, which modulates 'wide-dynamic-range' neurones. Furthermore, they inhibit the liberation of substance P and endorphines and activate serotoninergic neurones. Despite this variety of antinociceptive actions, there is still little experience with alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists as therapeutic agents for use in chronic pain syndromes. Studies in animals and patients have shown that the transdermal, epidural and intravenous administration of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine reduces pain intensity in neuropathic pain syndromes for periods varying from some hours up to 1 month. Patients suffering from lancinating or sharp pain respond best to this therapy. Topically applied clonidine (200-300 microg) relieves hyperalgesia in sympathetically maintained pain. Epidural administration of 300 microg clonidine dissolved in 5 ml NaCl 0.9 % has also been shown to be effective. In patients suffering from cancer pain tolerant to opioids, pain control has proved possible again with combinations of opioids and clonidine. In isolated cases clonidine has been administered epidurally at a dose of 1500 microg/day for almost 5 months without evidence for any histotoxic property of clonidine. Side effects often observed during administration of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists are dry mouth, sedation, hypotension and bradycardia. Therapeutic interventions are usually not required.

  1. Role of nicotine receptor partial agonists in tobacco cessation

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Nivedita; Chand, Prabhat; Murthy, Pratima

    2014-01-01

    One in three adults in India uses tobacco, a highly addictive substance in one or other form. In addition to prevention of tobacco use, offering evidence-based cessation services to dependent tobacco users constitutes an important approach in addressing this serious public health problem. A combination of behavioral methods and pharmacotherapy has shown the most optimal results in tobacco dependence treatment. Among currently available pharmacological agents, drugs that preferentially act on the α4 β2-nicotinic acetyl choline receptor like varenicline and cytisine appear to have relatively better cessation outcomes. These drugs are in general well tolerated and have minimal drug interactions. The odds of quitting tobacco use are at the very least doubled with the use of partial agonists compared with placebo and the outcomes are also superior when compared to nicotine replacement therapy and bupropion. The poor availability of partial agonists and specifically the cost of varenicline, as well as the lack of safety data for cytisine has limited their use world over, particularly in developing countries. Evidence for the benefit of partial agonists is more robust for smoking rather than smokeless forms of tobacco. Although more studies are needed to demonstrate their effectiveness in different populations of tobacco users, present literature supports the use of partial agonists in addition to behavioral methods for optimal outcome in tobacco dependence. PMID:24574554

  2. Dopamine receptor agonists for protection and repair in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Bonini, Sara A; Cenini, Giovanna; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Uberti, Daniela; Memo, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine agonists have been usually used as adjunctive therapy for the cure of Parkinson's disease. It is generally believed that treatment with these drugs is symptomatic rather than curative and it does not stop or delay the progression of neuronal degeneration. However, several dopamine agonists of the D2-receptor family have recently been shown to possess neuroprotective properties in different in vitro and in vivo experimental Parkinson's disease models. Here we summarize some recent molecular evidences underlining the wide pharmacological spectrum of dopamine agonists currently used for treating Parkinson's disease patients. In particular, the mechanism of action of different dopamine agonists does not always appear to be restricted to the stimulation of selective dopamine receptor subtypes since at least some of these drugs are endowed with antioxidant, antiapoptotic or neurotrophic properties. These neuroprotective activities are molecule-specific and may contribute to the clinical efficacy of these drugs for the treatment of chronic and progressive neurodegenerative diseases in which oxidative injury and/or protein misfolding and aggregation exert a primary role.

  3. Amylin and Amylin Agonists for Treating Psychiatric Diseases and Disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods and compositions for treating psychiatric diseases and disorders are disclosed. The methods provided generally involve the administration of an amylin or an amylin agonist to a subject in order to treat psychiatric diseases and disorders, and conditions associated with psychiatric diseases a...

  4. Analysis of lipid profile in lipid storage myopathy.

    PubMed

    Aguennouz, M'hammed; Beccaria, Marco; Purcaro, Giorgia; Oteri, Marianna; Micalizzi, Giuseppe; Musumesci, Olimpia; Ciranni, Annmaria; Di Giorgio, Rosa Maria; Toscano, Antonio; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    Lipid dysmetabolism disease is a condition in which lipids are stored abnormally in organs and tissues throughout the body, causing muscle weakness (myopathy). Usually, the diagnosis of this disease and its characterization goes through dosage of Acyl CoA in plasma accompanied with evidence of droplets of intra-fibrils lipids in the patient muscle biopsy. However, to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of lipid storage diseases, it is useful to identify the nature of lipids deposited in muscle fiber. In this work fatty acids and triglycerides profile of lipid accumulated in the muscle of people suffering from myopathies syndromes was characterized. In particular, the analyses were carried out on the muscle biopsy of people afflicted by lipid storage myopathy, such as multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, and neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy, and by the intramitochondrial lipid storage dysfunctions, such as deficiencies of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II enzyme. A single step extraction and derivatization procedure was applied to analyze fatty acids from muscle tissues by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector and with an electronic impact mass spectrometer. Triglycerides, extracted by using n-hexane, were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface. The most representative fatty acids in all samples were: C16:0 in the 13-24% range, C18:1n9 in the 20-52% range, and C18:2n6 in the 10-25% range. These fatty acids were part of the most representative triglycerides in all samples. The data obtained was statistically elaborated performing a principal component analysis. A satisfactory discrimination was obtained among the different diseases. Using component 1 vs component 3 a 43.3% of total variance was explained. Such results suggest the important role that lipid profile characterization can have in supporting a correct

  5. Melatonin receptor agonists: new options for insomnia and depression treatment.

    PubMed

    Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco

    2011-12-01

    The circadian nature of melatonin (MLT) secretion, coupled with the localization of MLT receptors to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, has led to numerous studies of the role of MLT in modulation of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms in humans. Although much more needs to be understood about the various functions exerted by MLT and its mechanisms of action, three therapeutic agents (ramelteon, prolonged-release MLT, and agomelatine) are already in use, and MLT receptor agonists are now appearing as new promising treatment options for sleep and circadian-rhythm related disorders. In this review, emphasis has been placed on medicinal chemistry strategies leading to MLT receptor agonists, and on the evidence supporting therapeutic efficacy of compounds undergoing clinical evaluation. A wide range of clinical trials demonstrated that ramelteon, prolonged-release MLT and tasimelteon have sleep-promoting effects, providing an important treatment option for insomnia and transient insomnia, even if the improvements of sleep maintenance appear moderate. Well-documented effects of agomelatine suggest that this MLT agonist offers an attractive alternative for the treatment of depression, combining efficacy with a favorable side effect profile. Despite a large number of high affinity nonselective MLT receptor agonists, only limited data on MT₁ or MT₂ subtype-selective compounds are available up to now. Administration of the MT₂-selective agonist IIK7 to rats has proved to decrease NREM sleep onset latency, suggesting that MT₂ receptor subtype is involved in the acute sleep-promoting action of MLT; rigorous clinical studies are needed to demonstrate this hypothesis. Further clinical candidates based on selective activation of MT₁ or MT₂ receptors are expected in coming years.

  6. Identification of raloxifene as a novel CB2 inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pritesh; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2013-05-24

    The purpose of the current study was to apply a high throughput assay to systematically screen a library of food and drug administration (FDA)-approved drugs as potential ligands for the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2). A cell-based, homogenous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) method for measuring changes in intracellular cAMP levels was validated and found to be suitable for testing ligands that may act on CB2. Among the 640 FDA-approved drugs screened, raloxifene, a drug used to treat/prevent post-menopausal osteoporosis, was identified for the first time to be a novel CB2 inverse agonist. Our results demonstrated that by acting on CB2, raloxifene enhances forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in a concentration-dependant manner. Furthermore, our data showed that raloxifene competes concentration-dependently for specific [(3)H]CP-55,940 binding to CB2. In addition, raloxifene pretreatment caused a rightward shift of the concentration-response curves of the cannabinoid agonists CP-55,940, HU-210, and WIN55,212-2. Raloxifene antagonism is most likely competitive in nature, as these rightward shifts were parallel and were not associated with any changes in the efficacy of cannabinoid agonists on CB2. Our discovery that raloxfiene is an inverse agonist for CB2 suggests that it might be possible to repurpose this FDA-approved drug for novel therapeutic indications for which CB2 is a target. Furthermore, identifying raloxifene as a CB2 inverse agonist also provides important novel mechanisms of actions to explain the known therapeutic effects of raloxifene.

  7. Update on cardiovascular safety of PPARgamma agonists and relevance to medicinal chemistry and clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ciudin, Andreea; Hernandez, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activator receptors (PPARs) are now known as members of the nuclear hormonereceptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate gene expression in response to nutritional and physiological stimuli. PPARγ plays a crucial role in glucose homeostasis and it is involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation and function. From all the PAARγ ligands, the thiazolidindiones (TZDs) are of most clinical importance. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone have been largely used so far in the clinical practice. They provide similar effects on glycemic control, as well as a range of similar adverse effects, such as weight gain, fluid retention, and increased risk of hearth failure, which seem to be PPARγ mediated. Interestingly, they differ on their effect on lipid and cardiovascular safety profile, indicating a PPARγ-independent mechanism. Indeed, rosiglitazone was recently withdrawn in Europe and its use has been restricted in USA as a consequence of increased risk of cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients. This review is focused on the cardiovascular effects of rosiglitazone and pioglitazone as representative members of PPARγ ligands, because they were widely evaluated in many clinical trials and experimental studies and data obtained from these studies are relevant from medicinal chemistry and clinical pharmacology point of view. Finally, an overview on the development of selective PPARγ modulators and/or dual PPARα/γ agonists will be given. These new approaches might provide anti-hyperglycemic efficacy without the associated undesirable side-effects. However, further experimental and clinical studies evaluating the theoretical benefit and safety of this therapeutic strategy are needed.

  8. Lipids in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hüsing, Anna; Kabar, Iyad; Schmidt, Hartmut H

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is very common after liver transplantation and can be observed in up to 71% of patients. The etiology of lipid disorders in these patients is multifactorial, with different lipid profiles observed depending on the immunosuppressive agents administered and the presence of additional risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and nutrition. Due to recent improvements in survival of liver transplant recipients, the prevention of cardiovascular events has become more important, especially as approximately 64% of liver transplant recipients present with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Management of dyslipidemia and of other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, has therefore become essential in these patients. Treatment of hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation consists of life style modification, modifying the dose or type of immunosuppressive agents and use of lipid lowering agents. At the start of administration of lipid lowering medications, it is important to monitor drug-drug interactions, especially between lipid lowering agents and immunosuppressive drugs. Furthermore, as combinations of various lipid lowering drugs can lead to severe side effects, such as myopathies and rhabdomyolysis, these combinations should therefore be avoided. To our knowledge, there are no current guidelines targeting the management of lipid metabolism disorders in liver transplant recipients. This paper therefore recommends an approach of managing lipid abnormalities occurring after liver transplantation. PMID:27022213

  9. The Flexibility of Ectopic Lipids.

    PubMed

    Loher, Hannah; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris; Christ, Emanuel

    2016-09-14

    In addition to the subcutaneous and the visceral fat tissue, lipids can also be stored in non-adipose tissue such as in hepatocytes (intrahepatocellular lipids; IHCL), skeletal (intramyocellular lipids; IMCL) or cardiac muscle cells (intracardiomyocellular lipids; ICCL). Ectopic lipids are flexible fuel stores that can be depleted by physical exercise and repleted by diet. They are related to obesity and insulin resistance. Quantification of IMCL was initially performed invasively, using muscle biopsies with biochemical and/or histological analysis. ¹H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-MRS) is now a validated method that allows for not only quantifying IMCL non-invasively and repeatedly, but also assessing IHCL and ICCL. This review summarizes the current available knowledge on the flexibility of ectopic lipids. The available evidence suggests a complex interplay between quantitative and qualitative diet, fat availability (fat mass), insulin action, and physical exercise, all important factors that influence the flexibility of ectopic lipids. Furthermore, the time frame of the intervention on these parameters (short-term vs. long-term) appears to be critical. Consequently, standardization of physical activity and diet are critical when assessing ectopic lipids in predefined clinical situations.

  10. Roles of Lipids in Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Endo, Kaichiro; Wada, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes in cyanobacterial cells and chloroplasts of algae and higher plants are the sites of oxygenic photosynthesis. The lipid composition of the thylakoid membrane is unique and highly conserved among oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Major lipids in thylakoid membranes are glycolipids, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, and the phospholipid, phosphatidylglycerol. The identification of almost all genes involved in the biosynthesis of each lipid class over the past decade has allowed the generation and isolation of mutants of various photosynthetic organisms incapable of synthesizing specific lipids. Numerous studies using such mutants have revealed that these lipids play important roles not only in the formation of the lipid bilayers of thylakoid membranes but also in the folding and assembly of the protein subunits in photosynthetic complexes. In addition to the studies with the mutants, recent X-ray crystallography studies of photosynthetic complexes in thylakoid membranes have also provided critical information on the association of lipids with photosynthetic complexes and their activities. In this chapter, we summarize our current understanding about the structural and functional involvement of thylakoid lipids in oxygenic photosynthesis.

  11. The Flexibility of Ectopic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Loher, Hannah; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris; Christ, Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the subcutaneous and the visceral fat tissue, lipids can also be stored in non-adipose tissue such as in hepatocytes (intrahepatocellular lipids; IHCL), skeletal (intramyocellular lipids; IMCL) or cardiac muscle cells (intracardiomyocellular lipids; ICCL). Ectopic lipids are flexible fuel stores that can be depleted by physical exercise and repleted by diet. They are related to obesity and insulin resistance. Quantification of IMCL was initially performed invasively, using muscle biopsies with biochemical and/or histological analysis. 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) is now a validated method that allows for not only quantifying IMCL non-invasively and repeatedly, but also assessing IHCL and ICCL. This review summarizes the current available knowledge on the flexibility of ectopic lipids. The available evidence suggests a complex interplay between quantitative and qualitative diet, fat availability (fat mass), insulin action, and physical exercise, all important factors that influence the flexibility of ectopic lipids. Furthermore, the time frame of the intervention on these parameters (short-term vs. long-term) appears to be critical. Consequently, standardization of physical activity and diet are critical when assessing ectopic lipids in predefined clinical situations. PMID:27649157

  12. Lipid droplets, lipophagy, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Lipids are essential components for life. Their various structural and physical properties influence diverse cellular processes and, thereby, human health. Lipids are not genetically encoded but are synthesized and modified by complex metabolic pathways, supplying energy, membranes, signaling molecules, and hormones to affect growth, physiology, and response to environmental insults. Lipid homeostasis is crucial, such that excess fatty acids (FAs) can be harmful to cells. To prevent such lipotoxicity, cells convert excess FAs into neutral lipids for storage in organelles called lipid droplets (LDs). These organelles do not simply manage lipid storage and metabolism but also are involved in protein quality management, pathogenesis, immune responses, and, potentially, neurodegeneration. In recent years, a major trend in LD biology has centered around the physiology of lipid mobilization via lipophagy of fat stored within LDs. This review summarizes key findings in LD biology and lipophagy, offering novel insights into this rapidly growing field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  13. Big, Fat World of Lipids

    MedlinePlus

    ... and proteomics spurred advances in the study of genes and proteins, lipidomics has offered a more quantitative and systematic approach to lipids research. Much of the effort has been led by a research consortium called LIPID MAPS. With funding from the National Institutes of Health, ...

  14. Subconjunctival and episcleral lipid deposits.

    PubMed Central

    Fraunfelder, F. T.; Garner, A.; Barras, T. C.

    1976-01-01

    Biomicroscopical examination of the bulbar conjunctiva and anterior episclera of 1000 randomly selected outpatients showed the presence of multiple discrete lipid globules in 30 per cent. The lipid deposits were asymptomatic. Their prevalence was age-related, while their distribution and composition were consistent with origin from the conjunctival blood vessels. Images PMID:952830

  15. Neuroimaging of Lipid Storage Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Deborah; Auerbach, Sarah; Robinson, Paul; Gropman, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Lipid storage diseases, also known as the lipidoses, are a group of inherited metabolic disorders in which there is lipid accumulation in various cell types, including the central nervous system, because of the deficiency of a variety of enzymes. Over time, excessive storage can cause permanent cellular and tissue damage. The brain is particularly…

  16. Structural basis for constitutive activity and agonist-induced activation of the enteroendocrine fat sensor GPR119

    PubMed Central

    Engelstoft, M S; Norn, C; Hauge, M; Holliday, N D; Elster, L; Lehmann, J; Jones, R M; Frimurer, T M; Schwartz, T W

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose GPR119 is a Gαs-coupled 7TM receptor activated by endogenous lipids such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and by the dietary triglyceride metabolite 2-monoacylglycerol. GPR119 stimulates enteroendocrine hormone and insulin secretion. But despite massive drug discovery efforts in the field, very little is known about the basic molecular pharmacology of GPR119. Experimental Approach GPR119 receptor signalling was studied in transfected cells. Mutational mapping (30 mutations in 23 positions) was performed on residues required for ligand-independent and agonist-induced GPR119 activation (AR231453 and OEA). Novel Rosetta-based receptor modelling was applied, using a composite template approach with segments from different X-ray structures and fully flexible ligand docking. Key Results The increased signalling induced by increasing the cell surface expression of GPR119 in the absence of agonist and the inhibitory effect of two synthetic inverse agonists demonstrated that GRP119 signals with a high degree of constitutive activity through the Gαs pathway. The mutational maps for AR231453 and OEA were very similar and, surprisingly, also similar to the mutational map for residues affecting the constitutive signalling – albeit with key differences. Surprisingly, almost all residues in extracellular loop-2b were important for the constitutive activity. The molecular modelling and docking demonstrated that AR231453 binds in a ‘vertical’ pocket in between mutational hits reaching from the centre of the receptor out to extracellular loop-2b. Conclusions and Implications The high constitutive activity of GPR119 should be taken into account in future drug discovery efforts, which can now be guided by the detailed knowledge of the physiochemical properties of the extended ligand-binding pocket. PMID:25117266

  17. Omega-3 fatty acids and other FFA4 agonists inhibit growth factor signaling in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze; Hopkins, Mandi M; Zhang, Zhihong; Quisenberry, Chrystal B; Fix, Louise C; Galvan, Brianna M; Meier, Kathryn E

    2015-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) are proposed to have many beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanisms underlying their potential cancer preventative effects are unclear. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1/GPR40 and FFA4/GPR120, specifically bind n-3 FAs as agonist ligands. In this study, we examined the effects of n-3 FAs in human prostate cancer cell lines. Initial studies established that the long-chain n-3 FAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, inhibit proliferation of DU145 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogenic lipid mediator. When added alone to serum-starved DU145 cells, EPA transiently activates signaling events, including p70S6K phosphorylation. However, when added 15 minutes prior to LPA, EPA suppresses LPA-induced activating phosphorylations of ERK, FAK, and p70S6K, and expression of the matricellular protein CCN1. The rapid onset of the inhibitory action of EPA suggested involvement of a GPCR. Further studies showed that DU145 and PC-3 cells express mRNA and protein for both FFA4 and FFA1. TUG-891 (4-[(4-fluoro-4'-methyl[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy]-benzenepropanoic acid), a selective agonist for FFA4, exerts inhibitory effects on LPA- and epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation and migration, similar to EPA, in DU145 and PC-3 cells. The effects of TUG-891 and EPA are readily reversible. The FFA1/FFA4 agonist GW9508 (4-[[(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl]amino]-benzenepropranoic acid) likewise inhibits proliferation at doses that block FFA4. Knockdown of FFA4 expression prevents EPA- and TUG-891-induced inhibition of growth and migration. Together, these results indicate that activation of FFA4 initiates signaling events that can inhibit growth factor-induced signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppression of cancer cell proliferation.

  18. Neural effects of gut- and brain-derived glucagon-like peptide-1 and its receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Kenichi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is derived from both the enteroendocrine L cells and preproglucagon-expressing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem. As GLP-1 is cleaved by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 yielding a half-life of less than 2 min, it is plausible that the gut-derived GLP-1, released postprandially, exerts its effects on the brain mainly by interacting with vagal afferent neurons located at the intestinal or hepatic portal area. GLP-1 neurons in the NTS widely project in the central nervous system and act as a neurotransmitter. One of the physiological roles of brain-derived GLP-1 is restriction of feeding. GLP-1 receptor agonists have recently been used to treat type 2 diabetic patients, and have been shown to exhibit pleiotropic effects beyond incretin action, which involve brain functions. GLP-1 receptor agonist administered in the periphery is stable because of its resistance to dipeptidyl peptidase-4, and is highly likely to act on the brain by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as well as interacting with vagal afferent nerves. Central actions of GLP-1 have various roles including regulation of feeding, weight, glucose and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular functions, cognitive functions, and stress and emotional responses. In the present review, we focus on the source of GLP-1 and the pathway by which peripheral GLP-1 informs the brain, and then discuss recent findings on the central effects of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor agonists.

  19. The peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor β/δ agonist GW0742 has direct protective effects on right heart hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension is a debilitating disease with no cure. We have previously shown that peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ agonists protect the right heart in hypoxia-driven pulmonary hypertension without affecting vascular remodeling. PPARβ/δ is an important receptor in lipid metabolism, athletic performance, and the sensing of prostacyclin. Treatment of right heart hypertrophy and failure in pulmonary hypertension is an emerging target for future therapy. Here we have investigated the potential of GW0742, a PPARβ agonist, to act directly on the right heart in vivo and what transcriptomic signatures are associated with its actions. Right heart hypertrophy and failure was induced in mice using a pulmonary artery banding (PAB) model. GW0742 was administered throughout the study. Cardiovascular parameters were measured using echocardiography and pressure monitoring. Fibrosis and cellular changes were measured using immunohistochemistry. Transcriptomics were measured using the Illumina MouseRef-8v3 BeadChip array and analyzed using GeneSpring GX (ver. 11.0). PAB resulted in right heart hypertrophy and failure and in increased fibrosis. GW0742 reduced or prevented the effects of PAB on all parameters measured. GW0742 altered a number of genes in the transcriptome, with Angptl4 emerging as the top gene altered (increased) in animals with PAB. In conclusion, the PPARβ/δ agonist GW0742 has direct protective effects on the right heart in vivo. These observations identify PPARβ/δ as a viable therapeutic target to treat pulmonary hypertension that may complement current and future vasodilator drugs. PMID:25006409

  20. Lipid Mediators in Acne

    PubMed Central

    Ottaviani, Monica; Camera, Emanuela; Picardo, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Multiple factors are involved in acne pathogenesis, and sebum secretion is one of the main ones. The role sebum plays in acne development has not been completely elucidated yet; however, increasing amounts of data seem to confirm the presence of alterations in sebum from acne patients. Altered ratio between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids has been indicated as an important feature to be considered in addition to the altered amount of specific fatty acids such as linoleic acid. Furthermore, particular attention has been focused on squalene peroxide that seems to be able to induce an inflammatory response beyond cytotoxicity and comedones formation. Moreover, recent data suggest that lipid mediators are able to interfere with sebocytes differentiation and sebogenesis through the activation of pathways related to peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors. Understanding the factors and mechanisms that regulate sebum production is needed in order to identify novel therapeutic strategies for acne treatment. PMID:20871834

  1. Dietary regulation of adiponectin by direct and indirect lipid activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rühl, R; Landrier, J F

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine mainly secreted by adipocytes that presents antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic functions. Therefore, modulation of adiponectin expression represents a promising target for prevention or treatment of several diseases including insulin resistance and type II diabetes. Pharmacological agents such as the nuclear hormone receptor synthetic agonists like peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonists are of particular interest in therapeutic strategies due to their ability to increase the plasma adiponectin concentration. Nutritional approaches are also of particular interest, especially in primary prevention, since some active compounds of our diet (notably vitamins, carotenoids, or other essential nutrients) are direct or indirect lipid-activators of nuclear hormone receptors and are modifiers of adiponectin expression and secretion. The aim of the present review is to summarize current knowledge about the nutritional regulation of adiponectin by derivatives of active compounds naturally present in the diet acting as indirect or direct activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

  2. Synthesis and SAR of potent LXR agonists containing an indole pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Campobasso, Nino; Smallwood, Angela; Parks, Derek J.; Webb, Christine L.; Frank, Kelly A.; Nord, Melanie; Duraiswami, Chaya; Evans, Christopher; Jaye, Michael; Thompson, Scott K.

    2009-03-27

    A novel series of 1H-indol-1-yl tertiary amine LXR agonists has been designed. Compounds from this series were potent agonists with good rat pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, the crystal structure of an LXR agonist bound to LXR{alpha} will be disclosed.

  3. Lipid functionalized biopolymers: A review.

    PubMed

    Qurat-Ul-Ain; Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zia, Fatima; Ali, Muhammad; Rehman, Saima; Zuber, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    Lipids are the main source of energy and widely used for various applications. In this review, the modification of lipids by using them in combination with other biomaterials like natural and synthetic polymers is elaborated. These new blends have characteristic features of both polymers and are characterized by different techniques (NMR, DSC, TGA, IR and Raman spectroscopy etc.) to understand their structure, properties and functional behavior. Lipids are hydrophobic, have anti-oxidant and anti-bacterial properties and thus impart hydrophobicity and flexibility to the polymers. While the polymers, on the other hand, make the lipids tougher. Properties of few polymers such as starch, polyethylene protein and chitosan that have brittleness, low combustion rate and hydrophobicity, are improved by incorporation of lipids ultimately increased their flexibility, combustion rate and hydrophobicity respectively. This review article is also focused on emerging fields for the applications of these composite materials. The most notable application of composite materials are in the field of paint industry.

