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Sample records for agonist recognition site

  1. Benzodiazepine recognition site inverse agonists Ro-15-4513 and FG 7142 both antagonize the EEG effects of ethanol in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Marrosu, F.; Mereu, G.; Giorgi, O.; Corda, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142, two inverse agonists for benzodiazepine recognition sites, to antagonize the EEG effects of ethanol in freely moving rats. Ethanol induced sedation and ataxia associated with a progressive suppression of the fast cortical activities and an enhancement of low frequencies in both cortical and hippocampal tracings. In contrast, Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142 both caused a state of alertness associated with desynchronized cortical activity and theta hippocampal rhythm as well as spiking activity which was predominantly observed in the cortical tracings. When rats were treated with FG 7142 or Ro 15-4513 either before or after ethanol, a reciprocal antagonism of the behavioral and EEG effects of ethanol and of the partial inverse agonists was observed. These data support the view that the anti-ethanol effects of Ro 15-4513 may be related to its partial inverse agonist properties.

  2. Synthetic peptides based upon a three-dimensional model for the receptor recognition site of follicle-stimulating hormone exhibit antagonistic or agonistic activity at low concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Hage-van Noort, M; Puijk, W C; Plasman, H H; Kuperus, D; Schaaper, W M; Beekman, N J; Grootegoed, J A; Meloen, R H

    1992-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (follitropin, FSH) belongs to a group of closely related glycoprotein hormones that contain two noncovalently linked dissimilar subunits designated alpha and beta. By using synthetic peptides, several receptor interaction sites in these hormones have been identified; however, the peptides have a reduced potency (lowest effective concentration of 10(-4) to 10(-5) M) relative to the hormone itself (10(-8) to 10(-11) M). This suggests that the peptides represent only a portion of a larger recognition site in the intact hormone that comprises parts of both the beta and the alpha chains. To develop peptides that exhibit FSH-antagonistic activity at low concentrations, we have constructed a three-dimensional model for FSH, which is based on an alignment of both the beta and the alpha chains of glycoprotein hormones with thioredoxin, for which x-ray diffraction data are available. This model resulted in the prediction of a conformational receptor-binding site in FSH, in which (parts of) three earlier proposed binding regions on the FSH molecule [namely, the regions FSH alpha-(34-37), with the amino acid sequence SRAY; FSH beta-(40-43), with the amino acid sequence TRDL; and FSH beta-(87-94), the "determinant loop" with the amino acid sequence CDSDSTDC] are located within 10 A of one another. On the basis of this model, peptides have been synthesized in which two of these binding regions are linked by a synthetic amino acid whose length was derived from the model, Ac-TDSDS-NH-(CH2)5-CO-SRAY-NH2 and Ac-SRAY-NH-(CH2)4-CO-TRDL-NH2. Both peptides inhibited FSH-induced cAMP production in Sertoli cells at 1000-fold lower concentrations (10(-7) M) than the peptides Ac-TRDL-NH2, Ac-SRAY-NH2, or Ac-TDSDS-NH2. In another peptide, Ac-TDSDS-NH-(CH2)5-CO-SRAY-NH-(CH2)4-CO-TRDL-NH2, all three binding regions have been linked. This peptide appeared to be a strong agonist of FSH action, as measured by the ability to stimulate cAMP production, at concentrations

  3. Principles of agonist recognition in Cys-loop receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lynagh, Timothy; Pless, Stephan A.

    2014-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by a structurally diverse array of neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine, serotonin, glycine, and GABA. After the term “chemoreceptor” emerged over 100 years ago, there was some wait until affinity labeling, molecular cloning, functional studies, and X-ray crystallography experiments identified the extracellular interface of adjacent subunits as the principal site of agonist binding. The question of how subtle differences at and around agonist-binding sites of different Cys-loop receptors can accommodate transmitters as chemically diverse as glycine and serotonin has been subject to intense research over the last three decades. This review outlines the functional diversity and current structural understanding of agonist-binding sites, including those of invertebrate Cys-loop receptors. Together, this provides a framework to understand the atomic determinants involved in how these valuable therapeutic targets recognize and bind their ligands. PMID:24795655

  4. Agonistic experience and individual recognition in male Quelea quelea.

    PubMed

    Shawcross, J E; Slater, P J

    1984-01-01

    Male Quelea were moved between groups to assess whether experience of winning or losing in new groups was correlated with their success in competition over food when they were returned to their original groups. No such effect was found. However, differences in time spent feeding after deprivation and in aggressive behaviour were found between groups depending on whether they were made up from high- or low-ranking individuals. In paired encounters there was no evidence that birds threatened unfamiliar individuals more than familiar ones or that they avoided sitting next to them more than familiar birds. This suggests that individual recognition, if it exists at all in these groups, is not important in their agonistic relationships. The rank birds occupied was correlated with beak colour, a probable measure of androgen levels, and with the amount of food consumed after deprivation. The latter result suggests that the same period of deprivation may affect some individuals more than others and this in turn may lead them to compete more for food. PMID:24923828

  5. Atomic interactions of neonicotinoid agonists with AChBP: Molecular recognition of the distinctive electronegative pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, Todd T.; Harel, Michal; Hibbs, Ryan E.; Radi, Zoran; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E.; Taylor, Palmer

    2008-07-28

    Acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) from mollusks are suitable structural and functional surrogates of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors when combined with transmembrane spans of the nicotinic receptor. These proteins assemble as a pentamer with identical ACh binding sites at the subunit interfaces and show ligand specificities resembling those of the nicotinic receptor for agonists and antagonists. A subset of ligands, termed the neonicotinoids, exhibit specificity for insect nicotinic receptors and selective toxicity as insecticides. AChBPs are of neither mammalian nor insect origin and exhibit a distinctive pattern of selectivity for the neonicotinoid ligands. We define here the binding orientation and determinants of differential molecular recognition for the neonicotinoids and classical nicotinoids by estimates of kinetic and equilibrium binding parameters and crystallographic analysis. Neonicotinoid complex formation is rapid and accompanied by quenching of the AChBP tryptophan fluorescence. Comparisons of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and thiacloprid in the binding site from Aplysia californica AChBP at 2.48 and 1.94 {angstrom} in resolution reveal a single conformation of the bound ligands with four of the five sites occupied in the pentameric crystal structure. The neonicotinoid electronegative pharmacophore is nestled in an inverted direction compared with the nicotinoid cationic functionality at the subunit interfacial binding pocket. Characteristic of several agonists, loop C largely envelops the ligand, positioning aromatic side chains to interact optimally with conjugated and hydrophobic regions of the neonicotinoid. This template defines the association of interacting amino acids and their energetic contributions to the distinctive interactions of neonicotinoids.

  6. Agonistic Recognition in Education: On Arendt's Qualification of Political and Moral Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ljunggren, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Agonistic recognition in education has three interlinked modes of aesthetic experience and self-presentation where one is related to actions in the public realm; one is related to plurality in the way in which it comes into existence in confrontation with others; and one is related to the subject-self, disclosed by "thinking. Arendt"s conception…

  7. Environmental enrichment improves novel object recognition and enhances agonistic behavior in male mice.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Gresa, Patricia; Pérez-Martinez, Asunción; Redolat, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an experimental paradigm in which rodents are housed in complex environments containing objects that provide stimulation, the effects of which are expected to improve the welfare of these subjects. EE has been shown to considerably improve learning and memory in rodents. However, knowledge about the effects of EE on social interaction is generally limited and rather controversial. Thus, our aim was to evaluate both novel object recognition and agonistic behavior in NMRI mice receiving EE, hypothesizing enhanced cognition and slightly enhanced agonistic interaction upon EE rearing. During a 4-week period half the mice (n = 16) were exposed to EE and the other half (n = 16) remained in a standard environment (SE). On PND 56-57, animals performed the object recognition test, in which recognition memory was measured using a discrimination index. The social interaction test consisted of an encounter between an experimental animal and a standard opponent. Results indicated that EE mice explored the new object for longer periods than SE animals (P < .05). During social encounters, EE mice devoted more time to sociability and agonistic behavior (P < .05) than their non-EE counterparts. In conclusion, EE has been shown to improve object recognition and increase agonistic behavior in adolescent/early adulthood mice. In the future we intend to extend this study on a longitudinal basis in order to assess in more depth the effect of EE and the consistency of the above-mentioned observations in NMRI mice. PMID:23588702

  8. A Potent and Site-Selective Agonist of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Junichiro; Mio, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Otsuka, Shinya; Mori, Yasuo; Uesugi, Motonari

    2015-12-23

    TRPA1 is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel family that is expressed primarily on sensory neurons. This chemosensor is activated through covalent modification of multiple cysteine residues with a wide range of reactive compounds including allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), a spicy component of wasabi. The present study reports on potent and selective agonists of TRPA1, discovered through screening 1657 electrophilic molecules. In an effort to validate the mode of action of hit molecules, we noted a new TRPA1-selective agonist, JT010 (molecule 1), which opens the TRPA1 channel by covalently and site-selectively binding to Cys621 (EC50 = 0.65 nM). The results suggest that a single modification of Cys621 is sufficient to open the TRPA1 channel. The TRPA1-selective probe described herein might be useful for further mechanistic studies of TRPA1 activation. PMID:26630251

  9. Molecular Recognition of Agonist and Antagonist for Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengyuan; Wang, Lushan; Zhao, Xian; Sun, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) is a ligand-activated transcription factor which plays important roles in lipid and glucose metabolism. The aim of this work is to find residues which selectively recognize PPAR-α agonists and antagonists. To achieve this aim, PPAR-α/13M and PPAR-α/471 complexes were subjected to perform molecular dynamics simulations. This research suggests that several key residues only participate in agonist recognition, while some other key residues only contribute to antagonist recognition. It is hoped that such work is useful for medicinal chemists to design novel PPAR-α agonists and antagonists. PMID:24837836

  10. Mapping the agonist binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Orientation requirements for activation by covalent agonist.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, D A; Cohen, J B

    2000-04-28

    To characterize the structural requirements for ligand orientation compatible with activation of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), we used Cys mutagenesis in conjunction with sulfhydryl-reactive reagents to tether primary or quaternary amines at defined positions within the agonist binding site of nAChRs containing mutant alpha- or gamma-subunits expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 4-(N-Maleimido)benzyltrimethylammonium and 2-aminoethylmethanethiosulfonate acted as irreversible antagonists when tethered at alphaY93C, alphaY198C, or gammaE57C, as well as at alphaN94C (2-aminoethylmethanethiosulfonate only). [2-(Trimethylammonium)-ethyl]-methanethiosulfonate (MTSET), which attaches thiocholine to binding site Cys, also acted as an irreversible antagonist when tethered at alphaY93C, alphaN94C, or gammaE57C. However, MTSET modification of alphaY198C resulted in prolonged activation of the nAChR not reversible by washing but inhibitable by subsequent exposure to non-competitive antagonists. Modification of alphaY198C (or any of the other positions tested) by [(trimethylammonium)methyl]methanethiosulfonate resulted only in irreversible inhibition, while modification of alphaY198C by [3-(trimethylammonium)propyl]methanethiosulfonate resulted in irreversible activation of nAChR, but at lower efficacy than by MTSET. Thus changing the length of the tethering arm by less than 1 A in either direction markedly effects the ability of the covalent trimethylammonium to activate the nAChR, and agonist activation depends on a very selective orientation of the quaternary ammonium within the agonist binding site. PMID:10777557

  11. Site of action of a pentapeptide agonist at the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor. Insight into a small molecule agonist-binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Pinon, Delia I.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2011-01-01

    The development of small molecule agonists for class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been quite challenging. With proof-of-concept that exenatide, the parenterally administered peptide agonist of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) receptor, is an effective treatment for patients with diabetes mellitus, the development of small molecule agonists could have substantial advantages. We previously reported a lead for small molecule GLP1 receptor agonist development representing the pentapeptide NRTFD. In this work, we have prepared an NRTFD derivative incorporating a photolabile benzoylphenylalanine and used it to define its site of action. This peptide probe was a full agonist with potency similar to NRTFD, which bound specifically and saturably to a single, distinct site within the GLP1 receptor. Peptide mapping using cyanogen bromide and endoproteinase Lys-C cleavage of labeled wild type and M397L mutant receptor constructs identified the site of covalent attachment of NRTFD within the third extracellular loop above the sixth transmembrane segment. This region is the same as that identified using an analogous photolabile probe based on secretin receptor sequences, and has been shown in mutagenesis studies to be important for natural agonist action of several members of this family. While these observations suggest that small molecule ligands can act at a site bordering the third extracellular loop to activate this class B GPCR, the relationship of this site to the site of action of the amino-terminal end of the natural agonist peptide is unclear. PMID:22079758

  12. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  13. Biochemical study of multiple drug recognition sites on central benzodiazepine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Trifiletti, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor complex of mammalian brain possesses recognition sites which mediate (at least in part) the pharmacologic actions of the 1,4-benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Evidence is provided suggesting the existence of least seven distinct drug recognition sites on this complex. Interactions between the various recognition sites have been explored using radioligand binding techniques. This information is utilized to provide a comprehensive scheme for characterizing receptor-active drugs on an anxiolytic-anticonvulsant/proconvulsant continuum using radioligand binding techniques, as well as a comprehensive program for identifying potential endogenous receptor-active substances. Further evidence is provided here supporting the notion of benzodiazepine recognition site heterogeneity. Classical 1,4-benzodiazepines do not appear to differentiate two populations of benzodiazepine receptors in an equilibrium sense, but appear to do so in a kinetic sense. An apparent physical separation of the two receptor subtypes can be achieved by differential solubilization. The benzodiazepine binding subunit can be identified by photoaffinity labeling with the benzodiazepine agonist (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepan. Conditions for reproducible partial proteolytic mapping of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled receptors are established. From these maps, it is concluded that there are probably no major differences in the primary sequence of the benzodiazepine binding subunit in various regions of the rat central nervous system.

  14. A Three-Site Mechanism for Agonist/Antagonist Selective Binding to Vasopressin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Noureldin; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco L; Haensele, Elke; Banting, Lee; Whitley, David C; Sopkova-de Oliveira Santos, Jana; Bureau, Ronan; Clark, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations with metadynamics enhanced sampling reveal three distinct binding sites for arginine vasopressin (AVP) within its V2 -receptor (V2 R). Two of these, the vestibule and intermediate sites, block (antagonize) the receptor, and the third is the orthosteric activation (agonist) site. The contacts found for the orthosteric site satisfy all the requirements deduced from mutagenesis experiments. Metadynamics simulations for V2 R and its V1a R-analog give an excellent correlation with experimental binding free energies by assuming that the most stable binding site in the simulations corresponds to the experimental binding free energy in each case. The resulting three-site mechanism separates agonists from antagonists and explains subtype selectivity. PMID:27184628

  15. A molecular characterization of the agonist binding site of a nematode cys-loop GABA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Mark D; Kwaka, Ariel; Callanan, Micah K; Nusrat, Humza; Desaulniers, Jean-Paul; Forrester, Sean G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cys-loop GABA receptors represent important targets for human chemotherapeutics and insecticides and are potential targets for novel anthelmintics (nematicides). However, compared with insect and mammalian receptors, little is known regarding the pharmacological characteristics of nematode Cys-loop GABA receptors. Here we have investigated the agonist binding site of the Cys-loop GABA receptor UNC-49 (Hco-UNC-49) from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. Experimental Approach We used two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology to measure channel activation by classical GABA receptor agonists on Hco-UNC-49 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, along with site-directed mutagenesis and in silico homology modelling. Key Results The sulphonated molecules P4S and taurine had no effect on Hco-UNC-49. Other classical Cys-loop GABAA receptor agonists tested on the Hco-UNC-49B/C heteromeric channel had a rank order efficacy of GABA > trans-4-aminocrotonic acid > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid (IMA) > (R)-(−)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [R(−)-GABOB] > (S)-(+)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [S(+)-GABOB] > guanidinoacetic acid > isonipecotic acid > 5-aminovaleric acid (DAVA) (partial agonist) > β-alanine (partial agonist). In silico ligand docking revealed some variation in binding between agonists. Mutagenesis of a key serine residue in binding loop C to threonine had minimal effects on GABA and IMA but significantly increased the maximal response to DAVA and decreased twofold the EC50 for R(−)- and S(+)-GABOB. Conclusions and Implications The pharmacological profile of Hco-UNC-49 differed from that of vertebrate Cys-loop GABA receptors and insect resistance to dieldrin receptors, suggesting differences in the agonist binding pocket. These findings could be exploited to develop new drugs that specifically target GABA receptors of parasitic nematodes. PMID:25850584

  16. Procaine rapidly inactivates acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo and competes with agonist for inhibition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Miller, K.W. )

    1989-02-21

    The relationship between the high-affinity procaine channel inhibition site and the agonist self-inhibition site on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) from Torpedo electroplaque was investigated by using rapid {sup 86}Rb{sup +} quenched-flux assays at 4 {degree}C in native AChR-rich vesicles on which 50-60% of ACh activation sites were blocked with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX). In the presence of channel-activating acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations alone, AChR undergoes one phase of inactivation in under a second. Addition of procaine produces two-phase inactivation similar to that seen with self-inhibiting ACh concentrations rapid inactivation complete in 30-75 ms is followed by fast desensitization at the same k{sub d} observed without procaine. The dependence of k{sub r} on (procaine) is consistent with a bimolecular association between procaine and its AChR site. Inhibition of AChR function by mixtures of procaine plus self-inhibiting concentrations of ACh or suberyldicholine was studied by reducing the level of {alpha}-BTX block in vesicles. The data support a mechanism where procaine binds preferentially to the open-channel AChR state, since no procaine-induced inactivation is observed without agonist and k{sub r}'s dependence on (ACh) in channel-activating range closely parallels that of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux response to ACh.

  17. Pattern recognition methods for protein functional site prediction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheng Rong; Wang, Lipo; Young, Natasha; Trudgian, Dave; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2005-10-01

    Protein functional site prediction is closely related to drug design, hence to public health. In order to save the cost and the time spent on identifying the functional sites in sequenced proteins in biology laboratory, computer programs have been widely used for decades. Many of them are implemented using the state-of-the-art pattern recognition algorithms, including decision trees, neural networks and support vector machines. Although the success of this effort has been obvious, advanced and new algorithms are still under development for addressing some difficult issues. This review will go through the major stages in developing pattern recognition algorithms for protein functional site prediction and outline the future research directions in this important area. PMID:16248799

  18. Apramycin Recognition by the Human Ribosomal Decoding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann,T.; Tereshko, V.; Skripkin, E.; Patel, D.

    2007-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics bind specifically to the bacterial ribosomal decoding-site RNA and thereby interfere with fidelity but not efficiency of translation. Apramycin stands out among aminoglycosides for its mechanism of action which is based on blocking translocation and its ability to bind also to the eukaryotic decoding site despite differences in key residues required for apramycin recognition by the bacterial target. To elucidate molecular recognition of the eukaryotic decoding site by apramycin we have determined the crystal structure of an oligoribonucleotide containing the human sequence free and in complex with the antibiotic at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. The drug binds in the deep groove of the RNA which forms a continuously stacked helix comprising non-canonical C{center_dot}A and G{center_dot}A base pairs and a bulged-out adenine. The binding mode of apramycin at the human decoding-site RNA is distinct from aminoglycoside recognition of the bacterial target, suggesting a molecular basis for the actions of apramycin in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  19. Solubilization and characterization of guanine nucleotide-sensitive muscarinic agonist binding sites from rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Berrie, C. P.; Birdsall, N. J.; Hulme, E. C.; Keen, M.; Stockton, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors from rat myocardial membranes may be solubilized by digitonin in good yield at low temperatures in the presence of Mg2+. Under these conditions, up to 60% of the soluble receptors show high affinity binding for the potent agonist [3H]-oxotremorine-M (KA = 10(9)M-1), which is inhibited by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate. The muscarinic binding site labelled with [3H]-oxotremorine-M has a higher sedimentation coefficient (13.4 s) than sites labelled with a 3H antagonist in the presence of guanylylimidodiphosphate (11.6 s) and probably represents a complex between the ligand binding subunit of the receptor and a guanine nucleotide binding protein. PMID:6478115

  20. Intra-perirhinal cortex administration of estradiol, but not an ERβ agonist, modulates object-recognition memory in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Nicole J; Hamel, Laurie M; Brake, Wayne G; Mumby, Dave G

    2016-09-01

    Intra-rhinal cortical infusion of 17-β estradiol (E2, 244.8pg/μl) enhances performance on the Novel-Object Preference (NOP) test and impairs accuracy on the delayed nonmatching-to-sample (DNMS) task in the same set of ovariectomized rats (Gervais, Jacob, Brake, & Mumby, 2013). These results appear paradoxical, as normal performance on both tests require intact object-recognition memory (ORM) ability. While demonstrating a preference for the novel object requires recognizing the sample object, rodents can recognize the sample object and still fail to demonstrate a preference. Therefore, enhanced NOP test performance is consistent with both improved ORM and increased novel-object exploration independent of memory processes. There is some evidence suggesting that estrogen receptor (ER) β agonists enhance NOP test performance (Jacome et al., 2010), but no study to date has examined the role of this receptor in DNMS task performance in rodents. The aim of the present study was to determine whether intra-PRh infusion of an ER β agonist, diarylpropionitrile (DPN, 2μg/μl), has divergent effects on novel-object preference (i.e. novelty preference) and accuracy on the DNMS task. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats (n=7) received chronic low E2 (∼22pg/ml serum) replacement, then intra-PRh infusion of DPN (2μg/μl), E2 (244.8pg/μl), or vehicle before each mixed-delay session (0.5-5min) of the DNMS task. A different set of OVX rats (n=10) received the same infusions before each NOP test trial, and were tested either 4 or 72h later. Consistent with Gervais et al. (2013), intra-PRh E2 reduced accuracy on the DNMS task following a 5-min retention delay and enhanced novelty preference on both tests. Intra-PRh DPN was associated with accuracy that was similar to the vehicle-infusion condition, despite enhancing novelty preference on both tests. The accuracy results suggest that while intra-PRh E2 impairs ORM, ERβ does not play a role. However, ERβ in the PRh appears to be

  1. A Unified Model of the GABAA Receptor Comprising Agonist and Benzodiazepine Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Pernille Louise; Sander, Tommy; Balle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present a full-length α1β2γ2 GABA receptor model optimized for agonists and benzodiazepine (BZD) allosteric modulators. We propose binding hypotheses for the agonists GABA, muscimol and THIP and for the allosteric modulator diazepam (DZP). The receptor model is primarily based on the glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) from C. elegans and includes additional structural information from the prokaryotic ligand-gated ion channel ELIC in a few regions. Available mutational data of the binding sites are well explained by the model and the proposed ligand binding poses. We suggest a GABA binding mode similar to the binding mode of glutamate in the GluCl X-ray structure. Key interactions are predicted with residues α1R66, β2T202, α1T129, β2E155, β2Y205 and the backbone of β2S156. Muscimol is predicted to bind similarly, however, with minor differences rationalized with quantum mechanical energy calculations. Muscimol key interactions are predicted to be α1R66, β2T202, α1T129, β2E155, β2Y205 and β2F200. Furthermore, we argue that a water molecule could mediate further interactions between muscimol and the backbone of β2S156 and β2Y157. DZP is predicted to bind with interactions comparable to those of the agonists in the orthosteric site. The carbonyl group of DZP is predicted to interact with two threonines α1T206 and γ2T142, similar to the acidic moiety of GABA. The chlorine atom of DZP is placed near the important α1H101 and the N-methyl group near α1Y159, α1T206, and α1Y209. We present a binding mode of DZP in which the pending phenyl moiety of DZP is buried in the binding pocket and thus shielded from solvent exposure. Our full length GABAA receptor is made available as Model S1. PMID:23308109

  2. Nicotinic α7 and α4β2 agonists enhance the formation and retrieval of recognition memory: Potential mechanisms for cognitive performance enhancement in neurological and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    McLean, Samantha L; Grayson, Ben; Marsh, Samuel; Zarroug, Samah H O; Harte, Michael K; Neill, Jo C

    2016-04-01

    Cholinergic dysfunction has been shown to be central to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease and has also been postulated to contribute to cognitive dysfunction observed in various psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Deficits are found across a number of cognitive domains and in spite of several attempts to develop new therapies, these remain an unmet clinical need. In the current study we investigated the efficacy of donepezil, risperidone and selective nicotinic α7 and α4β2 receptor agonists to reverse a delay-induced deficit in recognition memory. Adult female Hooded Lister rats received drug treatments and were tested in the novel object recognition (NOR) task following a 6h inter-trial interval (ITI). In all treatment groups, there was no preference for the left or right identical objects in the acquisition trial. Risperidone failed to enhance recognition memory in this paradigm whereas donepezil was effective such that rats discriminated between the novel and familiar object in the retention trial following a 6h ITI. Although a narrow dose range of PNU-282987 and RJR-2403 was tested, only one dose of each increased recognition memory, the highest dose of PNU-282987 (10mg/kg) and the lowest dose of RJR-2403 (0.1mg/kg), indicative of enhanced cognitive performance. Interestingly, these compounds were also efficacious when administered either before the acquisition or the retention trial of the task, suggesting an important role for nicotinic receptor subtypes in the formation and retrieval of recognition memory. PMID:26327238

  3. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  4. Construction of DNA recognition sites active in Haemophilus transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Danner, D B; Smith, H O; Narang, S A

    1982-01-01

    Competent Haemophilus cells recognize and preferentially take up Haemophilus DNA during genetic transformation. This preferential uptake is correlated with the presence on incoming DNA of an 11-base-pair (bp) sequence, 5'-A-A-G-T-G-C-G-G-T-C-A-3'. To prove that this sequence is the recognition site that identifies Haemophilus DNA to the competent cell, we have now constructed a series of plasmids, each of which contains the 11-bp sequence. Using two different assay systems we have tested the ability of fragments from these plasmids to compete with cloned Haemophilus DNA fragments that naturally contain the 11-bp sequence. We find that the addition of the 11-bp sequence to a DNA fragment is necessary and sufficient for preferential uptake of that fragment. However, plasmid DNAs containing this sequence may vary as much as 48-fold in uptake activity, and this variation correlates with the A+T-richness of the DNA flanking the 11-mer. Images PMID:6285382

  5. Interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with dopaminergic D3 binding sites in rat striatum. Evidence that (/sup 3/H)dopamine can label a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.E.; Creese, I.

    1985-02-01

    The interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with /sup 3/H-agonist labeled D3 dopaminergic binding sites of rat striatum have been characterized by radioligand-binding techniques. When the binding of (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)apomorphine to D2 dopamine receptors is blocked by the inclusion of D2 selective concentrations of unlabeled spiroperidol or domperidone, these ligands appear to label selectively the previously termed D3 binding site. Antagonist/(/sup 3/H)dopamine competition curves are of uniformly steep slope (nH . 1.0), suggesting the presence of a single D3 binding site. The relative potencies of antagonists to inhibit D3 specific (/sup 3/H)dopamine binding are significantly correlated with their potencies to block D1 dopamine receptors as measured by the inhibition of both dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase and (/sup 3/H)flupentixol-binding activities. The affinities of agonists to inhibit D3 specific (/sup 3/H)dopamine binding are also correlated with estimates of these agonists affinities for the high affinity binding component of agonist/(/sup 3/H)flupentixol competition curves. Both D3 specific (/sup 3/H) dopamine binding and the high affinity agonist-binding component of dopamine/(/sup 3/H)flupentixol competition curves show a similar sensitivity to guanine nucleotides. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the D3 binding site is related to a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor.

  6. Thermodynamic Modeling of Donor Splice Site Recognition in pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalberts, Daniel P.; Garland, Jeffrey A.

    2004-03-01

    When eukaryotic genes are edited by the spliceosome, the first step in intron recognition is the binding of a U1 snRNA with the donor (5') splice site. We model this interaction thermodynamically to identify splice sites. Applied to a set of 65 annotated genes, our Finding with Binding method achieves a significant separation between real and false sites. Analyzing binding patterns allows us to discard a large number of decoy sites. Our results improve statistics-based methods for donor site recognition, demonstrating the promise of physical modeling to find functional elements in the genome.

  7. Thermodynamic modeling of donor splice site recognition in pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Jeffrey A.; Aalberts, Daniel P.

    2004-04-01

    When eukaryotic genes are edited by the spliceosome, the first step in intron recognition is the binding of a U1 small nuclear RNA with the donor ( 5' ) splice site. We model this interaction thermodynamically to identify splice sites. Applied to a set of 65 annotated genes, our “finding with binding” method achieves a significant separation between real and false sites. Analyzing binding patterns allows us to discard a large number of decoy sites. Our results improve statistics-based methods for donor site recognition, demonstrating the promise of physical modeling to find functional elements in the genome.

  8. Methyl substitution of a rexinoid agonist improves potency and reveals site of lipid toxicity.

    PubMed

    Atigadda, Venkatram R; Xia, Gang; Desphande, Anil; Boerma, LeeAnn J; Lobo-Ruppert, Susan; Grubbs, Clinton J; Smith, Craig D; Brouillette, Wayne J; Muccio, Donald D

    2014-06-26

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3',4'-Dihydro-1'(2'H)-naphthalen-1'-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of these new analogues are reported here along with the X-ray crystal structures of each homologue bound to the ligand binding domain of hRXRα. We demonstrate that each homologue of 9cUAB30 is a more potent agonist, but only the 7-methyl-9cUAB30 caused severe hyperlipidemia in rats. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structures of these new rexinoids and bexarotene (Targretin) bound to hRXRα-LBD, we reveal that each rexinoid, which induced hyperlipidemia, had methyl groups that interacted with helix 7 residues of the LBD. PMID:24801499

  9. Methyl Substitution of a Rexinoid Agonist Improves Potency and Reveals Site of Lipid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3′,4′-Dihydro-1′(2′H)-naphthalen-1′-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of these new analogues are reported here along with the X-ray crystal structures of each homologue bound to the ligand binding domain of hRXRα. We demonstrate that each homologue of 9cUAB30 is a more potent agonist, but only the 7-methyl-9cUAB30 caused severe hyperlipidemia in rats. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structures of these new rexinoids and bexarotene (Targretin) bound to hRXRα-LBD, we reveal that each rexinoid, which induced hyperlipidemia, had methyl groups that interacted with helix 7 residues of the LBD. PMID:24801499

  10. Signatures of Protein-DNA Recognition in Free DNA Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Locasale, J.; Napoli, A; Chen, S; Berman, H; Lawson, C

    2009-01-01

    One obstacle to achieving complete understanding of the principles underlying sequence-dependent recognition of DNA is the paucity of structural data for DNA recognition sequences in their free (unbound) state. Here, we carried out crystallization screening of 50 DNA duplexes containing cognate protein binding sites and obtained new crystal structures of free DNA binding sites for three distinct modes of DNA recognition: anti-parallel ? strands (MetR), helix-turn-helix motif + hinge helices (PurR), and zinc fingers (Zif268). Structural changes between free and protein-bound DNA are manifested differently in each case. The new DNA structures reveal that distinctive sequence-dependent DNA geometry dominates recognition by MetR, protein-induced bending of DNA dictates recognition by PurR, and deformability of DNA along the A-B continuum is important in recognition by Zif268. Together, our findings show that crystal structures of free DNA binding sites provide new information about the nature of protein-DNA interactions and thus lend insights towards a structural code for DNA recognition.

  11. The agonist SR 146131 and the antagonist SR 27897 occupy different sites on the human CCK(1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Gouldson, P; Legoux, P; Carillon, C; Delpech, B; Le Fur, G; Ferrara, P; Shire, D

    2000-07-21

    1-[2-(4-(2-Chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl) aminocarbonyl indoyl] acetic acid (SR 27897) is an effective CCK(1) receptor antagonist, while the structurally related molecule 2-[4-(4-chloro-2, 5-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-(2-cyclohexyl-ethyl)-thiazol-2-ylcarbamoyl ]-5, 7-dimethyl-indol-1-yl-1-acetic acid (SR 146131) is a highly potent and specific agonist for the same receptor. To discover how the two molecules interact with the human cholecystokinin (CCK) CCK(1) receptor, we have carried out binding and activity studies with 33-point mutated receptors. Only six mutants showed altered [3H]SR 27897 binding properties, Lys(115), Lys(187), Phe(198), Trp(209), Leu(214) and Asn(333). In contrast, numerous mutations throughout the receptor either reduced SR 146131 agonist potency, Phe(97), Gly(122), Phe(198), Trp(209), Ile(229), Asn(333), Arg(336) and Leu(356) or increased it, Tyr(48), Cys(94), Asn(98), Leu(217) and Ser(359). Only mutations of Phe(198), Trp(209) and Asn(333) affected both SR 27897 and SR 146131 binding or activity. The collated information was used to construct molecular models of SR 27897 and SR 146131 bound to the human CCK(1) receptor. The clear difference in the binding sites of SR 27897 and SR 146131 offers a molecular explanation for their contrasting pharmacological characteristics. PMID:10988332

  12. Brevetoxin derivatives act as partial agonists at neurotoxin site 5 on the voltage-gated Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    LePage, K T; Baden, D G; Murray, T F

    2003-01-01

    Brevetoxins (PbTx-1 to PbTx-10) are potent lipid-soluble polyether neurotoxins produced by the marine dinoflagellate Karina brevis, an organism associated with 'red tide' blooms in the Gulf of Mexico. Ingestion of shellfish contaminated with K. brevis produces neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) in humans. NSP symptoms emanate from brevetoxin activation of neurotoxin site 5 on voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) [Toxicon 20 (1982) 457]. In primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGN), brevetoxins produce acute neuronal injury and death. The ability of a series of naturally occurring and synthetic brevetoxins to trigger Ca(2+) influx in CGN was explored in the present study. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was monitored in fluo-3-loaded CGN using a fluorescent laser imaging plate reader. The naturally occurring derivatives PbTx-1, PbTx-2 and PbTx-3 all produced a rapid and concentration-dependent increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. The maximum response to PbTx-1 was approximately two-fold greater than that of either PbTx-2 or PbTx-3. Two synthetic derivatives of PbTx-3, alpha-naphthoyl-PbTx-3 and beta-naphthoyl-PbTx-3, were also tested. Both alpha- and beta-naphthoyl-PbTx-3 stimulated a rapid and concentration-dependent Ca(2+) influx that was, however, less efficacious than that of PbTx-3. These data indicate that, analogous to neurotoxin site 2 ligands, activators of neurotoxin site 5 display a range of efficacies, with PbTx-1 being a full agonist and other derivatives acting as partial agonists. PMID:12480165

  13. Pattern recognition of native plant communities: Manitou Colorado test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Optimum channel selection among 12 channels of multispectral scanner imagery identified six as providing the best information about 11 vegetation classes and two nonvegetation classes at the Manitou Experimental Forest. Intensive preprocessing of the scanner signals was required to eliminate a serious scan angle effect. Final processing of the normalized data provided acceptable recognition results of generalized plant community types. Serious errors occurred with attempts to classify specific community types within upland grassland areas. The consideration of the convex mixtures concept (effects of amounts of live plant cover, exposed soil, and plant litter cover on apparent scene radiances) significantly improved the classification of some of the grassland classes.

  14. Mapping of the acetylcholine binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: ( sup 3 H)nicotine as an agonist photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, R.E.; Cohen, J.B. )

    1991-07-16

    The agonist ({sup 3}H)nicotine was used as a photoaffinity label for the acetylcholine binding sties on the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). ({sup 3}H)Nicotine binds at equilibrium with K{sub eq} = 0.6 {mu}M to the agonist binding sites. Irradiation with 254-nm light of AChR-rich membranes equilibrated with ({sup 3}H)nicotine resulted in covalent incorporation into the {alpha}- and {gamma}-subunits, which was inhibited by agonists and competitive antagonists but not by noncompetitive antagonists. Inhibition of labeling by d-tubocurarine demonstrated that the {alpha}-subunit was labeled via both agonist sites but the {gamma}-subunit was labeled only via the site that binds d-tubocurarine with high affinity. Chymotryptic digestion of the {alpha}-subunit confirmed that Try-198 was the principal amino acid labeled by ({sup 3}H)nicotine. This confirmation required a novel radiosequencing strategy employing o-phthalaldehyde ({sup 3}H)Nicotine, which is the first photoaffinity agonist used, labels primarily Tyr-198 in contrast to competitive antagonist affinity labels, which label primarily Tyr-190 and Cys-192/Cys-193.

  15. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  16. Antibody Recognition of Cancer-Related Gangliosides and Their Mimics Investigated Using in silico Site Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Agostino, Mark; Yuriev, Elizabeth; Ramsland, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Modified gangliosides may be overexpressed in certain types of cancer, thus, they are considered a valuable target in cancer immunotherapy. Structural knowledge of their interaction with antibodies is currently limited, due to the large size and high flexibility of these ligands. In this study, we apply our previously developed site mapping technique to investigate the recognition of cancer-related gangliosides by anti-ganglioside antibodies. The results reveal a potential ganglioside-binding motif in the four antibodies studied, suggesting the possibility of structural convergence in the anti-ganglioside immune response. The structural basis of the recognition of ganglioside-mimetic peptides is also investigated using site mapping and compared to ganglioside recognition. The peptides are shown to act as structural mimics of gangliosides by interacting with many of the same binding site residues as the cognate carbohydrate epitopes. These studies provide important clues as to the structural basis of immunological mimicry of carbohydrates. PMID:22536387

  17. Macromolecular recognition directs calcium ions to coccolith mineralization sites.

    PubMed

    Gal, Assaf; Wirth, Richard; Kopka, Joachim; Fratzl, Peter; Faivre, Damien; Scheffel, André

    2016-08-01

    Many organisms form elaborate mineralized structures, constituted of highly organized arrangements of crystals and organic macromolecules. The localization of crystals within these structures is presumably determined by the interaction of nucleating macromolecules with the mineral phase. Here we show that, preceding nucleation, a specific interaction between soluble organic molecules and an organic backbone structure directs mineral components to specific sites. This strategy underlies the formation of coccoliths, which are highly ordered arrangements of calcite crystals produced by marine microalgae. On combining the insoluble organic coccolith scaffold with coccolith-associated soluble macromolecules in vitro, we found a massive accretion of calcium ions at the sites where the crystals form in vivo. The in vitro process exhibits profound similarities to the initial stages of coccolith biogenesis in vivo. PMID:27493186

  18. A novel genome-wide polyadenylation sites recognition system based on condition random field.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiuqiang; Zhang, Shanxin; Liu, Jun; Liu, Ruiling

    2014-01-01

    Polyadenylation including the cleavage of pre-mRNA and addition of a stretch of adenosines to the 3'-end is an essential step of pre-mRNA processing in eukayotes. The known regulatory role of polyadenylation in mRNA localization, stability, and translation and the emerging link between poly(A) and disease states underline the necessary to fully characterize polyadenylation sites. Several artificial intelligence methods have been proposed for poly(A) sites recognition. However, these methods are suitable to small subsets of genome sequences. It is necessary to propose a method for genome-wide recognition of poly(A) sites. Recent efforts have found a lot of poly(A) related factors on DNA level. Here, we proposed a novel genome-wide poly(A) recognition method based on the Condition Random Field (CRF) by integrating multiple features. Compared with the polya_svm (the most accurate program for prediction of poly(A) sites till date), our method had a higher performance with the area under ROC curve(0.8621 versus 0.6796). The result suggests that our method is an effective method in genome wide poly(A) sites recognition. PMID:25571055

  19. Effects of site-specific level adjustments on speech recognition with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ning; Pfingst, Bryan E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Modulation detection thresholds (MDTs) vary across stimulation sites in a cochlear implant electrode array in a manner that is subject and ear specific. Previous studies have demonstrated that speech recognition with a cochlear implant can be improved by site-selection strategies, where selected stimulation sites with poor modulation sensitivity are removed from a subject’s processor MAP1. Limitations of site-selection strategies are that they can compromise spectral resolution and distort frequency-place mapping since the frequencies assigned to the removed sites are usually reallocated to other sites and site bandwidths are broadened. The objective of the current study was to test an alternative approach for rehabilitation that aimed at improving the across-site mean (ASM) MDTs by adjusting stimulation parameters at the poorly-performing sites. Based on previous findings that modulation detection contributes to speech recognition and improves significantly with stimulus level, we hypothesized that modulation sensitivity at the poor sites can be improved by artificially increasing stimulation levels at those sites in the speech processor, which then leads to improved speech recognition. Design Nine postlingually deafened ears implanted with Nucleus cochlear implants were evaluated for MDTs, absolute-detection threshold levels (T levels) and the maximum loudness levels (C levels) on each of the available stimulation sites. For each ear, the minimum stimulation level settings in the speech processor MAP were raised by 5%, and alternatively by 10%, of the dynamic range (DR) from true thresholds on 5 stimulation sites with the poorest MDTs. For comparison, a 5% level raise was globally applied to all stimulation sites. The C levels were fixed during these level manipulations. MDTs at the 5 poorest stimulation sites were compared at 20% DR before and after the level adjustments. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs), i.e., signal to noise ratios (SNRs

  20. Genome filtering using methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes with six-base pair recognition sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large fraction of repetitive DNA in many plant genomes has complicated all aspects of DNA sequencing and assembly, and thus techniques that enrich for genes and low-copy sequences have been employed to isolate gene space. Methyl sensitive restriction enzymes with six base pair recognition sites...

  1. Attenuation of phencyclidine-induced object recognition deficits by the combination of atypical antipsychotic drugs and pimavanserin (ACP 103), a 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) receptor inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Snigdha, S; Horiguchi, M; Huang, M; Li, Z; Shahid, M; Neill, J C; Meltzer, H Y

    2010-02-01

    Subchronic administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, phencyclidine (PCP), in rodents has been shown to produce impairment in novel object recognition (NOR), a model of visual learning and memory. We tested the hypothesis that the selective 5-HT(2A) inverse agonists, pimavanserin and (R)-(+)-alpha-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenylethyl]-4-piperidinemethanol (M100907), would potentiate subeffective doses of atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs) to reverse the NOR deficits. Female rats received vehicle or PCP (2 mg/kg b.i.d.) for 7 days, followed by a 7-day washout. Pimavanserin (3 mg/kg) or M100907 (1 mg/kg) alone, or four atypicial APDs, risperidone (0.05-0.1 mg/kg), melperone (1-3 mg/kg), olanzapine (1-2 mg/kg), or N-desmethylclozapine (1-2 mg/kg), and the typical APD, haloperidol (0.05-0.1 mg/kg), were administered alone, or in combination with pimavanserin or M100907, before NOR testing. The exploration times of objects during 3-min acquisition and retention trials, separated by a 1-min interval, were compared by analysis of variance. Vehicle-, but not PCP-treated, animals, explored the novel object significantly more than the familiar in the retention trial (p < 0.05-0.01). Pretreatment with the higher doses of the atypical APDs, but not pimavanserin, M100907, or haloperidol alone, reversed the effects of PCP. The effect of risperidone was blocked by haloperidol pretreatment. Coadministration of pimavanserin or M100907, with ineffective doses of the atypical APDs, but not haloperidol, also reversed the PCP-induced deficit in NOR. These results support the importance of 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) receptor blockade relative to D(2) receptor blockade in the ability of atypicals to ameliorate the effect of subchronic PCP, a putative measure of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:19864614

  2. Synthesis of GABAA Receptor Agonists and Evaluation of their α-Subunit Selectivity and Orientation in the GABA Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Michaela; Rabe, Holger; Strehle, Axelle; Dieler, Sandra; Debus, Fabian; Dannhardt, Gerd; Akabas, Myles H.; Lüddens, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Drugs used to treat various disorders target GABAA receptors. To develop α subunit selective compounds, we synthesized 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol (4-PIOL) derivatives. The 3-isoxazolol moiety was substituted by 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-one, 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-thione, and substituted 1,2,4-triazol-3-ol heterocycles with modifications to the basic piperidine substituent as well as substituents without basic nitrogen. Compounds were screened by [3H]muscimol binding and in patch-clamp experiments with heterologously expressed GABAA αiβ3γ2 receptors (i = 1–6). The effects of 5-aminomethyl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5d were comparable to GABA for all α subunit isoforms. 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5a and 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H- [1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-thione 6a were weak agonists at α3–, α3–, and α5–containing receptors. When coapplied with GABA they were antagonistic inα2–, α4–, and α6–containing receptors and potentiated α3-containing receptors. 6a protected GABA binding site cysteine-substitution mutants α1F64C and α1S68C from reacting with methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate. 6a specifically covalently modified the α1R66C thiol, in the GABA binding site, through its oxadiazolethione sulfur. These results demonstrate the feasibility of synthesizing α subtype selective GABA mimetic drugs. PMID:18651727

  3. In vivo brain dopaminergic receptor site mapping using /sup 75/Se-labeled pergolide analogs: the effects of various dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, A.

    1986-01-01

    Perogolide mesylate is a new synthetic ergoline derivative which is reported to possess agonistic activity at central dopamine receptor sites in the brain. The authors have synthesized a (/sup 75/Se)-radiolabeled pergolide mesylate derivative, (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate, which, after i.v. administration to mature male rats, showed a time course differentiation in the uptake of this radiolabeled compound in isolated peripheral and central (brain) tissues that are known to be rich in dopamine receptor sites. Further studies were conducted in which the animals were preexposed to the dopamine receptor agonist SKF-38393, as well as the dopamine receptor antagonists (+)-butaclamol, (-)-butaclamol, (+/-)-butaclamol and (-)-chloroethylnorapomorphine, to substantiate the specific peripheral and central localization patterns of (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate. Further investigations were also conducted in which the animals received an i.v. administration of N-isopropyl-l-123-p-iodoamphetamine ((/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine). However, (/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine did not demonstrate a specific affinity for any type of receptor site in the brain. These investigations further substantiated the fact that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate does cross the blood-brain barrier is quickly localized at specific dopamine receptor sites in the intact rat brain and that this localization pattern can be affected by preexposure to different dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Therefore, these investigations provided further evidence that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate and other radiolabeled ergoline analogs might be useful as brain dopamine receptor localization radiopharmaceuticals.

  4. Using chiral molecules as an approach to address low-druggability recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Xavier; Günther, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    The content of chiral carbon atoms or structural complexity, which is known to correlate well with relevant physicochemical properties of small molecules, represents a promising descriptor that could fill the gap in existing drug discovery between ligand library filtering rules and the corresponding properties of the target's recognition site. Herein, we present an in silico study on the yet unclear underlying correlations between molecular complexity and other more sophisticated physicochemical and biological properties. By analyzing thousands of protein-ligand complexes from DrugBank, we show that increasing molecular complexity of drugs is an approach to addressing particularly low-druggability and polar recognition sites. We also show that biologically relevant protein classes characteristically bind molecules with a certain degree of structural complexity. Three distinct behaviors toward drug recognition are described. The reported results set the basis for a better understanding of protein-drug recognition, and open the possibility of including target information in the filtering of large ligand libraries for screening. PMID:25223950

  5. Differential α4(+)/(-)β2 Agonist-binding Site Contributions to α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Function within and between Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Linda M; Weltzin, Maegan M; Eaton, J Brek; Cooper, John F; Lindstrom, Jon M; Lukas, Ronald J; Whiteaker, Paul

    2016-01-29

    Two α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4β2-nAChR) isoforms exist with (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2 subunit stoichiometries and high versus low agonist sensitivities (HS and LS), respectively. Both isoforms contain a pair of α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist-binding sites. The LS isoform also contains a unique α4(+)/(-)α4 site with lower agonist affinity than the α4(+)/(-)β2 sites. However, the relative roles of the conserved α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist-binding sites in and between the isoforms have not been studied. We used a fully linked subunit concatemeric nAChR approach to express pure populations of HS or LS isoform α4β2*-nAChR. This approach also allowed us to mutate individual subunit interfaces, or combinations thereof, on each isoform background. We used this approach to systematically mutate a triplet of β2 subunit (-)-face E-loop residues to their non-conserved α4 subunit counterparts or vice versa (β2HQT and α4VFL, respectively). Mutant-nAChR constructs (and unmodified controls) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Acetylcholine concentration-response curves and maximum function were measured using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Surface expression was measured with (125)I-mAb 295 binding and was used to define function/nAChR. If the α4(+)/(-)β2 sites contribute equally to function, making identical β2HQT substitutions at either site should produce similar functional outcomes. Instead, highly differential outcomes within the HS isoform, and between the two isoforms, were observed. In contrast, α4VFL mutation effects were very similar in all positions of both isoforms. Our results indicate that the identity of subunits neighboring the otherwise equivalent α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist sites modifies their contributions to nAChR activation and that E-loop residues are an important contributor to this neighbor effect. PMID:26644472

  6. Escherichia coli proline tRNA: structure and recognition sites for prolyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Yokogawa, T

    2000-01-01

    A major proline tRNA was purified from bulk Escherichia coli A19 tRNA by affinity chromatography with a biotinylated DNA probe. Its nucleotide sequence including modified nucleotides was determined by the post-labelling technique. In order to study the recognition sites of this proline tRNA for prolyl-tRNA synthetase, various mutant transcripts were prepared using an in vitro transcription system with T7 RNA polymerase. Based on the results of in vitro kinetic analyses of mutant transcripts, it was concluded that the second and third letters, G35 and G36, of the anticodon, G37 of the anticodon loop, the discriminator base A73, G72 of the acceptor stem, G49 and U17A that existed in the corner of an L-shaped structure are the recognition sites of proline tRNA for prolyl-tRNA synthetase. PMID:12903242

  7. Rapid agonist-induced loss of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin opioid receptor sites in NG108-15, but not SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, R.I.; Lameh, J.; Sadee, W. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have measured {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites on intact SK-N-SH and NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells, respectively, in culture. Use of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin ({beta}E) as a tracer, together with {beta}E(6-31) to block high-affinity non-opioid binding in both cell lines, permitted the measurement of cell surface {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites. Labeling was at {delta} sites in NG108-15 cells and predominantly at {mu} sites in SK-N-SH cells. Pretreatment with the {mu} and {delta} agonist, DADLE, caused a rapid loss of cell surface {delta} receptor sites in NG108-15 cells, but failed to reduce significantly {mu} receptor density in SK-N-SH cells.

  8. Site-selective Characterization of Src Homology 3 Domain Molecular Recognition with Cyanophenylalanine Infrared Probes

    PubMed Central

    Horness, Rachel E.; Basom, Edward J.; Thielges, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    Local heterogeneity of microenvironments in proteins is important in biological function, but difficult to characterize experimentally. One approach is the combination of infrared (IR) spectroscopy and site-selective incorporation of probe moieties with spectrally resolved IR absorptions that enable characterization within inherently congested protein IR spectra. We employed this method to study molecular recognition of a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain from the yeast protein Sho1 for a peptide containing the proline-rich recognition sequence of its physiological binding partner Pbs2. Nitrile IR probes were introduced at four distinct sites in the protein by selective incorporation of p-cyanophenylalanine via the amber codon suppressor method and characterized by IR spectroscopy. Variation among the IR absorption bands reports on heterogeneity in local residue environments dictated by the protein structure, as well as on residue-dependent changes upon peptide binding. The study informs on the molecular recognition of SH3Sho1 and illustrates the speed and simplicity of this approach for characterization of select microenvironments within proteins. PMID:26491469

  9. Sulfhydryl group(s) in the ligand binding site of the D-1 dopamine receptor: specific protection by agonist and antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.; Kassis, S.; Kebabian, J.; Fishman, P.H.

    1986-10-21

    An iodinated compound, (/sup 125/I)-8-iodo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepin-7-ol, has been recently reported to be a specific ligand for the D-1 dopamine receptor. Due to its high affinity and specific activity, this ligand was chosen for the biochemical characterization of the D-1 receptor. Alkylation of particulate fractions of rat caudate nucleus by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) caused an inactivation of the D-1 receptor, as measured by diminished binding of the radioligand to the receptor. The inactivation of the receptor sites by NEM was rapid and irreversible, resulting in a 70% net loss of binding sites. On the basis of Scatchard analysis of binding to NEM-treated tissue, the loss in binding sites was due to a net decrease in the receptor number with a 2-fold decrease in the affinity of the receptor for the radioligand. Receptor occupancy by either a D-1 specific agonist or antagonist protected the ligand binding sites from NEM-mediated inactivation. NEM treatment of the receptor in the absence or presence of protective compound abolished the agonist high-affinity state of the receptor as well as membrane adenylate cyclase activity. The above-treated striatal membranes were fused with HeLa membranes and assayed for dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. When the sources of D-1 receptors were from agonist-protected membranes, the receptors retained the ability to functionally couple to the HeLa adenylate cyclase. These results suggest that the D-1 dopamine receptor contains NEM-sensitive sulfhydryl group(s) either at or near the vicinity of the ligand binding sites, which are critical for both receptor binding and function.

  10. Molecular blueprint of allosteric binding sites in a homologue of the agonist-binding domain of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Spurny, Radovan; Debaveye, Sarah; Farinha, Ana; Veys, Ken; Vos, Ann M.; Gossas, Thomas; Atack, John; Bertrand, Sonia; Bertrand, Daniel; Danielson, U. Helena; Tresadern, Gary; Ulens, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) belongs to the family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels and is involved in fast synaptic signaling. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified chimera of the extracellular domain of the native α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and acetylcholine binding protein, termed α7-AChBP. This chimeric receptor was used to conduct an innovative fragment-library screening in combination with X-ray crystallography to identify allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site is surface-exposed and is located near the N-terminal α-helix of the extracellular domain. Ligand binding at this site causes a conformational change of the α-helix as the fragment wedges between the α-helix and a loop homologous to the main immunogenic region of the muscle α1 subunit. A second site is located in the vestibule of the receptor, in a preexisting intrasubunit pocket opposite the agonist binding site and corresponds to a previously identified site involved in positive allosteric modulation of the bacterial homolog ELIC. A third site is located at a pocket right below the agonist binding site. Using electrophysiological recordings on the human α7 nAChR we demonstrate that the identified fragments, which bind at these sites, can modulate receptor activation. This work presents a structural framework for different allosteric binding sites in the α7 nAChR and paves the way for future development of novel allosteric modulators with therapeutic potential. PMID:25918415

  11. Triplex molecular beacons for sensitive recognition of melamine based on abasic-site-containing DNA and fluorescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Sun, Qianqian; Zhu, Linling; Zhang, Junying; Wang, Fengyang; Lu, Linlin; Yu, Haijun; Xu, Zhiai; Zhang, Wen

    2015-05-01

    A melamine aptamer derived from an abasic-site-containing triplex molecular beacon (tMB) was designed and developed for sensitive recognition of melamine by integrating tMBs and fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). PMID:25865656

  12. Recognition of DNA abasic site nanocavity by fluorophore-switched probe: Suitable for all sequence environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Yuehua; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Lihua; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Xiaoshun; Shao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Removal of a damaged base in DNA produces an abasic site (AP site) nanocavity. If left un-repaired in vivo by the specific enzyme, this nanocavity will result in nucleotide mutation in the following DNA replication. Therefore, selective recognition of AP site nanocavity by small molecules is important for identification of such DNA damage and development of genetic drugs. In this work, we investigate the fluorescence behavior of isoquinoline alkaloids including palmatine (PAL), berberine (BER), epiberberine (EPI), jatrorrhizine (JAT), coptisine (COP), coralyne (COR), worenine (WOR), berberrubine (BEU), sanguinarine (SAN), chelerythrine (CHE), and nitidine (NIT) upon binding with the AP nanocavity. PAL is screened out as the most efficient fluorophore-switched probe to recognize the AP nanocavity over the fully matched DNA. Its fluorescence enhancement occurs for all of the AP nanocavity sequence environments, which has not been achieved by the previously used probes. The bridged π conjugation effect should partially contribute to the AP nanocavity-specific fluorescence, as opposed to the solvent effect. Due to the strong binding with the AP nanocavity, PAL will find wide applications in the DNA damage recognition and sensor development.

  13. Non-equivalence of Key Positively Charged Residues of the Free Fatty Acid 2 Receptor in the Recognition and Function of Agonist Versus Antagonist Ligands*

    PubMed Central

    Sergeev, Eugenia; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Pandey, Sunil K.; MacKenzie, Amanda E.; Hudson, Brian D.; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are produced in the gut by bacterial fermentation of poorly digested carbohydrates. A key mediator of their actions is the G protein-coupled free fatty acid 2 (FFA2) receptor, and this has been suggested as a therapeutic target for the treatment of both metabolic and inflammatory diseases. However, a lack of understanding of the molecular determinants dictating how ligands bind to this receptor has hindered development. We have developed a novel radiolabeled FFA2 antagonist to probe ligand binding to FFA2, and in combination with mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies, we define how agonist and antagonist ligands interact with the receptor. Although both agonist and antagonist ligands contain negatively charged carboxylates that interact with two key positively charged arginine residues in transmembrane domains V and VII of FFA2, there are clear differences in how these interactions occur. Specifically, although agonists require interaction with both arginine residues to bind the receptor, antagonists require an interaction with only one of the two. Moreover, different chemical series of antagonist interact preferentially with different arginine residues. A homology model capable of rationalizing these observations was developed and provides a tool that will be invaluable for identifying improved FFA2 agonists and antagonists to further define function and therapeutic opportunities of this receptor. PMID:26518871

  14. Non-equivalence of Key Positively Charged Residues of the Free Fatty Acid 2 Receptor in the Recognition and Function of Agonist Versus Antagonist Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sergeev, Eugenia; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Pandey, Sunil K; MacKenzie, Amanda E; Hudson, Brian D; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are produced in the gut by bacterial fermentation of poorly digested carbohydrates. A key mediator of their actions is the G protein-coupled free fatty acid 2 (FFA2) receptor, and this has been suggested as a therapeutic target for the treatment of both metabolic and inflammatory diseases. However, a lack of understanding of the molecular determinants dictating how ligands bind to this receptor has hindered development. We have developed a novel radiolabeled FFA2 antagonist to probe ligand binding to FFA2, and in combination with mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies, we define how agonist and antagonist ligands interact with the receptor. Although both agonist and antagonist ligands contain negatively charged carboxylates that interact with two key positively charged arginine residues in transmembrane domains V and VII of FFA2, there are clear differences in how these interactions occur. Specifically, although agonists require interaction with both arginine residues to bind the receptor, antagonists require an interaction with only one of the two. Moreover, different chemical series of antagonist interact preferentially with different arginine residues. A homology model capable of rationalizing these observations was developed and provides a tool that will be invaluable for identifying improved FFA2 agonists and antagonists to further define function and therapeutic opportunities of this receptor. PMID:26518871

  15. Distinct parietal sites mediate the influences of mood, arousal, and their interaction on human recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Greene, Ciara M; Flannery, Oliver; Soto, David

    2014-12-01

    The two dimensions of emotion, mood valence and arousal, have independent effects on recognition memory. At present, however, it is not clear how those effects are reflected in the human brain. Previous research in this area has generally dealt with memory for emotionally valenced or arousing stimuli, but the manner in which interacting mood and arousal states modulate responses in memory substrates remains poorly understood. We investigated memory for emotionally neutral items while independently manipulating mood valence and arousal state by means of music exposure. Four emotional conditions were created: positive mood/high arousal, positive mood/low arousal, negative mood/high arousal, and negative mood/low arousal. We observed distinct effects of mood valence and arousal in parietal substrates of recognition memory. Positive mood increased activity in ventral posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and orbitofrontal cortex, whereas arousal condition modulated activity in dorsal PPC and the posterior cingulate. An interaction between valence and arousal was observed in left ventral PPC, notably in a parietal area distinct from the those identified for the main effects, with a stronger effect of mood on recognition memory responses here under conditions of relative high versus low arousal. We interpreted the PPC activations in terms of the attention-to-memory hypothesis: Increased arousal may lead to increased top-down control of memory, and hence dorsal PPC activation, whereas positive mood valence may result in increased activity in ventral PPC regions associated with bottom-up attention to memory. These findings indicate that distinct parietal sites mediate the influences of mood, arousal, and their interplay during recognition memory. PMID:24604603

  16. Polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene binds specifically to functional recognition sites on a monomeric and a dimeric ubiquitin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanzoni, Serena; Ceccon, Alberto; Assfalg, Michael; Singh, Rajesh K.; Fushman, David; D'Onofrio, Mariapina

    2015-04-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which NPs interact with biomolecules. NPs associating with proteins may interfere with protein-protein interactions and affect cellular communication pathways, however the impact of NPs on biomolecular recognition remains poorly characterized. In this respect, particularly relevant is the study of NP-induced functional perturbations of proteins implicated in the regulation of key biochemical pathways. Ubiquitin (Ub) is a prototypical protein post-translational modifier playing a central role in numerous essential biological processes. To contribute to the understanding of the interactions between this universally distributed biomacromolecule and NPs, we investigated the adsorption of polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene on monomeric Ub and on a minimal polyubiquitin chain in vitro at atomic resolution. Site-resolved chemical shift and intensity perturbations of Ub's NMR signals, together with 15N spin relaxation rate changes, exchange saturation transfer effects, and fluorescence quenching data were consistent with the reversible formation of soluble aggregates incorporating fullerenol clusters. The specific interaction epitopes were identified, coincident with functional recognition sites in a monomeric and lysine48-linked dimeric Ub. Fullerenol appeared to target the open state of the dynamic structure of a dimeric Ub according to a conformational selection mechanism. Importantly, the protein-NP association prevented the enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of polyubiquitin chains. Our findings provide an experiment-based insight into protein/fullerenol recognition, with implications in functional biomolecular communication, including regulatory protein turnover, and for the opportunity of therapeutic intervention in Ub-dependent cellular pathways.The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which

  17. Polyhydroxylated [60]Fullerene Binds Specifically to Functional Recognition Sites on Monomeric and Dimeric Ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Zanzoni, Serena; Ceccon, Alberto; Assfalg, Michael; Singh, Rajesh K.; Fushman, David; D’Onofrio, Mariapina

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which NPs interact with biomolecules. NPs associating with proteins may interfere with protein-protein interactions and affect cellular communication pathways, however the impact of NPs on biomolecular recognition remains poorly characterized. In this respect, particularly relevant is the study of NP-induced functional perturbations of proteins implicated in the regulation of key biochemical pathways. Ubiquitin (Ub) is a prototypical protein post-translational modifier playing a central role in numerous essential biological processes. To contribute to an understanding of the interactions between this universally distributed biomacromolecule and NPs, we investigated the adsorption of polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene to monomeric Ub and to a minimal polyubiquitin chain in vitro at atomic resolution. Site-resolved chemical shift and intensity perturbations of Ub’s NMR signals, together with 15N spin relaxation rate changes, exchange saturation transfer effects, and fluorescence quenching data were consistent with the reversible formation of soluble aggregates incorporating fullerenol clusters. Specific interaction epitopes were identified, coincident with functional recognition sites in monomeric and lysine48-linked dimeric Ub. Fullerenol appeared to target the open state of the dynamic structure of dimeric Ub according to a conformational selection mechanism. Importantly, protein-NP association prevented enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of polyubiquitin chains. Our findings provide experiment-based insight into protein/fullerenol recognition, with implications in functional biomolecular communication, including regulatory protein turnover, and for the opportunity of therapeutic intervention in Ub-dependent cellular pathways. PMID:25811293

  18. Evolution of I-SceI Homing Endonucleases with Increased DNA Recognition Site Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Rakesh; Ho, Kwok Ki; Tenney, Kristen; Chen, Jui-Hui; Golden, Barbara L.; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2013-09-18

    Elucidating how homing endonucleases undergo changes in recognition site specificity will facilitate efforts to engineer proteins for gene therapy applications. I-SceI is a monomeric homing endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves within an 18-bp target. It tolerates limited degeneracy in its target sequence, including substitution of a C:G{sub +4} base pair for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} base pair. Libraries encoding randomized amino acids at I-SceI residue positions that contact or are proximal to A:T{sub +4} were used in conjunction with a bacterial one-hybrid system to select I-SceI derivatives that bind to recognition sites containing either the A:T{sub +4} or the C:G{sub +4} base pairs. As expected, isolates encoding wild-type residues at the randomized positions were selected using either target sequence. All I-SceI proteins isolated using the C:G{sub +4} recognition site included small side-chain substitutions at G100 and either contained (K86R/G100T, K86R/G100S and K86R/G100C) or lacked (G100A, G100T) a K86R substitution. Interestingly, the binding affinities of the selected variants for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} target are 4- to 11-fold lower than that of wild-type I-SceI, whereas those for the C:G{sub +4} target are similar. The increased specificity of the mutant proteins is also evident in binding experiments in vivo. These differences in binding affinities account for the observed -36-fold difference in target preference between the K86R/G100T and wild-type proteins in DNA cleavage assays. An X-ray crystal structure of the K86R/G100T mutant protein bound to a DNA duplex containing the C:G{sub +4} substitution suggests how sequence specificity of a homing enzyme can increase. This biochemical and structural analysis defines one pathway by which site specificity is augmented for a homing endonuclease.

  19. A NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, that simultaneously enhances LTP and reduces LTD at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-lei; Sullivan, John A.; Moskal, Joseph R.; Stanton, Patric K.

