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Sample records for agonist recognition site

  1. Sigma1 recognition sites in rabbit iris-ciliary body: topical sigma1-site agonists lower intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Bucolo, C; Campana, G; Di Toro, R; Cacciaguerra, S; Spampinato, S

    1999-06-01

    In this study, we examined the presence of sigma1 and sigma2 sites in the rabbit iris-ciliary body by receptor binding and investigated their effects on intraocular pressure (IOP) in albino rabbits. The iris-ciliary body has binding sites for the sigma1-site agonist [3H](+)-pentazocine (Kd = 4.6 nM; Bmax = 212 fmol/mg protein) and sigma2 sites labeled with [3H]1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) (Kd = 8. 2 nM; Bmax = 1120 fmol/mg protein). In competition binding studies, (+)-pentazocine and the sigma antagonist NE-100 displayed high affinity for sigma1 sites (Ki = 2.1 and 2.4 nM, respectively), whereas (+)-N-allylnormetazocine (NANM) was less potent (Ki = 178 nM). Unilateral topical (+)-pentazocine (0.01-0.1%) caused a significant dose-related reduction of IOP in ocular normotensive rabbits and in the alpha-chymotrypsin model of ocular hypertension. (+)-NANM was less potent than (+)-pentazocine. Neither compound altered the IOP of the contralateral eye, and their hypotensive activity was blocked by NE-100 that, by itself, had no effect on IOP. (-)-Pentazocine, (-)-NANM, and DTG had no effect on IOP. DTG prevented the hypotensive effect of (+)-pentazocine, suggesting that it acts as a sigma1-site antagonist. sigma-Site ligands did not affect pupil diameter or cause ocular inflammation. Topical [3H](+)-pentazocine reaches the intraocular tissues within 30 min, and its uptake in the iris-ciliary body and retina was significantly reduced by topical pretreatment with NE-100, as expected for a receptor-specific agent. Reverse-phase HPLC confirmed the presence of intact (+)-pentazocine in iris-ciliary body homogenates. sigma1-Site agonists may offer a novel class of agents potentially effective in the control of ocular hypertension.

  2. Competitive interaction of agonists and antagonists with 5-HT3 recognition sites in membranes of neuroblastoma cells labelled with (/sup 3/H)ICS 205-930

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, D.; Neijt, H.C.; Karpf, A.

    1989-01-01

    (3H)ICS 205-930 labelled 5-HT3 recognition sites in membranes prepared from murine neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells. Binding was rapid, reversible, saturable and stereoselective to an apparently homogeneous population of sites. Kinetic studies revealed that agonists and antagonists produced a monophasic dissociation reaction of (3H)ICS 205-930 from its recognition sites. The dissociation rate constant of the radioligand was similar whether the dissociation was induced by an agonist or an antagonist. Competition studies carried out with agonists and antagonists also suggested the presence of a homogeneous population of (3H)ICS 205-930 recognition sites. Competition curves were best fit for a 1 site model. (3H)ICS 205-930 binding sites displayed the pharmacological profile of a 5-HT3 receptor. The interactions of agonists and antagonists with (3H)ICS 205-930 recognition sites were apparently competitive in nature, as demonstrated in kinetic and equilibrium experiments. In saturation experiments carried out with (3H)ICS 205-930 in the presence and the absence of unlabelled agonists and antagonists, apparent Bmax values were not reduced whereas apparent Kd values were increased in the presence of competing ligands. There was a good agreement between apparent pKB values calculated for the competing ligands in saturation experiments and pKd values calculated from competition experiments. The present data demonstrate that (3H)ICS 205-930 labels a homogeneous population of sites at which agonists and antagonists interact competitively.

  3. Benzodiazepine recognition site inverse agonists Ro-15-4513 and FG 7142 both antagonize the EEG effects of ethanol in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Marrosu, F.; Mereu, G.; Giorgi, O.; Corda, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142, two inverse agonists for benzodiazepine recognition sites, to antagonize the EEG effects of ethanol in freely moving rats. Ethanol induced sedation and ataxia associated with a progressive suppression of the fast cortical activities and an enhancement of low frequencies in both cortical and hippocampal tracings. In contrast, Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142 both caused a state of alertness associated with desynchronized cortical activity and theta hippocampal rhythm as well as spiking activity which was predominantly observed in the cortical tracings. When rats were treated with FG 7142 or Ro 15-4513 either before or after ethanol, a reciprocal antagonism of the behavioral and EEG effects of ethanol and of the partial inverse agonists was observed. These data support the view that the anti-ethanol effects of Ro 15-4513 may be related to its partial inverse agonist properties.

  4. Atomic interactions of neonicotinoid agonists with AChBP: Molecular recognition of the distinctive electronegative pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, Todd T.; Harel, Michal; Hibbs, Ryan E.; Radi, Zoran; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E.; Taylor, Palmer

    2008-07-28

    Acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) from mollusks are suitable structural and functional surrogates of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors when combined with transmembrane spans of the nicotinic receptor. These proteins assemble as a pentamer with identical ACh binding sites at the subunit interfaces and show ligand specificities resembling those of the nicotinic receptor for agonists and antagonists. A subset of ligands, termed the neonicotinoids, exhibit specificity for insect nicotinic receptors and selective toxicity as insecticides. AChBPs are of neither mammalian nor insect origin and exhibit a distinctive pattern of selectivity for the neonicotinoid ligands. We define here the binding orientation and determinants of differential molecular recognition for the neonicotinoids and classical nicotinoids by estimates of kinetic and equilibrium binding parameters and crystallographic analysis. Neonicotinoid complex formation is rapid and accompanied by quenching of the AChBP tryptophan fluorescence. Comparisons of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and thiacloprid in the binding site from Aplysia californica AChBP at 2.48 and 1.94 {angstrom} in resolution reveal a single conformation of the bound ligands with four of the five sites occupied in the pentameric crystal structure. The neonicotinoid electronegative pharmacophore is nestled in an inverted direction compared with the nicotinoid cationic functionality at the subunit interfacial binding pocket. Characteristic of several agonists, loop C largely envelops the ligand, positioning aromatic side chains to interact optimally with conjugated and hydrophobic regions of the neonicotinoid. This template defines the association of interacting amino acids and their energetic contributions to the distinctive interactions of neonicotinoids.

  5. A Potent and Site-Selective Agonist of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Junichiro; Mio, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Otsuka, Shinya; Mori, Yasuo; Uesugi, Motonari

    2015-12-23

    TRPA1 is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel family that is expressed primarily on sensory neurons. This chemosensor is activated through covalent modification of multiple cysteine residues with a wide range of reactive compounds including allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), a spicy component of wasabi. The present study reports on potent and selective agonists of TRPA1, discovered through screening 1657 electrophilic molecules. In an effort to validate the mode of action of hit molecules, we noted a new TRPA1-selective agonist, JT010 (molecule 1), which opens the TRPA1 channel by covalently and site-selectively binding to Cys621 (EC50 = 0.65 nM). The results suggest that a single modification of Cys621 is sufficient to open the TRPA1 channel. The TRPA1-selective probe described herein might be useful for further mechanistic studies of TRPA1 activation.

  6. Hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI enhance dopamine D2R protomer recognition and signaling of D2-5-HT2A heteroreceptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Narvaez, Manuel; Oflijan, Julia; Agnati, Luigi F; Fuxe, Kjell

    2014-01-03

    Dopamine D2LR-serotonin 5-HT2AR heteromers were demonstrated in HEK293 cells after cotransfection of the two receptors and shown to have bidirectional receptor-receptor interactions. In the current study the existence of D2L-5-HT2A heteroreceptor complexes was demonstrated also in discrete regions of the ventral and dorsal striatum with in situ proximity ligation assays (PLA). The hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI but not the standard 5-HT2AR agonist TCB2 and 5-HT significantly increased the density of D2like antagonist (3)H-raclopride binding sites and significantly reduced the pKiH values of the high affinity D2R agonist binding sites in (3)H-raclopride/DA competition experiments. Similar results were obtained in HEK293 cells and in ventral striatum. The effects of the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists on D2R density and affinity were blocked by the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin. In a forskolin-induced CRE-luciferase reporter gene assay using cotransfected but not D2R singly transfected HEK293 cells DOI and LSD but not TCB2 significantly enhanced the D2LR agonist quinpirole induced inhibition of CRE-luciferase activity. Haloperidol blocked the effects of both quinpirole alone and the enhancing actions of DOI and LSD while ketanserin only blocked the enhancing actions of DOI and LSD. The mechanism for the allosteric enhancement of the D2R protomer recognition and signalling observed is likely mediated by a biased agonist action of the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists at the orthosteric site of the 5-HT2AR protomer. This mechanism may contribute to the psychotic actions of LSD and DOI and the D2-5-HT2A heteroreceptor complex may thus be a target for the psychotic actions of hallunicogenic 5-HT2A agonists.

  7. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  8. Agonist and antagonist protect sulfhydrals in the binding site of the D-1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.; Kebabian, J.W.; Fishman, P.H.

    1986-05-01

    An iodinated compound (/sup 125/I)-SCH 23982 (8-iodo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine-7-ol) has been characterized as a specific, high affinity (Kd = 0.7 nM) ligand for the D-1 dopamine receptor. The ligand binding site of the D-1 receptor in rat striatum was inactivated by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) in a time and concentration dependent manner. The inactivation was rapid and irreversible with a 70% net loss of binding sites. Scatchard analysis of binding to NEM-treated tissue showed a decrease both in receptor number and in radioligand affinity. The remaining receptors retained their selectivity for stereoisomers of both agonist and antagonist. Receptor occupancy by either a D-1 specific agonist or antagonist protected in a dose dependent manner the binding sites from inactivation by NEM; the agonist was more effective than the antagonist. The agonist high affinity site, however, was abolished in the absence or presence of protective compound, presumably because of inactivation of the GTP-binding component of adenylate cyclase. In this regard, there was a total loss of agonist- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity after NEM treatment. The authors conclude that the D-1 dopamine receptor contains NEM-sensitive sulfhydral group(s) at or near the vicinity of the ligand binding site.

  9. Biochemical study of multiple drug recognition sites on central benzodiazepine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Trifiletti, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor complex of mammalian brain possesses recognition sites which mediate (at least in part) the pharmacologic actions of the 1,4-benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Evidence is provided suggesting the existence of least seven distinct drug recognition sites on this complex. Interactions between the various recognition sites have been explored using radioligand binding techniques. This information is utilized to provide a comprehensive scheme for characterizing receptor-active drugs on an anxiolytic-anticonvulsant/proconvulsant continuum using radioligand binding techniques, as well as a comprehensive program for identifying potential endogenous receptor-active substances. Further evidence is provided here supporting the notion of benzodiazepine recognition site heterogeneity. Classical 1,4-benzodiazepines do not appear to differentiate two populations of benzodiazepine receptors in an equilibrium sense, but appear to do so in a kinetic sense. An apparent physical separation of the two receptor subtypes can be achieved by differential solubilization. The benzodiazepine binding subunit can be identified by photoaffinity labeling with the benzodiazepine agonist (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepan. Conditions for reproducible partial proteolytic mapping of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled receptors are established. From these maps, it is concluded that there are probably no major differences in the primary sequence of the benzodiazepine binding subunit in various regions of the rat central nervous system.

  10. A molecular characterization of the agonist binding site of a nematode cys-loop GABA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Mark D; Kwaka, Ariel; Callanan, Micah K; Nusrat, Humza; Desaulniers, Jean-Paul; Forrester, Sean G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cys-loop GABA receptors represent important targets for human chemotherapeutics and insecticides and are potential targets for novel anthelmintics (nematicides). However, compared with insect and mammalian receptors, little is known regarding the pharmacological characteristics of nematode Cys-loop GABA receptors. Here we have investigated the agonist binding site of the Cys-loop GABA receptor UNC-49 (Hco-UNC-49) from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. Experimental Approach We used two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology to measure channel activation by classical GABA receptor agonists on Hco-UNC-49 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, along with site-directed mutagenesis and in silico homology modelling. Key Results The sulphonated molecules P4S and taurine had no effect on Hco-UNC-49. Other classical Cys-loop GABAA receptor agonists tested on the Hco-UNC-49B/C heteromeric channel had a rank order efficacy of GABA > trans-4-aminocrotonic acid > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid (IMA) > (R)-(−)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [R(−)-GABOB] > (S)-(+)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [S(+)-GABOB] > guanidinoacetic acid > isonipecotic acid > 5-aminovaleric acid (DAVA) (partial agonist) > β-alanine (partial agonist). In silico ligand docking revealed some variation in binding between agonists. Mutagenesis of a key serine residue in binding loop C to threonine had minimal effects on GABA and IMA but significantly increased the maximal response to DAVA and decreased twofold the EC50 for R(−)- and S(+)-GABOB. Conclusions and Implications The pharmacological profile of Hco-UNC-49 differed from that of vertebrate Cys-loop GABA receptors and insect resistance to dieldrin receptors, suggesting differences in the agonist binding pocket. These findings could be exploited to develop new drugs that specifically target GABA receptors of parasitic nematodes. PMID:25850584

  11. Number and locations of agonist binding sites required to activate homomeric Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Sine, Steven M; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-05-06

    Homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors contain five identical agonist binding sites, each formed at a subunit interface. To determine the number and locations of binding sites required to generate a stable active state, we constructed a receptor subunit with a mutation that disables the agonist binding site and a reporter mutation that alters unitary conductance and coexpressed mutant and nonmutant subunits. Although receptors with a range of different subunit compositions are produced, patch-clamp recordings reveal that the amplitude of each single-channel opening event reports the number and, for certain subunit combinations, the locations of subunits with intact binding sites. We find that receptors with three binding sites at nonconsecutive subunit interfaces exhibit maximal mean channel open time, receptors with binding sites at three consecutive or two nonconsecutive interfaces exhibit intermediate open time, and receptors with binding sites at two consecutive or one interface exhibit brief open time. Macroscopic recordings after rapid application of agonist reveal that channel activation slows and the extent of desensitization decreases as the number of binding sites per receptor decreases. The overall results provide a framework for defining mechanisms of activation and drug modulation for homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors.

  12. Neuroprotection by a novel NMDAR functional glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Patric K; Potter, Pamela E; Aguilar, Jennifer; Decandia, Maria; Moskal, Joseph R

    2009-08-26

    GLYX-13 (threonine-proline-proline-threonine-amide) is an amidated di-pyrrolidine that acts as a functional partial agonist at the glycine site on N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs). GLYX-13 can both increase NMDAR conductance at NR2B-containing receptors, and reduce conductance of non-NR2B-containing receptors. Here, we report that GLYX-13 potently reduces delayed (24 h) death of CA1 pyramidal neurons produced by bilateral carotid occlusion in Mongolian gerbils, when administered up to 5 h post-ischemia. GLYX-13 also reduced delayed (24 h) neuronal death of CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus principal neurons elicited by oxygen/glucose deprivation in in-vitro hippocampal organotypic slice cultures, when applied up to 2 h post-oxygen/glucose deprivation. The glycine site full agonist D-serine completely occluded neuroprotection, indicating that GLYX-13 acts by modulating activation of this site.

  13. Hydration of protein–RNA recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of water molecules in 89 protein–RNA complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank. Those with tRNA and single-stranded RNA are less hydrated than with duplex or ribosomal proteins. Protein–RNA interfaces are hydrated less than protein–DNA interfaces, but more than protein–protein interfaces. Majority of the waters at protein–RNA interfaces makes multiple H-bonds; however, a fraction do not make any. Those making H-bonds have preferences for the polar groups of RNA than its partner protein. The spatial distribution of waters makes interfaces with ribosomal proteins and single-stranded RNA relatively ‘dry’ than interfaces with tRNA and duplex RNA. In contrast to protein–DNA interfaces, mainly due to the presence of the 2′OH, the ribose in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the phosphate or the bases. The minor groove in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the major groove, while in protein–DNA interfaces it is reverse. The strands make the highest number of water-mediated H-bonds per unit interface area followed by the helices and the non-regular structures. The preserved waters at protein–RNA interfaces make higher number of H-bonds than the other waters. Preserved waters contribute toward the affinity in protein–RNA recognition and should be carefully treated while engineering protein–RNA interfaces. PMID:25114050

  14. Probing binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-01

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein–RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein–protein and protein–RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein–RNA recognition sites with desired affinity. PMID:26365245

  15. Probing binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-29

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein-RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein-RNA recognition sites with desired affinity.

  16. M sub 1 muscarinic antagonists interact with. sigma. recognition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hudkins, R.L. ); DeHaven-Hudkins, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The M{sub 1}-selective muscarinic antagonists aprophen, caramiphen, carbetapentane, 2-DAEX, dicyclomine, hexahydrosiladifenidol, iodocaramiphen, nitrocaramiphen, oxybutynin and trihexyphenidyl potently inhibited binding to {sigma} sites in brain. Both basic ester and non-ester structural type compounds which exhibit affinity for the muscarinic receptor also demonstrated affinity for the {sigma} site, while the classical antimuscarinic agents atropine and QNB, and the tricyclic pirenzepine, were ineffective in binding to this site. The authors also observed a significant correlation between the K{sub i} values for {sigma}compounds to inhibit ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine binding and their IC{sub 50} values to inhibit carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover. These observations may aid in elucidating the relationship of {sigma} binding to inhibition of phosphoinositide turnover stimulated by cholinergic agonists.

  17. A multi-agent system simulating human splice site recognition.

    PubMed

    Vignal, L; Lisacek, F; Quinqueton, J; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Y; Thermes, C

    1999-06-15

    The present paper describes a method detecting splice sites automatically on the basis of sequence data and models of site/signal recognition supported by experimental evidences. The method is designed to simulate splicing and while doing so, track prediction failures, missing information and possibly test correcting hypotheses. Correlations between nucleotides in the splice site regions and the various elements of the acceptor region are evaluated and combined to assess compensating interactions between elements of the splicing machinery. A scanning model of the acceptor region and a model of interaction between the splicing complexes (exon definition model) are also incorporated in the detection process. Subsets of sites presenting deficiencies of several splice site elements could be identified. Further examination of these sites helps to determine lacking elements and refine models.

  18. Apramycin Recognition by the Human Ribosomal Decoding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann,T.; Tereshko, V.; Skripkin, E.; Patel, D.

    2007-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics bind specifically to the bacterial ribosomal decoding-site RNA and thereby interfere with fidelity but not efficiency of translation. Apramycin stands out among aminoglycosides for its mechanism of action which is based on blocking translocation and its ability to bind also to the eukaryotic decoding site despite differences in key residues required for apramycin recognition by the bacterial target. To elucidate molecular recognition of the eukaryotic decoding site by apramycin we have determined the crystal structure of an oligoribonucleotide containing the human sequence free and in complex with the antibiotic at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. The drug binds in the deep groove of the RNA which forms a continuously stacked helix comprising non-canonical C{center_dot}A and G{center_dot}A base pairs and a bulged-out adenine. The binding mode of apramycin at the human decoding-site RNA is distinct from aminoglycoside recognition of the bacterial target, suggesting a molecular basis for the actions of apramycin in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  19. Efficient help for autoreactive B-cell activation requires CD4+ T-cell recognition of an agonist peptide at the effector stage.

    PubMed

    Hondowicz, Brian D; Batheja, Amrita O; Metzgar, Michele H; Pagán, Antonio J; Perng, Olivia A; Willms, Simone; Caton, Andrew J; Erikson, Jan

    2009-09-01

    T-cell recognition of peptide/MHC complexes is flexible and can lead to differential activation, but how interactions with agonist (full activation) or partial agonist (suboptimal activation) peptides can shape immune responses in vivo is not well characterized. We investigated the effect of stimulation by agonist or partial agonist ligands during initial CD4(+) T-cell priming, and subsequent T-B-cell cognate interactions, on antibody production by anti-chromatin B cells. We found that autoantibody production required TCR recognition of an agonist peptide at the effector stage of B-cell activation. However, interaction with a weak agonist ligand at this effector stage failed to promote efficient autoantibody production, even if the CD4(+) T cells were fully primed by an agonist peptide. These studies suggest that the reactivity of the TCR for a target self-peptide during CD4(+) T-B-cell interaction can be a critical determinant in restraining anti-chromatin autoantibody production.

  20. Ligand Promiscuity of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists and Antagonists Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Soshilov, Anatoly A.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that can be activated by structurally diverse chemicals. To examine the mechanisms responsible for the promiscuity in AhR ligand binding, we determined the effects of mutations within the AhR ligand-binding domain (LBD) on the activity of diverse AhR ligands. Site-directed mutagenesis identified Ile319 of the mouse AhR and, to a lesser extent, Phe318 as residues involved in ligand-selective modulation of AhR transformation using a panel of 12 AhR ligands. These ligands could be categorized into four distinct structurally related groups based on their ability to activate AhR mutants at position 319 in vitro. The mutation I319K was selectively activated by FICZ and not by other examined ligands in vitro and in cell culture. F318L and F318A mutations resulted in the conversion of AhR agonists β-naphthoflavone and 3-methylcholanthrene, respectively, into partial agonists/antagonists. Hsp90 binding to the AhR was decreased with several mutations and was inversely correlated with AhR ligand-binding promiscuity. Together, these data define overlapping amino acid residues within the AhR LBD involved in the selectivity of ligand binding, the agonist or antagonist mode of ligand binding, and hsp90 binding and provide insights into the ligand diversity of AhR activators. PMID:24591650

  1. The effective opening of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with single agonist binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dustin K.; Stokes, Clare; Horenstein, Nicole A.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a means by which agonist-evoked responses of nicotinic receptors can be conditionally eliminated. Modification of α7L119C mutants by the sulfhydryl reagent 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSEA) reduces responses to acetylcholine (ACh) by more than 97%, whereas corresponding mutations in muscle-type receptors produce effects that depend on the specific subunits mutated and ACh concentration. We coexpressed α7L119C subunits with pseudo wild-type α7C116S subunits, as well as ACh-insensitive α7Y188F subunits with wild-type α7 subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes using varying ratios of cRNA. When mutant α7 cRNA was coinjected at a 5:1 ratio with wild-type cRNA, net charge responses to 300 µM ACh were retained by α7L119C-containing mutants after MTSEA modification and by the ACh-insensitive Y188F-containing mutants, even though the expected number of ACh-sensitive wild-type binding sites would on average be fewer than two per receptor. Responses of muscle-type receptors with one MTSEA-sensitive subunit were reduced at low ACh concentrations, but much less of an effect was observed when ACh concentrations were high (1 mM), indicating that saturation of a single binding site with agonist can evoke strong activation of nicotinic ACh receptors. Single-channel patch clamp analysis revealed that the burst durations of fetal wild-type and α1β1γδL121C receptors were equivalent until the α1β1γδL121C mutants were exposed to MTSEA, after which the majority (81%) of bursts were brief (≤2 ms). The longest duration events of the receptors modified at only one binding site were similar to the long bursts of native receptors traditionally associated with the activation of receptors with two sites containing bound agonists. PMID:21444659

  2. Coupling between agonist and chloride ionophore sites of the GABA(A) receptor: agonist/antagonist efficacy of 4-PIOL.

    PubMed

    Rabe, H; Picard, R; Uusi-Oukari, M; Hevers, W; Lüddens, H; Korpi, E R

    2000-12-15

    Eight gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mimetics were tested on their ability to differentiate native GABA(A) receptor subtypes present in various rat brain regions. In rat brain cryostat sections, little regional variations by the agonistic actions of muscimol, thiomuscimol, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoazolo(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol, piperidine-4-sulphonic acid, taurine and beta-alanine on [35S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]TBPS) binding to GABA(A) receptor channels were found. They were very similar to those found for GABA itself and indicated no direct correlation with single subunit distributions for any of these compounds. Only the low-efficacy GABA mimetic 5-(4-piperidyl)isoxazol-3-ol (4-PIOL) acted like a weak partial agonist or antagonist depending on the brain area. As the cerebellar granule cell layer was relatively insensitive to both modes of action, we tested 4-PIOL in recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 (widespread major subtype) and alpha6beta2gamma2 (cerebellar granule cell restricted) receptors where it had different effects on GABA-modulated [35S]TBPS binding and on electrophysiological responses. 4-PIOL may thus serve as a potential lead for receptor subtype selective compounds.