  4. Lipid Microdomains in Cell Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cascianelli, Giacomo; Villani, Maristella; Tosti, Marcello; Marini, Francesca; Bartoccini, Elisa; Viola Magni, Mariapia

    2008-01-01

    It is known that nuclear lipids play a role in proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic process. Cellular nuclei contain high levels of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, which are partially linked with cholesterol and proteins to form lipid–protein complexes. These lipids are also associated with transcription factors and newly synthesized RNA but, up to date, their organization is still unknown. The aim of the present work was to study if these specific lipid–protein interactions could be nuclear membrane microdomains and to evaluate their possible role. The results obtained demonstrate for the first time the existence of nuclear microdomains characterized by a specific lipid composition similar to that of intranuclear lipid–protein complexes previously described. Nuclear microdomain lipid composition changes during cell proliferation when the content of newly synthesized RNA increases. Because previous data show a correlation between nuclear lipids and transcription process, the role of nuclear microdomains in cellular functions is discussed. PMID:18923143

  5. Lipid Informed Quantitation and Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crowell, PNNL

    2014-07-21

    LIQUID (Lipid Informed Quantitation and Identification) is a software program that has been developed to enable users to conduct both informed and high-throughput global liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based lipidomics analysis. This newly designed desktop application can quickly identify and quantify lipids from LC-MS/MS datasets while providing a friendly graphical user interface for users to fully explore the data. Informed data analysis simply involves the user specifying an electrospray ionization mode, lipid common name (i.e. PE(16:0/18:2)), and associated charge carrier. A stemplot of the isotopic profile and a line plot of the extracted ion chromatogram are also provided to show the MS-level evidence of the identified lipid. In addition to plots, other information such as intensity, mass measurement error, and elution time are also provided. Typically, a global analysis for 15,000 lipid targets

  6. Lipids changes in liver cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing-ting; Xu, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-ying; Wu, Chang-ping

    2007-01-01

    Liver is one of the most important organs in energy metabolism. Most plasma apolipoproteins and endogenous lipids and lipoproteins are synthesized in the liver. It depends on the integrity of liver cellular function, which ensures homeostasis of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. When liver cancer occurs, these processes are impaired and the plasma lipid and lipoprotein patterns may be changed. Liver cancer is the fifth common malignant tumor worldwide, and is closely related to the infections of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). HBV and HCV infections are quite common in China and other Southeast Asian countries. In addition, liver cancer is often followed by a procession of chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, so that hepatic function is damaged obviously on these bases, which may significantly influence lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in vivo. In this review we summarize the clinical significance of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism under liver cancer. PMID:17565510

  7. The role of melatonin and melatonin agonists in counteracting antipsychotic-induced metabolic side effects: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2016-11-01

    This systematic review aims to investigate whether melatonin or melatonin agonists significantly attenuate metabolic side effects among psychiatric populations treated with atypical antipsychotics. Four randomized-controlled trials were identified through a comprehensive literature search using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library on 22 October 2015. These four trials (including three melatonin studies and one ramelteon study) included 138 patients, of whom 71 were treated with melatonin or ramelteon and 67 were treated with a placebo. Because of high heterogeneity, we did not carry out a meta-analysis. Melatonin was beneficial in lowering blood pressure among bipolar disorder patients; this blood pressure-lowering effect was not prominent among schizophrenic patients. Melatonin appeared to improve lipid profiles and body composition and attenuated weight gain among both schizophrenic and bipolar disorder patients. Ramelteon showed a significant efficacy in lowering total cholesterol level. Despite the few studies included, this systematic review provided promising evidence of the potential benefits of melatonin and its agonists in attenuating one or more components of metabolic syndrome among psychiatric patients using atypical antipsychotics.

  8. Direct single molecule measurement of TCR triggering by agonist pMHC in living primary T cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Geoff P; Pielak, Rafal M; Smoligovets, Alexander A; Lin, Jenny J; Groves, Jay T

    2013-07-03

    T cells discriminate between self and foreign antigenic peptides, displayed on antigen presenting cell surfaces, via the TCR. While the molecular interactions between TCR and its ligands are well characterized in vitro, quantitative measurements of these interactions in living cells are required to accurately resolve the physical mechanisms of TCR signaling. We report direct single molecule measurements of TCR triggering by agonist pMHC in hybrid junctions between live primary T cells and supported lipid membranes. Every pMHC:TCR complex over the entire cell is tracked while simultaneously monitoring the local membrane recruitment of ZAP70, as a readout of TCR triggering. Mean dwell times for pMHC:TCR molecular binding of 5 and 54 s were measured for two different pMHC:TCR systems. Single molecule measurements of the pMHC:TCR:ZAP70 complex indicate that TCR triggering is stoichiometric with agonist pMHC in a 1:1 ratio. Thus any signal amplification must occur downstream of TCR triggering. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00778.001.

  9. The TLR4 Agonist Vaccine Adjuvant, GLA-SE, Requires Canonical and Atypical Mechanisms of Action for TH1 Induction.

    PubMed

    Dubois Cauwelaert, Natasha; Desbien, Anthony L; Hudson, Thomas E; Pine, Samuel O; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N; Orr, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor 4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant formulated in a stable emulsion (GLA-SE) promotes strong TH1 and balanced IgG1/IgG2 responses to protein vaccine antigens. This enhanced immunity is sufficient to provide protection against many diseases including tuberculosis and leishmaniasis. To better characterize the adjuvant action it is important to understand how the different cytokines and transcription factors contribute to the initiation of immunity. In the present study using T-bet-/- and IL-12-/- mice and a blocking anti-IFNαR1 monoclonal antibody, we define mechanisms of adjuvant activity of GLA-SE. In accordance with previous studies of TLR4 agonist based adjuvants, we found that TH1 induction via GLA-SE was completely dependent upon T-bet, a key transcription factor for IFNγ production and TH1 differentiation. Consistent with this, deficiency of IL-12, a cytokine canonical to TH1 induction, ablated TH1 induction via GLA-SE. Finally we demonstrate that the innate immune response to GLA-SE, including rapid IFNγ production by memory CD8+ T cells and NK cells, was contingent on type I interferon, a cytokine group whose association with TH1 induction is contextual, and that they contributed to the adjuvant activity of GLA-SE.

  10. A formulation-enabled preclinical efficacy assessment of a farnesoid X receptor agonist, GW4064, in hamsters and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Thompson, David C; Ghosh, Sarbani; Heitmeier, Monique R

    2011-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to one of the human nuclear receptor superfamilies that regulate gene transcription. FXR is widely expressed in liver, gall bladder, intestine, kidney, and adrenal glands. It serves as a key controller of bile acid homeostasis through its regulation of bile acid synthesis, conjugation, secretion, and absorption. FXR is also known to play a role in lipid regulation, triglyceride synthesis, and lipoprotein metabolism and clearance. We used a commercially available FXR agonist, GW4064, as a model compound to assess preclinical efficacy in two species (hamster and cynomolgus monkey). The crystalline GW4064, however, was found to have limited solubility, which resulted in poor oral bioavailability. This made it difficult to assess in vivo efficacy at the exposure levels desired. The physiochemical properties of GW4064 were assessed and both salt and self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) formulation were developed and tested. The SEDDS formulation was found to greatly improve the oral bioavailability of GW4064, and permitted the evaluation of FXR agonist target efficacy.

  11. Lipid profiling in sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fenfen; Wu, Xuemin; Zhao, Luyao; Liu, Xiaohui; Qi, Juanjuan; Wang, Xueying; Wang, Jiawei

    2017-03-20

    High value-added reutilization of sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is essential in sustainable development in WWTPs. However, despite the advantage of high value reutilization, this process must be based on a detailed study of organics in sludge. We used the methods employed in life sciences to determine the profile of lipids (cellular lipids, free fatty acids (FFAs), and wax/gum) in five sludge samples obtained from three typical WWTPs in Beijing; these samples include one sludge sample from a primary sedimentation tank, two activated sludge samples from two Anaerobic-Anoxic-Oxic (A2/O) tanks, and two activated sludge samples from two membrane bioreactor tanks. The percentage of total raw lipids varied from 2.90% to 12.3%. Sludge from the primary sedimentation tank showed the highest concentrations of lipid, FFA, and wax/gum and the second highest concentration of cellular lipids. All activated sludge contained an abundance of cellular lipids (>54%). Cells in sludge can from plants, animals, microbes and so on in wastewater. Approximately 14 species of cellular lipids were identified, including considerable high value-potential ceramide (9567-38774 mg/kg), coenzyme (937-3897 mg/kg), and some phosphatidylcholine (75-548 mg/kg). The presence of those lipid constituents would thus require a wider range of recovery methods for sludge. Both cellular lipids and FFAs contain an abundance of C16-C18 lipids at high saturation level, and they serve as good resources for biodiesel production.

  12. Effects of an intrathecally administered benzodiazepine receptor agonist, antagonist and inverse agonist on morphine-induced inhibition of a spinal nociceptive reflex.

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, J. L.; Pieri, L.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of an intrathecally administered benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) agonist (midazolam, up to 50 micrograms), antagonist (flumazenil, Ro 15-1788, 5 micrograms) and inverse agonist (Ro 19-4603, 15 micrograms) on nociception and on morphine-induced antinociception were studied in rats. 2. By themselves, none of these compounds significantly altered pain threshold. 3. The BZR agonist midazolam enhanced the morphine-induced antinociceptive effect whereas the antagonist flumazenil did not alter it. In contrast, the BZR inverse agonist Ro 19-4603 decreased the morphine-induced antinociceptive effect. 4. Naloxone (1 mg kg-1 i.p.) completely reversed all these effects. 5. These results demonstrate that BZR agonists and inverse agonists are able to affect, by allosteric up- or down-modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA)-receptors, the transmission of nociceptive information at the spinal cord level, when this transmission is depressed by mu-opioid receptor activation. PMID:2898960

  13. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases. A Host Lipid Screen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dianfan; Lee, Jean; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-11-30

    The default lipid for the bulk of the crystallogenesis studies performed to date using the cubic mesophase method is monoolein. There is no good reason, however, why this 18-carbon, cis-monounsaturated monoacylglycerol should be the preferred lipid for all target membrane proteins. The latter come from an array of biomembrane types with varying properties that include hydrophobic thickness, intrinsic curvature, lateral pressure profile, lipid and protein makeup, and compositional asymmetry. Thus, it seems reasonable that screening for crystallizability based on the identity of the lipid creating the hosting mesophase would be worthwhile. For this, monoacylglycerols with differing acyl chain characteristics, such as length and olefinic bond position, must be available. A lipid synthesis and purification program is in place in the author's laboratory to serve this need. In the current study with the outer membrane sugar transporter, OprB, we demonstrate the utility of host lipid screening as a means for generating diffraction-quality crystals. Host lipid screening is likely to prove a generally useful strategy for mesophase-based crystallization of membrane proteins.

  14. Characterization of the sea bass melanocortin 5 receptor: a putative role in hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, E; Rubio, V C; Cerdá-Reverter, J M

    2009-12-01

    The melanocortin 5 receptor (MC5R) plays a key role in the regulation of exocrine secretion in mammalian species. This receptor has also been characterized in some fish species but its function is unknown. We report the molecular and pharmacological characterization, as well as the tissue expression pattern, of sea bass MC5R. Cloning of five active alleles showing different levels of sensitivity to endogenous melanocortin and one non-functional allele demonstrate the allelic complexity of the MC5R locus. The sea bass receptor was activated by all the melanocortins tested, with ACTH and desacetyl-MSH and beta-MSH showing the lowest efficiency. The acetylation of the MSH isoforms seems to be critical for the effectiveness of the agonist. Agouti-related protein had no effect on basal or agonist-stimulated activation of the receptor. SbMC5R was mainly expressed in the brain but lower expression levels were found in several peripheral tissues, including liver. Progressive fasting did not induce up- or downregulation of hypothalamic MC5R expression, suggesting that central MC5R is not involved in the regulation of food intake in the sea bass. MTII, a sbMC5R agonist, stimulated hepatic lipolysis in vitro, measured as free fatty acid release into the culture medium after melanocortin agonist exposure of liver fragments, suggesting that MC5R is involved in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. Taken together, the data suggest that different allelic combinations may confer differential sensitivity to endogenous melanocortin in tissues where MC5R is expressed and, by extension, in hepatic lipid metabolism.

  15. Regulation of adiponectin receptor 1 in human hepatocytes by agonists of nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeier, Markus; Weigert, Johanna; Schaeffler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas; Kirchner, Stefan; Laberer, Sabine; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Buechler, Christa . E-mail: christa.buechler@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2005-09-02

    The adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 have been identified to mediate the insulin-sensitizing effects of adiponectin. Although AdipoR2 was suggested to be the main receptor for this adipokine in hepatocytes, AdipoR1 protein is highly abundant in primary human hepatocytes and hepatocytic cell lines. Nuclear receptors are main regulators of lipid metabolism and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} and {gamma}, retinoid X receptor (RXR), and liver X receptor (LXR) by specific ligands may influence AdipoR1 abundance. AdipoR1 protein is neither altered by RXR or LXR agonists nor by pioglitazone. In contrast, fenofibric acid reduces AdipoR1 whereas hepatotoxic troglitazone upregulates AdipoR1 protein in HepG2 cells. Taken together this work shows for the first time that AdipoR1 protein is expressed in human hepatocytes but that it is not a direct target gene of nuclear receptors. Elevated AdipoR1 induced by hepatotoxic troglitazone may indicate a role of this receptor in adiponectin-mediated beneficial effects in liver damage.

  16. The influence of insect juvenile hormone agonists on metamorphosis and reproduction in estuarine crustaceans.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Charles L

    2005-01-01

    Comparative developmental and reproductive studies were performed on several species of estuarine crustaceans in response to three juvenile hormone agonists (pyriproxyfen, methoprene and fenoxycarb). Larval development of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was greater than two orders of magnitude more sensitive to disruption by methoprene and fenoxycarb than was embryonic development. Developing larvae of the mud crab, Rhithropanopeus harrisii, exhibited reduced metamorphic success at lower concentrations of methoprene and pyriproxyfen than grass shrimp larvae. These responses suggest that the more rigidly controlled metamorphic process in crabs is more sensitive to compounds acting as endocrine disruptors than is the more flexible metamorphic pattern in shrimp. The final crab larval stage, the megalopa, was more sensitive to methoprene and fenoxycarb exposure than earlier zoeal stages. Mud crab larvae exposed to fenoxycarb had reduced biomass and lipid content, particularly triglycerides and sterols. Concentrations of fenoxycarb which reduced the reproductive capacity in single life-cycle exposures of the estuarine mysid, Americamysis bahia, were similar to those concentrations which inhibited metamorphosis in grass shrimp. Juvenile mysids released by exposed adults and reared through maturation without further exposure produced fewer young and had altered sex ratios (lower percentages of males) at lower parental-exposure concentrations than directly affected parental reproduction. These transgenerational responses may well be a product of irreversible effects during developmental exposures which become apparent following maturation and initiation of reproduction. These findings support using a functional approach as an appropriate screening procedure to evaluate potential environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals in aquatic environments.

  17. Identification of novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonists using molecular modeling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Veronica M. W.; Wong, Fiona S. L.; Ramachandran, Lalitha; Sethi, Gautam; Kumar, Alan Prem; Yap, Chun Wei

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) plays a critical role in lipid and glucose homeostasis. It is the target of many drug discovery studies, because of its role in various disease states including diabetes and cancer. Thiazolidinediones, a synthetic class of agents that work by activation of PPARγ, have been used extensively as insulin-sensitizers for the management of type 2 diabetes. In this study, a combination of QSAR and docking methods were utilised to perform virtual screening of more than 25 million compounds in the ZINC library. The QSAR model was developed using 1,517 compounds and it identified 42,378 potential PPARγ agonists from the ZINC library, and 10,000 of these were selected for docking with PPARγ based on their diversity. Several steps were used to refine the docking results, and finally 30 potentially highly active ligands were identified. Four compounds were subsequently tested for their in vitro activity, and one compound was found to have a K i values of <5 μM.

  18. Liver X receptor agonist prevents LPS-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yunhe; Tian, Yuan; Wei, Zhengkai; Liu, Hui; Song, Xiaojing; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Liver X receptor-α (LXR-α) which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a ligand-activated transcription factor. Best known for its ability to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, LXRs have recently also been implicated in regulation of inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of synthetic LXR-α agonist T0901317 on LPS-induced mastitis in mice. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. T0901317 was injected 1h before and 12h after induction of LPS intraperitoneally. The results showed that T0901317 significantly attenuated the infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes, and the activation of myeloperoxidase (MPO); down-regulated the level of pro-inflammatory mediators including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and PEG2; inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65, caused by LPS. Moreover, we report for the first time that LXR-α activation impaired LPS-induced mastitis. Taken together, these data indicated that T0901317 had protective effect on mastitis and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of T0901317 on LPS induced mastitis in mice may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB signaling pathway. LXR-α activation can be used as a therapeutic approach to treat mastitis.

  19. Effects of PPAR-γ agonist treatment on LPS-induced mastitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mingfeng, Ding; Xiaodong, Ming; Yue, Liu; Taikui, Piao; Lei, Xiao; Ming, Liu

    2014-12-01

    PPAR-γ, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, plays an important role in lipid metabolism and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of synthetic PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis in rats. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by the injection of LPS through the duct of the mammary gland. Rosiglitazone was injected 1 h before the induction of LPS intraperitoneally. The results showed that rosiglitazone attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), and the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, Western blotting showed that rosiglitazone inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65. These results indicated that rosiglitazone has a protective effect on mastitis, and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of rosiglitazone on LPS-induced mastitis in rats may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB signaling pathways. PPAR-γ may be a potential therapeutic target against mastitis.

  20. Lipid mediators in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The implications of lipid lowering drugs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy have been considered. At the same time, the clinical efficacy of lipid lowering drugs has resulted in improvement in the cardiovascular functions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with or without diabetes, but no remarkable improvement has been observed in the kidney outcome. Earlier lipid mediators have been shown to cause accumulative effects in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Here, we attempt to analyze the involvement of lipid mediators in DN. The hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of diacyglycerol (DAG) is one of the causes for the activation of protein kinase C (PKCs), which is responsible for the activation of pathways, including the production of VEGF, TGFβ1, PAI-1, NADPH oxidases, and NFҟB signaling, accelerating the development of DN. Additionally, current studies on the role of ceramide are one of the major fields of study in DN. Researchers have reported excessive ceramide formation in the pathobiological conditions of DN. There is less report on the effect of lipid lowering drugs on the reduction of PKC activation and ceramide synthesis. Regulating PKC activation and ceramide biosynthesis could be a protective measure in the therapeutic potential of DN. Lipid lowering drugs also upregulate anti-fibrotic microRNAs, which could hint at the effects of lipid lowering drugs in DN. PMID:25206927

  1. A Potent and Site-Selective Agonist of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Junichiro; Mio, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Otsuka, Shinya; Mori, Yasuo; Uesugi, Motonari

    2015-12-23

    TRPA1 is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel family that is expressed primarily on sensory neurons. This chemosensor is activated through covalent modification of multiple cysteine residues with a wide range of reactive compounds including allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), a spicy component of wasabi. The present study reports on potent and selective agonists of TRPA1, discovered through screening 1657 electrophilic molecules. In an effort to validate the mode of action of hit molecules, we noted a new TRPA1-selective agonist, JT010 (molecule 1), which opens the TRPA1 channel by covalently and site-selectively binding to Cys621 (EC50 = 0.65 nM). The results suggest that a single modification of Cys621 is sufficient to open the TRPA1 channel. The TRPA1-selective probe described herein might be useful for further mechanistic studies of TRPA1 activation.

  2. Agonist-antagonist combinations in opioid dependence: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The potential therapeutic benefits of co-administering opiate agonist and antagonist agents remain largely to be investigated. This paper focuses on the mechanisms of very low doses of naltrexone that help modulate the effects of methadone withdrawal and review pharmacological properties of the buprenorphine/naltrexone combination that support its clinical investigation. The bench-to-bedside development of the very low dose naltrexone treatment can serve as a translational paradigm to investigate and treat drug addiction. Further research on putative mechanisms elicited by the use of opioid agonist-antagonist combinations may lead to effective pharmacological alternatives to the gold standard methadone treatment, also useful for the management of the abuse of non opioid drugs and alcohol. PMID:22448305

  3. β2-Adrenoceptor agonists in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Yuri K; Cameron, Robert B; Wills, Lauren P; Trager, Richard E; Lindsey, Chris C; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2013-10-01

    The stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) via cell surface G-protein coupled receptors is a promising strategy for cell repair and regeneration. Here we report the specificity and chemical rationale of a panel of β2-adrenoceptor agonists with regards to MB. Using primary cultures of renal cells, a diverse panel of β2-adrenoceptor agonists elicited three distinct phenotypes: full MB, partial MB, and non-MB. Full MB compounds had efficacy in the low nanomolar range and represent two chemical scaffolds containing three distinct chemical clusters. Interestingly, the MB phenotype did not correlate with reported receptor affinity or chemical similarity. Chemical clusters were then subjected to pharmacophore modeling creating two models with unique and distinct features, consisting of five conserved amongst full MB compounds were identified. The two discrete pharmacophore models were coalesced into a consensus pharmacophore with four unique features elucidating the spatial and chemical characteristics required to stimulate MB.

  4. Integrating costimulatory agonists to optimize immune-based cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Angela D; Wesa, Amy K; Storkus, Walter J

    2009-03-01

    While immunotherapy for cancer has become increasingly popular, clinical benefits for such approaches remain limited. This is likely due to tumor-associated immune suppression, particularly in the advanced-disease setting. Thus, a major goal of novel immunotherapeutic design has become the coordinate reversal of existing immune dysfunction and promotion of specific tumoricidal T-cell function. Costimulatory members of the TNF-receptor family are important regulators of T-cell-mediated immunity. Notably, agonist ligation of these receptors restores potent antitumor immunity in the tumor-bearing host. Current Phase I/II evaluation of TNF-receptor agonists as single-modality therapies will illuminate their safety, mechanism(s) of action, and best use in prospective combinational immunotherapy approaches capable of yielding superior benefits to cancer patients.

  5. Integrating costimulatory agonists to optimize immune-based cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Angela D; Wesa, Amy K

    2009-01-01

    While immunotherapy for cancer has become increasingly popular, clinical benefits for such approaches remain limited. This is likely due to tumor-associated immune suppression, particularly in the advanced-disease setting. Thus, a major goal of novel immunotherapeutic design has become the coordinate reversal of existing immune dysfunction and promotion of specific tumoricidal T-cell function. Costimulatory members of the TNF-receptor family are important regulators of T-cell-mediated immunity. Notably, agonist ligation of these receptors restores potent antitumor immunity in the tumor-bearing host. Current Phase I/II evaluation of TNF-receptor agonists as single-modality therapies will illuminate their safety, mechanism(s) of action, and best use in prospective combinational immunotherapy approaches capable of yielding superior benefits to cancer patients. PMID:20046961

  6. Lipid metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Terry K.; Bütikofer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei membranes consist of all major eukaryotic glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid classes. These are de novo synthesized from precursors obtained either from the host or from catabolised endocytosed lipids. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in the molecular and biochemical characterisation of several of these lipid biosynthetic pathways, using gene knockout or RNA interference strategies or by enzymatic characterization of individual reactions. Together with the completed genome, these studies have highlighted several possible differences between mammalian and trypanosome lipid biosynthesis that could be exploited for the development of drugs against the diseases caused by these parasites. PMID:20382188

  7. Ferroptosis: Death by Lipid Peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan Seok; Stockwell, Brent R

    2016-03-01

    Ferroptosis is a regulated form of cell death driven by loss of activity of the lipid repair enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4) and subsequent accumulation of lipid-based reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly lipid hydroperoxides. This form of iron-dependent cell death is genetically, biochemically, and morphologically distinct from other cell death modalities, including apoptosis, unregulated necrosis, and necroptosis. Ferroptosis is regulated by specific pathways and is involved in diverse biological contexts. Here we summarize the discovery of ferroptosis, the mechanism of ferroptosis regulation, and its increasingly appreciated relevance to both normal and pathological physiology.

  8. Bioconcentration factors and lipid solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S. ); Baughman, G.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The log-log relationship between bioconcentration and hydrophobicity breaks down for several medium and high molecular weight solutes that bioconcentrate either to a small extent or not at all. Much of the failure is attributed to the relatively low solubility of these compounds in lipid. Inclusion of a term in octanol solubility (in place of lipid solubility, which is generally unavailable) considerably improves the quality of the relationship (r = 0.95). It is speculated that the octanol solubility term compensates for the relatively low solubility of large compounds in lipid.

  9. Lipid Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    Nonviral vectors which offer a safer and versatile alternative to viral vectors have been developed to overcome problems caused by viral carriers. However, their transfection efficacy or level of expression is substantially lower than viral vectors. Among various nonviral gene vectors, lipid nanoparticles are an ideal platform for the incorporation of safety and efficacy into a single delivery system. In this chapter, we highlight current lipidic vectors that have been developed for gene therapy of tumors and other diseases. The pharmacokinetic, toxic behaviors and clinic trials of some successful lipids particles are also presented. PMID:25409602

  10. Dopamine agonists and the suppression of impulsive motor actions in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Scott A; Claassen, Daniel O; Huizenga, Hilde M; Schewel, Kerilyn D; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Bashore, Theodore R; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M

    2012-08-01

    The suppression of spontaneous motor impulses is an essential facet of cognitive control that is linked to frontal-BG circuitry. BG dysfunction caused by Parkinson disease (PD) disrupts the proficiency of action suppression, but how pharmacotherapy for PD impacts impulsive motor control is poorly understood. Dopamine agonists improve motor symptoms of PD but can also provoke impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICB). We investigated whether dopamine agonist medication has a beneficial or detrimental effect on impulsive action control in 38 PD patients, half of whom had current ICB. Participants performed the Simon conflict task, which measures susceptibility to acting on spontaneous action impulses as well as the proficiency of suppressing these impulses. Compared with an off-agonist state, patients on their agonists were no more susceptible to reacting impulsively but were less proficient at suppressing the interference from the activation of impulsive actions. Importantly, agonist effects depended on baseline performance in the off-agonist state; more proficient suppressors off agonist experienced a reduction in suppression on agonist, whereas less-proficient suppressors off agonist showed improved suppression on agonist. Patients with active ICB were actually less susceptible to making fast, impulsive response errors than patients without ICB, suggesting that behavioral problems in this subset of patients may be less related to impulsivity in motor control. Our findings provide further evidence that dopamine agonist medication impacts specific cognitive control processes and that the direction of its effects depends on individual differences in performance off medication.