    2008-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDAR) are a key route for Ca2+ influx into neurons important to both activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and, when uncontrolled, triggering events that cause neuronal degeneration and death. Among regulatory binding sites on the NMDAR complex is a glycine binding site, distinct from the glutamate binding site, which must be co-activated for NMDAR channel opening. We developed a novel glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, which is both nootropic and neuroprotective in vivo. Here, we assessed the effects of GLYX-13 on long-term synaptic plasticity and NMDAR transmission at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in hippocampal slices in vitro. GLYX-13 simultaneously enhanced the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission, while reducing long-term depression (LTD). GLYX-13 reduced NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons evoked by low-frequency Schaffer collateral stimulation, but enhanced NMDAR currents during high-frequency bursts of activity, and these actions were occluded by a saturating concentration of the glycine site agonist D-serine. Direct two-photon imaging of Schaffer collateral burst-evoked increases in [Ca2+] in individual dendritic spines revealed that GLYX-13 selectively enhanced burst-induced NMDAR-dependent spine Ca2+ influx. Examining the rate of MK-801 block of synaptic versus extrasynaptic NMDAR-gated channels revealed that GLYX-13 selectively enhanced activation of burst-driven extrasynaptic NMDARs, with an action that was blocked by the NR2B-selective NMDAR antagonist ifenprodil. Our data suggest that GLYX-13 may have unique therapeutic potential as a learning and memory enhancer because of its ability to simultaneously enhance LTP and suppress LTD. PMID:18796308

  20. Myc-binding-site recognition in the human genome is determined by chromatin context.

    PubMed

    Guccione, Ernesto; Martinato, Francesca; Finocchiaro, Giacomo; Luzi, Lucilla; Tizzoni, Laura; Dall' Olio, Valentina; Zardo, Giuseppe; Nervi, Clara; Bernard, Loris; Amati, Bruno

    2006-07-01

    Large-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies have been effective in unravelling the distribution of DNA-binding transcription factors along eukaryotic genomes, but specificity determinants remain elusive. Gene-regulatory regions display distinct histone variants and modifications (or marks). An attractive hypothesis is that these marks modulate protein recognition, but whether or not this applies to transcription factors remains unknown. Based on large-scale datasets and quantitative ChIP, we dissect the correlations between 35 histone marks and genomic binding by the transcription factor Myc. Our data reveal a relatively simple combinatorial organization of histone marks in human cells, with a few main groups of marks clustering on distinct promoter populations. A stretch of chromatin bearing high H3 K4/K79 methylation and H3 acetylation (or 'euchromatic island'), which is generally associated with a pre-engaged basal transcription machinery, is a strict pre-requisite for recognition of any target site by Myc (whether the consensus CACGTG or an alternative sequence). These data imply that tethering of a transcription factor to restricted chromatin domains is rate-limiting for sequence-specific DNA binding in vivo. PMID:16767079

  1. Recognition of forearm muscle activity by continuous classification of multi-site mechanomyogram signals.

    PubMed

    Alves, Natasha; Chau, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on identifying multiple activation states from mechanomyogram (MMG) signals for the purpose of controlling switching interfaces have employed pattern recognition methods where MMG signal features from multiple muscle sites are extracted and classified. The purpose of this study is to determine if MMG signal features retain enough discriminatory information to allow reliable continuous classification, and to determine if there is a decline in classification accuracy over short time periods. MMG signals were recorded from two accelerometers attached to the flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles of 12 able-bodied participants as participants performed three classes of forearm muscle activity. The data were collected over five recording sessions, with a ten-minute interval between each session. The data were spliced into 256 ms epochs, and a comprehensive set of signal features was extracted. A pattern classifier, trained with continuously acquired signal features from the first recording session, was tested with signals recorded from the other sessions. The average classification accuracy over the five sessions was 89 ± 2%. There was no obvious declining trend in classification accuracy with time. These results show that MMG signals recorded at the forearm retain enough discriminatory information to allow continuous recognition of hand motion across multiple (>90) repetitions, and the MMG-classifier does not show short-term degradation. These results indicate the potential of MMG as a multifunction control signal for muscle-machine interfaces. PMID:21097038

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis of the base recognition loop of ribonuclease from Bacillus intermedius (binase).

    PubMed

    Okorokov, A L; Panov, K I; Kolbanovskaya EYu; Karpeisky MYa; Polyakov, K M; Wilkinson, A J; Dodson, G G

    1996-04-15

    Members of the microbial guanyl-specific ribonuclease family show a high level of structural homology. The structural basis for guanyl base binding by microbial ribonucleases has been established for all members of the family and the existence of a guanine recognition loop was shown. However, bacillar RNases such as binase and barnase show far less specificity towards the guanyl base in hydrolysing oligonucleotides composed of more than 4 or 5 nucleotides. Using site-directed mutagenesis we introduced a number of amino acid substitutions into the base recognition loop of binase. The donor sequence originated from the guanyl specific ribonuclease Sa. Two single, two double and one triple (entire loop substitution) mutants were constructed and overproduced in E. coli. The kinetic properties of the mutant variants are different from the wild-type protein. Amino acid substitutions R61V, G60S, S56Q/R61V, G60S/R61V show 3-fold, 7-fold, 4-fold and 12-fold increased guanyl specificity respectively. However, all mutants retain the ability to catalyse the hydrolysis of a poly(A) substrate. PMID:8612811

  3. Structural Basis for Native Agonist and Synthetic Inhibitor Recognition by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Regulator PqsR (MvfR)

    PubMed Central

    Ilangovan, Aravindan; Fletcher, Matthew; Rampioni, Giordano; Pustelny, Christian; Rumbaugh, Kendra; Heeb, Stephan; Cámara, Miguel; Truman, Alex; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Emsley, Jonas; Williams, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial populations co-ordinate gene expression collectively through quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism employing diffusible signal molecules. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) protein PqsR (MvfR) is a key component of alkyl-quinolone (AQ)-dependent QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PqsR is activated by 2-alkyl-4-quinolones including the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone), its precursor 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ) and their C9 congeners, 2-nonyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (C9-PQS) and 2-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (NHQ). These drive the autoinduction of AQ biosynthesis and the up-regulation of key virulence determinants as a function of bacterial population density. Consequently, PqsR constitutes a potential target for novel antibacterial agents which attenuate infection through the blockade of virulence. Here we present the crystal structures of the PqsR co-inducer binding domain (CBD) and a complex with the native agonist NHQ. We show that the structure of the PqsR CBD has an unusually large ligand-binding pocket in which a native AQ agonist is stabilized entirely by hydrophobic interactions. Through a ligand-based design strategy we synthesized and evaluated a series of 50 AQ and novel quinazolinone (QZN) analogues and measured the impact on AQ biosynthesis, virulence gene expression and biofilm development. The simple exchange of two isosteres (OH for NH2) switches a QZN agonist to an antagonist with a concomitant impact on the induction of bacterial virulence factor production. We also determined the complex crystal structure of a QZN antagonist bound to PqsR revealing a similar orientation in the ligand binding pocket to the native agonist NHQ. This structure represents the first description of an LTTR-antagonist complex. Overall these studies present novel insights into LTTR ligand binding and ligand-based drug design and provide a chemical scaffold for further anti-P. aeruginosa

  4. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylase: possible role of the substrate "propeptide" as an intracellular recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Suttie, J W; Hoskins, J A; Engelke, J; Hopfgartner, A; Ehrlich, H; Bang, N U; Belagaje, R M; Schoner, B; Long, G L

    1987-01-01

    The liver microsomal vitamin K-dependent carboxylase catalyzes the posttranslational conversion of specific glutamate residues to gamma-carboxyglutamate residues in a limited number of proteins. A number of these proteins have been shown to contain a homologous basic amino acid-rich "propeptide" between the leader sequence and the amino terminus of the mature protein. Plasmids encoding protein C, a vitamin K-dependent protein, containing or lacking a propeptide region were constructed and the protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein products were assayed as substrates in an in vitro vitamin K-dependent carboxylase system. Only proteins containing a propeptide region were substrates for the enzyme. These data support the hypothesis that this sequence of the primary gene product is an important recognition site for this processing enzyme. PMID:3543932

  5. Allosteric modulation of ligand binding to [3H](+)pentazocine-defined sigma recognition sites by phenytoin.

    PubMed

    DeHaven-Hudkins, D L; Ford-Rice, F Y; Allen, J T; Hudkins, R L

    1993-01-01

    The allosteric modulation of sigma recognition sites by phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin) has been demonstrated by the ability of phenytoin to stimulate binding of various [3H] sigma ligands, as well as to slow dissociation from sigma sites and to shift sigma sites from a low- to a high-affinity state. Phenytoin stimulated the binding of the sigma 1- selective ligand [3H](+)pentazocine in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of binding at a final concentration of 250 microM phenytoin was associated with a decrease in the KD. The affinities of the sigma reference compounds caramiphen, dextromethorphan, dextrophan, (+)3-PPP and (+)SKF-10,047 were three- to eight-fold higher, while the affinities of benzetimide, BMY-14802, carbetapentane, DTG and haloperidol were unchanged in the presence of 250 microM phenytoin. The relative sensitivity of sigma compounds to allosteric modulation by phenytoin is not a property of all sigma ligands, and may provide an in vitro basis for distinguishing actions of sigma compounds and predicting sigma effects in vivo. PMID:8515681

  6. Recognition of AT-Rich DNA Binding Sites by the MogR Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Aimee; Higgins, Darren E.; Panne, Daniel

    2009-07-22

    The MogR transcriptional repressor of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes recognizes AT-rich binding sites in promoters of flagellar genes to downregulate flagellar gene expression during infection. We describe here the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of MogR bound to the recognition sequence 5' ATTTTTTAAAAAAAT 3' present within the flaA promoter region. Our structure shows that MogR binds as a dimer. Each half-site is recognized in the major groove by a helix-turn-helix motif and in the minor groove by a loop from the symmetry-related molecule, resulting in a 'crossover' binding mode. This oversampling through minor groove interactions is important for specificity. The MogR binding site has structural features of A-tract DNA and is bent by approximately 52 degrees away from the dimer. The structure explains how MogR achieves binding specificity in the AT-rich genome of L. monocytogenes and explains the evolutionary conservation of A-tract sequence elements within promoter regions of MogR-regulated flagellar genes.

  7. Toward an Understanding of Agonist Binding to Human Orexin-1 and Orexin-2 Receptors with G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Modeling and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) Orexin-1 (OX1) and Orexin-2 (OX2) are located predominantly in the brain and are linked to a range of different physiological functions, including the control of feeding, energy metabolism, modulation of neuro-endocrine function, and regulation of the sleep–wake cycle. The natural agonists for OX1 and OX2 are two neuropeptides, Orexin-A and Orexin-B, which have activity at both receptors. Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) has been reported on both the receptors and the peptides and has provided important insight into key features responsible for agonist activity. However, the structural interpretation of how these data are linked together is still lacking. In this work, we produced and used SDM data, homology modeling followed by MD simulation, and ensemble-flexible docking to generate binding poses of the Orexin peptides in the OX receptors to rationalize the SDM data. We also developed a protein pairwise similarity comparing method (ProS) and a GPCR-likeness assessment score (GLAS) to explore the structural data generated within a molecular dynamics simulation and to help distinguish between different GPCR substates. The results demonstrate how these newly developed methods of structural assessment for GPCRs can be used to provide a working model of neuropeptide–Orexin receptor interaction. PMID:24144388

  8. A Phase 3 Placebo-Controlled, Double Blind, Multi-Site Trial of the alpha-2-adrenergic Agonist, Lofexidine, for Opioid Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Elmer; Miotto, Karen; Akerele, Evaristo; Montgomery, Ann; Elkashef, Ahmed; Walsh, Robert; Montoya, Ivan; Fischman, Marian W.; Collins, Joseph; McSherry, Frances; Boardman, Kathy; Davies, David K.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Ling, Walter; Kleber, Herbert; Herman, Barbara H.

    2008-01-01

    Context Lofexidine is an alpha-2-A noradrenergic receptor agonist that is approved in the United Kingdom for the treatment of opioid withdrawal symptoms. Lofexidine has been reported to have more significant effects on decreasing opioid withdrawal symptoms with less hypotension than clonidine. Objective To demonstrate that lofexidine is well tolerated and effective in the alleviation of observationally-defined opioid withdrawal symptoms in opioid dependent individuals undergoing medically supervised opioid detoxification as compared to placebo. Design An inpatient, Phase 3, placebo-controlled, double blind, randomized multi-site trial with three phases: (1) Opioid Agonist Stabilization Phase (days 1–3), (2) Detoxification/Medication or Placebo Phase (days 4–8), and (3) Post Detoxification/Medication Phase (days 9–11). Subjects Sixty-eight opioid dependent subjects were enrolled at three sites with 35 randomized to lofexidine and 33 to placebo. Main Outcome Measure Modified Himmelsbach Opiate Withdrawal Scale (MHOWS) on study day 5 (2nd opioid detoxification treatment day). Results Due to significant findings, the study was terminated early. On the study day 5 MHOWS, subjects treated with lofexidine had significantly lower scores (equating to fewer/less severe withdrawal symptoms) than placebo subjects (Least squares means 19.5 ± 2.1 versus 30.9 ± 2.7; p=0.0019). Lofexidine subjects had significantly better retention in treatment than placebo subjects (38.2% versus 15.2%; Log rank test p=0.01). Conclusions Lofexidine is well tolerated and more efficacious than placebo for reducing opioid withdrawal symptoms in inpatients undergoing medically supervised opioid detoxification. Trial Registration trial registry name A Phase 3 Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Multi-Site Trial of Lofexidine for Opiate Withdrawal, registration number NCT00032942, URL for the registry http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00032942?order=4. PMID:18508207

  9. Mutations within the agonist-binding site convert the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor into a Zn2+-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Grudzinska, Joanna; Schumann, Tanja; Schemm, Rudolf; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2008-01-01

    The divalent cation Zn2+ has been shown to regulate inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS by affecting the activation of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR). In spinal neurons and cells expressing recombinant GlyRs, low micromolar (<10 microM) concentrations of Zn2+ enhance glycine currents, whereas higher concentrations (>10 microM) have an inhibitory effect. Mutational studies have localized the Zn2+ binding sites mediating allosteric potentiation and inhibition of GlyRs in distinct regions of the N-terminal extracellular domain of the GlyR alpha-subunits. Here, we examined the Zn2+ sensitivity of different mutations within the agonist binding site of the homomeric alpha(1)-subunit GlyR upon heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. This revealed that six substitutions within the ligand-binding pocket result in a total loss of Zn2+ inhibition. Furthermore, substitution of the positively charged residues arginine 65 and arginine 131 by alanine (alpha(1)(R65A), alpha(1)(R131A), or of the aromatic residue phenylalanine 207 by histidine (alpha(1)(F207H)), converted the alpha(1) GlyR into a chloride channel that was activated by Zn2+ alone. Dose-response analysis of the alpha(1)(F207H) GlyR disclosed an EC(50) value of 1.2 microM for Zn2+ activation; concomitantly the apparent glycine affinity was 1000-fold reduced. Thus, single point mutations within the agonist-binding site of the alpha(1) subunit convert the inhibitory GlyR from a glycine-gated into a selectively Zn2+-activated chloride channel. This might be exploited for the design of metal-specific biosensors by modeling-assisted mutagenesis. PMID:18690053

  10. Combinatorial targeting of ribbon–helix–helix artificial transcription factors to chimeric recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Zampini, Massimiliano; Hayes, Finbarr

    2012-01-01

    Artificial transcription factors (ATFs) are potent synthetic biology tools for modulating endogenous gene expression and precision genome editing. The ribbon–helix–helix (RHH) superfamily of transcription factors are widespread in bacteria and archaea. The principal DNA binding determinant in this family comprises a two-stranded antiparallel β-sheet (ribbons) in which a pair of eight-residue motifs insert into the major groove. Here, we demonstrate that ribbons of divergent RHH proteins are compact and portable elements that can be grafted into a common α-helical scaffold producing active ATFs. Hybrid proteins cooperatively recognize DNA sites possessing core tetramer boxes whose functional spacing is dictated by interactions between the α-helical backbones. These interactions also promote combinatorial binding of chimeras with different transplanted ribbons, but identical backbones, to synthetic sites bearing cognate boxes for each protein either in vitro or in vivo. The composite assembly of interacting hybrid proteins offers potential advantages associated with combinatorial approaches to DNA recognition compared with ATFs that involve binding of a single protein. Moreover, the new class of RHH ATFs may be utilized to re-engineer transcriptional circuits, or may be enhanced with affinity tags, fluorescent moieties or other elements for targeted genome marking and manipulation in bacteria and archaea. PMID:22492712

  11. Characterization of beta-glucan recognition site on C-type lectin, dectin 1.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Takashi; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Aketagawa, Jun; Tanaka, Shigenori; Ohno, Naohito

    2004-07-01

    Dectin 1 is a mammalian cell surface receptor for (1-->3)-beta-d-glucans. Since (1-->3)-beta-d-glucans are commonly present on fungal cell walls, it has been suggested that dectin 1 is important for recognizing fungal invasion. In this study we tried to deduce the amino acid residues in dectin 1 responsible for beta-glucan recognition. HEK293 cells transfected with mouse dectin 1 cDNA could bind to a gel-forming (1-->3)-beta-d-glucan, schizophyllan (SPG). The binding of SPG to a dectin 1 transfectant was inhibited by pretreatment with other beta-glucans having a (1-->3)-beta-d-glucosyl linkage but not by pretreatment with alpha-glucans. Dectin 1 has a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) consisting of six cysteine residues that are highly conserved in C-type lectins. We prepared 32 point mutants with mutations in the CRD and analyzed their binding to SPG. Mutations at Trp(221) and His(223) resulted in decreased binding to beta-glucan. Monoclonal antibody 4B2, a dectin- 1 monoclonal antibody which had a blocking effect on the beta-glucan interaction, completely failed to bind the dectin-1 mutant W221A. A mutant with mutations in Trp(221) and His(223) did not have a collaborative effect on Toll-like receptor 2-mediated cellular activation in response to zymosan. These amino acid residues are distinct from residues in other sugar-recognizing peptide sequences of typical C-type lectins. These results suggest that the amino acid sequence W221-I222-H223 is critical for formation of a beta-glucan binding site in the CRD of dectin 1. PMID:15213161

  12. Suppression of spreading depolarization and stabilization of dendritic spines by GLYX-13, an NMDA receptor glycine-site functional partial agonist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Shuttleworth, C William; Moskal, Joseph R; Stanton, Patric K

    2015-11-01

    Cortical spreading depolarization (SD) is a slow self-propagating wave of mass cellular depolarization in brain tissue, thought to be the underlying cause of migraine scintillating scotoma and aura, and associated with stroke, traumatic brain injury, and termination of status epilepticus. The N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor (NMDAR), which gates influx of calcium and is an important trigger of long-term synaptic plasticity, is also a contributor to the initiation and propagation of SD. The current study tested the potential of pharmacological modulation of NMDAR activity through the obligatory co-agonist binding site, to suppress the initiation of SD, and modulate the effects of SD on dendritic spine morphology, in in vitro hippocampal slices. A novel NMDAR functional glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, sometimes completely prevented the induction of SD and consistently slowed its rate of propagation. The passage of SD through the hippocampal CA1 region produced a rapid retraction of dendritic spines which reversed after neuronal depolarization had recovered. GLYX-13 improved the rate and extent of return of dendritic spines to their original sizes and locations following SD, suggesting that NMDAR modulators can protect synaptic connections in the brain from structural alterations elicited by SD. These data indicate that NMDAR modulation to renormalize activity may be an effective new treatment strategy for suppression or amelioration of the contribution of SD to short and long-term symptoms of migraine attacks, as well as the effects of SD on tissue damaged by stroke or traumatic brain injury. PMID:26244282

  13. Site-specific basicities regulate molecular recognition in receptor binding: in silico docking of thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gergő; Baska, Ferenc; Schretner, András; Rácz, Akos; Noszál, Béla

    2013-09-01

    Interactions between thyroid hormone α and β receptors and the eight protonation microspecies of each of the main thyroid hormones (thyroxine, liothyronine, and reverse liothyronine) were investigated and quantitated by molecular modeling. Flexible docking of the various protonation forms of thyroid hormones and high-affinity thyromimetics to the two thyroid receptors was carried out. In this method the role of the ionization state of each basic site could be studied in the composite process of molecular recognition. Our results quantitate at the molecular level how the ionization state and the charge distribution influence the protein binding. The anionic form of the carboxyl group (i.e., carboxylate site) is essential for protein binding, whereas the protonated form of amino group worsens the binding. The protonation state of the phenolate plays a less important role in the receptor affinity; its protonation, however, alters the electron density and the concomitant stacking propensity of the aromatic rings, resulting in a different binding score. The combined results of docking and microspeciation studies show that microspecies with the highest concentration at the pH of blood are not the strongest binding ones. The calculated binding free energy values can be well interpreted in terms of the interactions between the actual sites of the microspecies and the receptor amino acids. Our docking results were validated and compared with biological data from the literature. Since the thyroid hormone receptors influence several physiologic functions, such as metabolic rate, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and heart frequency, our binding results provide a molecular basis for drug design and development in related therapeutic indications. PMID:23907234

  14. A Novel Loop Domain in Superantigens Extends Their T Cell Receptor Recognition Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther,S.; Varma, A.; Moza, B.; Kasper, K.; Wyatt, A.; Zhu, P.; Nur-ur Rahman, A.; Li, Y.; Mariuzza, R.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Superantigens (SAGs) interact with host immune receptors to induce a massive release of inflammatory cytokines that can lead to toxic shock syndrome and death. Bacterial SAGs can be classified into five distinct evolutionary groups. Group V SAGs are characterized by the {alpha}3-{beta}8 loop, a unique {approx}15 amino acid residue extension that is required for optimal T cell activation. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of the group V SAG staphylococcal enterotoxin K (SEK) alone and in complex with the TCR hV{beta}5.1 domain. SEK adopts a unique TCR binding orientation relative to other SAG-TCR complexes, which results in the {alpha}3-{beta}8 loop contacting the apical loop of framework region 4, thereby extending the known TCR recognition site of SAGs. These interactions are absolutely required for TCR binding and T cell activation by SEK, and dictate the TCR V{beta} domain specificity of SEK and other group V SAGs.

  15. The Drosophila DPP signal is produced by cleavage of its proprotein at evolutionary diversified furin-recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Künnapuu, Jaana; Björkgren, Ida; Shimmi, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Maturation of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) requires cleavage of their precursor proteins by furin-type proprotein convertases. Here, we find that cleavage sites of the BMP2/4/decapentaplegic (DPP) subfamily have been evolutionary diversified and can be categorized into 4 different types. Cnidaria BMP2/4/DPP is considered to be a prototype containing only 1 furin site. Bilateria BMP2/4/DPP acquired an additional cleavage site with either the combination of minimal–optimal or optimal–optimal furin sites. DPPs belonging to Diptera, such as Drosophila and mosquito, and Lepidoptera of silkworm contain a third cleavage site between the 2 optimal furin sites. We studied how the 3 furin sites (FSI–III) of Drosophila DPP coordinate maturation of ligands and contribute to signals in vivo. Combining mutational analysis of furin-recognition sites and RNAi experiments, we found that the Drosophila DPP precursor is initially cleaved at an upstream furin-recognition site (FSII), with consequent cleavages at 2 furin sites (FSI and FSIII). Both Dfurin1 and Dfurin2 are involved in the processing of DPP proproteins. Biochemical and genetic analyses using cleavage mutants of DPP suggest the first cleavage at FSII to be critical and sufficient for long-range DPP signaling. Our data suggest that the Drosophila DPP precursor is cleaved in a different manner from vertebrate BMP4 even though they are functional orthologs. This indicates that the furin-cleavage sites in BMP2/4/DPP precursors are tolerant to mutations acquired through evolution and have adapted to different systems in diversified species. PMID:19433798

  16. A specific taurine recognition site in the rabbit brain is responsible for taurine effects on thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Frosini, Maria; Sesti, Casilde; Saponara, Simona; Ricci, Lorenzo; Valoti, Massimo; Palmi, Mitri; Machetti, Fabrizio; Sgaragli, Giampietro

    2003-01-01

    Taurine and GABA are recognized as endogenous cryogens. In a previous study, some structural analogues of taurine, namely 6-aminomethyl-3-methyl-4H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxide (TAG), 2-aminoethylarsonic (AEA), 2-hydroxyethanesulfonic (ISE) and (±)cis-2-aminocyclohexane sulfonic acids (CAHS) have been shown to displace [3H]taurine binding from rabbit brain synaptic membrane preparations, without interacting either with GABA-ergic systems, nor with taurine uptake mechanism, thus behaving like direct taurinergic agents. To answer the question whether the role of taurine as an endogenous cryogen depends on the activation of GABA receptors or that of specific taurine receptor(s), taurine or the above structural analogues were injected intracerebroventricularly in conscious, restrained rabbits singularly or in combination and their effects on rectal (RT)- and ear–skin temperature and gross motor behavior (GMB) were monitored. Taurine (1.2 × 10−6–4.8 × 10−5 mol) induced a dose-related hypothermia, vasodilation at ear vascular bed and inhibition of GMB. CAHS, at the highest dose tested (4.8 × 10−5 mol) induced a taurine-like effect either on RT or GMB. On the contrary ISE, injected at the same doses of taurine, induced a dose-related hyperthermia, vasoconstriction and excitation of GMB. AEA and TAG caused a dose-related hyperthermia, but at doses higher than 1.2 × 10−7 mol caused death within 24 h after treatment. CAHS (4.8 × 10−5 mol) antagonized the hyperthermic effect induced by TAG (1.2 × 10−6 mol), AEA (1.2 × 10−8 mol) or ISE (4.8 × 10−5 mol). In conclusion, these findings may indicate the existence of a recognition site specific for taurine, responsible for its effects on thermoregulation. PMID:12788808

  17. Structural characteristics of the recognition site for cholinergic ligands in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from squid optical ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Plyashkevich, Yu.G.; Demushkin, V.P.

    1986-01-20

    The influence of chemical modification on the parameters of the binding of cholinergic ligands by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of squid optical ganglia was investigated. The presence of two subpopulations of recognition sites, differing in the composition of the groups contained in them, was detected. It was established with high probability that subpopulation I contains arginine and tyrosine residues and a carboxyl group while subpopulation II contains an amino group, a thyrosine residue, and a carboxyl group. Moreover, in both subpopulations there is an amino group important only for the binding of tubocurarin. On the basis of the results obtained, a model of the recognition sites for cholinergic ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of squid optical ganglia is proposed.

  18. Pharmacological and Therapeutic Effects of A3 Adenosine Receptor (A3AR) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Pnina; Bar-Yehuda, Sara; Liang, Bruce T.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    The Gi-coupled A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) mediates anti-inflammatory, anticancer and anti-ischemic protective effects. The receptor is overexpressed in inflammatory and cancer cells, while low expression is found in normal cells, rendering the A3AR as a potential therapeutic target. Highly selective A3AR agonists have been synthesized and molecular recognition in the binding site has been characterized. The present review summarizes preclinical and clinical human studies demonstrating that A3AR agonists induce specific anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects via a molecular mechanism that entails modulation of the Wnt and the NF-κB signal transduction pathways. Currently, A3AR agonists are being developed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis; ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye syndrome and glaucoma; liver diseases such as hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatitis. PMID:22033198

  19. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the. gamma. -carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, D.G.; Sudmeier, J.L.; Bachovchin, W.W.; Kanagy, C.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. )

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational {gamma}-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing {alpha}-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues {minus}13 to {minus}3 form an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site, four residues ({minus}18, {minus}17, {minus}16, and {minus}15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue ({minus}10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic {alpha}-helix in the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site is discussed.

  20. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the gamma-carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanford, D G; Kanagy, C; Sudmeier, J L; Furie, B C; Furie, B; Bachovchin, W W

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a gamma-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational gamma-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing alpha-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues -13 to -3 form an amphipathic alpha-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5 degrees C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the gamma-carboxylation recognition site, four residues (-18, -17, -16, and -15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue (-10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic alpha-helix in the gamma-carboxylation recognition site is discussed. PMID:1911775

  1. Renal responses produced by microinjection of the kappa opioid receptor agonist, U50-488H, into sites within the rat lamina terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Cynthia; Fortepiani, Lourdes; Nguyen, Tin; Rangel, Yolanda; Strong, Randy; Gottlieb, Helmut B

    2015-01-01

    Activation of central kappa opioid receptors (KOR) has been demonstrated to produce marked free water diuresis with a concurrent increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). This study investigated the cardiovascular (CV) and renal effects evoked by central activation of KOR in two lamina terminalis sites, the median preoptic area (MPA) and anterolateral division of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BST). Rats anesthetized with urethane alpha-chloralose were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure, heart rate, RSNA, and urine output (V). Rats were infused with isotonic saline (25 μL/min) and urine samples were collected during two 10-min control periods and six consecutive 10-min experimental periods following microinjection of vehicle, U50-448H (U50, KOR agonist) alone or norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI, KOR antagonist) plus U50. Microinjection of U50 into the BST increased V (peak at 30 min, 84.8 ± 12.9 μL/min) as compared to its respective control, vehicle, or nor-BNI plus U50. This diuretic effect occurred without any significant changes in CV parameters, RSNA, or urinary sodium excretion. In contrast, U50 injection into the MPA significantly increased RSNA (peak at 20 mins: 129 ± 9.9) without increasing the other parameters. This study demonstrated novel sites through which activation of KOR selectively increases V and RSNA. The ability of U50 to increase V without affecting sodium excretion and RSNA raises the possibility that LT neurons could be an important substrate through which drugs targeting KOR could selectively facilitate water excretion in sodium-retaining diseases such as congestive heart failure. PMID:26038693

  2. Renal responses produced by microinjection of the kappa opioid receptor agonist, U50-488H, into sites within the rat lamina terminalis.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Cynthia; Fortepiani, Lourdes; Nguyen, Tin; Rangel, Yolanda; Strong, Randy; Gottlieb, Helmut B

    2015-03-01

    Activation of central kappa opioid receptors (KOR) has been demonstrated to produce marked free water diuresis with a concurrent increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). This study investigated the cardiovascular (CV) and renal effects evoked by central activation of KOR in two lamina terminalis sites, the median preoptic area (MPA) and anterolateral division of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BST). Rats anesthetized with urethane alpha-chloralose were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure, heart rate, RSNA, and urine output (V). Rats were infused with isotonic saline (25 μL/min) and urine samples were collected during two 10-min control periods and six consecutive 10-min experimental periods following microinjection of vehicle, U50-448H (U50, KOR agonist) alone or norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI, KOR antagonist) plus U50. Microinjection of U50 into the BST increased V (peak at 30 min, 84.8 ± 12.9 μL/min) as compared to its respective control, vehicle, or nor-BNI plus U50. This diuretic effect occurred without any significant changes in CV parameters, RSNA, or urinary sodium excretion. In contrast, U50 injection into the MPA significantly increased RSNA (peak at 20 mins: 129 ± 9.9) without increasing the other parameters. This study demonstrated novel sites through which activation of KOR selectively increases V and RSNA. The ability of U50 to increase V without affecting sodium excretion and RSNA raises the possibility that LT neurons could be an important substrate through which drugs targeting KOR could selectively facilitate water excretion in sodium-retaining diseases such as congestive heart failure. PMID:26038693

  3. Functional role for the angiotensin II receptor (AT1A) 3'-untranslated region in determining cellular responses to agonist: evidence for recognition by RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Thekkumkara, T J; Thomas, W G; Motel, T J; Baker, K M

    1998-01-01

    cells with and without the 3'-UTR revealed that the normally unstable AT1A receptor mRNA became highly stable by removing its 3'-UTR, identifying a role for the 3'-UTR in mRNA destabilization. Interestingly, both cells express similar levels of receptors at the cell surface, suggesting that the 3'-UTR is also involved in the efficient translation and/or translocation of the receptor protein to the plasma membrane. We hypothesized that these 3'-UTR-mediated functions of the receptor are regulated by RNA-binding proteins. To identify possible RNA-binding proteins for the AT1A 3'-UTR, cellular extracts were prepared from parental CHO-K1 cells and 3'-UTR-binding assays, electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and UV crosslinking studies were performed. A major cellular protein of 55 kDa was identified, which specifically interacted with the 3'-UTR. Our data suggest that the 3'-UTR of the AT1A can control specific receptor functions, perhaps via selective recognition of the 3'-UTR by RNA-binding proteins. PMID:9425107

  4. Interspecific aggression and character displacement of competitor recognition in Hetaerina damselflies

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Grether, Gregory F.

    2010-01-01

    In zones of sympatry between closely related species, species recognition errors in a competitive context can cause character displacement in agonistic signals and competitor recognition functions, just as species recognition errors in a mating context can cause character displacement in mating signals and mate recognition. These two processes are difficult to distinguish because the same traits can serve as both agonistic and mating signals. One solution is to test for sympatric shifts in recognition functions. We studied competitor recognition in Hetaerina damselflies by challenging territory holders with live tethered conspecific and heterospecific intruders. Heterospecific intruders elicited less aggression than conspecific intruders in species pairs with dissimilar wing coloration (H. occisa/H. titia, H. americana/H. titia) but not in species pairs with similar wing coloration (H. occisa/H. cruentata, H. americana/H. cruentata). Natural variation in the area of black wing pigmentation on H. titia intruders correlated negatively with heterospecific aggression. To directly examine the role of wing coloration, we blackened the wings of H. occisa or H. americana intruders and measured responses of conspecific territory holders. This treatment reduced territorial aggression at multiple sites where H. titia is present, but not at allopatric sites. These results provide strong evidence for agonistic character displacement. PMID:19864290

  5. Interspecific aggression and character displacement of competitor recognition in Hetaerina damselflies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher N; Grether, Gregory F

    2010-02-22

    In zones of sympatry between closely related species, species recognition errors in a competitive context can cause character displacement in agonistic signals and competitor recognition functions, just as species recognition errors in a mating context can cause character displacement in mating signals and mate recognition. These two processes are difficult to distinguish because the same traits can serve as both agonistic and mating signals. One solution is to test for sympatric shifts in recognition functions. We studied competitor recognition in Hetaerina damselflies by challenging territory holders with live tethered conspecific and heterospecific intruders. Heterospecific intruders elicited less aggression than conspecific intruders in species pairs with dissimilar wing coloration (H. occisa/H. titia, H. americana/H. titia) but not in species pairs with similar wing coloration (H. occisa/H. cruentata, H. americana/H. cruentata). Natural variation in the area of black wing pigmentation on H. titia intruders correlated negatively with heterospecific aggression. To directly examine the role of wing coloration, we blackened the wings of H. occisa or H. americana intruders and measured responses of conspecific territory holders. This treatment reduced territorial aggression at multiple sites where H. titia is present, but not at allopatric sites. These results provide strong evidence for agonistic character displacement. PMID:19864290

  6. Purification and characterization of (-)(/sup 125/I)hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine, an adenosine R-site agonist radioligand and theoretical analysis of mixed stereoisomer radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, J.

    1984-11-01

    (-)-N6-(R-4-Hydroxyphenylisopropyl)adenosine (HPIA) was iodinated with NaI and trace /sup 125/I. Mono- and diiodinated reaction products and the starting material were separated by high pressure liquid chromatography and the structures of the reaction products were verified by NMR. (-)-N6-(R-Phenylisopropyl)adenosine (PIA), IHPIA, and I2HPIA decreased rat atrial contractility with ED50 values of 24, 28, and 33 nM, respectively. The contractile effects of these compounds were competitively blocked by theophylline (KI . 7.9 microM), but were not affected by adenosine deaminase. IHPIA also inhibited (-)isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in adipocytes with an ED50 (10 nM) and to an extent (83%) nearly identical to PIA. (/sup 125/I)HPIA prepared using carrier-free /sup 125/I bound to adenosine receptors on membranes from rat cerebral cortex, adipocyte ghosts, and heart ventricles. Binding was inhibited stereospecifically by PIA and by other adenosine analogues and alkylxanthines. The KD of (/sup 125/I)HPIA determined kinetically using brain membranes at 21 degrees was 0.94 nM in good agreement with the equilibrium determination of 1.94 nM. The density of adenosine receptors in brain membranes was found to be 871 fmol/mg of protein. When normalized to protein, the density of receptors in heart membranes and adipocyte ghosts, respectively, was found to be 39- and 2.3-fold less than in brain membranes. It was concluded that (/sup 125/I)HPIA can be rapidly synthesized and purified, binds to adenosine R-sites and is an agonist radioligand resistant to adenosine deaminase. Computer modeling of the equilibrium binding resulting from the use of mixed stereoisomers of a radioligand indicates that the combined use of (-)(/sup 125/I)HPIA and (+)(/sup 125/I)HPIA would result in the generation of nonlinear Scatchard plots.

  7. Oviposition Site-Selection by Bactrocera dorsalis Is Mediated through an Innate Recognition Template Tuned to γ-Octalactone

    PubMed Central

    Pagadala Damodaram, Kamala Jayanthi; Kempraj, Vivek; Aurade, Ravindra Mahadappa; Venkataramanappa, Ravindra Kothapalli; Nandagopal, Bakthavatsalam; Verghese, Abraham; Bruce, Toby

    2014-01-01

    Innate recognition templates (IRTs) in insects are developed through many years of evolution. Here we investigated olfactory cues mediating oviposition behavior in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, and their role in triggering an IRT for oviposition site recognition. Behavioral assays with electrophysiologically active compounds from a preferred host, mango, revealed that one of the volatiles tested, γ-octalactone, had a powerful effect in eliciting oviposition by gravid B. dorsalis females. Electrophysiological responses were obtained and flies clearly differentiated between treated and untreated substrates over a wide range of concentrations of γ-octalactone. It triggered an innate response in flies, overriding inputs from other modalities required for oviposition site evaluation. A complex blend of mango volatiles not containing γ-octalactone elicited low levels of oviposition, whereas γ-octalactone alone elicited more oviposition response. Naïve flies with different rearing histories showed similar responses to γ-octalactone. Taken together, these results indicate that oviposition site selection in B. dorsalis is mediated through an IRT tuned to γ-octalactone. Our study provides empirical data on a cue underpinning innate behavior and may also find use in control operations against this invasive horticultural pest. PMID:24465690

  8. Bifunctional TaqII restriction endonuclease: redefining the prototype DNA recognition site and establishing the Fidelity Index for partial cleaving

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The TaqII enzyme is a member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family that we propounded previously within Type IIS restriction endonucleases, containing related thermophilic bifunctional endonucleases-methyltransferases from various Thermus sp.: TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI and TsoI. These enzymes show significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities, a rare phenomenon among restriction endonucleases, along with similarities in biochemical properties, molecular size, DNA recognition sequences and cleavage sites. They also feature some characteristics of Types I and III. Results Barker et al. reported the Type IIS/IIC restriction endonuclease TaqII as recognizing two distinct cognate site variants (5'-GACCGA-3' and 5'-CACCCA-3') while cleaving 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We used four independent methods, namely, shotgun cloning and sequencing, restriction pattern analysis, digestion of particular custom substrates and GeneScan analysis, to demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme recognizes only 5'-GACCGA-3' sites and cleaves 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We did not observe any 5'-CACCCA-3' cleavage under a variety of conditions and site arrangements tested. We also characterized the enzyme biochemically and established new digestion conditions optimal for practical enzyme applications. Finally, we developed and propose a new version of the Fidelity Index - the Fidelity Index for Partial Cleavage (FI-PC). Conclusions The DNA recognition sequence of the bifunctional prototype TaqII endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus has been redefined as recognizing only 5'-GACCGA-3' cognate sites. The reaction conditions (pH and salt concentrations) were designed either to minimize (pH = 8.0 and 10 mM ammonium sulphate) or to enhance star activity (pH = 6.0 and no salt). Redefinition of the recognition site and reaction conditions makes this prototype endonuclease a useful tool for DNA manipulation; as yet, this enzyme has no practical

  9. A novel 3′ splice site recognition by the two zinc fingers in the U2AF small subunit

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hisashi; Park, Sam-Yong; Oda, Takashi; Akiyoshi, Taeko; Sato, Mamoru; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tsuda, Kengo; Kuwasako, Kanako; Unzai, Satoru; Muto, Yutaka; Urano, Takeshi; Obayashi, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The pre-mRNA splicing reaction of eukaryotic cells has to be carried out extremely accurately, as failure to recognize the splice sites correctly causes serious disease. The small subunit of the U2AF heterodimer is essential for the determination of 3′ splice sites in pre-mRNA splicing, and several single-residue mutations of the U2AF small subunit cause severe disorders such as myelodysplastic syndromes. However, the mechanism of RNA recognition is poorly understood. Here we solved the crystal structure of the U2AF small subunit (U2AF23) from fission yeast, consisting of an RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain flanked by two conserved CCCH-type zinc fingers (ZFs). The two ZFs are positioned side by side on the β sheet of the RRM domain. Further mutational analysis revealed that the ZFs bind cooperatively to the target RNA sequence, but the RRM domain acts simply as a scaffold to organize the ZFs and does not itself contact the RNA directly. This completely novel and unexpected mode of RNA-binding mechanism by the U2AF small subunit sheds light on splicing errors caused by mutations of this highly conserved protein. PMID:26215567

  10. Preferential affinity of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quazepam for type I benzodiazepine recognition sites in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Corda, M.G.; Giorgi, O.; Longoni, B.; Ongini, E.; Montaldo, S.; Biggio, G.

    1988-01-01

    The hypnotic drug quazepam and its active metabolite 2-oxo-quazepam (2-oxo-quaz) are two benzodiazepines (BZ) containing a trifluoroethyl moiety on the ring nitrogen at position 1, characterized by their preferential affinity for Type I BZ recognition sites. In the present study we characterized the binding of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz in discrete areas of the human brain. Saturation analysis demonstrated specific and saturable binding of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz to membrane preparations from human cerebellum. Hill plot analysis of displacement curves of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding by 2-oxo-quaz yielded Hill coefficients of approximately 1 in the cerebellum and significantly less than 1 in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, thalamus and pons. Self and cross displacement curves for /sup 3/H-FNT and /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz binding in these brain areas indicated that 2-oxo-quaz binds with different affinities to two populations of binding sites. High affinity binding sites were more abundant in the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus, whereas low affinity sites were predominant in the caudate nucleus and pons. Competition studies of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz and /sup 3/H-FNT using unlabelled ligands indicated that compounds which preferentially bind to Type I sites are more potent at displacing /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz than /sup 3/H-FNT from cerebral cortex membrane preparations. 26 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Transforming the recognition site of 4-hydroxyaniline into 4-methoxyaniline grafted onto a BODIPY core switches the selective detection of peroxynitrite to hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunchang; An, Jiancai; Zhou, Li; Fei, Qiang; Wang, Feiyi; Tan, Jie; Shi, Ben; Wang, Rui; Guo, Zhiqian; Zhu, Wei-Hong

    2016-02-01

    Two novel probes were designed, sharing the same BODIPY core but differing only by a minimized variation in the recognition site from 4-hydroxyaniline into 4-methoxyaniline. Such a small change in the reaction site could switch the selective detection from peroxynitrite to HOCl. Undoubtedly, the new designed BODIPY core exhibits valuable properties. PMID:26688579

  12. DNA abasic site-directed formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters for selective nucleobase recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kun; Cui, Qinghua; Liu, Guiying; Wu, Fei; Xu, Shujuan; Shao, Yong

    2011-07-01

    DNA single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection has attracted much attention due to mutation related diseases. Various methods for SNP detection have been proposed and many are already in use. Here, we find that the abasic site (AP site) in the DNA duplex can be developed as a capping scaffold for the generation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). As a proof of concept, the DNA sequences from fragments near codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53 were used as a model for SNP detection by in situ formed Ag NCs. The formation of fluorescent Ag NCs in the AP site-containing DNA duplex is highly selective for cytosine facing the AP site and guanines flanking the site and can be employed in situ as readout for SNP detection. The fluorescent signal-on sensing for SNP based on this inorganic fluorophore is substantially advantageous over the previously reported signal-off responses using low-molecular-weight organic ligands. The strong dependence of fluorescent Ag NC formation on the sequences surrounding the AP site was successfully used to identify mutations in codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53. We anticipate that this approach will be employed to develop a practical SNP detection method by locating an AP site toward the midway cytosine in a target strand containing more than three consecutive cytosines.

  13. Site-specific DNA binding of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe origin recognition complex is determined by the Orc4 subunit.

    PubMed

    Kong, D; DePamphilis, M L

    2001-12-01

    The mechanism by which origin recognition complexes (ORCs) identify replication origins was investigated using purified Orc proteins from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Orc4p alone bound tightly and specifically to several sites within S. pombe replication origins that are genetically required for origin activity. These sites consisted of clusters of A or T residues on one strand but were devoid of either alternating A and T residues or GC-rich sequences. Addition of a complex consisting of Orc1, -2, -3, -5, and -6 proteins (ORC-5) altered neither Orc4p binding to origin DNA nor Orc4p protection of specific sequences. ORC-5 alone bound weakly and nonspecifically to DNA; strong binding required the presence of Orc4p. Under these conditions, all six subunits remained bound to chromatin isolated from each phase of the cell division cycle. These results reveal that the S. pombe ORC binds to multiple, specific sites within replication origins and that site selection, at least in vitro, is determined solely by the Orc4p subunit. PMID:11689699

  14. Accelerometry-based Recognition of the Placement Sites of a Wearable Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Andrea; Sabatini, Angelo M.; Intille, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes an automatic method to recognize the position of an accelerometer worn on five different parts of the body: ankle, thigh, hip, arm and wrist from raw accelerometer data. Automatic detection of body position of a wearable sensor would enable systems that allow users to wear sensors flexibly on different body parts or permit systems that need to automatically verify sensor placement. The two-stage location detection algorithm works by first detecting time periods during which candidates are walking (regardless of where the sensor is positioned). Then, assuming that the data refer to walking, the algorithm detects the position of the sensor. Algorithms were validated on a dataset that is substantially larger than in prior work, using a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation approach. Correct walking and placement recognition were obtained for 97.4% and 91.2% of classified data windows, respectively. PMID:26213528

  15. Structural basis for biomolecular recognition in overlapping binding sites in a diiron enzyme system

    PubMed Central

    Acheson, Justin F.; Bailey, Lucas J.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Fox, Brian G.

    2014-01-01

    Productive biomolecular recognition requires exquisite control of affinity and specificity. Accordingly, nature has devised many strategies to achieve proper binding interactions. Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases provide a fascinating example, where a diiron hydroxylase must reversibly interact with both ferredoxin and catalytic effector in order to achieve electron transfer and O2 activation during catalysis. Because these two accessory proteins have distinct structures, and because the hydroxylase-effector complex covers the entire surface closest to the hydroxylase diiron centre, how ferredoxin binds to the hydroxylase has been unclear. Here we present high-resolution structures of toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase complexed with its electron transfer ferredoxin and compare them with the hydroxylase-effector structure. These structures reveal that ferredoxin or effector protein binding produce different arrangements of conserved residues and customized interfaces on the hydroxylase in order to achieve different aspects of catalysis. PMID:25248368

  16. Affinity of pyridylalkylamines for nicotinic, muscarinic and histaminic recognition sites in brain tissue preparations.

    PubMed

    Repond, C; Pratt, J A; Stolerman, I P; Mayer, J M; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D; Testa, B

    1986-08-01

    The affinity of 15 regioisomeric and homologous pyridylalkylamines was examined in brain preparations for nicotinic, muscarinic, and H1-histaminic binding sites as labeled by [3H]-nicotine, [3H]-dexetimide and [3H]-mepyramine, respectively. Overall, the compounds show a clear selectivity for the nicotinic versus muscarinic binding sites, and a weak affinity for the H1-histaminic sites. Variations in affinity appear to be partly influenced by steric factors (such as position of attachment, length and rigidity of side-chain) and marginally by lipophilicity. PMID:3778556

  17. Frequent occurrence of recognition Site-like sequences in the restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Biro, Jan C; Biro, Josephine MK

    2004-01-01

    Background There are two different theories about the development of the genetic code. Woese suggested that it was developed in connection with the amino acid repertoire, while Crick argued that any connection between codons and amino acids is only the result of an "accident". This question is fundamental to understand the nature of specific protein-nucleic acid interactions. Results The nature of specific protein-nucleic acid interaction between restriction endonucleases (RE) and their recognition sequences (RS) was studied by bioinformatics methods. It was found that the frequency of 5–6 residue long RS-like oligonucleotides is unexpectedly high in the nucleic acid sequence of the corresponding RE (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001 respectively, n = 7). There is an extensive conservation of these RS-like sequences in RE isoschizomers. A review of the seven available crystallographic studies showed that the amino acids coded by codons that are subsets of recognition sequences were often closely located to the RS itself and they were in many cases directly adjacent to the codon-like triplets in the RS. Fifty-five examples of this codon-amino acid co-localization are found and analyzed, which represents 41.5% of total 132 amino acids which are localized within 8 Å distance to the C1' atoms in the DNA. The average distance between the closest atoms in the codons and amino acids is 5.5 +/- 0.2 Å (mean +/- S.E.M, n = 55), while the distance between the nitrogen and oxygen atoms of the co-localized molecules is significantly shorter, (3.4 +/- 0.2 Å, p < 0.001, n = 15), when positively charged amino acids are involved. This is indicating that an interaction between the nucleic- and amino acids might occur. Conclusion We interpret these results in favor of Woese and suggest that the genetic code is "rational" and there is a stereospecific relationship between the codes and the amino acids. PMID:15113406

  18. Loop recognition and copper-mediated disulfide reduction underpin metal site assembly of CuA in human cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Morgada, Marcos N; Abriata, Luciano A; Cefaro, Chiara; Gajda, Karolina; Banci, Lucia; Vila, Alejandro J

    2015-09-22

    Maturation of cytochrome oxidases is a complex process requiring assembly of several subunits and adequate uptake of the metal cofactors. Two orthologous Sco proteins (Sco1 and Sco2) are essential for the correct assembly of the dicopper CuA site in the human oxidase, but their function is not fully understood. Here, we report an in vitro biochemical study that shows that Sco1 is a metallochaperone that selectively transfers Cu(I) ions based on loop recognition, whereas Sco2 is a copper-dependent thiol reductase of the cysteine ligands in the oxidase. Copper binding to Sco2 is essential to elicit its redox function and as a guardian of the reduced state of its own cysteine residues in the oxidizing environment of the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). These results provide a detailed molecular mechanism for CuA assembly, suggesting that copper and redox homeostasis are intimately linked in the mitochondrion. PMID:26351686

  19. Evolutionary computation method for pattern recognition of cis-acting sites.

    PubMed

    Howard, Daniel; Benson, Karl

    2003-11-01

    This paper develops an evolutionary method that learns inductively to recognize the makeup and the position of very short consensus sequences, cis-acting sites, which are a typical feature of promoters in genomes. The method combines a Finite State Automata (FSA) and Genetic Programming (GP) to discover candidate promoter sequences in primary sequence data. An experiment measures the success of the method for promoter prediction in the human genome. This class of method can take large base pair jumps and this may enable it to process very long genomic sequences to discover gene specific cis-acting sites, and genes which are regulated together. PMID:14642656

  20. Phylogeographic evidence of cognate recognition site patterns and transformation efficiency differences in H. pylori: theory of strain dominance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori has diverged in parallel to its human host, leading to distinct phylogeographic populations. Recent evidence suggests that in the current human mixing in Latin America, European H. pylori (hpEurope) are increasingly dominant at the expense of Amerindian haplotypes (hspAmerind). This phenomenon might occur via DNA recombination, modulated by restriction-modification systems (RMS), in which differences in cognate recognition sites (CRS) and in active methylases will determine direction and frequency of gene flow. We hypothesized that genomes from hspAmerind strains that evolved from a small founder population have lost CRS for RMS and active methylases, promoting hpEurope’s DNA invasion. We determined the observed and expected frequencies of CRS for RMS in DNA from 7 H. pylori whole genomes and 110 multilocus sequences. We also measured the number of active methylases by resistance to in vitro digestion by 16 restriction enzymes of genomic DNA from 9 hpEurope and 9 hspAmerind strains, and determined the direction of DNA uptake in co-culture experiments of hspAmerind and hpEurope strains. Results Most of the CRS were underrepresented with consistency between whole genomes and multilocus sequences. Although neither the frequency of CRS nor the number of active methylases differ among the bacterial populations (average 8.6 ± 2.6), hspAmerind strains had a restriction profile distinct from that in hpEurope strains, with 15 recognition sites accounting for the differences. Amerindians strains also exhibited higher transformation rates than European strains, and were more susceptible to be subverted by larger DNA hpEurope-fragments than vice versa. Conclusions The geographical variation in the pattern of CRS provides evidence for ancestral differences in RMS representation and function, and the transformation findings support the hypothesis of Europeanization of the Amerindian strains in Latin America via DNA recombination. PMID:24050390

  1. Single-Stranded γPNAs for In Vivo Site-Specific Genome Editing via Watson-Crick Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bahal, Raman; Quijano, Elias; McNeer, Nicole Ali; Liu, Yanfeng; Bhunia, Dinesh C.; López-Giráldez, Francesco; Fields, Rachel J.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Ly, Danith H.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) facilitate gene editing by stimulating recombination of donor DNAs within genomic DNA via site-specific formation of altered helical structures that further stimulate DNA repair. However, PNAs designed for triplex formation are sequence restricted to homopurine sites. Herein we describe a novel strategy where next generation single-stranded gamma PNAs (γPNAs) containing miniPEG substitutions at the gamma position can target genomic DNA in mouse bone marrow at mixed-sequence sites to induce targeted gene editing. In addition to enhanced binding, γPNAs confer increased solubility and improved formulation into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles for efficient intracellular delivery. Single-stranded γPNAs induce targeted gene editing at frequencies of 0.8% in mouse bone marrow cells treated ex vivo and 0.1% in vivo via IV injection, without detectable toxicity. These results suggest that γPNAs may provide a new tool for induced gene editing based on Watson-Crick recognition without sequence restriction. PMID:25174576

  2. Increase in the Bmax of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A recognition sites in brain regions of mice receiving diazepam.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, P; Guidotti, A; Costa, E

    1984-01-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors were characterized in vivo by studying ex vivo the binding of [3H]muscimol to cerebellum, cortex, hippocampus, and corpus striatum of mice receiving intravenous injections of tracer doses of high-specific-activity (approximately equal to 30 Ci/mmol) [3H]muscimol. This ligand binds with high affinity (apparent Kd, 2-3 X 10(-9) M) to a single population of binding sites (apparent Bmax, 250-180 fmol per 10 mg of protein). Pharmacological studies using drugs that selectively bind to GABAA or GABAB receptors suggest that [3H]muscimol specifically labels a GABAA recognition site. Moreover, diazepam (1.5 mumol/kg, i.p.) increases the Bmax but fails to change the affinity of [3H]muscimol binding to different brain areas. This diazepam-elicited increase in Bmax is blocked in mice receiving the diazepam antagonist Ro 15-1788 (ethyl-8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5a]-[1,4] benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate). Since the diazepam-induced increase of [3H]muscimol binding is paralleled by a significant potentiation of the inhibitory effect of muscimol on locomotor activity, it is proposed that the facilitatory action on GABAergic transmission elicited in vivo by diazepam is mediated by an increase in the Bmax of the binding sites of GABAA receptors. Images PMID:6326115

  3. Substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by a single-subunit protein-only RNase P.

    PubMed

    Brillante, Nadia; Gößringer, Markus; Lindenhofer, Dominik; Toth, Ursula; Rossmanith, Walter; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-03-18

    RNase P is the enzyme that removes 5' extensions from tRNA precursors. With its diversity of enzyme forms-either protein- or RNA-based, ranging from single polypeptides to multi-subunit ribonucleoproteins-the RNase P enzyme family represents a unique model system to compare the evolution of enzymatic mechanisms. Here we present a comprehensive study of substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by the nuclear single-subunit proteinaceous RNase P PRORP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Compared to bacterial RNase P, the best-characterized RNA-based enzyme form, PRORP3 requires a larger part of intact tRNA structure, but little to no determinants at the cleavage site or interactions with the 5' or 3' extensions of the tRNA. The cleavage site depends on the combined dimensions of acceptor stem and T domain, but also requires the leader to be single-stranded. Overall, the single-subunit PRORP appears mechanistically more similar to the complex nuclear ribonucleoprotein enzymes than to the simpler bacterial RNase P. Mechanistic similarity or dissimilarity among different forms of RNase P thus apparently do not necessarily reflect molecular composition or evolutionary relationship. PMID:26896801

  4. Substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by a single-subunit protein-only RNase P

    PubMed Central

    Brillante, Nadia; Gößringer, Markus; Lindenhofer, Dominik; Toth, Ursula; Rossmanith, Walter; Hartmann, Roland K.

    2016-01-01

    RNase P is the enzyme that removes 5′ extensions from tRNA precursors. With its diversity of enzyme forms—either protein- or RNA-based, ranging from single polypeptides to multi-subunit ribonucleoproteins—the RNase P enzyme family represents a unique model system to compare the evolution of enzymatic mechanisms. Here we present a comprehensive study of substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by the nuclear single-subunit proteinaceous RNase P PRORP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Compared to bacterial RNase P, the best-characterized RNA-based enzyme form, PRORP3 requires a larger part of intact tRNA structure, but little to no determinants at the cleavage site or interactions with the 5′ or 3′ extensions of the tRNA. The cleavage site depends on the combined dimensions of acceptor stem and T domain, but also requires the leader to be single-stranded. Overall, the single-subunit PRORP appears mechanistically more similar to the complex nuclear ribonucleoprotein enzymes than to the simpler bacterial RNase P. Mechanistic similarity or dissimilarity among different forms of RNase P thus apparently do not necessarily reflect molecular composition or evolutionary relationship. PMID:26896801

  5. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Michael; Stock, Lorenz G; Traxler, Lukas; Leclercq, Laurent; Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot; Cottet, Hervé; Stutz, Hanno; Ebner, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27265903

  6. Integrin activation state determines selectivity for novel recognition sites in fibrillar collagens.

    PubMed

    Siljander, Pia R-M; Hamaia, Samir; Peachey, Anthony R; Slatter, David A; Smethurst, Peter A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Knight, C Graham; Farndale, Richard W

    2004-11-12

    Only three recognition motifs, GFOGER, GLOGER, and GASGER, all present in type I collagen, have been identified to date for collagen-binding integrins, such as alpha(2)beta(1). Sequence alignment was used to investigate the occurrence of related motifs in other human fibrillar collagens, and located a conserved array of novel GER motifs within their triple helical domains. We compared the integrin binding properties of synthetic triple helical peptides containing examples of such sequences (GLSGER, GMOGER, GAOGER, and GQRGER) or the previously identified motifs. Recombinant inserted (I) domains of integrin subunits alpha(1), alpha(2) and alpha(11) all bound poorly to all motifs other than GFOGER and GLOGER. Similarly, alpha(2)beta(1) -containing resting platelets adhered well only to GFOGER and GLOGER, while ADP-activated platelets, HT1080 cells and two active alpha(2)I domain mutants (E318W, locked open) bound all motifs well, indicating that affinity modulation determines the sequence selectivity of integrins. GxO/SGER peptides inhibited platelet adhesion to collagen monomers with order of potency F >/= L >/= M > A. These results establish GFOGER as a high affinity sequence, which can interact with the alpha(2)I domain in the absence of activation and suggest that integrin reactivity of collagens may be predicted from their GER content. PMID:15345717

  7. Explosion site recognition; neural net discriminator using single three-component stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorenko, Yu. V.; Husebye, Eystein S.; Ruud, Bent O.

    1999-06-01

    In monitoring of local seismicity, the occurrence of many chemical explosions poses sever practical problems of two kinds: (i) such recordings add significantly to the analyst workload and (ii) in extreme cases, pollute the seismicity data base to the extent of rendering it useless for serious scientific studies. In some countries, the local seismicity is equivalent to felt earthquakes but the problem remains since both earthquakes and explosions are and will be recorded by local stations. These events will therefore enter the network data center processing system, and thus, be subjected to further analysis. Source classification schemes are not always well suited for this kind of needed analysis at local distance ranges (not easily transportable). Besides, epicenter determinations may be less accurate in cases of few station reportings. The common denominator for failures is the modest usages of the information potential contained in seismic recordings being represented by a few time/amplitude parameters for the Pn- and Lg-phases. On the other hand, seismic waveform similarities for closely spaced earthquakes and explosions in particular are well established observationally. In this study period, we explore the possibility of using single station three-component (3C) covariance matrix traces from a priori known explosion sites (learning) for automatically recognizing subsequent explosions from the same site. To ensure adequate sampling, we used the nine different complex covariance time domain elements in combination with a suit of 12 bandpass filters equivalent to 108 observation pieces for a single event recording. We used a neural net scheme for teaching the computer to recognize new explosion recordings from a specific site through scanning of hundreds of detector segmented waveform files. No epicenter information was used in this analysis. The output was a single number between Zero and Four (log-scale) with an acceptance threshold (repeated explosion) of 1

  8. β2-agonist therapy in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Page, Clive P; Rogliani, Paola; Matera, M Gabriella

    2013-04-01

    β2-Agonists are effective bronchodilators due primarily to their ability to relax airway smooth muscle (ASM). They exert their effects via their binding to the active site of β2-adrenoceptors on ASM, which triggers a signaling cascade that results in a number of events, all of which contribute to relaxation of ASM. There are some differences between β2-agonists. Traditional inhaled short-acting β2-agonists albuterol, fenoterol, and terbutaline provide rapid as-needed symptom relief and short-term prophylactic protection against bronchoconstriction induced by exercise or other stimuli. The twice-daily β2-agonists formoterol and salmeterol represent important advances. Their effective bronchodilating properties and long-term improvement in lung function offer considerable clinical benefits to patients. More recently, a newer β2-agonist (indacaterol) with a longer pharmacodynamic half-life has been discovered, with the hopes of achieving once-daily dosing. In general, β2-agonists have an acceptable safety profile, although there is still controversy as to whether long-acting β2-agonists may increase the risk of asthma mortality. In any case, they can induce adverse effects, such as increased heart rate, palpitations, transient decrease in PaO2, and tremor. Desensitization of β2-adrenoceptors that occurs during the first few days of regular use of β2-agonist treatment may account for the commonly observed resolution of the majority of these adverse events after the first few doses. Nevertheless, it can also induce tolerance to bronchoprotective effects of β2-agonists and has the potential to reduce bronchodilator sensitivity to them. Some novel once-daily β2-agonists (olodaterol, vilanterol, abediterol) are under development, mainly in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid or a long-acting antimuscarinic agent. PMID:23348973

  9. Heterosubtypic antibody recognition of the influenza virus hemagglutinin receptor binding site enhanced by avidity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Peter S.; Yoshida, Reiko; Ekiert, Damian C.; Sakai, Naoki; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Takada, Ayato; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Continual and rapid mutation of seasonal influenza viruses by antigenic drift necessitates the almost annual reformulation of flu vaccines, which may offer little protection if the match to the dominant circulating strain is poor. S139/1 is a cross-reactive antibody that neutralizes multiple HA strains and subtypes, including those from H1N1 and H3N2 viruses that currently infect humans. The crystal structure of the S139/1 Fab in complex with the HA from the A/Victoria/3/1975 (H3N2) virus reveals that the antibody targets highly conserved residues in the receptor binding site and contacts antigenic sites A, B, and D. Binding and plaque reduction assays show that the monovalent Fab alone can protect against H3 strains, but the enhanced avidity from binding of bivalent IgG increases the breadth of neutralization to additional strains from the H1, H2, H13, and H16 subtypes. Thus, antibodies making relatively low affinity Fab interactions with the receptor binding site can have significant antiviral activity when enhanced by avidity through bivalent interactions of the IgG, thereby extending the breadth of binding and neutralization to highly divergent influenza virus strains and subtypes. PMID:23027945

  10. A Genetic Network That Balances Two Outcomes Utilizes Asymmetric Recognition of Operator Sites

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Abhishek; Bandyopadhyay, Sumita; Dhar, Amlanjyoti; Lewis, Dale E.A.; Deb, Sunanda; Dey, Sucharita; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Roy, Siddhartha

    2012-01-01

    Stability and induction of the lysogenic state of bacteriophage λ are balanced by a complex regulatory network. A key feature of this network is the mutually exclusive cooperative binding of a repressor dimer (CI) to one of two pairs of binding sites, OR1-OR2 or OR2-OR3. The structural features that underpin the mutually exclusive binding mode are not well understood. Recent studies have demonstrated that CI is an asymmetric dimer. The functional importance of the asymmetry is not fully clear. Due to the asymmetric nature of the CI dimer as well as its binding sites, there are two possible bound orientations. By fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements we showed that CI prefers one bound orientation. We also demonstrated that the relative configuration of the binding sites is important for CI dimer-dimer interactions and consequent cooperative binding. We proposed that the operator configuration dictates the orientations of the bound CI molecules, which in turn dictates CI cooperative interaction between the OR1-OR2 or OR2-OR3, but not both. Modeling suggests that the relative orientation of the C- and N-terminal domains may play an important role in the mutually exclusive nature of the cooperative binding. This work correlates unique structural features of a transcription regulatory protein with the functional properties of a gene regulatory network. PMID:22500758

  11. A genetic network that balances two outcomes utilizes asymmetric recognition of operator sites.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Abhishek; Bandyopadhyay, Sumita; Dhar, Amlanjyoti; Lewis, Dale E A; Deb, Sunanda; Dey, Sucharita; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Roy, Siddhartha

    2012-04-01

    Stability and induction of the lysogenic state of bacteriophage λ are balanced by a complex regulatory network. A key feature of this network is the mutually exclusive cooperative binding of a repressor dimer (CI) to one of two pairs of binding sites, O(R)1-O(R)2 or O(R)2-O(R)3. The structural features that underpin the mutually exclusive binding mode are not well understood. Recent studies have demonstrated that CI is an asymmetric dimer. The functional importance of the asymmetry is not fully clear. Due to the asymmetric nature of the CI dimer as well as its binding sites, there are two possible bound orientations. By fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements we showed that CI prefers one bound orientation. We also demonstrated that the relative configuration of the binding sites is important for CI dimer-dimer interactions and consequent cooperative binding. We proposed that the operator configuration dictates the orientations of the bound CI molecules, which in turn dictates CI cooperative interaction between the O(R)1-O(R)2 or O(R)2-O(R)3, but not both. Modeling suggests that the relative orientation of the C- and N-terminal domains may play an important role in the mutually exclusive nature of the cooperative binding. This work correlates unique structural features of a transcription regulatory protein with the functional properties of a gene regulatory network. PMID:22500758

  12. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  13. Cross-neutralizing human anti-poliovirus antibodies bind the recognition site for cellular receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaochun; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Hansen, Bryan T.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Bidzhieva, Bella; Makiya, Michelle; Agulto, Liane; Purcell, Robert H.; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    Most structural information about poliovirus interaction with neutralizing antibodies was obtained in the 1980s in studies of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Recently we have isolated a number of human/chimpanzee anti-poliovirus antibodies and demonstrated that one of them, MAb A12, could neutralize polioviruses of both serotypes 1 and 2. This communication presents data on isolation of an additional cross-neutralizing antibody (F12) and identification of a previously unknown epitope on the surface of poliovirus virions. Epitope mapping was performed by sequencing of antibody-resistant mutants and by cryo-EM of complexes of virions with Fab fragments. The results have demonstrated that both cross-neutralizing antibodies bind the site located at the bottom of the canyon surrounding the fivefold axis of symmetry that was previously shown to interact with cellular poliovirus receptor CD155. However, the same antibody binds to serotypes 1 and 2 through different specific interactions. It was also shown to interact with type 3 poliovirus, albeit with about 10-fold lower affinity, insufficient for effective neutralization. Antibody interaction with the binding site of the cellular receptor may explain its broad reactivity and suggest that further screening or antibody engineering could lead to a universal antibody capable of neutralizing all three serotypes of poliovirus. PMID:24277851

  14. Distinct roles of beta1 metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS), and ligand-associated metal-binding site (LIMBS) cation-binding sites in ligand recognition by integrin alpha2beta1.