  3. Quantitative encoding of a partial agonist effect on individual opioid receptors by multi-site phosphorylation and threshold detection

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Elaine K.; Trester-Zedlitz, Michelle; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Kotowski, Sarah J.; Krutchinsky, Andrew N.; Burlingame, Alma L.; von Zastrow, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Many drugs act as partial agonists of seven-transmembrane signaling receptors when compared to endogenous ligands. Partial agonism is well described as a 'macroscopic' property manifest at the level of physiological systems or cell populations, but it is not known whether partial agonists encode discrete regulatory information at the 'microscopic' level of individual receptors. We addressed this question by focusing on morphine, a partial agonist drug for µ-type opioid peptide receptors, and combining quantitative mass spectrometry with cell biological analysis to investigate morphine's reduced efficacy for promoting receptor endocytosis when compared to a peptide full agonist. We show that these chemically distinct ligands produce a complex, and qualitatively similar mixture of phosphorylated opioid receptor forms in intact cells. Quantitatively, however, the agonists promote markedly disproportional production of multi-site phosphorylation involving a specific Ser/Thr motif, whose modification at more than one residue is essential for efficient recruitment of the adaptor protein β-arrestin to clathrin-coated pits that mediate subsequent endocytosis of MORs. These results reveal quantitative encoding of agonist-selective endocytosis at the level of individual opioid receptors, based on the conserved biochemical principles of multi-site phosphorylation and threshold detection. PMID:21868358

  4. Thermodynamics of DNA target site recognition by homing endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Eastberg, Jennifer H.; Smith, Audrey McConnell; Zhao, Lei; Ashworth, Justin; Shen, Betty W.; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2007-01-01

    The thermodynamic profiles of target site recognition have been surveyed for homing endonucleases from various structural families. Similar to DNA-binding proteins that recognize shorter target sites, homing endonucleases display a narrow range of binding free energies and affinities, mediated by structural interactions that balance the magnitude of enthalpic and entropic forces. While the balance of ΔH and TΔS are not strongly correlated with the overall extent of DNA bending, unfavorable ΔHbinding is associated with unstacking of individual base steps in the target site. The effects of deleterious basepair substitutions in the optimal target sites of two LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases, and the subsequent effect of redesigning one of those endonucleases to accommodate that DNA sequence change, were also measured. The substitution of base-specific hydrogen bonds in a wild-type endonuclease/DNA complex with hydrophobic van der Waals contacts in a redesigned complex reduced the ability to discriminate between sites, due to nonspecific ΔSbinding. PMID:17947319

  5. Analogs of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone with high agonist potency and selectivity at human melanocortin receptor 1b: the role of Trp(9) in molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Maria A; Macneil, Tanya; Tang, Rui; Fong, Tung M; Angeles Cabello, M; Maroto, Marta; Teran, Ana

    2008-05-01

    alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (alphaMSH), Ac-Ser(1)-Tyr(2)-Ser(3)-Met(4)-Glu(5)-His(6)-Phe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Gly(10)-Lys(11)-Pro(12)-Val(13)-NH(2), is an endogenous agonist for the melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R), the receptor found in the skin, several types of immune cells, and other peripheral sites. Three-dimensional models of complexes of this receptor with alphaMSH and its synthetic analog NDP-alphaMSH, Ac-Ser(1)-Tyr(2)-Ser(3)-Nle(4)-Glu(5)-His(6)-D-Phe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Gly(10)-Lys(11)-Pro(12)-Val(13)-NH(2), have been previously proposed. In those models, the 6-9 segment of the ligand was considered essential for the ligand-receptor interactions. In this study, we probed the role of Trp(9) of NDP-alphaMSH in interactions with hMC1bR. Analogs of NDP-alphaMSH with various amino acids in place of Trp(9) were synthesized and tested in vitro in receptor affinity binding and cAMP functional assays at human melanocortin receptors 1b, 3, 4, and 5 (hMC1b,3-5R). Several new compounds displayed high agonist potency at hMC1bR (EC(50) = 0.5-5 nM) and receptor subtype selectivity greater than 2000-fold versus hMC3-5R. The Trp(9) residue of NDP-alphaMSH was determined to be not essential for molecular recognition at hMC1bR.

  6. In vivo analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HO nuclease recognition site by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, J A; Singer, J D; Heffron, F

    1990-01-01

    HO nuclease introduces a specific double-strand break in the mating-type locus (MAT) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, initiating mating-type interconversion. To define the sequence recognized by HO nuclease, random mutations were produced in a 30-base-pair region homologous to either MAT alpha or MATa by a chemical synthesis procedure. The mutant sites were introduced into S. cerevisiae on a shuttle vector and tested for the ability to stimulate recombination in an assay that mimics mating-type interconversion. The results suggest that a core of 8 noncontiguous bases near the Y-Z junction of MAT is essential for HO nuclease to bind and cleave its recognition site. Other contacts must be required because substrates that contain several mutations outside an intact core reduce or eliminate cleavage in vivo. The results show that HO site recognition is a complex phenomenon, similar to promoter-polymerase interactions. Images PMID:2406563

  7. Investigation of the histamine H3 receptor binding site. Design and synthesis of hybrid agonists with a lipophilic side chain.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Watanabe, Takashi; Kudo, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, Fumikazu; Yamauchi, Miki; Kato, Kazuhiko; Kakui, Nobukazu; Sato, Yasuo

    2010-09-09

    As a part of our search for novel histamine H3 receptor agonists, we designed and synthesized hybrid compounds in which the lipophilic (4'-alkylphenylthio)ethyl moiety of a novel H3 receptor agonist, 4-(2-(4'-tert-butylphenylthio)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (1), was incorporated into N(alpha)-methylhistamine, immepip, and immethridine derivatives. These hybrid compounds were expected to interact concurrently with the histamine-binding site and a putative hydrophobic region in the H3 receptor. Among them, piperidine- and pyridine-type derivatives displayed partial agonist activity, and (S)-4-(1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)-2-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenylthio)ethyl)piperidine (36) was identified as a potent H3 agonist. We performed computational docking studies to examine the binding mode of the agonists. The results indicated that immepip interacts with the key residues, Asp114 and Glu206, in a different manner from histamine. The binding mode of 36 to these residues is similar to that of immepip, and the lipophilic tail of 36 has an additional interaction with a hydrophobic region in transmembrane helix 6 of the receptor. These results indicated that 36 served as a useful tool for studies on receptor-agonist interactions and drug design.

  8. Intra-perirhinal cortex administration of estradiol, but not an ERβ agonist, modulates object-recognition memory in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Nicole J; Hamel, Laurie M; Brake, Wayne G; Mumby, Dave G

    2016-09-01

    Intra-rhinal cortical infusion of 17-β estradiol (E2, 244.8pg/μl) enhances performance on the Novel-Object Preference (NOP) test and impairs accuracy on the delayed nonmatching-to-sample (DNMS) task in the same set of ovariectomized rats (Gervais, Jacob, Brake, & Mumby, 2013). These results appear paradoxical, as normal performance on both tests require intact object-recognition memory (ORM) ability. While demonstrating a preference for the novel object requires recognizing the sample object, rodents can recognize the sample object and still fail to demonstrate a preference. Therefore, enhanced NOP test performance is consistent with both improved ORM and increased novel-object exploration independent of memory processes. There is some evidence suggesting that estrogen receptor (ER) β agonists enhance NOP test performance (Jacome et al., 2010), but no study to date has examined the role of this receptor in DNMS task performance in rodents. The aim of the present study was to determine whether intra-PRh infusion of an ER β agonist, diarylpropionitrile (DPN, 2μg/μl), has divergent effects on novel-object preference (i.e. novelty preference) and accuracy on the DNMS task. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats (n=7) received chronic low E2 (∼22pg/ml serum) replacement, then intra-PRh infusion of DPN (2μg/μl), E2 (244.8pg/μl), or vehicle before each mixed-delay session (0.5-5min) of the DNMS task. A different set of OVX rats (n=10) received the same infusions before each NOP test trial, and were tested either 4 or 72h later. Consistent with Gervais et al. (2013), intra-PRh E2 reduced accuracy on the DNMS task following a 5-min retention delay and enhanced novelty preference on both tests. Intra-PRh DPN was associated with accuracy that was similar to the vehicle-infusion condition, despite enhancing novelty preference on both tests. The accuracy results suggest that while intra-PRh E2 impairs ORM, ERβ does not play a role. However, ERβ in the PRh appears to be

  9. On the Site and Mechanism of Action of β3-Adrenoceptor Agonists in the Bladder

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The clinical success of mirabegron as the first β3-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist for treatment of the overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome, has resulted in substantial interest in its site and mechanism of action. Even if the adrenergic innervation of the bladder and urethra has been well studied, the location(s) of β3-ARs in different structures within the bladder wall and urethra, and the mode(s) of action of β3-AR stimulation have still not been established. The recent demonstration of β3-ARs on cholinergic nerve terminals with no immunoreactivity in urothelium or detrusor smooth muscle, is not in agreement with previous morphological studies, and functional data strongly suggest that β3-ARs can be found these structures. However, recent studies suggest that the β3-ARs on detrusor smooth muscle may not be the functionally most relevant. The assumption that β3-AR activation during bladder filling inhibits acetylcholine release from parasympathetic neurons by a prejunctional mechanism and that this decreases bladder micromotions that generate afferent activity, is an attractive hypothesis. It does not exclude that other mechanisms may be contributing, and supports combined approaches to reduce afferent activity for treatment of the OAB syndrome. PMID:28361520

  10. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Dods, Rachel L; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-11-23

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide-receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design.

  11. The GABA agonist THIP a muscimol analogue, does not interfere with the benzodiazepine binding site on rats cortical membranes.

    PubMed

    Maurer, R

    1979-04-01

    THIP, a cyclic analogue of muscimol, is a powerful GABA agonist. It is as active as GABA in displacing [3H]muscimol from its binding site to cerebellar membranes (IC50 = 31.5 +/- 2.5 mM). However, unlike muscimol or GABA, it is devoid of any modulatory interaction with the benzodiazepine binding site on rat's cortical membranes. Homotaurine, isoguvacine and imidazole acetic acid are less active than muscimol and GABA for increasing the affinity of [3H]diazepam to cortical membrane preparations.

  12. Thermodynamic Modeling of Donor Splice Site Recognition in pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalberts, Daniel P.; Garland, Jeffrey A.

    2004-03-01

    When eukaryotic genes are edited by the spliceosome, the first step in intron recognition is the binding of a U1 snRNA with the donor (5') splice site. We model this interaction thermodynamically to identify splice sites. Applied to a set of 65 annotated genes, our Finding with Binding method achieves a significant separation between real and false sites. Analyzing binding patterns allows us to discard a large number of decoy sites. Our results improve statistics-based methods for donor site recognition, demonstrating the promise of physical modeling to find functional elements in the genome.

  13. Thermodynamic modeling of donor splice site recognition in pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Jeffrey A.; Aalberts, Daniel P.

    2004-04-01

    When eukaryotic genes are edited by the spliceosome, the first step in intron recognition is the binding of a U1 small nuclear RNA with the donor ( 5' ) splice site. We model this interaction thermodynamically to identify splice sites. Applied to a set of 65 annotated genes, our “finding with binding” method achieves a significant separation between real and false sites. Analyzing binding patterns allows us to discard a large number of decoy sites. Our results improve statistics-based methods for donor site recognition, demonstrating the promise of physical modeling to find functional elements in the genome.

  14. Efficient internal exon recognition depends on near equal contributions from the 3' and 5' splice sites.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Peter J; Choi, Eun-A; Busch, Anke; Hertel, Klemens J

    2011-11-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is carried out by the spliceosome, which identifies exons and removes intervening introns. In vertebrates, most splice sites are initially recognized by the spliceosome across the exon, because most exons are small and surrounded by large introns. This gene architecture predicts that efficient exon recognition depends largely on the strength of the flanking 3' and 5' splice sites. However, it is unknown if the 3' or the 5' splice site dominates the exon recognition process. Here, we test the 3' and 5' splice site contributions towards efficient exon recognition by systematically replacing the splice sites of an internal exon with sequences of different splice site strengths. We show that the presence of an optimal splice site does not guarantee exon inclusion and that the best predictor for exon recognition is the sum of both splice site scores. Using a genome-wide approach, we demonstrate that the combined 3' and 5' splice site strengths of internal exons provide a much more significant separator between constitutive and alternative exons than either the 3' or the 5' splice site strength alone.

  15. 3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-2-[3-(4-nitrophenyl)ureido]propanamide enantiomers with human formyl-peptide receptor agonist activity: molecular modeling of chiral recognition by FPR2.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lucente, Ermelinda; Lacivita, Enza; De Giorgio, Paola; Quinn, Mark T

    2013-02-01

    N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that play critical roles in inflammatory reactions, and FPR-specific interactions can possibly be used to facilitate the resolution of pathological inflammatory reactions. Recent studies indicated that FPRs have stereo-selective preference for chiral ligands. Here, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of 24 chiral ureidopropanamides, including previously reported compounds PD168368/PD176252 and their close analogs, and used molecular modeling to define chiral recognition by FPR2. Unlike previously reported 6-methyl-2,4-disubstituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones, whose R-forms preferentially activated FPR1/FPR2, we found that four S-enantiomers in the seven ureidopropanamide pairs tested preferentially activated intracellular Ca(2+) flux in FPR2-transfected cells, while the R-counterpart was more active in two enantiomer pairs. Thus, active enantiomers of FPR2 agonists can be in either R- or S-configurations, depending on the molecular scaffold and specific substituents at the chiral center. Using molecular modeling approaches, including field point methodology, homology modeling, and docking studies, we propose a model that can explain stereoselective activity of chiral FPR2 agonists. Importantly, our docking studies of FPR2 chiral agonists correlated well with the FPR2 pharmacophore model derived previously. We conclude that the ability of FPR2 to discriminate between the enantiomers is the consequence of the arrangement of the three asymmetric hydrophobic subpockets at the main orthosteric FPR2 binding site with specific orientation of charged regions in the subpockets.

  16. 3-(1H-Indol-3-yl)-2-[3-(4-nitrophenyl)ureido]propanamide Enantiomers With Human Formyl-Peptide Receptor Agonist Activity: Molecular Modeling of Chiral Recognition by FPR2

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lucente, Ermelinda; Lacivita, Enza; De Giorgio, Paola; Quinn, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that play critical roles in inflammatory reactions, and FPR-specific interactions can possibly be used to facilitate the resolution of pathological inflammatory reactions. Recent studies indicated that FPRs have stereo-selective preference for chiral ligands. Here, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of 24 chiral ureidopropanamides, including previously reported compounds PD168368/PD176252 and their close analogs, and used molecular modeling to define chiral recognition by FPR2. Unlike previously reported 6-methyl-2,4-disubstituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones, whose R-forms preferentially activated FPR1/FPR2, we found that four S-enantiomers in the seven ureidopropanamide pairs tested preferentially activated intracellular Ca2+ flux in FPR2-transfected cells, while the R-counterpart was more active in two enantiomer pairs. Thus, active enantiomers of FPR2 agonists can be in either R- or S- configurations, depending on the molecular scaffold and specific substituents at the chiral center. Using molecular modeling approaches, including field point methodology, homology modeling, and docking studies, we propose a model that can explain stereoselective activity of chiral FPR2 agonists. Importantly, our docking studies of FPR2 chiral agonists correlated well with the FPR2 pharmacophore model derived previously. We conclude that the ability of FPR2 to discriminate between the enantiomers is the consequence of the arrangement of the three asymmetric hydrophobic subpockets at the main orthosteric FPR2 binding site with specific orientation of charged regions in the subpockets. PMID:23219934

  17. The metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 counteracted ketamine-and apomorphine-induced performance deficits in the object recognition task, but not object location task, in rats.

    PubMed

    Pitsikas, Nikolaos; Markou, Athina

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the non competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine and the mixed dopamine (DA) D1/D2 receptor agonist apomorphine induce schizophrenia-like symptoms in rodents, including cognitive deficits. Activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptors reduces the excessive glutamate release that is hypothesized to be associated with psychiatric disorders. Thus, mGlu2/3 receptor agonists may reverse deficits induced by excessive glutamate or DA release induced by administration of NMDA receptor antagonists and DA receptor agonists, respectively, and potentially those seen in schizophrenia. LY379268 is a selective mGlu2/3 receptor agonist that has shown to be effective in several animal models of stroke, epilepsy, and drug abuse. The present study investigated whether LY379268 antagonizes non-spatial and spatial recognition memory deficits induced by ketamine and apomorphine administration in rats. To assess the effects of the compounds on non-spatial and spatial recognition memory, the object recognition task and object location task were used. Post-training administration of LY379268 (1-3 mg/kg, i.p.) counteracted ketamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) and apomorphine (1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced performance deficits in the object recognition task. In contrast, LY379268 (1-3 mg/kg, i.p.) did not attenuate spatial recognition memory deficits produced by ketamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or apomorphine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in the object location task. The present data show that the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 reversed non-spatial, but not spatial, recognition memory deficits induced by NMDA receptor blockade or DA receptor agonism in rodents. Thus, such mGlu2/3 receptor agonists may be efficacious in reversing some memory deficits seen in schizophrenia patients.

  18. Competitive antagonists and partial agonists at the glycine modulatory site of the mouse N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, G; Johnson, J W; Ascher, P

    1990-01-01

    1. Kynurenate (Kyn), 7-chlorokynurenate (7-Cl-Kyn), 3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one (HA-966) and D-cycloserine are known to bind to the glycine site that modulates the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) response of vertebrate central neurones. The effects of these compounds were investigated with patch-clamp and fast-perfusion techniques on mouse cortical neurones in primary culture in an effort to establish whether they act as antagonists, partial agonists and/or inverse agonists of glycine. A fast drug application method allowed the study of both steady-state and transient responses. 2. The analysis of steady-state responses indicates that the main effects of Kyn and 7-Cl-Kyn are those expected from competitive antagonists of glycine, with a dissociation constant of 15 microM for Kyn, and of 0.3 microM for 7-Cl-Kyn. Concentration jumps indicate that at all concentrations of glycine, and in particular in the absence of added glycine, the blockade by Kyn and 7-Cl-Kyn develops at a rate which is close to the rate of dissociation of glycine from its binding site and is independent of antagonist concentration. 3. The main effects of D-cycloserine and of HA-966 are those of partial agonists of high and low efficacy, respectively. In the absence of added glycine, D-cycloserine always produced a potentiation, while HA-966 produced either a potentiation or an inhibition. This can be explained by assuming the presence of a variable level of contaminating glycine. With both D-cycloserine and HA-966, concentration jumps produced biphasic relaxations in which the onset rate of the slow component was, here again, close to the rate of dissociation of glycine from its binding site. 4. These results can be interpreted by assuming that (1) Kyn and 7-Cl-Kyn are competitive antagonists of glycine, (2) HA-966 and D-cycloserine are partial agonists, (3) in the absence of added glycine some glycine is present in the extracellular solution and (4) the response in the total absence of glycine

  19. Pattern recognition of native plant communities: Manitou Colorado test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Optimum channel selection among 12 channels of multispectral scanner imagery identified six as providing the best information about 11 vegetation classes and two nonvegetation classes at the Manitou Experimental Forest. Intensive preprocessing of the scanner signals was required to eliminate a serious scan angle effect. Final processing of the normalized data provided acceptable recognition results of generalized plant community types. Serious errors occurred with attempts to classify specific community types within upland grassland areas. The consideration of the convex mixtures concept (effects of amounts of live plant cover, exposed soil, and plant litter cover on apparent scene radiances) significantly improved the classification of some of the grassland classes.

  20. Short-term desensitization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse neuroblastoma cells: selective loss of agonist low-affinity and pirenzepine high-affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cioffi, C.L.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1986-09-01

    The effects of brief incubation with carbamylcholine on subsequent binding of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine were investigated in mouse neuroblastoma cells (clone N1E-115). This treatment demonstrated that the muscarinic receptors in this neuronal clone can be divided into two types; one which is readily susceptible to regulation by receptor agonists, whereas the other is resistant in this regard. In control cells, both pirenzepine and carbamylcholine interacted with high- and low-affinity subsets of muscarinic receptors. Computer-assisted analysis of the competition between pirenzepine and carbamylcholine with (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine showed that the receptor sites remaining upon desensitization are composed mainly of pirenzepine low-affinity and agonist high-affinity binding sites. Furthermore, there was an excellent correlation between the ability of various muscarinic receptor agonists to induce a decrease in consequent (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding and their efficacy in stimulating cyclic GMP synthesis in these cells. Thus, only the agonists that are known to recognize the receptor's low-affinity conformation in order to elicit increases in cyclic GMP levels were capable of diminishing ligand binding. Taken together, our present results suggest that the receptor population that is sensitive to regulation by agonists includes both the pirenzepine high-affinity and the agonist low-affinity receptor binding states. In addition, the sensitivity of these receptor subsets to rapid regulation by agonists further implicates their involvement in desensitization of muscarinic receptor-mediated cyclic GMP formation.

  1. Long-term modulation by postnatal oxytocin of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist binding sites in central autonomic regions and the role of prenatal stress.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cabiale, Z; Olausson, H; Sohlström, A; Agnati, L F; Narváez, J A; Uvnäs-Moberg, K; Fuxe, K

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate whether oxytocin administered in male rats subcutaneously early in life in the absence or presence of food restriction during pregnancy has life-long effects on the alpha(2)-agonist binding sites in the nucleus of the solitarii tract (NTS), in the hypothalamus and the amygdala, as evaluated by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Maternal food restriction alone increased the affinity of the alpha(2)-agonist [(3)H]UK14.304 binding sites exclusively in the NTS. In offspring from ad libitum fed dams, oxytocin treatment significantly increased the density of alpha(2)-agonist binding sites in the NTS and in the hypothalamus. The K(d) value of the alpha(2)-agonist binding sites in the hypothalamus of these rats, but not in the other regions studied, was also significantly increased. In offspring from food-restricted dams, oxytocin treatment produced a significant increase of the B(max) values in the hypothalamus and the amygdala and the K(d) value of the alpha(2)-agonist binding sites in the NTS of these rats also was selectively and significantly increased. These results suggest that a postnatal, oxytocin-induced increase of regional alpha(2)-adrenoceptor function can be seen in adulthood by a persistent, regionally selective increase in the density of central alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist binding sites, in the absence of an affinity change in the NTS. Such a regional increase of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor signalling in adulthood may contribute to the anti-stress action of postnatal oxytocin. By contrast, after prenatal stress, the potential increase in alpha(2)-adrenoceptor signalling takes place via selective increases of density with no changes of affinity of the alpha(2)-agonist binding sites in the hypothalamus and the amygdala.