  11. Improving the developability profile of pyrrolidine progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Kallander, Lara S.; Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Frazee, James S.; Stoy, Patrick; Johnson, Latisha; Lu, Qing; Hammond, Marlys; Barton, Linda S.; Patterson, Jaclyn R.; Azzarano, Leonard M.; Nagilla, Rakesh; Madauss, Kevin P.; Williams, Shawn P.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Duraiswami, Chaya; Grygielko, Eugene T.; Xu, Xiaoping; Laping, Nicholas J.; Bray, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Scott K.

    2010-09-17

    The previously reported pyrrolidine class of progesterone receptor partial agonists demonstrated excellent potency but suffered from serious liabilities including hERG blockade and high volume of distribution in the rat. The basic pyrrolidine amine was intentionally converted to a sulfonamide, carbamate, or amide to address these liabilities. The evaluation of the degree of partial agonism for these non-basic pyrrolidine derivatives and demonstration of their efficacy in an in vivo model of endometriosis is disclosed herein.

  12. Newspapers and newspaper ink contain agonists for the ah receptor.

    PubMed

    Bohonowych, Jessica E S; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T; Denison, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed.

  13. Newspapers and Newspaper Ink Contain Agonists for the Ah Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bohonowych, Jessica E. S.; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [3H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  14. Antipsychotic Induced Symptomatic Hyperprolactinemia: Are Dopamine Agonists Safe?

    PubMed

    Lertxundi, Unax; Domingo-Echaburu, Saioa; Peral, Javier; García, Montserrat

    2011-09-15

    Published literature shows that dopamine agonists can reverse antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia without worsening psychotic symptoms in the majority of schizophrenic patients. However, psychiatrists have been reluctant to use drugs with dopaminergic properties for fear of exacerbating psychiatric symptoms. There are reported cases of psychosis worsening published for both cabergoline and bromocriptine. Cabergoline has proven to be more effective and safe when used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but whether cabergoline is also safer than bromocriptine in antipsychotic induced hyperprolactinemia remains unproven.

  15. Antipsychotic Induced Symptomatic Hyperprolactinemia: Are Dopamine Agonists Safe?

    PubMed Central

    Lertxundi, Unax; Domingo-Echaburu, Saioa; Peral, Javier; García, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Published literature shows that dopamine agonists can reverse antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia without worsening psychotic symptoms in the majority of schizophrenic patients. However, psychiatrists have been reluctant to use drugs with dopaminergic properties for fear of exacerbating psychiatric symptoms. There are reported cases of psychosis worsening published for both cabergoline and bromocriptine. Cabergoline has proven to be more effective and safe when used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but whether cabergoline is also safer than bromocriptine in antipsychotic induced hyperprolactinemia remains unproven. PMID:27738363

  16. Angiotensin receptor agonistic autoantibodies and hypertension: preeclampsia and beyond.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Kellems, Rodney E

    2013-06-21

    Hypertensive disorders are life-threatening diseases with high morbidity and mortality, affecting billions of individuals worldwide. A multitude of underlying conditions may contribute to hypertension, thus the need for a plethora of treatment options to identify the approach that best meets the needs of individual patients. A growing body of evidence indicates that (1) autoantibodies that bind to and activate the major angiotensin II type I (AT₁) receptor exist in the circulation of patients with hypertensive disorders, (2) these autoantibodies contribute to disease pathophysiology, (3) antibody titers correlate to the severity of the disease, and (4) efforts to block or remove these pathogenic autoantibodies have therapeutic potential. These autoantibodies, termed AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies have been extensively characterized in preeclampsia, a life-threatening hypertensive condition of pregnancy. As reviewed here, these autoantibodies cause symptoms of preeclampsia when injected into pregnant mice. Somewhat surprisingly, these auto antibodies also appear in 3 animal models of preeclampsia. However, the occurrence of AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies is not restricted to pregnancy. These autoantibodies are prevalent among kidney transplant recipients who develop severe transplant rejection and malignant hypertension during the first week after transplantation. AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies are also highly abundant among a group of patients with essential hypertension that are refractory to standard therapy. More recently these autoantibodies have been seen in patients with the autoimmune disease, systemic sclerosis. These 3 examples extend the clinical impact of AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies beyond pregnancy. Research reviewed here raises the intriguing possibility that preeclampsia and other hypertensive conditions are autoimmune diseases characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies that activate the major angiotensin receptor, AT₁. These

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors agonists (GLP1 RA).

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2013-10-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors agonists (GLP1RA) are a relatively new class of drugs, used for management of type 2 diabetes. This review studies the characteristics of these drugs, focusing upon their mechanism of action, intra-class differences, and utility in clinical practice. It compares them with other incretin based therapies, the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors, and predicts future developments in the use of these molecules, while highlighting the robust indications for the use of these drugs.

  18. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  19. Dehydroepiandrosterone Derivatives as Potent Antiandrogens with Marginal Agonist Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    or 9), although these compounds still showed anti-DHT effects (lanes 2 vs. 6, 8, or 10). Figure 4 . The effects of DHEA derivatives on PSA...2009 - 30 JUN 2010 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dehydroepiandrosterone Derivatives as Potent Antiandrogens 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER with Marginal Agonist...words) We hypothesized that dehydroepiandrosterone ( DHEA ) metabolites or their synthetic derivatives are able to bind to the androgen receptor with

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of antagonist and agonist interactions with dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Duarte, E P; Oliveira, C R; Carvalho, A P

    1988-03-01

    The binding of [3H]spiperone to dopamine D-2 receptors and its inhibition by antagonists and agonists were examined in microsomes derived from the sheep caudate nucleus, at temperatures between 37 and 1 degree C, and the thermodynamic parameters of the binding were evaluated. The affinity of the receptor for the antagonists, spiperone and (+)-butaclamol, decreased as the incubation temperature decreased; the affinity for haloperidol did not further decrease at temperatures below 15 degrees C. The binding of the antagonists was associated with very large increases in entropy, as expected for hydrophobic interactions. The enthalpy and entropy changes associated with haloperidol binding were dependent on temperature, in contrast to those associated with spiperone and (+)-butaclamol. The magnitude of the entropy increase associated with the specific binding of the antagonists did not correlate with the degree of lipophilicity of these drugs. The data suggest that, in addition to hydrophobic forces, other forces are also involved in the antagonist-dopamine receptor interactions, and that a conformational change of the receptor could occur when the antagonist binds. Agonist binding data are consistent with a two-state model of the receptor, a high-affinity state (RH) and a low-affinity state (RL). The affinity of dopamine binding to the RH decreased with decreasing temperatures below 20 degrees C, whereas the affinity for the RL increased at low temperatures. In contrast, the affinity of apomorphine for both states of receptor decreased as the temperature decreased from 30 to 8 degrees C. A clear distinction between the energetics of high-affinity and low-affinity agonist binding was observed. The formation of the high-affinity complex was associated with larger increases in enthalpy and entropy than the interaction with the low-affinity state was. The results suggest that the interaction of the receptor with the G-proteins, induced or stabilized by the binding of

  1. Squalene emulsion potentiates the adjuvant activity of the TLR4 agonist, GLA, via inflammatory caspases, IL-18, and IFN-γ.

    PubMed

    Desbien, Anthony L; Reed, Steven J; Bailor, Hilton R; Dubois Cauwelaert, Natasha; Laurance, John D; Orr, Mark T; Fox, Christopher B; Carter, Darrick; Reed, Steven G; Duthie, Malcolm S

    2015-02-01

    The synthetic TLR4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant (GLA) is a potent Th1-response-inducing adjuvant when formulated in a squalene oil-in-water emulsion (SE). While the innate signals triggered by TLR4 engagement are well studied, the contribution of SE remains unclear. To better understand the effect of SE on the adjuvant properties of GLA-SE, we compared the innate and adaptive immune responses elicited by immunization with different formulations: GLA without oil, SE alone or the combination, GLA-SE, in mice. Within the innate response to adjuvants, only GLA-SE displayed features of inflammasome activation, evidenced by early IL-18 secretion and IFN-γ production in memory CD8(+) T cells and neutrophils. Such early IFN-γ production was ablated in caspase-1/11(-/-) mice and in IL-18R1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, caspase-1/11 and IL-18 were also required for full Th1 CD4(+) T-cell induction via GLA-SE. Thus, we demonstrate that IL-18 and caspase-1/11 are components of the response to immunization with the TLR4 agonist/squalene oil-in-water based adjuvant, GLA-SE, providing implications for other adjuvants that combine oils with TLR agonists.

  2. Hybrid lipid-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayani, Yasaman

    Biological membranes serve several important roles, such as structural support of cells and organelles, regulation of ionic and molecular transport, barriers to non-mediated transport, contact between cells within tissues, and accommodation of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins and other vital biomolecules incorporated into the membrane need a lipid membrane to function. Due to importance of lipid bilayers and their vital function in governing many processes in the cell, the development of various models as artificial lipid membranes that can mimic cell membranes has become a subject of great interest. Using different models of artificial lipid membranes, such as liposomes, planar lipid bilayers and supported or tethered lipid bilayers, we are able to study many biophysical processes in biological membranes. The ability of different molecules to interact with and change the structure of lipid membranes can be also investigated in artificial lipid membranes. An important application of lipid bilayer-containing interfaces is characterization of novel membrane proteins for high throughput drug screening studies to investigate receptor-drug interactions and develop biosensor systems. Membrane proteins need a lipid bilayer environment to preserve their stability and functionality. Fabrication of materials that can interact with biomolecules like proteins necessitates the use of lipid bilayers as a mimic of cell membranes. The objective of this research is to develop novel hybrid lipid-based nanostructures mimicking biological membranes. Toward this aim, two hybrid biocompatible structures are introduced: lipid bilayer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and hydrogel-anchored liposomes with double-stranded DNA anchors. These structures have potential applications in biosensing, drug targeting, drug delivery, and biophysical studies of cell membranes. In the first developed nanostructure, lipid molecules are covalently attached to the surfaces of MWCNTs, and

  3. Neuroprotective effects mediated by dopamine receptor agonists against malonate-induced lesion in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Fancellu, R; Armentero, M-T; Nappi, G; Blandini, F

    2003-10-01

    In rats, intrastriatal injection of malonate, a reversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, induces a lesion similar to that observed following focal ischemia or in Huntington's disease. In this study we used the malonate model to explore the neuroprotective potential of dopamine agonists. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with increasing concentrations of D1, D2, or mixed D1/D2 dopamine agonists prior to intrastriatal injection of malonate. Administration of increasing doses of the D2-specific agonist quinpirole resulted in increased protection against malonate toxicity. Conversely, the D1-specific agonist SKF-38393, as well as the mixed D1/D2 agonist apomorphine, conferred higher neuroprotection at lower than at higher drug concentrations. Our data suggest that malonate- induced striatal toxicity can be attenuated by systemic administration of dopamine agonists, with D1 and D2 agonists showing different profiles of efficacy.

  4. Dietary lipids and cancer.

    PubMed

    Granados, S; Quiles, J L; Gil, A; Ramírez-Tortosa, M C

    2006-05-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes of death in Western countries. Among the factors that contribute to the appearance of this disease, diet has a fundamental role, and specifically fats are the main component related to the increase in the incidence of cancerous diseases, particularly breast, colon-rectal, and prostate cancer. From dietary lipids, much attention has been given to the beneficial effects of fish oil, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids n-3 serie, as well as of olive oil, rich in monounsaturated fatty acids--primarily oleic acid. On the contrary, a negative effect has been reported for polyunsaturated fatty acids n-6 serie and for saturated fatty acids. Nutrition constitutes an important aspect of the life of cancer patients. Currently, nutritional formulas are being designed with supplements of polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids and other components such as arginine, RNA, lysine, etc., with the aim of ameliorating the effects of this pathology. The results demonstrate the lower morbility and therefore improved quality of life, a decline in mortality, and a reduction in related costs.

  5. Lipid A structural modifications in extreme conditions and identification of unique modifying enzymes to define the Toll-like receptor 4 structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alison J; Oyler, Benjamin L; Goodlett, David R; Ernst, Robert K

    2017-01-17

    Strategies utilizing Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonists for treatment of cancer, infectious diseases, and other targets report promising results. Potent TLR4 antagonists are also gaining attention as therapeutic leads. Though some principles for TLR4 modulation by lipid A have been described, a thorough understanding of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) is lacking. Only through a complete definition of lipid A-TLR4 SAR is it possible to predict TLR4 signaling effects of discrete lipid A structures, rendering them more pharmacologically relevant. A limited 'toolbox' of lipid A-modifying enzymes has been defined and is largely composed of enzymes from mesophile human and zoonotic pathogens. Expansion of this 'toolbox' will result from extending the search into lipid A biosynthesis and modification by bacteria living at the extremes. Here, we review the fundamentals of lipid A structure, advances in lipid A uses in TLR4 modulation, and the search for novel lipid A-modifying systems in extremophile bacteria. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop.

  6. Emerging strategies for exploiting cannabinoid receptor agonists as medicines.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2009-02-01

    Medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptor are already in the clinic. These are Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) and Sativex (Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol with cannabidiol). The first two of these medicines can be prescribed to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Marinol can also be prescribed to stimulate appetite, while Sativex is prescribed for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in adults with multiple sclerosis and as an adjunctive analgesic treatment for adult patients with advanced cancer. One challenge now is to identify additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a number of potential clinical applications for such agonists are mentioned in this review. A second challenge is to develop strategies that will improve the efficacy and/or the benefit-to-risk ratio of a cannabinoid receptor agonist. This review focuses on five strategies that have the potential to meet either or both of these objectives. These are strategies that involve: (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier; (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue; (iii) targeting up-regulated cannabinoid receptors; (iv) targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors; or (v) 'multi-targeting'. Preclinical data that justify additional research directed at evaluating the clinical importance of each of these strategies are also discussed.

  7. Contact- and agonist-regulated microvesiculation of human platelets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Li; Zaske, Ana-Maria; Zhou, Zhou; Fu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Xi; Conyers, Jodie L; Li, Min; Dong, Jing-fei; Zhang, Jianning

    2013-08-01

    After exposure to an agonist, platelets are activated and become aggregated. They also shed membrane microparticles that participate in the pathogenesis of thrombosis, hyper-coagulation and inflammation. However, microvesiculation can potentially disrupt the integrity of platelet aggregation by shedding the membrane receptors and phosphatidylserine critical for forming and stabilising a platelet clot. We tested the hypothesis that adhesion and microvesiculation are functions of different subsets of platelets at the time of haemostasis by real-time monitoring of agonist-induced morphological changes and microvesiculation of human platelets.We identified two types of platelets that are adherent to fibrinogen: a high density bubble shape (HDBS) and low-density spread shape (LDSS). Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) predominantly induced HDBS platelets to vesiculate, whereas LDSS platelets were highly resistant to such vesiculation. Thrombin-receptor activating peptide (TRAP) stabilised platelets against microvesiculation by promoting a rapid HDBS-to-LDSS morphological transition. These activities of ADP and TRAP were reversed for platelets in suspension, independent of an engagement integrin αIIbβ3. As the result of membrane contact, LDSS platelets inhibited the microvesiculation of HDBS platelets in response to ADP. Aspirin and clopidogrel inhibited ADP-induced microvesiculation through different mechanisms. These results suggest that platelet aggregation and microvesiculation occur in different subsets of platelets and are differently regulated by agonists, platelet-platelets and platelet-fibrinogen interactions.

  8. Pharmacophore-driven identification of PPARγ agonists from natural sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Rasmus K.; Christensen, Kathrine B.; Assimopoulou, Andreana N.; Fretté, Xavier; Papageorgiou, Vassilios P.; Kristiansen, Karsten; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene

    2011-02-01

    In a search for more effective and safe anti-diabetic compounds, we developed a pharmacophore model based on partial agonists of PPARγ. The model was used for the virtual screening of the Chinese Natural Product Database (CNPD), a library of plant-derived natural products primarily used in folk medicine. From the resulting hits, we selected methyl oleanonate, a compound found, among others, in Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia oleoresin (Chios mastic gum). The acid of methyl oleanonate, oleanonic acid, was identified as a PPARγ agonist through bioassay-guided chromatographic fractionations of Chios mastic gum fractions, whereas some other sub-fractions exhibited also biological activity towards PPARγ. The results from the present work are two-fold: on the one hand we demonstrate that the pharmacophore model we developed is able to select novel ligand scaffolds that act as PPARγ agonists; while at the same time it manifests that natural products are highly relevant for use in virtual screening-based drug discovery.

  9. Emerging strategies for exploiting cannabinoid receptor agonists as medicines

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2009-01-01

    Medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor are already in the clinic. These are Cesamet® (nabilone), Marinol® (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol) and Sativex® (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol with cannabidiol). The first two of these medicines can be prescribed to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Marinol® can also be prescribed to stimulate appetite, while Sativex® is prescribed for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in adults with multiple sclerosis and as an adjunctive analgesic treatment for adult patients with advanced cancer. One challenge now is to identify additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a number of potential clinical applications for such agonists are mentioned in this review. A second challenge is to develop strategies that will improve the efficacy and/or the benefit-to-risk ratio of a cannabinoid receptor agonist. This review focuses on five strategies that have the potential to meet either or both of these objectives. These are strategies that involve: (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier; (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue; (iii) targeting up-regulated cannabinoid receptors; (iv) targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors; or (v) ‘multi-targeting’. Preclinical data that justify additional research directed at evaluating the clinical importance of each of these strategies are also discussed. PMID:19226257

  10. LHRH Agonists for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: 2012

    PubMed Central

    Lepor, Herbert; Shore, Neal D

    2012-01-01

    The most recent guidelines on prostate cancer screening from the American Urological Association (2009), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (2011), and the European Association of Urology (2011), as well as treatment and advances in disease monitoring, have increased the androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) population and the duration of ADT usage as the first-line treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. According to the European Association of Urology, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists have become the leading therapeutic option for ADT because they avoid the physical and psychological discomforts associated with orchiectomy. However, GnRH agonists display several shortcomings, including testosterone (T) surge (“clinical flare”) and microsurges. T surge delays the intended serologic endpoint of T suppression and may exacerbate clinical symptoms. Furthermore, ADT manifests an adverse-event spectrum that can impact quality of life with its attendant well-documented morbidities. Strategies to improve ADT tolerability include a holistic management approach, improved diet and exercise, and more specific monitoring to detect and prevent T depletion toxicities. Intermittent ADT, which allows hormonal recovery between treatment periods, has become increasingly utilized as a methodology for improving quality of life while not diminishing chronic ADT efficacy, and may also provide healthcare cost savings. This review assesses the present and potential future role of GnRH agonists in prostate cancer and explores strategies to minimize the adverse-event profile for patients receiving ADT. PMID:23172994

  11. Covalent agonists for studying G protein-coupled receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Weichert, Dietmar; Kruse, Andrew C.; Manglik, Aashish; Hiller, Christine; Zhang, Cheng; Hübner, Harald; Kobilka, Brian K.; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provide important insights into the architecture and function of these important drug targets. However, the crystallization of GPCRs in active states is particularly challenging, requiring the formation of stable and conformationally homogeneous ligand-receptor complexes. Native hormones, neurotransmitters, and synthetic agonists that bind with low affinity are ineffective at stabilizing an active state for crystallogenesis. To promote structural studies on the pharmacologically highly relevant class of aminergic GPCRs, we here present the development of covalently binding molecular tools activating Gs-, Gi-, and Gq-coupled receptors. The covalent agonists are derived from the monoamine neurotransmitters noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, and histamine, and they were accessed using a general and versatile synthetic strategy. We demonstrate that the tool compounds presented herein display an efficient covalent binding mode and that the respective covalent ligand-receptor complexes activate G proteins comparable to the natural neurotransmitters. A crystal structure of the β2-adrenoreceptor in complex with a covalent noradrenaline analog and a conformationally selective antibody (nanobody) verified that these agonists can be used to facilitate crystallogenesis. PMID:25006259

  12. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes.

  13. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  14. TLR agonists: our best frenemy in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaczanowska, Sabina; Joseph, Ann Mary; Davila, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Various TLR agonists are currently under investigation in clinical trials for their ability to orchestrate antitumor immunity. The antitumor responses are largely attributed to their aptitude to stimulate APCs such as DCs which in turn, activate tumor-specific T cell responses. However, there is a potential for TLR signaling to occur on cells other than professional APCs that could negate antitumor responses or even worse, promote tumor growth. The impetus for this review is twofold. First, there is accumulating data demonstrating that the engagement of TLRs on different T cell subsets and different cancer types could promote tumor growth or conversely, contribute to antitumor responses. Second, the efficacy of TLR agonists as monotherapies to treat cancer patients has been limited. In this review, we discuss how TLR signaling within different T cell subsets and cancer cells can potentially impact the generation of antitumor responses. Based on evidence from preclinical models and clinical trials, we draw attention to several criteria that we believe must be considered when selecting TLR agonists for developing effective immunotherapeutic strategies against cancer. PMID:23475577

  15. LHRH Agonists for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: 2012.

    PubMed

    Lepor, Herbert; Shore, Neal D

    2012-01-01

    The most recent guidelines on prostate cancer screening from the American Urological Association (2009), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (2011), and the European Association of Urology (2011), as well as treatment and advances in disease monitoring, have increased the androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) population and the duration of ADT usage as the first-line treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. According to the European Association of Urology, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists have become the leading therapeutic option for ADT because they avoid the physical and psychological discomforts associated with orchiectomy. However, GnRH agonists display several shortcomings, including testosterone (T) surge ("clinical flare") and microsurges. T surge delays the intended serologic endpoint of T suppression and may exacerbate clinical symptoms. Furthermore, ADT manifests an adverse-event spectrum that can impact quality of life with its attendant well-documented morbidities. Strategies to improve ADT tolerability include a holistic management approach, improved diet and exercise, and more specific monitoring to detect and prevent T depletion toxicities. Intermittent ADT, which allows hormonal recovery between treatment periods, has become increasingly utilized as a methodology for improving quality of life while not diminishing chronic ADT efficacy, and may also provide healthcare cost savings. This review assesses the present and potential future role of GnRH agonists in prostate cancer and explores strategies to minimize the adverse-event profile for patients receiving ADT.

  16. Pregnane X receptor agonists impair postprandial glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rysä, J; Buler, M; Savolainen, M J; Ruskoaho, H; Hakkola, J; Hukkanen, J

    2013-06-01

    We conducted a randomized, open, placebo-controlled crossover trial to investigate the effects of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonist rifampin on an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 12 healthy volunteers. The subjects were administered 600 mg rifampin or placebo once daily for 7 days, and OGTT was performed on the eighth day. The mean incremental glucose and insulin areas under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC(incr)) increased by 192% (P = 0.008) and 45% (P = 0.031), respectively. The fasting glucose, insulin, and C-peptide, and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, were not affected. The glucose AUC(incr) during OGTT was significantly increased in rats after 4-day treatment with pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN), an agonist of the rat PXR. The hepatic level of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) mRNA was downregulated by PCN. In conclusion, both human and rat PXR agonists elicited postprandial hyperglycemia, suggesting a detrimental role of PXR activation on glucose tolerance.

  17. Beta2-Agonist Doping Control and Optical Isomer Challenges.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Glenn A; Fawcett, J Paul

    2016-12-01

    The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) currently allows therapeutic use of the beta2-agonists salbutamol, formoterol and salmeterol when delivered via inhalation despite some evidence suggesting these anti-asthma drugs may be performance enhancing. Beta2-agonists are usually administered as 50:50 racemic mixtures of two enantiomers (non-superimposable mirror images), one of which demonstrates significant beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated bronchodilation while the other appears to have little or no pharmacological activity. For salbutamol and formoterol, urine thresholds have been adopted to limit supratherapeutic dosing and to discriminate between inhaled (permitted) and oral (prohibited) use. However, chiral switches have led to the availability of enantiopure (active enantiomer only) preparations of salbutamol and formoterol, which effectively doubles their urine thresholds and provides a means for athletes to take supratherapeutic doses for doping purposes. Given the availability of these enantiopure beta2-agonists, the analysis of these drugs using enantioselective assays should now become routine. For salmeterol, there is currently only a therapeutic dose threshold and adoption of a urinary threshold should be a high priority for doping control.

  18. Effects of coumestrol on lipid and glucose metabolism as a farnesoid X receptor ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Miki; Kanayama, Tomohiko; Yashiro, Takuya; Kondo, Hidehiko; Murase, Takatoshi; Hase, Tadashi; Tokimitsu, Ichiro; Nishikawa, Jun-ichi; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2008-08-01

    In the course of an effort to identify novel agonists of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), coumestrol was determined to be one such ligand. Reporter and in vitro coactivator interaction assays revealed that coumestrol bound and activated FXR. Treatment of Hep G2 cells with coumestrol stimulated the expression of FXR target genes, thereby regulating the expression of target genes of the liver X receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factor-4{alpha}. Through these actions, coumestrol is expected to exert beneficial effects on lipid and glucose metabolism.

  19. Mechanisms of incretin effects on plasma lipids and implications for the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Lewis, Gary F

    2012-12-01

    Dyslipidemia is a prominent feature of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance that contributes to increased atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks under these conditions. Incretin-based therapies (GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors) have recently been developed and are approved for clinical use for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Besides improved glycemic control, other benefits are being increasingly appreciated, one of which is improved plasma lipid profile. This review aims to summarize the evidence and potential mechanism of such agents in humans in modulating fasting and postprandial lipoprotein metabolism.

  20. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R.; Harroun, Thad A.; Katsaras, John

    2016-04-04

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown – at least in some bilayers – to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in the vicinity of the lipid–water interface. In this study we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies.

  1. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R.; ...