    PubMed

    Valdramidou, Dimitra; Humphries, Martin J; Mould, A Paul

    2008-11-21

    Integrin-ligand interactions are regulated in a complex manner by divalent cations, and previous studies have identified ligand-competent, stimulatory, and inhibitory cation-binding sites. In collagen-binding integrins, such as alpha2beta1, ligand recognition takes place exclusively at the alpha subunit I domain. However, activation of the alphaI domain depends on its interaction with a structurally similar domain in the beta subunit known as the I-like or betaI domain. The top face of the betaI domain contains three cation-binding sites: the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), the ADMIDAS (adjacent to MIDAS), and LIMBS (ligand-associated metal-binding site). The role of these sites in controlling ligand binding to the alphaI domain has yet to be elucidated. Mutation of the MIDAS or LIMBS completely blocked collagen binding to alpha2beta1; in contrast mutation of the ADMIDAS reduced ligand recognition but this effect could be overcome by the activating monoclonal antibody TS2/16. Hence, the MIDAS and LIMBS appear to be essential for the interaction between alphaI and betaI, whereas occupancy of the ADMIDAS has an allosteric effect on the conformation of betaI. An activating mutation in the alpha2 I domain partially restored ligand binding to the MIDAS and LIMBS mutants. Analysis of the effects of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+) on ligand binding to these mutants showed that the MIDAS is a ligand-competent site through which Mn(2+) stimulates ligand binding, whereas the LIMBS is a stimulatory Ca(2+)-binding site, occupancy of which increases the affinity of Mg(2+) for the MIDAS. PMID:18820259

  15. Catalyst recognition of cis-1,2-diols enables site-selective functionalization of complex molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xixi; Lee, Hyelee; Lee, Sunggi; Tan, Kian L.

    2013-09-01

    Carbohydrates and natural products serve essential roles in nature, and also provide core scaffolds for pharmaceutical agents and vaccines. However, the inherent complexity of these molecules imposes significant synthetic hurdles for their selective functionalization and derivatization. Nature has, in part, addressed these issues by employing enzymes that are able to orient and activate substrates within a chiral pocket, which increases dramatically both the rate and selectivity of organic transformations. In this article we show that similar proximity effects can be utilized in the context of synthetic catalysts to achieve general and predictable site-selective functionalization of complex molecules. Unlike enzymes, our catalysts apply a single reversible covalent bond to recognize and bind to specific functional group displays within substrates. By combining this unique binding selectivity and asymmetric catalysis, we are able to modify the less reactive axial positions within monosaccharides and natural products.

  16. Conserved Hydration Sites in Pin1 Reveal a Distinctive Water Recognition Motif in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Smitherman, Crystal; Souffrant, Michael; Gadda, Giovanni; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-25

    Structurally conserved water molecules are important for biomolecular stability, flexibility, and function. X-ray crystallographic studies of Pin1 have resolved a number of water molecules around the enzyme, including two highly conserved water molecules within the protein. The functional role of these localized water molecules remains unknown and unexplored. Pin1 catalyzes cis/trans isomerizations of peptidyl prolyl bonds that are preceded by a phosphorylated serine or threonine residue. Pin1 is involved in many subcellular signaling processes and is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of several life threatening diseases. Here, we investigate the significance of these structurally conserved water molecules in the catalytic domain of Pin1 using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, free energy calculations, analysis of X-ray crystal structures, and circular dichroism (CD) experiments. MD simulations and free energy calculations suggest the tighter binding water molecule plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and stability of a critical hydrogen-bonding network in the active site. The second water molecule is exchangeable with bulk solvent and is found in a distinctive helix-turn-coil motif. Structural bioinformatics analysis of nonredundant X-ray crystallographic protein structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) suggest this motif is present in several other proteins and can act as a water site, akin to the calcium EF hand. CD experiments suggest the isolated motif is in a distorted PII conformation and requires the protein environment to fully form the α-helix-turn-coil motif. This study provides valuable insights into the role of hydration in the structural integrity of Pin1 that can be exploited in protein engineering and drug design. PMID:26651388

  17. Vibrational Recognition of Adsorption Sites for CO on Platinum and Platinum-Ruthenium Surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Dabo, Ismaila; Wieckowski, Andrzei; Marzari, Nicola N.

    2007-09-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We have studied the vibrational properties of CO adsorbed on platinum and platinum-ruthenium surfaces using density-functional perturbation theory within the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalizedgradient approximation. The calculated C-O stretching frequencies are found to be in excellent agreement with spectroscopic measurements. The frequency shifts that take place when the surface is covered with ruthenium monolayers are also correctly predicted. This agreement for both shifts and absolute vibrational frequencies is made more remarkable by the frequent failure of local and semilocal exchange-correlation functionals in predicting the stability of the different adsorption sites for CO on transition metal surfaces. We have investigated the chemical origin of the C-O frequency shifts introducing an orbital-resolved analysis of the force and frequency density of states, and assessed the effect of donation and backdonation on the CO vibrational frequency using a GGA + molecular U approach. These findings rationalize and establish the accuracy of density-functional calculations in predicting absolute vibrational frequencies, notwithstanding the failure in determining relative adsorption energies, in the strong chemisorption regime.

  18. Active Site Sharing and Subterminal Hairpin Recognition in a New Class of DNA Transposases

    SciTech Connect

    Ronning, Donald R.; Guynet, Catherine; Ton-Hoang, Bao; Perez, Zhanita N.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Chandler, Michael; Dyda, Fred

    2010-07-20

    Many bacteria harbor simple transposable elements termed insertion sequences (IS). In Helicobacter pylori, the chimeric IS605 family elements are particularly interesting due to their proximity to genes encoding gastric epithelial invasion factors. Protein sequences of IS605 transposases do not bear the hallmarks of other well-characterized transposases. We have solved the crystal structure of full-length transposase (TnpA) of a representative member, ISHp608. Structurally, TnpA does not resemble any characterized transposase; rather, it is related to rolling circle replication (RCR) proteins. Consistent with RCR, Mg{sup 2+} and a conserved tyrosine, Tyr127, are essential for DNA nicking and the formation of a covalent intermediate between TnpA and DNA. TnpA is dimeric, contains two shared active sites, and binds two DNA stem loops representing the conserved inverted repeats near each end of ISHp608. The cocrystal structure with stem-loop DNA illustrates how this family of transposases specifically recognizes and pairs ends, necessary steps during transposition.

  19. Recognition of triplex forming oligodeoxynucleotides incorporating abasic sites by 5-arylcytosine residues in duplex DNAs.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Masahiro; Banba, Jun-Ichi; Kanamori, Takashi; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Sekine, Mitsuo; Seio, Kohji

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we reported our attempt to use a 5arylcytosine (dC(ar)) and the abasic site () as an artificial base pair for DNA triplex. The idea was confirmed by the molecular modeling studied in which the aromatic group of (ph) which protrudes in the major groove was buried into the cleft formed by the residue in the TFO. We synthesized three kinds of dC(ar) and the oligonucleotides incorporating them. Our UV-melting experiments revealed that the DNA triplex containing the dC(ph).phi was more stable than that containing dC.phi pair. Moreover, the dC.phi pair was more stable than any other dC.Y pairs such as dC(ph).G, dC(ph).C, dC(ph).T and dC(ph).A. These results indicated the possibility that the appropriate pair of dC(Ar) and could be the new sequence code of DNA triplex. We also carried out the Tm analyses of other TFOs incorporating dC(Ar) and , and clarified the stability of these triplexes. PMID:18029568

  20. Profile of the DNA recognition site of the archaeal homing endonuclease I-DmoI.

    PubMed Central

    Aagaard, C; Awayez, M J; Garrett, R A

    1997-01-01

    I- Dmo I is a homing enzyme of the LAGLI-DADG type that recognizes up to 20 bp of DNA and is encoded by an archaeal intron of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus mobilis . A combined mutational and DNA footprinting approach was employed to investigate the specificity of the I- Dmo I-substrate interaction. The results indicate that the enzyme binds primarily to short base paired regions that border the sites of DNA cleavage and intron insertion. The minimal substrate spans no more than 15 bp and while sequence degeneracy is tolerated in the DNA binding regions, the sequence and size of the cleavage region is highly conserved. The enzyme has a slow turnover rate and cuts the coding strand with a slight preference over the non-coding strand. Complex formation produces some distortion of the DNA double helix within the cleavage region. The data are compatible with the two DNA-binding domains of I- Dmo I bridging the minor groove, where cleavage occurs, and interacting within the major groove on either side, thereby stabilizing a distorted DNA double helix. This may provide a general mode of DNA interaction at least for the LAGLIDADG-type homing enzymes. PMID:9092657

  1. Mapping of the RNA recognition site of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, F; Gagnon, M; Sans, D; Michnick, S; Brakier-Gingras, L

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein S7 initiates the folding of the 3' major domain of 16S ribosomal RNA by binding to its lower half. The X-ray structure of protein S7 from thermophilic bacteria was recently solved and found to be a modular structure, consisting of an alpha-helical domain with a beta-ribbon extension. To gain further insights into its interaction with rRNA, we cloned the S7 gene from Escherichia coli K12 into a pET expression vector and introduced 4 deletions and 12 amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. The binding of each mutant to the lower half of the 3' major domain of 16S rRNA was assessed by filtration on nitrocellulose membranes. Deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues or deletion of the B hairpins (residues 72-89) severely decreased S7 affinity for the rRNA. Truncation of the C-terminal portion (residues 138-178), which includes part of the terminal alpha-helix, significantly affected S7 binding, whereas a shorter truncation (residues 148-178) only marginally influenced its binding. Severe effects were also observed with several strategic point mutations located throughout the protein, including Q8A and F17G in the N-terminal region, and K35Q, G54S, K113Q, and M115G in loops connecting the alpha-helices. Our results are consistent with the occurrence of several sites of contact between S7 and the 16S rRNA, in line with its role in the folding of the 3' major domain. PMID:11105763

  2. Antibody light chain-restricted recognition of the site of immune pressure in the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial is phylogenetically conserved

    PubMed Central

    Wiehe, Kevin; Easterhoff, David; Luo, Kan; Nicely, Nathan I.; Bradley, Todd; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Dennison, S. Moses; Zhang, Ruijun; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Stolarchuk, Christina; Parks, Robert; Sutherland, Laura L.; Scearce, Richard M.; Morris, Lynn; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Sinangil, Faruk; Phogat, Sanjay; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Kelsoe, Garnett; Montefiori, David C.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Bonsignori, Mattia; Santra, Sampa; Kepler, Thomas B.; Alam, S. Munir; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In HIV-1, the ability to mount antibody responses to conserved, neutralizing epitopes is critical for protection. Here we have studied the light chain usage of human and rhesus macaque antibodies targeted to a dominant region of the HIV-1 envelope second variable (V2) region involving lysine (K)169, the site of immune pressure in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. We found that humans and rhesus macaques used orthologous lambda variable gene segments encoding a glutamic acid-aspartic acid (ED) motif for K169 recognition. Structure determination of an unmutated ancestor antibody demonstrated that the V2 binding site was pre-configured for ED motif-mediated recognition prior to maturation. Thus, light chain usage for recognition of the site of immune pressure in the RV144 trial is highly conserved across species. These data indicate the HIV-1 K169-recognizing ED motif has persisted over the diversification between rhesus macaques and humans, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of this antibody recognition mode. PMID:25526306

  3. Protease recognition sites in Bet v 1a are cryptic, explaining its slow processing relevant to its allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Freier, Regina; Dall, Elfriede; Brandstetter, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Despite a high similarity with homologous protein families, only few proteins trigger an allergic immune response with characteristic TH2 polarization. This puzzling observation is illustrated by the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1a and its hypoallergenic protein isoforms, e.g., Bet v 1d. Given the key role of proteolytic processing in antigen presentation and T cell polarization, we investigated the recognition of Bet v 1 isoforms by the relevant protease cathepsin S. We found that at moderately acidic pH values Bet v 1a bound to cathepsin S with significantly lower affinity and was more slowly cleaved than its hypoallergenic isoform Bet v 1d. Only at pH values ≤4.5 the known proteolytic cleavage sites in Bet v 1a became accessible, resulting in a strong increase in affinity towards cathepsin S. Antigen processing and class II MHC loading occurs at moderately acidic compartments where processing of Bet v 1a and Bet v 1d differs distinctly. This difference translates into low and high density class II MHC loading and subsequently in TH2 and TH1 polarization, respectively. PMID:26235974

  4. Motions of the Substrate Recognition Duplex in a Group I Intron Assessed by Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Gian Paola G; Boyd, Nathan; Herschlag, Daniel; Qin, Peter Z

    2009-03-11

    The Tetrahymena group I intron recognizes its oligonucleotide substrate in a two-step process. First, a substrate recognition duplex, called the P1 duplex, is formed. The P1 duplex then docks into the prefolded ribozyme core by forming tertiary contacts. P1 docking controls both the rate and the fidelity of substrate cleavage and has been extensively studied as a model for the formation of RNA tertiary structure. However, previous work has been limited to studying millisecond or slower motions. Here we investigated nanosecond P1 motions in the context of the ribozyme using site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. A nitroxide spin label (R5a) was covalently attached to a specific site of the substrate oligonucleotide, the labeled substrate was bound to a prefolded ribozyme to form the P1 duplex, and X-band EPR spectroscopy was used to monitor nitroxide motions in the 0.1-50 ns regime. Using substrates that favor the docked or the undocked states, it was established that R5a was capable of reporting P1 duplex motions. Using R5a-labeled substrates it was found that the J1/2 junction connecting P1 to the ribozyme core controls nanosecond P1 mobility in the undocked state. This may account for previous observations that J1/2 mutations weaken substrate binding and give rise to cryptic cleavage. This study establishes the use of SDSL to probe nanosecond dynamic behaviors of individual helices within large RNA and RNA/protein complexes. This approach may help in understanding the relationship between RNA structure, dynamics, and function.

  5. Simplified biased random walk model for RecA-protein-mediated homology recognition offers rapid and accurate self-assembly of long linear arrays of binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Kates-Harbeck, Julian; Tilloy, Antoine; Prentiss, Mara

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by RecA-protein-based homology recognition, we consider the pairing of two long linear arrays of binding sites. We propose a fully reversible, physically realizable biased random walk model for rapid and accurate self-assembly due to the spontaneous pairing of matching binding sites, where the statistics of the searched sample are included. In the model, there are two bound conformations, and the free energy for each conformation is a weakly nonlinear function of the number of contiguous matched bound sites. PMID:23944487

  6. Interactions between tRNA identity nucleotides and their recognition sites in glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase determine the cognate amino acid affinity of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ibba, M; Hong, K W; Sherman, J M; Sever, S; Söll, D

    1996-07-01

    Sequence-specific interactions between aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and their cognate tRNAs both ensure accurate RNA recognition and prevent the binding of noncognate substrates. Here we show for Escherichia coli glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS; EC 6.1.1.18) that the accuracy of tRNA recognition also determines the efficiency of cognate amino acid recognition. Steady-state kinetics revealed that interactions between tRNA identity nucleotides and their recognition sites in the enzyme modulate the amino acid affinity of GlnRS. Perturbation of any of the protein-RNA interactions through mutation of either component led to considerable changes in glutamine affinity with the most marked effects seen at the discriminator base, the 10:25 base pair, and the anticodon. Reexamination of the identity set of tRNA(Gln) in the light of these results indicates that its constituents can be differentiated based upon biochemical function and their contribution to the apparent Gibbs' free energy of tRNA binding. Interactions with the acceptor stem act as strong determinants of tRNA specificity, with the discriminator base positioning the 3' end. The 10:25 base pair and U35 are apparently the major binding sites to GlnRS, with G36 contributing both to binding and recognition. Furthermore, we show that E. coli tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase also displays tRNA-dependent changes in tryptophan affinity when charging a noncognate tRNA. The ability of tRNA to optimize amino acid recognition reveals a novel mechanism for maintaining translational fidelity and also provides a strong basis for the coevolution of tRNAs and their cognate synthetases. PMID:8692925

  7. Identification of precise electrostatic recognition sites between cytochrome c6 and the photosystem I subunit PsaF using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Frederik; Drepper, Friedel; Haehnel, Wolfgang; Hippler, Michael

    2006-11-17

    The reduction of the photo-oxidized special chlorophyll pair P700 of photosystem I (PSI) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of eukaryotic organisms is facilitated by the soluble copper-containing protein plastocyanin (pc). In the absence of copper, pc is functionally replaced by the heme-containing protein cytochrome c6 (cyt c6) in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Binding and electron transfer between both donors and PSI follows a two-step mechanism that depends on electrostatic and hydrophobic recognition between the partners. Although the electrostatic and hydrophobic recognition sites on pc and PSI are well known, the precise electrostatic recognition site on cyt c6 is unknown. To specify the interaction sites on a molecular level, we cross-linked cyt c6 and PSI using a zero-length cross-linker and obtained a cross-linked complex competent in fast and efficient electron transfer. As shown previously, cyt c6 cross-links specifically with the PsaF subunit of PSI. Mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides from the cross-linked product revealed specific interaction sites between residues Lys27 of PsaF and Glu69 of cyt c6 and between Lys23 of PsaF and Glu69/Glu70 of cyt c6. Using these new data, we present a molecular model of the intermolecular electron transfer complex between eukaryotic cyt c6 and PSI. PMID:16984911

  8. Binding of transcription factor GabR to DNA requires recognition of DNA shape at a location distinct from its cognate binding site.

    PubMed

    Al-Zyoud, Walid A; Hynson, Robert M G; Ganuelas, Lorraine A; Coster, Adelle C F; Duff, Anthony P; Baker, Matthew A B; Stewart, Alastair G; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Ho, Joshua W K; Gaus, Katharina; Liu, Dali; Lee, Lawrence K; Böcking, Till

    2016-02-18

    Mechanisms for transcription factor recognition of specific DNA base sequences are well characterized and recent studies demonstrate that the shape of these cognate binding sites is also important. Here, we uncover a new mechanism where the transcription factor GabR simultaneously recognizes two cognate binding sites and the shape of a 29 bp DNA sequence that bridges these sites. Small-angle X-ray scattering and multi-angle laser light scattering are consistent with a model where the DNA undergoes a conformational change to bend around GabR during binding. In silico predictions suggest that the bridging DNA sequence is likely to be bendable in one direction and kinetic analysis of mutant DNA sequences with biolayer interferometry, allowed the independent quantification of the relative contribution of DNA base and shape recognition in the GabR-DNA interaction. These indicate that the two cognate binding sites as well as the bendability of the DNA sequence in between these sites are required to form a stable complex. The mechanism of GabR-DNA interaction provides an example where the correct shape of DNA, at a clearly distinct location from the cognate binding site, is required for transcription factor binding and has implications for bioinformatics searches for novel binding sites. PMID:26681693

  9. Binding of transcription factor GabR to DNA requires recognition of DNA shape at a location distinct from its cognate binding site

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zyoud, Walid A.; Hynson, Robert MG.; Ganuelas, Lorraine A.; Coster, Adelle CF.; Duff, Anthony P.; Baker, Matthew AB.; Stewart, Alastair G.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Ho, Joshua WK.; Gaus, Katharina; Liu, Dali; Lee, Lawrence K.; Böcking, Till

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms for transcription factor recognition of specific DNA base sequences are well characterized and recent studies demonstrate that the shape of these cognate binding sites is also important. Here, we uncover a new mechanism where the transcription factor GabR simultaneously recognizes two cognate binding sites and the shape of a 29 bp DNA sequence that bridges these sites. Small-angle X-ray scattering and multi-angle laser light scattering are consistent with a model where the DNA undergoes a conformational change to bend around GabR during binding. In silico predictions suggest that the bridging DNA sequence is likely to be bendable in one direction and kinetic analysis of mutant DNA sequences with biolayer interferometry, allowed the independent quantification of the relative contribution of DNA base and shape recognition in the GabR–DNA interaction. These indicate that the two cognate binding sites as well as the bendability of the DNA sequence in between these sites are required to form a stable complex. The mechanism of GabR–DNA interaction provides an example where the correct shape of DNA, at a clearly distinct location from the cognate binding site, is required for transcription factor binding and has implications for bioinformatics searches for novel binding sites. PMID:26681693

  10. Design and x-ray crystal structures of high-potency nonsteroidal glucocorticoid agonists exploiting a novel binding site on the receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Coe, Diane M.; Cooper, Tony W.J.; House, David; Iannone, Marie A.; Macdonald, Simon J.F.; Madauss, Kevin P.; McLay, Iain M.; Shipley, Tracy J.; Taylor, Simon J.; Tran, Thuy B.; Uings, Iain J.; Weller, Victoria; Williams, Shawn P.

    2010-09-17

    Crystallography and computer modeling have been used to exploit a previously unexplored channel in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Highly potent, nonsteroidal indazole amides showing excellent complementarity to the channel were designed with the assistance of the computational technique AlleGrow. The accuracy of the design process was demonstrated through crystallographic structural determination of the GR ligand-binding domain-agonist complex of the D-prolinamide derivative 11. The utility of the channel was further exemplified through the design of a potent phenylindazole in which structural motifs, seen to interact with the traditional GR ligand pocket, were abandoned and replaced by interactions within the new channel. Occupation of the channel was confirmed with a second GR crystal structure of this truncated D-alaninamide derivative 13. Compound 11 displays properties compatible with development as an intranasal solution formulation, whereas oral bioavailability has been demonstrated with a related truncated exemplar 14. Data with the pyrrolidinone amide 12 demonstrate the potential for further elaboration within the 'meta' channel to deliver compounds with selectivity for the desired transrepressive activity of glucocorticoids. The discovery of these interactions with this important receptor offers significant opportunities for the design of novel GR modulators.

  11. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist.

    PubMed

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were observed, despite their distinct chemical nature and inverse pharmacological profiles. The optimized models showed significantly improved ligand recognition in a large-scale virtual screening assessment compared to the crystal structure. Our models provide new insights into small molecule ligand binding to NTSR1 and could facilitate the structure-based design of non-peptide ligands for the evaluation of the pharmacological potential of NTSR1 in neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:27491650

  12. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  13. Interactions between RNA polymerase and the core recognition element are a determinant of transcription start site selection.

    PubMed

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Zhang, Yuanchao; Taylor, Deanne M; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2016-05-24

    During transcription initiation, RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme unwinds ∼13 bp of promoter DNA, forming an RNAP-promoter open complex (RPo) containing a single-stranded transcription bubble, and selects a template-strand nucleotide to serve as the transcription start site (TSS). In RPo, RNAP core enzyme makes sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions with the downstream part of the nontemplate strand of the transcription bubble ("core recognition element," CRE). Here, we investigated whether sequence-specific RNAP-CRE interactions affect TSS selection. To do this, we used two next-generation sequencing-based approaches to compare the TSS profile of WT RNAP to that of an RNAP derivative defective in sequence-specific RNAP-CRE interactions. First, using massively systematic transcript end readout, MASTER, we assessed effects of RNAP-CRE interactions on TSS selection in vitro and in vivo for a library of 4(7) (∼16,000) consensus promoters containing different TSS region sequences, and we observed that the TSS profile of the RNAP derivative defective in RNAP-CRE interactions differed from that of WT RNAP, in a manner that correlated with the presence of consensus CRE sequences in the TSS region. Second, using 5' merodiploid native-elongating-transcript sequencing, 5' mNET-seq, we assessed effects of RNAP-CRE interactions at natural promoters in Escherichia coli, and we identified 39 promoters at which RNAP-CRE interactions determine TSS selection. Our findings establish RNAP-CRE interactions are a functional determinant of TSS selection. We propose that RNAP-CRE interactions modulate the position of the downstream end of the transcription bubble in RPo, and thereby modulate TSS selection, which involves transcription bubble expansion or transcription bubble contraction (scrunching or antiscrunching). PMID:27162333

  14. Pyrazolone as a recognition site: Rhodamine 6G-based fluorescent probe for the selective recognition of Fe3+ in acetonitrile-aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Sanjay; Boricha, Vinod P; Jadeja, R N

    2015-03-01

    Two novel Rhodamine-pyrazolone-based colorimetric off-on fluorescent chemosensors for Fe(3+) ions were designed and synthesized using pyrazolone as the recognition moiety and Rhodamine 6G as the signalling moiety. The photophysical properties and Fe(3+) -binding properties of sensors L(1) and L(2) in acetonitrile-aqueous solution were also investigated. Both sensors successfully exhibit a remarkably 'turn-on' response, toward Fe(3+) , which was attributed to 1: 2 complex formation between Fe(3+) and L(1) /L(2) . The fluorescent and colorimetric response to Fe(3+) can be detected by the naked eye, which provides a facile method for the visual detection of Fe(3+) . PMID:24898853

  15. Salt bridges overlapping the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist binding site reveal a coincidence detector for G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D; Mosberg, Henry I; Conn, P Michael

    2011-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to molecular biological approaches and to computer modeling. These techniques and interspecies comparisons are used to identify structural features that are important for both intracellular trafficking and GnRHR activation yet distinguish between these processes. Our model features two salt (Arg(38)-Asp(98) and Glu(90)-Lys(121)) and two disulfide (Cys(14)-Cys(200) and Cys(114)-Cys(196)) bridges, all of which are required for the human GnRHR to traffic to the plasma membrane. This study reveals that both constitutive and ligand-induced activation are associated with a "coincidence detector" that occurs when an agonist binds. The observed constitutive activation of receptors lacking Glu(90)-Lys(121), but not Arg(38)-Asp(98) ionic bridge, suggests that the role of the former connection is holding the receptor in the inactive conformation. Both the aromatic ring and hydroxyl group of Tyr(284) and the hydrogen bonding of Ser(217) are important for efficient receptor activation. Our modeling results, supported by the observed influence of Lys(191) from extracellular loop 2 (EL2) and a four-residue motif surrounding this loop on ligand binding and receptor activation, suggest that the positioning of EL2 within the seven-α-helical bundle regulates receptor stability, proper trafficking, and function. PMID:21527534

  16. Salt Bridges Overlapping the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Agonist Binding Site Reveal a Coincidence Detector for G Protein-Coupled Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to molecular biological approaches and to computer modeling. These techniques and interspecies comparisons are used to identify structural features that are important for both intracellular trafficking and GnRHR activation yet distinguish between these processes. Our model features two salt (Arg38-Asp98 and Glu90-Lys121) and two disulfide (Cys14-Cys200 and Cys114-Cys196) bridges, all of which are required for the human GnRHR to traffic to the plasma membrane. This study reveals that both constitutive and ligand-induced activation are associated with a “coincidence detector” that occurs when an agonist binds. The observed constitutive activation of receptors lacking Glu90-Lys121, but not Arg38-Asp98 ionic bridge, suggests that the role of the former connection is holding the receptor in the inactive conformation. Both the aromatic ring and hydroxyl group of Tyr284 and the hydrogen bonding of Ser217 are important for efficient receptor activation. Our modeling results, supported by the observed influence of Lys191 from extracellular loop 2 (EL2) and a four-residue motif surrounding this loop on ligand binding and receptor activation, suggest that the positioning of EL2 within the seven-α-helical bundle regulates receptor stability, proper trafficking, and function. PMID:21527534

  17. Recognition of Mannosylated Ligands and Influenza A Virus by Human Surfactant Protein D: Contributions of an Extended Site and Residue 343

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, E.; Hartshorn, K; Horlacher, T; McDonald, B; Smith, K; Cafarella, T; Seaton, B; Seeberger, P; Head, J

    2009-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in antiviral host defense. Although SP-D shows a preference for glucose/maltose, the protein also recognizes d-mannose and a variety of mannose-rich microbial ligands. This latter preference prompted an examination of the mechanisms of mannose recognition, particularly as they relate to high-mannose viral glycans. Trimeric neck plus carbohydrate recognition domains from human SP-D (hNCRD) preferred ?1-2-linked dimannose (DM) over the branched trimannose (TM) core, ?1-3 or ?1-6 DM, or d-mannose. Previous studies have shown residues flanking the carbohydrate binding site can fine-tune ligand recognition. A mutant with valine at 343 (R343V) showed enhanced binding to mannan relative to wild type and R343A. No alteration in affinity was observed for d-mannose or for ?1-3- or ?1-6-linked DM; however, substantially increased affinity was observed for ?1-2 DM. Both proteins showed efficient recognition of linear and branched subdomains of high-mannose glycans on carbohydrate microarrays, and R343V showed increased binding to a subset of the oligosaccharides. Crystallographic analysis of an R343V complex with 1,2-DM showed a novel mode of binding. The disaccharide is bound to calcium by the reducing sugar ring, and a stabilizing H-bond is formed between the 2-OH of the nonreducing sugar ring and Arg349. Although hNCRDs show negligible binding to influenza A virus (IAV), R343V showed markedly enhanced viral neutralizing activity. Hydrophobic substitutions for Arg343 selectively blocked binding of a monoclonal antibody (Hyb 246-05) that inhibits IAV binding activity. Our findings demonstrate an extended ligand binding site for mannosylated ligands and the significant contribution of the 343 side chain to specific recognition of multivalent microbial ligands, including high-mannose viral glycans.

  18. Binding of dexetimide and levetimide to [3H](+)pentazocine- and [3H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine-defined sigma recognition sites.

    PubMed

    DeHaven-Hudkins, D L; Hudkins, R L

    1991-01-01

    The potent antimuscarinic benzetimide and its resolved stereoisomers dexetimide and levetimide were tested for their affinities at sigma sites labelled by [3H](+)pentazocine or [3H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine. Levetimide was a potent and stereoselective inhibitor of [3H](+)pentazocine binding, with a Ki of 2.2 nM, while dexetimide was nine-fold less potent (Ki = 19 nM). Dexetimide and levetimide potently inhibited [3H]DTG binding although without stereoselectivity (Ki values of 65 and 103 nM, respectively). Levetimide may be a useful tool with which to investigate sigma recognition sites and sigma subtypes. PMID:1656155

  19. Specific and Independent Recognition of U3 and U5 att Sites by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takao; Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Harada, Shinji

    1998-01-01

    The retroviral attachment (att) sites at viral DNA ends are cis-acting regions essential for proviral integration. To investigate the sequence features of att important for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration in vivo, we generated a series of 25 att mutants of HIV-1 by mutagenesis of the U3, U5, or both boundaries of att. Our results indicated that the terminal 11 or 12 bp of viral DNA are sufficient for specific recognition by HIV-1 integrase (IN) and suggested that IN might recognize each att site independently in vivo. PMID:9733892

  20. DMXAA causes tumor site-specific vascular disruption in murine non-small cell lung cancer, and like the endogenous non-canonical cyclic dinucleotide STING agonist, 2'3'-cGAMP, induces M2 macrophage repolarization.

    PubMed

    Downey, Charlene M; Aghaei, Mehrnoosh; Schwendener, Reto A; Jirik, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    The vascular disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), a murine agonist of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING), appears to target the tumor vasculature primarily as a result of stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production from tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Since there were relatively few reports of DMXAA effects in genetically-engineered mutant mice (GEMM), and models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in particular, we examined both the effectiveness and macrophage dependence of DMXAA in various NSCLC models. The DMXAA responses of primary adenocarcinomas in K-rasLA1/+ transgenic mice, as well as syngeneic subcutaneous and metastatic tumors, generated by a p53R172HΔg/+; K-rasLA1/+ NSCLC line (344SQ-ELuc), were assessed both by in vivo bioluminescence imaging as well as by histopathology. Macrophage-dependence of DMXAA effects was explored by clodronate liposome-mediated TAM depletion. Furthermore, a comparison of the vascular structure between subcutaneous tumors and metastases was carried out using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Interestingly, in contrast to the characteristic hemorrhagic necrosis produced by DMXAA in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors, this agent failed to cause hemorrhagic necrosis of either 344SQ-ELuc-derived metastases or autochthonous K-rasLA1/+ NSCLCs. In addition, we found that clodronate liposome-mediated depletion of TAMs in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors led to non-hemorrhagic necrosis due to tumor feeding-vessel occlusion. Since NSCLC were comprised exclusively of TAMs with anti-inflammatory M2-like phenotype, the ability of DMXAA to re-educate M2-polarized macrophages was examined. Using various macrophage phenotypic markers, we found that the STING agonists, DMXAA and the non-canonical endogenous cyclic dinucleotide, 2'3'-cGAMP, were both capable of re-educating M2 cells towards an M1 phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that the choice of preclinical model and the anatomical site of a

  1. The anticonvulsant and behavioural profile of L-687,414, a partial agonist acting at the glycine modulatory site on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Tricklebank, M D; Bristow, L J; Hutson, P H; Leeson, P D; Rowley, M; Saywell, K; Singh, L; Tattersall, F D; Thorn, L; Williams, B J

    1994-11-01

    1. The anticonvulsant and behavioural effects of the glycine/NMDA receptor partial agonist, L-687,414 (R(+)-cis-beta-methyl-3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one) have been investigated in rodents. 2. L-687,414 dose-dependently antagonized seizures induced by N-methyl-D,L- aspartic acid (NMDLA, ED50 = 19.7 mg kg-1), pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, ED50 = 13.0 mg kg-1) and electroshock (ED50 = 26.1 mg kg-1) when given intravenously 15 min before test, in male Swiss Webster mice but was most potent against audiogenic seizures induced by a 120 dB bell in DBA/2 mice (ED50 = 5.1 mg kg-1, i.p., 30 min before test). 3. L-687,414 also induced impairments of performance in a rotarod test in both Swiss Webster and DBA/2 mice and the ratio [rotarod MED:anticonvulsant ED50] varied between 0.9 and 5, depending on the convulsant used. 4. Similar behaviours to those seen after administration of the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (head weaving, body rolling, hyperlocomotion) were seen in the mouse after giving L-687,414, although the peak effect occurred at a dose (100 mg kg-1) which was 5-20 times the anticonvulsant ED50S, depending on the convulsant used. Unlike MK-801, however, doses of L-687,414 that were behaviourally stimulant did not increase dopamine turnover in the nucleus accumbens. 5. Consistent with the interaction of L-687,414 with the glycine/NMDA receptor, the anticonvulsant, ataxic and motor stimulant effects of the compound were significantly attenuated by the glycine/NMDA receptor agonist, D-serine (10-100 micrograms per mouse, i.c.v.). 6. The results show that L-687,414 is a potent, orally active anticonvulsant with a more benign pharmacological profile than antagonists acting at the ion channel of the NMDA receptor complex. The compound is a useful tool with which to probe the functional role of the glycine co-agonist site in vivo. PMID:7858861

  2. DMXAA Causes Tumor Site-Specific Vascular Disruption in Murine Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and like the Endogenous Non-Canonical Cyclic Dinucleotide STING Agonist, 2′3′-cGAMP, Induces M2 Macrophage Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Charlene M.; Aghaei, Mehrnoosh; Schwendener, Reto A.; Jirik, Frank R.

    2014-01-01

    The vascular disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), a murine agonist of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING), appears to target the tumor vasculature primarily as a result of stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production from tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Since there were relatively few reports of DMXAA effects in genetically-engineered mutant mice (GEMM), and models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in particular, we examined both the effectiveness and macrophage dependence of DMXAA in various NSCLC models. The DMXAA responses of primary adenocarcinomas in K-rasLA1/+ transgenic mice, as well as syngeneic subcutaneous and metastatic tumors, generated by a p53R172HΔg/+; K-rasLA1/+ NSCLC line (344SQ-ELuc), were assessed both by in vivo bioluminescence imaging as well as by histopathology. Macrophage-dependence of DMXAA effects was explored by clodronate liposome-mediated TAM depletion. Furthermore, a comparison of the vascular structure between subcutaneous tumors and metastases was carried out using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Interestingly, in contrast to the characteristic hemorrhagic necrosis produced by DMXAA in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors, this agent failed to cause hemorrhagic necrosis of either 344SQ-ELuc-derived metastases or autochthonous K-rasLA1/+ NSCLCs. In addition, we found that clodronate liposome-mediated depletion of TAMs in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors led to non-hemorrhagic necrosis due to tumor feeding-vessel occlusion. Since NSCLC were comprised exclusively of TAMs with anti-inflammatory M2-like phenotype, the ability of DMXAA to re-educate M2-polarized macrophages was examined. Using various macrophage phenotypic markers, we found that the STING agonists, DMXAA and the non-canonical endogenous cyclic dinucleotide, 2′3′-cGAMP, were both capable of re-educating M2 cells towards an M1 phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that the choice of preclinical model and the anatomical site of a

  3. U2AF65 adapts to diverse pre-mRNA splice sites through conformational selection of specific and promiscuous RNA recognition motifs.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Jermaine L; Agrawal, Anant A; Gupta, Ankit; Green, Michael R; Kielkopf, Clara L

    2013-04-01

    Degenerate splice site sequences mark the intron boundaries of pre-mRNA transcripts in multicellular eukaryotes. The essential pre-mRNA splicing factor U2AF(65) is faced with the paradoxical tasks of accurately targeting polypyrimidine (Py) tracts preceding 3' splice sites while adapting to both cytidine and uridine nucleotides with nearly equivalent frequencies. To understand how U2AF(65) recognizes degenerate Py tracts, we determined six crystal structures of human U2AF(65) bound to cytidine-containing Py tracts. As deoxy-ribose backbones were required for co-crystallization with these Py tracts, we also determined two baseline structures of U2AF(65) bound to the deoxy-uridine counterparts and compared the original, RNA-bound structure. Local structural changes suggest that the N-terminal RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1) is more promiscuous for cytosine-containing Py tracts than the C-terminal RRM2. These structural differences between the RRMs were reinforced by the specificities of wild-type and site-directed mutant U2AF(65) for region-dependent cytosine- and uracil-containing RNA sites. Small-angle X-ray scattering analyses further demonstrated that Py tract variations select distinct inter-RRM spacings from a pre-existing ensemble of U2AF(65) conformations. Our results highlight both local and global conformational selection as a means for universal 3' splice site recognition by U2AF(65). PMID:23376934

  4. QSAR, docking, dynamic simulation and quantum mechanics studies to explore the recognition properties of cholinesterase binding sites.

    PubMed

    Correa-Basurto, J; Bello, M; Rosales-Hernández, M C; Hernández-Rodríguez, M; Nicolás-Vázquez, I; Rojo-Domínguez, A; Trujillo-Ferrara, J G; Miranda, René; Flores-Sandoval, C A

    2014-02-25

    despite the multiple conformations obtained through MD simulations on both ChEs, the ligand recognition properties were conserved. In fact, the complex formed between ChEs and the best N-aryl compound reproduced the binding mode experimentally reported, where the ligand was coupled into the choline-binding site and stabilized through π-π interactions with Trp82 or Trp86 for BChE and AChE, respectively, suggesting that this compound could be an efficient inhibitor and supporting our model. PMID:24321698

  5. Two saturable recognition sites for (-) (125I)iodo-N6-(4-hydroxyphenyl-isopropyl)-adenosine binding on purified cardiac sarcolemma

    SciTech Connect

    Hausleithner, V.; Freissmuth, M.; Schuetz, W.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of (-) (125)iodo-N6-(4-hydroxyphenylisopropyl)-adenosine (( /sup 125/I)HPIA) binding to purified sarcolemmal preparations of guinea pig and bovine hearts revealed two classes of binding sites when unlabeled iodo-HPIA (100 mumol/l) was used as non-specific binding marker. In the presence of 1 mmol/l theophylline, however, only the high affinity component was detected. Adenosine receptor agonists caused biphasic displacement of (/sup 125/I)HPIA binding, with a high affinity potency rank order typical of interaction with A1-adenosine receptors. Biphasic competition curves were also observed with 8-phenyltheophylline and isobutylmethylxanthine, whereas the theophylline curve was monophasic up to 1 mmol/l. In brain membranes, specific binding of (/sup 125/I)HPIA as well as of (/sup 3/H)PIA was further reduced when unlabeled iodo-HPIA replaces theophylline as the non-specific binding marker. These results suggest the presence of two (/sup 125/I)HPIA binding sites on cardiac sarcolemma and brain membranes, but receptor function can only be ascribed to the high affinity sites. The low affinity site probably represents an artefact, which is often observed when non-specific binding is defined with the unlabeled counterpart or a structurally related ligand of the radioligand used.

  6. (/sup 3/H)dihydroergotamine as a high-affinity, slowly dissociating radioligand for 5-HT1B binding sites in rat brain membranes: evidence for guanine nucleotide regulation of agonist affinity states

    SciTech Connect

    Hamblin, M.W.; Ariani, K.; Adriaenssens, P.I.; Ciaranello, R.D.

    1987-12-01

    (/sup 3/H)Dihydroergotamine (DE) labels a population of binding sites in rat brain membranes with an affinity of approximately 70 pM in both hippocampus (maximal binding at saturation (Bmax) = 340 fmol/mg of protein) and cerebral cortex (Bmax = 250 fmol/mg of protein). Specific binding typically comprises about 97% of total binding at the Kd of the radioligand when nonspecific binding is determined in the presence of 100 nM unlabeled DE. Association kinetics at 37 degrees C are consistent with a uniform association rate constant for all sites labeled. Specific binding is completely reversible with addition of excess unlabeled DE, but dissociation does not proceed with simple first-order kinetics, suggesting the presence of more than one discrete binding site. Competition studies with selective drugs reveal alpha adrenergic, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B components of (/sup 3/H)DE specific binding. When phentolamine (500 nM) is included to block alpha receptors and DPAT (100 nM) or spiroxatrine (500 nM) is included to block 5-HT1A receptors, specific binding is exclusively to sites with drug affinities characteristic of 5-HT1B receptors. Under these 5-HT1B-selective conditions, (/sup 3/H)DE binding is about 90% specific, with a Kd of about 50 to 60 pM and a Bmax of 96 fmol/mg of protein in hippocampus and 77 fmol/mg of protein in cortex. (/sup 3/H)DE binding to 5-HT1B sites is very slowly dissociable, with a T1/2 of greater than 2 h at 37 degrees C. 5-HT1B antagonists and DE itself yield competition curves at (/sup 3/H)DE-labeled 5-HT1B sites that are adequately fit assuming a single site in nonlinear regression analysis. Addition of 100 microM guanylyl 5'-imidodiphosphate appears to convert nearly all 5-HT1B sites to those having low affinity for agonists while having a much smaller effect on the binding of (/sup 3/H)DE.

  7. DISTINCT ROLES OF β1 MIDAS, ADMIDAS AND LIMBS CATION-BINDING SITES IN LIGAND RECOGNITION BY INTEGRIN α2β1*

    PubMed Central

    Valdramidou, Dimitra; Humphries, Martin J.; Mould, A. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Integrin-ligand interactions are regulated in a complex manner by divalent cations, and previous studies have identified ligand-competent, stimulatory, and inhibitory cation-binding sites. In collagen-binding integrins, such as α2β1, ligand recognition takes place exclusively at the α subunit I domain. However, activation of the αI domain depends on its interaction with a structurally similar domain in the β subunit known as the I-like or βI domain. The top face of the βI domain contains three cation-binding sites: the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), the ADMIDAS (adjacent to MIDAS) and LIMBS (ligand-associated metal binding site). The role of these sites in controlling ligand binding to the αI domain has yet to be elucidated. Mutation of the MIDAS or LIMBS completely blocked collagen binding to α2β1; in contrast mutation of the ADMIDAS reduced ligand recognition but this effect could be overcome by the activating mAb TS2/16. Hence, the MIDAS and LIMBS appear to be essential for the interaction between αI and βI whereas occupancy of the ADMIDAS has an allosteric effect on the conformation of βI. An activating mutation in the α2 I domain partially restored ligand binding to the MIDAS and LIMBS mutants. Analysis of the effects of Ca2+, Mg2+ and Mn2+ on ligand binding to these mutants showed that the MIDAS is a ligand-competent site through which Mn2+ stimulates ligand binding, whereas the LIMBS is a stimulatory Ca2+-binding site, occupancy of which increases the affinity of Mg2+ for the MIDAS. PMID:18820259

  8. Dopamine agonist-induced substance addiction: the next piece of the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    Traditional antiparkinson treatment strategies strive to balance the antiparkinson effects of dopaminergic drugs with the avoidance of motor response complications. Dopamine agonists have an established role in delaying the emergence of motor response complications or reducing motor "off" periods. The recent recognition of a range of "behavioural addictions" that are linked to dopamine agonist use has highlighted the role of dopamine in brain reward function and addiction disorders in general. Dopamine agonists have now even been linked occasionally to new substance addictions. The challenge now for the Parkinsonologist is to also balance the net benefits of using dopamine agonists for their motor effects with avoiding the harm from behavioural compulsions. PMID:20980151

  9. The ACE inhibitor ( sup 3 H)SQ29,852 identifies a high affinity recognition site located in the human temporal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, N.M.; Costall, B.; Egli, P.; Horovitz, Z.P.; Ironside, J.W.; Naylor, R.J.; Williams, T.J. )

    1990-07-01

    The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 identified a single high affinity recognition site (defined by 10.0 microM captopril) in the human temporal cortex (pKD 8.62 +/- 0.03; Bmax 248 +/- 24 fmol mg-1 protein, mean +/- S.E.M., n = 4). ACE inhibitors and thiorphan competed to a similar level for the ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 binding site in the human temporal cortex with a rank order of affinity (pKi values mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3), lisinopril (9.49 +/- 0.02), captopril (9.16 +/- 0.08), SQ29,852 (8.58 +/- 0.04), epicaptopril (7.09 +/- 0.08), fosinopril (7.08 +/- 0.05) and thiorphan (6.40 +/- 0.04). Since this rank order of affinity is similar to the affinity of these compounds to inhibit brain ACE activity it is concluded that ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 selectively labels the inhibitor recognition site of ACE in the human temporal cortex.

  10. 4-Acyl Pyrrole Derivatives Yield Novel Vectors for Designing Inhibitors of the Acetyl-Lysine Recognition Site of BRD4(1).

    PubMed

    Hügle, Martin; Lucas, Xavier; Weitzel, Gerhard; Ostrovskyi, Dmytro; Breit, Bernhard; Gerhardt, Stefan; Einsle, Oliver; Günther, Stefan; Wohlwend, Daniel

    2016-02-25

    Several human diseases, including cancer, show altered signaling pathways resulting from changes in the activity levels of epigenetic modulators. In the past few years, small-molecule inhibitors against specific modulators, including the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain family of acetylation readers, have shown early promise in the treatment of the genetically defined midline carcinoma and hematopoietic malignancies. We have recently developed a novel potent inhibitor of BET proteins, 1 (XD14[ Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2013, 52, 14055]), which exerts a strong inhibitory potential on the proliferation of specific leukemia cell lines. In the study presented here, we designed analogues of 1 to study the potential of substitutions on the 4-acyl pyrrole backbone to occupy additional sites within the substrate recognition site of BRD4(1). The compounds were profiled using ITC, DSF, and X-ray crystallography. We could introduce several substitutions that address previously untargeted areas of the substrate recognition site. This work may substantially contribute to the development of therapeutics with increased target specificity against BRD4-related malignancies. PMID:26731611

  11. Molecular Evolution of the CYP2D Subfamily in Primates: Purifying Selection on Substrate Recognition Sites without the Frequent or Long-Tract Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Yasukochi, Yoshiki; Satta, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    The human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 gene is a member of the CYP2D gene subfamily, along with the CYP2D7P and CYP2D8P pseudogenes. Although the CYP2D6 enzyme has been studied extensively because of its clinical importance, the evolution of the CYP2D subfamily has not yet been fully understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to reveal the evolutionary process of the human drug metabolic system. Here, we investigate molecular evolution of the CYP2D subfamily in primates by comparing 14 CYP2D sequences from humans to New World monkey genomes. Window analysis and statistical tests revealed that entire genomic sequences of paralogous genes were extensively homogenized by gene conversion during molecular evolution of CYP2D genes in primates. A neighbor-joining tree based on genomic sequences at the nonsubstrate recognition sites showed that CYP2D6 and CYP2D8 genes were clustered together due to gene conversion. In contrast, a phylogenetic tree using amino acid sequences at substrate recognition sites did not cluster the CYP2D6 and CYP2D8 genes, suggesting that the functional constraint on substrate specificity is one of the causes for purifying selection at the substrate recognition sites. Our results suggest that the CYP2D gene subfamily in primates has evolved to maintain the regioselectivity for a substrate hydroxylation activity between individual enzymes, even though extensive gene conversion has occurred across CYP2D coding sequences. PMID:25808902

  12. The sites of phosphorylation by protein kinase C and an intact SH2 domain are required for the enhanced response to beta-adrenergic agonists in cells overexpressing c-src.

    PubMed

    Moyers, J S; Bouton, A H; Parsons, S J

    1993-04-01

    Previously we demonstrated that C3H10T1/2 murine fibroblasts overexpressing avian c-src exhibit elevated levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in response to beta-adrenergic agonists compared with that in control cells and that this enhanced response requires c-src kinase activity (W. A. Bushman, L. K. Wilson, D. K. Luttrell, J. S. Moyers, and S. J. Parsons, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:7462-7466, 1990). However, it is not yet known which components of the beta-adrenergic receptor pathway, if any, interact with pp60c-src. It has recently been shown that immune complexes of pp60c-src phosphorylate recombinant G alpha proteins in vitro to stoichiometric levels, resulting in alterations of GTP binding and GTPase activity (W. P. Hausdorff, J. A. Pitcher, D. K. Luttrell, M. E. Linder, H. Kurose, S. J. Parsons, M. G. Caron, and R. J. Lefkowitz, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:5720-5724, 1992), raising the possibility that the Gs alpha protein may be an in vivo target for the interaction with pp60c-src. To further characterize the involvement of pp60c-src in the beta-adrenergic signalling pathway, we have overexpressed, in 10T1/2 cells, pp60c-src containing mutations in several domains which are believed to be important for signalling processes. In this study we show that the sites of phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) (Ser-12 and Ser-48) as well as the SH2 region of pp60c-src are required for the enhanced response of c-src overexpressors to beta-agonist stimulation. Mutation at the site of myristylation (Gly-2) results in a decrease in the enhanced response, while mutation at the site of phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (Ser-17) has no effect. Two-dimensional phosphotryptic analyses indicate that phosphorylation on Ser-12 and Ser-48 in unstimulated cells is associated with the ability of overexpressed pp60c-src to potentiate beta-adrenergic signalling. Cells overexpressing wild-type c-src also exhibit enhanced cAMP accumulation upon treatment with cholera

  13. Beta-Adrenergic Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Barisione, Giovanni; Baroffio, Michele; Crimi, Emanuele; Brusasco, Vito

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonists are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptoms-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. In this article, we first review the basic mechanisms by which the β2-adrenergic system contributes to the control of airway smooth muscle tone. Then, we go on describing the structural characteristics of β2-AR and the molecular basis of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and mechanisms of its desensitization/ dysfunction. In particular, phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A and β-adrenergic receptor kinase are examined in detail. Finally, we discuss the pivotal role of inhaled β2-AR agonists in the treatment of asthma and the concerns about their safety that have been recently raised.

  14. Na/sup +/ channels as sites of action of the cardioactive agent DPI 201-106 with agonist and antagonist enantiomers

    SciTech Connect

    Romey, G.; Quast, U.; Pauron, D.; Frelin, C.; Renaud, J.F.; Lazdunski, M.

    1987-02-01

    This paper shows the interaction of the cardiotonic agent 4-(3-(4-diphenylmethyl-1-piperazinyl)-2-hydroxypropoxy)-1H-indole-2-carbonitrile (DPI 201-106) and its optic enantiomers R-DPI (205-429) and S-DPI (205-430) with the Na/sup +/ channel of a variety of excitable cells. Voltage-clamp experiments show that DPI 201-106 acts on neuroblastoma cells and rat cardiac cells. S-DPI (205-430) increases the peak Na/sup +/ current, slows down the kinetics of Na/sup +/ channel inactivation, and is cardiotonic on heart cells. Conversely, R-DPI (205-429) reduces the peak Na/sup +/ current and blocks Na/sup +/ channel activity and cardiac contractions. Binding experiments using radioactively labeled toxins indicate that DPI 201-106 and its enantiomers do not interact with sites already identified for tetrodotoxin or sea anemone and scorpion toxins. DPI 201-106 and its enantiomers inhibit binding of a /sup 3/H-labeled batrachotoxin derivative, (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxinin A 20-..cap alpha..-benzoate, to brain membranes. The dissociation constant of the complex formed between the Na/sup +/ channel and both R-DPI and S-DPI is K/sub d/ approx. 100 nM. /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake experiments using different cell types have shown that R and S enantiomers of DPI 201-106 are active on the different Na/sup +/ channel subtypes with similar IC/sub 50/ values. These results are discussed in relation with the cardiotonic properties of DPI 201-106 that are not accompanied by cardiotoxic effects.

  15. Binding of dexetimide and levetimide to ( sup 3 H)(+)pentazocine- and ( sup 3 H)1,3-Di(2-tolyl)guanidine-defined. sigma. recognition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Dehaven-Hudkins, D.L.; Hudkins, R.L. Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA )

    1991-01-01

    The potent antimuscarinic benzetimide and its resolved stereoisomers dexetimide and levetimide were tested for their affinities at {sigma} sites labelled by ({sup 3}H)(+)pentazocine or ({sup 3}H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine. Levetimide was a potent and stereoselective inhibitor of ({sup 3}H)(+)pentazocine binding, with a K{sub i} of 2.2 nM, while dexetimide was nine-fold less potent (K{sub i} = 19 nM). Dexetimide and levetimide potently inhibited ({sup 3}H)DTG binding although without stereoselectivity (K{sub i} values of 65 and 103 nM, respectively). Levetimide may be a useful tool with which to investigate {sigma} recognition sites and {sigma} subtypes.

  16. Aqueous phase selective detection of 2,4,6-trinitrophenol using a fluorescent metal-organic framework with a pendant recognition site.

    PubMed

    Nagarkar, Sanjog S; Desai, Aamod V; Samanta, Partha; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2015-09-14

    Prompt and selective detection of nitro explosives in the aqueous phase is in high demand to meet homeland security and environmental concerns. Herein we report the chemically stable porous metal organic framework UiO-68@NH2 with a pendant recognition site for selective detection of the nitro-aromatic explosive TNP in the aqueous phase. The pendant Lewis basic amine moieties are expected to selectively interact with TNP via electrostatic interactions and act as recognition sites for TNP. The MOF can detect the presence of TNP in water at a concentration as low as 0.4 ppm with a response time of a few seconds. In addition, both excitation and emission wavelengths of the MOF are in the visible region. The high selectivity was observed even in the presence of competing nitro analytes in the aqueous phase. The quenching constant for TNP was found to be 5.8 × 10(4) M(-1) which is 23 times higher than that for TNT and for RDX, demonstrating superior and selective quenching ability. This unprecedented selectivity is ascribed to electron-transfer and energy-transfer mechanisms as well as electrostatic interactions between TNP and the MOF. An MOF-coated paper strip that we prepared demonstrated fast and selective response to TNP in water, which represents a first step towards a practical application. PMID:25797881

  17. Dissecting functions of the N-terminal domain and GAS-site recognition in STAT3 nuclear trafficking.

    PubMed

    Martincuks, Antons; Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Haan, Serge; Herrmann, Andreas; Küster, Andrea; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, inflammation and cancer progression. Cytokine-induced gene transcription greatly depends on tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 on a single tyrosine residue with subsequent nuclear accumulation and specific DNA sequence (GAS) recognition. In this study, we analyzed the roles of the conserved STAT3 N-terminal domain (NTD) and GAS-element binding ability of STAT3 in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Our results demonstrate the nonessential role of GAS-element recognition for both cytokine-induced and basal nuclear import of STAT3. Substitution of five key amino acids within the DNA-binding domain rendered STAT3 unable to bind to GAS-elements while still maintaining the ability for nuclear localization. In turn, deletion of the NTD markedly decreased nuclear accumulation upon IL-6 treatment resulting in a prolonged accumulation of phosphorylated dimers in the cytoplasm, at the same time preserving specific DNA recognition ability of the truncation mutant. Observed defect in nuclear localization could not be explained by flawed importin-α binding, since both wild-type and NTD deletion mutant of STAT3 could precipitate both full-length and autoinhibitory domain (∆IBB) deletion mutants of importin-α5, as well as ∆IBB-α3 and ∆IBB-α7 isoforms independently of IL-6 stimulation. Despite its inability to translocate to the nucleus upon IL-6 stimulation, the NTD lacking mutant still showed nuclear accumulation in resting cells similar to wild-type upon inhibition of nuclear export by leptomycin B. At the same time, blocking the nuclear export pathway could not rescue cytoplasmic trapping of phosphorylated STAT3 molecules without NTD. Moreover, STAT3 mutant with dysfunctional SH2 domain (R609Q) also localized in the nucleus of unstimulated cells after nuclear export blocking, while upon cytokine treatment the

  18. Characterization of agonist radioligand interactions with porcine atrial A1 adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Leid, M.; Schimerlik, M.I.; Murray, T.F.

    1988-09-01

    The agonist radioligand (-)-N6-(125I)-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyl-adenosine (( 125I)HPIA) was used to characterize adenosine recognition sites in porcine atrial membranes. (125I)HPIA showed saturable binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with a maximum binding capacity of 35 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein and an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.5 +/- 0.4 nM. Kinetic experiments were performed to address the molecular mechanism of (125I)HPIA binding in porcine atrial membranes. (125I)HPIA apparently interacts with the cardiac adenosine receptor in a simple bimolecular reaction. A kinetically derived (125I) HPIA dissociation constant (2.4 nM) was in good agreement with that parameter measured at equilibrium. Guanyl nucleotides negatively modulated (125I)HPIA binding by increasing its rate of dissociation. This finding is consonant with the formation of a ternary complex in porcine atrial membranes, consisting of ligand, receptor, and guanyl nucleotide-binding protein. Prototypic adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited specific binding in a manner consistent with the labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor. The results of these experiments suggest that the adenosine receptor present in porcine atrial membranes, as labeled by (125I)HPIA, is of the A1 subtype.

  19. Kinetics of the Antibody Recognition Site in the Third IgG-Binding Domain of Protein G.

    PubMed

    Pratihar, Supriya; Sabo, T Michael; Ban, David; Fenwick, R Bryn; Becker, Stefan; Salvatella, Xavier; Griesinger, Christian; Lee, Donghan

    2016-08-01

    Protein dynamics occurring on a wide range of timescales play a crucial role in governing protein function. Particularly, motions between the globular rotational correlation time (τc ) and 40 μs (supra-τc window), strongly influence molecular recognition. This supra-τc window was previously hidden, owing to a lack of experimental methods. Recently, we have developed a high-power relaxation dispersion (RD) experiment for measuring kinetics as fast as 4 μs. For the first time, this method, performed under super-cooled conditions, enabled us to detect a global motion in the first β-turn of the third IgG-binding domain of protein G (GB3), which was extrapolated to 371±115 ns at 310 K. Furthermore, the same residues show the plasticity in the model-free residual dipolar coupling (RDC) order parameters and in an ensemble encoding the supra-τc dynamics. This β-turn is involved in antibody binding, exhibiting the potential link of the observed supra-τc motion with molecular recognition. PMID:27345359

  20. A Tail of Two Sites: A Bipartite Mechanism for Recognition of Notch Ligands by Mind Bomb E3 Ligases

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Brian J.; Schnute, Björn; Ohlenhard, Nadja; Zimmerman, Brandon; Miles, Laura; Beglova, Natalia; Klein, Thomas; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mind bomb (Mib) proteins are large, multi-domain E3 ligases that promote ubiquitination of the cytoplasmic tails of Notch ligands. This ubiquitination step marks the ligand proteins for epsin-dependent endocytosis, which is critical for in vivo Notch receptor activation. We present here crystal structures of the substrate recognition domains of Mib1, both in isolation and in complex with peptides derived from Notch ligands. The structures, in combination with biochemical, cellular and in vivo assays, show that Mib1 contains two independent substrate recognition domains that engage two distinct epitopes from the cytoplasmic tail of the ligand Jagged1, one in the intracellular membrane proximal region and the other near the C-terminus. Together, these studies provide new insights into the mechanism of ubiquitin transfer by Mind bomb E3 ligases, illuminate a key event in ligand-induced activation of Notch receptors, and identify a potential new target for therapeutic modulation of Notch signal transduction in disease. PMID:25747658

  1. Tissue-specific N-glycosylation, site-specific oligosaccharide patterns and lentil lectin recognition of rat Thy-1.

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, R B; Tse, A G; Dwek, R A; Williams, A F; Rademacher, T W

    1987-01-01

    To examine the extent to which protein structure and tissue-type influence glycosylation, we have determined the oligosaccharide structures at each of the three glycosylation sites (Asn-23, 74 and 98) of the cell surface glycoprotein Thy-1 isolated from rat brain and thymus. The results show that there is tissue-specificity of glycosylation and that superimposed on this is a significant degree of site-specificity. On the basis of the site distribution of oligosaccharides, we find that no Thy-1 molecules are in common between the two tissues despite the amino acid sequences being identical. We suggest, therefore, that by controlling N-glycosylation a tissue creates an unique set of glycoforms (same polypeptide but with oligosaccharides that differ either in sequence or disposition). The structures at each of the three sites were also determined for the thymocyte Thy-1 that binds to lentil lectin (Thy-1 L+) and for that which does not (Thy-1 L-). Segregation of intact thymus Thy-1 into two distinct sets of glycoforms by lentil lectin was found to be due to the structures at site 74. Analysis of oligosaccharide structures at the 'passenger' sites (23 and 98) suggests that either Thy-1 L+ and Thy-1 L- molecules are made in different cell-types or that the biosynthesis of oligosaccharides at one site is influenced by the glycosylation at other sites. PMID:2886334

  2. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of 3,8-diazabicyclo[4.2.0]octane ligands, potent nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Frost, Jennifer M; Bunnelle, William H; Tietje, Karin R; Anderson, David J; Rueter, Lynne E; Curzon, Peter; Surowy, Carol S; Ji, Jianquo; Daanen, Jerome F; Kohlhaas, Kathy L; Buckley, Michael J; Henry, Rodger F; Dyhring, Tino; Ahring, Philip K; Meyer, Michael D

    2006-12-28

    A series of potent neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands based on a 3,8-diazabicyclo[4.2.0]octane core have been synthesized and evaluated for affinity and agonist efficacy at the human high affinity nicotine recognition site (halpha4beta2) and in a rat model of persistent nociceptive pain (formalin model). Numerous analogs in this series exhibit picomolar affinity in radioligand binding assays and nanomolar agonist potency in functional assays, placing them among the most potent nAChR ligands known for the halpha4beta2 receptor. Several of the compounds reported in this study (i.e., 24, 25, 28, 30, 32, and 47) exhibit equivalent or greater affinity for the halpha4beta2 receptor relative to epibatidine, and like epibatidine, many exhibit robust analgesic efficacy in the rat formalin model of persistent pain. PMID:17181167

  3. Shape-selective recognition of DNA abasic sites by metallohelices: inhibition of human AP endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Malina, Jaroslav; Scott, Peter; Brabec, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Loss of a base in DNA leading to creation of an abasic (AP) site leaving a deoxyribose residue in the strand, is a frequent lesion that may occur spontaneously or under the action of various physical and chemical agents. Progress in the understanding of the chemistry and enzymology of abasic DNA largely relies upon the study of AP sites in synthetic duplexes. We report here on interactions of diastereomerically pure metallo–helical ‘flexicate’ complexes, bimetallic triple-stranded ferro-helicates [Fe2(NN-NN)3]4+ incorporating the common NN–NN bis(bidentate) helicand, with short DNA duplexes containing AP sites in different sequence contexts. The results show that the flexicates bind to AP sites in DNA duplexes in a shape-selective manner. They preferentially bind to AP sites flanked by purines on both sides and their binding is enhanced when a pyrimidine is placed in opposite orientation to the lesion. Notably, the Λ-enantiomer binds to all tested AP sites with higher affinity than the Δ-enantiomer. In addition, the binding of the flexicates to AP sites inhibits the activity of human AP endonuclease 1, which is as a valid anticancer drug target. Hence, this finding indicates the potential of utilizing well-defined metallo–helical complexes for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25940617

  4. sup 1 H NMR studies of DNA recognition by the glucocorticoid receptor: Complex of the DNA binding domain with a half-site response element

    SciTech Connect

    Remerowski, M.L.; Kellenbach, E.; Boelens, R.; Kaptein, R. ); van der Marel, G.A.; van Boom, J.H. ); Maler, B.A.; Yamamoto, K.R. )

    1991-12-17

    The complex of the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) DNA binding domain (DBD) and half-site sequence of the consensus glucocorticoid response element (GRE) has been studied by two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. The DNA fragment is a 10 base-pair oligonucleotide, 5{prime}d(GCTGTTCTGC)3{prime}{center dot}5{prime}d-(GCAGAACAGC)3{prime}, containing the stronger binding GRE half-site hexamer, with GC base pairs at each end. The 93-residue GR-DBD contains an 86-residue segment corresponding to residues 440-525 of the rat GR. Eleven NOE cross peaks between the protein and DNA have been identified, and changes in the chemical shift of the DNA protons upon complex formation have been analyzed. Using these protein-DNA contact points, it can be concluded that (1) the 'recognition helix' formed by residues C460-E469 lies in the major groove of the DNA; (2) the GR-DBD is oriented on the GRE half-site such that residues A477-D481, forming the so-called D-loop, are available for protein-protein interaction in the GR-DBD dimer on the intact consensus GRE; and (3) the 5-methyl of the second thymine in the half-site and valine 462 interact, confirming indirect evidence that both play an important role in GR-DBD DNA binding.