  2. Methyl Substitution of a Rexinoid Agonist Improves Potency and Reveals Site of Lipid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3′,4′-Dihydro-1′(2′H)-naphthalen-1′-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of these new analogues are reported here along with the X-ray crystal structures of each homologue bound to the ligand binding domain of hRXRα. We demonstrate that each homologue of 9cUAB30 is a more potent agonist, but only the 7-methyl-9cUAB30 caused severe hyperlipidemia in rats. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structures of these new rexinoids and bexarotene (Targretin) bound to hRXRα-LBD, we reveal that each rexinoid, which induced hyperlipidemia, had methyl groups that interacted with helix 7 residues of the LBD. PMID:24801499

  3. Macromolecular recognition directs calcium ions to coccolith mineralization sites.

    PubMed

    Gal, Assaf; Wirth, Richard; Kopka, Joachim; Fratzl, Peter; Faivre, Damien; Scheffel, André

    2016-08-05

    Many organisms form elaborate mineralized structures, constituted of highly organized arrangements of crystals and organic macromolecules. The localization of crystals within these structures is presumably determined by the interaction of nucleating macromolecules with the mineral phase. Here we show that, preceding nucleation, a specific interaction between soluble organic molecules and an organic backbone structure directs mineral components to specific sites. This strategy underlies the formation of coccoliths, which are highly ordered arrangements of calcite crystals produced by marine microalgae. On combining the insoluble organic coccolith scaffold with coccolith-associated soluble macromolecules in vitro, we found a massive accretion of calcium ions at the sites where the crystals form in vivo. The in vitro process exhibits profound similarities to the initial stages of coccolith biogenesis in vivo.

  4. Recombinant decorsin: dynamics of the RGD recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Krezel, A. M.; Ulmer, J. S.; Wagner, G.; Lazarus, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Decorsin is an antagonist of integrin alphaIIbbeta3 and a potent platelet aggregation inhibitor. A synthetic gene encoding decorsin, originally isolated from the leech Macrobdella decora, was designed, constructed, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The synthetic gene was fused to the stII signal sequence and expressed under the transcriptional control of the E. coli alkaline phosphatase promoter. The protein was purified by size-exclusion filtration of the periplasmic contents followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Purified recombinant decorsin was found to be indistinguishable from leech-derived decorsin based on amino acid composition, mass spectral analysis, and biological activity assays. Complete sequential assignments of 1H and proton bound 13C resonances were established. Stereospecific assignments of 21 of 25 nondegenerate b-methylene groups were determined. The RGD adhesion site recognized by integrin receptors was found at the apex of a most exposed hairpin loop. The dynamic behavior of decorsin was analyzed using several independent NMR parameters. Although the loop containing the RGD sequence is the most flexible one in decorsin, the conformation of the RGD site itself is more restricted than in other proteins with similar activities. PMID:10975565

  5. Mapping of the acetylcholine binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: ( sup 3 H)nicotine as an agonist photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, R.E.; Cohen, J.B. )

    1991-07-16

    The agonist ({sup 3}H)nicotine was used as a photoaffinity label for the acetylcholine binding sties on the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). ({sup 3}H)Nicotine binds at equilibrium with K{sub eq} = 0.6 {mu}M to the agonist binding sites. Irradiation with 254-nm light of AChR-rich membranes equilibrated with ({sup 3}H)nicotine resulted in covalent incorporation into the {alpha}- and {gamma}-subunits, which was inhibited by agonists and competitive antagonists but not by noncompetitive antagonists. Inhibition of labeling by d-tubocurarine demonstrated that the {alpha}-subunit was labeled via both agonist sites but the {gamma}-subunit was labeled only via the site that binds d-tubocurarine with high affinity. Chymotryptic digestion of the {alpha}-subunit confirmed that Try-198 was the principal amino acid labeled by ({sup 3}H)nicotine. This confirmation required a novel radiosequencing strategy employing o-phthalaldehyde ({sup 3}H)Nicotine, which is the first photoaffinity agonist used, labels primarily Tyr-198 in contrast to competitive antagonist affinity labels, which label primarily Tyr-190 and Cys-192/Cys-193.

  6. Genome filtering using methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes with six-base pair recognition sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large fraction of repetitive DNA in many plant genomes has complicated all aspects of DNA sequencing and assembly, and thus techniques that enrich for genes and low-copy sequences have been employed to isolate gene space. Methyl sensitive restriction enzymes with six base pair recognition sites...

  7. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  8. The Unique α4(+)/(−)α4 Agonist Binding Site in (α4)3(β2)2 Subtype Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Permits Differential Agonist Desensitization Pharmacology versus the (α4)2(β2)3 Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, J. Brek; Lucero, Linda M.; Stratton, Harrison; Chang, Yongchang; Cooper, John F.; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Lukas, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Selected nicotinic agonists were used to activate and desensitize high-sensitivity (HS) (α4)2(β2)3) or low-sensitivity (LS) (α4)3(β2)2) isoforms of human α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Function was assessed using 86Rb+ efflux in a stably transfected SH-EP1-hα4β2 human epithelial cell line, and two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing concatenated pentameric HS or LS α4β2-nAChR constructs (HSP and LSP). Unlike previously studied agonists, desensitization by the highly selective agonists A-85380 [3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine] and sazetidine-A (Saz-A) preferentially reduced α4β2-nAChR HS-phase versus LS-phase responses. The concatenated-nAChR experiments confirmed that approximately 20% of LS-isoform acetylcholine-induced function occurs in an HS-like phase, which is abolished by Saz-A preincubation. Six mutant LSPs were generated, each targeting a conserved agonist binding residue within the LS-isoform-only α4(+)/(−)α4 interface agonist binding site. Every mutation reduced the percentage of LS-phase function, demonstrating that this site underpins LS-phase function. Oocyte-surface expression of the HSP and each of the LSP constructs was statistically indistinguishable, as measured using β2-subunit–specific [125I]mAb295 labeling. However, maximum function is approximately five times greater on a “per-receptor” basis for unmodified LSP versus HSP α4β2-nAChRs. Thus, recruitment of the α4(+)/(−)α4 site at higher agonist concentrations appears to augment otherwise-similar function mediated by the pair of α4(+)/(−)β2 sites shared by both isoforms. These studies elucidate the receptor-level differences underlying the differential pharmacology of the two α4β2-nAChR isoforms, and demonstrate that HS versus LS α4β2-nAChR activity can be selectively manipulated using pharmacological approaches. Since α4β2 nAChRs are the predominant neuronal subtype, these discoveries likely

  9. Agonists binding nicotinic receptors elicit specific channel-opening patterns at αγ and αδ sites

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Patrick; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Heckmann, Manfred; Dudel, Josef

    2014-01-01

    ‘Embryonic’ muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels (nAChRs) bind ligands at interfaces of α- and γ- or δ-subunits. αγ and αδ sites differ in affinity, but their contributions to opening the channel have remained elusive. We compared high-resolution patch clamp currents evoked by epibatidine (Ebd), carbamylcholine (CCh) and acetylcholine (ACh). Ebd binds with 75-fold higher affinity at αγ than at αδ sites, whereas CCh and ACh prefer αδ sites. Similar short (τO1), intermediate (τO2) and long (τO3) types of opening were observed with all three agonists. τO2 openings were maximally prevalent at low Ebd concentrations, binding at αγ sites. By contrast, τO1 openings appear to be generated at αδ sites. In addition, two types of burst appeared: short bursts of an average of 0.75 ms (τB1) that should arise from the αγ site, and long bursts of 12–25 ms (τB2) in duration arising from double liganded receptors. Limited by the temporal resolution, the closings within bursts were invariant at 3 μs. Corrected for missed closings, in the case of ACh the openings within long bursts lasted 170 μs and those in short bursts about 30 μs. Blocking αδ sites with α-conotoxin M1 (CTx) eliminated both τO1 and τB2 and left only τO2 and the short τB1 bursts, as expected. Furthermore we found desensitization when the receptors bound ACh only at the αγ site. When CTx was applied to ‘embryonic’ mouse endplates, monoquantal current rise times were increased, and amplitude and decay time constants were reduced, as expected. Thus the αγ and αδ sites of nAChRs elicit specific channel-opening patterns. PMID:24665094

  10. Modelling and mutation studies on the histamine H1-receptor agonist binding site reveal different binding modes for H1-agonists: Asp116 (TM3) has a constitutive role in receptor stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Laak, Anton M.; Timmerman, Hendrik; Leurs, Rob; Nederkoorn, Paul H. J.; Smit, Martine J.; Donné-Op den Kelder, Gabriëlle M.

    1995-08-01

    A modelling study has been carried out, investigating the binding of histamine (Hist), 2-methylhistamine (2-MeHist) and 2-phenylhistamine (2-PhHist) at two postulated agonistic binding sites on transmembrane domain 5 (TM5) of the histamine H1-receptor. For this purpose a conformational analysis study was performed on three particular residues of TM5, i.e., Lys200, Thr203 and Asn207, for which a functional role in binding has been proposed. The most favourable results were obtained for the interaction between Hist and the Lys200/Asn207 pair. Therefore, Lys200 was subsequently mutated and converted to an alanine, resulting in a 50-fold decrease of H1-receptor stimulation by histamine. Altogether, the data suggest that the Lys200/Asn207 pair is important for activation of the H1-receptor by histamine. In contrast, analogues of 2-PhHist seem to belong to a distinct subclass of histamine agonists and an alternative mode of binding is proposed in which the 2-phenyl ring binds to the same receptor location as one of the aromatic rings of classical histamine H1-antagonists. Subsequently, the binding modes of the agonists Hist, 2-MeHist and 2-PhHist and the H1-antagonist cyproheptadine were evaluated in three different seven-α-helical models of the H1-receptor built in homology with bacteriorhodopsin, but using three different alignments. Our findings suggest that the position of the carboxylate group of Asp116 (TM3) within the receptor pocket depends on whether an agonist or an antagonist binds to the protein; a conformational change of this aspartate residue upon agonist binding is expected to play an essential role in receptor stimulation.

  11. Using chiral molecules as an approach to address low-druggability recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Xavier; Günther, Stefan

    2014-11-05

    The content of chiral carbon atoms or structural complexity, which is known to correlate well with relevant physicochemical properties of small molecules, represents a promising descriptor that could fill the gap in existing drug discovery between ligand library filtering rules and the corresponding properties of the target's recognition site. Herein, we present an in silico study on the yet unclear underlying correlations between molecular complexity and other more sophisticated physicochemical and biological properties. By analyzing thousands of protein-ligand complexes from DrugBank, we show that increasing molecular complexity of drugs is an approach to addressing particularly low-druggability and polar recognition sites. We also show that biologically relevant protein classes characteristically bind molecules with a certain degree of structural complexity. Three distinct behaviors toward drug recognition are described. The reported results set the basis for a better understanding of protein-drug recognition, and open the possibility of including target information in the filtering of large ligand libraries for screening.

  12. Ribosome-messenger recognition: mRNA target sites for ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed Central

    Boni, I V; Isaeva, D M; Musychenko, M L; Tzareva, N V

    1991-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 is known to play an important role in translational initiation, being directly involved in recognition and binding of mRNAs by 30S ribosomal particles. Using a specially developed procedure based on efficient crosslinking of S1 to mRNA induced by UV irradiation, we have identified S1 binding sites on several phage RNAs in preinitiation complexes. Targets for S1 on Q beta and fr RNAs are localized upstream from the coat protein gene and contain oligo(U)-sequences. In the case of Q beta RNA, this S1 binding site overlaps the S-site for Q beta replicase and the site for S1 binding within a binary complex. It is reasonable that similar U-rich sequences represent S1 binding sites on bacterial mRNAs. To test this idea we have used E. coli ssb mRNA prepared in vitro with the T7 promoter/RNA polymerase system. By the methods of toeprinting, enzymatic footprinting, and UV crosslinking we have shown that binding of the ssb mRNA to 30S ribosomes is S1-dependent. The oligo(U)-sequence preceding the SD domain was found to be the target for S1. We propose that S1 binding sites, represented by pyrimidine-rich sequences upstream from the SD region, serve as determinants involved in recognition of mRNA by the ribosome. Images PMID:2011495

  13. Synthesis of GABAA Receptor Agonists and Evaluation of their α-Subunit Selectivity and Orientation in the GABA Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Michaela; Rabe, Holger; Strehle, Axelle; Dieler, Sandra; Debus, Fabian; Dannhardt, Gerd; Akabas, Myles H.; Lüddens, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Drugs used to treat various disorders target GABAA receptors. To develop α subunit selective compounds, we synthesized 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol (4-PIOL) derivatives. The 3-isoxazolol moiety was substituted by 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-one, 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-thione, and substituted 1,2,4-triazol-3-ol heterocycles with modifications to the basic piperidine substituent as well as substituents without basic nitrogen. Compounds were screened by [3H]muscimol binding and in patch-clamp experiments with heterologously expressed GABAA αiβ3γ2 receptors (i = 1–6). The effects of 5-aminomethyl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5d were comparable to GABA for all α subunit isoforms. 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5a and 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H- [1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-thione 6a were weak agonists at α3–, α3–, and α5–containing receptors. When coapplied with GABA they were antagonistic inα2–, α4–, and α6–containing receptors and potentiated α3-containing receptors. 6a protected GABA binding site cysteine-substitution mutants α1F64C and α1S68C from reacting with methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate. 6a specifically covalently modified the α1R66C thiol, in the GABA binding site, through its oxadiazolethione sulfur. These results demonstrate the feasibility of synthesizing α subtype selective GABA mimetic drugs. PMID:18651727

  14. Potential MiRNAs recognition site identification in 3' UTR regions by DSP methods.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Norbert; Arrigo, Patrizio; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate fundamental cellular processes in diverse organisms and that have an important function in gene expression regulation. miRNAs seem capable to concurrently modulate hundreds of target genes. Their abnormal expression is emerging as important element in many pathological conditions. The identification of microRNA binding sites on those proteins that can be disease biomarker is fundamental to design synthetic artificial oligomers. In this paper we suggest a method, based on signal processing, to filter out potential miRNA recognition sites in the 3' UTR region of mRNAs.

  15. The Startle Disease Mutation E103K Impairs Activation of Human Homomeric α1 Glycine Receptors by Disrupting an Intersubunit Salt Bridge across the Agonist Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Safar, Fatemah; Hurdiss, Elliot; Erotocritou, Marios; Greiner, Timo; Irvine, Mark W.; Fang, Guangyu; Jane, David; Yu, Rilei; Dämgen, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyR) belong to the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) superfamily and mediate fast inhibitory transmission in the vertebrate CNS. Disruption of glycinergic transmission by inherited mutations produces startle disease in man. Many startle mutations are in GlyRs and provide useful clues to the function of the channel domains. E103K is one of few startle mutations found in the extracellular agonist binding site of the channel, in loop A of the principal side of the subunit interface. Homology modeling shows that the side chain of Glu-103 is close to that of Arg-131, in loop E of the complementary side of the binding site, and may form a salt bridge at the back of the binding site, constraining its size. We investigated this hypothesis in recombinant human α1 GlyR by site-directed mutagenesis and functional measurements of agonist efficacy and potency by whole cell patch clamp and single channel recording. Despite its position near the binding site, E103K causes hyperekplexia by impairing the efficacy of glycine, its ability to gate the channel once bound, which is very high in wild type GlyR. Mutating Glu-103 and Arg-131 caused various degrees of loss-of-function in the action of glycine, whereas mutations in Arg-131 enhanced the efficacy of the slightly bigger partial agonist sarcosine (N-methylglycine). The effects of the single charge-swapping mutations of these two residues were largely rescued in the double mutant, supporting the possibility that they interact via a salt bridge that normally constrains the efficacy of larger agonist molecules. PMID:28174298

  16. In vivo brain dopaminergic receptor site mapping using /sup 75/Se-labeled pergolide analogs: the effects of various dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, A.

    1986-01-01

    Perogolide mesylate is a new synthetic ergoline derivative which is reported to possess agonistic activity at central dopamine receptor sites in the brain. The authors have synthesized a (/sup 75/Se)-radiolabeled pergolide mesylate derivative, (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate, which, after i.v. administration to mature male rats, showed a time course differentiation in the uptake of this radiolabeled compound in isolated peripheral and central (brain) tissues that are known to be rich in dopamine receptor sites. Further studies were conducted in which the animals were preexposed to the dopamine receptor agonist SKF-38393, as well as the dopamine receptor antagonists (+)-butaclamol, (-)-butaclamol, (+/-)-butaclamol and (-)-chloroethylnorapomorphine, to substantiate the specific peripheral and central localization patterns of (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate. Further investigations were also conducted in which the animals received an i.v. administration of N-isopropyl-l-123-p-iodoamphetamine ((/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine). However, (/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine did not demonstrate a specific affinity for any type of receptor site in the brain. These investigations further substantiated the fact that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate does cross the blood-brain barrier is quickly localized at specific dopamine receptor sites in the intact rat brain and that this localization pattern can be affected by preexposure to different dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Therefore, these investigations provided further evidence that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate and other radiolabeled ergoline analogs might be useful as brain dopamine receptor localization radiopharmaceuticals.

  17. Differential α4(+)/(−)β2 Agonist-binding Site Contributions to α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Function within and between Isoforms*

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Linda M.; Weltzin, Maegan M.; Eaton, J. Brek; Cooper, John F.; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Lukas, Ronald J.; Whiteaker, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Two α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4β2-nAChR) isoforms exist with (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2 subunit stoichiometries and high versus low agonist sensitivities (HS and LS), respectively. Both isoforms contain a pair of α4(+)/(−)β2 agonist-binding sites. The LS isoform also contains a unique α4(+)/(−)α4 site with lower agonist affinity than the α4(+)/(−)β2 sites. However, the relative roles of the conserved α4(+)/(−)β2 agonist-binding sites in and between the isoforms have not been studied. We used a fully linked subunit concatemeric nAChR approach to express pure populations of HS or LS isoform α4β2*-nAChR. This approach also allowed us to mutate individual subunit interfaces, or combinations thereof, on each isoform background. We used this approach to systematically mutate a triplet of β2 subunit (−)-face E-loop residues to their non-conserved α4 subunit counterparts or vice versa (β2HQT and α4VFL, respectively). Mutant-nAChR constructs (and unmodified controls) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Acetylcholine concentration-response curves and maximum function were measured using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Surface expression was measured with 125I-mAb 295 binding and was used to define function/nAChR. If the α4(+)/(−)β2 sites contribute equally to function, making identical β2HQT substitutions at either site should produce similar functional outcomes. Instead, highly differential outcomes within the HS isoform, and between the two isoforms, were observed. In contrast, α4VFL mutation effects were very similar in all positions of both isoforms. Our results indicate that the identity of subunits neighboring the otherwise equivalent α4(+)/(−)β2 agonist sites modifies their contributions to nAChR activation and that E-loop residues are an important contributor to this neighbor effect. PMID:26644472

  18. Differential α4(+)/(-)β2 Agonist-binding Site Contributions to α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Function within and between Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Linda M; Weltzin, Maegan M; Eaton, J Brek; Cooper, John F; Lindstrom, Jon M; Lukas, Ronald J; Whiteaker, Paul

    2016-01-29

    Two α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4β2-nAChR) isoforms exist with (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2 subunit stoichiometries and high versus low agonist sensitivities (HS and LS), respectively. Both isoforms contain a pair of α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist-binding sites. The LS isoform also contains a unique α4(+)/(-)α4 site with lower agonist affinity than the α4(+)/(-)β2 sites. However, the relative roles of the conserved α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist-binding sites in and between the isoforms have not been studied. We used a fully linked subunit concatemeric nAChR approach to express pure populations of HS or LS isoform α4β2*-nAChR. This approach also allowed us to mutate individual subunit interfaces, or combinations thereof, on each isoform background. We used this approach to systematically mutate a triplet of β2 subunit (-)-face E-loop residues to their non-conserved α4 subunit counterparts or vice versa (β2HQT and α4VFL, respectively). Mutant-nAChR constructs (and unmodified controls) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Acetylcholine concentration-response curves and maximum function were measured using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Surface expression was measured with (125)I-mAb 295 binding and was used to define function/nAChR. If the α4(+)/(-)β2 sites contribute equally to function, making identical β2HQT substitutions at either site should produce similar functional outcomes. Instead, highly differential outcomes within the HS isoform, and between the two isoforms, were observed. In contrast, α4VFL mutation effects were very similar in all positions of both isoforms. Our results indicate that the identity of subunits neighboring the otherwise equivalent α4(+)/(-)β2 agonist sites modifies their contributions to nAChR activation and that E-loop residues are an important contributor to this neighbor effect.

  19. Recognition of DNA abasic site nanocavity by fluorophore-switched probe: Suitable for all sequence environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Yuehua; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Lihua; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Xiaoshun; Shao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Removal of a damaged base in DNA produces an abasic site (AP site) nanocavity. If left un-repaired in vivo by the specific enzyme, this nanocavity will result in nucleotide mutation in the following DNA replication. Therefore, selective recognition of AP site nanocavity by small molecules is important for identification of such DNA damage and development of genetic drugs. In this work, we investigate the fluorescence behavior of isoquinoline alkaloids including palmatine (PAL), berberine (BER), epiberberine (EPI), jatrorrhizine (JAT), coptisine (COP), coralyne (COR), worenine (WOR), berberrubine (BEU), sanguinarine (SAN), chelerythrine (CHE), and nitidine (NIT) upon binding with the AP nanocavity. PAL is screened out as the most efficient fluorophore-switched probe to recognize the AP nanocavity over the fully matched DNA. Its fluorescence enhancement occurs for all of the AP nanocavity sequence environments, which has not been achieved by the previously used probes. The bridged π conjugation effect should partially contribute to the AP nanocavity-specific fluorescence, as opposed to the solvent effect. Due to the strong binding with the AP nanocavity, PAL will find wide applications in the DNA damage recognition and sensor development.

  20. The recognition of DNA cleavage sites by porcine spleen topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Huang, H W; Juang, J K; Liu, H J

    1992-02-11

    The cutting sites specificity of topoisomerase II from porcine spleen were determined by a modified Sanger's DNA sequencing method. The topoisomerase II prefers to cut DNA at the 3' side of A and leave 5' protruding end with two staggering bases. Through the free energy analysis for DNA duplex, we also found that the topoisomerase II seemed cut DNA preferably at energetically unstable regions. So it is concluded that the specific DNA cutting by porcine spleen topoisomerase II has two structural recognition factors: one is to localize around the energetically unstable region and another is to act at the 3' side of A base.