    2016-04-04

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown – at least in some bilayers – to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in themore » vicinity of the lipid–water interface. In this study we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies.« less

  2. Electronic polymers in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Patrik K; Jullesson, David; Elfwing, Anders; Liin, Sara I; Musumeci, Chiara; Zeglio, Erica; Elinder, Fredrik; Solin, Niclas; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-06-10

    Electrical interfaces between biological cells and man-made electrical devices exist in many forms, but it remains a challenge to bridge the different mechanical and chemical environments of electronic conductors (metals, semiconductors) and biosystems. Here we demonstrate soft electrical interfaces, by integrating the metallic polymer PEDOT-S into lipid membranes. By preparing complexes between alkyl-ammonium salts and PEDOT-S we were able to integrate PEDOT-S into both liposomes and in lipid bilayers on solid surfaces. This is a step towards efficient electronic conduction within lipid membranes. We also demonstrate that the PEDOT-S@alkyl-ammonium:lipid hybrid structures created in this work affect ion channels in the membrane of Xenopus oocytes, which shows the possibility to access and control cell membrane structures with conductive polyelectrolytes.

  3. The β2-adrenoceptor agonist formoterol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wills, Lauren P; Trager, Richard E; Beeson, Gyda C; Lindsey, Christopher C; Peterson, Yuri K; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2012-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common mediator of disease and organ injury. Although recent studies show that inducing mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) stimulates cell repair and regeneration, only a limited number of chemicals are known to induce MB. To examine the impact of the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) signaling pathway on MB, primary renal proximal tubule cells (RPTC) and adult feline cardiomyocytes were exposed for 24 h to multiple β-AR agonists: isoproterenol (nonselective β-AR agonist), (±)-(R*,R*)-[4-[2-[[2-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amino]propyl]phenoxy] acetic acid sodium hydrate (BRL 37344) (selective β(3)-AR agonist), and formoterol (selective β(2)-AR agonist). The Seahorse Biosciences (North Billerica, MA) extracellular flux analyzer was used to quantify carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP)-uncoupled oxygen consumption rate (OCR), a marker of maximal electron transport chain activity. Isoproterenol and BRL 37244 did not alter mitochondrial respiration at any of the concentrations examined. Formoterol exposure resulted in increases in both FCCP-uncoupled OCR and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number. The effect of formoterol on OCR in RPTC was inhibited by the β-AR antagonist propranolol and the β(2)-AR inverse agonist 3-(isopropylamino)-1-[(7-methyl-4-indanyl)oxy]butan-2-ol hydrochloride (ICI-118,551). Mice exposed to formoterol for 24 or 72 h exhibited increases in kidney and heart mtDNA copy number, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α, and multiple genes involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain (F0 subunit 6 of transmembrane F-type ATP synthase, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6, and NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] 1β subcomplex subunit 8). Cheminformatic modeling, virtual chemical library screening, and experimental validation identified nisoxetine from the Sigma Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds and two compounds from the ChemBridge DIVERSet

  4. Different skeletal effects of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α agonist fenofibrate and the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Syversen, Unni; Stunes, Astrid K; Gustafsson, Björn I; Obrant, Karl J; Nordsletten, Lars; Berge, Rolf; Thommesen, Liv; Reseland, Janne E

    2009-01-01

    Background All the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are found to be expressed in bone cells. The PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone has been shown to decrease bone mass in mice and thiazolidinediones (TZDs) have recently been found to increase bone loss and fracture risk in humans treated for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of the PPARα agonist fenofibrate (FENO) and the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone (PIO) on bone in intact female rats. Methods Rats were given methylcellulose (vehicle), fenofibrate or pioglitazone (35 mg/kg body weight/day) by gavage for 4 months. BMC, BMD, and body composition were measured by DXA. Histomorphometry and biomechanical testing of excised femurs were performed. Effects of the compounds on bone cells were studied. Results The FENO group had higher femoral BMD and smaller medullary area at the distal femur; while trabecular bone volume was similar to controls. Whole body BMD, BMC, and trabecular bone volume were lower, while medullary area was increased in PIO rats compared to controls. Ultimate bending moment and energy absorption of the femoral shafts were reduced in the PIO group, while similar to controls in the FENO group. Plasma osteocalcin was higher in the FENO group than in the other groups. FENO stimulated proliferation and differentiation of, and OPG release from, the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. Conclusion We show opposite skeletal effects of PPARα and γ agonists in intact female rats. FENO resulted in significantly higher femoral BMD and lower medullary area, while PIO induced bone loss and impairment of the mechanical strength. This represents a novel effect of PPARα activation. PMID:19331671

  5. Superagonist, Full Agonist, Partial Agonist, and Antagonist Actions of Arylguanidines at 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) Subunit A Receptors.

    PubMed

    Alix, Katie; Khatri, Shailesh; Mosier, Philip D; Casterlow, Samantha; Yan, Dong; Nyce, Heather L; White, Michael M; Schulte, Marvin K; Dukat, Małgorzata

    2016-11-16

    Introduction of minor variations to the substitution pattern of arylguanidine 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor ligands resulted in a broad spectrum of functionally-active ligands from antagonist to superagonist. For example, (i) introduction of an additional Cl-substituent(s) to our lead full agonist N-(3-chlorophenyl)guanidine (mCPG, 2; efficacy % = 106) yielded superagonists 7-9 (efficacy % = 186, 139, and 129, respectively), (ii) a positional isomer of 2, p-Cl analog 11, displayed partial agonist actions (efficacy % = 12), and (iii) replacing the halogen atom at the meta or para position with an electron donating OCH3 group or a stronger electron withdrawing (i.e., CF3) group resulted in antagonists 13-16. We posit based on combined mutagenesis, crystallographic, and computational analyses that for the 5-HT3 receptor, the arylguanidines that are better able to simultaneously engage the primary and complementary subunits, thus keeping them in close proximity, have greater agonist character while those that are deficient in this ability are antagonists.

  6. CtBP1/BARS is an activator of phospholipase D1 necessary for agonist-induced macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yuki; Miwa, Noriko; Jahangeer, Saleem; Okada, Taro; Nakamura, Shun-ichi

    2009-05-06

    Vesicular trafficking such as macropinocytosis is a dynamic process that requires coordinated interactions between specialized proteins and lipids. A recent report suggests the involvement of CtBP1/BARS in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced macropinocytosis. Detailed mechanisms as to how lipid remodelling is regulated during macropinocytosis are still undefined. Here, we show that CtBP1/BARS is a physiological activator of PLD1 required in agonist-induced macropinocytosis. EGF-induced macropinocytosis was specifically blocked by 1-butanol but not by 2-butanol. In addition, stimulation of cells by serum or EGF resulted in the association of CtBP1/BARS with PLD1. Finally, CtBP1/BARS activated PLD1 in a synergistic manner with other PLD activators, including ADP-ribosylation factors as demonstrated by in vitro and intact cell systems. The present results shed light on the molecular basis of how the 'fission protein' CtBP1/BARS controls vesicular trafficking events including macropinocytosis.

  7. Lipid disorders in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R B

    1981-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is common in diabetic patients. While our understanding of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in diabetes is incomplete, a pathophysiologic approach to this problem is presented. It is based on the recognition that diabetes is metabolically heterogeneous. Thus the roles of insulin deficiency, insulin resistance, obesity, and genetic factors are discussed in relation to their effects on lipoprotein production and catabolism. The most important defect in insulin-deficient subjects appears to be a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase, which is responsible for the removal of the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. In non-insulin-dependent subjects there is evidence for a removal defect as well as, in some patients, for overproduction of VLDL-triglyceride. Cholesterol levels may be elevated and it is important to distinguish between VLDL, LDL, and HDL as the causes for these increases. HDL-cholesterol levels may be increased in insulin-dependent subjects, whereas they may be decreased in obese non-insulin-dependent patients. Mild elevations of LDL-cholesterol may occur in inadequately controlled type I and II diabetic patients, while elevated VLDL may raise the serum cholesterol in addition to the triglyceride levels. The rationale for therapy is based on the complications of severe hypertriglyceridemia and the risk of occlusive atherosclerosis. Management is directed at improving glycemic control, altering dietary composition, and reducing calories in obese patients. Improved glycemic control is effective in reducing triglyceride and cholesterol levels in insulin-deficient subjects. The response of the non-insulin-dependent diabetic patient to improved control may be complicated by associated obesity or familial hyperlipidemia. The advantages and disadvantages of fat versus carbohydrate restriction in the diet are discussed. Finally, resistant hyperlipidemia may require drug therapy. Diabetic hyperlipidemia should be viewed as resulting from an interaction between

  8. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Dustin; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen; Hargreaves, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids . Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain.

  9. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical and thermal allodynia after burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Green, Dustin P; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids. Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain. PMID:27411353

  10. Virtual screening of CB(2) receptor agonists from bayesian network and high-throughput docking: structural insights into agonist-modulated GPCR features.

    PubMed

    Renault, Nicolas; Laurent, Xavier; Farce, Amaury; El Bakali, Jamal; Mansouri, Roxane; Gervois, Philippe; Millet, Régis; Desreumaux, Pierre; Furman, Christophe; Chavatte, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    The relevance of CB(2)-mediated therapeutics is well established in the treatment of pain, neurodegenerative and gastrointestinal tract disorders. Recent works such as the crystallization of class-A G-protein-coupled receptors in a range of active states and the identification of specific anchoring sites for CB(2) agonists challenged us to design a reliable agonist-bound homology model of CB(2) receptor. Docking-scoring enrichment tests of a high-throughput virtual screening of 140 compounds led to 13 hits within the micromolar affinity range. Most of these hits behaved as CB(2) agonists, among which two novel full agonists emerged. Although the main challenge was a high-throughput docking run targeting an agonist-bound state of a CB(2) model, a prior 2D ligand-based Bayesian network was computed to enrich the input commercial library for 3D screening. The exclusive discovery of agonists illustrates the reliability of this agonist-bound state model for the identification of polar and aromatic amino acids as new agonist-modulated CB(2) features to be integrated in the wide activation pathway of G-protein-coupled receptors.

  11. NMR spectroscopy for evaluation of lipid oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During storage and use of edible oils and other lipid-containing foods, reactions between lipids and oxygen occur, resulting in lipid oxidation and the subsequent development of off-flavors and odors. Accurate and timely assessment of lipid oxidation is critical for effective quality control of food...

  12. Small cationic DDA:TDB liposomes as protein vaccine adjuvants obviate the need for TLR agonists in inducing cellular and humoral responses.

    PubMed

    Milicic, Anita; Kaur, Randip; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Tang, Choon-Kit; Honeycutt, Jared; Perrie, Yvonne; Hill, Adrian V S

    2012-01-01

    Most subunit vaccines require adjuvants in order to induce protective immune responses to the targeted pathogen. However, many of the potent immunogenic adjuvants display unacceptable local or systemic reactogenicity. Liposomes are spherical vesicles consisting of single (unilamellar) or multiple (multilamellar) phospholipid bi-layers. The lipid membranes are interleaved with an aqueous buffer, which can be utilised to deliver hydrophilic vaccine components, such as protein antigens or ligands for immune receptors. Liposomes, in particular cationic DDA:TDB vesicles, have been shown in animal models to induce strong humoral responses to the associated antigen without increased reactogenicity, and are currently being tested in Phase I human clinical trials. We explored several modifications of DDA:TDB liposomes--including size, antigen association and addition of TLR agonists--to assess their immunogenic capacity as vaccine adjuvants, using Ovalbumin (OVA) protein as a model protein vaccine. Following triple homologous immunisation, small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) with no TLR agonists showed a significantly higher capacity for inducing spleen CD8 IFNγ responses against OVA in comparison with the larger multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Antigen-specific antibody reponses were also higher with SUVs. Addition of the TLR3 and TLR9 agonists significantly increased the adjuvanting capacity of MLVs and OVA-encapsulating dehydration-rehydration vesicles (DRVs), but not of SUVs. Our findings lend further support to the use of liposomes as protein vaccine adjuvants. Importantly, the ability of DDA:TDB SUVs to induce potent CD8 T cell responses without the need for adding immunostimulators would avoid the potential safety risks associated with the clinical use of TLR agonists in vaccines adjuvanted with liposomes.

  13. Lipid bilayers on nano-templates

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Bakajin, Olgica; Stoeve, Pieter

    2009-08-04

    A lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising a nanotube or nanowire and a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire. One embodiment provides a method of fabricating a lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising the steps of providing a nanotube or nanowire and forming a lipid bilayer around the polymer cushion. One embodiment provides a protein pore in the lipid bilayer. In one embodiment the protein pore is sensitive to specific agents

  14. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    Novel liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) provide a biologically inspired route for designing multifunctional bionanotheranostics. LNAs combine the benefits of lipids and liposomes to encapsulate, transport, and protect hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutics with functional nanoparticles. Functional nanoparticles endow LNAs with additional capabilities, including the ability to target diseases, triggered drug release, controlled therapeutic output, and diagnostic capabilities to produce a drug delivery system that can effectively and efficiently deliver therapeutics while reducing side effects. Not only could LNAs make existing drugs better, they could also provide an avenue to allow once promising non-approved drugs (rejected due to harmful side effects, inadequate pharmacokinetics, and poor efficacy) to be safely used through targeted and controlled delivery directly to the diseased site. LNAs have the potential to be stimuli responsive, delivering drugs on command by external (ultrasound, RF heating, etc.) or internal (pH, blood sugar, heart rate, etc.) stimuli. Individually, lipids and nanoparticles have been clinically approved for therapy, such as Doxil (a liposomal doxorubicin for cancer treatment), and diagnosis, such as Feridex (an iron oxide nanoparticle an MRI contrast enhancement agent for liver tumors). In order to engineer these multifunctional LNAs for theranostic applications, the interactions between nanoparticles and lipids must be better understood. This research sought to explore the formation, design, structures, characteristics, and functions of LNAs. To achieve this goal, different types of LNAs were formed, specifically magnetoliposomes, bilayer decorated LNAs (DLNAs), and lipid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). A fluorescent probe was embedded in the lipid bilayer of magnetoliposomes allowing the local temperature and membrane fluidity to be observed. When subjected to an electromagnetic field that heated the encapsulated iron

  15. The Lipids of Pneumocystis carinii

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, Edna S.

    1998-01-01

    Information about a number of Pneumocystis carinii lipids obtained by the analyses of organisms isolated and purified from infected lungs of corticosteroid-immunosuppressed rats has been reported in recent years. Of the common opportunistic protists associated with AIDS (Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, and the microsporidia), more is currently known about the lipids of P. carinii than the others. Lipids that are synthesized by the organism but not by humans are attractive targets for drug development. Thus, the elucidation of Δ7C-24-alykylated sterol and cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid biosyntheses in P. carinii is currently being examined in detail, since these have been identified as P. carinii-specific lipids. The development of low-toxicity drugs that prevent sterol C-24 alkylation and the specific inhibition of the lipoxygenase that forms cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid might prove fruitful. Although humans can synthesize coenzyme Q10, the anti-P. carinii activity and low toxicity of ubiquinone analogs such as atovaquone suggest that the electron transport chain in the pathogen may differ importantly from that in the host. Although resistance to atovaquone has been observed, development of other naphthoquinone drugs would provide a broader armamentarium of drugs to treat patients with P. carinii pneumonia. Studies of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and of infected lungs have demonstrated that the infection causes a number of chemical abnormalities. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained after the removal of lung cellular material and the organisms has been shown to contain larger amounts of surfactant proteins and smaller amounts of phospholipids than do comparable samples from P. carinii-free lungs. Increased phospholipase activity, inhibition of surfactant secretion by type II cells, and uptake and catabolism of lipids by the pathogen may explain this phenomenon related to P. carinii pneumonia. Although not yet thoroughly examined, initial studies on the uptake and

  16. PPARgamma agonist pioglitazone does not enhance performance in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Martinez-Bello, Vladimir E

    2014-09-01

    Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta and adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinases (AMPKs) regulate the metabolic and contractile characteristics of myofibres. PPAR proteins are nuclear receptors that function as transcription factors and regulate the expression of multiple genes. AMPK has been described as a master metabolic regulator which also controls gene expression through the direct phosphorylation of some nuclear proteins. Since it was discovered that both PPARdelta agonists (GW1516) and AMPK activators (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside, known as AICAR) are very effective performance-enhancing substances in sedentary mice, the World Anti-doping Agency (WADA) included AICAR and GW1516 in the prohibited list of substances as metabolic modulators in the class 'Hormone and metabolic modulators'. Thiazolidinediones are PPARgamma agonists that can induce similar biological effects to those of PPARdelta and PPARdelta-AMPK agonists. Thus in this study, the effects of pioglitazone on mitochondrial biogenesis and performance were evaluated. Blood glucose levels and the protein expression of the intermediates involved in the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway and the citrate synthase activity were determined in both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Maximal aerobic velocity (MAV), endurance capacity, and grip strength before and after the training period were also determined. The MAV endurance capacity and grip strength of trained animals significantly increased. We found that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and the nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) protein content and citrate synthase activity significantly increased in the soleus muscle of trained animals. No effect of treatment was found. Therefore in our study, pioglitazone administration did not affect mitochondrial biogenesis signaling pathway.

  17. Comparative endpoint sensitivity of in vitro estrogen agonist assays.

    PubMed

    Dreier, David A; Connors, Kristin A; Brooks, Bryan W

    2015-07-01

    Environmental and human health implications of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), particularly xenoestrogens, have received extensive study. In vitro assays are increasingly employed as diagnostic tools to comparatively evaluate chemicals, whole effluent toxicity and surface water quality, and to identify causative EDCs during toxicity identification evaluations. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) initiated ToxCast under the Tox21 program to generate novel bioactivity data through high throughput screening. This information is useful for prioritizing chemicals requiring additional hazard information, including endocrine active chemicals. Though multiple in vitro and in vivo techniques have been developed to assess estrogen agonist activity, the relative endpoint sensitivity of these approaches and agreement of their conclusions remain unclear during environmental diagnostic applications. Probabilistic hazard assessment (PHA) approaches, including chemical toxicity distributions (CTD), are useful for understanding the relative sensitivity of endpoints associated with in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays by predicting the likelihood of chemicals eliciting undesirable outcomes at or above environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, PHAs were employed to examine the comparative endpoint sensitivity of 16 in vitro assays for estrogen agonist activity using a diverse group of compounds from the USEPA ToxCast dataset. Reporter gene assays were generally observed to possess greater endpoint sensitivity than other assay types, and the Tox21 ERa LUC BG1 Agonist assay was identified as the most sensitive in vitro endpoint for detecting an estrogenic response. When the sensitivity of this most sensitive ToxCast in vitro endpoint was compared to the human MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, a common in vitro model for biomedical and environmental monitoring applications, the ERa LUC BG1 assay was several orders of magnitude less

  18. Biased signaling by peptide agonists of protease activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Kok, W Mei; Lim, Junxian; Wu, Kai-Chen; Liu, Ligong; Hill, Timothy A; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2017-02-07

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is associated with metabolism, obesity, inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, pain, cancer and other diseases. The extracellular N-terminus of PAR2 is a common target for multiple proteases, which cleave it at different sites to generate different N-termini that activate different PAR2-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. There are no synthetic PAR2 ligands that reproduce the same signaling profiles and potencies as proteases. Structure-activity relationships here for 26 compounds spanned a signaling bias over 3 log units, culminating in three small ligands as biased agonist tools for interrogating PAR2 functions. DF253 (2f-LAAAAI-NH2) triggered PAR2-mediated calcium release (EC50 2 μM) but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation (EC50 > 100 μM) in CHO cells transfected with hPAR2. AY77 (Isox-Cha-Chg-NH2) was a more potent calcium-biased agonist (EC50 40 nM, Ca2+; EC50 2 μM, ERK1/2), while its analogue AY254 (Isox-Cha-Chg-A-R-NH2) was an ERK-biased agonist (EC50 2 nM, ERK1/2; EC50 80 nM, Ca2+). Signaling bias led to different functional responses in human colorectal carcinoma cells (HT29). AY254, but not AY77 or DF253, attenuated cytokine-induced caspase 3/8 activation, promoted scratch-wound healing and induced IL-8 secretion, all via PAR2-ERK1/2 signaling. Different ligand components were responsible for different PAR2 signaling and functions, clues that can potentially lead to drugs that modulate different pathway-selective cellular and physiological responses.

  19. Melatonin and Melatonin Agonists as Adjunctive Treatments in Bipolar Disorders.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Etain, Bruno; Franchi, Jean-Arthur Micoulaud; Bellivier, Frank; Ritter, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorders (BD) present with abnormalities of circadian rhythmicity and sleep homeostasis, even during phases of remission. These abnormalities are linked to the underlying neurobiology of genetic susceptibility to BD. Melatonin is a pineal gland secreted neurohormone that induces circadian-related and sleep-related responses. Exogenous melatonin has demonstrated efficacy in treating primary insomnia, delayed sleep phase disorder, improving sleep parameters and overall sleep quality, and some psychiatric disorders like autistic spectrum disorders. In order to evaluate the efficacy of melatonin among patients with BD, this comprehensive review emphasizes the abnormal melatonin function in BD, the rationale of melatonin action in BD, the available data about the exogenous administration of melatonin, and melatonin agonists (ramelteon and tasimelteon), and recommendations of use in patients with BD. There is a scientific rationale to propose melatonin-agonists as an adjunctive treatment of mood stabilizers in treating sleep disorders in BD and thus to possibly prevent relapses when administered during remission phases. We emphasized the need to treat insomnia, sleep delayed latencies and sleep abnormalities in BD that are prodromal markers of an emerging mood episode and possible targets to prevent future relapses. An additional interesting adjunctive therapeutic effect might be on preventing metabolic syndrome, particularly in patients treated with antipsychotics. Finally, melatonin is well tolerated and has little dependence potential in contrast to most available sleep medications. Further studies are expected to be able to produce stronger evidence-based therapeutic guidelines to confirm and delineate the routine use of melatonin-agonists in the treatment of BD.

  20. Roles of PPAR delta in lipid absorption and metabolism: a new target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Luquet, Serge; Gaudel, Celine; Holst, Dorte; Lopez-Soriano, Joaquin; Jehl-Pietri, Chantal; Fredenrich, Alexandre; Grimaldi, Paul A

    2005-05-30

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are lipid-activated transcription factors exerting several functions in development and metabolism. PPARalpha, activated by polyunsaturated fatty acids and fibrates, is implicated in regulation of lipid metabolism, lipoprotein synthesis and metabolism and inflammatory response in liver and other tissues. PPARgamma plays important roles in regulation of proliferation and differentiation of several cell types, including adipose cells. Its activation by thiazolidinediones results in insulin sensibilization and antidiabetic action. Until recently, the physiological functions of PPARdelta remain elusive. The utilization of specific agonists and of appropriate cellular and animal models revealed that PPARdelta has an important role in metabolic adaptation of several tissues to environmental changes. Treatment of obese animals by specific PPARdelta agonists results in normalization of metabolic parameters and reduction of adiposity. The nuclear receptor appeared to be implicated in the regulation of fatty acid burning capacities of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue by controlling the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake, beta-oxidation and energy uncoupling. PPARdelta is also implicated in the adaptive metabolic response of skeletal muscle to endurance exercise by controlling the number of oxidative myofibers. Given the results obtained with animal models, PPARdelta agonists may have therapeutic usefulness in metabolic syndrome by increasing fatty acid consumption in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

  1. Hybrid Lipid as Biological Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewster, Robert; Pincus, Phil; Safran, Sam

    2009-03-01

    Systems capable of forming finite-sized, equilibrium domains are of biological interest in the context of membrane rafts where it has been observed that certain cellular functions are mediated by small (nanometric to tens of nanometers) domains with specific lipid composition that differs from the average composition of the membrane. These small domains are composed mainly of lipids with completely saturated hydrocarbon tails that show good orientational order in the membrane. The surrounding phase consists mostly of lipids with at least one unsaturated bond in the hydrocarbon tails which forces a ``kink'' in the chain and inhibits ordering. In vitro, this phase separation can be replicated; however, the finite domains coarsen into macroscopic domains with time. We have extended a model for the interactions of lipids in the membrane, akin to that developed in the group of Schick (Elliott et al., PRL 2006 and Garbes Putzel and Schick, Biophys. J. 2008), which depends entirely on the local ordering of hydrocarbon tails. We generalize this model to an additional species and identify a biologically relevant component, a lipid with one fully saturated hydrocarbon chain and one chain with at least one unsaturated bond, that may serve as a line-active component, capable of reducing the line tension between domains to zero, thus stabilizing finite sized domains in equilibrium.

  2. Lipids and the malarial parasite*

    PubMed Central

    Holz, George G.

    1977-01-01

    Merozoite endocytosis initiates Plasmodium development in a vacuole bounded by an erythrocyte-derived membrane, whose asymmetrical distribution of lipids and proteins is reversed in its orientation with respect to the parasite plasma membrane. Reorientation may accompany the proliferation of the membrane associated with the parasite's growth and phagocytic and pinocytic feeding. Increases in the membrane surface area of the parasite, and in some cases of the erythrocyte, parallel parasite growth and segmentation. Augmentation of all the membrane systems of the infected erythrocyte causes the lipid content to rise rapidly, but the parasite lipid composition differs from that of the erythrocyte in many respects: it is higher in diacyl phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, polyglycerol phosphatides, diacylglycerols, unesterified fatty acids, triacylglycerols, and hexadecanoic and octadecenoic fatty acids and lower in sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine, alkoxy phosphatidylethanolamine, cholesterol, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Active lipid metabolism accompanies the membrane proliferation associated with feeding, growth, and reproduction. Plasmodium is incapable of de novo biosynthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol; however, it can fabricate its glycerides and phosphoglycerides with host-supplied fatty acids, nitrogenous bases, alcohols, ATP, and coenzyme A, and can generate the glyceryl moiety during glycolysis. Cholesterol is obtained from the host but nothing is known of sphingolipid origins. Lipid metabolism of the parasite may be associated with alterations in the amounts of octadecenoic fatty acids and cholesterol in the erythrocyte plasma membrane, which in turn are responsible for changes in permeability and fragility. PMID:412602

  3. INSIGHT AGONISTES: A READING OF SOPHOCLES'S OEDIPUS THE KING.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Eugene J

    2015-07-01

    In this reading of Sophocles's Oedipus the King, the author suggests that insight can be thought of as the main protagonist of the tragedy. He personifies this depiction of insight, calling it Insight Agonistes, as if it were the sole conflicted character on the stage, albeit masquerading at times as several other characters, including gods, sphinxes, and oracles. This psychoanalytic reading of the text lends itself to an analogy between psychoanalytic process and Sophocles's tragic hero. The author views insight as always transgressing against, always at war with a conservative, societal, or intrapsychic chorus of structured elements. A clinical vignette is presented to illustrate this view of insight.