  5. Communication between the Zinc and Nickel Sites in Dimeric HypA: Metal Recognition and pH Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, R.; Perovic, I; Martin-Diaconescu, V; O’Brien, K; Chivers, P; Sondej Pochapsky, S; Pochapsky, T; Maroney, M

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a pathogen that colonizes the human stomach, requires the nickel-containing metalloenzymes urease and NiFe-hydrogenase to survive this low pH environment. The maturation of both enzymes depends on the metallochaperone, HypA. HypA contains two metal sites, an intrinsic zinc site and a low-affinity nickel binding site. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that the structure of the intrinsic zinc site of HypA is dynamic and able to sense both nickel loading and pH changes. At pH 6.3, an internal pH that occurs during acid shock, the zinc site undergoes unprecedented ligand substitutions to convert from a Zn(Cys){sub 4} site to a Zn(His){sub 2}(Cys){sub 2} site. NMR spectroscopy shows that binding of Ni(II) to HypA results in paramagnetic broadening of resonances near the N-terminus. NOEs between the {beta}-CH{sub 2} protons of Zn cysteinyl ligands are consistent with a strand-swapped HypA dimer. Addition of nickel causes resonances from the zinc binding motif and other regions to double, indicating more than one conformation can exist in solution. Although the structure of the high-spin, 5-6 coordinate Ni(II) site is relatively unaffected by pH, the nickel binding stoichiometry is decreased from one per monomer to one per dimer at pH = 6.3. Mutation of any cysteine residue in the zinc binding motif results in a zinc site structure similar to that found for holo-WT-HypA at low pH and is unperturbed by the addition of nickel. Mutation of the histidines that flank the CXXC motifs results in a zinc site structure that is similar to holo-WT-HypA at neutral pH (Zn(Cys){sub 4}) and is no longer responsive to nickel binding or pH changes. Using an in vitro urease activity assay, it is shown that the recombinant protein is sufficient for recovery of urease activity in cell lysate from a HypA deletion mutant, and that mutations in the zinc-binding motif result in a decrease in recovered urease activity. The results are interpreted in terms of a model

  6. Key substrate recognition residues in the active site of a plant cytochrome P450, CYP73A1. Homology guided site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Guillaume A; Attias, Roger; Le Ret, Monique; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2003-09-01

    CYP73 enzymes are highly conserved cytochromes P450 in plant species that catalyse the regiospecific 4-hydroxylation of cinnamic acid to form precursors of lignin and many other phenolic compounds. A CYP73A1 homology model based on P450 experimentally solved structures was used to identify active site residues likely to govern substrate binding and regio-specific catalysis. The functional significance of these residues was assessed using site-directed mutagenesis. Active site modelling predicted that N302 and I371 form a hydrogen bond and hydrophobic contacts with the anionic site or aromatic ring of the substrate. Modification of these residues led to a drastic decrease in substrate binding and metabolism without major perturbation of protein structure. Changes to residue K484, which is located too far in the active site model to form a direct contact with cinnamic acid in the oxidized enzyme, did not influence initial substrate binding. However, the K484M substitution led to a 50% loss in catalytic activity. K484 may affect positioning of the substrate in the reduced enzyme during the catalytic cycle, or product release. Catalytic analysis of the mutants with structural analogues of cinnamic acid, in particular indole-2-carboxylic acid that can be hydroxylated with different regioselectivities, supports the involvement of N302, I371 and K484 in substrate docking and orientation. PMID:12950252

  7. Recognition of CG interrupting site by W-shaped nucleoside analogs (WNA) having the pyrazole ring in an anti-parallel triplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yosuke; Uchida, Yuko; Takaki, Tomoko; Aoki, Eriko; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2009-10-01

    We have previously developed W-shaped nucleoside analogs (WNA) for recognition of TA and CG interrupting sites, which are the intrinsic limitation for the formation of a stable triplex DNA by the natural triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO). However, the stabilization effect of WNA is dependent on the neighboring nucleobases at both sides of the WNA analogs within the TFO. Considering that the base is located at the hindered site constructed of three bases of the target duplex and the TFO, it was expected that replacement of the pyrimidine base of the WNA analog with a smaller pyrazole ring might avoid steric repulsion to produce a greater stability for the triplex. In this study, the new WNA analogs bearing the pyrazole ring, 3-aminopyrazole (AP), and 4-methyl-3-pyrazole-5-on (MP) were synthesized, incorporated into the TFOs, then their stabilizing effects on the triplexes were evaluated. A remarkable success was illustrated by the fact that the TFO containing WNA-betaAP in the 3'G-WNA-G-5' sequence formed a stable triplex with selectivity to the CG interrupting site where the previous WNA-betaC did not induce the triplex formation. PMID:19736014

  8. Structure-Based Mutagenesis of the Substrate-Recognition Domain of Nrdp1/FLRF Identifies the Binding Site for the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ErbB3

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyain,S.; Leahy, D.

    2007-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degrading protein 1 (Nrdp1) mediates the ligand-independent degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor family member ErbB3/HER3. By regulating cellular levels of ErbB3, Nrdp1 influences ErbB3-mediated signaling, which is essential for normal vertebrate development. Nrdp1 belongs to the tripartite or RBCC (RING, B-box, coiled-coil) family of ubiquitin ligases in which the RING domain is responsible for ubiquitin ligation and a variable C-terminal region mediates substrate recognition. We report here the 1.95 A crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Nrdp1 and show that this domain is sufficient to mediate ErbB3 binding. Furthermore, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to map regions of the Nrdp1 surface that are important for interacting with ErbB3 and mediating its degradation in transfected cells. The ErbB3-binding site localizes to a region of Nrdp1 that is conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, in contrast to ErbB3, which is only found in vertebrates. This observation suggests that Nrdp1 uses a common binding site to recognize its targets in different species.

  9. Molecular insights of protein contour recognition with ligand pharmacophoric sites through combinatorial library design and MD simulation in validating HTLV-1 PR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Omer, Ankur; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Retroviruses HIV-1 and HTLV-1 are chiefly considered to be the most dangerous pathogens in Homo sapiens. These two viruses have structurally unique protease (PR) enzymes, which are having common function of its replication mechanism. Though HIV PR drugs failed to inhibit HTLV-1 infections, they emphatically emphasise the need for designing new lead compounds against HTLV-1 PR. Therefore, we tried to understand the binding level interactions through the charge environment present in both ligand and protein active sites. The domino effect illustrates that libraries of purvalanol-A are attuned to fill allosteric binding site of HTLV-1 PR through molecular recognition and shows proper binding of ligand pharmacophoric features in receptor contours. Our screening evaluates seven compounds from purvalanol-A libraries, and these compounds' pharmacophore searches for an appropriate place in the binding site and it places well according to respective receptor contour surfaces. Thus our result provides a platform for the progress of more effective compounds, which are better in free energy calculation, molecular docking, ADME and molecular dynamics studies. Finally, this research provided novel chemical scaffolds for HTLV-1 drug discovery. PMID:25335799

  10. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 Protein (DMBT1): A Pattern Recognition Receptor with Multiple Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, Antoon J. M.; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Veerman, Enno C. I.

    2010-01-01

    Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 protein (DMBT1), salivary agglutinin (DMBT1SAG), and lung glycoprotein-340 (DMBT1GP340) are three names for glycoproteins encoded by the same DMBT1 gene. All these proteins belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily of proteins: a superfamily of secreted or membrane-bound proteins with SRCR domains that are highly conserved down to sponges, the most ancient metazoa. In addition to SRCR domains, all DMBT1s contain two CUB domains and one zona pellucida domain. The SRCR domains play a role in the function of DMBT1s, which is the binding of a broad range of pathogens including cariogenic streptococci, Helicobacter pylori and HIV. Mucosal defense proteins like IgA, surfactant proteins and lactoferrin also bind to DMBT1s through their SRCR domains. The binding motif on the SRCR domains comprises an 11-mer peptide in which a few amino acids are essential for binding (GRVEVLYRGSW). Adjacent to each individual SRCR domain are glycosylation domains, where the attached carbohydrate chains play a role in the binding of influenza A virus and Helicobacter pylori. The composition of the carbohydrate chains is not only donor specific, but also varies between different organs. These data demonstrate a role for DMBT1s as pattern recognition molecules containing various peptide and carbohydrate binding motifs. PMID:21614203

  11. Structural insight into operator dre-sites recognition and effector binding in the GntR/HutC transcription regulator NagR

    PubMed Central

    Fillenberg, Simon B.; Grau, Florian C.; Seidel, Gerald; Muller, Yves A.

    2015-01-01

    The uptake and metabolism of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by NagR (formerly named YvoA), a member of the widely-occurring GntR/HutC family of transcription regulators. Upon binding to specific DNA operator sites (dre-sites) NagR blocks the transcription of genes for GlcNAc utilization and interaction of NagR with effectors abrogates gene repression. Here we report crystal structures of NagR in complex with operator DNA and in complex with the putative effector molecules glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6-P) and N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc-6-P). A comparison of the distinct conformational states suggests that effectors are able to displace the NagR–DNA-binding domains (NagR–DBDs) by almost 70 Å upon binding. In addition, a high-resolution crystal structure of isolated NagR–DBDs in complex with palindromic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) discloses both the determinants for highly sequence-specific operator dre-site recognition and for the unspecific binding of NagR to dsDNA. Extensive biochemical binding studies investigating the affinities of full-length NagR and isolated NagR–DBDs for either random DNA, dre-site-derived palindromic or naturally occurring non-palindromic dre-site sequences suggest that proper NagR function relies on an effector-induced fine-tuning of the DNA-binding affinities of NagR and not on a complete abrogation of its DNA binding. PMID:25564531

  12. Convenient and Precise Strategy for Mapping N-Glycosylation Sites Using Microwave-Assisted Acid Hydrolysis and Characteristic Ions Recognition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cheng; Qu, Jingyao; Meisner, Jeffrey; Zhao, Xinyuan; Li, Xu; Wu, Zhigang; Zhu, Hailiang; Yu, Zaikuan; Li, Lei; Guo, Yuxi; Song, Jing; Wang, Peng George

    2015-08-01

    N-glycosylation is one of the most prevalence protein post-translational modifications (PTM) which is involved in several biological processes. Alternation of N-glycosylation is associated with cellular malfunction and development of disease. Thus, investigation of protein N-glycosylation is crucial for diagnosis and treatment of disease. Currently, deglycosylation with peptide N-glycosidase F is the most commonly used technique in N-glycosylation analysis. Additionally, a common error in N-glycosylation site identification, resulting from protein chemical deamidation, has largely been ignored. In this study, we developed a convenient and precise approach for mapping N-glycosylation sites utilizing with optimized TFA hydrolysis, ZIC-HILIC enrichment, and characteristic ions of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) from higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation. Using this method, we identified a total of 257 N-glycosylation sites and 144 N-glycoproteins from healthy human serum. Compared to deglycosylation with endoglycosidase, this strategy is more convenient and efficient for large scale N-glycosylation sites identification and provides an important alternative approach for the study of N-glycoprotein function. PMID:26161579

  13. Mechanisms of inverse agonist action at D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Strange, Philip G

    2005-05-01

    Mechanisms of inverse agonist action at the D2(short) dopamine receptor have been examined. Discrimination of G-protein-coupled and -uncoupled forms of the receptor by inverse agonists was examined in competition ligand-binding studies versus the agonist [3H]NPA at a concentration labelling both G-protein-coupled and -uncoupled receptors. Competition of inverse agonists versus [3H]NPA gave data that were fitted best by a two-binding site model in the absence of GTP but by a one-binding site model in the presence of GTP. K(i) values were derived from the competition data for binding of the inverse agonists to G-protein-uncoupled and -coupled receptors. K(coupled) and K(uncoupled) were statistically different for the set of compounds tested (ANOVA) but the individual values were different in a post hoc test only for (+)-butaclamol. These observations were supported by simulations of these competition experiments according to the extended ternary complex model. Inverse agonist efficacy of the ligands was assessed from their ability to reduce agonist-independent [35S]GTP gamma S binding to varying degrees in concentration-response curves. Inverse agonism by (+)-butaclamol and spiperone occurred at higher potency when GDP was added to assays, whereas the potency of (-)-sulpiride was unaffected. These data show that some inverse agonists ((+)-butaclamol, spiperone) achieve inverse agonism by stabilising the uncoupled form of the receptor at the expense of the coupled form. For other compounds tested, we were unable to define the mechanism. PMID:15735658

  14. Identification of recognition sites for myc/max/mxd network proteins by a whole human chromosome 19 selection strategy.

    PubMed

    Akopov, S B; Chernov, I P; Wahlström, T; Kostina, M B; Klein, G; Henriksson, M; Nikolaev, L G

    2008-11-01

    In this study, we have identified 20 human sequences containing Myc network binding sites in a library from the whole human chromosome 19. We demonstrated binding of the Max protein to these sequences both in vitro and in vivo. The majority of the identified sequences contained one or several CACGTG or CATGTG E-boxes. Several of these sites were located within introns or in their vicinity and the corresponding genes were found to be up- or down-regulated in differentiating HL-60 cells. Our data show the proof of principle for using this strategy in identification of Max target genes, and this method can also be applied for other transcription factors. PMID:19120031

  15. Exploring the role of water in molecular recognition: predicting protein ligandability using a combinatorial search of surface hydration sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Brennan, Paul E.; Huggins, David J.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between any two biological molecules must compete with their interaction with water molecules. This makes water the most important molecule in medicine, as it controls the interactions of every therapeutic with its target. A small molecule binding to a protein is able to recognize a unique binding site on a protein by displacing bound water molecules from specific hydration sites. Quantifying the interactions of these water molecules allows us to estimate the potential of the protein to bind a small molecule. This is referred to as ligandability. In the study, we describe a method to predict ligandability by performing a search of all possible combinations of hydration sites on protein surfaces. We predict ligandability as the summed binding free energy for each of the constituent hydration sites, computed using inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory. We compared the predicted ligandability with the maximum observed binding affinity for 20 proteins in the human bromodomain family. Based on this comparison, it was determined that effective inhibitors have been developed for the majority of bromodomains, in the range from 10 to 100 nM. However, we predict that more potent inhibitors can be developed for the bromodomains BPTF and BRD7 with relative ease, but that further efforts to develop inhibitors for ATAD2 will be extremely challenging. We have also made predictions for the 14 bromodomains with no reported small molecule K d values by isothermal titration calorimetry. The calculations predict that PBRM1(1) will be a challenging target, while others such as TAF1L(2), PBRM1(4) and TAF1(2), should be highly ligandable. As an outcome of this work, we assembled a database of experimental maximal K d that can serve as a community resource assisting medicinal chemistry efforts focused on BRDs. Effective prediction of ligandability would be a very useful tool in the drug discovery process.

  16. Exploring the role of water in molecular recognition: predicting protein ligandability using a combinatorial search of surface hydration sites.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Brennan, Paul E; Huggins, David J

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between any two biological molecules must compete with their interaction with water molecules. This makes water the most important molecule in medicine, as it controls the interactions of every therapeutic with its target. A small molecule binding to a protein is able to recognize a unique binding site on a protein by displacing bound water molecules from specific hydration sites. Quantifying the interactions of these water molecules allows us to estimate the potential of the protein to bind a small molecule. This is referred to as ligandability. In the study, we describe a method to predict ligandability by performing a search of all possible combinations of hydration sites on protein surfaces. We predict ligandability as the summed binding free energy for each of the constituent hydration sites, computed using inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory. We compared the predicted ligandability with the maximum observed binding affinity for 20 proteins in the human bromodomain family. Based on this comparison, it was determined that effective inhibitors have been developed for the majority of bromodomains, in the range from 10 to 100 nM. However, we predict that more potent inhibitors can be developed for the bromodomains BPTF and BRD7 with relative ease, but that further efforts to develop inhibitors for ATAD2 will be extremely challenging. We have also made predictions for the 14 bromodomains with no reported small molecule K d values by isothermal titration calorimetry. The calculations predict that PBRM1(1) will be a challenging target, while others such as TAF1L(2), PBRM1(4) and TAF1(2), should be highly ligandable. As an outcome of this work, we assembled a database of experimental maximal K d that can serve as a community resource assisting medicinal chemistry efforts focused on BRDs. Effective prediction of ligandability would be a very useful tool in the drug discovery process. PMID:27367338

  17. Strategies for designing synthetic immune agonists.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tom Y-H

    2016-08-01

    Enhancing the immune system is a validated strategy to combat infectious disease, cancer and allergy. Nevertheless, the development of immune adjuvants has been hampered by safety concerns. Agents that can stimulate the immune system often bear structural similarities with pathogen-associated molecular patterns found in bacteria or viruses and are recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Activation of these PRRs results in the immediate release of inflammatory cytokines, up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules, and recruitment of innate immune cells. The distribution and duration of these early inflammatory events are crucial in the development of antigen-specific adaptive immunity in the forms of antibody and/or T cells capable of searching for and destroying the infectious pathogens or cancer cells. However, systemic activation of these PRRs is often poorly tolerated. Hence, different strategies have been employed to modify or deliver immune agonists in an attempt to control the early innate receptor activation through temporal or spatial restriction. These approaches include physicochemical manipulation, covalent conjugation, formulation and conditional activation/deactivation. This review will describe recent examples of discovery and optimization of synthetic immune agonists towards clinical application. PMID:27213842

  18. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site. PMID:27298318

  19. Near-Infrared Light-Responsive Hydrogel for Specific Recognition and Photothermal Site-Release of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Song-Wei; Liu, Ya; Xie, Min; Wang, Jing; Yan, Xue-Wei; Li, Zhen; Dong, Wei-Guo; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2016-06-28

    Isolation of single circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patients is a very challenging technique that may promote the process of individualized antitumor therapies. However, there exist few systems capable of highly efficient capture and release of single CTCs with high viability for downstream analysis and culture. Herein, we designed a near-infrared (NIR) light-responsive substrate for highly efficient immunocapture and biocompatible site-release of CTCs by a combination of the photothermal effect of gold nanorods (GNRs) and a thermoresponsive hydrogel. The substrate was fabricated by imprinting target cancer cells on a GNR-pre-embedded gelatin hydrogel. Micro/nanostructures generated by cell imprinting produce artificial receptors for cancer cells to improve capture efficiency. Temperature-responsive gelatin dissolves rapidly at 37 °C; this allows bulk recovery of captured CTCs at physiological temperature or site-specific release of single CTCs by NIR-mediated photothermal activation of embedded GNRs. Furthermore, the system has been applied to capture, individually release, and genetically analyze CTCs from the whole blood of cancer patients. The multifunctional NIR-responsive platform demonstrates excellent performance in capture and site-release of CTCs with high viability, which provides a robust and versatile means toward individualized antitumor therapies and also shows promising potential for dynamically manipulating cell-substrate interactions in vitro. PMID:27299807

  20. Selective localization of /sup 3/H-nitrendipine recognition sites and voltage-sensitive Ca/sup 2 +/ channels in nerve cell bodies of caudate nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sanna, E.; Wright, A.G. Jr.; Hanbauer, I.

    1986-03-05

    /sup 3/H-Nitrendipine, a Ca/sup 2 +/ channel antagonist, binds with high affinity to recognition sites on neuronal membranes and may serve as biochemical marker for Ca/sup 2 +/ channels. Seven days after injection of kainic acid into the caudate nucleus the number of specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-nitrendipine decreases from 240 +/- 19 fmol/mg prot (contralateral) to 38 +/- 3 fmol/mg prot (ipsilateral), while the affinity for /sup 3/H-nitrendipine remains unchanged (K/sub D/=2.0 x 10/sup -10/M). Selective destruction of serotonergic or dopaminergic nerve terminals in caudate nucleus fails to alter the number of /sup 3/H-nitrendipine binding sites. The accumulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ was measured in slices prepared from intact of kainic acid-lesioned caudate nuclei. In intact slices the /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake is maximally increased (5-fold) in presence of 10/sup -5/M veratridine. The veratridine-elicited increase of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake is attenuated by the addition of 10/sup -6/M tetrodotoxin in the incubation medium. In kainic acid-lesioned striatal slices the basal and veratridine-elicited increment of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake are almost abolished. The present data provide evidence that in caudate nucleus /sup 3/H-nitrendipine binding sites and voltage-dependent Ca/sup 2 +/ channels are located in intrinsic neutrons but not in nerve terminals emanating from other brain areas.

  1. Insulator protein Su(Hw) recruits SAGA and Brahma complexes and constitutes part of Origin Recognition Complex-binding sites in the Drosophila genome

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyeva, Nadezhda E.; Mazina, Marina U.; Golovnin, Anton K.; Kopytova, Daria V.; Gurskiy, Dmitriy Y.; Nabirochkina, Elena N.; Georgieva, Sofia G.; Georgiev, Pavel G.; Krasnov, Aleksey N.

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasing data on the properties of replication origins, molecular mechanisms underlying origin recognition complex (ORC) positioning in the genome are still poorly understood. The Su(Hw) protein accounts for the activity of best-studied Drosophila insulators. Here, we show that Su(Hw) recruits the histone acetyltransferase complex SAGA and chromatin remodeler Brahma to Su(Hw)-dependent insulators, which gives rise to regions with low nucleosome density and creates conditions for ORC binding. Depletion in Su(Hw) leads to a dramatic drop in the levels of SAGA, Brahma and ORC subunits and a significant increase in nucleosome density on Su(Hw)-dependent insulators, whereas artificial Su(Hw) recruitment itself is sufficient for subsequent SAGA, Brahma and ORC binding. In contrast to the majority of replication origins that associate with promoters of active genes, Su(Hw)-binding sites constitute a small proportion (6%) of ORC-binding sites that are localized preferentially in transcriptionally inactive chromatin regions termed BLACK and BLUE chromatin. We suggest that the key determinants of ORC positioning in the genome are DNA-binding proteins that constitute different DNA regulatory elements, including insulators, promoters and enhancers. Su(Hw) is the first example of such a protein. PMID:23609538

  2. Dopamine D1 receptor stimulation modulates the formation and retrieval of novel object recognition memory: Role of the prelimbic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pezze, Marie A.; Marshall, Hayley J.; Fone, Kevin C.F.; Cassaday, Helen J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that dopamine D1 receptor antagonists impair novel object recognition memory but the effects of dopamine D1 receptor stimulation remain to be determined. This study investigated the effects of the selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF81297 on acquisition and retrieval in the novel object recognition task in male Wistar rats. SKF81297 (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg s.c.) given 15 min before the sampling phase impaired novel object recognition evaluated 10 min or 24 h later. The same treatments also reduced novel object recognition memory tested 24 h after the sampling phase and when given 15 min before the choice session. These data indicate that D1 receptor stimulation modulates both the encoding and retrieval of object recognition memory. Microinfusion of SKF81297 (0.025 or 0.05 μg/side) into the prelimbic sub-region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in this case 10 min before the sampling phase also impaired novel object recognition memory, suggesting that the mPFC is one important site mediating the effects of D1 receptor stimulation on visual recognition memory. PMID:26277743

  3. Molecular recognition at the active site of subtilisin BPN': crystallographic studies using genetically engineered proteinaceous inhibitor SSI (Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor).

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Y; Noguchi, S; Satow, Y; Kojima, S; Kumagai, I; Miura, K; Nakamura, K T; Mitsui, Y

    1991-06-01

    Unlike trypsin-like serine proteases having only one conspicuous binding pocket in the active site, subtilisin BPN' has two such pockets, the S1 and S4 pockets, which accommodate the P1 and P4 residues of ligands (after Schechter and Berger notation) respectively. Using computer graphics, the geometrical nature of the two pockets was carefully examined and strategies for site-directed mutagenesis studies were set up against a protein SSI (Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor), which is a strong proteinaceous inhibitor (or a substrate analogue) of subtilisin BPN'. It was decided to convert the P1 residue, methionine 73, into lysine (M73K) with or without additional conversion of the P4 residue, methionine 70, into glycine (M70G). The crystal structures of the two complexes of subtilisin BPN', one with the single mutant SSI (M73K) and the other with the double mutant SSI (M73K, M70G) were solved showing that (i) small 'electrostatic induced-fit movement' occurs in the S1 pocket upon introducing the terminal plus charge of the lysine side chain, and (ii) large 'mechanical induced-fit movement' occurs in the S4 pocket upon reducing the size of the P4 side chain from methionine to glycine. In both (i) and (ii), the induced-fit movement occurred in a concerted fashion involving both the enzyme and 'substrate' amino acid residues. The term 'substrate-assisted stabilization' was coined to stress the cooperative nature of the induced-fit movements. PMID:1891457

  4. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G.; Johnson, Troy A.; Zianni, Michael R.; Arias, Cesar A.; Ladbury, John E.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-04-19

    LiaR is a ‘master regulator’ of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structural basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaRD191N increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. The crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons.

  5. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G.; Johnson, Troy A.; Zianni, Michael R.; Arias, Cesar A.; Ladbury, John E.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-04-19

    LiaR is a ‘master regulator’ of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structuralmore » basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaRD191N increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. The crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons.« less

  6. Intron Retention in the Alternatively Spliced Region of RON Results from Weak 3’ Splice Site Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lindsay D.; Lucas, Christian M.; Eperon, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    The RON gene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor for macrophage-stimulating protein. A constitutively active isoform that arises by skipping of exon 11 is expressed in carcinomas and contributes to an invasive phenotype. However, a high proportion of the mRNA expressed from the endogenous gene, or from transfected minigenes, appears to retain introns 10 and 11. It is not known whether this represents specific repression or the presence of weak splicing signals. We have used chimeric pre-mRNAs spliced in vitro to investigate the reason for intron retention. A systematic test showed that, surprisingly, the exon sequences known to modulate exon 11 skipping were not limiting, but the 3’ splice site regions adjacent to exons 11 and 12 were too weak to support splicing when inserted into a globin intron. UV-crosslinking experiments showed binding of hnRNP F/H just 5’ of these regions, but the hnRNP F/H target sequences did not mediate inhibition. Instead, the failure of splicing is linked to weak binding of U2AF65, and spliceosome assembly stalls prior to formation of any of the ATP-dependent complexes. We discuss mechanisms by which U2AF65 binding is facilitated in vivo. PMID:24155930

  7. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin

    PubMed Central

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G.; Johnson, Troy A.; Zianni, Michael R.; Arias, Cesar A.; Ladbury, John E.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-01-01

    LiaR is a ‘master regulator’ of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structural basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaRD191N increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. Crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons. PMID:25897118

  8. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G; Johnson, Troy A; Zianni, Michael R; Arias, Cesar A; Ladbury, John E; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-05-19

    LiaR is a 'master regulator' of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structural basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaR(D191N) increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. Crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons. PMID:25897118

  9. Chemical modification of A1 adenosine receptors in rat brain membranes. Evidence for histidine in different domains of the ligand binding site.

    PubMed

    Klotz, K N; Lohse, M J; Schwabe, U

    1988-11-25

    Chemical modification of amino acid residues was used to probe the ligand recognition site of A1 adenosine receptors from rat brain membranes. The effect of treatment with group-specific reagents on agonist and antagonist radioligand binding was investigated. The histidine-specific reagent diethylpyrocarbonate (DEP) induced a loss of binding of the agonist R-N6-[3H] phenylisopropyladenosine ([3H]PIA), which could be prevented in part by agonists, but not by antagonists. DEP treatment induced also a loss of binding of the antagonist [3H]8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine ([3H]DPCPX). Antagonists protected A1 receptors from this inactivation while agonists did not. This result provided evidence for the existence of at least 2 different histidine residues involved in ligand binding. Consistent with a modification of the binding site, DEP did not alter the affinity of [3H]DPCPX, but reduced receptor number. From the selective protection of [3H] PIA and [3H]DPCPX binding from inactivation, it is concluded that agonists and antagonists occupy different domains at the binding site. Sulfhydryl modifying reagents did not influence antagonist binding, but inhibited agonist binding. This effect is explained by modification of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein. Pyridoxal 5-phosphate inactivated both [3H]PIA and [3H]DPCPX binding, but the receptors could not be protected from inactivation by ligands. Therefore, no amino group seems to be located at the ligand binding site. In addition, it was shown that no further amino acids with polar side chains are present. The absence of hydrophilic amino acids from the recognition site of the receptor apart from histidine suggests an explanation for the lack of hydrophilic ligands with high affinity for A1 receptors. PMID:3182861

  10. The Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Membranous Web and Associated Nuclear Transport Machinery Limit Access of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Viral Replication Sites

    PubMed Central

    Neufeldt, Christopher J.; Joyce, Michael A.; Van Buuren, Nicholas; Levin, Aviad; Kirkegaard, Karla; Gale Jr., Michael; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J.; Wozniak, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-strand RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family and a major cause of liver disease worldwide. HCV replicates in the cytoplasm, and the synthesis of viral proteins induces extensive rearrangements of host cell membranes producing structures, collectively termed the membranous web (MW). The MW contains the sites of viral replication and assembly, and we have identified distinct membrane fractions derived from HCV-infected cells that contain replication and assembly complexes enriched for viral RNA and infectious virus, respectively. The complex membrane structure of the MW is thought to protect the viral genome limiting its interactions with cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and thereby preventing activation of cellular innate immune responses. Here we show that PRRs, including RIG-I and MDA5, and ribosomes are excluded from viral replication and assembly centers within the MW. Furthermore, we present evidence that components of the nuclear transport machinery regulate access of proteins to MW compartments. We show that the restricted assess of RIG-I to the MW can be overcome by the addition of a nuclear localization signal sequence, and that expression of a NLS-RIG-I construct leads to increased immune activation and the inhibition of viral replication. PMID:26863439

  11. The Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Membranous Web and Associated Nuclear Transport Machinery Limit Access of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Viral Replication Sites.

    PubMed

    Neufeldt, Christopher J; Joyce, Michael A; Van Buuren, Nicholas; Levin, Aviad; Kirkegaard, Karla; Gale, Michael; Tyrrell, D Lorne J; Wozniak, Richard W

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-strand RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family and a major cause of liver disease worldwide. HCV replicates in the cytoplasm, and the synthesis of viral proteins induces extensive rearrangements of host cell membranes producing structures, collectively termed the membranous web (MW). The MW contains the sites of viral replication and assembly, and we have identified distinct membrane fractions derived from HCV-infected cells that contain replication and assembly complexes enriched for viral RNA and infectious virus, respectively. The complex membrane structure of the MW is thought to protect the viral genome limiting its interactions with cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and thereby preventing activation of cellular innate immune responses. Here we show that PRRs, including RIG-I and MDA5, and ribosomes are excluded from viral replication and assembly centers within the MW. Furthermore, we present evidence that components of the nuclear transport machinery regulate access of proteins to MW compartments. We show that the restricted assess of RIG-I to the MW can be overcome by the addition of a nuclear localization signal sequence, and that expression of a NLS-RIG-I construct leads to increased immune activation and the inhibition of viral replication. PMID:26863439

  12. Agonist-trafficking and hallucinogens.

    PubMed

    González-Maeso, Javier; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2009-01-01

    Seven transmembrane domain receptors, also termed G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represent the most common molecular target for therapeutic drugs. The generally accepted pharmacological model for GPCR activation is the ternary complex model, in which GPCRs exist in a dynamic equilibrium between the active and inactive conformational states. However, the demonstration that different agonists sometimes elicit a different relative activation of two signaling pathways downstream of the same receptor has led to a revision of the ternary complex model. According to this agonist- trafficking model, agonists stabilize distinct activated receptor conformations that preferentially activate specific signaling pathways. Hallucinogenic drugs and non-hallucinogenic drugs represent an attractive experimental system with which to study agonist-trafficking of receptor signaling. Thus many of the behavioral responses induced by hallucinogenic drugs, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin or mescaline, depend on activation of serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT2ARs). In contrast, this neuropsychological state in humans is not induced by closely related chemicals, such as lisuride or ergotamine, despite their similar in vitro activity at the 5-HT2AR. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, as well as unresolved questions, regarding agonist-trafficking and the mechanism of action of hallucinogenic drugs. PMID:19275609

  13. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, Esam E; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-07-01

    We mutated key amino acids of the human variant of the M1 muscarinic receptor that target ligand binding, receptor activation, and receptor-G protein interaction. We compared the effects of these mutations on the action of two atypical M1 functionally preferring agonists (N-desmethylclozapine and xanomeline) and two classical non-selective orthosteric agonists (carbachol and oxotremorine). Mutations of D105 in the orthosteric binding site and mutation of D99 located out of the orthosteric binding site decreased affinity of all tested agonists that was translated as a decrease in potency in accumulation of inositol phosphates and intracellular calcium mobilization. Mutation of D105 decreased the potency of the atypical agonist xanomeline more than that of the classical agonists carbachol and oxotremorine. Mutation of the residues involved in receptor activation (D71) and coupling to G-proteins (R123) completely abolished the functional responses to both classical and atypical agonists. Our data show that both classical and atypical agonists activate hM1 receptors by the same molecular switch that involves D71 in the second transmembrane helix. The principal difference among the studied agonists is rather in the way they interact with D105 in the orthosteric binding site. Furthermore, our data demonstrate a key role of D105 in xanomeline wash-resistant binding and persistent activation of hM1 by wash-resistant xanomeline. PMID:25882246

  14. Thermodynamics of aminoglycoside-rRNA recognition: the binding of neomycin-class aminoglycosides to the A site of 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Malvika; Pilch, Daniel S

    2002-06-18

    three drug NH(3)(+) groups participating in electrostatic interactions with the host RNA. In the aggregate, our results reveal the impact of specific alterations in aminoglycoside structure on the thermodynamics of binding to an A-site model RNA oligonucleotide. Such systematic comparative studies are critical first steps toward establishing the thermodynamic database required for enhancing our understanding of the molecular forces that dictate and control aminoglycoside recognition of RNA. PMID:12056901

  15. Activation of endplate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by agonists.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of a small molecule made in one cell with a large receptor made in another is the signature event of cell signaling. Understanding the structure and energy changes associated with agonist activation is important for engineering drugs, receptors and synapses. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a ∼300kD ion channel that binds the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists to elicit electrical responses in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This mini-review is in two sections. First, general concepts of skeletal muscle AChR operation are discussed in terms of energy landscapes for conformational change. Second, adult vs. fetal AChRs are compared with regard to interaction energies between ACh and agonist-site side chains, measured by single-channel electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations. The five aromatic residues that form the core of each agonist binding site can be divided into two working groups, a triad (led by αY190) that behaves similarly at all sites and a coupled pair (led by γW55) that has a large influence on affinity only in fetal AChRs. Each endplate AChR has 5 homologous subunits, two of α(1) and one each of β, δ, and either γ (fetal) or ϵ (adult). These nicotinic AChRs have only 2 functional agonist binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αγ or αϵ subunit interfaces. The receptor undergoes a reversible, global isomerization between structures called C and O. The C shape does not conduct ions and has a relatively low affinity for ACh, whereas O conducts cations and has a higher affinity. When both agonist sites are empty (filled only with water) the probability of taking on the O conformation (PO) is low, <10(-6). When ACh molecules occupy the agonist sites the C→O opening rate constant and C↔O gating equilibrium constant increase dramatically. Following a pulse of ACh at the nerve-muscle synapse, the endplate current rises rapidly

  16. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  17. Anticodon recognition in evolution: switching tRNA specificity of an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase by site-directed peptide transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brevet, Annie; Chen, Josiane; Commans, Stéphane; Lazennec, Christine; Blanquet, Sylvain; Plateau, Pierre

    2003-08-15

    The highly conserved aspartyl-, asparaginyl-, and lysyl-tRNA synthetases compose one subclass of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, called IIb. The three enzymes possess an OB-folded extension at their N terminus. The function of this extension is to specifically recognize the anticodon triplet of the tRNA. Three-dimensional models of bacterial aspartyl- and lysyl-tRNA synthetases complexed to tRNA indicate that a rigid scaffold of amino acid residues along the five beta-strands of the OB-fold accommodates the base U at the center of the anticodon. The binding of the adjacent anticodon bases occurs through interactions with a flexible loop joining strands 4 and 5 (L45). As a result, a switching of the specificity of lysyl-tRNA synthetase from tRNALys (anticodon UUU) toward tRNAAsp (GUC) could be attempted by transplanting the small loop L45 of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase inside lysyl-tRNA synthetase. Upon this transplantation, lysyl-tRNA synthetase loses its capacity to aminoacylate tRNALys. In exchange, the chimeric enzyme acquires the capacity to charge tRNAAsp with lysine. Upon giving the tRNAAsp substrate the discriminator base of tRNALys, the specificity shift is improved. The change of specificity was also established in vivo. Indeed, the transplanted lysyl-tRNA synthetase succeeds in suppressing a missense Lys --> Asp mutation inserted into the beta-lactamase gene. These results functionally establish that sequence variation in a small peptide region of subclass IIb aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases contributes to specification of nucleic acid recognition. Because this peptide element is not part of the core catalytic structure, it may have evolved independently of the active sites of these synthetases. PMID:12766171

  18. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylase: affinity purification from bovine liver by using a synthetic propeptide containing the gamma-carboxylation recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, B R; Ulrich, M M; Jacobs, M; Vermeer, C; Walsh, C; Furie, B; Furie, B C

    1989-01-01

    The vitamin K-dependent carboxylase catalyzes the posttranslational modification of specific glutamic acid residues to form gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues within the vitamin K-dependent proteins. This enzyme recognizes the gamma-carboxylation recognition site on the propeptide of the precursor forms of the vitamin K-dependent blood coagulation proteins. To purify this enzyme to homogeneity, the carboxylase from bovine liver microsomes was solubilized with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS), the protein was fractionated with ammonium sulfate, and then the enzyme was isolated by affinity chromatography using a synthetic peptide based upon the structure of the prothrombin propeptide. Elution with 10 mM propeptide yielded a single major band on SDS gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight of 77,000. In the presence of high concentrations of propeptide, only minimal carboxylase activity was measurable. Antibodies to the protein inhibited the carboxylase activity in crude preparations. In an alternative affinity purification strategy the propeptide was coupled through an NH2-terminal cysteine to an activated thiol-Sepharose column. The carboxylase-propeptide complex was eluted at 25 degrees C by reductive cleavage of the enzyme-propeptide complex in the presence of detergent and phospholipids. The eluted protein (Mr, 77,000) contained both stable vitamin K-dependent carboxylase and vitamin K epoxidase activity. The protein, purified by either method, was detected as a single band (Mr, 77,000) in a Western blot using anti-carboxylase antibodies. A 10,000-fold purification of carboxylase activity from crude microsomes was estimated. Purified bovine liver vitamin K-dependent carboxylase should facilitate the study of its structure and of the mechanism of action of vitamin K as a cofactor in the reaction catalyzed by this enzyme. Images PMID:2780546

  19. D-Glucose-recognition and phlorizin-binding sites in human sodium/D-glucose cotransporter 1 (hSGLT1): a tryptophan scanning study.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Navneet K; Kumar, Azad; Goyal, Pankaj; Pandey, Dharmendra; Siess, Wolfgang; Kinne, Rolf K H

    2007-11-27

    In order to gain a better understanding of the structure-function relation in hSGLT1, single Trp residues were introduced into a functional hSGLT1 mutant devoid of Trps at positions that previously had been postulated to be involved in sugar recognition/translocation and/or phlorizin binding. The mutant proteins were expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and reconstituted into liposomes. In transport experiments the putative sugar binding site mutants W457hSGLT1 and W460hSGLT1 showed a drastic decrease in affinity toward alpha-methyl-d-glucopyranoside with Km values of 13.3 and 5.26 mM compared to 0.4 mM of the Trp-less hSGLT1. In addition, a strong decrease in the inhibitory effect of phlorizin was observed. In Trp fluorescence studies the position of the emission maxima of the mutants, their sensitivity to N-bromosuccinimide oxidation, and their interaction with water soluble quenchers demonstrate that Trp457 and Trp460 are in contact with the hydrophilic extravesicular environment. In both mutants Trp fluorescence was quenched significantly, but differently, by various glucose analogues. They also show significant protection by d-glucose and phlorizin against acrylamide, KI, or TCE quenching. W602hSGLT1 and W609hSGLT1, the putative aglucone binding site mutants, exhibit normal sugar and phlorizin affinity, and show fluorescence properties which indicate that these residues are located in a very hydrophilic environment. Phlorizin and phloretin, but not d-glucose, protect both mutants against collisional quenchers. Depth-calculations using the parallax method suggest a location of Trp457 and Trp460 at an average distance of 10.8 A and 7.4 A from the center of the bilayer, while Trp602 and Trp609 are located outside the membrane. These results suggest that in the native carrier residues Gln at position 457 and Thr at position 460 reside in a hydrophilic access pathway extending 5-7 A into the membrane to which sugars as well as the sugar moiety of inhibitory

  20. Voice recognition.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Amit; McLoud, Theresa C

    2003-07-01

    Voice recognition represents one of the new technologies that are changing the practice of radiology. Thirty percent of radiology practices are either currently or plan to have voice recognition (VR) systems. VR software encompasses 4 core processes: spoken recognition of human speech, synthesis of human readable characters into speech, speaker identification and verification, and comprehension. Many software packages are available offering VR. All these packages should contain an interface with the radiology information system. The benefits include decreased turnaround time and cost savings. Its advantages include the transfer of secretarial duties to the radiologist with a result in decreased productivity. PMID:12867815

  1. Buspirone and gepirone: partial agonists at the 5HT/sub 1/A receptor linked to adenylate cyclase (AC) in rat and guinea pig hippocampal preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Yocca, F.D.; Hyslop, D.K.; Taylor, D.P.; Maayani, S.

    1986-03-01

    The pharmacologic nature of the 5-HT receptor that is negatively linked to AC in membrane preparations from rat and guinea pig (gp) brain in cell culture and in gp hippocampal homogenates positively linked to AC seem to be indistinguishable from the 5HT/sub 1A/ binding site in similar preparations. Affinity values of chemically unrelated but selective drugs for a binding site are useful for taxonomy of functional receptors. The novel anxiolytic drug buspirone (B) and its analog gepirone (G) exhibit selectivity and affinity for spiperone-sensitive (/sup 3/H)-5-HT and (/sup 3/H)-8-OH-DPAT binding sites in gp and rat hippocampus. In the two species tested, B and G were partial agonists (intrinsic activity approx. = 0.5) compared to 5-HT and its potent analog 5-carboxamideotryptamine (5-COAT) at the 5-HT/sub 1A/ receptor linked to AC. The K/sub B/ value of spiperone determined with B and G was indistinguishable from that determined with 5-HT and 5-COAT (20-30 nM). Since B and G exert unique agonist effects at the functional 5HT/sub 1A/ receptor, their structures may be important for identifying chemical groups necessary for recognition and activation of the 5HT/sub 1A/ receptor.

  2. The anticonvulsant and behavioural profile of L-687,414, a partial agonist acting at the glycine modulatory site on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Tricklebank, M D; Bristow, L J; Hutson, P H; Leeson, P D; Rowley, M; Saywell, K; Singh, L; Tattersall, F D; Thorn, L; Williams, B J

    1994-01-01

    1. The anticonvulsant and behavioural effects of the glycine/NMDA receptor partial agonist, L-687,414 (R(+)-cis-beta-methyl-3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one) have been investigated in rodents. 2. L-687,414 dose-dependently antagonized seizures induced by N-methyl-D,L- aspartic acid (NMDLA, ED50 = 19.7 mg kg-1), pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, ED50 = 13.0 mg kg-1) and electroshock (ED50 = 26.1 mg kg-1) when given intravenously 15 min before test, in male Swiss Webster mice but was most potent against audiogenic seizures induced by a 120 dB bell in DBA/2 mice (ED50 = 5.1 mg kg-1, i.p., 30 min before test). 3. L-687,414 also induced impairments of performance in a rotarod test in both Swiss Webster and DBA/2 mice and the ratio [rotarod MED:anticonvulsant ED50] varied between 0.9 and 5, depending on the convulsant used. 4. Similar behaviours to those seen after administration of the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (head weaving, body rolling, hyperlocomotion) were seen in the mouse after giving L-687,414, although the peak effect occurred at a dose (100 mg kg-1) which was 5-20 times the anticonvulsant ED50S, depending on the convulsant used. Unlike MK-801, however, doses of L-687,414 that were behaviourally stimulant did not increase dopamine turnover in the nucleus accumbens. 5. Consistent with the interaction of L-687,414 with the glycine/NMDA receptor, the anticonvulsant, ataxic and motor stimulant effects of the compound were significantly attenuated by the glycine/NMDA receptor agonist, D-serine (10-100 micrograms per mouse, i.c.v.).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7858861

  3. The pharmacological properties of the imidazobenzodiazepine, FG 8205, a novel partial agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tricklebank, M.D.; Honoré, T.; Iversen, S.D.; Kemp, J.A.; Knight, A.R.; Marshall, G.R.; Rupniak, N.M.J.; Singh, L.; Tye, S.; Watjen, F.; Wong, E.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    1 The pharmacological properties of the benzodiazepine receptor ligand, FG 8205 (7-chloro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-3-(5-isopropyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-4H- imidazol[1,5a][1,4]benzodiazepine) have been examined. 2 FG 8205 potently displaced [3H]-flumazenil binding in rat cortical membranes with a K1 of 3.3 nM, but was inactive at 13 neurotransmitter recognition sites. 3 Consistent with a partial agonist profile, the affinity of FG 8205 for the benzodiazepine recognition site was increased in the presence of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 300μM) by a degree (—log [IC50 in the presence of GABA/IC50 alone] = 0.34) significantly less than found for diazepam (0.46). FG 8205 also potentiated the inhibitory potency of the GABAA-receptor agonist, isoguvacine, on the hippocampal CA1 population spike and, again, the maximum shift (—log dose-ratio = 0.2) was significantly less than that seen with diazepam (0.4). 4 In anticonvulsant studies, the ED50 doses of FG 8205 and diazepam needed to antagonize seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) or by sound in audiogenic seizure prone mice were similar with values of 0.2–0.3 mgkg-1, i.p. However, even high doses of FG 8205 (50 mgkg-1) did not protect against seizures induced by electroshock. 5 FG 8205 released responding suppressed by footshock in a rat operant conditioned emotional response task over the dose range 0.5–50 mgkg-1 (i.p.). Similar doses of FG 8205 had a marked taming effect in cynomolgus monkeys. However, measures of sedation and ataxia (as measured by rotarod in the mouse, climbing behaviour in the rat, and by scoring arousal and co-ordination in primates) were slight and only transiently affected by FG 8205, and FG 8205 significantly antagonized the rotarod performance deficit induced by diazepam in the mouse. 6 While the potentiation by FG 8205 of the response to isoguvacine in the rat hippocampal slice and the anxiolytic-like effects of the compound in both rats and primates were reversed by the

  4. Single dose efficacy evaluation of two partial benzodiazepine receptor agonists in photosensitive epilepsy patients: A placebo-controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Schmidt, Bernd; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are highly effective to suppress various types of seizures; however, their clinical use is limited due to adverse effects and tolerance and dependence liability. Drugs that act only as partial agonists at the BZD recognition site (initially termed "BZD receptor") of the GABAA receptor chloride ionophore complex or exhibit a GABAA receptor subtype-selectivity are thought to have advantages vs. full agonists such as diazepam and most other clinically used BZDs in that such compounds have less adverse effects and reduced or absent tolerance and dependence liability. One of such compounds, abecarnil, has been clinically evaluated as a novel anxiolytic drug, but, despite its potent preclinical anti-seizure activity, it has not yet been evaluated in patients with epilepsy. In the present proof-of-concept study, we performed a within-subject placebo-controlled, single oral dose study of abecarnil in patients with photosensitive epilepsy. Flumazenil, which is generally considered a BZD receptor antagonist, but has slight partial agonistic properties, was used for comparison. In total, 12 patients were enrolled in this study. Abecarnil, 5 or 10mg, completely abolished the photo-paroxysmal EEG response, while flumazenil, 30, 60 or 100mg, was less effective. The anti-epileptic effect of abecarnil was significantly different from both placebo and flumazenil. Sedative adverse effects were observed after abecarnil but not flumazenil. The study substantiates previous pre-clinical experiments that abecarnil exerts pronounced anti-seizure activity. Epilepsy is often associated with anxiety, so that the anxiolytic activity of abecarnil would be an added advantage when using this compound in epilepsy patients. PMID:26921854

  5. Speech recognition based on pattern recognition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiner, Lawrence R.

    1990-05-01

    Algorithms for speech recognition can be characterized broadly as pattern recognition approaches and acoustic phonetic approaches. To date, the greatest degree of success in speech recognition has been obtained using pattern recognition paradigms. The use of pattern recognition techniques were applied to the problems of isolated word (or discrete utterance) recognition, connected word recognition, and continuous speech recognition. It is shown that understanding (and consequently the resulting recognizer performance) is best to the simplest recognition tasks and is considerably less well developed for large scale recognition systems.

  6. An isocytidine derivative with a 2-amino-6-methylpyridine unit for selective recognition of the CG interrupting site in an antiparallel triplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hidenori; Taniguchi, Yosuke; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2014-11-01

    Sequence-specific recognition of duplex DNA mediated by triple helix formation offers a potential basis for oligonucleotide therapy and biotechnology. However, triplex formation is limited mostly to homopurine strands, due to poor stabilization at CG or TA base pairs in the target duplex DNA sequences. Several non-natural nucleosides have been designed for the recognition of CG or TA base pairs within an antiparallel triplex DNA. Nevertheless, problems including low selectivity and high dependence on the neighboring bases remain unsolved. We thus synthesized N(2)-arylmethyl isodC derivatives and incorporated them into triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) for the selective recognition of the CG base pair within antiparallel triplex DNA. It was shown that an isodC derivative bearing a 2-amino-6-methylpyridine moiety (AP-isodC) recognizes the CG base pair with high selectivity in antiparallel triplex DNA irrespective of the flanking base pairs. PMID:25186222

  7. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    PubMed

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  8. Interactions of dopamine agonists with brain D1 receptors labeled by /sup 3/H-antagonists. Evidence for the presence of high and low affinity agonist-binding states

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.E.; Hamblin, M.W.; Creese, I.

    1985-02-01

    The interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with /sup 3/H-antagonist labeled D1 dopamine receptors of rat striatum have been characterized. (/sup 3/H)Flupentixol has been found to selectively label D1 dopamine receptors when its binding to D2 dopamine receptors is blocked by the inclusion of D2 selective concentrations of unlabeled spiroperidol or domperidone. Antagonist//sup 3/H-antagonist competition curves are of uniformly steep slope (nH . 1.0) suggesting the presence of a single D1 dopamine receptor. Agonist//sup 3/H-antagonist competition curves are extremely shallow (nH less than or equal to 0.5) for agonists of high relative efficacy, suggesting the presence of heterogeneous populations of agonist-binding states of the D1 dopamine receptor. Computer-modeling techniques were used to estimate affinities and relative site densities for these heterogeneous binding states. This analysis indicates that the ratio of agonist affinities for low and high affinity agonist-binding states is correlated with agonist relative efficacies in activating adenylate cyclase in membrane homogenates. Under the assay conditions employed, the addition of saturating concentrations of guanine nucleotides reduced, but did not abolish, the relative density of high affinity agonist-binding sites. These binding data can, at least in part, be explained by postulating two states of the D1 dopamine receptor, inducible by agonists but not by antagonists and modulated by guanine nucleotides.

  9. Agonist-bound structure of the human P2Y12 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Kaihua; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Paoletta, Silvia; Zhang, Dandan; Han, Gye Won; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Zhang, Wenru; Müller, Christa E.; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Katritch, Vsevolod; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Wu, Beili; Zhao, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R), one of eight members of the P2YR family expressed in humans, has been identified as one of the most prominent clinical drug targets for inhibition of platelet aggregation. Consequently, extensive mutagenesis and modeling studies of the P2Y12R have revealed many aspects of agonist/antagonist binding1-4. However, the details of agonist and antagonist recognition and function at the P2Y12R remain poorly understood at the molecular level. Here, we report the structures of the human P2Y12R in complex with a full agonist 2-methylthio-adenosine-5′-diphosphate (2MeSADP, a close analogue of endogenous agonist ADP) at 2.5 Å resolution, and the corresponding ATP derivative 2-methylthio-adenosine-5′-triphosphate (2MeSATP) at 3.1 Å resolution. Analysis of these structures, together with the structure of the P2Y12R with antagonist ethyl 6-(4-((benzylsulfonyl)carbamoyl)piperidin-1-yl)-5-cyano-2-methylnicotinate (AZD1283)5, reveals dramatic conformational changes between nucleotide and non-nucleotide ligand complexes in the extracellular regions, providing the first insight into a different ligand binding landscape in the δ-group of class A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Agonist and non-nucleotide antagonist adopt different orientations in the P2Y12R, with only partially overlapped binding pockets. The agonist-bound P2Y12R structure answers long-standing ambiguities surrounding P2Y12R-agonist recognition, and reveals interactions with several residues that had not been reported to be involved in agonist binding. As a first example of a GPCR where agonist access to the binding pocket requires large scale rearrangements in the highly malleable extracellular region, the structural studies therefore will provide invaluable insight into the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of agonists and different classes of antagonists for the P2Y12R and potentially for other closely related P2YRs. PMID:24784220

  10. Macromolecular recognition: Recognition of polymer side chains by cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of cyclodextrins (CD) with water soluble polymers possessing guest residues has been investigated as model systems in biological molecular recognition. The selectivity of interaction of CD with polymer-carrying guest residues is controlled by polymer chains, i.e., the steric effect of polymer main chain, the conformational effect of polymer main chain, and multi-site interaction. Macroscopic assemblies have been also realized based on molecular recognition using polyacrylamide-based gels possessing CD and guest residues.

  11. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  12. Synthesis of a specific monolithic column with artificial recognition sites for L-glutamic acid via cryo-crosslinking of imprinted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Göktürk, Ilgım; Üzek, Recep; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a new molecular imprinting (MIP)-based monolithic cryogel column was prepared using chemically crosslinked molecularly imprinted nanoparticles, to achieve a simplified chromatographic separation (SPE) for a model compound, L-glutamic acid (L-Glu). Cryogelation through crosslinking of imprinted nanoparticles forms stable monolithic cryogel columns. This technique reduces the leakage of nanoparticles and increases the surface area, while protecting the structural features of the cryogel for stable and efficient recognition of the template molecule. A non-imprinted monolithic cryogel column (NIP) was also prepared, using non-imprinted nanoparticles produced without the addition of L-Glu during polymerization. The molecularly imprinted monolithic cryogel column (MIP) indicates apparent recognition selectivity and a good adsorption capacity compared to the NIP. Also, we have achieved a significant increase in the adsorption capacity, using the advantage of high surface area of the nanoparticles. PMID:25749280

  13. A model of EcoRII restriction endonuclease action: the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpova, E. A.; Kubareva, E. A.; Shabarova, Z. A.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of interaction of restriction endonuclease EcoRII with DNA, we studied by native gel electrophoresis the binding of this endonuclease to a set of synthetic DNA-duplexes containing the modified or canonical recognition sequence 5'-d(CCA/TGG)-3'. All binding substrate or substrate analogues tested could be divided into two major groups: (i) duplexes that, at the interaction with endonuclease EcoRII, form two types of stable complexes on native gel in the absence of Mg2+ cofactor; (ii) duplexes that form only one type of complex, observed both in the presence and absence of Mg2+. Unlike the latter, duplexes under the first group can be hydrolyzed by endonuclease. Data obtained suggest that the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition sequence. A model of EcoRII endonuclease action is presented.

  14. Agonist mediated conformational changes of solubilized calf forebrain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, P; Andre, C; de Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G

    1984-10-01

    Muscarinic receptors in calf forebrain membranes can be identified by the specific binding of the radiolabelled antagonist [3H]dexetimide. These receptors (2.8 pM/mg protein) comprise two non-interconvertible subpopulations with respectively high and low agonist affinity but with the same antagonist affinity. For all the agonists tested the low affinity sites represent 85 +/- 5% of the total receptor population. 0.5% Digitonin solubilized extracts contain 0.8 pM muscarinic receptor/mg protein. In contrast with the membranes, these extracts contain only sites with low agonist affinity. The alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide causes an increase of the acetylcholine affinity for the low affinity sites in membranes as well as for the solubilized sites. This effect is time dependent until a maximal 3-fold increase in affinity is attained. The rate of N-ethylmaleimide action is enhanced by the concomitant presence of agonists. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide does not affect antagonist binding. This suggests that agonists mediate a conformational change of both the membrane bound low affinity muscarinic sites and of the solubilized sites, resulting in their increased susceptibility towards NEM alkylation. PMID:6487351

  15. Alteration of zif268 zinc-finger motifs gives rise to non-native zinc-co-ordination sites but preserves wild-type DNA recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Green, A; Sarkar, B

    1998-01-01

    Zinc fingers are among the major structural motifs found in proteins that are involved in eukaryotic gene regulation. Many of these zinc-finger domains are involved in DNA binding. This study investigated whether the zinc-co-ordinating (Cys)2(His)2 motif found in the three zinc fingers of zif268 could be replaced by a (Cys)4 motif while still preserving DNA recognition. (Cys)2(His)2-to-(Cys)4 mutations were generated in each of the three zinc fingers of zif268 individually, as well as in fingers 1 and 3, and fingers 2 and 3 together. Whereas finger 1 and finger 3 tolerate the switch, such an alteration in finger 2 renders the polypeptide incapable of DNA recognition. The protein-DNA interaction was examined in greater detail by using a methylation-interference assay. The mutant polypeptides containing the (Cys)4 motif in fingers 1 or 3 recognize DNA in a manner identical to the wild-type protein, suggesting that the (Cys)4 motif appears to give rise to a properly folded finger. Additional results indicate that a zif268 variant containing a (Cys)2(His)(Ala) arrangement in finger 1 is also capable of DNA recognition in a manner identical to the wild-type polypeptide. This appears to be the first time that such alterations, in the context of an intact DNA-binding domain, have still allowed for specific DNA recognition. Taken together, the work presented here enhances our understanding of the relationship between metal ligation and DNA-binding by zinc fingers. PMID:9639566

  16. Beta-agonists and animal welfare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of beta-agonists in animal feed is a high profile topic within the U.S. as consumers and activist groups continue to question its safety. The only beta-agonist currently available for use in swine is ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC). This is available as Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health – FDA a...

  17. Pharmacological properties of acid N-thiazolylamide FFA2 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew J; Tsoulou, Christina; Ward, Emma; Gower, Elaine; Bhudia, Nisha; Chowdhury, Forhad; Dean, Tony W; Faucher, Nicolas; Gangar, Akanksha; Dowell, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    FFA2 is a receptor for short-chain fatty acids. Propionate (C3) and 4-chloro-α-(1-methylethyl)-N-2-thiazolyl-benzeneacetamide (4-CMTB), the prototypical synthetic FFA2 agonist, evoke calcium mobilization in neutrophils and inhibit lipolysis in adipocytes via this G-protein-coupled receptor. 4-CMTB contains an N-thiazolylamide motif but no acid group, and 4-CMTB and C3 bind to different sites on FFA2 and show allosteric cooperativity. Recently, FFA2 agonists have been described that contain both N-thiazolylamide and carboxylate groups, reminiscent of bitopic ligands. These are thought to engage the carboxylate-binding site on FFA2, but preliminary evidence suggests they do not bind to the same site as 4-CMTB even though both contain N-thiazolylamide. Here, we describe the characterization of four FFA2 ligands containing both N-thiazolylamide and carboxylate. (R)-3-benzyl-4-((4-(2-chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)(methyl)amino)-4-oxobutanoic acid (compound 14) exhibits allosteric agonism with 4-CMTB but not C3. Three other compounds agonize FFA2 in [35S]GTPγS-incorporation or cAMP assays but behave as inverse agonists in yeast-based gene-reporter assays, showing orthosteric antagonism of C3 responses but allosteric antagonism of 4-CMTB responses. Thus, the bitopic-like FFA2 ligands engage the orthosteric site but do not compete at the site of 4-CMTB binding on an FFA2 receptor molecule. Compound 14 activates FFA2 on human neutrophils and mouse adipocytes, but appears not to inhibit lipolysis upon treatment of human primary adipocytes in spite of the presence of a functional FFA2 receptor in these cells. Hence, these new ligands may reveal differences in coupling of FFA2 between human and rodent adipose tissues. PMID:26236484

  18. Defining Nicotinic Agonist Binding Surfaces through Photoaffinity Labeling†

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Maltby, David; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Zhang, Nanjing; Durkin, Kathleen A.; Presley, Jack; Talley, Todd T.; Taylor, Palmer; Burlingame, Alma L.; Casida, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChR) agonists are potential therapeutic agents for neurological dysfunction. In the present study, the homopentameric mollusk ACh binding protein (AChBP), used as a surrogate for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the nAChR, was specifically derivatized by the highly potent agonist azidoepibatidine (AzEPI) prepared as a photoaffinity probe and radioligand. One EPI-nitrene photoactivated molecule was incorporated in each subunit interface binding site based on analysis of the intact derivatized protein. Tryptic fragments of the modified AChBP were analyzed by collision-induced dissociation and Edman sequencing of radiolabeled peptides. Each specific EPI-nitrene-modified site involved either Tyr195 of loop C on the principal or (+)-face or Met116 of loop E on the complementary or (−)-face. The two derivatization sites were observed in similar frequency, providing evidence of the reactivity of the azido/nitrene probe substituent and close proximity to both residues. [3H]AzEPI binds to the α4β2 nAChR at a single high-affinity site and photoaffinity-labels only the α4 subunit, presumably modifying Tyr225 spatially corresponding to Tyr195 of AChBP. Phe137 of the β2 nAChR subunit, equivalent to Met116 of AChBP, conceivably lacks sufficient reactivity with the nitrene generated from the probe. The present photoaffinity labeling in a physiologically relevant condition combined with the crystal structure of AChBP allows development of precise structural models for the AzEPI interactions with AChBP and α4β2 nAChR. These findings enabled us to use AChBP as a structural surrogate to define the nAChR agonist site. PMID:17614369

  19. Agonist activity of a novel compound, 1-[3-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenoxy)propyl]-4-phenyl piperazine (BP-554), at central 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, T; Seong, Y H; Aono, H; Kanda, T; Baba, A; Saito, K; Tobe, A; Iwata, H

    1989-10-24

    We used an in vitro radioligand receptor binding assay with rat cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum membrane preparations to show that 1-[3-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenoxy)propyl]-4-phenyl piperazine (BP-554) had much higher affinity for 5-HT1A recognition sites than for 5-HT1-non-A, 5-HT2, benzodiazepine, dopamine D-2 and alpha 2-adrenergic recognition sites. The compound inhibited the activity of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in rat hippocampal membranes. Intraperitoneal injection of BP-554 to mice decreased the concentration of only 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid of the amines and their metabolites in the brain and decreased the accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptophan in the brain after decarboxylase inhibition by 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine. Furthermore, the administration of BP-554 caused hypothermia and increased serum corticosterone levels in mice. The observed effects of BP-554 were similar to those of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin. These results suggest that BP-554 acts as a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist in vivo. PMID:2533078

  20. Molecular modelling of human 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor (5-HT2A) and virtual screening studies towards the identification of agonist and antagonist molecules.

    PubMed

    Gandhimathi, A; Sowdhamini, R

    2016-05-01

    The serotonin receptors, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors, are a group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ligand-gated ion channels found in the central and peripheral nervous systems. GPCRs have a characteristic feature of activating different signalling pathways upon ligand binding and these ligands display several efficacy levels to differentially activate the receptor. GPCRs are primary drug targets due to their central role in several signal transduction pathways. Drug design for GPCRs is also most challenging due to their inherent promiscuity in ligand recognition, which gives rise to several side effects of existing drugs. Here, we have performed the ligand interaction study using the two prominent states of GPCR, namely the active and inactive state of the 5-HT2A receptor. Active state of 5-HT2A receptor model enhances the understanding of conformational difference which influences the ligand-binding site. A 5-HT2A receptor active state model was constructed by homology modelling using active state β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR). In addition, virtual screening and docking studies with both active and inactive state models reveal potential small molecule hits which could be considered as agonist-like and antagonist-like molecules. The results from the all-atom molecular dynamics simulations further confirmed that agonists and antagonists interact in different modes with the receptor. PMID:26327576

  1. Centrally acting hypotensive agents with affinity for 5-HT1A binding sites inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in calf hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Schoeffter, P.; Hoyer, D.

    1988-01-01

    1. A number of centrally acting hypotensive agents and other ligands with high affinity for 5-hydroxytryptamine1A (5-HT1A) recognition sites have been tested on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in calf hippocampus, a functional model for 5-HT1A-receptors. 2. Concentration-dependent inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was elicited by the reference 5-HT1-receptor agonists (mean EC50 value, nM): 5-HT (22), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, 3.2), 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 8.6), N,N-dipropyl-5-carboxamidotryptamine (DP-5-CT, 2.3), 1-[2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-piperazine (PAPP or LY 165163, 20), 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H indole (RU 24969, 20), buspirone (65) and ipsapirone (56). Emax amounted to 18-20% inhibition for all but the latter two agonists (14%). 3. The following hypotensive agents with high affinity for 5-HT1A sites were potent agonists in this system (mean EC50 value, nM): flesinoxan (24), indorenate (99), erythro-1-(1-[2-(1,4-benzodioxan-2-yl)-2-hydroxyethyl]-4-piperidyl )- 2-benzimidazolinone (R 28935, 2.5), urapidil (390) and 5-methyl-urapidil (3.5). The first two agents were full agonists, whereas the latter three acted as partial agonists with 60-80% efficacy. 4. Metergoline and methysergide behaved as full agonists and cyanopindolol as a partial agonist with low efficacy. Spiroxatrine and 2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)aminomethyl- 1,4-benzodioxane (WB 4101) which bind to 5-HT1A sites with nanomolar affinity, were agonists and inhibited potently forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in calf hippocampus, showing mean EC50 values of 23 and 15 nM, respectively. Spiroxatrine and WB 4101 yielded 90% and 50% efficacy, respectively. 5. Spiperone and methiothepin (each 1 microM) caused rightward shifts of the concentration-effect curve to 8-OH-DPAT, without loss of the maximal effect, as did the partial agonist cyanopindolol (0.1 microM) and the

  2. Improved design of hammerhead ribozyme for selective digestion of target RNA through recognition of site-specific adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masatora; Kurihara, Kei; Yamaguchi, Shota; Oyama, Yui; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is an endogenous regulatory mechanism involved in various biological processes. Site-specific, editing-state–dependent degradation of target RNA may be a powerful tool both for analyzing the mechanism of RNA editing and for regulating biological processes. Previously, we designed an artificial hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) for selective, site-specific RNA cleavage dependent on the A-to-I RNA editing state. In the present work, we developed an improved strategy for constructing a trans-acting HHR that specifically cleaves target editing sites in the adenosine but not the inosine state. Specificity for unedited sites was achieved by utilizing a sequence encoding the intrinsic cleavage specificity of a natural HHR. We used in vitro selection methods in an HHR library to select for an extended HHR containing a tertiary stabilization motif that facilitates HHR folding into an active conformation. By using this method, we successfully constructed highly active HHRs with unedited-specific cleavage. Moreover, using HHR cleavage followed by direct sequencing, we demonstrated that this ribozyme could cleave serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) mRNA extracted from mouse brain, depending on the site-specific editing state. This unedited-specific cleavage also enabled us to analyze the effect of editing state at the E and C sites on editing at other sites by using direct sequencing for the simultaneous quantification of the editing ratio at multiple sites. Our approach has the potential to elucidate the mechanism underlying the interdependencies of different editing states in substrate RNA with multiple editing sites. PMID:24448449

  3. Recognition intent and visual word recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man-Ying; Ching, Chi-Le

    2009-03-01

    This study adopted a change detection task to investigate whether and how recognition intent affects the construction of orthographic representation in visual word recognition. Chinese readers (Experiment 1-1) and nonreaders (Experiment 1-2) detected color changes in radical components of Chinese characters. Explicit recognition demand was imposed in Experiment 2 by an additional recognition task. When the recognition was implicit, a bias favoring the radical location informative of character identity was found in Chinese readers (Experiment 1-1), but not nonreaders (Experiment 1-2). With explicit recognition demands, the effect of radical location interacted with radical function and word frequency (Experiment 2). An estimate of identification performance under implicit recognition was derived in Experiment 3. These findings reflect the joint influence of recognition intent and orthographic regularity in shaping readers' orthographic representation. The implication for the role of visual attention in word recognition was also discussed. PMID:19036609

  4. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  5. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  6. Deciphering the GPER/GPR30-agonist and antagonists interactions using molecular modeling studies, molecular dynamics, and docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Luna, D; Martínez-Archundia, M; Maroun, Rachid C; Ceballos-Reyes, G; Fragoso-Vázquez, M J; González-Juárez, D E; Correa-Basurto, J

    2015-01-01

    The G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 GPER/GPR30 is a transmembrane seven-helix (7TM) receptor involved in the growth and proliferation of breast cancer. Due to the absence of a crystal structure of GPER/GPR30, in this work, molecular modeling studies have been carried out to build a three-dimensional structure, which was subsequently refined by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (up to 120 ns). Furthermore, we explored GPER/GPR30's molecular recognition properties by using reported agonist ligands (G1, estradiol (E2), tamoxifen, and fulvestrant) and the antagonist ligands (G15 and G36) in subsequent docking studies. Our results identified the E2 binding site on GPER/GPR30, as well as other receptor cavities for accepting large volume ligands, through GPER/GPR30 π-π, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bond interactions. Snapshots of the MD trajectory at 14 and 70 ns showed almost identical binding motifs for G1 and G15. It was also observed that C107 interacts with the acetyl oxygen of G1 (at 14 ns) and that at 70 ns the residue E275 interacts with the acetyl group and with the oxygen from the other agonist whereas the isopropyl group of G36 is oriented toward Met141, suggesting that both C107 and E275 could be involved in the protein activation. This contribution suggest that GPER1 has great structural changes which explain its great capacity to accept diverse ligands, and also, the same ligand could be recognized in different binding pose according to GPER structural conformations. PMID:25587872

  7. Monoterpenoid agonists of TRPV3

    PubMed Central

    Vogt-Eisele, A K; Weber, K; Sherkheli, M A; Vielhaber, G; Panten, J; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transient receptor potential (TRP) V3 is a thermosensitive ion channel expressed predominantly in the skin and neural tissues. It is activated by warmth and the monoterpene camphor and has been hypothesized to be involved in skin sensitization. A selection of monoterpenoid compounds was tested for TRPV3 activation to establish a structure-function relationship. The related channel TRPM8 is activated by cool temperatures and a number of chemicals, among them the monoterpene (-)-menthol. The overlap of the receptor pharmacology between the two channels was investigated. Experimental approach: Transfected HEK293 cells were superfused with the test substances. Evoked currents were measured in whole cell patch clamp measurements. Dose-response curves for the most potent agonists were obtained in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Key results: Six monoterpenes significantly more potent than camphor were identified: 6-tert-butyl-m-cresol, carvacrol, dihydrocarveol, thymol, carveol and (+)-borneol. Their EC50 is up to 16 times lower than that of camphor. All of these compounds carry a ring-located hydroxyl group and neither activates TRPM8 to a major extent. Conclusions and implications: Terpenoids have long been recognized as medically and pharmacologically active compounds, although their molecular targets have only partially been identified. TRPV3 activation may be responsible for several of the described effects of terpenoids. We show here that TRPV3 is activated by a number of monoterpenes and that a secondary hydroxyl-group is a structural requirement. PMID:17420775

  8. Structure and DNA-Binding Sites of the SWI1 AT-rich Interaction Domain (ARID) Suggest Determinants for Sequence-Specific DNA Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhkmann; Zhang, Ziming; Upchurch, Sean; Isern, Nancy G.; Chen, Yuan

    2004-04-16

    2 ARID is a homologous family of DNA-binding domains that occur in DNA binding proteins from a wide variety of species, ranging from yeast to nematodes, insects, mammals and plants. SWI1, a member of the SWI/SNF protein complex that is involved in chromatin remodeling during transcription, contains the ARID motif. The ARID domain of human SWI1 (also known as p270) does not select for a specific DNA sequence from a random sequence pool. The lack of sequence specificity shown by the SWI1 ARID domain stands in contrast to the other characterized ARID domains, which recognize specific AT-rich sequences. We have solved the three-dimensional structure of human SWI1 ARID using solution NMR methods. In addition, we have characterized non-specific DNA-binding by the SWI1 ARID domain. Results from this study indicate that a flexible long internal loop in ARID motif is likely to be important for sequence specific DNA-recognition. The structure of human SWI1 ARID domain also represents a distinct structural subfamily. Studies of ARID indicate that boundary of the DNA binding structural and functional domains can extend beyond the sequence homologous region in a homologous family of proteins. Structural studies of homologous domains such as ARID family of DNA-binding domains should provide information to better predict the boundary of structural and functional domains in structural genomic studies. Key Words: ARID, SWI1, NMR, structural genomics, protein-DNA interaction.