  1. Rapid agonist-induced loss of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin opioid receptor sites in NG108-15, but not SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, R.I.; Lameh, J.; Sadee, W. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have measured {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites on intact SK-N-SH and NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells, respectively, in culture. Use of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin ({beta}E) as a tracer, together with {beta}E(6-31) to block high-affinity non-opioid binding in both cell lines, permitted the measurement of cell surface {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites. Labeling was at {delta} sites in NG108-15 cells and predominantly at {mu} sites in SK-N-SH cells. Pretreatment with the {mu} and {delta} agonist, DADLE, caused a rapid loss of cell surface {delta} receptor sites in NG108-15 cells, but failed to reduce significantly {mu} receptor density in SK-N-SH cells.

  2. Distinct parietal sites mediate the influences of mood, arousal, and their interaction on human recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Greene, Ciara M; Flannery, Oliver; Soto, David

    2014-12-01

    The two dimensions of emotion, mood valence and arousal, have independent effects on recognition memory. At present, however, it is not clear how those effects are reflected in the human brain. Previous research in this area has generally dealt with memory for emotionally valenced or arousing stimuli, but the manner in which interacting mood and arousal states modulate responses in memory substrates remains poorly understood. We investigated memory for emotionally neutral items while independently manipulating mood valence and arousal state by means of music exposure. Four emotional conditions were created: positive mood/high arousal, positive mood/low arousal, negative mood/high arousal, and negative mood/low arousal. We observed distinct effects of mood valence and arousal in parietal substrates of recognition memory. Positive mood increased activity in ventral posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and orbitofrontal cortex, whereas arousal condition modulated activity in dorsal PPC and the posterior cingulate. An interaction between valence and arousal was observed in left ventral PPC, notably in a parietal area distinct from the those identified for the main effects, with a stronger effect of mood on recognition memory responses here under conditions of relative high versus low arousal. We interpreted the PPC activations in terms of the attention-to-memory hypothesis: Increased arousal may lead to increased top-down control of memory, and hence dorsal PPC activation, whereas positive mood valence may result in increased activity in ventral PPC regions associated with bottom-up attention to memory. These findings indicate that distinct parietal sites mediate the influences of mood, arousal, and their interplay during recognition memory.

  3. Polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene binds specifically to functional recognition sites on a monomeric and a dimeric ubiquitin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanzoni, Serena; Ceccon, Alberto; Assfalg, Michael; Singh, Rajesh K.; Fushman, David; D'Onofrio, Mariapina

    2015-04-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which NPs interact with biomolecules. NPs associating with proteins may interfere with protein-protein interactions and affect cellular communication pathways, however the impact of NPs on biomolecular recognition remains poorly characterized. In this respect, particularly relevant is the study of NP-induced functional perturbations of proteins implicated in the regulation of key biochemical pathways. Ubiquitin (Ub) is a prototypical protein post-translational modifier playing a central role in numerous essential biological processes. To contribute to the understanding of the interactions between this universally distributed biomacromolecule and NPs, we investigated the adsorption of polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene on monomeric Ub and on a minimal polyubiquitin chain in vitro at atomic resolution. Site-resolved chemical shift and intensity perturbations of Ub's NMR signals, together with 15N spin relaxation rate changes, exchange saturation transfer effects, and fluorescence quenching data were consistent with the reversible formation of soluble aggregates incorporating fullerenol clusters. The specific interaction epitopes were identified, coincident with functional recognition sites in a monomeric and lysine48-linked dimeric Ub. Fullerenol appeared to target the open state of the dynamic structure of a dimeric Ub according to a conformational selection mechanism. Importantly, the protein-NP association prevented the enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of polyubiquitin chains. Our findings provide an experiment-based insight into protein/fullerenol recognition, with implications in functional biomolecular communication, including regulatory protein turnover, and for the opportunity of therapeutic intervention in Ub-dependent cellular pathways.The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which

  4. Amino acids outside of the loops that define the agonist binding site are important for ligand binding to insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zewen; Han, Zhaojun; Liu, Shuhua; Zhang, Yixi; Song, Feng; Yao, Xiangmei; Gu, Jianhua

    2008-07-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) are the targets of several kinds of insecticides. Based on the mutagenesis studies of Torpedo californica nAChRs and solved structure of a molluscan, glial-derived soluble ACh-binding protein, a model of the agonist site was constructed with contributing amino acids from three distinct loops (A, B, and C) of the alpha subunits and another three loops (D, E, and F) of the non-alpha subunits. According to this model, most insect nAChR subunits can form the functional heteromeric or homomeric receptors. Actually, insect subunits themselves did not form any functional receptor at various combinations as yet, and only part of them can form the functional receptors with vertebrate non-alpha subunits. These findings suggested that the agonist binding for insect nAChRs was not only contributed by those key amino acids in six loops, but also some unidentified amino acids from other regions. In our previous studies on nAChRs for Nilaparvata lugens, a target-site mutation (Y151S) was found within two alpha subunits (Nlalpha1 and Nlalpha3). In Drosophila S2 cells and Xenopus oocytes, Nlalpha1 can form functional receptors with rat beta2 subunit. However, the same thing was not observed in Nlalpha3. In the present paper, by exchanging the corresponding regions between Nlalpha1 and Nlalpha3 to generate different chimeras, amino acid residues or residue clusters in the regions outside the six loops were found to play essential roles in agonist binding, especially for the amino acid clusters between loop B and C. This result indicated that the residues in the six loops could be necessary, but not enough for the activity of agonist binding.

  5. Conservation of genetic information: a code for site-specific DNA recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, L F; Sullivan, M R; Hickok, D F

    1993-01-01

    We present findings of genetic information conservation between the glucocorticoid response element (GRE) DNA and the cDNA encoding the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) DNA-binding domain (DBD). The regions of nucleotide sub-sequence similarity to the GRE in the GR DBD occur specifically at nucleotide sequences on the ends of exons 3,4, and 5 at their splice junction sites. These sequences encode the DNA recognition helix on exon 3, a beta-strand on exon 4, and a putative alpha-helix on exon 5, respectively. The nucleotide sequence of exon 5 that encodes the putative alpha-helix located on the carboxyl terminus of the GR DBD shares sequence similarity with the flanking nucleotide regions of the GRE. We generated a computer model of the GR DBD using atomic coordinates derived from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to which we attached the exon 5-encoded putative alpha-helix. We docked this GR DBD structure at the 39-base-pair nucleotide sequence containing the GRE binding site and flanking nucleotides, which contained conserved genetic information. We observed that amino acids of the DNA recognition helix, the beta-strand, and the putative alpha-helix are spatially aligned with trinucleotides identical to their cognate codons within the GRE and its flanking nucleotides. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8516297

  6. Evolution of I-SceI homing endonucleases with increased DNA recognition site specificity

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rakesh; Ho, Kwok Ki; Tenney, Kristen; Chen, Jui-Hui; Golden, Barbara L.; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Elucidating how homing endonucleases undergo changes in recognition site specificity will facilitate efforts to engineer proteins for gene therapy applications. I-SceI is a monomeric homing endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves within an 18-base-pair (bp) target. It tolerates limited degeneracy in its target sequence, including substitution of a C/G+4 base-pair for the wild-type A/T+4 base-pair. Libraries encoding randomized amino acids at I-SceI residue positions that contact or are proximal to A/T+4 were used in conjunction with a bacterial one-hybrid system to select I-SceI derivatives that bind to recognition sites containing either the A/T+4 or C/G+4 base-pairs. As expected, isolates encoding wild-type residues at the randomized positions were selected using either target sequence. All I-SceI proteins isolated using the C/G+4 recognition site included small side chain substitutions at G100, and either contained (K86R/G100T, K86R/G100S and K86R/G100C) or lacked (G100A, G100T) a K86R substitution. Interestingly, the binding affinities of the selected variants for the wild-type A/T+4 target are 4–11-fold lower than that of wild-type I-SceI, whereas those for the C/G+4 target are similar. The increased specificity of the mutant proteins is also evident in binding experiments in vivo. These differences in binding affinities account for the observed ~36-fold difference in target preference between the K86R/G100T and wild-type proteins in DNA cleavage assays. An X-ray crystal structure of the K86R/G100T mutant protein bound to a DNA duplex containing the C/G+4 substitution suggests how sequence specificity of a homing enzyme can increase. This biochemical and structural analysis defines one pathway by which site specificity is augmented for a homing endonuclease. PMID:21029741

  7. Evolution of I-SceI Homing Endonucleases with Increased DNA Recognition Site Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Rakesh; Ho, Kwok Ki; Tenney, Kristen; Chen, Jui-Hui; Golden, Barbara L.; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2013-09-18

    Elucidating how homing endonucleases undergo changes in recognition site specificity will facilitate efforts to engineer proteins for gene therapy applications. I-SceI is a monomeric homing endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves within an 18-bp target. It tolerates limited degeneracy in its target sequence, including substitution of a C:G{sub +4} base pair for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} base pair. Libraries encoding randomized amino acids at I-SceI residue positions that contact or are proximal to A:T{sub +4} were used in conjunction with a bacterial one-hybrid system to select I-SceI derivatives that bind to recognition sites containing either the A:T{sub +4} or the C:G{sub +4} base pairs. As expected, isolates encoding wild-type residues at the randomized positions were selected using either target sequence. All I-SceI proteins isolated using the C:G{sub +4} recognition site included small side-chain substitutions at G100 and either contained (K86R/G100T, K86R/G100S and K86R/G100C) or lacked (G100A, G100T) a K86R substitution. Interestingly, the binding affinities of the selected variants for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} target are 4- to 11-fold lower than that of wild-type I-SceI, whereas those for the C:G{sub +4} target are similar. The increased specificity of the mutant proteins is also evident in binding experiments in vivo. These differences in binding affinities account for the observed -36-fold difference in target preference between the K86R/G100T and wild-type proteins in DNA cleavage assays. An X-ray crystal structure of the K86R/G100T mutant protein bound to a DNA duplex containing the C:G{sub +4} substitution suggests how sequence specificity of a homing enzyme can increase. This biochemical and structural analysis defines one pathway by which site specificity is augmented for a homing endonuclease.

  8. Probing Conformational Changes and Interfacial Recognition Site of Lipases With Surfactants and Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Diaz, E; Amara, S; Roussel, A; Longhi, S; Cambillau, C; Carrière, F

    2017-01-01

    Structural studies on lipases by X-ray crystallography have revealed conformational changes occurring in the presence of surfactants/inhibitors and the pivotal role played by a molecular "lid" of variable size and structure depending on the enzyme. Besides controlling the access to the enzyme active site, the lid is involved in lipase activation, formation of the interfacial recognition site (IRS), and substrate docking within the active site. The combined use of surfactants and inhibitors has been critical for a better understanding of lipase structure-function relationships. An overview of crystal structures of lipases in complex with surfactants and inhibitors reveals common structural features and shows how surfactants monomers interact with the lid in its open conformation. The location of surfactants, inhibitors, and hydrophobic residues exposed upon lid opening provides insights into the IRS of lipases. The mechanism by which surfactants promote the lid opening can be further investigated in solution by site-directed spin labeling of lipase coupled to electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. These experimental approaches are illustrated here by results obtained with mammalian digestive lipases, fungal lipases, and cutinases.

  9. Potent neutralization of hepatitis A virus reveals a receptor mimic mechanism and the receptor recognition site

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangxi; Zhu, Ling; Dang, Minghao; Hu, Zhongyu; Gao, Qiang; Yuan, Shuai; Sun, Yao; Zhang, Bo; Ren, Jingshan; Kotecha, Abhay; Walter, Thomas S.; Wang, Junzhi; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Stuart, David I.; Rao, Zihe

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infects ∼1.4 million people annually and, although there is a vaccine, there are no licensed therapeutic drugs. HAV is unusually stable (making disinfection problematic) and little is known of how it enters cells and releases its RNA. Here we report a potent HAV-specific monoclonal antibody, R10, which neutralizes HAV infection by blocking attachment to the host cell. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of HAV full and empty particles and of the complex of HAV with R10 Fab reveal the atomic details of antibody binding and point to a receptor recognition site at the pentamer interface. These results, together with our observation that the R10 Fab destabilizes the capsid, suggest the use of a receptor mimic mechanism to neutralize virus infection, providing new opportunities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28074040

  10. Potent neutralization of hepatitis A virus reveals a receptor mimic mechanism and the receptor recognition site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangxi; Zhu, Ling; Dang, Minghao; Hu, Zhongyu; Gao, Qiang; Yuan, Shuai; Sun, Yao; Zhang, Bo; Ren, Jingshan; Kotecha, Abhay; Walter, Thomas S; Wang, Junzhi; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I; Rao, Zihe

    2017-01-24

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infects ∼1.4 million people annually and, although there is a vaccine, there are no licensed therapeutic drugs. HAV is unusually stable (making disinfection problematic) and little is known of how it enters cells and releases its RNA. Here we report a potent HAV-specific monoclonal antibody, R10, which neutralizes HAV infection by blocking attachment to the host cell. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of HAV full and empty particles and of the complex of HAV with R10 Fab reveal the atomic details of antibody binding and point to a receptor recognition site at the pentamer interface. These results, together with our observation that the R10 Fab destabilizes the capsid, suggest the use of a receptor mimic mechanism to neutralize virus infection, providing new opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  11. Recognition of AT-Rich DNA Binding Sites by the MogR Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Aimee; Higgins, Darren E.; Panne, Daniel

    2009-07-22

    The MogR transcriptional repressor of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes recognizes AT-rich binding sites in promoters of flagellar genes to downregulate flagellar gene expression during infection. We describe here the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of MogR bound to the recognition sequence 5' ATTTTTTAAAAAAAT 3' present within the flaA promoter region. Our structure shows that MogR binds as a dimer. Each half-site is recognized in the major groove by a helix-turn-helix motif and in the minor groove by a loop from the symmetry-related molecule, resulting in a 'crossover' binding mode. This oversampling through minor groove interactions is important for specificity. The MogR binding site has structural features of A-tract DNA and is bent by approximately 52 degrees away from the dimer. The structure explains how MogR achieves binding specificity in the AT-rich genome of L. monocytogenes and explains the evolutionary conservation of A-tract sequence elements within promoter regions of MogR-regulated flagellar genes.

  12. Mutational mapping of the transmembrane binding site of the G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 and binding mode prediction of TGR5 agonists.

    PubMed

    Gertzen, Christoph G W; Spomer, Lina; Smits, Sander H J; Häussinger, Dieter; Keitel, Verena; Gohlke, Holger

    2015-11-02

    TGR5 (Gpbar-1, M-Bar) is a class A G-protein coupled bile acid-sensing receptor predominately expressed in brain, liver and gastrointestinal tract, and a promising drug target for the treatment of metabolic disorders. Due to the lack of a crystal structure of TGR5, the development of TGR5 agonists has been guided by ligand-based approaches so far. Three binding mode models of bile acid derivatives have been presented recently. However, they differ from one another in terms of overall orientation or with respect to the location and interactions of the cholane scaffold, or cannot explain all results from mutagenesis experiments. Here, we present an extended binding mode model based on an iterative and integrated computational and biological approach. An alignment of 68 TGR5 agonists based on this binding mode leads to a significant and good structure-based 3D QSAR model, which constitutes the most comprehensive structure-based 3D-QSAR study of TGR5 agonists undertaken so far and suggests that the binding mode model is a close representation of the "true" binding mode. The binding mode model is further substantiated in that effects predicted for eight mutations in the binding site agree with experimental analyses on the impact of these TGR5 variants on receptor activity. In the binding mode, the hydrophobic cholane scaffold of taurolithocholate orients towards the interior of the orthosteric binding site such that rings A and B are in contact with TM5 and TM6, the taurine side chain orients towards the extracellular opening of the binding site and forms a salt bridge with R79(EL1), and the 3-hydroxyl group forms hydrogen bonds with E169(5.44) and Y240(6.51). The binding mode thus differs in important aspects from the ones recently presented. These results are highly relevant for the development of novel, more potent agonists of TGR5 and should be a valuable starting point for the development of TGR5 antagonists, which could show antiproliferative effects in tumor

  13. A NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, that simultaneously enhances LTP and reduces LTD at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-lei; Sullivan, John A.; Moskal, Joseph R.; Stanton, Patric K.

    2008-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDAR) are a key route for Ca2+ influx into neurons important to both activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and, when uncontrolled, triggering events that cause neuronal degeneration and death. Among regulatory binding sites on the NMDAR complex is a glycine binding site, distinct from the glutamate binding site, which must be co-activated for NMDAR channel opening. We developed a novel glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, which is both nootropic and neuroprotective in vivo. Here, we assessed the effects of GLYX-13 on long-term synaptic plasticity and NMDAR transmission at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in hippocampal slices in vitro. GLYX-13 simultaneously enhanced the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission, while reducing long-term depression (LTD). GLYX-13 reduced NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons evoked by low-frequency Schaffer collateral stimulation, but enhanced NMDAR currents during high-frequency bursts of activity, and these actions were occluded by a saturating concentration of the glycine site agonist D-serine. Direct two-photon imaging of Schaffer collateral burst-evoked increases in [Ca2+] in individual dendritic spines revealed that GLYX-13 selectively enhanced burst-induced NMDAR-dependent spine Ca2+ influx. Examining the rate of MK-801 block of synaptic versus extrasynaptic NMDAR-gated channels revealed that GLYX-13 selectively enhanced activation of burst-driven extrasynaptic NMDARs, with an action that was blocked by the NR2B-selective NMDAR antagonist ifenprodil. Our data suggest that GLYX-13 may have unique therapeutic potential as a learning and memory enhancer because of its ability to simultaneously enhance LTP and suppress LTD. PMID:18796308

  14. A NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, simultaneously enhances LTP and reduces LTD at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-lei; Sullivan, John A; Moskal, Joseph R; Stanton, Patric K

    2008-12-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs) are a key route for Ca2+ influx into neurons important to both activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and, when uncontrolled, triggering events that cause neuronal degeneration and death. Among regulatory binding sites on the NMDAR complex is a glycine binding site, distinct from the glutamate binding site, which must be co-activated for NMDAR channel opening. We developed a novel glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, which is both nootropic and neuroprotective in vivo. Here, we assessed the effects of GLYX-13 on long-term synaptic plasticity and NMDAR transmission at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in hippocampal slices in vitro. GLYX-13 simultaneously enhanced the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission, while reducing long-term depression (LTD). GLYX-13 reduced NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons evoked by low frequency Schaffer collateral stimulation, but enhanced NMDAR currents during high frequency bursts of activity, and these actions were occluded by a saturating concentration of the glycine site agonist d-serine. Direct two-photon imaging of Schaffer collateral burst-evoked increases in [Ca2+] in individual dendritic spines revealed that GLYX-13 selectively enhanced burst-induced NMDAR-dependent spine Ca2+ influx. Examining the rate of MK-801 block of synaptic versus extrasynaptic NMDAR-gated channels revealed that GLYX-13 selectively enhanced activation of burst-driven extrasynaptic NMDARs, with an action that was blocked by the NR2B-selective NMDAR antagonist ifenprodil. Our data suggest that GLYX-13 may have unique therapeutic potential as a learning and memory enhancer because of its ability to simultaneously enhance LTP and suppress LTD.

  15. Binding of polysaccharides to human galectin-3 at a noncanonical site in its carbohydrate recognition domain

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle C; Ippel, Hans; Suylen, Dennis; Klyosov, Anatole A; Traber, Peter G; Hackeng, Tilman; Mayo, Kevin H

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a multifunctional lectin, unique to galectins by the presence of a long N-terminal tail (NT) off of its carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). Many previous studies have investigated binding of small carbohydrates to its CRD. Here, we used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (15N–1H heteronuclear single quantum coherence data) to assess binding of 15N-Gal-3 (and truncated 15N-Gal-3 CRD) to several, relatively large polysaccharides, including eight varieties of galactomannans (GMs), as well as a β(1 → 4)-polymannan and an α-branched mannan. Overall, we found that these polysaccharides with a larger carbohydrate footprint interact primarily with a noncanonical carbohydrate-binding site on the F-face of the Gal-3 CRD β-sandwich, and to a less extent, if at all, with the canonical carbohydrate-binding site on the S-face. While there is no evidence for interaction with the NT itself, it does appear that the NT somehow mediates stronger interactions between the Gal-3 CRD and the GMs. Significant Gal-3 resonance broadening observed during polysaccharide titrations indicates that interactions occur in the intermediate exchange regime, and analysis of these data allows estimation of affinities and stoichiometries that range from 4 × 104 to 12 × 104 M−1 per site and multiple sites per polysaccharide, respectively. We also found that lactose can still bind to the CRD S-face of GM-bound Gal-3, with the binding of one ligand attenuating affinity of the other. These data are compared with previous results on Gal-1, revealing differences and similarities. They also provide research direction to the development of these polysaccharides as galectin-targeting therapeutics in the clinic. PMID:26646771

  16. Surface binding sites in amylase have distinct roles in recognition of starch structure motifs and degradation.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Morten M; Christiansen, Camilla; Andersen, Joakim M; Rannes, Julie B; Blennow, Andreas; Svensson, Birte

    2015-04-01

    Carbohydrate converting enzymes often possess extra substrate binding regions that enhance their activity. These can be found either on separate domains termed carbohydrate binding modules or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) situated on the catalytic domain. SBSs are common in starch degrading enzymes and critically important for their function. The affinity towards a variety of starch granules as well as soluble poly- and oligosaccharides of barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1) wild-type and mutants of two SBSs (SBS1 and SBS2) was investigated using Langmuir binding analysis, confocal laser scanning microscopy, affinity gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance to unravel functional roles of the SBSs. SBS1 was critical for binding to different starch types as Kd increased by 7-62-fold or was not measurable upon mutation. By contrast SBS2 was particularly important for binding to soluble polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with α-1,6 linkages, suggesting that branch points are key structural elements in recognition by SBS2. Mutation at both SBS1 and SBS2 eliminated binding to all starch granule types tested. Taken together, the findings indicate that the two SBSs act in concert to localize AMY1 to the starch granule surface and that SBS2 works synergistically with the active site in the degradation of amylopectin.

  17. Non-equivalence of Key Positively Charged Residues of the Free Fatty Acid 2 Receptor in the Recognition and Function of Agonist Versus Antagonist Ligands*

    PubMed Central

    Sergeev, Eugenia; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Pandey, Sunil K.; MacKenzie, Amanda E.; Hudson, Brian D.; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are produced in the gut by bacterial fermentation of poorly digested carbohydrates. A key mediator of their actions is the G protein-coupled free fatty acid 2 (FFA2) receptor, and this has been suggested as a therapeutic target for the treatment of both metabolic and inflammatory diseases. However, a lack of understanding of the molecular determinants dictating how ligands bind to this receptor has hindered development. We have developed a novel radiolabeled FFA2 antagonist to probe ligand binding to FFA2, and in combination with mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies, we define how agonist and antagonist ligands interact with the receptor. Although both agonist and antagonist ligands contain negatively charged carboxylates that interact with two key positively charged arginine residues in transmembrane domains V and VII of FFA2, there are clear differences in how these interactions occur. Specifically, although agonists require interaction with both arginine residues to bind the receptor, antagonists require an interaction with only one of the two. Moreover, different chemical series of antagonist interact preferentially with different arginine residues. A homology model capable of rationalizing these observations was developed and provides a tool that will be invaluable for identifying improved FFA2 agonists and antagonists to further define function and therapeutic opportunities of this receptor. PMID:26518871

  18. Histidines in potential substrate recognition sites affect thyroid hormone transport by monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8).