  4. Dehydroepiandrosterone Derivatives as Potent Antiandrogens with Marginal Agonist Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    DATES COVERED 01 July 2012 – 30 June 2013 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dehydroepiandrosterone Derivatives as Potent Antiandrogens with Marginal Agonist...Page Introduction…………………………………………………………….………..….. 1 Body………………………………………………………………………………….. 1- 4 Key Research...In addition, we previously found that androstenediol (Adiol), a physiological metabolite from dehydroepiandrosterone ( DHEA ) and a precursor of

  5. Clenbuterol, a beta(2)-agonist, retards atrophy in denervated muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2) agonist, clenbuterol, on the protein content as well as on the contractile strength and the muscle fiber cross-sectional area of various denervated muscles from rats were investigated. It was found that denervated soleus, anterior tibialis, and gastrocnemius muscles, but not the extensor digitorum longus, of rats treated for 2-3 weeks with clenbuterol contained 95-110 percent more protein than denervated controls. The twofold difference in the protein content of denervated solei was paralleled by similar changes in contractile strength and muscle fiber cross-sectional area.

  6. Is there a justification for classifying GLP-1 receptor agonists as basal and prandial?

    PubMed

    Miñambres, Inka; Pérez, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Several GLP-1 receptor agonists are currently available for treatment of type 2 diabetic patients. Based on their pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile, these drugs are classified as short-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists (exenatide and lixisenatide) or long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists (exenatide-LAR, liraglutide, albiglutide, and dulaglutide). In clinical practice, they are also classified as basal or prandial GLP-1 receptor agonists to differentiate between patients who would benefit more from one or another based on characteristics such as previous treatment and the predominance of fasting or postprandial hyperglycemia. In the present article we examine available data on the pharmacokinetic characteristics of the various GLP-1 agonists and compare their effects with respect to the main parameters used to evaluate glycemic control. The article also analyzes whether the differences between the different GLP-1 agonists justify their classification as basal or prandial.

  7. Antidepressant-like Effects of δ Opioid Receptor Agonists in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Recently, δ opioid receptor agonists have been proposed to be attractive targets for the development of novel antidepressants. Several studies revealed that single treatment of δ opioid receptor agonists produce antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test, which is one of the most popular animal models for screening antidepressants. In addition, subchronic treatment with δ opioid receptor agonists has been shown to completely attenuate the hyperemotional responses found in olfactory bulbectomized rats. This animal model exhibits hyperemotional behavior that may mimic the anxiety, aggression, and irritability found in depressed patients, suggesting that δ opioid receptor agonists could be effective in the treatment of these symptoms in depression. On the other hand, prototype δ opioid receptor agonists produce convulsive effects, which limit their therapeutic potential and clinical development. In this review, we presented the current knowledge regarding the antidepressant-like effects of δ opioid receptor agonists, which include some recently developed drugs lacking convulsive effects. PMID:23449756

  8. Lipid infusion lowers sympathetic nervous activity and leads to increased β-cell responsiveness to glucose

    PubMed Central

    Magnan, Christophe; Collins, Stephan; Berthault, Marie-France; Kassis, Nadim; Vincent, Mylène; Gilbert, Marc; Pénicaud, Luc; Ktorza, Alain; Assimacopoulos-Jeannet, Françoise

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the possible involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the effect of a long-term elevation of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration on glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) in rats. Rats were infused with an emulsion of triglycerides (Intralipid) for 48 hours (IL rats). This resulted in a twofold increase in plasma FFA concentration. At the end of infusion, GIIS as reflected in the insulinogenic index (ΔI/ΔG) was 2.5-fold greater in IL rats compared with control saline-infused rats. The ratio of sympathetic to parasympathetic nervous activities was sharply decreased in IL rats relative to controls. GIIS was studied in the presence of increasing amounts of α- and β-adrenoreceptor agonists and antagonists. The lowest concentrations of the α2A-adrenoreceptor agonist oxymetazoline, which were ineffective in control rats, reduced GIIS in IL rats. At the dose of 0.3 pmol/kg, GIIS became similar in IL and control rats. The use of β-adrenoreceptor agonist (isoproterenol) or antagonist (propranolol) did not result in a significant alteration in GIIS in both groups. GIIS remained as high in IL vagotomized rats as in intact IL rats, indicating that changes in parasympathetic tone were of minor importance. Altogether, the data show that lipid infusion provokes β-cell hyperresponsiveness in vivo, at least in part through changes in α2-adrenergic innervation. PMID:9927503

  9. Contamination with retinoic acid receptor agonists in two rivers in the Kinki region of Japan.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nakama, Koki; Sawada, Kazuko; Watanabe, Taro; Takagi, Mai; Sei, Kazunari; Yang, Min; Hirotsuji, Junji; Hu, Jianying; Nishikawa, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the agonistic activity against human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha in the Lake Biwa-Yodo River and the Ina River in the Kinki region of Japan. To accomplish this, a yeast two-hybrid assay was used to elucidate the spatial and temporal variations and potential sources of RARalpha agonist contamination in the river basins. RARalpha agonistic activity was commonly detected in the surface water samples collected along two rivers at different periods, with maximum all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) equivalents of 47.6 ng-atRA/L and 23.5 ng-atRA/L being observed in Lake Biwa-Yodo River and Ina River, respectively. The results indicated that RARalpha agonists are always present and widespread in the rivers. Comparative investigation of RARalpha and estrogen receptor alpha agonistic activities at 20 stations along each river revealed that the spatial variation pattern of RARalpha agonist contamination was entirely different from that of the estrogenic compound contamination. This suggests that the effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants, a primary source of estrogenic compounds, seemed not to be the cause of RARalpha agonist contamination in the rivers. Fractionation using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) directed by the bioassay found two bioactive fractions from river water samples, suggesting the presence of at least two RARalpha agonists in the rivers. Although a trial conducted to identify RARalpha agonists in the major bioactive fraction was not completed as part of this study, comparison of retention times in HPLC analysis and quantification with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the major causative contaminants responsible for the RARalpha agonistic activity were not RAs (natural RAR ligands) and 4-oxo-RAs, while 4-oxo-RAs were identified as the major RAR agonists in sewage in Beijing, China. These findings suggest that there are unknown RARalpha agonists with high

  10. β‐Arrestin 2 dependence of δ opioid receptor agonists is correlated with alcohol intake

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, T; Sansuk, K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose δ Opioid receptor agonists are being developed as potential treatments for depression and alcohol use disorders. This is particularly interesting as depression is frequently co‐morbid with alcohol use disorders. Yet we have previously shown that δ receptor agonists range widely in their ability to modulate alcohol intake; certain δ receptor agonists actually increase alcohol consumption in mice. We propose that variations in β‐arrestin 2 recruitment contribute to the differential behavioural profile of δ receptor agonists. Experimental Approach We used three diarylmethylpiperazine‐based non‐peptidic δ receptor selective agonists (SNC80, SNC162 and ARM390) and three structurally diverse δ receptor agonists (TAN‐67, KNT127 and NIH11082). We tested these agonists in cAMP and β‐arrestin 2 recruitment assays and a behavioural assay of alcohol intake in male C57BL/6 mice. We used β‐arrestin 2 knockout mice and a model of depression‐like behaviour to further study the role of β‐arrestin 2 in δ receptor pharmacology. Key Results All six tested δ receptor agonists were full agonists in the cAMP assay but displayed distinct β‐arrestin 2 recruitment efficacy. The efficacy of δ receptor agonists to recruit β‐arrestin 2 positively correlated with their ability to increase alcohol intake (P < 0.01). The effects of the very efficacious recruiter SNC80 on alcohol intake, alcohol place preference and depression‐like behaviour were β‐arrestin 2‐dependent. Conclusions and Implications Our finding that δ receptor agonists that strongly recruit β‐arrestin 2 can increase alcohol intake carries important ramifications for drug development of δ receptor agonists for treatment of alcohol use disorders and depressive disorders. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society PMID:26507558

  11. Electrophysiological perspectives on the therapeutic use of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Papke, Roger L; Trocmé-Thibierge, Caryn; Guendisch, Daniela; Al Rubaiy, Shehd Abdullah Abbas; Bloom, Stephen A

    2011-05-01

    Partial agonist therapies rely variously on two hypotheses: the partial agonists have their effects through chronic low-level receptor activation or the partial agonists work by decreasing the effects of endogenous or exogenous full agonists. The relative significance of these activities probably depends on whether acute or chronic effects are considered. We studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes to test a model for the acute interactions between acetylcholine (ACh) and weak partial agonists. Data were best-fit to a basic competition model that included an additional factor for noncompetitive inhibition. Partial agonist effects were compared with the nAChR antagonist bupropion in prolonged bath application experiments that were designed to mimic prolonged drug exposure typical of therapeutic drug delivery. A primary effect of prolonged application of nicotine was to decrease the response of all nAChR subtypes to acute applications of ACh. In addition, nicotine, cytisine, and varenicline produced detectable steady-state activation of α4β2* [(α4)(2)(β2)(3), (α4)(3)(β2)(2), and (α4)(2)(β2)(2)α5)] receptor subtypes that was not seen with other test compounds. Partial agonists produced no detectable steady-state activation of α7 nAChR, but seemed to show small potentiation of ACh-evoked responses; however, "run-up" of α7 ACh responses was also sometimes observed under control conditions. Potential off-target effects of the partial agonists therefore included the modulation of α7 responses by α4β2 partial agonists and decreases in α4β2* responses by α7-selective agonists. These data indicate the dual effects expected for α4β2* partial agonists and provide models and insights for utility of partial agonists in therapeutic development.

  12. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by downregulation of lipid transporter expression via PPAR-α dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Kondaiah, Palsa; Palika, Ravindranadh; Ghosh, Sudip; Nair, Madhavan K; Raghu, Pullakhandam

    2016-01-15

    The involvement of lipid transporters, the scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) and Niemann-Pick type C1 Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) in carotenoid absorption is demonstrated in intestinal cells and animal models. Dietary ω-3 fatty acids are known to possess antilipidemic properties, which could be mediated by activation of PPAR family transcription factors. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), on intestinal β-carotene absorption. β-carotene uptake in Caco-2/TC7 cells was inhibited by EPA (p < 0.01) and PPARα agonist (P < 0.01), but not by DHA, PPARγ or PPARδ agonists. Despite unaltered β-carotene uptake, both DHA and PPARδ agonists inhibited the NPC1L1 expression. Further, EPA also induced the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A) expression, a PPARα target gene. Interestingly, EPA induced inhibition of β-carotene uptake and SR B1 expression were abrogated by specific PPARα antagonist, but not by PPARδ antagonist. EPA and PPARα agonist also inhibited the basolateral secretion of β-carotene from Caco-2 cells grown on permeable supports. These results suggest that EPA inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by down regulation of SR B1 expression via PPARα dependent mechanism and provide an evidence for dietary modulation of intestinal β-carotene absorption.

  13. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of a potent opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, compared to subtype-selective opioid receptor agonists for stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Islam, Mohammad R; Karamyan, Vardan T; Abbruscato, Thomas J

    2015-06-03

    To meet the challenge of identification of new treatments for stroke, this study was designed to evaluate a potent, nonselective opioid receptor (OR) agonist, biphalin, in comparison to subtype selective OR agonists, as a potential neuroprotective drug candidate using in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. Our in vitro approach included mouse primary neuronal cells that were challenged with glutamate and hypoxic/aglycemic (H/A) conditions. We observed that 10nM biphalin, exerted a statistically significant neuroprotective effect after glutamate challenge, compared to all selective opioid agonists, according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Moreover, 10nM biphalin provided superior neuroprotection after H/A-reoxygenation compared to selective opioid agonists in all cases. Our in vitro investigations were supported by in vivo studies which indicate that the nonselective opioid agonist, biphalin, achieves enhanced neuroprotective potency compared to any of the selective opioid agonists, evidenced by reduced edema and infarct ratios. Reduction of edema and infarction was accompanied by neurological improvement of the animals in two independent behavioral tests. Collectively these data strongly suggest that concurrent agonist stimulation of mu, kappa and delta ORs with biphalin is neuroprotective and superior to neuroprotection by activation of any single OR subtype.

  14. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of a potent opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, compared to subtype-selective opioid receptor agonists for stroke treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Islam, Mohammad R; Karamyan, Vardan T.; Abbruscato, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    To meet the challenge of identification of new treatments for stroke, this study was designed to evaluate a potent, nonselective opioid receptor (OR) agonist, biphalin, in comparison to subtype selective OR agonists, as a potential neuroprotective drug candidate using in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. Our in vitro approach included mouse primary neuronal cells that were challenged with glutamate and hypoxic/aglycemic (H/A) conditions. We observed that 10 nM biphalin, exerted a statistically significant neuroprotective effect after glutamate challenge, compared to all selective opioid agonists, according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Moreover, 10 nM biphalin provided superior neuroprotection after H/A-reoxygenation compared to selective opioid agonists in all cases. Our in vitro investigations were supported by in vivo studies which indicate that the nonselective opioid agonist, biphalin, achieves enhanced neuroprotective potency compared to any of the selective opioid agonists, evidenced by reduced edema and infarct ratios. Reduction of edema and infarction was accompanied by neurological improvement of the animals in two independent behavioral tests. Collectively these data strongly suggest that concurrent agonist stimulation of mu, kappa and delta ORs with biphalin is neuroprotective and superior to neuroprotection by activation of any single OR subtype. PMID:25801116

  15. Yeast lipid metabolism at a glance.

    PubMed

    Klug, Lisa; Daum, Günther

    2014-05-01

    During the last decades, lipids have gained much attention due to their involvement in health and disease. Lipids are required for the formation of membranes and contribute to many different processes such as cell signaling, energy supply, and cell death. Various organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lipid droplets are involved in lipid metabolism. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a reliable model organism to study biochemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology of lipids. The availability of mutants bearing defects in lipid metabolic pathways and the ease of manipulation by culture conditions facilitated these investigations. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about lipid metabolism in yeast. We grouped this large topic into three sections dealing with (1) fatty acids; (2) membrane lipids; and (3) storage lipids. Fatty acids serve as building blocks for the synthesis of membrane lipids (phospholipids, sphingolipids) and storage lipids (triacylglycerols, steryl esters). Phospholipids, sterols, and sphingolipids are essential components of cellular membranes. Recent investigations addressing lipid synthesis, degradation, and storage as well as regulatory aspects are presented. The role of enzymes governing important steps of the different lipid metabolic pathways is described. Finally, the link between lipid metabolic and dynamic processes is discussed.

  16. Fuel from microalgae lipid products

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, A.M.; Feinberg, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    The large-scale production of microalgae is a promising method of producing a renewable feedstock for a wide variety of fuel products currently refined from crude petroleum. These microalgae-derived products include lipid extraction products (triglycerides, fatty acids, and hydrocarbons) and catalytic conversion products (paraffins and olefins). Microalgal biomass productivity and lipid composition of current experimental systems are estimated at 66.0 metric tons per hectare year and 30% lipid content. Similar yields in a large-scale facility indicate that production costs are approximately six times higher than the average domestic price for crude, well-head petroleum. Based on achievable targets for productivity and production costs, the potential for microalgae as a fuel feedstock is presented in context with selected process refining routes and is compared with conventional and alternative feedstocks (e.g., oilseeds) with which microalgae must compete. 24 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

  17. Crystallization modifiers in lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Masuchi, Monise Helen; Miyasaki, Eriksen Koji; Domingues, Maria Aliciane Fontenele; Stroppa, Valter Luís Zuliani; de Oliveira, Glazieli Marangoni; Kieckbusch, Theo Guenter

    2015-07-01

    Crystallization of fats is a determinant physical event affecting the structure and properties of fat-based products. The stability of these processed foods is regulated by changes in the physical state of fats and alterations in their crystallization behavior. Problems like polymorphic transitions, oil migration, fat bloom development, slow crystallization and formation of crystalline aggregates stand out. The change of the crystallization behavior of lipid systems has been a strategic issue for the processing of foods, aiming at taylor made products, reducing costs, improving quality, and increasing the applicability and stability of different industrial fats. In this connection, advances in understanding the complex mechanisms that govern fat crystallization led to the development of strategies in order to modulate the conventional processes of fat structuration, based on the use of crystallization modifiers. Different components have been evaluated, such as specific triacyglycerols, partial glycerides (monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols), free fatty acids, phospholipids and emulsifiers. The knowledge and expertise on the influence of these specific additives or minor lipids on the crystallization behavior of fat systems represents a focus of current interest for the industrial processing of oils and fats. This article presents a comprehensive review on the use of crystallization modifiers in lipid systems, especially for palm oil, cocoa butter and general purpose fats, highlighting: i) the removal, addition or fractionation of minor lipids in fat bases; ii) the use of nucleating agents to modify the crystallization process; iii) control of crystallization in lipid bases by using emulsifiers. The addition of these components into lipid systems is discussed in relation to the phenomena of nucleation, crystal growth, morphology, thermal behavior and polymorphism, with the intention of providing the reader with a complete panorama of the associated mechanisms

  18. Benzodiazepine agonist and inverse agonist actions on GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. I. Acute effects of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, K.J.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Acute exposure to ethanol was found to enhance the ability of a benzodiazepine (BZ) inverse agonist, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM), to reduce muscimol-activated 36Cl- uptake by membranes isolated from mouse cerebral cortex. Pretreatment in vivo with a hypnotic dose of ethanol (but not a subhypnotic dose), or exposure to a corresponding concentration in vitro, was effective. This increase in sensitivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor-operated chloride channels to the actions of DMCM was due to an increase in both the potency and efficacy of DMCM. Sensitization to DMCM was reversible and was not observed 24 hr after a single injection of ethanol. Pretreatment with ethanol (10, 50 and 100 mM) in vitro produced sensitization to DMCM in a concentration-dependent manner, similar to that produced by in vivo exposure; this increase in sensitivity did not develop if the membranes were pretreated with ethanol at 0 degrees C. Similarly, in vitro exposure to pentobarbital (200 microM) or flunitrazepam (1 microM) enhanced the actions of the inverse agonist Ro15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,5a)(1,4)BZ-3- carboxylate). Acute ethanol exposure did not alter low-affinity gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor binding or muscimol action, or the ability of a BZ agonist, flunitrazepam, to augment muscimol-activated chloride flux. Ethanol exposure did not alter (3H)flumazenil (Ro15-1788) binding to central BZ receptors, its displacement by DMCM or allosteric modulation of DMCM binding by muscimol (muscimol-shift).

  19. Trial Watch: Immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor agonists in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, Kristina; Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Cremer, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Špíšek, Radek; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating preclinical evidence indicates that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists efficiently boost tumor-targeting immune responses (re)initiated by most, if not all, paradigms of anticancer immunotherapy. Moreover, TLR agonists have been successfully employed to ameliorate the efficacy of various chemotherapeutics and targeted anticancer agents, at least in rodent tumor models. So far, only three TLR agonists have been approved by regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients. Moreover, over the past decade, the interest of scientists and clinicians in these immunostimulatory agents has been fluctuating. Here, we summarize recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of TLR agonists for cancer therapy.

  20. Analysis of agonist dissociation constants as assessed by functional antagonism in guinea pig left atria

    SciTech Connect

    Molenaar, P.; Malta, E.

    1986-04-01

    In electrically driven guinea pig left atria, positive inotropic responses to (-)-isoprenaline and the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist RO363 were obtained in the absence and in the presence of the functional antagonists adenosine, carbachol, gallopamil, nifedipine, and Ro 03-7894. Each of the functional antagonists reduced the maximum response to both agonists and produced nonparallel rightward shifts in the cumulative concentration effect curves. For both agonists, dissociation constants (KA) were calculated using the equation described by Furchgott (1966) for irreversible antagonism. For RO363, which is a partial agonist with high agonist activity, the equations outlined for functional interaction by Mackay (1981) were also employed to calculate KA values. The KA values obtained by each method were compared with the dissociation constants (KD) for the two agonists determined from their ability to displace the radioligand (-)-(/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol from beta 1-adrenoceptors in guinea pig left atrial membrane preparations. The estimates of KA varied substantially from KD values. The KD values were taken as more accurate estimates of the true values for the dissociation constants because a high degree of correlation exists between pKD and pD2 values for a number of other beta-adrenoceptor agonists that behave as partial agonists and between pKD and pKB values for a number of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. Thus, it appears that there are serious limitations in the current theory for using functional antagonism as a means of obtaining agonist dissociation constants.

  1. The pharmacology of epanolol (ICI 141292)--a new beta 1-selective adrenoceptor partial agonist.

    PubMed

    Bilski, A J; Hadfield, S E; Wale, J L

    1988-08-01

    The clinical benefit of beta-adrenoceptor partial agonists is still debated. To clarify the situation, epanolol, ICI 141,292 [N-[-2-(3-o-cyanophenoxy-2-hydroxypropylamino)ethyl]-4- hydroxyphenylactamide], has been developed to assess the role of modest beta-adrenoceptor partial agonist activity in humans. Animal studies have shown that epanolol is a potent beta-adrenoceptor partial agonist with a greater affinity for beta 1- than beta 2-adrenoceptors. In vitro, the PA2 values obtained for espanolol at atrial and tracheal beta-adrenoceptors were 8.42 and 6.33, respectively (isoproterenol as agonist), giving a selectivity ratio of 123. The potency was studied in vivo in the dog, where it was also shown that as an antagonist at the cardiac beta 1-adrenoceptor, it was 18 and 40 times more potent than atenolol and practolol, respectively. Espanolol has less partial agonist activity in the rat than pindolol, but more than practolol. In this species, it is also a classical partial agonist, exhibiting agonist activity at all beta-adrenoceptor blocking doses. This is in contrast to pindolol, which caused predominantly beta-adrenoceptor blockade at low doses and partial agonist activity at higher doses. These differences were confirmed in haemodynamic studies in the dog. In contrast to many other partial agonists, the partition coefficient, log P, of epanolol in octanol and water is low (0.92).

  2. Trial Watch: Immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor agonists in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Iribarren, Kristina; Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Cremer, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Špíšek, Radek; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulating preclinical evidence indicates that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists efficiently boost tumor-targeting immune responses (re)initiated by most, if not all, paradigms of anticancer immunotherapy. Moreover, TLR agonists have been successfully employed to ameliorate the efficacy of various chemotherapeutics and targeted anticancer agents, at least in rodent tumor models. So far, only three TLR agonists have been approved by regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients. Moreover, over the past decade, the interest of scientists and clinicians in these immunostimulatory agents has been fluctuating. Here, we summarize recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of TLR agonists for cancer therapy. PMID:27141345

  3. Agonist signalling properties of radiotracers used for imaging of dopamine D2/3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) agonist radiopharmaceuticals are considered superior to antagonists to detect dopamine release, e.g. induced by amphetamines. Agonists bind preferentially to the high-affinity state of the dopamine D2R, which has been proposed as the reason why agonists are more sensitive to detect dopamine release than antagonist radiopharmaceuticals, but this theory has been challenged. Interestingly, not all agonists similarly activate the classic cyclic adenosine mono phosphate (cAMP) and the ?-arrestin-2 pathway, some stimulate preferentially one of these pathways; a phenomenon called biased agonism. Because these pathways can be affected separately by pathologies or drugs (including dopamine releasers), it is important to know how agonist radiotracers act on these pathways. Therefore, we characterized the intracellular signalling of the well-known D2/3R agonist radiopharmaceuticals NPA and PHNO and of several novel D2/3R agonists. Methods cAMP accumulation and ?-arrestin-2 recruitment were measured on cells expressing human D2R. Results All tested agonists showed (almost) full agonism in both pathways. Conclusions The tested D2/3R agonist radiopharmaceuticals did not exhibit biased agonism in vitro. Consequently, it is likely that drugs (including psychostimulants like amphetamines) and/or pathologies that influence the cAMP and/or the ?-arrestin-2 pathway may influence the binding of these radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:25977878

  4. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities.

  5. Endocrine treatment of male-to-female transsexuals using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, R; Binder, H; Cupisti, S; Hoffmann, I; Beckmann, M W; Mueller, A

    2005-12-01

    In transsexual people, cross-sex hormone therapy is an important component of medical treatment. In male-to-female transsexuals, feminizing effects should be achieved before irreversible sex reassignment surgery (SRS) is considered. The most common treatment regimen in male-to-female transsexuals is a combination of ethinyl oestradiol and cyproterone acetate, with the exception of transdermal oestradiol-17beta in individuals over the age of 40. The mortality and morbidity rates with this treatment regimen have been reported in more than 800 patients. Typical side effects include venous thrombosis, elevated liver enzymes, symptomatic gallstones, hyperprolactinaemia and depression. Sixty male-to-female transsexuals were treated with monthly injections of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) and oral oestradiol-17beta valerate for 2 years to achieve feminisation until SRS. There was a significant decline in gonadotropins, total testosterone and calculated free testosterone. In general, the treatment regimen was well accepted. An equal increase in breast size was achieved compared to common hormone therapy. Two side effects were documented. One, venous thrombosis, occurred in a patient with a homozygous MTHFR mutation. One patient was found to be suffering from symptomatic preexisting gallstones. No other complications were documented. Liver enzymes, lipids, and prolactin levels were unchanged. Significantly increased oestradiol and SHBG serum levels were detectable. In addition, an increase in bone mass density, in the femoral neck and lumbar spine, was recorded. We conclude that cross-sex hormone treatment of male-to-female transsexuals using GnRHa and oestradiol-17beta valerate is effective, and side effects and complication rates can be reduced using the treatment regimen presented here.