  9. Three-dimensional common-feature hypotheses for octopamine agonist 2-(arylimino)imidazolidines.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Eiji; Eto, Morifusa

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 10 octopamine (OA) agonist 2-(Arylimino)imidazolidines (AIIs), 2-(Arylimino)thiazolidines (AITs) and 2-(Arylimino)oxazolidines (AIOs). Among the 10 common-featured models generated by program Catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a ring aromatic (RA), a positive ionizable (PI) and three hydrophobic aliphatic (HpAl) features was considered to be important in evaluating the OA-agonist activity. Active OA agonist 2,6-Et2 AII mapped well onto all the RA, PI and HpAl features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, less active compounds were shown to be difficult to achieve the energetically favorable conformation which is found in the active molecules in order to fit the 3-D common-feature pharmacophore models. Taken together, 2,6-Et2-Ph and foramidine structures are important as OA agonists. The present studies on OA agonists demonstrate that a RA, a PI and three HpAl sites located on the molecule seem to be essential for OA-agonist activity. PMID:11738614

  10. Piperidine derivatives as nonprostanoid IP receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ryoji; Sakagami, Hideki; Koiwa, Masakazu; Ito, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Mitsuko; Isogaya, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of a new class of nonprostanoid prostaglandin I2 receptor (IP receptor) agonists is reported. Among them, the unique piperidine derivative 31b (2-((1-(2-(N-(4-tolyl)benzamido)ethyl)piperidin-4-yl)oxy)acetic acid) was a good IP receptor agonist and was 50-fold more selective for the human IP receptor than for other human prostanoid receptors. This compound showed good pharmacokinetic properties in dog. PMID:26996371

  11. SH-I-048A, AN IN VITRO NONSELECTIVE SUPER-AGONIST AT THE BENZODIAZEPINE SITE OF GABAA RECEPTORS: THE APPROXIMATED ACTIVATION OF RECEPTOR SUBTYPES MAY EXPLAIN BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Obradović, Aleksandar Lj.; Joksimović, Srđan; Poe, Michael M.; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Varagic, Zdravko; Namjoshi, Ojas; Batinić, Bojan; Radulović, Tamara; Marković, Bojan; Roth, Brian; Sieghart, Werner; Cook, James M.; Savić, Miroslav M.

    2014-01-01

    Enormous progress in understanding the role of four populations of benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAA receptors was paralleled by the puzzling findings suggesting that substantial separation of behavioral effects may be accomplished by apparently non-selective modulators. We report on SH-I-048A, a newly-synthesized chiral positive modulator of GABAA receptors characterized by exceptional subnanomolar affinity, high efficacy and non-selectivity. Its influence on behavior was assessed in Wistar rats and contrasted to that obtained with 2 mg/kg diazepam. SH-I-048A reached micromolar concentrations in brain tissue, while the unbound fraction in brain homogenate was around 1.5%. The approximated electrophysiological responses, which estimated free concentrations of SH-I-048A or diazepam are able to elicit, suggested a similarity between the 10 mg/kg dose of the novel ligand and 2 mg/kg diazepam; however, SH-I-048A was relatively more active at α1- and α5-containing GABAA receptors. Behaviorally, SH-I-048A induced sedative, muscle relaxant and ataxic effects, reversed mechanical hyperalgesia 24 hours after injury, while it was devoid of clear anxiolytic actions and did not affect water-maze performance. While lack of clear anxiolytic actions may be connected with an enhanced potentiation at α1-containing GABAA receptors, the observed behavior in the rotarod, water maze and peripheral nerve injury tests was possibly affected by its prominent action at receptors containing the α5 subunit. The current results encourage further innovative approaches aimed at linking in vitro and in vivo data in order to help define fine-tuning mechanisms at four sensitive receptor populations that underlie subtle differences in behavioral profiles of benzodiazepine site ligands. PMID:24472579

  12. Sh-I-048A, an in vitro non-selective super-agonist at the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors: the approximated activation of receptor subtypes may explain behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Obradović, Aleksandar Lj; Joksimović, Srđan; Poe, Michael M; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Varagic, Zdravko; Namjoshi, Ojas; Batinić, Bojan; Radulović, Tamara; Marković, Bojan; Roth, Brian L; Sieghart, Werner; Cook, James M; Savić, Miroslav M

    2014-03-20

    Enormous progress in understanding the role of four populations of benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAA receptors was paralleled by the puzzling findings suggesting that substantial separation of behavioral effects may be accomplished by apparently non-selective modulators. We report on SH-I-048A, a newly synthesized chiral positive modulator of GABAA receptors characterized by exceptional subnanomolar affinity, high efficacy and non-selectivity. Its influence on behavior was assessed in Wistar rats and contrasted to that obtained with 2mg/kg diazepam. SH-I-048A reached micromolar concentrations in brain tissue, while the unbound fraction in brain homogenate was around 1.5%. The approximated electrophysiological responses, which estimated free concentrations of SH-I-048A or diazepam are able to elicit, suggested a similarity between the 10mg/kg dose of the novel ligand and 2mg/kg diazepam; however, SH-I-048A was relatively more active at α1- and α5-containing GABAA receptors. Behaviorally, SH-I-048A induced sedative, muscle relaxant and ataxic effects, reversed mechanical hyperalgesia 24h after injury, while it was devoid of clear anxiolytic actions and did not affect water-maze performance. While lack of clear anxiolytic actions may be connected with an enhanced potentiation at α1-containing GABAA receptors, the observed behavior in the rotarod, water maze and peripheral nerve injury tests was possibly affected by its prominent action at receptors containing the α5 subunit. The current results encourage further innovative approaches aimed at linking in vitro and in vivo data in order to help define fine-tuning mechanisms at four sensitive receptor populations that underlie subtle differences in behavioral profiles of benzodiazepine site ligands. PMID:24472579

  13. Crystal structure of human U1 snRNP, a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle, reveals the mechanism of 5' splice site recognition.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    U1 snRNP binds to the 5' exon-intron junction of pre-mRNA and thus plays a crucial role at an early stage of pre-mRNA splicing. We present two crystal structures of engineered U1 sub-structures, which together reveal at atomic resolution an almost complete network of protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions within U1 snRNP, and show how the 5' splice site of pre-mRNA is recognised by U1 snRNP. The zinc-finger of U1-C interacts with the duplex between pre-mRNA and the 5'-end of U1 snRNA. The binding of the RNA duplex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between U1-C and the RNA backbone around the splice junction but U1-C makes no base-specific contacts with pre-mRNA. The structure, together with RNA binding assays, shows that the selection of 5'-splice site nucleotides by U1 snRNP is achieved predominantly through basepairing with U1 snRNA whilst U1-C fine-tunes relative affinities of mismatched 5'-splice sites. PMID:25555158

  14. Crystal structure of human U1 snRNP, a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle, reveals the mechanism of 5′ splice site recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    U1 snRNP binds to the 5′ exon-intron junction of pre-mRNA and thus plays a crucial role at an early stage of pre-mRNA splicing. We present two crystal structures of engineered U1 sub-structures, which together reveal at atomic resolution an almost complete network of protein–protein and RNA-protein interactions within U1 snRNP, and show how the 5′ splice site of pre-mRNA is recognised by U1 snRNP. The zinc-finger of U1-C interacts with the duplex between pre-mRNA and the 5′-end of U1 snRNA. The binding of the RNA duplex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between U1-C and the RNA backbone around the splice junction but U1-C makes no base-specific contacts with pre-mRNA. The structure, together with RNA binding assays, shows that the selection of 5′-splice site nucleotides by U1 snRNP is achieved predominantly through basepairing with U1 snRNA whilst U1-C fine-tunes relative affinities of mismatched 5′-splice sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04986.001 PMID:25555158

  15. Agonist self-inhibition at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor a nonspecific action

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Firestone, L.L.; Miller, K.W.

    1987-05-19

    Agonist concentration-response relationships at nicotinic postsynaptic receptors were established by measuring /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from acetylcholine receptor rich native Torpedo membrane vesicles under three different conditions: (1) integrated net ion efflux (in 10 s) from untreated vesicles, (2) integrated net efflux from vesicles in which most acetylcholine sites were irreversibly blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin, and (3) initial rates of efflux (5-100 ms) from vesicles that were partially blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin. Exposure to acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine, phenyltrimethylammonium, or (-)-nicotine over 10/sup 8/-fold concentration ranges results in bell-shaped ion flux response curves due to stimulation of acetylcholine receptor channel opening at low concentrations and inhibition of channel function at 60-2000 times higher concentrations. Concentrations of agonists that inhibit their own maximum /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux by 50% (K/sub B/ values) are 110, 211, 3.0, 39, and 8.9 mM, respectively, for the agonists listed above. For acetylcholine and carbamylcholine, K/sub B/ values determined from both 10-s and 15-ms efflux measurements are the same, indicating that the rate of agonist-induced desensitization increases to maximum at concentrations lower than those causing self-inhibition. For all partial and full agonists studied, Hill coefficients for self-inhibition are close to 1.0. Concentrations of agonists up to 8 times K/sub B/ did not change the order parameter reported by a spin-labeled fatty acid incorporated in Torpedo membranes. The authors conclude that agonist self-inhibition cannot be attributed to a general nonspecific membrane perturbation. Instead, these results are consistent with a saturable site of action either at the lipid-protein interface or on the acetylcholine receptor protein itself.

  16. Visual discrimination of phenolic group β₂-agonists and the ultrasensitive identification of their oxidation products by use of a tyrosinase-based catalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Huayu; Guo, Chunhui; Liu, Ping; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2014-05-20

    The fast, visual discrimination of β2-agonist drugs is needed for the on-site screening of various types of β2-agonists in blood and urine samples. We developed a simple, rapid, one-step colorimetric method to detect phenolic β2-agonists by use of a tyrosinase catalytic reaction, which involved the oxidation of the phenol group on the benzene rings of β2-agonists. The enzymatic oxidation products of β2-agonists with phenolic groups exhibited different color transitions based on the different substituent groups on the aromatic ring, whereas β2-agonists with the aniline group or the resorcinol group remained colorless. This visual color discrepancy has been used to intuitively and conveniently differentiate the phenolic group β2-agonists, such as ractopamine, isoxsuprine, ritodrine, and fenoterol. The oxidation products of these compounds have been identified using mass spectrometry, and the possible reaction mechanisms between β2-agonists and tyrosinase have been deduced. The parameters that govern the analytical performance of the reaction product, including the pH of the buffer solution, the concentration of tyrosinase, and the incubation time, have been studied and optimized using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and electrochemical methods. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the absorbance intensity and electrochemical signal were found to increase proportionally to the concentrations of the phenolic group β2-agonists, which gave a quantitative description of the β2-agonists in solution. PMID:24785981

  17. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  18. Protection of CpG islands against de novo DNA methylation during oogenesis is associated with the recognition site of E2f1 and E2f2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epigenetic reprogramming during early mammalian embryonic and germ cell development is a genome-wide process. CpG islands (CGIs), central to the regulation of mammalian gene expression, are exceptional in terms of whether, when and how they are affected by epigenetic reprogramming. Results We investigated the DNA sequences of CGIs in the context of genome-wide data on DNA methylation and transcription during oogenesis and early embryogenesis to identify signals associated with methylation establishment and protection from de novo methylation in oocytes and associated with post-fertilisation methylation maintenance. We find no evidence for a characteristic DNA sequence motif in oocyte-methylated CGIs. Neither do we find evidence for a general role of regular CpG spacing in methylation establishment at CGIs in oocytes. In contrast, the resistance of most CGIs to de novo methylation during oogenesis is associated with the motif CGCGC, the recognition site of E2f1 and E2f2, transcription factors highly expressed specifically in oocytes. This association is independent of prominent known hypomethylation-associated factors: CGI promoter activity, H3K4me3, Cfp1 binding or R-loop formation potential. Conclusions Our results support a DNA sequence-independent and transcription-driven model of de novo CGI methylation during oogenesis. In contrast, our results for CGIs that remain unmethylated are consistent with a model of protection from methylation involving sequence recognition by DNA-binding proteins, E2f1 and E2f2 being probable candidates. PMID:25478011

  19. Isothiouronium compounds as gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, R. D.; Dickenson, H. W.; Hiern, B. P.; Johnston, G. A.; Kazlauskas, R.

    1986-01-01

    Analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) incorporating an isothiouronium salt as a replacement for a protonated amino functional group have been investigated for activity on: GABA receptors in the guinea-pig ileum; [3H]-GABA and [3H]-diazepam binding to rat brain membranes; and GABA uptake and transamination. For the homologous series of omega-isothiouronium alkanoic acids, maximum GABA-mimetic activity was found at 3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]propanoic acid. Introduction of unsaturation into this compound gave two isomeric conformationally restricted analogues. The trans isomer was inactive at GABA receptors while the cis compound ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid (ZAPA)) was more potent than muscimol and GABA as a GABA agonist with respect to low affinity GABA receptor sites. Both isomers were moderately potent at inhibiting the uptake of [3H]-GABA into rat brain slices. Comparison of possible conformations of the two unsaturated isomers by interactive computer graphics modelling and comparison with muscimol has led to a plausible active conformation of ZAPA, which may be a selective and potent agonist for low affinity GABA binding sites. PMID:3015310

  20. Purine (N)-Methanocarba Nucleoside Derivatives Lacking an Exocyclic Amine as Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Dilip K; Ciancetta, Antonella; Warnick, Eugene; O'Connor, Robert; Chen, Zhoumou; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Crane, Steven; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Auchampach, John A; Salvemini, Daniela; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2016-04-14

    Purine (N)-methanocarba-5'-N-alkyluronamidoriboside A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) agonists lacking an exocyclic amine resulted from an unexpected reaction during a Sonogashira coupling and subsequent aminolysis. Because the initial C6-Me and C6-styryl derivatives had unexpectedly high A3AR affinity, other rigid nucleoside analogues lacking an exocyclic amine were prepared. Of these, the C6-Me-(2-phenylethynyl) and C2-(5-chlorothienylethynyl) analogues were particularly potent, with human A3AR Ki values of 6 and 42 nM, respectively. Additionally, the C2-(5-chlorothienyl)-6-H analogue was potent and selective at A3AR (MRS7220, Ki 60 nM) and also completely reversed mouse sciatic nerve mechanoallodynia (in vivo, 3 μmol/kg, po). The lack of a C6 H-bond donor while maintaining A3AR affinity and efficacy could be rationalized by homology modeling and docking of these hypermodified nucleosides. The modeling suggests that a suitable combination of stabilizing features can partially compensate for the lack of an exocyclic amine, an otherwise important contributor to recognition in the A3AR binding site. PMID:26890707

  1. OX40 agonist therapy enhances CD8 infiltration and decreases immune suppression in the tumor.

    PubMed

    Gough, Michael J; Ruby, Carl E; Redmond, William L; Dhungel, Birat; Brown, Alexis; Weinberg, Andrew D

    2008-07-01

    Acquisition of full T-cell effector function and memory differentiation requires appropriate costimulatory signals, including ligation of the costimulatory molecule OX40 (TNFRSF4, CD134). Tumors often grow despite the presence of tumor-specific T cells and establish an environment with weak costimulation and immune suppression. Administration of OX40 agonists has been shown to significantly increase the survival of tumor-bearing mice and was dependent on the presence of both CD4 and CD8 T cells during tumor-specific priming. To understand how OX40 agonists work in mice with established tumors, we developed a model to study changes in immune cell populations within the tumor environment. We show here that systemic administration of OX40 agonist antibodies increased the proportion of CD8 T cells at the tumor site in three different tumor models. The function of the CD8 T cells at the tumor site was also increased by administration of OX40 agonist antibody, and we observed an increase in the proportion of antigen-specific CD8 T cells within the tumor. Despite decreases in the proportion of T regulatory cells at the tumor site, T regulatory cell function in the spleen was unaffected by OX40 agonist antibody therapy. Interestingly, administration of OX40 agonist antibody caused significant changes in the tumor stroma, including decreased macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and decreased expression of transforming growth factor-beta. Thus, therapies targeting OX40 dramatically changed the tumor environment by enhancing the infiltration and function of CD8 T cells combined with diminished suppressive influences within the tumor. PMID:18593921

  2. Dual roles for an arginine-rich motif in specific genome recognition and localization of viral coat protein to RNA replication sites in flock house virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Venter, P Arno; Marshall, Dawn; Schneemann, Anette

    2009-04-01

    Assembly of many RNA viruses entails the encapsidation of multiple genome segments into a single virion, and underlying mechanisms for this process are still poorly understood. In the case of the nodavirus Flock House virus (FHV), a bipartite positive-strand RNA genome consisting of RNA1 and RNA2 is copackaged into progeny virions. In this study, we investigated whether the specific packaging of FHV RNA is dependent on an arginine-rich motif (ARM) located in the N terminus of the coat protein. Our results demonstrate that the replacement of all arginine residues within this motif with alanines rendered the resultant coat protein unable to package RNA1, suggesting that the ARM represents an important determinant for the encapsidation of this genome segment. In contrast, replacement of all arginines with lysines had no effect on RNA1 packaging. Interestingly, confocal microscopic analysis demonstrated that the RNA1 packaging-deficient mutant did not localize to mitochondrial sites of FHV RNA replication as efficiently as wild-type coat protein. In addition, gain-of-function analyses showed that the ARM by itself was sufficient to target green fluorescent protein to RNA replication sites. These data suggest that the packaging of RNA1 is dependent on trafficking of coat protein to mitochondria, the presumed site of FHV assembly, and that this trafficking requires a high density of positive charge in the N terminus. Our results are compatible with a model in which recognition of RNA1 and RNA2 for encapsidation occurs sequentially and in distinct cellular microenvironments. PMID:19158251

  3. beta2-Agonists at the Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Kenneth D

    2006-01-01

    The different approaches that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) had adopted to beta2-agonists and the implications for athletes are reviewed by a former Olympic team physician who later became a member of the Medical Commission of the IOC (IOC-MC). Steadily increasing knowledge of the effects of inhaled beta2-agonists on health, is concerned with the fact that oral beta2-agonists may be anabolic, and rapid increased use of inhaled beta2-agonists by elite athletes has contributed to the changes to the IOC rules. Since 2001, the necessity for athletes to meet IOC criteria (i.e., that they have asthma and/or exercise-induced asthma [EIA]) has resulted in improved management of athletes. The prevalence of beta2-agonist use by athletes mirrors the known prevalence of asthma symptoms in each country, although athletes in endurance events have the highest prevalence. The age-of-onset of asthma/EIA in elite winter athletes may be atypical. Of the 193 athletes at the 2006 Winter Olympics who met th IOC's criteria, only 32.1% had childhood asthma and 48.7% of athletes reported onset at age 20 yr or older. These findings lead to speculation that years of intense endurance training may be a causative factor in bronchial hyperreactivity. The distinction between oral (prohibited in sports) and inhaled salbutamol is possible, but athletes must be warned that excessive use of inhaled salbutamol can lead to urinary concentrations similar to those observed after oral administration. This article provides justification that athletes should provide evidence of asthma or EIA before being permitted to use inhaled beta2-agonists. PMID:17085798

  4. Importance of Hydrogen-Bonding Sites in the Chiral Recognition Mechanism Between Racemic D3 Terbium(III) Complexes and Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    MOUSSA, AHMED; PHAM, CHRISTINE; BOMMIREDDY, SHRUTHI; MULLER, GILLES

    2009-01-01

    The perturbation of the racemic equilibrium of luminescent D3 terbium(III) complexes with chelidamic acid (CDA), a hydroxylated derivative of 2,6-pyridine-dicarboxylic acid (DPA), by added chiral biomolecules such as l-amino acids has been studied using circularly polarized luminescence and 13C NMR spectroscopy. It is shown in this work that the chiral-induced equilibrium shift of [Tb(CDA)3]6− by l-amino acids (i.e. l-proline or l-arginine) was largely influenced by the hydrogen-bonding networks formed between the ligand interface of racemic [Tb(CDA)3]6− and these added chiral agents. The capping of potential hydrogen-bonding sites by acetylation in l-proline led to a ∼100-fold drop in the induced optical activity of the [Tb(CDA)3]6−:N-acetyl-l-proline system. This result suggested that the hydrogen-bonding networks serve as the basis for further noncovalent discriminatory interactions between racemic [Tb(CDA)3]6− and added l-amino acids. PMID:18698640

  5. Introduction of a single isomer beta agonist.

    PubMed

    Rau, J L

    2000-08-01

    The release of levalbuterol offers the first approved single-isomer beta agonist for oral inhalation. Data from in vitro studies support the concept that S albuterol is not inactive and may have properties antagonistic to bronchodilation. There is some variability in the results of clinical studies with the separate isomers of albuterol, which suggests the need for further study. The introduction of levalbuterol into general clinical use in managing asthma and chronic obstructive disease should begin to offer additional information on the effects of a single isomer beta agonist in comparison to previous racemic mixtures. PMID:10963321

  6. Multiple cytokines stimulate the binding of a common 145-kilodalton protein to Shc at the Grb2 recognition site of Shc.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L; Damen, J E; Cutler, R L; Krystal, G

    1994-01-01

    We recently reported that interleukin-3, Steel factor, and erythropoietin all induce the tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and its association with Grb2 in hemopoietic cell lines. We have now further characterized the proteins that become associated with Shc following stimulation with these cytokines and found that, in response to all three, the tyrosine-phosphorylated form of Shc binds to common 145- and 52-kDa proteins which also become tyrosine phosphorylated in response to these growth factors. The 145-kDa protein, which appears, from antiphosphotyrosine blots of two-dimensional O'Farrell gels, to exist in four different phosphorylation states following cytokine stimulation (with isoelectric points ranging from 7.2 to 7.8), does not appear to be immunologically related to the beta subunit of the interleukin-3 receptor, c-Kit, BCR, ABL, JAK1, JAK2, Sos1, eps15, or insulin receptor substrate 1 protein. Silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate gels indicate that the association of the 145-kDa protein with Shc occurs only after cytokine stimulation and that it can bind to the tyrosine-phosphorylated form of Shc in its non-tyrosine-phosphorylated state. The latter finding, in conjunction with the observations that p145 does not bind, in vitro, to the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of Shc, that it is not present in anti-Grb2 immunoprecipitates, and that a phosphopeptide which blocks the binding of Shc to the SH2 domain of Grb2 also blocks the binding of Shc to p145, suggests that p145 contains an SH2 domain and competes with Grb2 for the same tyrosine-phosphorylated site on Shc. This implicates p145 as a potential regulator of Ras activity and, perhaps, of other as yet unidentified functions of Shc. Images PMID:7523859

  7. Search for new type of PPARγ agonist-like anti-diabetic compounds from medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisashi; Nakamura, Seikou; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Potent ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) such as thiazolidinediones (pioglitazone, troglitazone, etc.) improve insulin sensitivity by increasing the levels of adiponectin, an important adipocytokine associated with insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue. Several constituents from medicinal plants were recently reported to show PPARγ agonist-like activity in 3T3-L1 cells, but did not show agonistic activity at the receptor site different from thiazolidinediones. Our recent studies on PPARγ agonist-like constituents, such as hydrangenol and hydrangeic acid from the processed leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla var. thunbergii, piperlonguminine and retrofractamide A from the fruit of Piper chaba, and tetramethylkaempferol and pentamethylquercetin from the rhizomes of Kaempferia parviflora, are reviewed. PMID:24882400

  8. Incorporation of Phosphonate into Benzonaphthyridine Toll-like Receptor 7 Agonists for Adsorption to Aluminum Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Alex; Li, Yongkai; Miller, Andrew T; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Yue, Kathy; Maginnis, Jillian; Hampton, Janice; Hall, De Shon; Shapiro, Michael; Nayak, Bishnu; D'Oro, Ugo; Li, Chun; Skibinski, David; Mbow, M Lamine; Singh, Manmohan; O'Hagan, Derek T; Cooke, Michael P; Valiante, Nicholas M; Wu, Tom Y-H

    2016-06-23

    Small molecule Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonists have been used as vaccine adjuvants by enhancing innate immune activation to afford better adaptive response. Localized TLR7 agonists without systemic exposure can afford good adjuvanticity, suggesting peripheral innate activation (non-antigen-specific) is not required for immune priming. To enhance colocalization of antigen and adjuvant, benzonaphthyridine (BZN) TLR7 agonists are chemically modified with phosphonates to allow adsorption onto aluminum hydroxide (alum), a formulation commonly used in vaccines for antigen stabilization and injection site deposition. The adsorption process is facilitated by enhancing aqueous solubility of BZN analogs to avoid physical mixture of two insoluble particulates. These BZN-phosphonates are highly adsorbed onto alum, which significantly reduced systemic exposure and increased local retention post injection. This report demonstrates a novel approach in vaccine adjuvant design using phosphonate modification to afford adsorption of small molecule immune potentiator (SMIP) onto alum, thereby enhancing co-delivery with antigen. PMID:27270029

  9. Quantitative Measure of Receptor Agonist and Modulator Equi-Response and Equi-Occupancy Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rumin; Kavana, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are an important class of drug targets. Quantitative analysis by global curve fitting of properly designed dose-dependent GPCR agonism and allosterism data permits the determination of all affinity and efficacy parameters based on a general operational model. We report here a quantitative and panoramic measure of receptor agonist and modulator equi-response and equi-occupancy selectivity calculated from these parameters. The selectivity values help to differentiate not only one agonist or modulator from another, but on-target from off-target receptor or functional pathway as well. Furthermore, in conjunction with target site free drug concentrations and endogenous agonist tones, the allosterism parameters and selectivity values may be used to predict in vivo efficacy and safety margins. PMID:27116909

  10. Agonist binding and function at the human alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor: allosteric modulation by amilorides.

    PubMed

    Leppik, R A; Birdsall, N J

    2000-11-01

    It has been found previously that amilorides act via an allosteric site on the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor to strongly inhibit antagonist binding. In this study, allosteric modulation of agonist binding and function at the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor was explored. The dissociation rate of the agonist [(3)H]UK14304 from alpha(2A)-receptors was decreased by the amilorides in a concentration-dependent manner. This contrasts with the increases in (3)H-antagonist dissociation rate found previously. The agonist-amiloride analog interaction data could be fitted to equations derived from the ternary complex allosteric model. The calculated log affinities of the amilorides at the [(3)H]UK14304-occupied receptor increased with the size of the 5-N-alkyl side chain and ranged from 2.4 for amiloride to 4.2 for 5-(N,N-hexamethylene)-amiloride. The calculated negative cooperativities cover a narrow range, in sharp contrast to the broad range found for antagonist-amiloride analog interactions. The effects of the amilorides on the agonist actions of UK14304, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were explored using a [(35)S]GTPgammaS functional assay, and the parameters calculated for the cooperativities and affinities of the UK14304-amiloride analog interactions, using the equation derived from the ternary complex allosteric model, were in good agreement with those derived from the kinetic studies. Therefore both the binding and functional data provide further support for the existence of a well defined allosteric site on the human alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. The binding mode of the amilorides at the agonist-occupied and antagonist-occupied receptor differs markedly but, within each group, the structure of either the agonist or the antagonist examined has only a slight effect on the allosteric interactions. PMID:11040058

  11. Low resolution X-ray structure of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase from Bacillus licheniformis: opened active site cleft and a cluster of acid residues potentially involved in the recognition of a metal ion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Liu; Chen, Yi-Yu; Chi, Meng-Chun; Merlino, Antonello

    2014-09-01

    γ-Glutamyltranspeptidases (γ-GTs) cleave the γ-glutamyl amide bond of glutathione and transfer the released γ-glutamyl group to water (hydrolysis) or acceptor amino acids (transpeptidation). These ubiquitous enzymes play a key role in the biosynthesis and degradation of glutathione, and in xenobiotic detoxification. Here we report the 3Å resolution crystal structure of Bacillus licheniformis γ-GT (BlGT) and that of its complex with l-Glu. X-ray structures confirm that BlGT belongs to the N-terminal nucleophilic hydrolase superfamily and reveal that the protein possesses an opened active site cleft similar to that reported for the homologous enzyme from Bacillus subtilis, but different from those observed for human γ-GT and for γ-GTs from other microorganisms. Data suggest that the binding of l-Glu induces a reordering of the C-terminal tail of BlGT large subunit and allow the identification of a cluster of acid residues that are potentially involved in the recognition of a metal ion. The role of these residues on the conformational stability of BlGT has been studied by characterizing the autoprocessing, enzymatic activity, chemical and thermal denaturation of four new Ala single mutants. The results show that replacement of Asp568 with an Ala affects both the autoprocessing and structural stability of the protein. PMID:24780583

  12. Reciprocity of agonistic support in ravens

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Orlaith N.; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cooperative behaviour through reciprocation or interchange of valuable services in primates has received considerable attention, especially regarding the timeframe of reciprocation and its ensuing cognitive implications. Much less, however, is known about reciprocity in other animals, particularly birds. We investigated patterns of agonistic support (defined as a third party intervening in an ongoing conflict to attack one of the conflict participants, thus supporting the other) in a group of 13 captive ravens, Corvus corax. We found support for long-term, but not short-term, reciprocation of agonistic support. Ravens were more likely to support individuals who preened them, kin and dominant group members. These results suggest that ravens do not reciprocate on a calculated tit-for-tat basis, but aid individuals from whom reciprocated support would be most useful and those with whom they share a good relationship. Additionally, dyadic levels of agonistic support and consolation (postconflict affiliation from a bystander to the victim) correlated strongly with each other, but we found no evidence to suggest that receiving agonistic support influences the victim’s likelihood of receiving support (consolation) after the conflict ends. Our findings are consistent with an emotionally mediated form of reciprocity in ravens and provide additional support for convergent cognitive evolution in birds and mammals. PMID:22298910

  13. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  14. Small molecule TSHR agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Gershengorn, M C

    2011-04-01

    TSH activates the TSH receptor (TSHR) thereby stimulating the function of thyroid follicular cells (thyrocytes) leading to biosynthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones. Because TSHR is involved in several thyroid pathologies, there is a strong rationale for the design of small molecule "drug-like" ligands. Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH, Thyrogen(®)) has been used in the follow-up of patients with thyroid cancer to increase the sensitivity for detection of recurrence or metastasis. rhTSH is difficult to produce and must be administered by injection. A small molecule TSHR agonist could produce the same beneficial effects as rhTSH but with greater ease of oral administration. We developed a small molecule ligand that is a full agonist at TSHR. Importantly for its clinical potential, this agonist elevated serum thyroxine and stimulated thyroidal radioiodide uptake in mice after its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract following oral administration. Graves' disease (GD) is caused by persistent, unregulated stimulation of thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSAbs) that activate TSHR. We identified the first small molecule TSHR antagonists that inhibited TSH- and TSAb-stimulated signalling in primary cultures of human thyrocytes. Our results provide proof-of-principle for effectiveness of small molecule agonists and antagonists for TSHR. We suggest that these small molecule ligands are lead compounds for the development of higher potency ligands that can be used as probes of TSHR biology with therapeutic potential. PMID:21511239

  15. Reciprocity of agonistic support in ravens.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Orlaith N; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cooperative behaviour through reciprocation or interchange of valuable services in primates has received considerable attention, especially regarding the timeframe of reciprocation and its ensuing cognitive implications. Much less, however, is known about reciprocity in other animals, particularly birds. We investigated patterns of agonistic support (defined as a third party intervening in an ongoing conflict to attack one of the conflict participants, thus supporting the other) in a group of 13 captive ravens, Corvus corax. We found support for long-term, but not short-term, reciprocation of agonistic support. Ravens were more likely to support individuals who preened them, kin and dominant group members. These results suggest that ravens do not reciprocate on a calculated tit-for-tat basis, but aid individuals from whom reciprocated support would be most useful and those with whom they share a good relationship. Additionally, dyadic levels of agonistic support and consolation (postconflict affiliation from a bystander to the victim) correlated strongly with each other, but we found no evidence to suggest that receiving agonistic support influences the victim's likelihood of receiving support (consolation) after the conflict ends. Our findings are consistent with an emotionally mediated form of reciprocity in ravens and provide additional support for convergent cognitive evolution in birds and mammals. PMID:22298910

  16. The T----C substitution at -198 of the A gamma-globin gene associated with the British form of HPFH generates overlapping recognition sites for two DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, K D; Nowock, J

    1990-01-01

    Defects in the developmental changes of human hemoglobin production characterized by the continued expression of fetal globin during adult life are classified as hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH). Among the various molecular lesions associated with this phenotype, the non-deletion forms with point mutations in the promoter region are thought to provide mechanistic clues for gamma-globin gene regulation. The natural occurrence of four different base substitutions mapping within six nucleotides of a homopurine.homopyrimidine motif in the upstream promoter region demarcate a potential control element. To assess its importance for transcriptional activity, we compared the -202 (C----G), -198 (T----C) and -196 (C----T) HPFH mutations with the normal sequence in binding studies with nuclear proteins from erythroid and non-erythroid cells. Wildtype DNA and HPFH mutations at -202 or -196 showed only a weak protein interaction of unclear functional significance. In contrast, -198 (T----C) generated overlapping, high-affinity binding sites for two ubiquitous nuclear proteins. One cognate protein was identified as the transcription factor Sp1. The second one was termed NF-G.C as it interacted strongly with the homopolymer poly(dG).poly(dC). The generation of additional recognition sites for trans-acting factors by the -198 HPFH mutation correlated with a modest increase in promoter activity in vitro specifically with nuclear extracts from erythroid cells. The activation appears to be mediated by binding of Sp1, but it requires interaction with an erythroid-specific factor, most likely GF-1. Templates containing the -196 HPFH mutation showed a transcriptional activity identical to wildtype. This suggests that despite the topological proximity of the mutations, the HPFH phenotype may be established by different mechanisms. Images PMID:1699206

  17. Speech recognition and understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Vintsyuk, T.K.

    1983-05-01

    This article discusses the automatic processing of speech signals with the aim of finding a sequence of works (speech recognition) or a concept (speech understanding) being transmitted by the speech signal. The goal of the research is to develop an automatic typewriter that will automatically edit and type text under voice control. A dynamic programming method is proposed in which all possible class signals are stored, after which the presented signal is compared to all the stored signals during the recognition phase. Topics considered include element-by-element recognition of words of speech, learning speech recognition, phoneme-by-phoneme speech recognition, the recognition of connected speech, understanding connected speech, and prospects for designing speech recognition and understanding systems. An application of the composition dynamic programming method for the solution of basic problems in the recognition and understanding of speech is presented.

  18. Correction for Inhibition Leads to an Allosteric Co-Agonist Model for Pentobarbital Modulation and Activation of α1β3γ2L GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Alexis M.; Forman, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pentobarbital, like propofol and etomidate, produces important general anesthetic effects through GABAA receptors. Photolabeling also indicates that pentobarbital binds to some of the same sites where propofol and etomidate act. Quantitative allosteric co-agonist models for propofol and etomidate account for modulatory and agonist effects in GABAA receptors and have proven valuable in establishing drug site characteristics and for functional analysis of mutants. We therefore sought to establish an allosteric co-agonist model for pentobarbital activation and modulation of α1β3γ2L receptors, using a novel approach to first correct pentobarbital activation data for inhibitory effects in the same concentration range. Methods Using oocyte-expressed α1β3γ2L GABAA receptors and two-microelectrode voltage-clamp, we quantified modulation of GABA responses by a low pentobarbital concentration and direct effects of high pentobarbital concentrations, the latter displaying mixed agonist and inhibitory effects. We then isolated and quantified pentobarbital inhibition in activated receptors using a novel single-sweep “notch” approach, and used these results to correct steady-state direct activation for inhibition. Results Combining results for GABA modulation and corrected direct activation, we estimated receptor open probability and optimized parameters for a Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric co-agonist model. Inhibition by pentobarbital was consistent with two sites with IC50s near 1 mM, while co-agonist model parameters suggest two allosteric pentobarbital agonist sites characterized by KPB ≈ 5 mM and high efficacy. The results also indicate that pentobarbital may be a more efficacious agonist than GABA. Conclusions Our novel approach to quantifying both inhibitory and co-agonist effects of pentobarbital provides a basis for future structure-function analyses of GABAA receptor mutations in putative pentobarbital binding sites. PMID:27110714

  19. A new genomic tool, ultra-frequently cleaving TaqII/sinefungin endonuclease with a combined 2.9-bp recognition site, applied to the construction of horse DNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomics and metagenomics are currently leading research areas, with DNA sequences accumulating at an exponential rate. Although enormous advances in DNA sequencing technologies are taking place, progress is frequently limited by factors such as genomic contig assembly and generation of representative libraries. A number of DNA fragmentation methods, such as hydrodynamic sharing, sonication or DNase I fragmentation, have various drawbacks, including DNA damage, poor fragmentation control, irreproducibility and non-overlapping DNA segment representation. Improvements in these limited DNA scission methods are consequently needed. An alternative method for obtaining higher quality DNA fragments involves partial digestion with restriction endonucleases (REases). We have shown previously that class-IIS/IIC/IIG TspGWI REase, the prototype member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family, can be chemically relaxed by a cofactor analogue, allowing it to recognize very short DNA sequences of 3-bp combined frequency. Such frequently cleaving REases are extremely rare, with CviJI/CviJI*, SetI and FaiI the only other ones found in nature. Their unusual features make them very useful molecular tools for the development of representative DNA libraries. Results We constructed a horse genomic library and a deletion derivative library of the butyrylcholinesterase cDNA coding region using a novel method, based on TaqII, Thermus sp. family bifunctional enzyme exhibiting cofactor analogue specificity relaxation. We used sinefungin (SIN) – an S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) analogue with reversed charge pattern, and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), to convert the 6-bp recognition site TaqII (5′-GACCGA-3′ [11/9]) into a theoretical 2.9-bp REase, with 70 shortened variants of the canonical recognition sequence detected. Because partial DNA cleavage is an inherent feature of the Thermus sp. enzyme family, this modified TaqII is uniquely suited to quasi-random library generation. Conclusions

  20. Survey of Gait Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ling-Feng; Jia, Wei; Zhu, Yi-Hai

    Gait recognition, the process of identifying an individual by his /her walking style, is a relatively new research area. It has been receiving wide attention in the computer vision community. In this paper, a comprehensive survey of video based gait recognition approaches is presented. And the research challenges and future directions of the gait recognition are also discussed.

  1. Modulation of agonist binding to human dopamine receptor subtypes by L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide and a peptidomimetic analog.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vaneeta; Mann, Amandeep; Costain, Willard; Pontoriero, Giuseppe; Castellano, Jessica M; Skoblenick, Kevin; Gupta, Suresh K; Pristupa, Zdenek; Niznik, Hyman B; Johnson, Rodney L; Nair, Venugopalan D; Mishra, Ram K

    2005-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the hypothalamic tripeptide L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG) and its conformationally constrained analog 3(R)-[(2(S)-pyrrolidinylcarbonyl)amino]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide (PAOPA) in modulating agonist binding to human dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected with respective cDNAs. Both PLG and PAOPA enhanced agonist [3H]N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) and [3H]quinpirole binding in a dose-dependent manner to the DA D2L,D2S, and D4 receptors. However, agonist binding to the D1 and D3 receptors and antagonist binding to the D2L receptors by PLG were not significantly affected. Scatchard analysis of [3H]NPA binding to membranes in the presence of PLG revealed a significant increase in affinity of the agonist binding sites for the D2L, D2S, and D4 receptors. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition curves revealed that PLG and PAOPA increased the population and affinity of the high-affinity form of the D2L receptor and attenuated guanosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imido)-triphosphate-induced inhibition of high-affinity agonist binding sites for the DA D2L receptor. Furthermore, direct NPA binding with D2L cell membranes pretreated with suramin, a compound that can uncouple receptor/G protein complexes, and incubated with and without DA showed that both PLG and PAOPA had only increased agonist binding in membranes pretreated with both suramin and DA, suggesting that PLG requires the D2L receptor/G protein complex to increase agonist binding. These results suggest that PLG possibly modulates DA D2S, D2L, and D4 receptors in an allosteric manner and that the coupling of D2 receptors to the G protein is essential for this modulation to occur. PMID:16126839

  2. Transcriptional analysis of antiviral small molecule therapeutics as agonists of the RLR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Green, R.R.; Wilkins, C.; Pattabhi, S.; Dong, R.; Loo, Y.; Gale, M.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRR) during viral infection initiates the induction of antiviral signaling pathways, including activation of the Interferon Regulator Factor 3 (IRF3). We identified small molecule compounds that activate IRF3 through MAVS, thereby inhibiting infection by viruses of the families Flaviviridae (West Nile virus, dengue virus and hepatitis C virus), Filoviridae (Ebola virus), Orthomyxoviridae (influenza A virus), Arenaviridae (Lassa virus) and Paramyxoviridae (respiratory syncytial virus, Nipah virus) (1). In this study, we tested a lead compound along with medicinal chemistry-derived analogs to compare the gene transcriptional profiles induced by these molecules to that of other known MAVS-dependent IRF3 agonists. Transcriptional analysis of these small molecules revealed the induction of specific antiviral genes and identified a novel module of host driven immune regulated genes that suppress infection of a range of RNA viruses. Microarray data can be found in Gene Expression Omnibus (GSE74047). PMID:26981429

  3. Transcriptional analysis of antiviral small molecule therapeutics as agonists of the RLR pathway.

    PubMed

    Green, R R; Wilkins, C; Pattabhi, S; Dong, R; Loo, Y; Gale, M

    2016-03-01

    The recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRR) during viral infection initiates the induction of antiviral signaling pathways, including activation of the Interferon Regulator Factor 3 (IRF3). We identified small molecule compounds that activate IRF3 through MAVS, thereby inhibiting infection by viruses of the families Flaviviridae (West Nile virus, dengue virus and hepatitis C virus), Filoviridae (Ebola virus), Orthomyxoviridae (influenza A virus), Arenaviridae (Lassa virus) and Paramyxoviridae (respiratory syncytial virus, Nipah virus) (1). In this study, we tested a lead compound along with medicinal chemistry-derived analogs to compare the gene transcriptional profiles induced by these molecules to that of other known MAVS-dependent IRF3 agonists. Transcriptional analysis of these small molecules revealed the induction of specific antiviral genes and identified a novel module of host driven immune regulated genes that suppress infection of a range of RNA viruses. Microarray data can be found in Gene Expression Omnibus (GSE74047). PMID:26981429

  4. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-09-18

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  5. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  6. Identification of novel multitargeted PPARα/γ/δ pan agonists by core hopping of rosiglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Jiao; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Shu-Qing; Xu, Wei-Ren; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Wang, Run-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The thiazolidinedione class peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are restricted in clinical use as antidiabetic agents because of side effects such as edema, weight gain, and heart failure. The single and selective agonism of PPARγ is the main cause of these side effects. Multitargeted PPARα/γ/δ pan agonist development is the hot topic in the antidiabetic drug research field. In order to identify PPARα/γ/δ pan agonists, a compound database was established by core hopping of rosiglitazone, which was then docked into a PPARα/γ/δ active site to screen out a number of candidate compounds with a higher docking score and better interaction with the active site. Further, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity prediction was done to give eight compounds. Molecular dynamics simulation of the representative Cpd#1 showed more favorable binding conformation for PPARs receptor than the original ligand. Cpd#1 could act as a PPARα/γ/δ pan agonist for novel antidiabetic drug research. PMID:25422585

  7. Identification of novel multitargeted PPARα/γ/δ pan agonists by core hopping of rosiglitazone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Jiao; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Shu-Qing; Xu, Wei-Ren; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Wang, Run-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The thiazolidinedione class peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are restricted in clinical use as antidiabetic agents because of side effects such as edema, weight gain, and heart failure. The single and selective agonism of PPARγ is the main cause of these side effects. Multitargeted PPARα/γ/δ pan agonist development is the hot topic in the antidiabetic drug research field. In order to identify PPARα/γ/δ pan agonists, a compound database was established by core hopping of rosiglitazone, which was then docked into a PPARα/γ/δ active site to screen out a number of candidate compounds with a higher docking score and better interaction with the active site. Further, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity prediction was done to give eight compounds. Molecular dynamics simulation of the representative Cpd#1 showed more favorable binding conformation for PPARs receptor than the original ligand. Cpd#1 could act as a PPARα/γ/δ pan agonist for novel antidiabetic drug research. PMID:25422585

  8. CoMSIA study on substituted aryl alkanoic acid analogs as GPR40 agonists.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Aaditya; Patel, Pallav D; Patel, Maulik R; Singh, Satyakam; Lau-Cam, Cesar A; Talele, Tanaji T

    2011-05-01

    GPR40, a G-protein-coupled receptor has been well established to play a crucial role in regulating blood glucose levels. Hence, GPR40 is a potential target for future antidiabetic agents. The present 3D QSAR study is aimed at delineating structural parameters governing GPR40 agonistic activity. To meet this objective, a comparative molecular similarity indices analysis for 63 different GPR40 agonists was performed using two methods; a ligand-based 3D QSAR model employing the atom fit alignment method and a receptor-based 3D QSAR model that was derived from the predicted binding conformations obtained by docking all the GPR40 agonists at the active site of GPR40. The results of these studies showed the ligand-based model to be superior (r(cv)(2) value of 0.610) to the receptor-based model (r(cv)(2) value of 0.519) in terms of statistical data. The predictive ability of these models was evaluated using a test set of 15 compounds not included in the preliminary training set of 48 compounds. The predictive r(2) values for the ligand- and the receptor-based models were found to be 0.863 and 0.599, respectively. Further, interpretation of the comparative molecular similarity indices analysis contour maps with reference to the active site of GPR40 provided an insight into GPR40-agonist interactions. PMID:21352503

  9. ( sup 3 H)CGS 21680, a selective A2 adenosine receptor agonist directly labels A2 receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, M.F.; Schulz, R.; Hutchison, A.J.; Do, U.H.; Sills, M.A.; Williams, M. )

    1989-12-01

    In the present study, the binding of a highly A2-selective agonist radioligand, (3H)CGS 21680 (2-(p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino)-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine) is described. (3H)CGS 21680 specific binding to rat striatal membranes was saturable, reversible and dependent upon protein concentration. Saturation studies revealed that (3H)CGS 21680 bound with high affinity (Kd = 15.5 nM) and limited capacity (apparent Bmax = 375 fmol/mg of protein) to a single class of recognition sites. Estimates of ligand affinity (16 nM) determined from association and dissociation kinetic experiments were in close agreement with the results from the saturation studies. (3H)CGS 21680 binding was greatest in striatal membranes with negligible specific binding obtained in rat cortical membranes. Adenosine agonists ligands competed for the binding of 5 nM (3H)CGS 21680 to striatal membranes with the following order of activity; CGS 21680 = 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine greater than 2-phenylaminoadenosine (CV-1808) = 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine = 2-chloroadenosine greater than R-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than N6-cyclohexyladenosine greater than N6cyclopentyltheophylline greater than S-phenylisopropyladenosine. The nonxanthine adenosine antagonist, CGS 15943A, was the most active compound in inhibiting the binding of (3H)CGS 21680. Other adenosine antagonists inhibited binding in the following order; xanthine amine congener = 1,3-dipropyl-8-(2-amino-4-chloro)phenylxanthine greater than 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine greater than 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine greater than 8-phenyltheophylline greater than 8-cyclopentyltheophylline = xanthine carboxylic acid congener greater than 8-parasulfophenyltheophylline greater than theophylline greater than caffeine.

  10. HERG1 Channel Agonists and Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Sanguinetti, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG1) potassium channels are a key determinant of normal repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Loss of function mutations in hERG1 channels cause inherited long QT syndrome and increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. Many common medications that block hERG1 channels as an unintended side effect also increase arrhythmic risk. Routine preclinical screening for hERG1 block led to the discovery of agonists that shorten action potential duration and QT interval. Agonists have the potential to be used as pharmacotherapy for long QT syndrome, but can also be proarrhythmic. Recent studies have elucidated multiple mechanisms of action for these compounds and the structural basis for their binding to the pore domain of the hERG1 channel. PMID:24721650

  11. HERG1 channel agonists and cardiac arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG1) potassium channels are a key determinant of normal repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Loss of function mutations in hERG1 channels cause inherited long QT syndrome and increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. Many common medications that block hERG1 channels as an unintended side effect also increase arrhythmic risk. Routine preclinical screening for hERG1 block led to the discovery of agonists that shorten action potential duration and QT interval. Agonists have the potential to be used as pharmacotherapy for long QT syndrome, but can also be proarrhythmic. Recent studies have elucidated multiple mechanisms of action for these compounds and the structural basis for their binding to the pore domain of the hERG1 channel. PMID:24721650

  12. Interaction of a radiolabeled agonist with cardiac muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Harden, T.K.; Meeker, R.B.; Martin, M.W.

    1983-12-01

    The interaction of a radiolabeled muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist, (methyl-/sup 3/H)oxotremorine acetate ((/sup 3/H)OXO), with a washed membrane preparation derived from rat heart, has been studied. In binding assays at 4 degrees C, the rate constants for association and dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO were 2 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 and 5 X 10(-3) min-1, respectively, Saturation binding isotherms indicated that binding was to a single population of sites with a Kd of approximately 300 pM. The density of (/sup 3/H)OXO binding sites (90-100 fmol/mg of protein) was approximately 75% of that determined for the radiolabeled receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate. Both muscarinic receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO with high affinity and Hill slopes of approximately one. Guanine nucleotides completely inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO. This effect was on the maximum binding (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)OXO with no change occurring in the Kd; the order of potency for five nucleotides was guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio-triphosphate) greater than 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate greater than GTP greater than or equal to guanosine/diphosphate greater than GMP. The (/sup 3/H)OXO-induced interaction of muscarinic receptors with a guanine nucleotide binding protein was stable to solubilization. That is, membrane receptors that were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)OXO could be solubilized with digitonin, and the addition of guanine nucleotides to the soluble, (/sup 3/H)OXO-labeled complex resulted in dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO from the receptor. Pretreatment of membranes with relatively low concentrations of N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)OXO binding by 85% with no change in the Kd of (/sup 3/H)OXO, and with no effect on (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding.

  13. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits. PMID:26832440

  14. Melanocortin 1 Receptor Agonists Reduce Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Ebefors, Kerstin; Johansson, Martin E.; Stefánsson, Bergur; Granqvist, Anna; Arnadottir, Margret; Berg, Anna-Lena; Nyström, Jenny; Haraldsson, Börje

    2010-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy is one of the most common causes of nephrotic syndrome in adults. Recent reports suggest that treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) reduces proteinuria, but the mechanism of action is unknown. Here, we identified gene expression of the melanocortin receptor MC1R in podocytes, glomerular endothelial cells, mesangial cells, and tubular epithelial cells. Podocytes expressed most MC1R protein, which colocalized with synaptopodin but not with an endothelial-specific lectin. We treated rats with passive Heymann nephritis (PHN) with MS05, a specific MC1R agonist, which significantly reduced proteinuria compared with untreated PHN rats (P < 0.01). Furthermore, treatment with MC1R agonists improved podocyte morphology and reduced oxidative stress. In summary, podocytes express MC1R, and MC1R agonism reduces proteinuria, improves glomerular morphology, and reduces oxidative stress in nephrotic rats with PHN. These data may explain the proteinuria-reducing effects of ACTH observed in patients with membranous nephropathy, and MC1R agonists may provide a new therapeutic option for these patients. PMID:20507942

  15. Peptidoglycan recognition by the Drosophila Imd pathway.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takashi; Golenbock, Douglas; Silverman, Neal

    2005-01-01

    The structural requirements for recognition of peptidoglycan (PGN) by PGRP-LC and activation of the Drosophila IMD pathway are not yet clear. In order to examine this question more carefully, the activity of peptidoglycan from different types of bacteria was compared in cell-based and whole animal assays. Drosophila S2* cells, but not adult flies, responded to Lys-type Micrococcus luteus PGN, but with significantly less potency compared to Dap-type Escherichia coli PGN, while intact Lys-type PGN from Staphylococcus aureus was inactive. After treatment with lysostaphin, which digests the cross-bridging peptides, S. aureus PGN weakly stimulated the IMD pathway, similar to M. luteus PGN. Further digestion with mutanolysin, which creates monomeric PGN fragments, abolished the activity of S. aureus PGN. On the other hand, monomeric E. coli PGN, generated by mutanolysin digestion, was still active but required different isoforms of PGRP-LC for recognition. Polymeric PGN required only PGRP-LCx, while monomeric E. coli PGN required both the PGRP-LCa and PGRP-LCx isoforms. These results suggest that the recognition by PGRP-LCx alone requires polymeric PGN, and that polymeric Dap-type PGN is a more potent PGRP-LCx agonist, compared to Lys-type PGN. These results also suggest that the heteromeric PGRP-LCa/LCx receptor complex recognizes monomeric Dap-type, but not Lys-type, PGN. PMID:16303095

  16. Optical Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Jutamulia, Suganda

    2008-10-01

    Contributors; Preface; 1. Pattern recognition with optics Francis T. S. Yu and Don A. Gregory; 2. Hybrid neural networks for nonlinear pattern recognition Taiwei Lu; 3. Wavelets, optics, and pattern recognition Yao Li and Yunglong Sheng; 4. Applications of the fractional Fourier transform to optical pattern recognition David Mendlovic, Zeev Zalesky and Haldum M. Oxaktas; 5. Optical implementation of mathematical morphology Tien-Hsin Chao; 6. Nonlinear optical correlators with improved discrimination capability for object location and recognition Leonid P. Yaroslavsky; 7. Distortion-invariant quadratic filters Gregory Gheen; 8. Composite filter synthesis as applied to pattern recognition Shizhou Yin and Guowen Lu; 9. Iterative procedures in electro-optical pattern recognition Joseph Shamir; 10. Optoelectronic hybrid system for three-dimensional object pattern recognition Guoguang Mu, Mingzhe Lu and Ying Sun; 11. Applications of photrefractive devices in optical pattern recognition Ziangyang Yang; 12. Optical pattern recognition with microlasers Eung-Gi Paek; 13. Optical properties and applications of bacteriorhodopsin Q. Wang Song and Yu-He Zhang; 14. Liquid-crystal spatial light modulators Aris Tanone and Suganda Jutamulia; 15. Representations of fully complex functions on real-time spatial light modulators Robert W. Cohn and Laurence G. Hassbrook; Index.

  17. Muscarinic receptors in rat nasal mucosa are predominantly of the low affinity agonist type.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues de Miranda, J F; Scheres, H M; Salden, H J; Beld, A J; Klaassen, A B; Kuijpers, W

    1985-07-31

    Specific [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to rat nasal mucosa homogenates occurs to a homogeneous class of binding sites with Kd = 60 +/- 2 10(-12) M and Bmax = 8.1 +/- 2 pmol/g tissue. Binding is stereoselectively inhibited by benzetimide enantiomers. Pirenzepine inhibits [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding with low affinity (Ki = 5.0 10(-7) M), classifying the binding sites as muscarinic M2-receptors. Methylfurtrethonium and methacholine inhibit [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding following an almost sigmoid curve at high concentrations pointing to the presence of mainly low affinity agonist binding sites. PMID:3840092

  18. Novel selective agonists and antagonists confirm neurokinin NK1 receptors in guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J. M.; Morton, I. K.

    1991-01-01

    1. This study investigated the recognition characteristics of neurokinin receptors mediating potentiation of the contractile response to field stimulation in the guinea-pig vas deferens. 2. A predominant NK1 receptor population is strongly suggested by the relative activities of the common naturally-occurring tachykinin agonists, which fall within less than one order of magnitude. This conclusion is supported by the relative activities of the synthetic NK1 selective agonists substance P methyl ester, [Glp6,L-Pro9]-SP(6-11) and delta-aminovaleryl-[L-Pro9,N-MeLeu10]- SP(7-11) (GR73632) which were 0.78, 9.3 and 120 as active as substance P, respectively. Furthermore, the NK2 selective agonist [Lys3, Gly8,-R-gamma-lactam-Leu9]-NKA(3-10) (GR64349) was active only at the highest concentrations tested (greater than 10 microM), and the NK3 selective agonist, succ-[Asp6,N-MePhe8]-SP(6-11) (senktide) was essentially inactive (10 nM-32 microM). 3. [D-Arg1,D-Pro2,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]-SP(1-11) antagonized responses to neurokinin A, neurokinin B, physalaemin, eledoisin, [Glp6,D-Pro9]-SP(6-11), GR73632 and GR64349 (apparent pKB s 5.6-6.2), but was less potent in antagonizing responses to substance P, substance P methyl ester and [Glp6,L-Pro9]-SP(6-11) (apparent pKB s less than or equal to 5.0-5.0). 4. In contrast, the recently developed NK1-selective receptor antagonist [D-Pro9[Spiro-gamma-lactam]Leu10,Trp11]-SP(1-11) (GR71251) did not produce agonist-dependent pKB estimates. Schild plot analysis indicated a competitive interaction with a single receptor population where the antagonist had an estimated overall pKB of 7.58 +/- 0.13 for the four agonists of differing subtype selectivity tested (GR73632, GR64349, substance P methyl ester and neurokinin B).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1707714

  19. Diagnostic odor recognition

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt; Phan; Desandre; Lobon; Hsu

    2000-10-01

    Many diseases, toxic ingestions, and intoxications have characteristic odors. These odors may provide diagnostic clues that affect rapid treatment long before laboratory confirmation or clinical deterioration. Odor recognition skills, similar to auscultation and palpation skills, require teaching and practical exposure. Dr. Goldfrank and colleagues recognized the importance of teaching odor recognition to emergency service providers. They proposed the "sniffing bar" method for odor recognition training. OBJECTIVES: (1) To identify the recognition rates of medically important odors among emergency care providers. (2) To investigate the effectiveness of teaching odor recognition. Hypothesis: The recognition rates of medically important odors will increase after teaching exposure. METHODS: The study exposed emergency care providers to 11 tubes of odors. Identifications of each substance were recorded. After corrective feedback, subjects were re-tested on their ability to identify the odors. Analysis of odor recognition improvement after teaching was done via chi-square test. RESULTS: Improvement in identification after teaching was seen in all odors. However, the improvement was significant only in the lesscommon substances because their initial recognition was especially low. Significant changes may improve with a larger sample size. Subjects often confuse the odors of alcohol with acetone, and wintergreen with camphor. CONCLUSIONS: The recognition rates are higher for the more-common odors, and lower for the less-common odors. Teaching exposures to the less well-known odors are effective and can significantly improve the recognition rate of these substances. Because odor recognition may affect rapid diagnosis and treatment of certain medical emergencies such as toxic ingestion, future studies should investigate the correlation between odor recognition and the ability to identify corresponding medical emergencies. PMID:11015270

  20. Identification of a novel partial agonist of liver X receptor α (LXRα) via screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Ni; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Chang; Li, Yongzhen; Feng, Tingting; Xu, Yanni; Si, Shuyi

    2014-12-01

    Liver X receptor α (LXRα) plays an important role in the cholesterol metabolism process, and LXRα activation can reduce atherosclerosis. In the present study, using an LXRα-GAL4 luciferase reporter screening, we discovered IMB-170, a structural analog of quinazolinone, which showed potent LXRα agonistic activity. IMB-170 significantly activated LXRα, with an EC50 value of 0.27μM. Interestingly, IMB-170 not only increased the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and G1 (ABCG1), which are related to the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) process, but also influenced the expression levels of other genes involved in the cholesterol metabolism pathway in many cell lines. Moreover, IMB-170 significantly reduced cellular lipid accumulation and increased cholesterol efflux from RAW264.7 and THP-1 macrophages. Interestingly, compared with TO901317, IMB-170 only slightly increased protein expression levels of lipogenesis-related genes in HepG2 cells, indicating that IMB-170 may have a lower lipogenesis side effect in vivo. These results suggest that IMB-170 showed the selective agonistic activity for LXRα. Moreover, compared with full LXR-agonists, IMB-170 possesses a differential ability to recruit coregulators. This suggests that IMB-170 has distinct interactions with the active sites in the LXRα ligand-binding domain. In summary, IMB-170 is a novel partial LXRα agonist without the classical lipogenesis side effects, which could be used as a potential anti-atherosclerotic leading compound in the future. PMID:25450668

  1. Success with voice recognition.

    PubMed

    Sferrella, Sheila M

    2003-01-01

    You need a compelling reason to implement voice recognition technology. At my institution, the compelling reason was a turnaround time for Radiology results of more than two days. Only 41 percent of our reports were transcribed and signed within 24 hours. In November 1998, a team from Lehigh Valley Hospital went to RSNA and reviewed every voice system on the market. The evaluation was done with the radiologist workflow in mind, and we came back from the meeting with the vendor selection completed. The next steps included developing a business plan, approval of funds, reference calls to more than 15 sites and contract negotiation, all of which took about six months. The department of Radiology at Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network (LVHHN) is a multi-site center that performs over 360,000 procedures annually. The department handles all modalities of radiology: general diagnosis, neuroradiology, ultrasound, CT Scan, MRI, interventional radiology, arthography, myelography, bone densitometry, nuclear medicine, PET imaging, vascular lab and other advanced procedures. The department consists of 200 FTEs and a medical staff of more than 40 radiologists. The budget is in the $10.3 million range. There are three hospital sites and four outpatient imaging center sites where services are provided. At Lehigh Valley Hospital, radiologists are not dedicated to one subspecialty, so implementing a voice system by modality was not an option. Because transcription was so far behind, we needed to eliminate that part of the process. As a result, we decided to deploy the system all at once and with the radiologists as editors. The planning and testing phase took about four months, and the implementation took two weeks. We deployed over 40 workstations and trained close to 50 physicians. The radiologists brought in an extra radiologist from our group for the two weeks of training. That allowed us to train without taking a radiologist out of the department. We trained three to six

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein LprG (Rv1411c) binds triacylated glycolipid agonists of Toll-like receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drage, Michael G.; Tsai, Han-Chun; Pecora, Nicole D.; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Arida, Ahmad R.; Shukla, Supriya; Rojas, Roxana E.; Seshadri, Chetan; Moody, D. Branch; Boom, W. Henry; Sacchettini, James C.; Harding, Clifford V.

    2010-09-27

    Knockout of lprG results in decreased virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in mice. MTB lipoprotein LprG has TLR2 agonist activity, which is thought to be dependent on its N-terminal triacylation. Unexpectedly, here we find that nonacylated LprG retains TLR2 activity. Moreover, we show LprG association with triacylated glycolipid TLR2 agonists lipoarabinomannan, lipomannan and phosphatidylinositol mannosides (which share core structures). Binding of triacylated species was specific to LprG (not LprA) and increased LprG TLR2 agonist activity; conversely, association of glycolipids with LprG enhanced their recognition by TLR2. The crystal structure of LprG in complex with phosphatidylinositol mannoside revealed a hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the three alkyl chains of the ligand. In conclusion, we demonstrate a glycolipid binding function of LprG that enhances recognition of triacylated MTB glycolipids by TLR2 and may affect glycolipid assembly or transport for bacterial cell wall biogenesis.