    PubMed

    Braun, Doreen; Lelios, Iva; Krause, Gerd; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8; SLC16A2) cause the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, a severe X-linked psychomotor retardation syndrome. MCT8 belongs to the major facilitator superfamily of 12 transmembrane-spanning proteins and transports thyroid hormones across the blood-brain barrier and into neurons. How MCT8 distinguishes thyroid hormone substrates from structurally closely related compounds is not known. The goal of this study was to identify critical amino acids along the transport channel cavity, which participate in thyroid hormone recognition. The fact that T3 is bound between a His-Arg clamp in the crystal structure of the T3 receptor/T3 complex prompted us to investigate whether such a motif might potentially be relevant for T3 recognition in MCT8. We therefore replaced candidate histidines and arginines by site-directed mutagenesis and performed activity assays in MDCK-1 cells and Xenopus oocytes. Histidines were replaced by alanine, phenylalanine, and glutamine to probe for molecular properties like aromatic ring structure and H-bonding properties. It was found that some mutations in His192 and His415 significantly changed substrate transport kinetics. Arg301 at the intracellular end of the substrate channel is at an ideal distance to His415 to participate in a His-Arg clamp and mutation to alanine-abrogated hormone transport. Molecular modeling demonstrates a perfect fit of T3 poised into the substrate channel between His415 and Arg301 and observing the same geometry as in the T3 receptor.

  19. Composite organization of the cobalamin binding and cubilin recognition sites of intrinsic factor.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Fedosova, Natalya U; Berglund, Lars; Moestrup, Søren K; Nexø, Ebba; Petersen, Torben E

    2005-03-08

    Intrinsic factor (IF(50)) is a cobalamin (Cbl)-transporting protein of 50 kDa, which can be cleaved into two fragments: the 30 kDa N-terminal peptide IF(30) and the 20 kDa C-terminal glycopeptide IF(20). Experiments on binding of Cbl to IF(30), IF(20), and IF(50) revealed comparable association rate constants (k(+)(Cbl) = 4 x 10(6), 14 x 10(6), and 26 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1), respectively), but the equilibrium dissociation constants were essentially different (K(Cbl) = 200 microM, 0.2 microM, and recognition and retention of the ligand. Each isolated fragment of IF was tested for the binding to the specific receptor cubilin in the presence or absence of Cbl. Neither apo nor holo forms of IF(20) and IF(30) were recognized by the receptor. When two fragments were mixed and incubated with Cbl, they associated into a stable complex, IF(30+20).Cbl, which bound to cubilin as well as the noncleaved IF(50).Cbl complex. We suggest that formation of the cubilin recognition site on IF is caused by assembly of two distant domains, which allows the saturated protein to be recognized by the receptor. The obtained parameters for ligand and receptor binding indicate that both full-length IF(50) and the fragments may be involved in Cbl assimilation.

  20. An important base triple anchors the substrate helix recognition surface within the Tetrahymena ribozyme active site.

    PubMed

    Szewczak, A A; Ortoleva-Donnelly, L; Zivarts, M V; Oyelere, A K; Kazantsev, A V; Strobel, S A

    1999-09-28

    Key to understanding the structural biology of catalytic RNA is determining the underlying networks of interactions that stabilize RNA folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here we demonstrate the existence and functional importance of a Hoogsteen base triple (U300.A97-U277), which anchors the substrate helix recognition surface within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme active site. Nucleotide analog interference suppression analysis of the interacting functional groups shows that the U300.A97-U277 triple forms part of a network of hydrogen bonds that connect the P3 helix, the J8/7 strand, and the P1 substrate helix. Product binding and substrate cleavage kinetics experiments performed on mutant ribozymes that lack this base triple (C A-U, U G-C) or replace it with the isomorphous C(+).G-C triple show that the A97 Hoogsteen triple contributes to the stabilization of both substrate helix docking and the conformation of the ribozyme's active site. The U300. A97-U277 base triple is not formed in the recently reported crystallographic model of a portion of the group I intron, despite the presence of J8/7 and P3 in the RNA construct [Golden, B. L., Gooding, A. R., Podell, E. R. & Cech, T. R. (1998) Science 282, 259-264]. This, along with other biochemical evidence, suggests that the active site in the crystallized form of the ribozyme is not fully preorganized and that substantial rearrangement may be required for substrate helix docking and catalysis.

  1. ICRPfinder: a fast pattern design algorithm for coding sequences and its application in finding potential restriction enzyme recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Li, Yuhua; Zhang, Xiangmin; Stafford, Phillip; Dinu, Valentin

    2009-01-01

    Background Restriction enzymes can produce easily definable segments from DNA sequences by using a variety of cut patterns. There are, however, no software tools that can aid in gene building -- that is, modifying wild-type DNA sequences to express the same wild-type amino acid sequences but with enhanced codons, specific cut sites, unique post-translational modifications, and other engineered-in components for recombinant applications. A fast DNA pattern design algorithm, ICRPfinder, is provided in this paper and applied to find or create potential recognition sites in target coding sequences. Results ICRPfinder is applied to find or create restriction enzyme recognition sites by introducing silent mutations. The algorithm is shown capable of mapping existing cut-sites but importantly it also can generate specified new unique cut-sites within a specified region that are guaranteed not to be present elsewhere in the DNA sequence. Conclusion ICRPfinder is a powerful tool for finding or creating specific DNA patterns in a given target coding sequence. ICRPfinder finds or creates patterns, which can include restriction enzyme recognition sites, without changing the translated protein sequence. ICRPfinder is a browser-based JavaScript application and it can run on any platform, in on-line or off-line mode. PMID:19747395

  2. A Novel Loop Domain in Superantigens Extends Their T Cell Receptor Recognition Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther,S.; Varma, A.; Moza, B.; Kasper, K.; Wyatt, A.; Zhu, P.; Nur-ur Rahman, A.; Li, Y.; Mariuzza, R.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Superantigens (SAGs) interact with host immune receptors to induce a massive release of inflammatory cytokines that can lead to toxic shock syndrome and death. Bacterial SAGs can be classified into five distinct evolutionary groups. Group V SAGs are characterized by the {alpha}3-{beta}8 loop, a unique {approx}15 amino acid residue extension that is required for optimal T cell activation. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of the group V SAG staphylococcal enterotoxin K (SEK) alone and in complex with the TCR hV{beta}5.1 domain. SEK adopts a unique TCR binding orientation relative to other SAG-TCR complexes, which results in the {alpha}3-{beta}8 loop contacting the apical loop of framework region 4, thereby extending the known TCR recognition site of SAGs. These interactions are absolutely required for TCR binding and T cell activation by SEK, and dictate the TCR V{beta} domain specificity of SEK and other group V SAGs.

  3. The novel alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist [3H]mivazerol binds to non-adrenergic binding sites in human striatum membranes that are distinct from imidazoline receptors.

    PubMed

    Flamez, A; Gillard, M; De Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G; Noyer, M

    1997-07-01

    The alpha 2 adrenergic agonist [3H]mivazerol labelled two populations of binding sites in membranes from the human striatum. Forty per cent of the sites labelled by 3 nM [3H]mivazerol corresponded to alpha 2 adrenergic receptors as they displayed a high affinity for (-)-adrenaline and for rauwolscine. The remaining binding was displaced by mivazerol with a pIC50 of 6.5 +/- 0.1. These sites displayed higher affinity for dexmedetomidine (pIC50 = 7.1 +/- 0.1), but much lower affinity for clonidine (pIC50 < 5.0) and for idazoxan (pIC50 = 5.1 +/- 0.1). Mivazerol also showed low affinity for the [3H]clonidine-labelled I1 imidazoline receptors and for the [3H]idazoxan-labelled I2 receptors (pIC50 = 5.1 and 3.9, respectively). These results suggest that the non-adrenergic [3H]mivazerol binding sites are distinct from the imidazoline receptors in the human striatum.

  4. Site-specific dephosphorylation of tau of apolipoprotein E-deficient and control mice by M1 muscarinic agonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Genis, I; Fisher, A; Michaelson, D M

    1999-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice have memory deficits that are associated with synaptic loss of basal forebrain cholinergic projections and with hyperphosphorylation of distinct epitopes of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Furthermore, treatment of apoE-deficient mice with the M1 selective agonist 1-methylpiperidine-4-spiro-(2'-methylthiazoline) [AF150(S)] abolishes their memory deficits and results in recovery of their brain cholinergic markers. In the present study, we used a panel of anti-tau monoclonal antibodies to further map the tau epitopes that are hyperphosphorylated in apoE-deficient mice and examined the effects of prolonged treatment with AF150(S). This revealed that tau of apoE-deficient mice contains a distinct, hyperphosphorylated "hot spot" domain which is localized N-terminally to the microtubule binding domain of tau, and that AF150(S) has an epitope-specific tau dephosphorylating effect whose magnitude is affected by apoE deficiency. Accordingly, epitopes which reside in the hyperphosphorylated "hot spot" are dephosphorylated by AF150(S) in apoE-deficient mice but are almost unaffected in the controls, whereas epitopes which flank this tau domain are dephosphorylated by AF150(S) in both mice groups. In contrast, epitopes located at the N and C terminals of tau are unaffected by AF150(S) in both groups of mice. These findings suggest that apoE deficiency results in hyperphosphorylation of a distinct tau domain whose excess phosphorylation can be reduced by muscarinic treatment.

  5. Suppression of spreading depolarization and stabilization of dendritic spines by GLYX-13, an NMDA receptor glycine-site functional partial agonist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Shuttleworth, C William; Moskal, Joseph R; Stanton, Patric K

    2015-11-01

    Cortical spreading depolarization (SD) is a slow self-propagating wave of mass cellular depolarization in brain tissue, thought to be the underlying cause of migraine scintillating scotoma and aura, and associated with stroke, traumatic brain injury, and termination of status epilepticus. The N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor (NMDAR), which gates influx of calcium and is an important trigger of long-term synaptic plasticity, is also a contributor to the initiation and propagation of SD. The current study tested the potential of pharmacological modulation of NMDAR activity through the obligatory co-agonist binding site, to suppress the initiation of SD, and modulate the effects of SD on dendritic spine morphology, in in vitro hippocampal slices. A novel NMDAR functional glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13, sometimes completely prevented the induction of SD and consistently slowed its rate of propagation. The passage of SD through the hippocampal CA1 region produced a rapid retraction of dendritic spines which reversed after neuronal depolarization had recovered. GLYX-13 improved the rate and extent of return of dendritic spines to their original sizes and locations following SD, suggesting that NMDAR modulators can protect synaptic connections in the brain from structural alterations elicited by SD. These data indicate that NMDAR modulation to renormalize activity may be an effective new treatment strategy for suppression or amelioration of the contribution of SD to short and long-term symptoms of migraine attacks, as well as the effects of SD on tissue damaged by stroke or traumatic brain injury.

  6. Characterization of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid binding site in U937 membranes using a novel radiolabeled agonist, 20-125i-14,15-epoxyeicosa-8(Z)-enoic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqi; Tuniki, Venugopal Raju; Anjaiah, Siddam; Falck, J R; Hillard, Cecilia J; Campbell, William B

    2008-03-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are important regulators of vascular tone and homeostasis. Whether they initiate signaling through membrane receptors is unclear. We developed 20-iodo-14,15-epoxyeicosa-8(Z)-enoic acid (20-I-14,15-EE8ZE), a radiolabeled EET agonist, to characterize EET binding to membranes of U937 cells. 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE stimulated cAMP production in U937 cells with similar potency, but it decreased efficacy compared with 11,12-EET. Maximum cAMP production increased 4.2-fold, with an EC(50) value of 9 muM. Like 14,15-EET, 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE relaxed bovine coronary arteries, with a similar EC(50) value. Both 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE agonist activities were blocked by the EET antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)enoic acid (14,15-EE5ZE). Specific 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE binding to U937 membranes reached equilibrium within 10 min and remained unchanged for 30 min at 4 degrees C. The binding was saturable, reversible, and exhibited K(D) and B(max) values of 11.8 +/- 1.1 nM and 5.8 +/- 0.2 pmol/mg protein, respectively. Pretreatment of the membranes with guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate reduced the B(max) in a concentration-related manner. 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE binding was inhibited by eicosanoids with potency order of 11,12-EET >14,15-EE5ZE approximately 14,15-EET > 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid > 14,15-EET-thiirane >14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid. This order is in agreement with the efficacy and potency of cAMP production. In summary, 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE is a radiolabeled EET agonist that is useful to study binding and metabolism. Using this radioligand, we have identified a specific high-affinity and high-abundance EET binding site in U937 cell membranes. This binding site could represent a specific EET receptor, which is probably a G protein-coupled receptor.

  7. Different effects of serotonin antagonists on /sup 3/H-mianserin and /sup 3/H-ketanserin recognition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gandolfi, O.; Barbaccia, M.L.; Costa, E.

    1985-02-25

    In minces prepared from the frontal cortex of rats treated with ketanserin (10 mg/kg i.p.) or mianserin (5 mg/kg i.p.) twice daily for 21 days, the Vmax of the adenylate cyclase stimulated by NE (100 ..mu..M) is attenuated, suggesting that ketanserin and mianserin share with a number of antidepressants the ability to attenuate the adenylate cyclase stimulation by NE. Ketanserin, given with the above mentioned dose schedule for 7 consecutive days, reduced the Bmax of 5HT/sub 2/ recognition sites but failed to change either the Bmax or the apparent Kd of /sup 3/H-mianserin binding. A significant decrease in the Bmax of 5HT/sub 2/ binding sites is elicited also by a single injection of mianserin. This drug also down-regulates its own binding when given twice daily for 3 weeks. From this and other information, it is concluded that ketanserin and mianserin bind to distinct recognition sites. The possibility that 5HT/sub 2/ and mianserin recognition sites are functionally related and that serotonergic synapses are modulated by multiple chemical signals might be considered. 34 references, 3 figures.

  8. Structural Basis for Native Agonist and Synthetic Inhibitor Recognition by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Regulator PqsR (MvfR)

    PubMed Central

    Ilangovan, Aravindan; Fletcher, Matthew; Rampioni, Giordano; Pustelny, Christian; Rumbaugh, Kendra; Heeb, Stephan; Cámara, Miguel; Truman, Alex; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Emsley, Jonas; Williams, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial populations co-ordinate gene expression collectively through quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism employing diffusible signal molecules. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) protein PqsR (MvfR) is a key component of alkyl-quinolone (AQ)-dependent QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PqsR is activated by 2-alkyl-4-quinolones including the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone), its precursor 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ) and their C9 congeners, 2-nonyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (C9-PQS) and 2-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (NHQ). These drive the autoinduction of AQ biosynthesis and the up-regulation of key virulence determinants as a function of bacterial population density. Consequently, PqsR constitutes a potential target for novel antibacterial agents which attenuate infection through the blockade of virulence. Here we present the crystal structures of the PqsR co-inducer binding domain (CBD) and a complex with the native agonist NHQ. We show that the structure of the PqsR CBD has an unusually large ligand-binding pocket in which a native AQ agonist is stabilized entirely by hydrophobic interactions. Through a ligand-based design strategy we synthesized and evaluated a series of 50 AQ and novel quinazolinone (QZN) analogues and measured the impact on AQ biosynthesis, virulence gene expression and biofilm development. The simple exchange of two isosteres (OH for NH2) switches a QZN agonist to an antagonist with a concomitant impact on the induction of bacterial virulence factor production. We also determined the complex crystal structure of a QZN antagonist bound to PqsR revealing a similar orientation in the ligand binding pocket to the native agonist NHQ. This structure represents the first description of an LTTR-antagonist complex. Overall these studies present novel insights into LTTR ligand binding and ligand-based drug design and provide a chemical scaffold for further anti-P. aeruginosa

  9. Structural basis for native agonist and synthetic inhibitor recognition by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing regulator PqsR (MvfR).

    PubMed

    Ilangovan, Aravindan; Fletcher, Matthew; Rampioni, Giordano; Pustelny, Christian; Rumbaugh, Kendra; Heeb, Stephan; Cámara, Miguel; Truman, Alex; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Emsley, Jonas; Williams, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial populations co-ordinate gene expression collectively through quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism employing diffusible signal molecules. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) protein PqsR (MvfR) is a key component of alkyl-quinolone (AQ)-dependent QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PqsR is activated by 2-alkyl-4-quinolones including the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone), its precursor 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ) and their C9 congeners, 2-nonyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (C9-PQS) and 2-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (NHQ). These drive the autoinduction of AQ biosynthesis and the up-regulation of key virulence determinants as a function of bacterial population density. Consequently, PqsR constitutes a potential target for novel antibacterial agents which attenuate infection through the blockade of virulence. Here we present the crystal structures of the PqsR co-inducer binding domain (CBD) and a complex with the native agonist NHQ. We show that the structure of the PqsR CBD has an unusually large ligand-binding pocket in which a native AQ agonist is stabilized entirely by hydrophobic interactions. Through a ligand-based design strategy we synthesized and evaluated a series of 50 AQ and novel quinazolinone (QZN) analogues and measured the impact on AQ biosynthesis, virulence gene expression and biofilm development. The simple exchange of two isosteres (OH for NH₂) switches a QZN agonist to an antagonist with a concomitant impact on the induction of bacterial virulence factor production. We also determined the complex crystal structure of a QZN antagonist bound to PqsR revealing a similar orientation in the ligand binding pocket to the native agonist NHQ. This structure represents the first description of an LTTR-antagonist complex. Overall these studies present novel insights into LTTR ligand binding and ligand-based drug design and provide a chemical scaffold for further anti-P. aeruginosa

  10. Antibody recognition of the pandemic H1N1 Influenza virus hemagglutinin receptor binding site.

    PubMed

    Hong, Minsun; Lee, Peter S; Hoffman, Ryan M B; Zhu, Xueyong; Krause, Jens C; Laursen, Nick S; Yoon, Sung-Il; Song, Langzhou; Tussey, Lynda; Crowe, James E; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-11-01

    Influenza virus is a global health concern due to its unpredictable pandemic potential. This potential threat was realized in 2009 when an H1N1 virus emerged that resembled the 1918 virus in antigenicity but fortunately was not nearly as deadly. 5J8 is a human antibody that potently neutralizes a broad spectrum of H1N1 viruses, including the 1918 and 2009 pandemic viruses. Here, we present the crystal structure of 5J8 Fab in complex with a bacterially expressed and refolded globular head domain from the hemagglutinin (HA) of the A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) pandemic virus. 5J8 recognizes a conserved epitope in and around the receptor binding site (RBS), and its HCDR3 closely mimics interactions of the sialic acid receptor. Electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions of 5J8 Fab in complex with an HA trimer from a 1986 H1 strain and with an engineered stabilized HA trimer from the 2009 H1 pandemic virus showed a similar mode of binding. As for other characterized RBS-targeted antibodies, 5J8 uses avidity to extend its breadth and affinity against divergent H1 strains. 5J8 selectively interacts with HA insertion residue 133a, which is conserved in pandemic H1 strains and has precluded binding of other RBS-targeted antibodies. Thus, the RBS of divergent HAs is targeted by 5J8 and adds to the growing arsenal of common recognition motifs for design of therapeutics and vaccines. Moreover, consistent with previous studies, the bacterially expressed H1 HA properly refolds, retaining its antigenic structure, and presents a low-cost and rapid alternative for engineering and manufacturing candidate flu vaccines.

  11. Recognition pattern of different bases in the active site of ribonuclease Ms--a model building study.

    PubMed

    Floegel, R; Zielenkiewicz, P; Saenger, W

    1989-10-01

    The structure of base non-specific ribonuclease Ms from Aspergillus saitoi was predicted by sequence similarity to guanine-specific RNase T1 of known structure. In this paper the interaction pattern of binding site of RNase Ms with different nucleic acids bases is analysed using model building and energy minimisation techniques. It is shown that unspecificity of this protein can be explained only when taking into account flexibility of the base recognition loop.

  12. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the. gamma. -carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, D.G.; Sudmeier, J.L.; Bachovchin, W.W.; Kanagy, C.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. )

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational {gamma}-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing {alpha}-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues {minus}13 to {minus}3 form an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site, four residues ({minus}18, {minus}17, {minus}16, and {minus}15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue ({minus}10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic {alpha}-helix in the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site is discussed.

  13. Recognition of the 3' splice site RNA by the U2AF heterodimer involves a dynamic population shift.

    PubMed

    Voith von Voithenberg, Lena; Sánchez-Rico, Carolina; Kang, Hyun-Seo; Madl, Tobias; Zanier, Katia; Barth, Anders; Warner, Lisa R; Sattler, Michael; Lamb, Don C

    2016-11-15

    An essential early step in the assembly of human spliceosomes onto pre-mRNA involves the recognition of regulatory RNA cis elements in the 3' splice site by the U2 auxiliary factor (U2AF). The large (U2AF65) and small (U2AF35) subunits of the U2AF heterodimer contact the polypyrimidine tract (Py-tract) and the AG-dinucleotide, respectively. The tandem RNA recognition motif domains (RRM1,2) of U2AF65 adopt closed/inactive and open/active conformations in the free form and when bound to bona fide Py-tract RNA ligands. To investigate the molecular mechanism and dynamics of 3' splice site recognition by U2AF65 and the role of U2AF35 in the U2AF heterodimer, we have combined single-pair FRET and NMR experiments. In the absence of RNA, the RRM1,2 domain arrangement is highly dynamic on a submillisecond time scale, switching between closed and open conformations. The addition of Py-tract RNA ligands with increasing binding affinity (strength) gradually shifts the equilibrium toward an open conformation. Notably, the protein-RNA complex is rigid in the presence of a strong Py-tract but exhibits internal motion with weak Py-tracts. Surprisingly, the presence of U2AF35, whose UHM domain interacts with U2AF65 RRM1, increases the population of the open arrangement of U2AF65 RRM1,2 in the absence and presence of a weak Py-tract. These data indicate that the U2AF heterodimer promotes spliceosome assembly by a dynamic population shift toward the open conformation of U2AF65 to facilitate the recognition of weak Py-tracts at the 3' splice site. The structure and RNA binding of the heterodimer was unaffected by cancer-linked myelodysplastic syndrome mutants.