  6. BMI and metabolic profile in patients with prolactinoma before and after treatment with dopamine agonists.

    PubMed

    dos Santos Silva, Cintia M; Barbosa, Flavia R P; Lima, Giovanna A B; Warszawski, Leila; Fontes, Rosita; Domingues, Romeu C; Gadelha, Mõnica R

    2011-04-01

    Hyperprolactinemia might be related to weight gain, metabolic syndrome (MS), and insulin resistance (IR). Treatment with dopamine agonist (DA) has been shown to reduce body weight and improve metabolic parameters. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of obesity, overweight, MS, and IR in patients with prolactinoma before and after therapy with DA and to evaluate the relation between prolactin (PRL), body weight, fat distribution, leptin levels, IR, and lipid profile before treatment. In addition, we investigated the correlation of the reduction in PRL levels with weight loss and metabolic profile improvement. Twenty-two patients with prolactinoma completed 6 months of treatment with DA. These patients were submitted to clinical (BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure (BP)), laboratory evaluation (leptin, glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and triglyceride (TG) levels) and abdominal computed tomography (CT) before and after treatment. The statistical analyses were done by nonparametric tests. At the beginning of the study, the prevalence of obesity, overweight, MS, and IR was 45, 27, 27, and 18%, respectively. After 6 months of treatment with DA, PRL levels normalized, but no significant difference in BMI was observed. However, there was a significant decrease on homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA(IR)) index, glucose, LDL-cholesterol, and TG levels. This study suggests a possible involvement of prolactinoma on the prevalence of obesity. We should consider that DA may be effective on improving metabolic parameters, and we speculate that a period longer than 6 months of treatment is necessary to conclude whether this drug can interfere in the body weight of patients with prolactinoma.

  7. CB2 Receptor Agonists Protect Human Dopaminergic Neurons against Damage from HIV-1 gp120

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shuxian; Sheng, Wen S.; Rock, R. Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the therapeutic impact of anti-retroviral therapy, HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remains a serious threat to AIDS patients, and there currently remains no specific therapy for the neurological manifestations of HIV-1. Recent work suggests that the nigrostriatal dopaminergic area is a critical brain region for the neuronal dysfunction and death seen in HAND and that human dopaminergic neurons have a particular sensitivity to gp120-induced damage, manifested as reduced function (decreased dopamine uptake), morphological changes, and reduced viability. Synthetic cannabinoids inhibit HIV-1 expression in human microglia, suppress production of inflammatory mediators in human astrocytes, and there is substantial literature demonstrating the neuroprotective properties of cannabinoids in other neuropathogenic processes. Based on these data, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that synthetic cannabinoids will protect dopaminergic neurons against the toxic effects of the HIV-1 protein gp120. Using a human mesencephalic neuronal/glial culture model, which contains dopaminergic neurons, microglia, and astrocytes, we were able to show that the CB1/CB2 agonist WIN55,212-2 blunts gp120-induced neuronal damage as measured by dopamine transporter function, apoptosis and lipid peroxidation; these actions were mediated principally by the CB2 receptor. Adding supplementary human microglia to our cultures enhances gp120-induced damage; WIN55,212-2 is able to alleviate this enhanced damage. Additionally, WIN55,212-2 inhibits gp120-induced superoxide production by purified human microglial cells, inhibits migration of human microglia towards supernatants generated from gp120-stimulated human mesencephalic neuronal/glial cultures and reduces chemokine and cytokine production from the human mesencephalic neuronal/glial cultures. These data suggest that synthetic cannabinoids are capable of protecting human dopaminergic neurons from gp120 in a variety

  8. Melatonin and Its Agonist Ramelteon in Alzheimer's Disease: Possible Therapeutic Value

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Kaur, Charanjit; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu; Brown, Gregory M.; Cardinali, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of cognitive function, loss of memory and insomnia, and abnormal behavioral signs and symptoms. Among the various theories that have been put forth to explain the pathophysiology of AD, the oxidative stress induced by amyloid β-protein (Aβ) deposition has received great attention. Studies undertaken on postmortem brain samples of AD patients have consistently shown extensive lipid, protein, and DNA oxidation. Presence of abnormal tau protein, mitochondrial dysfunction, and protein hyperphosphorylation all have been demonstrated in neural tissues of AD patients. Moreover, AD patients exhibit severe sleep/wake disturbances and insomnia and these are associated with more rapid cognitive decline and memory impairment. On this basis, the successful management of AD patients requires an ideal drug that besides antagonizing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity could also correct the disturbed sleep-wake rhythm and improve sleep quality. Melatonin is an effective chronobiotic agent and has significant neuroprotective properties preventing Aβ-induced neurotoxic effects in a number of animal experimental models. Since melatonin levels in AD patients are greatly reduced, melatonin replacement has the potential value to be used as a therapeutic agent for treating AD, particularly at the early phases of the disease and especially in those in whom the relevant melatonin receptors are intact. As sleep deprivation has been shown to produce oxidative damage, impaired mitochondrial function, neurodegenerative inflammation, and altered proteosomal processing with abnormal activation of enzymes, treatment of sleep disturbances may be a priority for arresting the progression of AD. In this context the newly introduced melatonin agonist ramelteon can be of much therapeutic value because of its highly selective action on melatonin MT1/MT2 receptors in promoting sleep. PMID:21197086

  9. Cholesterol lipids and cholesterol-containing lipid rafts in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; London, Erwin

    2016-09-01

    Sterols are important components of eukaryotic membranes, but rare in bacteria. Some bacteria obtain sterols from their host or environment. In some cases, these sterols form membrane domains analogous the lipid rafts proposed to exist in eukaryotic membranes. This review describes the properties and roles of sterols in Borrelia and Helicobacter.

  10. Lipids of Sarcina lutea III. Composition of the Complex Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Charles K.; Albro, Phillip W.; Grindey, Gerald B.

    1965-01-01

    Huston, Charles K. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.), Phillip W. Albro, and Gerald B. Grindey. Lipids of Sarcina lutea. III. Composition of the complex lipids. J. Bacteriol. 89:768–775. 1965.—The complex lipids from a strain of Sarcina lutea were isolated and separated into fractions on diethylaminoethyl cellulose acetate and silicic acid columns. These fractions were monitored in several thin-layer chromatography systems. The various lipid types were characterized by their behavior in thin-layer systems and by an analysis of their hydrolysis products. The fatty acid composition of the column fractions was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. A number of components (13) were separated by thin-layer chromatography and characterized. The major components were polyglycerol phosphatide (17.0%), lipoamino acids (15.1%), phosphatidyl glycerol (13.8%), and an incompletely characterized substance (15.0%). Minor constituents included phosphatidyl inositol (5.5%), phosphatidic acid (4.2%), phosphatidyl serine (2.0%), and phosphatidyl choline (1.0%). No phosphatidyl ethanolamine was observed. PMID:14273659

  11. Melatonin and melatonin agonist for delirium in the elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Dwaipayan; Tampi, Deena J; Tampi, Rajesh R

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize the available data on the use of melatonin and melatonin agonist for the prevention and management of delirium in the elderly patients from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A systematic search of 5 major databases PubMed, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Embase, and Cochrane Library was conducted. This search yielded a total of 2 RCTs for melatonin. One study compared melatonin to midazolam, clonidine, and control groups for the prevention and management of delirium in individuals who were pre- and posthip post-hip arthroplasty. The other study compared melatonin to placebo for the prevention of delirium in older adults admitted to an inpatient internal medicine service. Data from these 2 studies indicate that melatonin may have some benefit in the prevention and management of delirium in older adults. However, there is no evidence that melatonin reduces the severity of delirium or has any effect on behaviors or functions in these individuals. Melatonin was well tolerated in these 2 studies. The search for a melatonin agonist for delirium in the elderly patients yielded 1 study of ramelteon. In this study, ramelteon was found to be beneficial in preventing delirium in medically ill individuals when compared to placebo. Ramelteon was well tolerated in this study.

  12. GLP-1 receptor agonist-induced polyarthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Maria Luisa; Monami, Matteo; Sati, Lavinia; Marchionni, Niccolò; Di Bari, Mauro; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2014-08-01

    Occasional cases of bilateral, symmetrical, seronegative polyarthritis have been reported in patients treated with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (Crickx et al. in Rheumatol Int, 2013). We report here a similar case observed during treatment with a GLP-1 receptor agonist. A 42-year-old man with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin 1,500 mg/day and liraglutide 1.8 mg/day. After 6 months from the beginning of treatment, the patient complained of bilateral arthralgia (hands, feet, ankles, knees, and hips). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and leukocytes were increased. Rheumatoid factor, anticyclic citrullinated protein antibody, antinuclear antibodies, anti-Borrelia, and burgdorferi antibodies were all negative, and myoglobin and calcitonin were normal. Liraglutide was withdrawn, and the symptoms completely disappeared within 1 week, with normalization of ESR, CRP, fibrinogen, and leukocytes. Previously described cases of polyarthritis associated with DPP4 inhibitors had been attributed to a direct effect of the drugs on inflammatory cells expressing the enzyme. The present case, occurred during treatment with a GLP-1 receptor agonists, suggests a possibly different mechanism, mediated by GLP-1 receptor stimulation, which deserved further investigation.

  13. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist attenuates ILC2-dependent airway hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Galle-Treger, Lauriane; Suzuki, Yuzo; Patel, Nisheel; Sankaranarayanan, Ishwarya; Aron, Jennifer L.; Maazi, Hadi; Chen, Lin; Akbari, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a complex and chronic inflammatory disorder that is associated with airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and driven by Th2 cytokine secretion. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) produce large amounts of Th2 cytokines and contribute to the development of AHR. Here, we show that ILC2s express the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR), which is thought to have an anti-inflammatory role in several inflammatory diseases. We show that engagement of a specific agonist with α7nAChR on ILC2s reduces ILC2 effector function and represses ILC2-dependent AHR, while decreasing expression of ILC2 key transcription factor GATA-3 and critical inflammatory modulator NF-κB, and reducing phosphorylation of upstream kinase IKKα/β. Additionally, the specific α7nAChR agonist reduces cytokine production and AHR in a humanized ILC2 mouse model. Collectively, our data suggest that α7nAChR expressed by ILC2s is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ILC2-mediated asthma. PMID:27752043

  14. The evolution of histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Lebois, Evan P; Jones, Carrie K; Lindsley, Craig W

    2011-01-01

    This article describes our efforts along with recent advances in the development, biological evaluation and clinical proof of concept of small molecule histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists. The H3 receptor is a presynaptic autoreceptor within the Class A GPCR family, but also functions as a heteroreceptor modulating levels of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate. Thus, H₃R has garnered a great deal of interest from the pharmaceutical industry for the possible treatment of obesity, epilepsy, sleep/wake, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, neuropathic pain and ADHD. Within the two main classes of H₃ ligands, both imidazole and non-imidazole derived, have shown sufficient potency and specificity which culminated with efficacy in preclinical models for various CNS disorders. Importantly, conserved elements have been identified within the small molecule H₃ ligand scaffolds that resulted in a highly predictive pharmacophore model. Understanding of the pharmacophore model has allowed several groups to dial H₃R activity into scaffolds designed for other CNS targets, and engender directed polypharmacology. Moreover, Abbott, GSK, Pfizer and several others have reported positive Phase I and/or Phase II data with structurally diverse H₃R antagonists/inverse agonists.

  15. Mood Disorders, Circadian Rhythms, Melatonin and Melatonin Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Quera Salva, M.A.; Hartley, S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of circadian rhythms have led to an interest in the treatment of major depressive disorder with chronobiotic agents. Many tissues have autonomous circadian rhythms, which are orchestrated by the master clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNC). Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine) is secreted from the pineal gland during darkness. Melatonin acts mainly on MT1 and MT2 receptors, which are present in the SNC, regulating physiological and neuroendocrine functions, including circadian entrainment, referred to as the chronobiotic effet. Circadian rhythms has been shown to be either misaligned or phase shifted or decreased in amplitude in both acute episodes and relapse of major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder. Manipulation of circadian rhythms either using physical treatments (such as high intensity light) or behavioral therapy has shown promise in improving symptoms. Pharmacotherapy using melatonin and pure melatonin receptor agonists, while improving sleep, has not been shown to improve symptoms of depression. A novel antidepressant, agomelatine, combines 5HT2c antagonist and melatonin agonist action, and has shown promise in both acute treatment of MDD and in preventing relapse. PMID:23650464

  16. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John M.; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O.; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A.; Milner, Joshua D.; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K.; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  17. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Knight, John M; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A; Milner, Joshua D; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah; McMurray, John S; Corry, David B

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6.

  18. Pharmacology and toxicology of Cannabis derivatives and endocannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Zaimovic, Amir; Gerra, Maria L; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cippitelli, Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Somaini, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    For centuries Cannabis sativa and cannabis extracts have been used in natural medicine. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main active ingredient of Cannabis. THC seems to be responsible for most of the pharmacological and therapeutic actions of cannabis. In a few countries THC extracts (i.e. Sativex) or THC derivatives such as nabilone, and dronabinol are used in the clinic for the treatment of several pathological conditions like chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. On the other hand the severe side effects and the high abuse liability of these agents represent a serious limitation in their medical use. In addition, diversion in the use of these active ingredients for recreational purpose is a concern. Over recent years, alternative approaches using synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists or agents acting as activators of the endocannabinoid systems are under scrutiny with the hope to develop more effective and safer clinical applications. Likely, in the near future few of these new molecules will be available for clinical use. The present article review recent study and patents with focus on the cannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of central nervous system disorders with emphasis on agonists.

  19. How does agonistic behaviour differ in albino and pigmented fish?

    PubMed Central

    Horký, Pavel; Wackermannová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    In addition to hypopigmentation of the skin and red iris colouration, albino animals also display distinct physiological and behavioural alterations. However, information on the social interactions of albino animals is rare and has mostly been limited to specially bred strains of albino rodents and animals from unique environments in caves. Differentiating between the effects of albinism and domestication on behaviour in rodents can be difficult, and social behaviour in cave fish changes according to species-specific adaptations to conditions of permanent darkness. The agonistic behaviours of albino offspring of pigmented parents have yet to be described. In this study, we observed agonistic behaviour in albino and pigmented juvenile Silurus glanis catfish. We found that the total number of aggressive interactions was lower in albinos than in pigmented catfish. The distance between conspecifics was also analysed, and albinos showed a tendency towards greater separation from their same-coloured conspecifics compared with pigmented catfish. These results demonstrate that albinism can be associated with lower aggressiveness and with reduced shoaling behaviour preference, as demonstrated by a tendency towards greater separation of albinos from conspecifics. PMID:27114883

  20. Chemical and structural investigation of lipid nanoparticles: drug-lipid interaction and molecular distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantachaisilp, Suranan; Meejoo Smith, Siwaporn; Treetong, Alongkot; Pratontep, Sirapat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Rungsardthong Ruktanonchai, Uracha

    2010-03-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are a promising alternative to existing carriers in chemical or drug delivery systems. A key challenge is to determine how chemicals are incorporated and distributed inside nanoparticles, which assists in controlling chemical retention and release characteristics. This study reports the chemical and structural investigation of γ-oryzanol loading inside a model lipid nanoparticle drug delivery system composed of cetyl palmitate as solid lipid and Miglyol 812® as liquid lipid. The lipid nanoparticles were prepared by high pressure homogenization at varying liquid lipid content, in comparison with the γ-oryzanol free systems. The size of the lipid nanoparticles, as measured by the photon correlation spectroscopy, was found to decrease with increased liquid lipid content from 200 to 160 nm. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements of the medium chain triglyceride of the liquid lipid has confirmed successful incorporation of the liquid lipid in the lipid nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetric and powder x-ray diffraction measurements provide complementary results to the 1H-NMR, whereby the crystallinity of the lipid nanoparticles diminishes with an increase in the liquid lipid content. For the distribution of γ-oryzanol inside the lipid nanoparticles, the 1H-NMR revealed that the chemical shifts of the liquid lipid in γ-oryzanol loaded systems were found at rather higher field than those in γ-oryzanol free systems, suggesting incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid lipid. In addition, the phase-separated structure was observed by atomic force microscopy for lipid nanoparticles with 0% liquid lipid, but not for lipid nanoparticles with 5 and 10% liquid lipid. Raman spectroscopic and mapping measurements further revealed preferential incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid part rather than the solid part of in the lipid nanoparticles. Simple models representing the distribution of γ-oryzanol and

  1. Nanoparticle-lipid bilayer interactions studied with lipid bilayer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bin; Smith, Tyler; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2015-04-01

    The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which can provide insight into the nature of the particle-membrane interaction through variation of membrane and solution properties not possible with cell-based assays. However, the scope of these studies can be limited because of the low throughput characteristic of lipid bilayer platforms. We have recently described an easy to use, parallel lipid bilayer platform which we have used to electrically investigate the activity of 60 nm diameter amine and carboxyl modified polystyrene nanoparticles (NH2-NP and COOH-NP) with over 1000 lipid bilayers while varying lipid composition, bilayer charge, ionic strength, pH, voltage, serum, particle concentration, and particle charge. Our results confirm recent studies finding activity of NH2-NP but not COOH-NP. Detailed analysis shows that NH2-NP formed pores 0.3-2.3 nm in radius, dependent on bilayer and solution composition. These interactions appear to be electrostatic, as they are regulated by NH2-NP surface charge, solution ionic strength, and bilayer charge. The ability to rapidly measure a large number of nanoparticle and membrane parameters indicates strong potential of this bilayer array platform for additional nanoparticle bilayer studies.The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which

  2. Perioperative treatment with the new synthetic TLR-4 agonist GLA-SE reduces cancer metastasis without adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Pini; Sorski, Liat; Shaashua, Lee; Elbaz, Ely; Lavon, Hagar; Melamed, Rivka; Rosenne, Ella; Gotlieb, Neta; Benbenishty, Amit; Reed, Steve G; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2016-04-01

    The use of TLR agonists as an anti-cancer treatment is gaining momentum given their capacity to activate various host cellular responses through the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and type-I interferons. It is now also recognized that the perioperative period is a window of opportunity for various interventions aiming at reducing the risk of cancer metastases-the major cause of cancer related death. However, immune-stimulatory approach has not been used perioperatively given several contraindications to surgery. To overcome these obstacles, in this study, we used the newly introduced, fully synthetic TLR-4 agonist, Glucopyranosyl Lipid-A (GLA-SE), in various models of cancer metastases, and in the context of acute stress or surgery. Without exerting evident adverse effects, a single systemic administration of GLA-SE rapidly and dose dependently elevated both innate and adaptive immunity in the circulation, lungs and the lymphatic system. Importantly, GLA-SE treatment led to reduced metastatic development of a mammary adenocarcinoma and a colon carcinoma by approximately 40-75% in F344 rats and BALB/c mice, respectively, at least partly through elevating marginating-pulmonary NK cell cytotoxicity. GLA-SE is safe and well tolerated in humans, and currently is used as an adjuvant in phase-II clinical trials. Given that the TLR-4 receptor and its signaling cascade is highly conserved throughout evolution, our current results suggest that GLA-SE may be a promising immune stimulatory agent in the context of oncological surgeries, aiming to reduce long-term cancer recurrence.

  3. Anti-kindling Effect of Bezafibrate, a Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptors Alpha Agonist, in Pentylenetetrazole Induced Kindling Seizure Model

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Lekha; Bhandari, Swati; Bhatia, Alka; Banerjee, Dibyajyoti; Chakrabarti, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Studies in the animals suggested that Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) may be involved in seizure control and selective agonists of PPAR α or PPAR γ raise seizure thresholds. The present study was contemplated with the aim of evaluating the anti kindling effects and the mechanism of bezafibrate, a Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α (PPAR-α) agonist in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced kindling model of seizures in rats. Methods: In a PTZ kindled Wistar rat model, different doses of bezafibrate (100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally 30 minutes before the PTZ injection. The PTZ injection was given on alternate day till the animal became fully kindled or till 10 weeks. The parameters measured were the latency to develop kindling and incidence of kindling, histopathological study of hippocampus, hippocampal lipid peroxidation studies, serum neuron specific enolase, and hippocampal DNA fragmentation study. Results: In this study, bezafibrate significantly reduced the incidence of kindling in PTZ treated rats and exhibited a marked prolongation in the latencies to seizures. In the present study bezafibrate decreased the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance i.e. Malondialdehyde levels, increased the reduced glutathione levels, catalase and superoxide dismutase activity in the brain. This added to its additional neuroprotective effects. Bezafibrate also reduced the neuronal damage and apoptosis in hippocampal area of the brain. Therefore bezafibrate exerted anticonvulsant properties in PTZ induced kindling model in rats. Conclusions: These findings may provide insights into the understanding of the mechanism of bezafibrate as an anti kindling agent and could offer a useful support to the basic antiepileptic therapy in preventing the development of PTZ induced seizures, suggesting its potential for therapeutic applications in temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:25625088

  4. Lipid flopping in the liver.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kenneth J

    2015-10-01

    Bile is synthesized in the liver and is essential for the emulsification of dietary lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins. It is a complex mixture of amphiphilic bile acids (BAs; which act as detergent molecules), the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), cholesterol and a variety of endogenous metabolites and waste products. Over the last 20 years, the combined effort of clinicians, geneticists, physiologists and biochemists has shown that each of these bile components is transported across the canalicular membrane of the hepatocyte by its own specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. The bile salt export pump (BSEP) ABCB11 transports the BAs and drives bile flow from the liver, but it is now clear that two lipid transporters, ABCB4 (which flops PC into the bile) and the P-type ATPase ATP8B1/CDC50 (which flips a different phospholipid in the opposite direction) play equally critical roles that protect the biliary tree from the detergent activity of the bile acids. Understanding the interdependency of these lipid floppases and flippases has allowed the development of an assay to measure ABCB4 function. ABCB4 harbours numerous mis-sense mutations which probably reflects the spectrum of liver disease rooted in ABCB4 aetiology. Characterization of the effect of these mutations at the protein level opens the possibility for the development of personalized prognosis and treatment.

  5. You Sank My Lipid Rafts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Tessa N.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane is the membrane that serves as a boundary between the interior of a cell and its extracellular environment. Lipid rafts are microdomains within a cellular membrane that possess decreased fluidity due to the presence of cholesterol, glycolipids, and phospholipids containing longer fatty acids. These domains are involved in many…

  6. Lipid membranes on nanostructured silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, Andrea Lynn; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Ista, Linnea K.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bisong, Paul; Zeineldin, Reema R.; Last, Julie A.; Brueck, Stephen R. J.

    2004-12-01

    A unique composite nanoscale architecture that combines the self-organization and molecular dynamics of lipid membranes with a corrugated nanotextured silicon wafer was prepared and characterized with fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The goal of this project was to understand how such structures can be assembled for supported membrane research and how the interfacial interactions between the solid substrate and the soft, self-assembled material create unique physical and mechanical behavior through the confinement of phases in the membrane. The nanometer scale structure of the silicon wafer was produced through interference lithography followed by anisotropic wet etching. For the present study, a line pattern with 100 nm line widths, 200 nm depth and a pitch of 360 nm pitch was fabricated. Lipid membranes were successfully adsorbed on the structured silicon surface via membrane fusion techniques. The surface topology of the bilayer-Si structure was imaged using in situ tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The membrane was observed to drape over the silicon structure producing an undulated topology with amplitude of 40 nm that matched the 360 nm pitch of the silicon structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments found that on the microscale those same structures exhibit anisotropic lipid mobility that was coincident with the silicon substructure. The results showed that while the lipid membrane maintains much of its self-assembled structure in the composite architecture, the silicon substructure indeed influences the dynamics of the molecular motion within the membrane.

  7. Coupling between agonist and chloride ionophore sites of the GABA(A) receptor: agonist/antagonist efficacy of 4-PIOL.

    PubMed

    Rabe, H; Picard, R; Uusi-Oukari, M; Hevers, W; Lüddens, H; Korpi, E R

    2000-12-15

    Eight gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mimetics were tested on their ability to differentiate native GABA(A) receptor subtypes present in various rat brain regions. In rat brain cryostat sections, little regional variations by the agonistic actions of muscimol, thiomuscimol, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoazolo(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol, piperidine-4-sulphonic acid, taurine and beta-alanine on [35S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]TBPS) binding to GABA(A) receptor channels were found. They were very similar to those found for GABA itself and indicated no direct correlation with single subunit distributions for any of these compounds. Only the low-efficacy GABA mimetic 5-(4-piperidyl)isoxazol-3-ol (4-PIOL) acted like a weak partial agonist or antagonist depending on the brain area. As the cerebellar granule cell layer was relatively insensitive to both modes of action, we tested 4-PIOL in recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 (widespread major subtype) and alpha6beta2gamma2 (cerebellar granule cell restricted) receptors where it had different effects on GABA-modulated [35S]TBPS binding and on electrophysiological responses. 4-PIOL may thus serve as a potential lead for receptor subtype selective compounds.