  3. Recognition and management of food induced anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Keet, Corinne

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Food-induced anaphylactic reactions are common and increasing in frequency. Despite the existence of a consensus definition of anaphylaxis, many cases are missed, recommended treatments are not given and follow-up is inadequate. New aspects of its pathophysiology and causes, including atypical food-induced causes., are still being uncovered. Epinephrine remains the cornerstone for successfully treating anaphylaxis; H1 and H2 antihistamines, glucocorticoids and β-agonists are ancillary medications that may be used in some cases in addition to epinephrine. However, the added utility of these secondary medications in anaphylaxis has not been conclusively demonstrated. Early recognition of anaphylaxis, appropriate emergency treatment and follow-up, including prescription of self-injectable epinephrine, are essential to prevent death and significant morbidity from anaphylaxis. PMID:21453808

  4. Structural basis for sulfation-dependent self-glycan recognition by the human immune-inhibitory receptor Siglec-8.

    PubMed

    Pröpster, Johannes M; Yang, Fan; Rabbani, Said; Ernst, Beat; Allain, Frédéric H-T; Schubert, Mario

    2016-07-19

    Siglec-8 is a human immune-inhibitory receptor that, when engaged by specific self-glycans, triggers eosinophil apoptosis and inhibits mast cell degranulation, providing an endogenous mechanism to down-regulate immune responses of these central inflammatory effector cells. Here we used solution NMR spectroscopy to dissect the fine specificity of Siglec-8 toward different sialylated and sulfated carbohydrate ligands and determined the structure of the Siglec-8 lectin domain in complex with its prime glycan target 6'-sulfo sialyl Lewis(x) A canonical motif for sialic acid recognition, extended by a secondary motif formed by unique loop regions, recognizing 6-O-sulfated galactose dictates tight specificity distinct from other Siglec family members and any other endogenous glycan recognition receptors. Structure-guided mutagenesis revealed key contacts of both interfaces to be equally essential for binding. Our work provides critical structural and mechanistic insights into how Siglec-8 selectively recognizes its glycan target, rationalizes the functional impact of site-specific glycan sulfation in modulating this lectin-glycan interaction, and will enable the rational design of Siglec-8-targeted agonists to treat eosinophil- and mast cell-related allergic and inflammatory diseases, such as asthma. PMID:27357658

  5. Dopamine agonist: pathological gambling and hypersexuality.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    (1) Pathological gambling and increased sexual activity can occur in patients taking dopaminergic drugs. Detailed case reports and small case series mention serious familial and social consequences. The frequency is poorly documented; (2) Most affected patients are being treated for Parkinson's disease, but cases have been reported among patients prescribed a dopamine agonist for restless legs syndrome or pituitary adenoma; (3) Patients treated with this type of drug, and their relatives, should be informed of these risks so that they can watch for changes in behaviour. If such disorders occur, it may be necessary to reduce the dose or to withdraw the drug or replace it with another medication. PMID:19536937

  6. Modulation of Innate Immune Responses via Covalently Linked TLR Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the synthesis of novel adjuvants for vaccine development using multivalent scaffolds and bioconjugation chemistry to spatially manipulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. TLRs are primary receptors for activation of the innate immune system during vaccination. Vaccines that contain a combination of small and macromolecule TLR agonists elicit more directed immune responses and prolong responses against foreign pathogens. In addition, immune activation is enhanced upon stimulation of two distinct TLRs. Here, we synthesized combinations of TLR agonists as spatially defined tri- and di-agonists to understand how specific TLR agonist combinations contribute to the overall immune response. We covalently conjugated three TLR agonists (TLR4, 7, and 9) to a small molecule core to probe the spatial arrangement of the agonists. Treating immune cells with the linked agonists increased activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and enhanced and directed immune related cytokine production and gene expression beyond cells treated with an unconjugated mixture of the same three agonists. The use of TLR signaling inhibitors and knockout studies confirmed that the tri-agonist molecule activated multiple signaling pathways leading to the observed higher activity. To validate that the TLR4, 7, and 9 agonist combination would activate the immune response to a greater extent, we performed in vivo studies using a vaccinia vaccination model. Mice vaccinated with the linked TLR agonists showed an increase in antibody depth and breadth compared to mice vaccinated with the unconjugated mixture. These studies demonstrate how activation of multiple TLRs through chemically and spatially defined organization assists in guiding immune responses, providing the potential to use chemical tools to design and develop more effective vaccines. PMID:26640818

  7. Mechanisms of agonist action at D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Lin, Hong; Strange, Philip G

    2004-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the biochemical mechanisms of agonist action at the G protein-coupled D2 dopamine receptor expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Stimulation of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding by full and partial agonists was determined at different concentrations of [35S]GTPgammaS (0.1 and 10 nM) and in the presence of different concentrations of GDP. At both concentrations of [35S]GTPgammaS, increasing GDP decreased the [35S]GTPgammaS binding observed with maximally stimulating concentrations of agonist, with partial agonists exhibiting greater sensitivity to the effects of GDP than full agonists. The relative efficacy of partial agonists was greater at the lower GDP concentrations. Concentration-response experiments were performed for a range of agonists at the two [35S]GTPgammaS concentrations and with different concentrations of GDP. At 0.1 nM [35S]GTPgammaS, the potency of both full and partial agonists was dependent on the GDP concentration in the assays. At 10 nM [35S]GTPgammaS, the potency of full agonists exhibited a greater dependence on the GDP concentration, whereas the potency of partial agonists was virtually independent of GDP. We concluded that at the lower [35S]GTPgammaS concentration, the rate-determining step in G protein activation is the binding of [35S]GTPgammaS to the G protein. At the higher [35S]GTPgammaS concentration, for full agonists, [35S]GTPgammaS binding remains the slowest step, whereas for partial agonists, another (GDP-independent) step, probably ternary complex breakdown, becomes rate-determining. PMID:15340043

  8. Moreland Recognition Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreland Elementary School District, San Jose, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Recognition for special effort and achievement has been noted as a component of effective schools. Schools in the Moreland School District have effectively improved standards of discipline and achievement by providing forty-six different ways for children to receive positive recognition. Good…

  9. Errors in the measurement of agonist potency-ratios produced by uptake processes: a general model applied to beta-adrenoceptor agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Kenakin, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    1. The sensitization of guinea-pig atria and trachea to noradrenaline, isoprenaline, and salbutamol, produced by an inhibitor of neuronal (cocaine) and extraneuronal (metanephrine) uptake, was studied quantitatively. The data were compared to a theoretical model. 2. Cocaine produced near maximal sensitization to noradrenaline in guinea-pig atria (5 fold) at concentrations which produced only partial sensitization in guinea-pig trachea (4.7 fold sensitization of a maximum 11 fold). These results agreed with the model which predicts that there is a direct relationship between the amount of uptake inhibitor required to produce full sensitization and the magnitude of maximal sensitization demonstrable in the tissue. This makes extrapolation of uptake inhibition concentrations from tissue to tissue a potentially erroneous practice. 3. In normal trachea, salbutamol is 20 times more potent than noradrenaline but this difference is abolished (to 0.9 times) by cocaine (100 microM). This reduction of potency-ratio is due to the selective cocaine-induced sensitization of trachea to noradrenaline and raises a serious objection to the classification of salbutamol as a beta 2 selective agonist. 4. Metanephrine produced very little sensitization of trachea to isoprenaline. Experiments with salbutamol showed metanephrine to be a simple competitive antagonist of beta-adrenoceptors (pKb = 4.3) and that this receptor antagonism masked sensitization to isoprenaline. 5. A theoretical model indicates that an inhibitor of agonist uptake requires a remarkable degree of selectivity for the uptake mechanism (i.e. Kb for receptors 10(4) x KI for uptake sites) to demonstrate tissue sensitization to the agonist. This analysis and the data with metanephrine indicate that a sinistral shift of the concentration-response curve is a poor indicator of the importance of uptake mechanisms in an isolated tissue. 6. An alternate method to determine the importance of agonist-uptake effects on

  10. Computational modeling toward understanding agonist binding on dopamine 3.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaxue; Lu, Xuefeng; Yang, Chao-Yie; Huang, Zhimin; Fu, Wei; Hou, Tingjun; Zhang, Jian

    2010-09-27

    The dopamine 3 (D3) receptor is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of nervous system disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, and current research interests primarily focus on the discovery/design of potent D3 agonists. Herein, a well-designed computational protocol, which combines pharmacophore identification, homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was employed to understand the agonist binding on D3 aiming to provide insights into the development of novel potent D3 agonists. We (1) identified the chemical features required in effective D3 agonists by pharmacophore modeling based upon 18 known diverse D3 agonists; (2) constructed the three-dimensional (3D) structure of D3 based on homology modeling and the pharmacophore hypothesis; (3) identified the binding modes of the agonists to D3 by the correlation between the predicted binding free energies and the experimental values; and (4) investigated the induced fit of D3 upon agonist binding through MD simulations. The pharmacophore models of the D3 agonists and the 3D structure of D3 can be used for either ligand- or receptor-based drug design. Furthermore, the MD simulations further give the insight that the long and flexible EL2 acts as a "door" for agonist binding, and the "ionic lock" at the bottom of TM3 and TM6 is essential to transduce the activation signal. PMID:20695484

  11. Proglumide exhibits delta opioid agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, A; Stokes, K B; Rhoads, D L; Way, E L

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it was reported that proglumide, a cholecystokinin (CCK) antagonist, potentiates the analgetic effects of morphine and endogenous opioid peptides and reverses morphine tolerance by antagonizing the CCK system in the central nervous system of the rat. In order to provide additional insight into the mode of action of this agent, we assessed the effect of proglumide in the isolated guinea pig ileum and the mouse, rat and rabbit vas deferens. Furthermore, we studied the in vitro binding affinity of this substance to mouse brain synaptosomes. Our results show that proglumide inhibits, dose dependently, the electrically stimulated twitches in the mouse vas deferens and guinea pig ileum, but not in the rat or rabbit vas deferens. The inhibitory action of proglumide on the mouse vas deferens, but not on the guinea pig ileum, is antagonized by naloxone and by the selective delta-antagonist, ICI 174,864, in a competitive fashion. Other CCK antagonists were found to be devoid of such activity on the mouse vas deferens. In vitro binding studies showed that proglumide displaces D-ala-D-[leucine]5-enkephalin (DADLE), a delta agonist, but not ethylketocyclazocine (EKC), a preferentially selective kappa agonist. The effect of proglumide appeared to be elicited presynaptically since it did not alter the norepinephrine-induced contractions of the mouse vas deferens. Our results suggest that proglumide might exert its opiate-like effects by activation of delta-opioid receptors. PMID:3030338

  12. Chimpanzees Extract Social Information from Agonistic Screams

    PubMed Central

    Slocombe, Katie E.; Kaller, Tanja; Call, Josep; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) agonistic screams are graded vocal signals that are produced in a context-specific manner. Screams given by aggressors and victims can be discriminated based on their acoustic structure but the mechanisms of listener comprehension of these calls are currently unknown. In this study, we show that chimpanzees extract social information from these vocal signals that, combined with their more general social knowledge, enables them to understand the nature of out-of-sight social interactions. In playback experiments, we broadcast congruent and incongruent sequences of agonistic calls and monitored the response of bystanders. Congruent sequences were in accordance with existing social dominance relations; incongruent ones violated them. Subjects looked significantly longer at incongruent sequences, despite them being acoustically less salient (fewer call types from fewer individuals) than congruent ones. We concluded that chimpanzees categorised an apparently simple acoustic signal into victim and aggressor screams and used pragmatics to form inferences about third-party interactions they could not see. PMID:20644722

  13. Heterologous Expression in Remodeled C. elegans: A Platform for Monoaminergic Agonist Identification and Anthelmintic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Law, Wenjing; Wuescher, Leah M.; Ortega, Amanda; Hapiak, Vera M.; Komuniecki, Patricia R.; Komuniecki, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Monoamines, such as 5-HT and tyramine (TA), paralyze both free-living and parasitic nematodes when applied exogenously and serotonergic agonists have been used to clear Haemonchus contortus infections in vivo. Since nematode cell lines are not available and animal screening options are limited, we have developed a screening platform to identify monoamine receptor agonists. Key receptors were expressed heterologously in chimeric, genetically-engineered Caenorhabditis elegans, at sites likely to yield robust phenotypes upon agonist stimulation. This approach potentially preserves the unique pharmacologies of the receptors, while including nematode-specific accessory proteins and the nematode cuticle. Importantly, the sensitivity of monoamine-dependent paralysis could be increased dramatically by hypotonic incubation or the use of bus mutants with increased cuticular permeabilities. We have demonstrated that the monoamine-dependent inhibition of key interneurons, cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscle inhibited locomotion and caused paralysis. Specifically, 5-HT paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT receptor null animals expressing either nematode, insect or human orthologues of a key Gαo-coupled 5-HT1-like receptor in the cholinergic motor neurons. Importantly, 8-OH-DPAT and PAPP, 5-HT receptor agonists, differentially paralyzed the transgenic animals, with 8-OH-DPAT paralyzing mutant animals expressing the human receptor at concentrations well below those affecting its C. elegans or insect orthologues. Similarly, 5-HT and TA paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT or TA receptor null animals, respectively, expressing either C. elegans or H. contortus 5-HT or TA-gated Cl- channels in either C. elegans cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscles. Together, these data suggest that this heterologous, ectopic expression screening approach will be useful for the identification of agonists for key monoamine receptors from parasites and could have broad application for the identification

  14. High-affinity σ1 protein agonist reduces clinical and pathological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Oxombre, B; Lee-Chang, C; Duhamel, A; Toussaint, M; Giroux, M; Donnier-Maréchal, M; Carato, P; Lefranc, D; Zéphir, H; Prin, L; Melnyk, P; Vermersch, P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Selective agonists of the sigma-1 receptor (σ1 protein) are generally reported to protect against neuronal damage and modulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Human and rodent lymphocytes possess saturable, high-affinity binding sites for compounds binding to the σ1 protein and potential immunomodulatory properties have been described for σ1 protein ligands. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is recognized as a valuable model of the inflammatory aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we have assessed the role of a σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, in EAE. Experimental Approach EAE was induced in SJL/J female mice by active immunization with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139–151 peptide. The σ1 protein agonist was injected i.p. at the time of immunization (day 0). Disease severity was assessed clinically and by histopathological evaluation of the CNS. Phenotyping of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells were performed by flow cytometry in spleen and cervical lymph nodes. Key Results Prophylactic treatment of EAE mice with the σ1 protein agonist prevented mononuclear cell accumulation and demyelination in brain and spinal cord and increased T2 B-cells and regulatory T-cells, resulting in an overall reduction in the clinical progression of EAE. Conclusions and Implications This σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, decreased the magnitude of inflammation in EAE. This effect was associated with increased proportions of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells with potential immunoregulatory functions. Targeting of the σ1 protein might thus provide new therapeutic opportunities in MS. PMID:25521311

  15. Extrinsic factors regulate partial agonist efficacy of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Farroni, Jeffrey S; McCool, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    the systems examine here, these effects are independent of both absolute expression level and any system-related alterations in the agonist binding site. We conclude that complex interactions between receptor composition and extrinsic factors may play a significant role in determining strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor partial agonist pharmacology. PMID:15301692

  16. Developments in Molecular Recognition and Sensing at Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Hill, Jonathan P.; Endo, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    In biological systems, molecular recognition events occur mostly within interfacial environments such as at membrane surfaces, enzyme reaction sites, or at the interior of the DNA double helix. Investigation of molecular recognition at model interfaces provides great insights into biological phenomena. Molecular recognition at interfaces not only has relevance to biological systems but is also important for modern applications such as high sensitivity sensors. Selective binding of guest molecules in solution to host molecules located at solid surfaces is crucial for electronic or photonic detection of analyte substances. In response to these demands, molecular recognition at interfaces has been investigated extensively during the past two decades using Langmuir monolayers, self-assembled monolayers, and lipid assemblies as recognition media. In this review, advances of molecular recognition at interfaces are briefly summarized.

  17. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  18. Synthesis, activity, and docking study of phenylthiazole acids as potential agonists of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Taijin; Shi, Min; Ye, Haoyu

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-mediated transcription factor playing key roles in glucose and lipid homeostasis, and PPARγ ligands possess therapeutic potential in these as well as other areas. In this study, a series of phenylthiazole acids have been synthesized and evaluated for agonistic activity by a convenient fluorescence polarization-based PPARγ ligand screening assay. Compound 4t, as a potential PPARγ agonist with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) 0.75±0.20 μM, exhibited in vitro potency comparable with a 0.83±0.14 μM of the positive control rosiglitazone. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicated that phenylthiazole acid 4t interacted with the amino acid residues of the active site of the PPARγ complex in a stable manner, consistent with the result of the in vitro ligand assay. PMID:27313447

  19. Alpha2-adrenoreceptors profile modulation. 4. From antagonist to agonist behavior.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Francesco; Cardinaletti, Claudia; Vesprini, Cristian; Carrieri, Antonio; Ghelfi, Francesca; Farande, Aniket; Giannella, Mario; Piergentili, Alessandro; Quaglia, Wilma; Laurila, Jonne M; Huhtinen, Anna; Scheinin, Mika; Pigini, Maria

    2008-07-24

    The goal of the present study was to modulate the receptor interaction properties of known alpha 2-adrenoreceptor (AR) antagonists to obtain novel alpha 2-AR agonists with desirable subtype selectivity. Therefore, a phenyl group or one of its bioisosteres or aliphatic moieties with similar steric hindrance were introduced into the aromatic ring of the antagonist lead basic structure. The functional properties of the novel compounds allowed our previous observations to be confirmed. The high efficacy of 7, 12, and 13 as alpha 2-AR agonists and the significant alpha 2C-AR subtype selective activation displayed by 11 and 15 demonstrated that favorable interactions to induce alpha 2-AR activation were formed between the pendant groups of the ligands and the aromatic cluster present in transmembrane domain 6 of the binding site cavity of the receptors. PMID:18578476

  20. Three-dimensional common-feature hypotheses for octopamine agonist arylethanolamines.

    PubMed

    Hirashim, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Eiji; Eto, Morifusa

    2002-10-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 12 octopamine (OA) agonist arylethanolamines (AEAs). Among the 10 common-featured models generated by program catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond donor (HBD) and a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid (HBA1) features was considered to be important in evaluating the OA activity. OA mapped well onto all the HBD and HBA1 features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, for some inactive compounds, their lack of affinity is primarily due to their inability to achieve an energetically favorable conformation shared by the active compounds. Taken together, structures of a 4-OH-Ph, alpha-OH, and a primary amine are important for OA activities. The present studies on OA agonists demonstrate that an HBD and an HBA1 sites located on the molecule seem to be essential for OA activity. PMID:12398339

  1. Recent progress in the development of agonists and antagonists for melatonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Zlotos, D P

    2012-01-01

    The various physiological actions of the neurohormone melatonin are mediated mainly by two G-protein-coupled MT(1) and MT(2) receptors. The melatoninergic drugs on the market, ramelteon and agomelatine, as well as the most advanced drug candidates under clinical evaluation, tasimelteon and PD-6735, are high-affinity nonselective MT(1) and MT(2) agonists. However, exploring the exact physiological role of the MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors requires subtype selective MT(1) and MT(2) ligands. This review covers novel melatoninergic agonists and antagonists published since 2010, focusing on high-affinity and subtype selective agents. Additionally, compounds not mentioned in the previous review articles and ligands selective for the MT(3) binding site are included. PMID:22680635

  2. Discovery of potent hexapeptide agonists to human neuromedin u receptor 1 and identification of their serum metabolites.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Kentaro; Mori, Kenji; Sohma, Yuko; Taketa, Koji; Taguchi, Akihiro; Yakushiji, Fumika; Minamino, Naoto; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2015-03-12

    Neuromedin U (NMU) and S (NMS) display various physiological activities, including an anorexigenic effect, and share a common C-terminal heptapeptide-amide sequence that is necessary to activate two NMU receptors (NMUR1 and NMUR2). On the basis of this knowledge, we recently developed hexapeptide agonists 2 and 3, which are highly selective to human NMUR1 and NMUR2, respectively. However, the agonists are still less potent than the endogenous ligand, hNMU. Therefore, we performed an additional structure-activity relationship study, which led to the identification of the more potent hexapeptide 5d that exhibits similar NMUR1-agonistic activity as compared to hNMU. Additionally, we studied the stability of synthesized agonists, including 5d, in rat serum, and identified two major biodegradation sites: Phe(2)-Arg(3) and Arg(5)-Asn(6). The latter was more predominantly cleaved than the former. Moreover, substitution with 4-fluorophenylalanine, as in 5d, enhanced the metabolic stability at Phe(2)-Arg(3). These results provide important information to guide the development of practical hNMU agonists. PMID:25815150

  3. CASE Recognition Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A total of 294 schools, colleges, and universities received prizes in this year's CASE Recognition program. Awards were given in: public relations programs, student recruitment, marketing, program pulications, news writing, fund raising, radio programming, school periodicals, etc. (MLW)

  4. Planfulness and Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogoff, Barbara; And Others

    1974-01-01

    A study of recorded and analyzed inspection times in a picture recognition memory task involving three different delays between inspection and test. Subjects were 108 4-, 6-, and 8-year-old children. (Author/SDH)

  5. Pattern recognition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Technique operates regardless of pattern rotation, translation or magnification and successfully detects out-of-register patterns. It improves accuracy and reduces cost of various optical character recognition devices and page readers and provides data input to computer.

  6. Context based gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazazian, Shermin; Gavrilova, Marina

    2012-06-01

    Gait recognition has recently become a popular topic in the field of biometrics. However, the main hurdle is the insufficient recognition rate in the presence of low quality samples. The main focus of this paper is to investigate how the performance of a gait recognition system can be improved using additional information about behavioral patterns of users and the context in which samples have been taken. The obtained results show combining the context information with biometric data improves the performance of the system at a very low cost. The amount of improvement depends on the distinctiveness of the behavioral patterns and the quality of the gait samples. Using the appropriate distinctive behavioral models it is possible to achieve a 100% recognition rate.

  7. Structural Insights into the Activation of Human Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1 by Small-Molecule Agonists.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Myhr, Courtney; Huang, Zaohua; Xiao, Jingbo; Barnaeva, Elena; Ho, Brian A; Agoulnik, Irina U; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan J; Southall, Noel; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2016-03-29

    The GPCR relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) mediates the action of relaxin peptide hormone, including its tissue remodeling and antifibrotic effects. The peptide has a short half-life in plasma, limiting its therapeutic utility. However, small-molecule agonists of human RXFP1 can overcome this limitation and may provide a useful therapeutic approach, especially for chronic diseases such as heart failure and fibrosis. The first small-molecule agonists of RXFP1 were recently identified from a high-throughput screening, using a homogeneous cell-based cAMP assay. Optimization of the hit compounds resulted in a series of highly potent and RXFP1 selective agonists with low cytotoxicity, and excellent in vitro ADME and pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we undertook extensive site-directed mutagenesis studies in combination with computational modeling analysis to probe the molecular basis of the small-molecule binding to RXFP1. The results showed that the agonists bind to an allosteric site of RXFP1 in a manner that closely interacts with the seventh transmembrane domain (TM7) and the third extracellular loop (ECL3). Several residues were determined to play an important role in the agonist binding and receptor activation, including a hydrophobic region at TM7 consisting of W664, F668, and L670. The G659/T660 motif within ECL3 is crucial to the observed species selectivity of the agonists for RXFP1. The receptor binding and activation effects by the small molecule ML290 were compared with the cognate ligand, relaxin, providing valuable insights on the structural basis and molecular mechanism of receptor activation and selectivity for RXFP1. PMID:26866459

  8. Estrogen receptor beta agonists in neurobehavioral investigations.

    PubMed

    Choleris, Elena; Clipperton, Amy E; Phan, Anna; Kavaliers, Martin

    2008-07-01

    Neurobehavioral investigations into the functions of estrogen receptor (ER)alpha and ERbeta have utilized 'knockout' mice, phytoestrogens and, more recently, ER-specific agonists. Feeding, sexual, aggressive and social behavior, anxiety, depression, drug abuse, pain perception, and learning (and associated synaptic plasticity) are affected by ERalpha and ERbeta in a manner that is dependent upon the specific behavior studied, gender and developmental stage. Overall, ERalpha and ERbeta appear to function together to foster sociosexual behavior while inhibiting behaviors that, if occurring at the time of behavioral estrous, may compete with reproduction (eg, feeding). Recently developed pharmacological tools have limited selectivity and availability to the research community at large, as they are not commercially available. The development of highly selective, commercially available ERbeta-specific antagonists would greatly benefit preclinical and applied research. PMID:18600582

  9. Non-Benzodiazepine Receptor Agonists for Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Becker, Philip M; Somiah, Manya

    2015-03-01

    Because of proven efficacy, reduced side effects, and less concern about addiction, non-benzodiazepine receptor agonists (non-BzRA) have become the most commonly prescribed hypnotic agents to treat onset and maintenance insomnia. First-line treatment is cognitive-behavioral therapy. When pharmacologic treatment is indicated, non-BzRA are first-line agents for the short-term and long-term management of transient and chronic insomnia related to adjustment, psychophysiologic, primary, and secondary causation. In this article, the benefits and risks of non-BzRA are reviewed, and the selection of a hypnotic agent is defined, based on efficacy, pharmacologic profile, and adverse events. PMID:26055674

  10. Interactions between cannabinoid receptor agonists and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys discriminating fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) enhance some (antinociceptive) but not other (positive reinforcing) effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, suggesting that cannabinoids might be combined with opioids to treat pain without increasing, and possibly decreasing, abuse. The degree to which cannabinoids enhance antinociceptive effects of opioids varies across drugs insofar as Δ(9)-THC and the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 increase the potency of some mu opioid receptor agonists (e.g., fentanyl) more than others (e.g., nalbuphine). It is not known whether interactions between cannabinoids and opioids vary similarly for other (abuse-related) effects. This study examined whether Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 differentially impact the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine in monkeys (n=4) discriminating 0.01mg/kg of fentanyl (s.c.) from saline. Fentanyl (0.00178-0.0178mg/kg) and nalbuphine (0.01-0.32mg/kg) dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding. Neither Δ(9)-THC (0.032-1.0mg/kg) nor CP55940 (0.0032-0.032mg/kg) enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl or nalbuphine; however, doses of Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 that shifted the nalbuphine dose-effect curve markedly to the right and/or down were less effective or ineffective in shifting the fentanyl dose-effect curve. The mu opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.032mg/kg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine similarly. These data indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine are more sensitive to attenuation by cannabinoids than those of fentanyl. That the discriminative stimulus effects of some opioids are more susceptible to modification by drugs from other classes has implications for developing maximally effective therapeutic drug mixtures with reduced abuse liability. PMID:27184925

  11. Cartographic Character Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafal, Howard B.; Ward, Matthew O.

    1989-11-01

    This work details a methodology for recognizing text elements on cartographic documents. Cartographic Character Recognition differs from traditional OCR in that many fonts may occur on the same page, text may have any orientation, text may follow a curved path, and text may be interfered with by graphics. The technique presented reduces the process to three steps: blobbing, stringing, and recognition. Blobbing uses image processing techniques to turn the gray level image into a binary image and then separates the image into probable graphic elements and probable text elements. Stringing relates the text elements into words. This is done by using proximity information of the letters to create string contours. These contours also help to retrieve orientation information of the text element. Recognition takes the strings and associates a letter with each blob. The letters are first approximated using feature descriptions, resulting in a set of possible letters. Orientation information is then used to refine the guesses. Final recognition is performed using elastic matching Feedback is employed at all phases of execution to refine the processing. Stringing and recognition give information that is useful in finding hidden blobs. Recognition helps make decisions about string paths. Results of this work are shown.

  12. Individual recognition in crayfish (Cherax dispar): the roles of strength and experience in deciding aggressive encounters.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Frank; Wilson, Robbie S

    2007-10-22

    The outcomes of agonistic interactions modulate access to resources and thereby affect fitness. Success in agonistic encounters may depend on intrinsic physical and physiological performance, and on social experience. Here we test the hypothesis that previous experience will override physical strength in determining the outcome of fights in the freshwater crayfish Cherax dispar. Between unfamiliar opponents, greater chelae closing force significantly increases the chances of winning. However, even when the chelae of the original winners were disabled, the winners kept on winning against the same opponents after 30min and 24h. This winner effect disappeared when previous winners encountered unfamiliar individuals. Similarly, a previous loss did not affect the outcomes of subsequent encounters with unknown crayfish. We suggest that this prolonged recognition of individuals and their relative fighting ability is a mechanism that can reduce the number of agonistic encounters experienced by individuals. PMID:17623630

  13. Importance of Nucleic Acid Recognition in Inflammation and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Barrat, Franck J; Elkon, Keith B; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    An important concept in immunology is the classification of immune responses as either innate or adaptive, based on whether the antigen receptors are encoded in the germline or generated somatically by gene rearrangement. The innate immune system is an ancient mode of immunity, and by being a first layer in our defense against infectious agents, it is essential for our ability to develop rapid and sustained responses to pathogens. We discuss the importance of nucleic acid recognition by the innate immune system to mounting an appropriate immune response to pathogens and also how inflammation driven by uncontrolled recognition of self-nucleic acids can lead to autoimmune diseases. We also summarize current efforts to either harness the immune system using agonists of nucleic acid-specific innate sensors or, on the contrary, by using inhibitors in autoimmune situations. PMID:26526766

  14. IFN-alpha/beta-dependent cross-priming induced by specific toll-like receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Durand, Vanessa; Wong, Simon Y C; Tough, David F; Le Bon, Agnes

    2006-04-12

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors that have been identified as crucial in the initiation of innate immune responses against pathogens. They are thought to be involved in shaping appropriate adaptive immune responses, although their precise contribution has not yet been fully characterised. Our aim was to investigate in vivo the effect of different TLR stimuli on cellular immune responses. We examined the ability of a range of TLR stimuli to induce CD8+ T cell responses against a model soluble protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA). We found that TLR 3, TLR 4, and TLR 9 agonists induced functional cross-priming, and that this process was dependent on IFN-alpha/beta signalling pathway. PMID:16823911

  15. Effects of the neurotensin NTS1 receptor agonist PD149163 on visual signal detection in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hillhouse, Todd M.; Prus, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs provide limited efficacy for cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Recent studies have found that the neurotensin NTS1 receptor agonist and putative atypical antipsychotic drug PD149163 reverses deficits in sensory-gating and novel object recognition, suggesting that this compound may have the potential to improve cognitive functioning in schizophrenia. The present study sought to extend these investigations by evaluating the effects of PD149163 on sustained attention using a visual signal detection operant task in rats. PD149163, the atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine, and the dopamine D2/3 receptor antagonist raclopride all significantly decreased percent “hit” accuracy, while none of these compounds altered “correct rejections” (compared to vehicle control). Clozapine and raclopride significantly increased response latency, while high doses of PD149163 and raclopride significantly increased trial omissions. Nicotine, which was tested as a positive control, significantly improved overall performance in this task and did not affect response latency or trial omissions. The present findings suggest that neurotensin NTS1 receptor agonists, like antipsychotic drugs, may inhibit sustained attention in this task despite having different pharmacological mechanisms of action. PMID:24076181

  16. The murine neutrophil NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by soluble but not particulate or crystalline agonists.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaiwen W; Bezbradica, Jelena S; Groß, Christina J; Wall, Adam A; Sweet, Matthew J; Stow, Jennifer L; Schroder, Kate

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophils express pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and regulate immune responses via PRR-dependent cytokine production. An emerging theme is that neutrophil PRRs often exhibit cell type-specific adaptations in their signalling pathways. This prompted us to examine inflammasome signalling by the PRR NLRP3 in murine neutrophils, in comparison to well-established NLRP3 signalling pathways in macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that while murine neutrophils can indeed signal via the NLRP3 inflammasome, neutrophil NLRP3 selectively responds to soluble agonists but not to the particulate/crystalline agonists that trigger NLRP3 activation in macrophages via phagolysosomal rupture. In keeping with this, alum did not trigger IL-1β production from human PMN, and the lysosomotropic peptide Leu-Leu-OMe stimulated only weak NLRP3-dependent IL-1β production from murine neutrophils, suggesting that lysosomal rupture is not a strong stimulus for NLRP3 activation in neutrophils. We validated our in vitro findings for poor neutrophil NLRP3 responses to particles in vivo, where we demonstrated that neutrophils do not significantly contribute to alum-induced IL-1β production in mice. In all, our studies highlight that myeloid cell identity and the nature of the danger signal can strongly influence signalling by a single PRR, thus shaping the nature of the resultant immune response. PMID:27062120

  17. Thromboxane agonist (U46619) potentiates norepinephrine efflux from adrenergic nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Trachte, G.J.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of the synthetic thromboxane/prostaglandin (PG) H2 agonist U46619 on the electrically stimulated rabbit isolated vas deferens was examined to test for thromboxane influences on adrenergic nerves. U46619 effects on force generation, (/sup 3/H) norepinephrine release and norepinephrine-induced contractions were assessed to determine the mechanism of action. U46619 maximally enhanced adrenergic force generation 135 +/- 24% at a concentration of 100 nM. U46619 potentiated maximal contractile effects of exogenously administered norepinephrine 16 +/- 4% and augmented (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine release from electrically stimulated preparations 142 +/- 44%. A competitive thromboxane/PGH2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548, significantly shifted the concentration-response curve for U46619 to the right in a concentration-dependent manner and blocked U46619-induced tritium release. Thus, U46619 appears to potentiate neurotransmitter release by interacting with thromboxane/PGH2 receptors. Because SQ29548 did not prevent the potentiation of norepinephrine contractions by U46619, the postjunctional effect may be independent of thromboxane/PGH2 receptors. We interpret these results to be indicative of both pre- and postjunctional sites of action of U46619. The physiological importance of these thromboxane effects is unknown currently.

  18. 8 CFR 292.2 - Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. 292.2... REPRESENTATION AND APPEARANCES § 292.2 Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for...

  19. 8 CFR 292.2 - Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. 292.2... REPRESENTATION AND APPEARANCES § 292.2 Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for...

  20. 8 CFR 292.2 - Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. 292.2... REPRESENTATION AND APPEARANCES § 292.2 Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for...

  1. 8 CFR 292.2 - Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. 292.2... REPRESENTATION AND APPEARANCES § 292.2 Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for...

  2. 8 CFR 292.2 - Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. 292.2... REPRESENTATION AND APPEARANCES § 292.2 Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for...

  3. Stereochemical Recognition of Helicenes on Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Karl-Heinz

    2016-06-21

    molecular handedness from single molecules into extended two-dimensional supramolecular structures are identified. For the problem of racemate versus conglomerate crystallization, the impact of surface and molecular structure and their interplay are analyzed. This leads to detailed conclusions about the importance of the match of molecular and surface binding sites for long-range self-assembly. The absence of polar groups puts emphasis on van der Waals interaction and their maximization by steric overlap of molecular parts in enantiomeric and diastereomeric interactions. With STM as a manipulation tool, dimers are manually separated in order to analyze their chiral composition. And finally, new nonlinear cooperative effects induced by small enantiospecific bias are discovered that lead to single enantiomorphism in two-dimensional racemate crystals as well as in racemic multilayered films. By means of these model studies many details that govern chiral recognition at surfaces are rationalized. PMID:27251099

  4. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and PAMs as adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Monica M; Björkholm, Carl; Malmerfelt, Anna; Möller, Annie; Påhlsson, Ninni; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Feltmann, Kristin; Jardemark, Kent; Schilström, Björn; Svensson, Torgny H

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine has been found to improve cognition and reduce negative symptoms in schizophrenia and a genetic and pathophysiological link between the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and schizophrenia has been demonstrated. Therefore, there has been a large interest in developing drugs affecting the α7 nAChRs for schizophrenia. In the present study we investigated, in rats, the effects of a selective α7 agonist (PNU282987) and a α7 positive allosteric modulator (PAM; NS1738) alone and in combination with the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone for their utility as adjunct treatment in schizophrenia. Moreover we also investigated their utility as adjunct treatment in depression in combination with the SSRI citalopram. We found that NS1738 and to some extent also PNU282987, potentiated a subeffective dose of risperidone in the conditioned avoidance response test. Both drugs also potentiated the effect of a sub-effective concentration of risperidone on NMDA-induced currents in pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, NS1738 and PNU282987 enhanced recognition memory in the novel object recognition test, when given separately. Both drugs also potentiated accumbal but not prefrontal risperidone-induced dopamine release. Finally, PNU282987 reduced immobility in the forced swim test, indicating an antidepressant-like effect. Taken together, our data support the utility of drugs targeting the α7 nAChRs, perhaps especially α7 PAMs, to potentiate the effect of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Moreover, our data suggest that α7 agonists and PAMs can be used to ameliorate cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia and depression. PMID:27474687

  5. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation. PMID:22269613

  6. [PPAR receptors and insulin sensitivity: new agonists in development].

    PubMed

    Pégorier, J-P

    2005-04-01

    Thiazolidinediones (or glitazones) are synthetic PPARgamma (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors gamma) ligands with well recognized effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The clinical use of these PPARgamma agonists in type 2 diabetic patients leads to an improved glycemic control and an inhanced insulin sensitivity, and at least in animal models, to a protective effect on pancreatic beta-cell function. However, they can produce adverse effects, generally mild or moderate, but some of them (mainly peripheral edema and weight gain) may conduct to treatment cessation. Several pharmacological classes are currently in pre-clinical or clinical development, with the objective to retain the beneficial metabolic properties of PPARgamma agonists, either alone or in association with the PPARalpha agonists (fibrates) benefit on lipid profile, but devoid of the side-effects on weight gain and fluid retention. These new pharmacological classes: partial PPARgamma agonists, PPARgamma antagonists, dual PPARalpha/PPARgamma agonists, pan PPARalpha/beta(delta)/gamma agonists, RXR receptor agonists (rexinoids), are presented in this review. Main results from in vitro cell experiments and animal model studies are discussed, as well as the few published short-term studies in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:15959400

  7. Risk versus benefit considerations for the beta(2)-agonists.

    PubMed

    Kelly, H William

    2006-09-01

    Short-acting beta(2)-agonists are the mainstay of therapy for acute bronchospasm associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, whereas long-acting beta(2)-agonists are used in maintaining disease control in these respiratory disorders. This review describes and compares the pharmacology of the beta(2)-agonists and explains how these differences translate into differences in efficacy and beta(2)-adrenergic-mediated adverse effects. Questions commonly asked by clinicians regarding the efficacy and safety of short- and long-acting beta(2)-agonists include issues about cardiovascular effects, tolerance to their bronchodilator and bronchoprotective effects, blunting of albuterol response by long-acting beta(2)-agonists, potential masking of worsening asthma control, and the role of long-acting beta(2)-agonists as adjunctive therapy with inhaled corticosteroids in maintaining asthma control. Pharmacogenetics may play a role in determining which patients may be at risk for a reduced response to a beta(2)-agonist. The continued use of racemic albuterol, which contains a mixture of R-albuterol and S-albuterol, has been questioned because of data from preclinical and clinical studies suggesting that S-albuterol causes proinflammatory effects and may increase bronchial hyperreactivity. The preclinical and clinical effects of these two stereoisomers are reviewed. Data describing the efficacy and safety of levalbuterol (R-albuterol) and racemic albuterol are presented. PMID:16945063

  8. γ-Aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor subtype inverse agonists as therapeutic agents in cognition.

    PubMed

    Gabriella, Guerrini; Giovanna, Ciciani

    2010-01-01

    The gabaergic system has been identified as a relevant regulator of cognitive and emotional processing. In fact, the discovery that negative allosteric regulators (or inverse agonists) at GABA(A) (γ-aminobutyric acid) α5 subtype receptors improve learning and memory tasks, has further validated this concept. The localization of these extrasynaptic subtype receptors, mainly in the hippocampus, has suggested that they play a key role in the three stages of memory: acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval. The "α5 inverse agonist" binds to an allosteric site at GABA(A) receptor, provoking a reduction of chlorine current, but to elicit this effect, the necessary condition is the binding of agonist neurotransmitter (γ-amino butyric acid) at its orthosteric site. In this case, the GABA(A) receptor is not a "constitutively active receptor" and, however, the presence of spontaneous opening channels for native GABA(A) receptors is rare. Here, we present various classes of nonselective and α5 selective GABA(A) receptor ligands, and the in vitro and in vivo tests to elucidate their affinity and activity. The study of the GABA(A) α5 inverse agonists is one of the important tools, although not the only one, for the development of clinical strategies for treatment of Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment. PMID:21050918

  9. Dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome: implications for patient care.

    PubMed

    Nirenberg, Melissa J

    2013-08-01

    Dopamine agonists are effective treatments for a variety of indications, including Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, but may have serious side effects, such as orthostatic hypotension, hallucinations, and impulse control disorders (including pathological gambling, compulsive eating, compulsive shopping/buying, and hypersexuality). The most effective way to alleviate these side effects is to taper or discontinue dopamine agonist therapy. A subset of patients who taper a dopamine agonist, however, develop dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome (DAWS), which has been defined as a severe, stereotyped cluster of physical and psychological symptoms that correlate with dopamine agonist withdrawal in a dose-dependent manner, cause clinically significant distress or social/occupational dysfunction, are refractory to levodopa and other dopaminergic medications, and cannot be accounted for by other clinical factors. The symptoms of DAWS include anxiety, panic attacks, dysphoria, depression, agitation, irritability, suicidal ideation, fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, generalized pain, and drug cravings. The severity and prognosis of DAWS is highly variable. While some patients have transient symptoms and make a full recovery, others have a protracted withdrawal syndrome lasting for months to years, and therefore may be unwilling or unable to discontinue DA therapy. Impulse control disorders appear to be a major risk factor for DAWS, and are present in virtually all affected patients. Thus, patients who are unable to discontinue dopamine agonist therapy may experience chronic impulse control disorders. At the current time, there are no known effective treatments for DAWS. For this reason, providers are urged to use dopamine agonists judiciously, warn patients about the risks of DAWS prior to the initiation of dopamine agonist therapy, and follow patients closely for withdrawal symptoms during dopamine agonist taper. PMID:23686524

  10. The pain receptor TRPV1 displays agonist-dependent activation stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Hazan, Adina; Kumar, Rakesh; Matzner, Henry; Priel, Avi

    2015-01-01

    The receptor channel TRPV1 (Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1) is expressed by primary afferent sensory neurons of the pain pathway, where it functions as a sensor of noxious heat and various chemicals, including eicosanoids, capsaicin, protons and peptide toxins. Comprised of four identical subunits that organize into a non-selective cationic permeable channel, this receptor has a variety of binding sites responsible for detecting their respective agonists. Although its physiological role as a chemosensor has been described in detail, the stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation by its different ligands remains unknown. Here, we combined the use of concatemeric constructs harboring mutated binding sites with patch-clamp recordings in order to determine the stoichiometry for TRPV1 activation through the vanilloid binding site and the outer-pore domain by capsaicin and protons, respectively. We show that, while a single capsaicin-bound subunit was sufficient to achieve a maximal open-channel lifetime, all four proton-binding sites were required. Thus, our results demonstrate a distinct stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation through two of its different agonist-binding domains. PMID:26194846

  11. The pain receptor TRPV1 displays agonist-dependent activation stoichiometry

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Adina; Kumar, Rakesh; Matzner, Henry; Priel, Avi

    2015-01-01

    The receptor channel TRPV1 (Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1) is expressed by primary afferent sensory neurons of the pain pathway, where it functions as a sensor of noxious heat and various chemicals, including eicosanoids, capsaicin, protons and peptide toxins. Comprised of four identical subunits that organize into a non-selective cationic permeable channel, this receptor has a variety of binding sites responsible for detecting their respective agonists. Although its physiological role as a chemosensor has been described in detail, the stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation by its different ligands remains unknown. Here, we combined the use of concatemeric constructs harboring mutated binding sites with patch-clamp recordings in order to determine the stoichiometry for TRPV1 activation through the vanilloid binding site and the outer-pore domain by capsaicin and protons, respectively. We show that, while a single capsaicin-bound subunit was sufficient to achieve a maximal open-channel lifetime, all four proton-binding sites were required. Thus, our results demonstrate a distinct stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation through two of its different agonist-binding domains. PMID:26194846

  12. Target sites of anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Martin, R J; Robertson, A P; Bjorn, H

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews sites of action of anthelmintic drugs including: (1) levamisole and pyrantel, which act as agonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of nematodes; (2) the avermectins, which potentiate or gate the opening of glutamategated chloride channels found only in invertebrates; (3) piperazine, which acts as an agonist at GABA gated chloride channels on nematode muscle; (4) praziquantel, which increases the permeability of trematode tegument to calcium and results in contraction of the parasite muscle; (5) the benzimidazoles, like thiabendazole, which bind selectively to parasite beta-tubulin and prevents microtubule formation; (6) the proton ionophores, like closantel, which uncouple oxidative phosphorylation; (7) diamphenethide and clorsulon, which selectively inhibit glucose metabolism of Fasciola and; (8) diethylcarbamazine, which appears to interfere with arachidonic acid metabolism of filarial parasites and host. The review concludes with brief comments on the development of anthelmintics in the future. PMID:9309773

  13. Supra-physiological efficacy at GPCRs: superstition or super agonists?

    PubMed

    Langmead, Christopher J; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2013-05-01

    The concept of 'super agonism' has been described since the discovery of peptide hormone analogues that yielded greater functional responses than the endogenous agonists, in the early 1980s. It has remained an area of debate as to whether such compounds can really display greater efficacy than an endogenous agonist. However, recent pharmacological data, combined with crystal structures of different GPCR conformations and improved analytical methods for quantifying drug action, are starting to shed light on this phenomenon and indicate that super agonists may be more than superstition. PMID:23441648

  14. A clinical review of GLP-1 receptor agonists: efficacy and safety in diabetes and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Prasad-Reddy, Lalita; Isaacs, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an astounding rate. Many of the agents used to treat type 2 diabetes have undesirable adverse effects of hypoglycemia and weight gain. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists represent a unique approach to the treatment of diabetes, with benefits extending outside glucose control, including positive effects on weight, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and beta-cell function. They mimic the effects of the incretin hormone GLP-1, which is released from the intestine in response to food intake. Their effects include increasing insulin secretion, decreasing glucagon release, increasing satiety, and slowing gastric emptying. There are currently four approved GLP-1 receptor agonists in the United States: exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, and dulaglutide. A fifth agent, lixisenatide, is available in Europe. There are important pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical differences of each agent. The most common adverse effects seen with GLP-1 therapy include nausea, vomiting, and injection-site reactions. Other warnings and precautions include pancreatitis and thyroid cell carcinomas. GLP-1 receptor agonists are an innovative and effective option to improve blood glucose control, with other potential benefits of preserving beta-cell function, weight loss, and increasing insulin sensitivity. Once-weekly formulations may also improve patient adherence. Overall, these are effective agents for patients with type 2 diabetes, who are either uncontrolled on metformin or intolerant to metformin. PMID:26213556

  15. γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is not an agonist of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Connelly, William M; Errington, Adam C; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents. PMID:24244421

  16. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid (GHB) Is Not an Agonist of Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, William M.; Errington, Adam C.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents. PMID:24244421

  17. Important pharmacophoric features of pan PPAR agonists: common chemical feature analysis and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Sandeep; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2009-09-01

    HipHop program was used to generate a common chemical feature hypothesis for pan Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) agonists. The top scoring hypothesis (hypo-1) was found to differentiate the pan agonists (actives) from subtype-specific and dual PPAR agonists (inactives). The importance of individual features in hypo-1 was assessed by deleting a particular feature to generate a new hypothesis and observing its discriminating ability between 'actives' and 'inactives'. Deletion of aromatic features AR-1 (hypo-1b), AR-2 (hypo-1e) and a Hydrophobic feature HYD-1 (hypo-1c) individually did not affect the discriminating power of the hypo-1 significantly. However, deletion of a Hydrogen Bond Acceptor (HBA) feature (hypo-1f) in the hydrophobic tail group was found to be highly detrimental for the specificity of hypo-1 leading to high hit rate of 'inactives'. Since hypo-1 did not produce any useful hits from the database search, hypo-1b, hypo-1c and hypo-1e were used for virtual screening leading to the identification of new potential pan PPAR ligands. The docking studies were used to predict the binding pose of the proposed molecules in PPARgamma active site. PMID:19268404

  18. N-terminal galanin-(1-16) fragment is an agonist at the hippocampal galanin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisone, G.; Berthold, M.; Bedecs, K.; Unden, A.; Bartfai, T.; Bertorelli, R.; Consolo, S.; Crawley, J.; Martin, B.; Nilsson, S.; )

    1989-12-01

    The galanin N-terminal fragment (galanin-(1-16)) has been prepared by solid-phase synthesis and by enzymic cleavage of galanin by endoproteinase Asp-N. This peptide fragment displaced {sup 125}I-labeled galanin in receptor autoradiography experiments on rat forebrain and spinal cord and in equilibrium binding experiments from high-affinity binding sites in the ventral hippocampus with an IC50 of approximately 3 nM. In tissue slices of the same brain area, galanin-(1-16), similarly to galanin, inhibited the muscarinic agonist-stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids. Upon intracerebroventricular administration, galanin-(1-16) (10 micrograms/15 microliters) also inhibited the scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.)-evoked release of acetylcholine, as studied in vivo by microdialysis. Substitution of (L-Trp2) for (D-Trp2) resulted in a 500-fold loss in affinity as compared with galanin-(1-16). It is concluded that, in the ventral hippocampus, the N-terminal galanin fragment (galanin-(1-16)) is recognized by the galanin receptors controlling acetylcholine release and muscarinic agonist-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown as a high-affinity agonist and that amino acid residue (Trp2) plays an important role in the receptor-ligand interactions.

  19. Probabilistic Open Set Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Lalit Prithviraj

    Real-world tasks in computer vision, pattern recognition and machine learning often touch upon the open set recognition problem: multi-class recognition with incomplete knowledge of the world and many unknown inputs. An obvious way to approach such problems is to develop a recognition system that thresholds probabilities to reject unknown classes. Traditional rejection techniques are not about the unknown; they are about the uncertain boundary and rejection around that boundary. Thus traditional techniques only represent the "known unknowns". However, a proper open set recognition algorithm is needed to reduce the risk from the "unknown unknowns". This dissertation examines this concept and finds existing probabilistic multi-class recognition approaches are ineffective for true open set recognition. We hypothesize the cause is due to weak adhoc assumptions combined with closed-world assumptions made by existing calibration techniques. Intuitively, if we could accurately model just the positive data for any known class without overfitting, we could reject the large set of unknown classes even under this assumption of incomplete class knowledge. For this, we formulate the problem as one of modeling positive training data by invoking statistical extreme value theory (EVT) near the decision boundary of positive data with respect to negative data. We provide a new algorithm called the PI-SVM for estimating the unnormalized posterior probability of class inclusion. This dissertation also introduces a new open set recognition model called Compact Abating Probability (CAP), where the probability of class membership decreases in value (abates) as points move from known data toward open space. We show that CAP models improve open set recognition for multiple algorithms. Leveraging the CAP formulation, we go on to describe the novel Weibull-calibrated SVM (W-SVM) algorithm, which combines the useful properties of statistical EVT for score calibration with one-class and binary

  20. Identification of potential dual agonists of FXR and TGR5 using e-pharmacophore based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Thangaraj; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2015-05-01

    Farnesoid X receptor and Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor-5 are well known bile acid receptors and act as promising targets for the drug development and treatment of diabetes. Agonists of both the bile acid receptors increase insulin sensitivity and control glucose, lipids and bile acid homeostasis. The current study deals with the identification of novel dual agonists using ligand and structure-based virtual screening. Initially, an experimentally proven well-known dual agonist of FXR and TGR5, namely INT-767, was docked into the binding sites of FXR and TGR5 to determine the protein residues important for ligand binding. The docked complexes FXRINT-767 and TGR5INT-767 were used to generate e-pharmacophore hypotheses. Ligand-based virtual screening was carried out using the hypothetical e-pharmacophore model against the ChemBridge database. Further, structure-based virtual screening was performed with screened hits to find potential agonists of FXR and TGR5. A total of four best agonists were identified based on their affinity and mode of interactions with the receptors. The binding mode of these compounds with both receptors was analyzed in detail. Furthermore, molecular dynamics, ADME toxicity prediction, density functional theory and binding free energy calculations were carried out to rank the compounds. Based on the above analyses, the most potent compound, ChemBridge_9149693, was selected for further in vitro studies. The results of in vitro assays suggested that ChemBridge_9149693 is a potent and promising drug for the treatment of type II diabetes. Thus, the compound could be used for further drug design and development of dual agonists of FXR and TGR5. PMID:25787676

  1. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Unravels Biased Phosphorylation of Serotonin 2A Receptor at Ser280 by Hallucinogenic versus Nonhallucinogenic Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J.; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT2A receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT2A receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT2A agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser280) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT2A receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser280 by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT2A receptors at Ser280 in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser280 to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased phosphorylation of

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unravels biased phosphorylation of serotonin 2A receptor at Ser280 by hallucinogenic versus nonhallucinogenic agonists.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-05-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT(2A) receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT(2A) receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser(280)) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT(2A) receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser(280) by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT(2A) receptors at Ser(280) in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser(280) to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased

  3. Relamorelin: A Novel Gastrocolokinetic Synthetic Ghrelin Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Acosta, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic ghrelin agonists, predominantly small molecules, are being developed as prokinetic agents that may prove useful in the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders. Relamorelin (RM-131) is a pentapeptide synthetic ghrelin analog that activates the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS)-1a (also called the ghrelin) receptor with approximately 6-fold greater potency than natural ghrelin. The ability of relamorelin to stimulate growth hormone (GH) release is comparable to that of native ghrelin. Relamorelin has enhanced efficacy and plasma stability compared to native ghrelin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and potential indications for relamorelin. Relamorelin is administered subcutaneously, dosed daily or twice daily. Relamorelin is being studied for the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal motility disorders. Phase IIA pharmacodynamic studies have demonstrated acceleration of gastric emptying in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 DM (T2DM) and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. In a phase IIA study in patients with diabetic gastroparesis, relamorelin accelerated gastric emptying and significantly improved vomiting frequency compared to placebo and improved other symptoms of gastroparesis in a pre-specified subgroup of patients with vomiting at baseline. In patients with chronic idiopathic constipation with defined transit profile at baseline, relamorelin relieved constipation and accelerated colonic transit compared to placebo. These characteristics suggest that this new ghrelin analog shows great promise to relieve patients with upper or lower gastrointestinal motility disorders. PMID:25545036

  4. Structural Investigation for Optimization of Anthranilic Acid Derivatives as Partial FXR Agonists by in Silico Approaches.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meimei; Yang, Xuemei; Lai, Xinmei; Kang, Jie; Gan, Huijuan; Gao, Yuxing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a three level in silico approach was applied to investigate some important structural and physicochemical aspects of a series of anthranilic acid derivatives (AAD) newly identified as potent partial farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists. Initially, both two and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (2D- and 3D-QSAR) studies were performed based on such AAD by a stepwise technology combined with multiple linear regression and comparative molecular field analysis. The obtained 2D-QSAR model gave a high predictive ability (R²train = 0.935, R²test = 0.902, Q²LOO = 0.899). It also uncovered that number of rotatable single bonds (b_rotN), relative negative partial charges (RPC(-)), oprea's lead-like (opr_leadlike), subdivided van der Waal's surface area (SlogP_VSA2) and accessible surface area (ASA) were important features in defining activity. Additionally, the derived3D-QSAR model presented a higher predictive ability (R²train = 0.944, R²test = 0.892, Q²LOO = 0.802). Meanwhile, the derived contour maps from the 3D-QSAR model revealed the significant structural features (steric and electronic effects) required for improving FXR agonist activity. Finally, nine newly designed AAD with higher predicted EC50 values than the known template compound were docked into the FXR active site. The excellent molecular binding patterns of these molecules also suggested that they can be robust and potent partial FXR agonists in agreement with the QSAR results. Overall, these derived models may help to identify and design novel AAD with better FXR agonist activity. PMID:27070594

  5. Structural Investigation for Optimization of Anthranilic Acid Derivatives as Partial FXR Agonists by in Silico Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meimei; Yang, Xuemei; Lai, Xinmei; Kang, Jie; Gan, Huijuan; Gao, Yuxing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a three level in silico approach was applied to investigate some important structural and physicochemical aspects of a series of anthranilic acid derivatives (AAD) newly identified as potent partial farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists. Initially, both two and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (2D- and 3D-QSAR) studies were performed based on such AAD by a stepwise technology combined with multiple linear regression and comparative molecular field analysis. The obtained 2D-QSAR model gave a high predictive ability (R2train = 0.935, R2test = 0.902, Q2LOO = 0.899). It also uncovered that number of rotatable single bonds (b_rotN), relative negative partial charges (RPC−), oprea's lead-like (opr_leadlike), subdivided van der Waal’s surface area (SlogP_VSA2) and accessible surface area (ASA) were important features in defining activity. Additionally, the derived3D-QSAR model presented a higher predictive ability (R2train = 0.944, R2test = 0.892, Q2LOO = 0.802). Meanwhile, the derived contour maps from the 3D-QSAR model revealed the significant structural features (steric and electronic effects) required for improving FXR agonist activity. Finally, nine newly designed AAD with higher predicted EC50 values than the known template compound were docked into the FXR active site. The excellent molecular binding patterns of these molecules also suggested that they can be robust and potent partial FXR agonists in agreement with the QSAR results. Overall, these derived models may help to identify and design novel AAD with better FXR agonist activity. PMID:27070594

  6. Dihydromorphine-peptide hybrids with delta receptor agonistic and mu receptor antagonistic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.B.; Medzihradsky, F.; Woods, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    The actions of two morphine derivatives with short peptide side chains were evaluated upon the contraction of the isolated mouse vas deferens and upon displacement of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat brain membranes. NIH-9833 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl) was a potent agonist upon the vas deferens. Its EC50 for inhibition of the twitch was 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. Both naltrexone (10/sup -7/ M) a relatively nonselective opioid antagonist, and ICI-174864 (10/sup -/' M) a highly selective delta receptor antagonist, blocked the actions of NIH-9833 which indicates that this drug is a delta receptor agonist. In contrast, NIH-9835 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-glycyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl), which differs from NIH-9835 by the presence of a single amino acid residue, was devoid of opioid agonistic activity but was a potent antagonist of the inhibitory actions on the vas deferens of morphine and sufentanil. NIH-9833 and NIH-9835 were potent displacers of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat cerebral membranes with EC50's of 0.58 nM and 1.7 nM, respectively. The observation that addition of a single glycyl group changes a dihydromorphine-peptide analog from a potent delta receptor agonist to an equally potent mu receptor antagonist suggests that the two receptor sites might be structurally quite similar.

  7. TLR4, TLR7/8 agonist-induced miR-146a promotes macrophage tolerance to MyD88-dependent TLR agonists.

    PubMed

    Nahid, M Abu; Benso, Lia M; Shin, John D; Mehmet, Huseyin; Hicks, Alexandra; Ramadas, Ravisankar A

    2016-08-01

    TLRs facilitate the recognition of pathogens by immune cells and the initiation of the immune response, leading to the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Production of proinflammatory mediators by innate immune cells, such as macrophages, is tightly regulated to facilitate pathogen clearance while limiting an adverse impact on host tissue. Exposure of innate immune cells to TLR ligands induces a state of temporary refractoriness to a subsequent exposure of a TLR ligand, a phenomenon referred to as "tolerance." This study sought to evaluate the mechanistic regulation of TLR4 and TLR7/8 ligand-induced tolerance to other TLRs by microRNA-146a. With the use of THP-1 macrophages, as well as human classic and alternative macrophages, we demonstrate that priming with a TLR4 agonist (LPS) or a TLR7/8 agonist (R848) induces homologous and heterologous tolerance to various TLR ligands in macrophages, leading to the impaired production of cytokines and chemokines. We also demonstrate that overexpression of microRNA-146a is sufficient to mimic LPS or R848-induced hyporesponsiveness. Conversely, inhibition of microRNA-146a activity leads to LPS- or R848-induced TLR hyper-responsiveness in TLR signaling tolerance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microRNA-146a dampens cytokine production following a primary stimulus with MyD88-dependent but not MyD88-independent TLR pathways. Collectively, these data provide comprehensive evidence of the central role of microRNA-146a in TLR signaling tolerance to plasma membrane, as well as endosomal TLR ligands in human macrophages. PMID:26908827

  8. Selecting agonists from single cells infected with combinatorial antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Yea, Kyungmoo; Xie, Jia; Ruiz, Diana; Wilson, Ian A; Lerner, Richard A

    2013-05-23

    We describe a system for direct selection of antibodies that are receptor agonists. Combinatorial antibody libraries in lentiviruses are used to infect eukaryotic cells that contain a fluorescent reporter system coupled to the receptor for which receptor agonist antibodies are sought. In this embodiment of the method, very large numbers of candidate antibodies expressing lentivirus and eukaryotic reporter cells are packaged together in a format where each is capable of replication, thereby forging a direct link between genotype and phenotype. Following infection, cells that fluoresce are sorted and the integrated genes encoding the agonist antibodies recovered. We validated the system by illustrating its ability to generate rapidly potent antibody agonists that are complete thrombopoietin phenocopies. The system should be generalizable to any pathway where its activation can be linked to production of a selectable phenotype. PMID:23706638

  9. Therapeutic Potential of 5-HT6 Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Karila, Delphine; Freret, Thomas; Bouet, Valentine; Boulouard, Michel; Dallemagne, Patrick; Rochais, Christophe

    2015-10-22

    Given its predominant expression in the central nervous system (CNS), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT: serotonin) subtype 6 receptor (5-HT6R) has been considered as a valuable target for the development of CNS drugs with limited side effects. After 2 decades of intense research, numerous selective ligands have been developed to target this receptor; this holds potential interest for the treatment of neuropathological disorders. In fact, some agents (mainly antagonists) are currently undergoing clinical trial. More recently, a series of potent and selective agonists have been developed, and preclinical studies have been conducted that suggest the therapeutic interest of 5-HT6R agonists. This review details the medicinal chemistry of these agonists, highlights their activities, and discusses their potential for treating cognitive issues associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), depression, or obesity. Surprisingly, some studies have shown that both 5-HT6R agonists and antagonists exert similar procognitive activities. This article summarizes the hypotheses that could explain this paradox. PMID:26099069

  10. Partial agonist therapy in schizophrenia: relevance to diminished criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Gavaudan, Gilles; Magalon, David; Cohen, Julien; Lançon, Christophe; Léonetti, Georges; Pélissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure

    2010-11-01

    Pathological gambling (PG), classified in the DSM-IV among impulse control disorders, is defined as inappropriate, persistent gaming for money with serious personal, family, and social consequences. Offenses are frequently committed to obtain money for gambling. Pathological gambling, a planned and structured behavioral disorder, has often been described as a complication of dopamine agonist treatment in patients with Parkinson's disease. It has never been described in patients with schizophrenia receiving dopamine agonists. We present two patients with schizophrenia, previously treated with antipsychotic drugs without any suggestion of PG, who a short time after starting aripiprazole, a dopamine partial agonist, developed PG and criminal behavior, which totally resolved when aripiprazole was discontinued. Based on recent advances in research on PG and adverse drug reactions to dopamine agonists in Parkinson's disease, we postulate a link between aripiprazole and PG in both our patients with schizophrenia and raise the question of criminal responsibility. PMID:20579229

  11. Selective 5-HT2C agonists as potential antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Leysen, D C

    1999-02-01

    The antidepressants currently used need improvement, especially in terms of efficacy, relapse rate and onset of action. In this review the clinical and experimental data which support the rationale for 5-HT2C agonists in the treatment of depression are listed. Next, the results obtained with the non-selective 5-HT2C agonists on the market and in clinical development are described. Finally, the preclinical data on the more selective 5-HT2C agonists are summarized. These recent preclinical results reveal a greater potency and effect size compared to fluoxetine, good tolerability and no evidence of tolerance development. Selective 5-HT2C agonists might become innovative drugs for the treatment of depression, panic, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), some forms of aggression and eating disorders. PMID:16160946

  12. Agonist pharmacology of two Drosophila GABA receptor splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The Drosophila melanogaster gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunits, RDLac and DRC 17-1-2, form functional homo-oligomeric receptors when heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The subunits differ in only 17 amino acids, principally in regions of the N-terminal domain which determine agonist pharmacology in vertebrate ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors. A range of conformationally restricted GABA analogues were tested on the two homo-oligomers and their agonists pharmacology compared with that of insect and vertebrate iontropic GABA receptors. 2. The actions of GABA, isoguvacine and isonipecotic acid on RDLac and DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers were compared, by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp. All three compounds were full agonists of both receptors, but were 4-6 fold less potent agonists of DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers than of RDLac. However, the relative potencies of these agonists on each receptor were very similar. 3. A more complete agonist profile was established for RDLac homo-oligomers. The most potent agonists of these receptors were GABA, muscimol and trans-aminocrotonic acid (TACA), which were approximately equipotent. RDLac homo-oligomers were fully activated by a range of GABA analogues, with the order of potency: GABA > ZAPA ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid) > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid > or = isonipecotic acid > or = cis-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) > beta-alanine. 3-Aminopropane sulphonic acid (3-APS), a partial agonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, was the weakest agonist tested and 100 fold less potent than GABA. 4. SR95531, an antagonist of vertebrate GABAA receptors, competitively inhibited the GABA responses of RDLac homo-oligomers, which have previously been found to insensitive to bicuculline. However, its potency (IC50 500 microM) was much reduced when compared to GABAA receptors. 5. The agonist pharmacology of Drosophila RDLac homo-oligomers exhibits aspects of the characteristic pharmacology of

  13. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  14. Agonist-Specific Conformational Changes in the α1-γ2 Subunit Interface of the GABAA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Megan M.; Lim, You Bin; Bracamontes, John; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2012-01-01

    The GABAA receptor undergoes conformational changes upon the binding of agonist that lead to the opening of the channel gate and a flow of small anions across the cell membrane. Besides the transmitter GABA, allosteric ligands such as the general anesthetics pentobarbital and etomidate can activate the receptor. Here, we have investigated the agonist specificity of structural changes in the extracellular domain of the receptor. We used the substituted cysteine accessibility method and focused on the γ2(S195C) site (loop F). We show that modification of the site with (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) results in an enhanced response to GABA, indicating accessibility of the resting receptor to the modifying agent. Coapplication of GABA or muscimol, but not of gabazine, with MTSES prevented the effect, suggesting that GABA and muscimol elicit a conformational change that reduces access to the γ2(S195C) site. Exposure of the receptors to MTSES in the presence of the allosteric activators pentobarbital and etomidate resulted in an enhanced current response indicating accessibility and labeling of the γ2(S195C) site. However, comparison of the rates of modification indicated that labeling in the presence of etomidate was significantly faster than that in the presence of pentobarbital or gabazine or in resting receptors. We infer from the data that the structure of the α1-γ2 subunit interface undergoes agonist-specific conformational changes. PMID:22572883

  15. Agonist-specific conformational changes in the α1-γ2 subunit interface of the GABA A receptor.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Megan M; Lim, You Bin; Bracamontes, John; Steinbach, Joe Henry; Akk, Gustav

    2012-08-01

    The GABA(A) receptor undergoes conformational changes upon the binding of agonist that lead to the opening of the channel gate and a flow of small anions across the cell membrane. Besides the transmitter GABA, allosteric ligands such as the general anesthetics pentobarbital and etomidate can activate the receptor. Here, we have investigated the agonist specificity of structural changes in the extracellular domain of the receptor. We used the substituted cysteine accessibility method and focused on the γ2(S195C) site (loop F). We show that modification of the site with (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) results in an enhanced response to GABA, indicating accessibility of the resting receptor to the modifying agent. Coapplication of GABA or muscimol, but not of gabazine, with MTSES prevented the effect, suggesting that GABA and muscimol elicit a conformational change that reduces access to the γ2(S195C) site. Exposure of the receptors to MTSES in the presence of the allosteric activators pentobarbital and etomidate resulted in an enhanced current response indicating accessibility and labeling of the γ2(S195C) site. However, comparison of the rates of modification indicated that labeling in the presence of etomidate was significantly faster than that in the presence of pentobarbital or gabazine or in resting receptors. We infer from the data that the structure of the α1-γ2 subunit interface undergoes agonist-specific conformational changes. PMID:22572883

  16. Molecular Recognition and Specific Interactions for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Chung; Kang, Dae Joon

    2008-01-01

    Molecular recognition and specific interactions are reliable and versatile routes for site-specific and well-oriented immobilization of functional biomolecules on surfaces. The control of surface properties via the molecular recognition and specific interactions at the nanoscale is a key element for the nanofabrication of biosensors with high sensitivity and specificity. This review intends to provide a comprehensive understanding of the molecular recognition- and specific interaction-mediated biosensor fabrication routes that leads to biosensors with well-ordered and controlled structures on both nanopatterned surfaces and nanomaterials. Herein self-assembly of the biomolecules via the molecular recognition and specific interactions on nanoscaled surfaces as well as nanofabrication techniques of the biomolecules for biosensor architecture are discussed. We also describe the detection of molecular recognition- and specific interaction-mediated molecular binding as well as advantages of nanoscale detection.

