Science.gov

Sample records for agonist phenylephrine phe

  1. Phenylephrine

    MedlinePlus

    Rynatuss® (as a combination product containing Carbetapentane, Chlorpheniramine, Ephedrine, Phenylephrine) ... Tuss® (as a combination product containing Carbetapentane, Chlorpheniramine, Ephedrine, Phenylephrine)

  2. Effects of α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine on swelling-activated chloride currents in human atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yetao; Du, Xinling

    2015-02-01

    Swelling-activated chloride currents (ICl.swell) play an important role in cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis. However, the regulation of these currents has not been clarified to date. In this research, we focused on the function of phenylephrine, an α1-adrenoceptor agonist, in the regulation of I(Cl.swell) in human atrial myocytes. We recorded I(Cl.swell) evoked by a hypotonic bath solution with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that I(Cl.swell) increased over time, and it was difficult to achieve absolute steady state. Phenylephrine potentiated I(Cl.swell) from -1.00 ± 0.51 pA/pF at -90 mV and 2.58 ± 1.17 pA/pF at +40 mV to -1.46 ± 0.70 and 3.84 ± 1.67 pA/pF, respectively (P < 0.05, n = 6), and the upward trend in ICl.swell was slowed after washout. This effect was concentration-dependent, and the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin shifted the dose-effect curve rightward. Addition of prazosin or the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM) attenuated the effect of phenylephrine. The PKC activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) activated I(Cl.swell) from -1.69 ± 1.67 pA/pF at -90 mV and 5.58 ± 6.36 pA/pF at +40 mV to -2.41 ± 1.95 pA/pF and 7.05 ± 6.99 pA/pF, respectively (P < 0.01 at -90 mV and P < 0.05 at +40 mV; n = 6). In conclusion, the α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine augmented I(Cl.swell), a result that differs from previous reports in other animal species. The effect was attenuated by BIM and mimicked by PDBu, which indicates that phenylephrine might modulate I(Cl,swell) in a PKC-dependent manner.

  3. The inverse type II β-turn on D-Trp-Phe, a pharmacophoric motif for MOR agonists.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, Luca; Tolomelli, Alessandra; De Marco, Rossella; Spampinato, Santi; Bedini, Andrea; Artali, Roberto

    2011-09-01

    Herein we propose the D-Trp-Phe sequence within an inverse type II β-turn as a new kind of pharmacophoric motif for μ-opioid receptor (MOR) cyclopeptide agonists. Initially, we observed that c[Tyr-D-Pro-D-Trp-Phe-Gly] (4), an analogue of endomorphin-1 (H-Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH₂) lacking the crucial protonatable amino group of Tyr 1, is a MOR agonist with 10⁻⁸ M affinity. Molecular docking analysis suggested that the relevant interactions with the receptor involve D-Trp-Phe. The bioactive conformation of this region was investigated by selected derivatives of 4 designed to adopt an inverse type II β-turn. These efforts led to c[Tyr-Gly-D-Trp-Phe-Gly] (14) and to the cyclotetrapeptide c[D-Asp-1-amide-β-Ala-D-Trp-Phe] (15), showing improved nanomolar affinity. Both 14 and 15 selectively bind MOR, as they have negligible affinity for the κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Both 14 and 15 behave as partial MOR agonists in functional assays. Conformational and docking analyses confirm the role of the inverse β-turn in binding. These results indicate that the D-Trp-Phe inverse β-turn structure can be used for designing non-endomorphin-like peptidomimetic opioid agonists in general, characterized by an atypical mechanism of interaction between ligand and receptor.

  4. alpha-Adrenoceptors in the ventricular myocardium: clonidine, naphazoline and methoxamine as partial alpha-agonists exerting a competitive dualism in action to phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Schümann, H J; Endoh, M

    1976-04-01

    Tha alpha-sympathomimetic agonists, clonidine, naphazoline, methoxamine, oxymetazoline and phenylephrine were used to further characterize the alpha-adrenoceptors mediating the positive inotropic effect in the isolated papillary muscle of the rabbit heart. The maximal inotropic effects of these amines were compared with the effect of isoprenaline and it was examined whether or not these amines compete for alpha-adrenoceptors. On the papillary muscle stimulated at 0.5 Hz, phenylephrine showed a high affinity (pD2 value=6.13) and produced the most pronounced intrinsic activity of the alpha-sympathomimetic amines. Therefore, the intrinsic activity of phenylephrine, in the presence of prindolol (3 X 10(-8) M), was used for comparison with those of the other alpha-agonists. Clonidine caused a positive inotropic effect: the intrinsic activity amounted to 0.32 of that of phenylephrine; the affinity was the highest among the amines tested (pD2 value=6.46); its effect was inhibited by 10(-6) M phentolamine. The affinity and the intrinsic activity of naphazoline were slightly lower than those of clonidine. Methoxamine showed a relatively high intrinsic activity (0.56) but the lowest affinity (4.68). Oxymetazoline did not cause any positive inotropic effect. Clonidine, naphazoline and oxymetazoline antagonized the positive inotropic effect of phenylephrine, mediated via the alpha-adrenocaptors in the presence of 3 X 10(-8) M prindolol, in a competitive manner. This observation suggests that these alpha-sympathomimetic amines compete with phenylephrine for the same receptor site. Thus the present results provide additional evidence for alpha-adrenoceptors mediating the positive inotropic actions of sympathomimetic amines in the rabbit papillary muscle.

  5. From the potent and selective mu opioid receptor agonist H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2) to the potent delta antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Lys(Z)-OH.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Cocco, Maria Teresa; Salvadori, Severo; Romagnoli, Romeo; Sasaki, Yusuke; Okada, Yoshio; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2005-08-25

    H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2) ([Dmt(1)]DALDA) binds with high affinity and selectivity to the mu opioid receptor and is a potent and long-acting analgesic. Substitution of d-Arg in position 2 with Tic and masking of the lysine amine side chain by Z protection and of the C-terminal carboxylic function instead of the amide function transform a potent and selective mu agonist into a potent and selective delta antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Lys(Z)-OH. Such a delta antagonist could be used as a pharmacological tool.

  6. Pseudoephedrine, Phenylephrine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... I use pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine if I am breastfeeding? At recommended doses, only a small amount of pseudoephedrine gets into breast milk. In general, pseudoephedrine does not cause any side effects in the breastfed baby, but a few cases ...

  7. The cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic effects of phenylephrine on corneal stromal cells via a mitochondrion-dependent pathway both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Qiu, Yue; Tian, Cheng-Lei; Fan, Ting-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Phenylephrine (PHE), a selective α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, is often used as a decongestant for mydriasis prior to cataract surgery, and its abuse might be cytotoxic to the cornea and result in blurred vision. However, the cytotoxicity of PHE to the cornea and its cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. To provide references for secure medication and prospective therapeutic interventions of PHE, we investigated the cytotoxicity of PHE to corneal stroma and its possible mechanisms using an in vitro model of human corneal stromal (HCS) cells and an in vivo model of cat keratocytes. We found that PHE, above the concentration of 0.0781125% (1/128 of its clinical therapeutic dosage), had a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity to HCS cells by inducing morphological abnormality and viability decline, as well as S phase arrest. Moreover, PHE induced apoptosis of HCS cells by inducing plasma membrane permeability elevation, phosphatidylserine externalization, DNA fragmentation and apoptotic body formation. Furthermore, PHE could induce activations of caspase-3 and -9, disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL, upregulation of pro-apoptotic Bax, along with upregulation of cytoplasmic cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor. The cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic effects of PHE were also proven by the induced apoptotic-like ultrastructural alterations of keratocytes in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that PHE has a significant cytotoxicity to corneal stroma cells both in vitro and in vivo by inducing cell apoptosis, and the pro-apoptotic effect of PHE is achieved via a Bcl-2 family proteins-mediated mitochondrion-dependent pathway. PMID:27344612

  8. Effects of the CRF receptor antagonist D-Phe CRF(12-41) and the α2-adrenergic receptor agonist clonidine on stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zislis, George; Desai, Tina V.; Prado, Melissa; Shah, Hina P.; Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Tobacco dependence is a chronic disorder that is characterized by relapse after periods of abstinence. It has been hypothesized that the activation of brain stress systems mediates stress-induced relapse to smoking. The aim of these experiments was to investigate the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and norepinephrine in stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished nicotine-seeking behavior. Rats were allowed to self-administer nicotine under a fixed-ratio 5 schedule for 14 days and then nicotine-seeking behavior was extinguished by substituting saline for nicotine. In the first experiment, footshocks reinstated extinguished nicotine-seeking behavior. In the second experiment, there was a trend for the CRF1/2 receptor antagonist D-Phe CRF(12-41) (5, 25 μg, icv) to decrease stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior. Footshock-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior was observed only in a subset of stress-responsive rats (71%). D-Phe CRF(12-41) significantly attenuated stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior in this subset of rats. In the third experiment, the α2-adrenergic receptor agonist clonidine (20, 40 μg/kg, sc) attenuated footshock-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior. In the fourth experiment, the effects of D-Phe CRF(12-41) and clonidine on responding for chocolate-flavored food pellets was investigated in order to determine if these compounds have sedative effects. D-Phe CRF(12-41) did not affect responding for food pellets. Clonidine slightly, but significantly, decreased responding for food pellets. Clonidine decreased responding for food to a lesser degree than it decreased stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior. These data provide support for the hypothesis that an increased activity of brain CRF and norepinephrine systems mediates stress-induced relapse to nicotine-seeking behavior. PMID:17976662

  9. Phenylephrine enhances glutamate release in the medial prefrontal cortex through interaction with N-type Ca2+ channels and release machinery.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fei; Li, Si-Hai; Tang, Hua; Deng, Wei-Ke; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    α1 -adrenoceptors (α1 -ARs) stimulation has been found to enhance excitatory processes in many brain regions. A recent study in our laboratory showed that α1 -ARs stimulation enhances glutamatergic transmission via both pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms in layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). However, a number of pre-synaptic mechanisms may contribute to α1 -ARs-induced enhancement of glutamate release. In this study, we blocked the possible post-synaptic action mediated by α1 -ARs to investigate how α1 -ARs activation regulates pre-synaptic glutamate release in layer V/VI pyramidal neurons of mPFC. We found that the α1 -ARs agonist phenylephrine (Phe) induced a significant enhancement of glutamatergic transmission. The Phe-induced potentiation was mediated by enhancing pre-synaptic glutamate release probability and increasing the number of release vesicles via a protein kinase C-dependent pathway. The mechanisms of Phe-induced potentiation included interaction with both glutamate release machinery and N-type Ca(2+) channels, probably via a pre-synaptic Gq /phospholipase C/protein kinase C pathway. Our results may provide a cellular and molecular mechanism that helps explain α1 -ARs-mediated influence on PFC cognitive functions. Alpha1 -adrenoceptor (α1 -ARs) stimulation has been reported to enhance glutamatergic transmission in layer V/VI pyramidal neurons of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We found that α1 -ARs agonist phenylephrine (Phe) increases pre-synaptic glutamate release probability and the number of released vesicles via interaction with both glutamate release machinery and N-type Ca(2+) channels. Our results may provide a cellular and molecular mechanism that helps explain α1 -ARs-mediated influence on PFC cognitive functions. Gq, Gq protein; PLC, phospholipase C; PKC, protein kinase C; AMPA, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid; NMDA, N-methyl-d-aspartate; Glu, glutamate; Phe

  10. Response of the parotid gland of red kangaroos, Macropus rufus, to phenylephrine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Beal, A M

    2003-01-01

    Intracarotid infusions of l-phenylephrine at 1.0 or 10 nmol kg(-1) min(-1) were accompanied by increases in salivary amylase activity, protein, potassium, magnesium and chloride relative to cholinergically-stimulated saliva. Intravenous infusions of phenylephrine at the same dose rates had a lesser effect on salivary composition particularly protein. Propranolol administered with phenylephrine via the carotid artery, at an antagonist/agonist ratio of 10:1, was much more effective in blocking the phenylephrine-induced changes in salivary composition than equimolar infusion of phentolamine with phenylephrine. It was concluded that alpha(1)-adrenoreceptors were not present in functionally significant numbers in the gland and that the effect of phenylephrine on the kangaroo parotid was mediated by beta-adrenoreceptors. As the phenylephrine dose rates in the kangaroos were comparable with those used to determine alpha-adrenergic responses of eutherian salivary glands and as phentolamine appeared to have minor beta-sympathomimetic activity, at least one subtype of beta-adrenoreceptors in macropods may not be identical to its eutherian counterpart.

  11. Effect of adrenergic antagonists during phenylephrine stimulation of the mandibular gland of red kangaroos, Macropus rufus.

    PubMed

    Beal, A M

    2002-07-01

    Intracarotid infusions of l-phenylephrine at 1.0 nmol.kg(-1).min(-1) or(.)10 nmol.kg(-1).min(-1) were accompanied by increases in salivary protein, urea, magnesium and bicarbonate, and by decreases in osmolality, hydrogen ion activity, sodium, potassium and chloride relative to cholinergically stimulated saliva. Intravenous infusions of phenylephrine at the same dose rates had much less effect on salivary composition with the differences between the routes of administration being greatest for the higher dose rate. Propranolol administered with phenylephrine via the carotid artery, at an antagonist:agonist ratio of 10:1, was much more effective in blocking the phenylephrine-induced changes in salivary composition than equimolar infusion of phentolamine with phenylephrine. Simultaneous intracarotid infusions of either a beta(1)-antagonist (CGP20712A) or a beta(2)-antagonist (ICI118551) with phenylephrine showed that ICI118551 was more potent than CGP20712A at preventing the changes in salivary composition associated with phenylephrine administration. It was concluded that alpha(1)-adrenoreceptors were not present in functionally significant numbers in the gland and that the effect of phenylephrine on the kangaroo mandibular was mediated by beta-adrenoreceptors predominantly of the beta(2)-subtype. As the phenylephrine dose rates in the kangaroos were comparable with those used to determine alpha-adrenergic responses of eutherian salivary glands and as both propranolol and phentolamine appeared to have minor beta-sympathomimetic activity, at least one subtype of beta-adrenoreceptors in macropods may not be identical to its eutherian counterpart.

  12. A study of [D-Pro2, D-Phe7, D-Trp9]-substance P and [D-Trp7,9]-substance P as tachykinin partial agonists in the rat colon.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, S. J.; Jordan, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Two substance P (SP) analogues, [D-Pro2, D-Phe7, D-Trp9]-SP (DPDPDT) and [D-Trp7,9]-SP (DT79), previously described as tachykinin antagonists, have been shown to contract the rat colon muscularis mucosae preparation. The maximum response exhibited by these analogues was about 30% that of the SP maximum, suggesting that they were acting as partial agonists relative to SP. The responses to DPDPDT were unaffected by pretreatment with mepyramine, methysergide or [Sar1, Ile5, Ala8]-angiotensin II, which abolished the responses to histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and angiotensin II, respectively. Methysergide also did not affect the responses to DT79; the other antagonists were not tested against this analogue. Indomethacin and cimetidine also had no inhibitory effect. Atropine (2 microM) was present in all experiments to prevent indirect muscarinic effects. Phenoxybenzamine did not affect the dose-response curves to SP, eledoisin-related peptide (ERP), kassinin, eledoisin or physalaemin, nor did it affect the responses to individual doses of DPDPDT or DT79. However, in the absence of atropine, it shifted the carbachol dose-response curve markedly to the right, and reduced its maximum. The tachykinin antagonist [D-Pro4, D-Trp7,9,10]-SP4-11 reduced the responses to individual matched doses of DPDPDT, DT79 and SP to the same degree, whilst leaving responses to 5-HT or angiotensin II unaffected. This suggested that DPDPDT and DT79 were acting at the same receptor as SP. The inhibitory effects of DPDPDT on responses to SP, ERP and kassinin, and that of DT79 on responses to SP, were analysed. All four combinations yielded data compatible with an interaction at only one receptor, although DPDPDT appeared slightly more potent at inhibiting responses to kassinin. The results are discussed in the light of the proposed existence of multiple tachykinin receptor subtypes. The possible influence of differential metabolism of tachykinin analogues is also considered. PMID:6203595

  13. N-terminal guanidinylation of TIPP (Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe) peptides results in major changes of the opioid activity profile.

    PubMed

    Weltrowska, Grazyna; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Chung, Nga N; Wilkes, Brian C; Schiller, Peter W

    2013-09-15

    Derivatives of peptides of the TIPP (Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe; Tic=1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) family containing a guanidino (Guan) function in place of the N-terminal amino group were synthesized in an effort to improve their blood-brain barrier permeability. Unexpectedly, N-terminal amidination significantly altered the in vitro opioid activity profiles. Guan-analogues of TIPP-related δ opioid antagonists showed δ partial agonist or mixed δ partial agonist/μ partial agonist activity. Guanidinylation of the mixed μ agonist/δ antagonists H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) and H-Dmt-TicΨ[CH2NH]Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2[Ψ]) converted them to mixed μ agonistagonists. A docking study revealed distinct positioning of DIPP-NH2 and Guan-DIPP-NH2 in the δ receptor binding site. Lys(3)-analogues of DIPP-NH2 and DIPP-NH2[Ψ] (guanidinylated or non-guanidinylated) turned out to be mixed μ/κ agonists with δ antagonist-, δ partial agonist- or δ full agonist activity. Compounds with some of the observed mixed opioid activity profiles have therapeutic potential as analgesics with reduced side effects or for treatment of cocaine addiction.

  14. Derivative emission spectrofluorimetry for the simultaneous determination of guaifenesin and phenylephrine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical tablets.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Alshehri, Mona M; Al-taweel, Shorog M

    2015-05-01

    Rapid, simple and sensitive derivative emission spectrofluorimetric methods have been developed for the simultaneous analysis of binary mixtures of guaifenesin (GUA) and phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHE). The methods are based upon measurement of the native fluorescence intensity of the two drugs at λex = 275 nm in methanolic solutions, followed by differentiation using first (D1) and second (D2) derivative techniques. The derivative fluorescence intensity-concentration plots were rectilinear over a range of 0.1-2 µg/mL for both GUA and PHE. The limits of detection were 0.027 (D1, GUA), 0.025 (D2, GUA), 0.031 (D1, PHE) and 0.033 (D2, PHE) µg/mL and limits of quantitation were 0.089 (D1, GUA), 0.083 (D2, GUA), 0.095 (D1, PHE) and 0.097 (D2, PHE) µg/mL. The proposed derivative emission spectrofluorimetric methods (D1 and D2) were successfully applied for the determination of the two compounds in binary mixtures and tablets with high precision and accuracy. The proposed methods were fully validated as per ICH guidelines.

  15. Derivative emission spectrofluorimetry for the simultaneous determination of guaifenesin and phenylephrine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical tablets.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Alshehri, Mona M; Al-taweel, Shorog M

    2015-05-01

    Rapid, simple and sensitive derivative emission spectrofluorimetric methods have been developed for the simultaneous analysis of binary mixtures of guaifenesin (GUA) and phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHE). The methods are based upon measurement of the native fluorescence intensity of the two drugs at λex = 275 nm in methanolic solutions, followed by differentiation using first (D1) and second (D2) derivative techniques. The derivative fluorescence intensity-concentration plots were rectilinear over a range of 0.1-2 µg/mL for both GUA and PHE. The limits of detection were 0.027 (D1, GUA), 0.025 (D2, GUA), 0.031 (D1, PHE) and 0.033 (D2, PHE) µg/mL and limits of quantitation were 0.089 (D1, GUA), 0.083 (D2, GUA), 0.095 (D1, PHE) and 0.097 (D2, PHE) µg/mL. The proposed derivative emission spectrofluorimetric methods (D1 and D2) were successfully applied for the determination of the two compounds in binary mixtures and tablets with high precision and accuracy. The proposed methods were fully validated as per ICH guidelines. PMID:25044215

  16. Metformin exaggerates phenylephrine-induced AMPK phosphorylation independent of CaMKKβ and attenuates contractile response in endothelium-denuded rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Pyla, Rajkumar; Osman, Islam; Pichavaram, Prahalathan; Hansen, Paul; Segar, Lakshman

    2014-11-15

    Metformin, a widely prescribed antidiabetic drug, has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. Its beneficial effect toward improved vasodilation results from its ability to activate AMPK and enhance nitric oxide formation in the endothelium. To date, metformin regulation of AMPK has not been fully studied in intact arterial smooth muscle, especially during contraction evoked by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists. In the present study, ex vivo incubation of endothelium-denuded rat aortic rings with 3mM metformin for 2h resulted in significant accumulation of metformin (∼ 600 pmoles/mg tissue), as revealed by LC-MS/MS MRM analysis. However, metformin did not show significant increase in AMPK phosphorylation under these conditions. Exposure of aortic rings to a GPCR agonist (e.g., phenylephrine) resulted in enhanced AMPK phosphorylation by ∼ 2.5-fold. Importantly, in metformin-treated aortic rings, phenylephrine challenge showed an exaggerated increase in AMPK phosphorylation by ∼ 9.7-fold, which was associated with an increase in AMP/ATP ratio. Pretreatment with compound C (AMPK inhibitor) prevented AMPK phosphorylation induced by phenylephrine alone and also that induced by phenylephrine after metformin treatment. However, pretreatment with STO-609 (CaMKKβ inhibitor) diminished AMPK phosphorylation induced by phenylephrine alone but not that induced by phenylephrine after metformin treatment. Furthermore, attenuation of phenylephrine-induced contraction (observed after metformin treatment) was prevented by AMPK inhibition but not by CaMKKβ inhibition. Together, these findings suggest that, upon endothelial damage in the vessel wall, metformin uptake by the underlying vascular smooth muscle would accentuate AMPK phosphorylation by GPCR agonists independent of CaMKKβ to promote vasorelaxation.

  17. Validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for simultaneous determination of ketorolac tromethamine and phenylephrine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Belal, T S; El-Kafrawy, D S; Mahrous, M S; Abdel-Khalek, M M; Abo-Gharam, A H

    2016-07-01

    This work describes five simple and reliable spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for analysis of the binary mixture of ketorolac tromethamine (KTR) and phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHE). Method I is based on the use of conventional Amax and derivative spectrophotometry with the zero-crossing technique where KTR was determined using its Amax and (1)D amplitudes at 323 and 341nm respectively, while PHE was determined by measuring the (1)D amplitudes at 248.5nm. Method II involves the application of the ratio spectra derivative spectrophotometry. For KTR, 12μg/mL PHE was used as a divisor and the (1)DD amplitudes at 265nm were plotted against KTR concentrations; while - by using 4μg/mL KTR as divisor - the (1)DD amplitudes at 243.5nm were found proportional to PHE concentrations. Method III depends on ratio-difference measurement where the peak to trough amplitudes between 260 and 284nm were measured and correlated to KTR concentration. Similarly, the peak to trough amplitudes between 235 and 260nm in the PHE ratio spectra were recorded. For method IV, the two compounds were separated using Merck HPTLC sheets of silica gel 60 F254 and a mobile phase composed of chloroform/methanol/ammonia (70:30:2, by volume) followed by densitometric measurement of KTR and PHE spots at 320 and 278nm respectively. Method V depends on HPLC-DAD. Effective chromatographic separation was achieved using Zorbax eclipse plus C8 column (4.6×250mm, 5μm) with a mobile phase consisting of 0.05M o-phosphoric acid and acetonitrile (50:50, by volume) at a flow rate 1mL/min and detection at 313 and 274nm for KTR and PHE respectively. Analytical performance of the developed methods was statistically validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, detection and quantification limits. The validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods were successfully applied to the simultaneous analysis of KTR and PHE in synthetic mixtures

  18. Phenylephrine protects autotransplanted rabbit submandibular gland from apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Bin; Zhang Yan; Li Yuming; Gao Yan; Gan Yehua; Wu Liling Yu Guangyan

    2008-12-05

    Submandibular gland (SMG) autotransplantation is an effective treatment for severe keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Our previous studies have shown that phenylephrine attenuates structural injury and promotes cell proliferation in autotransplanted rabbit SMG. However, the mechanism by which phenylephrine reduces the injury has not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigate the ability of phenylephrine to inhibit apoptosis in autotransplanted rabbit SMG. We observed that apoptosis occurred in the early phase of SMG transplantation and that phenylephrine treatment protected transplanted SMG from apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that phenylephrine could significantly upregulate the expression of Bcl-2, downregulate the expression of Bax, and inhibit the activation of both caspase-3 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in autotransplanted SMG. Therefore, the cytoprotective effects of phenylephrine on autotransplanted SMG may be a novel clinical strategy for autotransplanted SMG protection during the early postoperative stage of transplantation.

  19. Sulfation of phenylephrine by the human cytosolic sulfotransferases.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akihiro; Kim, Jiwan; Liu, Ming-Yih; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies had demonstrated that sulfation constituted a major pathway for the metabolism of phenylephrine in vivo. The current study was designed to identify the major human SULT(s) responsible for the sulfation of phenylephrine. Of the twelve human SULTs analyzed, SULT1A3 displayed the strongest sulfating activity toward phenylephrine. The enzyme exhibited a pH optimum spanning 7 - 10.5. Kinetic analysis revealed that SULT1A3- mediated sulfation of phenylephrine occurred in the same order of magnitude compared with that previously reported for SULT1A3-mediated sulfation of dopamine. Moreover, sulfation of phenylephrine was shown to occur in HepG2 cells under metabolic setting. Collectively, these results provided useful information concerning the biochemical basis underlying the metabolism of phenylephrine in vivo as previously reported.

  20. Acute ischaemic colitis associated with oral phenylephrine decongestant use.

    PubMed

    Ward, Paul W; Shaneyfelt, Terrence M; Roan, Ronald M

    2014-01-01

    In this case, the authors have presented for the first time that ischaemic colitis may be associated with phenylephrine use. Since phenylephrine is the more common active ingredient in over-the-counter (OTC) cold medications, other presentations may follow this case. A MEDLINE search was performed for all case reports or case series of ischaemic colitis secondary to pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine use published between 1966 and 2013. The search resulted in four case reports and one case series describing patients with acute onset ischaemic colitis with exposure to pseudoephedrine immediately prior to onset. However, we found no case reports of ischaemic colitis associated with phenylephrine use. We present this case as an unexpected clinical outcome of phenylephrine, which has not been associated with ischaemic colitis in the literature. Also, this case serves as a reminder of the important clinical lesson to question all patients' use of OTC and prescribed medications.

  1. Effect of phenylephrine infusion on atrial electrophysiological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, J. W.; Basta, M.; Fletcher, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of changes in autonomic tone induced by phenylephrine infusion on atrial refractoriness and conduction. DESIGN: Left and right atrial electrophysiological properties were measured before and after a constant phenylephrine infusion designed to increase sinus cycle length by 25%. SUBJECTS: 20 patients, aged 53 (SD 6) years, undergoing electrophysiological study for investigation of idiopathic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (seven patients) or for routine follow up after successful catheter ablation of supraventricular tachycardia (13 patients). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in left and right atrial effective refractory periods, atrial activation times, and frequency of induction of atrial fibrillation. RESULTS: Phenylephrine (mean dose 69 (SD 18) mg/min) increased mean blood pressure by 22 (12) mm Hg (range 7 to 44) and lengthened sinus cycle length by 223 (94) ms (20 to 430). Left atrial effective refractory period lengthened following phenylephrine infusion from 250 (25) to 264 (21) ms (P < 0.001) but there was no significant change in right atrial effective refractory period: 200 (20) v 206 (29), P = 0.11. There was a significant relation between the effect of phenylephrine on sinus cycle length and on right atrial refractoriness (r = 0.6, P = 0.005) with shortening of right atrial refractoriness in patients with the greatest prolongation in sinus cycle length. During phenylephrine infusion, the right atrial stimulus to left atrial activation time at the basic pacing cycle length of 600 ms was unchanged, at 130 (18) v 131 (17) ms, but activation delay with a premature extrastimulus increased: 212 (28) v 227 (38) ms, P = 0.002. Atrial fibrillation was induced by two of 58 refractory period measurements at baseline and by 12 of 61 measurements during phenylephrine infusion (P < 0.01). Phenylephrine increased the difference between left and right atrial refractory periods by 22.8 (19.4) ms in the five patients with induced atrial

  2. Simultaneous determination of naphazoline, diphenhydramine and phenylephrine in nasal solutions by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, A F; Williner, M R; Mantovani, V E; Robles, J C; Goicoechea, H C

    2003-02-01

    A capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method has been developed to separate and quantitate naphazoline (NAPH), dyphenhydramine (DIP) and phenylephrine (PHE) in nasal solutions. Samples were diluted 1:25 in ultrapure water and injected at the anodic end. A central composite design has been used to optimise the experimental conditions for a complete and fast separation of the active ingredients studied. Critical parameters such as voltage, pH and buffer concentration have been studied to evaluate how they affect responses such as resolution and migration times. Separation was performed on a silica capillary with 75 microm I.D. and 70 cm total length at an applied voltage of 17.7 kV with a phosphate run buffer of pH 3.72 and 0.063 mol l(-1). Calibration curves were prepared for NAPH, DIP and PHE. For each analyte, the correlation coefficients were >0.999 (n=15). The RSD% of six replicate injections for each analyte were reasonably good. The method was applied to the quantitation of the three components in a commercial dosage form. The proposed method has the advantage of needing a very simple sample pretreatment and being faster than a typical HPLC chromatographic method.

  3. Patient considerations in cataract surgery – the role of combined therapy using phenylephrine and ketorolac

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Guarnieri, Adriano; Guirao Navarro, María Concepción; Saenz-de-Viteri, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Cataract, a degradation of the optical quality of the crystalline lens, progressive and age-related, is the leading cause of treatable blindness worldwide. Cataract surgery is the most common surgical procedure performed by ophthalmologists and is the only effective treatment for cataracts. Advances in the surgical techniques and better postoperative visual outcomes have progressively changed the primary concern of cataract surgery to become a procedure refined to yield the best possible refractive results. Sufficient mydriasis during cataract removal is critical to a successful surgical outcome. Poor pupil dilation can lead to serious sight-threatening complications that significantly increase the cost of surgery and decrease patients comfort. Mydriasis is obtained using anticholinergic and sympathomimetic drugs. Phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, can efficiently dilate the pupil when administered by intracameral injection. Additionally, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ketorolac, which inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins, are used to decrease intraoperative miosis, control pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery, and to prevent the development of cystoid macular edema following surgery. Recently, a new combination of phenylephrine and ketorolac (Omidria®) has been approved by United States Food and Drug Administration for use during cataract surgery to maintain intraoperative mydriasis, prevent miosis, and reduce postoperative pain and inflammation. Clinical trials have shown that this new combination is effective, combining the positive effects of both drugs with a good safety profile and patient tolerability. Moreover, recent reports suggest that this combination is also effective in patients with high risk of poor pupil dilation. In conclusion, cataract is a global problem that significantly affects patients’ quality of life. However, they can be managed with a safe and minimally invasive surgery

  4. Patient considerations in cataract surgery – the role of combined therapy using phenylephrine and ketorolac

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Guarnieri, Adriano; Guirao Navarro, María Concepción; Saenz-de-Viteri, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Cataract, a degradation of the optical quality of the crystalline lens, progressive and age-related, is the leading cause of treatable blindness worldwide. Cataract surgery is the most common surgical procedure performed by ophthalmologists and is the only effective treatment for cataracts. Advances in the surgical techniques and better postoperative visual outcomes have progressively changed the primary concern of cataract surgery to become a procedure refined to yield the best possible refractive results. Sufficient mydriasis during cataract removal is critical to a successful surgical outcome. Poor pupil dilation can lead to serious sight-threatening complications that significantly increase the cost of surgery and decrease patients comfort. Mydriasis is obtained using anticholinergic and sympathomimetic drugs. Phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, can efficiently dilate the pupil when administered by intracameral injection. Additionally, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ketorolac, which inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins, are used to decrease intraoperative miosis, control pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery, and to prevent the development of cystoid macular edema following surgery. Recently, a new combination of phenylephrine and ketorolac (Omidria®) has been approved by United States Food and Drug Administration for use during cataract surgery to maintain intraoperative mydriasis, prevent miosis, and reduce postoperative pain and inflammation. Clinical trials have shown that this new combination is effective, combining the positive effects of both drugs with a good safety profile and patient tolerability. Moreover, recent reports suggest that this combination is also effective in patients with high risk of poor pupil dilation. In conclusion, cataract is a global problem that significantly affects patients’ quality of life. However, they can be managed with a safe and minimally invasive surgery

  5. Low doses of esmolol and phenylephrine act as diuretics during intravenous anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The renal clearance of infused crystalloid fluid is very low during anaesthesia and surgery, but experiments in conscious sheep indicate that the renal fluid clearance might approach a normal rate when the adrenergic balance is modified. Methods Sixty females (mean age, 32 years) undergoing laparoscopic gynecological surgery were randomized to control group and received only the conventional anesthetic drugs and 20 ml/kg of lactated Ringer's over 30 mins. The others were also given an infusion of 50 μg/kg/min of esmolol (beta1-receptor blocker) or 0.01 μg/kg/min of phenylephrine (alpha1-adrenergic agonist) over 3 hours. The distribution and elimination of infused fluid were studied by volume kinetic analysis based on urinary excretion and blood hemoglobin level. Results Both drugs significantly increased urinary excretion while heart rate and arterial pressure remained largely unaffected. The urine flows during non-surgery were 43, 147, and 176 ml in the control, esmolol, and phenylephrine groups, respectively (medians, P < 0.03). When surgery had started the corresponding values were 34, 65 and 61 ml (P < 0.04). At 3 hours, averages of 9%, 20%, and 25% of the infused volume had been excreted in the three groups (P < 0.01). The kinetic analyses indicated that both treatments slowed down the distribution of fluid from the plasma to the interstitial fluid space, thereby preventing hypovolemia. Conclusions Esmolol doubled and phenylephrine almost tripled urinary excretion during anesthesia-induced depression of renal fluid clearance. PMID:22289281

  6. Inflammation contributes to axon reflex vasodilatation evoked by iontophoresis of an α-1 adrenoceptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D

    2011-01-20

    Iontophoresis of α(1)-adrenoceptor agonists in the human forearm evoke axon reflex vasodilatation, possibly due to an accumulation of inflammatory agents at the site of iontophoresis. To investigate this possibility, skin sites in the forearm of healthy participants were treated with an anti-inflammatory gel containing ibuprofen 5% before the iontophoresis of the α(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (350μA for 3min). Red cell flux was measured with laser Doppler flowmetry at the site of iontophoresis and 8mm away in the region of axon reflex vasodilatation. In additional experiments, skin sites were treated with the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (to counteract vasoconstriction and disperse inflammatory mediators produced during the iontophoresis of phenylephrine); local anaesthetic agent (to determine whether the axon reflex to phenylephrine was neurally-mediated); or the α(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine (to investigate the specificity of the adrenergic axon reflex). Phenylephrine evoked marked vasodilatation 8mm from the site of iontophoresis whereas clonidine and saline-control did not (mean flux increase±S.E. 485±132% for phenylephrine; 44±24% for clonidine; 39±19% for saline-control; p<0.05 for phenylephrine versus control). Axon reflex vasodilatation to phenylephrine was unaffected by variations in blood flow at the site of phenylephrine iontophoresis, but was reduced by ibuprofen pretreatment and abolished by local anaesthetic pretreatment. These findings suggest that prostaglandin synthesis at the site of iontophoresis contributes to but does not account entirely for axon reflex vasodilatation to phenylephrine. Alpha-1 adrenoceptor mediation of axon reflexes could play a role in aberrant sensory-sympathetic coupling in neuro-inflammatory diseases.

  7. Phenylephrine Decreases Vascular Tension in Goat Arteries in Specific Circumstances.

    PubMed

    Raj, Renu R; Subramani, Sathya

    2016-01-01

    Phenylephrine (PE) causes vasoconstriction through alpha adrenergic receptors. PE-induced vasodilatation has also been reported earlier in pre-constricted vessels. Here we demonstrate in spiral strips of goat arteries that addition of PE can decrease tone even from base-line levels (i.e. not pre-constricted) and show that this process requires nitric oxide (NO) and alpha adrenergic stimulation, but is cGMP-independent. Under control conditions, PE caused vasoconstriction, but under conditions where NO levels are higher, as with L-Arginine or sodium nitroprusside, PE decreased vessel tension. L-Arginine/PE combination was not able to decrease tension when alpha adrenoceptors were blocked with Phentolamine or endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was blocked with Nω-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA). Propranolol, a beta blocker, was unable to prevent the reduction in tension by the L-Arginine/PE combination. Adrenaline and noradrenaline (and not isoproterenol) also reduced vessel tension in the presence of L-Arginine. Even when NO levels were not enhanced, relieving NO from having to stimulate the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) (either by using sGC blockers, namely ODQ or methylene blue, or by enhancing cGMP levels (with sildenafil) which by negative feedback probably inhibits sGC) led to PE-induced reduction of vascular tension. PMA-phorbol myristate acetate-an agonist which stimulates Protein Kinase C was able to prevent the ability of PE to reduce vascular tension in a high NO environment. Our conclusion is that PE reduces vascular tension through alpha adrenoceptors if there is excess NO availability to activate a putative pathway. Though the reduction of vessel tone by PE is dependent on NO, it is independent of cGMP. Prior treatment with PMA or PE itself can prevent further PE-induced reduction of tension in a high NO environment. The results here suggest, counter-intuitively, that alpha blockers may be of help in the treatment of septic shock where nitric

  8. Phenylephrine Decreases Vascular Tension in Goat Arteries in Specific Circumstances.

    PubMed

    Raj, Renu R; Subramani, Sathya

    2016-01-01

    Phenylephrine (PE) causes vasoconstriction through alpha adrenergic receptors. PE-induced vasodilatation has also been reported earlier in pre-constricted vessels. Here we demonstrate in spiral strips of goat arteries that addition of PE can decrease tone even from base-line levels (i.e. not pre-constricted) and show that this process requires nitric oxide (NO) and alpha adrenergic stimulation, but is cGMP-independent. Under control conditions, PE caused vasoconstriction, but under conditions where NO levels are higher, as with L-Arginine or sodium nitroprusside, PE decreased vessel tension. L-Arginine/PE combination was not able to decrease tension when alpha adrenoceptors were blocked with Phentolamine or endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was blocked with Nω-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA). Propranolol, a beta blocker, was unable to prevent the reduction in tension by the L-Arginine/PE combination. Adrenaline and noradrenaline (and not isoproterenol) also reduced vessel tension in the presence of L-Arginine. Even when NO levels were not enhanced, relieving NO from having to stimulate the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) (either by using sGC blockers, namely ODQ or methylene blue, or by enhancing cGMP levels (with sildenafil) which by negative feedback probably inhibits sGC) led to PE-induced reduction of vascular tension. PMA-phorbol myristate acetate-an agonist which stimulates Protein Kinase C was able to prevent the ability of PE to reduce vascular tension in a high NO environment. Our conclusion is that PE reduces vascular tension through alpha adrenoceptors if there is excess NO availability to activate a putative pathway. Though the reduction of vessel tone by PE is dependent on NO, it is independent of cGMP. Prior treatment with PMA or PE itself can prevent further PE-induced reduction of tension in a high NO environment. The results here suggest, counter-intuitively, that alpha blockers may be of help in the treatment of septic shock where nitric

  9. Phenylephrine Decreases Vascular Tension in Goat Arteries in Specific Circumstances

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Renu R.

    2016-01-01

    Phenylephrine (PE) causes vasoconstriction through alpha adrenergic receptors. PE-induced vasodilatation has also been reported earlier in pre-constricted vessels. Here we demonstrate in spiral strips of goat arteries that addition of PE can decrease tone even from base-line levels (i.e. not pre-constricted) and show that this process requires nitric oxide (NO) and alpha adrenergic stimulation, but is cGMP-independent. Under control conditions, PE caused vasoconstriction, but under conditions where NO levels are higher, as with L-Arginine or sodium nitroprusside, PE decreased vessel tension. L-Arginine/PE combination was not able to decrease tension when alpha adrenoceptors were blocked with Phentolamine or endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was blocked with Nω-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA). Propranolol, a beta blocker, was unable to prevent the reduction in tension by the L-Arginine/PE combination. Adrenaline and noradrenaline (and not isoproterenol) also reduced vessel tension in the presence of L-Arginine. Even when NO levels were not enhanced, relieving NO from having to stimulate the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) (either by using sGC blockers, namely ODQ or methylene blue, or by enhancing cGMP levels (with sildenafil) which by negative feedback probably inhibits sGC) led to PE-induced reduction of vascular tension. PMA—phorbol myristate acetate—an agonist which stimulates Protein Kinase C was able to prevent the ability of PE to reduce vascular tension in a high NO environment. Our conclusion is that PE reduces vascular tension through alpha adrenoceptors if there is excess NO availability to activate a putative pathway. Though the reduction of vessel tone by PE is dependent on NO, it is independent of cGMP. Prior treatment with PMA or PE itself can prevent further PE-induced reduction of tension in a high NO environment. The results here suggest, counter-intuitively, that alpha blockers may be of help in the treatment of septic shock where

  10. Computationally-designed phenylephrine prodrugs - a model for enhancing bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Rafik; Karaman, Donia; Zeiadeh, Isra'

    2013-11-01

    DFT calculations at B3LYP 6-31G (d,p) for intramolecular proton transfer in a number of Kirby's enzyme models demonstrated that the driving force for the proton transfer efficiency is the distance between the two reactive centres (rGM) and the attack angle (α); and the rate of the reaction is linearly correlated with rGM2 and sin (180°- α). Based on these results three phenylephrine prodrugs were designed to provide phenylephrine with higher bioavailability than their parent drug. Using the experimental t1/2 (the time needed for the conversion of 50% of the reactants to products) and EM (effective molarity) values for these processes the t1/2 values for the conversion of the three prodrugs to the parent drug, phenylephrine were calculated. The calculated t1/2 values for ProD 1 and ProD 2 were very high (145 days and several years, respectively) whereas that of ProD 3 was found to be about 35 hours. Therefore, the intra-conversion rates of the phenylephrine prodrugs to phenylephrine can be programmed according to the nature of the prodrug linker.

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Phenylephrine Nasal Drops in Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Gholamreza; Akbarpour, Marzieh; Mohammadi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract infection in the first year of life. In this disease upper respiratory tract infection is associated with nasal congestion, respiratory distress and hypoxia. We studied the effect of phenylephrine drops as a decongestant in treatment of light and moderately severe cases of acute bronchiolitis. Methods: This is a double blind randomized trial involving 100 children aged 4 weeks to 12 months. The patients were divided into two groups, the first group received 0.1 ml phenylephrine 0.5% and the second group 0.1 ml sodium chloride (NaCl) 0.9% as placebo in both nostrils. Respiratory rate, heart rate, O2 saturation, dyspnea, retractions and wheezing were assessed before and 30 minutes after medication. Findings: After medication, O2 saturation and respiratory muscles retractions in the phenylephrine group were significantly better than those of the placebo group (P=0.004 and P=0.002, respectively). In the phenylephrine group, O2 saturation, retractions and wheezing were also significantly better before than those after medication (P=0.003 and P<0.0001 respectively). In the placebo group no significant difference before and after intervention was observed. Conclusion: Phenylephrine as a topical decongestant is an inexpensive, easily available and suitable means in the treatment of mild to moderately severe bronchiolitis. PMID:25793067

  12. Protein kinase Cδ contributes to phenylephrine-mediated contraction in the aortae of high fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limei; Liu, Jian; Gao, Yuansheng; Yu, Xiaoxing; Dou, Dou; Huang, Yu

    2014-04-18

    The down-regulation of α-adrenoceptor-mediated signaling casacade has been implicated in obesity but the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The present study investigated whether inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor and protein kinase C (PKC) were involved in the reduction of α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine-evoked contraction in aortae of high fat diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a rodent diet containing 45 kcal% fat for 16 weeks to induce obesity. Isolated mouse aortae were suspended in myograph for isometric force measurement. Protein phosphorylations and expressions were determined by Western blotting. In C57BL/6 mouse aortae, phenylephrine-induced contraction was partially inhibited by either IP3 receptor antagonist heparin or PKC inhibitor GFX, and the combined treatment with heparin and GFX abolished the contraction. Phenylephrine-induced contraction was significantly less in the aortae of DIO mice than those of control mice; only GFX but not heparin attenuated the contraction, indicating a diminishing role of IP3 receptor in DIO mice. Western blotting showed the reduced expression and phosphorylation of IP3 receptor and the down-regulated expression of PKC, PKCβ, PKCδ, and PKCζ in DIO mouse aortae. Importantly, PKCδ was more likely to maintain phenylephrine-mediated contraction in DIO mouse aortae because that (1) PKCδ inhibitor rottlerin but not PKCα and PKCβ inhibitor Gö6976, PKCβ inhibitor hispidin, or PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor attenuated the contraction; and (2) PKCδ phosphorylation was increased but phosphorylations of PKCα, PKCβ, and PKCζ were reduced in DIO mouse aortae. The present study thus provides additional insights into the cellular mechanisms responsible for vascular dysfunction in obesity.

  13. Chemometrics resolution and quantification power evaluation: Application on pharmaceutical quaternary mixture of Paracetamol, Guaifenesin, Phenylephrine and p-aminophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehia, Ali M.; Mohamed, Heba M.

    2016-01-01

    Three advanced chemmometric-assisted spectrophotometric methods namely; Concentration Residuals Augmented Classical Least Squares (CRACLS), Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) and Principal Component Analysis-Artificial Neural Networks (PCA-ANN) were developed, validated and benchmarked to PLS calibration; to resolve the severely overlapped spectra and simultaneously determine; Paracetamol (PAR), Guaifenesin (GUA) and Phenylephrine (PHE) in their ternary mixture and in presence of p-aminophenol (AP) the main degradation product and synthesis impurity of Paracetamol. The analytical performance of the proposed methods was described by percentage recoveries, root mean square error of calibration and standard error of prediction. The four multivariate calibration methods could be directly used without any preliminary separation step and successfully applied for pharmaceutical formulation analysis, showing no excipients' interference.

  14. Chemometrics resolution and quantification power evaluation: Application on pharmaceutical quaternary mixture of Paracetamol, Guaifenesin, Phenylephrine and p-aminophenol.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Ali M; Mohamed, Heba M

    2016-01-01

    Three advanced chemmometric-assisted spectrophotometric methods namely; Concentration Residuals Augmented Classical Least Squares (CRACLS), Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) and Principal Component Analysis-Artificial Neural Networks (PCA-ANN) were developed, validated and benchmarked to PLS calibration; to resolve the severely overlapped spectra and simultaneously determine; Paracetamol (PAR), Guaifenesin (GUA) and Phenylephrine (PHE) in their ternary mixture and in presence of p-aminophenol (AP) the main degradation product and synthesis impurity of Paracetamol. The analytical performance of the proposed methods was described by percentage recoveries, root mean square error of calibration and standard error of prediction. The four multivariate calibration methods could be directly used without any preliminary separation step and successfully applied for pharmaceutical formulation analysis, showing no excipients' interference.

  15. Chemometrics resolution and quantification power evaluation: Application on pharmaceutical quaternary mixture of Paracetamol, Guaifenesin, Phenylephrine and p-aminophenol.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Ali M; Mohamed, Heba M

    2016-01-01

    Three advanced chemmometric-assisted spectrophotometric methods namely; Concentration Residuals Augmented Classical Least Squares (CRACLS), Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) and Principal Component Analysis-Artificial Neural Networks (PCA-ANN) were developed, validated and benchmarked to PLS calibration; to resolve the severely overlapped spectra and simultaneously determine; Paracetamol (PAR), Guaifenesin (GUA) and Phenylephrine (PHE) in their ternary mixture and in presence of p-aminophenol (AP) the main degradation product and synthesis impurity of Paracetamol. The analytical performance of the proposed methods was described by percentage recoveries, root mean square error of calibration and standard error of prediction. The four multivariate calibration methods could be directly used without any preliminary separation step and successfully applied for pharmaceutical formulation analysis, showing no excipients' interference. PMID:26254602

  16. The Phe-Phe Motif for Peptide Self-Assembly in Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Marchesan, Silvia; Vargiu, Attilio V; Styan, Katie E

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery, the Phe-Phe motif has gained in popularity as a minimalist building block to drive the self-assembly of short peptides and their analogues into nanostructures and hydrogels. Molecules based on the Phe-Phe motif have found a range of applications in nanomedicine, from drug delivery and biomaterials to new therapeutic paradigms. Here we discuss the various production methods for this class of compounds, and the characterization, nanomorphologies, and application of their self-assembled nanostructures. We include the most recent findings on their remarkable properties, which hold substantial promise for the creation of the next generation nanomedicines.

  17. The Phe-Phe Motif for Peptide Self-Assembly in Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Marchesan, Silvia; Vargiu, Attilio V; Styan, Katie E

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery, the Phe-Phe motif has gained in popularity as a minimalist building block to drive the self-assembly of short peptides and their analogues into nanostructures and hydrogels. Molecules based on the Phe-Phe motif have found a range of applications in nanomedicine, from drug delivery and biomaterials to new therapeutic paradigms. Here we discuss the various production methods for this class of compounds, and the characterization, nanomorphologies, and application of their self-assembled nanostructures. We include the most recent findings on their remarkable properties, which hold substantial promise for the creation of the next generation nanomedicines. PMID:26540034

  18. Agonist-specific behaviour of the intracellular Ca2+ response in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chatton, J Y; Cao, Y; Stucki, J W

    1997-01-01

    A variety of agonists stimulate in hepatocytes a response that takes the shape of repetitive cytosolic free Ca2+ transients called Ca2+ oscillations. The shape of spikes and the pattern of oscillations in a given cell differ depending on the agonist of the phosphoinositide pathway that is applied. In this study, the response of individual rat hepatocytes to maximal stimulation by arginine vasopressin (AVP), phenylephrine and ADP was investigated by fluorescence microscopy and flash photolysis. Hepatocytes loaded with Ca2+-sensitive probes were stimulated with a first agonist to evoke a maximal response, and then a second agonist was added. When phenylephrine or ADP was used as the first agonist, AVP applied subsequently could elicit an additional response, which did not happen when AVP was first applied and phenylephrine or ADP was applied later. Cells microinjected with caged myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) were challenged with the different agonists and, when a maximal response was obtained, photorelease of IP3 was triggered. Cells maximally stimulated with AVP did not respond to IP3 photorelease, whereas those stimulated with phenylephrine or ADP responded with a fast Ca2+ spike above the elevated steady-state level, which was followed by an undershoot. In contrast, with all three agonists, IP3 photorelease triggered at the top of an oscillatory Ca2+ transient was able to mobilize additional Ca2+. These experiments indicate that the differential response of cells to agonists is found not only during Ca2+ oscillations but also during maximal agonist stimulation and that potency and efficacy differences exist among agonists. PMID:9371717

  19. The modulation of vascular ATP-sensitive K+ channel function via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway activated by phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Haba, Masanori; Hatakeyama, Noboru; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Teramae, Hiroki; Azma, Toshiharu; Hatano, Yoshio; Matsuda, Naoyuki

    2010-08-01

    The present study examined the modulator role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway activated by the alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine in ATP-sensitive K(+) channel function in intact vascular smooth muscle. We evaluated the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel function and the activity of the PI3K-Akt pathway in the rat thoracic aorta without endothelium. The PI3K inhibitor 2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride (LY294002) (10(-5) M) augmented relaxation in response to the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel opener levcromakalim (10(-8) to 3 x 10(-6) M) in aortic rings contracted with phenylephrine (3 x 10(-7) M) but not with 9,11-dideoxy-11alpha,9alpha-epoxy-methanoprostaglandin F(2alpha) (U46619; 3 x 10(-8) M), although those agents induced similar contraction. ATP-sensitive K(+) channel currents induced by levcromakalim (10(-6) M) in the presence of phenylephrine (3 x 10(-7) M) were enhanced by the nonselective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (10(-7) M) and LY294002 (10(-5) M). Levels of the regulatory subunits of PI3K p85-alpha and p55-gamma increased in the membrane fraction from aortas without endothelium treated with phenylephrine (3 x 10(-7) M) but not with U46619 (3 x 10(-8) M). Phenylephrine simultaneously augmented Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 and Thr308. Therefore, activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway seems to play a role in the impairment of ATP-sensitive K(+) channel function in vascular smooth muscle exposed to alpha-1 adrenergic stimuli.

  20. Charge-transfer complexes of phenylephrine with nitrobenzene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mossalamy, E. H.

    2004-04-01

    The molecular charge-transfer complexes of phenylephrine with picric acid and m-dinitrobenzene have been studied and investigated by IR, 1H NMR electronic spectra in organic solvents and buffer solutions, respectively. Simple and selective methods are proposed for the determination of phenylephrine hydrochloride in bulk form and in tablets. The two methods are based on the formation of charge-transfer complexes between drug base as a n-donor (D) and picric acid, m-dinitrobenzene as π-acceptor (A). The products exhibit absorption maxima at 497 and 560 nm in acetonitrile for picric acid and m-dinitrobenzene, respectively. The coloured product exhibits an absorption maximum at 650 nm in dioxane. The sensitive kinetic methods for the determination phynylephrine hydrochloride are described. The method is based upon a kinetic investigation of the oxidation reaction of the drug with alkaline potassium permanganate at room temperature for a fixed time at 20 min.

  1. Magnesium and diltiazem relaxes phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Mustafa; Peker, Recep O.; Donmez, Soner; Gokalp, Osman

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative vasospasm during cardiovascular surgery is a challenging problem. Several vasodilator agents are frequently utilized for its prevention in surgical practice. Magnesium and diltiazem both have known potential vasorelaxant effects. We planned to compare the efficacy of diltiazem and magnesium in relieving phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings. Ten young adult female Wistar albino rats weighing 230–260 g were used in this study. The aortic rings in the organ bath equilibrated and reached their baseline tension. Precontraction was induced by 0.001 mmol/l phenylephrine and cumulative concentration–relaxation curves were obtained by consecutively increasing the addition of either diltiazem (10−6-0.1 mmol/l) or magnesium (0.1–10 mmol/l). The mean maximal relaxation responses observed by diltiazem and magnesium on separate aortic rings were 90 ± 3 and 53 ± 2%, respectively. The calculated EC50 of diltiazem was 0.01035 mmol/l, whereas the EC50 of magnesium was 4.064 mmol/l (P < 0.05). Both magnesium and diltiazem produced vasorelaxation on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings in this study, but the potency of diltiazem regarding the EC50 value was significantly higher than that of magnesium. Magnesium could be a candidate together with diltiazem to inhibit vasospasm on arterial grafts during coronary bypass surgery. PMID:22523136

  2. Influence of circulating alpha adrenoceptor agonists on lung function in patients with exercise induced asthma and healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, K; Martinsson, A; Hjemdahl, P

    1986-01-01

    The influence of circulating noradrenaline (in this context primarily a non-selective alpha agonist) and the alpha 1 selective agonist phenylephrine on bronchial tone, blood pressure, and heart rate was studied in eight patients with exercise induced asthma and eight age and sex matched controls. All subjects refrained from taking treatment for at least one week before the trial. The agonists were infused intravenously in stepwise increasing doses of 0.04, 0.085, 0.17, and 0.34 micrograms/kg a minute for noradrenaline and 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 micrograms/kg a minute for phenylephrine. At the highest dose the plasma concentration of noradrenaline was about 30 nmol/l, resembling the concentrations found during intense exercise, and that of phenylephrine was about 400 nmol/l. Both agonists caused dose dependent and similar increases in blood pressure in the two groups. Despite clearcut cardiovascular effects (systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by about 40-50/25-30 mm Hg), neither agonist altered lung function, as assessed by measurements of specific airway compliance (sGaw), peak expiratory flow (PEF), or end expiratory flow rate, in either group. It is concluded that circulating alpha agonists, whether alpha 1 selective (phenylephrine) or non-selective (noradrenaline), fail to alter basal bronchial tone in patients with exercise induced asthma or in healthy subjects. PMID:3787535

  3. Phenylephrine activates eNOS Ser 1177 phosphorylation and nitric oxide signaling in renal hypertensive rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno R; Pernomian, Laena; Grando, Marcella D; Bendhack, Lusiane M

    2014-09-01

    The endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in the control of the vascular tone. This work aimed to evaluate the role of an α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (PE) on eNOS activity and downstream signaling pathway activation in normotensive (2K) and renal hypertensive (2K-1C) intact-endothelium rat aortas. Concentration-effect curves were performed for PE in intact-endothelium aortas from 2K and 2K-1C rats, in the absence of or in the presence of NOS or soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor. Intact endothelium aortas were stimulated with PE in organ chambers and eNOS Ser(1177)/Thr(495) phosphorylation expression was evaluated by western blot. Nitric Oxide (NO) production was evaluated in isolated endothelial cells from 2K and 2K-1C rat aortas by flow-cytometry using NO selective fluorescent probe, DAF-2DA. The sGC activity/expression was also evaluated. PE-induced contractile response is lower in 2K-1C than in 2K intact-endothelium rat aorta. This is due to higher eNOS Ser(1177) phosphorylation in 2K-1C, which induces the eNOS overactivation. It was abolished by NOS or sGC inhibition. Phenylephrine reduces NO production in 2K as compared to the basal level, but it is not modified in 2K-1C. In PE-stimulated endothelial cells, the NO production is higher in 2K-1C than in 2K. Phenylephrine induces higher cGMP production in 2K-1C than in 2K, despite the lower expression of sGC in 2K-1C. Our results suggest that alpha1-adrenoceptor activation contributes to the increased activity of the enzyme eNOS by Ser(1177) phosphorylation in 2K-1C intact-endothelium aorta, which consequently decreases PE-induced contractile response.

  4. (D-Phe/sup 12/)bombesin analogues: a new class of bombesin receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz-Erian, P.; Coy, D.H.; Tamura, M.; Jones, S.W.; Gardner, J.D.; Jensen, R.T.

    1987-03-01

    Previous attempts to develop analogues of bombesin that function as specific receptor antagonists have been unsuccessful. Alteration of the histidine in luteinizing hormone releasing factor has resulted in analogues that function as competitive antagonists. In the present study the authors have used a similar strategy and altered the histidine in bombesin. (D-Phe/sup 12/)bombesin, (D-Phe/sup 12/,Leu/sup 14/)bombesin, and (Try/sup 4/, D-)je/sup 12/) bombesin did not stimulate amylase release from guinea pig pancreatic acini when present alone, but each analog inhibited bombesin-stimulated secretion. For each analog, detectable inhibition occurred at 1 ..mu..M and half-maximal inhibition at 4 ..mu..M. Each analog inhibited amylase release by bombesin and other agonists that stimulate secretion by interacting with bombesin receptors. The analogues of bombesin did not alter stimulation by substance P or other agonists that interact with other receptors. The inhibition of the action of bombesin was competitive with Schild plots having slopes of 1.0. Each analog also inhibited binding of /sup 125/I-labeled (Try/sup 4/) bombesin but not /sup 125/I-labeled substance P. These results demonstrate that (D-Phe/sup 12/) analogues of bombesin function as bombesin receptor antagonists and are the only bombesin receptor antagonists that interact only with the bombesin receptor. Because of their specificity, these analogues may prove useful for defining the role of bombesin in various physiological or pathological processes.

  5. Beta-methyl substitution of cyclohexylalanine in Dmt-Tic-Cha-Phe peptides results in highly potent delta opioid antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Géza; Ioja, Eniko; Tömböly, Csaba; Ballet, Steven; Tourwé, Dirk; Péter, Antal; Martinek, Tamás; Chung, Nga N; Schiller, Peter W; Benyhe, Sándor; Borsodi, Anna

    2007-01-25

    The opioid peptide TIPP (H-Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe-OH, Tic:1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) was substituted with Dmt (2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) and a new unnatural amino acid, beta-MeCha (beta-methyl-cyclohexylalanine). This double substitution led to a new series of opioid peptides displaying subnanomolar delta antagonist activity and mu agonist or antagonist properties depending on the configuration of the beta-MeCha residue. The most promising analog, H-Dmt-Tic-(2S,3S)-beta-MeCha-Phe-OH was a very selective delta antagonist both in the mouse vas deferens (MVD) assay (Ke = 0.241 +/- 0.05 nM) and in radioligand binding assay (K i delta = 0.48 +/- 0.05 nM, K i mu/K i delta = 2800). The epimeric peptide H-Dmt-Tic-(2S,3R)-beta-MeCha-Phe-OH and the corresponding peptide amide turned out to be mixed partial mu agonist/delta antagonists in the guinea pig ileum and MVD assays. Our results constitute further examples of the influence of Dmt and beta-methyl substitution as well as C-terminal amidation on the potency, selectivity, and signal transduction properties of TIPP related peptides. Some of these compounds represent valuable pharmacological tools for opioid research.

  6. Maximizing myocardial perfusion with combined dipyridamole and phenylephrine

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, K.P.; Lyons, J.; Eugene, J.; McColgan, S.; Gelezunas, V.; Swan, L.

    1984-01-01

    Intravenous dipyridamole (DP), a potent coronary vasodilator, has been used as a pharmacological exercise substitute for Thallium scintigraphy. Increased coronary artery flow occurs in animals. Humans with severe coronary disease have been imaged with Thallium using this technique. However, in both animals and man, the systemic blood pressure decreases especially at higher dosages. Myocardial perfusion (MP) is dependent on delivery pressure as well as the diameter of the coronary artery. The authors therefore maintained blood pressure by infusion of phenylephrine (PE) during maximal coronary artery dilatation from DP. Seven anesthetized, mongrel, open chest dogs weighing 20-25 kgs were infused with DP alone, 0.075 mg/kg/min for 10 minutes. Mp was measured in a highly localized small volume (0.5 cm/sup 3/) of myocardium using a silicon avalanche radiation detector to record the washout of a 2-5 mCi bolus of xenon in saline using the Kety-Schmidt formula. Polyethylene tubing (O.D. 0.03 inches) was directed into the proximal LAD using a brass canula introduced through the carotid artery. In 5 other dogs, 0.1 mg of PE was added to the DP. DP alone caused only a minor elevation of MP (15%) while the blood pressure decreased. In contrast with PE, the pressure was maintained and MP more than doubled. With continued infusion, both pressure and MP fell. In conclusion, elevation of MP by a coronary dilator DP can be enhanced when combined with a vasopressor (PE) and may be better for pharmacological stimulation of MP for Thallium imaging. Prolonged administration of DP may decrease rather than increase MP even during infusion of phenylephrine.

  7. Cardiovascular effects of dobutamine and phenylephrine infusion in sevoflurane-anesthetized Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Minoru; Kurimoto, Shinjiro; Ishikawa, Yuhiro; Tokushige, Hirotaka; Mae, Naomi; Nagata, Shun-ichi; Mamada, Masayuki

    2013-11-01

    To determine dose-dependent cardiovascular effects of dobutamine and phenylephrine during anesthesia in horses, increasing doses of dobutamine and phenylephrine were infused to 6 healthy Thoroughbred horses. Anesthesia was induced with xylazine, guaifenesin and thiopental and maintained with sevoflurane at 2.8% of end-tidal concentration in all horses. The horses were positioned in right lateral recumbency and infused 3 increasing doses of dobutamine (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µg/kg/min) for 15 min each dose. Following to 30 min of reversal period, 3 increasing doses of phenylephrine (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/kg/min) were infused. Cardiovascular parameters were measured before and at the end of each 15-min infusion period for each drug. Blood samples were collected every 5 min during phenylephrine infusion period. There were no significant changes in heart rate throughout the infusion period. Both dobutamine and phenylephrine reversed sevoflurane-induced hypotension. Dobutamine increased both mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and cardiac output (CO) as the result of the increase in stroke volume, whereas phenylephrine increased MAP but decreased CO as the result of the increase in systemic vascular resistance. Plasma phenylephrine concentration increased dose-dependently, and these values at 15, 30 and 45 min were 6.2 ± 1.2, 17.0 ± 4.8 and 37.9 ± 7.3 ng/ml, respectively.

  8. Cardiovascular effects of dobutamine and phenylephrine infusion in sevoflurane-anesthetized Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Minoru; Kurimoto, Shinjiro; Ishikawa, Yuhiro; Tokushige, Hirotaka; Mae, Naomi; Nagata, Shun-ichi; Mamada, Masayuki

    2013-11-01

    To determine dose-dependent cardiovascular effects of dobutamine and phenylephrine during anesthesia in horses, increasing doses of dobutamine and phenylephrine were infused to 6 healthy Thoroughbred horses. Anesthesia was induced with xylazine, guaifenesin and thiopental and maintained with sevoflurane at 2.8% of end-tidal concentration in all horses. The horses were positioned in right lateral recumbency and infused 3 increasing doses of dobutamine (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µg/kg/min) for 15 min each dose. Following to 30 min of reversal period, 3 increasing doses of phenylephrine (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/kg/min) were infused. Cardiovascular parameters were measured before and at the end of each 15-min infusion period for each drug. Blood samples were collected every 5 min during phenylephrine infusion period. There were no significant changes in heart rate throughout the infusion period. Both dobutamine and phenylephrine reversed sevoflurane-induced hypotension. Dobutamine increased both mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and cardiac output (CO) as the result of the increase in stroke volume, whereas phenylephrine increased MAP but decreased CO as the result of the increase in systemic vascular resistance. Plasma phenylephrine concentration increased dose-dependently, and these values at 15, 30 and 45 min were 6.2 ± 1.2, 17.0 ± 4.8 and 37.9 ± 7.3 ng/ml, respectively. PMID:23832627

  9. Cardiovascular Effects of Dobutamine and Phenylephrine Infusion in Sevoflurane-anesthetized Thoroughbred Horses

    PubMed Central

    OHTA, Minoru; KURIMOTO, Shinjiro; ISHIKAWA, Yuhiro; TOKUSHIGE, Hirotaka; MAE, Naomi; NAGATA, Shun-ichi; MAMADA, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT To determine dose-dependent cardiovascular effects of dobutamine and phenylephrine during anesthesia in horses, increasing doses of dobutamine and phenylephrine were infused to 6 healthy Thoroughbred horses. Anesthesia was induced with xylazine, guaifenesin and thiopental and maintained with sevoflurane at 2.8% of end-tidal concentration in all horses. The horses were positioned in right lateral recumbency and infused 3 increasing doses of dobutamine (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µg/kg/min) for 15 min each dose. Following to 30 min of reversal period, 3 increasing doses of phenylephrine (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/kg/min) were infused. Cardiovascular parameters were measured before and at the end of each 15-min infusion period for each drug. Blood samples were collected every 5 min during phenylephrine infusion period. There were no significant changes in heart rate throughout the infusion period. Both dobutamine and phenylephrine reversed sevoflurane-induced hypotension. Dobutamine increased both mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and cardiac output (CO) as the result of the increase in stroke volume, whereas phenylephrine increased MAP but decreased CO as the result of the increase in systemic vascular resistance. Plasma phenylephrine concentration increased dose-dependently, and these values at 15, 30 and 45 min were 6.2 ± 1.2, 17.0 ± 4.8 and 37.9 ± 7.3 ng/ml, respectively. PMID:23832627

  10. Studies on the positive inotropic effect of phenylephrine: a comparison with isoprenaline.

    PubMed

    Ledda, F; Marchetti, P; Mugelli, A

    1975-05-01

    1. The effects of phenylephrine and isoprenaline on the isometric contraction of guinea-pig ventricle were compared over the whole range of their respective dose-response curves. 2. In preparations driven at 2.5 Hz the increase in contractile force induced by either isoprenaline of phenylephrine was linearly correlated to an increase in maximum velocity of force development. The relaxation time was shortened by isoprenaline but not by phenylephrine. 3. The negative inotropic effect induced by delta [N-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-N-methyl-amino]-alpha-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)alpha-isopropylvaleronitrile hydrochloride (D(600)) was reversed by isoprenaline, but little influenced by phenylephrine. 4. The study of the interval-force relationship shows that the increase in contractile force induced by phenylephrine (3 X 10(-5) M) was relatively greater at low frequencies of stimulation, and that the maximum effect was reached at the frequency of 1 Hz. 5. The positive inotropic effect of phenylephrine (10-4 M) was significantly higher at a frequency of 1 Hz than at 2.5 Hz; the effect of isoprenaline (3 x 10-8 M) was not significantly different at the two driving frequencies. 6. In preparations driven at 1 Hz the inotropic effect of the lower concentrations of phenylephrine was due to an increase in the time to peak tension without any change of the maximum velocity of force development; however an increase of this parameter became evident only after higher concentrations of the amine (10-5 M or more), associated with a progressive shortening of the time to peak. 7. A correlation between mechanical and electrophysiological effects of phenylephrine is attempted; the suggestion is advanced that the prolongation of the action potential and of the active state duration may be an important factor in the inotropic effect of phenylephrine.

  11. Short-term effects of phenylephrine on systemic and regional hemodynamics in patients with septic shock: a crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Andrea; Lange, Matthias; Ertmer, Christian; Dünser, Martin; Rehberg, Sebastian; Bachetoni, Alessandra; D'Alessandro, Marladomenica; Van Aken, Hugo; Guarracino, Fabio; Pietropaoli, Paolo; Traber, Daniel L; Westphal, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Clinical studies evaluating the use of phenylephrine in septic shock are lacking. The present study was designed as a prospective, crossover pilot study to compare the effects of norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine on systemic and regional hemodynamics in patients with catecholamine-dependent septic shock. In 15 septic shock patients, NE (0.82 +/- 0.689 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) was replaced with phenylephrine (4.39 +/- 5.23 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) titrated to maintain MAP between 65 and 75 mmHg. After 8 h of phenylephrine infusion treatment was switched back to NE. Data from right heart catheterization, acid-base balance, thermo-dye dilution catheter, gastric tonometry, and renal function were obtained before, during, and after replacing NE with phenylephrine. Variables of systemic hemodynamics, global oxygen transport, and acid-base balance remained unchanged after replacing NE with phenylephrine except for a significant decrease in heart rate (phenylephrine, 89 +/- 18 vs. NE, 93 +/- 18 bpm; P < 0.05). However, plasma disappearance rate (phenylephrine, 13.5 +/- 7.1 vs. NE, 16.4 +/- 8.7% x min(-1)) and clearance of indocyanine green (phenylephrine, 330 +/- 197 vs. NE, 380 +/- 227 mL x min(-1) x m(-2)), as well as creatinine clearance (phenylephrine, 81.3 +/- 78.4 vs. NE, 94.3 +/- 93.5 mL x min(-1)) were significantly decreased by phenylephrine infusion (each P < 0.05). In addition, phenylephrine increased arterial lactate concentrations as compared with NE infusion (1.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 1.4 +/- 1.1 mM; P < 0.05). After switching back to NE, all variables returned to values obtained before phenylephrine infusion except creatinine clearance and gastric tonometry values. Our results suggest that for the same MAP, phenylephrine causes a more pronounced hepatosplanchnic vasoconstriction as compared with NE.

  12. Inhibition by trifluoperazine of glycogenolytic effects of phenylephrine, vasopressin, and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Koide, Y; Kimura, S; Tada, R; Kugai, N; Yamashita, K

    1982-06-01

    The effects of trifluoperazine on the activation of glycogenolysis by various hormones were studied in perfused rat liver. Trifluoperazine significantly inhibited glycogenolytic effect of phenylephrine and angiotensin II by lowering maximal response, and that of vasopressin by shifting the dose-response curve to the right, while alpha-antagonist phentolamine was inhibitory only to phenylephrine. Phosphorylase activation of phenylephrine was inhibited by trifluoperazine in parallel with glycogenolytic response. The increase in 45Ca2+ efflux induced by phenylephrine, angiotensin II, and vasopressin was also inhibited by the agent. These inhibitory effects of trifluoperazine were not related to the change in tissue cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP levels. On the other hand, neither the glycogenolytic effect of glucagon, cyclic AMP, and N6,O2-dibutyryl cyclic AMP nor phosphorylase activation by glucagon was affected by trifluoperazine. Thus, trifluoperazine specifically inhibits the activation of glycogenolysis by Ca2+-dependent hormones.