  14. Yhh1p/Cft1p directly links poly(A) site recognition and RNA polymerase II transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Dichtl, Bernhard; Blank, Diana; Sadowski, Martin; Hübner, Wolfgang; Weiser, Stefan; Keller, Walter

    2002-08-01

    RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription termination requires co-transcriptional recognition of a functional polyadenylation signal, but the molecular mechanisms that transduce this signal to pol II remain unclear. We show that Yhh1p/Cft1p, the yeast homologue of the mammalian AAUAAA interacting protein CPSF 160, is an RNA-binding protein and provide evidence that it participates in poly(A) site recognition. Interestingly, RNA binding is mediated by a central domain composed of predicted beta-propeller-forming repeats, which occurs in proteins of diverse cellular functions. We also found that Yhh1p/Cft1p bound specifically to the phosphorylated C-terminal domain (CTD) of pol II in vitro and in a two-hybrid test in vivo. Furthermore, transcriptional run-on analysis demonstrated that yhh1 mutants were defective in transcription termination, suggesting that Yhh1p/Cft1p functions in the coupling of transcription and 3'-end formation. We propose that direct interactions of Yhh1p/Cft1p with both the RNA transcript and the CTD are required to communicate poly(A) site recognition to elongating pol II to initiate transcription termination.

  15. Systematic Design of Trypsin Cleavage Site Mutated Exendin4-Cysteine 1, an Orally Bioavailable Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Sai, Wenbo; Tian, Hong; Yang, Kangmin; Tang, Daoqi; Bao, Jinxiao; Ge, Yang; Song, Xiaoda; Zhang, Yu; Luo, Cheng; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2017-01-01

    Exendin-4 is a strong therapeutic candidate for the treatment of metabolic syndrome. Related receptor agonist drugs have been on the market since 2005. However, technical limitations and the pain caused by subcutaneous injection have severely limited patient compliance. The goal of the study is to investigate a biologically active exendin-4 analog could be administered orally. Using intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, we discovered that exendin4-cysteine administered by oral gavage had a distinct hypoglycemic effect in C57BL/6J mice. Using Rosetta Design and Amber, we designed and screened a series of exendin4-cysteine analogs to identify those that retained biological activity while resisting trypsin digestion. Trypsin Cleavage Site Mutated Exendin4-cysteine 1 (TSME-1), an analog whose bioactivity was similar to exendin-4 and was almost completely resistant to trypsin, was screened out. In addition, TSME-1 significantly normalized the blood glucose levels and the availability of TSME-1 was significantly higher than that of exendin-4 and exendin4-cysteine. Collectively orally administered TSME-1, a trypsin-resistant exendin-4 analog obtained by the system, is a strong candidate for future treatments of type 2 diabetes. PMID:28282854

  16. Imprinting of Molecular Recognition Sites on Nanostructures and Its Applications in Chemosensors.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guijian; Liu, Bianhua; Wang, Zhenyang; Zhang, Zhongping

    2008-12-15

    Biological receptors including enzymes, antibodies and active proteins have been widely used as the detection platform in a variety of chemo/biosensors and bioassays. However, the use of artificial host materials in chemical/biological detections has become increasingly attractive, because the synthetic recognition systems such as molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) usually have lower costs, higher physical/chemical stability, easier preparation and better engineering possibility than biological receptors. Molecular imprinting is one of the most efficient strategies to offer a synthetic route to artificial recognition systems by a template polymerization technique, and has attracted considerable efforts due to its importance in separation, chemo/biosensors, catalysis and biomedicine. Despite the fact that MIPs have molecular recognition ability similar to that of biological receptors, traditional bulky MIP materials usually exhibit a low binding capacity and slow binding kinetics to the target species. Moreover, the MIP materials lack the signal-output response to analyte binding events when used as recognition elements in chemo/biosensors or bioassays. Recently, various explorations have demonstrated that molecular imprinting nanotechniques may provide a potential solution to these difficulties. Many successful examples of the development of MIP-based sensors have also been reported during the past several decades. This review will begin with a brief introduction to the principle of molecular imprinting nanotechnology, and then mainly summarize various synthesis methodologies and recognition properties of MIP nanomaterials and their applications in MIP-based chemosensors. Finally, the future perspectives and efforts in MIP nanomaterials and MIP-based sensors are given.

  17. Imprinting of Molecular Recognition Sites on Nanostructures and Its Applications in Chemosensors

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Guijian; Liu, Bianhua; Wang, Zhenyang; Zhang, Zhongping

    2008-01-01

    Biological receptors including enzymes, antibodies and active proteins have been widely used as the detection platform in a variety of chemo/biosensors and bioassays. However, the use of artificial host materials in chemical/biological detections has become increasingly attractive, because the synthetic recognition systems such as molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) usually have lower costs, higher physical/chemical stability, easier preparation and better engineering possibility than biological receptors. Molecular imprinting is one of the most efficient strategies to offer a synthetic route to artificial recognition systems by a template polymerization technique, and has attracted considerable efforts due to its importance in separation, chemo/biosensors, catalysis and biomedicine. Despite the fact that MIPs have molecular recognition ability similar to that of biological receptors, traditional bulky MIP materials usually exhibit a low binding capacity and slow binding kinetics to the target species. Moreover, the MIP materials lack the signal-output response to analyte binding events when used as recognition elements in chemo/biosensors or bioassays. Recently, various explorations have demonstrated that molecular imprinting nanotechniques may provide a potential solution to these difficulties. Many successful examples of the development of MIP-based sensors have also been reported during the past several decades. This review will begin with a brief introduction to the principle of molecular imprinting nanotechnology, and then mainly summarize various synthesis methodologies and recognition properties of MIP nanomaterials and their applications in MIP-based chemosensors. Finally, the future perspectives and efforts in MIP nanomaterials and MIP-based sensors are given. PMID:27873989

  18. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-02: Automatic Recognition of Patient Treatment Site in Portal Images Using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, X; Yang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the method to automatically recognize the treatment site in the X-Ray portal images. It could be useful to detect potential treatment errors, and to provide guidance to sequential tasks, e.g. automatically verify the patient daily setup. Methods: The portal images were exported from MOSAIQ as DICOM files, and were 1) processed with a threshold based intensity transformation algorithm to enhance contrast, and 2) where then down-sampled (from 1024×768 to 128×96) by using bi-cubic interpolation algorithm. An appearance-based vector space model (VSM) was used to rearrange the images into vectors. A principal component analysis (PCA) method was used to reduce the vector dimensions. A multi-class support vector machine (SVM), with radial basis function kernel, was used to build the treatment site recognition models. These models were then used to recognize the treatment sites in the portal image. Portal images of 120 patients were included in the study. The images were selected to cover six treatment sites: brain, head and neck, breast, lung, abdomen and pelvis. Each site had images of the twenty patients. Cross-validation experiments were performed to evaluate the performance. Results: MATLAB image processing Toolbox and scikit-learn (a machine learning library in python) were used to implement the proposed method. The average accuracies using the AP and RT images separately were 95% and 94% respectively. The average accuracy using AP and RT images together was 98%. Computation time was ∼0.16 seconds per patient with AP or RT image, ∼0.33 seconds per patient with both of AP and RT images. Conclusion: The proposed method of treatment site recognition is efficient and accurate. It is not sensitive to the differences of image intensity, size and positions of patients in the portal images. It could be useful for the patient safety assurance. The work was partially supported by a research grant from Varian Medical System.

  19. Role in the selectivity of neonicotinoids of insect-specific basic residues in loop D of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding site.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Masaru; Yokota, Maiko; Ihara, Makoto; Akamatsu, Miki; Sattelle, David B; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2006-10-01

    The insecticide imidacloprid and structurally related neonicotinoids act selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). To investigate the mechanism of neonicotinoid selectivity, we have examined the effects of mutations to basic amino acid residues in loop D of the nAChR acetylcholine (ACh) binding site on the interactions with imidacloprid. The receptors investigated are the recombinant chicken alpha4beta2 nAChR and Drosophila melanogaster Dalpha2/chicken beta2 hybrid nAChR expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Although mutations of Thr77 in loop D of the beta2 subunit resulted in a barely detectable effect on the imidacloprid concentration-response curve for the alpha4beta2 nAChR, T77R;E79V double mutations shifted the curve dramatically to higher affinity binding of imidacloprid. Likewise, T77K;E79R and T77N;E79R double mutations in the Dalpha2beta2 nAChR also resulted in a shift to a higher affinity for imidacloprid, which exceeded that observed for a single mutation of Thr77 to basic residues. By contrast, these double mutations scarcely influenced the ACh concentration-response curve, suggesting selective interactions with imidacloprid of the newly introduced basic residues. Computational, homology models of the agonist binding domain of the wild-type and mutant alpha4beta2 and Dalpha2beta2 nAChRs with imidacloprid bound were generated based on the crystal structures of acetylcholine binding proteins of Lymnaea stagnalis and Aplysia californica. The models indicate that the nitro group of imidacloprid interacts directly with the introduced basic residues at position 77, whereas those at position 79 either prevent or permit such interactions depending on their electrostatic properties, thereby explaining the observed functional changes resulting from site-directed mutagenesis.

  20. Matricryptic sites control tissue injury responses in the cardiovascular system: relationships to pattern recognition receptor regulated events.

    PubMed

    Davis, George E

    2010-03-01

    This review addresses new concepts related to the importance of how cells within the cardiovascular system respond to matricryptic sites generated from the extracellular matrix (ECM) following tissue injury. A model is presented whereby matricryptic sites exposed from the ECM result in activation of multiple cell surface receptors including integrins, scavenger receptors, and toll-like receptors which together are hypothesized to coactivate downstream signaling pathways which alter cell behaviors following tissue injury. Of great interest are the relationships between matricryptic fragments of ECM called matricryptins and other stimuli that activate cells during injury states such as released components from cells (DNA, RNA, cytoskeletal components such as actin) or products from infectious agents in innate immunity responses. These types of cell activating molecules, which are composed of repeating molecular elements, are known to interact with pattern recognition receptors that (i) are expressed from cell surfaces, (ii) are released from cells following tissue injury, or (iii) circulate as components of plasma. Thus, cell recognition of matricryptic sites from the ECM appears to be an important component of a broad cell and tissue sensory system to detect and respond to environmental cues generated following varied types of tissue injury.

  1. Specificity of DNA binding of the c-Myc/Max and ARNT/ARNT dimers at the CACGTG recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, H I; Yang, J H

    1999-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix proteins that interact with the DNA recognition site CACGTG include the c-Myc/Max heterodimer and the ARNT (Ahreceptornucleartranslocator) homodimer. We have utilized a PCR-based protocol to identify high affinity binding sites of either the c-Myc/Max or ARNT/ARNT dimers and analyzed the ability of these dimers to interact with their derived consensus sequences and activate genes. chi(2)analysis of the selected DNA recognition sites revealed that DNA binding of the ARNT homodimer is symmetric, resulting in the consensus sequence RTCACGTGAY. Gel shift analysis demonstrated that the flanking nucleotides play an important role in dictating DNA binding affinity of the ARNT homodimer. These flanking sequences also regulate the ability of ARNT to competitively displace the c-Myc/Max heterodimer from a CACGTG-containing sequence. However, transient transfection analyses in CV-1 cells revealed that ARNT and c-Myc/Max exhibited similar abilities to activate transcription through each other's consensus sequences. Taken together, these results indicate that although binding affinity of these dimers for the CACGTG core sequences may be differentially influenced by flanking nucleotides, transcriptional activity may also be determined by other factors, such as cellular concentrations of these proteins and their co-activators. PMID:10454619

  2. Oviposition Site-Selection by Bactrocera dorsalis Is Mediated through an Innate Recognition Template Tuned to γ-Octalactone

    PubMed Central

    Pagadala Damodaram, Kamala Jayanthi; Kempraj, Vivek; Aurade, Ravindra Mahadappa; Venkataramanappa, Ravindra Kothapalli; Nandagopal, Bakthavatsalam; Verghese, Abraham; Bruce, Toby

    2014-01-01

    Innate recognition templates (IRTs) in insects are developed through many years of evolution. Here we investigated olfactory cues mediating oviposition behavior in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, and their role in triggering an IRT for oviposition site recognition. Behavioral assays with electrophysiologically active compounds from a preferred host, mango, revealed that one of the volatiles tested, γ-octalactone, had a powerful effect in eliciting oviposition by gravid B. dorsalis females. Electrophysiological responses were obtained and flies clearly differentiated between treated and untreated substrates over a wide range of concentrations of γ-octalactone. It triggered an innate response in flies, overriding inputs from other modalities required for oviposition site evaluation. A complex blend of mango volatiles not containing γ-octalactone elicited low levels of oviposition, whereas γ-octalactone alone elicited more oviposition response. Naïve flies with different rearing histories showed similar responses to γ-octalactone. Taken together, these results indicate that oviposition site selection in B. dorsalis is mediated through an IRT tuned to γ-octalactone. Our study provides empirical data on a cue underpinning innate behavior and may also find use in control operations against this invasive horticultural pest. PMID:24465690

  3. Increased Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Protein Underlies Chronic Nicotine-Induced Up-Regulation of Nicotinic Agonist Binding Sites in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    McClure-Begley, Tristan D.; Whiteaker, Paul; Salminen, Outi; Brown, Robert W. B.; Cooper, John; Collins, Allan C.; Lindstrom, Jon M.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic nicotine treatment elicits a brain region-selective increase in the number of high-affinity agonist binding sites, a phenomenon termed up-regulation. Nicotine-induced up-regulation of α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in cell cultures results from increased assembly and/or decreased degradation of nAChRs, leading to increased nAChR protein levels. To evaluate whether the increased binding in mouse brain results from an increase in nAChR subunit proteins, C57BL/6 mice were treated with nicotine by chronic intravenous infusion. Tissue sections were prepared, and binding of [125I]3-((2S)-azetidinylmethoxy)-5-iodo-pyridine (A85380) to β2*-nAChR sites, [125I]monoclonal antibody (mAb) 299 to α4 nAChR subunits, and [125I]mAb 270 to β2 nAChR subunits was determined by quantitative autoradiography. Chronic nicotine treatment dose-dependently increased binding of all three ligands. In regions that express α4β2-nAChR almost exclusively, binding of all three ligands increased coordinately. However, in brain regions containing significant β2*-nAChR without α4 subunits, relatively less increase in mAb 270 binding to β2 subunits was observed. Signal intensity measured with the mAbs was lower than that with [125I]A85380, perhaps because the small ligand penetrated deeply into the sections, whereas the much larger mAbs encountered permeability barriers. Immunoprecipitation of [125I]epibatidine binding sites with mAb 270 in select regions of nicotine-treated mice was nearly quantitative, although somewhat less so with mAb 299, confirming that the mAbs effectively recognize their targets. The patterns of change measured using immunoprecipitation were comparable with those determined autoradiographically. Thus, increases in α4β2*-nAChR binding sites after chronic nicotine treatment reflect increased nAChR protein. PMID:21228066

  4. Analysis of full and partial agonists binding to beta2-adrenergic receptor suggests a role of transmembrane helix V in agonist-specific conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Reynolds, Kimberly A; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A; Roth, Christopher B; Yeager, Mark; Abagyan, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    The 2.4 A crystal structure of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR) in complex with the high-affinity inverse agonist (-)-carazolol provides a detailed structural framework for the analysis of ligand recognition by adrenergic receptors. Insights into agonist binding and the corresponding conformational changes triggering G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation mechanism are of special interest. Here we show that while the carazolol pocket captured in the beta(2)AR crystal structure accommodates (-)-isoproterenol and other agonists without steric clashes, a finite movement of the flexible extracellular part of TM-V helix (TM-Ve) obtained by receptor optimization in the presence of docked ligand can further improve the calculated binding affinities for agonist compounds. Tilting of TM-Ve towards the receptor axis provides a more complete description of polar receptor-ligand interactions for full and partial agonists, by enabling optimal engagement of agonists with two experimentally identified anchor sites, formed by Asp113/Asn312 and Ser203/Ser204/Ser207 side chains. Further, receptor models incorporating a flexible TM-V backbone allow reliable prediction of binding affinities for a set of diverse ligands, suggesting potential utility of this approach to design of effective and subtype-specific agonists for adrenergic receptors. Systematic differences in capacity of partial, full and inverse agonists to induce TM-V helix tilt in the beta(2)AR model suggest potential role of TM-V as a conformational "rheostat" involved in the whole spectrum of beta(2)AR responses to small molecule signals.

  5. Preferential affinity of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quazepam for type I benzodiazepine recognition sites in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Corda, M.G.; Giorgi, O.; Longoni, B.; Ongini, E.; Montaldo, S.; Biggio, G.

    1988-01-01

    The hypnotic drug quazepam and its active metabolite 2-oxo-quazepam (2-oxo-quaz) are two benzodiazepines (BZ) containing a trifluoroethyl moiety on the ring nitrogen at position 1, characterized by their preferential affinity for Type I BZ recognition sites. In the present study we characterized the binding of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz in discrete areas of the human brain. Saturation analysis demonstrated specific and saturable binding of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz to membrane preparations from human cerebellum. Hill plot analysis of displacement curves of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding by 2-oxo-quaz yielded Hill coefficients of approximately 1 in the cerebellum and significantly less than 1 in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, thalamus and pons. Self and cross displacement curves for /sup 3/H-FNT and /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz binding in these brain areas indicated that 2-oxo-quaz binds with different affinities to two populations of binding sites. High affinity binding sites were more abundant in the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus, whereas low affinity sites were predominant in the caudate nucleus and pons. Competition studies of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz and /sup 3/H-FNT using unlabelled ligands indicated that compounds which preferentially bind to Type I sites are more potent at displacing /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz than /sup 3/H-FNT from cerebral cortex membrane preparations. 26 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Molecular basis of agonist docking in a human GPR103 homology model by site-directed mutagenesis and structure–activity relationship studies

    PubMed Central

    Neveu, C; Dulin, F; Lefranc, B; Galas, L; Calbrix, C; Bureau, R; Rault, S; Chuquet, J; Boutin, J A; Guilhaudis, L; Ségalas-Milazzo, I; Vaudry, D; Vaudry, H; Santos, J Sopkova-de Oliveira; Leprince, J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The neuropeptide 26RFa and its cognate receptor GPR103 are involved in the control of food intake and bone mineralization. Here, we have tested, experimentally, the predicted ligand-receptor interactions by site-directed mutagenesis of GPR103 and designed point-substituted 26RFa analogues. Experimental Approach Using the X-ray structure of the β2-adrenoceptor, a 3-D molecular model of GPR103 has been built. The bioactive C-terminal octapeptide 26RFa(19–26), KGGFSFRF-NH2, was docked in this GPR103 model and the ligand-receptor complex was submitted to energy minimization. Key Results In the most stable complex, the Phe-Arg-Phe-NH2 part was oriented inside the receptor cavity, whereas the N-terminal Lys residue remained outside. A strong intermolecular interaction was predicted between the Arg25 residue of 26RFa and the Gln125 residue located in the third transmembrane helix of GPR103. To confirm this interaction experimentally, we tested the ability of 26RFa and Arg-modified 26RFa analogues to activate the wild-type and the Q125A mutant receptors transiently expressed in CHO cells. 26RFa (10−6 M) enhanced [Ca2+]i in wild-type GPR103-transfected cells, but failed to increase [Ca2+]i in Q125A mutant receptor-expressing cells. Moreover, asymmetric dimethylation of the side chain of arginine led to a 26RFa analogue, [ADMA25]26RFa(20–26), that was unable to activate the wild-type GPR103, but antagonized 26RFa-evoked [Ca2+]i increase. Conclusion and Implications Altogether, these data provide strong evidence for a functional interaction between the Arg25 residue of 26RFa and the Gln125 residue of GPR103 upon ligand-receptor activation, which can be exploited for the rational design of potent GPR103 agonists and antagonists. PMID:24913445

  7. DNA abasic site-directed formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters for selective nucleobase recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kun; Cui, Qinghua; Liu, Guiying; Wu, Fei; Xu, Shujuan; Shao, Yong

    2011-07-01

    DNA single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection has attracted much attention due to mutation related diseases. Various methods for SNP detection have been proposed and many are already in use. Here, we find that the abasic site (AP site) in the DNA duplex can be developed as a capping scaffold for the generation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). As a proof of concept, the DNA sequences from fragments near codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53 were used as a model for SNP detection by in situ formed Ag NCs. The formation of fluorescent Ag NCs in the AP site-containing DNA duplex is highly selective for cytosine facing the AP site and guanines flanking the site and can be employed in situ as readout for SNP detection. The fluorescent signal-on sensing for SNP based on this inorganic fluorophore is substantially advantageous over the previously reported signal-off responses using low-molecular-weight organic ligands. The strong dependence of fluorescent Ag NC formation on the sequences surrounding the AP site was successfully used to identify mutations in codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53. We anticipate that this approach will be employed to develop a practical SNP detection method by locating an AP site toward the midway cytosine in a target strand containing more than three consecutive cytosines.

  8. Accelerometry-based Recognition of the Placement Sites of a Wearable Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Andrea; Sabatini, Angelo M.; Intille, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes an automatic method to recognize the position of an accelerometer worn on five different parts of the body: ankle, thigh, hip, arm and wrist from raw accelerometer data. Automatic detection of body position of a wearable sensor would enable systems that allow users to wear sensors flexibly on different body parts or permit systems that need to automatically verify sensor placement. The two-stage location detection algorithm works by first detecting time periods during which candidates are walking (regardless of where the sensor is positioned). Then, assuming that the data refer to walking, the algorithm detects the position of the sensor. Algorithms were validated on a dataset that is substantially larger than in prior work, using a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation approach. Correct walking and placement recognition were obtained for 97.4% and 91.2% of classified data windows, respectively. PMID:26213528

  9. Accelerometry-based Recognition of the Placement Sites of a Wearable Sensor.

    PubMed

    Mannini, Andrea; Sabatini, Angelo M; Intille, Stephen S

    2015-08-01

    This work describes an automatic method to recognize the position of an accelerometer worn on five different parts of the body: ankle, thigh, hip, arm and wrist from raw accelerometer data. Automatic detection of body position of a wearable sensor would enable systems that allow users to wear sensors flexibly on different body parts or permit systems that need to automatically verify sensor placement. The two-stage location detection algorithm works by first detecting time periods during which candidates are walking (regardless of where the sensor is positioned). Then, assuming that the data refer to walking, the algorithm detects the position of the sensor. Algorithms were validated on a dataset that is substantially larger than in prior work, using a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation approach. Correct walking and placement recognition were obtained for 97.4% and 91.2% of classified data windows, respectively.