  17. Further Studies on 2-Arylacetamide Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones: Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of 4,6-Disubstituted Analogues as Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Dahlgren, Claes; Graziano, Alessia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Zerbinati, Serena; Vergelli, Claudia; Quinn, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) play an essential role in the regulation of endogenous inflammation and immunity. In the present studies, a large series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives bearing an arylacetamide chain at position 2 was synthesized and tested for FPR agonist activity. The pyridazin-3(2H)-one ring was confirmed to be an appropriate scaffold to support FPR agonist activity, and its modification at the 4 and 6 positions led to the identification of additional active agonists, which induced intracellular Ca2+ flux in HL-60 cells transfected with either FPR1, FPR2, or FPR3. Seven formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1)-specific and several mixed FPR1/FPR2 dual agonists were identified with low micromolar EC50 values. Furthermore, these agonists also activated human neutrophils, inducing intracellular Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis. Finally, molecular docking studies indicated that the most potent pyridazin-3(2H)-ones overlapped in their best docking poses with fMLF and WKYMVM peptides in the FPR1 and FPR2 ligand binding sites, respectively. Thus, pyridazinone-based compounds represent potential lead compounds for further development of selective and/or potent FPR agonists. PMID:23685570

  18. High potency olfactory receptor agonists discovered by virtual high-throughput screening: molecular probes for receptor structure and olfactory function

    PubMed Central

    Triballeau, Nicolas; Van Name, Eric; Laslier, Guillaume; Cai, Diana; Paillard, Guillaume; Sorensen, Peter W.; Hoffmann, Rémy; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Ngai, John; Acher, Francine C.

    2008-01-01

    The detection and discrimination of diverse chemical structures by the vertebrate olfactory system is accomplished by the recognition of odorous ligands by their cognate receptors. In the present study we used a computational high-throughput screening strategy to discover novel high affinity agonists of an olfactory G protein-coupled receptor tuned to recognize amino acid ligands. Functional testing of the top candidates validated several agonists with potencies higher than any of the receptor’s known natural ligands. Computational modeling revealed molecular interactions involved in ligand recognition by this receptor, and further highlighted interactions that have been conserved in evolutionarily divergent amino acid receptors. Significantly, the top compounds display robust activities as odorants in vivo, and include a natural product that may be used to signal the presence of bacteria in the aquatic environment. Our virtual screening approach should be applicable to the identification of new bioactive molecules for probing the structure of chemosensory receptors and the function of chemosensory systems in vivo. PMID:19081373

  19. Sleep attacks in patients taking dopamine agonists: review

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Carl Nikolaus; Wenzel, Karoline; Suppan, Klaudia; Ivanic, Gerd; Kriechbaum, Norbert; Crevenna, Richard; Ott, Erwin

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To assess the evidence for the existence and prevalence of sleep attacks in patients taking dopamine agonists for Parkinson's disease, the type of drugs implicated, and strategies for prevention and treatment. Design Review of publications between July 1999 and May 2001 in which sleep attacks or narcoleptic-like attacks were discussed in patients with Parkinson's disease. Results 124 patients with sleep events were found in 20 publications. Overall, 6.6% of patients taking dopamine agonists who attended movement disorder centres had sleep events. Men were over-represented. Sleep events occurred at both high and low doses of the drugs, with different durations of treatment (0-20 years), and with or without preceding signs of tiredness. Sleep attacks are a class effect, having been found in patients taking the following dopamine agonists: levodopa (monotherapy in 8 patients), ergot agonists (apomorphine in 2 patients, bromocriptine in 13, cabergoline in 1, lisuride or piribedil in 23, pergolide in 5,) and non-ergot agonists (pramipexole in 32, ropinirole in 38). Reports suggest two distinct types of events: those of sudden onset without warning and those of slow onset with prodrome drowsiness. Conclusion Insufficient data are available to provide effective guidelines for prevention and treatment of sleep events in patients taking dopamine agonists for Parkinson's disease. Prospective population based studies are needed to provide this information. What is already known on this topicCar crashes in patients with Parkinson's disease have been associated with sleep attacks caused by the dopamine agonists pramipexole and ropiniroleWhether sleep attacks exist, their connection with certain agonists, prevention or treatment, and the justification of legal actions are controversialWhat this study addsSleep attacks as a phenomenon distinct from normal somnolence really do existThey are a class effect of all dopamine drugsEffective prevention and treatment

  20. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    DOEpatents

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  1. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25326839

  2. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25437461

  3. PPAR dual agonists: are they opening Pandora's Box?

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Rose, Madhankumar; Ganti, Subrahmanya S; Krishan, Pawan; Singh, Manjeet

    2007-08-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the major cause of mortality in patients of diabetes mellitus. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of nuclear hormone receptor superfamily comprising of three subtypes such as PPARalpha, PPARgamma and PPARdelta/beta. Activation of PPARalpha reduces triglycerides and involves in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPARgamma causes insulin sensitization and enhances glucose metabolism, whereas activation of PPARdelta enhances fatty acid metabolism. Current therapeutic strategies available for the treatment of diabetes do not inhibit the associated secondary cardiovascular complications. Hence, the development of multimodal drugs which can reduce hyperglycemia and concomitantly inhibit the progression of secondary cardiovascular complications may offer valuable therapeutic option. Several basic and clinical studies have exemplified the beneficial effects of PPARalpha and PPARgamma ligands in preventing the cardiovascular risks. The PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists are developed to increase insulin sensitivity and simultaneously prevent diabetic cardiovascular complications. Such compounds are under clinical trials and proposed for treatment of Type II diabetes with secondary cardiovascular complications. However, PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists such as muraglitazar, tesaglitazar and ragaglitazar have been noted to produce several cardiovascular risks and carcinogenicity, which raised number of questions about the clinical applications of dual agonists in diabetes and its associated complications. The ongoing basic studies have elucidated the cardio protective role of PPARdelta. Therefore, further studies are on the track to develop PPARalpha/delta and PPAR gamma/delta dual agonists and PPARalpha/gamma/delta pan agonists for the treatment of diabetic cardiovascular complications. The present review critically analyzes the protective and detrimental effect of PPAR agonists in

  4. Automatic object recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranganath, H. S.; Mcingvale, Pat; Sage, Heinz

    1988-01-01

    Geometric and intensity features are very useful in object recognition. An intensity feature is a measure of contrast between object pixels and background pixels. Geometric features provide shape and size information. A model based approach is presented for computing geometric features. Knowledge about objects and imaging system is used to estimate orientation of objects with respect to the line of sight.

  5. Pattern recognition in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Dick; de Ridder, Jeroen; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2013-09-01

    Pattern recognition is concerned with the development of systems that learn to solve a given problem using a set of example instances, each represented by a number of features. These problems include clustering, the grouping of similar instances; classification, the task of assigning a discrete label to a given instance; and dimensionality reduction, combining or selecting features to arrive at a more useful representation. The use of statistical pattern recognition algorithms in bioinformatics is pervasive. Classification and clustering are often applied to high-throughput measurement data arising from microarray, mass spectrometry and next-generation sequencing experiments for selecting markers, predicting phenotype and grouping objects or genes. Less explicitly, classification is at the core of a wide range of tools such as predictors of genes, protein function, functional or genetic interactions, etc., and used extensively in systems biology. A course on pattern recognition (or machine learning) should therefore be at the core of any bioinformatics education program. In this review, we discuss the main elements of a pattern recognition course, based on material developed for courses taught at the BSc, MSc and PhD levels to an audience of bioinformaticians, computer scientists and life scientists. We pay attention to common problems and pitfalls encountered in applications and in interpretation of the results obtained. PMID:23559637

  6. 1987 CASE Recognition Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 CASE Recognition Awards are presented for: general excellence in programs; student recruitment marketing improvement; video public service announcements, news, and commercial spots; total publications; magazines of the decade; improvement in periodicals; photocommunications via print; designer of the year and series; and imagination in…

  7. Microprocessor for speech recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, H.; Watari, M.; Sakoe, H.; Chiba, S.; Iwata, T.; Matsuki, T.; Kawakami, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A new single-chip microprocessor for speech recognition has been developed utilizing multi-processor architecture and pipelined structure. By DP-matching algorithm, the processor recognizes up to 340 isolated words or 40 connected words in realtime. 6 references.

  8. Automated galaxy recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, Barry; Anderson, Kurt

    Previous approaches to automated image processing have used both deterministic and nondeterministic techniques. These have not used any form of conceptual learning nor have they employed artificial intelligence techniques. Addition of such techniques to the task of image processing may significantly enhance the efficiencies and accuracies of the recognition and classification processes. In our application, the objects to be recognized and classified are galaxies.

  9. View Invariant Gait Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, Richard D.; Goffredo, Michela; Carter, John N.; Nixon, Mark S.

    Recognition by gait is of particular interest since it is the biometric that is available at the lowest resolution, or when other biometrics are (intentionally) obscured. Gait as a biometric has now shown increasing recognition capability. There are many approaches and these show that recognition can achieve excellent performance on current large databases. The majority of these approaches are planar 2D, largely since the early large databases featured subjects walking in a plane normal to the camera view. To extend deployment capability, we need viewpoint invariant gait biometrics. We describe approaches where viewpoint invariance is achieved by 3D approaches or in 2D. In the first group, the identification relies on parameters extracted from the 3D body deformation during walking. These methods use several video cameras and the 3D reconstruction is achieved after a camera calibration process. On the other hand, the 2D gait biometric approaches use a single camera, usually positioned perpendicular to the subject’s walking direction. Because in real surveillance scenarios a system that operates in an unconstrained environment is necessary, many of the recent gait analysis approaches are orientated toward view-invariant gait recognition.

  10. Intralist Cueing of Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slamecka, Norman J.

    1975-01-01

    Two experiments tested for effects of intralist cues upon recognition probability. Categorized and random lists were each tested, with targets appearing with zero, one or three intralist cues. Experiments showed substantial effects of trials and list type, but not of intralist context. (CHK)

  11. Optical Character Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Converso, L.; Hocek, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems, focusing on their components (the computer, the scanner, the OCR, and the output device); how the systems work; and features to consider in selecting a system. A list of 26 questions to ask to evaluate systems for potential purchase is included. (JDD)

  12. Differential effects of AMPK agonists on cell growth and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Emma E.; Coelho, Paula P.; Blagih, Julianna; Griss, Takla; Viollet, Benoit; Jones, Russell G.

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of cellular energy status, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is believed to act in opposition to the metabolic phenotypes favored by proliferating tumor cells. Consequently, compounds known to activate AMPK have been proposed as cancer therapeutics. However, the extent to which the anti-neoplastic properties of these agonists are mediated by AMPK is unclear. Here we examined the AMPK-dependence of six commonly used AMPK agonists (metformin, phenformin, AICAR, 2DG, salicylate and A-769662) and their influence on cellular processes often deregulated in tumor cells. We demonstrate that the majority of these agonists display AMPK-independent effects on cell proliferation and metabolism with only the synthetic activator, A-769662, exerting AMPK-dependent effects on these processes. We find that A-769662 promotes an AMPK-dependent increase in mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity (SRC). Finally, contrary to the view of AMPK activity being tumor suppressive, we find A-769662 confers a selective proliferative advantage to tumor cells growing under nutrient deprivation. Our results indicate that many of the anti-growth properties of these agonists cannot be attributed to AMPK activity in cells, and thus any observed effects using these agonists should be confirmed using AMPK-deficient cells. Ultimately, our data urge caution, not only regarding the type of AMPK agonist proposed for cancer treatment, but also the context in which they are used. PMID:25241895

  13. Whole-book recognition.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Pingping; Baird, Henry S

    2012-12-01

    Whole-book recognition is a document image analysis strategy that operates on the complete set of a book's page images using automatic adaptation to improve accuracy. We describe an algorithm which expects to be initialized with approximate iconic and linguistic models--derived from (generally errorful) OCR results and (generally imperfect) dictionaries--and then, guided entirely by evidence internal to the test set, corrects the models which, in turn, yields higher recognition accuracy. The iconic model describes image formation and determines the behavior of a character-image classifier, and the linguistic model describes word-occurrence probabilities. Our algorithm detects "disagreements" between these two models by measuring cross entropy between 1) the posterior probability distribution of character classes (the recognition results resulting from image classification alone) and 2) the posterior probability distribution of word classes (the recognition results from image classification combined with linguistic constraints). We show how disagreements can identify candidates for model corrections at both the character and word levels. Some model corrections will reduce the error rate over the whole book, and these can be identified by comparing model disagreements, summed across the whole book, before and after the correction is applied. Experiments on passages up to 180 pages long show that when a candidate model adaptation reduces whole-book disagreement, it is also likely to correct recognition errors. Also, the longer the passage operated on by the algorithm, the more reliable this adaptation policy becomes, and the lower the error rate achieved. The best results occur when both the iconic and linguistic models mutually correct one another. We have observed recognition error rates driven down by nearly an order of magnitude fully automatically without supervision (or indeed without any user intervention or interaction). Improvement is nearly monotonic, and

  14. Solubilization and reconstitution of the D-1 dopamine receptor: potentiation of the agonist high-affinity state of the receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.

    1988-11-29

    The D-1 dopamine receptor was extracted from rat striatal membranes with sodium cholate and NaCl in the presence of a specific agonist and phospholipids. The soluble receptor then was reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles by further addition of phospholipids prior to detergent removal. Of the total membrane receptors, up to 48% were extracted and 36% were reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. Yields were greatly reduced if the agonist was omitted or replaced with an antagonist. The solubilized and reconstituted D-1 receptors retained the pharmacological properties of the membrane-bound receptors, including the ability to discriminate between active and inactive enantiomers of specific agonists and antagonists. In this regard, the affinity of the reconstituted receptors for the D-1 specific antagonist /sup 125/I SCH 23982 was similar to that of the membrane-bound receptors with a Kd of 1.5 nM. Both the soluble and reconstituted forms of the D-1 receptor exhibited two affinity states for the D-1 specific agonist SKandF R-38393. In contrast to the low proportion of the receptors that had a high affinity for the agonists in striatal membranes (less than 6%), there was a dramatic increase following solubilization (22%) and reconstitution (40%). Similar results were obtained by using dopamine; the proportion of high-affinity sites increased from 4% (membrane-bound) to 48% (reconstituted) of the total receptor population. These high-affinity sites were coupled to G proteins, as guanyl nucleotides completely abolished them. Addition of guanyl nucleotides prior to solubilization or to reconstitution, however, had no effect on the subsequent yield of the reconstituted receptors.

  15. Perception of specific trigeminal chemosensory agonists

    PubMed Central

    Frasnelli, J; Albrecht, J; Bryant, B; Lundström, JN

    2011-01-01

    The intranasal trigeminal system is a third chemical sense in addition to olfaction and gustation. As opposed to smell and taste, we still lack knowledge on the relationship between receptor binding and perception for the trigeminal system. We therefore investigated the sensitivity of the intranasal trigeminal system towards agonists of the trigeminal receptors TRPM8 and TRPA1 by assessing subjects’ ability to identify which nostril has been stimulated in a monorhinal stimulation design. We summed the number of correct identifications resulting in a lateralization score. Stimuli were menthol (activating TRPM8 receptors), eucalyptol (TRPM8), mustard oil (TRPA1) and two mixtures thereof (menthol/eucalyptol and menthol/mustard oil). In addition, we examined the relationship between intensity and lateralization scores and investigated whether intensity evaluation and lateralization scores of the mixtures show additive effects. All stimuli were correctly lateralized significantly above chance. Across subjects the lateralization scores for single compounds activating the same receptor showed a stronger correlation than stimuli activating different receptors. Although single compounds were isointense, the mixture of menthol and eucalyptol (activating only TRPM8) was perceived as weaker and was lateralized less accurately than the mixture of menthol and mustard oil (activating both TRPM8 and TRPA1) suggesting suppression effects in the former mixture. In conclusion, sensitivity of different subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons seems to be related, but only to a certain degree. The large coherence in sensitivity between various intranasal trigeminal stimuli suggests that measuring sensitivity to one single trigeminal chemical stimulus may be sufficient to generally assess the trigeminal system’s chemosensitivity. Further, for stimuli activating the same receptor a mixture suppression effect appears to occur similar to that observed in the other chemosensory

  16. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-1 Selective Agonist Enhances Collateral Growth and Protects against Subsequent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Li, Fuying; Yui, Daishi; Miki, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    increased after CCAO. Administration of the S1PR1 selective agonist significantly increased cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the diameter of leptomeningeal collateral vessels (42.9 ± 2.6 μm) compared with the controls (27.6 ± 5.7 μm; P < 0.01). S1PR1 inverse agonist administration diminished the effect of the S1PR1 agonist (P < 0.001). After pMCAO, S1PR1 agonist pretreated animals showed significantly smaller infarct volume (17.5% ± 4.0% vs. 7.7% ± 4.0%, P < 0.01) and better functional recovery than vehicle-treated controls. Conclusions These results suggest that S1PR1 is one of the principal regulators of leptomeningeal collateral recruitment at the site of increased shear stress and provide evidence that an S1PR1 selective agonist has a role in promoting collateral growth and preventing of ischemic damage and neurological dysfunction after subsequent stroke in patients with intracranial major artery stenosis or occlusion. PMID:26367258

  17. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  18. Visual Recognition Memory across Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Emily J. H.; Pascalis, Olivier; Eacott, Madeline J.; Herbert, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the development of representational flexibility in visual recognition memory during infancy using the Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task. In Experiment 1, 6- and 9-month-old infants exhibited recognition when familiarization and test occurred in the same room, but showed no evidence of recognition when…

  19. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  20. Chemical Modification of the M1 Agonist VU0364572 Reveals Molecular Switches in Pharmacology and a Bitopic Binding Mode

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the discovery of VU0364572 and VU0357017 as M1-selective agonists that appear to activate M1 through actions at an allosteric site. Previous studies have revealed that chemical scaffolds for many allosteric modulators contain molecular switches that allow discovery of allosteric antagonists and allosteric agonists or positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) based on a single chemical scaffold. Based on this, we initiated a series of studies to develop selective M1 allosteric antagonists based on the VU0364572 scaffold. Interestingly, two lead antagonists identified in this series, VU0409774 and VU0409775, inhibited ACh-induced Ca2+ responses at rat M1–5 receptor subtypes, suggesting they are nonselective muscarinic antagonists. VU0409774 and VU0409775 also completely displaced binding of the nonselective radioligand [3H]-NMS at M1 and M3 mAChRs with affinities similar to their functional IC50 values. Finally, Schild analysis revealed that these compounds inhibit M1 responses through a fully competitive interaction at the orthosteric binding site. This surprising finding prompted further studies to determine whether agonist activity of VU0364572 and VU0357017 may also engage in previously unappreciated actions at the orthosteric site on M1. Surprisingly, both VU0364572 and VU0357017 completely displaced [3H]-NMS binding to the orthosteric site of M1–M5 receptors at high concentrations. Furthermore, evaluation of agonist activity in systems with varying levels of receptor reserve and Furchgott analysis using a cell line expressing M1 under control of an inducible promotor was consistent with an action of these compounds as weak orthosteric partial agonists of M1. However, consistent with previous studies suggesting actions at a site that is distinct from the orthosteric binding site, VU0364572 or VU0357017 slowed the rate of [3H]-NMS dissociation from CHO-rM1 membranes. Together, these results suggest that VU0364572 and VU0357017 act as

  1. [Functional exploration of brown adipose tissue using beta3 agonists].

    PubMed

    Bertin, R; de Marco, F; Blancher, G; Portet, R

    1994-06-01

    In view to utilize beta 3 adrenoceptor agonists for the investigation of body lipid metabolism, a study of the effects of BRL 37344 on the functional activity of the brown adipose tissue was performed in the Rat. It is known that this tissue is the principal site of heat production for nonshivering thermogenesis mainly due to the oxidation of fatty acids under the control of norepinephrine (NA) released from the sympathetic nervous system. In order to stimulate the activity of the tissue, rats were reared at 16 degrees C. When they were one month old, they were divided in two groups; one group received a surgical sympathectomy of the interscapular brown adipose tissue (TABI) (S group); the other group was sham-operated (T group). The resting metabolism was estimated by the continuous measurement of O2 consumption and CO2 release, at an ambient temperature of 25 degrees C. The animal capacity for nonshivering thermogenesis was determined by increased O2 consumption following i.p. administration of NA or BRL 37344. In the S group a large decrease in TABI NA content and a decrease in resting metabolism were observed. In both groups VO2 was increased by the two drugs; the increase was linearly related to the dose of BRL (between 2.5 to 10 micrograms/kg); but it was 3 times as high in the T group as in the S group. Moreover, the effect of BRL was 40 fold greater than the effect of NA. These results seem to indicate that, in cold reared rats, a part of nonshivering thermogenesis may be mediated by the beta 3 receptors of the brown fat. It may be concluded that the rats born in cold conditions are good models to study the role of beta 3 receptors in the energetic activity of this tissue very profuse in infant but not in adult man. PMID:7994586

  2. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.

    1989-08-01

    During the past year, further studies on mAChR were conducted. These studies included verification of the difference in pituitary distribution based on ligand charge. The pituitary localization of TRB. A neutral mAChR ligand, was verified. The lack of QNB blockade of TRB uptake was tested by blockage with scopolamine, another mAChR antagonist and by testing the effect in a different strain of rat. Neither scopolamine or change of rat strain had any effect. We concluded that TRB uptake in pituitary is not a receptor-mediated process. Further studies were conducted with an additional quaternized mAChR ligand: MQNB. Pituitary localization of MQNB, like MTRB, could be blocked by pretreatment with QNB. We have tentatively concluded that permanent charge on a mAChR antagonist changes the mechanism of uptake in the pituitary. Time course studies and the effects of DES on myocardial uptake are reported. A brief report on preliminary results of evaluation of quaternized mAChR ligands in the heart is included. In a limited series of such ligands, we have observed a single binding site and a difference in B{sub max} values: QNB competition studies yield larger B{sub max} values than studies with {sup 3}H-NMS. Progress in the synthesis of D{sub 2} agonists includes solving a synthetic problem and preparation of the cold'' analogue of N-0437 using procedures applicable to eventual synthesis with {sup 11}C-CH{sub 3}I. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Electrophysiological studies in cultured mouse CNS neurones of the actions of an agonist and an inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, M. S.; Lambert, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    usually around 10(-6) M, but was sometimes as low as 10(-8) M. Dose-response curves of IGABA or gGABA showed the inhibition to be of a non-competitive nature. The maximum inhibition achieved was around 70%. For a given neurone, and at doses which did not necessarily cause a reduction of the response to GABA, DMCM could antagonize the potentiating action of midazolam on GABA responses. A possible interpretation is that more than one BZ site per receptor complex must be occupied by a BZ agonist (or inverse agonist) before the functional changes for the complex as a whole can occur. Desensitization to GABA was increased by midazolam. PMID:3017492

  4. Binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon, a high affinity mu-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Spetea, Mariana; Tóth, Fanni; Schütz, Johannes; Otvös, Ferenc; Tóth, Géza; Benyhe, Sandor; Borsodi, Anna; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2003-07-01

    The highly potent micro -opioid receptor agonist 14-methoxymetopon (4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-5beta,17-dimethylmorphinan-6-one) was prepared in tritium labelled form by a catalytic dehalogenation method resulting in a specific radioactivity of 15.9 Ci/mmol. Opioid binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon were determined using radioligand binding assay in rat brain membranes. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon specifically labelled a single class of opioid sites with affinity in low subnanomolar range (Ki = 0.43 nm) and maximal number of binding sites of 314 fmol/mg protein. Binding of [3H]14-methoxymetopon was inhibited by ligands selective for the micro -opioid receptor with high potency, while selective kappa-opioids and delta-opioids were weaker inhibitors. 14-Methoxymetopon increased guanosine-5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding with an EC50 of 70.9 nm, thus, providing evidence for the agonist character of this ligand. The increase of [35S]GTPgammaS binding was inhibited by naloxone and selective micro -opioid antagonists, indicating a micro -opioid receptor-mediated action. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon is one of the few nonpeptide mu-opioid receptor agonists available in radiolabelled form up to now. Due to its high affinity and selectivity, high stability and extremely low nonspecific binding (<10%), this radioligand would be an important and useful tool in probing mu-opioid receptor mechanisms, as well as to promote a further understanding of the opioid system at the cellular and molecular level. PMID:12887410

  5. Face Recognition Increases during Saccade Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hai; Rizak, Joshua D.; Ma, Yuan-ye; Yang, Shang-chuan; Chen, Lin; Hu, Xin-tian

    2014-01-01

    Face perception is integral to human perception system as it underlies social interactions. Saccadic eye movements are frequently made to bring interesting visual information, such as faces, onto the fovea for detailed processing. Just before eye movement onset, the processing of some basic features, such as the orientation, of an object improves at the saccade landing point. Interestingly, there is also evidence that indicates faces are processed in early visual processing stages similar to basic features. However, it is not known whether this early enhancement of processing includes face recognition. In this study, three experiments were performed to map the timing of face presentation to the beginning of the eye movement in order to evaluate pre-saccadic face recognition. Faces were found to be similarly processed as simple objects immediately prior to saccadic movements. Starting ∼ 120 ms before a saccade to a target face, independent of whether or not the face was surrounded by other faces, the face recognition gradually improved and the critical spacing of the crowding decreased as saccade onset was approaching. These results suggest that an upcoming saccade prepares the visual system for new information about faces at the saccade landing site and may reduce the background in a crowd to target the intended face. This indicates an important role of pre-saccadic eye movement signals in human face recognition. PMID:24671174

  6. Face photo-sketch synthesis and recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaogang; Tang, Xiaoou

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel face photo-sketch synthesis and recognition method using a multiscale Markov Random Fields (MRF) model. Our system has three components: 1) given a face photo, synthesizing a sketch drawing; 2) given a face sketch drawing, synthesizing a photo; and 3) searching for face photos in the database based on a query sketch drawn by an artist. It has useful applications for both digital entertainment and law enforcement. We assume that faces to be studied are in a frontal pose, with normal lighting and neutral expression, and have no occlusions. To synthesize sketch/photo images, the face region is divided into overlapping patches for learning. The size of the patches decides the scale of local face structures to be learned. From a training set which contains photo-sketch pairs, the joint photo-sketch model is learned at multiple scales using a multiscale MRF model. By transforming a face photo to a sketch (or transforming a sketch to a photo), the difference between photos and sketches is significantly reduced, thus allowing effective matching between the two in face sketch recognition. After the photo-sketch transformation, in principle, most of the proposed face photo recognition approaches can be applied to face sketch recognition in a straightforward way. Extensive experiments are conducted on a face sketch database including 606 faces, which can be downloaded from our Web site (http://mmlab.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/facesketch.html). PMID:19762924

  7. Anti-nociception mediated by a κ opioid receptor agonist is blocked by a δ receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A M W; Roberts, K W; Pradhan, A A; Akbari, H A; Walwyn, W; Lutfy, K; Carroll, F I; Cahill, C M; Evans, C J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The opioid receptor family comprises four structurally homologous but functionally distinct sub-groups, the μ (MOP), δ (DOP), κ (KOP) and nociceptin (NOP) receptors. As most opioid agonists are selective but not specific, a broad spectrum of behaviours due to activation of different opioid receptors is expected. In this study, we examine whether other opioid receptor systems influenced KOP-mediated antinociception. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used a tail withdrawal assay in C57Bl/6 mice to assay the antinociceptive effect of systemically administered opioid agonists with varying selectivity at KOP receptors. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to analyse the interactions of the other opioid receptors in modulating KOP-mediated antinociception. KEY RESULTS Etorphine, a potent agonist at all four opioid receptors, was not anti-nociceptive in MOP knockout (KO) mice, although etorphine is an efficacious KOP receptor agonist and specific KOP receptor agonists remain analgesic in MOP KO mice. As KOP receptor agonists are aversive, we considered KOP-mediated antinociception might be a form of stress-induced analgesia that is blocked by the anxiolytic effects of DOP receptor agonists. In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with the DOP antagonist, naltrindole (10 mg·kg−1), unmasked etorphine (3 mg·kg−1) antinociception in MOP KO mice. Further, in wild-type mice, KOP-mediated antinociception by systemic U50,488H (10 mg·kg−1) was blocked by pretreatment with the DOP agonist SNC80 (5 mg·kg−1) and diazepam (1 mg·kg−1). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Systemic DOP receptor agonists blocked systemic KOP antinociception, and these results identify DOP receptor agonists as potential agents for reversing stress-driven addictive and depressive behaviours mediated through KOP receptor activation. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles

  8. Dihydrocodeine/Agonists for Alcohol Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, Albrecht; Müller, Markus; Frietsch, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol addiction too often remains insufficiently treated. It shows the same profile as severe chronic diseases, but no comparable, effective basic treatment has been established up to now. Especially patients with repeated relapses, despite all therapeutic approaches, and patients who are not able to attain an essential abstinence to alcohol, need a basic medication. It seems necessary to acknowledge that parts of them need any agonistic substance, for years, possibly lifelong. For >14 years, we have prescribed such substances with own addictive character for these patients. Methods: We present a documented best possible practice, no designed study. Since 1997, we prescribed Dihydrocodeine (DHC) to 102 heavily alcohol addicted patients, later, also Buprenorphine, Clomethiazole (>6 weeks), Baclofen, and in one case Amphetamine, each on individual indication. This paper focuses on the data with DHC, especially. The Clomethiazole-data has been submitted to a German journal. The number of treatments with the other substances is still low. Results: The 102 patients with the DHC treatment had 1367 medically assisted detoxifications and specialized therapies before! The 4 years-retention rate was 26.4%, including 2.8% successfully terminated treatments. In our 12-steps scale on clinical impression, we noticed a significant improvement from mean 3.7 to 8.4 after 2 years. The demand for medically assisted detoxifications in the 2 years remaining patients was reduced by 65.5%. Mean GGT improved from 206.6 U/l at baseline to 66.8 U/l after 2 years. Experiences with the other substances are similar but different in details. Conclusion: Similar to the Italian studies with GHB and Baclofen, we present a new approach, not only with new substances, but also with a new setting and much more trusting attitude. We observe a huge improvement, reaching an almost optimal, stable, long term status in around 1/4 of the patients already. Many further

  9. Agonists and antagonists for P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Costanzi, Stefano; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Besada, Pedro; Shin, Dae Hong; Ko, Hyojin; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Mamedova, Liaman

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has identified nucleotide agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 receptors. Selective non-nucleotide antagonists have been reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2X2/3/P2X3 and P2X7 receptors. For example, the dinucleotide INS 37217 (Up4dC) potently activates the P2Y2 receptor, and the non-nucleotide antagonist A-317491 is selective for P2X2/3/P2X3 receptors. Nucleotide analogues in which the ribose moiety is substituted by a variety of novel ring systems, including conformation-ally locked moieties, have been synthesized as ligands for P2Y receptors. The focus on conformational factors of the ribose-like moiety allows the inclusion of general modifications that lead to enhanced potency and selectivity. At P2Y1,2,4,11 receptors, there is a preference for the North conformation as indicated with (N)-methanocarba analogues. The P2Y1 antagonist MRS2500 inhibited ADP-induced human platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.95 nM. MRS2365, an (N)-methanocarba analogue of 2-MeSADP, displayed potency (EC50) of 0.4 nM at the P2Y1 receptor, with >10 000-fold selectivity in comparison to P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors. At P2Y6 receptors there is a dramatic preference for the South conformation. Three-dimensional structures of P2Y receptors have been deduced from structure activity relationships (SAR), mutagenesis and modelling studies. Detailed three-dimensional structures of P2X receptors have not yet been proposed. PMID:16805423

  10. Audio-visual gender recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Xu, Xun; Huang, Thomas S.

    2007-11-01

    Combining different modalities for pattern recognition task is a very promising field. Basically, human always fuse information from different modalities to recognize object and perform inference, etc. Audio-Visual gender recognition is one of the most common task in human social communication. Human can identify the gender by facial appearance, by speech and also by body gait. Indeed, human gender recognition is a multi-modal data acquisition and processing procedure. However, computational multimodal gender recognition has not been extensively investigated in the literature. In this paper, speech and facial image are fused to perform a mutli-modal gender recognition for exploring the improvement of combining different modalities.

  11. 8 CFR 1292.2 - Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. 1292.2... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS REPRESENTATION AND APPEARANCES § 1292.2 Organizations qualified for...

  12. 8 CFR 1292.2 - Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. 1292.2... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS REPRESENTATION AND APPEARANCES § 1292.2 Organizations qualified for...

  13. 8 CFR 1292.2 - Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. 1292.2... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS REPRESENTATION AND APPEARANCES § 1292.2 Organizations qualified for...

  14. 8 CFR 1292.2 - Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. 1292.2... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS REPRESENTATION AND APPEARANCES § 1292.2 Organizations qualified for...

  15. Recognition of Teaching Excellence*

    PubMed Central

    Piascik, Peggy; Medina, Melissa; Pittenger, Amy; Rose, Renee; Creekmore, Freddy; Soltis, Robert; Bouldin, Alicia; Schwarz, Lindsay; Scott, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The 2008-2009 Task Force for the Recognition of Teaching Excellence was charged by the AACP Council of Faculties Leadership to examine teaching excellence by collecting best practices from colleges and schools of pharmacy, evaluating the literature to identify evidence-based criteria for excellent teaching, and recommending appropriate means to acknowledge and reward teaching excellence. This report defines teaching excellence and discusses a variety of ways to assess it, including student, alumni, peer, and self-assessment. The task force identifies important considerations that colleges and schools must address when establishing teaching recognition programs including the purpose, criteria, number and mix of awards, frequency, type of award, and method of nominating and determining awardees. The report concludes with recommendations for the academy to consider when establishing and revising teaching award programs. PMID:21301598

  16. Halogen bonding anion recognition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Asha; Beer, Paul D

    2016-07-01

    A halogen bond is an attractive non-covalent interaction between an electrophilic region in a covalently bonded halogen atom and a Lewis base. While these interactions have long been exploited as a tool in crystal engineering their powerful ability to direct supramolecular self-assembly and molecular recognition processes in solution has, until recently, been overlooked. During the last decade however an ever-increasing number of studies on solution-phase halogen-bond-mediated anion recognition processes has emerged. This Feature Article summarises advancements which have been made thus far in this rapidly developing research area. We survey the use of iodoperfluoroarene, haloimidazolium and halotriazole/triazolium halogen-bond-donor motifs in anion receptor design, before providing an account of our research into the application of mechanically interlocked rotaxane and catenane frameworks as halogen bonding anion host systems. PMID:27273600

  17. Reduced fear-recognition sensitivity following acute buprenorphine administration in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ipser, Jonathan C; Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Phillips, Nicole; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Thomas, Kevin; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2013-01-01

    In rodents, the endogenous opioid system has been implicated in emotion regulation, and in the reduction of fear in particular. In humans, while there is evidence that the opioid antagonist naloxone acutely enhances the acquisition of conditioned fear, there are no corresponding data on the effect of opioid agonists in moderating responses to fear. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mu-opioid agonist buprenorphine would decrease fear sensitivity with an emotion-recognition paradigm. Healthy human subjects participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, in which they performed a dynamic emotion recognition task 120min after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. In the recognition task, basic emotional expressions were morphed between their full expression and neutral in 2% steps, and presented as dynamic video-clips with final frames of different emotional intensity for each trial, which allows for a fine-grained measurement of emotion sensitivity. Additionally, visual analog scales were used to investigate acute effects of buprenorphine on mood. Compared to placebo, buprenorphine resulted in a significant reduction in the sensitivity for recognizing fearful facial expressions exclusively. Our data demonstrate, for the first time in humans, that acute up-regulation of the opioid system reduces fear recognition sensitivity. Moreover, the absence of an effect of buprenorphine on mood provides evidence of a direct influence of opioids upon the core fear system in the human brain. PMID:22651957

  18. Major neurotransmitter systems in dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala control social recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Garrido Zinn, Carolina; Clairis, Nicolas; Silva Cavalcante, Lorena Evelyn; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2016-08-16

    Social recognition memory (SRM) is crucial for reproduction, forming social groups, and species survival. Despite its importance, SRM is still relatively little studied. Here we examine the participation of the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) and the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and that of dopaminergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems in both structures in the consolidation of SRM. Male Wistar rats received intra-CA1 or intra-BLA infusions of different drugs immediately after the sample phase of a social discrimination task and 24-h later were subjected to a 5-min retention test. Animals treated with the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin, into either the CA1 or BLA were unable to recognize the previously exposed juvenile (familiar) during the retention test. When infused into the CA1, the β-adrenoreceptor agonist, isoproterenol, the D1/D5 dopaminergic receptor antagonist, SCH23390, and the H2 histaminergic receptor antagonist, ranitidine, also hindered the recognition of the familiar juvenile 24-h later. The latter drug effects were more intense in the CA1 than in the BLA. When infused into the BLA, the β-adrenoreceptor antagonist, timolol, the D1/D5 dopamine receptor agonist, SKF38393, and the H2 histaminergic receptor agonist, ranitidine, also hindered recognition of the familiar juvenile 24-h later. In all cases, the impairment to recognize the familiar juvenile was abolished by the coinfusion of agonist plus antagonist. Clearly, both the CA1 and BLA, probably in that order, play major roles in the consolidation of SRM, but these roles are different in each structure vis-à-vis the involvement of the β-noradrenergic, D1/D5-dopaminergic, and H2-histaminergic receptors therein. PMID:27482097

  19. Pattern Recognition by Pentraxins

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Alok; Singh, Prem Prakash; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Pentraxins are a family of evolutionarily conserved pattern-recognition proteins that are made up of five identical subunits. Based on the primary structure of the subunit, the pentraxins are divided into two groups: short pentraxins and long pentraxins. C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P-component (SAP) are the two short pentraxins. The prototype protein of the long pentraxin group is pentraxin 3 (PTX3). CRP and SAP are produced primarily in the liver while PTX3 is produced in a variety of tissues during inflammation. The main functions of short pentraxins are to recognize a variety of pathogenic agents and then to either eliminate them or neutralize their harmful effects by utilizing the complement pathways and macrophages in the host. CRP binds to modified low-density lipoproteins, bacterial polysaccharides, apoptotic cells, and nuclear materials. By virtue of these recognition functions, CRP participates in the resolution of cardiovascular, infectious, and autoimmune diseases. SAP recognizes carbohydrates, nuclear substances, and amyloid fibrils and thus participates in the resolution of infectious diseases, autoimmunity, and amyloidosis. PTX3 interacts with several ligands, including growth factors, extracellular matrix component and selected pathogens, playing a role in complement activation and facilitating pathogen recognition by phagocytes. In addition, data in gene-targeted mice show that PTX3 is essential in female fertility, participating in the assembly of the cumulus oophorus extra-cellular matrix. PTX3 is therefore a nonredundant component of the humoral arm of innate immunity as well as a tuner of inflammation. Thus, in conjunction with the other components of innate immunity, the pentraxins use their pattern-recognition property for the benefit of the host. PMID:19799114

  20. Video Scene Recognition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Robert Y.; Sallak, Rashid M.

    1983-03-01

    Microprocessors are used to show a possible implementation of a multiprocessoi system for video scene recognition operations. The system was designed in the multiple input stream and multiple data stream (MIMD) configuration. "Autonomous cooperation" among the working processors is supervised by a global operating system, the heart of which is the scheduler. The design of the scheduler and the overall operations of the system are discussed.

  1. Metamorphopsia and letter recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acuity is the most commonly used measure of visual function, and reductions in acuity are associated with most eye diseases. Metamorphopsia—a perceived distortion of visual space—is another common symptom of visual impairment and is currently assessed qualitatively using Amsler (1953) charts. In order to quantify the impact of metamorphopsia on acuity, we measured the effect of physical spatial distortion on letter recognition. Following earlier work showing that letter recognition is tuned to specific spatial frequency (SF) channels, we hypothesized that the effect of distortion might depend on the spatial scale of visual distortion just as it depends on the spatial scale of masking noise. Six normally sighted observers completed a 26 alternate forced choice (AFC) Sloan letter identification task at five different viewing distances, and the letters underwent different levels of spatial distortion. Distortion was controlled using spatially band-pass filtered noise that spatially remapped pixel locations. Noise was varied over five spatial frequencies and five magnitudes. Performance was modeled with logistic regression and worsened linearly with increasing distortion magnitude and decreasing letter size. We found that retinal SF affects distortion at midrange frequencies and can be explained with the tuning of a basic contrast sensitivity function, while object-centered distortion SF follows a similar pattern of letter object recognition sensitivity and is tuned to approximately three cycles per letter (CPL). The interaction between letter size and distortion makes acuity an unreliable outcome for metamorphopsia assessment. PMID:25453116

  2. Autonomous underwater barcode recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Karl R.

    2003-11-01

    Wide area symbol recognition is a task that plagues many autonomous vehicles. A process is needed first to recognize if the symbol is present, and if so where it is. Once the symbol's position is detected it must be analyzed and recognized. In this scenario we have a submersible attempting to locate man made objects on the bottom of a large water basin. These man made objects have bar codes on them that need to be read and the position of the code needs to be recorded relative to where it is in the entire pond. A two step process has been developed to allow the position recognition within a frame to be dealt with on a separate DSP associated with one of three total cameras. The object recognition is then dealt with on a high speed computer aboard the vehicle to read the proper code. The reading is done using a statistics based approach that assumes a noisy, but contrasting background. This approach has proven to be effective in environments in which the background has very little ordered noise, such as the bottom of lakes and ponds, but requires very high clarity in order to capture a suitable image.

  3. Techniques for automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. K.

    1983-05-01

    A brief insight into some of the algorithms that lie behind current automatic speech recognition system is provided. Early phonetically based approaches were not particularly successful, due mainly to a lack of appreciation of the problems involved. These problems are summarized, and various recognition techniques are reviewed in the contect of the solutions that they provide. It is pointed out that the majority of currently available speech recognition equipments employ a "whole-word' pattern matching approach which, although relatively simple, has proved particularly successful in its ability to recognize speech. The concepts of time-normalizing plays a central role in this type of recognition process and a family of such algorithms is described in detail. The technique of dynamic time warping is not only capable of providing good performance for isolated word recognition, but how it is also extended to the recognition of connected speech (thereby removing one of the most severe limitations of early speech recognition equipment).

  4. Honokiol: A non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist from nature☆

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Atanas G.; Wang, Jian N.; Gu, Shi P.; Bu, Jing; Kramer, Matthias P.; Baumgartner, Lisa; Fakhrudin, Nanang; Ladurner, Angela; Malainer, Clemens; Vuorinen, Anna; Noha, Stefan M.; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Schuster, Daniela; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M.; Heiss, Elke H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are clinically used to counteract hyperglycemia. However, so far experienced unwanted side effects, such as weight gain, promote the search for new PPARγ activators. Methods We used a combination of in silico, in vitro, cell-based and in vivo models to identify and validate natural products as promising leads for partial novel PPARγ agonists. Results The natural product honokiol from the traditional Chinese herbal drug Magnolia bark was in silico predicted to bind into the PPARγ ligand binding pocket as dimer. Honokiol indeed directly bound to purified PPARγ ligand-binding domain (LBD) and acted as partial agonist in a PPARγ-mediated luciferase reporter assay. Honokiol was then directly compared to the clinically used full agonist pioglitazone with regard to stimulation of glucose uptake in adipocytes as well as adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. While honokiol stimulated basal glucose uptake to a similar extent as pioglitazone, it did not induce adipogenesis in contrast to pioglitazone. In diabetic KKAy mice oral application of honokiol prevented hyperglycemia and suppressed weight gain. Conclusion We identified honokiol as a partial non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist in vitro which prevented hyperglycemia and weight gain in vivo. General significance This observed activity profile suggests honokiol as promising new pharmaceutical lead or dietary supplement to combat metabolic disease, and provides a molecular explanation for the use of Magnolia in traditional medicine. PMID:23811337

  5. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C.; Konger, Raymond L.; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  6. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Harrison, Kathleen A; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C; Konger, Raymond L; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-04-12

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  7. Identification and Pharmacological Characterization of Multiple Allosteric Binding Sites on the Free Fatty Acid 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Daniel C.-H.; Guo, Qi; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Jane; Nguyen, Kathy; Chen, Michael; Tran, Thanh; Dransfield, Paul J.; Brown, Sean P.; Houze, Jonathan; Vimolratana, Marc; Jiao, Xian Yun; Wang, Yingcai; Birdsall, Nigel J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of FFA1 (GPR40), a member of G protein-coupling receptor family A, is mediated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids and leads to amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting a potential role for free fatty acid 1 (FFA1) as a target for type 2 diabetes. It was assumed previously that there is a single binding site for fatty acids and synthetic FFA1 agonists. However, using members of two chemical series of partial and full agonists that have been identified, radioligand binding interaction studies revealed that the full agonists do not bind to the same site as the partial agonists but exhibit positive heterotropic cooperativity. Analysis of functional data reveals positive functional cooperativity between the full agonists and partial agonists in various functional assays (in vitro and ex vivo) and also in vivo. Furthermore, the endogenous fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) shows negative or neutral cooperativity with members of both series of agonists in binding assays but displays positive cooperativity in functional assays. Another synthetic agonist is allosteric with members of both agonist series, but apparently competitive with DHA. Therefore, there appear to be three allosterically linked binding sites on FFA1 with agonists specific for each of these sites. Activation of free fatty acid 1 receptor (FFAR1) by each of these agonists is differentially affected by mutations of two arginine residues, previously found to be important for FFAR1 binding and activation. These ligands with their high potencies and strong positive functional cooperativity with endogenous fatty acids, demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, have the potential to deliver therapeutic benefits. PMID:22859723

  8. Identification and pharmacological characterization of multiple allosteric binding sites on the free fatty acid 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daniel C-H; Guo, Qi; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Jane; Nguyen, Kathy; Chen, Michael; Tran, Thanh; Dransfield, Paul J; Brown, Sean P; Houze, Jonathan; Vimolratana, Marc; Jiao, Xian Yun; Wang, Yingcai; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Swaminath, Gayathri

    2012-11-01

    Activation of FFA1 (GPR40), a member of G protein-coupling receptor family A, is mediated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids and leads to amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting a potential role for free fatty acid 1 (FFA1) as a target for type 2 diabetes. It was assumed previously that there is a single binding site for fatty acids and synthetic FFA1 agonists. However, using members of two chemical series of partial and full agonists that have been identified, radioligand binding interaction studies revealed that the full agonists do not bind to the same site as the partial agonists but exhibit positive heterotropic cooperativity. Analysis of functional data reveals positive functional cooperativity between the full agonists and partial agonists in various functional assays (in vitro and ex vivo) and also in vivo. Furthermore, the endogenous fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) shows negative or neutral cooperativity with members of both series of agonists in binding assays but displays positive cooperativity in functional assays. Another synthetic agonist is allosteric with members of both agonist series, but apparently competitive with DHA. Therefore, there appear to be three allosterically linked binding sites on FFA1 with agonists specific for each of these sites. Activation of free fatty acid 1 receptor (FFAR1) by each of these agonists is differentially affected by mutations of two arginine residues, previously found to be important for FFAR1 binding and activation. These ligands with their high potencies and strong positive functional cooperativity with endogenous fatty acids, demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, have the potential to deliver therapeutic benefits. PMID:22859723

  9. Recognition and home care of low birth weight neonates: a qualitative study of knowledge, beliefs and practices of mothers in Iganga-Mayuge Health and Demographic Surveillance Site, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal mortality has remained persistently high worldwide. In Uganda, neonatal deaths account for 50% of all infant deaths. Low birth weight is associated with a higher risk of death during the neonatal period. Failure to recognize low birth weight and inappropriate home care practices increase the risk of morbidity and mortality in this high risk group. This study explored mothers’ knowledge, beliefs and practices in recognising and providing home care for low birth weight babies. Methods The study was carried out in Eastern Uganda. In-depth interviews were conducted with sixteen mothers of small babies who delivered in health facilities (10) or at home (6) two months prior to the study. Interviews were conducted in mothers’ homes using the local language. Interviewer notes and audio recordings were transcribed and translated to English. Content analysis was done using Atlas-ti software. Results Recognition of low birth weight by mothers when a baby is not weighed was difficult. Mothers were aware of the causes of low birth weight though some mothers believed in the influence of supernatural powers. Mothers who delivered in hospital had better knowledge of appropriate home care practices for low birth weight babies compared to mothers who delivered at home or in a lower level health facility. Practices related to cord care and keeping the baby warm were good while poor practices were noted concerning initiation and exclusive breast feeding, and bathing the baby. Low birth weight was not appreciated as a danger sign in newborns and therefore mothers did not seek health care. Some mothers who initiated good care practices for low birth weight newborns in the facilities did not sustain them at home. Conclusions Recognition of low birth weight is still poor. This leads to inappropriate home care practices for these high risk newborns. Mothers’ knowledge and care practices can be improved through health education, and this should be extended to the

  10. Preparation, characterization and molecular modeling of PEGylated human growth hormone with agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Khameneh, Bahman; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad; Varasteh, AbdolReza; Chamani, JamshidKhan; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Mohammadpanah, Hamid; Abnous, Khalil; Saberi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-09-01

    In this study, site-specific PEGylated human growth hormone (hGH) was prepared by microbial transglutaminase, modeled and characterized. To this end, the effects of different reaction parameters including reaction media, PEG:protein ratios, reaction time and pH value were investigated. PEG-hGH was purified by size exclusion chromatography method and analyzed by SDS-PAGE, BCA, peptide mapping, ESI and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectroscopy methods. Biophysical and biological properties of PEG-hGH were evaluated. Molecular simulation was utilized to provide molecular insight into the protein-receptor interaction. The optimum conditions that were obtained for PEGylation were phosphate buffer with pH of 7.4, 48 h of stirring and PEG:protein ratio of 40:1. By this method, mono-PEG-hGH with high reaction yield was obtained and PEGylation site was at Gln-40 residue. The circular dichroism and fluorescence spectrum indicated that PEGylation did not change the secondary structure while tertiary structure was altered. Upon enzymatic PEGylation, agonistic activity of hGH was preserved; however, Somavert(®), which is prepared by chemical PEGylation, is an antagonist form of protein. These data were confirmed by the total energy of affinity obtained by computational protein-receptor interaction. In conclusion, PEGylation of hGH was led to prepare a novel form of hormone with an agonist activity which merits further investigations. PMID:26116386

  11. Discovery of a Novel, Orally Efficacious Liver X Receptor (LXR) β Agonist.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yajun; Zhuang, Linghang; Fan, Kristi Yi; Tice, Colin M; Zhao, Wei; Dong, Chengguo; Lotesta, Stephen D; Leftheris, Katerina; Lindblom, Peter R; Liu, Zhijie; Shimada, Jun; Noto, Paul B; Meng, Shi; Hardy, Andrew; Howard, Lamont; Krosky, Paula; Guo, Joan; Lipinski, Kerri; Kandpal, Geeta; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Zhao, Yi; Lala, Deepak; Van Orden, Rebecca; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Guozhou; Wu, Zhongren; McKeever, Brian M; McGeehan, Gerard M; Gregg, Richard E; Claremon, David A; Singh, Suresh B

    2016-04-14

    This article describes the application of Contour to the design and discovery of a novel, potent, orally efficacious liver X receptor β (LXRβ) agonist (17). Contour technology is a structure-based drug design platform that generates molecules using a context perceptive growth algorithm guided by a contact sensitive scoring function. The growth engine uses binding site perception and programmable growth capability to create drug-like molecules by assembling fragments that naturally complement hydrophilic and hydrophobic features of the protein binding site. Starting with a crystal structure of LXRβ and a docked 2-(methylsulfonyl)benzyl alcohol fragment (6), Contour was used to design agonists containing a piperazine core. Compound 17 binds to LXRβ with high affinity and to LXRα to a lesser extent, and induces the expression of LXR target genes in vitro and in vivo. This molecule served as a starting point for further optimization and generation of a candidate which is currently in human clinical trials for treating atopic dermatitis. PMID:26990539

  12. Structural and Functional Studies of the Modulator NS9283 Reveal Agonist-like Mechanism of Action at α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Jeppe A.; Ahring, Philip K.; Kastrup, Jette S.; Gajhede, Michael; Balle, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of Cys loop receptor ion channels is a proven drug discovery strategy, but many underlying mechanisms of the mode of action are poorly understood. We report the x-ray structure of the acetylcholine-binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis with NS9283, a stoichiometry selective positive modulator that targets the α4-α4 interface of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Together with homology modeling, mutational data, quantum mechanical calculations, and pharmacological studies on α4β2 nAChRs, the structure reveals a modulator binding mode that overlaps the α4-α4 interface agonist (acetylcholine)-binding site. Analysis of contacts to residues known to govern agonist binding and function suggests that modulation occurs by an agonist-like mechanism. Selectivity for α4-α4 over α4-β2 interfaces is determined mainly by steric restrictions from Val-136 on the β2-subunit and favorable interactions between NS9283 and His-142 at the complementary side of α4. In the concentration ranges where modulation is observed, its selectivity prevents NS9283 from directly activating nAChRs because activation requires coordinated action from more than one interface. However, we demonstrate that in a mutant receptor with one natural and two engineered α4-α4 interfaces, NS9283 is an agonist. Modulation via extracellular binding sites is well known for benzodiazepines acting at γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors. Like NS9283, benzodiazepines increase the apparent agonist potency with a minimal effect on efficacy. The shared modulatory profile along with a binding site located in an extracellular subunit interface suggest that modulation via an agonist-like mechanism may be a common mechanism of action that potentially could apply to Cys loop receptors beyond the α4β2 nAChRs. PMID:24982426

  13. p-( sup 125 I)iodoclonidine, a novel radiolabeled agonist for studying central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.M.; Siegel, B.W. )

    1990-09-01

    Unlabeled p-iodoclonidine was efficacious in attenuating forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells. Maximal attenuation was 76 +/- 3%, with an EC50 of 347 +/- 60 nM. Comparable values of epinephrine were 72 +/- 3% and 122 +/- 22 nM. Responses to both agonists were abolished by 10 microM phentolamine. Therefore, p-iodoclonidine is an agonist in a cell culture model system of the neuronal alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. p-(125I)Iodoclonidine binding to membranes were measured using various regions of the rat brain. The agonist labeled a single population of sites present on cerebral cortical membranes, which was saturable (Bmax = 230 fmol/mg of protein) and possessed high affinity for the ligand (Kd = 0.6 nM). Binding was largely specific (93% at 0.6 nM). A variety of alpha 2-adrenergic agonists and antagonists were shown to compete for the binding of the radioligand. The binding of p-(125I)iodoclonidine was much less sensitive to agents that interact with alpha 1-adrenergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic receptors. Approximately 65% of the binding was sensitive to guanine nucleotides. Association kinetics using 0.4 nM radioligand were biphasic (37% associate rapidly, with kobs = 0.96 min-1, with the remainder binding more slowly, with kobs = 0.031 min-1) and reached a plateau by 90 min at 25 degrees. Dissociation kinetics were also biphasic, with 30% of the binding dissociating rapidly (k1 = 0.32 min-1) and the remainder dissociating 50-fold more slowly (k2 = 0.006 min-1). Agonist binding is, therefore, uniquely complex and probably reflects the conformational changes that accompany receptor activation.

  14. Supra-physiological efficacy at GPCRs: superstition or super agonists?

    PubMed Central

    Langmead, Christopher J; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The concept of ‘super agonism’ has been described since the discovery of peptide hormone analogues that yielded greater functional responses than the endogenous agonists, in the early 1980s. It has remained an area of debate as to whether such compounds can really display greater efficacy than an endogenous agonist. However, recent pharmacological data, combined with crystal structures of different GPCR conformations and improved analytical methods for quantifying drug action, are starting to shed light on this phenomenon and indicate that super agonists may be more than superstition. Linked Article This article is a commentary on Schrage et al., pp. 357–370 of this issue. To view this paper visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12003 PMID:23441648

  15. Alpha-2 agonists as pain therapy in horses.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    Alpha-2 agonists, such as xylazine, clonidine, romifidine, detomidine, medetomidine, and dexmedetomidine, are potent analgesic drugs that also induce physiologic and behavioral changes, such as hypertension, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, excessive sedation and ataxia, all of which can potentially limit their systemic use as analgesics in some clinical cases. The use of medetomidine and dexmetomidine has been introduced for equine anesthesia/analgesia, and although not approved in this species, their increased specificity for alpha-2 receptors may offer some potential advantages over the traditional alpha-2 agonists. Similarly, other routes of administration and benefits of alpha-2 agonists are recognized in the human and laboratory animal literature, which may prove useful in the equine patient if validated in the near future. This review presents this relevant information. PMID:21056297

  16. Effects of GABA agonists on body temperature regulation in GABAB(1)−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Quéva, Christophe; Bremner-Danielsen, Marianne; Edlund, Anders; Jonas Ekstrand, A; Elg, Susanne; Erickson, Sven; Johansson, Thore; Lehmann, Anders; Mattsson, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    Activation of GABAB receptors evokes hypothermia in wildtype (GABAB(1)+/+) but not in GABAB receptor knockout (GABAB(1)−/−) mice. The aim of the present study was to determine the hypothermic and behavioural effects of the putative GABAB receptor agonist γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), and of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol. In addition, basal body temperature was determined in GABAB(1)+/+, GABAB(1)+/− and GABAB(1)−/− mice. GABAB(1)−/− mice were generated by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Correct gene targeting was assessed by Southern blotting, PCR and Western blotting. GABAB receptor-binding sites were quantified with radioligand binding. Measurement of body temperature was done using subcutaneous temperature-sensitive chips, and behavioural changes after drug administration were scored according to a semiquantitative scale. GABAB(1)−/− mice had a short lifespan, probably caused by generalised seizure activity. No histopathological or blood chemistry changes were seen, but the expression of GABAB(2) receptor protein was below the detection limit in brains from GABAB(1)−/− mice, in the absence of changes in mRNA levels. GABAB receptor-binding sites were absent in brain membranes from GABAB(1)−/− mice. GABAB(1)−/− mice were hypothermic by approximately 1°C compared to GABAB(1)+/+ and GABAB(1)+/− mice. Injection of baclofen (9.6 mg kg−1) produced a large reduction in body temperature and behavioural effects in GABAB(1)+/+ and in GABAB(1)+/− mice, but GABAB(1)−/− mice were unaffected. The same pattern was seen after administration of GHB (400 mg kg−1). The GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (2 mg kg−1), on the other hand, produced a more pronounced hypothermia in GABAB(1)−/−mice. In GABAB(1)+/+ and GABAB(1)+/− mice, muscimol induced sedation and reduced locomotor activity. However, when given to GABAB(1)−/− mice, muscimol triggered periods of intense jumping and wild running. It is concluded that

  17. Systems Analysis of a RIG-I Agonist Inducing Broad Spectrum Inhibition of Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Marie-Line; Olagnier, David; Xu, Zhengyun; Paz, Suzanne; Belgnaoui, S. Mehdi; Lafferty, Erin I.; Janelle, Valérie; Arguello, Meztli; Paquet, Marilene; Ghneim, Khader; Richards, Stephanie; Smith, Andrew; Wilkinson, Peter; Cameron, Mark; Kalinke, Ulrich; Qureshi, Salman; Lamarre, Alain; Haddad, Elias K.; Sekaly, Rafick Pierre; Peri, Suraj; Balachandran, Siddharth; Lin, Rongtuan; Hiscott, John

    2013-01-01

    The RIG-I like receptor pathway is stimulated during RNA virus infection by interaction between cytosolic RIG-I and viral RNA structures that contain short hairpin dsRNA and 5′ triphosphate (5′ppp) terminal structure. In the present study, an RNA agonist of RIG-I was synthesized in vitro and shown to stimulate RIG-I-dependent antiviral responses at concentrations in the picomolar range. In human lung epithelial A549 cells, 5′pppRNA specifically stimulated multiple parameters of the innate antiviral response, including IRF3, IRF7 and STAT1 activation, and induction of inflammatory and interferon stimulated genes - hallmarks of a fully functional antiviral response. Evaluation of the magnitude and duration of gene expression by transcriptional profiling identified a robust, sustained and diversified antiviral and inflammatory response characterized by enhanced pathogen recognition and interferon (IFN) signaling. Bioinformatics analysis further identified a transcriptional signature uniquely induced by 5′pppRNA, and not by IFNα-2b, that included a constellation of IRF7 and NF-kB target genes capable of mobilizing multiple arms of the innate and adaptive immune response. Treatment of primary PBMCs or lung epithelial A549 cells with 5′pppRNA provided significant protection against a spectrum of RNA and DNA viruses. In C57Bl/6 mice, intravenous administration of 5′pppRNA protected animals from a lethal challenge with H1N1 Influenza, reduced virus titers in mouse lungs and protected animals from virus-induced pneumonia. Strikingly, the RIG-I-specific transcriptional response afforded partial protection from influenza challenge, even in the absence of type I interferon signaling. This systems approach provides transcriptional, biochemical, and in vivo analysis of the antiviral efficacy of 5′pppRNA and highlights the therapeutic potential associated with the use of RIG-I agonists as broad spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:23633948

  18. Evolutionary Conservation of 3-Iodothyronamine as an Agonist at the Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Cöster, Maxi; Biebermann, Heike; Schöneberg, Torsten; Stäubert, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The trace amine-associated receptor 1 (Taar1) is a Gs protein-coupled receptor activated by trace amines, such as β-phenylethylamine (β-PEA) and 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM). T1AM is an endogenous biogenic amine and thyroid hormone derivative that exerts several biological functions. However, the physiological relevance of T1AM acting via Taar1 is still under discussion. Therefore, we studied the structural and functional evolution of Taar1 in vertebrates to provide evidence for a conserved Taar1-mediated T1AM function. Study Design We searched public sequence databases to retrieve Taar1 sequence information from vertebrates. We cloned and functionally characterized Taar1 from selected vertebrate species using cAMP assays to determine the evolutionary conservation of T1AM action at Taar1. Results We found intact open reading frames of Taar1 in more than 100 vertebrate species, including mammals, sauropsids and amphibians. Evolutionary conservation analyses of Taar1 protein sequences revealed a high variation in amino acid residues proposed to be involved in agonist binding, especially in rodent Taar1 orthologs. Functional characterization showed that T1AM, β-PEA and p-tyramine (p-Tyr) act as agonists at all tested orthologs, but EC50 values of T1AM at rat Taar1 differed significantly when compared to all other tested vertebrate Taar1. Conclusions The high structural conservation of Taar1 throughout vertebrate evolution highlights the physiological relevance of Taar1, but species-specific differences in T1AM potency at Taar1 orthologs suggest a specialization of rat Taar1 for T1AM recognition. In contrast, β-PEA and p-Tyr potencies were rather conserved throughout all tested Taar1 orthologs. We provide evidence that the observed differences in potency are related to differences in constraint during Taar1 evolution. PMID:26601069

  19. Different affinity states of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors defined by agonists and antagonists in bovine aorta plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesh, G.; Deth, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    Evidence for a nonlinear relationship between alpha-1 adrenergic receptor occupancy and tissue responses, together with the finding of different affinity states for agonist binding, has raised the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. We have conducted studies to examine: 1) binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)prazosin, 2) competition of antagonists at these sites and 3) different affinity states of the receptor for agonists and modulation of these states by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p). A plasma membrane-enriched vesicular fraction (F2; 15%/33% sucrose interphase) was prepared from the muscular medial layer of bovine thoracic aorta. (/sup 3/H)Prazosin binding was characterized by a monophasic saturation isotherm (KD = 0.116 nM, Bmax = 112 fmol/mg of protein). Antagonist displacement studies yielded a relative potency order of prazosin greater than or equal to WB4104 much greater than phentolamine greater than corynanthine greater than yohimbine greater than or equal to idazoxan greater than rauwolscine. Competition curves for unlabeled prazosin, WB4101 (2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)-aminomethyl-1,4 benzodioxane) and phentolamine were shallow and were best modeled to two binding sites with picomolar and nanomolar KD values. Gpp(NH)p was without effect on antagonist affinity. Agonist (epinephrine, norepinephrine and phenylephrine) competition with (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding was biphasic with pseudo-Hill slopes less than 1.0. Binding was best described by a two-site model in which the average contribution of high affinity sites was 23% of total binding. KD values for the high affinity site ranged from 2.9 to 18 nM, and 3.9 to 5.0 microM for the low affinity site.