  13. Phenylephrine as an alternative to cocaine for nasal vasoconstriction before nasal surgery: A randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    AlHaddad, Sawsan T; Khanna, Ashish K; Mascha, Edward J; Abdelmalak, Basem B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cocaine is often used topically to provide the profound vasoconstriction required for nasal surgery; however, it has been associated with intraoperative cardiac adverse effects. We compared cocaine with phenylephrine as an alternative to ascertain their relative efficacy as vasoconstrictors in nasal septoplasty. Methods: Adult patients, presenting for elective nasal septoplasty, of American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status I-III, were randomised to either 0.5% phenylephrine or 4% cocaine. The primary outcome was quality of vasoconstriction on a 5-point scale (1=unacceptable, 5=excellent), rated by the surgeon at the end of the procedure. Results: Twenty-nine patients received phenylephrine and 26 received cocaine. The median rating for quality of the vasoconstriction was 4.0 (good) in both the phenylephrine and cocaine groups (P=0.84). Median blood loss was 50 ml in the phenylephrine group and 62.5 ml in the cocaine group (P=0.49). In secondary analyses, phenylephrine was shown to be non-inferior to cocaine on both quality of vasoconstriction (non-inferiority delta of 1 point, P=0.009) and estimated blood loss (non-inferiority delta of 25 ml, P=0.028). The frequency of ventricular ectopy, ST segment changes or blood pressure changes after nasal packing was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: Phenylephrine in a concentration of 0.5% is not different from 4% cocaine on the quality of vasoconstriction in septoplasty. Given the abuse potential of cocaine and the added administrative burden associated with its handling, phenylephrine might serve as an alternative. PMID:23825816

  14. Metal-Catalyzed Cleavage of tRNA[superscript Phe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Sarah R.; Silverstein, Todd P.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.

    2008-01-01

    This laboratory project is one component of a semester-long advanced biochemistry laboratory course that uses several complementary techniques to study tRNA[superscript Phe] conformational changes induced by ligand binding. In this article we describe a set of experiments in which students assay metal-catalyzed hydrolysis of tRNA[superscript Phe]…

  15. Myosin light chain phosphorylation in sup 32 P-labeled rabbit aorta stimulated by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and phenylephrine

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, H.A.; Oren, J.W.; Benscoter, H.A. )

    1989-12-15

    The mechanism(s) of force development in vascular smooth muscle following pharmacological activation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters are not known. In this study, we examined the myosin light chain phosphorylation response following stimulation by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDB) or phenylephrine in rabbit aorta which had been incubated with 32PO4 in order to label ATP pools. Through tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of myosin light chain from intact tissue and comparison to controls using purified components, we inferred that Ca2+-dependent force stimulated by PDB was associated with small increases in serine-19 phosphorylation, consistent with a contractile mechanism involving indirect activation of myosin light chain kinase. Additional residues, consistent with the in vitro substrate specificity of protein kinase C, were also observed to be phosphorylated in response to PDB and represented proportionately a larger fraction of the total phosphorylated myosin light chain in Ca2+-depleted tissues. Stimulation by an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist (phenylephrine) resulted in phosphorylation of residues which were consistent with an activation mechanism involving myosin light chain kinase only. These results indicate that in rabbit aorta the contractile effects of PDB may be partially mediated by Ca2+-dependent activation of myosin light chain kinase. However, the data do not rule out a component of the PDB-stimulated contractile response which is independent of myosin light chain phosphorylation on the serine-19 residue. In addition, activation by a more physiological stimulus, phenylephrine, does not result in protein kinase C-mediated myosin light chain phosphorylation.

  16. Visualizing the endocytosis of phenylephrine in living cells by quantum dot-based tracking.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Wu, Lina; Hou, Zhun; Song, Yao; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To study the intracellular receptor-drug transportation, a fluorescent probe consisting of phenylephrine-polyethylene glycol-quantum dots conjugate was employed to track endocytosis process of phenylephrine in living cells. This type of movement was studied by continuously filming fluorescent images in the same cell. We also calculated the movement parameters, and divided the endocytosis process into 6 stages. Furthermore, the movement parameters of this probe in different organelles were determined by co-localization of the probe fluorescent images and different cellular organelles. After comparing the parameters in cellular organelles with these in 6 stages, the whole endocytosis pathway was demonstrated. These results verified that this probe successfully tracked the whole intracellular dynamic endocytosis process of phenylephrine. Our method realized the visual tracking the whole receptor-mediated endocytosis, which is a new approach on investigating the molecular mechanisms and kinetic properties of intracellular receptor-drug transportation.

  17. Phenylephrine potentiates the anticonvulsant effect and neutralizes the sedative effect of diazepam in rats upon combined intragastric administration.

    PubMed

    Serdyuk, S E; Gmiro, V E

    2014-12-01

    High doses of phenylephrine and diazepam (1 and 10 mg/kg, respectively) suppressed the development of generalized tonic-clonic pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in 86-100% rats, but did not prevent local clonic pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions. Diazepam in the specified dose produced strong sedation, while phenylephrine had no sedative effect in the open-field test. Combined intragastric administration of phenylephrine in a medium and individually ineffective dose (0.3 mg/kg) and diazepam in a high dose (10 mg/kg) potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of diazepam: it prevented not only tonic-clonic, but also clonic pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in 100% rats and 2.6-fold increased anticonvulsant activity of diazepam. The specified combination of diazepam and phenylephrine had no sedative effect. The mechanism of potentiation of the anticonvulsive effect and elimination of the sedative side effect is based on stimulation of gastric mucosa afferents by phenylephrine.

  18. Prophylactic phenylephrine for caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Heesen, M; Kölhr, S; Rossaint, R; Straube, S

    2014-02-01

    We conducted a systematic review to determine the harm and benefit associated with prophylactic phenylephrine for caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia. We included 21 randomised controlled trials with 1504 women. The relative risk (95% CI) of hypotension with phenylephrine infusion – as defined by authors – before delivery was 0.36 (0.18–0.73) vs placebo, p = 0.004; 0.58 (0.39–0.88) vs an ephedrine infusion, p = 0.009; and 0.73 (0.55–0.96) when added to an ephedrine infusion, p = 0.02. After delivery, the relative risks of hypotension and nausea and vomiting with phenylephrine compared with placebo were 0.37 (0.19–0.71), p = 0.003, and 0.39 (0.17–0.91), p = 0.03, respectively. There was no evidence that hypertension, bradycardia or neonatal endpoints were affected. Phenylephrine reduced the risk for hypotension and nausea and vomiting after spinal doses of bupivacaine generally exceeding 8 mg, but there was no evidence that it reduced other maternal or neonatal morbidities.

  19. Phenylephrine-induced elevations in arterial blood pressure are attenuated in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that phenylephrine-induced elevations in blood pressure are attenuated in heat-stressed humans, blood pressure was elevated via steady-state infusion of three doses of phenylephrine HCl in 10 healthy subjects in both normothermic and heat stress conditions. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature by 0.5 degrees C, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), heart rate, and cardiac output and decreased total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR; all P < 0.005) but did not change mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; P > 0.05). At the highest dose of phenylephrine, the increase in MAP and TPR from predrug baselines was significantly attenuated during the heat stress [DeltaMAP 8.4 +/- 1.2 mmHg; DeltaTPR 0.96 +/- 0.85 peripheral resistance units (PRU)] compared with normothermia (DeltaMAP 15.4 +/- 1.4 mmHg, DeltaTPR 7.13 +/- 1.18 PRU; all P < 0.001). The sensitivity of baroreflex control of MSNA and heart rate, expressed as the slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure, as well as the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure, respectively, was similar between thermal conditions (each P > 0.05). These data suggest that phenylephrine-induced elevations in MAP are attenuated in heat-stressed humans without affecting baroreflex control of MSNA or heart rate.

  20. Human sympathetic and vagal baroreflex responses to sequential nitroprusside and phenylephrine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudas, L.; Crossman, A. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Halliwill, J. R.; Tahvanainen, K. U.; Kuusela, T. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated a method of baroreflex testing involving sequential intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside followed by phenylephrine and phenylephrine followed by nitroprusside in 18 healthy men and women, and we drew inferences regarding human sympathetic and vagal baroreflex mechanisms. We recorded the electrocardiogram, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, and peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity. We then contrasted least squares linear regression slopes derived from the depressor (nitroprusside) and pressor (phenylephrine) phases with 1) slopes derived from spontaneous fluctuations of systolic arterial pressures and R-R intervals, and 2) baroreflex gain derived from cross-spectral analyses of systolic pressures and R-R intervals. We calculated sympathetic baroreflex gain from integrated muscle sympathetic nerve activity and diastolic pressures. We found that vagal baroreflex slopes are less when arterial pressures are falling than when they are rising and that this hysteresis exists over pressure ranges both below and above baseline levels. Although pharmacological and spontaneous vagal baroreflex responses correlate closely, pharmacological baroreflex slopes tend to be lower than those derived from spontaneous fluctuations. Sympathetic baroreflex slopes are similar when arterial pressure is falling and rising; however, small pressure elevations above baseline silence sympathetic motoneurons. Vagal, but not sympathetic baroreflex gains vary inversely with subjects' ages and their baseline arterial pressures. There is no correlation between sympathetic and vagal baroreflex gains. We recommend repeated sequential nitroprusside followed by phenylephrine doses as a simple, efficientmeans to provoke and characterize human vagal and sympathetic baroreflex responses.

  1. The evolutionary stage of an RRs star SX Phe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saio, H.; Takeuti, M.

    1980-01-01

    The evolutionary stage for a short period variable SX Phe was investigated. It was assumed that SX Phe is a mixed star with low metal abundance in which the material was mixed after the star evolved off the main sequence, and is in the second hydrogen burning stage. The validity of this hypothesis was examined by constructing two evolutionary sequences with (X,Z,M/solar mass) = (0.5,0.004,0.75) and (0.5,0.001,0.70) in the hydrogen burning phase and computed the pulsation period. Agreement between theoretical results and observational data was sufficient to conclude that the mixed model is actually adequate for SX Phe. The applicability of this model to other RRs stars is briefly discussed.

  2. The evolutionary stage of an RRs star SX Phe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saio, H.; Takeuti, M.

    1980-05-01

    The evolutionary stage for a short period variable SX Phe was investigated. It was assumed that SX Phe is a mixed star with low metal abundance in which the material was mixed after the star evolved off the main sequence, and is in the second hydrogen burning stage. The validity of this hypothesis was examined by constructing two evolutionary sequences with (X,Z,M/solar mass) = (0.5,0.004,0.75) and (0.5,0.001,0.70) in the hydrogen burning phase and computed the pulsation period. Agreement between theoretical results and observational data was sufficient to conclude that the mixed model is actually adequate for SX Phe. The applicability of this model to other RRs stars is briefly discussed.

  3. Pharmacological actions of the slow release hydrogen sulfide donor GYY4137 on phenylephrine-induced tone in isolated bovine ciliary artery.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Madhura Kulkarni; Njie-Mbye, Ya Fatou; Opere, Catherine A; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Ohia, Sunny E

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a colorless gas characterized by its pungent odor of rotten eggs has been reported to elicit relaxation effects on basal and pre-contracted non-ocular smooth muscles of several mammalian species. In the present study, we investigated the pharmacological actions of a H2S donor, GYY4137 on isolated bovine posterior ciliary artery after contraction with the adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine. Furthermore, we studied the underlying mechanism of inhibitory action of GYY4137 on the posterior ciliary arteries. Isolated bovine posterior ciliary arteries were mounted in oxygenated organ baths and changes in isometric tension were measured with a Grass FT03 transducer connected to a recorder using a Grass Polyview Software. The relaxant actions of GYY4137 on phenylephrine pre-contracted arteries were observed in the absence and presence of an inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase, flurbiprofen. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of GYY4137 were studied in the absence or presence of inhibitors/activators of biosynthetic enzymes for H2S and nitric oxide production, as well as specific ion channel blockers. In the concentration range, 100 nM to 100 μM, GYY4137 elicited a concentration-dependant relaxation of phenylephrine-induced tone in isolated posterior ciliary arteries, with IC50 value of 13.4 ± 1.9 μM (n = 6). The cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, significantly (p < 0.01) enhanced the relaxation induced by GYY4137 yielding IC50 value of 0.13 ± 0.08 μM (n = 6). Both the inhibitors of cystathionine β-synthase (aminooxyacetic acid, AOAA, 30 μM) and cystathionine γ-lyase (propargylglycine, PAG, 1 mM) caused significant (p < 0.05) rightward shifts in the concentration-response curve to GYY4137. Furthermore, the KATP channel antagonist, glibenclamide (100 μM) significantly (p < 0.01) attenuated the relaxant action induced by GYY4137 on bovine ciliary artery. Conversely, the activator of cystathionine β-synthase, SAM (100 μM) and an

  4. Role of Ca2+ and L-Phe in Regulating Functional Cooperativity of Disease-Associated “Toggle” Calcium-Sensing Receptor Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Mulpuri, Nagaraju; Hannan, Fadil M.; Nesbit, M. Andrew; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Hamelberg, Donald; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2014-01-01

    The Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulates Ca2+ homeostasis in the body by monitoring extracellular levels of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o) and amino acids. Mutations at the hinge region of the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain (VFTD) produce either receptor inactivation (L173P, P221Q) or activation (L173F, P221L) related to hypercalcemic or hypocalcemic disorders. In this paper, we report that both L173P and P221Q markedly impair the functional positive cooperativity of the CaSR as reflected by [Ca2+]o–induced [Ca2+]i oscillations, inositol-1-phosphate (IP1) accumulation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) activity. In contrast, L173F and P221L show enhanced responsiveness of these three functional readouts to [Ca2+]o. Further analysis of the dynamics of the VFTD mutants using computational simulation studies supports disruption in the correlated motions in the loss-of-function CaSR mutants, while these motions are enhanced in the gain-of-function mutants. Wild type (WT) CaSR was modulated by L-Phe in a heterotropic positive cooperative way, achieving an EC50 similar to those of the two activating mutations. The response of the inactivating P221Q mutant to [Ca2+]o was partially rescued by L-Phe, illustrating the capacity of the L-Phe binding site to enhance the positive homotropic cooperativity of CaSR. L-Phe had no effect on the other inactivating mutant. Moreover, our results carried out both in silico and in intact cells indicate that residue Leu173, which is close to residues that are part of the L-Phe-binding pocket, exhibited impaired heterotropic cooperativity in the presence of L-Phe. Thus, Pro221 and Leu173 are important for the positive homo- and heterotropic cooperative regulation elicited by agonist binding. PMID:25420019

  5. Role of Ca2+ and L-Phe in regulating functional cooperativity of disease-associated "toggle" calcium-sensing receptor mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Mulpuri, Nagaraju; Hannan, Fadil M; Nesbit, M Andrew; Thakker, Rajesh V; Hamelberg, Donald; Brown, Edward M; Yang, Jenny J

    2014-01-01

    The Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulates Ca(2+) homeostasis in the body by monitoring extracellular levels of Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]o) and amino acids. Mutations at the hinge region of the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain (VFTD) produce either receptor inactivation (L173P, P221Q) or activation (L173F, P221L) related to hypercalcemic or hypocalcemic disorders. In this paper, we report that both L173P and P221Q markedly impair the functional positive cooperativity of the CaSR as reflected by [Ca(2+)]o-induced [Ca(2+)]i oscillations, inositol-1-phosphate (IP1) accumulation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) activity. In contrast, L173F and P221L show enhanced responsiveness of these three functional readouts to [Ca(2+)]o. Further analysis of the dynamics of the VFTD mutants using computational simulation studies supports disruption in the correlated motions in the loss-of-function CaSR mutants, while these motions are enhanced in the gain-of-function mutants. Wild type (WT) CaSR was modulated by L-Phe in a heterotropic positive cooperative way, achieving an EC50 similar to those of the two activating mutations. The response of the inactivating P221Q mutant to [Ca(2+)]o was partially rescued by L-Phe, illustrating the capacity of the L-Phe binding site to enhance the positive homotropic cooperativity of CaSR. L-Phe had no effect on the other inactivating mutant. Moreover, our results carried out both in silico and in intact cells indicate that residue Leu(173), which is close to residues that are part of the L-Phe-binding pocket, exhibited impaired heterotropic cooperativity in the presence of L-Phe. Thus, Pro(221) and Leu(173) are important for the positive homo- and heterotropic cooperative regulation elicited by agonist binding.

  6. Photoelectron spectra and structures of three cyclic dipeptides: PhePhe, TyrPro, and HisGly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickrama Arachchilage, Anoja P.; Wang, Feng; Feyer, Vitaliy; Plekan, Oksana; Prince, Kevin C.

    2012-03-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of three cyclic dipeptides: cyclo(Histidyl-Glycyl) (cHisGly), cyclo(Tyrosyl-Prolyl) (cTyrPro), and cyclo(Phenylalanyl-Phenylalanyl) (cPhePhe) in the vapor phase, by means of photoemission spectroscopy and theoretical modeling. The last compound was evaporated from the solid linear dipeptide, but cyclised, losing water to form cPhePhe in the gas phase. The results are compared with our previous studies of three other cyclopeptides. Experimental valence and core level spectra have been interpreted in the light of calculations to identify the basic chemical properties associated with the central diketopiperazine ring, and with the additional functional groups. The valence spectra are generally characterized by a restricted set of outer valence orbitals separated by a gap from most other valence orbitals. The theoretically simulated core and valence spectra of all three cyclic dipeptides agree reasonably well with the experimental spectra. The central ring and the side chains act as independent chromophores whose spectra do not influence one another, except for prolyl dipeptides, where the pyrrole ring is fused with the central ring. In this case, significant changes in the valence and core level spectra were observed, and explained by stronger hybridization of the valence orbitals.

  7. Potent contractile actions of prostanoid EP3-receptor agonists on human isolated pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Qian, Y M; Jones, R L; Chan, K M; Stock, A I; Ho, J K

    1994-10-01

    1. In 13 of 15 experiments, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and sulprostone (a prostanoid EP1/EP3-receptor agonist) contracted isolated rings of human pulmonary artery at low concentrations (> or = 5 and > or = 0.5 nM respectively). Tissue was obtained from patients undergoing surgery mainly for carcinoma of the lung. Characterization of the receptors involved was complicated by loss of sensitivity to the contractile PGE action over the experimental period. In contrast, contractile responses to KCl, phenylephrine and the specific thromboxane (TP-) receptor agonist, U-46619, did not decrease with time. 2. The relative contractile potencies for seven PGE analogues, measured during the first few hours after setting up the preparations, were as follows: sulprostone > misoprostol = gemeprost > or = PGE2 > or = GR 63799X > 17-phenyl-omega-trinor PGE2 > or = 11-deoxy PGE1. This ranking indicates that an EP3-receptor is involved. 3. The contractile action of sulprostone was not blocked by the TP-receptor antagonists, EP 169 and GR 32191, and the EP1-receptor antagonist, AH 6809. 4. In two experiments, PGE2 (50 nM) reduced basal tone and sulprostone was a weak contractile agent. Phenylephrine-induced tone was also inhibited by PGE2 (EC50 = 5-20 nM), 11-deoxy PGE1 and butaprost (a selective EP2-receptor agonist); the latter prostanoids were about 2 and 4 times less potent than PGE2 respectively. Interactions with phenylephrine were different in experiments where PGE2 alone was contractile: PGE2 induced contraction superimposed on the phenylephrine response and 11-deoxy PGE1 induced either further contraction or had no effect. Butaprost produced relaxation at high concentrations;this may not be an EP2 action since preparations were highly sensitive to relaxant actions of prostacyclin (IP-) receptor agonists (cicaprost and TEI-9063).5 The study has shown that in the majority of experiments on the human isolated pulmonary artery,the contractile EP3 system outweighed the relaxant EP2

  8. The clinical utility of new combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Lawuyi, Lola Elizabeth; Gurbaxani, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of mydriasis throughout cataract extraction surgery and the control of ocular inflammation are crucial for successful surgical outcomes. The development of miosis during cataract surgery compromises the visualization of the surgical field and working space for surgeons. This may lead to complications that include posterior capsular tear and associated vitreous loss, longer surgical time, and postoperative inflammation. Postoperative inflammation is often uncomfortable and frustrating for patients. It causes pain, redness, and photophobia. This compromises the best-uncorrected vision following surgery and often leads to multiple clinic visits. This article examines the literature published on the current treatments used to manage mydriasis, pain, and inflammation in cataract extraction surgery. Combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection offers an exciting new class of medication for use in cataract surgery. With the recent approval of Omidria™ (combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3%) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for intraocular use, we review the clinical utility of this new combination injection in cataract surgery. PubMed, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings were searched for the relevant literature using a combination of the following search terms: cataract extraction surgery, pupil dilation (mydriasis), miosis, phenylephrine, ketorolac, Omidria™, intracameral mydriatic. Relevant articles were reviewed and their references checked for further relevant literature. All abstracts were reviewed and full texts retrieved where available.

  9. The clinical utility of new combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Lawuyi, Lola Elizabeth; Gurbaxani, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of mydriasis throughout cataract extraction surgery and the control of ocular inflammation are crucial for successful surgical outcomes. The development of miosis during cataract surgery compromises the visualization of the surgical field and working space for surgeons. This may lead to complications that include posterior capsular tear and associated vitreous loss, longer surgical time, and postoperative inflammation. Postoperative inflammation is often uncomfortable and frustrating for patients. It causes pain, redness, and photophobia. This compromises the best-uncorrected vision following surgery and often leads to multiple clinic visits. This article examines the literature published on the current treatments used to manage mydriasis, pain, and inflammation in cataract extraction surgery. Combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection offers an exciting new class of medication for use in cataract surgery. With the recent approval of Omidria™ (combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3%) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for intraocular use, we review the clinical utility of this new combination injection in cataract surgery. PubMed, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings were searched for the relevant literature using a combination of the following search terms: cataract extraction surgery, pupil dilation (mydriasis), miosis, phenylephrine, ketorolac, Omidria™, intracameral mydriatic. Relevant articles were reviewed and their references checked for further relevant literature. All abstracts were reviewed and full texts retrieved where available. PMID:26203214

  10. Polydatin prevents hypertrophy in phenylephrine induced neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes and pressure-overload mouse models.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ming; Ding, Wenwen; Liao, Yansong; Liu, Ye; Yan, Dewen; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Rongming; Zheng, Na; Liu, Shuaiye; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that polydatin (PD), a resveratrol glucoside, may have beneficial actions on the cardiac hypertrophy. Therefore, the current study focused on the underlying mechanism of the PD anti-hypertrophic effect in cultured cardiomyocytes and in progression from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure in vivo. Experiments were performed on cultured neonatal rat, ventricular myocytes as well as adult mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Treatment of cardiomyocytes with phenylephrine for three days produced a marked hypertrophic effect as evidenced by significantly increased cell surface area and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) protein expression. These effects were attenuated by PD in a concentration-dependent manner with a complete inhibition of hypertrophy at the concentration of 50 µM. Phenylephrine increased ROCK activity, as well as intracellular reactive oxygen species production and lipid peroxidation. The oxidizing agent DTDP similarly increased Rho kinase (ROCK) activity and induced hypertrophic remodeling. PD treatment inhibited phenylephrine-induced oxidative stress and consequently suppressed ROCK activation in cardiomyocytes. Hypertrophic remodeling and heart failure were demonstrated in mice subjected to 13 weeks of TAC. Upregulation of ROCK signaling pathway was also evident in TAC mice. PD treatment significantly attenuated the increased ROCK activity, associated with a markedly reduced hypertrophic response and improved cardiac function. Our results demonstrated a robust anti-hypertrophic remodeling effect of polydatin, which is mediated by inhibition of reactive oxygen species dependent ROCK activation.

  11. Genetic variation in the α1A-adrenergic receptor and phenylephrine-mediated venoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Adefurin, A; Ghimire, L V; Kohli, U; Muszkat, M; Sofowora, G G; Li, C; Paranjape, S Y; Stein, C M; Kurnik, D

    2015-08-01

    There is large interindividual variability and ethnic differences in phenylephrine-mediated vasoconstriction. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in ADRA1A, the α1A adrenergic receptor gene, contributes to the variability and ethnic differences. We measured local dorsal hand vein responses to increasing doses of phenylephrine in 64 Caucasians and 42 African-Americans and genotyped for 32 ADRA1A single nucleotide polymorphisms. The ED50 ranged from 11 to 5442 ng min(-1), and the Emax ranged from 13.5-100%. The rs574647 variant was associated with a trend towards lower logED50 in each race and in the combined cohort (P=0.008). In addition, rs1079078 was associated with a trend to higher logED50 in each race and in the combined cohort (P=0.011). Neither variant accounted for the ethnic differences in response. None of the ADRA1A haplotypes was associated with the outcomes. In conclusion, ADRA1A variants do not contribute substantially to the marked interindividual variability or ethnic differences in phenylephrine-mediated venoconstriction.

  12. Safety of peripheral administration of phenylephrine in a neurologic intensive care unit: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Tim; Wolfe, Brianne; Davis, Gary; Ansari, Safdar

    2016-08-01

    Integral to the management of the neurocritically injured patient are the prevention and treatment of hypotension, maintenance of cerebral perfusion pressure, and occasionally blood pressure augmentation. When adequate volume resuscitation fails to meet perfusion needs, vasopressors are often used to restore end-organ perfusion. This has historically necessitated central venous access given well-documented incidence of extravasation injuries associated with peripheral administration of vasopressors. In this pilot study, we report our 6-month experience with peripheral administration of low-concentration phenylephrine (40 μg/mL) in our neurocritical care unit. We were able to administer peripheral phenylephrine, up to a dose of 2 μg/(kg min), for an average of 14.29hours (1-54.3) in 20 patients with only 1 possible minor complication and no major complications. This was achieved by adding additional safety measures in our computerized physician order entry system and additional nurse-driven safety protocols. Thus, with careful monitoring and safety precautions, peripheral administration of phenylephrine at an optimized concentration appears to have an acceptable safety profile for use in the neurocritical care unit up to a mean infusion time of 14hours. PMID:27288620

  13. The clinical utility of new combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lawuyi, Lola Elizabeth; Gurbaxani, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of mydriasis throughout cataract extraction surgery and the control of ocular inflammation are crucial for successful surgical outcomes. The development of miosis during cataract surgery compromises the visualization of the surgical field and working space for surgeons. This may lead to complications that include posterior capsular tear and associated vitreous loss, longer surgical time, and postoperative inflammation. Postoperative inflammation is often uncomfortable and frustrating for patients. It causes pain, redness, and photophobia. This compromises the best-uncorrected vision following surgery and often leads to multiple clinic visits. This article examines the literature published on the current treatments used to manage mydriasis, pain, and inflammation in cataract extraction surgery. Combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection offers an exciting new class of medication for use in cataract surgery. With the recent approval of Omidria™ (combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3%) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for intraocular use, we review the clinical utility of this new combination injection in cataract surgery. PubMed, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings were searched for the relevant literature using a combination of the following search terms: cataract extraction surgery, pupil dilation (mydriasis), miosis, phenylephrine, ketorolac, Omidria™, intracameral mydriatic. Relevant articles were reviewed and their references checked for further relevant literature. All abstracts were reviewed and full texts retrieved where available. PMID:26203214

  14. Condensation dynamics of the L-Pro-L-Phe and L-Hyp-L-Phe binary mixtures in solution.

    PubMed

    Sajewicz, Mieczysław; Godziek, Agnieszka; Maciejowska, Anna; Kowalska, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    We employ the achiral liquid chromatography with diode array, evaporative light scattering and mass spectrometric detection (HPLC-DAD, HPLC-ELSD and LC-MS) to assess structural instability (understood as spontaneous oscillatory chiral conversion and spontaneous oscillatory condensation) of the two pairs of amino acids, L-proline-L-phenylalanine (L-Pro-L-Phe) and L-hydroxyproline-L-phenylalanine (L-Hyp-L-Phe), in aqueous acetonitrile. In our earlier studies, we managed to demonstrate that single amino acids in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions undergo spontaneous oscillatory chiral conversion and oscillatory condensation. We also investigated condensation in the binary L-Pro-L-Hyp mixture in aqueous solution, and proposed a theoretical model to explain the specific dynamics of this process, which involves mutual catalytic effects of the two amino acids. In this study, we demonstrate oscillatory instability with the other two amino acid pairs in the organic-aqueous solution and reflect on the dynamics of condensation in the investigated cases. The choice of L-Pro and L-Hyp is due to their important role as building blocks of collagen, which is omnipresent in the connective tissues of mammals, and largely responsible for tissue architecture and strength. L-Phe is one of the 20 exogenous amino acids and is a building block of the majority of naturally occurring proteins.

  15. Reliability of a new 4th generation FloTrac algorithm to track cardiac output changes in patients receiving phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fuhai; Li, Jian; Fleming, Neal; Rose, David; Liu, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Phenylephrine is often used to treat intra-operative hypotension. Previous studies have shown that the FloTrac cardiac monitor may overestimate cardiac output (CO) changes following phenylephrine administration. A new algorithm (4th generation) has been developed to improve performance in this setting. We performed a prospective observational study to assess the effects of phenylephrine administration on CO values measured by the 3rd and 4th generation FloTrac algorithms. 54 patients were enrolled in this study. We used the Nexfin, a pulse contour method shown to be insensitive to vasopressor administration, as the reference method. Radial arterial pressures were recorded continuously in patients undergoing surgery. Phenylephrine administration times were documented. Arterial pressure recordings were subsequently analyzed offline using three different pulse contour analysis algorithms: FloTrac 3rd generation (G3), FloTrac 4th generation (G4), and Nexfin (nf). One minute of hemodynamic measurements was analyzed immediately before phenylephrine administration and then repeated when the mean arterial pressure peaked. A total of 157 (4.6 ± 3.2 per patient, range 1-15) paired sets of hemodynamic recordings were analyzed. Phenylephrine induced a significant increase in stroke volume (SV) and CO with the FloTrac G3, but not with FloTrac G4 or Nexfin algorithms. Agreement between FloTrac G3 and Nexfin was: 0.23 ± 1.19 l/min and concordance was 51.1%. In contrast, agreement between FloTrac G4 and Nexfin was: 0.19 ± 0.86 l/min and concordance was 87.2%. In conclusion, the pulse contour method of measuring CO, as implemented in FloTrac 4th generation algorithm, has significantly improved its ability to track the changes in CO induced by phenylephrine.

  16. A novel natural mutation AαPhe98Ile in the fibrinogen coiled-coil affects fibrinogen function.

    PubMed

    Riedelová-Reicheltová, Zuzana; Kotlín, Roman; Suttnar, Jiří; Geierová, Véra; Riedel, Tomáš; Májek, Pavel; Dyr, Jan Evangelista

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structure and function of fibrinogen obtained from a patient with normal coagulation times and idiopathic thrombophilia. This was done by SDS-PAGE and DNA sequence analyses, scanning electron microscopy, fibrinopeptide release, fibrin polymerisation initiated by thrombin and reptilase, fibrinolysis, and platelet aggregometry. A novel heterozygous point mutation in the fibrinogen Aα chain, Phe98 to Ile, was found and designated as fibrinogen Vizovice. The mutation, which is located in the RGDF sequence (Aα 95-98) of the fibrinogen coiled-coil region, significantly affected fibrin clot morphology. Namely, the clot formed by fibrinogen Vizovice contained thinner and curled fibrin fibers with reduced length. Lysis of the clots prepared from Vizovice plasma and isolated fibrinogen were found to be impaired. The lysis rate of Vizovice clots was almost four times slower than the lysis rate of control clots. In the presence of platelets agonists the mutant fibrinogen caused increased platelet aggregation. The data obtained show that natural mutation of Phe98 to Ile in the fibrinogen Aα chain influences lateral aggregation of fibrin protofibrils, fibrinolysis, and platelet aggregation. They also suggest that delayed fibrinolysis, together with the abnormal fibrin network morphology and increased platelet aggregation, may be the direct cause of thrombotic complications in the patient associated with pregnancy loss. PMID:24108601

  17. Alpha/sub 1/ receptor coupling events initiated by methoxy-substituted tolazoline partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, P.; Keung, A.; Deth, R.

    1986-03-01

    A series of mono- and dimethyoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives, known to be partial agonists at the alpha/sub 1/ receptor, were compared with the ..cap alpha../sub 1/ selective full agonist phenylephrine (PE) on isolated strips of rabbit aorta Agonist activity was evaluated in contraction, /sup 45/Ca influx, /sup 45/Ca efflux, and /sup 32/P-Phospholipid labelling studies. Maximum contractile responses for the 2-, 3-, and 3, 5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives (10/sup -5/M) were 53.8, 67.6 and 99.7% of the PE (10/sup -5/M) response respectively. These same partial agonists caused a stimulation of /sup 45/Ca influx to the extent of 64, 86, and 95% of the PE response respectively. In /sup 45/Ca efflux studies, (a measure of the intracellular Ca/sup +2/ release) the tolazolines caused: 30%, 63%, and 78% of the PE stimulated level. /sup 32/P-Phosphatidic acid (PA) labelling was measured as an index of PI turnover after ..cap alpha../sub 1/ receptor stimulation. Compared to PE, the 2-, 3-, and 3,5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives caused 22, 46, and 72% PA labelling. The above values are all in reasonable accord with the rank order or agonist activity shown in maximum contractile responses. The results of this investigation suggest that partial agonists stimulate ..cap alpha.. receptor coupling events at a level which is quantitatively comparable to their potencies in causing contraction of arterial smooth muscle.

  18. Stereoselective synthesis of (R)-phenylephrine using recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing a novel short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase gene from Serratia marcescens BCRC 10948.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guan-Jhih; Kuan, Yi-Chia; Chou, Hsiao-Yi; Fu, Tze-Kai; Lin, Jia-Shin; Hsu, Wen-Hwei; Yang, Ming-Te

    2014-01-20

    (R)-Phenylephrine [(R)-PE] is an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist and is widely used as a nasal decongestant to treat the common cold without the side effects of other ephedrine adrenergic drugs. We identified a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SM_SDR) from Serratia marcescens BCRC 10948 that was able to convert 1-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(methylamino) ethanone (HPMAE) into (R)-PE. The SM_SDR used NADPH and NADH as cofactors with specific activities of 17.35±0.71 and 5.57±0.07mU/mg protein, respectively, at 30°C and pH 7.0, thereby indicating that this enzyme could be categorized as an NADPH-preferring short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase. Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) expressing SM_SDR could convert HPMAE into (R)-PE with more than 99% enantiomeric excess. The productivity and conversion yield were 0.57mmolPE/lh and 51.06%, respectively, using 10mM HPMAE. Fructose was the most effective carbon source for the conversion of HPMAE to (R)-PE.

  19. Flaxseed oil increases aortic reactivity to phenylephrine through reactive oxygen species and the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Flaxseed oil has the highest concentration of omega-3 α-linolenic acid, which has been associated with cardiovascular benefit. However, the mechanism underlying the vascular effects induced through flaxseed oil is not well known. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of flaxseed oil on vascular function in isolated rat aortic rings. Methods Wistar rats were treated daily with flaxseed oil or a control (mineral oil) intramuscular (i.m.) for fifteen days. Isolated aortic segments were used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression, superoxide anion levels and vascular reactivity experiments. Results Flaxseed oil treatment increased the vasoconstrictor response of aortic rings to phenylephrine. Endothelium removal increased the response to phenylephrine in aortic segments isolated from both groups, but the effect was smaller in the treated group. L-NAME incubation similarly increased the phenylephrine response in segments from both groups. The TXA2 synthase inhibitor furegrelate, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS 398, the TP receptor antagonist SQ 29.548, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger apocynin, the superoxide anion scavengers tiron and the phospholipase A2 inhibitor dexamethasone partially reversed the flaxseed oil-induced increase in reactivity to phenylephrine. Conclusions These findings suggest that flaxseed oil treatment increased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine through an increase in ROS production and COX-2-derived TXA2 production. The results obtained in the present study provide new insight into the effects of flaxseed oil treatment (i.m.) on vascular function. PMID:24993607

  20. Phenylephrine infusion for spinal-induced hypotension in elective cesarean delivery: Does preload make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Bottiger, Brandi A; Bezinover, Dmitri S; Mets, Berend; Dalal, Priti G; Prozesky, Jansie; Ural, Serdar; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Patients undergoing elective cesarean delivery (CD) have a high-risk of spinal-induced hypotension (SIH). We hypothesized that a colloid preload would further reduce SIH when compared with a crystalloid preload. Material and Methods: Eighty-two healthy parturients undergoing elective CD were included in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups (41 patients in each group) to receive either Lactated Ringer's solution (1500 ml) or hydroxyethyl starch (6% in normal saline, 500 ml) 30 min prior to placement of spinal anesthesia. All patients were treated with a phenylephrine infusion (100 mcg/min), titrated during the study. Results: There was no statistical difference between groups with regards to the incidence of hypotension (10.8% in the colloid group vs. 27.0% in the crystalloid group, P = 0.12). There was also no difference between groups with respect to bradycardia, APGAR scores, and nausea and vomiting. Significantly less phenylephrine (1077.5 ± 514 mcg) was used in the colloid group than the crystalloid group (1477 ± 591 mcg, P = 0.003). Conclusion: The preload with 6% of hydroxyethyl starch before CD might be beneficial for the prevention of SIH. PMID:27625478

  1. [Phenylephrine dosing error in Intensive Care Unit. Case of the trimester].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    A real clinical case reported to SENSAR is presented. A patient admitted to the surgical intensive care unit following a lung resection, suffered arterial hypotension. The nurse was asked to give the patient 1 mL of phenylephrine. A few seconds afterwards, the patient experienced a hypertensive crisis, which resolved spontaneously without damage. Thereafter, the nurse was interviewed and a dosing error was identified: she had mistakenly given the patient 1 mg of phenylephrine (1 mL) instead of 100 mcg (1 mL of the standard dilution, 1mg in 10 mL). The incident analysis revealed latent factors (event triggers) due to the lack of protocols and standard operating procedures, communication errors among team members (physician-nurse), suboptimal training, and underdeveloped safety culture. In order to preempt similar incidents in the future, the following actions were implemented in the surgical intensive care unit: a protocol for bolus and short lived infusions (<30 min) was developed and to close the communication gap through the adoption of communication techniques. The protocol was designed by physicians and nurses to standardize the administration of drugs with high potential for errors. To close the communication gap, repeated checks about saying and understanding was proposed ("closed loop"). Labeling syringes with the drug dilution was also recommended.

  2. Phenylephrine stimulated breakdown of phosphoinositides in brown adipocytes is attenuated by adenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmel, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    Selective activation of alpha adrenergic receptors on brown adipocytes brings about increased mitochondrial respiration. This response is associated with a rapid breakdown of phosphoinositides in the plasma membrane. The authors have shown that respiration increased by alpha receptor activation can be inhibited by adenosine but the mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. The present study probes the possibility that adenosine inhibition of alpha receptor stimulated respiration is secondary to an inhibition of stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids. Phospholipids were labeled with (/sup 32/P) by incubation with (/sup 32/P)-Pi for up to four hours. Phenylephrine and other ligands were then added and the radioactivity present in individual lipids determined following their resolution by thin layer chromatography. Addition of 2-chloroadenosine or phenylisopropyl adenosine, but not 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, inhibited phenylephrine promoted breakdown of phosphoinositides. The dose response relation for this effect was similar to that for attenuation of stimulated respiration. This finding demonstrates adenosine inhibition of a phospholipase in brown fat cells and suggests the possibility that breakdown of inositol phospholipids is a critical control site for stimulation and attenuation of respiration.

  3. Phenylephrine infusion for spinal-induced hypotension in elective cesarean delivery: Does preload make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Bottiger, Brandi A; Bezinover, Dmitri S; Mets, Berend; Dalal, Priti G; Prozesky, Jansie; Ural, Serdar; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Patients undergoing elective cesarean delivery (CD) have a high-risk of spinal-induced hypotension (SIH). We hypothesized that a colloid preload would further reduce SIH when compared with a crystalloid preload. Material and Methods: Eighty-two healthy parturients undergoing elective CD were included in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups (41 patients in each group) to receive either Lactated Ringer's solution (1500 ml) or hydroxyethyl starch (6% in normal saline, 500 ml) 30 min prior to placement of spinal anesthesia. All patients were treated with a phenylephrine infusion (100 mcg/min), titrated during the study. Results: There was no statistical difference between groups with regards to the incidence of hypotension (10.8% in the colloid group vs. 27.0% in the crystalloid group, P = 0.12). There was also no difference between groups with respect to bradycardia, APGAR scores, and nausea and vomiting. Significantly less phenylephrine (1077.5 ± 514 mcg) was used in the colloid group than the crystalloid group (1477 ± 591 mcg, P = 0.003). Conclusion: The preload with 6% of hydroxyethyl starch before CD might be beneficial for the prevention of SIH.

  4. Effect of different phenylephrine bolus doses for treatment of hypotension during spinal anaesthesia in patients undergoing elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Mohta, M; Harisinghani, P; Sethi, A K; Agarwal, D

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of phenylephrine might be improved by giving doses higher than that traditionally used (100 µg). This study compared the effects of three initial bolus doses of intravenous phenylephrine; 100 µg (group P100), 125 µg (group P125) and 150 µg (group P150), for the treatment of post-spinal hypotension in patients undergoing elective caesarean delivery. If hypotension was not corrected by this dose, additional boluses of 25 µg were given every minute. Further hypotensive episodes were treated with half the initial bolus dose, followed by 25 µg boluses, as required. Umbilical arterial and venous blood samples were obtained for blood gas analysis and Apgar scores recorded. One hundred and twenty subjects (40 per group) who developed post-spinal hypotension (75%) were included in this randomised, double blind trial. Although systolic blood pressure was higher at certain time-points after 150 µg phenylephrine, there were no statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of the first bolus of phenylephrine to treat hypotension (85%, 95% and 95% in groups P100, P125 and P150, respectively, P=0.215); the additional dose of phenylephrine after the first bolus (P=0.810); the number of additional boluses (P=0.318) or of hypotensive episodes (P=0.118). There were no significant differences in the number of patients developing reactive hypertension or bradycardia, in maternal side-effects or in neonatal outcomes. Although the study may have been underpowered, initial phenylephrine bolus doses of 100 µg, 125 µg and 150 µg did not significantly differ in efficacy to treat post-spinal hypotension in these patients.

  5. [Separation and determination of optical isomers of phenylephrine by chiral ligand exchange capillary elcctrophoresis coupling with the promoting effect of ionic liquid].

    PubMed

    Yang, Simei; Zhang, Jiayao; Li, Fei; Hu, Xufang; Cao, Qiue

    2016-01-01

    A method for the separation and determination of optical isomers of phenylephrine was developed based on the promoting effect of non-chiral ionic liquid on chiral ligand-exchange capillary electrophoresis after the electrophoretic parameters were optimized systematically. R-phenylephrine and S-phenylephrine can be separated and determined effectively in 20 mmol/L Tris-H3PO4 buffer solution (pH 5.4) composed of 4.0 mmol/L Cu(II), 8.0 mmol/L L-proline (L-Pro) and 15 mmol/L 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM] Cl) with the applied voltage of 20 kV, capillary temperature of 25 °C , detection wavelength of 254 nm, and injection of 5 s at 3,447 Pa. The resolution of R- and S-phenylephrines was 1. 42. The linear ranges for the determination of R-phenylephrine and S-phenylephrine were 12. 5 - 150 mg/L and 15. 0-150 mg/L, respectively. The method has been satisfactorily used for the determination of R-phenylephrine and S-phenylephrine in the spiked blood and urine samples. The spiked recoveries in the urine sample were in the range of 93. 7% -108. 2% with the RSDs lower than 3. 18% (n= 3) , and the spiked recoveries in the blood sample were in the range of 91. 4% and 113. 1% with the RSDs lower than 4. 82% (n =3).

  6. [Separation and determination of optical isomers of phenylephrine by chiral ligand exchange capillary elcctrophoresis coupling with the promoting effect of ionic liquid].

    PubMed

    Yang, Simei; Zhang, Jiayao; Li, Fei; Hu, Xufang; Cao, Qiue

    2016-01-01

    A method for the separation and determination of optical isomers of phenylephrine was developed based on the promoting effect of non-chiral ionic liquid on chiral ligand-exchange capillary electrophoresis after the electrophoretic parameters were optimized systematically. R-phenylephrine and S-phenylephrine can be separated and determined effectively in 20 mmol/L Tris-H3PO4 buffer solution (pH 5.4) composed of 4.0 mmol/L Cu(II), 8.0 mmol/L L-proline (L-Pro) and 15 mmol/L 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM] Cl) with the applied voltage of 20 kV, capillary temperature of 25 °C , detection wavelength of 254 nm, and injection of 5 s at 3,447 Pa. The resolution of R- and S-phenylephrines was 1. 42. The linear ranges for the determination of R-phenylephrine and S-phenylephrine were 12. 5 - 150 mg/L and 15. 0-150 mg/L, respectively. The method has been satisfactorily used for the determination of R-phenylephrine and S-phenylephrine in the spiked blood and urine samples. The spiked recoveries in the urine sample were in the range of 93. 7% -108. 2% with the RSDs lower than 3. 18% (n= 3) , and the spiked recoveries in the blood sample were in the range of 91. 4% and 113. 1% with the RSDs lower than 4. 82% (n =3). PMID:27319173

  7. Long-Term Changes in the Periods of SX Phe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, H.; Bambery, K. R.; Coates, D. W.; Thompson, K.

    2007-05-01

    We have used times of maximum light for SX Phe, obtained by ourselves and other workers over 55 years to study the behaviour of the fundamental and first overtone radial pulsation modes of the star. We find (1/P0)dP0/dt to be (+2.53 +/- 0.05) × 10-8 yr-1 and (1/P1)dP1/dt to be (-1.60 +/- 0.03) × 10-7 yr-1, which differ significantly from the value +1.9 × 10-9 yr-1 expected if the changes are due to standard evolution of the star. The residuals in O-C from a quadratic fit cannot be explained by a light-time effect in a binary. There is some evidence that the amplitudes of the two modes change slowly with time.

  8. Redoubling the ring size of an endomorphin-2 analog transforms a centrally acting mu-opioid receptor agonist into a pure peripheral analgesic.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; De Marco, Rossella; Gentilucci, Luca; Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Calo', Girolamo; Tömböly, Csaba; Artali, Roberto; Janecka, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The study reports the synthesis and biological evaluation of two opioid analogs, a monomer and a dimer, obtained as products of the solid-phase, side-chain to side-chain cyclization of the pentapeptide Tyr-d-Lys-Phe-Phe-AspNH2 . The binding affinities to the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors, as well as results obtained in a calcium mobilization functional assay are reported. Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 1 was a potent and selective full agonist of mu with sub-nanomolar affinity, while the dimer (Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 )2 2 showed a significant mixed mu/kappa affinity, acting as an agonist at the mu. Molecular docking computations were utilized to explain the ability of the dimeric cyclopeptide 2 to interact with the receptor. Interestingly, in spite of the increased ring size, the higher flexibility allowed 2 to fold and fit into the mu receptor binding pocket. Both cyclopeptides were shown to elicit strong antinociceptive activity after intraventricular injection but only cyclomonomer 1 was able to cross the blood-brain barrier. However, the cyclodimer 2 displayed a potent peripheral antinociceptive activity in a mouse model of visceral inflammatory pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 309-317, 2016. PMID:27038094

  9. Comparison of the involvement protein kinase C in agonist-induced contractions in mouse aorta and corpus cavernosum

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liming; Teixeira, Cleber E; Webb, R. Clinton; Leite, Romulo

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the regulation of vascular smooth muscle contraction. However, the role of PKC in erectile function is poorly understood. This study investigated whether PKC mediates agonist-induced contractions in mouse penile tissue (corpora cavernosa). We also compared the effects of PKC activators and inhibitors on contractile responses in mouse corpus cavernosum with those in mouse aorta. Aortic rings and corpus cavernosal strips from C57BL/6J mice was isolated, mounted in the organ bath for isometric tension recording. Our data showed that a PKCα/β selective inhibitor, Gö6976 (10 µM), inhibited phenylephrine and 9,11-dideoxy-11α,9α-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F2α (U46619, a thromboxane mimetic)-induced contractions in mouse aorta, reducing the maximum contraction from 123 ± 2% of KCl-induced maximum contraction to 7 ± 2% and 13 ± 1%, respectively. A non-selective PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine (30 µM), also significantly reduced phenylephrine-and U46619-induced maximum contractions in mouse aorta. However, Gö6976 and chelerythrine had no significant effects on phenylephrine-and U46619-induced contractions in corpus cavernosum. Furthermore, a PKC activator, phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (0.1 µM), significantly increased contractions in aorta (208 ± 14% of KCl-induced maximum contraction) but failed to cause contractions in corpus cavernosum at 1 and 10 µM. Western blot analysis data suggested that protein expression of PKC was similar in aorta and corpus cavernosum. Taken together, our data indicate that PKC does not have a significant role in agonist-induced contractions in mouse corpus cavernosum, whereas it mediates the contractile response to agonists in the aorta. PMID:18614166

  10. A DKP Cyclo(L-Phe-L-Phe) Found in Chicken Essence Is a Dual Inhibitor of the Serotonin Transporter and Acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruoka, Nobuo; Beppu, Yoshinori; Koda, Hirofumi; Doe, Nobutaka; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Abe, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Diketopiperazines (DKPs) are naturally-occurring cyclic dipeptides with a small structure and are found in many organisms and in large amounts in some foods and beverages. We found that a chicken essence beverage, which is popular among Southeast Asians as a traditional remedy and a rich source of DKPs, inhibited the serotonin transporter (SERT) and suppressed serotonin uptake from rat brain synaptosomes, which prompted us to isolate and identify the active substance(s). We purified a SERT inhibitor from the chicken essence beverage and identified it as the DKP cyclo(L-Phe-L-Phe). Interestingly, it was a naturally occurring dual inhibitor that inhibited both SERT and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in vitro. The DKP increased extracellular levels of the cerebral monoamines serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex and acetylcholine in the ventral hippocampus of freely moving rats when administered orally. Moreover, cyclo(L-Phe-L-Phe) significantly shortened escape latency in the water maze test in depressed mice previously subjected to a repeated open-space swimming task, which induces a depression-like state. Cyclo(L-Phe-L-Phe) also significantly improved accuracy rates in a radial maze test in rats and increased step-through latencies in a passive avoidance test in mice with scopolamine-induced amnesia. These animal test results suggest that cyclo(L-Phe-L-Phe), which is present abundantly in some foods such as chicken essence, may abrogate the onset of depression and, thus, contribute to preventing the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia, because senile depression is a risk factor for dementia. PMID:23209830

  11. Effects of peripherally restricted κ opioid receptor agonists on pain-related stimulation and depression of behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Negus, S Stevens; O'Connell, Robert; Morrissey, Ember; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C

    2012-03-01

    κ opioid receptor agonists that do not readily cross the blood-brain barrier are peripherally restricted and distribute poorly to the central nervous system after systemic administration. Peripherally restricted κ agonists have promise as candidate analgesics, because they may produce antinociception mediated by peripheral κ receptors more potently than they produce undesirable sedative and psychotomimetic effects mediated by central κ receptors. The present study used assays of pain-related stimulation and depression of behavior in rats to compare effects of 1) two peripherally restricted κ agonists [the tetrapeptide D-Phe-D-Phe-D-Ile-D-Arg-NH(2) (ffir) and the nonpeptidic compound ((R,S)-N-[2-(N-methyl-3,4-dichlorophenylacetamido)-2-(3-carboxyphenyl)-ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride (ICI204448)], 2) a centrally penetrating κ agonist (salvinorin A), and 3) several reference drugs, including a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID; ketoprofen). Intraperitoneal injection of dilute lactic acid served as a noxious stimulus to stimulate a stretching response and depress intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) maintained by the delivery of electrical brain stimulation to the medial forebrain bundle. Acid-stimulated stretching was blocked by ketoprofen, the peripherally restricted κ agonists, and salvinorin A. However, acid-induced depression of ICSS was blocked only by ketoprofen. The peripherally restricted κ agonists had little effect, and salvinorin A exacerbated acid-induced depression of ICSS. These results suggest that peripherally restricted κ agonists may be safer than centrally penetrating κ agonists but less efficacious than NSAIDS or μ opioid receptor agonists to block pain-related depression of behavior; however, the peripheral selectivity of ffir and ICI204448 is limited, and future studies with κ agonists capable of greater peripheral selectivity are warranted.

  12. Simultaneous determination of dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine and phenylephrine in expectorant and decongestant syrups by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gomez, María R; Olsina, Roberto A; Martínez, Luis D; Silva, María F

    2002-10-15

    The separation of basic nitrogenous compounds commonly used as active ingredients in cold medicine formulations by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography and capillary zone electrophoresis with direct absorptiometric detection was investigated. The type and composition of the background electrolyte (BGE) were investigated with respect to separation selectivity and BGE stability. BGE of 10 mM sodium dihydrogenphosphate-sodium tetraborate buffer containing 10 mM SDS and 10% acetonitrile, pH 9.0 was found to be optimal. Dextromethorphan hydrobhromide, diphenhydramine hydrochloride and phenylephrine hydrochloride were baseline-separated in less than 11 min, giving separation efficiencies of up to 494,000 theoretical plates, reproducibility of corrected peaks areas below 3% relative standard deviation and concentration detection limits from 2.5 to 5.5 microg ml(-1). Detection was performed at 196 and 214 nm.

  13. Simultaneous determination of paracetamol, phenylephrine hydrochloride and chlorpheniramine maleate in pharmaceutical preparations using multivariate calibration 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi-Maybodi, Abdolraouf; Hassani Nejad-Darzi, Seyed Karim

    2010-04-01

    Resolution of binary mixtures of paracetamol, phenylephrine hydrochloride and chlorpheniramine maleate with minimum sample pre-treatment and without analyte separation has been successfully achieved by methods of partial least squares algorithm with one dependent variable, principal component regression and hybrid linear analysis. Data of analysis were obtained from UV-vis spectra of the above compounds. The method of central composite design was used in the ranges of 1-15 mg L -1 for both calibration and validation sets. The models refinement procedure and their validation were performed by cross-validation. Figures of merit such as selectivity, sensitivity, analytical sensitivity and limit of detection were determined for all three compounds. The procedure was successfully applied to simultaneous determination of the above compounds in pharmaceutical tablets.

  14. Simultaneous determination of paracetamol, phenylephrine hydrochloride and chlorpheniramine maleate in pharmaceutical preparations using multivariate calibration 1.

    PubMed

    Samadi-Maybodi, Abdolraouf; Hassani Nejad-Darzi, Seyed Karim

    2010-04-01

    Resolution of binary mixtures of paracetamol, phenylephrine hydrochloride and chlorpheniramine maleate with minimum sample pre-treatment and without analyte separation has been successfully achieved by methods of partial least squares algorithm with one dependent variable, principal component regression and hybrid linear analysis. Data of analysis were obtained from UV-vis spectra of the above compounds. The method of central composite design was used in the ranges of 1-15 mg L(-1) for both calibration and validation sets. The models refinement procedure and their validation were performed by cross-validation. Figures of merit such as selectivity, sensitivity, analytical sensitivity and limit of detection were determined for all three compounds. The procedure was successfully applied to simultaneous determination of the above compounds in pharmaceutical tablets.

  15. Probing Changes in the Conformation of tRNA[superscript Phe]: An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Sarah R.; Silverstein, Todd P.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.; Taylor, Buck L. H.

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a new guided-inquiry laboratory for an advanced biochemistry course. This integrated laboratory focuses on the biomolecule tRNA[superscript Phe] and combines elements of bioorganic and bioinorganic chemistry with biochemistry. Throughout the semester students work together to study tRNA[superscript Phe] structure and ligand…

  16. UV Thermal Melting Curves of tRNA[superscript Phe] in the Presence of Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Sarah R.; Silverstein, Todd P.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.

    2008-01-01

    This laboratory project is one component of a semester-long advanced biochemistry laboratory course that uses several complementary techniques to study tRNA[superscript Phe] conformational changes induced by ligand binding. In this article we describe a set of experiments in which the thermal unfolding of tRNA[superscript Phe] is studied with…

  17. Transfer and amplification of chirality in Phe-based C3-symmetric non-ionic amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Julia; García, Fátima; Yélamos, Belén; Sánchez, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis of amphiphiles and endowed with three l- or d-Phe units is reported. The chiral features provided by the Phe fragment are transferred to the supramolecular level to yield enantiomerically enriched helices. Additionally, we report herein the first example of amplification of chirality demonstrated by MR performed with supramolecular polymers showing very low degree of cooperativity. PMID:27345432

  18. Magnetic properties of copper(II) complexes containing peptides. Crystal structure of [Cu(phe-leu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchiz, J.; Kremer, C.; Torre, M. H.; Facchin, G.; Kremer, E.; Castellano, E. E.; Ellena, J.

    2006-09-01

    A novel copper(II) complex containing the peptide phe-leu has been prepared and characterized. The crystal structure of [Cu(phe-leu)] ( 1) was determined by X-ray diffraction. The presence of carboxylate and amido bridges allows the formation of an extended 2D arrangement. This structure is similar to those found in [Cu(gly-val)] · 1/2H 2O ( 2), [Cu(val-gly)] ( 3), [Cu(val-phe)] ( 4), and [Cu(phe-phe)] ( 5). The magnetic properties of compounds 1- 5 were studied and analyzed comparatively. The experimental data show that the magnetic interactions are mainly transmitted through μ 2-COO - bridges, being ferromagnetic for 1 and 3, and antiferromagnetic for 2, 4 and 5.

  19. Comparison of Prophylactic Infusion of Phenylephrine with Ephedrine for Prevention of Hypotension in Elective Cesarean Section under Spinal Anesthesi: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Farnaz; Rasooli, Sousan

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal anesthesia is an accepted technique in elective cesarean sections. However, hypotension, resulted from sympathectomy is a common problem, especially in pregnant women. Prevention of this complication by sympathomimetic agents is of potential clinical significance. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of prophylactic infusion of Phenylephrine versus Ephedrine in the prevention of hypotension during spinal anesthesia in elective cesarean section. Methods Eighty-three patients were enrolled in this study and randomly divided into three groups. Group Ph received phenylephrine infusion, group E received ephedrine infusion while group P were delivered placebo. Vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, and arterial oxygen saturation) were recorded throughout the surgery. Maternal and neonatal perioperative complications were also controlled and recorded. Results There was an insignificant difference in demographic data between the groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher in the phenylephrine group than control, but not higher than the ephedrine group. Maternal dysrhythmias were more common in ephedrine and phenylephrine groups than the control group. Vomiting was more common in ephedrine group (P<0.05). In addition, the fifth-minute Apgar score of neonates was higher in phenylephrine and ephedrine groups than the control group (P<0.05). Neonates of phenylephrine group had less acidosis than the other groups. Conclusion Prophylactic infusion of phenylephrine can effectively decrease spinal anesthesia related hypotension without any significant complication for mother or her fetus. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2012120911700N1 PMID:25649721

  20. Effect of Phenylephrine Pretreatment on the Expressions of Aquaporin 5 and c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase in Irradiated Submandibular Gland.

    PubMed

    Han, Lichi; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Fuyin; Liu, Ke Jian; Xiang, Bin

    2015-06-01

    Radiotherapy for malignant tumors of the head and neck commonly leads to radiation-induced sialadenitis as a result of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. We demonstrated previously that phenylephrine could protect the irradiated submandibular gland against apoptosis, although the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated the influence of phenylephrine pretreatment on the expressions of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) that were presumed to have a role in radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. Rats pretreated with phenylephrine (5 mg/kg) were locally irradiated (20 Gy) in the head and neck region. The submandibular glands were removed on day 7 after irradiation. The expression of AQP5 and activation of JNK were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The localization of AQP5 at the apical and lateral plasma membrane of acinar cells was significantly reduced by irradiation, but markedly enhanced with phenylephrine pretreatment. The protein expression of AQP5 was decreased by 84.91% in irradiated glands, whereas it was fully recovered to the control level in phenylephrine-pretreated glands. Moreover, many acinar, ductal and granular convoluted tubular cells in the irradiated glands exhibited intense immunoreactivity for p-JNK, while in the phenylephrine-pretreated irradiated glands, only a few acinar cells exhibited very faint immunoreactivity for p-JNK. The protein expression level of p-JNK was increased by 41.65% in the irradiated alone glands, but was significantly decreased in the phenylephrine-pretreated irradiated glands. These results suggest that the protective mechanism of phenylephrine might be related to the improved expression of AQP5 and decreased activation of JNK. Pretreatment with phenylephrine in patients undergoing radiotherapy may provide a helpful strategy for suppression of radiation-induced sialadenitis.

  1. Quantitative analysis of mitragynine, codeine, caffeine, chlorpheniramine and phenylephrine in a kratom (Mitragyna speciosa Korth.) cocktail using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chittrakarn, Somsmorn; Penjamras, Pimpimol; Keawpradub, Niwat

    2012-04-10

    A simple HPLC technique for determining mitragynine, codeine, caffeine, chlorpheniramine and phenylephrine in 'kratom cocktail' was developed. The analytical method for mitragynine, codeine and caffeine used an Eclipse XDB-C8 column. A Lichrospher CN column was using for analysing chlorpheniramine and phenylephrine. The correlation coefficient of each standard was between 0.9957 and 0.9993. The precision of the methods were between 0.700 and 7.108% RSD. The concentration of mitragynine, codeine, caffeine, chlorpheniramine and phenylephrine in 'kratom cocktail' was 90.021, 234.174, 73.986, 7.053 and 1.486 mg/L, respectively. PMID:22018854

  2. Synthesis of tritium labeled Ac-(Nle/sup 4/, D-Phe/sup 7/)-. cap alpha. -MSH/sub 4-11/-NH/sub 2/: a superpotent melanotropin with prolonged biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, B.D.; Hruby, V.J.; Yamamura, H.I.; Akiyama, K.; Castrucci, A.M. de; Hadley, M.E.; Andrews, J.R.; Wan, Y.P.

    1984-03-05

    Ac-(Nle/sup 4/, D-Phe/sup 7/)-..cap alpha..-MSH/sub 4-11/-NH/sub 2/ an octapeptide, is a melanotropin analogue (Ac-Nle-Glu-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly-Lys-NH/sub 2/), which is a superpotent agonist of frog and lizard skin melanocytes and mouse S 91 (Cloudman) melanoma cells. This melanotropin possesses ultraprolonged activity on melanocytes, both in vitro and in vivo, and the peptide is resistant to inactivation by serum enzymes. The tritium-labeled congener was prepared by direct incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-labeled norleucine into the peptide. The melanotropic activity of the labeled peptide is identical to the unlabeled analogue. This labeled peptide should be useful for studies on the localization and characterization of melanotropin receptors.

  3. Characterization of Cu(II) and Cd(II) resistance mechanisms in Sphingobium sp. PHE-SPH and Ochrobactrum sp. PHE-OCH and their potential application in the bioremediation of heavy metal-phenanthrene co-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Lei, Wenrui; Lu, Min; Zhang, Jianan; Zhang, Zhou; Luo, Chunling; Chen, Yahua; Hong, Qing; Shen, Zhenguo

    2016-04-01

    Soil that is co-contaminated with heavy metals (HMs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is difficult to bioremediate due to the ability of toxic metals to inhibit PAH degradation by bacteria. We demonstrated the resistance mechanisms to Cu(II) and Cd(II) of two newly isolated strains of Sphingobium sp. PHE-SPH and Ochrobactrum sp. PHE-OCH and further tested their potential application in the bioremediation of HM-phenanthrene (PhA) co-contaminated sites. The PHE-SPH and PHE-OCH strains tolerated 4.63 and 4.34 mM Cu(II) and also showed tolerance to 0.48 and 1.52 mM Cd(II), respectively. Diverse resistance patterns were detected between the two strains. In PHE-OCH cells, the maximum accumulation of Cu(II) occurred in the cell wall, while the maximum accumulation was in the cytoplasm of PHE-SPH cells. This resulted in a sudden suppression of growth in PHE-OCH and a gradual inhibition in PHE-SPH as the concentration of Cu(II) increased. Organic acid production was markedly higher in PHE-OCH than in PHE-SPH, which may also have a role in the resistance mechanisms, and contributes to the higher Cd(II) tolerance of PHE-OCH. The factors involved in the absorption of Cu(II) or Cd(II) in PHE-SPH and PHE-OCH were identified as proteins and carbohydrates by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Furthermore, both strains showed the ability to efficiently degrade PhA and maintained this high degradation efficiency under HM stress. The high tolerance to HMs and the PhA degradation capacity make Sphingobium sp. PHE-SPH and Ochrobactrum sp. PHE-OCH excellent candidate organisms for the bioremediation of HM-PhA co-contaminated sites.

  4. Tributyltin chloride increases phenylephrine-induced contraction and vascular stiffness in mesenteric resistance arteries from female rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro Júnior, Rogério Faustino; Marques, Vinicius Bermond; Nunes, Dieli Oliveira; Ronconi, Karoline de Sousa; de Araújo, Julia F P; Rodrigues, Paula Lopes; Padilha, Alessandra Simão; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Graceli, Jones B; Stefanon, Ivanita

    2016-03-15

    Tributyltin chloride (TBT) is an organotin compound that reduces estrogen levels in female rats. We aimed to investigate the effects of TBT exposure on vascular tonus and vascular remodelling in the resistance arteries of female rats. Rats were treated daily with TBT (500 ng/kg) for 15 days. TBT did not change arterial blood pressure but did modify some morpho-physiological parameters of third-order mesenteric resistance arteries in the following ways: (1) decreased lumen and external diameters; (2) increased wall/lm ratio and wall thickness; (3) decreased distensibility and increased stiffness; (4) increased collagen deposition; and (5) increased pulse wave velocity. TBT exposure increased the phenylephrine-induced contractile response in mesenteric resistance arteries. However, vasodilatation responses induced by acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were not modified by TBT. It is suggested that TBT exposure reduces vascular nitric oxide (NO) production, because:(1) L-NAME incubation did not cause a leftward shift in the concentration-response curve for phenylephrine; (2) both eNOS protein expression; (3) in situ NO production were reduced. Incubation with L-NAME; and (4) SOD shifted the phenylephrine response curve to the left in TBT rats. Tiron, catalase, ML-171 and VAS2870 decreased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine only in TBT rats. Moreover, increased superoxide anion production was observed in the mesenteric resistance arteries of TBT rats accompanied by an increase in gp91phox, catalase, AT1 receptor and total ERK1/2 protein expression. In conclusion, these findings show that TBT induced alterations are most likely due to a reduction of NO production combined with increased O2(-) production derived from NADPH oxidase and ERK1/2 activation. These findings offer further evidence that TBT is an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

  5. Comparison Between Phenylephrine and Dopamine in Maintaining Cerebral Oxygen Saturation in Thoracic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Won; Joo Ahn, Hyun; JooAhn, Hyun; Yang, Mikyung; Kim, Jie Ae; Lee, Sangmin M; Ahn, Jin Hee

    2015-12-01

    Fluid is usually restricted during thoracic surgery, and vasoactive agents are often administered to maintain blood pressure. One-lung ventilation (OLV) decreases arterial oxygenation; thus oxygen delivery to the brain can be decreased. In this study, we compared phenylephrine and dopamine with respect to maintaining cerebral oxygenation during OLV in major thoracic surgery.Sixty-three patients undergoing lobectomies were randomly assigned to the dopamine (D) or phenylephrine (P) group. The patients' mean arterial pressure was maintained within 20% of baseline by a continuous infusion of dopamine or phenylephrine. Maintenance fluid was kept at 5 mL/kg/h. The depth of anesthesia was maintained with desflurane 1MAC and remifentanil infusion under bispectral index guidance. Regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) and hemodynamic variables were recorded using near-infrared spectroscopy and esophageal cardiac Doppler.The rScO2 was higher in the D group than the P group during OLV (OLV 60 min: 71 ± 6% vs 63 ± 12%; P = 0.03). The number of patients whose rScO2 dropped more than 20% from baseline was 0 and 6 in the D and P groups, respectively (P = 0.02). The D group showed higher cardiac output, but lower mean arterial pressure than the P group (4.7 ± 1.0 vs 3.9 ± 1.2 L/min; 76.7 ± 8.1 vs 84.5 ± 7.5 mm Hg; P = 0.02, P = 0.02). Among the variables, age, hemoglobin concentration, and cardiac output were associated with rScO2 by correlation analysis.Dopamine was superior to phenylephrine in maintaining cerebral oxygenation during OLV in thoracic surgery.

  6. Preparation and in vitro characterization of thermosensitive and mucoadhesive hydrogels for nasal delivery of phenylephrine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Shen, Yan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Chunmeng; Li, Chang; Xiong, Yerong; Tu, Jiasheng

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop a nasal delivery system of phenylephrine hydrochloride (PE) in spray form to make prolonged remedy of nasal congestion. The formulations contain the thermosensitive hydrogel, i.e., Poloxamer 407 (P407) and Poloxamer 188 (P188) mixtures, and mucoadhesives, i.e., ε-polylysine (ε-PL) and low molecular weight sodium hyaluronate (MW 11,000Da). The in vitro characterizations of formulations including rheology studies, texture profiles and in vitro mucoadhesion potential were investigated after gelation temperatures measurements. The results showed that the concentration of P407 or P188 had significant influence on gelation temperature and texture profiles. The addition of mucoadhesives, though lowered the gel strength of formulations, increased interaction with mucin. After screening, two formulations (i.e., 1.0% PE/0.5% ε-PL/17% P407/0.5% P188 or Formulation A; and 1.0% PE/0.5% HA/17% P407/0.8% P188 or Formulation B) presenting suitable gelation temperatures (∼32°C) were used for further studies on in vitro release behaviors and mucosa ciliotoxicity. Both formulations showed sustained release of PE for up to 8h and similar toxicity to saline, the negative control. Thus, the thermosensitive and mucoadhesive PE-containing hydrogels are promising to achieve prolonged decongestion in nasal cavity.

  7. Ultrasound-assisted (R)-phenylephrine whole-cell bioconversion by S. marcescens N10612.

    PubMed

    Zang, Chi-Zong; Kan, Shu-Chen; Yeh, Chiung-Wen; Lin, Chia-Chi; Shieh, Chwen-Jen; Liu, Yung-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    The strain Serratia marcescens N10612 is used to perform the bioconversion of 1-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(methyamino)-ethanone (HPMAE) to (R)-phenylephrine ((R)-PE), which is an ephedrine drug substitute. The use of an ultrasound approach is found to improve the efficiency of the (R)-PE bioconversion. The optimization of the (R)-PE bioconversion is carried out by means of statistical experiment design. The optimal conditions obtained are 1.0mM HPMAE, 18.68 g/L glucose and ultrasound power of 120 W, where the predicted specific rate of the (R)-PE bioconversion is 31.46 ± 2.22 (ìmol/h/g-cells) and the experimental specific rate is 33.27 ± 1.46 (ìmol/h/g-cells), which is 3-fold higher than for the operation under ultrasound power of 200 W (11.11 ìmol/h/g-cells) and 4.3-fold higher than for the shaking operation (7.69 ìmol/h/g-cells). The kinetics study of the bioconversion also shows that under the ultrasound operation, the optimal rate (Vmax) of the (R)-PE bioconversion increases from 7.69 to 11.11 (μmol/h/g-cells) and the substrate inhibition constant (KSi) increases from 1.063 mM for the shaking operation to 1.490 mM for ultrasound operation.

  8. Simultaneous determination of phenylephrine hydrochloride, guaifenesin, and chlorpheniramine maleate in cough syrup by gradient liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Amer, Sawsan M; Abbas, Samah S; Shehata, Mostafa A; Ali, Nahed M

    2008-01-01

    A simple and reliable high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of mixture of phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHENYL), guaifenesin (GUAIF), and chlorpheniramine maleate (CHLO) either in pure form or in the presence of methylparaben and propylparaben in a commercial cough syrup dosage form. Separation was achieved on a C8 column using 0.005 M heptane sulfonic acid sodium salt (pH 3.4 +/- 0.1) and acetonitrile as a mobile phase by gradient elution at different flow rates, and detection was done spectrophotometrically at 210 nm. A linear relationship in the range of 30-180, 120-1800, and 10-60 microg/mL was obtained for PHENYL, GUAIF, and CHLO, respectively. The results were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the British Pharmacopoeia (2002) method and showed that the proposed method is precise, accurate, and can be easily applied for the determination of the drugs under investigation in pure form and in cough syrup formulations.