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis of human beta-adrenergic receptors: substitution of aspartic acid-130 by asparagine produces a receptor with high-affinity agonist binding that is uncoupled from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, C M; Chung, F Z; Wang, C D; Venter, J C

    1988-01-01

    By using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, we have produced a point mutation (guanine to adenine) at nucleotide 388 of the gene for human beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR) that results in a substitution of asparagine for the highly conserved aspartic acid at position 130 in the putative third transmembrane domain of the human beta AR ([Asn130]beta AR). We have examined the functional significance of this mutation in B-82 cells continuously expressing the mutant [Asn130]beta AR. The mutant [Asn130]beta AR displayed normal antagonist binding but unusually high-affinity agonist binding (5- to 10-fold higher than wild-type beta AR), consistent with a single class of high-affinity binding sites. The mutant beta AR displayed guanine nucleotide-sensitive changes in agonist affinity (3- to 5-fold shift) implying an interaction between the beta AR and the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein; however, the ability of guanine nucleotides to alter agonist affinity was attenuated. Addition of saturating concentrations of isoproterenol to cell cultures expressing mutant [Asn130]-beta ARs had no effect on intracellular levels of cAMP, indicating that the mutant beta AR is unable to affect stimulation of adenylate cyclase. These results indicate that substitution of the aspartic acid with asparagine at residue 130 of the human beta AR dissociates the well-characterized guanine nucleotide effects on agonist affinity from those on activation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein and adenylate cyclase and suggests the existence of two distinct counterions for the amine portion of catecholamines that are associated with high- and low-affinity agonist binding states of beta AR. Images PMID:2840663

  11. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  12. Moleculary imprinted polymers with metalloporphyrin-based molecular recognition sites coassembled with methacrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Mukawa, T; Matsui, J; Higashi, M; Shimizu, K D

    2001-08-15

    A diastereoselective molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for (-)-cinchonidine, PPM(CD), was prepared by the combined use of methacrylic acid and vinyl-substituted zinc(II) porphyrin as functional monomers. Compared to MIPs using only methacrylic acid or zinc porphyrin as a functional monomer, PM(CD) and PP(CD), respectively, PPM(CD) showed higher binding ability for (-)-cinchonidine in chromatographic tests using the MIP-packed columns. Scatchard analysis gave a higher association constant of PPM(CD) for (-)-cinchonidine (1.14 x 10(7) M(-1)) than those of PP(CD) (1.45 x 10(6) M(-1)) and PM(CD) (6.78 x 10(6) M(-1)). The affinity distribution of binding sites estimated by affinity spectrum analysis showed a higher percentage of high-affinity sites and a lower percentage of low-affinity sites in PPM(CD). The MIPs containing a zinc(II) porphyrin in the binding sites, PPM(CD) and PP(CD), showed fluorescence quenching according to the binding of (-)-cinchonidine, and the quenching was significant in the low-concentration range, suggesting that the high-affinity binding sites contain the porphyrin residue. The correlation of the relative fluorescence intensity against log of (-)-cinchonidine concentrations showed a linear relationship. These results revealed that the MIP having highly specific binding sites was assembled by the two functional monomers, vinyl-substituted zinc(II) porphyrin and methacrylic acid, and they cooperatively worked to yield the specific binding. In addition, the zinc(II) porphyrin-based MIPs appeared to act as fluorescence sensor selectively responded by binding events of the template molecule.

  13. Interspecific aggression and character displacement of competitor recognition in Hetaerina damselflies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher N; Grether, Gregory F

    2010-02-22

    In zones of sympatry between closely related species, species recognition errors in a competitive context can cause character displacement in agonistic signals and competitor recognition functions, just as species recognition errors in a mating context can cause character displacement in mating signals and mate recognition. These two processes are difficult to distinguish because the same traits can serve as both agonistic and mating signals. One solution is to test for sympatric shifts in recognition functions. We studied competitor recognition in Hetaerina damselflies by challenging territory holders with live tethered conspecific and heterospecific intruders. Heterospecific intruders elicited less aggression than conspecific intruders in species pairs with dissimilar wing coloration (H. occisa/H. titia, H. americana/H. titia) but not in species pairs with similar wing coloration (H. occisa/H. cruentata, H. americana/H. cruentata). Natural variation in the area of black wing pigmentation on H. titia intruders correlated negatively with heterospecific aggression. To directly examine the role of wing coloration, we blackened the wings of H. occisa or H. americana intruders and measured responses of conspecific territory holders. This treatment reduced territorial aggression at multiple sites where H. titia is present, but not at allopatric sites. These results provide strong evidence for agonistic character displacement.

  14. The M1 muscarinic receptor allosteric agonists AC-42 and 1-[1'-(2-methylbenzyl)-1,4'-bipiperidin-4-yl]-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one bind to a unique site distinct from the acetylcholine orthosteric site.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Marlene A; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Pascarella, Danette M; O'Brien, Julie A; Sur, Cyrille

    2010-10-01

    Activation of M1 muscarinic receptors occurs through orthosteric and allosteric binding sites. To identify critical residues, site-directed mutagenesis and chimeric receptors were evaluated in functional calcium mobilization assays to compare orthosteric agonists, acetylcholine and xanomeline, M1 allosteric agonists AC-42 (4-n-butyl-1-[4-(2-methylphenyl)-4-oxo-1-butyl]-piperidine hydrogen chloride), TBPB (1-[1'-(2-methylbenzyl)-1,4'-bipiperidin-4-yl]-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one), and the clozapine metabolite N-desmethylclozapine. A minimal epitope has been defined for AC-42 that comprises the first 45 amino acids, the third extracellular loop, and seventh transmembrane domain (Mol Pharmacol 61:1297-1302, 2002). Using chimeric M1 and M3 receptor constructs, the AC-42 minimal epitope has been extended to also include transmembrane II. Phe77 was identified as a critical residue for maintenance of AC-42 and TBPB agonist activity. In contrast, the functional activity of N-desmethylclozapine did not require Phe77. To further map the binding site of AC-42, TBPB, and N-desmethylclozapine, point mutations previously reported to affect activities of M1 orthosteric agonists and antagonists were studied. Docking into an M1 receptor homology model revealed that AC-42 and TBPB share a similar binding pocket adjacent to the orthosteric binding site at the opposite face of Trp101. In contrast, the activity of N-desmethylclozapine was generally unaffected by the point mutations studied, and the docking indicated that N-desmethylclozapine bound to a site distinct from AC-42 and TBPB overlapping with the orthosteric site. These results suggest that structurally diverse allosteric agonists AC-42, TBPB, and N-desmethylclozapine may interact with different subsets of residues, supporting the hypothesis that M1 receptor activation can occur through at least three different binding domains.

  15. Loop recognition and copper-mediated disulfide reduction underpin metal site assembly of CuA in human cytochrome oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Morgada, Marcos N.; Abriata, Luciano A.; Cefaro, Chiara; Gajda, Karolina; Banci, Lucia; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Maturation of cytochrome oxidases is a complex process requiring assembly of several subunits and adequate uptake of the metal cofactors. Two orthologous Sco proteins (Sco1 and Sco2) are essential for the correct assembly of the dicopper CuA site in the human oxidase, but their function is not fully understood. Here, we report an in vitro biochemical study that shows that Sco1 is a metallochaperone that selectively transfers Cu(I) ions based on loop recognition, whereas Sco2 is a copper-dependent thiol reductase of the cysteine ligands in the oxidase. Copper binding to Sco2 is essential to elicit its redox function and as a guardian of the reduced state of its own cysteine residues in the oxidizing environment of the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). These results provide a detailed molecular mechanism for CuA assembly, suggesting that copper and redox homeostasis are intimately linked in the mitochondrion. PMID:26351686

  16. Single-stranded γPNAs for in vivo site-specific genome editing via Watson-Crick recognition.

    PubMed

    Bahal, Raman; Quijano, Elias; McNeer, Nicole A; Liu, Yanfeng; Bhunia, Dinesh C; Lopez-Giraldez, Francesco; Fields, Rachel J; Saltzman, William M; Ly, Danith H; Glazer, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) facilitate gene editing by stimulating recombination of donor DNAs within genomic DNA via site-specific formation of altered helical structures that further stimulate DNA repair. However, PNAs designed for triplex formation are sequence restricted to homopurine sites. Herein we describe a novel strategy where next generation single-stranded gamma PNAs (γPNAs) containing miniPEG substitutions at the gamma position can target genomic DNA in mouse bone marrow at mixed-sequence sites to induce targeted gene editing. In addition to enhanced binding, γPNAs confer increased solubility and improved formulation into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles for efficient intracellular delivery. Single-stranded γPNAs induce targeted gene editing at frequencies of 0.8% in mouse bone marrow cells treated ex vivo and 0.1% in vivo via IV injection, without detectable toxicity. These results suggest that γPNAs may provide a new tool for induced gene editing based on Watson-Crick recognition without sequence restriction.

  17. Conformational changes in the P site and mRNA entry channel evoked by AUG recognition in yeast translation preinitiation complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Saini, Adesh K.; Shin, Byung-Sik; Nanda, Jagpreet; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    The translation preinitiation complex (PIC) is thought to assume an open conformation when scanning the mRNA leader, with AUG recognition evoking a closed conformation and more stable P site interaction of Met-tRNAi; however, physical evidence is lacking that AUG recognition constrains interaction of mRNA with the 40S binding cleft. We compared patterns of hydroxyl radical cleavage of rRNA by Fe(II)-BABE tethered to unique sites in eIF1A in yeast PICs reconstituted with mRNA harboring an AUG or near-cognate (AUC) start codon. rRNA residues in the P site display reduced cleavage in AUG versus AUC PICs; and enhanced cleavage in the AUC complexes was diminished by mutations of scanning enhancer elements of eIF1A that increase near-cognate recognition in vivo. This suggests that accessibility of these rRNA residues is reduced by accommodation of Met-tRNAi in the P site (PIN state) and by their interactions with the anticodon stem of Met-tRNAi. Our cleavage data also provide evidence that AUG recognition evokes dissociation of eIF1 from its 40S binding site, ejection of the eIF1A-CTT from the P-site and rearrangement to a closed conformation of the entry channel with reduced mobility of mRNA. PMID:25670678

  18. Phylogeographic evidence of cognate recognition site patterns and transformation efficiency differences in H. pylori: theory of strain dominance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori has diverged in parallel to its human host, leading to distinct phylogeographic populations. Recent evidence suggests that in the current human mixing in Latin America, European H. pylori (hpEurope) are increasingly dominant at the expense of Amerindian haplotypes (hspAmerind). This phenomenon might occur via DNA recombination, modulated by restriction-modification systems (RMS), in which differences in cognate recognition sites (CRS) and in active methylases will determine direction and frequency of gene flow. We hypothesized that genomes from hspAmerind strains that evolved from a small founder population have lost CRS for RMS and active methylases, promoting hpEurope’s DNA invasion. We determined the observed and expected frequencies of CRS for RMS in DNA from 7 H. pylori whole genomes and 110 multilocus sequences. We also measured the number of active methylases by resistance to in vitro digestion by 16 restriction enzymes of genomic DNA from 9 hpEurope and 9 hspAmerind strains, and determined the direction of DNA uptake in co-culture experiments of hspAmerind and hpEurope strains. Results Most of the CRS were underrepresented with consistency between whole genomes and multilocus sequences. Although neither the frequency of CRS nor the number of active methylases differ among the bacterial populations (average 8.6 ± 2.6), hspAmerind strains had a restriction profile distinct from that in hpEurope strains, with 15 recognition sites accounting for the differences. Amerindians strains also exhibited higher transformation rates than European strains, and were more susceptible to be subverted by larger DNA hpEurope-fragments than vice versa. Conclusions The geographical variation in the pattern of CRS provides evidence for ancestral differences in RMS representation and function, and the transformation findings support the hypothesis of Europeanization of the Amerindian strains in Latin America via DNA recombination. PMID:24050390

  19. Investigation of the mechanism of agonist and inverse agonist action at D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Lin, Hong; Strange, Philip G

    2004-05-01

    This study investigated, for the D2 dopamine receptor, the relation between the ability of agonists and inverse agonists to stabilise different states of the receptor and their relative efficacies. Ki values for agonists were determined in competition versus the binding of the antagonist [3H]spiperone. Competition data were fitted best by a two-binding site model (with the exception of bromocriptine, for which a one-binding site model provided the best fit) and agonist affinities for the higher (Kh) (G protein-coupled) and lower affinity (Kl) (G protein-uncoupled) sites determined. Ki values for agonists were also determined in competition versus the binding of the agonist [3H]N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) to provide a second estimate of Kh. Maximal agonist effects (Emax) and their potencies (EC50) were determined from concentration-response curves for agonist stimulation of guanosine-5'-O-(3-[32S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding. The ability of agonists to stabilise the G protein-coupled state of the receptor (Kl/Kh determined from ligand-binding assays) did not correlate with either of two measures of relative efficacy (relative Emax, Kl/EC50) of agonists determined in [35S]GTPgammaS-binding assays, when the data for all of the compounds tested were analysed. For a subset of compounds, however, there was a relation between Kl/Kh and Emax. Competition-binding data versus [3H]spiperone and [3H]NPA for a range of inverse agonists were fitted best by a one-binding site model. Ki values for the inverse agonists tested were slightly lower in competition versus [3H]NPA compared to [3H]spiperone. These data do not provide support for the idea that inverse agonists act by binding preferentially to the ground state of the receptor.

  20. Cross-neutralizing human anti-poliovirus antibodies bind the recognition site for cellular receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaochun; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Hansen, Bryan T.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Bidzhieva, Bella; Makiya, Michelle; Agulto, Liane; Purcell, Robert H.; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    Most structural information about poliovirus interaction with neutralizing antibodies was obtained in the 1980s in studies of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Recently we have isolated a number of human/chimpanzee anti-poliovirus antibodies and demonstrated that one of them, MAb A12, could neutralize polioviruses of both serotypes 1 and 2. This communication presents data on isolation of an additional cross-neutralizing antibody (F12) and identification of a previously unknown epitope on the surface of poliovirus virions. Epitope mapping was performed by sequencing of antibody-resistant mutants and by cryo-EM of complexes of virions with Fab fragments. The results have demonstrated that both cross-neutralizing antibodies bind the site located at the bottom of the canyon surrounding the fivefold axis of symmetry that was previously shown to interact with cellular poliovirus receptor CD155. However, the same antibody binds to serotypes 1 and 2 through different specific interactions. It was also shown to interact with type 3 poliovirus, albeit with about 10-fold lower affinity, insufficient for effective neutralization. Antibody interaction with the binding site of the cellular receptor may explain its broad reactivity and suggest that further screening or antibody engineering could lead to a universal antibody capable of neutralizing all three serotypes of poliovirus. PMID:24277851

  1. Binding Sites for Acylated Trehalose Analogs of Glycolipid Ligands on an Extended Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of the Macrophage Receptor Mincle*

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Hadar; Rambaruth, Neela D. S.; Jégouzo, Sabine A. F.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Djurhuus, Rasmus; Poulsen, Thomas B.; Weis, William I.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage receptor mincle binds to trehalose dimycolate on the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Signaling initiated by this interaction leads to cytokine production, which underlies the ability of mycobacteria to evade the immune system and also to function as adjuvants. In previous work the mechanism for binding of the sugar headgroup of trehalose dimycolate to mincle has been elucidated, but the basis for enhanced binding to glycolipid ligands, in which hydrophobic substituents are attached to the 6-hydroxyl groups, has been the subject of speculation. In the work reported here, the interaction of trehalose derivatives with bovine mincle has been probed with a series of synthetic mimics of trehalose dimycolate in binding assays, in structural studies by x-ray crystallography, and by site-directed mutagenesis. Binding studies reveal that, rather than reflecting specific structural preference, the apparent affinity of mincle for ligands with hydrophobic substituents correlates with their overall size. Structural and mutagenesis analysis provides evidence for interaction of the hydrophobic substituents with multiple different portions of the surface of mincle and confirms the presence of three Ca2+-binding sites. The structure of an extended portion of the extracellular domain of mincle, beyond the minimal C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, also constrains the way the binding domains may interact on the surface of macrophages. PMID:27542410

  2. Pattern recognition of genomic features with microarrays: site typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Stuart, Joshua M.; Liu, Xuemin; Small, Peter M.; Altman, Russ B.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb.) strains differ in the number and locations of a transposon-like insertion sequence known as IS6110. Accurate detection of this sequence can be used as a fingerprint for individual strains, but can be difficult because of noisy data. In this paper, we propose a non-parametric discriminant analysis method for predicting the locations of the IS6110 sequence from microarray data. Polymerase chain reaction extension products generated from primers specific for the insertion sequence are hybridized to a microarray containing targets corresponding to each open reading frame in M. tb. To test for insertion sites, we use microarray intensity values extracted from small windows of contiguous open reading frames. Rank-transformation of spot intensities and first-order differences in local windows provide enough information to reliably determine the presence of an insertion sequence. The non-parametric approach outperforms all other methods tested in this study. PMID:10977090

  3. Catalyst recognition of cis-1,2-diols enables site-selective functionalization of complex molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xixi; Lee, Hyelee; Lee, Sunggi; Tan, Kian L.

    2013-09-01

    Carbohydrates and natural products serve essential roles in nature, and also provide core scaffolds for pharmaceutical agents and vaccines. However, the inherent complexity of these molecules imposes significant synthetic hurdles for their selective functionalization and derivatization. Nature has, in part, addressed these issues by employing enzymes that are able to orient and activate substrates within a chiral pocket, which increases dramatically both the rate and selectivity of organic transformations. In this article we show that similar proximity effects can be utilized in the context of synthetic catalysts to achieve general and predictable site-selective functionalization of complex molecules. Unlike enzymes, our catalysts apply a single reversible covalent bond to recognize and bind to specific functional group displays within substrates. By combining this unique binding selectivity and asymmetric catalysis, we are able to modify the less reactive axial positions within monosaccharides and natural products.

  4. Conserved Hydration Sites in Pin1 Reveal a Distinctive Water Recognition Motif in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Smitherman, Crystal; Souffrant, Michael; Gadda, Giovanni; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-25

    Structurally conserved water molecules are important for biomolecular stability, flexibility, and function. X-ray crystallographic studies of Pin1 have resolved a number of water molecules around the enzyme, including two highly conserved water molecules within the protein. The functional role of these localized water molecules remains unknown and unexplored. Pin1 catalyzes cis/trans isomerizations of peptidyl prolyl bonds that are preceded by a phosphorylated serine or threonine residue. Pin1 is involved in many subcellular signaling processes and is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of several life threatening diseases. Here, we investigate the significance of these structurally conserved water molecules in the catalytic domain of Pin1 using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, free energy calculations, analysis of X-ray crystal structures, and circular dichroism (CD) experiments. MD simulations and free energy calculations suggest the tighter binding water molecule plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and stability of a critical hydrogen-bonding network in the active site. The second water molecule is exchangeable with bulk solvent and is found in a distinctive helix-turn-coil motif. Structural bioinformatics analysis of nonredundant X-ray crystallographic protein structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) suggest this motif is present in several other proteins and can act as a water site, akin to the calcium EF hand. CD experiments suggest the isolated motif is in a distorted PII conformation and requires the protein environment to fully form the α-helix-turn-coil motif. This study provides valuable insights into the role of hydration in the structural integrity of Pin1 that can be exploited in protein engineering and drug design.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of an amphiphilic cyclodextrin, a micelle with two recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Silva, O Fernando; Fernández, Mariana A; Pennie, Sarah L; Gil, Roberto R; de Rossi, Rita H

    2008-04-15

    A cyclodextrin derivative (Mod-CD) was synthesized through the monoesterification of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) with 3-((E)-dec-2-enyl)-dihydrofuran-2,5-dione. The compound is an interesting surfactant that can form large aggregates not only through the interaction of the hydrophobic tails as in common amphiphilic compounds but also through the inclusion of the alkenyl chain into the cavity of another Mod-CD molecule. The self-inclusion of the chain in the cavity of cyclodextrin as well as the intermolecular inclusion was demonstrated by 1H NMR measurements that were able to detect methyl groups in three different environments. Besides, in the aggregates of Mod-CD, the cavity is available to interact with external guests such as phenolphthalein, 1-amino adamantane, and Prodan. Phenolphthalein has the same binding constant with Mod-CD and beta-CD, but the equilibrium constant for the interaction with Prodan is about 2 times larger for Mod-CD than for beta-CD. The latter result is attributed to the fact that this probe interacts with the micelle in two binding sites: the cavity of the cyclodextrin and the apolar heart of the micelle as evidenced by the spectrofluorimetric behavior of Prodan in solutions containing different concentrations of Mod-CD.

  6. Mapping of the RNA recognition site of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, F; Gagnon, M; Sans, D; Michnick, S; Brakier-Gingras, L

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein S7 initiates the folding of the 3' major domain of 16S ribosomal RNA by binding to its lower half. The X-ray structure of protein S7 from thermophilic bacteria was recently solved and found to be a modular structure, consisting of an alpha-helical domain with a beta-ribbon extension. To gain further insights into its interaction with rRNA, we cloned the S7 gene from Escherichia coli K12 into a pET expression vector and introduced 4 deletions and 12 amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. The binding of each mutant to the lower half of the 3' major domain of 16S rRNA was assessed by filtration on nitrocellulose membranes. Deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues or deletion of the B hairpins (residues 72-89) severely decreased S7 affinity for the rRNA. Truncation of the C-terminal portion (residues 138-178), which includes part of the terminal alpha-helix, significantly affected S7 binding, whereas a shorter truncation (residues 148-178) only marginally influenced its binding. Severe effects were also observed with several strategic point mutations located throughout the protein, including Q8A and F17G in the N-terminal region, and K35Q, G54S, K113Q, and M115G in loops connecting the alpha-helices. Our results are consistent with the occurrence of several sites of contact between S7 and the 16S rRNA, in line with its role in the folding of the 3' major domain. PMID:11105763

  7. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  8. 8-Oxoguanine Affects DNA Backbone Conformation in the EcoRI Recognition Site and Inhibits Its Cleavage by the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kiryutin, Alexey S.; Kasymov, Rustem D.; Petrova, Darya V.; Endutkin, Anton V.; Popov, Alexander V.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Fedechkin, Stanislav O.; Brockerman, Jacob A.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Smirnov, Serge L.