  20. Physical signals for protein-DNA recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zeng, Jia; Yan, Hong

    2009-09-01

    This paper discovers consensus physical signals around eukaryotic splice sites, transcription start sites, and replication origin start and end sites on a genome-wide scale based on their DNA flexibility profiles calculated by three different flexibility models. These salient physical signals are localized highly rigid and flexible DNAs, which may play important roles in protein-DNA recognition by the sliding search mechanism. The found physical signals lead us to a detailed hypothetical view of the search process in which a DNA-binding protein first finds a genomic region close to the target site from an arbitrary starting location by three-dimensional (3D) hopping and intersegment transfer mechanisms for long distances, and subsequently uses the one-dimensional (1D) sliding mechanism facilitated by the localized highly rigid DNAs to accurately locate the target flexible binding site within 30 bp (base pair) short distances. Guided by these physical signals, DNA-binding proteins rapidly search the entire genome to recognize a specific target site from the 3D to 1D pathway. Our findings also show that current promoter prediction programs (PPPs) based on DNA physical properties may suffer from lots of false positives because other functional sites such as splice sites and replication origins have similar physical signals as promoters do.

  1. Molecular recognition in protein modification with rhodium metallopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical manipulation of natural, unengineered proteins is a daunting challenge which tests the limits of reaction design. By combining transition-metal or other catalysts with molecular recognition ideas, it is possible to achieve site-selective protein reactivity without the need for engineered recognition sequences or reactive sites. Some recent examples in this area have used ruthenium photocatalysis, pyridine organocatalysis, and rhodium(II) metallocarbene catalysis, indicating that the fundamental ideas provide opportunities for using diverse reactivity on complex protein substrates and in complex cell-like environments. PMID:25588960

  2. Agonist treatment in opioid use: advances and controversy.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Biju; Chand, Prabhat; Benegal, Vivek; Murthy, Pratima

    2012-06-01

    Opioid dependence is a chronic relapsing condition which requires comprehensive care; pharmacological agents form the mainstay of its long term treatment. The two most popular approaches are the harm reduction method using agonists and the complete abstinence method using antagonists. Currently, particularly from the harm minimization perspective and the low feasibility of an abstinence based approach, there is an increasing trend toward agonist treatment. The use of buprenorphine has gained popularity in view of its safety profile and the availability of the buprenorphine-naloxone combination has made it popular as a take-home treatment. This review outlines the pharmacological advances and controversies in this area. PMID:22813654

  3. Insect Nicotinic Receptor Agonists as Flea Adulticides in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dai Tan; Hsu, Walter H.; Martin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Fleas are significant ectoparasites of small animals. They can be a severe irritant to animals and serve as a vector for a number of infectious diseases. In this article, we discuss the pharmacological characteristics of four insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists used as fleacides in dogs and cats, which include three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, nitenpyram, and dinotefuran) and spinosad. Insect nAChR agonists are one of the most important new classes of insecticides, which are used to control sucking insects both on plants and on companion animals. These new compounds provide a new approach for practitioners to safely and effectively eliminate fleas. PMID:20646191

  4. Piperidine derivatives as nonprostanoid IP receptor agonists 2.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ryoji; Ito, Hiroaki; Ishigaki, Takeshi; Morita, Yasuhiro; Miyamoto, Mitsuko; Isogaya, Masafumi

    2016-06-15

    We searched for a strong and selective nonprostanoid IP agonist bearing piperidine and benzanilide moieties. Through optimization of substituents on the benzanilide moiety, the crucial part of the agonist, 43 (2-((1-(2-(N-(4-tolyl)benzo[d][1,3]dioxole-5-carboxamido)ethyl)piperidin-4-yl)oxy)acetic acid monohydrate monohydrochloride) was discovered and exhibited strong platelet aggregation inhibition (IC50=21nM) and 100-fold selectivity for IP receptor over other PG receptors. The systemic exposure level and bioavailability after oral administration of 43 were also good in dog. PMID:27133594

  5. Automatic speaker recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Alan; Naylor, Joe

    1984-07-01

    The Defense Communications Division of ITT (ITTDCD) has developed an automatic speaker recognition (ASR) system that meets the functional requirements defined in NRL's Statement of Work. This report is organized as follows. Chapter 2 is a short history of the development of the ASR system, both the algorithm and the implementation. Chapter 3 describes the methodology of system testing, and Chapter 4 summarizes test results. In Chapter 5, some additional testing performed using GFM test material is discussed. Conclusions derived from the contract work are given in Chapter 6.

  6. Genetic specificity of face recognition

    PubMed Central

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G.; Plomin, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Specific cognitive abilities in diverse domains are typically found to be highly heritable and substantially correlated with general cognitive ability (g), both phenotypically and genetically. Recent twin studies have found the ability to memorize and recognize faces to be an exception, being similarly heritable but phenotypically substantially uncorrelated both with g and with general object recognition. However, the genetic relationships between face recognition and other abilities (the extent to which they share a common genetic etiology) cannot be determined from phenotypic associations. In this, to our knowledge, first study of the genetic associations between face recognition and other domains, 2,000 18- and 19-year-old United Kingdom twins completed tests assessing their face recognition, object recognition, and general cognitive abilities. Results confirmed the substantial heritability of face recognition (61%), and multivariate genetic analyses found that most of this genetic influence is unique and not shared with other cognitive abilities. PMID:26417086

  7. Pyrrolo- and Pyridomorphinans: Non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, V.; Clark, M.J.; Traynor, J.R.; Lewis, J.W.; Husbands, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse. PMID:24973818

  8. Pyrrolo- and pyridomorphinans: non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Clark, M J; Traynor, J R; Lewis, J W; Husbands, S M

    2014-08-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse. PMID:24973818

  9. Role of extracellular domain dimerization in agonist-induced activation of natriuretic peptide receptor A.

    PubMed

    Parat, Marie; McNicoll, Normand; Wilkes, Brian; Fournier, Alain; De Léan, André

    2008-02-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR) A is composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) with a ligand binding site, a single transmembrane region, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. The natural agonists atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP) bind and activate NPRA, leading to cyclic GMP production, which is responsible for their role in cardiovascular homeostasis. Previous studies suggested that stabilization of a dimeric form of NPRA by agonist is essential for receptor activation. However, ligand specificity and sequential steps of this dimerization process have not been investigated. We used radioligand binding, fluorescence resonance energy transfer homoquenching, and molecular modeling to characterize the interaction of human NPRA-ECD with ANP, BNP, the superagonist (Arg(10),Leu(12),Ser(17),Leu(18))-rANP-(1-28), the minimized analog mini-ANP and the antagonist (Arg(6),beta-cyclohexyl-Ala(8),d-Tic(16),Arg(17),Cys(18))-rANP-(6-18)-amide (A71915). ANP binds to preformed ECD dimers and spontaneous dimerization is the rate-limiting step of the ligand binding process. All the studied peptides, including A71915 antagonist, induce a dose-dependent fluorescence homoquenching, specific to dimerization, with potencies highly correlated with their binding affinities. A71915 induced more quenching than other peptides, suggesting stabilization by the antagonist of ECD dimer in a distinct inactive conformation. In summary, these results indicate that the ligand-induced dimerization process of NPRA is different from that for cytokine receptor model. Agonists or antagonists bind to preformed dimeric ECD, leading to dimer stabilization in an active or inactive conformation, respectively. Furthermore, the highly sensitive fluorescence assay designed to assess dimerization could serve as a powerful tool for further detailing the kinetic steps involved in natriuretic peptide receptor binding and activation. PMID:17965196

  10. Noribogaine is a G-protein biased κ-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Emeline L; Milon, Nicolas; Heghinian, Mari D; Fishback, James; Schürer, Stephan C; Garamszegi, Nandor; Mash, Deborah C

    2015-12-01

    Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 μM after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors. Functional activities of noribogaine at G-protein and non G-protein pathways of the mu and kappa opioid receptors were characterized. Noribogaine was a weak mu antagonist with a functional inhibition constants (Ke) of 20 μM at the G-protein and β-arrestin signaling pathways. Conversely, noribogaine was a G-protein biased kappa agonist 75% as efficacious as dynorphin A at stimulating GDP-GTP exchange (EC50=9 μM) but only 12% as efficacious at recruiting β-arrestin, which could contribute to the lack of dysphoric effects of noribogaine. In turn, noribogaine functionally inhibited dynorphin-induced kappa β-arrestin recruitment and was more potent than its G-protein agonistic activity with an IC50 of 1 μM. This biased agonist/antagonist pharmacology is unique to noribogaine in comparison to various other ligands including ibogaine, 18-MC, nalmefene, and 6'-GNTI. We predict noribogaine to promote certain analgesic effects as well as anti-addictive effects at effective concentrations>1 μM in the brain. Because elevated levels of dynorphins are commonly observed and correlated with anxiety, dysphoric effects, and decreased dopaminergic tone, a therapeutically relevant functional inhibition bias to endogenously released dynorphins by noribogaine might be worthy of consideration for treating anxiety and substance related disorders. PMID:26302653

  11. Investigations into factors determining the duration of action of the beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist, salmeterol.

    PubMed Central

    Nials, A. T.; Sumner, M. J.; Johnson, M.; Coleman, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    1. This study has explored the mechanism underlying the long duration of action of the beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist, salmeterol. 2. Salmeterol, salbutamol and isoprenaline caused a concentration-related inhibition of electrically-induced contractile responses of the guinea-pig superfused trachea preparation. The effects of both isoprenaline and salbutamol were rapid in onset and rapidly reversed upon removal of the agonist. In contrast, the effects of salmeterol were slower in onset and could not be reversed by superfusion of the tissue with agonist-free Krebs solution even for periods of up to 10 h. 3. The effects of salmeterol were, however, readily reversed by a number of beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs, as was the effect of a continuous infusion of isoprenaline. Upon removal of the antagonist, however, the effects of salmeterol and of the isoprenaline infusion were reasserted at a rate which was inversely related to the lipophilicity of a beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs. 4. Salmeterol inhibited the binding of [125I]-(-)-iodopindolol (100 pM) to rat lung membranes (pIC50 7.1), with isoprenaline (pIC50 6.2) and salbutamol (pIC50 5.1) having lower potencies. The inhibition of binding by salmeterol was apparently non-competitive, whereas that produced by salbutamol and isoprenaline was competitive in nature. 5. Isoprenaline and salbutamol rapidly dissociated from their binding sites, whereas in marked contrast, the binding of salmeterol showed no dissociation for periods of up to 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8095419

  12. The action of dopamine and vascular dopamine (DA1) receptor agonists on human isolated subcutaneous and omental small arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, A. D.; Sever, P. S.

    1989-01-01

    1. Human small arteries were obtained from surgical specimens and studied in vitro by use of a myograph technique. Following induction of tone with a potassium depolarizing solution, dopamine in the presence of beta-adrenoceptor and catecholamine uptake blockade relaxed isolated omental and subcutaneous arteries. Preincubation of tissues with phentolamine increased the maximum relaxation in response to dopamine. 2. The selective vascular dopamine receptor agonists, fenoldopam and SKF 38393 also relaxed isolated subcutaneous and omental arteries in a concentration-dependent manner. The order of potency for agonists was dopamine greater than fenoldopam greater than SKF 38393. 3. Dopamine-induced relaxation was competitively antagonized by SCH 23390, (R)- and (S)-sulpiride, and fenoldopam induced relaxation by SCH 23390 and (+)- but not (-)-butaclamol. 4. These results indicate the presence of vascular dopamine receptors (DA1 subtype) on human isolated resistance arteries from omental and subcutaneous sites. PMID:2474354

  13. Sudden event recognition: a survey.

    PubMed

    Suriani, Nor Surayahani; Hussain, Aini; Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf

    2013-01-01

    Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1) the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2) frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3) the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4) various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition. PMID:23921828

  14. Sudden Event Recognition: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Suriani, Nor Surayahani; Hussain, Aini; Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf

    2013-01-01

    Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1) the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2) frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3) the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4) various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition. PMID:23921828

  15. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  16. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  17. Naval ship recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino García, I.; Zölzer, U.

    2012-09-01

    Object recognition is a very interesting task with multiple applications and for that reason it has been dealt with very intensively in the last years. In particular, the application to naval ship pictures may facilitate the work of the coastguards or the navy. However, this type of images entails some difficulties due to their specific environment. Water reflects the light and as a consequence, some areas may presumably show different brightness and color. Waves from wind or moving ships pose a problem due to the additional edges that they produce. The camouflage of ships in the military context is also an issue to take into account. Therefore, it is difficult to propose a simple method that is valid for every image. A discussion about which techniques may solve these problems is presented and finally a combined solution based on contour recognition is suggested. Test images are preprocessed by histogram stretching. Then, the Canny method is applied to the image and to the reference contour in order to obtain not only their edges, but also their respective orientations. The problem of recognizing the reference contour within the detected edges is addressed by making use of the Generalized Hough Transform (GHT).

  18. Comparative pharmacology of bombesin receptor subtype-3, nonpeptide agonist MK-5046, a universal peptide agonist, and peptide antagonist Bantag-1 for human bombesin receptors.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Paola; Mantey, Samuel A; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Reitman, Marc L; González, Nieves; Coy, David H; Jensen, Robert T

    2013-10-01

    Bombesin-receptor-subtype-3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor of the bombesin (Bn) family whose natural ligand is unknown and which does not bind any natural Bn-peptide with high affinity. It is present in the central nervous system, peripheral tissues, and tumors; however, its role in normal physiology/pathophysiology is largely unknown because of the lack of selective ligands. Recently, MK-5046 [(2S)-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-[4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)phenyl]-3-(4-{[1-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-imidazol-2-yl)propan-2-ol] and Bantag-1 [Boc-Phe-His-4-amino-5-cyclohexyl-2,4,5-trideoxypentonyl-Leu-(3-dimethylamino) benzylamide N-methylammonium trifluoroacetate], a nonpeptide agonist and a peptide antagonist, respectively, for BRS-3 have been described, but there have been limited studies on their pharmacology. We studied MK-5046 and Bantag-1 interactions with human Bn-receptors-human bombesin receptor subtype-3 (hBRS-3), gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R), and neuromedin B receptor (NMB-R)-and compared them with the nonselective, peptide-agonist [d-Tyr6,βAla11,Phe13,Nle14]Bn-(6-14) (peptide #1). Receptor activation was detected by activation of phospholipase C (PLC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, and Akt. In hBRS-3 cells, the relative affinities were Bantag-1 (1.3 nM) > peptide #1 (2 nM) > MK-5046 (37-160 nM) > GRP, NMB (>10 μM), and the binding-dose-inhibition curves were broad (>4 logs), with Hill coefficients differing significantly from unity. Curve-fitting demonstrated high-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 0.08 nM) and low-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 11-29 nM) binding sites. For PLC activation in hBRS-3 cells, the relative potencies were MK-5046 (0.02 nM) > peptide #1 (6 nM) > GRP, NMB, Bantag-1 (>10 μM), and MK-5046 had a biphasic dose response, whereas peptide #1 was monophasic. Bantag-1 was a specific hBRS-3-antagonist. In hBRS-3 cells, MK-5046 was a full agonist for activation of MAPK, FAK, Akt

  19. Comparative Pharmacology of Bombesin Receptor Subtype-3, Nonpeptide Agonist MK-5046, a Universal Peptide Agonist, and Peptide Antagonist Bantag-1 for Human Bombesin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Paola; Mantey, Samuel A.; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Reitman, Marc L.; González, Nieves; Coy, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Bombesin-receptor-subtype-3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor of the bombesin (Bn) family whose natural ligand is unknown and which does not bind any natural Bn-peptide with high affinity. It is present in the central nervous system, peripheral tissues, and tumors; however, its role in normal physiology/pathophysiology is largely unknown because of the lack of selective ligands. Recently, MK-5046 [(2S)-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-[4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)phenyl]-3-(4-{[1-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-imidazol-2-yl)propan-2-ol] and Bantag-1 [Boc-Phe-His-4-amino-5-cyclohexyl-2,4,5-trideoxypentonyl-Leu-(3-dimethylamino) benzylamide N-methylammonium trifluoroacetate], a nonpeptide agonist and a peptide antagonist, respectively, for BRS-3 have been described, but there have been limited studies on their pharmacology. We studied MK-5046 and Bantag-1 interactions with human Bn-receptors—human bombesin receptor subtype-3 (hBRS-3), gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R), and neuromedin B receptor (NMB-R)—and compared them with the nonselective, peptide-agonist [d-Tyr6,βAla11,Phe13,Nle14]Bn-(6–14) (peptide #1). Receptor activation was detected by activation of phospholipase C (PLC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, and Akt. In hBRS-3 cells, the relative affinities were Bantag-1 (1.3 nM) > peptide #1 (2 nM) > MK-5046 (37–160 nM) > GRP, NMB (>10 μM), and the binding-dose-inhibition curves were broad (>4 logs), with Hill coefficients differing significantly from unity. Curve-fitting demonstrated high-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 0.08 nM) and low-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 11–29 nM) binding sites. For PLC activation in hBRS-3 cells, the relative potencies were MK-5046 (0.02 nM) > peptide #1 (6 nM) > GRP, NMB, Bantag-1 (>10 μM), and MK-5046 had a biphasic dose response, whereas peptide #1 was monophasic. Bantag-1 was a specific hBRS-3-antagonist. In hBRS-3 cells, MK-5046 was a full agonist for activation of MAPK

  20. Studies on molecular recognition of thymidines with molecularly imprinted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-He; Luo, Ai-Qin; Sun, Li-Quan

    2009-07-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with excellent molecular recognition ability have been used in chemical sensors, chromatographic separation and biochemical analyses. Thymidine is an important part of DNA for biomolecular recognition and the intermediate of many medicines. The polymers imprinted with the template of thymidine and 5'-Otosylthymidine have been prepared, using a non-proton solvent, acetonitrile as the porogen. Direct imprinting with thymidine could not form strong molecular interaction sites in this system. Relative MIPs were obtained by bulk polymerization and their adsorption capacities were investigated. The adsorption capacities of MIP (P2) and nonimprinted polymer (P20) for thymidine are 0.120 mg•g-1and 0.103 mg•g-1, respectively. The imprinting factor is 1.17. As 5'-O-tosylthymidine is more soluble than thymidine moiety in acetonitrile and give rise to more sites of molecular recognition. The results demonstrated that the imprinted polymers were able to bind and recognize thymidine moderately in acetonitrile. MIPs imprinted with 5'-O-tosylthymidine like nature enzymes displayed some recognition ability to its analogues. The insoluble derivatives in the non-proton solvent can be an effective template to prepare efficient imprinting recognition sites.

  1. Testosterone and its metabolites modulate 5HT1A and 5HT1B agonist effects on intermale aggression.

    PubMed

    Simon, N G; Cologer-Clifford, A; Lu, S F; McKenna, S E; Hu, S

    1998-01-01

    Our understanding of the neurochemical and neuroendocrine systems' regulating the display of offensive intermale aggression has progressed substantially over the past twenty years. Pharmacological studies have shown that serotonin, via its action at 5HT1A and/or 5HT1B receptor sites, modulates the display of intermale aggressive behavior and that its effects serve to decrease behavioral expression. Neuroendocrine investigations, in turn, have demonstrated that male-typical aggression is testosterone-dependent and studies of genetic effects, metabolic function and steroid receptor binding have shown that facilitation of behavioral displays can occur via independent androgen-sensitive or estrogen-sensitive pathways. Remarkably, there have been virtually no studies that examined the interrelationship between these facilitative and inhibitory systems. As an initial step toward characterizing the interaction between the systems, studies were conducted that assessed hormonal modulation of serotonin function at 5HT1A and 5HT1B receptor sites. They demonstrated: (1) that the androgenic and estrogenic metabolites of testosterone differentially modulate the ability of systemically administered 8-OH-DPAT (a 5HT1A agonist) and CGS12066B (a 5HT1B agonist) to decrease offensive aggression; and (2) when microinjected into the lateral septum (LS) or medial preoptic area (MPO), the aggression-attenuating effects of 1A and 1B agonists differ regionally and vary with the steroidal milieu. In general, the results suggest that estrogens establish a restrictive environment for attenuation of T-dependent aggression by 8-OH-DPAT and CGS 12066B, while androgens either do not inhibit, or perhaps even facilitate, the ability of 5HT1A and 5HT1B agonists to reduce aggression. Potential mechanisms involved in the production of these steroidal effects are discussed and emerging issues that may impact on efforts to develop an integrative neurobiological model of offensive, intermale aggression

  2. Synthetic RORγt Agonists Enhance Protective Immunity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mi Ra; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Doebelin, Christelle; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D; Novick, Scott J; Kuruvilla, Dana S; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Griffin, Patrick R

    2016-04-15

    The T cell specific RORγ isoform RORγt has been shown to be the key lineage-defining transcription factor to initiate the differentiation program of TH17 and TC17 cells, cells that have demonstrated antitumor efficacy. RORγt controls gene networks that enhance immunity including increased IL17 production and decreased immune suppression. Both synthetic and putative endogenous agonists of RORγt have been shown to increase the basal activity of RORγt enhancing TH17 cell proliferation. Here, we show that activation of RORγt using synthetic agonists drives proliferation of TH17 cells while decreasing levels of the immune checkpoint protein PD-1, a mechanism that should enhance antitumor immunity while blunting tumor associated adaptive immune resistance. Interestingly, putative endogenous agonists drive proliferation of TH17 cells but do not repress PD-1. These findings suggest that synthetic agonists of RORγt should activate TC17/TH17 cells (with concomitant reduction in the Tregs population), repress PD-1, and produce IL17 in situ (a factor associated with good prognosis in cancer). Enhanced immunity and blockage of immune checkpoints has transformed cancer treatment; thus such a molecule would provide a unique approach for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26785144

  3. Amphetamine- type reinforcement by dopaminergic agonists in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yokel, R A; Wise, R A

    1978-07-19

    Intravenous self-administration of d-amphetamine (0.25 mg/kg/injection) decreased in a dose-related fashion after injections of the dopaminergic agonists apomorphine and piribedil. The dopaminergic agonists appear to suppress amphetamine intake in the same way as do 'free' amphetamine injections, by extending drug satiation in a given interresponse period. Clonidine, an alpha noradrenergic agonist, did not have similar effects. Apomorphine and piribedil did not increase 14C-amphetamine levels in rat brains, nor did they retard disappearance of 14C-amphetamine; thus their amphetamine-like effects are not due to alterations of amphetamine metabolism. Rats responding for amphetamine continued to respond for apomorphine or peribedil when the latter drugs were substituted for the former. Rats experienced in amphetamine self-administration readily initiated and maintained responding for apomorphine and piribedil. The dopaminergic blocker (+)-butaclamol disrupted responding for apomorphine and piribedil, although it produced no marked increase in responding for the dopaminergic agonists, as it does for amphetamine. These data add to the evidence that actions in the dopaminergic synapse account for amphetamine's reinforcing properties. PMID:98800

  4. Alkaloid delta agonist BW373U86 increases hypoxic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bofetiado, D M; Mayfield, K P; D'Alecy, L G

    1996-06-01

    Activation of delta opioid receptors increases survival time during acute, lethal hypoxia in mice. delta Agonists therefore present a promising avenue for therapeutic application to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with clinical hypoxia in settings such as drowning, head injury apnea, and complicated childbirths. However, most delta agonists now available are peptides, and may have limited clinical utility. In the present study, we evaluate the neuroprotective ability of an alkaloid delta agonist, BW373U86. Alkaloid compounds, due to increased stability and increased systemic distribution, may be more favorable for clinical use. We found that BW373U86, like the peptide delta agonist, DPDPE ([D-Pen2, D-Pen5]-enkephalin), increases survival time of mice during lethal hypoxia. The mechanism of neuroprotection induced by delta receptor activation appears to involve decreasing body temperature. Further, using selective opioid receptor antagonists, it appears that BW373U86 exerts these neuroprotective effects by acting at delta-opioid receptors. PMID:8638797

  5. The Agonistic Approach: Reframing Resistance in Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitus, Kathrine

    2008-01-01

    The agonistic approach--aimed at embracing opposing perspectives as part of a qualitative research process and acknowledging that process as fundamentally political--sheds light on both the construction of and the resistance to research identities. This approach involves reflexively embedding interview situations into the ethnographic context as a…

  6. [Alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, G; Minguet, G; Brichant, J F

    2014-02-01

    Alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists have long been used in the treatment of arterial hypertension. However, in that indication they have progressively been replaced by antihypertensive drugs with a more interesting therapeutic profile. Nonetheless, pharmacological activation of alpha-2 adrenoreceptors leads to a variety of clinical effects that are of major interest for anaesthesia and intensive care practice. Indeed, the sedative and analgesic properties of alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists allow a reduction of hypnotic and opioid needs during general anaesthesia. In addition, they induce a down-regulation of the level of consciousness comparable to that of natural slow-wave sleep during post-anaesthesia and intensive care unit stay. These drugs may also prevent some deleterious effects of the sympathetic discharge in response to surgical stress. Furthermore, alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists are potent adjuncts for locoregional anaesthesia. In this article, we will summarize the most frequent applications of alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine. We will focus on the clinical data available for the two most representative molecules of this pharmacological class: clonidine and dexmedetomidine. PMID:24683831

  7. The emerging therapeutic roles of κ-opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark R; Kaye, Alan D; Kaye, Aaron J; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The current practice of μ-opioid receptor agonists such as morphine as the primary means of acute and chronic pain relief has several dangerous consequences that limit their effectiveness, including respiratory depression, gastrointestinal motility inhibition, addiction, tolerance, and abuse. Several other opioid receptors, notably the μ-opioid (KOP) receptor, have long been known to play a role in pain relief. Recent discoveries and advancements in laboratory techniques have allowed significant developments of KOP agonists as potential novel therapies for pain relief and other pathological processes. These drugs exhibit none of the classic opioid adverse effects and have displayed pronounced analgesia in several different scenarios. New formulations since 2014 have unveiled increased oral bioavailability, exceptional peripheral versus central selectivity, and a positive safety profile. Continued refinements of established μ-opioid agonist formulations have virtually eliminated the centrally mediated side effects of dysphoria and sedation that limited the applicability of previous KOP agonists. Further research is required to better elucidate the potential of these compounds in pain management, as well as in the mediation or modulation of other complex pathophysiological processes as therapeutic agents. PMID:27194194

  8. Physician perceptions of GLP-1 receptor agonists in the UK.

    PubMed

    Matza, Louis S; Curtis, Sarah E; Jordan, Jessica B; Adetunji, Omolara; Martin, Sherry A; Boye, Kristina S

    2016-05-01

    Objectives Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have been used to treat type 2 diabetes for almost a decade, and new treatments in this class have recently been introduced. The purpose of this study was to examine perceptions of GLP-1 receptor agonists among physicians who treat patients with type 2 diabetes in the UK. Methods A total of 670 physicians (226 diabetes specialists; 444 general practice [GP] physicians) completed a survey in 2014. Results Almost all physicians had prescribed GLP-1 receptor agonists (95.4% total sample; 99.1% specialists; 93.5% GP), most frequently to patients whose glucose levels are not adequately controlled with oral medications (85.9% of physicians) and obese/overweight patients (83.7%). Physicians' most common reasons for prescribing a GLP-1 receptor agonist were: associated with weight loss (65.8%), good efficacy (55.7%), less hypoglycemia risk than insulin (55.2%), not associated with weight gain (34.5%), and better efficacy than oral medications (32.7%). Factors that most commonly cause hesitation when prescribing this class were: not considered first line therapy according to guidelines (56.9%), injectable administration (44.6%), cost (36.7%), gastrointestinal side effects (33.4%), and risk of pancreatitis (26.7%). Almost all specialists (99.1%) believed they had sufficient knowledge to prescribe a GLP-1 receptor agonist, compared with 76.1% of GPs. Conclusions Results highlight the widespread use of GLP-1 receptor agonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes in the UK. However, almost a quarter of GPs reported that they do not have enough knowledge to prescribe GLP-1s, suggesting a need for increased dissemination of information to targeted groups of physicians. Study limitations were that the generalizability of the clinician sample is unknown; survey questions required clinicians to select answers from multiple response options rather than generating the responses themselves; and responses to this survey conducted

  9. Modulation of glycine sites enhances social memory in rats using PQQ combined with d-serine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xingqin; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Rongjun; Peng, Ying; Qin, Xiaofeng; Mao, Shishi

    2016-07-15

    The aim of study was to investigate the effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) combined with d-serine on the modulation of glycine sites in the brain of rats using social recognition test. Rats were divided into seven groups (n=10) and given repeated intraperitoneal (ip) injections of saline, MK-801 (0.5mg/kg), clozapine (1mg/kg), haloperidol (0.1mg/kg), d-serine (0.8g/kg), PQQ (2.0μg/kg), or d-serine (0.4g/kg) combined with PQQ (1.0μg/kg) for seven days. A social recognition test, including assessment of time-dependent memory impairment, was performed. A non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, significantly impaired social memory, and this impairment was significantly repaired with an atypical antipsychotic (clozapine) but not with a typical antipsychotic (haloperidol). Likewise, d-serine combined with PQQ significantly improved MK-801-disrupted cognition in naïve rats, whereas haloperidol was ineffective. The present results show that the co-agonist NMDA receptor treated with PQQ and d-serine enhances social memory and may be an effective approach for treating the cognitive dysfunction observed in schizophrenic patients. PQQ stimulates glycine modulatory sites by which it may antagonize indirectly by removing glycine from the synaptic cleft or by binding the unsaturated site with d-serine in the brain, providing the insights into future research of central nervous system and drug discovery. PMID:27109337

  10. The Legal Recognition of Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Meulder, Maartje

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an analytical overview of the different types of explicit legal recognition of sign languages. Five categories are distinguished: constitutional recognition, recognition by means of general language legislation, recognition by means of a sign language law or act, recognition by means of a sign language law or act including…

  11. Teaching and the Dialectic of Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttunen, Rauno; Heikkinen, Hannu L. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the processes of recognition within education are discussed. Frequently, recognition is reduced to polite behaviour or etiquette. Another narrow view of recognition is, behaviouristically speaking, to regard it as mere feedback. We claim that authentic recognition is a different matter. Receiving recognition, as Charles Taylor has…

  12. Oxytocin (OT) and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) act on OT receptors and not AVP V1a receptors to enhance social recognition in adult Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Song, Zhimin; Larkin, Tony E; Malley, Maureen O'; Albers, H Elliott

    2016-05-01

    Social recognition is a fundamental requirement for all forms of social relationships. A majority of studies investigating the neural mechanisms underlying social recognition in rodents have investigated relatively neutral social stimuli such as juveniles or ovariectomized females over short time intervals (e.g., 2h). The present study developed a new testing model to study social recognition among adult males using a potent social stimulus. Flank gland odors are used extensively in social communication in Syrian hamsters and convey important information such as dominance status. We found that the recognition of flank gland odors after a 3min exposure lasted for at least 24h, substantially longer than the recognition of other social cues in rats and mice. Intracerebroventricular injections of OT and AVP prolonged the recognition of flank gland odor for up to 48h. Selective OTR but not V1aR agonists, mimicked these enhancing effects of OT and AVP. Similarly, selective OTR but not V1aR antagonists blocked recognition of the odors after 20min. In contrast, the recognition of non-social stimuli was not blocked by either the OTR or the V1aR antagonists. Our findings suggest both OT and AVP enhance social recognition via acting on OTRs and not V1aRs and that the recognition enhancing effects of OT and AVP are limited to social stimuli. PMID:26975586

  13. Discovery of Tertiary Amine and Indole Derivatives as Potent RORγt Inverse Agonists.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Liu, Qian; Cheng, Yaobang; Cai, Wei; Ma, Yingli; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Qianqian; Orband-Miller, Lisa A; Zhou, Ling; Xiang, Zhijun; Huxdorf, Melanie; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Xiang, Jia-Ning; Leung, Stewart; Qiu, Yang; Zhong, Zhong; Elliott, John D; Lin, Xichen; Wang, Yonghui

    2014-01-01

    A novel series of tertiary amines as retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma-t (RORγt) inverse agonists was discovered through agonist/inverse agonist conversion. The level of RORγt inhibition can be enhanced by modulating the conformational disruption of H12 in RORγt LBD. Linker exploration and rational design led to the discovery of more potent indole-based RORγt inverse agonists. PMID:24900774

  14. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel indazolyl glucocorticoid receptor partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, John L; Sheppeck, James E; Wang, Jim; Dhar, T G Murali; Cavallaro, Cullen; Doweyko, Arthur M; Mckay, Lorraine; Cunningham, Mark D; Habte, Sium F; Nadler, Steven G; Dodd, John H; Somerville, John E; Barrish, Joel C

    2013-10-01

    SAR was used to further develop an indazole class of non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor agonists aided by a GR LBD (ligand-binding domain)-agonist co-crystal structure described in the accompanying paper. Progress towards discovering a dissociated GR agonist guided by human in vitro assays biased the optimization of this compound series towards partial agonists that possessed excellent selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors. PMID:23916594

  15. Sex differences in opioid antinociception: kappa and 'mixed action' agonists.

    PubMed

    Craft, R M; Bernal, S A

    2001-08-01

    A number of investigators have shown that male animals are more sensitive than females to the antinociceptive effects of mu-opioid agonists. The present study was conducted to examine sex differences in opioid antinociception in the rat using agonists known to differ in selectivity for and efficacy at kappa- versus mu-receptors. Dose- and time-effect curves were obtained for s.c. U69593, U50488, ethylketazocine, (-)-bremazocine, (-)-pentazocine, butorphanol and nalbuphine on the 50 or 54 degrees C hotplate and warm water tail withdrawal assays; spontaneous locomotor activity was measured 32-52 min post-injection in the same rats. On the hotplate assay, only butorphanol (54 degrees C) and nalbuphine (50 degrees C) were significantly more potent in males than females. On the tail withdrawal assay, all agonists were significantly more potent or efficacious in males than females at one or both temperatures. In contrast, no agonist was consistently more potent in one sex or the other in decreasing locomotor activity. Estrous stage in female rats only slightly influenced opioid effects, accounting for an average of 2.6% of the variance in females' antinociceptive and locomotor responses to drug (50 degrees C experiment). These results suggest that (1) sex differences in antinociceptive effects of opioids are not mu-receptor-dependent, as they may occur with opioids known to have significant kappa-receptor-mediated activity; (2) the mechanisms underlying sex differences in kappa-opioid antinociception may be primarily spinal rather than supraspinal; (3) sex differences in antinociceptive effects of opioid agonists are not secondary to sex differences in their sedative effects. PMID:11418226

  16. Reversal of endotoxic shock with the calcium channel agonist BAY k 8644

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, N.; King, J.W.; Chernow, B.; Roth, B.L.

    1986-03-05

    The hypotension and diminished myocardial function observed in sepsis and endotoxin-induced shock are difficult to overcome pharmacologically. They previously demonstrated that a down regulation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors may contribute to the hypotension and diminished response to catecholamines seen in septic shock. They here demonstrate that the calcium channel agonist BAY k 8644 potently reverses the hypotension of experimental endotoxin (20 mg/kg Difico lipopolysaccharide) shock in rats. A dose as low as 10 ..mu..g/kg BAY k 8644 significantly elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP) in hypotensive rats. The maximum percentage increase in MAP was greater in endotoxin-treated rats compared with saline-treated controls (153% vs 120% increase respectively). BAY k 8644 also caused a dose-dependent decrease in heart rate of 37% in endotoxin-treated rats and 39% in controls. No difference in (/sup 3/H)-nitrendipine binding sites were detected comparing control and endotoxin-treated rates. These results demonstrate that calcium channel agonists might represent unique agents in pathologic states characterized by hypotension and diminished cardiac function.

  17. Euodenine A: a small-molecule agonist of human TLR4.

    PubMed

    Neve, Juliette E; Wijesekera, Hasanthi P; Duffy, Sandra; Jenkins, Ian D; Ripper, Justin A; Teague, Simon J; Campitelli, Marc; Garavelas, Agatha; Nikolakopoulos, George; Le, Phuc V; de A Leone, Priscila; Pham, Ngoc B; Shelton, Philip; Fraser, Neil; Carroll, Anthony R; Avery, Vicky M; McCrae, Christopher; Williams, Nicola; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-02-27

    A small-molecule natural product, euodenine A (1), was identified as an agonist of the human TLR4 receptor. Euodenine A was isolated from the leaves of Euodia asteridula (Rutaceae) found in Papua New Guinea and has an unusual U-shaped structure. It was synthesized along with a series of analogues that exhibit potent and selective agonism of the TLR4 receptor. SAR development around the cyclobutane ring resulted in a 10-fold increase in potency. The natural product demonstrated an extracellular site of action, which requires the extracellular domain of TLR4 to stimulate a NF-κB reporter response. 1 is a human-selective agonist that is CD14-independent, and it requires both TLR4 and MD-2 for full efficacy. Testing for immunomodulation in PBMC cells shows the induction of the cytokines IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p40 as well as suppression of IL-5 from activated PBMCs, indicating that compounds like 1 could modulate the Th2 immune response without causing lung damage. PMID:24471857

  18. Agonist-activated Ca2+ influx occurs at stable plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum junctions

    PubMed Central

    Treves, Susan; Vukcevic, Mirko; Griesser, Johanna; Armstrong, Clara-Franzini; Zhu, Michael X.; Zorzato, Fancesco

    2010-01-01

    Junctate is a 33 kDa integral protein of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum membranes that forms a macromolecular complex with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] receptors and TRPC3 channels. TIRF microscopy shows that junctate enhances the number of fluorescent puncta on the plasma membrane. The size and distribution of these puncta are not affected by the addition of agonists that mobilize Ca2+ from Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive stores. Puncta are associated with a significantly larger number of peripheral junctions between endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane, which are further enhanced upon stable co-expression of junctate and TRPC3. The gap between the membranes of peripheral junctions is bridged by regularly spaced electron-dense structures of 10 nm. Ins(1,4,5)P3 inhibits the interaction of the cytoplasmic N-terminus of junctate with the ligand-binding domain of the Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor. Furthermore, Ca2+ influx evoked by activation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptors is increased where puncta are located. We conclude that stable peripheral junctions between the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum are the anatomical sites of agonist-activated Ca2+ entry. PMID:21062895

  19. Development of a Single-Chain Peptide Agonist of the Relaxin-3 Receptor Using Hydrocarbon Stapling.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Keiko; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Tailhades, Julien; Shabanpoor, Fazel; Wong, Lilian L L; Ong-Pålsson, Emma E K; Kastman, Hanna E; Ma, Sherie; Gundlach, Andrew L; Rosengren, K Johan; Wade, John D; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2016-08-25

    Structure-activity studies of the insulin superfamily member, relaxin-3, have shown that its G protein-coupled receptor (RXFP3) binding site is contained within its central B-chain α-helix and this helical structure is essential for receptor activation. We sought to develop a single B-chain mimetic that retained agonist activity. This was achieved by use of solid phase peptide synthesis together with on-resin ruthenium-catalyzed ring closure metathesis of a pair of judiciously placed i,i+4 α-methyl, α-alkenyl amino acids. The resulting hydrocarbon stapled peptide was shown by solution NMR spectroscopy to mimic the native helical conformation of relaxin-3 and to possess potent RXFP3 receptor binding and activation. Alternative stapling procedures were unsuccessful, highlighting the critical need to carefully consider both the peptide sequence and stapling methodology for optimal outcomes. Our result is the first successful minimization of an insulin-like peptide to a single-chain α-helical peptide agonist which will facilitate study of the function of relaxin-3. PMID:27464307

  20. Robust Bioinformatics Recognition with VLSI Biochip Microsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lue, Jaw-Chyng L.; Fang, Wai-Chi

    2006-01-01

    A microsystem architecture for real-time, on-site, robust bioinformatic patterns recognition and analysis has been proposed. This system is compatible with on-chip DNA analysis means such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR)amplification. A corresponding novel artificial neural network (ANN) learning algorithm using new sigmoid-logarithmic transfer function based on error backpropagation (EBP) algorithm is invented. Our results show the trained new ANN can recognize low fluorescence patterns better than the conventional sigmoidal ANN does. A differential logarithmic imaging chip is designed for calculating logarithm of relative intensities of fluorescence signals. The single-rail logarithmic circuit and a prototype ANN chip are designed, fabricated and characterized.

  1. Chemical recognition software

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  2. Chemical recognition software

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  3. Early recognition of speech

    PubMed Central

    Remez, Robert E; Thomas, Emily F

    2013-01-01

    Classic research on the perception of speech sought to identify minimal acoustic correlates of each consonant and vowel. In explaining perception, this view designated momentary components of an acoustic spectrum as cues to the recognition of elementary phonemes. This conceptualization of speech perception is untenable given the findings of phonetic sensitivity to modulation independent of the acoustic and auditory form of the carrier. The empirical key is provided by studies of the perceptual organization of speech, a low-level integrative function that finds and follows the sensory effects of speech amid concurrent events. These projects have shown that the perceptual organization of speech is keyed to modulation; fast; unlearned; nonsymbolic; indifferent to short-term auditory properties; and organization requires attention. The ineluctably multisensory nature of speech perception also imposes conditions that distinguish language among cognitive systems. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:213–223. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1213 PMID:23926454

  4. Recognition Using Hybrid Classifiers.

    PubMed

    Osadchy, Margarita; Keren, Daniel; Raviv, Dolev

    2016-04-01

    A canonical problem in computer vision is category recognition (e.g., find all instances of human faces, cars etc., in an image). Typically, the input for training a binary classifier is a relatively small sample of positive examples, and a huge sample of negative examples, which can be very diverse, consisting of images from a large number of categories. The difficulty of the problem sharply increases with the dimension and size of the negative example set. We propose to alleviate this problem by applying a "hybrid" classifier, which replaces the negative samples by a prior, and then finds a hyperplane which separates the positive samples from this prior. The method is extended to kernel space and to an ensemble-based approach. The resulting binary classifiers achieve an identical or better classification rate than SVM, while requiring far smaller memory and lower computational complexity to train and apply. PMID:26959677

  5. Automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy-Wilson, Carol

    2005-04-01

    Great strides have been made in the development of automatic speech recognition (ASR) technology over the past thirty years. Most of this effort has been centered around the extension and improvement of Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approaches to ASR. Current commercially-available and industry systems based on HMMs can perform well for certain situational tasks that restrict variability such as phone dialing or limited voice commands. However, the holy grail of ASR systems is performance comparable to humans-in other words, the ability to automatically transcribe unrestricted conversational speech spoken by an infinite number of speakers under varying acoustic environments. This goal is far from being reached. Key to the success of ASR is effective modeling of variability in the speech signal. This tutorial will review the basics of ASR and the various ways in which our current knowledge of speech production, speech perception and prosody can be exploited to improve robustness at every level of the system.

  6. Methods of Teaching Speech Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Martha H.; Bailey, Glenn A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces the history and development of speech recognition, addresses its role in the business curriculum, outlines related national and state standards, describes instructional strategies, and discusses the assessment of student achievement in speech recognition classes. Methods: Research methods included a synthesis of…

  7. Computer image processing and recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, E. L.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic introduction to the concepts and techniques of computer image processing and recognition is presented. Consideration is given to such topics as image formation and perception; computer representation of images; image enhancement and restoration; reconstruction from projections; digital television, encoding, and data compression; scene understanding; scene matching and recognition; and processing techniques for linear systems.

  8. Synthesis and SAR of potent LXR agonists containing an indole pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Campobasso, Nino; Smallwood, Angela; Parks, Derek J.; Webb, Christine L.; Frank, Kelly A.; Nord, Melanie; Duraiswami, Chaya; Evans, Christopher; Jaye, Michael; Thompson, Scott K.

    2009-03-27

    A novel series of 1H-indol-1-yl tertiary amine LXR agonists has been designed. Compounds from this series were potent agonists with good rat pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, the crystal structure of an LXR agonist bound to LXR{alpha} will be disclosed.

  9. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists: Beta-Cell Protection or Exhaustion?

    PubMed

    van Raalte, Daniël H; Verchere, C Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists enhance insulin secretion and may improve pancreatic islet cell function. However, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist treatment may have more complex, and sometimes deleterious, effects on beta cells. We discuss the concepts of beta cell protection versus exhaustion for different GLP-1R agonists based on recent data. PMID:27160799

  10. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 gene regulation by a PPAR alpha agonist in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Souissi, Imen Jguirim; Billiet, Ludivine; Cuaz-Perolin, Clarisse; Rouis, Mustapha

    2008-11-01

    MMP-12, a macrophage-specific matrix metalloproteinase with large substrate specificity, has been reported to be highly expressed in mice, rabbits and human atherosclerotic lesions. Increased MMP-12 from inflammatory macrophages is associated with several degenerative diseases such as atherosclerosis. In this manuscript, we show that IL-1{beta}, a proinflammatory cytokine found in atherosclerotic plaques, increases both mRNA and protein levels of MMP-12 in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), such as PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, are expressed in macrophages and because PPAR activation exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on vascular cells, we have investigated the effect of PPAR{alpha} and {gamma} isoforms on MMP-12 regulation in HMDM. Our results show that MMP-12 expression (mRNA and protein) is down regulated in IL-1{beta}-treated macrophages only in the presence of a specific PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647, in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, this inhibitory effect was abolished in IL-1{beta}-stimulated peritoneal macrophages isolated from PPAR{alpha}{sup -/-} mice and treated with the PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647. Moreover, reporter gene transfection experiments using different MMP-12 promoter constructs showed a reduction of the promoter activities by {approx} 50% in IL-1{beta}-stimulated PPAR{alpha}-pre-treated cells. However, MMP-12 promoter analysis did not reveal the presence of a PPRE response element. The IL-1{beta} effect is known to be mediated through the AP-1 binding site. Mutation of the AP-1 site, located at - 81 in the MMP-12 promoter region relative to the transcription start site, followed by transfection analysis, gel shift and ChIP experiments revealed that the inhibitory effect was the consequence of the protein-protein interaction between GW 647-activated PPAR{alpha} and c-Fos or c-Jun transcription factors, leading to inhibition of their binding to the AP-1 motif. These studies

  11. Perturbation of DNA hairpins containing the EcoRI recognition site by hairpin loops of varying size and composition: physical (NMR and UV) and enzymatic (EcoRI) studies.

    PubMed Central

    Germann, M W; Kalisch, B W; Lundberg, P; Vogel, H J; van de Sande, J H

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated loop-induced structural perturbation of the stem structure in hairpins d(GAATTCXnGAATTC) (X = A, T and n = 3, 4, 5 and 6) that contain an EcoRI restriction site in close proximity to the hairpin loop. Oligonucleotides containing either a T3 or a A3 loop were not hydrolyzed by the restriction enzyme and also showed only weak binding to EcoRI in the absence of the cofactor Mg2+. In contrast, hairpins with larger loops are hydrolyzed by the enzyme at the scission site next to the loop although the substrate with a A4 loop is significantly more resistant than the oligonucleotide containing a T4 loop. The hairpin structures with 3 loop residues were found to be thermally most stable while larger hairpin loops resulted in structures with lower melting temperatures. The T-loop hairpins are thermally more stable than the hairpins containing the same number of A residues in the loop. As judged from proton NMR spectroscopy and the thermodynamic data, the base pair closest to the hairpin loop did form in all cases studied. The hairpin loops did, however, affect the conformation of the stem structure of the hairpins. From 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy we conclude that the perturbation of the stem structure is stronger for smaller hairpin loops and that the extent of the perturbation is limited to 2-3 base pairs for hairpins with T3 or A4 loops. Our results demonstrate that hairpin loops modulate the conformation of the stem residues close to the loop and that this in turn reduces the substrate activity for DNA sequence specific proteins. Images PMID:2326190

  12. Online handwritten mathematical expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büyükbayrak, Hakan; Yanikoglu, Berrin; Erçil, Aytül

    2007-01-01

    We describe a system for recognizing online, handwritten mathematical expressions. The system is designed with a user-interface for writing scientific articles, supporting the recognition of basic mathematical expressions as well as integrals, summations, matrices etc. A feed-forward neural network recognizes symbols which are assumed to be single-stroke and a recursive algorithm parses the expression by combining neural network output and the structure of the expression. Preliminary results show that writer-dependent recognition rates are very high (99.8%) while writer-independent symbol recognition rates are lower (75%). The interface associated with the proposed system integrates the built-in recognition capabilities of the Microsoft's Tablet PC API for recognizing textual input and supports conversion of hand-drawn figures into PNG format. This enables the user to enter text, mathematics and draw figures in a single interface. After recognition, all output is combined into one LATEX code and compiled into a PDF file.

  13. A face recognition embedded system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Kwok Ho; Moon, Yiu Sang; Tsang, Chi Chiu; Chow, Chun Tak; Chan, Siu Man

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the implementation of a face recognition system in embedded systems. To investigate the feasibility and practicality of real time face recognition on such systems, a door access control system based on face recognition is built. Due to the limited computation power of embedded device, a semi-automatic scheme for face detection and eye location is proposed to solve these computationally hard problems. It is found that to achieve real time performance, optimization of the core face recognition module is needed. As a result, extensive profiling is done to pinpoint the execution hotspots in the system and optimization are carried out. After careful precision analysis, all slow floating point calculations are replaced with their fixed-point versions. Experimental results show that real time performance can be achieved without significant loss in recognition accuracy.

  14. Speech Recognition: How Do We Teach It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barksdale, Karl

    2002-01-01

    States that growing use of speech recognition software has made voice writing an essential computer skill. Describes how to present the topic, develop basic speech recognition skills, and teach speech recognition outlining, writing, proofreading, and editing. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  15. Comparing Class A GPCRs to bitter taste receptors: Structural motifs, ligand interactions and agonist-to-antagonist ratios.

    PubMed

    Di Pizio, Antonella; Levit, Anat; Slutzki, Michal; Behrens, Maik; Karaman, Rafik; Niv, Masha Y

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane (TM) proteins that play a key role in human physiology. The GPCR superfamily comprises about 800 members, classified into several classes, with rhodopsin-like Class A being the largest and most studied thus far. A huge component of the human repertoire consists of the chemosensory GPCRs, including ∼400 odorant receptors, 25 bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs), which are thought to guard the organism from consuming poisons, and sweet and umami TAS1R heteromers, which indicate the nutritive value of food. The location of the binding site of TAS2Rs is similar to that of Class A GPCRs. However, most of the known bitter ligands are agonists, with only a few antagonists documented thus far. The agonist-to-antagonist ratios of Class A GPCRs vary, but in general are much lower than for TAS2Rs. For a set of well-studied GPCRs, a gradual change in agonists-to-antagonists ratios is observed when comparing low (10 μM)- and high (10 nM)-affinity ligand sets from ChEMBL and the DrugBank set of drugs. This shift reflects pharmaceutical bias toward the therapeutically desirable pharmacology for each of these GPCRs, while the 10 μM sets possibly represent the native tendency of the receptors toward either agonists or antagonists. Analyzing ligand-GPCR interactions in 56 X-ray structures representative of currently available structural data, we find that the N-terminus, TM1 and TM2 are more involved in binding of antagonists than of agonists. On the other hand, ECL2 tends to be more involved in binding of agonists. This is of interest, since TAS2Rs harbor variations on the typical Class A sequence motifs, including the absence of the ECL2-TM3 disulfide bridge. This suggests an alternative mode of regulation of conformational states for TAS2Rs, with potentially less stabilized inactive state. The comparison of TAS2Rs and Class A GPCRs structural features and the pharmacology of the their ligands highlights the intricacies of

  16. Direct measurement of agonist binding to genetically engineered peptides of the acetylcholine receptor by selective T sub 1 NMR relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Y.; Navon, G. ); Aronheim, A.; Gershoni, J.M. )

    1990-03-13

    Interactions of four ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with genetically engineered peptides have been studied by NMR. A recombinant cholinergic binding site was prepared as a fusion protein between a truncated form of the bacterial protein trpE and a peptide corresponding to the sequence {alpha}184-200 from the Torpedo californica receptor. This construct binds {alpha}-bungarotoxin while the trpE protein alone does not, and thus serves as a negative control. In this study agonist binding to {alpha}184-200 is demonstrated by monitoring the T{sub 1} relaxation of the ligand's protons in the presence and absence of the recombinant binding site. This binding is specific as it can be competed with {alpha}-bungarotoxin. Quantitative analyses of such competitions yielded the concentration of binding sites, which corresponded to 3.3% and 16.5% of the total protein, for partially purified and affinity-purified {alpha}184-200 constructs, respectively. The K{sub D} values for the binding of acetylcholine, nicotine, d-tubocurarine, and gallamine to the affinity-purified construct were 1.4, 1.4, 0.20, and 0.21 mM, respectively, while K{sub D}'s with the nontoxin binding protein were all above 10 mM. Thus, this is a direct demonstration that the toxin binding domain {alpha}184-200 may comprise a major component of the cholinergic agonist site.

  17. Pathogenesis and management of inherited thrombocytopenias: rationale for the use of thrombopoietin-receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Pecci, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge in the field of inherited thrombocytopenias (ITs) has considerably improved over the recent years. In the last 5 years, nine new genes whose mutations are responsible for thrombocytopenia have been identified, and this also led to the recognition of several novel nosographic entities, such as thrombocytopenias deriving from mutations in CYCS, TUBB1, FLNA, ITGA2B/ITGB3, ANKRD26 and ACTN1. The identification of novel molecular alterations causing thrombocytopenia together with improvement of methodologies to study megakaryopoiesis led to considerable advances in understanding pathophysiology of ITs, thus providing the background for proposing new treatments. Thrombopoietin-receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) represent an appealing therapeutic hypothesis for ITs and have been tested in a limited number of patients. In this review, we provide an updated description of pathogenetic mechanisms of thrombocytopenia in the different forms of ITs and recapitulate the current management of these disorders. Moreover, we report the available clinical and preclinical data about the role of TPO-RAs in ITs and discuss the rationale for the use of these molecules in view of pathogenesis of the different forms of thrombocytopenia of genetic origin. PMID:23636669

  18. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as TLR9 agonists: therapeutic applications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Murad, Yanal M; Clay, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are part of the innate immune system, and they belong to the pattern recognition receptors (PRR) family. The PRR family is designed to recognize and bind conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns, which are not generated by the host and are restricted and essential to micro-organisms. TLR9, which recognizes unmethylated CpG (cytosine guanosine dinucleotide), is a very promising target for therapeutic activation. Stimulation of TLR9 activates human plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells, and results in potent T helper-1 (T(h)1)-type immune responses and antitumor responses in mouse tumor models and in patients. Several pharmaceutical companies, such as Pfizer, Idera, and Dynavax, are developing CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) for the treatment of cancer, along with other conditions, such as infections and allergy. CpG ODNs have shown promising results as vaccine adjuvants and in combination with cancer immunotherapy. Several TLR9 agonists are being developed and have entered clinical trials to evaluate their safety and efficacy for the treatment of several hematopoietic and solid tumors. In this review, we discuss the use of CpG ODNs in several phase I and II clinical trials for the treatment of NHL, renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and non-small cell lung cancer, either alone or in combination with other agents. PMID:19894778

  19. Therapeutic potential of Takeda-G-protein-receptor-5 (TGR5) agonists. Hope or hype?

    PubMed

    Hodge, R J; Nunez, D J

    2016-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract regulates glucose and energy metabolism, and there is increasing recognition that bile acids function as key signalling molecules in these processes. For example, bile acid changes that occur after bariatric surgery have been implicated in the effects on satiety, lipid and cholesterol regulation, glucose and energy metabolism, and the gut microbiome. In recent years, Takeda-G-protein-receptor-5 (TGR5), a bile acid receptor found in widely dispersed tissues, has been the target of significant drug discovery efforts in the hope of identifying effective treatments for metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis, fatty liver disease and cancer. Although the benefits of targeting the TGR5 receptor are potentially great, drug development work to date has identified risks that include histopathological changes, tumorigenesis, gender differences, and questions about the translation of animal data to humans. The present article reviews the noteworthy challenges that must be addressed along the path of development of a safe and effective TGR5 agonist therapy. PMID:26818602

  20. The Toll-like receptor-3 agonist poly(I:C) triggers nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Deleidi, Michela; Hallett, Penelope J.; Koprich, James B.; Chung, Chee-Yeun; Isacson, Ole

    2010-01-01

    In Parkinson’s disease (PD), loss of striatal dopaminergic (DA) terminals and degeneration of DA neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) are associated with glial reactions. Such inflammatory processes are commonly considered an epiphenomenon of neuronal degeneration. However, there is increasing recognition of the role of neuroinflammation as an initiation factor of DA neuron degeneration. To investigate this issue, we established a new model of brain inflammation by injecting the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR-3) agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] in the SN of adult rats. Poly(I:C) injection induced a sustained inflammatory reaction in the SN and in the dorsolateral striatum. Significant changes were detected in proteins relevant to synaptic transmission and axonal transport. In addition, cytoplasmic mislocalization of neuronal TDP-43 was observed. Poly(I:C) injection increased the susceptibility of midbrain DA neurons to a subsequent neurotoxic trigger (low dose 6-hydroxydopamine). Systemic delivery of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL1-ra) protected SN DA neurons exposed to combined poly(I:C) induced inflammatory and neurotoxic oxidative stress. These data indicate that viral-like neuroinflammation induces predegenerative changes in the DA system, which lowers the set point toward neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. New powerful neuroprotective therapies for PD might be considered by targeting critical inflammatory mechanisms, including cytokine-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:21123556

  1. RNA and Imidazoquinolines are sensed by distinct TLR7/8 ectodomain sites resulting in functionally disparate signaling events

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Elif; Leslie, Alasdair; Zausmer, Kieran; Khatamzas, Elham; Kubarenko, Andriy V.; Pichulik, Tica; Klimosch, Sascha N.; Mayer, Alice; Siggs, Owen; Hector, Andreas; Fischer, Roman; Klesser, Benedikt; Rautanen, Anna; Frank, Martin; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Manoury, Bénédicte; Beutler, Bruce; Hartl, Dominik; Simmons, Alison; Weber, Alexander N. R.

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) 7 and 8 are pattern recognition receptors controlling antiviral host defense or autoimmune diseases. Apart from foreign and host RNA, synthetic RNA oligoribonucleotides (ORN) or small molecules of the imidazoquinoline family activate TLR7 and 8 and are being developed as therapeutic agonists. The structure-function relationships for RNA ORN and imidazoquinoline sensing and consequent downstream signaling by human TLR7 and TLR8 are unknown. Proteome- and genome-wide analyses in primary human monocyte-derived dendritic cells here showed that TLR8 sensing of RNA ORN vs. imidazoquinoline translates to ligand-specific differential phosphorylation and transcriptional events. Additionally, TLR7 and 8 ectodomains were found to discriminate between RNA ORN and imidazoquinolines by overlapping and non-overlapping recognition sites to which murine loss-of-function mutations and human naturally occurring hyporesponsive polymorphisms map. Our data suggest TLR7 and TLR8 can signal in two different ‘modes’ depending on the class of ligand. Considering RNA ORN and imidazoquinolines have been regarded as functionally interchangeable, our study highlights important functional incongruities whose understanding will be important for developing TLR7 or 8 therapeutics with desirable effector and safety profiles for in vivo application. PMID:24813206

  2. Determination of the utility of remote sensing data for land use/cover analysis in the lower Appalachia region: Assessing the utility of remote sensing data for archeological site recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, N. V.

    1983-01-01

    Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data were gathered by NASA/ERL over a portion of the lower Ohio River and the middle Mississippi River valleys on April 11, 1982. CIR imagery accompanied the 10 and 30 meter resolution TMS data sets. This area is somewhat unique archeologically as there exists a concentration of sites with major features such as mounds, earthworks, and villages. It was the primary purpose of this study to determine the utility of TMS data in identifying signatures which are distinctly archeological. TMS data were processed using the NASA/ERL software package ELAS. No signatures that were distinctly archeological were detected, due in large part to the complexity of the land cover and land use practices. However, as more sophisticated classification techniques were employed, the classes which were related to archeological features were narrowed. TMS data could certainly be of assistance to a trained archeologist/interpreter in narrowing an area which has to be field-surveyed as anomalous features can be recognized within a particular environmental context.

  3. Thermodynamics and mechanism of the interaction of willardiine partial agonists with a glutamate receptor: implications for drug development.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Madeline; Ahmed, Ahmed H; Loh, Adrienne P; Oswald, Robert E

    2014-06-17

    Understanding the thermodynamics of binding of a lead compound to a receptor can provide valuable information for drug design. The binding of compounds, particularly partial agonists, to subtypes of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor is, in some cases, driven by increases in entropy. Using a series of partial agonists based on the structure of the natural product, willardiine, we show that the charged state of the ligand determines the enthalpic contribution to binding. Willardiines have uracil rings with pKa values ranging from 5.5 to 10. The binding of the charged form is largely driven by enthalpy, while that of the uncharged form is largely driven by entropy. This is due at least in part to changes in the hydrogen bonding network within the binding site involving one water molecule. This work illustrates the importance of charge to the thermodynamics of binding of agonists and antagonists to AMPA receptors and provides clues for further drug discovery. PMID:24850223

  4. A sensitive and quantitative fluorescent multi-component immuno-chromatographic sensor for β-agonist residues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peilong; Wang, Zhi; Su, Xiaoou

    2015-02-15

    A sensitive and quantitative fluorescent multi-component immuno-chromatographic sensor was developed for detection of three β-agonizts: clenbuterol, ractopamine and salbuterol. A competitive immune strategy between antibody conjugated fluorescent beads and β-agonist or their antigens was employed. Each monoclonal antibody specifically recognizes it is corresponding β-agonist in the conjugating zone. The unreacted antibodies were captured by β-agonist antigens immobilized at three test lines in nitrocellulose membrane reaction zone. This enables simultaneous detection of 3 β-agonizts in one single test without any further sample preparation. The test results can be obtained within 10 min. Limit of detections for clenbuterol, ractopamine and salbuterol were 0.10 ng/mL, 0.10 ng/mL and 0.09 ng/mL, respectively. Recoveries ranged from 70.0% to 100.5% and relative standard deviations were below 15%. The assay was evaluated using spiked and real samples and the results were compared with LC-MS/MS. The developed novel assay method provides a low cost, sensitive and rapid approach for on site detection of β-agonizts. PMID:25310481

  5. Thermodynamics and Mechanism of the Interaction of Willardiine Partial Agonists with a Glutamate Receptor: Implications for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the thermodynamics of binding of a lead compound to a receptor can provide valuable information for drug design. The binding of compounds, particularly partial agonists, to subtypes of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor is, in some cases, driven by increases in entropy. Using a series of partial agonists based on the structure of the natural product, willardiine, we show that the charged state of the ligand determines the enthalpic contribution to binding. Willardiines have uracil rings with pKa values ranging from 5.5 to 10. The binding of the charged form is largely driven by enthalpy, while that of the uncharged form is largely driven by entropy. This is due at least in part to changes in the hydrogen bonding network within the binding site involving one water molecule. This work illustrates the importance of charge to the thermodynamics of binding of agonists and antagonists to AMPA receptors and provides clues for further drug discovery. PMID:24850223

  6. Heterologous expression and nonsense suppression provide insights into agonist behavior at α6β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Post, Michael R; Limapichat, Walrati; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2015-10-01

    The α6-containing subtypes of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) are localized to presynaptic terminals of the dopaminergic pathways of the central nervous system. Selective ligands for these nAChRs are potentially useful in both Parkinson's disease and addiction. For these and other goals, it is important to distinguish the binding behavior of agonists at the α6-β2 binding site versus other subtypes. To study this problem, we apply nonsense suppression-based non-canonical amino acid mutagenesis. We report a combination of four mutations in α6β2 that yield high-level heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. By varying mRNA injection ratios, two populations were observed with unique characteristics, likely due to differing stoichiometries. Responses to nine known nAChR agonists were analyzed at the receptor, and their corresponding EC50 values and efficacies are reported. The system is compatible with nonsense suppression, allowing structure-function studies between Trp149 - a conserved residue on loop B found to make a cation-π interaction at several nAChR subtypes - and several agonists. These studies reveal that acetylcholine forms a strong cation-π interaction with the conserved tryptophan, while nicotine and TC299423 do not, suggesting a unique pharmacology for the α6β2 nAChR. PMID:25908401

  7. Inhibition of cation channel function at the nicotinic acethylcholine receptor from Torpedo: Agonist self-inhibition and anesthetic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Modulation of the nicotinic acethylcholine receptor from Torpedo by cholinergic agonists, local anesthetics, and n-alkanols was studied using {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux studies in sealed native Torpedo electroplaque membrane vesicles. Reliable concentration-response and kinetic data were obtained using manual ten sec filtration assays in vesicles partially blocked with alpha-bungarotoxin to remove spare receptors and quenched-flow assays to assess initial {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux rates or the rate of drug-induced receptor inactivation. Concentration response relationships for the agonists acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine, phenyltrimethylammonium, and (-)-nicotine are all bell-shape due to stimulation of cation channel opening at low concentrations and inhibition of channels at higher concentrations. The rate of agonist-induced fast desensitization (k{sub d}) increases with (acetylcholine) in parallel with channel activation, suggesting that desensitization proceeds from the open state and/or states in rapid equilibrium with it. At self-inhibitory acetylcholine concentrations, a new rapid inactivation (rate = k{sub f}) is observed before fast desensitization. The rate and extent of rapid inactivation is compatible with bimolecular association between acethylcholine and inhibitory site with K{sub B} = 40 mM.

  8. ION AND MOLECULE SENSORS USING MOLECULAR RECOGNITION IN LUMINESCENT, CONDUCTIVE POLYMERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This program integrates three individual, highly interactive projects that will use molecular recognition strategies to develop sensor technology based on luminescent, conductive polymers that contain sites for binding specific molecules or ions in the presence of related molecul...

  9. Accuracy enhanced thermal face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Fu; Lin, Sheng-Fuu

    2013-11-01

    Human face recognition has been generally researched for the last three decades. Face recognition with thermal image has begun to attract significant attention gradually since illumination of environment would not affect the recognition performance. However, the recognition performance of traditional thermal face recognizer is still insufficient in practical application. This study presents a novel thermal face recognizer employing not only thermal features but also critical facial geometric features which would not be influenced by hair style to improve the recognition performance. A three-layer back-propagation feed-forward neural network is applied as the classifier. Traditional thermal face recognizers only use the indirect information of the topography of blood vessels like thermogram as features. To overcome this limitation, the proposed thermal face recognizer can use not only the indirect information but also the direct information of the topography of blood vessels which is unique for every human. Moreover, the recognition performance of the proposed thermal features would not decrease even if the hair of frontal bone varies, the eye blinks or the nose breathes. Experimental results show that the proposed features are significantly more effective than traditional thermal features and the recognition performance of thermal face recognizer is improved.

  10. Identification and optimization of small-molecule agonists of the human relaxin hormone receptor RXFP1.