  9. Simultaneous determination of phenylephrine hydrochloride, guaifenesin, and chlorpheniramine maleate in cough syrup by gradient liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Amer, Sawsan M; Abbas, Samah S; Shehata, Mostafa A; Ali, Nahed M

    2008-01-01

    A simple and reliable high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of mixture of phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHENYL), guaifenesin (GUAIF), and chlorpheniramine maleate (CHLO) either in pure form or in the presence of methylparaben and propylparaben in a commercial cough syrup dosage form. Separation was achieved on a C8 column using 0.005 M heptane sulfonic acid sodium salt (pH 3.4 +/- 0.1) and acetonitrile as a mobile phase by gradient elution at different flow rates, and detection was done spectrophotometrically at 210 nm. A linear relationship in the range of 30-180, 120-1800, and 10-60 microg/mL was obtained for PHENYL, GUAIF, and CHLO, respectively. The results were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the British Pharmacopoeia (2002) method and showed that the proposed method is precise, accurate, and can be easily applied for the determination of the drugs under investigation in pure form and in cough syrup formulations. PMID:18476338

  10. Mesenteric artery responsiveness to acetylcholine and phenylephrine in cirrhotic rats challenged with endotoxin: the role of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Rezayat, Seyed-Mahdi; Ejtemaei-Mehr, Shahram; Tavangar, Seyed-Mohammad; Nikoui, Vahid; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Eftekhari, Golnar; Abdollahi, Alireza; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2015-06-01

    Cirrhosis is associated with vascular dysfunction and endotoxemia. These experiments were designed to investigate the hypothesis that the administration of a low-dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) worsens vascular dysfunction in rats subjected to bile-duct ligation (BDL), and to determine whether LPS initiates changes in vascular Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression. Four weeks after BDL, the animals were given an intraperitoneal injection of either saline or LPS (1.0 mg/kg body mass). Three hours later, the superior mesenteric artery was isolated, perfused, and then subjected to the vasoconstriction and vasodilatation effects of phenylephrine and acetylcholine, respectively. Our results show that phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction decreased in the cirrhotic vascular bed (BDL rats) compared with the vascular bed of the sham-operated animals, and that the LPS injections in the cirrhotic (BDL) rats worsened this response. LPS injection administered to the sham-operated animals had no such effect. On the other hand, both the BDL procedure and the LPS injection increased acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation, but LPS administration to the BDL rats had no effect on this response. The mRNA levels of TLR4 did not change, but immunohistochemical studies showed that TLR4 localization switched from the endothelium to vascular smooth muscle cells following chronic BDL. In conclusion, acute endotoxemia in cirrhotic rats is associated with hyporesponsiveness to phenylephrine and tolerance to the effects of acetylcholine. Altered localization of TLR4 may be responsible for these effects.

  11. Differential effects of vasopressin and phenylephrine on protein kinase C-mediated protein phosphorylations in isolated hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.H.; Johanson, R.A.; Wiliamson, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    Receptor-mediated breakdown of inositol lipids produces two intracellular signals, diacylglycerol, which activates protein kinase C, and inositol trisphosphate, which causes release of intracellular vesicular Ca/sup 2 +/. This study examined the effects of Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophores, vasopressin, phenylephrine, and phorbol ester (PMA) on hepatocyte protein phosphorylations. (/sup 32/P) Phosphoproteins from hepatocytes prelabeled with /sup 32/P were resolved by 2-dimensional SDS-PAGE and corresponding autoradiographs were quantitated by densitometric analysis. The phosphorylation of five proteins, a plasma membrane bound 16 kDa protein with pI 6.4, a cytosolic 16 kDa protein with pI 5.8, and proteins with Mr's of 36 kDa, 52 kDa, and 68 kDa, could be attributed to phosphorylation by protein kinase C since the phosphorylation was stimulated by PMA. When the vasopressin concentration was varied, low vasopressin stimulated the phosphorylation of only the membrane bound 16 kDa protein of the above set of proteins, while higher vasopressin concentrations were required to stimulate the phosphorylation of all five proteins. Phenylephrine, even at supramaximal concentrations, stimulated the phosphorylation of only the membrane bound 16 kDa protein. These results suggest that phenylephrine is a less potent activator of protein kinase C than vasopressin by virtue of limited or localized diacylglycerol production.

  12. One Step Synthesis of Inverted Aspartame Type Sweetener, Ac-Phe-Lys, Using Chemically Modified Chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Oaki, J; Nakahara, K; Tamura, M; Okai, H

    1999-01-01

    To search for techniques of simplified peptide synthesis, benzyloxycarbonyl chymotrypsin was prepared by a water-soluble acylating reagent and used to make Ac-Phe-Lys, an artificial peptide sweetener, which was selected as a target compound. As a result of using chemically modified chymotrypsin, Lys can be coupled directly with Ac-Phe and Ac-Phe-Lys made virtually in one step. Moreover, the total yield from preparation and purification steps for Ac-Phe-Lys was 13%. The value corresponds to that of the chemical synthesis method. On the contrary, enzymatic synthesis using native chymotrypsin cannot reach the level of the new method. It is expected that the method is more effective for simplified peptide synthesis as compared with other methods, especially on a large scale.

  13. Phenylephrine alteration of cerebral blood flow during orthostasis: effect on n-back performance in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Medow, Marvin S; Sood, Shilpa; Messer, Zachary; Dzogbeta, Seli; Terilli, Courtney; Stewart, Julian M

    2014-11-15

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) with orthostatic intolerance is characterized by neurocognitive deficits and impaired working memory, concentration, and information processing. In CFS, upright tilting [head-up tilt (HUT)] caused decreased cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) related to hyperventilation/hypocapnia and impaired cerebral autoregulation; increasing orthostatic stress resulted in decreased neurocognition. We loaded the baroreflex with phenylephrine to prevent hyperventilation and performed n-back neurocognition testing in 11 control subjects and 15 CFS patients. HUT caused a significant increase in heart rate (109.4 ± 3.9 vs. 77.2 ± 1.6 beats/min, P < 0.05) and respiratory rate (20.9 ± 1.7 vs. 14.2 ± 1.2 breaths/min, P < 0.05) and decrease in end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2; 42.8 ± 1.2 vs. 33.9 ± 1.1 Torr, P < 0.05) in CFS vs. control. HUT caused CBFv to decrease 8.7% in control subjects but fell 22.5% in CFS. In CFS, phenylephrine prevented the HUT-induced hyperventilation/hypocapnia and the significant drop in CBFv with HUT (-8.1% vs. -22.5% untreated). There was no difference in control subject n-back normalized response time (nRT) comparing supine to HUT (106.1 ± 6.9 vs. 97.6 ± 7.1 ms at n = 4), and no difference comparing control to CFS while supine (97.1 ± 7.1 vs 96.5 ± 3.9 ms at n = 4). However, HUT of CFS subjects caused a significant increase in nRT (148.0 ± 9.3 vs. 96.4 ± 6.0 ms at n = 4) compared with supine. Phenylephrine significantly reduced the HUT-induced increase in nRT in CFS to levels similar to supine (114.6 ± 7.1 vs. 114.6 ± 9.3 ms at n = 4). Compared with control subjects, CFS subjects are more sensitive both to orthostatic challenge and to baroreflex/chemoreflex-mediated interventions. Increasing blood pressure with phenylephrine can alter CBFv. In CFS subjects, mitigation of the HUT-induced CBFv decrease with phenylephrine has a beneficial effect on n-back outcome.

  14. Binding of the anticancer alkaloid sanguinarine with tRNA(phe): spectroscopic and calorimetric studies.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Maidul; Kabir, Ayesha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of the natural plant alkaloid and anticancer agent sanguinarine with tRNA(phe) has been investigated by spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques. Sanguinarine iminium binds to tRNA(phe) cooperatively; alkanolamine does not bind but in presence of large tRNA(phe) concentration, a conversion from alkanolamine to iminium occurs resulting in concomitant binding of the latter. The binding affinity of the iminium to tRNA(phe) obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry was of the order of 10(5) M(-1), which is close to that evaluated from spectroscopy. The binding was driven largely by negative enthalpy and a smaller but favourable positive entropy change. The binding was dependent on the [Na(+)] concentration, but had a larger non-electrostatic contribution to the Gibbs energy. A small heat capacity value and the enthalpy-entropy compensation in the energetics of the interaction characterized the binding of the iminium form to tRNA(phe). This study confirms that the tRNA(phe) binding moiety is the iminium form of sanguinarine. PMID:22702734

  15. Exploring the Phe-Gly dipeptide-derived piperazinone scaffold in the search for antagonists of the thrombin receptor PAR1.

    PubMed

    Valdivielso, Ángel M; García-López, M Teresa; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Marta; Herranz, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    A series of Phe-Gly dipeptide-derived piperazinones containing an aromatic urea moiety and a basic amino acid has been synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human platelet aggregation induced by the PAR1 agonist SFLLRN and as cytotoxic agents in human cancer cells. The synthetic strategy involves coupling of a protected basic amino acid benzyl amide to 1,2- and 1,2,4-substituted-piperazinone derivatives, through a carbonylmethyl group at the N1-position, followed by formation of an aromatic urea at the exocyclic moiety linked at the C2 position of the piperazine ring and removal of protecting groups. None of the compounds showed activity in the biological evaluation. PMID:24743938

  16. A natural history of "agonist".

    PubMed

    Russo, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    This paper constructs a brief history of the biochemical term agonist by exploring the multiple meanings of the root agôn in ancient Greek literature and describing how agonist first appeared in the scientific literature of the 20th century in the context of neurophysiologists' debates about the existence and properties of cellular receptors. While the narrow scientific definition of agonist may appear colorless and dead when compared with the web of allusions spun by the ancient Greek agôn, the scientific power and creativity of agonist actually resides precisely in its exact, restricted meaning for biomedical researchers.

  17. Dissecting out the Complex Ca2+-Mediated Phenylephrine-Induced Contractions of Mouse Aortic Segments

    PubMed Central

    Fransen, Paul; Van Hove, Cor E.; Leloup, Arthur J. A.; Martinet, Wim; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.; Lemmens, Katrien; Bult, Hidde; Schrijvers, Dorien M.

    2015-01-01

    L-type Ca2+ channel (VGCC) mediated Ca2+ influx in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) contributes to the functional properties of large arteries in arterial stiffening and central blood pressure regulation. How this influx relates to steady-state contractions elicited by α1-adrenoreceptor stimulation and how it is modulated by small variations in resting membrane potential (Vm) of VSMC is not clear yet. Here, we show that α1-adrenoreceptor stimulation of aortic segments of C57Bl6 mice with phenylephrine (PE) causes phasic and tonic contractions. By studying the relationship between Ca2+ mobilisation and isometric tension, it was found that the phasic contraction was due to intracellular Ca2+ release and the tonic contraction determined by Ca2+ influx. The latter component involves both Ca2+ influx via VGCC and via non-selective cation channels (NSCC). Influx via VGCC occurs only within the window voltage range of the channel. Modulation of this window Ca2+ influx by small variations of the VSMC Vm causes substantial effects on the contractile performance of aortic segments. The relative contribution of VGCC and NSCC to the contraction by α1-adrenoceptor stimulation could be manipulated by increasing intracellular Ca2+ release from non-contractile sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores. Results of this study point to a complex interactions between α1-adrenoceptor-mediated VSMC contractile performance and Ca2+ release form contractile or non-contractile Ca2+ stores with concomitant Ca2+ influx. Given the importance of VGCC and their blockers in arterial stiffening and hypertension, they further point toward an additional role of NSCC (and NSCC blockers) herein. PMID:25803863

  18. Dissecting out the complex Ca2+-mediated phenylephrine-induced contractions of mouse aortic segments.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Paul; Van Hove, Cor E; Leloup, Arthur J A; Martinet, Wim; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Lemmens, Katrien; Bult, Hidde; Schrijvers, Dorien M

    2015-01-01

    L-type Ca2+ channel (VGCC) mediated Ca2+ influx in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) contributes to the functional properties of large arteries in arterial stiffening and central blood pressure regulation. How this influx relates to steady-state contractions elicited by α1-adrenoreceptor stimulation and how it is modulated by small variations in resting membrane potential (Vm) of VSMC is not clear yet. Here, we show that α1-adrenoreceptor stimulation of aortic segments of C57Bl6 mice with phenylephrine (PE) causes phasic and tonic contractions. By studying the relationship between Ca2+ mobilisation and isometric tension, it was found that the phasic contraction was due to intracellular Ca2+ release and the tonic contraction determined by Ca2+ influx. The latter component involves both Ca2+ influx via VGCC and via non-selective cation channels (NSCC). Influx via VGCC occurs only within the window voltage range of the channel. Modulation of this window Ca2+ influx by small variations of the VSMC Vm causes substantial effects on the contractile performance of aortic segments. The relative contribution of VGCC and NSCC to the contraction by α1-adrenoceptor stimulation could be manipulated by increasing intracellular Ca2+ release from non-contractile sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores. Results of this study point to a complex interactions between α1-adrenoceptor-mediated VSMC contractile performance and Ca2+ release form contractile or non-contractile Ca2+ stores with concomitant Ca2+ influx. Given the importance of VGCC and their blockers in arterial stiffening and hypertension, they further point toward an additional role of NSCC (and NSCC blockers) herein.

  19. Agonist-induced redistribution of calponin in contractile vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, C A; Takahashi, K; Tao, T; Morgan, K G

    1994-11-01

    Calponin is a thin filament-associated protein that has been implicated in playing an auxiliary regulatory role in smooth muscle contraction. We have used immunofluorescence and digital imaging microscopy to determine the cellular distribution of calponin in single cells freshly isolated from the ferret portal vein. In resting cells calponin is distributed throughout the cytosol, associated with filamentous structures, and is excluded from the nuclear area of the cell. The ratio of surface cortex-associated calponin to cytosol-associated calponin (R) was found to be 0.639 +/- 0.021. Upon depolarization of the cell with physiological saline solution containing 96 mM K+, the distribution of calponin did not change from that of a resting cell (R = 0.678 +/- 0.025, P = 0.369). Upon stimulation with an agonist (10 microM phenylephrine) that is known to activate protein kinase C (PKC) in these cells, the cellular distribution of calponin changed from primarily cytosolic to primarily surface cortex associated (R = 1.24 +/- 0.085, P < 0.001). This agonist-induced redistribution of calponin was partially inhibited by the PKC inhibitor calphostin, overlapped in time with PKC translocation, and preceded contraction of these cells. These results suggest that the physiological function of calponin may be to mediate agonist-activated contraction via a PKC-dependent pathway. PMID:7526695

  20. Measuring patient engagement: development and psychometric properties of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) Scale.

    PubMed

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Barello, Serena; Bonanomi, Andrea; Lozza, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the rhetorical call for increasing patients' engagement, policy makers recognize the urgency to have an evidence-based measure of patients' engagement and capture its effect when planning and implementing initiatives aimed at sustaining the engagement of consumers in their health. In this paper, authors describe the Patient Health Engagement Scale (PHE-scale), a measure of patient engagement that is grounded in rigorous conceptualization and appropriate psychometric methods. The scale was developed based on our previous conceptualization of patient engagement (the PHE-model). In particular, the items of the PHE-scale were developed based on the findings from the literature review and from interviews with chronic patients. Initial psychometric analysis was performed to pilot test a preliminary version of the items. The items were then refined and administered to a national sample of chronic patients (N = 382) to assess the measure's psychometric performance. A final phase of test-retest reliability was performed. The analysis showed that the PHE Scale has good psychometric properties with good correlation with concurrent measures and solid reliability. Having a valid and reliable measure to assess patient engagement is the first step in understanding patient engagement and its role in health care quality, outcomes, and cost containment. The PHE Scale shows a promising clinical relevance, indicating that it can be used to tailor intervention and assess changes after patient engagement interventions.

  1. Neurokinin B- and specific tachykinin NK3 receptor agonists-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Daoui, Samira; Naline, Emmanuel; Lagente, Vincent; Emonds-Alt, Xavier; Advenier, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether neurokinin B (NKB) or specific agonists of tachykinin NK3 receptors, [MePhe7]NKB and senktide, were able to induce airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea-pigs. The effects of these compounds were compared to those of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA) and the preferential tachykinin NK1 ([Sar9, Met(02)11]SP) or NK2 ([βAla8]NKA (4-10)) receptor agonists.In guinea-pigs pretreated with phosphoramidon (10−4 M aerosol for 10 min) and salbutamol (8.7×10−3 M for 10 min), all tachykinins administrated by aerosol (3×10−7 to 10−4 M) induced airway hyperresponsiveness 24 h later, displayed by an exaggerated response to the bronchoconstrictor effect of acetylcholine (i.v.). The rank order of potency was: [βAla8]NKA (4-10)>NKA=NKB=senktide=[MePhe7]NKB=[Sar9,Met(02)11]SP>SP.Airway hyperresponsiveness induced by [MePhe7]NKB was prevented by the tachykinin NK3 (SR 142801) and NK2 (SR 48968) receptor antagonists.Bronchoconstriction induced by tachykinins administered by aerosol was also determined. SP, NKA, NKB and the tachykinin NK1 and NK2 receptor agonist induced bronchoconstriction. The rank order of potency was: NKA=[βAla8]NKA (4-10)>NKB=SP=[Sar9,Met(02)11]SP. Under similar conditions, and for concentrations which induce airway hyperresponsiveness, senktide and [MePhe7]NKB failed to induce bronchoconstriction.It is concluded that tachykinin NK3-receptor stimulation can induce airway hyperresponsiveness and that this effect is not related to the ability of tachykinins to induce bronchoconstriction. PMID:10780997

  2. Use of hollow microneedles for targeted delivery of phenylephrine to treat fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hyesun; Han, Mee-Ree; Kang, Nae-Gyu; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jung Ho

    2015-06-10

    A hollow microneedle (HM) was prepared to deliver a phenylephrine (PE) solution into the anal sphincter muscle as a method for treating fecal incontinence. The goal of this study was the local targeted delivery of PE into the sphincter muscle through the perianal skin with minimal pain using hollow microneedles, resulting in the increase of resting anal sphincter pressure. PE was administered on the left and the right sides of the anus of a rat through the perianal skin using 1.5mm long HM. An in vivo imaging system study was conducted after injection of Rhodamine B, and a histological study was performed after injection of gentian violet. The resting anal sphincter pressure in response to various drug doses was measured by using an air-charged catheter. Anal pressure change produced by HM administration was compared with change produced by intravenous injection (IV), subcutaneous (SC) injection and intramuscular (IM) injection. The change in mean blood pressure produced by HM administration as a function of PE dose was compared with change produced by PBS injection. A pharmacokinetic study of the new HM administration method was performed. A model drug solution was localized in the muscle layer under the perianal skin at the injection site and then diffused out over time. HM administration of PE induced significant contraction of internal anal sphincter pressure over 12h after injection, and the maximum anal pressure was obtained between 5 and 6h. Compared to IV, SC and IM treatments, HM treatment produced greater anal pressure. There was no increase in blood pressure after HM administration of PE within the range of predetermined concentration. Administration of 800μg/kg of PE using HM produced 0.81±0.38h of tmax. Our study suggests that HM administration enables local delivery of a therapeutic dose of PE to the anal sphincter muscle layer with less pain. This new treatment has great potential as a clinical application because of the ease of the procedure

  3. Vascular Dysfunction in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease: Effects of CB1R and CB2R Cannabinoid Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Villalba, Nuria; Prieto, Dolores; Brera, Begoña; Martín-Moreno, Ana M.; Tejerina, Teresa; de Ceballos, María L.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence of altered vascular function, including cerebrovascular, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transgenic models of the disease. Indeed vasoconstrictor responses are increased, while vasodilation is reduced in both conditions. β-Amyloid (Aβ) appears to be responsible, at least in part, of alterations in vascular function. Cannabinoids, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents, induce vasodilation both in vivo and in vitro. We have demonstrated a beneficial effect of cannabinoids in models of AD by preventing glial activation. In this work we have studied the effects of these compounds on vessel density in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice, line 2576, and on altered vascular responses in aortae isolated ring. First we showed increased collagen IV positive vessels in AD brain compared to control subjects, with a similar increase in TgAPP mice, which was normalized by prolonged oral treatment with the CB1/CB2 mixed agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and the CB2 selective agonist JWH-133 (JWH). In Tg APP mice the vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine and the thromboxane agonist U46619 was significantly increased, and no change in the vasodilation to acetylcholine (ACh) was observed. Tg APP displayed decreased vasodilation to both cannabinoid agonists, which were able to prevent decreased ACh relaxation in the presence of Aβ. In summary, we have confirmed and extended the existence of altered vascular responses in Tg APP mice. Moreover, our results suggest that treatment with cannabinoids may ameliorate the vascular responses in AD-type pathology.

  4. Vascular Dysfunction in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease: Effects of CB1R and CB2R Cannabinoid Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Villalba, Nuria; Prieto, Dolores; Brera, Begoña; Martín-Moreno, Ana M.; Tejerina, Teresa; de Ceballos, María L.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence of altered vascular function, including cerebrovascular, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transgenic models of the disease. Indeed vasoconstrictor responses are increased, while vasodilation is reduced in both conditions. β-Amyloid (Aβ) appears to be responsible, at least in part, of alterations in vascular function. Cannabinoids, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents, induce vasodilation both in vivo and in vitro. We have demonstrated a beneficial effect of cannabinoids in models of AD by preventing glial activation. In this work we have studied the effects of these compounds on vessel density in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice, line 2576, and on altered vascular responses in aortae isolated ring. First we showed increased collagen IV positive vessels in AD brain compared to control subjects, with a similar increase in TgAPP mice, which was normalized by prolonged oral treatment with the CB1/CB2 mixed agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and the CB2 selective agonist JWH-133 (JWH). In Tg APP mice the vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine and the thromboxane agonist U46619 was significantly increased, and no change in the vasodilation to acetylcholine (ACh) was observed. Tg APP displayed decreased vasodilation to both cannabinoid agonists, which were able to prevent decreased ACh relaxation in the presence of Aβ. In summary, we have confirmed and extended the existence of altered vascular responses in Tg APP mice. Moreover, our results suggest that treatment with cannabinoids may ameliorate the vascular responses in AD-type pathology. PMID:27695396

  5. Opioid effects of short enkephalin fragments containing the Gly-Phe sequence on contractile responses of guinea pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Radomirov, R; Pencheva, N; Stoyneva, I; Lazova, L

    1994-03-01

    1. Effects of the fragments H-Gly-Phe-OH, H-Gly-Phe-NH2 or H-Gly-Phe-OMe on the electrically stimulated cholinergic contractions of the longitudinal layer in isolated guinea pig ileum and on the Morphine-, Met-enkephalin- or Leu-enkephalin-induced inhibition of these contractions were analyzed for opioid activity in respect to Gly-Phe sequence. 2. H-Gly-Phe-OH or H-Gly-Phe-NH2 exerted no effects, while H-Gly-Phe-OMe applied cumulatively (1 pM-1 mM), concentration-dependently reduced the contractions to electrical stimulation, the IC50 value being 1.96 +/- 0.06 microM. Naloxone (1-5 microM) did not reverse the H-Gly-Phe-OMe effects. 3. H-Gly-Phe-OMe at single concentrations (1-10 microM) significantly decreased the maximum inhibition produced by cumulatively added (0.1 nM-100 microM) morphine, Met-enkephalin or Leu-enkephalin. The regression lines for the opioids were shifted to the right but not always in a parallel fashion; the IC50 values were higher as compared to the controls and lower as compared to the IC50 values after naloxone. 4. The pA2 value for H-Gly-Phe-OMe with respect to morphine (6.43 +/- 0.14) did not differ from that to Met-enkephalin (6.68 +/- 0.35) or Leu-enkephalin (9.06 +/- 0.98); the slope of the pA2 plot to morphine was near unity. 5. These data indicated that H-Gly-Phe-OMe exerted predominantly a potent non-competitive opioid antagonistic effect suggesting that short enkephalin fragments containing the Gly-Phe sequence might possess an opioid activity.

  6. The effect of urapidil, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, on the vascular tone of the porcine coronary and pulmonary arteries, the rat aorta and the human pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Claire; Auger, Cyril; Diemunsch, Pierre; Schini-Kerth, Valérie

    2016-05-15

    Urapidil (Eupressyl(®)) an antihypertensive drug acting as an α1 antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, may be of special interest in the treatment of hypertension associated with preeclamptic toxaemia and hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial vasoconstriction. However, the effect of urapidil on vascular tone has been poorly investigated. Vascular reactivity was evaluated using pulmonary and coronary arteries from 36 pigs, aortae from 22 rats and 9 human pulmonary artery samples suspended in organ chambers. Concentration-relaxation curves either to urapidil, 5-HT, or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT were constructed after pre-contraction of rings. Pig pulmonary and coronary artery rings were contracted with U46619, a thromboxane mimetic, rat aortic rings with either endothelin-1 or phenylephrine, and human pulmonary artery rings with U46619 or phenylephrine. Urapidil markedly inhibited phenylephrine-induced contractions in rat aortic rings with and without endothelium with a more pronounced effect observed in rings without endothelium. Both 5-HT and 8-OH-DPAT failed to induce relaxation in rat aortic rings with an intact endothelium. 5-HT, but not urapidil and 8-OH-DPAT, induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in the porcine coronary and pulmonary artery rings with an intact endothelium (P<0.05). 5-HT and phenylephrine but not urapidil caused concentration-dependent contractions in human pulmonary artery rings. The present findings, while confirming that urapidil is a potent inhibitor of α1-adrenoceptor-induced contraction, do not support the role of 5-HT1A receptor activation in the control of the vascular tone of the different types of arteries tested in response to urapidil. In addition, they indicate that urapidil seems to preferentially target arteries with endothelial dysfunction.

  7. The iminoproton NMR spectrum of yeast tRNA-Phe predicted from crystal coordinates.

    PubMed Central

    Geerdes, H A; Hilbers, C W

    1977-01-01

    The ring current effects on the base paired iminoprotons in yeast tRNA-Phe have been calculated from crystal coordinates. The results in conjunction with independently determined intrinsic positions of the iminoprotons in various base pairs enable us to predict the low field NMR spectrum of yeast tRNA-Phe. It turns out that the calculated NMR spectra are very sensitive to slight changes in structure. Moreover the crystal and solution structure are identical as far as the present methods go. PMID:325518

  8. Enhanced β-turn conformational stability of tripeptides containing ΔPhe in cis over trans configuration.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Mariusz; Jaremko, Lukasz; Mazur, Adam; Makowski, Maciej; Lisowski, Marek

    2013-10-01

    Conformations of three pairs of dehydropeptides with the opposite configuration of the ΔPhe residue, Boc-Gly-Δ(Z/E)Phe-Phe-p-NA (Z- p -NA and E- p -NA), Boc-Gly-Δ(Z/E)Phe-Phe-OMe (Z-OMe and E-OMe), and Boc-Gly-Δ(Z/E)Phe-Phe-OH (Z-OH and E-OH) were compared on the basis of CD and NMR studies in MeOH, TFE, and DMSO. The CD results were used as the additional input data for the NMR-based calculations of the detailed solution conformations of the peptides. It was found that Z- p -NA, E- p -NA, Z-OMe, and Z-OH adopt the β-turn conformations and E-OMe and E-OH are unordered. There are two overlapping type III β-turns in Z- p -NA, type II' β-turn in E- p -NA, and type II β-turn in Z-OMe and Z-OH. The results obtained indicate that in the case of methyl esters and peptides with a free carboxyl group, Δ(Z)Phe is a much stronger inducer of ordered conformations than Δ(E)Phe. It was also found that temperature coefficients of the amide protons are not reliable indicators of intramolecular hydrogen bonds donors in small peptides.

  9. Synthesis and activity of (R)-(-)-m-trimethylacetoxy-alpha-[(methylamino)methyl]benzyl alcohol hydrochloride: a prodrug form of (R)-(-)-phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Yuan, S S; Bador, N

    1976-06-01

    Optically pure (R)-(-)-m-trimethylacetoxy-alpha-[(methylamino)methyl]benzyl alcohol hydrochloride was synthesized by the following sequence: (R)-(-)-phenylephrine was condensed with acetone in the presence of calcium carbide to give an oxazolidine derivative and then treated with thallous ethoxide in ether followed by trimethylacetyl chloride to yield the phenolic ester. Finally, the oxazolidine ring was cleaved by one equivalent of hydrogen chloride in ethanol. Condensation of phenylephrine with benzaldehyde, with or without solvents, gave either 1,1,2-trimethyl-4,6-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline or a mixture of side-chain oxazolidine and the tetrahydroisoquinoline. Condensation of epinephrine with opianic acid in pyridine also gave a tetrahydroisoquinoline only. When applied on rabbit eyes, the prodrug (R)-(-)-m-trimethylacetoxy-alpha[(methylamino)methyl]benzyl alcohol hydrochloride exhibited an unexpected, three times higher mydriatic activity than the corresponding racemic prodrug and was 15 times more active than the parent, (R)-(-)-phenylephrine.

  10. NG-nitro-L-arginine and phenylephrine have similar effects on the vascular waterfall in the canine hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Shrier, I; Magder, S

    1995-02-01

    Hindlimb pressure-flow relationships are well characterized by modeling a vascular waterfall at the arteriolar level. Under these conditions, Q = (Pper - Pcrit)/Rart, where Q is blood flow, Pper is perfusion pressure, Pcrit is waterfall pressure, and Rart is the resistance upstream from the waterfall. To determine the effects of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) on Pcrit, Rart, and venous resistance (Rv), we varied Pper in the canine hindlimb between 100 and 200 mmHg before and after NG-nitro-L-arginine infusion (L-NNA, an inhibitor of EDRF synthesis). Before L-NNA, Pcrit increased with increasing Pper. After L-NNA, Pcrit was higher at each Pper, and the increase in Pcrit with increases in Pper was greater than under control conditions. In contrast to Pcrit, Rart decreased with increasing Pper before L-NNA. After L-NNA, Rart was higher at each Pper and no longer decreased with increasing Pper. Rv was not affected by Pper under control conditions but decreased with increasing Pper after L-NNA. The pressure in the small venules at each Pper decreased after L-NNA. In a second group of animals, we infused phenylephrine to control for increased tone produced by L-NNA. Results were similar to those seen with L-NNA. In conclusion, blocking EDRF synthesis increases both Pcrit and Rart, but the same response was also obtained with phenylephrine.

  11. Defining Nicotinic Agonist Binding Surfaces through Photoaffinity Labeling†

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Maltby, David; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Zhang, Nanjing; Durkin, Kathleen A.; Presley, Jack; Talley, Todd T.; Taylor, Palmer; Burlingame, Alma L.; Casida, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChR) agonists are potential therapeutic agents for neurological dysfunction. In the present study, the homopentameric mollusk ACh binding protein (AChBP), used as a surrogate for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the nAChR, was specifically derivatized by the highly potent agonist azidoepibatidine (AzEPI) prepared as a photoaffinity probe and radioligand. One EPI-nitrene photoactivated molecule was incorporated in each subunit interface binding site based on analysis of the intact derivatized protein. Tryptic fragments of the modified AChBP were analyzed by collision-induced dissociation and Edman sequencing of radiolabeled peptides. Each specific EPI-nitrene-modified site involved either Tyr195 of loop C on the principal or (+)-face or Met116 of loop E on the complementary or (−)-face. The two derivatization sites were observed in similar frequency, providing evidence of the reactivity of the azido/nitrene probe substituent and close proximity to both residues. [3H]AzEPI binds to the α4β2 nAChR at a single high-affinity site and photoaffinity-labels only the α4 subunit, presumably modifying Tyr225 spatially corresponding to Tyr195 of AChBP. Phe137 of the β2 nAChR subunit, equivalent to Met116 of AChBP, conceivably lacks sufficient reactivity with the nitrene generated from the probe. The present photoaffinity labeling in a physiologically relevant condition combined with the crystal structure of AChBP allows development of precise structural models for the AzEPI interactions with AChBP and α4β2 nAChR. These findings enabled us to use AChBP as a structural surrogate to define the nAChR agonist site. PMID:17614369

  12. [Dmt(1)]DALDA analogues with enhanced μ opioid agonist potency and with a mixed μ/κ opioid activity profile.

    PubMed

    Bai, Longxiang; Li, Ziyuan; Chen, Jiajia; Chung, Nga N; Wilkes, Brian C; Li, Tingyou; Schiller, Peter W

    2014-04-01

    Analogues of [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt=2',6'-dimethyltyrosine), a potent μ opioid agonist peptide with mitochondria-targeted antioxidant activity, were prepared by replacing Phe(3) with various 2',6'-dialkylated Phe analogues, including 2',6'-dimethylphenylalanine (Dmp), 2',4',6'-trimethylphenylalanine (Tmp), 2'-isopropyl-6'-methylphenylalanine (Imp) and 2'-ethyl-6'-methylphenylalanine (Emp), or with the bulky amino acids 3'-(1-naphthyl)alanine (1-Nal), 3'-(2-naphthyl)alanine (2-Nal) or Trp. Several compounds showed significantly increased μ agonist potency, retained μ receptor selectivity and are of interest as drug candidates for neuropathic pain treatment. Surprisingly, the Dmp(3)-, Imp(3)-, Emp(3)- and 1-Nal(3)-containing analogues showed much increased κ receptor binding affinity and had mixed μ/κ properties. In these cases, molecular dynamics studies indicated conformational preorganization of the unbound peptide ligands due to rotational restriction around the C(β)C(γ) bond of the Xxx(3) residue, in correlation with the observed κ receptor binding enhancement. Compounds with a mixed μ/κ opioid activity profile are known to have therapeutic potential for treatment of cocaine abuse.

  13. p90 ribosomal S6 kinases play a significant role in early gene regulation in the cardiomyocyte response to G(q)-protein-coupled receptor stimuli, endothelin-1 and α(1)-adrenergic receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Amirak, Emre; Fuller, Stephen J; Sugden, Peter H; Clerk, Angela

    2013-03-01

    ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and their substrates RSKs (p90 ribosomal S6 kinases) phosphorylate different transcription factors, contributing differentially to transcriptomic profiles. In cardiomyocytes ERK1/2 are required for >70% of the transcriptomic response to endothelin-1. In the present study we investigated the role of RSKs in the transcriptomic responses to the G(q)-protein-coupled receptor agonists endothelin-1, phenylephrine (a generic α(1)-adrenergic receptor agonist) and A61603 (α(1A)-adrenergic receptor selective). Phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-RSKs appeared in cardiomyocyte nuclei within 2-3 min of stimulation (endothelin-1>A61603≈phenylephrine). All agonists increased nuclear RSK2, but only endothelin-1 increased the nuclear RSK1 content. PD184352 (inhibits ERK1/2 activation) and BI-D1870 (inhibits RSKs) were used to dissect the contribution of RSKs to the endothelin-1-responsive transcriptome. Of the 213 RNAs up-regulated after 1 h, 51% required RSKs for their up-regulation, whereas 29% required ERK1/2 but not RSKs. The transcriptomic response to phenylephrine overlapped with, but was not identical with, endothelin-1. As with endothelin-1, PD184352 inhibited the up-regulation of most phenylephrine-responsive transcripts, but the greater variation in the effects of BI-D1870 suggests that differential RSK signalling influences global gene expression. A61603 induced similar changes in RNA expression in cardiomyocytes as phenylephrine, indicating that the signal was mediated largely through α(1A)-adrenergic receptors. A61603 also increased expression of immediate early genes in perfused adult rat hearts and, as in cardiomyocytes, up-regulation of the majority of genes was inhibited by PD184352. PD184352 or BI-D1870 prevented the increased surface area induced by endothelin-1 in cardiomyocytes. Thus RSKs play a significant role in regulating cardiomyocyte gene expression and hypertrophy in response to G

  14. mu-Opioid receptor-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate binding in rat thalamus and cultured cell lines: signal transduction mechanisms underlying agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Selley, D E; Sim, L J; Xiao, R; Liu, Q; Childers, S R

    1997-01-01

    G protein activation by different mu-selective opioid agonists was examined in rat thalamus, SK-N-SH cells, and mu-opioid receptor-transfected mMOR-CHO cells using agonist-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTP gamma S) binding to membranes in the presence of excess GDP. [D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly5-ol]Enkephalin (DAMGO) was the most efficacious agonist in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells, followed by (in rank order) fentanyl = morphine > > buprenorphine. In mMOR-CHO cells expressing a high density of mu receptors, no differences were observed among DAMGO, morphine or fentanyl, but these agonists were more efficacious than buprenorphine, which was more efficacious than levallorphan. In all three systems, efficacy differences were magnified by increasing GDP concentrations, indicating that the activity state of G proteins can affect agonist efficacy. Scatchard analysis of net agon stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding revealed two major components responsible for agonist efficacy differences. First, differences in the KD values of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding between high efficacy agonists (DAMGO, fentanyl, and morphine) and classic partial agonists (buprenorphine and levallorphan) were observed in all three systems. Second, differences in the Bmax value of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding were observed between DAMGO and morphine or fentanyl in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells and between the high efficacy agonists and buprenorphine or levallorphan in all three systems. These results suggest that mu-opioid agonist efficacy is determined by the magnitude of the receptor-mediated affinity shift in the binding of GTP (or[35S]GTP gamma S) versus GDP to the G protein and by the number of G proteins activated per occupied receptor.

  15. Dissemination of pheU- and pheV-located genomic islands among enteropathogenic (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) E. coli and their possible role in the horizontal transfer of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE).

    PubMed

    Rumer, Leonid; Jores, Joerg; Kirsch, Petra; Cavignac, Yolaine; Zehmke, Karen; Wieler, Lothar H

    2003-02-01

    We have recently shown that the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) of the bovine enterohemorrhagic E. coli RW1374 (O103:H2) resides within a large pathogenicity island (PAI), integrated in the vicinity of the phenylalanine tRNA gene pheV. Here we describe an additional, but LEE-negative genomic island in RW1374 in the vicinity of another phenylalanine tRNA gene, pheU, the sequence of which is identical to pheV. These two genomic islands revealed identity of the left, but a relative variability of their right end sequences. To investigate the mechanism of LEE-PAI distribution in E. coli, we analysed similar junctions in the pheU/pheV loci of additional EPEC and EHEC strains the LEE location of which had not been determined before. By hybridisation of NotI restriction fragments with probes specific for LEE, pheV locus, and pheU locus, the LEE was found linked to either one of these two loci. The results agreed well with recently published phylogenetic data and indicate that in the clones of diarrheagenic E. coli (Dec) Dec 11 and Dec 12, forming the phylogenetic cluster EPEC 2, and in the strains of the most typical serotypes of the Dec 8, belonging to the phylogenetic cluster EHEC 2, the LEE was linked with pheV and not with the pheU locus as previously assumed. Sequence comparison with other pheU- and pheV-located genomic islands from different E. coli pathotypes (uropathogenic E. coli, septicemic E. coli) as well as from Shigella indicated the same structural features at the junctions. These conserved structures suggested a common DNA cassette, serving as common vehicle for horizontal gene transfer of various PAls. In addition, the elements suggest an origin from a common pheU-located ancestor and integration into the chromosome through site-specific recombination. Our results indicate that pheU/pheV-located genomic islands played an important role in the evolution of several PAls in E. coli and related pathogens.

  16. Denatonium and 6-n-Propyl-2-thiouracil, Agonists of Bitter Taste Receptor, Inhibit Contraction of Various Types of Smooth Muscles in the Rat and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sato, Ken; Kai, Yuki; Chiba, Yoshihiko; Narita, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Recently the global expression of taste 2 receptors (TAS2Rs) on smooth muscle cells in human airways was demonstrated. Here, the effects of agonists of taste receptor, type 2, denatonium and 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil, on smooth-muscle contraction were examined in the rat and mouse. Contractions induced by carbachol (CCh), high K(+), and sodium fluoride, but not calyculin-A, were inhibited significantly in the presence of a TAS2R agonist in the bronchial smooth muscle of mice. The contraction induced by CCh was inhibited by TAS2R agonists in ileal smooth muscle. Phenylephrine-induced contraction was also inhibited by TAS2R agonists in aortic smooth muscle. Gastrointestinal motility and blood pressure were attenuated by administration of TAS2R agonists in vivo. These findings suggest that TAS2R may be receptor for endogenous biologically active substances as well as for bitter tastes on the tongue. TAS2R signaling could be employed in the development of anti-asthmatic, anti-spasmodic, and anti-hypertensive drugs.

  17. Denatonium and 6-n-Propyl-2-thiouracil, Agonists of Bitter Taste Receptor, Inhibit Contraction of Various Types of Smooth Muscles in the Rat and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sato, Ken; Kai, Yuki; Chiba, Yoshihiko; Narita, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Recently the global expression of taste 2 receptors (TAS2Rs) on smooth muscle cells in human airways was demonstrated. Here, the effects of agonists of taste receptor, type 2, denatonium and 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil, on smooth-muscle contraction were examined in the rat and mouse. Contractions induced by carbachol (CCh), high K, and sodium fluoride, but not calyculin-A, were inhibited significantly in the presence of a TAS2R agonist in the bronchial smooth muscle of mice. The contraction induced by CCh was inhibited by TAS2R agonists in ileal smooth muscle. Phenylephrine-induced contraction was also inhibited by TAS2R agonists in aortic smooth muscle. Gastrointestinal motility and blood pressure were attenuated by administration of TAS2R agonists in vivo. These findings suggest that TAS2R may be receptor for endogenous biologically active substances as well as for bitter tastes on the tongue. TAS2R signaling could be employed in the development of anti-asthmatic, anti-spasmodic, and anti-hypertensive drugs. PMID:27110632

  18. Denatonium and 6-n-Propyl-2-thiouracil, Agonists of Bitter Taste Receptor, Inhibit Contraction of Various Types of Smooth Muscles in the Rat and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sato, Ken; Kai, Yuki; Chiba, Yoshihiko; Narita, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Recently the global expression of taste 2 receptors (TAS2Rs) on smooth muscle cells in human airways was demonstrated. Here, the effects of agonists of taste receptor, type 2, denatonium and 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil, on smooth-muscle contraction were examined in the rat and mouse. Contractions induced by carbachol (CCh), high K(+), and sodium fluoride, but not calyculin-A, were inhibited significantly in the presence of a TAS2R agonist in the bronchial smooth muscle of mice. The contraction induced by CCh was inhibited by TAS2R agonists in ileal smooth muscle. Phenylephrine-induced contraction was also inhibited by TAS2R agonists in aortic smooth muscle. Gastrointestinal motility and blood pressure were attenuated by administration of TAS2R agonists in vivo. These findings suggest that TAS2R may be receptor for endogenous biologically active substances as well as for bitter tastes on the tongue. TAS2R signaling could be employed in the development of anti-asthmatic, anti-spasmodic, and anti-hypertensive drugs. PMID:26567724

  19. 40 CFR 721.7600 - Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny-lazohetero monocyclic poly-one (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7600 Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny... reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl (heter-o-cyc-licyl) phenyl-azo-he-tero mono-cyclic polyone...

  20. 40 CFR 721.7620 - Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl-azohetero monocyclic polyone, ((alkylimidazolyl) methyl) derivative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl... Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl-azohetero monocyclic polyone, ((alkylimidazolyl) methyl) derivative... substance alkyl (heter-o-cyc-licyl) phenyl-azo-het-ero mono-cyc-lic polyone, ((al-kyli-mi-da-zolyl)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.7600 - Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny-lazohetero monocyclic poly-one (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7600 Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny... reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl (heter-o-cyc-licyl) phenyl-azo-he-tero mono-cyclic polyone...

  2. 40 CFR 721.7620 - Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl-azohetero monocyclic polyone, ((alkylimidazolyl) methyl) derivative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl... Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl-azohetero monocyclic polyone, ((alkylimidazolyl) methyl) derivative... substance alkyl (heter-o-cyc-licyl) phenyl-azo-het-ero mono-cyc-lic polyone, ((al-kyli-mi-da-zolyl)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.7600 - Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny-lazohetero monocyclic poly-one (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7600 Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny... reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl (heter-o-cyc-licyl) phenyl-azo-he-tero mono-cyclic polyone...

  4. 40 CFR 721.7620 - Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl-azohetero monocyclic polyone, ((alkylimidazolyl) methyl) derivative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl... Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl-azohetero monocyclic polyone, ((alkylimidazolyl) methyl) derivative... substance alkyl (heter-o-cyc-licyl) phenyl-azo-het-ero mono-cyc-lic polyone, ((al-kyli-mi-da-zolyl)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.7600 - Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny-lazohetero monocyclic poly-one (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7600 Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny... reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl (heter-o-cyc-licyl) phenyl-azo-he-tero mono-cyclic polyone...

  6. 40 CFR 721.7620 - Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl-azohetero monocyclic polyone, ((alkylimidazolyl) methyl) derivative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl... Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl-azohetero monocyclic polyone, ((alkylimidazolyl) methyl) derivative... substance alkyl (heter-o-cyc-licyl) phenyl-azo-het-ero mono-cyc-lic polyone, ((al-kyli-mi-da-zolyl)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.7620 - Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl-azohetero monocyclic polyone, ((alkylimidazolyl) methyl) derivative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl... Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-nyl-azohetero monocyclic polyone, ((alkylimidazolyl) methyl) derivative... substance alkyl (heter-o-cyc-licyl) phenyl-azo-het-ero mono-cyc-lic polyone, ((al-kyli-mi-da-zolyl)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.7600 - Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny-lazohetero monocyclic poly-one (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7600 Alkyl(heterocyclicyl) phe-ny... reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl (heter-o-cyc-licyl) phenyl-azo-he-tero mono-cyclic polyone...

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of a Chlorinated-Ethene Degrader, Cupriavidus necator Strain PHE3-6 (NBRC 110655)

    PubMed Central

    Yonezuka, Kenta; Shimodaira, Jun; Tabata, Michiro; Nagase, Shun; Kasai, Daisuke; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Fujita, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Cupriavidus necator strain PHE3-6 grows on phenol as a sole carbon source and cometabolizes cis- and trans-dichloroethenes and trichloroethene. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of PHE3-6, which provides insights into the degradation system of phenol and chlorinated ethenes. PMID:26941158

  10. Alterations in phenylephrine-induced contractions and the vascular expression of Na+,K+-ATPase in ouabain-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni, Luciana V; Salaices, Mercedes; Marín, Jesús; Vassallo, Dalton V; Alonso, María J

    2002-01-01

    Hypertension development, phenylephrine-induced contraction and Na+,K+-ATPase functional activity and protein expression in aorta (AO), tail (TA) and superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries from ouabain- (25 μg day−1, s.c., 5 weeks) and vehicle-treated rats were evaluated.Ouabain treatment increased systolic blood pressure (127±1 vs 160±2 mmHg, n=24, 35; P<0.001) while the maximum response to phenylephrine was reduced (P<0.01) in AO (102.8±3.9 vs 67.1±10.1% of KCl response, n=12, 9) and SMA (82.5±7.5 vs 52.2±5.8%, n=12, 9).Endothelium removal potentiated the phenylephrine response to a greater extent in segments from ouabain-treated rats. Thus, differences of area under the concentration-response curves (dAUC) in endothelium-denuded and intact segments for control and ouabain-treated rats were, respectively: AO, 56.6±9.6 vs 198.3±18.3 (n=9, 7); SMA, 85.5±15.4 vs 165.4±24.8 (n=6, 6); TA, 13.0±6.1 vs 39.5±10.4% of the corresponding control AUC (n=6, 6); P<0.05.The relaxation to KCl (1 – 10 mM) was similar in segments from both groups. Compared to controls, the inhibition of 0.1 mM ouabain on KCl relaxation was greater in AO (dAUC: 64.8±4.6 vs 84.0±5.1%, n=11, 14; P<0.05), similar in SMA (dAUC: 39.1±3.9 vs 43.3±7.8%, n=6, 7; P>0.05) and smaller in TA (dAUC: 62.1±5.5 vs 41.4±8.2%, n=12, 13; P<0.05) in ouabain-treated rats.Protein expression of both α1 and α2 isoforms of Na+,K+-ATPase was augmented in AO, unmodified in SMA and reduced in TA from ouabain-treated rats.These results suggest that chronic administration of ouabain induces hypertension and regional vascular alterations, the latter possibly as a consequence of the hypertension. PMID:11834625

  11. Potential retinoid x receptor agonists for treating Alzheimer's disease from traditional chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Chung; Liu, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Chun; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is neurodegenerative disorder due to the accumulation of amyloid- β in the brain and causes dementia with ageing. Some researches indicate that the RXR agonist, Targretin, has also been used for treatment of Alzheimer's disease in mouse models. We investigate the potent candidates as RXR agonists from the vast repertoire of TCM compounds in TCM Database@Taiwan. The potential TCM compounds, β -lipoic acid and sulfanilic acid, had higher potent binding affinities than both 9-cis-retinoic acid and Targretin in docking simulation and have stable H-bonds with residues Arg316 and some equivalent hydrophobic contacts with residues Ala272, Gln275, Leu309, Phe313, Val342, Ile345, and Cys432 as Targretin. The carboxyl or sulfonyl hydroxide group can form a H-bond with key residue Arg316 in the docking pose, and the phenyl group next to the carboxyl or sulfonyl hydroxide group can form a π interaction with residue Phe313. Moreover, β -lipoic acid and sulfanilic acid have stable H-bonds with residue Gln275, Ser313, and residue Ala327, respectively, which may strengthen and stabilize TCM candidates inside the binding domain of RXR protein. Hence, we propose β -lipoic acid and sulfanilic acid as potential lead compounds for further study in drug development process with the RXR protein against Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Agonist-trafficking and hallucinogens.

    PubMed

    González-Maeso, Javier; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2009-01-01

    Seven transmembrane domain receptors, also termed G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represent the most common molecular target for therapeutic drugs. The generally accepted pharmacological model for GPCR activation is the ternary complex model, in which GPCRs exist in a dynamic equilibrium between the active and inactive conformational states. However, the demonstration that different agonists sometimes elicit a different relative activation of two signaling pathways downstream of the same receptor has led to a revision of the ternary complex model. According to this agonist- trafficking model, agonists stabilize distinct activated receptor conformations that preferentially activate specific signaling pathways. Hallucinogenic drugs and non-hallucinogenic drugs represent an attractive experimental system with which to study agonist-trafficking of receptor signaling. Thus many of the behavioral responses induced by hallucinogenic drugs, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin or mescaline, depend on activation of serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT2ARs). In contrast, this neuropsychological state in humans is not induced by closely related chemicals, such as lisuride or ergotamine, despite their similar in vitro activity at the 5-HT2AR. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, as well as unresolved questions, regarding agonist-trafficking and the mechanism of action of hallucinogenic drugs.

  13. Cathepsin G-regulated Release of Formyl Peptide Receptor Agonists Modulate Neutrophil Effector Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Woloszynek, Josh C.; Hu, Ying; Pham, Christine T. N.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases play an important role in inflammation by modulating neutrophil effector functions. We have previously shown that neutrophils deficient in the serine proteases cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase (CG/NE neutrophils) exhibit severe defects in chemokine CXCL2 release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production when activated on immobilized immune complex. Exogenously added active CG rescues these defects, but the mechanism remains undefined. Using a protease-based proteomic approach, we found that, in vitro, the addition of exogenous CG to immune complex-stimulated CG/NE neutrophils led to a decrease in the level of cell-associated annexin A1 (AnxA1) and cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP), both known inflammatory mediators. We further confirmed that, in vivo, CG was required for the extracellular release of AnxA1 and CRAMP in a subcutaneous air pouch model. In vitro, CG efficiently cleaved AnxA1, releasing the active N-terminal peptide Ac2-26, and processed CRAMP in limited fashion. Ac2-26 and CRAMP peptides enhanced the release of CXCL2 by CG/NE neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner via formyl peptide receptor (FPR) stimulation. Blockade of FPRs by an antagonist, Boc2 (t-Boc-Phe-d-Leu-Phe-d-Leu-Phe), abrogates CXCL2 release, whereas addition of FPR agonists, fMLF and F2L, relieves Boc2 inhibition. Furthermore, the addition of active CG, but not inactive CG, also relieves Boc2 inhibition. These findings suggest that CG modulates neutrophil effector functions partly by controlling the release (and proteolysis) of FPR agonists. Unexpectedly, we found that mature CRAMP, but not Ac2-26, induced ROS production through an FPR-independent pathway. PMID:22879591

  14. Simultaneous spectrophotometric-multivariate calibration determination of several components of ophthalmic solutions: phenylephrine, chloramphenicol, antipyrine, methylparaben and thimerosal.

    PubMed

    Collado, M S; Mantovani, V E; Goicoechea, H C; Olivieri, A C

    2000-08-16

    The use of multivariate spectrophotometric calibration for the simultaneous determination of several active components and excipients in ophthalmic solutions is presented. The resolution of five-component mixtures of phenylephrine, chloramphenicol, antipyrine, methylparaben and thimerosal has been accomplished by using partial least-squares (PLS-1) and a variant of the so-called hybrid linear analysis (HLA). Notwithstanding the presence of a large number of components and their high degree of spectral overlap, they have been determined simultaneously with high accuracy and precision, with no interference, rapidly and without resorting to extraction procedures using non aqueous solvents. A simple and fast method for wavelength selection in the calibration step is presented, based on the minimisation of the predicted error sum of squares (PRESS) calculated as a function of a moving spectral window.

  15. Simultaneous high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of paracetamol, phenylephrine HCl, and chlorpheniramine maleate in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Senyuva, Hamide; Ozden, Tuncel

    2002-02-01

    A rapid, precise, and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol, phenylephrine HCI, and chlorpheniramine maleate in combined pharmaceutical dosage forms. The method involves the use of a microBondapak CN RP analytical column (125 A, 10 microm, 3.9 x 150 mm) at 22 degrees C as the stationary phase with the mixture of acetonitrile and phosphate buffer (pH 6.22, 78:22) as the mobile phase. Derivatization of the drugs is not required. The method is applied to commercial pediatric cough-cold syrups, tablets, and capsules marketed in Turkey. The relative standard deviation for 10 replicate measurements of each drug in the medicaments is always less than 2%.

  16. Biosynthesis of wyosine derivatives in tRNA(Phe) of Archaea: role of a remarkable bifunctional tRNA(Phe):m1G/imG2 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Urbonavičius, Jaunius; Meškys, Rolandas; Grosjean, Henri

    2014-06-01

    The presence of tricyclic wyosine derivatives 3'-adjacent to anticodon is a hallmark of tRNA(Phe) in eukaryotes and archaea. In yeast, formation of wybutosine (yW) results from five enzymes acting in a strict sequential order. In archaea, the intermediate compound imG-14 (4-demethylwyosine) is a target of three different enzymes, leading to the formation of distinct wyosine derivatives (yW-86, imG, and imG2). We focus here on a peculiar methyltransferase (aTrm5a) that catalyzes two distinct reactions: N(1)-methylation of guanosine and C(7)-methylation of imG-14, whose function is to allow the production of isowyosine (imG2), an intermediate of the 7-methylwyosine (mimG) biosynthetic pathway. Based on the formation of mesomeric forms of imG-14, a rationale for such dual enzymatic activities is proposed. This bifunctional tRNA:m(1)G/imG2 methyltransferase, acting on two chemically distinct guanosine derivatives located at the same position of tRNA(Phe), is unique to certain archaea and has no homologs in eukaryotes. This enzyme here referred to as Taw22, probably played an important role in the emergence of the multistep biosynthetic pathway of wyosine derivatives in archaea and eukaryotes.

  17. Lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination for cystic fibrosis patients homozygous for Phe508del-CFTR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y H; Strokes, D C; Naren, A P

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening inherited disease caused by the loss or dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel activity resulting from mutations in the CFTR gene. Phe508del is the most prevalent mutation, with approximately 90% of all CF patients carrying it on at least one allele. Over the past two or three decades, significant progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of CF, and in the development of effective CF therapies. The approval of Orkambi® (lumacaftor/ivacaftor) marks another milestone in CF therapeutics development, which, with the advent of personalized medicine, could potentially revolutionize CF care and management. This article reviews the rationale, progress and future direction in the development of lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination to treat CF patients homozygous for the Phe508del-CFTR mutation. PMID:27252987

  18. Lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination for cystic fibrosis patients homozygous for Phe508del-CFTR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y H; Strokes, D C; Naren, A P

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening inherited disease caused by the loss or dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel activity resulting from mutations in the CFTR gene. Phe508del is the most prevalent mutation, with approximately 90% of all CF patients carrying it on at least one allele. Over the past two or three decades, significant progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of CF, and in the development of effective CF therapies. The approval of Orkambi® (lumacaftor/ivacaftor) marks another milestone in CF therapeutics development, which, with the advent of personalized medicine, could potentially revolutionize CF care and management. This article reviews the rationale, progress and future direction in the development of lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination to treat CF patients homozygous for the Phe508del-CFTR mutation.

  19. Side chain and backbone contributions of Phe508 to CFTR folding

    SciTech Connect

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Thomas, Philip J.

    2010-12-07

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an integral membrane protein, cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The most common CF-causing mutant, deletion of Phe508, fails to properly fold. To elucidate the role Phe508 plays in the folding of CFTR, missense mutations at this position were generated. Only one missense mutation had a pronounced effect on the stability and folding of the isolated domain in vitro. In contrast, many substitutions, including those of charged and bulky residues, disrupted folding of full-length CFTR in cells. Structures of two mutant nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) reveal only local alterations of the surface near position 508. These results suggest that the peptide backbone plays a role in the proper folding of the domain, whereas the side chain plays a role in defining a surface of NBD1 that potentially interacts with other domains during the maturation of intact CFTR.

  20. Propellant Handler's Ensemble (PHE) Aka Self-Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensemble (SCAPE), Ventilator Improvement Study Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    The overall objective for this project is to evaluate two candidate alternatives for the existing Propellant Handler's Ensemble (PHE) escape ventilator. The new candidate ventilators use newer technology with similar quantities of air at approximately half the weight of the current ventilator. Ventilators are typically used to ingress/egress a hazardous work area when hard line air is provided at the work area but the hose is not long enough to get the operator to and from the staging area to the work area. The intent of this test is to verify that the new ventilators perform as well as or better than the current ventilators in maintaining proper oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the PHE during a typical use for the rated time period (10 minutes). We will evaluate two new units comparing them to the existing unit. Subjects will wear the Category I version of the Propellant Handler's Ensemble with the rear suit pouch snapped.

  1. 3,4-Phenylenedioxythiophene (PheDOT) Based Hole-Transporting Materials for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Chen, Bai-Xue; Zhang, Fang-Shuai; Yu, Hui-Juan; Ma, Shuang; Kuang, Dai-Bin; Shao, Guang; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2016-04-01

    Two new electron-rich molecules based on 3,4-phenylenedioxythiophene (PheDOT) were synthesized and successfully adopted as hole-transporting materials (HTMs) in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). X-ray diffraction, absorption spectra, photoluminescence spectra, electrochemical properties, thermal stabilities, hole mobilities, conductivities, and photovoltaic parameters of PSCs based on these two HTMs were compared with each other. By introducing methoxy substituents into the main skeleton, the energy levels of PheDOT-core HTM were tuned to match with the perovskite, and its hole mobility was also improved (1.33×10(-4)  cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1) , being higher than that of spiro-OMeTAD, 2.34×10(-5)  cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1)). The PSC based on MeO-PheDOT as HTM exhibits a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 18.31 mA cm(-2) , an open-circuit potential (Voc ) of 0.914 V, and a fill factor (FF) of 0.636, yielding an encouraging power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 10.64 % under AM 1.5G illumination. These results give some insight into how the molecular structures of HTMs affect their performances and pave the way for developing high-efficiency and low-cost HTMs for PSCs.

  2. Bacterial and eukaryotic phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases catalyze misaminoacylation of tRNA(Phe) with 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Moor, Nina; Klipcan, Liron; Safro, Mark G

    2011-10-28

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases exert control over the accuracy of translation by selective pairing the correct amino acids with their cognate tRNAs, and proofreading the misacylated products. Here we show that three existing, structurally different phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases-human mitochondrial (HsmtPheRS), human cytoplasmic (HsctPheRS), and eubacterial from Thermus thermophilus (TtPheRS), catalyze mischarging of tRNA(Phe) with an oxidized analog of tyrosine-L-dopa. The lowest level of L-dopa discrimination over the cognate amino acid, exhibited by HsmtPheRS, is comparable to that of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. HsmtPheRS and TtPheRS complexes with L-dopa revealed in the active sites an electron density shaping this ligand. HsctPheRS and TtPheRS possessing editing activity are capable of hydrolyzing the exogenous L-dopa-tRNA(Phe) as efficiently as Tyr-tRNA(Phe). However, editing activity of PheRS does not guarantee reduction of the aminoacylation error rate to escape misincorporation of L-dopa into polypeptide chains.

  3. (/sup 3/H)(D-Ala2,NMePhe4,Gly-ol5)-enkephalin (mu-opioid) binding in beige-J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Raffa, R.B.; Baldy, W.J. Jr.; Shank, R.P.; Mathiasen, J.R.; Vaught, J.L.

    1988-05-01

    Tritiated (D-Ala2,NMePhe4,Gly-ol5)-enkephalin ((3H)DAGO) was used to examine mu-opioid receptor number and mu-ligand binding in brain synaptic membranes (P2 fraction) from C57BL/6J-bgJ/bgJ (beige-J) mice, a strain with combined deficiencies in immunological function (resembling Chediak-Higashi syndrome) and analgesic response to mu-opioid agonists such as morphine and DAGO. As controls, white mice, beige-J littermates (normally responsive to mu-opioid agonists), and a known mu-deficient strain (CXBK) were also examined. Neither the KD (0.47 to 0.49 nM) nor the Bmax (153 to 168 fmol/mg protein) determined for beige-J mice was significantly different from values determined for littermates or white mice. In contrast, the Bmax of CXBK mice (66 fmol/mg protein) was clearly less than that of the other strains. The analgesic defect of beige-J mice, therefore, is not likely due to an insufficient number of mu-opioid receptors, as it presumably is in CXBK mice. Carbachol (200 micrograms/ml), which partly corrects the analgesic defect of beige-J mice, had no effect on (3H)DAGO binding either acutely in vitro or chronically ex vivo after administration to beige-J mice for three weeks. Hence, the analgesic defect of beige-J mice appears to be due to some defect in the mu-opioid receptor-effector coupling mechanism or to some endogenous substance that inhibits binding of mu-opioid ligands to otherwise functional receptors.

  4. Regional haemodynamic effects of mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid agonists microinjected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious, unrestrained rats.

    PubMed Central

    Bachelard, H.; Pître, M.

    1995-01-01

    1. The cardiovascular effects of bilateral injection into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of selective mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptor agonists were investigated in conscious, unrestrained Wistar Kyoto rats, chronically instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes for measurement of regional haemodynamics. 2. The selective mu-agonist [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly5ol]enkephalin (DAMGO), injected bilaterally into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei (0.01-1.0 nmol), caused increases in blood pressure, tachycardias, vasoconstriction in renal and superior mesenteric vascular beds and substantial vasodilatation in the hindquarter vascular bed. 3. The administration of increasing doses (0.01-5.0 nmol) of the selective delta-agonist [D-Phe2,5]enkephalin (DPDPE) or the selective kappa-agonist, U50488H into the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) had no significant effect on blood pressure, heart rate, or regional haemodynamics. 4. Together, the present results are further evidence of a role for opioid peptides, especially acting at mu-receptors in the PVN, in the central regulation of the cardiovascular system, whereas a role for opioid peptides, acting at delta- and kappa-receptors in the PVN, seems less obvious from the present results. Images Figure 1 PMID:7582480

  5. Regional haemodynamic effects of mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid agonists microinjected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious, unrestrained rats.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H; Pître, M

    1995-06-01

    1. The cardiovascular effects of bilateral injection into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of selective mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptor agonists were investigated in conscious, unrestrained Wistar Kyoto rats, chronically instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes for measurement of regional haemodynamics. 2. The selective mu-agonist [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly5ol]enkephalin (DAMGO), injected bilaterally into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei (0.01-1.0 nmol), caused increases in blood pressure, tachycardias, vasoconstriction in renal and superior mesenteric vascular beds and substantial vasodilatation in the hindquarter vascular bed. 3. The administration of increasing doses (0.01-5.0 nmol) of the selective delta-agonist [D-Phe2,5]enkephalin (DPDPE) or the selective kappa-agonist, U50488H into the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) had no significant effect on blood pressure, heart rate, or regional haemodynamics. 4. Together, the present results are further evidence of a role for opioid peptides, especially acting at mu-receptors in the PVN, in the central regulation of the cardiovascular system, whereas a role for opioid peptides, acting at delta- and kappa-receptors in the PVN, seems less obvious from the present results.

  6. Candida glabrata binds to glycosylated and lectinic receptors on the coronary endothelial luminal membrane and inhibits flow sense and cardiac responses to agonists.

    PubMed

    Torres-Tirado, David; Knabb, Maureen; Castaño, Irene; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Rubio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata (CG) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that initiates infection by binding to host cells via specific lectin-like adhesin proteins. We have previously shown the importance of lectin-oligosaccharide binding in cardiac responses to flow and agonists. Because of the lectinic-oligosaccharide nature of CG binding, we tested the ability of CG to alter the agonist- and flow-induced changes in cardiac function in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed strong attachment of CG to the coronary endothelium, even after extensive washing. CG shifted the coronary flow vs. auricular-ventricular (AV) delay relationship upward, indicating that greater flow was required to achieve the same AV delay. This effect was completely reversed with mannose, partially reversed with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, but hyaluronan had no effect. Western blot analysis was used to determine binding of CG to isolated coronary endothelial luminal membrane (CELM) receptors, and the results indicate that flow-sensitive CELM receptors, ANG II type I, α-adrenergic 1A receptor, endothelin-2, and VCAM-1 bind to CG. In addition, CG inhibited agonist-induced effects of bradykinin, angiotensin, and phenylephrine on AV delay, coronary perfusion pressure, and left ventricular pressure. Mannose reversed the inhibitory effects of CG on the agonist responses. These results suggest that CG directly binds to flow-sensitive CELM receptors via lectinic-oligosaccharide interactions with mannose and disrupts the lectin-oligosaccharide binding necessary for flow-induced cardiac responses.

  7. Tail shock produces inhibition as well as sensitization of the siphon-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia: possible behavioral role for presynaptic inhibition mediated by the peptide Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2.

    PubMed

    Mackey, S L; Glanzman, D L; Small, S A; Dyke, A M; Kandel, E R; Hawkins, R D

    1987-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that, in addition to being modulated by presynaptic facilitation, the sensory neurons of the gill- and siphon-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia are also capable of being modulated by transient presynaptic inhibition produced by the peptide Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2. These two modulatory effects involve different second-messenger systems: the facilitation is mediated through cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation, and the inhibition is mediated through the lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid. To explore the behavioral function of this inhibition, we have carried out a parametric analysis of the effect of tail shock on the siphon-withdrawal reflex. In addition to producing sensitization of the withdrawal reflex, tail shock also transiently inhibits the reflex. The inhibition is produced by relatively weak shock, whereas sensitization is more prominent and may mask the inhibition with stronger shock. Furthermore, inhibition is not observed after habituation training. Cellular studies suggest that the behavioral inhibition is mediated, at least in part, by presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release from the siphon sensory neurons. Moreover, we have identified an interneuron within the left pleural ganglion (LPL16) that shows Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2 immunoreactivity, is activated by tail shock, and simulates the presynaptic inhibitory actions produced by tail shock. Therefore, our results suggest that presynaptic inhibition mediated by Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2 and its lipoxygenase second messenger contributes to behavioral inhibition of the siphon-withdrawal reflex.

  8. Organization of the horizontally transferred pheBA operon and its adjacent genes in the genomes of eight indigenous Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed

    Peters, Maire; Tomikas, Ave; Nurk, Allan

    2004-11-01

    Horizontal transfer of genes encoding phenol degradation (pheBA) in the environment has been previously described. Complete or partial phe-operon was redetected in plasmids of several indigenous Pseudomonas strains isolated from the river water. The sequences of up- and downstream regions of the acquired phe-DNA in eight different plasmids were analyzed. In all cases, miniature insertional elements or putative transposase genes were found suggesting transposase dependent pheBA integration into plasmids. In three cases, an open reading frame encoding homologue to the transcription regulator protein (CatR) of the pheBA operon was determined. PMID:15518880

  9. Novel diazabicycloalkane delta opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Loriga, Giovanni; Lazzari, Paolo; Manca, Ilaria; Ruiu, Stefania; Falzoi, Matteo; Murineddu, Gabriele; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Pinna, Giovanni; Pinna, Gérard Aimè

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the investigation of diazabicycloalkane cores as potential new scaffolds for the development of novel analogues of the previously reported diazatricyclodecane selective delta (δ) opioid agonists, as conformationally constrained homologues of the reference δ agonist (+)-4-[(αR)-α((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80). In particular, we have simplified the diazatricyclodecane motif of δ opioid agonist prototype 1a with bridged bicyclic cores. 3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptane, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane, and 3,10-diazabicyclo[4.3.1]decane were adopted as core motifs of the novel derivatives. The compounds were synthesized and biologically assayed as racemic (3-5) or diastereoisomeric (6,7) mixtures. All the novel compounds 3-7 showed δ agonism behaviour and remarkable affinity to δ receptors. Amongst the novel derivatives, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane based compound 4 evidenced improved δ affinity and selectivity relative to SNC80.

  10. [ROLE OF THROMBOXANE AND LEUKOTRIENES IN MECHANISMS OF CONTRACTILE REACTIONS OF PORTAL VEIN, INDUCED BY ACETYLCHLINE AND PHENYLEPHRINE].

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, O O; Yanchuk, P I; Pasichnichenko, O M

    2015-01-01

    Effects of picotamide and zileuton on tonic contractile activity of the rat portal vein preparations, induced by acetylcholine (2.10(-5) mol/1) and phenylephrine (5.10(-7) mol/1) were investigated. Conversion of arachidonic acid products (prostaglandins, leukotrienes) synthesized by endothelial cells, plays an important role in the local regulation of vascular tone. The compounds formed in a cascade of enzymatic transformations can modulate the effect of other vasoactive factors. Picotamide (6,5.10(-5) mol/1) - thromboxane receptor and thromboxane -synthase blocker - depress acetylcholine-induction tonic contraction of isolated segments of portal vein with intact endothelium by 29% and norepinephrine-induction reduction of 45% relative to the control values. The obtained results indicate a participation of thromboxane and/or endoperoxide H2 in this reaction. Partial inhibition of the contractions by 5-lipoxygenase blocker zileuton(4,2.10(-5) mol/1) at 23% relative to control values suggests, that products of lipoxigenase pathways of arachidonic acid conversion are involved in mechanisms of specified reactions. These data indicate complex mechanisms of regulation of vascular tone of the portal vein, which play an important role eicosanoids. Further study of these mechanisms is necessary for the formation of basic knowledge, as well as to elucidate the mechanisms of occurrence and development of pathological conditions of vessels and the development of methods of their correction.

  11. Early NADPH oxidase-2 activation is crucial in phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy of H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Nynke E; Musters, René J P; Fritz, Jan M; Pagano, Patrick J; Vonk, Alexander B A; Paulus, Walter J; van Rossum, Albert C; Meischl, Christof; Niessen, Hans W M; Krijnen, Paul A J

    2014-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by different NADPH oxidases (NOX) play a role in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by different stimuli, such as angiotensin II and pressure overload. However, the role of the specific NOX isoforms in phenylephrine (PE)-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is unknown. Therefore we aimed to determine the involvement of the NOX isoforms NOX1, NOX2 and NOX4 in PE-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Hereto rat neonatal cardiomyoblasts (H9c2 cells) were incubated with 100 μM PE to induce hypertrophy after 24 and 48h as determined via cell and nuclear size measurements using digital imaging microscopy, electron microscopy and an automated cell counter. Digital-imaging microscopy further revealed that in contrast to NOX1 and NOX4, NOX2 expression increased significantly up to 4h after PE stimulation, coinciding and co-localizing with ROS production in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus. Furthermore, inhibition of NOX-mediated ROS production with apocynin, diphenylene iodonium (DPI) or NOX2 docking sequence (Nox2ds)-tat peptide during these first 4h of PE stimulation significantly inhibited PE-induced hypertrophy of H9c2 cells, both after 24 and 48h of PE stimulation. These data show that early NOX2-mediated ROS production is crucial in PE-induced hypertrophy of H9c2 cells.