  8. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  9. Anandamide and analogous endocannabinoids: a lipid self-assembly study

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Krodkiewska, Irena; Mulet, Xavier; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    Anandamide, the endogenous agonist of the cannabinoid receptors, has been widely studied for its interesting biological and medicinal properties and is recognized as a highly significant lipid signaling molecule within the nervous system. Few studies have, however, examined the effect of the physical conformation of anandamide on its function. The study presented herein has focused on characterizing the self-assembly behaviour of anandamide and four other endocannabinoid analogues of anandamide, viz., 2-arachidonyl glycerol, arachidonyl dopamine, 2-arachidonyl glycerol ether (noladin ether), and o-arachidonyl ethanolamide (virodhamine). Molecular modeling of the five endocannabinoid lipids indicates that the highly unsaturated arachidonyl chain has a preference for a U or J shaped conformation. Thermal phase studies of the neat amphiphiles showed that a glass transition was observed for all of the endocannabinoids at {approx} -110 C with the exception of anandamide, with a second glass transition occurring for 2-arachidonyl glycerol, 2-arachidonyl glycerol ether, and virodhamine (-86 C, -95 C, -46 C respectively). Both anandamide and arachidonyl dopamine displayed a crystal-isotropic melting point (-4.8 and -20.4 C respectively), while a liquid crystal-isotropic melting transition was seen for 2-arachidonyl glycerol (-40.7 C) and 2-arachidonyl glycerol ether (-71.2 C). No additional transitions were observed for virodhamine. Small angle X-ray scattering and cross polarized optical microscopy studies as a function of temperature indicated that in the presence of excess water, both 2-arachidonyl glycerol and anandamide form co-existing Q{sub II}{sup G} (gyroid) and Q{sub II}{sup D} (diamond) bicontinuous cubic phases from 0 C to 20 C, which are kinetically stable over a period of weeks but may not represent true thermodynamic equilibrium. Similarly, 2-arachidonyl glycerol ether acquired an inverse hexagonal (HII) phase in excess water from 0 C to 40 C, while

  10. Effects of beta-adrenergic blockers with different ancillary properties on lipid peroxidation in hyperthyroid rat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Asayama, K; Dobashi, K; Hayashibe, H; Kato, K

    1989-10-01

    To determine whether beta-blockade protects rat heart against thyroxine (T4)-induced accelelation of lipid peroxidation, in vivo effects of 3 beta-blockers with different ancillary properties on the mitochondrial oxidative enzyme, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxide were investigated. The rats were rendered hyperthyroid by adding T4 to their drinking water for 3 weeks and were treated simultaneously with either carteolol (a blocker with partial agonist activity; 30 mg/kg/day), atenolol (50 mg/kg/day) or arotinolol (a blocker with weak alpha-blocking action; 50 mg/kg/day). The T4-induced tachycardia was alleviated completely by either atenolol or arotinolol, but only partially by carteolol. Cytochrome c oxidase activity in the heart muscle was increased by T4 with a parallel increase in manganese (mitochondrial) superoxide dismutase. Atenolol, but neither carteolol nor arotinolol, suppressed this increase. Similarly, the T4-induced acceleration of lipid peroxidation was suppressed by atenolol alone. Glutathione peroxidase was markedly decreased, and both copper zinc (cytosolic) superoxide dismutase and catalase were also decreased or tended to be decreased by T4. The levels of these 3 enzymes were only minimally affected by the beta-blocker treatments. These results suggest that beta-blockade suppresses mitochondrial hypermetabolism and protects heart muscle against oxidative stress in hyperthyroidism, and that the ancillary properties of beta-blockers such as partial agonist activity and alpha-blocking action negate the protection.

  11. Effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist treatment on elemental and biomolecular content and distribution in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, J.; Gajda, M.; Jawień, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Appel, K.; Dumas, P.

    2013-12-01

    Gene-targeted apolipoprotein E-knockout (apoE-KO) mice display early and highly progressive vascular lesions containing lipid deposits and they became a reliable animal model to study atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist on the distribution of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory elements as well as biomolecules in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and Fourier Transform Infrared (micro-FTIR) microspectroscopies were applied. Two-month-old apoE-KO mice were fed for following four months diet supplemented with AVE 0991 (0.58 μmol/kg b.w. per day). Histological sections of ascending aortas were analyzed spectroscopically. The distribution of P, Ca, Fe and Zn were found to correspond with histological structure of the lesion. Significantly lower contents of P, Ca, Zn and significantly higher content of Fe were observed in animals treated with AVE 0991. Biomolecular analysis showed lower lipids saturation level and lower lipid to protein ratio in AVE 0991 treated group. Protein secondary structure was studied according to the composition of amide I band (1660 cm-1) and it demonstrated higher proportion of β-sheet structure as compared to α-helix in both studied groups.

  12. Substrate-supported lipid nanotube arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A. I.; Poluektov, O. G.; Chemistry; North Carolina State

    2003-07-16

    This Communication describes the self-assembly of phospholipids into lipid nanotubes inside nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide substrate. Orientations of the lipid molecules in such lipid nanoscale structures were verified by high-resolution spin labeling EPR at 95 GHz. The static order parameter of lipids in such nanotube arrays was determined from low-temperature EPR spectra and was found to be exceptionally high, S{sub static} {approx} 0.9. We propose that substrate-supported lipid nanotube arrays have potential for building robust biochips and biosensors in which rigid nanoporous substrates protect the bilayer surface from contamination. The total bilayer surface in the lipid nanotube arrays is much greater than that in the planar substrate-supported membranes. The lipid nanotube arrays seem to be suitable for developing patterned lipid deposition and could be potentially used for patterning of membrane-associated molecules.

  13. Discriminative stimulus properties of indorenate, a serotonin agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Martínez, D N; López Cabrera, M; Sánchez, H; Ramírez, J I; Hong, E

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether indorenate, a serotonin-receptor agonist, can exert discriminative control over operant responses, to establish the temporal course of discriminative control and to compare its stimulus properties to a (5-HT)IA receptor agonist. [3H]-8-hydroxy-2-(di-N-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). DESIGN: Prospective animal study. ANIMALS: Ten male Wistar rats. INTERVENTIONS: Rats were trained to press either of 2 levers for sucrose solution according to a fixed ratio schedule, which was gradually increased. Rats were given injections of either indorenate or saline solution during discrimination training. Once they had achieved an 83% accuracy rate, rats underwent generalization tests after having received a different dose of indorenate, the training dose of indorenate at various intervals before the test, various doses of 8-OH-DPT, or NAN-190 administered before indorenate or 8-OH-DPAT. OUTCOME MEASURES: Distribution of responses between the 2 levers before the first reinforcer of the session, response rate for all the responses in the session, and a discrimination index that expressed the drug-appropriate responses as a proportion of the total responses. RESULTS: Indorenate administration resulted in discriminative control over operant responses, maintained at fixed ratio 10, at a dose of 10.0 mg/kg (but not 3.0 mg/kg). When the interval between the administration of indorenate and the start of the session was varied, the time course of its cue properties followed that of its described effects on 5-HT turnover. In generalization tests, the discrimination index was a function of the dose of indorenate employed; moreover, administration of 8-OH-DPAT (from 0.1 to 1.0 mg/kg) fully mimicked the stimulus properties of indorenate in a dose-dependent way. The (5-HT)IA antagonist NAN-190 prevented the stimulus generalization from indorenate to 8-OH-DPAT. Also, NAN-190 antagonized the stimulus control of indorenate when administered 45 minutes before

  14. New Small Molecule Agonists to the Thyrotropin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M. Rejwan; Ma, Risheng; David, Martine; Morshed, Syed A.; Ohlmeyer, Michael; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Lau, Zerlina; Mezei, Mihaly; Davies, Terry F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Novel small molecular ligands (SMLs) to the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) have potential as improved molecular probes and as therapeutic agents for the treatment of thyroid dysfunction and thyroid cancer. Methods To identify novel SMLs to the TSHR, we developed a transcription-based luciferase-cAMP high-throughput screening system and we screened 48,224 compounds from a 100K library in duplicate. Results We obtained 62 hits using the cut-off criteria of the mean±three standard deviations above the baseline. Twenty molecules with the greatest activity were rescreened against the parent CHO-luciferase cell for nonspecific activation, and we selected two molecules (MS437 and MS438) with the highest potency for further study. These lead molecules demonstrated no detectible cross-reactivity with homologous receptors when tested against luteinizing hormone (LH)/human chorionic gonadotropin receptor and follicle stimulating hormone receptor–expressing cells. Molecule MS437 had a TSHR-stimulating potency with an EC50 of 13×10−8 M, and molecule MS438 had an EC50 of 5.3×10−8 M. The ability of these small molecule agonists to bind to the transmembrane domain of the receptor and initiate signal transduction was suggested by their activation of a chimeric receptor consisting of an LHR ectodomain and a TSHR transmembrane. Molecular modeling demonstrated that these molecules bound to residues S505 and E506 for MS438 and T501 for MS437 in the intrahelical region of transmembrane helix 3. We also examined the G protein activating ability of these molecules using CHO cells co-expressing TSHRs transfected with luciferase reporter vectors in order to measure Gsα, Gβγ, Gαq, and Gα12 activation quantitatively. The MS437 and MS438 molecules showed potent activation of Gsα, Gαq, and Gα12 similar to TSH, but neither the small molecule agonists nor TSH showed activation of the Gβγ pathway. The small molecules MS437 and MS438 also showed upregulation of

  15. MD-2 Residues Tyrosine 42, Arginine 69, Aspartic Acid 122, and Leucine 125 Provide Species Specificity for Lipid IVA*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jianmin; Drolet, Joshua R.; Monks, Brian G.; Golenbock, Douglas T.

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates the innate immune response through the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)·MD-2 complex. A synthetic lipid A precursor, lipid IVA, induces an innate immune response in mice but not in humans. Both TLR4 and MD-2 are required for the agonist activity of lipid IVA in mice, with TLR4 interacting through specific surface charges at the dimerization interface. In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to identify the MD-2 residues that determine lipid IVA species specificity. A single mutation of murine MD-2 at the hydrophobic pocket entrance, E122K, substantially reduced the response to lipid IVA. Combining the murine MD-2 E122K with the murine TLR4 K367E/S386K/R434Q mutations completely abolished the response to lipid IVA, effectively converting the murine cellular response to a human-like response. In human cells, however, simultaneous mutations of K122E, K125L, Y41F, and R69G on human MD-2 were required to promote a response to lipid IVA. Combining the human MD-2 quadruple mutations with the human TLR4 E369K/Q436R mutations completely converted the human MD-2/human TLR4 receptor to a murine-like receptor. Because MD-2 residues 122 and 125 reside at the dimerization interface near the pocket entrance, surface charge differences here directly affect receptor dimerization. In comparison, residues 42 and 69 reside at the MD-2/TLR4 interaction surface opposite the dimerization interface. Surface charge differences there likely affect the binding angle and/or rigidity between MD-2 and TLR4, exerting an indirect influence on receptor dimerization and activation. Thus, surface charge differences at the two MD-2/TLR4 interfaces determine the species-specific activation of lipid IVA. PMID:20592019

  16. Recombinant cannabinoid type 2 receptor in liposome model activates g protein in response to anionic lipid constituents.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Yeliseev, Alexei A; Vukoti, Krishna; Rhodes, Steven D; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2012-02-03

    Human cannabinoid type 2 (CB(2)) receptor expressed in Escherichia coli was purified and successfully reconstituted in the functional form into lipid bilayers composed of POPC, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (POPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Reconstitution was performed by detergent removal from the protein/lipid/detergent mixed micelles either on an adsorbent column, or by rapid dilution to below the critical micelle concentration of detergent followed by removal of detergent monomers on a concentrator. Proteoliposomes prepared at a protein/phospholipid/CHS molar ratio of 1/620-650/210-220 are free of detergent as shown by (1)H NMR, have a homogeneous protein/lipid ratio shown by isopycnic gradient ultracentrifugation, and are small in size with a mean diameter of 150-200 nm as measured by dynamic light scattering. Functional integrity of the reconstituted receptor was confirmed by quantitative binding of (2)H-labeled agonist CP-55,940-d(6) measured by (2)H magic angle spinning NMR, as well as by activation of G protein. The efficiency of G protein activation by agonist-bound CB(2) receptor was affected by negative electric surface potentials of proteoliposomes controlled by the content of anionic CHS or POPS. The activation was highest at an anionic lipid content of about 50 mol %. There was no correlation between the efficiency of G protein activation and an increase of hydrocarbon chain order induced by CHS or cholesterol. The results suggest the importance of anionic lipids in regulating signal transduction by CB(2) receptor and other class A GPCR. The successful reconstitution of milligram quantities of pure, functional CB(2) receptor enables a wide variety of structural studies.

  17. Analysis of full and partial agonists binding to beta2-adrenergic receptor suggests a role of transmembrane helix V in agonist-specific conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Reynolds, Kimberly A; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A; Roth, Christopher B; Yeager, Mark; Abagyan, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    The 2.4 A crystal structure of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR) in complex with the high-affinity inverse agonist (-)-carazolol provides a detailed structural framework for the analysis of ligand recognition by adrenergic receptors. Insights into agonist binding and the corresponding conformational changes triggering G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation mechanism are of special interest. Here we show that while the carazolol pocket captured in the beta(2)AR crystal structure accommodates (-)-isoproterenol and other agonists without steric clashes, a finite movement of the flexible extracellular part of TM-V helix (TM-Ve) obtained by receptor optimization in the presence of docked ligand can further improve the calculated binding affinities for agonist compounds. Tilting of TM-Ve towards the receptor axis provides a more complete description of polar receptor-ligand interactions for full and partial agonists, by enabling optimal engagement of agonists with two experimentally identified anchor sites, formed by Asp113/Asn312 and Ser203/Ser204/Ser207 side chains. Further, receptor models incorporating a flexible TM-V backbone allow reliable prediction of binding affinities for a set of diverse ligands, suggesting potential utility of this approach to design of effective and subtype-specific agonists for adrenergic receptors. Systematic differences in capacity of partial, full and inverse agonists to induce TM-V helix tilt in the beta(2)AR model suggest potential role of TM-V as a conformational "rheostat" involved in the whole spectrum of beta(2)AR responses to small molecule signals.

  18. Impact of efficacy at the μ-opioid receptor on antinociceptive effects of combinations of μ-opioid receptor agonists and cannabinoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2014-11-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists, such as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), enhance the antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists, which suggests that combining cannabinoids with opioids would improve pain treatment. Combinations with lower efficacy agonists might be preferred and could avoid adverse effects associated with large doses; however, it is unclear whether interactions between opioids and cannabinoids vary across drugs with different efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists alone and in combination with cannabinoid receptor agonists were studied in rhesus monkeys (n = 4) using a warm water tail withdrawal procedure. Etorphine, fentanyl, morphine, buprenorphine, nalbuphine, Δ(9)-THC, and CP 55,940 (2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol) each increased tail withdrawal latency. Pretreatment with doses of Δ(9)-THC (1.0 mg/kg) or CP 55,940 (0.032 mg/kg) that were ineffective alone shifted the fentanyl dose-effect curve leftward 20.6- and 52.9-fold, respectively, and the etorphine dose-effect curve leftward 12.4- and 19.6-fold, respectively. Δ(9)-THC and CP 55,940 shifted the morphine dose-effect curve leftward only 3.4- and 7.9-fold, respectively, and the buprenorphine curve only 5.4- and 4.1-fold, respectively. Neither Δ(9)-THC nor CP 55,940 significantly altered the effects of nalbuphine. Cannabinoid receptor agonists increase the antinociceptive potency of higher efficacy opioid receptor agonists more than lower efficacy agonists; however, because much smaller doses of each drug can be administered in combinations while achieving adequate pain relief and that other (e.g., abuse-related) effects of opioids do not appear to be enhanced by cannabinoids, these results provide additional support for combining opioids with cannabinoids to treat pain.

  19. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have long been known for their ability to initiate innate immune responses upon exposure to conserved microbial components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and double-stranded RNA. More recently, this family of pattern recognition receptors has been attributed a critical role in the elicitation of anticancer immune responses, raising interest in the development of immunochemotherapeutic regimens based on natural or synthetic TLR agonists. In spite of such an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation, only three TLR agonists are currently licensed by FDA for use in cancer patients: bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that operates as a mixed TLR2/TLR4 agonist; monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a derivative of Salmonella minnesota that functions as a potent agonist of TLR4; and imiquimod, a synthetic imidazoquinoline that activates TLR7. One year ago, in the August and September issues of OncoImmunology, we described the main biological features of TLRs and discussed the progress of clinical studies evaluating the safety and therapeutic potential of TLR agonists in cancer patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this exciting area of research, focusing on preclinical studies that have been published during the last 13 mo and clinical trials launched in the same period to investigate the antineoplastic activity of TLR agonists. PMID:24083080

  20. Sensitivity of GBM cells to cAMP agonist-mediated apoptosis correlates with CD44 expression and agonist resistance with MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Paul M; Filiz, Gulay; Mantamadiotis, Theo

    2016-01-01

    In some cell types, activation of the second messenger cAMP leads to increased expression of proapoptotic Bim and subsequent cell death. We demonstrate that suppression of the cAMP pathway is a common event across many cancers and that pharmacological activation of cAMP in glioblastoma (GBM) cells leads to enhanced BIM expression and apoptosis in specific GBM cell types. We identified the MAPK signaling axis as the determinant of cAMP agonist sensitivity in GBM cells, with high MAPK activity corresponding to cAMP resistance and low activity corresponding to sensitization to cAMP-induced apoptosis. Sensitive cells were efficiently killed by cAMP agonists alone, while targeting both the cAMP and MAPK pathways in resistant GBM cells resulted in efficient apoptosis. We also show that CD44 is differentially expressed in cAMP agonist-sensitive and -resistant cells. We thus propose that CD44 may be a useful biomarker for distinguishing tumors that may be sensitive to cAMP agonists alone or cAMP agonists in combination with other pathway inhibitors. This suggests that using existing chemotherapeutic compounds in combination with existing FDA-approved cAMP agonists may fast track trials toward improved therapies for difficult-to-treat cancers, such as GBM. PMID:27906173

  1. Modulation of [3H]diazepam binding in rat cortical membranes by GABAA agonists.

    PubMed

    Wong, E H; Iversen, L L

    1985-04-01

    GABAA receptor agonists modulate [3H]diazepam binding in rat cortical membranes with different efficacies. At 23 degrees C, the relative potencies for enhancement of [3H]diazepam binding by agonists parallel their potencies in inhibiting [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid [( 3H]GABA) binding. The agonist concentrations needed for enhancement of [3H]diazepam binding are up to 35 times higher than for [3H]GABA binding and correspond closely to the concentrations required for displacement of [3H]bicuculline methochloride (BMC) binding. The maximum enhancement of [3H]diazepam varied among agonists: muscimol = GABA greater than isoguvacine greater than 3-aminopropane sulphonic acid (3APS) = imidazoleacetic acid (IAA) greater than 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo (4,5,6)-pyridin-3-ol (THIP) = taurine greater than piperidine 4-sulphonic acid (P4S). At 37 degrees C, the potencies of agonists remained unchanged, but isoguvacine, 3 APS, and THIP acquired efficacies similar to GABA, whereas IAA, taurine, and P4S maintained their partial agonist profiles. At both temperatures the agonist-induced enhancement of [3H]diazepam binding was reversible by bicuculline methobromide and by the steroid GABA antagonist RU 5135. These results stress the importance of studying receptor-receptor interaction under near-physiological conditions and offer an in vitro assay that may predict the agonist status of putative GABA receptor ligands.

  2. Use-dependent inhibition of P2X3 receptors by nanomolar agonist.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Emily B; Brink, Thaddeus S; Bergson, Pamela; Voigt, Mark M; Cook, Sean P

    2005-08-10

    P2X3 receptors desensitize within 100 ms of channel activation, yet recovery from desensitization requires several minutes. The molecular basis for this slow rate of recovery is unknown. We designed experiments to test the hypothesis that this slow recovery is attributable to the high affinity (< 1 nM) of desensitized P2X3 receptors for agonist. We found that agonist binding to the desensitized state provided a mechanism for potent inhibition of P2X3 current. Sustained applications of 0.5 nM ATP inhibited > 50% of current to repetitive applications of P2X3 agonist. Inhibition occurred at 1000-fold lower agonist concentrations than required for channel activation and showed strong use dependence. No inhibition occurred without previous activation and desensitization. Our data are consistent with a model whereby inhibition of P2X3 by nanomolar [agonist] occurs by the rebinding of agonist to desensitized channels before recovery from desensitization. For several ATP analogs, the concentration required to inhibit P2X3 current inversely correlated with the rate of recovery from desensitization. This indicates that the affinity of the desensitized state and recovery rate primarily depend on the rate of agonist unbinding. Consistent with this hypothesis, unbinding of [32P]ATP from desensitized P2X3 receptors mirrored the rate of recovery from desensitization. As expected, disruption of agonist binding by site-directed mutagenesis increased the IC50 for inhibition and increased the rate of recovery.

  3. Yawning and locomotor behavior induced by dopamine receptor agonists in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Min; Collins, Gregory T; Paul, Noel M; Grundt, Peter; Newman, Amy H; Xu, Ming; Grandy, David K; Woods, James H; Katz, Jonathan L

    2010-05-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) agonist-induced yawning in rats seems to be mediated by DA D3 receptors, and low doses of several DA agonists decrease locomotor activity, an effect attributed to presynaptic D2 receptors. Effects of several DA agonists on yawning and locomotor activity were examined in rats and mice. Yawning was reliably produced in rats, and by the cholinergic agonist, physostigmine, in both the species. However, DA agonists were ineffective in producing yawning in Swiss-Webster or DA D2R and DA D3R knockout or wild-type mice. The drugs significantly decreased locomotor activity in rats at one or two low doses, with activity returning to control levels at higher doses. In mice, the drugs decreased locomotion across a 1000-10 000-fold range of doses, with activity at control levels (U-91356A) or above control levels [(+/-)-7-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin HBr, quinpirole] at the highest doses. Low doses of agonists decreased locomotion in all mice except the DA D2R knockout mice, but were not antagonized by DA D2R or D3R antagonists (L-741 626, BP 897, or PG01037). Yawning does not provide a selective in-vivo indicator of DA D3R agonist activity in mice. Decreases in mouse locomotor activity by the DA agonists seem to be mediated by D2 DA receptors.

  4. Prolonging Survival of Corneal Transplantation by Selective Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Yang; Han, Gencheng; Jia, Liang; Wang, Liqiang; Lei, Tian; Huang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most used therapy for eye disorders. Although the cornea is somewhat an immune privileged organ, immune rejection is still the major problem that reduces the success rate. Therefore, effective chemical drugs that regulate immunoreactions are needed to improve the outcome of corneal transplantations. Here, a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) selective agonist was systematically evaluated in mouse allogeneic corneal transplantation and compared with the commonly used immunosuppressive agents. Compared with CsA and the non-selective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist FTY720, the S1P1 selective agonist can prolong the survival corneal transplantation for more than 30 days with a low immune response. More importantly, the optimal dose of the S1P1 selective agonist was much less than non-selective S1P receptor agonist FTY720, which would reduce the dose-dependent toxicity in drug application. Then we analyzed the mechanisms of the selected S1P1 selective agonist on the immunosuppression. The results shown that the S1P1 selective agonist could regulate the distribution of the immune cells with less CD4+ T cells and enhanced Treg cells in the allograft, moreover the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines TGF-β1 and IL-10 unregulated which can reduce the immunoreactions. These findings suggest that S1P1 selective agonist may be a more appropriate immunosuppressive compound to effectively prolong mouse allogeneic corneal grafts survival. PMID:25216235

  5. Bitter Taste Receptor Agonists Mitigate Features of Allergic Asthma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan; Yi, Roslyn; Nayak, Ajay P.; Wang, Nadan; Tang, Francesca; Knight, Morgan J.; Pan, Shi; Oliver, Brian; Deshpande, Deepak A.

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, mucus secretion, remodeling and hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Recent research has established the bronchodilatory effect of bitter taste receptor (TAS2R) agonists in various models. Comprehensive pre-clinical studies aimed at establishing effectiveness of TAS2R agonists in disease models are lacking. Here we aimed to determine the effect of TAS2R agonists on features of asthma. Further, we elucidated a mechanism by which TAS2R agonists mitigate features of asthma. Asthma was induced in mice using intranasal house dust mite or aerosol ova-albumin challenge, and chloroquine or quinine were tested in both prophylactic and treatment models. Allergen challenge resulted in airway inflammation as evidenced by increased immune cells infiltration and release of cytokines and chemokines in the lungs, which were significantly attenuated in TAS2R agonists treated mice. TAS2R agonists attenuated features of airway remodeling including smooth muscle mass, extracellular matrix deposition and pro-fibrotic signaling, and also prevented mucus accumulation and development of AHR in mice. Mechanistic studies using human neutrophils demonstrated that inhibition of immune cell chemotaxis is a key mechanism by which TAS2R agonists blocked allergic airway inflammation and exerted anti-asthma effects. Our comprehensive studies establish the effectiveness of TAS2R agonists in mitigating multiple features of allergic asthma.

  6. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of “new drug delivery systems” is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today. PMID:27882209

  7. Identification of diarylsulfonamides as agonists of the free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4/GPR120).

    PubMed

    Sparks, Steven M; Chen, Grace; Collins, Jon L; Danger, Dana; Dock, Steven T; Jayawickreme, Channa; Jenkinson, Stephen; Laudeman, Christopher; Leesnitzer, M Anthony; Liang, Xi; Maloney, Patrick; McCoy, David C; Moncol, David; Rash, Vincent; Rimele, Thomas; Vulimiri, Padmaja; Way, James M; Ross, Sean

    2014-07-15

    The exploration of a diarylsulfonamide series of free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4/GPR120) agonists is described. This work led to the identification of selective FFA4 agonist 8 (GSK137647A) and selective FFA4 antagonist 39. The in vitro profile of compounds 8 and 39 is presented herein.

  8. The dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF-82958 effectively increases eye blinking count in common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Manato; Kiyoshi, Akihiko; Murai, Takeshi; Nakako, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Ikejiri, Masaru; Ogi, Yuji; Ikeda, Kazuhito

    2016-03-01

    Eye blinking is a spontaneous behavior observed in all mammals, and has been used as a well-established clinical indicator for dopamine production in neuropsychiatric disorders, including Parkinson's disease and Tourette syndrome [1,2]. Pharmacological studies in humans and non-human primates have shown that dopamine agonists/antagonists increase/decrease eye blinking rate. Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) have recently attracted a great deal of attention as suitable experimental animals in the psychoneurological field due to their more developed prefrontal cortex than rodents, easy handling compare to other non-human primates, and requirement for small amounts of test drugs. In this study, we evaluated the effects of dopamine D1-4 receptors agonists on eye blinking in common marmosets. Our results show that the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF-82958 and the non-selective dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine significantly increased common marmosets eye blinking count, whereas the dopamine D2 agonist (+)-PHNO and the dopamine D3 receptor agonist (+)-PD-128907 produced somnolence in common marmosets resulting in a decrease in eye blinking count. The dopamine D4 receptor agonists PD-168077 and A-41297 had no effect on common marmosets' eye blinking count. Finally, the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 39166 completely blocked apomorphine-induced increase in eye blinking count. These results indicate that eye blinking in common marmosets may be a useful tool for in vivo screening of novel dopamine D1 receptor agonists as antipsychotics.