  12. Polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis is involved in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Nicola A; Lillycrop, Karen A; Fielding, Barbara; Torrens, Christopher; Hanson, Mark A; Burdge, Graham C

    2015-10-01

    Stimulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) α1-adrenoceptors induces myosin phosphorylation and vasoconstriction via mobilisation of intracellular calcium and production of specific eicosanoids. Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved, although the precise mechanism is not known. To address this, we characterised PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells and determined its role in intracellular calcium release and eicosanoid production. Murine VSM cells converted 18:2n-6 to longer chain PUFA including 22:5n-6. Δ6 (D6d) and Δ5 (D5d) desaturase, and elongase (Elovl) 5 were expressed. Elovl2 was not detected in human, mouse or rat VSM cells, or in rat or mouse aortae, but tit was not associated with hypermethylation of its promoter. D6d or D5d inhibition reduced 18:3n-6 and 20:4n-6 synthesis, respectively, and induced concentration-related decrease in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release, and in PGE2 and PGF2α secretion. Together these findings suggest that PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved in calcium release associated with vasoconstriction.

  13. Polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis is involved in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Nicola A; Lillycrop, Karen A; Fielding, Barbara; Torrens, Christopher; Hanson, Mark A; Burdge, Graham C

    2015-10-01

    Stimulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) α1-adrenoceptors induces myosin phosphorylation and vasoconstriction via mobilisation of intracellular calcium and production of specific eicosanoids. Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved, although the precise mechanism is not known. To address this, we characterised PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells and determined its role in intracellular calcium release and eicosanoid production. Murine VSM cells converted 18:2n-6 to longer chain PUFA including 22:5n-6. Δ6 (D6d) and Δ5 (D5d) desaturase, and elongase (Elovl) 5 were expressed. Elovl2 was not detected in human, mouse or rat VSM cells, or in rat or mouse aortae, but tit was not associated with hypermethylation of its promoter. D6d or D5d inhibition reduced 18:3n-6 and 20:4n-6 synthesis, respectively, and induced concentration-related decrease in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release, and in PGE2 and PGF2α secretion. Together these findings suggest that PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved in calcium release associated with vasoconstriction. PMID:26324193

  14. EGCG Blocked Phenylephrin-Induced Hypertrophy in H9C2 Cardiomyocytes, by Activating AMPK-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Zhao, Li; Qin, Yuan; Wu, Xiao-Qian

    2015-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy metabolism. Previous studies have shown that activation of AMPK results in suppression of cardiac myocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of the p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF2) signaling pathways. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol found in green tea, possesses multiple protective effects on the cardiovascular system including cardiac hypertrophy. However, the molecular mechanisms has not been well investigated. In this study, we found that EGCG could significantly reduce natriuretic peptides type A (Nppa), brain natriuretic polypeptide (BNP) mRNA expression and decrease cell surface area in H9C2 cardiomyocytes stimulated with phenylephrine (PE). Moreover, we showed that AMPK is activated in H9C2 cardiomyocytes by EGCG, and AMPK-dependent pathway participates in the inhibitory effects of EGCG on cardiac hypertrophy. Taken together, our findings provide the first evidence that the effect of EGCG against cardiac hypertrophy may be attributed to its activation on AMPK-dependent signaling pathway, suggesting the therapeutic potential of EGCG on the prevention of cardiac remodeling in patients with pressure overload hypertrophy. PMID:25954124

  15. Early NADPH oxidase-2 activation is crucial in phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy of H9c2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Nynke E.; Musters, René J.P.; Fritz, Jan M.; Pagano, Patrick J.; Vonk, Alexander B.A.; Paulus, Walter J.; van Rossum, Albert C.; Meischl, Christof; Niessen, Hans W.M.; Krijnen, Paul A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by different NADPH oxidases (NOX) play a role in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by different stimuli, such as angiotensin II and pressure overload. However, the role of the specific NOX isoforms in phenylephrine (PE)-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is unknown. Therefore we aimed to determine the involvement of the NOX isoforms NOX1, NOX2 and NOX4 in PE-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Hereto rat neonatal cardiomyoblasts (H9c2 cells) were incubated with 100 μM PE to induce hypertrophy after 24 and 48 h as determined via cell and nuclear size measurements using digital imaging microscopy, electron microscopy and an automated cell counter. Digital-imaging microscopy further revealed that in contrast to NOX1 and NOX4, NOX2 expression increased significantly up to 4 h after PE stimulation, coinciding and co-localizing with ROS production in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus. Furthermore, inhibition of NOX-mediated ROS production with apocynin, diphenylene iodonium (DPI) or NOX2 docking sequence (Nox2ds)-tat peptide during these first 4 h of PE stimulation significantly inhibited PE-induced hypertrophy of H9c2 cells, both after 24 and 48 h of PE stimulation. These data show that early NOX2-mediated ROS production is crucial in PE-induced hypertrophy of H9c2 cells. PMID:24794531

  16. A close hidden stellar companion to the SX Phe-type variable star DW Psc

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Li, L.-J.; Wang, S.-M.; He, J.-J.; Zhou, X.; Jiang, L.-Q.

    2015-01-01

    DW Psc is a high-amplitude SX Phe-type variable with a period of pulsation of 0.05875 days. Using a few newly determined times of maximum light together with those collected from the literature, the changes in the observed-calculated (O-C) diagram are analyzed. It is discovered that the O-C curve of DW Psc shows a cyclic variation with a period of 6.08 years and a semi-amplitude of 0.0066 days. The periodic variation is analyzed for the light travel time effect, which is due to the presence of a stellar companion (M{sub 2}sini∼0.45(±0.03) M{sub ⊙}). The two-component stars in the binary system are orbiting each other in an eccentric orbit (e ∼ 0.4) at an orbital separation of about 2.7(±0.3) AU. The detection of a close stellar companion to an SX Phe-type star supports the idea that SX Phe-type pulsating stars are blue stragglers that were formed from the merging of close binaries. The stellar companion has played an important role in the merging of the original binary by removing angular momentum from the central binary during early dynamical interaction or/and late dynamical evolution. After the more massive component in DW Psc evolves into a red giant, the cool close companion should help to remove the giant envelope via possible critical Roche-lobe overflow, and the system may be a progenitor of a cataclysmic variable. The detection of a close stellar companion to DW Psc makes it a very interesting system to study in the future.

  17. [Stimulation of gastric mucosa afferents by phenylephrine potentiates anticonvulsive and eliminates sedative action of sodium valproate in the pentylenetetrazol kindling model in rats].

    PubMed

    Serdiuk, S E; Gmiro, V E; Veselkina, O S

    2014-01-01

    Sodium valproate after chronic intragastric administration in the high dose of 100-200 mg/kg eliminates generalized clonic-tonic pentylenetetrazol seizures in 100 % of rats, but only in 33-57 % of rats it prevents local clonic kindling seizures. Strong sedation is induced by the specified doses of sodium valproate. The combined oral chronic administration of phenylephrine in threshold, noneffective alone dose of 0.2 mg/kg and sodium valproate in high doses of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg potentiates anticonvulsive action of sodium valproate, because prevents both clonic-tonic kindling. seizures in 100 % of rats and clonic kindling seizures in 86-100 % of rats, and also it increases in 1.7-1.9 times anticonvulsive activity of valproate. The specified combinations of sodium valproate with phenylephrine do not produce the sedative side effect. The basis of the mechanism of potentiation of anticonvulsive action and elimination of sedative action of sodium valproate in high doses is the stimulation of gastric mucosa afferents by phenylephrine.

  18. Double-to-single target ionization ratio for electron capture in fast p-He collisions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H T; Fardi, A; Schuch, R; Schwartz, S H; Zettergren, H; Cederquist, H; Bagge, L; Danared, H; Källberg, A; Jensen, J; Rensfelt, K-G; Mergel, V; Schmidt, L; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Cocke, C L

    2002-10-14

    We have used the ion storage ring CRYRING and its internal gas-jet target and recoil-ion-momentum spectrometer to measure absolute cross sections for transfer ionization (TI: p+He-->H0+He2++e(-)) in 2.5-4.5 MeV p-He collisions with separate Thomas (TTI) and kinematic (KTI) TI contributions. The probability for electron emission in kinematical capture decreases with increasing velocity and appears to approach the photoionization shakeoff value (1.63%) [T. Aberg, Phys. Rev. A 2, 1726 (1970)

  19. A cyclic carbo-isosteric penta-depsipeptide: cyclo(Phe1–d-Ala2–Gly3–Phe4–APO5)

    PubMed Central

    Guéret, Stéphanie M.; Wagner, Trixie

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, cyclo(Phe1–d-Ala2–Gly3–Phe4–APO5), C26H32N4O5, is the minor diastereoisomer of a cyclic penta-peptidomimetic analogue containing a novel 2-amino­propyl lactone (APO) motif, which displays the same number of atoms as the native amino acid glycine and has a methyl group in place of the carbonyl O atom. The crystal structure presented here allows the analysis of the secondary structure of this unprecedented cyclic carbo-isosteric depsipeptide. The conformation of the central ring is stabilized by an intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond between the carbonyl O atom of the first residue (Phe1) and the amide group H atom of the fourth residue (Phe4). Based on the previously reported hydrogen bond and on the values of the torsion angles ϕ and ψ, the loop formed by the first, second, third and fourth residues (Phe1, d-Ala2, Gly3 and Phe4) can be classified as a type II′ β-turn. The loop around the new peptidomimetic motif, on the other hand, resembles an open γ-turn containing a weak N—H⋯O hydrogen bond between the carbonyl group O atom of the fourth residue (Phe4) and the amide unit H atom of the first residue (Phe1). In the crystal, the peptidomimetic mol­ecules are arranged in chains along the b-axis direction. Within such a chain, the mol­ecules of the structure are linked via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the amide group H atom of the secondary residue (d-Ala2) and the carb­oxy unit O atom of the fourth residue (Phe4) in a neighboring mol­ecule. The newly formed methyl stereocentre of the APO peptidomimetic motif (APO5) was obtained as the minor diastereoisomer in a ring-closing reductive amination reaction and adopts an R configuration. PMID:25705467

  20. Oxidation of Phe454 in the Gating Segment Inactivates Trametes multicolor Pyranose Oxidase during Substrate Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Volc, Jindrich; Peterbauer, Clemens K.; Leitner, Christian; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The flavin-dependent enzyme pyranose oxidase catalyses the oxidation of several pyranose sugars at position C-2. In a second reaction step, oxygen is reduced to hydrogen peroxide. POx is of interest for biocatalytic carbohydrate oxidations, yet it was found that the enzyme is rapidly inactivated under turnover conditions. We studied pyranose oxidase from Trametes multicolor (TmPOx) inactivated either during glucose oxidation or by exogenous hydrogen peroxide using mass spectrometry. MALDI-MS experiments of proteolytic fragments of inactivated TmPOx showed several peptides with a mass increase of 16 or 32 Da indicating oxidation of certain amino acids. Most of these fragments contain at least one methionine residue, which most likely is oxidised by hydrogen peroxide. One peptide fragment that did not contain any amino acid residue that is likely to be oxidised by hydrogen peroxide (DAFSYGAVQQSIDSR) was studied in detail by LC-ESI-MS/MS, which showed a +16 Da mass increase for Phe454. We propose that oxidation of Phe454, which is located at the flexible active-site loop of TmPOx, is the first and main step in the inactivation of TmPOx by hydrogen peroxide. Oxidation of methionine residues might then further contribute to the complete inactivation of the enzyme. PMID:26828796

  1. Cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Phe): a new antibacterial, anticancer, and antioxidant cyclic dipeptide from Bacillus sp. N strain associated with a rhabditid entomopathogenic nematode.

    PubMed

    Nishanth Kumar, S; Dileep, C; Mohandas, C; Nambisan, Bala; Ca, Jayaprakas

    2014-03-01

    A new microbial cyclic dipeptide (diketopiperazine), cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Phe) was isolated for the first time from the ethyl acetate extract of fermented modified nutrient broth of Bacillus sp. N strain associated with rhabditid Entomopathogenic nematode. Antibacterial activity of the compound was determined by minimum inhibitory concentration and agar disc diffusion method against medically important bacteria and the compound recorded significant antibacterial against test bacteria. Highest activity was recorded against Staphylococcus epidermis (1 µg/ml) followed by Proteus mirabilis (2 µg/ml). The activity of cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Phe) against S. epidermis is better than chloramphenicol, the standard antibiotics. Cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Phe) recorded significant antitumor activity against A549 cells (IC50 value: 10 μM) and this compound recorded no cytotoxicity against factor signaling normal fibroblast cells up to 100 μM. Cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Phe) induced significant morphological changes and DNA fragmentation associated with apoptosis in A549 cells. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide stained cells indicated apoptosis induction by cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Phe). Flow cytometry analysis showed that the cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Phe) did not induce cell cycle arrest. Effector molecule of apoptosis such as caspase-3 was found activated in treated cells, suggesting apoptosis as the main mode of cell death. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by free radical scavenging and reducing power activity, and the compound recorded significant antioxidant activity. The free radical scavenging activity of cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Phe) is almost equal to that of butylated hydroxyanisole, the standard antioxidant agent. We also compared the biological activity of natural cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Phe) with synthetic cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Phe) and cyclo(L-Tyr-L-Phe). Natural and synthetic cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Phe) recorded similar pattern of activity. Although synthetic cyclo(L-Tyr-L-Phe) recorded lower activity. But in the case of reducing power activity

  2. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  3. Fast HPLC method using ion-pair and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography for determination of phenylephrine in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Dousa, Michal; Gibala, Petr

    2010-01-01

    A rapid procedure based on a direct extraction and HPLC determination with fluorescence detection of phenylephrine in pharmaceutical sachets that include a large excess of paracetamol (65 + 1, w/w), ascorbic acid (5 + 1, w/w), and other excipients (aspartame and sucrose) was developed and validated. The final optimized chromatographic method for ion-pair chromatography used an XTerra RP18 column, 3 microm particle size, 50 x 3.0 mm id. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of acetonitrile and buffer (10 mM sodium octane-1-sulfonate, adjusted with H3PO4 to pH 2.2; 200 + 800, v/v), with a constant flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. The separation was carried out at 30 degrees C, and the injection volume was 3 microL. Fluorescence detection was performed at excitation and emission wavelengths of 275 and 310 nm, respectively. The mobile phase parameters, such as the organic solvent fraction (acetonitrile) in mobile phase as an organic modifier, the concentration of sodium octane-1-sulfonate as a counter-ion, temperature, and pH of mobile phase, were studied. As an alternative to ion-pair chromatography, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was investigated using a Luna HILIC column, 3 microm, 100 x 4.6 mm id. The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and buffer (5 mM potassium dihydrogen phosphate, adjusted with H3PO4 to pH 2.5; 750 + 250, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The separation was carried out at 25 degrees C, and the injection volume was 5 microL. The proposed method has an advantage of a very simple sample pretreatment, and is much faster than the currently utilized HPLC methods using gradient elution and UV detection. Commercial samples of sachets were successfully analyzed by the proposed HPLC method.

  4. Evidence for a requirement of agonist-induced diacylglycerol production during tonic contraction of rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    A possible role for protein kinase C during the tonic phase of arterial contraction was examined in rat aorta by observing the effects of the phorbol ester, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), on angiotensin II (AII)-induced responses. The ability of AII and phenylephrine (PE) to induce diacylglycerol (DAG) production was monitored as agonist-stimulated /sup 32/P-labelling of phosphatidic acid (PA). AII (5 x 10/sup -7/M) causes only a transient contractile response, while PE (10/sup -5/M) causes a sustained tonic contraction. /sup 32/P-labelling studies showed that AII caused an initial increase of PA synthesis equal to PE, however, AII failed to sustain this increase at 5 and 10 min while PE was able to do so, indicating the failure of AII to provide DAG to sustain protein kinase C activation. Activation of protein kinase C with TPA prior to and during AII exposure converted the normally transient contraction to a more sustained, tonic pattern. These results suggest that the inability of AII to maintain tension, unlike PE, is due to its inability to produce DAG continuously and activate protein kinase C.

  5. Lumacaftor–Ivacaftor in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Homozygous for Phe508del CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, C.E.; Elborn, J.S.; Ramsey, B.W.; Marigowda, G.; Huang, X.; Cipolli, M.; Colombo, C.; Davies, J.C.; De Boeck, K.; Flume, P.A.; Konstan, M.W.; McColley, S.A.; McCoy, K.; McKone, E.F.; Munck, A.; Ratjen, F.; Rowe, S.M.; Waltz, D.; Boyle, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting disease that is caused by defective or deficient cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity. Phe508del is the most common CFTR mutation. METHODS We conducted two phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies that were designed to assess the effects of lumacaftor (VX-809), a CFTR corrector, in combination with ivacaftor (VX-770), a CFTR potentiator, in patients 12 years of age or older who had cystic fibrosis and were homozygous for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. In both studies, patients were randomly assigned to receive either lumacaftor (600 mg once daily or 400 mg every 12 hours) in combination with ivacaftor (250 mg every 12 hours) or matched placebo for 24 weeks. The primary end point was the absolute change from baseline in the percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) at week 24. RESULTS A total of 1108 patients underwent randomization and received study drug. The mean baseline FEV1 was 61% of the predicted value. In both studies, there were significant improvements in the primary end point in both lumacaftor–ivacaftor dose groups; the difference between active treatment and placebo with respect to the mean absolute improvement in the percentage of predicted FEV1 ranged from 2.6 to 4.0 percentage points (P<0.001), which corresponded to a mean relative treatment difference of 4.3 to 6.7% (P<0.001). Pooled analyses showed that the rate of pulmonary exacerbations was 30 to 39% lower in the lumacaftor–ivacaftor groups than in the placebo group; the rate of events leading to hospitalization or the use of intravenous antibiotics was lower in the lumacaftor–ivacaftor groups as well. The incidence of adverse events was generally similar in the lumacaftor–ivacaftor and placebo groups. The rate of discontinuation due to an adverse event was 4.2% among patients who received lumacaftor–ivacaftor versus 1.6% among those who received placebo

  6. Study of factors which negatively affect expression of the phenol degradation operon pheBA in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Putrins, Marta; Tover, Andres; Tegova, Radi; Saks, Ulle; Kivisaar, Maia

    2007-06-01

    Transcription of the plasmid-borne phenol catabolic operon pheBA in Pseudomonas putida is activated by the LysR-family regulator CatR in the presence of the effector molecule cis,cis-muconate (CCM), which is an intermediate of the phenol degradation pathway. In addition to the positive control of the operon, several factors negatively affect transcription initiation from the pheBA promoter. First, the activation of the pheBA operon depends on the extracellular concentration of phenol. The pheBA promoter is rapidly activated in the presence of micromolar concentrations of phenol in minimal growth medium, but the initiation of transcription from this promoter is severely delayed after sudden exposure of bacteria to 2.5 mM phenol. Second, the transcriptional activation from this promoter is impeded when the growth medium of bacteria contains amino acids. The negative effects of amino acids can be suppressed either by overproducing CatR or by increasing, the intracellular amount of CCM. However, the intracellular amount of CCM is a major limiting factor for the transcriptional activation of the pheBA operon, as accumulation of CCM in a P. putida catB-defective strain, unable to metabolize CCM (but expressing CatR at a natural level), almost completely relieves the negative effects of amino acids. The intracellular amount of CCM is negatively affected by the catabolite repression control protein via downregulating at the post-transcriptional level the expression of the pheBA-encoded catechol 1,2-dioxygenase and the phenol monooxygenase, the enzymes needed for CCM production. PMID:17526843

  7. cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant-associated proteolipid SPL(Phe)

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Fox, J.L.; Whitsett, J.A.

    1987-06-01

    Hydrophobic surfactant-associated protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 was isolated from either/ethanol or chloroform/methanol extracts of mammalian pulmonary surfactant. Automated Edman degradation in a gas-phase sequencer showed the major N-terminus of the human low molecular weight protein to be Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-Try-Cys-Trp-Leu-Cys-Arg-Ala-Leu-. Because of the N-terminal phenylalanine, the surfactant protein was designated SPL(Phe). Antiserum generated against hydrophobic surfactant protein(s) from bovine pulmonary surfactant recognized protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 in immunoblot analysis and was used to screen a lambdagt11 expression library constructed from adult human lung poly(A)/sup +/ RNA. This resulted in identification of a 1.4-kilobase cDNA clone that was shown to encode the N-terminus of the surfactant polypeptide SPL(Phe) (Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-) within an open reading frame for a larger protein. Expression of a fused ..beta..-galactosidase-SPL (Phe) gene in Escherichia coli yielded an immunoreactive M/sub r/ 34,000 fusion peptide. Hybrid-arrested translation with the cDNA and immunoprecipitation of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled in vitro translation products of human poly(A)/sup +/ RNA with a surfactant polyclonal antibody resulted in identification of a M/sub r/ 40,000 precursor protein. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated RNA from human lung detected a 2.0-kilobase RNA that was more abundant in adult lung than in fetal lung. These proteins, and specifically SPL(Phe), may therefore be useful for synthesis of replacement surfactants for treatment of hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants or of other surfactant-deficient states.

  8. Hydrolysis of tRNA(sup Phe) on Suspensions of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Kui; Orgel, Leslie E.

    2001-01-01

    RNA is adsorbed strongly on suspensions of many moderately soluble organic solids. In some cases, the hydrolysis of tRNA(sup Phe) is greatly accelerated by adsorption, and the major sites of hydrolysis are changed from those that are important in homogeneous solution. Here we show that the hydrolysis is greatly accelerated by suspensions of aspartic acid and beta-glutamic acid but not by suspensions of alpha-glutamic acid, asparagine, or glutamine. The non-enzymatic hydrolysis of RNA has been studied extensively, especially because of its relevance to the mechanisms of action of ribozymes and to biotechnology and therapy. Many ribonucleases, ribozymes, and non-biological catalysts function via acid-base catalysis of an intramolecular transesterification mechanism in which the 2'-OH group attacks the adjacent phosphate group. The pentacoordinated phosphorane intermediate may collapse back to starting material, or yield isomerized or cleaved products.

  9. Molecular cloning and sequencing of pheU, a gene for Escherichia coli tRNAPhe.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, I; Klotsky, R A; Elseviers, D; Gallagher, P J; Krauskopf, M; Siddiqui, M A; Wong, J F; Roe, B A

    1983-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid (designated pID2) carrying the E. coli gene for tRNAPhe has been isolated from a plasmid bank constructed by the ligation of a total EcoRI digest of E. coli K12 DNA into the EcoRI site of pACYC184 DNA. The plasmid was selected by virtue of its ability to complement a temperature-sensitive lesion in the gene (PheS) for the alpha-subunit of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase. Crude tRNA isolated from such transformants exhibited elevated levels of phenylalanine acceptor activity. The tRNAPhe gene has been localized within the first 300 base pairs of a 3.6 kb SalI fragment of pID2. The sequence of the gene and its flanking regions is presented. Images PMID:6306588

  10. Beta-agonists and animal welfare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of beta-agonists in animal feed is a high profile topic within the U.S. as consumers and activist groups continue to question its safety. The only beta-agonist currently available for use in swine is ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC). This is available as Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health – FDA a...

  11. Crosslinking of elongation factor Tu to tRNA(Phe) by trans-diamminedichloroplatinum (II). Characterization of two crosslinking sites in the tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wikman, F P; Romby, P; Metz, M H; Reinbolt, J; Clark, B F; Ebel, J P; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B

    1987-01-01

    Trans-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) was used to induce reversible crosslinks between EF-Tu and Phe-tRNA(Phe) within the ternary EF-Tu/GTP/Phe-tRNA(Phe) complex. Up to 40% of the complex was specifically converted into crosslinked species. Two crosslinking sites have been unambiguously identified. The major one encompassing nucleotides 58 to 65 is located in the 3'-part of the T-stem, and the minor one encompassing nucleotides 31 to 42 includes the anticodon loop and part of the 3'-strand of the anticodon stem. Images PMID:3302946

  12. [Adrenergic beta-agonist intoxication].

    PubMed

    Carrola, Paulo; Devesa, Nuno; Silva, José Manuel; Ramos, Fernando; Alexandrino, Mário B; Moura, José J

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe two clinical cases (father and daughter), observed in the Hospital Urgency with distal tremors, anxiety, palpitations, nausea, headaches and dizziness, two hours after ingestión of cow liver. They also had leucocytosis (with neutrophylia), hypokalemia and hyperglycaemia. After treatment with potassium i.v. and propranolol, the symptoms disappeared. The symptoms recurred at home because the patients didn't take the prescribed medication and persisted for five days, with spontaneous disappearance. The serum of both patients revealed the presence of clenbuterol (65 hg/ml - father and 58 hg/ml - daughter). The animal's liver had a concentration of 1,42 mg/kg. Clenbuterol is a ß-adrenergic agonist with low specificity, with some veterinary indications. However, this substance has been illegally used as a growth's promotor. We intend to alert doctors for this problem, particularly those that work in the Urgency.

  13. Accurate long-range coefficients for two excited like isotope He atoms: He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 1}P), He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P), and He(2 {sup 3}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Yan, Z.-C.; Vrinceanu, D.; Babb, J. F.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2007-07-15

    A general formalism is used to express the long-range potential energies in inverse powers of the separation distance between two like atomic or molecular systems with P symmetries. The long-range molecular interaction coefficients are calculated for the molecular symmetries {delta}, {pi}, and {sigma}, arising from the following interactions: He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 1}P), He(2 {sup 1}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P), and He(2 {sup 3}P)-He(2 {sup 3}P). The electric quadrupole-quadrupole term C{sub 5}, the van der Waals (dispersion) term C{sub 6}, and higher-order terms C{sub 8} and C{sub 10} are calculated ab initio using accurate variational wave functions in Hylleraas coordinates with finite nuclear mass effects. A comparison is made with previously published results where available.

  14. β2-agonist therapy in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Page, Clive P; Rogliani, Paola; Matera, M Gabriella

    2013-04-01

    β2-Agonists are effective bronchodilators due primarily to their ability to relax airway smooth muscle (ASM). They exert their effects via their binding to the active site of β2-adrenoceptors on ASM, which triggers a signaling cascade that results in a number of events, all of which contribute to relaxation of ASM. There are some differences between β2-agonists. Traditional inhaled short-acting β2-agonists albuterol, fenoterol, and terbutaline provide rapid as-needed symptom relief and short-term prophylactic protection against bronchoconstriction induced by exercise or other stimuli. The twice-daily β2-agonists formoterol and salmeterol represent important advances. Their effective bronchodilating properties and long-term improvement in lung function offer considerable clinical benefits to patients. More recently, a newer β2-agonist (indacaterol) with a longer pharmacodynamic half-life has been discovered, with the hopes of achieving once-daily dosing. In general, β2-agonists have an acceptable safety profile, although there is still controversy as to whether long-acting β2-agonists may increase the risk of asthma mortality. In any case, they can induce adverse effects, such as increased heart rate, palpitations, transient decrease in PaO2, and tremor. Desensitization of β2-adrenoceptors that occurs during the first few days of regular use of β2-agonist treatment may account for the commonly observed resolution of the majority of these adverse events after the first few doses. Nevertheless, it can also induce tolerance to bronchoprotective effects of β2-agonists and has the potential to reduce bronchodilator sensitivity to them. Some novel once-daily β2-agonists (olodaterol, vilanterol, abediterol) are under development, mainly in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid or a long-acting antimuscarinic agent. PMID:23348973

  15. Middle cerebral O₂ delivery during the modified Oxford maneuver increases with sodium nitroprusside and decreases during phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julian M; Medow, Marvin S; DelPozzi, Andrew; Messer, Zachary R; Terilli, Courtney; Schwartz, Christopher E

    2013-06-01

    The modified Oxford maneuver is the reference standard for assessing arterial baroreflex function. The maneuver comprises a systemic bolus injection of 100 μg sodium nitroprusside (SNP) followed by 150 μg phenylephrine (PE). On the one hand, this results in an increase in oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin followed by a decrease within the cerebral sample volume illuminated by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). On the other hand, it produces a decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) within the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during SNP and an increase in CBFv during PE as measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound. To resolve this apparent discrepancy, we hypothesized that SNP dilates, whereas PE constricts, the MCA. We combined transcranial Doppler ultrasound of the right MCA with NIRS illuminating the right frontal cortex in 12 supine healthy subjects 18-24 yr old. Assuming constant O₂ consumption and venous saturation, as estimated by partial venous occlusion plethysmography, we used conservation of mass (continuity) equations to estimate the changes in arterial inflow (ΔQa) and venous outflow (ΔQv) of the NIRS-illuminated area. Oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin, respectively, increased by 13.6 ± 1.6 and 15.2 ± 1.4 μmol/kg brain tissue with SNP despite hypotension and decreased by 6 ± 1 and 7 ± 1 μmol/kg with PE despite hypertension. SNP increased ΔQa by 0.36 ± .03 μmol·kg(-1)·s(-1) (21.6 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)), whereas CBFv decreased from 71 ± 2 to 62 ± 2 cm/s. PE decreased ΔQa by 0.27 ± .2 μmol·kg(-1)·s(-1) (16.2 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)), whereas CBFv increased to 75 ± 3 cm/s. These results are consistent with dilation of the MCA by SNP and constriction by PE. PMID:23564308

  16. Differing effects when using phenylephrine and norepinephrine to augment cerebral blood flow after traumatic brain injury in the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Friess, Stuart H; Bruins, Benjamin; Kilbaugh, Todd J; Smith, Colin; Margulies, Susan S

    2015-02-15

    Low cerebral blood flow (CBF) states have been demonstrated in children early after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and have been correlated with poorer outcomes. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) support following severe TBI is commonly implemented to correct cerebral hypoperfusion, but the efficacy of various vasopressors has not been determined. Sixteen 4-week-old female swine underwent nonimpact inertial brain injury in the sagittal plane. Intraparenchymal monitors were placed to measure intracranial pressure (ICP), CBF, brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2), and cerebral microdialysis 30 min to 6 h post-injury. One hour after injury, animals were randomized to receive either phenylephrine (PE) or norepinephrine (NE) infusions titrated to a CPP>70 mm Hg for 5 h. Animals were euthanized 6 h post-TBI, and brains were fixed and stained to assess regions of cell and axonal injury. After initiation of CPP augmentation with NE or PE infusions, there were no differences in ICP between the groups or over time. Animals receiving NE had higher PbtO2 than those receiving PE (29.6±10.2 vs. 19.6±6.4 torr at 6 h post-injury, p<0.05). CBF increased similarly in both the NE and PE groups. CPP support with PE resulted in a greater reduction in metabolic crisis than with NE (lactate/pyruvate ratio 16.7±2.4 vs. 42.7±10.2 at 6 h post-injury, p<0.05). Augmentation of CPP to 70 mm Hg with PE resulted in significantly smaller cell injury volumes at 6 h post-injury than CPP support with NE (0.4% vs. 1.4%, p<0.05). Despite similar increases in CBF, CPP support with NE resulted in greater brain tissue oxygenation and hypoxic-ischemic injury than CPP support with PE. Future clinical studies comparing the effectiveness of various vasopressors for CPP support are warranted.

  17. Middle cerebral O2 delivery during the modified Oxford maneuver increases with sodium nitroprusside and decreases during phenylephrine

    PubMed Central

    Medow, Marvin S.; DelPozzi, Andrew; Messer, Zachary R.; Terilli, Courtney; Schwartz, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    The modified Oxford maneuver is the reference standard for assessing arterial baroreflex function. The maneuver comprises a systemic bolus injection of 100 μg sodium nitroprusside (SNP) followed by 150 μg phenylephrine (PE). On the one hand, this results in an increase in oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin followed by a decrease within the cerebral sample volume illuminated by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). On the other hand, it produces a decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) within the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during SNP and an increase in CBFv during PE as measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound. To resolve this apparent discrepancy, we hypothesized that SNP dilates, whereas PE constricts, the MCA. We combined transcranial Doppler ultrasound of the right MCA with NIRS illuminating the right frontal cortex in 12 supine healthy subjects 18–24 yr old. Assuming constant O2 consumption and venous saturation, as estimated by partial venous occlusion plethysmography, we used conservation of mass (continuity) equations to estimate the changes in arterial inflow (ΔQa) and venous outflow (ΔQv) of the NIRS-illuminated area. Oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin, respectively, increased by 13.6 ± 1.6 and 15.2 ± 1.4 μmol/kg brain tissue with SNP despite hypotension and decreased by 6 ± 1 and 7 ± 1 μmol/kg with PE despite hypertension. SNP increased ΔQa by 0.36 ± .03 μmol·kg−1·s−1 (21.6 μmol·kg−1·min−1), whereas CBFv decreased from 71 ± 2 to 62 ± 2 cm/s. PE decreased ΔQa by 0.27 ± .2 μmol·kg−1·s−1 (16.2 μmol·kg−1·min−1), whereas CBFv increased to 75 ± 3 cm/s. These results are consistent with dilation of the MCA by SNP and constriction by PE. PMID:23564308

  18. Identification of potent 11mer glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist peptides with novel C-terminal amino acids: Homohomophenylalanine analogs.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tasir S; Lee, Ving G; Riexinger, Douglas; Lei, Ming; Malmstrom, Sarah; Xin, Li; Han, Songping; Mapelli, Claudio; Cooper, Christopher B; Zhang, Ge; Ewing, William R; Krupinski, John

    2010-05-01

    We report the identification of potent agonists of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R). These compounds are short, 11 amino acid peptides containing several unnatural amino acids, including (in particular) analogs of homohomophenylalanine (hhPhe) at the C-terminal position. Typically the functional activity of the more potent peptides in this class is in the low picomolar range in an in vitro cAMP assay, with one example demonstrating excellent in vivo activity in an ob/ob mouse model of diabetes.

  19. Potent μ-Opioid Receptor Agonists from Cyclic Peptides Tyr-c[D-Lys-Xxx-Tyr-Gly]: Synthesis, Biological, and Structural Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yangmei; Cazares, Margret; Wu, Jinhua; Houghten, Richard A; Toll, Laurence; Dooley, Colette

    2016-02-11

    To optimize the structure of a μ-opioid receptor ligand, analogs H-Tyr-c[D-Lys-Xxx-Tyr-Gly] were synthesized and their biological activity was tested. The analog containing a Phe(3) was identified as not only exhibiting binding affinity 14-fold higher than the original hit but also producing agonist activity 3-fold more potent than morphine. NMR study suggested that a trans conformation at D-Lys(2)-Xxx(3) is crucial for these cyclic peptides to maintain high affinity, selectivity, and functional activity toward the μ-opioid receptor. PMID:26789491

  20. Potent μ-Opioid Receptor Agonists from Cyclic Peptides Tyr-c[D-Lys-Xxx-Tyr-Gly]: Synthesis, Biological, and Structural Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yangmei; Cazares, Margret; Wu, Jinhua; Houghten, Richard A; Toll, Laurence; Dooley, Colette

    2016-02-11

    To optimize the structure of a μ-opioid receptor ligand, analogs H-Tyr-c[D-Lys-Xxx-Tyr-Gly] were synthesized and their biological activity was tested. The analog containing a Phe(3) was identified as not only exhibiting binding affinity 14-fold higher than the original hit but also producing agonist activity 3-fold more potent than morphine. NMR study suggested that a trans conformation at D-Lys(2)-Xxx(3) is crucial for these cyclic peptides to maintain high affinity, selectivity, and functional activity toward the μ-opioid receptor.

  1. Role of nociceptin/orphanin FQ and the pseudopeptide [Phe1Psi(CH2NH)Gly2]-nociceptin(1-13)-NH2 and their interaction with classic opioids in the modulation of thermonociception in the land snail Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    Miller-Pérez, Carolina; Sánchez-Islas, Eduardo; Pellicer, Francisco; Rodríguez-Manzo, Gabriela; Cruz, Silvia L; León-Olea, Martha

    2008-02-26

    The role in nociception of nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) and its receptor, the opioid receptor-like 1 (NOP), remains unclear because this peptide has been implicated in both suppression and enhancement of nociception. The present work characterises the effects of N/OFQ and the NOP receptor antagonist, the pseudopeptide [Phe(1)Psi(CH(2)NH)Gly(2)]-nociceptin(1-13)-NH(2) (Phe(1)Psi), on thermonociception in the snail Helix aspersa using the hot plate assay. Additionally, the possible interaction of each of these compounds with morphine or dynorphin A(1-17) and naloxone was studied. Compounds were administered into the hemocoel cavity of H. aspersa and the latency to the aversive withdrawal behaviour recorded. Dose-response and time course curves were done. N/OFQ and naloxone produced a similar dose-dependent pronociceptive effect; however, N/OFQ reached its peak effect earlier and was 30 times more potent than naloxone. [Phe(1)Psi(CH(2)NH)Gly(2)]-nociceptin(1-13)-NH(2) and the opioid agonists, morphine and dynorphin A(1-17) produced antinociception with a similar efficacy, but [Phe(1)Psi(CH(2)NH)Gly(2)]-nociceptin(1-13)-NH(2) reached its peak effect more rapidly and lasted longer than that of dynorphin A(1-17) and morphine. [Phe(1)Psi(CH(2)NH)Gly(2)]-nociceptin(1-13)-NH(2) was 50 times less potent than dynorphin A(1-17), but 30 times more potent than morphine. N/OFQ significantly reduced morphine and dynorphin A(1-17)-induced antinociception. Combined administration of low doses of [Phe(1)Psi(CH(2)NH)Gly(2)]-nociceptin(1-13)-NH(2) and morphine or dynorphin A(1-17) produced a potent antinociceptive effect. Sub-effective doses of naloxone and N/OFQ also synergised to produce pronociception. Data suggest that these two opioid classes regulate nociception through parallel systems. The H. aspersa model appears as a valuable experimental preparation to continue the study of these opioid receptor systems.

  2. Different affinity states of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors defined by agonists and antagonists in bovine aorta plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesh, G.; Deth, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    Evidence for a nonlinear relationship between alpha-1 adrenergic receptor occupancy and tissue responses, together with the finding of different affinity states for agonist binding, has raised the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. We have conducted studies to examine: 1) binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)prazosin, 2) competition of antagonists at these sites and 3) different affinity states of the receptor for agonists and modulation of these states by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p). A plasma membrane-enriched vesicular fraction (F2; 15%/33% sucrose interphase) was prepared from the muscular medial layer of bovine thoracic aorta. (/sup 3/H)Prazosin binding was characterized by a monophasic saturation isotherm (KD = 0.116 nM, Bmax = 112 fmol/mg of protein). Antagonist displacement studies yielded a relative potency order of prazosin greater than or equal to WB4104 much greater than phentolamine greater than corynanthine greater than yohimbine greater than or equal to idazoxan greater than rauwolscine. Competition curves for unlabeled prazosin, WB4101 (2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)-aminomethyl-1,4 benzodioxane) and phentolamine were shallow and were best modeled to two binding sites with picomolar and nanomolar KD values. Gpp(NH)p was without effect on antagonist affinity. Agonist (epinephrine, norepinephrine and phenylephrine) competition with (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding was biphasic with pseudo-Hill slopes less than 1.0. Binding was best described by a two-site model in which the average contribution of high affinity sites was 23% of total binding. KD values for the high affinity site ranged from 2.9 to 18 nM, and 3.9 to 5.0 microM for the low affinity site.

  3. The evolution of beta2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Sears, M R

    2001-08-01

    Beta-agonists have been widely used in the treatment of asthma for many years Although concerns have been expressed over their safety based largely upon epidemics of increased mortality in asthmatics associated with high doses of isoprenaline in the 1960s and fenoterol in the 1970s and 1980s, the specific beta2-agonists are vital drugs in asthma management. The short-acting beta2-agonists have an important prophylactic role in the prevention of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and are essential in the emergency treatment of severe asthma. However, little if any benefit seems to be derived from regular use of short-acting beta2-agonists and regular or frequent use can increase the severity of the condition. The development of beta2-agonists with long-acting properties, such as salmeterol and formoterol, has provided advantages over short-acting beta-agonists, such as prolonged bronchodilation, reduced day- and night-time symptoms and improved quality of sleep, and has reduced the requirement for short-acting beta2-agonists as relief medication. Both drugs are well tolerated and, when added to inhaled corticosteroids, produce greater mprovement in lung function than increased steroid dose alone. Because of its rapid onset of action, formoterol also has the potential to be used for as-needed bronchodilator therapy in asthma.

  4. Phe362Tyr in AChE: A Major Factor Responsible for Azamethiphos Resistance in Lepeophtheirus salmonis in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Jansen, Peder Andreas; Aspehaug, Vidar Teis; Horsberg, Tor Einar

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates (OP) are one of the major treatments used against the salmon louse (Lepeophtherius salmonis) in Norwegian salmonid aquaculture. The use of OP since the late 1970s has resulted in widespread resistant parasites. Recently, we reported a single mutation (Phe362Tyr) in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as the major mechanism behind resistance in salmon louse towards OP. The present study was carried out to validate this mechanism at the field level. A total of 6658 salmon louse samples were enrolled from 56 different fish farms across the Norwegian coast, from Vest Agder in the south to Finnmark in the north. All the samples were genotyped using a TaqMan probe assay for the Phe362Tyr mutation. A strong association was observed between areas with frequent use of the OP (azamethiphos) and the Phe362Tyr mutation. This was confirmed at 15 sites where results from independently conducted bioassays and genotyping of parasites correlated well. Furthermore, genotyping of surviving and moribund parasites from six bioassay experiments demonstrated a highly significant negative correlation between the frequency of resistance alleles and the probability of dying when exposed to azamethiphos in a bioassay. Based on these observations, we could strongly conclude that the Phe362Tyr mutation is a major factor responsible for OP resistance in salmon louse on Norwegian fish farms. PMID:26882536

  5. Description of two new alpha variants: Hb Canuts [alpha85(F6)Asp-->His (alpha1)] and Hb Ambroise Pare [alpha117(GH5)Phe-->Ile (alpha2)]; two new beta variants: Hb Beaujolais [beta84(EF8)Thr-->Asn] and Hb Monplaisir [beta147 (Tyr-Lys-Leu-Ala-Phe-Phe-Leu-Leu-Ser-Asn-Phe-Tyr-158-COOH)] and one new delta variant: Hb (A2)North Africa [delta59(E3)Lys-->Met].

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Bererd, Martine; Garcia, Caroline; Zanella-Cleon, Isabelle; Becchi, Michel; Aubry, Martine; Couprie, Nicole; Francina, Alain

    2009-01-01

    We present here five new hemoglobin (Hb) variants which have been identified during routine Hb analysis before their genotypic characterization. Four of these result from a classical missense mutation: Hb Canuts [alpha85(F6)Asp-->His (alpha1)], Hb Ambroise Pare [alpha117(GH5)Phe-->Ile (alpha2)], Hb Beaujolais [beta84(EF8)Thr-->Asn] and HbA(2)-North Africa [delta59(E3)Lys-->Met]. The last one, Hb Monplaisir [beta147 (Tyr-Lys-Leu-Ala-Phe-Phe-Leu-Leu-Ser-Asn-Phe-Tyr-158-COOH)], results from a frameshift mutation at the stop codon of the beta-globin gene which leads to a modified C-terminal sequence in the beta-globin chain. None of these variants seem to have a particular clinical expression in the heterozygous state. The circumstances of the discovery of these five new Hb variants emphasize the fact that an association of techniques is necessary for a complete screening of Hb variants during routine Hb analysis. Globin chain separation by reversed phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) appears to be the most relevant method.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Comamonas thiooxydans Strain PHE2-6 (NBRC 110656), a Chlorinated-Ethene-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Shimodaira, Jun; Yonezuka, Kenta; Tabata, Michiro; Nagase, Shun; Kasai, Daisuke; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Fujita, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Comamonas thiooxydans strain PHE2-6 (NBRC 110656), which was isolated from a trichloroethene-contaminated site in Japan, utilizes phenol as a sole source of carbon and cometabolizes cis- and trans-dichloroethenes. We report here the draft genome sequence of this strain, containing 5,309,680 bp, with 60.6% G+C content. PMID:27340052

  7. Phe362Tyr in AChE: A Major Factor Responsible for Azamethiphos Resistance in Lepeophtheirus salmonis in Norway.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Jansen, Peder Andreas; Aspehaug, Vidar Teis; Horsberg, Tor Einar

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates (OP) are one of the major treatments used against the salmon louse (Lepeophtherius salmonis) in Norwegian salmonid aquaculture. The use of OP since the late 1970s has resulted in widespread resistant parasites. Recently, we reported a single mutation (Phe362Tyr) in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as the major mechanism behind resistance in salmon louse towards OP. The present study was carried out to validate this mechanism at the field level. A total of 6658 salmon louse samples were enrolled from 56 different fish farms across the Norwegian coast, from Vest Agder in the south to Finnmark in the north. All the samples were genotyped using a TaqMan probe assay for the Phe362Tyr mutation. A strong association was observed between areas with frequent use of the OP (azamethiphos) and the Phe362Tyr mutation. This was confirmed at 15 sites where results from independently conducted bioassays and genotyping of parasites correlated well. Furthermore, genotyping of surviving and moribund parasites from six bioassay experiments demonstrated a highly significant negative correlation between the frequency of resistance alleles and the probability of dying when exposed to azamethiphos in a bioassay. Based on these observations, we could strongly conclude that the Phe362Tyr mutation is a major factor responsible for OP resistance in salmon louse on Norwegian fish farms. PMID:26882536

  8. Serum stability of selected decapeptide agonists of KISS1R using pseudopeptides.

    PubMed

    Asami, Taiji; Nishizawa, Naoki; Ishibashi, Yoshihiro; Nishibori, Kimiko; Nakayama, Masaharu; Horikoshi, Yasuko; Matsumoto, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Tarui, Naoki; Ohtaki, Tetsuya; Kitada, Chieko

    2012-10-15

    Metastin/kisspeptin, a 54-amino acid peptide, is the ligand of the G-protein-coupled receptor KISS1R which plays a key role in pathways that regulate reproduction and cell migration in many endocrine and gonadal tissues. The N-terminally truncated decapeptide, metastin(45-54), has 3-10 times higher receptor affinity and intracellular calcium ion-mobilizing activity but is rapidly inactivated in serum. In this study we designed and synthesized stable KISS1R agonistic decapeptide analogs with selected substitutions at positions 47, 50, and 51. Replacement of glycine with azaglycine (azaGly) in which the α-carbon is replaced with a nitrogen atom at position 51 improved the stability of amide bonds between Phe(50)-Gly(51) and Gly(51)-Leu(52) as determined by in vitro mouse serum stability studies. Substitution for tryptophan at position 47 with other amino acids such as serine, threonine, β-(3-pyridyl)alanine, and D-tryptophan (D-Trp), produced analogs that were highly stable in mouse serum. D-Trp(47) analog 13 showed not only high metabolic stability but also excellent KISS1R agonistic activity. Other labile peptides may have increased serum stability using amino acid substitution. PMID:22975302

  9. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  10. Australian lungfish neurohypophysial hormone genes encode vasotocin and [Phe2]mesotocin precursors homologous to tetrapod-type precursors.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, S; Ishii, S; Joss, J M

    1997-11-25

    In view of the well-established role of neurohypophysial hormones in osmoregulation of terrestrial vertebrates, lungfishes are a key group for study of the molecular and functional evolution of the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system. Here we report on the primary structure of the precursors encoding vasotocin (VT) and [Phe2]mesotocin ([Phe2]MT) of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri. Genomic sequence analysis and Northern blot analysis confirmed that [Phe2]MT is a native oxytocin family peptide in the Australian lungfish, although it has been reported that the lungfish neurohypophysis contains MT. The VT precursor consists of a signal peptide, VT, that is connected to a neurophysin by a Gly-Lys-Arg sequence, and a copeptin moiety that includes a Leu-rich core segment and a glycosylation site. In contrast, the [Phe2]MT precursor does not contain a copeptin moiety. These structural features of the lungfish precursors are consistent with those in tetrapods, but different from those in teleosts where both VT and isotocin precursors contain a copeptin-like moiety without a glycosylation site at the carboxyl terminals of their neurophysins. Comparison of the exon/intron organization also supports homology of the lungfish [Phe2]MT gene with tetrapod oxytocin/MT genes, rather than with teleost isotocin genes. Moreover, molecular phylogenetic analysis shows that neurohypophysial hormone genes of the lungfish are closely related to those of the toad. The present results along with previous morphological findings indicate that the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system of the lungfish has evolved along the tetrapod lineage, whereas the teleosts form a separate lineage, both within the class Osteichthyes.

  11. Efficient Activation of Pathogenic ΔPhe501 Mutation in Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 by Chemical and Pharmacological Chaperones.

    PubMed

    Braun, Doreen; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a thyroid hormone transmembrane transporter expressed in many cell types, including neurons. Mutations that inactivate transport activity of MCT8 cause severe X-linked psychomotor retardation in male patients, a syndrome originally described as the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. Treatment options currently explored the focus on finding thyroid hormone-like compounds that bypass MCT8 and enter cells through different transporters. Because MCT8 is a multipass transmembrane protein, some pathogenic mutations affect membrane trafficking while potentially retaining some transporter activity. We explore here the effects of chemical and pharmacological chaperones on the expression and transport activity of the MCT8 mutant ΔPhe501. Dimethylsulfoxide, 4-phenylbutyric acid as well as its sodium salt, and the isoflavone genistein increase T3 uptake into MDCK1 cells stably transfected with mutant MCT8-ΔPhe501. We show that ΔPhe501 represents a temperature-sensitive mutant protein that is stabilized by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. 4-Phenylbutyrate has been used to stabilize ΔPhe508 mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein and is in clinical use in patients with urea cycle defects. Genistein is enriched in soy and available as a nutritional supplement. It is effective in stabilizing MCT8-ΔPhe501 at 100 nM concentration. Expression of the L471P mutant is increased in response to phenylbutyrate, but T3 uptake activity is not induced, supporting the notion that the chaperone specifically increases membrane expression. Our findings suggest that certain pathogenic MCT8 mutants may be responsive to (co-)treatment with readily available compounds, which increase endogenous protein function. PMID:26368820

  12. Rational design and characterization of D-Phe-Pro-D-Arg-derived direct thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Ana C; Clement, Cristina C; Zakia, Sheuli; Gingold, Julian; Philipp, Manfred; Pereira, Pedro J B

    2012-01-01

    The tremendous social and economic impact of thrombotic disorders, together with the considerable risks associated to the currently available therapies, prompt for the development of more efficient and safer anticoagulants. Novel peptide-based thrombin inhibitors were identified using in silico structure-based design and further validated in vitro. The best candidate compounds contained both L- and D-amino acids, with the general sequence D-Phe(P3)-Pro(P2)-D-Arg(P1)-P1'-CONH₂. The P1' position was scanned with L- and D-isomers of natural or unnatural amino acids, covering the major chemical classes. The most potent non-covalent and proteolysis-resistant inhibitors contain small hydrophobic or polar amino acids (Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr) at the P1' position. The lead tetrapeptide, D-Phe-Pro-D-Arg-D-Thr-CONH₂, competitively inhibits α-thrombin's cleavage of the S2238 chromogenic substrate with a K(i) of 0.92 µM. In order to understand the molecular details of their inhibitory action, the three-dimensional structure of three peptides (with P1' L-isoleucine (fPrI), L-cysteine (fPrC) or D-threonine (fPrt)) in complex with human α-thrombin were determined by X-ray crystallography. All the inhibitors bind in a substrate-like orientation to the active site of the enzyme. The contacts established between the D-Arg residue in position P1 and thrombin are similar to those observed for the L-isomer in other substrates and inhibitors. However, fPrC and fPrt disrupt the active site His57-Ser195 hydrogen bond, while the combination of a P1 D-Arg and a bulkier P1' residue in fPrI induce an unfavorable geometry for the nucleophilic attack of the scissile bond by the catalytic serine. The experimental models explain the observed relative potency of the inhibitors, as well as their stability to proteolysis. Moreover, the newly identified direct thrombin inhibitors provide a novel pharmacophore platform for developing antithrombotic agents by exploring the conformational

  13. Potential of Endophytic Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 Isolated from Plantago asiatica L. for Reduction of PAH Contamination in Plant Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuezhu; Jin, Li; Sun, Kai; Li, Shuang; Ling, Wanting; Li, Xuelin

    2016-01-01

    Endophytes are ubiquitous in plants, and they may have a natural capacity to biodegrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In our study, a phenanthrene-degrading endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 was isolated from P. asiatica L. grown in a PAH-contaminated site. The effects of environmental variables on phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 were studied, and the ability of strain PHE-3 to use high molecular weight PAH (HMW-PAH) as a sole carbon source was also evaluated. Our results indicated that pH value of 4.0-8.0, temperature of 30 °C-42 °C, initial phenanthrene concentration less than 100 mg·L(-1), and some additional nutrients are favorable for the biodegradation of phenanthrene by strain PHE-3. The maximum biodegradation efficiency of phenanthrene was achieved at 99.9% after 84 h cultivation with additional glutamate. Moreover, the phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 was positively correlated with the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity (ρ = 0.981, p < 0.05), suggesting that strain PHE-3 had the capability of degrading HMW-PAHs. In the presence of other 2-, 3-ringed PAHs, strain PHE-3 effectively degraded HMW-PAHs through co-metabolism. The results of this study are beneficial in that the re-colonization potential and PAH degradation performance of endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 may be applied towards reducing PAH contamination in plants. PMID:27347988

  14. Potential of Endophytic Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 Isolated from Plantago asiatica L. for Reduction of PAH Contamination in Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuezhu; Jin, Li; Sun, Kai; Li, Shuang; Ling, Wanting; Li, Xuelin

    2016-01-01

    Endophytes are ubiquitous in plants, and they may have a natural capacity to biodegrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In our study, a phenanthrene-degrading endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 was isolated from P. asiatica L. grown in a PAH-contaminated site. The effects of environmental variables on phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 were studied, and the ability of strain PHE-3 to use high molecular weight PAH (HMW-PAH) as a sole carbon source was also evaluated. Our results indicated that pH value of 4.0–8.0, temperature of 30 °C–42 °C, initial phenanthrene concentration less than 100 mg·L−1, and some additional nutrients are favorable for the biodegradation of phenanthrene by strain PHE-3. The maximum biodegradation efficiency of phenanthrene was achieved at 99.9% after 84 h cultivation with additional glutamate. Moreover, the phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 was positively correlated with the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity (ρ = 0.981, p < 0.05), suggesting that strain PHE-3 had the capability of degrading HMW-PAHs. In the presence of other 2-, 3-ringed PAHs, strain PHE-3 effectively degraded HMW-PAHs through co-metabolism. The results of this study are beneficial in that the re-colonization potential and PAH degradation performance of endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 may be applied towards reducing PAH contamination in plants. PMID:27347988

  15. Association of the N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe receptor in human neutrophils with a GTP-binding protein sensitive to pertussis toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Lad, P M; Olson, C V; Smiley, P A

    1985-01-01

    Pertussis toxin inhibits the N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMet-Leu-Phe) mediated human neutrophil functions of enzyme release, superoxide generation, aggregation, and chemotaxis. As pertussis toxin modifies the GTP binding receptor-regulatory protein "Ni," the association of the fMet-Leu-Phe receptor with such a protein was further examined in purified neutrophil plasma membranes. Both fMet-Leu-Phe-mediated guanine nucleotide exchange and nucleotide-mediated regulation of the fMet-Leu-Phe receptor are inhibited by pertussis toxin. In addition, membrane pretreatment with pertussis toxin abolishes the fMet-Leu-Phe-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase. Actions of pertussis toxin are due to the ADP-ribosylation of a single subunit at 41 kDa in the neutrophil plasma membrane, which comigrates on NaDodSO4 gels with the Ni GTP-binding protein in the platelet plasma membrane. Our results suggest that (i) the fMet-Leu-Phe receptor is associated with a Ni GTP regulatory protein, and (ii) a fMet-Leu-Phe-Ni complex is important in the control of several neutrophil functions, probably involving multiple transduction systems, including adenylate cyclase. Images PMID:2983319

  16. Monoterpenoid agonists of TRPV3

    PubMed Central

    Vogt-Eisele, A K; Weber, K; Sherkheli, M A; Vielhaber, G; Panten, J; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transient receptor potential (TRP) V3 is a thermosensitive ion channel expressed predominantly in the skin and neural tissues. It is activated by warmth and the monoterpene camphor and has been hypothesized to be involved in skin sensitization. A selection of monoterpenoid compounds was tested for TRPV3 activation to establish a structure-function relationship. The related channel TRPM8 is activated by cool temperatures and a number of chemicals, among them the monoterpene (-)-menthol. The overlap of the receptor pharmacology between the two channels was investigated. Experimental approach: Transfected HEK293 cells were superfused with the test substances. Evoked currents were measured in whole cell patch clamp measurements. Dose-response curves for the most potent agonists were obtained in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Key results: Six monoterpenes significantly more potent than camphor were identified: 6-tert-butyl-m-cresol, carvacrol, dihydrocarveol, thymol, carveol and (+)-borneol. Their EC50 is up to 16 times lower than that of camphor. All of these compounds carry a ring-located hydroxyl group and neither activates TRPM8 to a major extent. Conclusions and implications: Terpenoids have long been recognized as medically and pharmacologically active compounds, although their molecular targets have only partially been identified. TRPV3 activation may be responsible for several of the described effects of terpenoids. We show here that TRPV3 is activated by a number of monoterpenes and that a secondary hydroxyl-group is a structural requirement. PMID:17420775

  17. Effects of opioids in morphine-treated pigeons trained to discriminate among morphine, the low-efficacy agonist nalbuphine, and saline.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ellen A; Picker, Mitchell J; Granger, Arthur; Dykstra, Linda A

    2004-07-01

    In opioid-dependent subjects, the low-efficacy mu agonist nalbuphine generally precipitates withdrawal or withdrawal-like stimulus effects. To provide a more complete characterization of the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine in opioid-treated subjects, seven White Carneux pigeons were treated daily with 10 mg/kg morphine i.m. and trained 6 h later to discriminate among 10 mg/kg morphine, 1.0 mg/kg nalbuphine, and saline by responding on one of three different keys. When tested, morphine produced morphine-key responding and nalbuphine produced nalbuphine-key responding. Replacing the daily morphine injection with saline produced nalbuphine-key responding, and this effect was reversed by the administration of morphine. In substitution tests with other compounds, the antagonists naltrexone (i.m.) and CTAP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Tryp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2) (i.c.v.) produced nalbuphine-key responding. High-efficacy agonists fentanyl and etorphine produced morphine-key responding. The intermediate-efficacy agonists buprenorphine, dezocine, and butorphanol produced a pattern of morphine-, saline-, and/or nalbuphine-key responding that differed across individual pigeons. The lower efficacy agonists nalorphine and levallorphan produced predominantly nalbuphine-key responding. The kappa agonists spiradoline and U50,488 [trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-[1-pyrrolidinyl]cyclohexyl)benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate], the nonopioid d-amphetamine, and saline produced predominantly saline-key responding. Naltrexone and nalbuphine dose dependently reversed the morphine-key responding produced by the training dose of morphine. Together, these data suggest that the discriminative-stimulus effects of the low-efficacy micro agonist nalbuphine in morphine-treated pigeons are similar to those of other low-efficacy agonists, naltrexone, and the termination of daily morphine treatment.

  18. The bifunctional μ opioid agonist/antioxidant [Dmt(1)]DALDA is a superior analgesic in an animal model of complex regional pain syndrome-type i.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Peter W; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Saray, Amy; Poon, Annie Wing Hoi; Laferrière, André; Coderre, Terence J

    2015-11-18

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the development of complex regional pain syndrome-Type I (CRPS-I), as also demonstrated with the chronic post ischemia pain (CPIP) animal model of CRPS-I. We show that morphine and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) act synergistically to reduce mechanical allodynia in CPIP rats. The tetrapeptide amide [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2) is a potent and selective μ opioid receptor (MOR) agonist with favorable pharmacokinetic properties and with antioxidant activity due to its N-terminal Dmt (2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) residue. In the CPIP model, [Dmt(1)]DALDA was 15-fold more potent than morphine in reversing mechanical allodynia and 4.5-fold more potent as analgesic in the heat algesia test. The results indicate that bifunctional compounds with MOR agonist/antioxidant activity have therapeutic potential for the treatment of CRPS-I.

  19. The Bifunctional μ Opioid Agonist/Antioxidant [Dmt1]DALDA Is a Superior Analgesic in an Animal Model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome-Type I

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Peter W.; Nguyen, Thi M.-D.; Saray, Amy; Poon, Annie Wing Hoi; Laferrière, André; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the development of complex regional pain syndrome-Type I (CRPS-I), as also demonstrated with the chronic post ischemia pain (CPIP) animal model of CRPS-I. We show that morphine and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) act synergistically to reduce mechanical allodynia in CPIP rats. The tetrapeptide amide [Dmt1]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2) is a potent and selective μ opioid receptor (MOR) agonist with favorable pharmacokinetic properties and with antioxidant activity due to its N-terminal Dmt (2′,6′-dimethyltyrosine) residue. In the CPIP model, [Dmt1]DALDA was 15-fold more potent than morphine in reversing mechanical allodynia and 4.5-fold more potent as analgesic in the heat algesia test. The results indicate that bifunctional compounds with MOR agonist/antioxidant activity have therapeutic potential for the treatment of CRPS-I. PMID:26352668

  20. [Safety of beta-agonists in asthma].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa, Teodoro J

    2014-01-01

    Beta 2 agonist bronchodilators (β2A) are very important part in the pharmacotherapy of bronchial asthma, a disease that progresses in the world in an epidemic way. The β2A are prescribed to millions of people around the world, therefore the safety aspects is of public interest. Short-Acting β2 Agonists (SABAs), such as albuterol inhaler, according to current evidence, confirming its safety when used as a quick-relief or rescue medication. The long-acting β2 agonists (LABAs) The long-acting bronchodilators β2A (Long acting β2 Agonists or LABAs) are used associated with inhaled corticosteroids as controller drugs for asthma exacerbationsaccess, for safety reasons LABAs are not recommended for use as monotherapy.

  1. A neuropeptide FF agonist blocks the acquisition of conditioned place preference to morphine in C57Bl/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Stéphane; Betourne, Alexandre; Marty, Virginie; Daumas, Stéphanie; Halley, Hélène; Lassalle, Jean-Michel; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Frances, Bernard

    2006-05-01

    Neuropeptide FF behaves as an opioid-modulating peptide that seems to be involved in morphine tolerance and physical dependence. Nevertheless, the effects of neuropeptide FF agonists on the rewarding properties of morphine remain unknown. C57BL6 mice were conditioned in an unbiased balanced paradigm of conditioned place preference to study the effect of i.c.v. injections of 1DMe (D-Tyr1(NMe)Phe3]NPFF), a stable agonist of the neuropeptide FF system, on the acquisition of place conditioning by morphine or alcohol (ethanol). Morphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or ethanol (2 g/kg, i.p.) induced a significant place preference. Injection of 1DMe (1-20 nmol), given 10 min before the i.p. injection of the reinforcing drug during conditioning, inhibited the rewarding effect of morphine but had no effect on the rewarding effect of ethanol. However, a single injection of 1DMe given just before place preference testing was unable to inhibit the rewarding effects of morphine. By itself, 1DMe was inactive but an aversive effect of this agonist could be evidenced if the experimental procedure was biased. These results suggest that neuropeptide FF, injected during conditioning, should influence the development of rewarding effects of morphine and reinforce the hypothesis of strong inhibitory interactions between neuropeptide FF and opioids.

  2. Nonpeptidic Lysosomal Modulators Derived from Z-Phe-Ala-Diazomethylketone for Treating Protein Accumulation Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomes are involved in protein turnover and removing misfolded species, and their enzymes have the potential to offset the defect in proteolytic clearance that contributes to the age-related dementia Alzheimer's disease (AD). The weak cathepsin B and L inhibitor Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK) enhances lysosomal cathepsin levels at low concentrations, thereby eliciting protective clearance of PHF-τ and Aβ42 in the hippocampus and other brain regions. Here, a class of positive modulators is established with compounds decoupled from the cathepsin inhibitory properties. We utilized PADK as a departure point to develop nonpeptidic structures with the hydroxyethyl isostere. The first-in-class modulators SD1002 and SD1003 exhibit improved levels of cathepsin up-regulation but almost complete removal of cathepsin inhibitory properties as compared to PADK. Isomers of the lead compound SD1002 were synthesized, and the modulatory activity was determined to be stereoselective. In addition, the lead compound was tested in transgenic mice with results indicating protection against AD-type protein accumulation pathology. PMID:24900408

  3. Structural and thermodynamic analysis of the binding of tRNA(phe) by the putative anticancer alkaloid chelerythrine: Spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Basu, Pritha; Payghan, Pavan V; Ghoshal, Nanda; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of the putative anticancer alkaloid chelerythrine with tRNA(phe) was characterized by spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular docking studies. The charged iminium form of chelerythrine binds with tRNA(phe) in a cooperative mode with a binding affinity value of (4.06±0.01)×10(5)M(-1). The neutral alkanolamine form does not bind to tRNA(phe) but in the presence of high concentration of tRNA(phe) this form gets converted to the iminium form and then binds with tRNA(phe). The partial intercalative mode of binding of chelerythrine to the tRNA(phe) was characterized from the steady state anisotropy, iodide ion-induced fluorescence quenching and viscosity measurements. Chelerythrine binding induced conformational perturbations in tRNA(phe) as observed from the circular dichroism spectroscopy. The strong binding was also supported by the ethidium bromide displacement assay. The binding was favoured by both enthalpy and entropy contributions. Although the binding was dependent on the [Na(+)], non-electrostatic forces contributed predominantly to the Gibbs energy change. The negative value of the heat capacity change proposed the involvement of hydrophobic forces in the binding. Molecular docking study was carried out to decipher the details of the recognition of tRNA(phe) by chelerythrine. The study provided insights about the chelerythrine binding pockets on tRNA(phe) and marked the necessary interactions for binding of chelerythrine molecule. Partially intercalative mode of the alkaloid binding was supported by docking studies. In total, docking studies corroborated well with our experiential observations. The structural and thermodynamic results of chelerythrine binding to tRNA(phe) may be helpful to develop new RNA therapeutic agents.

  4. [Role of the activating mutation Val617Phe of Janus kinase 2 gene in myeloproliferative diseases and significance of its detection].

    PubMed

    Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Szilvási, Anikó; Meggyesi, Nóra; Király, Viktória; Halm, Gabriella; Lueff, Sándor; Nahajevszky, Sarolta; Mikala, Gábor; Sipos, Andrea; Lovas, Nóra; Csukly, Zoltán; Mátrai, Zoltán; Tamáska, Júlia; Tordai, Attila; Masszi, Tamás

    2007-02-01

    The Val617Phe point mutation of Janus kinase 2 gene is believed to participate in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative syndrome characterised by the clonal alteration of hematopoietic stem cells. According to current results, the frequency of Val617Phe activating mutation is around 80% in polycythaemia vera, 35% in essential thrombocythemia, and 50% in chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis. The diagnoses of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and idiopathic myelofibrosis were so far based on the exclusion of secondary factors as well as bone marrow biopsy histology. The goal of the present work was to establish simple molecular genetic techniques for the routine testing of Janus kinase 2 gene Val617Phe mutation, and to compare the clinical phenotypes of Val617Phe mutation positive and negative myeloproliferative syndromes. We employed the allele specific polymerase chain technique for detection of Val617Phe mutation in 252 patients with myeloproliferative syndrome. We measured Val617Phe frequency as 85,4% (117/137) in polycythemia vera, 56,6% (56/99) in essential thrombocythemia, and 87,5% (14/16) in idiopathic myelofibrosis. We found significantly elevated hemoglobin levels and white blood cell counts (measured at the time of diagnosis) in Val617Phe-positive polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia patient groups compared to Val617Phe-negative patients. However, the frequencies of splenomegaly and other complications (thrombosis, bleeding, transformation to acute leukemia) were not significantly different between the mutation-positive and negative groups. In conclusion, the non-invasive mutation analysis of the Janus kinase 2 Val617Phe is suitable for routine laboratory application and helps the differential diagnosis of myeloproliferative syndrome. Although the exact role of Val617Phe mutation testing has not yet been identified on the basis of a broad professional consensus, the testing is suggested in cases of erythrocytoses and thrombocytoses of

  5. Structural and thermodynamic analysis of the binding of tRNA(phe) by the putative anticancer alkaloid chelerythrine: Spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Basu, Pritha; Payghan, Pavan V; Ghoshal, Nanda; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of the putative anticancer alkaloid chelerythrine with tRNA(phe) was characterized by spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular docking studies. The charged iminium form of chelerythrine binds with tRNA(phe) in a cooperative mode with a binding affinity value of (4.06±0.01)×10(5)M(-1). The neutral alkanolamine form does not bind to tRNA(phe) but in the presence of high concentration of tRNA(phe) this form gets converted to the iminium form and then binds with tRNA(phe). The partial intercalative mode of binding of chelerythrine to the tRNA(phe) was characterized from the steady state anisotropy, iodide ion-induced fluorescence quenching and viscosity measurements. Chelerythrine binding induced conformational perturbations in tRNA(phe) as observed from the circular dichroism spectroscopy. The strong binding was also supported by the ethidium bromide displacement assay. The binding was favoured by both enthalpy and entropy contributions. Although the binding was dependent on the [Na(+)], non-electrostatic forces contributed predominantly to the Gibbs energy change. The negative value of the heat capacity change proposed the involvement of hydrophobic forces in the binding. Molecular docking study was carried out to decipher the details of the recognition of tRNA(phe) by chelerythrine. The study provided insights about the chelerythrine binding pockets on tRNA(phe) and marked the necessary interactions for binding of chelerythrine molecule. Partially intercalative mode of the alkaloid binding was supported by docking studies. In total, docking studies corroborated well with our experiential observations. The structural and thermodynamic results of chelerythrine binding to tRNA(phe) may be helpful to develop new RNA therapeutic agents. PMID:27289446

  6. Dopamine receptor partial agonists and addiction.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fabricio A; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2015-04-01

    Many drugs abused by humans acutely facilitate, either directly or indirectly, dopamine neurotransmission in the mesolimbic pathway. As a consequence dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists have been widely investigated as putative pharmacological therapies for addiction. This general strategy, however, has had only limited success due in part to poor treatment adherence and efficacy and the significant adverse effects of dopaminergic medications. In this perspective, we discuss the potential therapeutic use of dopamine receptor partial agonists in addiction, developed initially as antipsychotic agents. Recent research indicates that the dopamine D2 receptor partial agonists, such as aripiprazole, also shows useful ancillary efficacy in several animal models of psychostimulant and opioid addiction. Notably, these findings suggest that unlike full dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists these compounds have low abuse liability and are generally well tolerated. Indeed, partial dopamine agonists attenuate the rewarding properties of opioids without interfering with their analgesic effects. Herein we discuss the utility and potential of dopamine receptor partial agonists as treatments for both stimulant and non-stimulant drug addiction.

  7. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Thomas, Merlin C

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARalpha agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARgamma agonists, and more recently dual PPARalpha/gamma coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARgamma receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  8. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna C.; Thomas, Merlin C.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARα agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARγ agonists, and more recently dual PPARα/γ coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARγ receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:18288280

  9. Rational design and identification of a non-peptidic aggregation inhibitor of amyloid-β based on a pharmacophore motif obtained from cyclo[-Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe-].

    PubMed

    Arai, Tadamasa; Araya, Takushi; Sasaki, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Atsuhiko; Sato, Takeshi; Sohma, Youhei; Kanai, Motomu

    2014-07-28

    Inhibition of pathogenic protein aggregation may be an important and straightforward therapeutic strategy for curing amyloid diseases. Small-molecule aggregation inhibitors of Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ) are extremely scarce, however, and are mainly restricted to dye- and polyphenol-type compounds that lack drug-likeness. Based on the structure-activity relationship of cyclic Aβ16-20 (cyclo-[KLVFF]), we identified unique pharmacophore motifs comprising side-chains of Leu(2), Val(3), Phe(4), and Phe(5) residues without involvement of the backbone amide bonds to inhibit Aβ aggregation. This finding allowed us to design non-peptidic, small-molecule aggregation inhibitors that possess potent activity. These molecules are the first successful non-peptidic, small-molecule aggregation inhibitors of amyloids based on rational molecular design.

  10. Beta-agonist- and prostaglandin E1-induced translocation of the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase: evidence that the kinase may act on multiple adenylate cyclase-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, R H; Benovic, J L; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J

    1986-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic receptor kinase (beta-AR kinase) is a cytosolic enzyme that phosphorylates the beta-adrenergic receptor only when it is occupied by an agonist [Benovic, J. Strasser, R. H., Caron, M. G. & Lefkowitz, R. J. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 2797-2801.] It may be crucially involved in the processes that lead to homologous or agonist-specific desensitization of the receptor. Stimulation of DDT1MF-2 hamster smooth muscle cells or S49 mouse lymphoma cells with a beta-agonist leads to translocation of 80-90% of the beta-AR kinase activity from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. The translocation process is quite rapid, is concurrent with receptor phosphorylation, and precedes receptor desensitization and sequestration. It is also transient, since much of the activity returns to the cytosol as the receptors become sequestered. Stimulation of beta-AR kinase translocation is a receptor-mediated event, since the beta-antagonist propranolol blocks the effect of agonist. In the kin- mutant of the S49 cells (lacks cAMP-dependent protein kinase), prostaglandin E1, which provokes homologous desensitization of its own receptor, is at least as effective as isoproterenol in promoting beta-AR kinase translocation to the plasma membrane. However, in the DDT1MF-2 cells, which contain alpha 1-adrenergic receptors coupled to phosphatidylinositol turnover, the alpha 1-agonist phenylephrine is ineffective. These results suggest that the first step in homologous desensitization of the beta-adrenergic receptor may be an agonist-promoted translocation of beta-AR kinase from cytosol to plasma membrane and that beta-AR kinase may represent a more general adenylate cyclase-coupled receptor kinase that participates in regulating the function of many such receptors. Images PMID:3018728

  11. The effect of cold storage on the inhibitory action of isoprenaline, phenylephrine and nicotine on the mechanical and membranal activities of guinea-pig taenia caecum

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Shoji

    1972-01-01

    1. The effects of prolonged cold storage on the mechanical and membranal responses to stimulation of α- and β-adrenoceptors by phenylephrine and isoprenaline, respectively, were studied on the guinea-pig taenia caecum. 2. Cold storage invariably caused a decrease in the resting membrane potential, and this effect was enhanced as the duration of treatment was prolonged. 3. After cold storage (18 days) the tissue potassium ion content (89·7 ± 1·7 mmol/kg wet wt.) was decreased to 30·5 ± 1·9 mmol/kg wet wt. whereas that for sodium (69·2 ± 1·4 mmol/kg wet wt.) increased to 134·0 ± 2·3 mmol/kg wet wt. 4. In the fresh preparations, phenylephrine (1 and 2 μM) caused a cessation of spontaneous action potentials, accompanied by hyperpolarization of the membrane and relaxation of the muscle. These effects were markedly diminished after 18 days of cold storage. Isoprenaline (1 and 2 μM) also blocked the action potentials and caused a concomitant muscle relaxation, but in most cases the hyperpolarization was not observed. After 14 days of cold storage these mechanical and membranal changes associated with isoprenaline treatment were not demonstrable in most preparations. 5. Nicotine (5 μM and 50 μM) produced a biphasic effect, cessation of the action potential, hyperpolarization and subsequent relaxation followed by a long lasting depolarization, an accelerated discharge of action potentials and an increase in muscle tension. After a few days of cold storage the hyperpolarization effect disappeared but the intensity of the long-lasting depolarization as well as the contractile effects were increased. After cold storage for more than 7 days, nicotine did not affect mechanical or electrical activity. 6. Dibutyryl 3′5′ cyclic AMP (1 μM to 500 μM) failed to affect the mechanical and electrical activities of taenia caecum. 7. Phenylephrine and isoprenaline had no effect on the high potassiumdepolarized taenia. 8. These observations suggest that the electro

  12. Asn47 and Phe114 modulate the inner sphere reorganization energies of type zero copper proteins.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, Biswajit; Sundararajan, Mahesh

    2016-06-22

    The geometric structures and electron transfer properties of type 1 Cu proteins are reasonably understood at the molecular level (E. I. Solomon and R. G. Hadt, Coord. Chem. Rev., 2011, 255, 774-789, J. J. Warren, K. M. Lancaster, J. H. Richards and H. B. Gray, J. Inorg. Biochem., 2012, 115, 119-126). Much understanding of type 1 copper electron transfer reactivity has come from site directed mutagenesis studies. For example, artificial "type zero" Cu-centres constructed in cupredoxin-azurin have showcased the capacity of outer-sphere hydrogen bonding networks to enhance Cu II/I electron transfer reactivity. In this paper, we have elaborated on earlier kinetics and electronic structural studies of type zero Cu by calculating the inner sphere reorganization energies of type 1, type 2, and type zero Cu proteins using density functional theory (DFT). Although the choice of density functionals for copper systems is not straightforward, we have benchmarked the density functionals against the recently reported ESI-PES data for two synthetic copper models (S. Niu, D.-L. Huang, P. D. Dau, H.-T. Liu, L.-S. Wang and T. J. Ichiye, Chem. Theory Comput., 2014, 10, 1283). For the Cu proteins, our calculations predict that changes in the coordination number upon metal reduction lead to large inner sphere reorganization energies for type 2 Cu sites, whereas retention in the coordination number is observed for type zero Cu sites. These variations in the coordination number are modulated by the outer-sphere coordinating residues Asn47 and Phe114, which are involved in hydrogen bonding with the Asp112 side chain.

  13. Introduction of a Phe377del Mutation in ANK Creates a Mouse Model for Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Ping; Wang, Chiachien J.; Strecker, Sara; Koczon-Jaremko, Boguslawa; Boskey, Adele; Reichenberger, Ernst J.

    2009-01-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a monogenic human disorder characterized by thickening of craniofacial bones and flaring metaphyses of long bones. Mutations for autosomal dominant CMD have been identified in the progressive ankylosis gene ANKH. Previous studies of Ank loss-of-function models, Anknull/null and Ankank/ank mice, suggest that Ank plays a role in the regulation of bone mineralization. However, the mechanism for Ank mutations leading to CMD remains unknown. We generated the first knockin (KI) mouse model for CMD expressing a human mutation (Phe377 deletion) in ANK. Homozygous Ank knockin mice (AnkKI/KI) replicate many typical features of human CMD including hyperostosis of craniofacial bones, massive jawbones, decreased diameters of cranial foramina, obliteration of nasal sinuses, fusion of middle ear bones, and club-shaped femurs. In addition, AnkKI/KI mice have increased serum alkaline phosphatase and TRACP5b, as reported in CMD patients. Biochemical markers of bone formation and bone resorption, N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen and type I collagen cross-linked C-terminal telopeptide, are significantly increased in AnkKI/KI mice, suggesting increased bone turnover. Interestingly, AnkKI/KI bone marrow–derived macrophage cultures show decreased osteoclastogenesis. Despite the hyperostotic phenotype, bone matrix in AnkKI/KI mice is hypomineralized and less mature, indicating that biomechanical properties of bones may be compromised by the Ank mutation. We believe this new mouse model will facilitate studies of skeletal abnormalities in CMD at cellular and molecular levels. PMID:19257826

  14. ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide, a potential radiopharmaceutical for imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors: Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vitro validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Hofland, L.J.; Marbach, P.; Pless, J.; Pralet, D.; Stolz, B.; Koper, J.W.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P. Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    As starting material for a potentially convenient radiopharmaceutical, a diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated derivative of octreotide (SMS 201-995) was prepared. This peptide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide (SDZ 215-811) binds more than 95% of added {sup 111}In in an easy, single-step labeling procedure without necessity of further purification. The specific somatostatin-like biologic effect of these analogues was proven by the inhibition of growth hormone secretion by cultured rat pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion by octreotide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide and non-radioactive ({sup 115}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide. The binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to rat brain cortex membranes proved to be displaced similarly by natural somatosatin as well as by octreotide, suggesting specific binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to somatostatin receptors. The binding of the indium-labeled compound showed a somewhat lower affinity when compared with the iodinated (Tyr{sup 3})-octreotide, but indium-labeled (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide still binds with nanomolar affinity. In conjunction with in vivo studies, these results suggest that ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a promising radiopharmaceutical for scintigraphic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors.

  15. Discovery of orally bioavailable 1,3,4-trisubstituted 2-oxopiperazine-based melanocortin-4 receptor agonists as potential antiobesity agents.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinrong; Switzer, Adrian G; Derose, Steve A; Mishra, Rajesh K; Solinsky, Mark G; Mumin, Rashid N; Ebetino, Frank H; Jayasinghe, Lalith R; Webster, Mark E; Colson, Anny-Odile; Crossdoersen, Doreen; Pinney, Beth B; Farmer, Julie A; Dowty, Martin E; Obringer, Cindy M; Cruze, Charles A; Burklow, Melissa L; Suchanek, Paula M; Dong, Lily; Dirr, Mary Kay; Sheldon, Russell J; Wos, John A

    2008-10-01

    A study that was designed to identify plausible replacements for highly basic guanidine moiety contained in potent MC4R agonists, as exemplified by 1, led to the discovery of initial nonguanidine lead 5. Propyl analog 23 was subsequently found to be equipotent to 5, whereas analogs bearing smaller and branched alkyl groups at the 3 position of the oxopiperazine template demonstrated reduced binding affinity and agonist potency for MC4R. Acylation of the NH2 group of the 4F-D-Phe residue of 3-propyl analog 23 significantly increased the binding affinity and the functional activity for MC4R. Analogs with neutral and weakly basic capping groups of the D-Phe residue exhibited excellent MC4R selectivity against MC1R whereas those with an amino acid had moderate MC4R/MC1R selectivity. We have also demonstrated that compound 35 showed promising oral bioavailability and a moderate oral half life and induced significant weight loss in a 28-day rat obesity model.

  16. Clinical and structural impact of mutations affecting the residue Phe367 of FOXP3 in patients with IPEX syndrome.

    PubMed

    Colobran, Roger; Álvarez de la Campa, Elena; Soler-Palacín, Pere; Martín-Nalda, Andrea; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo; de la Cruz, Xavier; Martínez-Gallo, Mónica

    2016-02-01

    Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a monogenic autoimmune disease characterized by early-onset life-threatening multisystemic autoimmunity. This rare hereditary disorder is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) transcription factor, which plays a key role in the differentiation and function of CD4(+)CD25(+) natural regulatory T cells (Tregs), essential for the establishment and maintenance of natural tolerance. We identified a novel mutation in the FOXP3 gene affecting the Phe367 residue of the protein (F367V) in a family with three male siblings affected by IPEX. Two other mutations affecting the FOXP3 Phe367 residue (F367L and F367C) have been described previously. This unique situation of three mutations affecting the same residue in FOXP3 led us to study the molecular impact of these mutations on the structure of FOXP3 protein. Structure analysis showed that Phe367 is involved in a rich interaction network related to both monomer and dimer structure stabilization, and is crucial for FOXP3 regulatory activity. The relevance of this location is confirmed by the results of SIFT and PolyPhen-2 pathogenicity predictions for F367V mutation. In summary, as assessment of the pathogenicity of a novel mutation is crucial to achieve a proper molecular diagnosis, we analysed the impact of mutations affecting the Phe367 residue using a combined approach that provides a mechanistic view of their pathogenic effect. PMID:26748374

  17. Chemotactic peptide analogues. Synthesis and chemotactic activity of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe analogues containing (S)-phenylalaninol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zecchini, G P; Paradisi, M P; Torrini, I; Spisani, S

    1995-09-01

    The synthesis and the biological activity towards human neutrophils of some N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-OMe analogues containing (S)-phenylalaninol (Pheol) or its derivatives in place of the native phenylalanine are reported. While the analogue containing Pheol (4) was found to be devoid of significant biological activity, its esters 3 and 5, although inactive as chemoattractants, are able to strongly stimulate superoxide production and are active with a lower efficacy in the lysozyme release. PMID:7487425

  18. Analysis of Tyr to Phe and fa/fa leptin receptor mutations in the PC12 cell line.

    PubMed

    Eyckerman, S; Waelput, W; Verhee, A; Broekaert, D; Vandekerckhove, J; Tavernier, J

    1999-12-01

    Weight regulation through body-fat content and energy homeostasis, is regulated mainly through the actions of leptin. Herein, we analyse the effect of mutations in the mouse leptin receptor using the PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line as a model system. Both the induction of pancreatitis associated protein 1 and metallothionein-II, two leptin regulated genes in PC12, was evaluated. Tyr to Phe mutations in the cytoplasmic tail of the mouse leptin receptor confirmed the critical role of Tyr1138 (a YxxQ motif) and STAT-3 activation for induction of leptin-induced genes in PC12. In addition, the Tyr985Phe mutation showed enhanced responsiveness to leptin, which was even more pronounced in combination with Tyr1077Phe. The short isoform of the leptin receptor showed complete loss of stimulation of both genes. In contrast, a leptin receptor devoid of all Tyr residues in its cytoplasmic tail was still capable of a limited induction of the PAP 1 gene. A mutant mouse leptin receptor containing the fa/fa mutation showed constitutive signalling and impaired responsiveness to leptin. Treatment with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin alone, in the absence of leptin was sufficient to obtain full induction of both genes. PMID:10586122

  19. Prevention of hypotension associated with the induction dose of propofol: A randomized controlled trial comparing equipotent doses of phenylephrine and ephedrine

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Muhammad; Hoda, Muhammad Qamarul; Ullah, Hameed

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Propofol, the most commonly used intravenous (IV) anesthetic agent is associated with hypotension on induction of anesthesia. Different methods have been used to prevent hypotension but with variable results. The objective of this study was to evaluate efficacy of equipotent doses of phenylpehrine and ephedrine in preventing the hypotensive response to the induction dose of propofol. Material and Methods: One hundred thirty five adult patients were randomised to one of the study groups: propofol-saline (PS), propofol-phenylephrine (PP) or propofol-ephedrine (PE) by adding study drugs to propofol. Anesthesia was induced with a mixture of propofol and the study drug. Patients were manually mask-ventilated for 5 min using 40% oxygen in nitrous oxide and isoflurane at 1%. A baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP) was recorded prior to induction of anesthesia. Systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure and heart rate were recorded every minute for up to 5 min after induction. Hypotension was defined as a 20% decrease from the baseline MAP. Results: There were no significant demographic differences between the groups. Overall incidence of hypotension in this study was 38.5% (52/135). Rate of hypotension was significantly higher in group PS than group PP (60% vs. 24.4% P = 0.001) and group PE (60% vs. 31.1% P = 0.005). In contrast, a significant difference in rate of hypotension was not observed between groups PP and group PE. Conclusion: In equipotent doses, phenylephrine is as good as ephedrine in preventing the hypotensive response to an induction dose of propofol. PMID:26702213

  20. Interactions of the Melanocortin-4 Receptor with the Peptide Agonist NDP-MSH

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Kathryn L.; Kinsella, Gemma K.; Cox, Alan; Donnelly, Dan; Findlay, John B.C.

    2010-01-01

    Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) has an important regulatory role in energy homeostasis and food intake. Peptide agonists of the MC4R are characterized by the conserved sequence His6-Phe7-Arg8-Trp9, which is crucial for their interaction with the receptor. This investigation utilized the covalent attachment approach to identify receptor residues in close proximity to the bound ligand [Nle4,d-Phe7]melanocyte-stimulating hormone (NDP-MSH), thereby differentiating between residues directly involved in ligand binding and those mutations that compromise ligand binding by inducing conformational changes in the receptor. Also, recent X-ray structures of G-protein-coupled receptors were utilized to refine a model of human MC4R in the active state (R⁎), which was used to generate a better understanding of the binding mode of the ligand NDP-MSH at the atomic level. The mutation of residues in the human MC4R—such as Leu106 of extracellular loop 1, and Asp122, Ile125, and Asp126 of transmembrane (TM) helix 3, His264 (TM6), and Met292 (TM7)—to Cys residues produced definitive indications of proximity to the side chains of residues in the core region of the peptide ligand. Of particular interest was the contact between d-Phe7 on the ligand and Ile125 of TM3 on the MC4R. Additionally, Met292 (TM7) equivalent to Lys(7.45) (Ballesteros numbering scheme) involved in covalently attaching retinal in rhodopsin is shown to be in close proximity to Trp9. For the first time, the interactions between the terminal regions of NDP-MSH and the receptor are described. The amino-terminus appears to be adjacent to a series of hydrophilic residues with novel interactions at Cys196 (TM5) and Asp189 (extracellular loop 2). These interactions are reminiscent of sequential ligand binding exhibited by the β2-adrenergic receptor, with the former interaction being equivalent to the known interaction involving Ser204 of the β2-adrenergic receptor. PMID:20600126

  1. Agonist-induced functional desensitization of the mu-opioid receptor is mediated by loss of membrane receptors rather than uncoupling from G protein.

    PubMed

    Pak, Y; Kouvelas, A; Scheideler, M A; Rasmussen, J; O'Dowd, B F; George, S R

    1996-11-01

    The effects of acute exposure of the opioid peptide [D-Ala2,N-MePhe4, Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO) on the mu-opioid receptor were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K-1 and baby hamster kidney stable transfectants. In the CHO cell line, acute 1-hr treatment with DAMGO decreased the density of receptors without affecting the affinity or proportion of agonist-detected sites and attenuated the ability of the agonist to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. In contrast, similar 1-hr treatment of baby hamster kidney cells did not affect receptor density or agonist ability to inhibit cAMP accumulation, but longer duration of agonist exposure resulted in a reduction in membrane receptor, identical to the CHO cells. These results suggested that for the mu-opioid receptor, alteration in receptor density was the major determinant for the observed agonist-induced desensitization. Consistent with this notion, the ratio of the DAMGO concentration yielding half-maximal occupation of the mu receptor to that yielding half-maximal functional response was < 1. This suggests the necessity for a high mu receptor occupancy rate for maximal functional response, so that any loss of cell surface opioid-binding sites was a critical determinant in reducing the maximal response. This hypothesis was further supported by the observation that irreversible inactivation of fixed proportions of opioid-binding sites with beta-chlorn-altrexamine demonstrated that there were few spare receptors, which is in contrast to what has been reported for other G protein-coupled receptors, including the delta-opioid receptor. Taken together, these data suggest that the opioid agonist DAMGO has a high affinity for the mu receptor but must occupy > 70% of the available receptors to generate the maximal second messenger-linked response.

  2. In vivo treatment with mu and delta, but not kappa-selective opioid agonists reduces [3H]spiperone binding to the guinea-pig striatum: autoradiographic evidence.

    PubMed

    Brent, P J; Bunn, S J

    1994-08-22

    In guinea-pigs, acute treatment with mu and delta receptor opioid agonists induces sedation and immobility [1,5], and attenuates the behavioural activation produced by the dopamine D2 agonist quinpirole [5]. In contrast, kappa-selective opioid agonists induce dystonic-like movements [4,5,8]. This has led us to investigate the possibility of an interaction between acute opioid treatment and the dopamine D2 system. The effect of acute treatment with mu, delta and kappa opioid agonists on [3H]spiperone binding sites (dopamine D2) in guinea-pig brain was studied using receptor autoradiography. The mu preferring agonist morphine (15 mg/kg subcutaneously, SC) given for 2 h, and the delta receptor selective agonist DPDPE (Tyr-D-Pen-Gly-Phe-D-Pen) (20 nM, intracerebroventricularly, ICV) given for 0.5 h, both decreased the density of specific (butaclamol displaceable) [3H]spiperone binding in the caudate putamen by 23.8 +/- 1.7% and 24.2 +/- 2.7% respectively, and in nucleus accumbens by 26.1 +/- 2.7% and 21.9 +/- 4.6% respectively compared to saline treated animals. There were no significant changes in the level of [3H]spiperone binding to other brain regions examined including frontal cortex, hippocampus, substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, amygdala, hypothalamic nuclei and cerebellum. In other experiments, incubation of coronal slices from various brain regions with [3H]spiperone, in the presence of a high concentration of morphine (20 microM) or DPDPE (10 microM) did not affect the level of binding, thus precluding effects due to residual tissue levels of drugs after in vivo treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. beta2-Agonists at the Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Kenneth D

    2006-01-01

    The different approaches that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) had adopted to beta2-agonists and the implications for athletes are reviewed by a former Olympic team physician who later became a member of the Medical Commission of the IOC (IOC-MC). Steadily increasing knowledge of the effects of inhaled beta2-agonists on health, is concerned with the fact that oral beta2-agonists may be anabolic, and rapid increased use of inhaled beta2-agonists by elite athletes has contributed to the changes to the IOC rules. Since 2001, the necessity for athletes to meet IOC criteria (i.e., that they have asthma and/or exercise-induced asthma [EIA]) has resulted in improved management of athletes. The prevalence of beta2-agonist use by athletes mirrors the known prevalence of asthma symptoms in each country, although athletes in endurance events have the highest prevalence. The age-of-onset of asthma/EIA in elite winter athletes may be atypical. Of the 193 athletes at the 2006 Winter Olympics who met th IOC's criteria, only 32.1% had childhood asthma and 48.7% of athletes reported onset at age 20 yr or older. These findings lead to speculation that years of intense endurance training may be a causative factor in bronchial hyperreactivity. The distinction between oral (prohibited in sports) and inhaled salbutamol is possible, but athletes must be warned that excessive use of inhaled salbutamol can lead to urinary concentrations similar to those observed after oral administration. This article provides justification that athletes should provide evidence of asthma or EIA before being permitted to use inhaled beta2-agonists. PMID:17085798

  4. Identification of Selective ERRγ Inverse Agonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jina; Im, Chun Young; Yoo, Eun Kyung; Ma, Min Jung; Kim, Sang-Bum; Hong, Eunmi; Chin, Jungwook; Hwang, Hayoung; Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Nam Doo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Lee, In-Kyu; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin

    2016-01-12

    GSK5182 (4) is currently one of the lead compounds for the development of estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) inverse agonists. Here, we report the design, synthesis, pharmacological and in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity (ADMET) properties of a series of compounds related to 4. Starting from 4, a series of analogs were structurally modified and their ERRγ inverse agonist activity was measured. A key pharmacophore feature of this novel class of ligands is the introduction of a heterocyclic group for A-ring substitution in the core scaffold. Among the tested compounds, several of them are potent ERRγ inverse agonists as determined by binding and functional assays. The most promising compound, 15g, had excellent binding selectivity over related subtypes (IC50 = 0.44, >10, >10, and 10 μM at the ERRγ, ERRα, ERRβ, and ERα subtypes, respectively). Compound 15g also resulted in 95% transcriptional repression at a concentration of 10 μM, while still maintaining an acceptable in vitro ADMET profile. This novel class of ERRγ inverse agonists shows promise in the development of drugs targeting ERRγ-related diseases.

  5. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  6. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064

    SciTech Connect

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Navas, III, Frank; Parks, Derek J.; Spearing, Paul K.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  7. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064.

    PubMed

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Navas, Frank; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Bruce Wisely, G

    2009-08-15

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  8. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and automated docking of constrained analogues of the opioid peptide H-Dmt-D-Ala-Phe-Gly-NH₂ using the 4- or 5-methyl substituted 4-amino-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-2-benzazepin-3-one scaffold.

    PubMed

    De Wachter, Rien; de Graaf, Chris; Keresztes, Atilla; Vandormael, Bart; Ballet, Steven; Tóth, Géza; Rognan, Didier; Tourwé, Dirk

    2011-10-13

    The Phe(3) residue of the N-terminal tetrapeptide of dermorphin (H-Dmt-d-Ala-Phe-Gly-NH(2)) was conformationally constrained using 4- or 5-methyl-substituted 4-amino-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-2-benzazepin-3-one (Aba) stereoisomeric scaffolds. Several of the synthesized peptides were determined to be high affinity agonists for the μ opioid receptor (OPRM) with selectivity over the δ opioid receptor (OPRD). Interesting effects of the Aba configuration on ligand binding affinity were observed. H-Dmt-d-Ala-erythro-(4S,5S)-5-Me-Aba-Gly-NH(2)9 and H-Dmt-threo-(4R,5S)-5-Me-Aba-Gly-NH(2)12 exhibited subnanomolar affinity for OPRM, while they possess an opposite absolute configuration at position 4 of the Aba ring. However, in the 4-methyl substituted analogues, H-Dmt-d-Ala-(4R)-Me-Aba-Gly-NH(2)14 was significantly more potent than the (4S)-derivative 13. These unexpected results were rationalized using the binding poses predicted by molecular docking simulations. Interestingly, H-Dmt-d-Ala-(4R)-Me-Aba-Gly-NH(2)14 is proposed to bind in a different mode compared with the other analogues. Moreover, in contrast to Ac-4-Me-Aba-NH-Me, which adopts a β-turn in solution and in the crystal structure, the binding mode of this analogue suggests an alternative receptor-bound conformation.

  9. Optimum Topical Delivery of Adrenergic Agonists to Oral Mucosa Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Soref, Cheryl M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Identify an orotopical vehicle to deliver an α-adrenergic vasoconstrictor to submucosal vasculature that is readily palatable to cancer/bone marrow transplant patients that suppresses chemo-radiotherapy-associated oral mucositis. Methods A [3H] norepinephrine ligand binding assay was developed to quantify receptor binding in hamster oral mucosa. Vehicle components (alcohols, polyols, cellulose, PVP) were tested versus [3H] norepinephrine binding. Vehicle refinement was also done to mask phenylephrine bitter taste and achieve human subject acceptance. The optimized vehicle was tested with α-adrenergic active agents to suppress radiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. Results The ligand binding assay quantified dose- and time-dependent, saturable binding of [3H] norepinephrine. An ethanol:glycerol:propylene glycol:water (6:6:8:80) vehicle provided the best delivery and binding. Further vehicle modification (flavoring and sucralose) yielded a vehicle with excellent taste scores in humans. Addition of phenylephrine, norepinephrine or epinephrine to the optimized vehicle and painting into mouse mouths 20 min before 19 Gy irradiation conferred significant suppression of the weight loss (P < 0.001) observed in mice who received oral vehicle. Conclusion We identified a highly efficient vehicle for the topical delivery of phenylephrine to the oral mucosa of both hamster and human subjects. This will enable its testing to suppress oral mucositis in an upcoming human clinical trial. PMID:25079392

  10. Free Cholesterol Induces Higher β-Sheet Content in Aβ Peptide Oligomers by Aromatic Interaction with Phe19

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence support an enhancing effect of free cholesterol on amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregation. To probe the mechanisms of cholesterol-mediated Aβ aggregation, we applied all-atom molecular dynamic simulations on Aβ42 peptides in presence of free cholesterol. Several control systems were also designed to examine the specificity of cholesterol-residue interactions, including mutation on aromatic residue, substitution of cholesterol with sphingomyelin (SM) and DPPC bilayer, and a mixing SM and cholesterol. Each system was performed 4 independent simulations, with a total time of 560 ns. It was found that cholesterol increased β-sheet formation by 4 folds, but the Phe19→Ser mutation on Aβ42 peptide totally eliminated cholesterol’s effect. A stable contact was recognized between the steroid group of cholesterol and the Benzyl group of Phe19. Interestingly, our simulation revealed a regular 1 ns time interval between the establishment of cholesterol-phenylalanine contact and consequent β-sheet formation, suggesting an important role of steroid-benzyl interaction in cholesterol-mediated aggregation. The presence of SM slightly increased β-sheet formation, but the mixture of cholesterol and SM had a strong induction effect. Also, the measurement of Phe19-lipid distance indicates that aromatic side chains of peptides prone to bind to cholesterol on the surface of the mixed micelle. In the DPPC system, polar chains were attracted to the surface of membrane, yielding moderate increase of β-sheet formation. These results shed light on the mechanism of cholesterol-mediated fibrillogenesis, and help to differentiate the effects of cholesterol and other lipids on β-sheet formation process. PMID:23049991

  11. Copper.Lys-Gly-His-Lys mediated cleavage of tRNA(Phe): studies of reaction mechanism and cleavage specificity.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Seth; Kawarasaki, Yuta; Cowan, J A

    2009-06-01

    The reactivity of [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys-NH2]2+ and [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys]+ toward tRNA(Phe) has been evaluated. The amidated and carboxylate forms of the copper peptides display complex binding behavior with strong and weak sites evident (K(D1)(app) approximately 71 microM, K(D2)(app) approximately 211 microM for the amide form; and K(D1)(app) approximately 34 microM, K(D2)(app) approximately 240 microM for the carboxylate form), while Cu2+(aq) yielded K(D1)(app) approximately 81 microM and K(D2)(app) approximately 136 microM. The time-dependence of the reaction of [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys]+ and [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys-NH2]2+ with tRNA(Phe) yielded k(obs) approximately 0.075 h(-1) for both complexes. HPLC analysis of the reaction products demonstrated guanine as the sole base product. Mass spectrometric data shows a limited number of cleavage fragments with product peak masses consistent with chemistry occurring at a discrete site defined by the structurally contiguous D and TPsiC loops, and in a domain where high affinity magnesium centers have previously been observed to promote hydrolysis of the tRNA(Phe) backbone. This cleavage pattern is more selective than that previously observed by Long and coworkers for nickel complexes of a series of C-terminally amidated peptides (Gly-Gly-His, Lys-Gly-His, and Arg-Gly-His), and may reflect variations in structural recognition and a distinct reaction path by the nickel derivatives. The data emphasizes the optimal positioning of the metal-associated reactive oxygen species, relative to scissile bonds, as a major criterion for development of efficient catalytic nucleases or therapeutics. PMID:19386364

  12. Peptide hairpins with strand segments containing alpha- and beta-amino acid residues: cross-strand aromatic interactions of facing Phe residues.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rituparna S; Gopi, Hosahudya N; Raghothama, S; Gilardi, Richard D; Karle, Isabella L; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2005-01-01

    The incporation of beta-amino acid residues into the strand segments of designed beta-hairpin leads to the formation of polar sheets, since in the case of beta-peptide strands, all adjacent carbonyl groups point in one direction and the amide groups orient in the opposite direction. The conformational analysis of two designed peptide hairpins composed of alpha/beta-hybrid segments are described: Boc-Leu-betaPhe-Val-(D)-Pro-Gly-Leu-betaPhe-Val-OMe (1) and Boc-betaLeu-Phe-betaVal-D-Pro-Gly-betaLeu-Phe-betaVal-OMe (2). A 500-MHz 1H-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) analysis in methanol supports a significant population of hairpin conformations in both peptides. Diagnostic nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) are observed in both cases. X-ray diffraction studies on single crystals of peptide 1 reveal a beta-hairpin conformation in both the molecules, which constitute the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Three cross-strand hydrogen bonds and a nucleating type II' beta-turn at the D-Pro-Gly segment are observed in the two independent molecules. In peptide 1, the betaPhe residues at positions 2 and 7 occur at the nonhydrogen-bonding position, with the benzyl side chains pointing on opposite faces of the beta-sheet. The observed aromatic centroid-to-centroid distances are 8.92 A (molecule A) and 8.94 A (molecule B). In peptide 2, the aromatic rings must occupy facing positions in antiparallel strands, in the NMR-derived structure. Peptide 1 yields a normal "hairpin-like" CD spectrum in methanol with a minimum at 224 nm. The CD spectrum of peptide 2 reveals a negative band at 234 nm and a positive band at 221 nm, suggestive of an exciton split doublet. Modeling of the facing Phe side chains at the hydrogen-bonding position of a canonical beta-hairpin suggests that interring separation is approximately 4.78 A for the gauche+ gauche- (g+ g-) rotamer. A previously reported peptide beta-hairpin composed of only alpha-amino acids, Boc-Leu-Phe-Val-D-Pro-Gly-Leu-Phe-Val-OMe also

  13. Heparin and penicillamine-hypotaurine-epinephrine (PHE) solution during bovine in vitro fertilization procedures impair the quality of spermatozoa but improve normal oocyte fecundation and early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, F S; Barretto, L S S; Arruda, R P; Perri, S H V; Mingoti, G Z

    2014-01-01

    The presence of heparin and a mixture of penicillamine, hypotaurine, and epinephrine (PHE) solution in the in vitro fertilization (IVF) media seem to be a prerequisite when bovine spermatozoa are capacitated in vitro, in order to stimulate sperm motility and acrosome reaction. The present study was designed to determine the effect of the addition of heparin and PHE during IVF on the quality and penetrability of spermatozoa into bovine oocytes and on subsequent embryo development. Sperm quality, evaluated by the integrity of plasma and acrosomal membranes and mitochondrial function, was diminished (P<0.05) in the presence of heparin and PHE. Oocyte penetration and normal pronuclear formation rates, as well as the percentage of zygotes presenting more than two pronuclei, was higher (P<0.05) in the presence of heparin and PHE. No differences were observed in cleavage rates between treatment and control (P>0.05). However, the developmental rate to the blastocyst stage was increased in the presence of heparin and PHE (P>0.05). The quality of embryos that reached the blastocyst stage was evaluated by counting the inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cell numbers and total number of cells; the percentage of ICM and TE cells was unaffected (P>0.05) in the presence of heparin and PHE (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study demonstrated that while the supplementation of IVF media with heparin and PHE solution impairs spermatozoa quality, it plays an important role in sperm capacitation, improving pronuclear formation, and early embryonic development.

  14. Heparin and penicillamine-hypotaurine-epinephrine (PHE) solution during bovine in vitro fertilization procedures impair the quality of spermatozoa but improve normal oocyte fecundation and early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, F S; Barretto, L S S; Arruda, R P; Perri, S H V; Mingoti, G Z

    2014-01-01

    The presence of heparin and a mixture of penicillamine, hypotaurine, and epinephrine (PHE) solution in the in vitro fertilization (IVF) media seem to be a prerequisite when bovine spermatozoa are capacitated in vitro, in order to stimulate sperm motility and acrosome reaction. The present study was designed to determine the effect of the addition of heparin and PHE during IVF on the quality and penetrability of spermatozoa into bovine oocytes and on subsequent embryo development. Sperm quality, evaluated by the integrity of plasma and acrosomal membranes and mitochondrial function, was diminished (P<0.05) in the presence of heparin and PHE. Oocyte penetration and normal pronuclear formation rates, as well as the percentage of zygotes presenting more than two pronuclei, was higher (P<0.05) in the presence of heparin and PHE. No differences were observed in cleavage rates between treatment and control (P>0.05). However, the developmental rate to the blastocyst stage was increased in the presence of heparin and PHE (P>0.05). The quality of embryos that reached the blastocyst stage was evaluated by counting the inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cell numbers and total number of cells; the percentage of ICM and TE cells was unaffected (P>0.05) in the presence of heparin and PHE (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study demonstrated that while the supplementation of IVF media with heparin and PHE solution impairs spermatozoa quality, it plays an important role in sperm capacitation, improving pronuclear formation, and early embryonic development. PMID:23949783

  15. Wheel running reduces high-fat diet intake, preference and mu-opioid agonist stimulated intake.

    PubMed

    Liang, Nu-Chu; Bello, Nicholas T; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-05-01

    The ranges of mechanisms by which exercise affects energy balance remain unclear. One potential mechanism may be that exercise reduces intake and preference for highly palatable, energy dense fatty foods. The current study used a rodent wheel running model to determine whether and how physical activity affects HF diet intake/preference and reward signaling. Experiment 1 examined whether wheel running affected the ability of intracerebroventricular (ICV) μ opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyol5-enkephalin (DAMGO) to increase HF diet intake. Experiment 2 examined the effects of wheel running on the intake of and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. We also assessed the effects of wheel running and diet choice on mesolimbic dopaminergic and opioidergic gene expression. Experiment 1 revealed that wheel running decreased the ability of ICV DAMGO administration to stimulate HF diet intake. Experiment 2 showed that wheel running suppressed weight gain and reduced intake and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. Furthermore, the mesolimbic gene expression profile of wheel running rats was different from that of their sedentary paired-fed controls but similar to that of sedentary rats with large HF diet consumption. These data suggest that alterations in preference for palatable, energy dense foods play a role in the effects of exercise on energy homeostasis. The gene expression results also suggest that the hedonic effects of exercise may substitute for food reward to limit food intake and suppress weight gain.

  16. Recent advances in the discovery of alpha1-adrenoceptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The alpha(1) adrenoceptors are three of nine well-characterized receptors that are activated by epinephrine and norepinephrine. Agonists acting at the alpha(1) adrenoceptors produce numerous physiological effects, and are used therapeutically for several indications. Many known alpha(1) adrenoceptor agonists are alpha(1A) selective, but the discovery of highly selective alpha(1B) and alpha(1D) adrenoceptor agonists has proven to be an extremely difficult goal to achieve. This review will focus on recent advances in the discovery, development and clinical utility of subtype-specific alpha(1) agonists as well as contributions to our understanding of agonist-receptor interactions.

  17. The crystal structure of human dipeptidyl peptidase I (cathepsin C) in complex with the inhibitor Gly-Phe-CHN2

    PubMed Central

    Mølgaard, Anne; Arnau, Jose; Lauritzen, Conni; Larsen, Sine; Petersen, Gitte; Pedersen, John

    2006-01-01

    hDDPI (human dipeptidyl peptidase I) is a lysosomal cysteine protease involved in zymogen activation of granule-associated proteases, including granzymes A and B from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and natural killer cells, cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase, and mast cell tryptase and chymase. In the present paper, we provide the first crystal structure of an hDPPI–inhibitor complex. The inhibitor Gly-Phe-CHN2 (Gly-Phe-diazomethane) was co-crystallized with hDPPI and the structure was determined at 2.0 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution. The structure of the native enzyme was also determined to 2.05 Å resolution to resolve apparent discrepancies between the complex structure and the previously published structure of the native enzyme. The new structure of the native enzyme is, within the experimental error, identical with the structure of the enzyme–inhibitor complex presented here. The inhibitor interacts with three subunits of hDPPI, and is covalently bound to Cys234 at the active site. The interaction between the totally conserved Asp1 of hDPPI and the ammonium group of the inhibitor forms an essential interaction that mimics enzyme–substrate interactions. The structure of the inhibitor complex provides an explanation of the substrate specificity of hDPPI, and gives a background for the design of new inhibitors. PMID:17020538

  18. The Phe105 Loop of Alix Bro1 Domain Plays a Key Role in HIV-1 Release

    SciTech Connect

    Sette, Paola; Mu, Ruiling; Dussupt, Vincent; Jiang, Jiansheng; Snyder, Greg; Smith, Patrick; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Bouamr, Fadila

    2011-12-07

    Alix and cellular paralogs HD-PTP and Brox contain N-terminal Bro1 domains that bind ESCRT-III CHMP4. In contrast to HD-PTP and Brox, expression of the Bro1 domain of Alix alleviates HIV-1 release defects that result from interrupted access to ESCRT. In an attempt to elucidate this functional discrepancy, we solved the crystal structures of the Bro1 domains of HD-PTP and Brox. They revealed typical 'boomerang' folds they share with the Bro1 Alix domain. However, they each contain unique structural features that may be relevant to their specific function(s). In particular, phenylalanine residue in position 105 (Phe105) of Alix belongs to a long loop that is unique to its Bro1 domain. Concurrently, mutation of Phe105 and surrounding residues at the tip of the loop compromise the function of Alix in HIV-1 budding without affecting its interactions with Gag or CHMP4. These studies identify a new functional determinant in the Bro1 domain of Alix.

  19. Increased agonist affinity at the mu-opioid receptor induced by prolonged agonist exposure

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Clark, Mary J.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.; Traynor, John R.; Williams, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to high-efficacy agonists results in desensitization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Desensitized receptors are thought to be unable to couple to G-proteins, preventing downstream signaling, however the changes to the receptor itself are not well characterized. In the current study, confocal imaging was used to determine whether desensitizing conditions cause a change in agonist-receptor interactions. Using rapid solution exchange, the binding kinetics of fluorescently labeled opioid agonist, dermorphin Alexa594 (derm A594), to MORs was measured in live cells. The affinity of derm A594 binding increased following prolonged treatment of cells with multiple agonists that are known to cause receptor desensitization. In contrast, binding of a fluorescent antagonist, naltrexamine Alexa 594, was unaffected by similar agonist pre-treatment. The increased affinity of derm A594 for the receptor was long-lived and partially reversed after a 45 min wash. Treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin did not alter the increase in affinity of the derm A594 for MOR. Likewise the affinity of derm A594 for MORs expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from arrestin 1 and 2 knockout animals increased following treatment of the cells with the desensitization protocol. Thus, opioid receptors were “imprinted” with a memory of prior agonist exposure that was independent of G-protein activation or arrestin binding that altered subsequent agonist-receptor interactions. The increased affinity suggests that acute desensitization results in a long lasting but reversible conformational change in the receptor. PMID:23447620

  20. Agonistic and reproductive interactions in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, P M

    1984-12-01

    Reproductive and agonistic behaviors in Siamese fighting fish were investigated in eight experiments, and some consequences and determinants of these sequences were isolated. First, fights and the formation of dominance-subordinancy relations were studied. Second, it was determined that large body size as well as males' prior residency in a tank produced an agonistic advantage; the magnitude of this advantage was positively related to the duration of residency. Third, the prior-residency effect in Bettas was determined by males' familiarity with visual and/or tactile cues in their home tanks. Fourth, dominant males had greater access to living space and were more likely to display at a mirror, build nests, and approach females than were subordinates. Finally, it was discovered that chemical cues associated with presumedly inert plastic tank dividers influence Bettas' social behavior.

  1. Development and validation of RP-HPLC method for simultaneous estimation of nimesulide, phenylephrine hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate and caffeine anhydrous in pharmaceutical dosage form.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Rishbha; Nair, Anroop; Saini, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a simple, specific and accurate reverse phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of nimesulide (NS), phenylephrine hydrochloride (PE), chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) and caffeine anhydrous (CF) in pharmaceutical dosage forms. A reversed phase Hypersil phenyl column (4.6 mm x 25 cm) with mobile phase having pH 5.5 consisting of methanol and buffer (55:45, v/v) was used. The flow rate was 1.0 mL per minute and the effluents were monitored at 214 nm. The retention times of all the drugs were found to be 7.47 min (NS), 3.944 min (PE), 4.55 min (CF) and 17.15 min (CPM), respectively. The linearity for all the drugs was obtained in the range of 300-800 microg/mL (NS), 15-32 microg/mL (PE), 16-32 microg/mL (CPM) and 30-180 microg/mL (CF), respectively. The results of analysis have been well validated according to guidelines of International Conference of Harmonisation of technical requirements for registration of pharmaceuticals for human use. The method was found to be simple, precise, economical, less time consuming and reproducible. Hence, the suggested procedure could be used for the determination of all the four drugs in commercial preparations.

  2. Determination of phenylephrine hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate, and methscopolamine nitrate in tablets or capsules by liquid chromatography with two UV absorbance detectors in series.

    PubMed

    Cieri, Uco R

    2006-01-01

    A procedure is presented for the simultaneous determination of phenylephrine HCI (PE), chlorpheniramine maleate (CM), and methscopolamine nitrate in commercial tablets or capsules by liquid chromatography (LC) with 2 UV absorbance detectors in series. Reference and sample solutions are prepared in methanol. LC separations are performed on a 7.5 cm Novapak silica column. The mobile phase is prepared by mixing 930 mL methanol with 70 mL of a 0.5% aqueous solution of 1-pentanesulfonic acid, sodium salt. The injection volume is 20 microL; the flow rate is approximately 1 mL/min. Retention times are approximately 1.5 min for PE, 3 min for CM, and 6 min for methscopolamine nitrate. One detector determines the first 2 compounds at 265 nm, but the third compound does not produce a detectable peak. The other detector set at 210 nm generates peaks for all 3 compounds, but only methscopolamine is within the recorder range; the other 2 compounds are exceedingly off scale. If it is not feasible or desirable to arrange 2 UV absorbance detectors in series, separate determinations can be made, one for the first 2 compounds and the other for the third component of the mixture. Two commercial samples of tablets and 2 commercial samples of capsules were analyzed by the proposed method. Recovery studies were also conducted with amounts of the 3 compounds ranging from 80 to 120% of the quantities present in the sample solutions.

  3. Effect of the administration of Solanum nigrum fruit on blood glucose, lipid profiles, and sensitivity of the vascular mesenteric bed to phenylephrine in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabipour, Shahla; Kharazmi, Fatemah; Soltani, Nepton; Kamalinejad, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background Solanum nigrum fruit is traditionally used in Asia to manage, control, and treat diabetes but there is no scientific evidence of the efficacy of Solanum nigrum fruit in treatment of diabetes. We designed this study to investigate the effect of the administration of oral doses of aqueous extract from Solanum nigrum fruit on plasma glucose, lipid profiles, and the sensitivity of the vascular mesenteric bed to Phenylephrine in diabetic and non-diabetic rats. Material/Methods Animals were divided into 5 groups (n=10): 2 groups served as non-diabetic controls (NDC), and the other groups had diabetes induced with a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Solanum nigrum-treated chronic diabetic (CD-SNE) and Solanum nigrum-treated controls (ND-SNE) received 1g/l of Solanum nigrum added to drinking water for 8 weeks. The mesenteric vascular beds were prepared using the McGregor method. Results Administration of Solanum nigrum caused Ca/Mg ratio, plasma glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), total cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations to return to normal levels, and was shown to decrease alteration in vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictor agents. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that Solanum nigrum could play a role in the management of diabetes and the prevention of vascular complications in STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:23660828

  4. Kinetic properties of C-11 phenylephrine in isolated rat heart: Effects of di-deuterium substitution, age, MAO inhibition, and reserpine

    SciTech Connect

    Raffel, D.M.; Rosario, R.B. del; Tluczek, L.

    1995-05-01

    Elimination of the {alpha}-carbon CH{sub 3} group from C-11 hydroxyephedrine (HED) yields a new radiotracer for cardiac sympathetic neurons: C-11 phenylephrine (PHEN). This small structural change has profound effects on the tracer kinetics - HED is not metabolized by neuronal monoamine oxidase (MAO), while PHEN is an excellent MAO substrate. To assess the influence of MAO metabolism and vesicular storage on PHEN kinetics a series of constant infusion studies were performed. Isolated working rat hearts were perfused under control conditions for 25 min, then switched to a second perfusate circuit containing PHEN at tracer concentrations. PHEN was infused for 10 min then the heart switched back to normal perfusate to effect washout of PHEN. The amount of PHEN in the heart was externally measured using coinsidence detection. The data between 1 and 4 min were used to estimate an uptake constant, K{sub up} (ml/min/g wet). Washout data were fit to multiple exponentials. Several studies were done: (1) To slow MAO metabolism, the dideuterium substituted analog C-11 D{sub 2-}PHEN was made and studied as described above. (2) For both tracers, the effect of age on washout kinetics was studied as rat heart MAO levels steadily increase throughout the animal`s life. (3) The effect of MAO inhibition was studied using 100 {mu}M pargyline throughout the experiment. (4) Reserpine pretreated rats were used to assess the influence of vesicular storage on tracer kinetics.

  5. Clinical assessment of the warming sensation accompanying flavor 316282 in a cold and cough syrup containing paracetamol, phenylephrine hydrochloride, and guaifenesin

    PubMed Central

    Monnet, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The primary objective was to assess the warming sensation caused by flavor 316282 in a cold and cough product in the target population. Methods: A single-cohort, single-treatment arm, open-label study. Subjects received one 30-mL dose of syrup containing flavor 316282, paracetamol, phenylephrine hydrochloride, and guaifenesin and recorded onset and disappearance of any warming sensation in the mouth/throat. Subjects’ assessment of strength and appeal of the sensation, taste, texture, and acceptability of the product as a cold and cough remedy was investigated using questionnaires. Results: A total of 51 subjects were included; 47 (92.1%) experienced a warming sensation. The median duration of the warming sensation was 100 s (95% confidence interval = 82 s, 112 s). The majority of subjects rated the syrup as excellent, good, or fair for treatment of cough and cold symptoms (96.1%), taste (80.4%), and texture (98.0%). There were no safety concerns, and the syrup was well tolerated. Most subjects liked the warming sensation. Conclusions: Flavor 316282 in a cold and cough syrup is associated with a warming sensation. The syrup is well tolerated, safe, and palatable. PMID:26770699

  6. Development and validation of RP-HPLC method for simultaneous estimation of nimesulide, phenylephrine hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate and caffeine anhydrous in pharmaceutical dosage form.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Rishbha; Nair, Anroop; Saini, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a simple, specific and accurate reverse phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of nimesulide (NS), phenylephrine hydrochloride (PE), chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) and caffeine anhydrous (CF) in pharmaceutical dosage forms. A reversed phase Hypersil phenyl column (4.6 mm x 25 cm) with mobile phase having pH 5.5 consisting of methanol and buffer (55:45, v/v) was used. The flow rate was 1.0 mL per minute and the effluents were monitored at 214 nm. The retention times of all the drugs were found to be 7.47 min (NS), 3.944 min (PE), 4.55 min (CF) and 17.15 min (CPM), respectively. The linearity for all the drugs was obtained in the range of 300-800 microg/mL (NS), 15-32 microg/mL (PE), 16-32 microg/mL (CPM) and 30-180 microg/mL (CF), respectively. The results of analysis have been well validated according to guidelines of International Conference of Harmonisation of technical requirements for registration of pharmaceuticals for human use. The method was found to be simple, precise, economical, less time consuming and reproducible. Hence, the suggested procedure could be used for the determination of all the four drugs in commercial preparations. PMID:23285660

  7. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits. PMID:26832440

  8. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits.

  9. Development of Spexin-based Human Galanin Receptor Type II-Specific Agonists with Increased Stability in Serum and Anxiolytic Effect in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Lee, Yoo-Na; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Nam Hoon; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Yun, Seongsik; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Seong, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The novel neuropeptide spexin (SPX) was discovered to activate galanin receptor 2 (GALR2) and 3 (GALR3) but not galanin receptor 1 (GALR1). Although GALR2 is known to display a function, particularly in anxiety, depression, and appetite regulation, the further determination of its function would benefit from a more stable and selective agonist that acts only at GALR2. In the present study, we developed a GALR2-specific agonist with increased stability in serum. As galanin (GAL) showed a low affinity to GALR3, the residues in SPX were replaced with those in GAL, revealing that particular mutations such as Gln5 → Asn, Met7 → Ala, Lys11 → Phe, and Ala13 → Pro significantly decreased potencies toward GALR3 but not toward GALR2. Quadruple (Qu) mutation of these residues still retained potency to GALR2 but totally abolished the potency to both GALR3 and GALR1. The first amino acid modifications or D-Asn1 substitution significantly increased the stability when they are incubated in 100% fetal bovine serum. Intracerebroventricular administration of the mutant peptide with D-Asn1 and quadruple substitution (dN1-Qu) exhibited an anxiolytic effect in mice. Taken together, the GALR2-specific agonist with increased stability can greatly help delineation of GALR2-mediated functions and be very useful for treatments of anxiety disorder. PMID:26907960

  10. Reduction in renal blood flow following administration of norepinephrine and phenylephrine in septic rats treated with Kir6.1 ATP-sensitive and KCa1.1 calcium-activated K+ channel blockers.

    PubMed

    da Rosa Maggi Sant'Helena, Bruna; Guarido, Karla L; de Souza, Priscila; Crestani, Sandra; da Silva-Santos, J Eduardo

    2015-10-15

    We evaluated the effects of K+ channel blockers in the vascular reactivity of in vitro perfused kidneys, as well as on the influence of vasoactive agents in the renal blood flow of rats subjected to the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. Both norepinephrine and phenylephrine had the ability to increase the vascular perfusion pressure reduced in kidneys of rats subjected to CLP at 18 h and 36 h before the experiments. The non-selective K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium, but not the Kir6.1 blocker glibenclamide, normalized the effects of phenylephrine in kidneys from the CLP 18 h group. Systemic administration of tetraethylammonium, glibenclamide, or the KCa1.1 blocker iberiotoxin, did not change the renal blood flow in control or septic rats. Norepinephrine or phenylephrine also had no influence on the renal blood flow of septic animals, but its injection in rats from the CLP 18 h group previously treated with either glibenclamide or iberiotoxin resulted in an exacerbated reduction in the renal blood flow. These results suggest an abnormal functionality of K+ channels in the renal vascular bed in sepsis, and that the blockage of different subtypes of K+ channels may be deleterious for blood perfusion in kidneys, mainly when associated with vasoactive drugs.

  11. Reduction in renal blood flow following administration of norepinephrine and phenylephrine in septic rats treated with Kir6.1 ATP-sensitive and KCa1.1 calcium-activated K+ channel blockers.

    PubMed

    da Rosa Maggi Sant'Helena, Bruna; Guarido, Karla L; de Souza, Priscila; Crestani, Sandra; da Silva-Santos, J Eduardo

    2015-10-15

    We evaluated the effects of K+ channel blockers in the vascular reactivity of in vitro perfused kidneys, as well as on the influence of vasoactive agents in the renal blood flow of rats subjected to the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. Both norepinephrine and phenylephrine had the ability to increase the vascular perfusion pressure reduced in kidneys of rats subjected to CLP at 18 h and 36 h before the experiments. The non-selective K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium, but not the Kir6.1 blocker glibenclamide, normalized the effects of phenylephrine in kidneys from the CLP 18 h group. Systemic administration of tetraethylammonium, glibenclamide, or the KCa1.1 blocker iberiotoxin, did not change the renal blood flow in control or septic rats. Norepinephrine or phenylephrine also had no influence on the renal blood flow of septic animals, but its injection in rats from the CLP 18 h group previously treated with either glibenclamide or iberiotoxin resulted in an exacerbated reduction in the renal blood flow. These results suggest an abnormal functionality of K+ channels in the renal vascular bed in sepsis, and that the blockage of different subtypes of K+ channels may be deleterious for blood perfusion in kidneys, mainly when associated with vasoactive drugs. PMID:26277325

  12. Behavioural activity of angiotensin II (3-7)4Phe--analogue of natural fragment 3-7 of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Hoły, Z; Wiśniewski, K; Jachimowicz, A; Braszko, J

    1996-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of pentapeptide 3-7 angiotensin II [AII(3-7)], its analogue 3-7(4)Phe [AII(3-7)4Phe] and angiotensin II (AII) on the behaviour of adult male rats. The motility, stereotypy, spatial performance, learning of conditioned and passive avoidance responses allowing to avoid aversive stimulation were estimated. Examined peptides at the dose 1 nmol injected intracerebroventricularly 15 min before the experiment did not produce specific changes in psychomotor activity in the "open field" test and in retention of the spatial task in the Morris water maze. The rate of acquisition of conditioned avoidance responses was stimulated by AII(3-7)4Phe, AII(3-7) and AII administration. In the passive avoidance situation AII improved retention of the responses whereas analogue AII(3-7)4Phe and fragment 3-7 caused similar though less pronounced effect. All the peptides applied immediately before the experiment intensified stereotypy, a behaviour evoked by of apomorphine-1 mg/kg and amphetamine-7.5 mg/kg intraperitonealy injection. These results show similar psychotropic activity of analogue AII(3-7)4Phe, comparable with the activity of natural fragment 3-7 of angiotensin II.

  13. Design of peptides with α,β-dehydro-residues: syntheses, crystal structures and molecular conformations of two ΔPhe-Trp containing peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, R.; Makker, J.; Kumar, P.; Dey, S.; Singh, T. P.

    2003-06-01

    The ΔPhe-Trp is a newly designed moiety that was found inducing a unique conformation in peptides. The peptides Boc-L-Val-ΔPhe-L-Trp-OCH 3 (I) and Boc-L-Leu-ΔPhe-L-Trp-OCH 3 (II) were synthesized by azlactone method in solution phase. The peptide (I) was crystallized from its solution in ethanol-water mixture in orthorhombic space group P2 12 12 1 with a=10.663(3) Å, b=11.204(3) Å, c=26.516(10) Å and peptide (II) was crystallized from its solution in acetone in a monoclinic space group P2 1 with a=9.354(1)Å, b=11.218(4)Å, c=15.633(1)Å and β=101.83(1)°. The structures were determined by direct methods. Peptide (I) was refined to an R value of 0.059 for 1554 observed reflections [ I≥2 σ (I)] and peptide (II) was refined to an R value of 0.043 for 2920 observed reflections [ I≥2 σ (I)]. The structures of peptides (I) and (II) were found to be identical. They formed an unusual type VIa β-turn conformation which is observed for the first time with a ΔPhe residue at ( i+2) position indicating a unique influence of ΔPhe-Trp moiety in inducing a reproducible new structure in peptides.

  14. Footprinting of tRNA(Phe) transcripts from Thermus thermophilus HB8 with the homologous phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase reveals a novel mode of interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Kreutzer, R; Kern, D; Giegé, R; Rudinger, J

    1995-01-01

    The phosphates of the tRNA(Phe) transcript from Thermus thermophilus interacting with the cognate synthetase were determined by footprinting. Backbone bond protection against cleavage by iodine of the phosphorothioate-containing transcripts was found in the anticodon stem-loop, the D stem-loop and the acceptor stem and weak protection was also seen in the variable loop. Most of the protected phosphates correspond to regions around known identity elements of tRNA(Phe). Enhancement of cleavage at certain positions indicates bending of tRNAPhe upon binding to the enzyme. When applied to the three-dimensional model of tRNA(Phe) from yeast the majority of the protections occur on the D loop side of the molecule, revealing that phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase has a rather complex and novel pattern of interaction with tRNAPhe, differing from that of other known class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Images PMID:8524648

  15. Cation-π Interactions in Chemistry and Biology: A New View of Benzene, Phe, Tyr, and Trp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Dennis A.

    1996-01-01

    Cations bind to the π face of an aromatic structure through a surprisingly strong, non-covalent force termed the cation-π interaction. The magnitude and generality of the effect have been established by gas-phase measurements and by studies of model receptors in aqueous media. To first order, the interaction can be considered an electrostatic attraction between a positive charge and the quadrupole moment of the aromatic. A great deal of direct and circumstantial evidence indicates that cation-π interactions are important in a variety of proteins that bind cationic ligands or substrates. In this context, the amino acids phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), and tryptophan (Trp) can be viewed as polar, yet hydrophobic, residues.

  16. [Evolution of vasopressins in marsupials: a new hormone, phenypressin (Phe2-Arg8-vasopressin), present in the Macropodidae].

    PubMed

    Chauvet, M T; Hurpet, D; Chauvet, J; Acher, R

    1980-10-13

    A duplication of the pressor hormone has been found in some marsupials, either American species belonging to the family Didelphidae or Australian species belonging to the family Macropodidae. Two pressor peptides, lysine vasopressin and phenypressin (Phe2-Arg8-vasopressin) have been chemically identified in the red Kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and the Tammar (Macropus eugenii). In contrast, the brush-tailed Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), a species belonging to the family Phalangeridae, has a single pressor hormone, arginine vasopressin. Because this latter hormone was also found in a prototherian species, the Echidna, it might be assumed that it is the product of a primitive gene and that a duplication and subsequent mutations led to lysine vasopressin and phenypressin in Macropodidae.

  17. Proteolysis of His-Phe-Arg-Trp-Pro-Gly-Pro in the blood and brain of rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, K V; Nagaev, I Yu; Babakov, V N; Andreeva, L A; Shevchenko, V P; Radilov, A S; Myasoedov, N F

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of the content of His-Phe-Arg-Trp-Pro-Gly-Pro (ACTH (6-9)PGP) and its hydrolysis products in the blood and brain of rats in the case of intranasal administration and intravenous injection of tritiated ACTH(6-9)PGP was studied. The parameters of bioavailability of ACTH(6-9)PGP administered intranasally were higher, indicating certain prospects in the intranasal application in clinical practice. We also found that the factor that determines ACTH(6-9)PGP proteolysis in experiments both in vivo and in vitro is aminopeptidases. The main products of ACTH(6-9)PGP during its metabolism in rats are short peptides and amino acids.

  18. IR and IR + UV spectroscopy of isolated [Al-AcPheOMe]n+ cluster cations (n = 1, 3).

    PubMed

    Bialach, P M; Martin, T C; Gerhards, M

    2012-06-14

    Singly and triply charged cationic clusters of aluminium and the protected amino acid AcPheOMe are investigated in a supersonic beam by using a combination of a thermic and a laser ablation ion source. For the singly charged species UV- and IR photodissociation spectroscopy is applied. In the case of the triply charged clusters a variant of combined IR + UV spectroscopy is used to obtain information in the NH-stretching region. By comparison with DFT calculations structural assignments are suggested and it turns out that both clusters prefer a helical arrangement with aluminium being aggregated to both carbonyl groups. For the triply charged cluster a globular structure is formed in which aluminium is captured both by the carbonyl groups and the phenyl ring.

  19. Agonist-Directed Desensitization of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Vasiliy; Jin, Yan; Sun, Haiyan; Ferrie, Ann M.; Wu, Qi; Fang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists with reduced tachyphylaxis may offer new therapeutic agents with improved tolerance profile. However, receptor desensitization assays are often inferred at the single signaling molecule level, thus ligand-directed desensitization is poorly understood. Here we report a label-free biosensor whole cell assay with microfluidics to determine ligand-directed desensitization of the β2AR. Together with mechanistic deconvolution using small molecule inhibitors, the receptor desensitization and resensitization patterns under the short-term agonist exposure manifested the long-acting agonism of salmeterol, and differentiated the mechanisms of agonist-directed desensitization between a full agonist epinephrine and a partial agonist pindolol. This study reveals the cellular mechanisms of agonist-selective β2AR desensitization at the whole cell level. PMID:21541288

  20. Sports doping: emerging designer and therapeutic β2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Georgakopoulos, C; Sterk, S; Nielen, M W F

    2013-10-21

    Beta2-adrenergic agonists, or β2-agonists, are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptom-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. The use of β2-agonists is prohibited in sports by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) due to claimed anabolic effects, and also, is prohibited as growth promoters in cattle fattening in the European Union. This paper reviews the last seven-year (2006-2012) literature concerning the development of novel β2-agonists molecules either by modifying the molecule of known β2-agonists or by introducing moieties producing indole-, adamantyl- or phenyl urea derivatives. New emerging β2-agonists molecules for future therapeutic use are also presented, intending to emphasize their potential use for doping purposes or as growth promoters in the near future.

  1. The antimetastatic drug NAMI-A potentiates the phenylephrine-induced contraction of aortic smooth muscle cells and induces a transient increase in systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Vadori, M; Florio, C; Groppo, B; Cocchietto, M; Pacor, S; Zorzet, S; Candussio, L; Sava, G

    2015-07-01

    The ruthenium-based drug imidazolium trans-imidazoledimethylsulphoxidetetrachlorido ruthenate (NAMI-A) is a novel antitumour drug under clinical evaluation. In this study, NAMI-A is tested on aortic rings in vitro and on the systolic blood pressure in vivo with the aim of evaluating its effects on smooth muscle cells and, more in general, on the vascular system. Pre-incubation of aortic rings with 10 µM NAMI-A for 10 min potentiates the contraction induced by phenylephrine (PE). The reduction of the B max value of [(3)H]-prazosin bound to NAMI-A-treated aortic rings and the ability of NAMI-A to displace [(3)H]-prazosin and [(3)H]-IP3 binding by 25 and 42%, respectively, suggest the involvement of α1-adrenoceptor in mediating the effects on smooth muscle cells. NAMI-A also decreases the number of maximal sites of [(3)H]-prazosin bound to kidney membrane preparation from 34 to 24 fmol/mg proteins. A single i.p. dose (105 mg/kg) or a repeated treatment for 6 consecutive days (17 mg/kg/day) in Wistar rats increases the systolic blood pressure, respectively, 1 h and 3 days after treatment, and the responsiveness of rat aortic rings to PE. Atomic absorption spectroscopy confirms the presence of ruthenium in the aortic rings excised from the treated rats. These findings suggest monitoring the cardiovascular parameters when the drug is used in humans for treating cancer patients, particularly if the drug is associated with chemicals that are potentially active at the cardiovascular level.

  2. Modulation of Innate Immune Responses via Covalently Linked TLR Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the synthesis of novel adjuvants for vaccine development using multivalent scaffolds and bioconjugation chemistry to spatially manipulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. TLRs are primary receptors for activation of the innate immune system during vaccination. Vaccines that contain a combination of small and macromolecule TLR agonists elicit more directed immune responses and prolong responses against foreign pathogens. In addition, immune activation is enhanced upon stimulation of two distinct TLRs. Here, we synthesized combinations of TLR agonists as spatially defined tri- and di-agonists to understand how specific TLR agonist combinations contribute to the overall immune response. We covalently conjugated three TLR agonists (TLR4, 7, and 9) to a small molecule core to probe the spatial arrangement of the agonists. Treating immune cells with the linked agonists increased activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and enhanced and directed immune related cytokine production and gene expression beyond cells treated with an unconjugated mixture of the same three agonists. The use of TLR signaling inhibitors and knockout studies confirmed that the tri-agonist molecule activated multiple signaling pathways leading to the observed higher activity. To validate that the TLR4, 7, and 9 agonist combination would activate the immune response to a greater extent, we performed in vivo studies using a vaccinia vaccination model. Mice vaccinated with the linked TLR agonists showed an increase in antibody depth and breadth compared to mice vaccinated with the unconjugated mixture. These studies demonstrate how activation of multiple TLRs through chemically and spatially defined organization assists in guiding immune responses, providing the potential to use chemical tools to design and develop more effective vaccines. PMID:26640818

  3. Small Molecule Bax Agonists for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Meiguo; Li, Rui; Xie, Maohua; Park, Dongkyoo; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Sica, Gabriel L.; Corsino, Patrick E.; Zhou, Jia; Ding, Chunyong; White, Mark A.; Magis, Andrew T.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Curran, Walter J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Deng, Xingming

    2014-01-01

    Bax, a central death regulator, is required at the decisional stage of apoptosis. We recently identified serine 184 (S184) of Bax as a critical functional switch controlling its proapoptotic activity. Here, we employed the structural pocket around S184 as a docking site to screen the NCI library of small molecules using the UCSF-DOCK program suite. Three compounds, small molecule Bax agonists SMBA1, SMBA2 and SMBA3, induce conformational changes in Bax by blocking S184 phosphorylation, facilitating Bax insertion into mitochondrial membranes and forming Bax oligomers. The latter leads to cytochrome c release and apoptosis in human lung cancer cells, which occurs in a Bax- but not Bak-dependent fashion. SMBA1 potently suppresses lung tumor growth via apoptosis by selectively activating Bax in vivo without significant normal tissue toxicity. Development of Bax agonists as a new class of anti-cancer drugs offers a strategy for the treatment of lung cancer and other Bax-expressing malignancies. PMID:25230299

  4. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of tRNA[superscript Phe] Y Base in the Presence of Mg[superscript 2+] and Small Molecule Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Sarah R.; Silverstein, Todd P.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.

    2008-01-01

    This laboratory project is one component of a semester-long advanced biochemistry laboratory course that uses several complementary techniques to study tRNA[superscript Phe] conformational changes induced by ligand binding. In this article we describe a set of experiments in which students use fluorescence spectroscopy to study tRNA[superscript…

  5. Cyanoquinolines with Independent Corrector and Potentiator Activities Restore ΔPhe508-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Function in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Phuan, Puay-Wah; Yang, Baoxue; Knapp, John M.; Wood, Alex B.; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Kurth, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    The ΔPhe508 mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein impairs its folding, stability, and chloride channel gating. Although small molecules that separately correct defective ΔPhe508-CFTR folding/cellular processing (“correctors”) or chloride channel gating (“potentiators”) have been discovered and are in clinical trials, single compounds with bona fide dual corrector and potentiator activities have not been identified. Here, screening of ∼110,000 small molecules not tested previously revealed a cyanoquinoline class of compounds with independent corrector and potentiator activities (termed CoPo). Analysis of 180 CoPo analogs revealed 6 compounds with dual corrector and potentiator activities and 13 compounds with only potentiator activity. N-(2-((3-Cyano-5,7-dimethylquinolin-2-yl)amino)ethyl)-3-methoxybenzamide (CoPo-22), which was synthesized in six steps in 52% overall yield, had low micromolar EC50 for ΔPhe508-CFTR corrector and potentiator activities by short-circuit current assay. Maximal corrector and potentiator activities were comparable with those conferred by the bithiazole Corr-4a and the flavone genistein, respectively. CoPo-22 also activated wild-type and G551D CFTR chloride conductance within minutes in a forskolin-dependent manner. Compounds with dual corrector and potentiator activities may be useful for single-drug treatment of cystic fibrosis caused by ΔPhe508 mutation. PMID:21730204

  6. Biological active metabolite cyclo (L-Trp-L-Phe) produced by South China Sea sponge Holoxea sp. associated fungus Aspergillus versicolor strain TS08.

    PubMed

    Chu, Dan; Peng, Chongsheng; Ding, Bo; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Fengli; Lin, Houwen; Li, Zhiyong

    2011-02-01

    Sponge-associated fungi represent the single most prolific source of novel natural products from marine fungi. Cyclo (L-Trp-L-Phe) exhibits biological functions such as plant growth regulation, moderate cytotoxicity and thus has the application potential in pharmaceutical and agricultural biotechnologies. In this study, a fungal strain TS08 was isolated from sponge Holoxea sp. in the South China Sea and identified as A. versicolor according to its 18S rRNA gene and morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. Meanwhile, cyclo (L-Trp-L-Phe) was found to be produced by A. versicolor strain TS08 mainly in the exponential growth phase. The highest yield of cyclo (L-Trp-L-Phe), 13.24 mg/g (per crude extract of EtOAc), 2.51% of cell dry weigh, was obtained on the tenth day of the fungal cultivation. It was the first time to find the biological active cyclo (L-Trp-L-Phe) in sponge-associated microorganism.

  7. Comparisons of Interfacial Phe, Tyr, and Trp Residues as Determinants of Orientation and Dynamics for GWALP Transmembrane Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic amino acids often flank the transmembrane alpha helices of integral membrane proteins. By favoring locations within the membrane–water interface of the lipid bilayer, aromatic residues Trp, Tyr, and sometimes Phe may serve as anchors to help stabilize a transmembrane orientation. In this work, we compare the influence of interfacial Trp, Tyr, or Phe residues upon the properties of tilted helical transmembrane peptides. For such comparisons, it has been critical to start with no more than one interfacial aromatic residue near each end of a transmembrane helix, for example, that of GWALP23 (acetyl-GGALW5(LA)6LW19LAGA-[ethanol]amide). To this end, we have employed 2H-labeled alanines and solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the consequences of moving or replacing W5 or W19 in GWALP23 with selected Tyr, Phe, or Trp residues at the same or proximate locations. We find that GWALP23 peptides having F5, Y5, or W5 exhibit essentially the same average tilt and similar dynamics in bilayer membranes of 1,2-dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) or 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC). When double Tyr anchors are present, in Y4,5GWALP23 the NMR observables are markedly more subject to dynamic averaging and at the same time are less responsive to the bilayer thickness. Decreased dynamics are nevertheless observed when ring hydrogen bonding is removed, such that F4,5GWALP23 exhibits a similar extent of low dynamic averaging as GWALP23 itself. When F5 is the sole aromatic group in the N-interfacial region, the dynamic averaging is (only) slightly more extensive than with W5, Y5, or Y4 alone or with F4,5, yet it is much less than that observed for Y4,5GWALP23. Interestingly, moving Y5 to Y4 or W19 to W18, while retaining only one hydrogen-bond-capable aromatic ring at each interface, maintains the low level of dynamic averaging but alters the helix azimuthal rotation. The rotation change is about 40° for Y4 regardless of whether the host lipid bilayer is DLPC or

  8. Comparisons of interfacial Phe, Tyr, and Trp residues as determinants of orientation and dynamics for GWALP transmembrane peptides.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Kelsey A; Gleason, Nicholas J; Gist, Renetra; Langston, Rebekah; Greathouse, Denise V; Koeppe, Roger E

    2014-06-10

    Aromatic amino acids often flank the transmembrane alpha helices of integral membrane proteins. By favoring locations within the membrane-water interface of the lipid bilayer, aromatic residues Trp, Tyr, and sometimes Phe may serve as anchors to help stabilize a transmembrane orientation. In this work, we compare the influence of interfacial Trp, Tyr, or Phe residues upon the properties of tilted helical transmembrane peptides. For such comparisons, it has been critical to start with no more than one interfacial aromatic residue near each end of a transmembrane helix, for example, that of GWALP23 (acetyl-GGALW(5)(LA)6LW(19)LAGA-[ethanol]amide). To this end, we have employed (2)H-labeled alanines and solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the consequences of moving or replacing W5 or W19 in GWALP23 with selected Tyr, Phe, or Trp residues at the same or proximate locations. We find that GWALP23 peptides having F5, Y5, or W5 exhibit essentially the same average tilt and similar dynamics in bilayer membranes of 1,2-dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) or 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC). When double Tyr anchors are present, in Y(4,5)GWALP23 the NMR observables are markedly more subject to dynamic averaging and at the same time are less responsive to the bilayer thickness. Decreased dynamics are nevertheless observed when ring hydrogen bonding is removed, such that F(4,5)GWALP23 exhibits a similar extent of low dynamic averaging as GWALP23 itself. When F5 is the sole aromatic group in the N-interfacial region, the dynamic averaging is (only) slightly more extensive than with W5, Y5, or Y4 alone or with F4,5, yet it is much less than that observed for Y(4,5)GWALP23. Interestingly, moving Y5 to Y4 or W19 to W18, while retaining only one hydrogen-bond-capable aromatic ring at each interface, maintains the low level of dynamic averaging but alters the helix azimuthal rotation. The rotation change is about 40° for Y4 regardless of whether the host lipid bilayer is

  9. Biological findings from the PheWAS catalog: focus on connective tissue-related disorders (pelvic floor dysfunction, abdominal hernia, varicose veins and hemorrhoids).