  9. Dopamine receptor agonists mediate neuroprotection in malonate-induced striatal lesion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Armentero, Marie-Thérèse; Fancellu, Roberto; Nappi, Giuseppe; Blandini, Fabio

    2002-12-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetic defects are involved in neurological disorders associated with neuronal damage in the striatum, such as Huntington's disease and cerebral ischemia. The striatal release of neurotransmitters, in particular dopamine, may contribute to the development of the neuronal damage. Recent studies have shown that dopamine agonists may exert neuroprotective effects via multiple mechanisms, including modulation of dopamine release from nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals. In rats, intrastriatal injection of malonate, a reversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, induces a lesion similar to that observed following focal ischemia or in Huntington's disease. In this study, we used the malonate model to explore the neuroprotective potential of dopamine agonists. Sprague-Dawley rats were injected systemically with increasing concentrations of D(1), D(2), or mixed D(1)/D(2) dopamine agonists prior to malonate intrastriatal insult. Administration of increasing doses of the D(2)-specific agonist quinpirole resulted in increased protection against malonate toxicity. Conversely, the D(1)-specific agonist SKF-38393, as well as the mixed D(1)/D(2) agonist apomorphine, conferred higher neuroprotection at lower than at higher concentrations. Our data suggest that malonate-induced striatal toxicity can be attenuated by systemic administration of dopamine agonists, with D(1) and D(2) agonists showing different profiles of efficacy.

  10. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of "new drug delivery systems" is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today.

  11. LIPID MAPS-Nature Lipidomics Gateway: An Online Resource for Students and Educators Interested in Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Manish; Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Dennis, Edward A.; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2012-01-01

    The LIPID MAPS-Nature Lipidomics Gateway is a free, comprehensive online resource providing tutorials and instructional material, experimental data for lipids and genes along with protocols and standards, databases of lipid structures and lipid-associated genes or proteins, and a variety of lipidomics tools. PMID:24764601

  12. LIPID MAPS-Nature Lipidomics Gateway: An Online Resource for Students and Educators Interested in Lipids.

    PubMed

    Sud, Manish; Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Dennis, Edward A; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2012-01-10

    The LIPID MAPS-Nature Lipidomics Gateway is a free, comprehensive online resource providing tutorials and instructional material, experimental data for lipids and genes along with protocols and standards, databases of lipid structures and lipid-associated genes or proteins, and a variety of lipidomics tools.

  13. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  14. TSH and Thyrotropic Agonists: Key Actors in Thyroid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Johannes W.; Landgrafe, Gabi; Fotiadou, Elisavet H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the reader with an overview of our current knowledge of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid feedback from a cybernetic standpoint. Over the past decades we have gained a plethora of information from biochemical, clinical, and epidemiological investigation, especially on the role of TSH and other thyrotropic agonists as critical components of this complex relationship. Integrating these data into a systems perspective delivers new insights into static and dynamic behaviour of thyroid homeostasis. Explicit usage of this information with mathematical methods promises to deliver a better understanding of thyrotropic feedback control and new options for personalised diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and targeted therapy, also by permitting a new perspective on the conundrum of the TSH reference range. PMID:23365787

  15. [Safety and tolerability of GLP-1 receptor agonists].

    PubMed

    Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1ra) are a new group of drugs with a glucose-lowering action due to their incretin effect. The GLP-1 receptor is expressed in various human tissues, which could be related to the pleiotropic effects of human GLP-1, as well as to the adverse effects described in patients treated with GLP-1ra. The risk of hypoglycaemia is low, which is one of the main considerations in the safety of this family of compounds and is also important to patients with diabetes. The most frequent adverse effect is nausea, which usually occurs at the start of treatment and is transient in 20-60% of affected patients. This article also reviews the information available on antibody formation, the potential effect on the thyroid gland, and the controversial association between this group of drugs with pancreatitis and cancer.

  16. [Safety and tolerability of GLP-1 receptor agonists].

    PubMed

    Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1ra) are a new group of drugs with a glucose-lowering action due to their incretin effect. The GLP-1 receptor is expressed in various human tissues, which could be related to the pleiotropic effects of human GLP-1, as well as to the adverse effects described in patients treated with GLP-1ra. The risk of hypoglycaemia is low, which is one of the main considerations in the safety of this family of compounds and is also important to patients with diabetes. The most frequent adverse effect is nausea, which usually occurs at the start of treatment and is transient in 20-60% of affected patients. This article also reviews the information available on antibody formation, the potential effect on the thyroid gland, and the controversial association between this group of drugs with pancreatitis and cancer.

  17. Locomotion induced by ventral tegmental microinjections of a nicotinic agonist.

    PubMed

    Museo, E; Wise, R A

    1990-03-01

    Bilateral microinjections of the nicotinic agonist cytisine (0.1, 1 or 10 nanomoles per side) into the ventral tegmental area increased locomotor activity. This increase in locomotion was antagonized by mecamylamine (2 mg/kg, IP), a nicotinic antagonist that readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, and by pimozide (0.3 mg/kg, IP), a central dopaminergic antagonist. Hexamethonium (2 mg/kg, IP), a nicotinic antagonist that, unlike mecamylamine, does not cross the blood-brain barrier, had no effect; this suggests that mecamylamine's attenuation of cytisine-induced locomotor activity resulted from a blockade of central and not peripheral nicotinic receptors. The data support the notion that nicotinic and dopaminergic substrates interact at the level of the VTA to produce increases in locomotor activity.

  18. Basal Insulin Use With GLP-1 Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sarah L; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF The combination of basal insulin and a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist is becoming increasingly common and offers several potential benefits to patients with type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies have demonstrated improved glycemic control and low risks of hypoglycemia and weight gain with the combination, which provides a safe and effective alternative to basal-bolus insulin with less treatment burden. Fixed-ratio combination products that administer both agents in a single injection are in the pipeline and will offer additional options for clinicians and patients. This review focuses on the rationale for, clinical evidence on, and implications of using this combination of therapies in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  19. Could dopamine agonists aid in drug development for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Frank, Guido K W

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways.

  20. Interaction of a radiolabeled agonist with cardiac muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Harden, T.K.; Meeker, R.B.; Martin, M.W.

    1983-12-01

    The interaction of a radiolabeled muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist, (methyl-/sup 3/H)oxotremorine acetate ((/sup 3/H)OXO), with a washed membrane preparation derived from rat heart, has been studied. In binding assays at 4 degrees C, the rate constants for association and dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO were 2 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 and 5 X 10(-3) min-1, respectively, Saturation binding isotherms indicated that binding was to a single population of sites with a Kd of approximately 300 pM. The density of (/sup 3/H)OXO binding sites (90-100 fmol/mg of protein) was approximately 75% of that determined for the radiolabeled receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate. Both muscarinic receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO with high affinity and Hill slopes of approximately one. Guanine nucleotides completely inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO. This effect was on the maximum binding (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)OXO with no change occurring in the Kd; the order of potency for five nucleotides was guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio-triphosphate) greater than 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate greater than GTP greater than or equal to guanosine/diphosphate greater than GMP. The (/sup 3/H)OXO-induced interaction of muscarinic receptors with a guanine nucleotide binding protein was stable to solubilization. That is, membrane receptors that were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)OXO could be solubilized with digitonin, and the addition of guanine nucleotides to the soluble, (/sup 3/H)OXO-labeled complex resulted in dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO from the receptor. Pretreatment of membranes with relatively low concentrations of N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)OXO binding by 85% with no change in the Kd of (/sup 3/H)OXO, and with no effect on (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding.

  1. Differential opioid agonist regulation of the mouse mu opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Blake, A D; Bot, G; Freeman, J C; Reisine, T

    1997-01-10

    Mu opioid receptors mediate the analgesia induced by morphine. Prolonged use of morphine causes tolerance development and dependence. To investigate the molecular basis of tolerance and dependence, the cloned mouse mu opioid receptor with an amino-terminal epitope tag was stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, and the effects of prolonged opioid agonist treatment on receptor regulation were examined. In HEK 293 cells the expressed mu receptor showed high affinity, specific, saturable binding of radioligands and a pertussis toxin-sensitive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. Pretreatment (1 h, 3 h, or overnight) of cells with 1 microM morphine or [D-Ala2MePhe4,Gly(ol)5]enkephalin (DAMGO) resulted in no apparent receptor desensitization, as assessed by opioid inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels. In contrast, the morphine and DAMGO pretreatments (3 h) resulted in a 3-4-fold compensatory increase in forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. The opioid agonists methadone and buprenorphine are used in the treatment of addiction because of a markedly lower abuse potential. Pretreatment of mu receptor-expressing HEK 293 cells with methadone or buprenorphine abolished the ability of opioids to inhibit adenylyl cyclase. No compensatory increase in forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation was found with methadone or buprenorphine; these opioids blocked the compensatory effects observed with morphine and DAMGO. Taken together, these results indicate that methadone and buprenorphine interact differently with the mouse mu receptor than either morphine or DAMGO. The ability of methadone and buprenorphine to desensitize the mu receptor and block the compensatory rise in forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation may be an underlying mechanism by which these agents are effective in the treatment of morphine addiction.

  2. Kappa Agonists as a Novel Therapy for Menopausal Hot Flashes

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Amy E.; Steiner, Robert A.; Chavkin, Charles; Clifton, Donald K.; Ferrara, Laura K.; Reed, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Postmenopausal hot flash etiology is poorly understood, making it difficult to develop and target ideal therapies. A network of hypothalamic estrogen-sensitive neurons producing Kisspeptin, Neurokinin B, and Dynorphin (KNDy neurons), located adjacent to the thermoregulatory center, regulate pulsatile secretion of GnRH and LH. Dynorphin may inhibit this system by binding kappa opioid receptors within the vicinity of KNDy neurons. We hypothesize that hot flashes are reduced by KNDy neuron manipulation. Methods A double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled pilot study evaluated the effect of a kappa agonist (KA).Hot flash frequency was the primary outcome. Twelve healthy postmenopausal women with moderate-severe hot flashes, ages 48-60 years, were randomized. Eight women with sufficient baseline hot flashes for statistical analysis completed all 3 interventions: placebo, standard Pentazocine/Naloxone (50/0.5 mg) or low-dose Pentazocine/Naloxone (25/0.25 mg). In an inpatient research setting, each participant received the 3 interventions, in randomized order, on 3 separate days. On each day, an intravenous catheter was inserted for luteinizing hormone (LH) blood sampling, and skin conductance and Holter monitors were placed. Subjective hot flash frequency and severity were recorded. Results Mean hot flash frequency 2-7 hours following therapy initiation was lower than that for placebo (KA standard-dose: 4.75 ± 0.67; KA low-dose: 4.50 ± 0.57; and placebo: 5.94 ± 0.78 hot flashes/5 hours; p =0.025). Hot flash intensity did not vary between interventions. LH pulsatility mirrored objective hot flashes in some, but not all women. Conclusions This pilot suggests that kappa agonists may affect menopausal vasomotor symptoms. PMID:25988798

  3. Agonistic and antagonistic estrogens in licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra).

    PubMed

    Simons, Rudy; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Mol, Loes A M; The, Susan A M; Bovee, Toine F H; Luijendijk, Teus J C; Verbruggen, Marian A; Gruppen, Harry

    2011-07-01

    The roots of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) are a rich source of flavonoids, in particular, prenylated flavonoids, such as the isoflavan glabridin and the isoflavene glabrene. Fractionation of an ethyl acetate extract from licorice root by centrifugal partitioning chromatography yielded 51 fractions, which were characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and screened for activity in yeast estrogen bioassays. One third of the fractions displayed estrogenic activity towards either one or both estrogen receptors (ERs; ERα and ERβ). Glabrene-rich fractions displayed an estrogenic response, predominantly to the ERα. Surprisingly, glabridin did not exert agonistic activity to both ER subtypes. Several fractions displayed higher responses than the maximum response obtained with the reference compound, the natural hormone 17β-estradiol (E(2)). The estrogenic activities of all fractions, including this so-called superinduction, were clearly ER-mediated, as the estrogenic response was inhibited by 20-60% by known ER antagonists, and no activity was found in yeast cells that did not express the ERα or ERβ subtype. Prolonged exposure of the yeast to the estrogenic fractions that showed superinduction did, contrary to E(2), not result in a decrease of the fluorescent response. Therefore, the superinduction was most likely the result of stabilization of the ER, yeast-enhanced green fluorescent protein, or a combination of both. Most fractions displaying superinduction were rich in flavonoids with single prenylation. Glabridin displayed ERα-selective antagonism, similar to the ERα-selective antagonist RU 58668. Whereas glabridin was able to reduce the estrogenic response of E(2) by approximately 80% at 6 × 10(-6) M, glabrene-rich fractions only exhibited agonistic responses, preferentially on ERα.

  4. Cardiovascular selectivity of adenosine receptor agonists in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Gerencer, R. Z.; Finegan, B. A.; Clanachan, A. S.

    1992-01-01

    1. In order to determine the relevance of adenosine (Ado) receptor classification obtained from in vitro methods to the cardiovascular actions of Ado agonists in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA, 400 fold A1-selective), 5'-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA, A1 approximately A2) and 2-phenylaminoadenosine (PAA, 5 fold A2-selective) were compared in open-chest, fentanyl-pentobarbitone anaesthetized dogs. 2. Graded doses of CHA (10 to 1000 micrograms kg-1), NECA (0.5 to 100 micrograms kg-1) or PAA (0.1 to 20 micrograms kg-1) were administered intravenously and changes in haemodynamics and myocardial contractility were assessed 10 min following each dose. The effects of graded infusions of AMP (200 to 1000 micrograms kg-1 min-1) were also evaluated. 3. AMP and each of the Ado analogues (NECA > PAA > CHA) increased the systemic vascular conductance index (SVCI) in a dose-dependent manner and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). At doses causing similar increases in SVCI, these agonists caused (i) similar reflex increases in heart rate (HR) and cardiac index (CI) and decreases in AV conduction interval (AVi) and (ii) similar increases in coronary vascular conductance (CVC). 4. After cardiac autonomic blockade with atropine (0.2 mg kg-1) and propranolol (1 mg kg-1), AMP, CHA and PAA still increased SVCI and CVC and decreased MAP. CHA and PAA had no marked effects on HR, CI or AVi. As in the absence of cardiac autonomic blockade, equieffective vasodilator doses of CHA and PAA had identical effects on CVC, CI and AVi.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1467827

  5. GITR agonist enhances vaccination responses in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li X; Davoodi, Michael; Srivastava, Minu K; Kachroo, Puja; Lee, Jay M; St John, Maie; Harris-White, Marni; Huang, Min; Strieter, Robert M; Dubinett, Steven; Sharma, Sherven

    2015-04-01

    An immune tolerant tumor microenvironment promotes immune evasion of lung cancer. Agents that antagonize immune tolerance will thus aid the fight against this devastating disease. Members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family modulate the magnitude, duration and phenotype of immune responsiveness to antigens. Among these, GITR expressed on immune cells functions as a key regulator in inflammatory and immune responses. Here, we evaluate the GITR agonistic antibody (DTA-1) as a mono-therapy and in combination with therapeutic vaccination in murine lung cancer models. We found that DTA-1 treatment of tumor-bearing mice increased: (i) the frequency and activation of intratumoral natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes, (ii) the antigen presenting cell (APC) activity in the tumor, and (iii) systemic T-cell specific tumor cell cytolysis. DTA-1 treatment enhanced tumor cell apoptosis as quantified by cleaved caspase-3 staining in the tumors. DTA-1 treatment increased expression of IFNγ, TNFα and IL-12 but reduced IL-10 levels in tumors. Furthermore, increased anti-angiogenic chemokines corresponding with decreased pro-angiogenic chemokine levels correlated with reduced expression of the endothelial cell marker Meca 32 in the tumors of DTA-1 treated mice. In accordance, there was reduced tumor growth (8-fold by weight) in the DTA-1 treatment group. NK cell depletion markedly inhibited the antitumor response elicited by DTA-1. DTA-1 combined with therapeutic vaccination caused tumor rejection in 38% of mice and a 20-fold reduction in tumor burden in the remaining mice relative to control. Mice that rejected tumors following therapy developed immunological memory against subsequent re-challenge. Our data demonstrates GITR agonist antibody activated NK cell and T lymphocyte activity, and enhanced therapeutic vaccination responses against lung cancer.

  6. Influence of beta-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on baclofen-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, M R; Haidari, H; Jafari, M R; Djahanguiri, B

    2004-07-01

    Post-training administration of different doses of baclofen (a GABAB agonist) has been shown to impair memory retention, in a step-down passive avoidance test in mice. We have studied the effects of beta-adrenergic agonists and antagonists on baclofen-induced memory impairment in mice. Dobutamine (a beta 1-agonist) or salbutamol (a beta 2-agonist) reversed the memory impairment induced by baclofen without exhibiting intrinsic actions on memory when administered alone. The administration of atenolol (a beta 1-antagonist) or propranolol (a beta-antagonist) produced a memory impairment. When co-administered with baclofen, both atenolol and propranolol exacerbated the memory impairment induced by the GABAB agonist. It is concluded that beta-adrenergic mechanisms may be involved in the modulation of memory via GABAB receptors.

  7. Rate constants of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors in rat brain medulla. Evaluation by competition kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, G.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1985-07-25

    The method of competition kinetics, which measures the binding kinetics of an unlabeled ligand through its effect on the binding kinetics of a labeled ligand, was employed to investigate the kinetics of muscarinic agonist binding to rat brain medulla pons homogenates. The agonists studied were acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and oxotremorine, with N-methyl-4-(TH)piperidyl benzilate employed as the radiolabeled ligand. Our results suggested that the binding of muscarinic agonists to the high affinity sites is characterized by dissociation rate constants higher by 2 orders of magnitude than those of antagonists, with rather similar association rate constants. Our findings also suggest that isomerization of the muscarinic receptors following ligand binding is significant in the case of antagonists, but not of agonists. Moreover, it is demonstrated that in the medulla pons preparation, agonist-induced interconversion between high and low affinity bindings sites does not occur to an appreciable extent.

  8. Wheat leaf lipids during heat stress: II. Lipids experiencing coordinated metabolism are detected by analysis of lipid co-occurrence.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sruthi; Prasad, P V Vara; Welti, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    Identifying lipids that experience coordinated metabolism during heat stress would provide information regarding lipid dynamics under stress conditions and assist in developing heat-tolerant wheat varieties. We hypothesized that co-occurring lipids, which are up-regulated or down-regulated together through time during heat stress, represent groups that can be explained by coordinated metabolism. Wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L.) were subjected to 12 days of high day and/or night temperature stress, followed by a 4-day recovery period. Leaves were sampled at four time points, and 165 lipids were measured by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Correlation analysis of lipid levels in 160 leaf samples from each of two wheat genotypes revealed 13 groups of lipids. Lipids within each group co-occurred through the high day and night temperature stress treatments. The lipid groups can be broadly classified as groups containing extraplastidic phospholipids, plastidic glycerolipids, oxidized glycerolipids, triacylglycerols, acylated sterol glycosides and sterol glycosides. Current knowledge of lipid metabolism suggests that the lipids in each group co-occur because they are regulated by the same enzyme(s). The results suggest that increases in activities of desaturating, oxidizing, glycosylating and acylating enzymes lead to simultaneous changes in levels of multiple lipid species during high day and night temperature stress in wheat.

  9. Intramembrane aromatic interactions influence the lipid sensitivities of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Carswell, Casey L; Sun, Jiayin; Baenziger, John E

    2015-01-23

    Although the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine (PC) membranes lacking cholesterol and anionic lipids adopts a conformation where agonist binding is uncoupled from channel gating, the underlying mechanism remains to be defined. Here, we examine the mechanism behind lipid-dependent uncoupling by comparing the propensities of two prokaryotic homologs, Gloebacter and Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC and ELIC, respectively), to adopt a similar uncoupled conformation. Membrane-reconstituted GLIC and ELIC both exhibit folded structures in the minimal PC membranes that stabilize an uncoupled nAChR. GLIC, with a large number of aromatic interactions at the interface between the outermost transmembrane α-helix, M4, and the adjacent transmembrane α-helices, M1 and M3, retains the ability to flux cations in this uncoupling PC membrane environment. In contrast, ELIC, with a level of aromatic interactions intermediate between that of the nAChR and GLIC, does not undergo agonist-induced channel gating, although it does not exhibit the expected biophysical characteristics of the uncoupled state. Engineering new aromatic interactions at the M4-M1/M3 interface to promote effective M4 interactions with M1/M3, however, increases the stability of the transmembrane domain to restore channel function. Our data provide direct evidence that M4 interactions with M1/M3 are modulated during lipid sensing. Aromatic residues strengthen M4 interactions with M1/M3 to reduce the sensitivities of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels to their surrounding membrane environment.

  10. Combining a GLP-1 receptor agonist and basal insulin: study evidence and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Carris, Nicholas W; Taylor, James R; Gums, John G

    2014-12-01

    Most patients with diabetes mellitus require multiple medications to achieve glycemic goals. Considering this and the increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes worldwide, the need for effective combination therapy is pressing. Basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are frequently used to treat type 2 diabetes. Though both classes of medication are exclusively injectable, which may cause initial hesitation from providers, evidence for their combined use is substantial. This review summarizes the theoretical benefit, supporting evidence, and implementation of a combined basal insulin-GLP-1 receptor agonist regimen. Basal insulin added to a GLP-1 receptor agonist reduces hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) without weight gain or significantly increased hypoglycemia. A GLP-1 receptor agonist added to basal insulin reduces HbA1c and body weight. Compared with the addition of meal-time insulin to basal insulin, a GLP-1 receptor agonist produces similar or greater reduction in HbA1c, weight loss instead of weight gain, and less hypoglycemia. Gastrointestinal adverse events are common with GLP-1 receptor agonists, especially during initiation and titration. However, combination with basal insulin is not expected to augment expected adverse events that come with using a GLP-1 receptor agonist. Basal insulin can be added to a GLP-1 receptor agonist with a slow titration to target goal fasting plasma glucose. In patients starting a GLP-1 receptor agonist, the dose of basal insulin should be decreased by 20 % in patients with an HbA1c ≤8 %. The evidence from 15 randomized prospective studies supports the combined use of a GLP-1 receptor agonist with basal insulin in a broad range of patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

  11. Lipid Use and Misuse by the Heart.

    PubMed

    Schulze, P Christian; Drosatos, Konstantinos; Goldberg, Ira J

    2016-05-27

    The heart utilizes large amounts of fatty acids as energy providing substrates. The physiological balance of lipid uptake and oxidation prevents accumulation of excess lipids. Several processes that affect cardiac function, including ischemia, obesity, diabetes mellitus, sepsis, and most forms of heart failure lead to altered fatty acid oxidation and often also to the accumulation of lipids. There is now mounting evidence associating certain species of these lipids with cardiac lipotoxicity and subsequent myocardial dysfunction. Experimental and clinical data are discussed and paths to reduction of toxic lipids as a means to improve cardiac function are suggested.

  12. Lipid Polymorphisms and Membrane Shape

    PubMed Central

    Frolov, Vadim A.; Shnyrova, Anna V.; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Morphological plasticity of biological membrane is critical for cellular life, as cells need to quickly rearrange their membranes. Yet, these rearrangements are constrained in two ways. First, membrane transformations may not lead to undesirable mixing of, or leakage from, the participating cellular compartments. Second, membrane systems should be metastable at large length scales, ensuring the correct function of the particular organelle and its turnover during cellular division. Lipids, through their ability to exist with many shapes (polymorphism), provide an adequate construction material for cellular membranes. They can self-assemble into shells that are very flexible, albeit hardly stretchable, which allows for their far-reaching morphological and topological behaviors. In this article, we will discuss the importance of lipid polymorphisms in the shaping of membranes and its role in controlling cellular membrane morphology. PMID:21646378

  13. Lipid Chaperones and Metabolic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Masato; Ishimura, Shutaro; Ota, Hideki; Miura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, a large body of evidence has emerged demonstrating an integration of metabolic and immune response pathways. It is now clear that obesity and associated disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a metabolically driven, low-grade, chronic inflammatory state, referred to as “metaflammation.” Several inflammatory cytokines as well as lipids and metabolic stress pathways can activate metaflammation, which targets metabolically critical organs and tissues including adipocytes and macrophages to adversely affect systemic homeostasis. On the other hand, inside the cell, fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), a family of lipid chaperones, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria play significant roles in promotion of metabolically triggered inflammation. Here, we discuss the molecular and cellular basis of the roles of FABPs, especially FABP4 and FABP5, in metaflammation and related diseases including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. PMID:22121495

  14. Anesthetics interacting with lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Bandeiras, Cátia; Serro, Ana Paula; Luzyanin, Konstantin; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2013-01-23

    The exact mechanism by which anesthetics induce cell membrane-mediated modifications is still an open question. Although the fluidization effect of the anesthetic molecules on the cellular membrane is widely recognized, it is not known if anesthetics show any preference for specific membrane domains, namely the lipid rafts. The importance of these membrane micro-domains derives from the fact that they have been associated with cell signaling pathways, as well as with specific drug interactions. The objective of this work is to contribute for the elucidation of this question through the comparison of the anesthetic interactions with membranes of various lipid compositions. Liposomes prepared with an equimolar mixture of POPC, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, were chosen as models for lipid rafts. The interactions of these liposomes with two local anesthetics, tetracaine and lidocaine, and one general anesthetic, propofol, were studied. The effect of cholesterol was investigated by comparing anesthetic interactions with POPC/SM liposomes and POPC/SM/CHOL liposomes. The following experimental techniques were used: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, differential scanning calorimetry and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. Although the liposomes investigated by the different techniques are not in the same conditions, it is possible to assemble the information obtained from all experimental techniques employed to reach a general conclusion. Tetracaine interacts more with raftlike domains, lidocaine induces stronger modifications on POPC/SM liposomes and the results for propofol are not fully conclusive but it seems to be the least prone to lipid interactions. The results were compared with those obtained with DMPC-containing liposomes, reported in a previous work.

  15. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small