    PubMed

    Salnikova, Lyubov E; Khadzhieva, Maryam B; Kolobkov, Dmitry S

    2016-07-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction, specifically genital prolapse (GP) and stress urinary inconsistency (SUI) presumably co-occur with other connective tissue disorders such as hernia, hemorrhoids, and varicose veins. Observations on non-random coexistence of these disorders have never been summarized in a meta-analysis. The performed meta-analysis demonstrated that varicose veins and hernia are associated with GP. Disease connections on the molecular level may be partially based on shared genetic susceptibility. A unique opportunity to estimate shared genetic susceptibility to disorders is provided by a PheWAS (phenome-wide association study) designed to utilize GWAS data concurrently to many phenotypes. We searched the PheWAS Catalog, which includes the results of the PheWAS study with P value < 0.05, for genes associated with GP, SUI, abdominal hernia, varicose veins and hemorrhoids. We found pronounced signals for the associations of the SLC2A9 gene with SUI (P = 6.0e-05) and the MYH9 gene with varicose veins of lower extremity (P = 0.0001) and hemorrhoids (P = 0.0007). The comparison of the PheWAS Catalog and the NHGRI Catalog data revealed enrichment of genes associated with bone mineral density in GP and with activated partial thromboplastin time in varicose veins of lower extremity. In cross-phenotype associations, genes responsible for peripheral nerve functions seem to predominate. This study not only established novel biologically plausible associations that may warrant further studies but also exemplified an effective use of the PheWAS Catalog data.

  10. Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rH GM-CSF) regulates f Met-Leu-Phe receptors on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Y H; Lopez, A F; Marasco, W A; Lucas, C M; Wong, G G; Burns, G F; Vadas, M A

    1988-01-01

    The regulation of mature human neutrophil function by recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rH GM-CSF) was studied. Preincubation of neutrophils with this CSF did not stimulate superoxide anion directly but enhanced the subsequent release of superoxide anion in response to stimulation with the bacterial product formylmethionylleucyl-phenylalanine (f Met-Leu-Phe). Enhanced superoxide anion production was evident by 5 min and reached a plateau at 30 min. In contrast, neutrophils preincubated with rH GM-CSF exhibited reduced chemotaxis under agarose in response to a gradient of f Met-Leu-Phe. The inhibition of neutrophil migration was dependent on the dose of rH GM-CSF and exhibited a time-course similar to the effect on superoxide production. Binding studies of f Met-Leu-[3H]Phe to purified human neutrophils revealed heterogeneous binding to unstimulated cells. Two affinity components were identified. The high-affinity component consisted of approximately 2000 sites/cell and had an average Kd of 4 +/- 2 nM (n = 6). The low-affinity component consisted of approximately 40,000 sites/cell and had an average Kd of 220 +/- 130 nM (n = 6). rH GM-CSF caused conversion to a linear Scatchard plot showing no significant change in total binding sites but a single Kd of 30 +/- 10 nM. These data indicate that rH GM-CSF may influence neutrophil responses to f Met-Leu-Phe by regulating the affinity of f Met-Leu-Phe receptors. PMID:2842255

  11. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  12. GLP-1 agonist treatment: implications for diabetic retinopathy screening.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, Lakshminarayanan; Humphreys, Tracy; Hariman, Christian; Walker, Adrian B; Varughese, George I

    2011-12-01

    Rapid improvement in glycaemic control induced by GLP-1 agonist therapy could be yet another illustration of transient or permanent progression of diabetic retinopathy, similar to documented examples such as pregnancy and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Specific guidelines would be needed to monitor this paradoxical phenomenon during treatment with GLP-1 agonists. PMID:21906831

  13. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  14. Interactions between cannabinoid receptor agonists and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys discriminating fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) enhance some (antinociceptive) but not other (positive reinforcing) effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, suggesting that cannabinoids might be combined with opioids to treat pain without increasing, and possibly decreasing, abuse. The degree to which cannabinoids enhance antinociceptive effects of opioids varies across drugs insofar as Δ(9)-THC and the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 increase the potency of some mu opioid receptor agonists (e.g., fentanyl) more than others (e.g., nalbuphine). It is not known whether interactions between cannabinoids and opioids vary similarly for other (abuse-related) effects. This study examined whether Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 differentially impact the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine in monkeys (n=4) discriminating 0.01mg/kg of fentanyl (s.c.) from saline. Fentanyl (0.00178-0.0178mg/kg) and nalbuphine (0.01-0.32mg/kg) dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding. Neither Δ(9)-THC (0.032-1.0mg/kg) nor CP55940 (0.0032-0.032mg/kg) enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl or nalbuphine; however, doses of Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 that shifted the nalbuphine dose-effect curve markedly to the right and/or down were less effective or ineffective in shifting the fentanyl dose-effect curve. The mu opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.032mg/kg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine similarly. These data indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine are more sensitive to attenuation by cannabinoids than those of fentanyl. That the discriminative stimulus effects of some opioids are more susceptible to modification by drugs from other classes has implications for developing maximally effective therapeutic drug mixtures with reduced abuse liability. PMID:27184925

  15. MR-PheWAS: hypothesis prioritization among potential causal effects of body mass index on many outcomes, using Mendelian randomization.

    PubMed

    Millard, Louise A C; Davies, Neil M; Timpson, Nic J; Tilling, Kate; Flach, Peter A; Davey Smith, George

    2015-01-01

    Observational cohort studies can provide rich datasets with a diverse range of phenotypic variables. However, hypothesis-driven epidemiological analyses by definition only test particular hypotheses chosen by researchers. Furthermore, observational analyses may not provide robust evidence of causality, as they are susceptible to confounding, reverse causation and measurement error. Using body mass index (BMI) as an exemplar, we demonstrate a novel extension to the phenome-wide association study (pheWAS) approach, using automated screening with genotypic instruments to screen for causal associations amongst any number of phenotypic outcomes. We used a sample of 8,121 children from the ALSPAC dataset, and tested the linear association of a BMI-associated allele score with 172 phenotypic outcomes (with variable sample sizes). We also performed an instrumental variable analysis to estimate the causal effect of BMI on each phenotype. We found 21 of the 172 outcomes were associated with the allele score at an unadjusted p < 0.05 threshold, and use Bonferroni corrections, permutation testing and estimates of the false discovery rate to consider the strength of results given the number of tests performed. The most strongly associated outcomes included leptin, lipid profile, and blood pressure. We also found novel evidence of effects of BMI on a global self-worth score. PMID:26568383

  16. Validation challenge of density-functional theory for peptides-example of Ac-Phe-Ala5-LysH(+).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mariana; Chutia, Sucismita; Scheffler, Matthias; Blum, Volker

    2014-09-01

    We assess the performance of a group of exchange-correlation functionals for predicting the secondary structure of peptide chains, up to a new many-body dispersion corrected hybrid density functional, dubbed PBE0+MBD* by its original authors. For the purpose of validation, we first compare to published, high-level benchmark conformational energy hierarchies (coupled cluster at the singles, doubles, and perturbative triples level, CCSD(T)) for 73 conformers of small three-residue peptides, establishing that the van der Waals corrected PBE0 functional yields an average error of only ∼20 meV (∼0.5 kcal/mol). This compares to ∼40-50 meV for nondispersion corrected PBE0 and 40-100 meV for different empirical force fields (estimated for the alanine tetrapeptide). For longer peptide chains that form a secondary structure, CCSD(T) level benchmark data are currently unaffordable. We thus turn to the experimentally well studied Ac-Phe-Ala5-LysH(+) peptide, for which four closely competing conformers were established by infrared spectroscopy. For comparison, an exhaustive theoretical conformational space exploration yields at least 11 competing low energy minima. We show that (i) the many-body dispersion correction, (ii) the hybrid functional nature of PBE0+MBD*, and (iii) zero-point corrections are needed to reveal the four experimentally observed structures as the minima that would be populated at low temperature. PMID:24405171

  17. Rapid Brownian Motion Primes Ultrafast Reconstruction of Intrinsically Disordered Phe-Gly Repeats Inside the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Moussavi-Baygi, R; Mofrad, M R K

    2016-01-01

    Conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins, such as Phe-Gly repeat domains, alters drastically when they are confined in, and tethered to, nan channels. This has challenged our understanding of how they serve to selectively facilitate translocation of nuclear transport receptor (NTR)-bearing macromolecules. Heterogeneous FG-repeats, tethered to the NPC interior, nonuniformly fill the channel in a diameter-dependent manner and adopt a rapid Brownian motion, thereby forming a porous and highly dynamic polymeric meshwork that percolates in radial and axial directions and features two distinguishable zones: a dense hydrophobic rod-like zone located in the center, and a peripheral low-density shell-like zone. The FG-meshwork is locally disrupted upon interacting with NTR-bearing macromolecules, but immediately reconstructs itself between 0.44 μs and 7.0 μs, depending on cargo size and shape. This confers a perpetually-sealed state to the NPC, and is solely due to rapid Brownian motion of FG-repeats, not FG-repeat hydrophobic bonds. Elongated-shaped macromolecules, both in the presence and absence of NTRs, penetrate more readily into the FG-meshwork compared to their globular counterparts of identical volume and surface chemistry, highlighting the importance of the shape effects in nucleocytoplasmic transport. These results can help our understanding of geometrical effects in, and the design of, intelligent and responsive biopolymer-based materials in nanofiltration and artificial nanopores. PMID:27470900

  18. Human biodistribution of [111In]diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-(DTPA)-D-[Phe1]-octreotide and peroperative detection of endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Ohrvall, U; Westlin, J E; Nilsson, S; Wilander, E; Juhlin, C; Rastad, J; Akerström, G

    1995-12-01

    Requisites for preoperative and intraoperative tumor localization with [111In]diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-D-[Phe1]-octreotide scanning were explored in 23 patients with endocrine tumors (15 carcinoids, 4 insulinomas, and single cases of gastrinoma, medullary thyroid carcinoma, aldosteronoma, and paraganglioma). The patients were subjected to Octreoscan single photon emission computed tomographic examination prior to surgery and well counter investigation of nuclide uptake in tumors and normal tissues sampled at surgery. Somatostatin receptor-positive tumors demonstrated efficient nuclide accumulation with mean tumor:blood radioactivity ratios of 180-370 (for carcinoids and insulinoma), compared with tissue:blood ratios of 302 for spleen, 42 for liver, and < 10-15 in other normal tissues (pancreas, small intestine, and mesenteric fat). Inefficient preoperative visualization of lesions was related to inconspicuous size, as for primary intestinal carcinoids, tiny liver metastases, and a single small insulinoma. High background activity, pronounced tumor fibrosis, and meager accumulation of tracer also interfered with visualization. Tumor deposits in organs with low background activity (such as carcinoid mesenteric metastases and endocrine pancreatic tumors) were generally most readily detected. Intraoperative investigations with hand-held gamma detector probes were disturbed by obvious high background activity. These investigations revealed two preoperatively unrecognized primary intestinal carcinoids, which, however, were both palpable during surgery. These studies, therefore, had little impact on the surgical strategy. PMID:7493348

  19. Rapid Brownian Motion Primes Ultrafast Reconstruction of Intrinsically Disordered Phe-Gly Repeats Inside the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Moussavi-Baygi, R.; Mofrad, M. R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins, such as Phe-Gly repeat domains, alters drastically when they are confined in, and tethered to, nan channels. This has challenged our understanding of how they serve to selectively facilitate translocation of nuclear transport receptor (NTR)-bearing macromolecules. Heterogeneous FG-repeats, tethered to the NPC interior, nonuniformly fill the channel in a diameter-dependent manner and adopt a rapid Brownian motion, thereby forming a porous and highly dynamic polymeric meshwork that percolates in radial and axial directions and features two distinguishable zones: a dense hydrophobic rod-like zone located in the center, and a peripheral low-density shell-like zone. The FG-meshwork is locally disrupted upon interacting with NTR-bearing macromolecules, but immediately reconstructs itself between 0.44 μs and 7.0 μs, depending on cargo size and shape. This confers a perpetually-sealed state to the NPC, and is solely due to rapid Brownian motion of FG-repeats, not FG-repeat hydrophobic bonds. Elongated-shaped macromolecules, both in the presence and absence of NTRs, penetrate more readily into the FG-meshwork compared to their globular counterparts of identical volume and surface chemistry, highlighting the importance of the shape effects in nucleocytoplasmic transport. These results can help our understanding of geometrical effects in, and the design of, intelligent and responsive biopolymer-based materials in nanofiltration and artificial nanopores. PMID:27470900

  20. MR-PheWAS: hypothesis prioritization among potential causal effects of body mass index on many outcomes, using Mendelian randomization

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Louise A. C.; Davies, Neil M.; Timpson, Nic J.; Tilling, Kate; Flach, Peter A.; Smith, George Davey

    2015-01-01

    Observational cohort studies can provide rich datasets with a diverse range of phenotypic variables. However, hypothesis-driven epidemiological analyses by definition only test particular hypotheses chosen by researchers. Furthermore, observational analyses may not provide robust evidence of causality, as they are susceptible to confounding, reverse causation and measurement error. Using body mass index (BMI) as an exemplar, we demonstrate a novel extension to the phenome-wide association study (pheWAS) approach, using automated screening with genotypic instruments to screen for causal associations amongst any number of phenotypic outcomes. We used a sample of 8,121 children from the ALSPAC dataset, and tested the linear association of a BMI-associated allele score with 172 phenotypic outcomes (with variable sample sizes). We also performed an instrumental variable analysis to estimate the causal effect of BMI on each phenotype. We found 21 of the 172 outcomes were associated with the allele score at an unadjusted p < 0.05 threshold, and use Bonferroni corrections, permutation testing and estimates of the false discovery rate to consider the strength of results given the number of tests performed. The most strongly associated outcomes included leptin, lipid profile, and blood pressure. We also found novel evidence of effects of BMI on a global self-worth score. PMID:26568383

  1. Crystal structure of Boc-(S)-ABOC-(S)-Ala-(S)-ABOC-(S)-Phe-OBn chloro-form monosolvate.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Emmanuel; Moulat, Laure; Legrand, Baptiste; Amblard, Muriel; Calmès, Monique; Didierjean, Claude

    2015-10-01

    In the title compound, phenyl (S)-2-[(S)-(1-{2-[(S)-(1-{[(tert-but-oxy)carbon-yl]amino}-bicyclo-[2.2.2]octan-2-yl)formamido]-propanamido}-bicyclo-[2.2.2]octan-2-yl)formamido]-3-phenyl-propano-ate chloro-form monosolvate, C42H56N4O7·CHCl3, the α,β-hybrid peptide contains two non-proteinogenic amino acid residues of (S)-1-amino-bicyclo-[2.2.2]octane-2-carb-oxy-lic acid [(S)-ABOC], two amino acid residues of (S)-2-amino-propanoic acid [(S)-Ala] and (S)-2-amino-3-phenyl-propanoic acid [(S)-Phe], and protecting groups of tert-but-oxy-carbonyl (Boc) and benzyl ester (OBn). The tetra-mer folds into a right-handed mixed 11/9 helix stabilized by intra-molecular i,i + 3 and i,i - 1 C=O⋯H-N hydrogen bonds. In the crystal, the oligomers are linked by N-H⋯O=C hydrogen bonds into chains along the a-axis direction. The chloro-form solvent mol-ecules are inter-calated between the folded chains via C-H⋯O=C inter-actions. PMID:26594404

  2. Mouse Prion Protein Polymorphism Phe-108/Val-189 Affects the Kinetics of Fibril Formation and the Response to Seeding

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Leonardo M.; Kumar, Jitendra; Renault, Ludovic; Young, Howard S.; Sim, Valerie L.

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders associated with the polymerization of the cellular form of prion protein (PrPC) into an amyloidogenic β-sheet infectious form (PrPSc). The sequence of host PrP is the major determinant of host prion disease susceptibility. In mice, the presence of allele a (Prnpa, encoding the polymorphism Leu-108/Thr-189) or b (Prnpb, Phe-108/Val-189) is associated with short or long incubation times, respectively, following infection with PrPSc. The molecular bases linking PrP sequence, infection susceptibility, and convertibility of PrPC into PrPSc remain unclear. Here we show that recombinant PrPa and PrPb aggregate and respond to seeding differently in vitro. Our kinetic studies reveal differences during the nucleation phase of the aggregation process, where PrPb exhibits a longer lag phase that cannot be completely eliminated by seeding the reaction with preformed fibrils. Additionally, PrPb is more prone to propagate features of the seeds, as demonstrated by conformational stability and electron microscopy studies of the formed fibrils. We propose a model of polymerization to explain how the polymorphisms at positions 108 and 189 produce the phenotypes seen in vivo. This model also provides insight into phenomena such as species barrier and prion strain generation, two phenomena also influenced by the primary structure of PrP. PMID:23283973

  3. Validation challenge of density-functional theory for peptides-example of Ac-Phe-Ala5-LysH(+).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mariana; Chutia, Sucismita; Scheffler, Matthias; Blum, Volker

    2014-09-01

    We assess the performance of a group of exchange-correlation functionals for predicting the secondary structure of peptide chains, up to a new many-body dispersion corrected hybrid density functional, dubbed PBE0+MBD* by its original authors. For the purpose of validation, we first compare to published, high-level benchmark conformational energy hierarchies (coupled cluster at the singles, doubles, and perturbative triples level, CCSD(T)) for 73 conformers of small three-residue peptides, establishing that the van der Waals corrected PBE0 functional yields an average error of only ∼20 meV (∼0.5 kcal/mol). This compares to ∼40-50 meV for nondispersion corrected PBE0 and 40-100 meV for different empirical force fields (estimated for the alanine tetrapeptide). For longer peptide chains that form a secondary structure, CCSD(T) level benchmark data are currently unaffordable. We thus turn to the experimentally well studied Ac-Phe-Ala5-LysH(+) peptide, for which four closely competing conformers were established by infrared spectroscopy. For comparison, an exhaustive theoretical conformational space exploration yields at least 11 competing low energy minima. We show that (i) the many-body dispersion correction, (ii) the hybrid functional nature of PBE0+MBD*, and (iii) zero-point corrections are needed to reveal the four experimentally observed structures as the minima that would be populated at low temperature.

  4. Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK) disrupts and remodels early oligomer states of the Alzheimer disease Aβ42 protein.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xueyun; Gessel, Megan M; Wisniewski, Meagan L; Viswanathan, Kishore; Wright, Dennis L; Bahr, Ben A; Bowers, Michael T

    2012-02-24

    The oligomerization of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is an important event in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology. Developing small molecules that disrupt formation of early oligomeric states of Aβ and thereby reduce the effective amount of toxic oligomers is a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. Here, mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry were used to investigate the effects of a small molecule, Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK), on the Aβ42 form of the protein. The mass spectrum of a mixture of PADK and Aβ42 clearly shows that PADK binds directly to Aβ42 monomers and small oligomers. Ion mobility results indicate that PADK not only inhibits the formation of Aβ42 dodecamers, but also removes preformed Aβ42 dodecamers from the solution. Electron microscopy images show that PADK inhibits Aβ42 fibril formation in the solution. These results are consistent with a previous study that found that PADK has protective effects in an AD transgenic mouse model. The study of PADK and Aβ42 provides an example of small molecule therapeutic development for AD and other amyloid diseases.

  5. Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK) Disrupts and Remodels Early Oligomer States of the Alzheimer Disease Aβ42 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xueyun; Gessel, Megan M.; Wisniewski, Meagan L.; Viswanathan, Kishore; Wright, Dennis L.; Bahr, Ben A.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    The oligomerization of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is an important event in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology. Developing small molecules that disrupt formation of early oligomeric states of Aβ and thereby reduce the effective amount of toxic oligomers is a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. Here, mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry were used to investigate the effects of a small molecule, Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK), on the Aβ42 form of the protein. The mass spectrum of a mixture of PADK and Aβ42 clearly shows that PADK binds directly to Aβ42 monomers and small oligomers. Ion mobility results indicate that PADK not only inhibits the formation of Aβ42 dodecamers, but also removes preformed Aβ42 dodecamers from the solution. Electron microscopy images show that PADK inhibits Aβ42 fibril formation in the solution. These results are consistent with a previous study that found that PADK has protective effects in an AD transgenic mouse model. The study of PADK and Aβ42 provides an example of small molecule therapeutic development for AD and other amyloid diseases. PMID:22253440

  6. Design, Synthesis, Structural and Functional Characterization of Novel Melanocortin Agonists Based on the Cyclotide Kalata B1*

    PubMed Central

    Eliasen, Rasmus; Daly, Norelle L.; Wulff, Birgitte S.; Andresen, Thomas L.; Conde-Frieboes, Kilian W.; Craik, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly important global health problem that lacks current treatment options. The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is a target for obesity therapies because its activation triggers appetite suppression and increases energy expenditure. Cyclotides have been suggested as scaffolds for the insertion and stabilization of pharmaceutically active peptides. In this study, we explored the development of appetite-reducing peptides by synthesizing MC4R agonists based on the insertion of the His-Phe-Arg-Trp sequence into the cyclotide kalata B1. The ability of the analogues to fold similarly to kalata B1 but display MC4R activity were investigated. Four peptides were synthesized using t-butoxycarbonyl peptide chemistry with a C-terminal thioester to facilitate backbone cyclization. The structures of the peptides were found to be similar to kalata B1, evaluated by Hα NMR chemical shifts. KB1(GHFRWG;23–28) had a Ki of 29 nm at the MC4R and was 107 or 314 times more selective over this receptor than MC1R or MC5R, respectively, and had no detectable binding to MC3R. The peptide had higher affinity for the MC4R than the endogenous agonist, α-melanocyte stimulation hormone, but it was less potent at the MC4R, with an EC50 of 580 nm for activation of the MC4R. In conclusion, we synthesized melanocortin analogues of kalata B1 that preserve the structural scaffold and display receptor binding and functional activity. KB1(GHFRWG;23–28) is potent and selective for the MC4R. This compound validates the use of cyclotides as scaffolds and has the potential to be a new lead for the treatment of obesity. PMID:23012369

  7. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation. PMID:22269613

  8. [PPAR receptors and insulin sensitivity: new agonists in development].

    PubMed

    Pégorier, J-P

    2005-04-01

    Thiazolidinediones (or glitazones) are synthetic PPARgamma (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors gamma) ligands with well recognized effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The clinical use of these PPARgamma agonists in type 2 diabetic patients leads to an improved glycemic control and an inhanced insulin sensitivity, and at least in animal models, to a protective effect on pancreatic beta-cell function. However, they can produce adverse effects, generally mild or moderate, but some of them (mainly peripheral edema and weight gain) may conduct to treatment cessation. Several pharmacological classes are currently in pre-clinical or clinical development, with the objective to retain the beneficial metabolic properties of PPARgamma agonists, either alone or in association with the PPARalpha agonists (fibrates) benefit on lipid profile, but devoid of the side-effects on weight gain and fluid retention. These new pharmacological classes: partial PPARgamma agonists, PPARgamma antagonists, dual PPARalpha/PPARgamma agonists, pan PPARalpha/beta(delta)/gamma agonists, RXR receptor agonists (rexinoids), are presented in this review. Main results from in vitro cell experiments and animal model studies are discussed, as well as the few published short-term studies in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:15959400

  9. Irreversible binding of a carbostyril-based agonist and antagonist to the β-adrenoceptor in DDT1 MF-2 cells and rat aorta

    PubMed Central

    Deyrup, Malgorzata D; Greco, Phillip G; Otero, Deborah H; Dennis, Donn M; Gelband, Craig H; Baker, Stephen P

    1998-01-01

    The chemoreactive ligands 5(2-(((1′-(4′-isothiocyanatophenylamino)thiocarbonyl)-amino)-2-methyl-propyl)amino-2-hydroxypropoxy)-3,4-dihydrocarbostyril (DCITC) and 8-hydroxy-5(2-(((1′-(4′-isothiocya-natophenylamino)thiocarbonyl)amino)-2-methylprop-2-yl)amino-1-hydroxyethyl)-carbostyril (HCITC)were synthesized and shown to be potent irreversible antagonist and agonist ligands, respectively, for the β-adrenoceptor in DDT1 MF-2 (DDT) cells and the rat isolated aorta.In DDT cell membranes DCITC and HCITC inhibited (−)[125I]-iodocyanopindolol (CYP) binding to the β-adrenoceptor with IC50 values of 1.1 and 18 nM, respectively. (−)-Isoprenaline inhibited [125I]-CYP binding with an IC50 of 355 nM. Pretreatment of membranes with either chemoreactive ligand produced a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in the β-adrenoceptor content, indicating irreversible receptor binding. DCITC at concentrations up to 10 μM did not stimulate cyclic AMP accumulation in DDT cells nor did it amplify forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation.In the rat isolated aorta, DCITC (0.1 μM) did not affect either the phenylephrine-mediated tissue contraction or the acetylcholine-mediated relaxation. DCITC attenuated the maximal (−)-isoprenaline-mediated relaxation of a phenylephrine contracted aorta in a concentration-dependent manner and shifted the dose-response curves for (−)-isoprenaline to the right. The DCITC-induced decrease in maximal response was not reversed by extensive tissue washing. By use of the operational model of agonism, the calculated dissociation constant for (−)-isoprenaline ws 286 nM and the estimated receptor reserve for this agonist was 23% at the maximal response.HCITC and (−)-isoprenaline stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in DDT cells with pD2 values (negative logarithm to base 10 of EC50) of 7.95 and 7.97, respectively, and both mediated the same maximal stimulation. In the rat isolated aorta, HCITC produced a concentration

  10. Superpotent [Dmt¹] dermorphin tetrapeptides containing the 4-aminotetrahydro-2-benzazepin-3-one scaffold with mixed μ/δ opioid receptor agonistic properties.

    PubMed

    Vandormael, Bart; Fourla, Danai-Dionysia; Gramowski-Voss, Alexandra; Kosson, Piotr; Weiss, Dieter G; Schröder, Olaf H-U; Lipkowski, Andrzej; Georgoussi, Zafiroula; Tourwé, Dirk

    2011-11-24

    Novel dermorphin tetrapeptides are described in which Tyr(1) is replaced by Dmt(1), where d-Ala(2) and Gly(4) are N-methylated, and where Phe(3)-Gly(4) residue is substituted by the constrained Aba(3)-Gly(4) peptidomimetic. Most of these peptidic ligands displayed binding affinities in the nanomolar range for both μ- and δ-opioid receptors but no detectable affinity for the κ-opioid receptor. Measurements of cAMP accumulation, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) in HEK293 cells stably expressing each of these receptors individually, and functional screening in primary neuronal cultures confirmed the potent agonistic properties of these peptides. The most potent ligand H-Dmt-NMe-d-Ala-Aba-Gly-NH(2) (BVD03) displayed mixed μ/δ opioid agonist properties with picomolar functional potencies. Functional electrophysiological in vitro assays using primary cortical and spinal cord networks showed that this analogue possessed electrophysiological similarity toward gabapentin and sufentanil, which makes it an interesting candidate for further study as an analgesic for neuropathic pain.

  11. Antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists.

    PubMed

    Labrie, F; Bélanger, A; Kelly, P A; Séguin, C; Cusan, L; Lefebvre, F A; Reeves, J J; Lemay, A; Faure, N; Gourdeau, Y; Raynaud, J P

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms responsible for the antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists. Large doses of the LHRH agonist LHRH-EA lead to a marked reduction of testicular and secondary sex organ weight, LH receptor levels, and plasma testosterone concentration. A marked inhibition of basal testicular and testosterone concentrations is obtained after daily administration of the LHRH agonists at doses greater than 10 ng. Treatment with low doses of the LHRH agonist can lead to an increased steroidogenic response to LH. Treatment with low doses of LHRH agonists could stimulate Leydig cell function while high doses are history. A study of the effects of longterm treatment with an LHRH agonsist on spermatogenesis revelaed that testis, prostate, and seminal vesicle weight decreased and plasma LH and FSH levels increased over 12 weeks. Comparison of the effects of increasing doses of LHRH agonist on testicular and ovarian gonadotropin receptors and steroidogenesis in male rats indicates that single or repeated administration of LHRH agonists can lead to loss of testicular LH receptors in the absence of the pituitary gland. The loss of ovarian gonadotropin receptors in female rats is also investigated. Antifertility effects of LHRH ethylamide are accompanied by a marked loss of LH/hCG and FSH receptors in ovarian tissue. The injection of 1,3, or 10 ng LHRH-EA in intact rats has no significant effect on ovarian LH receptor levels. A study of the direct action of LHRH agonists at the ovarian level demonstrates a close relationship between the binding activity of a large series of LHRH agonists and antagonists in the anterior pituitary gland and the ovary. Inhibition of testicular steroidogenesis in man by treatment with a potent LHRH agonist is also demonstrated. Intranasal administration of LHRH ethylamide has luteolytic effects in normal women. Daily administration of LHRH-EA inhibited ovulation in all but 2 of 89 treatment

  12. A new alpha-globin variant with increased oxygen affinity in a Swiss family: Hb Frauenfeld [alpha 138(H21)Ser-->Phe, TCC>TTC (alpha 2)].

    PubMed

    Hochuli, Michel; Zurbriggen, Karin; Schmid, Marlis; Speer, Oliver; Rochat, Philippe; Frauchiger, Beat; Kleinert, Peter; Schmugge, Markus; Troxler, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    A new alpha-globin mutation [alpha 138(H21)Ser-->Phe] was found in a 55-year-old male proband with an erythrocytosis known since his youth. Cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed an additional peak eluting slightly before Hb A indicating the presence of a variant. The peak area of the variant was approximately one-third that of Hb A suggesting an alpha-globin variant. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the mutation at the protein level. The variant is also detectable with isoelectric focusing and reversed phase HPLC. DNA analysis revealed a heterozygous sequence mutation at codon 138 of the alpha2 gene. A C>T transition at the second nucleotide of the codon indicated a Ser-->Phe exchange. The variant showed increased oxygen affinity and was named Hb Frauenfeld.

  13. PHE in Action”: Development and Modeling of an Intervention to Improve Patient Engagement among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Julia; Graffigna, Guendalina

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic conditions among older adults constitutes a major public health problem. Thus, changes in lifestyles are required to prevent secondary conditions and sustain good care practices. While patient engagement received great attention in the last years as key strategy to solve this issue, to date no interventions exist to sustain the engagement of older chronic patients toward their health management. This study describes the design, development, and optimization of PHEinAction, a theoretically-driven intervention program to increase patient engagement in older chronic populations and consequently to foster healthy changes that can help reduce risks of health problems. The development process followed the UK Medical Research Council's (MRC) guidelines and involved selecting the theoretical base for the intervention, identifying the relevant evidence-based literature, and conducting exploratory research to qualitatively evaluate program's feasibility, acceptability, and comprehension. The result was a user-endorsed intervention designed to improve older patients' engagement in health management based on the theoretical framework of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) model. The intervention program, which emerged from this process, consisted of 2 monthly face-to-face 1-h sessions delivered by a trained facilitator and one brief telephonic consultation, and aimed to facilitate a range of changes for patient engagement (e.g., motivation to change, health information seeking and use, emotional adjustment, health behaviors planning). PHEinAction is the first example of a theoretically-based patient engagement intervention designed for older chronic targets. The intervention program is based on psychological theory and evidence; it facilitates emotional, psychological, and behavioral processes to support patient engagement and lifestyle change and maintenance. It provides estimates of the extent to which it could help high-risk groups

  14. PHE in Action”: Development and Modeling of an Intervention to Improve Patient Engagement among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Julia; Graffigna, Guendalina

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic conditions among older adults constitutes a major public health problem. Thus, changes in lifestyles are required to prevent secondary conditions and sustain good care practices. While patient engagement received great attention in the last years as key strategy to solve this issue, to date no interventions exist to sustain the engagement of older chronic patients toward their health management. This study describes the design, development, and optimization of PHEinAction, a theoretically-driven intervention program to increase patient engagement in older chronic populations and consequently to foster healthy changes that can help reduce risks of health problems. The development process followed the UK Medical Research Council's (MRC) guidelines and involved selecting the theoretical base for the intervention, identifying the relevant evidence-based literature, and conducting exploratory research to qualitatively evaluate program's feasibility, acceptability, and comprehension. The result was a user-endorsed intervention designed to improve older patients' engagement in health management based on the theoretical framework of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) model. The intervention program, which emerged from this process, consisted of 2 monthly face-to-face 1-h sessions delivered by a trained facilitator and one brief telephonic consultation, and aimed to facilitate a range of changes for patient engagement (e.g., motivation to change, health information seeking and use, emotional adjustment, health behaviors planning). PHEinAction is the first example of a theoretically-based patient engagement intervention designed for older chronic targets. The intervention program is based on psychological theory and evidence; it facilitates emotional, psychological, and behavioral processes to support patient engagement and lifestyle change and maintenance. It provides estimates of the extent to which it could help high-risk groups

  15. Calcium mobilization by quinones and other free radical generating systems in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.C.; Chan, T.M.

    1987-05-01

    Using isolated rat hepatocytes, sublethal concentrations of quinones and other free radical generating systems were used to test the role of extracellular calcium (Ca) in activating glycogen phosphorylase and intracellular Ca mobilization. The ..cap alpha..-agonist phenylephrine (Phe) was used for comparison. The EC50's were: Phe = 2.6 x 10/sup -7/M, menadione (K/sub 3/) = 4.5 x 10/sup -5/M, dicumarol = 2 x 10/sup -5/M. In normal Ca buffer, activation by K/sub 3/ was slower than Phe, being maximal at 2' but more sustained. Dicumarol and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BH) activated phosphorylase similarly. The xanthine-xanthine oxidase (X-XO) system stimulated activation similar to K/sub 3/. Dicumarol greatly augmented phosphorylase activation by K/sub 3/ but had no effect on Phe action. Depletion of extracellular Ca abolished Phe action, markedly diminished t-BH and dicumarol, but had no effect on K/sub 3/ or X-XO activation of phosphorylase. Ca efflux exchange measured in /sup 45/Ca preloaded cells were stimulated equally by Phe, K/sub 3/, dicumarol, or K/sub 3/+ dicumarol in the presence of extracellular Ca. Absence of extracellular Ca abolished Phe effect but minimally affected stimulation by K/sub 3/ or K/sub 3/+ dicumarol. These data suggest that activation of glycogen phosphorylase by sublethal doses of quinones may not reflect the degree and the mechanism of intracellular Ca mobilization.

  16. Design of peptides with α, β-dehydro-residues: synthesis and crystal structure of a tripeptide N-benzyloxycarbonyl-ΔVal-ΔPhe- L-Ala-OCH 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Vijay Kumar; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Tej P.

    2005-03-01

    In order to develop the design rules for producing specific conformations of peptides with α, β-dehydro-residues a peptide Cbz-ΔVal-ΔPhe-Ala-OCH 3 was synthesized in solution phase. The crystal structure has been determined by X-ray diffraction method. The structure was refined to an R-value of 0.050. The peptide adopts a type I β-turn conformation with backbone torsion angles of two corner residues, ϕ1=-53.9(6)°, ψ1=-33.0(6)°, ϕ2=-73.7(5)° and ψ2=-12.2(6)°. The conformation is stabilized by an intramolecular 4→1 hydrogen bond involving NH of Ala residue as a donor and carbonyl oxygen atom of Cbz group as an acceptor. The torsion angles, χ11,1=172.8(6) and χ11,2=-6.9(9) of ΔVal residue indicate that its side chain is planar while the torsion angles, χ21=-9.0(9), χ22,1=-43.4(10) and χ22,2=130.1(9) show that the side chain of ΔPhe deviates considerably from the planarity. This is the first sequence in which ΔVal and ΔPhe are introduced at adjacent positions and the structure reveals clearly that the side chain of ΔPhe is a relatively less rigid than that of ΔVal. The molecules are packed in columns parallel to c-axis.

  17. Isomerization and epimerization of the aspartyl tetrapeptide Ala-Phe-Asp-GlyOH at pH 10-A CE study.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Christin; Bunz, Svenja-Catharina; Imhof, Diana; Neusüss, Christian; Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2013-09-01

    Isomerization and enantiomerization of Asp in the tetrapeptide Ala-Phe-Asp-GlyOH are studied at pH 10 and 80°C as well as 25°C. CE-MS allowed the distinction between α-Asp and β-Asp linkages in degradation products based on the ratio of the b and y fragment ions. Besides isomerization and enantiomerization of Asp, enantiomerization of Ala and Phe was also observed at both temperatures by chiral amino acid HPLC analysis using Marfey's reagent for derivatization. The rate of enantiomerization of the amino acids proceeded in the order Asp > Ala > Phe. The CE assay was validated with respect to linearity, LOQ, LOD, and precision and employed to characterize the time course of the degradation of the tetrapeptide upon incubation in borate buffer, pH 10. Isomerization to β-Asp peptides was identified as the major degradation reaction. The configuration of Asp or Ala affected the half-life of the starting peptide to a minor extent but did not influence the distribution of the individual products under equilibrium conditions at 80°C. Degradation at 25°C proceeded very slowly so that the equilibrium was not reached after 245 days.

  18. Mutation of Phe318 within the NPxxY(x)(5,6)F motif in melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 results in an efficient signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Akie; Horikawa, Manabu; Saho, Tomoko; Saito, Yumiko

    2012-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays an important role in feeding by coupling to Gα(q)- and Gα(i)-mediated signal transduction pathways. To interrogate the molecular basis for MCHR1 activation, we analyzed the effect of a series of site-directed mutations on rat MCHR1 function. In the highly conserved NPxxY(x)(5,6)F domain of GPCRs, the phenylalanine residue is involved in structural constraints; replacement with alanine generally leads to impaired/lost GPCR function. However, Phe-to-Ala (F318A) mutation in MCHR1 had no significant effect on the level of cell surface expression and receptor signaling. By analyzing a further series of mutants, we found that Phe-to-Lys substitution (F318K) caused the most significant reduction in the EC(50) value of MCH for calcium mobilization without affecting receptor expression at the cell surface. Interestingly, GTPγS-binding, which monitors Gα(i) activation, was not modulated by F318K. Our results, combined with computer modeling, provide new insight into the role of Phe in the NPxxY(x)(5,6)F motif as a structurally critical site for receptor dynamics and a determinant of Gα protein interaction.

  19. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  20. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  1. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25437461

  2. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25326839

  3. PPAR dual agonists: are they opening Pandora's Box?

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Rose, Madhankumar; Ganti, Subrahmanya S; Krishan, Pawan; Singh, Manjeet

    2007-08-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the major cause of mortality in patients of diabetes mellitus. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of nuclear hormone receptor superfamily comprising of three subtypes such as PPARalpha, PPARgamma and PPARdelta/beta. Activation of PPARalpha reduces triglycerides and involves in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPARgamma causes insulin sensitization and enhances glucose metabolism, whereas activation of PPARdelta enhances fatty acid metabolism. Current therapeutic strategies available for the treatment of diabetes do not inhibit the associated secondary cardiovascular complications. Hence, the development of multimodal drugs which can reduce hyperglycemia and concomitantly inhibit the progression of secondary cardiovascular complications may offer valuable therapeutic option. Several basic and clinical studies have exemplified the beneficial effects of PPARalpha and PPARgamma ligands in preventing the cardiovascular risks. The PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists are developed to increase insulin sensitivity and simultaneously prevent diabetic cardiovascular complications. Such compounds are under clinical trials and proposed for treatment of Type II diabetes with secondary cardiovascular complications. However, PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists such as muraglitazar, tesaglitazar and ragaglitazar have been noted to produce several cardiovascular risks and carcinogenicity, which raised number of questions about the clinical applications of dual agonists in diabetes and its associated complications. The ongoing basic studies have elucidated the cardio protective role of PPARdelta. Therefore, further studies are on the track to develop PPARalpha/delta and PPAR gamma/delta dual agonists and PPARalpha/gamma/delta pan agonists for the treatment of diabetic cardiovascular complications. The present review critically analyzes the protective and detrimental effect of PPAR agonists in

  4. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  5. Pharmacogenetics of beta2 adrenergic receptor agonists in asthma management.

    PubMed

    Ortega, V E

    2014-07-01

    Beta2 (β2) adrenergic receptor agonists (beta agonists) are a commonly prescribed treatment for asthma despite the small increase in risk for life-threatening adverse responses associated with long-acting beta agonist (LABA). The concern for life-threatening adverse effects associated with LABA and the inter-individual variability of therapeutic responsiveness to LABA-containing combination therapies provide the rationale for pharmacogenetic studies of beta agonists. These studies primarily evaluated genes within the β2-adrenergic receptor and related pathways; however, recent genome-wide studies have identified novel loci for beta agonist response. Recent studies have identified a role for rare genetic variants in determining beta agonist response and, potentially, the risk for rare, adverse responses to LABA. Before genomics research can be applied to the development of genetic profiles for personalized medicine, it will be necessary to continue adapting to the analysis of an increasing volume of genetic data in larger cohorts with a combination of analytical methods and in vitro studies.

  6. Pairwise agonist scanning predicts cellular signaling responses to combinatorial stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Manash S; Purvis, Jeremy E; Brass, Lawrence F; Diamond, Scott L

    2010-07-01

    Prediction of cellular response to multiple stimuli is central to evaluating patient-specific clinical status and to basic understanding of cell biology. Cross-talk between signaling pathways cannot be predicted by studying them in isolation and the combinatorial complexity of multiple agonists acting together prohibits an exhaustive exploration of the complete experimental space. Here we describe pairwise agonist scanning (PAS), a strategy that trains a neural network model based on measurements of cellular responses to individual and all pairwise combinations of input signals. We apply PAS to predict calcium signaling responses of human platelets in EDTA-treated plasma to six different agonists (ADP, convulxin, U46619, SFLLRN, AYPGKF and PGE(2)) at three concentrations (0.1, 1 and 10 x EC(50)). The model predicted responses to sequentially added agonists, to ternary combinations of agonists and to 45 different combinations of four to six agonists (R = 0.88). Furthermore, we use PAS to distinguish between the phenotypic responses of platelets from ten donors. Training neural networks with pairs of stimuli across the dose-response regime represents an efficient approach for predicting complex signal integration in a patient-specific disease milieu. PMID:20562863

  7. Substitutions at Phe61 in the beta3-beta4 hairpin of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase reveal a role for the Fingers subdomain in strand displacement DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Timothy S; Darden, Tom; Prasad, Vinayaka R

    2003-01-17

    Unlike most DNA polymerases, retroviral reverse transcriptases (RTs) are capable of strand displacement DNA synthesis in vitro, unassisted by other proteins. While human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RT has been shown to possess this rare ability, the structural determinants responsible are unknown. X-Ray crystallographic and biochemical studies have indicated that the beta3-beta4 hairpin of the fingers subdomain of HIV-1 RT contains key contacts for the incoming template strand. In order to assess the possible role of the fingers subdomain in strand displacement synthesis, a set of substitutions was created at the highly conserved Phe61 residue, which is thought to contact the template strand immediately ahead of the dNTP-binding site. Purified heterodimeric RTs containing Phe61 substitutions displayed altered degrees of strand displacement synthesis on nicked and gapped duplex DNA templates with the relative order being: F61Y > or = F61L > wild-type = F61A > F61W. In order to verify that the effects on strand displacement synthesis were not an indirect effect of alterations in processivity, all Phe61 mutants were tested for processive polymerization. While the strand displacement activity of F61W RT variant was affected severely, it displayed a wild-type-like processivity. In contrast, both F61L and F61Y substitutions, despite showing enhanced strand displacement synthesis, displayed reduced processivity. In contrast, the processivity of F61A mutant, which had displayed nearly wild-type-like strand displacement synthesis, was affected most. These results showed that the effects of Phe61 substitutions on strand displacement are not due to global changes in polymerase processivity. Analysis of pause sites during DNA polymerization on double-stranded templates revealed that the wild-type and the Phe61 mutant RTs interact with the template quite differently. Modeling a 5 nt duplex DNA ahead of the dNTP-binding site of HIV-1 RT suggested a correlation between

  8. Perception of specific trigeminal chemosensory agonists

    PubMed Central

    Frasnelli, J; Albrecht, J; Bryant, B; Lundström, JN

    2011-01-01

    The intranasal trigeminal system is a third chemical sense in addition to olfaction and gustation. As opposed to smell and taste, we still lack knowledge on the relationship between receptor binding and perception for the trigeminal system. We therefore investigated the sensitivity of the intranasal trigeminal system towards agonists of the trigeminal receptors TRPM8 and TRPA1 by assessing subjects’ ability to identify which nostril has been stimulated in a monorhinal stimulation design. We summed the number of correct identifications resulting in a lateralization score. Stimuli were menthol (activating TRPM8 receptors), eucalyptol (TRPM8), mustard oil (TRPA1) and two mixtures thereof (menthol/eucalyptol and menthol/mustard oil). In addition, we examined the relationship between intensity and lateralization scores and investigated whether intensity evaluation and lateralization scores of the mixtures show additive effects. All stimuli were correctly lateralized significantly above chance. Across subjects the lateralization scores for single compounds activating the same receptor showed a stronger correlation than stimuli activating different receptors. Although single compounds were isointense, the mixture of menthol and eucalyptol (activating only TRPM8) was perceived as weaker and was lateralized less accurately than the mixture of menthol and mustard oil (activating both TRPM8 and TRPA1) suggesting suppression effects in the former mixture. In conclusion, sensitivity of different subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons seems to be related, but only to a certain degree. The large coherence in sensitivity between various intranasal trigeminal stimuli suggests that measuring sensitivity to one single trigeminal chemical stimulus may be sufficient to generally assess the trigeminal system’s chemosensitivity. Further, for stimuli activating the same receptor a mixture suppression effect appears to occur similar to that observed in the other chemosensory

  9. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  10. RXR Partial Agonist CBt-PMN Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Type 2 Diabetes without the Side Effects of RXR Full Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treating insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in rodents, currently known retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonists induce significant adverse effects. Here we introduce a novel RXR partial agonist CBt-PMN (11b), which shows a potent glucose-lowering effect and improvements of insulin secretion and glucose tolerance without the serious adverse effects caused by RXR full agonists. We suggest that RXR partial agonists may be a new class of antitype 2 diabetes drug candidates. PMID:24900488

  11. Dihydrocodeine/Agonists for Alcohol Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, Albrecht; Müller, Markus; Frietsch, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol addiction too often remains insufficiently treated. It shows the same profile as severe chronic diseases, but no comparable, effective basic treatment has been established up to now. Especially patients with repeated relapses, despite all therapeutic approaches, and patients who are not able to attain an essential abstinence to alcohol, need a basic medication. It seems necessary to acknowledge that parts of them need any agonistic substance, for years, possibly lifelong. For >14 years, we have prescribed such substances with own addictive character for these patients. Methods: We present a documented best possible practice, no designed study. Since 1997, we prescribed Dihydrocodeine (DHC) to 102 heavily alcohol addicted patients, later, also Buprenorphine, Clomethiazole (>6 weeks), Baclofen, and in one case Amphetamine, each on individual indication. This paper focuses on the data with DHC, especially. The Clomethiazole-data has been submitted to a German journal. The number of treatments with the other substances is still low. Results: The 102 patients with the DHC treatment had 1367 medically assisted detoxifications and specialized therapies before! The 4 years-retention rate was 26.4%, including 2.8% successfully terminated treatments. In our 12-steps scale on clinical impression, we noticed a significant improvement from mean 3.7 to 8.4 after 2 years. The demand for medically assisted detoxifications in the 2 years remaining patients was reduced by 65.5%. Mean GGT improved from 206.6 U/l at baseline to 66.8 U/l after 2 years. Experiences with the other substances are similar but different in details. Conclusion: Similar to the Italian studies with GHB and Baclofen, we present a new approach, not only with new substances, but also with a new setting and much more trusting attitude. We observe a huge improvement, reaching an almost optimal, stable, long term status in around 1/4 of the patients already. Many further

  12. Multivariate optimization and validation of a capillary electrophoresis method for the simultaneous determination of dextromethorphan hydrobromur, phenylephrine hydrochloride, paracetamol and chlorpheniramine maleate in a pharmaceutical preparation using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Palabiyik, I Murat; Onur, Feyyaz

    2010-01-01

    A fast, accurate, precise and sensitive capillary electrophoresis method for the simultaneous determination of dextromethorphan hydrobromide, phenylephrine hydrochloride, paracetamol and chlorpheniramine maleate has been developed. Response surface methodology with a central composite design was used for optimization of the concentration of the buffer, pH of the buffer and applied voltage. Therefore, working with Na(2)HPO(4) buffer (pH 8.00, 0.01 M) at 20 kV as an applied voltage in the capillary electrophoresis method were found to be suitable; under these optimal conditions, these four active ingredients were separated in about 7 min. This developed method was validated and successfully applied to a pharmaceutical preparation, sugar-coated tablet, and the results were compared with a high-performance liquid chromatographic method developed by us.

  13. Honokiol: A non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist from nature☆

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Atanas G.; Wang, Jian N.; Gu, Shi P.; Bu, Jing; Kramer, Matthias P.; Baumgartner, Lisa; Fakhrudin, Nanang; Ladurner, Angela; Malainer, Clemens; Vuorinen, Anna; Noha, Stefan M.; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Schuster, Daniela; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M.; Heiss, Elke H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are clinically used to counteract hyperglycemia. However, so far experienced unwanted side effects, such as weight gain, promote the search for new PPARγ activators. Methods We used a combination of in silico, in vitro, cell-based and in vivo models to identify and validate natural products as promising leads for partial novel PPARγ agonists. Results The natural product honokiol from the traditional Chinese herbal drug Magnolia bark was in silico predicted to bind into the PPARγ ligand binding pocket as dimer. Honokiol indeed directly bound to purified PPARγ ligand-binding domain (LBD) and acted as partial agonist in a PPARγ-mediated luciferase reporter assay. Honokiol was then directly compared to the clinically used full agonist pioglitazone with regard to stimulation of glucose uptake in adipocytes as well as adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. While honokiol stimulated basal glucose uptake to a similar extent as pioglitazone, it did not induce adipogenesis in contrast to pioglitazone. In diabetic KKAy mice oral application of honokiol prevented hyperglycemia and suppressed weight gain. Conclusion We identified honokiol as a partial non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist in vitro which prevented hyperglycemia and weight gain in vivo. General significance This observed activity profile suggests honokiol as promising new pharmaceutical lead or dietary supplement to combat metabolic disease, and provides a molecular explanation for the use of Magnolia in traditional medicine. PMID:23811337

  14. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  15. Sound production during agonistic behavior of male Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Thorin; Kravitz, Edward A

    2011-01-01

    Male Drosophila fruit flies acquire and defend territories in order to attract females for reproduction. Both, male-directed agonistic behavior and female-directed courtship consist of series of recurrent stereotypical components. Various studies demonstrated the importance of species-specific sound patterns generated by wing vibration as being critical for male courtship success. In this study we analyzed the patterns and importance of sound signals generated during agonistic interactions of male Drosophila melanogaster. In contrast to acoustic courtship signals that consist of sine and pulse patterns and are generated by one extended wing, agonistic signals lack sine-like components and are generally produced by simultaneous movements of both wings. Though intra-pulse oscillation frequencies (carrier frequency) are identical, inter-pulse intervals are twice as long and more variable in aggression signals than in courtship songs, where their precise temporal pattern serves species recognition. Acoustic signals accompany male agonistic interactions over their entire course but occur particularly often after tapping behavior which is a major way to identify the gender of the interaction partner. Since similar wing movements may either be silent or generate sound and wing movements with sound have a greater impact on the subsequent behavior of a receiver, sound producing wing movements seem to be generated intentionally to serve as a specific signal during fruit fly agonistic encounters. PMID:20953152

  16. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C.; Konger, Raymond L.; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  17. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Harrison, Kathleen A; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C; Konger, Raymond L; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-04-12

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  18. Tolerance with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists: time for reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Grove, A; Lipworth, B J

    1995-01-01

    1. In spite of the widespread use of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of asthma controversy continues regarding their possible role in increasing asthma mortality and morbidity. There is however no evidence available to suggest that tolerance to the bronchodilator or anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs is responsible for the deleterious effects reported with the regular use of bronchodilators. 2. There is no conclusive evidence to suggest that tolerance develops to the bronchodilator effects of short-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. Tolerance does however appear to develop to the anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs. 3. With regard to the long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, there is evidence to suggest that tolerance develops both to their anti-bronchoconstrictor, and bronchodilator effects. Tolerance was however demonstrated in the presence of improved symptom control, therefore the clinical relevance of this phenomenon is uncertain. 4. Systemic corticosteroids can modulate lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor function both preventing, and reversing tolerance. The situation regarding the effects of systemic or inhaled corticosteroids on modulating bronchodilator responses in asthmatics is less clear. There is some evidence to suggest that inhaled corticosteroids are unable to prevent bronchodilator or systemic tolerance to long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. 5. On the basis of the current evidence, the British Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of asthma appear appropriate with regard to their recommendations for the use of long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:7742147

  19. Current issues with beta2-adrenoceptor agonists: historical background.

    PubMed

    Tattersfield, Anne E

    2006-01-01

    The discovery that dessicated adrenal glands had beneficial effects in asthma arose in 1900 following a vogue for studying organotherapy at the end of the 19th century. The adrenal hormone adrenaline was found to have sympathomimetic properties and was isolated and synthesized in 1901. The first nonselective beta-agonist, isoproterenol, was isolated in 1940, followed by the development of selective beta2-agonists in the 1960s and the introduction of the long-acting beta2-agonists in the 1990s. The introduction of beta2-selectivity reduced adverse effects, as did developments in inhaler technology that allowed subjects to inhale much smaller doses of drug selectively to the airways. The beta2-agonists are some of the more important drugs to have been developed in the 20th century. Excessive doses can cause problems, and attempts to maximize the benefit from beta2-agonists and to reduce adverse effects has led to considerable epidemiological, clinical, and mechanistic research over the last 50 yr.

  20. The CF-modifying gene EHF promotes p.Phe508del-CFTR residual function by altering protein glycosylation and trafficking in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stanke, Frauke; van Barneveld, Andrea; Hedtfeld, Silke; Wölfl, Stefan; Becker, Tim; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2014-05-01

    The three-base-pair deletion c.1521_1523delCTT (p.Phe508del, F508del) in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the most frequent disease-causing lesion in cystic fibrosis (CF). The CFTR gene encodes a chloride and bicarbonate channel at the apical membrane of epithelial cells. Altered ion transport of CFTR-expressing epithelia can be used to differentiate manifestations of the so-called CF basic defect. Recently, an 11p13 region has been described as a CF modifier by the North American CF Genetic Modifier Study Consortium. Selecting the epithelial-specific transcription factor EHF (ets homologous factor) as the likely candidate gene on 11p13, we have genotyped two intragenic microsatellites in EHF to replicate the 11p13 finding in the patient cohort of the European CF Twin and Sibling Study. We could observe an association of rare EHF haplotypes among homozygotes for c.1521_1523delCTT in CFTR, which exhibit a CF-untypical manifestation of the CF basic defect such as CFTR-mediated residual chloride secretion and low response to amiloride. We have reviewed transcriptome data obtained from intestinal epithelial samples of homozygotes for c.1521_1523delCTT in CFTR, which were stratified for their EHF genetic background. Transcripts that were upregulated among homozygotes for c.1521_1523delCTT in CFTR, who carry two rare EHF alleles, were enriched for genes that alter protein glycosylation and trafficking, both mechanisms being pivotal for the effective targeting of fully functional p.Phe508del-CFTR to the apical membrane of epithelial cells. We conclude that EHF modifies the CF phenotype by altering capabilities of the epithelial cell to correctly process the folding and trafficking of mutant p.Phe508del-CFTR.

  1. Effects of cyclooxygenase inhibition on vascular responses evoked in fingers of men and women by iontophoresis of α1- and α2-adrenoceptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Amar; Marshall, Janice M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In 10 men and nine women aged 20–23 years, we aimed to establish whether endogenous prostanoids synthesised by cyclooxygenase (COX) affect responses evoked in the finger by α1- or α2-adrenoceptor agonists. Cutaneous red cell flux (cRCF) was recorded in dorsal finger during iontophoresis of phenylephrine (PE) or clonidine (0.5 mm, seven 0.1 mA pulses followed by one 0.2 mA pulse: 30 s each at 60 s intervals) before and after the COX inhibitor aspirin (600 mg p.o.). In men, PE evoked a biphasic mean increase/decrease in cRCF before but a monophasic mean decrease in cRCF of 30–40% after aspirin (P < 0.05). In women in the low oestrogen (E2) phase of the menstrual cycle, PE evoked a decrease in cRCF (30–40%; P < 0.05) that was unchanged by aspirin, whereas in the high E2 phase, PE evoked no change before but a graded decrease in cRCF (30–40%; P < 0.05) after aspirin. Clonidine evoked a decrease in cRCF (∼30%; P < 0.05) in men before, but not after, aspirin. Clonidine evoked both increases and decreases in cRCF before and after aspirin in women in the low and high E2 phases (P > 0.05). We propose that finger vasoconstriction evoked by extraluminal α1-adrenoceptor stimulation is blunted by vasodilator COX products in young men and overcome by their action in women in the high, but not low E2, phase of the menstrual cycle. By contrast, α2-adrenoceptor stimulation evokes finger vasoconstriction that is mediated by vasoconstrictor COX products in young men, but evokes no consistent response in women in the low or high E2 phases of the menstrual cycle. PMID:21807614

  2. Difficult diagnosis and localization of focal nesidioblastosis: clinical implications of (68)Gallium-DOTA-D-Phe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide PET scanning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Ri; Jang, Jin-Young; Shin, Yong Chan; Cho, Young Min; Kim, Hongbeom; Kwon, Wooil; Han, Young Min; Kim, Sun-Whe

    2016-07-01

    Focal nesidioblastosis is a rare cause of endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in adults. Because it is difficult to localize and detect with current imaging modalities, nesidioblastosis is challenging for biliary-pancreatic surgeons. (68)Gallium-DOTA-D-Phe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide PET scanning and (111)indium-pentetreotide diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid octreotide scanning may be superior to conventional imaging modalities in determining the localization of nesidioblastosis. We report the successful surgical treatment of a 54-year-old woman with focal hyperplasia of the islets of Langerhans, who experienced frequent hypoglycemic symptoms and underwent various diagnostic examinations with different results. PMID:27433465

  3. Spectroscopic characterization of mutations at the Phe41 position in the distal haem pocket of horseradish peroxidase C: structural and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Heering, Hendrik A; Smith, Andrew T; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2002-05-01

    Three mutants of horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRPC) have been constructed in which the conserved distal aromatic residue Phe(41) has been substituted by Trp, Val or Ala and the properties of the mutant proteins have been compared with that of the wild-type. The ferric and ferrous states have been studied by resonance Raman, electronic absorption and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopies, together with their respective fluoride and CO complexes as probes for the integrity of the distal haem-pocket hydrogen-bonding network. The catalytic properties of the mutants, most notably the HRPC-mutant Phe(41)-->Trp (F41W) variant, were also affected. Structural modelling suggests that the bulky indole group of the F41W mutant blocks the distal cavity, inhibiting the binding of fluoride and CO to the haem iron, severely impairing the reaction of the enzyme with H(2)O(2) to form Compound I. Substitution with the smaller side-chain residues Val or Ala resulted in a 2-fold increase in the affinity of the mutants for the aromatic donor benzhydroxamic acid (BHA) compared with the wild-type, whereas the sterically hindered F41W mutant was not able to bind BHA at all. All the mutations studied increased the amount of a ferric six-coordinate aquo-high-spin species. On the other hand, the similarity in the Fe-Im stretching frequencies of the mutants and wild-type protein suggests that the distal haem-pocket mutations do not cause any substantive changes on the proximal side of the haem. Spectra of the HRPC mutant Phe(41)-->Ala-CO and the HRPC mutant Phe(41)-->Val-CO complexes strongly suggested a weakening of the interaction between CO and Arg(38) due to a secondary rearrangement of the haem relative to helix B. The effects observed for these HRP mutants were somewhat different from those noted recently for the analogous Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) mutants, particularly the Trp mutant. These differences can be reconciled in part as being due to the smaller size of the

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of mutations at the Phe41 position in the distal haem pocket of horseradish peroxidase C: structural and functional consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Heering, Hendrik A; Smith, Andrew T; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2002-01-01

    Three mutants of horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRPC) have been constructed in which the conserved distal aromatic residue Phe(41) has been substituted by Trp, Val or Ala and the properties of the mutant proteins have been compared with that of the wild-type. The ferric and ferrous states have been studied by resonance Raman, electronic absorption and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopies, together with their respective fluoride and CO complexes as probes for the integrity of the distal haem-pocket hydrogen-bonding network. The catalytic properties of the mutants, most notably the HRPC-mutant Phe(41)-->Trp (F41W) variant, were also affected. Structural modelling suggests that the bulky indole group of the F41W mutant blocks the distal cavity, inhibiting the binding of fluoride and CO to the haem iron, severely impairing the reaction of the enzyme with H(2)O(2) to form Compound I. Substitution with the smaller side-chain residues Val or Ala resulted in a 2-fold increase in the affinity of the mutants for the aromatic donor benzhydroxamic acid (BHA) compared with the wild-type, whereas the sterically hindered F41W mutant was not able to bind BHA at all. All the mutations studied increased the amount of a ferric six-coordinate aquo-high-spin species. On the other hand, the similarity in the Fe-Im stretching frequencies of the mutants and wild-type protein suggests that the distal haem-pocket mutations do not cause any substantive changes on the proximal side of the haem. Spectra of the HRPC mutant Phe(41)-->Ala-CO and the HRPC mutant Phe(41)-->Val-CO complexes strongly suggested a weakening of the interaction between CO and Arg(38) due to a secondary rearrangement of the haem relative to helix B. The effects observed for these HRP mutants were somewhat different from those noted recently for the analogous Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) mutants, particularly the Trp mutant. These differences can be reconciled in part as being due to the smaller size of the

  5. Difficult diagnosis and localization of focal nesidioblastosis: clinical implications of 68Gallium-DOTA-D-Phe1-Tyr3-octreotide PET scanning

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Ri; Shin, Yong Chan; Cho, Young Min; Kim, Hongbeom; Kwon, Wooil; Han, Young Min; Kim, Sun-Whe

    2016-01-01

    Focal nesidioblastosis is a rare cause of endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in adults. Because it is difficult to localize and detect with current imaging modalities, nesidioblastosis is challenging for biliary-pancreatic surgeons. 68Gallium-DOTA-D-Phe1-Tyr3-octreotide PET scanning and 111indium-pentetreotide diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid octreotide scanning may be superior to conventional imaging modalities in determining the localization of nesidioblastosis. We report the successful surgical treatment of a 54-year-old woman with focal hyperplasia of the islets of Langerhans, who experienced frequent hypoglycemic symptoms and underwent various diagnostic examinations with different results. PMID:27433465

  6. Peptide inhibitors of CDK2-cyclin A that target the cyclin recruitment-site: structural variants of the C-terminal Phe.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Gail E; Cowan, Angela; McInnes, Campbell; Zheleva, Daniella I; Fischer, Peter M; Chan, Weng C

    2002-09-16

    A focused series of octapeptides based on the lead compound H-His-Ala-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu-Ile-Phe-NH(2) 1, in which the C-terminal phenylalanine residue was replaced by alpha and/or beta-modified variants, was synthesized using solid-phase chemistry. Both the L-threo-beta-hydroxy-phenylalanine (beta-phenylserine, Pse) and (2S)-phenylalaninol derivatives, as competitive binders at the cyclin-recruitment site, displayed potent inhibitory activity towards the CDK2-cyclin A complex. Unexpectedly, the D-threo-Pse derivatives also showed inhibitory activity. PMID:12182847

  7. Confounding of the Comparative Safety of Prenatal Opioid Agonist Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brogly, Susan B; Hahn, Kristen A; Diaz, Sonia Hernandez; Werler, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal opioid agonist therapy with methadone or buprenorphine prevents maternal illicit opioid use and withdrawal and improves pregnancy outcomes compared to heroin use alone. Historically, methadone has been the first-line opioid agonist therapy for pregnant opioid dependent women; in recent years buprenorphine has become first-line treatment for some opioid dependent pregnant women. While there is some evidence of better outcomes in neonates exposed to buprenorphine vs. methadone, the effect of confounding from differences in women who use buprenorphine and methadone has not been carefully examined in most studies. This review explores mechanisms by which confounding can arise in measuring associations between prenatal buprenorphine vs. methadone exposure on neonatal outcomes using a graphical approach, directed acyclic graphs. The goal of this paper is to facilitate better understanding of the factors influencing neonatal abstinence syndrome and accurate assessment of the comparative safety of opioid agonist therapies on the neonate. PMID:27547489

  8. Adenosine receptor agonists for promotion of dermal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Valls, María D.; Cronstein, Bruce N.; Montesinos, M. Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex process that involves a well coordinated, highly regulated series of events including inflammation, tissue formation, revascularization and tissue remodeling. However, this orderly sequence is impaired in certain pathophysiological conditions such as diabetes mellitus, venous insufficiency, chronic glucocorticoid use, aging and malnutrition. Together with proper wound care, promotion of the healing process is the primary objective in the management of chronic poorly healing wounds. Recent studies have demonstrated that A2A adenosine receptor agonists promote wound healing in normal and diabetic animals and one such agonist, Sonedenoson, is currently being evaluated as a prospective new therapy of diabetic foot ulcers. We will review the mechanisms by which adenosine receptor activation affects the function of the cells and tissues that participate in wound healing, emphasizing the potential beneficial impact of adenosine receptor agonists in diabetic impaired healing. PMID:19041853

  9. Design, evaluation, and comparison of ghrelin receptor agonists and inverse agonists as suitable radiotracers for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Constance; Bergmann, Ralf; Pietzsch, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-04-18

    Ghrelin agonist and inverse agonist radiotracers, suitable for positron emission tomography (PET), were developed to study the behavior of ghrelin receptor ligands in vivo and for further design of druggable peptides. The target peptides were synthesized on solid support and conjugated to the bifunctional chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane,1-glutaric acid-4,7-acetic acid (NODAGA), which is known to form a stable complex with Ga(3+). Complexation with (68)Ga could be achieved under mild conditions and led to radiotracers with high radiochemical purity and specific activity. The biological activity of the radiotracers was evaluated in vitro by an inositol phosphate turnover assay. Pharmacokinetic profile and metabolic stability of the (68)Ga-NODAGA-radiotracers were investigated by small animal PET in rodent. Ghrelin derived agonists presented very high kidney accumulation, negligible tissue distribution, fast blood clearance, and poor stability in blood. Contrarily, the inverse agonist radiotracer exhibited very high stability in blood, large diffusion in tissues, reasonable kidney and liver metabolism, and slow blood clearance. This pharmacokinetic profile makes the ghrelin inverse agonist motif KwFwLL-CONH(2) suitable for further development of radiotracers and a promising lead to design peptide-based therapeutics against obesity. PMID:22372770

  10. Agonist treatment in opioid use: advances and controversy.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Biju; Chand, Prabhat; Benegal, Vivek; Murthy, Pratima

    2012-06-01

    Opioid dependence is a chronic relapsing condition which requires comprehensive care; pharmacological agents form the mainstay of its long term treatment. The two most popular approaches are the harm reduction method using agonists and the complete abstinence method using antagonists. Currently, particularly from the harm minimization perspective and the low feasibility of an abstinence based approach, there is an increasing trend toward agonist treatment. The use of buprenorphine has gained popularity in view of its safety profile and the availability of the buprenorphine-naloxone combination has made it popular as a take-home treatment. This review outlines the pharmacological advances and controversies in this area. PMID:22813654

  11. Insect Nicotinic Receptor Agonists as Flea Adulticides in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dai Tan; Hsu, Walter H.; Martin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Fleas are significant ectoparasites of small animals. They can be a severe irritant to animals and serve as a vector for a number of infectious diseases. In this article, we discuss the pharmacological characteristics of four insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists used as fleacides in dogs and cats, which include three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, nitenpyram, and dinotefuran) and spinosad. Insect nAChR agonists are one of the most important new classes of insecticides, which are used to control sucking insects both on plants and on companion animals. These new compounds provide a new approach for practitioners to safely and effectively eliminate fleas. PMID:20646191

  12. Beta2-agonist extraction procedures for chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    dos Ramos, F J

    2000-06-01

    Normally, different procedures were necessary to prepare sample matrices for chromatographic determination of beta2-agonists. The present review includes sampling, pre-treatment and extraction/purification for urine, plasma, liver, meat, feeds, hair and milk powder, as previous steps for chromatographic analysis of beta2-agonists. Six methodologies were especially revised for extraction/purification namely, liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction (SPE), matrix solid-phase dispersion, immunoaffinity chromatography, dialysis and supercritical fluid extraction. SPE was discussed in detail and five mechanisms were described: adsorption, apolar, polar, ion-exchange and mixed phase. A brief conclusion in this field was also outlined.

  13. Effect of bombesin receptor subtype-3 and its synthetic agonist on signaling, glucose transport and metabolism in myocytes from patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    GONZÁLEZ, NIEVES; MARTÍN-DUCE, ANTONIO; MARTÍNEZ-ARRIETA, FÉLIX; MORENO-VILLEGAS, ZAIDA; PORTAL-NÚÑEZ, SERGIO; SANZ, RAÚL; EGIDO, JESÚS

    2015-01-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) member of the bombesin receptor family. Several studies have suggested an association between obesity, alterations in glucose metabolism, diabetes and the BRS-3 receptor. In this study, we focused on patients simultaneously diagnosed with obesity and type 2 diabetes (OB/T2D). The analysis of BRS-3 expression in the skeletal muscle of these patients revealed a marked decrease in the expression of BRS-3 at the mRNA (23.6±1.3-fold downregulation, p<0.0001) and protein level (49±7% decrease, p<0.05) compared to the normal patients (no obesity and diabetes). Moreover, in cultured primary myocytes from patients with OB/T2D, the synthetic BRS-3 agonist, [D-Try6,β-Ala11,Phe13,Nle14]bombesin6–14, significantly increased the phosphorylation levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), p90RSK1, protein kinase B (PKB) and p70s6K. Specifically, the ligand at 10−11 M induced the maximal phosphorylation of MAPKs (p42, 159±15% of the control; p44, 166±11% of the control; p<0.0001) and p90RSK1 (148±2% of the control, p<0.0001). The basal phosphorylation levels of all kinases were reduced (p<0.05) in the patients with OB/T2D compared to the normal patients. Furthermore, the BRS-3 agonist stimulated glucose transport, which was already detected at 10−12 M (133±9% of the control), reached maximal levels at 10−11 M (160±9%, p<0.0001) and was maintained at up to 10−8 M (overall mean, 153±7%; p<0.007). This effect was less promiment than that attained with 10−8 M insulin (202±9%, p=0.009). The effect of the agonist on glycogen synthase a activity achieved the maximum effect at 10−11 M (165±16% of the control; p<0.0001), which did not differ from that observed with higher concentrations of the agonist. These results suggest that muscle cells isolated from patients with OB/T2D have extremely high sensitivity to the synthetic ligand, and the effects are particularly observed on

  14. Estrogen, nitric oxide, and hypertension differentially modulate agonist-induced contractile responses in female transgenic (mRen2)27 hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Brosnihan, K Bridget; Li, Ping; Figueroa, Jorge P; Ganten, Detlev; Ferrario, Carlos M

    2008-05-01

    Clinical trials revealed that estrogen may result in cardiovascular risk in patients with coronary heart disease, despite earlier studies demonstrating that estrogen provided cardiovascular protection. It is possible that the preexisting condition of hypertension and the ability of estrogen to activate the renin-angiotensin system could confound its beneficial effects. Our hypothesis is that the attenuation of estrogen to agonist-induced vasoconstrictor responses through the activation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) is impaired by hypertension. We investigated the effects of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) replacement in normotensive Sprague-Dawley (SD) and (mRen2)27 hypertensive transgenic (TG) rats on contractile responses to three vasoconstrictors, angiotensin II (ANG II), serotonin (5-HT), and phenylephrine (PE), and on the modulatory role of vascular NO to these responses. The aorta was isolated from ovariectomized SD and TG rats treated chronically with 5 mg E(2) or placebo (P). The isometric tension of the aortic rings was measured in organ chambers, and endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the rat aorta was detected using Western blot analysis. E(2) treatment increased eNOS expression in the SD and TG aorta and reduced ANG II- and 5-HT- but not PE-induced contractions in SD and TG rats. The inhibition of NOS with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester enhanced ANG II-, 5-HT-, and PE-induced contractions in P-treated and ANG II and PE responses in E(2)-treated SD and TG rats. Only the responses to 5-HT were augmented in hypertensive rats. In conclusion, this study shows that the preexisting condition of hypertension augmented the vascular responsiveness of 5-HT, whereas the attenuation of estrogen by ANG II and 5-HT vascular responses was not impaired by hypertension. The adrenergic agonist was unresponsive to estrogen treatment. The contribution of NO as a factor contributing to the relative refractoriness of the vascular responses is dependent on the nature of the

  15. Capillary electrophoretic study of the degradation pathways and kinetics of the aspartyl model tetrapeptide Gly-Phe-Asp-GlyOH in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Christin; Imhof, Diana; Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2013-03-25

    The aim of the present study was the investigation of the isomerization and epimerization kinetics of the aspartyl tetrapeptide Gly-Phe-Asp-GlyOH at alkaline conditions. Incubations of the model tetrapeptide in sodium borate buffer, pH 10 and ionic strength 0.2M, at 25°C and 80°C were analyzed by a validated CE-UV assay and fitted according to a pharmacokinetic model. CE-ESI-MS was used for peptide identification. Enantiomerization and isomerization of the aspartyl residue of the model tetrapeptide was observed under all experimental conditions applied. Differences in the velocity and the ratios of the rates of the degradation reactions indicated different effects of temperature on the individual reactions. At 80°C, a rapid formation of β-Asp and d-Asp containing isomers from Gly-l-Phe-α-l-Asp-GlyOH was monitored. Rate constants of the hydrolysis of the succinimide (Asu) intermediate generally exceeded the formation of the intermediate from α/β-Asp peptides. A higher rate constant was observed for the enantiomerization from l-configured Asu compared to d-Asu. At 25°C, epimerization and isomerization equilibrium was not reached within 5208h. Compared to 80°C different ratios of the individual reaction rates were noted. Moreover, inversion of the sequence of the first 2 amino acids was noted as a minor side reaction at 80°C.

  16. The effect of stirring and seeding on the AcPheLeuNH(2) synthesis and crystallization in a reversed micellar system.

    PubMed

    Feliciano; Dias; Prazeres

    2000-08-01

    The present work describes the enzymatic synthesis and simultaneous crystallization of the dipeptide AcPheLeuNH(2) by alpha-chymotrypsin in a reversed micellar system of tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB)/heptane/octanol/carbonate buffer. The low solubility of the dipeptide in the micellar solution led to the formation and growth of needle-like crystals during the synthesis as soon as supersaturation was achieved. The crystallization process then followed a typical pattern, proceeding in three phases: nucleation, de-supersaturation, and re-equilibrium of saturation. Crystallization was followed by visual observation with an optical microscope, and the increase of crystal number and size was confirmed. Experiments showed that the supersaturation concentration decreases with the addition of AcPheLeuNH(2) seeds before the reaction, and also with a decrease of the stirring speed. It was also observed that the increase of both seed concentration and stirring advances the start of crystallization, so that the dipeptide is more quickly removed from solution. The consequent decrease in its loss through hydrolysis causes an increase in its yield. Both stirring and seeding could constitute important generic strategies for promoting crystallization of more soluble dipeptides during their synthesis in similar reversed micellar systems.

  17. Secondary structures of Val-Phe and Val-Tyr(Me) peptide chains in the gas phase: effect of the nature of the protecting groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Wutharath; Dognon, Jean-Pierre; Piuzzi, François; Dimicoli, Iliana; Mons, Michel

    Recent experimental gas-phase studies of very similar peptide chain models (Ac-Val-Tyr(Me)-NHMe and Ac-Val-Phe-NH2) have led to different assignments for the secondary structures adopted: β-strand and β-turn, respectively. We present a discussion of the possible causes for such different behaviour in the light of quantum chemistry calculations. The consistent set of data presently obtained (relative energies and IR calculated spectra) leads us to propose the same structural assignment for the experimentally observed Val-Tyr(Me) and Val-Phe peptide chains, i.e. a β-turn conformation. In addition, calculations also suggest that the nature of the chemical protection on the C-terminal (-NHMe vs. -NH2) of the chain model does not affect its conformational preference, nor its structure or its energetics, which suggests the less simple, but more informative, -NH2-protected models for the determination of the intrinsic structural properties of a peptide chain.

  18. A Novel Missense Mutation in the Second Extracellular Domain of GJB2, p.Ser183Phe, Causes a Syndrome of Focal Palmoplantar Keratoderma with Deafness

    PubMed Central

    de Zwart-Storm, Eugene A.; van Geel, Michel; van Neer, Pierre A.F.A.; Steijlen, Peter M.; Martin, Patricia E.; van Steensel, Maurice A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Gap junctions, which consist of connexins, are intercellular channels that mediate rapid intercellular communication. In the skin, connexins are involved in the regulation of epidermal growth and differentiation. GJB2 encodes connexin26, which is an important skin-expressed gap junction protein. Mutations in GJB2 cause a wide variety of unique disorders, but despite extensive research, their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. The identification of novel diseases caused by mutations in GJB2 may help to illuminate the genotype-phenotype correlation and elucidate the function of different regions of the protein. Here, we report the first account of a family with a GJB2 missense mutation in the second extracellular domain (p.Ser183Phe) that causes skin abnormalities in addition to sensorineural hearing loss. Using fluorescent connexin26-EGFP fusion proteins, we showed that the mutation induces a partial protein transport defect that cannot be rescued by wild-type protein. Dye-transfer experiments using a parachute assay revealed channel functionality. Although p.Ser183Phe affects the second extracellular domain, mutations in the first extracellular domain also lead to focal palmoplantar keratoderma and likewise perturb protein transport in a dominant-negative manner. Therefore, we hypothesize that focal palmoplantar keratoderma in gap junction skin disease may be specifically associated with connexin trafficking defects as well as with mutations affecting its extracellular domains, thus broadening the spectrum of GJB2-associated diseases. PMID:18787097

  19. In vivo application of ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide for detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Krenning, E.P.; Reubi, J.C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Setyono-Han, B.; de Jong, M.; Kooij, P.P.M.; Bruns, C.; van Hagen, P.M.; Marbach, P.; Visser, T.J.; Pless, J.; Lamberts, S.W.J. Sandoz Research Inst., Berne Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, Rotterdam Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    In this study the authors investigated its in vivo application in the visualization of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in rats. The distribution of the radiopharmaceutical was investigated after intravenous injection in normal rats and in rats bearing the somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic carcinoma CA 20948. Ex vivo autoradiographic studies showed that specific accumulation of radioactivity occurred in somatostatin receptor-containing tissue (anterior pituitary gland). However, in contrast to the adrenals and pituitary, the tracer accumulation in the kidneys was not mediated by somatostatin receptors. Increasing radioactivity over the somatostatin receptor-positive tumors was measured rapidly after injection and the tumors were clearly visualized by gamma camera scintigraphy. In rats pretreated with 1 mg octreotide accumulation of ({sup 111}In-DPTA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide in the tumors was prevented. Because of its relatively long effective half-life, ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a radionuclide-coupled somatostatin analogue which can be used to visualize somatostatin receptor-bearing tumors efficiently after 24 hr, when interfering background radioactivity is minimized by renal clearance.

  20. The emerging therapeutic roles of κ-opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark R; Kaye, Alan D; Kaye, Aaron J; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The current practice of μ-opioid receptor agonists such as morphine as the primary means of acute and chronic pain relief has several dangerous consequences that limit their effectiveness, including respiratory depression, gastrointestinal motility inhibition, addiction, tolerance, and abuse. Several other opioid receptors, notably the μ-opioid (KOP) receptor, have long been known to play a role in pain relief. Recent discoveries and advancements in laboratory techniques have allowed significant developments of KOP agonists as potential novel therapies for pain relief and other pathological processes. These drugs exhibit none of the classic opioid adverse effects and have displayed pronounced analgesia in several different scenarios. New formulations since 2014 have unveiled increased oral bioavailability, exceptional peripheral versus central selectivity, and a positive safety profile. Continued refinements of established μ-opioid agonist formulations have virtually eliminated the centrally mediated side effects of dysphoria and sedation that limited the applicability of previous KOP agonists. Further research is required to better elucidate the potential of these compounds in pain management, as well as in the mediation or modulation of other complex pathophysiological processes as therapeutic agents. PMID:27194194

  1. Systemic cancer immunotherapy with Toll-like receptor 7 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Hotz, Christian; Bourquin, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists represent a promising strategy for the immunotherapy of cancer. We have recently investigated the influence of TLR tolerance on the efficacy of systemic tumor treatment with TLR7 ligands. We propose that considering the kinetics of receptor sensitivity highly improves the outcome of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22720251

  2. Synthesis and immunostimulatory activity of substituted TLR7 agonists.

    PubMed

    Akinbobuyi, Babatope; Wang, Lei; Upchurch, Katherine C; Byrd, Matthew R; Chang, Charles A; Quintana, Jeremy M; Petersen, Rachel E; Seifert, Zacharie J; Boquin, José R; Oh, SangKon; Kane, Robert R

    2016-09-01

    Fifteen new substituted adenines were synthesized as potential TLR7 agonists. These compounds, along with 9 previously reported compounds, were analyzed for TLR7 activity and for the selective stimulation of B cell proliferation. Several functionalized derivatives exhibit significant activity, suggesting their potential for use as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27476423

  3. The emerging therapeutic roles of κ-opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark R; Kaye, Alan D; Kaye, Aaron J; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The current practice of μ-opioid receptor agonists such as morphine as the primary means of acute and chronic pain relief has several dangerous consequences that limit their effectiveness, including respiratory depression, gastrointestinal motility inhibition, addiction, tolerance, and abuse. Several other opioid receptors, notably the μ-opioid (KOP) receptor, have long been known to play a role in pain relief. Recent discoveries and advancements in laboratory techniques have allowed significant developments of KOP agonists as potential novel therapies for pain relief and other pathological processes. These drugs exhibit none of the classic opioid adverse effects and have displayed pronounced analgesia in several different scenarios. New formulations since 2014 have unveiled increased oral bioavailability, exceptional peripheral versus central selectivity, and a positive safety profile. Continued refinements of established μ-opioid agonist formulations have virtually eliminated the centrally mediated side effects of dysphoria and sedation that limited the applicability of previous KOP agonists. Further research is required to better elucidate the potential of these compounds in pain management, as well as in the mediation or modulation of other complex pathophysiological processes as therapeutic agents.

  4. Synthesis and immunostimulatory activity of substituted TLR7 agonists.

    PubMed

    Akinbobuyi, Babatope; Wang, Lei; Upchurch, Katherine C; Byrd, Matthew R; Chang, Charles A; Quintana, Jeremy M; Petersen, Rachel E; Seifert, Zacharie J; Boquin, José R; Oh, SangKon; Kane, Robert R

    2016-09-01

    Fifteen new substituted adenines were synthesized as potential TLR7 agonists. These compounds, along with 9 previously reported compounds, were analyzed for TLR7 activity and for the selective stimulation of B cell proliferation. Several functionalized derivatives exhibit significant activity, suggesting their potential for use as vaccine adjuvants.

  5. Activation of endplate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by agonists.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of a small molecule made in one cell with a large receptor made in another is the signature event of cell signaling. Understanding the structure and energy changes associated with agonist activation is important for engineering drugs, receptors and synapses. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a ∼300kD ion channel that binds the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists to elicit electrical responses in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This mini-review is in two sections. First, general concepts of skeletal muscle AChR operation are discussed in terms of energy landscapes for conformational change. Second, adult vs. fetal AChRs are compared with regard to interaction energies between ACh and agonist-site side chains, measured by single-channel electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations. The five aromatic residues that form the core of each agonist binding site can be divided into two working groups, a triad (led by αY190) that behaves similarly at all sites and a coupled pair (led by γW55) that has a large influence on affinity only in fetal AChRs. Each endplate AChR has 5 homologous subunits, two of α(1) and one each of β, δ, and either γ (fetal) or ϵ (adult). These nicotinic AChRs have only 2 functional agonist binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αγ or αϵ subunit interfaces. The receptor undergoes a reversible, global isomerization between structures called C and O. The C shape does not conduct ions and has a relatively low affinity for ACh, whereas O conducts cations and has a higher affinity. When both agonist sites are empty (filled only with water) the probability of taking on the O conformation (PO) is low, <10(-6). When ACh molecules occupy the agonist sites the C→O opening rate constant and C↔O gating equilibrium constant increase dramatically. Following a pulse of ACh at the nerve-muscle synapse, the endplate current rises rapidly

  6. Sex differences in opioid antinociception: kappa and 'mixed action' agonists.

    PubMed

    Craft, R M; Bernal, S A

    2001-08-01

    A number of investigators have shown that male animals are more sensitive than females to the antinociceptive effects of mu-opioid agonists. The present study was conducted to examine sex differences in opioid antinociception in the rat using agonists known to differ in selectivity for and efficacy at kappa- versus mu-receptors. Dose- and time-effect curves were obtained for s.c. U69593, U50488, ethylketazocine, (-)-bremazocine, (-)-pentazocine, butorphanol and nalbuphine on the 50 or 54 degrees C hotplate and warm water tail withdrawal assays; spontaneous locomotor activity was measured 32-52 min post-injection in the same rats. On the hotplate assay, only butorphanol (54 degrees C) and nalbuphine (50 degrees C) were significantly more potent in males than females. On the tail withdrawal assay, all agonists were significantly more potent or efficacious in males than females at one or both temperatures. In contrast, no agonist was consistently more potent in one sex or the other in decreasing locomotor activity. Estrous stage in female rats only slightly influenced opioid effects, accounting for an average of 2.6% of the variance in females' antinociceptive and locomotor responses to drug (50 degrees C experiment). These results suggest that (1) sex differences in antinociceptive effects of opioids are not mu-receptor-dependent, as they may occur with opioids known to have significant kappa-receptor-mediated activity; (2) the mechanisms underlying sex differences in kappa-opioid antinociception may be primarily spinal rather than supraspinal; (3) sex differences in antinociceptive effects of opioid agonists are not secondary to sex differences in their sedative effects. PMID:11418226

  7. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel indazolyl glucocorticoid receptor partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, John L; Sheppeck, James E; Wang, Jim; Dhar, T G Murali; Cavallaro, Cullen; Doweyko, Arthur M; Mckay, Lorraine; Cunningham, Mark D; Habte, Sium F; Nadler, Steven G; Dodd, John H; Somerville, John E; Barrish, Joel C

    2013-10-01

    SAR was used to further develop an indazole class of non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor agonists aided by a GR LBD (ligand-binding domain)-agonist co-crystal structure described in the accompanying paper. Progress towards discovering a dissociated GR agonist guided by human in vitro assays biased the optimization of this compound series towards partial agonists that possessed excellent selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors. PMID:23916594

  8. Induction of Selective Blood-Tumor Barrier Permeability and Macromolecular Transport by a Biostable Kinin B1 Receptor Agonist in a Glioma Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Jérôme; Bovenzi, Veronica; Savard, Martin; Dubuc, Céléna; Fortier, Audrey; Neugebauer, Witold; Tremblay, Luc; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Tsanaclis, Ana-Maria; Lepage, Martin; Fortin, David; Gobeil, Fernand

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of malignant glioma with chemotherapy is limited mostly because of delivery impediment related to the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). B1 receptors (B1R), inducible prototypical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) can regulate permeability of vessels including possibly that of brain tumors. Here, we determine the extent of BTB permeability induced by the natural and synthetic peptide B1R agonists, LysdesArg9BK (LDBK) and SarLys[dPhe8]desArg9BK (NG29), in syngeneic F98 glioma-implanted Fischer rats. Ten days after tumor inoculation, we detected the presence of B1R on tumor cells and associated vasculature. NG29 infusion increased brain distribution volume and uptake profiles of paramagnetic probes (Magnevist and Gadomer) at tumoral sites (T1-weighted imaging). These effects were blocked by B1R antagonist and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, but not by B2R antagonist and non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Consistent with MRI data, systemic co-administration of NG29 improved brain tumor delivery of Carboplatin chemotherapy (ICP-Mass spectrometry). We also detected elevated B1R expression in clinical samples of high-grade glioma. Our results documented a novel GPCR-signaling mechanism for promoting transient BTB disruption, involving activation of B1R and ensuing production of COX metabolites. They also underlined the potential value of synthetic biostable B1R agonists as selective BTB modulators for local delivery of different sized-therapeutics at (peri)tumoral sites. PMID:22629405

  9. Effects of receptor-selective neurokinin agonists and a neurokinin antagonist on the electrical activity of spinal cord neurones in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Wienrich, M.; Reuss, K.; Harting, J.

    1989-01-01

    1. Rat spinal cord neurones grown in tissue culture were used to examine the electrophysiological effects of the neurokin in (NK)-selective agonists (pGlu6, Pro9) substance P(6-11) (septide; NK1, 10(-6)M) and (pGlu5, MePhe8, MeGly9)SP(1-7) (DiMe-C7; NK3, 10(-6)M). In addition, the effect of the neurokinin antagonist (D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11)SP (10(-5)M) on the neurokinin-evoked responses was investigated. 2. Neurokinin-evoked responses consisted of an increase in neuronal activity with or without long-lasting (mean: 50s) depolarizations of the membrane potential of up to 25mV. The latter also occurred in the presence of tetrodotoxin (10(-7)M) (direct response). 3. In a number of spinal cord neurones (n = 17) only septide induced a membrane depolarization while DiMe-C7 elicited no response. On the other hand, in 2 neurones a response was exclusively evoked by DiMe-C7. 4. The neurokinin antagonist (D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11)SP had no effect of its own but blocked the septide- and DiMe-C7-induced depolarizations. It had no effect on the glutamate (10(-5)M)-evoked depolarization. 5. It is concluded that by the use of neurokinin receptor-selective agonists, subpopulations of spinal cord neurones in primary dissociated cell culture can be differentiated which express the NK1 or the NK3 receptor. Cells expressing only the NK1 receptor outnumber those expressing only the NK3 receptor subtype. Both receptors can be blocked by the neurokinin antagonist (D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11)SP. PMID:2480170

  10. Clinically relevant infusion rates of mu-opioid agonist remifentanil cause bradypnea in decerebrate dogs but not via direct effects in the pre-Bötzinger complex region.

    PubMed

    Mustapic, Sanda; Radocaj, Tomislav; Sanchez, Antonio; Dogas, Zoran; Stucke, Astrid G; Hopp, Francis A; Stuth, Eckehard A E; Zuperku, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    Systemic administration of mu-opioids at clinical doses for analgesia typically slows respiratory rate. Mu-opioid receptors (MORs) on pre-Bötzinger Complex (pre-BötC) respiratory neurons, the putative kernel of respiratory rhythmogenesis, are potential targets. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of pre-BötC MORs to the bradypnea produced in vivo by intravenous administration of clinically relevant infusion rates of remifentanil (remi), a short-acting, potent mu-opioid analgesic. In decerebrate dogs, multibarrel micropipettes were used to record pre-BötC neuronal activity and to eject the opioid antagonist naloxone (NAL, 0.5 mM), the glutamate agonist D-homocysteic acid (DLH, 20 mM), or the MOR agonist [D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), gly-ol(5)]-enkephalin (DAMGO, 100 microM). Inspiratory and expiratory durations (T(I) and T(E)) and peak phrenic nerve activity (PPA) were measured from the phrenic neurogram. The pre-BötC was functionally identified by its rate altering response (typically tachypnea) to DLH microinjection. During intravenous remi-induced bradypnea (approximately 60% decrease in central breathing frequency, f(B)), bilateral injections of NAL in the pre-BötC did not change T(I), T(E), f(B), and PPA. Also, NAL picoejected onto single pre-BötC neurons depressed by intravenous remi had no effect on their discharge. In contrast, approximately 60 microg/kg of intravenous NAL rapidly reversed all remi-induced effects. In a separate group of dogs, microinjections of DAMGO in the pre-BötC increased f(B) by 44%, while subsequent intravenous remi infusion more than offset this DAMGO induced tachypnea. These results indicate that mu-opioids at plasma concentrations that cause profound analgesia produce their bradypneic effect via MORs located outside the pre-BötC region.

  11. Synthesis and SAR of potent LXR agonists containing an indole pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Campobasso, Nino; Smallwood, Angela; Parks, Derek J.; Webb, Christine L.; Frank, Kelly A.; Nord, Melanie; Duraiswami, Chaya; Evans, Christopher; Jaye, Michael; Thompson, Scott K.

    2009-03-27

    A novel series of 1H-indol-1-yl tertiary amine LXR agonists has been designed. Compounds from this series were potent agonists with good rat pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, the crystal structure of an LXR agonist bound to LXR{alpha} will be disclosed.

  12. Agonists and partial agonists of rhodopsin: retinal polyene methylation affects receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Reiner; Lüdeke, Steffen; Siebert, Friedrich; Sakmar, Thomas P; Hirshfeld, Amiram; Sheves, Mordechai

    2006-02-14

    Using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy, we have studied the impact of sites and extent of methylation of the retinal polyene with respect to position and thermodynamic parameters of the conformational equilibrium between the Meta I and Meta II photoproducts of rhodopsin. Deletion of methyl groups to form 9-demethyl and 13-demethyl analogues, as well as addition of a methyl group at C10 or C12, shifted the Meta I/Meta II equilibrium toward Meta I, such that the retinal analogues behaved like partial agonists. This equilibrium shift resulted from an apparent reduction of the entropy gain of the transition of up to 65%, which was only partially offset by a concomitant reduction of the enthalpy increase. The analogues produced Meta II photoproducts with relatively small alterations, while their Meta I states were significantly altered, which accounted for the aberrant transitions to Meta II. Addition of a methyl group at C14 influenced the thermodynamic parameters but had little impact on the position of the Meta I/Meta II equilibrium. Neutralization of the residue 134 in the E134Q opsin mutant increased the Meta II content of the 13-demethyl analogue, but not of the 9-demethyl analogue, indicating a severe impairment of the allosteric coupling between the conserved cytoplasmic ERY motif involved in proton uptake and the Schiff base/Glu 113 microdomain in the 9-demethyl analogue. The 9-methyl group appears therefore essential for the correct positioning of retinal to link protonation of the cytoplasmic motif with protonation of Glu 113 during receptor activation.

  13. Development of potent gastrin-releasing peptide antagonists having a D-Pro-psi(CH2NH)-Phe-NH2 C terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Leban, J J; Kull, F C; Landavazo, A; Stockstill, B; McDermed, J D

    1993-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a 27-amino acid neuroendocrine hormone that may play a role in the pathophysiology of small cell lung carcinoma. GRP and bombesin, a structurally related peptide, stimulate the growth of some cultured cell types. C-terminal GRP peptide analogs were developed that inhibited 6 nM bombesin-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation into quiescent murine Swiss 3T3 cells, which routinely produced a 6-fold stimulation over the basal extent of incorporation. The peptides were also analyzed for their capacity to inhibit the binding of 50 pM 125I-labeled GRP to Swiss 3T3 cells. The combination of two chemical modifications, each antagonistic in itself, led to the creation of antagonists with orders of magnitude greater potency than either modification alone. (i) Antagonist analogs of the form -Leu26-psi(CH2NH)-Xaa27-NH2 [where Xaa is Leu, norleucine (Nle), or Phe; residues numbered after GRP], similar to those introduced by Coy and coworkers [for review, see Jensen, R. T. & Coy, D. H. (1991) Trends Pharmacol. Sci. 12, 13-19], were found to have nanomolar potencies. (ii) We found that an octapeptide C-terminal GRP analog having D-Pro adjacent to the C-terminal amino acid amide was antagonistic, with a potency of 40 nM. By combining both modifications, specific analogs were found with potencies > 1000-fold greater than our lead structure--[(4'-hydroxy)-3-phenylpropanoyl]-Pro-Arg-Gly-Asn-His-Tr p-Ala-Val - Gly-His-Leu-psi(CH2NH)-Nle-NH2--and greater than any antagonist previously reported. The analogs [(4'-hydroxy)-3-phenylpropanoyl]-His-Trp-Ala-Val-D-Ala-His-D-Pro- psi(CH2NH)-Phe-NH2 and 1-naphthoyl-His-Trp-Ala-Val-D-Ala-His-D-Pro-psi(CH2NH)-Phe-NH2 antagonized [3H]thymidine incorporation with IC50 values of approximately 0.3 nM and inhibited the binding of 125I-labeled GRP with IC50 values of approximately 1 pM. These peptides may be of use in the study of the physiology of GRP. PMID:8446610

  14. Illegal use of beta-adrenergic agonists: European Community.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, H A; Noordam, M Y; van Dooren-Flipsen, M M; Schilt, R; Roos, A H

    1998-01-01

    The use of veterinary medicinal products within the European Community is governed by a series of directives and regulations that describe the requirements for safety, quality, and efficacy of these products. Veterinary therapeutic use of beta-agonists has only been approved in the case of clenbuterol for bronchodilatation in horses and calves and for tocolysis in cows. No beta-agonists have been permitted in the European Community for growth-promoting purposes in farm animals. Surveillance for the presence of residues of veterinary agents in food-producing animals and meat is regulated by the Directive 86/469/EEC containing specific guidelines for sampling procedures on farms and in slaughterhouses. The level and frequency of sampling is dependent on the category of compounds and animal species. When positive samples have been identified (above certain action levels), sampling intensity is increased. Results of monitoring programs in EU member states during 1992 and 1993 for the occurrence of residues of beta-agonists in food-producing animals vary substantially with respect to the percentages of positive samples, ranging from 0 to 7%. The variability is partly explained by differences in sampling strategies, detection methods, and action levels applied. Identification of the proper matrices for sampling and detection of beta-agonists is important. In the case of clenbuterol, hair and choroid retinal tissue are appropriate tissues because clenbuterol accumulates in these matrices. A clear decrease in the use of clenbuterol in cattle has been observed in The Netherlands, Germany, Northern Ireland, and Spanish Basque Country over the last 3 yr. This is partly due to intensified surveillance activities at farms and slaughterhouses by governmental agencies and production sector organizations. There are data on human intoxication following consumption of liver or meat from cattle treated with beta-agonists. At the concentrations of clenbuterol measured in contaminated

  15. Cell type and gene-specific activity of the retinoid inverse agonist AGN 193109: divergent effects from agonist at retinoic acid receptor gamma in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Thacher, S M; Nagpal, S; Klein, E S; Arefieg, T; Krasinski, G; DiSepio, D; Agarwal, C; Johnson, A; Eckert, R L; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-04-01

    Retinoids are important regulators of epithelial differentiation. AGN 193109 is a high-affinity antagonist and inverse agonist for the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Paradoxically, both AGN 193109 and retinoid agonists inhibit the expression of the differentiation marker MRP-8 in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). TTNPB, an RAR agonist, and AGN 193109 mutually antagonize MRP-8 inhibition at both mRNA and protein levels. We find that this antagonism, which is greatest at an AGN 193109:TTNPB ratio of about 10:1, is absent when either compound is in significant excess. The potent RARalpha-specific agonist, AGN 193836, has no effect on MRP-8 regulation. These data indicate that inverse agonists and agonists suppress MRP-8 in NHKs through RARgamma using distinct and mutually inhibitory mechanisms. The activity of AGN 193109 on MRP-8 is cell type specific. In differentiating ECE16-1 cervical cells, TTNPB inhibits while AGN 193109 induces MRP-8 mRNA levels. The effect of AGN 193109 on genes inhibited by retinoid agonists in NHKs is also selective; expression of the differentiation markers transglutaminase 1 and keratin 6 is not down-regulated by AGN 193109 whereas stromelysin-1 expression is suppressed. These results show a complex gene and cell context-specific interplay between agonist and inverse agonist for the regulation of gene expression.

  16. Fundus albipunctatus: review of the literature and report of a novel RDH5 gene mutation affecting the invariant tyrosine (p.Tyr175Phe).

    PubMed

    Skorczyk-Werner, Anna; Pawłowski, Przemysław; Michalczuk, Marta; Warowicka, Alicja; Wawrocka, Anna; Wicher, Katarzyna; Bakunowicz-Łazarczyk, Alina; Krawczyński, Maciej R

    2015-08-01

    Fundus albipunctatus (FA) is a rare, congenital form of night blindness with rod system impairment, characterised by the presence of numerous small, white-yellow retinal lesions. FA belongs to a heterogenous group of so-called flecked retina syndromes. This disorder shows autosomal recessive inheritance and is caused mostly by mutations in the RDH5 gene. This gene encodes the enzyme that is a part of the visual cycle, the 11-cis retinol dehydrogenase. This study is a brief review of the literature on FA and a report of the first molecular evidence for RDH5 gene mutation in a Polish patient with this rare disorder. We present a novel pathogenic RDH5 gene mutation in a 16-year-old female patient with symptoms of night blindness. The patient underwent ophthalmological examinations, including colour vision testing, fundus photography, automated visual field testing, full-field electroretinography (ERG) and spectral optical coherent tomography (SOCT). The patient showed typical FA ERG records, the visual field was constricted and fundus examination revealed numerous characteristic, small, white-yellowish retinal lesions. DNA sequencing of the RDH5 gene coding sequence (exons 2-5) enabled the detection of the homozygous missense substitution c.524A > T (p.Tyr175Phe) in exon 3. This is the first report of RDH5 gene mutation that affects the invariant tyrosine, one of the most conserved amino acid residues in short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs), crucial for these enzymes' activity. The location of this substitution, together with its predicted influence on the protein function, indicate that the p.Tyr175Phe mutation is the cause of FA in our patient. PMID:25820994

  17. Agonist-antagonist combinations in opioid dependence: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The potential therapeutic benefits of co-administering opiate agonist and antagonist agents remain largely to be investigated. This paper focuses on the mechanisms of very low doses of naltrexone that help modulate the effects of methadone withdrawal and review pharmacological properties of the buprenorphine/naltrexone combination that support its clinical investigation. The bench-to-bedside development of the very low dose naltrexone treatment can serve as a translational paradigm to investigate and treat drug addiction. Further research on putative mechanisms elicited by the use of opioid agonist-antagonist combinations may lead to effective pharmacological alternatives to the gold standard methadone treatment, also useful for the management of the abuse of non opioid drugs and alcohol. PMID:22448305

  18. Orvinols with Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonist Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [35S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile. PMID:23438330

  19. Orvinols with mixed kappa/mu opioid receptor agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Greedy, Benjamin M; Bradbury, Faye; Thomas, Mark P; Grivas, Konstantinos; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Archambeau, Ashley; Bosse, Kelly; Clark, Mary J; Aceto, Mario; Lewis, John W; Traynor, John R; Husbands, Stephen M

    2013-04-25

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [(35)S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile.

  20. Grooming, rank, and agonistic support in tufted capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schino, Gabriele; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Visalberghi, Elisabetta

    2009-02-01

    Studies investigating the relation between allogrooming and social rank in capuchin monkeys (genus Cebus) have yielded inconsistent results. In this study, we investigated the relation between grooming, agonistic support, aggression and social rank in a captive group of tufted capuchin monkeys (C. apella). Differently from most previous studies, we based our analyses on a relatively large database and studied a group with known genealogical relationships. Tufted capuchin females did not exchange grooming for rank-related benefits such as agonistic support or reduced aggression. Coherently with this picture, they did not groom up the hierarchy and did not compete for accessing high-ranking grooming partners. It is suggested that a small group size, coupled with a strong kin bias, may make the exchange of grooming for rank-related benefits impossible or unprofitable, thus eliminating the advantages of grooming up the hierarchy. We provide several possible explanations for the heterogeneity of results across capuchin studies that have addressed similar questions.

  1. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site.

  2. Dopamine Agonists and the Suppression of Impulsive Motor Actions in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, S.A.; Claassen, D.O.; Huizenga, H.M.; Schewel, K.D.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Bashore, T.R.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The suppression of spontaneous motor impulses is an essential facet of cognitive control that is linked to frontal-basal ganglia circuitry. Basal ganglia dysfunction caused by Parkinson’s disease (PD) disrupts the proficiency of action suppression, but how pharmacotherapy for PD impacts impulsive motor control is poorly understood. Dopamine agonists improve motor symptoms of PD, but can also provoke impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICB). We investigated whether dopamine agonist medication has a beneficial or detrimental effect on impulsive action control in thirty-eight PD patients, half of whom had current ICB. Participants performed the Simon conflict task, which measures susceptibility to acting on spontaneous action impulses as well as the proficiency of suppressing these impulses. Compared to an off agonist state, patients on their agonist were no more susceptible to reacting impulsively, but were less proficient at suppressing the interference from the activation of impulsive actions. Importantly, agonist effects depended on baseline performance in the off agonist state; more proficient suppressors off agonist experienced a reduction in suppression on agonist, whereas less proficient suppressors off agonist showed improved suppression on agonist. Patients with active ICB were actually less susceptible to making fast, impulsive response errors than patients without ICB, suggesting that behavioral problems in this subset of patients may be less related to impulsivity in motor control. Our findings provide further evidence that dopamine agonist medication impacts specific cognitive control processes and that the direction of its effects depends on individual differences in performance off medication. PMID:22571461

  3. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site. PMID:27298318

  4. Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonists: The 6β-Naltrexamines

    PubMed Central

    Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Neal, Adrian P.; Bradbury, Faye A.; Purington, Lauren C.; Aceto, Mario D.; Harris, Louis S.; Lewis, John W.; Traynor, John R.; Husbands, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Ligands from the naltrexamine series have consistently demonstrated agonist activity at kappa opioid receptors (KOR), with varying activity at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Various 6β-cinnamoylamino derivatives were made with the aim of generating ligands with a KOR agonist/MOR partial agonist profile, as ligands with this activity may be of interest as treatment agents for cocaine abuse. The ligands all displayed the desired high affinity, non-selective binding in vitro and in the functional assays were high efficacy KOR agonists with some partial agonist activity at MOR. Two of the new ligands (12a, 12b) have been evaluated in vivo, with 12a acting as a KOR agonist, and therefore somewhat similar to the previously evaluated analogues 3–6, while 12b displayed predominant MOR agonist activity. PMID:19253970

  5. Octopaminergic agonists for the cockroach neuronal octopamine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Eto, Morifusa

    2003-01-01

    The compounds 1-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine-2-thione and 2-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine showed the almost same activity as octopamine in stimulating adenylate cyclase of cockroach thoracic nervous system among 70 octopamine agonists, suggesting that only these compounds are full octopamine agonists and other compounds are partial octopamine agonists. The quantitative structure-activity relationship of a set of 22 octopamine agonists against receptor 2 in cockroach nervous tissue, was analyzed using receptor surface modeling. Three-dimensional energetics descriptors were calculated from receptor surface model/ligand interaction and these three-dimensional descriptors were used in quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis. A receptor surface model was generated using some subset of the most active structures and the results provided useful information in the characterization and differentiation of octopaminergic receptor. Abbreviation: AEA arylethanolamine AII 2-(arylimino)imidazolidine AIO 2-(arylimino)oxazolidine AIT 2-(arylimino)thiazolidine APAT 2-(α-phenylethylamino)-2-thiazoline BPAT 2-(β-phenylethylamino)-2-thiazoline CAO 2-(3-chlorobenzylamino)-2-oxazoline DCAO 2-(3,5-dichlorobenzylamino)-2-oxazoline DET5 2-(2,6-diethylphenylimino)-5-methylthiazolidine DET6 2-(2,6-diethylphenylimino)thiazine EGTA ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid GFA genetic function approximation G/PLS genetic partial least squares IND 2-aminomethyl-2-indanol LAH lithium aluminum hydride MCSG maximum common subgroup MCT6 2-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenylimino)thiazine OA octopamine PLS partial least squares QSAR quantitative structure-activity relationship SBAT 2-(substituted benzylamino)-2-thiazoline SD the sum of squared deviations of the dependent variable values from their mean SPIT 3-(substituted phenyl)imidazolidine-2-thione THI 2-amino-1-(2-thiazoyl)ethanol TMS tetramethyl silane PMID:15841226

  6. Newspapers and newspaper ink contain agonists for the ah receptor.

    PubMed

    Bohonowych, Jessica E S; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T; Denison, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  7. Synthesis of fluorinated agonist of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Aliouane, Lucie; Chao, Sovy; Brizuela, Leyre; Pfund, Emmanuel; Cuvillier, Olivier; Jean, Ludovic; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Lequeux, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The bioactive metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a product of sphingosine kinases (SphKs), mediates diverse biological processes such as cell differentiation, proliferation, survival and angiogenesis. A fluorinated analogue of S1P receptor agonist has been synthesized by utilizing a ring opening reaction of oxacycles by a lithiated difluoromethylphosphonate anion as the key reaction. In vitro activity of this S1P analogue is also reported.

  8. A human platelet calcium calculator trained by pairwise agonist scanning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-02-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide.

  9. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline.

  10. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline. PMID:20030735

  11. Antipsychotic Induced Symptomatic Hyperprolactinemia: Are Dopamine Agonists Safe?

    PubMed Central

    Lertxundi, Unax; Domingo-Echaburu, Saioa; Peral, Javier; García, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Published literature shows that dopamine agonists can reverse antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia without worsening psychotic symptoms in the majority of schizophrenic patients. However, psychiatrists have been reluctant to use drugs with dopaminergic properties for fear of exacerbating psychiatric symptoms. There are reported cases of psychosis worsening published for both cabergoline and bromocriptine. Cabergoline has proven to be more effective and safe when used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but whether cabergoline is also safer than bromocriptine in antipsychotic induced hyperprolactinemia remains unproven.

  12. A human platelet calcium calculator trained by pairwise agonist scanning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-02-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide. PMID:25723389

  13. Improving the developability profile of pyrrolidine progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Kallander, Lara S.; Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Frazee, James S.; Stoy, Patrick; Johnson, Latisha; Lu, Qing; Hammond, Marlys; Barton, Linda S.; Patterson, Jaclyn R.; Azzarano, Leonard M.; Nagilla, Rakesh; Madauss, Kevin P.; Williams, Shawn P.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Duraiswami, Chaya; Grygielko, Eugene T.; Xu, Xiaoping; Laping, Nicholas J.; Bray, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Scott K.

    2010-09-17

    The previously reported pyrrolidine class of progesterone receptor partial agonists demonstrated excellent potency but suffered from serious liabilities including hERG blockade and high volume of distribution in the rat. The basic pyrrolidine amine was intentionally converted to a sulfonamide, carbamate, or amide to address these liabilities. The evaluation of the degree of partial agonism for these non-basic pyrrolidine derivatives and demonstration of their efficacy in an in vivo model of endometriosis is disclosed herein.

  14. A Human Platelet Calcium Calculator Trained by Pairwise Agonist Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide. PMID:25723389

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  16. Increased flow precedes remote arteriolar dilations for some microapplied agonists.

    PubMed

    Frame, M D

    2000-04-01

    This study asks which occurs first in time for remote responses: a dilation or a remote change in flow. Arteriolar diameter (approximately 20 microm) and fluorescently labeled red blood cell (RBC) velocity were measured in the cremaster muscle of anesthetized (pentobarbital sodium, 70 mg/kg) hamsters (n = 51). Arterioles were locally stimulated for 60 s with micropipette-applied 10 microg/ml LM-609 (alpha(v)beta(3)-integrin agonist), 10(-3) M adenosine, or 10(-3) M 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1, nitric oxide donor) as remote response agonists or with 10(-3) M papaverine, which dilates only locally. Observations were made at a remote site 1,200 microm upstream. With LM-609 or adenosine, the RBC velocity increased first (within 5 s), and the remote dilation followed 5-7 s later. N-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM) blocked the LM-609 (100%) and adenosine (60%) remote dilations. SIN-1 induced a concurrent remote dilation and decrease in RBC velocity (approximately 10 s), suggesting the primary signal was to dilate. Papaverine had no remote effects. This study suggests that, although remote responses to some agonists are induced by primary signals to dilate, additionally, network changes in flow can stimulate extensive remote changes in diameter.

  17. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  18. Emerging strategies for exploiting cannabinoid receptor agonists as medicines.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2009-02-01

    Medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptor are already in the clinic. These are Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) and Sativex (Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol with cannabidiol). The first two of these medicines can be prescribed to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Marinol can also be prescribed to stimulate appetite, while Sativex is prescribed for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in adults with multiple sclerosis and as an adjunctive analgesic treatment for adult patients with advanced cancer. One challenge now is to identify additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a number of potential clinical applications for such agonists are mentioned in this review. A second challenge is to develop strategies that will improve the efficacy and/or the benefit-to-risk ratio of a cannabinoid receptor agonist. This review focuses on five strategies that have the potential to meet either or both of these objectives. These are strategies that involve: (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier; (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue; (iii) targeting up-regulated cannabinoid receptors; (iv) targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors; or (v) 'multi-targeting'. Preclinical data that justify additional research directed at evaluating the clinical importance of each of these strategies are also discussed. PMID:19226257

  19. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes. PMID:24038158

  20. Structure of the agonist-bound neurotensin receptor.

    PubMed

    White, Jim F; Noinaj, Nicholas; Shibata, Yoko; Love, James; Kloss, Brian; Xu, Feng; Gvozdenovic-Jeremic, Jelena; Shah, Priyanka; Shiloach, Joseph; Tate, Christopher G; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2012-10-25

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13-amino-acid peptide that functions as both a neurotransmitter and a hormone through the activation of the neurotensin receptor NTSR1, a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In the brain, NTS modulates the activity of dopaminergic systems, opioid-independent analgesia, and the inhibition of food intake; in the gut, NTS regulates a range of digestive processes. Here we present the structure at 2.8 Å resolution of Rattus norvegicus NTSR1 in an active-like state, bound to NTS(8-13), the carboxy-terminal portion of NTS responsible for agonist-induced activation of the receptor. The peptide agonist binds to NTSR1 in an extended conformation nearly perpendicular to the membrane plane, with the C terminus oriented towards the receptor core. Our findings provide, to our knowledge, the first insight into the binding mode of a peptide agonist to a GPCR and may support the development of non-peptide ligands that could be useful in the treatment of neurological disorders, cancer and obesity.

  1. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes.

  2. Meclizine is an agonist ligand for mouse constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and an inverse agonist for human CAR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wendong; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Ping; Schrader, William T; Moore, David D

    2004-10-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is a key regulator of xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. The ligand-binding domains of murine (m) and human (h) CAR are divergent relative to other nuclear hormone receptors, resulting in species-specific differences in xenobiotic responses. Here we identify the widely used antiemetic meclizine (Antivert; Bonine) as both an agonist ligand for mCAR and an inverse agonist for hCAR. Meclizine increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. Like the mCAR agonist 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, meclizine stimulates binding of steroid receptor coactivator 1 to the murine receptor in vitro. Meclizine administration to mice increases expression of CAR target genes in a CAR-dependent manner. In contrast, meclizine suppresses hCAR transactivation and inhibits the phenobarbital-induced expression of the CAR target genes, cytochrome p450 monooxygenase (CYP)2B10, CYP3A11, and CYP1A2, in primary hepatocytes derived from mice expressing hCAR, but not mCAR. The inhibitory effect of meclizine also suppresses acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in humanized CAR mice. These results demonstrate that a single compound can induce opposite xenobiotic responses via orthologous receptors in rodents and humans. PMID:15272053

  3. Additive antinociceptive effects of mixtures of the κ-opioid receptor agonist spiradoline and the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 in rats.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a significant clinical problem, and there is a need for pharmacotherapies that are more effective with fewer adverse effects than currently available medications. Cannabinoid receptor agonists enhance the antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists; it is unclear whether they impact the effects of agonists acting at other opioid receptors. κ-Opioid receptor agonists have antinociceptive effects, but their clinical use is precluded by adverse effects; however, their therapeutic potential might be realized if antinociceptive effects could be selectively enhanced. In this study, the antinociceptive effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 and the κ-opioid receptor agonist spiradoline, alone and in combination, were studied in rats (n=7) using a warm water tail-withdrawal procedure. When administered alone, CP55940 (0.032-1.0 mg/kg) and spiradoline (1.0-32.0 mg/kg) increased tail-withdrawal latency, and mixtures of CP55940 and spiradoline (ratios of 1 : 3, 1 : 1, and 3 : 1) produced additive effects. It remains to be determined whether this additive interaction between a κ-opioid receptor agonist and a cannabinoid receptor agonist is selective for antinociception and whether it can be generalized to other drugs. PMID:26292184

  4. A new hemoglobin variant: Hb Meylan [β73(E17)Asp → Phe; HBB: c.220G>T; c.221A>T] with a double base mutation at the same codon.

    PubMed

    Renoux, Céline; Feray, Cécile; Joly, Philippe; Zanella-Cleon, Isabelle; Garcia, Caroline; Lacan, Philippe; Couprie, Nicole; Francina, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We report a new β-globin chain variant: Hb Meylan [β73(E17)Asp → Phe; HBB: c.220G>T; c.221A>T]. The new variant results from a double nucleotide mutation at the same codon. The possible molecular mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Different serotonin receptor agonists have distinct effects on sound-evoked responses in inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M

    2006-11-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin has a complex set of effects on the auditory responses of neurons within the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain auditory nucleus that integrates a wide range of inputs from auditory and nonauditory sources. To determine whether activation of different types of serotonin receptors is a source of the variability in serotonergic effects, four selective agonists of serotonin receptors in the serotonin (5-HT) 1 and 5-HT2 families were iontophoretically applied to IC neurons, which were monitored for changes in their responses to auditory stimuli. Different agonists had different effects on neural responses. The 5-HT1A agonist had mixed facilitatory and depressive effects, whereas 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C agonists were both largely facilitatory. Different agonists changed threshold and frequency tuning in ways that reflected their effects on spike count. When pairs of agonists were applied sequentially to the same neurons, selective agonists sometimes affected neurons in ways that were similar to serotonin, but not to other selective agonists tested. Different agonists also differentially affected groups of neurons classified by the shapes of their frequency-tuning curves, with serotonin and the 5-HT1 receptors affecting proportionally more non-V-type neurons relative to the other agonists tested. In all, evidence suggests that the diversity of serotonin receptor subtypes in the IC is likely to account for at least some of the variability of the effects of serotonin and that receptor subtypes fulfill specialized roles in auditory processing. PMID:16870843

  6. Heterogeneous responses of human limbs to infused adrenergic agonists: a gravitational effect?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawelczyk, James A.; Levine, Benjamin D.

    2002-01-01

    Unlike quadrupeds, the legs of humans are regularly exposed to elevated pressures relative to the arms. We hypothesized that this "dependent hypertension" would be associated with altered adrenergic responsiveness. Isoproterenol (0.75-24 ng x 100 ml limb volume-1 x min-1) and phenylephrine (0.025-0.8 microg x 100 ml limb volume-1 x min-1) were infused incrementally in the brachial and femoral arteries of 12 normal volunteers; changes in limb blood flow were quantified by using strain-gauge plethysmography. Compared with the forearm, baseline calf vascular resistance was greater (38.8 +/- 2.5 vs. 26.9 +/- 2.0 mmHg x 100 ml x min x ml-1; P < 0.001) and maximal conductance was lower (46.1 +/- 11.9 vs. 59.4 +/- 13.4 ml x ml-1 x min-1 x mmHg-1; P < 0.03). Vascular conductance did not differ between the two limbs during isoproterenol infusions, whereas decreases in vascular conductance were greater in the calf than the forearm during phenylephrine infusions (P < 0.001). With responses normalized to maximal conductance, the half-maximal response for phenylephrine was significantly less for the calf than the forearm (P < 0.001), whereas the half-maximal response for isoproterenol did not differ between limbs. We conclude that alpha1- but not beta-adrenergic-receptor responsiveness in human limbs is nonuniform. The relatively greater response to alpha1-adrenergic-receptor stimulation in the calf may represent an adaptive mechanism that limits blood pooling and capillary filtration in the legs during standing.

  7. INSIGHT AGONISTES: A READING OF SOPHOCLES'S OEDIPUS THE KING.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Eugene J

    2015-07-01

    In this reading of Sophocles's Oedipus the King, the author suggests that insight can be thought of as the main protagonist of the tragedy. He personifies this depiction of insight, calling it Insight Agonistes, as if it were the sole conflicted character on the stage, albeit masquerading at times as several other characters, including gods, sphinxes, and oracles. This psychoanalytic reading of the text lends itself to an analogy between psychoanalytic process and Sophocles's tragic hero. The author views insight as always transgressing against, always at war with a conservative, societal, or intrapsychic chorus of structured elements. A clinical vignette is presented to illustrate this view of insight.

  8. Narrow SAR in odorant sensing Orco receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Romaine, Ian M; Taylor, Robert W; Saidu, Samsudeen P; Kim, Kwangho; Sulikowski, Gary A; Zwiebel, Laurence J; Waterson, Alex G

    2014-06-15

    The systematic exploration of a series of triazole-based agonists of the cation channel insect odorant receptor is reported. The structure-activity relationships of independent sections of the molecules are examined. Very small changes to the compound structure were found to exert a large impact on compound activity. Optimal substitutions were combined using a 'mix-and-match' strategy to produce best-in-class compounds that are capable of potently agonizing odorant receptor activity and may form the basis for the identification of a new mode of insect behavior modification. PMID:24813736

  9. Clenbuterol, a beta(2)-agonist, retards atrophy in denervated muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2) agonist, clenbuterol, on the protein content as well as on the contractile strength and the muscle fiber cross-sectional area of various denervated muscles from rats were investigated. It was found that denervated soleus, anterior tibialis, and gastrocnemius muscles, but not the extensor digitorum longus, of rats treated for 2-3 weeks with clenbuterol contained 95-110 percent more protein than denervated controls. The twofold difference in the protein content of denervated solei was paralleled by similar changes in contractile strength and muscle fiber cross-sectional area.

  10. INSIGHT AGONISTES: A READING OF SOPHOCLES'S OEDIPUS THE KING.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Eugene J

    2015-07-01

    In this reading of Sophocles's Oedipus the King, the author suggests that insight can be thought of as the main protagonist of the tragedy. He personifies this depiction of insight, calling it Insight Agonistes, as if it were the sole conflicted character on the stage, albeit masquerading at times as several other characters, including gods, sphinxes, and oracles. This psychoanalytic reading of the text lends itself to an analogy between psychoanalytic process and Sophocles's tragic hero. The author views insight as always transgressing against, always at war with a conservative, societal, or intrapsychic chorus of structured elements. A clinical vignette is presented to illustrate this view of insight. PMID:26198605

  11. Induction of depersonalization by the serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine.

    PubMed

    Simeon, D; Hollander, E; Stein, D J; DeCaria, C; Cohen, L J; Saoud, J B; Islam, N; Hwang, M

    1995-09-29

    Sixty-seven subjects, including normal volunteers and patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, and borderline personality disorder, received ratings of depersonalization after double-blind, placebo-controlled challenges with the partial serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP). Challenge with m-CPP induced depersonalization significantly more than did placebo. Subjects who became depersonalized did not differ in age, sex, or diagnosis from those who did not experience depersonalization. There was a significant correlation between the induction of depersonalization and increase in panic, but not nervousness, anxiety, sadness, depression, or drowsiness. This report suggests that serotonergic dysregulation may in part underlie depersonalization.

  12. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter. PMID:26585147

  13. Discovery of a potent and selective GPR120 agonist.

    PubMed

    Shimpukade, Bharat; Hudson, Brian D; Hovgaard, Christine Kiel; Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond

    2012-05-10

    GPR120 is a receptor of unsaturated long-chain fatty acids reported to mediate GLP-1 secretion, insulin sensitization, anti-inflammatory, and anti-obesity effects and is therefore emerging as a new potential target for treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic diseases. Further investigation is however hindered by the lack of suitable receptor modulators. Screening of FFA1 ligands provided a lead with moderate activity on GPR120 and moderate selectivity over FFA1. Optimization led to the discovery of the first potent and selective GPR120 agonist.

  14. Chiral Effect of a Phe Residue in Position 3 of the Dmt(1)-L(or D)-Tic(2) Analogues on Opioid Functional Activities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon Sun; Qu, Hong Chang; Davis, Peg; Ma, Shou-Wu; Vardanyan, Ruben; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Hruby, Victor J

    2013-07-11

    In this letter, we describe a structure-activity relationships study, specifically related to the chirality of third amino acid residue in our H-Dmt-L(or D)-Tic analogues, of which C-terminus is attached to a piperidinyl moiety. Observed selectivities and functional activities of these analogues demonstrated that the chiralities of the second and third position residues are crucial for determining whether these ligands act as antagonists or agonists at the δ opioid receptor, but not at the μ opioid receptor.

  15. Contamination with retinoic acid receptor agonists in two rivers in the Kinki region of Japan.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nakama, Koki; Sawada, Kazuko; Watanabe, Taro; Takagi, Mai; Sei, Kazunari; Yang, Min; Hirotsuji, Junji; Hu, Jianying; Nishikawa, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the agonistic activity against human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha in the Lake Biwa-Yodo River and the Ina River in the Kinki region of Japan. To accomplish this, a yeast two-hybrid assay was used to elucidate the spatial and temporal variations and potential sources of RARalpha agonist contamination in the river basins. RARalpha agonistic activity was commonly detected in the surface water samples collected along two rivers at different periods, with maximum all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) equivalents of 47.6 ng-atRA/L and 23.5 ng-atRA/L being observed in Lake Biwa-Yodo River and Ina River, respectively. The results indicated that RARalpha agonists are always present and widespread in the rivers. Comparative investigation of RARalpha and estrogen receptor alpha agonistic activities at 20 stations along each river revealed that the spatial variation pattern of RARalpha agonist contamination was entirely different from that of the estrogenic compound contamination. This suggests that the effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants, a primary source of estrogenic compounds, seemed not to be the cause of RARalpha agonist contamination in the rivers. Fractionation using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) directed by the bioassay found two bioactive fractions from river water samples, suggesting the presence of at least two RARalpha agonists in the rivers. Although a trial conducted to identify RARalpha agonists in the major bioactive fraction was not completed as part of this study, comparison of retention times in HPLC analysis and quantification with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the major causative contaminants responsible for the RARalpha agonistic activity were not RAs (natural RAR ligands) and 4-oxo-RAs, while 4-oxo-RAs were identified as the major RAR agonists in sewage in Beijing, China. These findings suggest that there are unknown RARalpha agonists with high

  16. Substituted isoxazole analogs of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist GW4064

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Parks, Derek J.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of alternately 3,5-substituted isoxazoles was prepared. Several of these analogs were potent full FXR agonists. A subset of this series, with a tether between the isoxazole ring and the 3-position aryl substituent, were equipotent FXR agonists to GW 4064 1a, with the 2,6-dimethyl phenol analog 1t having greater FRET FXR potency than GW 4064 1a.

  17. Substituted isoxazole analogs of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist GW4064.

    PubMed

    Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Parks, Derek J; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Wisely, G Bruce

    2009-06-01

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of alternately 3,5-substituted isoxazoles was prepared. Several of these analogs were potent full FXR agonists. A subset of this series, with a tether between the isoxazole ring and the 3-position aryl substituent, were equipotent FXR agonists to GW 4064 1a, with the 2,6-dimethyl phenol analog 1t having greater FRET FXR potency than GW 4064 1a.

  18. Discovery of potent and selective nonsteroidal indazolyl amide glucocorticoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sheppeck, James E; Gilmore, John L; Xiao, Hai-Yun; Dhar, T G Murali; Nirschl, David; Doweyko, Arthur M; Sack, Jack S; Corbett, Martin J; Malley, Mary F; Gougoutas, Jack Z; Mckay, Lorraine; Cunningham, Mark D; Habte, Sium F; Dodd, John H; Nadler, Steven G; Somerville, John E; Barrish, Joel C

    2013-10-01

    Modification of a phenolic lead structure based on lessons learned from increasing the potency of steroidal glucocorticoid agonists lead to the discovery of exceptionally potent, nonsteroidal, indazole GR agonists. SAR was developed to achieve good selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors with the ultimate goal of achieving a dissociated GR agonist as measured by human in vitro assays. The specific interactions by which this class of compounds inhibits GR was elucidated by solving an X-ray co-crystal structure. PMID:23953070

  19. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of a potent opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, compared to subtype-selective opioid receptor agonists for stroke treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Islam, Mohammad R; Karamyan, Vardan T.; Abbruscato, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    To meet the challenge of identification of new treatments for stroke, this study was designed to evaluate a potent, nonselective opioid receptor (OR) agonist, biphalin, in comparison to subtype selective OR agonists, as a potential neuroprotective drug candidate using in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. Our in vitro approach included mouse primary neuronal cells that were challenged with glutamate and hypoxic/aglycemic (H/A) conditions. We observed that 10 nM biphalin, exerted a statistically significant neuroprotective effect after glutamate challenge, compared to all selective opioid agonists, according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Moreover, 10 nM biphalin provided superior neuroprotection after H/A-reoxygenation compared to selective opioid agonists in all cases. Our in vitro investigations were supported by in vivo studies which indicate that the nonselective opioid agonist, biphalin, achieves enhanced neuroprotective potency compared to any of the selective opioid agonists, evidenced by reduced edema and infarct ratios. Reduction of edema and infarction was accompanied by neurological improvement of the animals in two independent behavioral tests. Collectively these data strongly suggest that concurrent agonist stimulation of mu, kappa and delta ORs with biphalin is neuroprotective and superior to neuroprotection by activation of any single OR subtype. PMID:25801116

  20. Nodule de Sœur Marie-Josèphe révélateur de carcinomes digestif et ovarien: à propos de 4 cas

    PubMed Central

    Touré, Papa Souleymane; Tall, Cheikh Tidiane; Dioussé, Pauline; Berthé, Adama; Diop, Madoky Maguatte; Sarr, Mamadou Moustapha; Diop, Balla; Léye, Yakham Mohamed; Diop, Bernard Marcel; Ka, Mamadou Mourtalla

    2015-01-01

    Le nodule de Sœur Marie-Josèphe est une métastase ombilicale d'une tumeur le plus souvent intra-abdominale. C'est un signe clinique rare dont l'incidence est de 1-3% de toutes les néoplasies abdomino-pelviennes, avec un pronostic péjoratif du fait de son retard diagnostique. Nous rapportons quatre observations d'une métastase cutanée ombilicale révélatrice d'un adénocarcinome dont deux pancréatiques, un gastrique et un d'origine ovarienne. Le but de notre travail est de montrer à travers ces quatre cas cliniques, l'intérêt de l'imagerie (tomodensitométrie, échographie) et de la biopsie dans la démarche diagnostique. A travers ces quatre observations nous insistons aussi sur les difficultés diagnostiques et thérapeutiques que pose cette tumeur dans nos pays à ressources limitées. PMID:26958132

  1. Platelets abrogate leukotriene B(4) generation by human blood neutrophils stimulated with monosodium urate monohydrate or f-Met-Leu-Phe in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chabannes, Bernard; Poubelle, Patrice E; Molière, Patrick; De Médicis, Rinaldo; Lussier, André; Lagarde, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Neutrophils are physiologically associated with platelets in whole blood. Inflammatory reactions can be modulated by the presence of platelets. To investigate the influence of platelets on neutrophil activity, we studied the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolic pathway in normal human blood neutrophils stimulated with f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) or monosodium urate monohydrate (MSUM) in the presence of autologous platelets. Platelets inhibited by more than 90% the synthesis of leukotriene B(4) and 5-HETE in neutrophils activated with fMLP or MSUM. The addition of exogenous arachidonic acid did not reverse the inhibitory effect of platelets on 5-LOX-generated metabolites in fMLP- or MSUM-activated neutrophils. Preincubation of neutrophils with adenosine deaminase reversed the inhibitory effect of platelets in fMLP-treated neutrophils, indicating that adenosine was responsible for the platelet inhibition of leukotriene B(4) and 5-HETE formation. In contrast, adenosine deaminase had no influence on the inhibitory effects of platelets in MSUM-stimulated cells. These results suggest that platelets can inhibit the synthesis of 5-LOX products (a). by acting mainly downstream to phospholipase A(2) in cells stimulated by fMLP or MSUM, (b). through adenosine when neutrophils are activated with fMLP, and (c). by an adenosine-independent mechanism in MSUM-activated neutrophils by an as-yet-unidentified mediator.

  2. Effects of LAAM and methadone utilization in an opiate agonist treatment program.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, J F; Khattak, S

    2000-01-01

    The development and approval of levo-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) as a pharmacotherapeutic agent in opioid agonist therapy provided an alternative to methadone. Clinicians recognized the potential benefits that LAAM, a synthetic mu agonist with pharmacological properties which differ from those of methadone,could have in the treatment management of addicts in opioid agonist therapy. We report our experience utilizing LAAM from 1995 to 1999 at the Hines VA opioid agonist therapy clinic. The addition of LAAM to the clinic's treatment armamentarium has resulted in management options that have improved the areas of patient recruitment, patient retention, patient traffic, take-home medication, detoxification, and treatment outcomes.

  3. Trial Watch: Immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor agonists in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Iribarren, Kristina; Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Cremer, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Špíšek, Radek; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulating preclinical evidence indicates that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists efficiently boost tumor-targeting immune responses (re)initiated by most, if not all, paradigms of anticancer immunotherapy. Moreover, TLR agonists have been successfully employed to ameliorate the efficacy of various chemotherapeutics and targeted anticancer agents, at least in rodent tumor models. So far, only three TLR agonists have been approved by regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients. Moreover, over the past decade, the interest of scientists and clinicians in these immunostimulatory agents has been fluctuating. Here, we summarize recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of TLR agonists for cancer therapy. PMID:27141345

  4. Dopamine agonist-induced substance addiction: the next piece of the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    Traditional antiparkinson treatment strategies strive to balance the antiparkinson effects of dopaminergic drugs with the avoidance of motor response complications. Dopamine agonists have an established role in delaying the emergence of motor response complications or reducing motor "off" periods. The recent recognition of a range of "behavioural addictions" that are linked to dopamine agonist use has highlighted the role of dopamine in brain reward function and addiction disorders in general. Dopamine agonists have now even been linked occasionally to new substance addictions. The challenge now for the Parkinsonologist is to also balance the net benefits of using dopamine agonists for their motor effects with avoiding the harm from behavioural compulsions. PMID:20980151

  5. Analysis of agonist dissociation constants as assessed by functional antagonism in guinea pig left atria

    SciTech Connect

    Molenaar, P.; Malta, E.

    1986-04-01

    In electrically driven guinea pig left atria, positive inotropic responses to (-)-isoprenaline and the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist RO363 were obtained in the absence and in the presence of the functional antagonists adenosine, carbachol, gallopamil, nifedipine, and Ro 03-7894. Each of the functional antagonists reduced the maximum response to both agonists and produced nonparallel rightward shifts in the cumulative concentration effect curves. For both agonists, dissociation constants (KA) were calculated using the equation described by Furchgott (1966) for irreversible antagonism. For RO363, which is a partial agonist with high agonist activity, the equations outlined for functional interaction by Mackay (1981) were also employed to calculate KA values. The KA values obtained by each method were compared with the dissociation constants (KD) for the two agonists determined from their ability to displace the radioligand (-)-(/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol from beta 1-adrenoceptors in guinea pig left atrial membrane preparations. The estimates of KA varied substantially from KD values. The KD values were taken as more accurate estimates of the true values for the dissociation constants because a high degree of correlation exists between pKD and pD2 values for a number of other beta-adrenoceptor agonists that behave as partial agonists and between pKD and pKB values for a number of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. Thus, it appears that there are serious limitations in the current theory for using functional antagonism as a means of obtaining agonist dissociation constants.

  6. Structural complexes of the agonist, inverse agonist and antagonist bound C5a receptor: insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    PubMed

    Rana, Soumendra; Sahoo, Amita Rani; Majhi, Bharat Kumar

    2016-04-26

    The C5a receptor (C5aR) is a pharmacologically important G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that interacts with (h)C5a, by recruiting both the "orthosteric" sites (site1 at the N-terminus and site2 at the ECS, extra cellular surface) on C5aR in a two site-binding model. However, the complex pharmacological landscape and the distinguishing chemistry operating either at the "orthosteric" site1 or at the functionally important "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR are still not clear, which greatly limits the understanding of C5aR pharmacology. One of the major bottlenecks is the lack of an experimental structure or a refined model structure of C5aR with appropriately defined active sites. The study attempts to understand the pharmacology at the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR rationally by generating a highly refined full-blown model structure of C5aR through advanced molecular modeling techniques, and further subjecting it to automated docking and molecular dynamics (MD) studies in the POPC bilayer. The first series of structural complexes of C5aR respectively bound to a linear native peptide agonist ((h)C5a-CT), a small molecule inverse agonist (NDT) and a cyclic peptide antagonist (PMX53) are reported, apparently establishing the unique pharmacological landscape of the "orthosteric" site2, which also illustrates an energetically distinct but coherent competitive chemistry ("cation-π" vs. "π-π" interactions) involved in distinguishing the established ligands known for targeting the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR. Over a total of 1 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in the POPC bilayer, it is evidenced that while the agonist prefers a "cation-π" interaction, the inverse agonist prefers a "cogwheel/L-shaped" interaction in contrast to the "edge-to-face/T-shaped" type π-π interactions demonstrated by the antagonist by engaging the F275(7.28) of the C5aR. In the absence of a NMR or crystallographically guided model structure of C5aR, the computational model complexes not only

  7. Serotonergic agonists stimulate inositol lipid metabolism in rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Schaechter, M.; Godfrey, P.P.; Minchin, M.C.W.; McClue, S.J.; Young, M.M.

    1985-10-28

    The metabolism of inositol phospholipids in response to serotonergic agonists was investigated in rabbit platelets. In platelets prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)-inositol, in a medium containing 10 mM LiCl which blocks the enzyme inositol-1-phosphatase, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused a dose-dependent accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP). This suggests a phospholipase-C-mediated breakdown of phosphoinositides. Ketanserin, a selective 5-HT/sub 2/ antagonist, was a potent inhibitor of the 5-HT response, with a Ki of 28 nM, indicating that 5-HT is activating receptors of the 5-HT/sub 2/ type in the platelet. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and quipazine also caused dose-related increases in inositol phosphate levels, though these were considerably less than those produced by 5-HT. These results show that relatively small changes in phosphoinositide metabolism induced by serotonergic agonists can be investigated in the rabbit platelet, and this cell may therefore be a useful model for the study of some 5-HT receptors. 30 references, 4 figures.

  8. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John M.; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O.; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A.; Milner, Joshua D.; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K.; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  9. Agonistic induction of PPARγ reverses cigarette smoke–induced emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Ming; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Frazier, Michael V.; Porter, Paul; Seryshev, Alexander; Hong, Jeong-Soo; Song, Li-zhen; Zhang, Yiqun; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Whitehead, Lawrence; Zarinkamar, Nazanin; Perusich, Sarah; Corry, David B.; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    The development of emphysema in humans and mice exposed to cigarette smoke is promoted by activation of an adaptive immune response. Lung myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) derived from cigarette smokers activate autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cells. mDC-dependent activation of T cell subsets requires expression of the SPP1 gene, which encodes osteopontin (OPN), a pleiotropic cytokine implicated in autoimmune responses. The upstream molecular events that promote SPP1 expression and activate mDCs in response to smoke remain unknown. Here, we show that peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARG/Pparg) expression was downregulated in mDCs of smokers with emphysema and mice exposed to chronic smoke. Conditional knockout of PPARγ in APCs using Cd11c-Cre Ppargflox/flox mice led to spontaneous lung inflammation and emphysema that resembled the phenotype of smoke-exposed mice. The inflammatory phenotype of Cd11c-Cre Ppargflox/flox mice required OPN, suggesting an antiinflammatory mechanism in which PPARγ negatively regulates Spp1 expression in the lung. A 2-month treatment with a PPARγ agonist reversed emphysema in WT mice despite continual smoke exposure. Furthermore, endogenous PPARγ agonists were reduced in the plasma of smokers with emphysema. These findings reveal a proinflammatory pathway, in which reduced PPARγ activity promotes emphysema, and suggest that targeting this pathway in smokers could prevent and reverse emphysema. PMID:24569375

  10. A novel PPARgamma agonist monascin's potential application in diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2014-07-25

    Edible fungi of the Monascus species have been used as traditional Chinese medicine in eastern Asia for several centuries. Monascus-fermented products possess a number of functional secondary metabolites, including the anti-inflammatory pigments monascin and ankaflavin. Monascin has been shown to prevent or ameliorate several conditions, including hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and obesity. Recently, monascin has been shown to improve hyperglycemia, attenuate oxidative stress, inhibit insulin resistance, and suppress inflammatory cytokine production. In our recent study, we have found that monascin is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) agonist. The PPARgamma agonist activity had been investigated and its exerted benefits are inhibition of inflammation in methylglyoxal (MG)-treated rats, prevention of pancreas impairment causing advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), promotion of insulin expression in vivo and in vitro, and attenuated carboxymethyllysine (CML)-induced hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation in the past several years. Moreover, our studies also demonstrated that monascin also activated nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in pancreatic RIN-m5F cell line thereby invading methylglyoxal induced pancreas dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the chemo-preventive properties of monascin against metabolic syndrome through PPARgamma and Nrf2 pathways. PMID:24752777

  11. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist attenuates ILC2-dependent airway hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Galle-Treger, Lauriane; Suzuki, Yuzo; Patel, Nisheel; Sankaranarayanan, Ishwarya; Aron, Jennifer L.; Maazi, Hadi; Chen, Lin; Akbari, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a complex and chronic inflammatory disorder that is associated with airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and driven by Th2 cytokine secretion. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) produce large amounts of Th2 cytokines and contribute to the development of AHR. Here, we show that ILC2s express the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR), which is thought to have an anti-inflammatory role in several inflammatory diseases. We show that engagement of a specific agonist with α7nAChR on ILC2s reduces ILC2 effector function and represses ILC2-dependent AHR, while decreasing expression of ILC2 key transcription factor GATA-3 and critical inflammatory modulator NF-κB, and reducing phosphorylation of upstream kinase IKKα/β. Additionally, the specific α7nAChR agonist reduces cytokine production and AHR in a humanized ILC2 mouse model. Collectively, our data suggest that α7nAChR expressed by ILC2s is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ILC2-mediated asthma. PMID:27752043

  12. A novel PPARgamma agonist monascin's potential application in diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2014-07-25

    Edible fungi of the Monascus species have been used as traditional Chinese medicine in eastern Asia for several centuries. Monascus-fermented products possess a number of functional secondary metabolites, including the anti-inflammatory pigments monascin and ankaflavin. Monascin has been shown to prevent or ameliorate several conditions, including hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and obesity. Recently, monascin has been shown to improve hyperglycemia, attenuate oxidative stress, inhibit insulin resistance, and suppress inflammatory cytokine production. In our recent study, we have found that monascin is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) agonist. The PPARgamma agonist activity had been investigated and its exerted benefits are inhibition of inflammation in methylglyoxal (MG)-treated rats, prevention of pancreas impairment causing advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), promotion of insulin expression in vivo and in vitro, and attenuated carboxymethyllysine (CML)-induced hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation in the past several years. Moreover, our studies also demonstrated that monascin also activated nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in pancreatic RIN-m5F cell line thereby invading methylglyoxal induced pancreas dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the chemo-preventive properties of monascin against metabolic syndrome through PPARgamma and Nrf2 pathways.

  13. Mood disorders, circadian rhythms, melatonin and melatonin agonists.

    PubMed

    Quera Salva, M A; Hartley, S

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of circadian rhythms have led to an interest in the treatment of major depressive disorder with chronobiotic agents. Many tissues have autonomous circadian rhythms, which are orchestrated by the master clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNC). Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine) is secreted from the pineal gland during darkness. Melatonin acts mainly on MT1 and MT2 receptors, which are present in the SNC, regulating physiological and neuroendocrine functions, including circadian entrainment, referred to as the chronobiotic effet. Circadian rhythms has been shown to be either misaligned or phase shifted or decreased in amplitude in both acute episodes and relapse of major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder. Manipulation of circadian rhythms either using physical treatments (such as high intensity light) or behavioral therapy has shown promise in improving symptoms. Pharmacotherapy using melatonin and pure melatonin receptor agonists, while improving sleep, has not been shown to improve symptoms of depression. A novel antidepressant, agomelatine, combines 5HT2c antagonist and melatonin agonist action, and has shown promise in both acute treatment of MDD and in preventing relapse.

  14. Pindolol--the pharmacology of a partial agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, B J; Menninger, K; Bertholet, A

    1982-01-01

    1 Pindolol is a non-selective beta-adrenoceptor blocking agent; its affinity to adrenoceptors in guinea pig atria (beta 1) is not significantly different from that in guinea pig trachea (beta 1 + beta 2) and canine vascular smooth muscle (beta 2). 2 Pindolol displays a striking diversity of agonist activities in isolated tissues. Stimulant effects correspond to 40--50% of the maximum effects of isoprenaline in isolated kitten atria and guinea pig trachea and to only 10% in guinea pig atria. Effects in canine isolated mesenteric vessels are those of a full agonist, maximum responses equaling those of isoprenaline. These findings suggest that the stimulant effects of pindolol are exerted principally on beta 2-adrenoceptors. 3 Cardiac stimulation produced by pindolol in the dog is sufficient to compensate for the cardiac depression resulting from blockade of beta-adrenoceptors in the heart. Reductions in cardiac output and compensatory increases in total peripheral resistance do not occur or are much smaller than those produced by beta-adrenoceptor blocking agents lacking sympathomimetic activity. 4 Pindolol-induced relaxation of bronchial smooth muscle prevents or minimizes the bronchoconstrictor effects of injected spasmogens in the cat. 5 Pindolol has marked vasodilator activity, small doses reducing femoral and mesenteric vascular resistance by approximately 30%. Doses comparable to those used in hypertensive patients lower blood pressure by 20 mmHg in non-anaesthetized dogs. PMID:7049208

  15. Pharmacology and toxicology of Cannabis derivatives and endocannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Zaimovic, Amir; Gerra, Maria L; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cippitelli, Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Somaini, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    For centuries Cannabis sativa and cannabis extracts have been used in natural medicine. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main active ingredient of Cannabis. THC seems to be responsible for most of the pharmacological and therapeutic actions of cannabis. In a few countries THC extracts (i.e. Sativex) or THC derivatives such as nabilone, and dronabinol are used in the clinic for the treatment of several pathological conditions like chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. On the other hand the severe side effects and the high abuse liability of these agents represent a serious limitation in their medical use. In addition, diversion in the use of these active ingredients for recreational purpose is a concern. Over recent years, alternative approaches using synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists or agents acting as activators of the endocannabinoid systems are under scrutiny with the hope to develop more effective and safer clinical applications. Likely, in the near future few of these new molecules will be available for clinical use. The present article review recent study and patents with focus on the cannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of central nervous system disorders with emphasis on agonists. PMID:19832688

  16. Pharmacology and toxicology of Cannabis derivatives and endocannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Zaimovic, Amir; Gerra, Maria L; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cippitelli, Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Somaini, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    For centuries Cannabis sativa and cannabis extracts have been used in natural medicine. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main active ingredient of Cannabis. THC seems to be responsible for most of the pharmacological and therapeutic actions of cannabis. In a few countries THC extracts (i.e. Sativex) or THC derivatives such as nabilone, and dronabinol are used in the clinic for the treatment of several pathological conditions like chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. On the other hand the severe side effects and the high abuse liability of these agents represent a serious limitation in their medical use. In addition, diversion in the use of these active ingredients for recreational purpose is a concern. Over recent years, alternative approaches using synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists or agents acting as activators of the endocannabinoid systems are under scrutiny with the hope to develop more effective and safer clinical applications. Likely, in the near future few of these new molecules will be available for clinical use. The present article review recent study and patents with focus on the cannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of central nervous system disorders with emphasis on agonists.

  17. Identification of agonists for a group of human odorant receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Kristeller, Daniela C.; do Nascimento, João B. P.; Galante, Pedro A. F.; Malnic, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction plays a critical role in several aspects of the human life. Odorants are detected by hundreds of odorant receptors (ORs) which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are expressed in the olfactory sensory neurons of the nose. The information provided by the activation of different combinations of ORs in the nose is transmitted to the brain, leading to odorant perception and emotional and behavioral responses. There are ~400 intact human ORs, and to date only a small percentage of these receptors (~10%) have known agonists. The determination of the specificity of the human ORs will contribute to a better understanding of how odorants are discriminated by the olfactory system. In this work, we aimed to identify human specific ORs, that is, ORs that are present in humans but absent from other species, and their corresponding agonists. To do this, we first selected 22 OR gene sequences from the human genome with no counterparts in the mouse, rat or dog genomes. Then we used a heterologous expression system to screen a subset of these human ORs against a panel of odorants of biological relevance, including foodborne aroma volatiles. We found that different types of odorants are able to activate some of these previously uncharacterized human ORs. PMID:25784876

  18. How does agonistic behaviour differ in albino and pigmented fish?

    PubMed Central

    Horký, Pavel; Wackermannová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    In addition to hypopigmentation of the skin and red iris colouration, albino animals also display distinct physiological and behavioural alterations. However, information on the social interactions of albino animals is rare and has mostly been limited to specially bred strains of albino rodents and animals from unique environments in caves. Differentiating between the effects of albinism and domestication on behaviour in rodents can be difficult, and social behaviour in cave fish changes according to species-specific adaptations to conditions of permanent darkness. The agonistic behaviours of albino offspring of pigmented parents have yet to be described. In this study, we observed agonistic behaviour in albino and pigmented juvenile Silurus glanis catfish. We found that the total number of aggressive interactions was lower in albinos than in pigmented catfish. The distance between conspecifics was also analysed, and albinos showed a tendency towards greater separation from their same-coloured conspecifics compared with pigmented catfish. These results demonstrate that albinism can be associated with lower aggressiveness and with reduced shoaling behaviour preference, as demonstrated by a tendency towards greater separation of albinos from conspecifics. PMID:27114883

  19. Biostable agonists that match or exceed activity of native insect kinins on recombinant arthropod GPCRs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The multifunctional arthropod insect kinins share the evolutionarily conserved C-terminal pentapeptide motif Phe-X1-X2-Trp-Gly-NH2, where X1 = His, Asn, Ser, or Tyr and X2 = Ser, Pro, or Ala. Insect kinins regulate diuresis in many species of insects. Compounds with similar biological activity cou...

  20. Modulation of PPAR subtype selectivity. Part 2: Transforming PPARα/γ dual agonist into α selective PPAR agonist through bioisosteric modification.

    PubMed

    Zaware, Pandurang; Shah, Shailesh R; Pingali, Harikishore; Makadia, Pankaj; Thube, Baban; Pola, Suresh; Patel, Darshit; Priyadarshini, Priyanka; Suthar, Dinesh; Shah, Maanan; Jamili, Jeevankumar; Sairam, Kalapatapu V V M; Giri, Suresh; Patel, Lala; Patel, Harilal; Sudani, Hareshkumar; Patel, Hiren; Jain, Mukul; Patel, Pankaj; Bahekar, Rajesh

    2011-01-15

    A novel series of oxime containing benzyl-1,3-dioxane-r-2-carboxylic acid derivatives (6a-k) were designed as selective PPARα agonists, through bioisosteric modification in the lipophilic tail region of PPARα/γ dual agonist. Some of the test compounds (6a, 6b, 6c and 6f) showed high selectivity towards PPARα over PPARγ in vitro. Further, highly potent and selective PPARα agonist 6c exhibited significant antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic activity in vivo, along with its improved pharmacokinetic profile. Favorable in-silico interaction of 6c with PPARα binding pocket correlate its in vitro selectivity profile toward PPARα over PPARγ. Together, these results confirm discovery of novel series of oxime based selective PPARα agonists for the safe and effective treatment of various metabolic disorders. PMID:21195611

  1. Phenylephrine preconditioning in embryonic heart H9c2 cells is mediated by up-regulation of SUR2B/Kir6.2: A first evidence for functional role of SUR2B in sarcolemmal KATP channels and cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Sofija; Ballantyne, Thomas; Du, Qingyou; Blagojević, Miloš; Jovanović, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels were originally described in cardiomyocytes, where physiological levels of intracellular ATP keep them in a closed state. Structurally, these channels are composed of pore-forming inward rectifier, Kir6.1 or Kir6.2, and a regulatory, ATP-binding subunit, SUR1, SUR2A or SUR2B. SUR1 and Kir6.2 form pancreatic type of KATP channels, SUR2A and Kir6.2 form cardiac type of KATP channels, SUR2B and Kir6.1 form vascular smooth muscle type of KATP channels. The presence of SUR2B has been described in cardiomyocytes, but its functional significance and role has remained unknown. Pretreatment with phenylephrine (100nM) for 24h increased mRNA levels of SUR2B and Kir6.2, without affecting those levels of SUR1, SUR2A and Kir6.1 in embryonic heart H9c2 cells. Such increase was associated with increased K(+) current through KATP channels and Kir6.2/SUR2B protein complexes as revealed by whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology and immunoprecipitation/Western blotting respectively. Pretreatment with phenylephrine (100nM) generated a cellular phenotype that acquired resistance to chemical hypoxia induced by 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP; 10mM), which was accompanied by increased in K(+) current in response to DNP (10mM). Cytoprotection afforded by phenylephrine (100nM) was abolished by infection of H9c2 cells with adenovirus containing Kir6.2AFA, a mutant form of Kir6.2 with largely reduced K(+) conductance. Taking all together, the present findings demonstrate that the activation of α1-adrenoceptors up-regulates SUR2B/Kir6.2 to confer cardioprotection. This is the first account of possible physiological role of SUR2B in cardiomyocytes.

  2. Benzodiazepine Site Agonists Differentially Alter Acetylcholine Release in Rat Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Hambrecht-Wiedbusch, Viviane S.; Mitchell, Melinda F.; Firn, Kelsie A.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Background Agonist binding at the benzodiazepine site of γ-aminobutric acid type A receptors diminishes anxiety and insomnia by actions in the amygdala. The neurochemical effects of benzodiazepine-site agonists remain incompletely understood. Cholinergic neurotransmission modulates amygdala function, and in this study we tested the hypothesis that benzodiazepine-site agonists alter acetylcholine (ACh) release in the amygdala. Methods Microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography quantified ACh release in the amygdala of Sprague-Dawley rats (n=33). ACh was measured before and after IV administration (3 mg/kg) of midazolam or eszopiclone, with and without anesthesia. ACh in isoflurane-anesthetized rats during dialysis with Ringer’s solution(control) was compared to ACh release during dialysis with Ringer’s solution containing (100 μM) midazolam, diazepam, eszopiclone, or zolpidem. Results In unanesthetized rats, ACh in the amygdala was decreased by IV midazolam (−51.1%; P=0.0029; 95% CI= −73.0% to −29.2%) and eszopiclone (−39.6%; P=0.0222; 95% CI= −69.8% to −9.3%). In anesthetized rats, ACh in the amygdala was decreased by IV administration of midazolam (−46.2%; P=0.0041; 95% CI= −67.9% to −24.5%) and eszopiclone (−34.0%; P=0.0009; 95% CI= −44.7% to −23.3%), and increased by amygdala delivery of diazepam (43.2%; P=0.0434; 95% CI= 2.1% to 84.3%), and eszopiclone (222.2%; P=0.0159; 95% CI= 68.5% to 375.8%). Conclusions ACh release in the amygdala was decreased by IV delivery of midazolam and eszopiclone. Dialysis delivery directly into the amygdala caused either increased (eszopiclone and diazepam) or likely no significant change (midazolam and zolpidem) in ACh release. These contrasting effects of delivery route on ACh release support the interpretation that systemically administered midazolam and eszopiclone decrease ACh release in the amygdala by acting on neuronal systems outside of the amygdala. PMID:24842176

  3. Discriminative stimulus properties of indorenate, a serotonin agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Martínez, D N; López Cabrera, M; Sánchez, H; Ramírez, J I; Hong, E

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether indorenate, a serotonin-receptor agonist, can exert discriminative control over operant responses, to establish the temporal course of discriminative control and to compare its stimulus properties to a (5-HT)IA receptor agonist. [3H]-8-hydroxy-2-(di-N-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). DESIGN: Prospective animal study. ANIMALS: Ten male Wistar rats. INTERVENTIONS: Rats were trained to press either of 2 levers for sucrose solution according to a fixed ratio schedule, which was gradually increased. Rats were given injections of either indorenate or saline solution during discrimination training. Once they had achieved an 83% accuracy rate, rats underwent generalization tests after having received a different dose of indorenate, the training dose of indorenate at various intervals before the test, various doses of 8-OH-DPT, or NAN-190 administered before indorenate or 8-OH-DPAT. OUTCOME MEASURES: Distribution of responses between the 2 levers before the first reinforcer of the session, response rate for all the responses in the session, and a discrimination index that expressed the drug-appropriate responses as a proportion of the total responses. RESULTS: Indorenate administration resulted in discriminative control over operant responses, maintained at fixed ratio 10, at a dose of 10.0 mg/kg (but not 3.0 mg/kg). When the interval between the administration of indorenate and the start of the session was varied, the time course of its cue properties followed that of its described effects on 5-HT turnover. In generalization tests, the discrimination index was a function of the dose of indorenate employed; moreover, administration of 8-OH-DPAT (from 0.1 to 1.0 mg/kg) fully mimicked the stimulus properties of indorenate in a dose-dependent way. The (5-HT)IA antagonist NAN-190 prevented the stimulus generalization from indorenate to 8-OH-DPAT. Also, NAN-190 antagonized the stimulus control of indorenate when administered 45 minutes before

  4. Novel sst(4)-selective somatostatin (SRIF) agonists. 4. Three-dimensional consensus structure by NMR.

    PubMed

    Grace, Christy Rani R; Koerber, Steven C; Erchegyi, Judit; Reubi, Jean Claude; Rivier, Jean; Riek, Roland

    2003-12-18

    The three-dimensional NMR structures of eight cyclic octapeptide analogues of somatostatin (SRIF) are described. These analogues, with the basic sequence H-c[Cys(3)-Phe(6)-Xxx(7)-Yyy(8)-Lys(9)-Thr(10)-Zzz(11)-Cys(14)]-OH (the numbering refers to the position in native SRIF), with Xxx(7) being Phe/Ala/Tyr, Yyy(8) being Trp/DTrp/D-threo-beta-Me2Nal/L-threo-beta-Me2Nal, and Zzz(11) being Phe/Ala, exhibit potent and highly selective binding to human SRIF type 4 (sst(4)) receptors. The conformations reveal that the backbones of these analogues do not have the usual type-II' beta-turn reported in the literature for sst(2)-subtype-selective analogues. Instead, the structures contain a unique arrangement of side chains of Yyy(8), Lys(9), and Phe(6) or Phe(11). The conformational preferences and results from biological analyses of these analogues (parts 1-3 of this series, Rivier et al., Erchegyi et al., and Erchegyi et al., J. Med. Chem. 2003, preceding papers in this issue) allow a detailed study of the structure-activity relationship of SRIF. The proposed consensus structural motif at the binding pocket for the sst(4)-selective analogues requires a unique set of distances between an indole/2-naphthyl ring, a lysine side chain, and another aromatic ring. This motif is necessary and sufficient to explain the binding affinities of all of the analogues studied and is distinct from the existing model suggested for sst(2)/sst(5) selectivity. PMID:14667215

  5. Impact of Efficacy at the μ-Opioid Receptor on Antinociceptive Effects of Combinations of μ-Opioid Receptor Agonists and Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), enhance the antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists, which suggests that combining cannabinoids with opioids would improve pain treatment. Combinations with lower efficacy agonists might be preferred and could avoid adverse effects associated with large doses; however, it is unclear whether interactions between opioids and cannabinoids vary across drugs with different efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists alone and in combination with cannabinoid receptor agonists were studied in rhesus monkeys (n = 4) using a warm water tail withdrawal procedure. Etorphine, fentanyl, morphine, buprenorphine, nalbuphine, Δ9-THC, and CP 55,940 (2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol) each increased tail withdrawal latency. Pretreatment with doses of Δ9-THC (1.0 mg/kg) or CP 55,940 (0.032 mg/kg) that were ineffective alone shifted the fentanyl dose-effect curve leftward 20.6- and 52.9-fold, respectively, and the etorphine dose-effect curve leftward 12.4- and 19.6-fold, respectively. Δ9-THC and CP 55,940 shifted the morphine dose-effect curve leftward only 3.4- and 7.9-fold, respectively, and the buprenorphine curve only 5.4- and 4.1-fold, respectively. Neither Δ9-THC nor CP 55,940 significantly altered the effects of nalbuphine. Cannabinoid receptor agonists increase the antinociceptive potency of higher efficacy opioid receptor agonists more than lower efficacy agonists; however, because much smaller doses of each drug can be administered in combinations while achieving adequate pain relief and that other (e.g., abuse-related) effects of opioids do not appear to be enhanced by cannabinoids, these results provide additional support for combining opioids with cannabinoids to treat pain. PMID:25194020

  6. Yawning and locomotor behavior induced by dopamine receptor agonists in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Min; Collins, Gregory T; Paul, Noel M; Grundt, Peter; Newman, Amy H; Xu, Ming; Grandy, David K; Woods, James H; Katz, Jonathan L

    2010-05-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) agonist-induced yawning in rats seems to be mediated by DA D3 receptors, and low doses of several DA agonists decrease locomotor activity, an effect attributed to presynaptic D2 receptors. Effects of several DA agonists on yawning and locomotor activity were examined in rats and mice. Yawning was reliably produced in rats, and by the cholinergic agonist, physostigmine, in both the species. However, DA agonists were ineffective in producing yawning in Swiss-Webster or DA D2R and DA D3R knockout or wild-type mice. The drugs significantly decreased locomotor activity in rats at one or two low doses, with activity returning to control levels at higher doses. In mice, the drugs decreased locomotion across a 1000-10 000-fold range of doses, with activity at control levels (U-91356A) or above control levels [(+/-)-7-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin HBr, quinpirole] at the highest doses. Low doses of agonists decreased locomotion in all mice except the DA D2R knockout mice, but were not antagonized by DA D2R or D3R antagonists (L-741 626, BP 897, or PG01037). Yawning does not provide a selective in-vivo indicator of DA D3R agonist activity in mice. Decreases in mouse locomotor activity by the DA agonists seem to be mediated by D2 DA receptors.

  7. Prolonging Survival of Corneal Transplantation by Selective Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Yang; Han, Gencheng; Jia, Liang; Wang, Liqiang; Lei, Tian; Huang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most used therapy for eye disorders. Although the cornea is somewhat an immune privileged organ, immune rejection is still the major problem that reduces the success rate. Therefore, effective chemical drugs that regulate immunoreactions are needed to improve the outcome of corneal transplantations. Here, a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) selective agonist was systematically evaluated in mouse allogeneic corneal transplantation and compared with the commonly used immunosuppressive agents. Compared with CsA and the non-selective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist FTY720, the S1P1 selective agonist can prolong the survival corneal transplantation for more than 30 days with a low immune response. More importantly, the optimal dose of the S1P1 selective agonist was much less than non-selective S1P receptor agonist FTY720, which would reduce the dose-dependent toxicity in drug application. Then we analyzed the mechanisms of the selected S1P1 selective agonist on the immunosuppression. The results shown that the S1P1 selective agonist could regulate the distribution of the immune cells with less CD4+ T cells and enhanced Treg cells in the allograft, moreover the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines TGF-β1 and IL-10 unregulated which can reduce the immunoreactions. These findings suggest that S1P1 selective agonist may be a more appropriate immunosuppressive compound to effectively prolong mouse allogeneic corneal grafts survival. PMID:25216235

  8. Conformationally constrained farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists: Naphthoic acid-based analogs of GW 4064.

    PubMed

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Jones, Stacey A; Kaldor, Istvan; Liu, Yaping; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Iii, Frank Navas; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Wisely, G Bruce

    2008-08-01

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of stilbene replacements were prepared. The 6-substituted 1-naphthoic acid 1b was an equipotent FXR agonist with improved developability parameters relative to 1a. Analog 1b also reduced the severity of cholestasis in the ANIT acute cholestatic rat model.

  9. Agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity requires shear and a Rac1-dependent signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Michael Keegan; Liu, Junling; Kim, Kyungho; Shen, Bo; Stojanovic-Terpo, Aleksandra; Zheng, Yi; Cho, Jaehyung

    2014-01-01

    Activated platelets facilitate blood coagulation by exposing phosphatidylserine (PS) and releasing microvesicles (MVs). However, the potent physiological agonists thrombin and collagen poorly induce PS exposure when a single agonist is used. To obtain a greater procoagulant response, thrombin is commonly used in combination with glycoprotein VI agonists. However, even under these conditions, only a percentage of platelets express procoagulant activity. To date, it remains unclear why platelets poorly expose PS even when stimulated with multiple agonists and what the signaling pathways are of soluble agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity. Here we show that physiological levels of shear present in blood significantly enhance agonist-induced platelet PS exposure and MV release, enabling low doses of a single agonist to induce full-scale platelet procoagulant activity. PS exposed on the platelet surface was immediately released as MVs, revealing a tight coupling between the 2 processes under shear. Using platelet-specific Rac1−/− mice, we discovered that Rac1 plays a common role in mediating the low-dose agonist-induced procoagulant response independent of platelet aggregation, secretion, and the apoptosis pathway. Platelet-specific Rac1 function was not only important for coagulation in vitro but also for fibrin accumulation in vivo following laser-induced arteriolar injury. PMID:25079357

  10. Steroidal esters of the aromatic nitrogen mustard 2-[4-N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)amino-phenyl]butanoic acid (2-PHE-BU): synthesis and in-vivo biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Papaconstantinou, Ioanna C; Fousteris, Manolis A; Koutsourea, Anna I; Pairas, Georgios N; Papageorgiou, Athanasios D; Nikolaropoulos, Sotiris S

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of the results of in-silico predictions and in an effort to extend our structure-activity relationship studies, the aromatic nitrogen mustard 2-[4-N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl) amino-phenyl]butanoic acid (2-PHE-BU) was synthesized and conjugated with various steroidal alcohols. The resulting steroidal esters were evaluated for their in-vivo toxicity and antileukemic activity in P388-leukemia-bearing mice. The new derivatives showed significantly reduced toxicity and marginally improved antileukemic activity compared with free 2-PHE-BU. Nevertheless, they did not prove to be superior either to the template steroidal ester used for in-silico predictions or to previously synthesized steroidal esters of aromatic nitrogen mustards. The results obtained indicate that in-silico design predictions may guide the design and synthesis of new bioactive steroidal esters, but further parameters should be considered aiming at the discovery of compounds with optimum activity.

  11. Evaluation of Surlyn 8920 as PHE Visor Material and Evaluations of New Adhesives for Improving Bonding Between Teflon and Stainless Steel at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Asit K.

    1991-01-01

    Two studies are presented, and in the first study, Surlyn 8920 (an ionic and amorphous low density polyethylene made by Dupont) was evaluated as a possible replacement of Plexyglass G as PHE visor material. Four formulations of the polymer were made by adding different amounts of UV stabilizer, energy quencher, and antioxident in a Brabender Plasticorder. The formulated polymers were molded in the form of sheets in a compression molder. Cut samples from the molded sheets were exposed in a weatherometer and tested on Instron Tensile Tester for strength and elongation. Specially molded samples of the formulated polymers were subjected to Charpy Impact Tests. In the second study, preliminary evaluations of adhesives for improvement of bonding between Teflon and stainless steel (SS) were performed. Kapton, a high temperature polyimide made by Dupont, and a rubber based adhesive made by Potter Paint Co., were evaluated against industrial quality epoxy, the current material used to bond Teflon and SS. The degreased surfaces of the SS discs were etched mechanically, with a few of these etched chemically. The surfaces of the SS discs were etched mechanically, with a few of these etched chemically. Bonding strengths were evaluated using lap shear tests on the Instron Tensile Tester for the samples bonded by Kapton and industrial quality epoxy. Bond strengths were also evaluated using a pull test on the Instron for the samples bonded by Potter adhesive (CWL-152) and industrial quality epoxy. Based on limited lap shear data, Kapton gave bond strength favorable compared to that of industrial epoxy. Based on limited pull test data, Kapton bonded and CWL-152 bonded samples showed poor strength compared to epoxy bonded sample.

  12. TSH and Thyrotropic Agonists: Key Actors in Thyroid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Johannes W.; Landgrafe, Gabi; Fotiadou, Elisavet H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the reader with an overview of our current knowledge of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid feedback from a cybernetic standpoint. Over the past decades we have gained a plethora of information from biochemical, clinical, and epidemiological investigation, especially on the role of TSH and other thyrotropic agonists as critical components of this complex relationship. Integrating these data into a systems perspective delivers new insights into static and dynamic behaviour of thyroid homeostasis. Explicit usage of this information with mathematical methods promises to deliver a better understanding of thyrotropic feedback control and new options for personalised diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and targeted therapy, also by permitting a new perspective on the conundrum of the TSH reference range. PMID:23365787

  13. Proopiomelanocortin Deficiency Treated with a Melanocortin-4 Receptor Agonist.

    PubMed

    Kühnen, Peter; Clément, Karine; Wiegand, Susanna; Blankenstein, Oliver; Gottesdiener, Keith; Martini, Lea L; Mai, Knut; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko

    2016-07-21

    Patients with rare defects in the gene encoding proopiomelanocortin (POMC) have extreme early-onset obesity, hyperphagia, hypopigmentation, and hypocortisolism, resulting from the lack of the proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides melanocyte-stimulating hormone and corticotropin. In such patients, adrenal insufficiency must be treated with hydrocortisone early in life. No effective pharmacologic treatments have been available for the hyperphagia and obesity that characterize the condition. In this investigator-initiated, open-label study, two patients with proopiomelanocortin deficiency were treated with setmelanotide, a new melanocortin-4 receptor agonist. The patients had a sustainable reduction in hunger and substantial weight loss (51.0 kg after 42 weeks in Patient 1 and 20.5 kg after 12 weeks in Patient 2). PMID:27468060

  14. [Safety and tolerability of GLP-1 receptor agonists].

    PubMed

    Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1ra) are a new group of drugs with a glucose-lowering action due to their incretin effect. The GLP-1 receptor is expressed in various human tissues, which could be related to the pleiotropic effects of human GLP-1, as well as to the adverse effects described in patients treated with GLP-1ra. The risk of hypoglycaemia is low, which is one of the main considerations in the safety of this family of compounds and is also important to patients with diabetes. The most frequent adverse effect is nausea, which usually occurs at the start of treatment and is transient in 20-60% of affected patients. This article also reviews the information available on antibody formation, the potential effect on the thyroid gland, and the controversial association between this group of drugs with pancreatitis and cancer.

  15. [Safety and tolerability of GLP-1 receptor agonists].

    PubMed

    Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1ra) are a new group of drugs with a glucose-lowering action due to their incretin effect. The GLP-1 receptor is expressed in various human tissues, which could be related to the pleiotropic effects of human GLP-1, as well as to the adverse effects described in patients treated with GLP-1ra. The risk of hypoglycaemia is low, which is one of the main considerations in the safety of this family of compounds and is also important to patients with diabetes. The most frequent adverse effect is nausea, which usually occurs at the start of treatment and is transient in 20-60% of affected patients. This article also reviews the information available on antibody formation, the potential effect on the thyroid gland, and the controversial association between this group of drugs with pancreatitis and cancer.

  16. Locomotion induced by ventral tegmental microinjections of a nicotinic agonist.

    PubMed

    Museo, E; Wise, R A

    1990-03-01

    Bilateral microinjections of the nicotinic agonist cytisine (0.1, 1 or 10 nanomoles per side) into the ventral tegmental area increased locomotor activity. This increase in locomotion was antagonized by mecamylamine (2 mg/kg, IP), a nicotinic antagonist that readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, and by pimozide (0.3 mg/kg, IP), a central dopaminergic antagonist. Hexamethonium (2 mg/kg, IP), a nicotinic antagonist that, unlike mecamylamine, does not cross the blood-brain barrier, had no effect; this suggests that mecamylamine's attenuation of cytisine-induced locomotor activity resulted from a blockade of central and not peripheral nicotinic receptors. The data support the notion that nicotinic and dopaminergic substrates interact at the level of the VTA to produce increases in locomotor activity.

  17. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity.

    PubMed

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  18. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  19. Effects of dopamine agonists on hypothalamic defensive attack in cats.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Sato, T; Maki, S

    1985-07-01

    The effects of methamphetamine (MAT) and apomorphine (APO), dopamine agonists, were studied in 16 cats to evaluate their effects on threshold for defensive attack behavior elicited by electrical stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH). Directed attack and hissing were selected from elementary responses as constituting a defensive attack. Hissing threshold was measured in two situations, one with human provocation and the other without provocation. MAT administered systemically lowered the thresholds for all three types of responses in a dose-related manner (0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg). The effects of 1.0 mg/kg of APO were almost identical to those observed with 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg of MAT. These results suggest that MAT-induced aggressive behavior may be mediated by a dopamine-induced increase in the excitability of the VMH. PMID:4059404

  20. Antiinfective applications of toll-like receptor 9 agonists.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Arthur M

    2007-07-01

    The innate immune system detects pathogens by the presence of highly conserved pathogen-expressed molecules, which trigger host immune defenses. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 detects unmethylated CpG dinucleotides in bacterial or viral DNA, and can be stimulated for therapeutic applications with synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing immune stimulatory "CpG motifs." TLR9 activation induces both innate and adaptive immunity. The TLR9-induced innate immune activation can be applied in the prevention or treatment of infectious diseases, and the adaptive immune-enhancing effects can be harnessed for improving vaccines. This article highlights the current understanding of the mechanism of action of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, and provides an overview of the preclinical data and early human clinical trial results, applying these TLR9 agonists in the field of infectious diseases. PMID:17607015

  1. Capillary electrophoresis analysis of the degradation of the aspartyl tripeptide Phe-Asp-GlyOH at pH 2.0 and 7.4 under forced conditions.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Uwe; Taichrib, Angelina; Neusüss, Christian; Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2010-02-01

    The degradation of the tripeptide l-Phe-alpha-l-Asp-GlyOH was studied at 80 degrees C and pH 2.0 and 7.4 by capillary electrophoresis. Separation of most known as well as unknown degradation products was achieved in a 50mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 3.0. The diastereomers l-Phe-alpha-l-Asp-GlyOH/l-Phe-alpha-d-Asp-GlyOH could only be separated upon addition of 16mg/ml carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin and 5% acetonitrile to the background electrolyte. Compound identification was performed by capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. In addition to Asp isomerization and epimerization products as well as hydrolysis products four diketopiperazine derivatives were identified. Moreover, two degradation products were observed containing the amino acids Asp, Gly and Phe but the unequivocal assignment could not be accomplished based on the mass spectra. Following validation with regard to linearity, range, limit of detection, limit of quantitation and precision the assay was applied to the analysis of the incubation solutions. While peptide backbone hydrolysis dominated at pH 2.0, isomerization and enantiomerization yielding beta-Asp and d-Asp peptides as well as cyclization to diketopiperazine derivatives were observed at pH 7.4. The diketopiperazines were the dominant reaction products amounting to about 85% of the compounds detected after the maximal incubation time of 240h. A kinetic model was used to fit the concentration versus time data.

  2. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  3. Asimadoline, a κ-Opioid Agonist, and Visceral Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Asimadoline is a potent κ-opioid receptor agonist with a diaryl acetamide structure. It has high affinity for the κ receptor, with IC50 of 5.6 nM (guinea pig) and 1.2 nM (human recombinant), and high selectively with κ: μ: δ binding ratios of 1:501:498 in human recombinant receptors. It acts as a complete agonist in in vitro assay. Asimadoline reduced sensation in response to colonic distension at subnoxious pressures in healthy volunteers and in IBS patients without alteration of colonic compliance. Asimadoline reduced satiation and enhanced the postprandial gastric volume (in female volunteers). However, there were no significant effects on gastrointestinal transit, colonic compliance, fasting or postprandial colonic tone. In a clinical trial in 40 patients with functional dyspepsia (Rome II), asimadoline did not significantly alter satiation or symptoms over 8 weeks. However, asimadoline, 0.5 mg, significantly decreased satiation in patients with higher postprandial fullness scores, and daily postprandial fullness severity (over 8 weeks); the asimadoline 1.0 mg group was borderline significant. In a clinical trial in patients with IBS, average pain 2 hours post-on-demand treatment with asimadoline was not significantly reduced. Post-hoc analyses suggest asimadoline was effective in mixed IBS. In a 12-week study in 596 patients, chronic treatment with asimadoline, 0.5 mg and 1.0 mg, was associated with adequate relief of pain and discomfort, improvement in pain score and number of pain free days in patients with IBS-D. The 1.0 mg dose was also efficacious in IBS-alternating. There were also weeks with significant reduction in bowel frequency and urgency. Asimadoline has been well tolerated in human trials to date. PMID:18715494

  4. Recent advances in the development of farnesoid X receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Elizabeth J.; Lindor, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are nuclear hormone receptors expressed in high amounts in body tissues that participate in bilirubin metabolism including the liver, intestines, and kidneys. Bile acids (BAs) are the natural ligands of the FXRs. FXRs regulate the expression of the gene encoding for cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase, which is the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis. In addition, FXRs play a critical role in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and regulation of insulin sensitivity. FXRs also modulate live growth and regeneration during liver injury. Preclinical studies have shown that FXR activation protects against cholestasis-induced liver injury. Moreover, FXR activation protects against fatty liver injury in animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and improved hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin sensitivity. Obeticholic acid (OCA), a 6α-ethyl derivative of the natural human BA chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) is the first-in-class selective FXR agonist that is ~100-fold more potent than CDCA. Preliminary human clinical trials have shown that OCA is safe and effective. In a phase II clinical trial, administration of OCA was well-tolerated, increased insulin sensitivity and reduced markers of liver inflammation and fibrosis in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and NAFLD. In two clinical trials of OCA in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a progressive cholestatic liver disease, OCA significantly reduced serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, an important disease marker that correlates well with clinical outcomes of patients with PBC. Together, these studies suggest that FXR agonists could potentially be used as therapeutic tools in patients suffering from nonalcoholic fatty and cholestatic liver diseases. Larger and Longer-term studies are currently ongoing. PMID:25705637

  5. Theory of partial agonist activity of steroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Carson C.; Ong, Karen M.; Kagan, Benjamin; Simons, S. Stoney

    2015-01-01

    The different amounts of residual partial agonist activity (PAA) of antisteroids under assorted conditions have long been useful in clinical applications but remain largely unexplained. Not only does a given antagonist often afford unequal induction for multiple genes in the same cell but also the activity of the same antisteroid with the same gene changes with variations in concentration of numerous cofactors. Using glucocorticoid receptors as a model system, we have recently succeeded in constructing from first principles a theory that accurately describes how cofactors can modulate the ability of agonist steroids to regulate both gene induction and gene repression. We now extend this framework to the actions of antisteroids in gene induction. The theory shows why changes in PAA cannot be explained simply by differences in ligand affinity for receptor and requires action at a second step or site in the overall sequence of reactions. The theory also provides a method for locating the position of this second site, relative to a concentration limited step (CLS), which is a previously identified step in glucocorticoid-regulated transactivation that always occurs at the same position in the overall sequence of events of gene induction. Finally, the theory predicts that classes of antagonist ligands may be grouped on the basis of their maximal PAA with excess added cofactor and that the members of each class differ by how they act at the same step in the overall gene induction process. Thus, this theory now makes it possible to predict how different cofactors modulate antisteroid PAA, which should be invaluable in developing more selective antagonists. PMID:25984562

  6. Agonistic and antagonistic estrogens in licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra).

    PubMed

    Simons, Rudy; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Mol, Loes A M; The, Susan A M; Bovee, Toine F H; Luijendijk, Teus J C; Verbruggen, Marian A; Gruppen, Harry

    2011-07-01

    The roots of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) are a rich source of flavonoids, in particular, prenylated flavonoids, such as the isoflavan glabridin and the isoflavene glabrene. Fractionation of an ethyl acetate extract from licorice root by centrifugal partitioning chromatography yielded 51 fractions, which were characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and screened for activity in yeast estrogen bioassays. One third of the fractions displayed estrogenic activity towards either one or both estrogen receptors (ERs; ERα and ERβ). Glabrene-rich fractions displayed an estrogenic response, predominantly to the ERα. Surprisingly, glabridin did not exert agonistic activity to both ER subtypes. Several fractions displayed higher responses than the maximum response obtained with the reference compound, the natural hormone 17β-estradiol (E(2)). The estrogenic activities of all fractions, including this so-called superinduction, were clearly ER-mediated, as the estrogenic response was inhibited by 20-60% by known ER antagonists, and no activity was found in yeast cells that did not express the ERα or ERβ subtype. Prolonged exposure of the yeast to the estrogenic fractions that showed superinduction did, contrary to E(2), not result in a decrease of the fluorescent response. Therefore, the superinduction was most likely the result of stabilization of the ER, yeast-enhanced green fluorescent protein, or a combination of both. Most fractions displaying superinduction were rich in flavonoids with single prenylation. Glabridin displayed ERα-selective antagonism, similar to the ERα-selective antagonist RU 58668. Whereas glabridin was able to reduce the estrogenic response of E(2) by approximately 80% at 6 × 10(-6) M, glabrene-rich fractions only exhibited agonistic responses, preferentially on ERα.

  7. The 1.8 A crystal structure of human cathepsin G in complex with Suc-Val-Pro-PheP-(OPh)2: a Janus-faced proteinase with two opposite specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Hof, P; Mayr, I; Huber, R; Korzus, E; Potempa, J; Travis, J; Powers, J C; Bode, W

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structure of human neutrophil cathepsin G, complexed with the peptidyl phosphonate inhibitor Suc-Val-Pro-PheP-(OPh)2, has been determined to a resolution of 1.8 A using Patterson search techniques. The cathepsin G structure shows the polypeptide fold characteristic of trypsin-like serine proteinases and is especially similar to rat mast cell proteinase II. Unique to cathepsin G, however, is the presence of Glu226 (chymotrypsinogen numbering), which is situated at the bottom of the S1 specificity pocket, dividing it into two compartments. For this reason, the benzyl side chain of the inhibitor PheP residue does not fully occupy the pocket but is, instead, located at its entrance. Its positively charged equatorial edge is involved in a favourable electrostatic interaction with the negatively charged carboxylate group of Glu226. Arrangement of this Glu226 carboxylate would also allow accommodation of a Lys side chain in this S1 pocket, in agreement with the recently observed cathepsin G preference for Lys and Phe at P1. The cathepsin G complex with the covalently bound phosphonate inhibitor mimics a tetrahedral substrate intermediate. A comparison of the Arg surface distributions of cathepsin G, leukocyte elastase and rat mast cell protease II shows no simple common recognition pattern for a mannose-6-phosphate receptor-independent targeting mechanism for sorting of these granular proteinases. Images PMID:8896442

  8. 46,XY disorder of sexual development resulting from a novel monoallelic mutation (p.Ser31Phe) in the steroid 5α-reductase type-2 (SRD5A2) gene

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, Bertha; Ramos, Luis; Gómez, Rita; Vilchis, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the 5α-steroid reductase type-2 (SRD5A2) gene result in a broad spectrum of masculinization defects, ranging from a male phenotype with hypospadias to a female phenotype with Wolffian structures. Molecular studies of the SRD5A2 revealed a new heterozygous gene variant within the coding region that results in phenotypic expression. A c.92C>T transition changing serine to phenylalanine at codon 31 of exon 1 (p.Ser31Phe) was identified in a patient with 46,XY disorder of sexual development who displayed glandular hypospadias with micropenis and bilateral cryptorchidism. The restoration of the p.Ser31Phe mutation by site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression assays using cultured HEK-293 cells showed that this novel substitution does not abolish but does deregulate the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Thus, the maximum velocity (Vmax) value was higher for the mutant enzyme (22.5 ± 6.9 nmol DHT mg protein−1 h−1) than for the wild-type enzyme (9.8 ± 2.0 nmol DHT mg protein−1 h−1). Increased in vitro activity of the p.Ser31Phe mutant suggested an activating effect. This case provides evidence that heterozygous missense mutations in SRD5A2 may induce the abnormal development of male external genitalia. PMID:25077171

  9. Dissociated sterol-based liver X receptor agonists as therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Li, Sijia; Henke, Adam; Muse, Evan D; Cheng, Bo; Welzel, Gustav; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Wang, Danling; Roland, Jason; Glass, Christopher K; Tremblay, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR), a nuclear hormone receptor, is an essential regulator of immune responses. Activation of LXR-mediated transcription by synthetic agonists, such as T0901317 and GW3965, attenuates progression of inflammatory disease in animal models. However, the adverse effects of these conventional LXR agonists in elevating liver lipids have impeded exploitation of this intriguing mechanism for chronic therapy. Here, we explore the ability of a series of sterol-based LXR agonists to alleviate inflammatory conditions in mice without hepatotoxicity. We show that oral treatment with sterol-based LXR agonists in mice significantly reduces dextran sulfate sodium colitis-induced body weight loss, which is accompanied by reduced expression of inflammatory markers in the large intestine. The anti-inflammatory property of these agonists is recapitulated in vitro in mouse lamina propria mononuclear cells, human colonic epithelial cells, and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, treatment with LXR agonists dramatically suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression in a model of traumatic brain injury. Importantly, in both disease models, the sterol-based agonists do not affect the liver, and the conventional agonist T0901317 results in significant liver lipid accumulation and injury. Overall, these results provide evidence for the development of sterol-based LXR agonists as novel therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases.-Yu, S., Li, S., Henke, A., Muse, E. D., Cheng, B., Welzel, G., Chatterjee, A. K., Wang, D., Roland, J., Glass, C. K., Tremblay, M. Dissociated sterol-based liver X receptor agonists as therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27025962

  10. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    PubMed

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  11. Reduced Anorexigenic Efficacy of Leptin, But Not of the Melanocortin Receptor Agonist Melanotan-II, Predicts Diet-Induced Obesity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Gertjan; de Vries, Koert; Nyakas, Csaba; Buwalda, Bauke; Adage, Tiziana; Kuipers, Folkert; Kas, Martien J. H.; Adan, Roger A. H.; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Thiele, Todd E.; Scheurink, Anton J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Leptin gains access to the central nervous system where it influences activity of neuronal networks involved in ingestive behavior, neuroendocrine activity, and metabolism. In particular, the brain melanocortin (MC) system is important in leptin signaling and maintenance of energy balance. Although leptin or MC receptor insensitivity has been proposed to be associated with obesity, the present study compared central leptin and MC receptor stimulation on some of the above-mentioned parameters and investigated whether these treatments predict proneness to diet-induced obesity (DIO) in out-bred Wistar rats. Third-cerebroventricular administration of equi-anorexigenic doses of leptin and of the MC agonist melanotan-II caused comparable increases in plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels and c-Fos-labeling in approximately 70% of paraventricular hypothalamic (PVN) neuronal cell bodies containing CRH. This reinforces involvement of paraventricular CRH neurons in the short-term neuroendocrine and ingestive effects of leptin and melanocortins. In the DIO prediction study, anorexigenic efficacy of melanotan-II was not correlated with any parameter linked to DIO but was highly correlated with MC in situ binding (with labeled [Nle4,d-Phe7]α-MSH) as well as CRH immunoreactivity in the PVN of DIO rats. This suggests intricate relationships among MC signaling, the CRH system, and ingestive behavior unrelated to DIO. In the same animals, leptin’s anorexigenic efficacy was not correlated with PVN MC in situ binding or CRH immunoreactivity but correlated inversely to post-DIO plasma leptin, liver weight, and abdominal adiposity, the latter being correlated to insulin resistance. Thus, differences in leptin but not MC signaling might underlie DIO, visceral obesity, and insulin resistance. PMID:16166222

  12. Mechanisms of the regional hemodynamic effects of a mu-opioid receptor agonist microinjected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious unrestrained rats.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H; Pître, M; Lessard, A

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize the mechanisms of the hemodynamic responses to microinjection of the selective mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, in conscious rats chronically instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes. We found that i.v. pretreatment with phentolamine had no effect on the tachycardia elicited by DAMGO (1 nmol); however, the pressor response was reversed to a state of hypotension, the renal and superior mesenteric vasoconstrictions were attenuated and the hindquarter vasodilation was potentiated. In the presence of propranolol, the pressor response and renal vasoconstriction were unchanged, whereas the superior mesenteric vasoconstriction was reduced and the hindquarter vasodilation was abolished. Moreover, in those animals we observed bradycardia followed by tachycardia. Combined i.v. pretreatment with phentolamine and propranolol abolished the pressor and heart rate responses to DAMGO but had no effect on the renal and superior mesenteric vasoconstrictions, although the hindquarter vasodilation was reduced. Intravenous pretreatment with a vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist or captopril had no effect on the cardiovascular responses to DAMGO. Together, these results indicate that the hypertension observed after injection of DAMGO into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus was secondary to alpha adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstrictions in renal and superior mesenteric vascular beds and to beta adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the hindquarter vascular bed, whereas the involvement of circulating vasopressin or angiotensin seems less obvious from the present findings. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that nonadrenergic, nonvasopressinergic and nonangiotensinergic vasoconstrictor mechanisms were acting in the renal and superior mesenteric vascular beds.

  13. Detection of pleiotropy through a Phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) of epidemiologic data as part of the Environmental Architecture for Genes Linked to Environment (EAGLE) study.

    PubMed

    Hall, Molly A; Verma, Anurag; Brown-Gentry, Kristin D; Goodloe, Robert; Boston, Jonathan; Wilson, Sarah; McClellan, Bob; Sutcliffe, Cara; Dilks, Holly H; Gillani, Nila B; Jin, Hailing; Mayo, Ping; Allen, Melissa; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie; Crawford, Dana C; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Pendergrass, Sarah A

    2014-12-01

    We performed a Phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) utilizing diverse genotypic and phenotypic data existing across multiple populations in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and accessed by the Epidemiological Architecture for Genes Linked to Environment (EAGLE) study. We calculated comprehensive tests of association in Genetic NHANES using 80 SNPs and 1,008 phenotypes (grouped into 184 phenotype classes), stratified by race-ethnicity. Genetic NHANES includes three surveys (NHANES III, 1999-2000, and 2001-2002) and three race-ethnicities: non-Hispanic whites (n = 6,634), non-Hispanic blacks (n = 3,458), and Mexican Americans (n = 3,950). We identified 69 PheWAS associations replicating across surveys for the same SNP, phenotype-class, direction of effect, and race-ethnicity at p<0.01, allele frequency >0.01, and sample size >200. Of these 69 PheWAS associations, 39 replicated previously reported SNP-phenotype associations, 9 were related to previously reported associations, and 21 were novel associations. Fourteen results had the same direction of effect across more than one race-ethnicity: one result was novel, 11 replicated previously reported associations, and two were related to previously reported results. Thirteen SNPs showed evidence of pleiotropy. We further explored results with gene-based biological networks, contrasting the direction of effect for pleiotropic associations across phenotypes. One PheWAS result was ABCG2 missense SNP rs2231142, associated with uric acid levels in both non-Hispanic whites and Mexican Americans, protoporphyrin levels in non-Hispanic whites and Mexican Americans, and blood pressure levels in Mexican Americans. Another example was SNP rs1800588 near LIPC, significantly associated with the novel phenotypes of folate levels (Mexican Americans), vitamin E levels (non-Hispanic whites) and triglyceride levels (non-Hispanic whites

  14. Phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) in EMR-linked pediatric cohorts, genetically links PLCL1 to speech language development and IL5-IL13 to Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Namjou, Bahram; Marsolo, Keith; Caroll, Robert J.; Denny, Joshua C.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Verma, Shefali S.; Lingren, Todd; Porollo, Aleksey; Cobb, Beth L.; Perry, Cassandra; Kottyan, Leah C.; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Thompson, Susan D.; Holm, Ingrid A.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Harley, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We report the first pediatric specific Phenome-Wide Association Study (PheWAS) using electronic medical records (EMRs). Given the early success of PheWAS in adult populations, we investigated the feasibility of this approach in pediatric cohorts in which associations between a previously known genetic variant and a wide range of clinical or physiological traits were evaluated. Although computationally intensive, this approach has potential to reveal disease mechanistic relationships between a variant and a network of phenotypes. Method: Data on 5049 samples of European ancestry were obtained from the EMRs of two large academic centers in five different genotyped cohorts. Recently, these samples have undergone whole genome imputation. After standard quality controls, removing missing data and outliers based on principal components analyses (PCA), 4268 samples were used for the PheWAS study. We scanned for associations between 2476 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with available genotyping data from previously published GWAS studies and 539 EMR-derived phenotypes. The false discovery rate was calculated and, for any new PheWAS findings, a permutation approach (with up to 1,000,000 trials) was implemented. Results: This PheWAS found a variety of common variants (MAF > 10%) with prior GWAS associations in our pediatric cohorts including Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA), Asthma, Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) and Type 1 Diabetes with a false discovery rate < 0.05 and power of study above 80%. In addition, several new PheWAS findings were identified including a cluster of association near the NDFIP1 gene for mental retardation (best SNP rs10057309, p = 4.33 × 10−7, OR = 1.70, 95%CI = 1.38 − 2.09); association near PLCL1 gene for developmental delays and speech disorder [best SNP rs1595825, p = 1.13 × 10−8, OR = 0.65(0.57 − 0.76)]; a cluster of associations in the IL5-IL13 region with Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) [best at

  15. Mimicking corticosterone's daily rhythm with specific receptor agonists: effects on food, water, and sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Devenport, L; Stith, R

    1992-06-01

    The endogenous pattern of type I and II corticosteroid receptor stimulation was systematically assembled from specific agonists in order to detect any unique receptor interactions in the control of ingestive behavior. The type II agonists dexamethasone (0, 5, or 25 micrograms/kg) or RU28362 (0, 5, or 25 micrograms/kg) were injected daily in the final hour of the light phase of the illumination cycle of adrenalectomized rats. This was carried out in the presence or absence of continuous aldosterone (type I agonist) infusion. Additional comparisons were made with sham-operated groups and animals receiving type II agonists by continuous infusion. Type II agonists increased the intake of 2% saline and the proportion of food taken at night, but had negligible effects on total food intake. Type II agonists did not interact with the type I agonist. Type II effects were greatly potentiated by continuous infusion, though administered at the same doses as acute injection. When the effects of type II receptor stimulation emerged, they always consisted of an exacerbation of the adrenalectomy syndrome, not a return to normal quantities or patterns. In contrast, type I receptor stimulation restored both the quantities and unique day-night patterns of saline, water, and food intake to values matching intact animals. The findings suggest that the behavioral significance of corticosterone's nocturnal peak of type II stimulation is small, and that its most important function may lie in the metabolic processes it instigates during its steady rise in the light phase.

  16. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist use in men without a cancer registry diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yong-fang; Goodwin, James S; Shahinian, Vahakn B

    2008-01-01

    Background Use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists has become popular for virtually all stages of prostate cancer. We hypothesized that some men receive these agents after only a limited work-up for their cancer. Such cases may be missed by tumor registries, leading to underestimates of the total extent of GnRH agonist use. Methods We used linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare data from 1993 through 2001 to identify GnRH agonist use in men with either a diagnosis of prostate cancer registered in SEER, or with a diagnosis of prostate cancer based only on Medicare claims (from the 5% control sample of Medicare beneficiaries residing in SEER areas without a registered diagnosis of cancer). The proportion of incident GnRH agonist users without a registry diagnosis of prostate cancer was calculated. Factors associated with lack of a registry diagnosis were examined in multivariable analyses. Results Of incident GnRH agonist users, 8.9% had no diagnosis of prostate cancer registered in SEER. In a multivariable logistic regression model, lack of a registry diagnosis of prostate cancer in GnRH agonist users was significantly more likely with increasing comorbidity, whereas it was less likely in men who had undergone either inpatient admission or procedures such as radical prostatectomy, prostate biopsy, or transurethral resection of the prostate. Conclusion Reliance solely on tumor registry data may underestimate the rate of GnRH agonist use in men with prostate cancer. PMID:18620606

  17. Cu(II)-catalyzed reactions in ternary [Cu(AA)(AA - H)]+ complexes (AA = Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, t-Leu, Phe).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Ohanessian, Gilles; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2009-01-01

    The unimolecular chemistry of [Cu(II)AA(AA - H)](+) complexes, composed of an intact and a deprotonated amino acid (AA) ligand, have been probed in the gas phase by tandem and multistage mass spectrometry in an electrospray ionization quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The amino acids examined include Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, t-Leu and Phe. Upon collisionally-activated dissociation (CAD), the [Cu(II)AA(AA - H)](+) complexes undergo decarboxylation with simultaneous reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I); during this process, a radical site is created at the alpha-carbon of the decarboxylated ligand (H(2)N(1) - (*)C(alpha)H - C(beta)H(2) - R; R = side chain substituent). The radical site is able to move along the backbone of the decarboxylated amino acid to form two new radicals (HN(1)(*) - C(alpha)H(2) - C(beta)H(2) - R and H(2)N(1) - C(alpha)H(2) - (*)C(beta)H - R). From the complexes of Gly and t-Leu, only C(alpha) and N(1) radicals can be formed. The whole radical ligand can be lost to form [Cu(I)AA](+) from these three isomeric radicals. Alternatively, further radical induced dissociations can take place along the backbone of the decarboxylated amino acid ligand to yield [Cu(II)AA(AA - 2H - CO(2))](+), [Cu(I)AA((*)NH(2))](+), [Cu(I)AA(HN = C(alpha)H(2))](+), or [Cu(I)AA(H(2)N - C(alpha)H = C(beta)H - R'](+) (R' = partial side chain substituent). The sodiated copper complexes, [Cu(II)(AA - H + Na)(AA - H)](+), show the same fragmentation patterns as their non-sodiated counterparts; sodium ion is retained on the intact amino acid ligand and is not involved in the CAD pathways. The amino groups of both AA units, the carbonyl group of the intact amino acid, and the deprotonated hydroxyl oxygen coordinate Cu(II) in square-planar fashion. Ab initio calculations indicate that the metal ion facilitates hydrogen atom shuttling between the N(1), C(alpha) and C(beta) atoms of the decarboxylated amino acid ligand. The dissociations of the decarboxylated radical ions unveil

  18. Use of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists in controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Muasher, S J

    1992-01-01

    The aim of ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) is the recruitment of multiple fertilizable healthy oocytes. Transfer of multiple embryos yields a better success rate than single-embryo transfers. Moreover, cryopreservation of excess pre-embryos allows patients an added opportunity to achieve a pregnancy without undergoing a repeat stimulated cycle. In the last 4 years, gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) agonists have been used widely as adjuncts to gonadotrophins for ovarian hyperstimulation. Advantages of Gn-RH agonist use include prevention of a premature luteinising hormone (LH) surge, suppression of endogenous basal LH levels and recruitment of a larger cohort of follicles. Gn-RH agonists can be used in a long (suppression) or a short (stimulatory, flare-up) protocol. In our clinic, the use of Gn-RH agonist suppression (starting in the mid-luteal phase) prior to ovarian hyperstimulation was demonstrated to be extremely beneficial in intermediate and high responder patients but not in low responders (defined endocrinologically as patients with a basal follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH]: LH ratio of 1:1 and a basal LH:FSH ratio of greater than or equal to 1.5, respectively). We have not been able to demonstrate any beneficial effects from the use of Gn-RH agonist suppression in low responder patients (defined endocrinologically as patients with a basal FSH greater than or equal to 15 mIU/ml). In such low responder patients, the use of a 'flare-up' Gn-RH agonist protocol (Gn-RH agonist starting on day 2 of the cycle, followed by gonadotrophins on day 4 of the cycle), taking advantage of the initial agonistic stimulatory effect of Gn-RH agonists on endogenous FSH and LH secretion, has provided significant improvements in stimulation characteristics and better pregnancy results. It should be emphasised that comparisons of results cannot be attempted due to the selective use of each protocol in different patient populations.

  19. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •TRPA1 agonists inhibited compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves. •This inhibition was not mediated by TRPA1 channels. •This efficacy was comparable to those of lidocaine and cocaine. •We found for the first time an ability of TRPA1 agonists to inhibit nerve conduction. -- Abstract: Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC{sub 50} values of 1.2 and 1.5 mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-α-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC{sub 50} = 0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other.

  20. Utility of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists in programs of ovarian hyperstimulation with intrauterine insemination.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, C L

    1993-09-01

    The GnRH agonists have practical and theoretic advantages for adjunctive use in ovulation induction. The IVF cycles demonstrate a decrease in the cancellation rate, an increase in the ease of scheduling, and an increase in the number of oocytes obtained per retrieval when GnRH agonists are employed. Other advantages, such as an improvement in the fertilization and cleavage rate, an increased length of the luteal phase, and an increased pregnancy rate, are suggested but not universally accepted. The utility of adding GnRH agonists to human menopausal gonadotropin-intrauterine insemination cycles is similarly in dispute. Although controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with both human menopausal gonadotropins alone and in conjunction with GnRH agonists have produced pregnancies when coupled with intrauterine insemination, it was demonstrated that there was a significantly greater pregnancy rate per cycle with the use of a GnRH agonist in a recalcitrant infertile population. Others did not substantiate this improvement in pregnancy rate per cycle in their patient population of regularly ovulating women undergoing their first controlled ovarian stimulation cycle either with or without GnRH agonist therapy. This suggests that women with ovulatory dysfunction, and particularly women who previously have not responded to therapy with human menopausal gonadotropin therapy, will reap the most benefits from the addition of a GnRH agonist to their ovulation induction regimen. The addition of a GnRH agonist to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation is a highly effective method of inducing pregnancy in a recalcitrant infertile population. Patients who did not conceive with human menopausal gonadotropins-intrauterine insemination may conceive with GnRH agonist-human menopausal gonadotropins-intrauterine insemination therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8403617

  1. Pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) measures inside-out signaling and patient-specific response to combinatorial platelet agonists.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Daniel T L; Diamond, Scott L

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the response of cells to multiple stimuli is vital for predicting donor specific responses and better understanding the signaling pathways involved. This is of particular importance in platelets because exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) occurs upon costimulation but not with a single agonist. Here, we describe a multiplexed pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) method of measuring platelet inside-out responses to all pairs of six platelet agonists (convulxin, SFLLRN, AYPGKF, ADP, U46619, and PGE(2)) used at their EC(50) concentrations. These agonists allowed exploration of platelet signaling downstream of GPVI, PAR-1, PAR-4, P2Y(1), P2Y(12), TP, and IP receptors. The three-color flow cytometry method simultaneously measured integrin α(IIb)β(3) activation with PAC-1 antibody, P-selectin exposure (via α granule release) with anti-P-selectin, and PS exposure with annexin V. These responses were consistent across a healthy male donor pool. In duplicate measurements with each donor, 4 of the 10 donors had a sufficiently unique 45-parameter (15 pairs × 3 colors) phenotype to self-cluster (P < 0.001). This method has the potential for efficiently scanning for patient specific responses across a broad agonist-receptor space.

  2. Pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) measures inside-out signaling and patient-specific response to combinatorial platelet agonists.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Daniel T L; Diamond, Scott L

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the response of cells to multiple stimuli is vital for predicting donor specific responses and better understanding the signaling pathways involved. This is of particular importance in platelets because exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) occurs upon costimulation but not with a single agonist. Here, we describe a multiplexed pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) method of measuring platelet inside-out responses to all pairs of six platelet agonists (convulxin, SFLLRN, AYPGKF, ADP, U46619, and PGE(2)) used at their EC(50) concentrations. These agonists allowed exploration of platelet signaling downstream of GPVI, PAR-1, PAR-4, P2Y(1), P2Y(12), TP, and IP receptors. The three-color flow cytometry method simultaneously measured integrin α(IIb)β(3) activation with PAC-1 antibody, P-selectin exposure (via α granule release) with anti-P-selectin, and PS exposure with annexin V. These responses were consistent across a healthy male donor pool. In duplicate measurements with each donor, 4 of the 10 donors had a sufficiently unique 45-parameter (15 pairs × 3 colors) phenotype to self-cluster (P < 0.001). This method has the potential for efficiently scanning for patient specific responses across a broad agonist-receptor space. PMID:23662898

  3. Agonist/antagonist modulation in a series of 2-aryl benzimidazole H4 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Savall, Brad M; Edwards, James P; Venable, Jennifer D; Buzard, Daniel J; Thurmond, Robin; Hack, Michael; McGovern, Patricia

    2010-06-01

    The present work details the transformation of a series of human histamine H(4) agonists into potent functional antagonists. Replacement of the aminopyrrolidine diamine functionality with a 5,6-fused pyrrolopiperidine ring system led to an antagonist. The dissection of this fused diamine led to the eventual replacement with heterocycles. The incorporation of histamine as the terminal amine led to a very potent and selective histamine H(4) agonist; whereas incorporation of the constrained histamine analog, spinacamine, modulated the functional activity to give a partial agonist. In two separate series, we demonstrate that constraining the terminal amino portion modulated the spectrum of functional activity of histamine H(4) ligands.

  4. Agonist-Specific Recruitment of Arrestin Isoforms Differentially Modify Delta Opioid Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Perroy, Julie; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Smith, Monique L.; Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Bana, Alia; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-specific recruitment of arrestins facilitates functional selectivity of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. Here, we describe agonist-selective recruitment of different arrestin isoforms to the delta opioid receptor in mice. A high-internalizing delta opioid receptor agonist (SNC80) preferentially recruited arrestin 2 and, in arrestin 2 knock-outs (KOs), we observed a significant increase in the potency of SNC80 to inhibit mechanical hyperalgesia and decreased acute tolerance. In contrast, the low-internalizing delta agonists (ARM390, JNJ20788560) preferentially recruited arrestin 3 with unaltered behavioral effects in arrestin 2 KOs. Surprisingly, arrestin 3 KO revealed an acute tolerance to these low-internalizing agonists, an effect never observed in wild-type animals. Furthermore, we examined delta opioid receptor–Ca2+ channel coupling in dorsal root ganglia desensitized by ARM390 and the rate of resensitization was correspondingly decreased in arrestin 3 KOs. Live-cell imaging in HEK293 cells revealed that delta opioid receptors are in pre-engaged complexes with arrestin 3 at the cell membrane and that ARM390 strengthens this membrane interaction. The disruption of these complexes in arrestin 3 KOs likely accounts for the altered responses to low-internalizing agonists. Together, our results show agonist-selective recruitment of arrestin isoforms and reveal a novel endogenous role of arrestin 3 as a facilitator of resensitization and an inhibitor of tolerance mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Agonists that bind to the same receptor can produce highly distinct signaling events and arrestins are a major mediator of this ligand bias. Here, we demonstrate that delta opioid receptor agonists differentially recruit arrestin isoforms. We found that the high-internalizing agonist SNC80 preferentially recruits arrestin 2 and knock-out (KO) of this protein results in increased efficacy of SNC80. In contrast, low-internalizing agonists (ARM390 and JNJ20788560

  5. Synthesis and characterization of photoactivatable peptide agonists of the human thrombin receptor.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, R; Cordier, Y; Rasmussen, U B; Schlesinger, Y; Gachet, C; Jaquinod, M; Tripet, B; Chong, P C; Pavirani, A

    1994-08-01

    Chemical synthesis and biochemical analysis of modified agonist peptides of the human thrombin receptor derived from the sequence SFLLRNP containing photoactivatable azido groups and biotin for sensitive detection is described. Substitution of leucine in position three with p-azidophenylalanine and extension of the C-terminus with a KGGK spacer containing biotin covalently linked to the side chain of the C-terminal lysine residue resulted in an active receptor agonist as determined by intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells. In contrast, substitution of phenylalanine in position two with p-azidophenylalanine reduced agonist activity significantly. PMID:8050586

  6. PPARα agonist, fenofibrate, ameliorates age-related renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Nim; Lim, Ji Hee; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Hyung Wook; Park, Cheol Whee; Chang, Yoon Sik; Choi, Bum Soon

    2016-08-01

    The kidney ages quickly compared with other organs. Expression of senescence markers reflects changes in the energy metabolism in the kidney. Two important issues in aging are mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily. PPARα plays a major role as a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes involved in various processes. In this study, 18-month-old male C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups, the control group (n=7) and the fenofibrate-treated group (n=7) was fed the normal chow plus fenofibrate for 6months. The PPARα agonist, fenofibrate, improved renal function, proteinuria, histological change (glomerulosclerosis and tubular interstitial fibrosis), inflammation, and apoptosis in aging mice. This protective effect against age-related renal injury occurred through the activation of AMPK and SIRT1 signaling. The activation of AMPK and SIRT1 allowed for the concurrent deacetylation and phosphorylation of their target molecules and decreased the kidney's susceptibility to age-related changes. Activation of the AMPK-FOXO3a and AMPK-PGC-1α signaling pathways ameliorated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that activation of PPARα and AMPK-SIRT1 signaling may have protective effects against age-related renal injury. Pharmacological targeting of PPARα and AMPK-SIRT1 signaling molecules may prevent or attenuate age-related pathological changes in the kidney. PMID:27130813

  7. Object-horning in goitered gazelle: agonistic or marking behaviour?

    PubMed

    Blank, David; Yang, Weikang

    2014-03-01

    We studied object-horning behaviour in goitered gazelles in the natural, arid environment of Kazakhstan over a 6-year period. We found that object-horning was used by adult males mostly as a threat display during territorial conflicts. Therefore object-horning was observed most frequently in territorial single males during the rut in November-December. Object-horning, though, also had a marking effect, with the males' use of this behaviour leaving visible traces that advertized the location of preorbital and urination-defecation scent marks. Therefore, this pattern also was observed linked with preorbital marking and urination-defecation marking behaviours, especially during the rut. Goitered gazelle males chose the most abundant and eatable shrubs for object horning. In contrast to other gazelle species, object-horning in goitered gazelle was observed much more frequently and at the same rate as preorbital and urination-defecation scent markings. This, then, proved a more vigorous and aggressive level of rutting behaviour of the goitered gazelle compared to tropical gazelles, and most likely connected to the short rutting period in the studied species. We concluded, therefore, that object-horning was a manifold phenomenon that played a very important role in goitered gazelle agonistic displays, but without loosing the marking intention of this behaviour. PMID:24365541

  8. Therapeutic applications of TRAIL receptor agonists in cancer and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    TRAIL/Apo-2L is a member of the TNF superfamily first described as an apoptosis-inducing cytokine in 1995. Similar to TNF and Fas ligand, TRAIL induces apoptosis in caspase-dependent manner following TRAIL death receptor trimerization. Because tumor cells were shown to be particularly sensitive to this cytokine while normal cells/tissues proved to be resistant along with being able to synthesize and release TRAIL, it was rapidly appreciated that TRAIL likely served as one of our major physiologic weapons against cancer. In line with this, a number of research laboratories and pharmaceutical companies have attempted to exploit the ability of TRAIL to kill cancer cells by developing recombinant forms of TRAIL or TRAIL receptor agonists (e.g., receptor-specific mAb) for therapeutic purposes. In this review article we will describe the biochemical pathways used by TRAIL to induce different cell death programs. We will also summarize the clinical trials related to this pathway and discuss possible novel uses of TRAIL-related therapies. In recent years, the physiological importance of TRAIL has expanded beyond being a tumoricidal molecule to one critical for a number of clinical settings — ranging from infectious disease and autoimmunity to cardiovascular anomalies. We will also highlight some of these conditions where modulation of the TRAIL/TRAIL receptor system may be targeted in the future. PMID:26343199

  9. Glyoxalase 1 increases anxiety by reducing GABAA receptor agonist methylglyoxal

    PubMed Central

    Distler, Margaret G.; Plant, Leigh D.; Sokoloff, Greta; Hawk, Andrew J.; Aneas, Ivy; Wuenschell, Gerald E.; Termini, John; Meredith, Stephen C.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2012-01-01

    Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) expression has previously been associated with anxiety in mice; however, its role in anxiety is controversial, and the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that GLO1 increases anxiety by reducing levels of methylglyoxal (MG), a GABAA receptor agonist. Mice overexpressing Glo1 on a Tg bacterial artificial chromosome displayed increased anxiety-like behavior and reduced brain MG concentrations. Treatment with low doses of MG reduced anxiety-like behavior, while higher doses caused locomotor depression, ataxia, and hypothermia, which are characteristic effects of GABAA receptor activation. Consistent with these data, we found that physiological concentrations of MG selectively activated GABAA receptors in primary neurons. These data indicate that GLO1 increases anxiety by reducing levels of MG, thereby decreasing GABAA receptor activation. More broadly, our findings potentially link metabolic state, neuronal inhibitory tone, and behavior. Finally, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of GLO1 reduced anxiety, suggesting that GLO1 is a possible target for the treatment of anxiety disorders. PMID:22585572

  10. Therapeutic applications of TRAIL receptor agonists in cancer and beyond.

    PubMed

    Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P; Griffith, Thomas S

    2015-11-01

    TRAIL/Apo-2L is a member of the TNF superfamily first described as an apoptosis-inducing cytokine in 1995. Similar to TNF and Fas ligand, TRAIL induces apoptosis in caspase-dependent manner following TRAIL death receptor trimerization. Because tumor cells were shown to be particularly sensitive to this cytokine while normal cells/tissues proved to be resistant along with being able to synthesize and release TRAIL, it was rapidly appreciated that TRAIL likely served as one of our major physiologic weapons against cancer. In line with this, a number of research laboratories and pharmaceutical companies have attempted to exploit the ability of TRAIL to kill cancer cells by developing recombinant forms of TRAIL or TRAIL receptor agonists (e.g., receptor-specific mAb) for therapeutic purposes. In this review article we will describe the biochemical pathways used by TRAIL to induce different cell death programs. We will also summarize the clinical trials related to this pathway and discuss possible novel uses of TRAIL-related therapies. In recent years, the physiological importance of TRAIL has expanded beyond being a tumoricidal molecule to one critical for a number of clinical settings - ranging from infectious disease and autoimmunity to cardiovascular anomalies. We will also highlight some of these conditions where modulation of the TRAIL/TRAIL receptor system may be targeted in the future.

  11. Neurotensin agonist attenuates nicotine potentiation to cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Paul; Boules, Mona; Stennett, Bethany; Richelson, Elliott

    2014-03-01

    Tobacco usage typically precedes illicit drug use in adolescent and young adult populations. Several animal studies suggest nicotine increases the risk for subsequent cocaine abuse, and may be a negative prognostic factor for treatment of cocaine addiction; i.e., a "gateway drug". Neurotensin (NT) is a 13-amino acid neuropeptide that modulates dopamine, acetylcholine, glutamate, and GABA neurotransmission in brain reward pathways. NT69L, a NT(8-13) analog, blocks behavioral sensitization (an animal model for psychostimulant addiction) to nicotine, and nicotine self-administration in rats. The present study tested the effect of NT69L on the potentiating effects of nicotine on cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Male Wistar rats were injected d