    2016-01-01

    8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant and impactful oxidative DNA lesions. However, the reasons underlying its effects, especially those not directly explained by the altered base pairing ability, are poorly understood. We report the effect of the lesion on the action of EcoRI, a widely used restriction endonuclease. Introduction of 8-oxoguanine inside, or adjacent to, the GAATTC recognition site embedded within the Drew—Dickerson dodecamer sequence notably reduced the EcoRI activity. Solution NMR revealed that 8-oxoguanine in the DNA duplex causes substantial alterations in the sugar—phosphate backbone conformation, inducing a BI→BII transition. Moreover, molecular dynamics of the complex suggested that 8-oxoguanine, although does not disrupt the sequence-specific contacts formed by the enzyme with DNA, shifts the distribution of BI/BII backbone conformers. Based on our data, we propose that the disruption of enzymatic cleavage can be linked with the altered backbone conformation and dynamics in the free oxidized DNA substrate and, possibly, at the protein—DNA interface. PMID:27749894

  9. Stochastic and reversible assembly of a multiprotein DNA repair complex ensures accurate target site recognition and efficient repair

    PubMed Central

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; von Bornstaedt, Gesa; Gourdin, Audrey M.; Politi, Antonio Z.; Moné, Martijn J.; Warmerdam, Daniël O.; Goedhart, Joachim; Vermeulen, Wim

    2010-01-01

    To understand how multiprotein complexes assemble and function on chromatin, we combined quantitative analysis of the mammalian nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) machinery in living cells with computational modeling. We found that individual NER components exchange within tens of seconds between the bound state in repair complexes and the diffusive state in the nucleoplasm, whereas their net accumulation at repair sites evolves over several hours. Based on these in vivo data, we developed a predictive kinetic model for the assembly and function of repair complexes. DNA repair is orchestrated by the interplay of reversible protein-binding events and progressive enzymatic modifications of the chromatin substrate. We demonstrate that faithful recognition of DNA lesions is time consuming, whereas subsequently, repair complexes form rapidly through random and reversible assembly of NER proteins. Our kinetic analysis of the NER system reveals a fundamental conflict between specificity and efficiency of chromatin-associated protein machineries and shows how a trade off is negotiated through reversibility of protein binding. PMID:20439997

  10. Motions of the Substrate Recognition Duplex in a Group I Intron Assessed by Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Gian Paola G; Boyd, Nathan; Herschlag, Daniel; Qin, Peter Z

    2009-03-11

    The Tetrahymena group I intron recognizes its oligonucleotide substrate in a two-step process. First, a substrate recognition duplex, called the P1 duplex, is formed. The P1 duplex then docks into the prefolded ribozyme core by forming tertiary contacts. P1 docking controls both the rate and the fidelity of substrate cleavage and has been extensively studied as a model for the formation of RNA tertiary structure. However, previous work has been limited to studying millisecond or slower motions. Here we investigated nanosecond P1 motions in the context of the ribozyme using site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. A nitroxide spin label (R5a) was covalently attached to a specific site of the substrate oligonucleotide, the labeled substrate was bound to a prefolded ribozyme to form the P1 duplex, and X-band EPR spectroscopy was used to monitor nitroxide motions in the 0.1-50 ns regime. Using substrates that favor the docked or the undocked states, it was established that R5a was capable of reporting P1 duplex motions. Using R5a-labeled substrates it was found that the J1/2 junction connecting P1 to the ribozyme core controls nanosecond P1 mobility in the undocked state. This may account for previous observations that J1/2 mutations weaken substrate binding and give rise to cryptic cleavage. This study establishes the use of SDSL to probe nanosecond dynamic behaviors of individual helices within large RNA and RNA/protein complexes. This approach may help in understanding the relationship between RNA structure, dynamics, and function.

  11. Molecular recognition by thrombin. Role of the slow-->fast transition, site-specific ion binding energetics and thermodynamic mapping of structural components.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Y; Di Cera, E

    1994-01-14

    The interaction of thrombin with the potent natural inhibitor hirudin is controlled in a complex fashion by the binding of Na+ and Cl- to the enzyme and allosteric transitions. Binding of hirudin is positively linked to Na+ binding, but is opposed in a competitive fashion by the binding of Cl-. Since Na+ binding induces the slow-->fast transition of thrombin, it follows from linkage principles that hirudin binds to the fast form with higher affinity. Hence, the slow-->fast transition is a key component of molecular recognition of hirudin by thrombin. We propose a three-step mechanism for molecular recognition of hirudin by thrombin, which is also relevant for recognition of fibrinogen and possibly the platelet receptor and thrombomodulin. First, the C-terminal acidic tail of hirudin binds to the fibrinogen recognition site of thrombin displacing one Cl ion from the thrombin surface. Then, the enzyme undergoes a conformational transition that gives rise to increased accessibility of the catalytic pocket to small synthetic substrates through movement of the Trp148 loop. The changes in the catalytic moiety triggered allosterically by binding to the fibrinogen recognition site are linked to the uptake of Na+ and are similar to, if not identical with, those observed in the Na(+)-induced slow-->fast transition. Finally, the compact N-terminal domain is accommodated in the region surrounding the catalytic pocket. Hirudin binding is also used as a probe of site-specific ion-binding interactions of Na+ and Cl- with the enzyme, characterized by cooperativity between the Na+ and Cl- binding domains. The structural components directly involved or linked to Na+ and Cl- binding have been explored in terms of free energy perturbations of the binding of hirudin and a number of ligands. The fibrinogen recognition site stores most of the free energy of coupling with Cl- binding, while regions surrounding the access to the catalytic pocket provide most of the free energy of coupling

  12. The T-loop region of animal mitochondrial tRNA(Ser)(AGY) is a main recognition site for homologous seryl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, T; Yotsumoto, Y; Ikeda, K; Watanabe, K

    1992-01-01

    Recognition sites of bovine mitochondrial serine tRNA specific for condons AGY [tRNA(Ser) (AGY)] by the cognate mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase were studied using a range of tRNA(Ser)(AGY) variants which were obtained by the in vitro transcription of synthetic tRNA genes with T7 RNA polymerase. Base replacements in the anticodon and discriminator sites did not affect serine acceptance. However, deletion and/or replacement in the T-loop region completely deprived the variants of their charging activities. Point mutation experiments in this region also showed that the adenosine residue in the middle of the T-loop (position 58), which is involved in tertiary interaction between the T-loop and the truncated D-arm [de Bruijn and Klug, 1983] played a significant role in the recognition process by the synthetase. PMID:1375735

  13. Mechanistic heterogeneity in site recognition by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of the ETS family transcription factors Ets-1 and PU.1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D; Wilson, W David; Poon, Gregory M K

    2014-08-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a "dry" mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1 · DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages.

  14. Mechanistic Heterogeneity in Site Recognition by the Structurally Homologous DNA-binding Domains of the ETS Family Transcription Factors Ets-1 and PU.1*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H.; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D.; Wilson, W. David; Poon, Gregory M. K.

    2014-01-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a “dry” mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1·DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages. PMID:24952944

  15. Acquired resistance to Ah receptor agonists in a population of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) inhabiting a marine superfund site: in vivo and in vitro studies on the inducibility of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bello, S M; Franks, D G; Stegeman, J J; Hahn, M E

    2001-03-01

    New Bedford Harbor (NBH), MA, is a federal Superfund site that is heavily contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs), including some potent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. A population of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) continues to inhabit this site, despite accumulating extraordinarily high concentrations of PCBs (272 microg/g dry weight). To determine if NBH killifish have developed resistance to HAHs that act through the AhR, we examined the inducibility of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1), UDP glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in fish from NBH and a reference site, Scorton Creek (SC, Cape Cod, MA; PCB concentrations 0.177 microg/g dry weight). 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) induced CYP1A1 mRNA, protein, and activity in SC fish in all tissues examined (liver, heart, gut, gill, kidney, spleen, and gonad). In contrast, NBH fish expressed low levels of CYP1A1 and showed no induction of CYP1A1 mRNA, protein, or activity by TCDF, or induction that was lower in magnitude or required higher doses of inducer. p-Nitrophenol UGT activity was not induced by TCDF in either population, while GST activity with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrate was induced only in NBH fish in one experiment. Inducibility of CYP1A1 by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) was measured in primary hepatocyte cultures prepared from SC and NBH fish. TCDD induced CYP1A1 activity (ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase) to the same degree in hepatocytes from both populations, demonstrating the functionality of the AhR signaling pathway in NBH fish. However, hepatocytes from NBH fish were 14-fold less sensitive to TCDD than were those from SC fish. The nonhalogenated AhR agonist BNF also induced CYP1A1 in cells from both populations, although with only a 3-fold difference in sensitivity (NBH < SC). These results indicate that chronic exposure to high

  16. Analysis of eukaryotic topoisomerase II cleavage sites in the presence of the quinolone CP-115,953 reveals drug-dependent and -independent recognition elements.

    PubMed

    Spitzner, J R; Chung, I K; Gootz, T D; McGuirk, P R; Muller, M T

    1995-08-01

    The quinolone derivative CP-115,953 [6,8-difluoro-7-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-cyclopropyl-4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid] has been shown to induce eukaryotic topoisomerase II-mediated breaks in DNA, producing cleavage patterns that are distinct from those induced by the anticancer drugs amsacrine, etoposide, and teniposide. High levels of the quinolone have been found to inhibit topoisomerase II activity via an interaction with the enzyme and not by DNA unwinding. Topoisomerase II cleavage sites were analyzed on nine DNA fragments, and 85 quinolone-induced sites were sequenced, as well as 86 amsacrine and 134 teniposide sites. A consensus sequence was derived for the quinolone sites that is different from those reported for other drugs; however, because topoisomerase II cleavage sites are double-stranded but not palindromic, different consensus sequences are not easily compared. For this reason, a new, double-stranded, consensus sequence method, the "unique-base analysis," was developed; this was applied to the quinolone sites as well as six other large sets of topoisomerase II sites determined in the absence or presence of drugs. For each of the seven sets of sites, conserved bases were found in the 16-base region spanning positions -6 to +10, relative to the enzyme cleavage site (DNA breakage between -1 and +1). The conserved bases were virtually identical in the regions flanking the cleavage site for all seven data sets. In contrast, the base preferences identified proximal to the cleavage sites were unique to the drug tested. These observations suggest that the selection of cleavage sites by topoisomerase II involves both enzyme-dependent and drug-dependent recognition elements. The single most preferred base in the quinolone sites was a cytosine at -1; the same preference was found with teniposide, and 60 of the 85 quinolone sites co-localized with teniposide sites.

  17. Recognition of Mannosylated Ligands and Influenza A Virus by Human Surfactant Protein D: Contributions of an Extended Site and Residue 343

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, E.; Hartshorn, K; Horlacher, T; McDonald, B; Smith, K; Cafarella, T; Seaton, B; Seeberger, P; Head, J

    2009-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in antiviral host defense. Although SP-D shows a preference for glucose/maltose, the protein also recognizes d-mannose and a variety of mannose-rich microbial ligands. This latter preference prompted an examination of the mechanisms of mannose recognition, particularly as they relate to high-mannose viral glycans. Trimeric neck plus carbohydrate recognition domains from human SP-D (hNCRD) preferred ?1-2-linked dimannose (DM) over the branched trimannose (TM) core, ?1-3 or ?1-6 DM, or d-mannose. Previous studies have shown residues flanking the carbohydrate binding site can fine-tune ligand recognition. A mutant with valine at 343 (R343V) showed enhanced binding to mannan relative to wild type and R343A. No alteration in affinity was observed for d-mannose or for ?1-3- or ?1-6-linked DM; however, substantially increased affinity was observed for ?1-2 DM. Both proteins showed efficient recognition of linear and branched subdomains of high-mannose glycans on carbohydrate microarrays, and R343V showed increased binding to a subset of the oligosaccharides. Crystallographic analysis of an R343V complex with 1,2-DM showed a novel mode of binding. The disaccharide is bound to calcium by the reducing sugar ring, and a stabilizing H-bond is formed between the 2-OH of the nonreducing sugar ring and Arg349. Although hNCRDs show negligible binding to influenza A virus (IAV), R343V showed markedly enhanced viral neutralizing activity. Hydrophobic substitutions for Arg343 selectively blocked binding of a monoclonal antibody (Hyb 246-05) that inhibits IAV binding activity. Our findings demonstrate an extended ligand binding site for mannosylated ligands and the significant contribution of the 343 side chain to specific recognition of multivalent microbial ligands, including high-mannose viral glycans.

  18. U2AF65 adapts to diverse pre-mRNA splice sites through conformational selection of specific and promiscuous RNA recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jermaine L.; Agrawal, Anant A.; Gupta, Ankit; Green, Michael R.; Kielkopf, Clara L.

    2013-01-01

    Degenerate splice site sequences mark the intron boundaries of pre-mRNA transcripts in multicellular eukaryotes. The essential pre-mRNA splicing factor U2AF65 is faced with the paradoxical tasks of accurately targeting polypyrimidine (Py) tracts preceding 3′ splice sites while adapting to both cytidine and uridine nucleotides with nearly equivalent frequencies. To understand how U2AF65 recognizes degenerate Py tracts, we determined six crystal structures of human U2AF65 bound to cytidine-containing Py tracts. As deoxy-ribose backbones were required for co-crystallization with these Py tracts, we also determined two baseline structures of U2AF65 bound to the deoxy-uridine counterparts and compared the original, RNA-bound structure. Local structural changes suggest that the N-terminal RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1) is more promiscuous for cytosine-containing Py tracts than the C-terminal RRM2. These structural differences between the RRMs were reinforced by the specificities of wild-type and site-directed mutant U2AF65 for region-dependent cytosine- and uracil-containing RNA sites. Small-angle X-ray scattering analyses further demonstrated that Py tract variations select distinct inter-RRM spacings from a pre-existing ensemble of U2AF65 conformations. Our results highlight both local and global conformational selection as a means for universal 3′ splice site recognition by U2AF65. PMID:23376934

  19. QSAR, docking, dynamic simulation and quantum mechanics studies to explore the recognition properties of cholinesterase binding sites.

    PubMed

    Correa-Basurto, J; Bello, M; Rosales-Hernández, M C; Hernández-Rodríguez, M; Nicolás-Vázquez, I; Rojo-Domínguez, A; Trujillo-Ferrara, J G; Miranda, René; Flores-Sandoval, C A

    2014-02-25

    despite the multiple conformations obtained through MD simulations on both ChEs, the ligand recognition properties were conserved. In fact, the complex formed between ChEs and the best N-aryl compound reproduced the binding mode experimentally reported, where the ligand was coupled into the choline-binding site and stabilized through π-π interactions with Trp82 or Trp86 for BChE and AChE, respectively, suggesting that this compound could be an efficient inhibitor and supporting our model.

  20. Detection of multiple H3 receptor affinity states utilizing [3H]A-349821, a novel, selective, non-imidazole histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist radioligand.

    PubMed

    Witte, David G; Yao, Betty Bei; Miller, Thomas R; Carr, Tracy L; Cassar, Steven; Sharma, Rahul; Faghih, Ramin; Surber, Bruce W; Esbenshade, Timothy A; Hancock, Arthur A; Krueger, Kathleen M

    2006-07-01

    1. A-349821 is a selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Herein, binding of the novel non-imidazole H3 receptor radioligand [3H]A-349821 to membranes expressing native or recombinant H3 receptors from rat or human sources was characterized and compared with the binding of the agonist [3H]N--methylhistamine ([3H]NMH). 2. [3H]A-349821 bound with high affinity and specificity to an apparent single class of saturable sites and recognized human H3 receptors with 10-fold higher affinity compared to rat H3 receptors. [3H]A-349821 detected larger populations of receptors compared to [3H]NMH. 3. Displacement of [3H]A-349821 binding by H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists was monophasic, suggesting recognition of a single binding site, while that of H3 receptor agonists was biphasic, suggesting recognition of both high- and low-affinity H3 receptor sites. 4. pKi values of high-affinity binding sites for H3 receptor competitors utilizing [3H]A-349821 were highly correlated with pKi values obtained with [3H]NalphaMH, consistent with labelling of H3 receptors by [3H]A-349821. 5. Unlike assays utilizing [3H]NMH, addition of GDP had no effect on saturation parameters measured with [3H]A-349821, while displacement of [3H]A-349821 binding by the H3 receptor agonist histamine was sensitive to GDP. 6. In conclusion, [3H]A-349821 labels interconvertible high- and low-affinity states of the H3 receptor, and displays improved selectivity over imidazole-containing H3 receptor antagonist radioligands. [3H]A-349821 competition studies showed significant differences in the proportions and potencies of high- and low-affinity sites across species, providing new information about the fundamental pharmacological nature of H3 receptors.

  1. Ligand Binding at the α4-α4 Agonist-Binding Site of the α4β2 nAChR Triggers Receptor Activation through a Pre-Activated Conformational State

    PubMed Central

    Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Ahring, Philip K.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Absalom, Nathan L.

    2016-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant subtype in the brain and exists in two functional stoichiometries: (α4)3(β2)2 and (α4)2(β2)3. A distinct feature of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor is the biphasic activation response to the endogenous agonist acetylcholine, where it is activated with high potency and low efficacy when two α4-β2 binding sites are occupied and with low potency/high efficacy when a third α4-α4 binding site is occupied. Further, exogenous ligands can bind to the third α4-α4 binding site and potentiate the activation of the receptor by ACh that is bound at the two α4-β2 sites. We propose that perturbations of the recently described pre-activation step when a third binding site is occupied are a key driver of these distinct activation properties. To investigate this, we used a combination of simple linear kinetic models and voltage clamp electrophysiology to determine whether transitions into the pre-activated state were increased when three binding sites were occupied. We separated the binding at the two different sites with ligands selective for the α4-β2 site (Sazetidine-A and TC-2559) and the α4-α4 site (NS9283) and identified that when a third binding site was occupied, changes in the concentration-response curves were best explained by an increase in transitions into a pre-activated state. We propose that perturbations of transitions into a pre-activated state are essential to explain the activation properties of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor by acetylcholine and other ligands. Considering the widespread clinical use of benzodiazepines, this discovery of a conserved mechanism that benzodiazepines and ACh potentiate receptor activation via a third binding site can be exploited to develop therapeutics with similar properties at other cys-loop receptors. PMID:27552221

  2. Salt bridges overlapping the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist binding site reveal a coincidence detector for G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D; Mosberg, Henry I; Conn, P Michael

    2011-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to molecular biological approaches and to computer modeling. These techniques and interspecies comparisons are used to identify structural features that are important for both intracellular trafficking and GnRHR activation yet distinguish between these processes. Our model features two salt (Arg(38)-Asp(98) and Glu(90)-Lys(121)) and two disulfide (Cys(14)-Cys(200) and Cys(114)-Cys(196)) bridges, all of which are required for the human GnRHR to traffic to the plasma membrane. This study reveals that both constitutive and ligand-induced activation are associated with a "coincidence detector" that occurs when an agonist binds. The observed constitutive activation of receptors lacking Glu(90)-Lys(121), but not Arg(38)-Asp(98) ionic bridge, suggests that the role of the former connection is holding the receptor in the inactive conformation. Both the aromatic ring and hydroxyl group of Tyr(284) and the hydrogen bonding of Ser(217) are important for efficient receptor activation. Our modeling results, supported by the observed influence of Lys(191) from extracellular loop 2 (EL2) and a four-residue motif surrounding this loop on ligand binding and receptor activation, suggest that the positioning of EL2 within the seven-α-helical bundle regulates receptor stability, proper trafficking, and function.

  3. NMR structure of the 5' splice site in the group IIB intron Sc.ai5γ--conformational requirements for exon-intron recognition.

    PubMed

    Kruschel, Daniela; Skilandat, Miriam; Sigel, Roland K O

    2014-03-01

    A crucial step of the self-splicing reaction of group II intron ribozymes is the recognition of the 5' exon by the intron. This recognition is achieved by two regions in domain 1 of the intron, the exon-binding sites EBS1 and EBS2 forming base pairs with the intron-binding sites IBS1 and IBS2 located at the end of the 5' exon. The complementarity of the EBS1•IBS1 contact is most important for ensuring site-specific cleavage of the phosphodiester bond between the 5' exon and the intron. Here, we present the NMR solution structures of the d3' hairpin including EBS1 free in solution and bound to the IBS1 7-mer. In the unbound state, EBS1 is part of a flexible 11-nucleotide (nt) loop. Binding of IBS1 restructures and freezes the entire loop region. Mg(2+) ions are bound near the termini of the EBS1•IBS1 helix, stabilizing the interaction. Formation of the 7-bp EBS1•IBS1 helix within a loop of only 11 nt forces the loop backbone to form a sharp turn opposite of the splice site, thereby presenting the scissile phosphate in a position that is structurally unique.

  4. Recognition sites for microbes and components of the immune system on human mast cells: relationship to CD antigens and implications for host defense.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, M; Aichberger, K J; Florian, S; Valent, P

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, mast cells (MCs) have been considered to play an important role in allergic disorders and helminth infections. More recently, MCs have been implicated in a variety of different infectious diseases including life-threatening disorders caused by viruses and bacteria. Apart from recognition through specific IgE, MCs are considered to recognize such bacteria and viruses via specific cell surface binding sites. In addition, MCs interact with diverse components and cells of the immune system and thereby may facilitate the targeting and the elimination of invading microbes in the tissues. The current article provides an overview on MC antigens contributing to microbe recognition and targeting as an important element of natural host-defense.

  5. Inducible Prophage Mutant of Escherichia coli Can Lyse New Host and the Key Sites of Receptor Recognition Identification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mianmian; Zhang, Lei; Xin, Sipei; Yao, Huochun; Lu, Chengping; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages as therapeutic agents is hindered by their narrow and specific host range, and by a lack of the knowledge concerning the molecular mechanism of receptor recognition. Two P2-like coliphages, named P88 and pro147, were induced from Escherichia coli strains K88 and DE147, respectively. A comparison of the genomes of these two and other P2-like coliphages obtained from GenBank showed that the tail fiber protein genes, which are the key genes for receptor recognition in other myoviridae phages, showed more diversity than the conserved lysin, replicase, and terminase genes. Firstly, replacing hypervariable region 2 (HR2: amino acids 716–746) of the tail fiber protein of P88 with that of pro147 changed the host range of P88. Then, replacing six amino acids in HR2 with the corresponding residues from pro147 altered the host range only in these mutants with changes at position 730 (leucine) and 744 (glutamic acid). Thus, we predicted that these amino acids are vital to establish the host range of P88. This study provided a vector of lysogenic bacteria that could be used to change or expand the phage host range of P88. These results illustrated that, in P2-like phage P88, the tail fiber protein determined the receptor recognition. Amino acids 716–746 and the amino acids at positions 730 and 744 were important for receptor recognition. PMID:28203234

  6. Toll-like receptor agonists in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors related to the Drosophila Toll protein. TLR activation alerts the immune system to microbial products and initiates innate and adaptive immune responses. The naturally powerful immunostimulatory property of TLR agonists can be exploited for active immunotherapy against cancer. Antitumor activity has been demonstrated in several cancers, and TLR agonists are now undergoing extensive clinical investigation. This review discusses recent advances in the field and highlights potential opportunities for the clinical development of TLR agonists as single agent immunomodulators, vaccine adjuvants and in combination with conventional cancer therapies. PMID:20563267

  7. The ACE inhibitor ( sup 3 H)SQ29,852 identifies a high affinity recognition site located in the human temporal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, N.M.; Costall, B.; Egli, P.; Horovitz, Z.P.; Ironside, J.W.; Naylor, R.J.; Williams, T.J. )

    1990-07-01

    The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 identified a single high affinity recognition site (defined by 10.0 microM captopril) in the human temporal cortex (pKD 8.62 +/- 0.03; Bmax 248 +/- 24 fmol mg-1 protein, mean +/- S.E.M., n = 4). ACE inhibitors and thiorphan competed to a similar level for the ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 binding site in the human temporal cortex with a rank order of affinity (pKi values mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3), lisinopril (9.49 +/- 0.02), captopril (9.16 +/- 0.08), SQ29,852 (8.58 +/- 0.04), epicaptopril (7.09 +/- 0.08), fosinopril (7.08 +/- 0.05) and thiorphan (6.40 +/- 0.04). Since this rank order of affinity is similar to the affinity of these compounds to inhibit brain ACE activity it is concluded that ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 selectively labels the inhibitor recognition site of ACE in the human temporal cortex.

  8. Recognition site of nuclear factor I, a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein from HeLa cells that stimulates adenovirus DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Leegwater, P A; van Driel, W; van der Vliet, P C

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear factor I is a 47-kd protein, isolated from nuclei of HeLa cells, that binds specifically to the inverted terminal repeat of the adenovirus (Ad) DNA and enhances Ad DNA replication in vitro. We have studied the DNA sequence specificity of nuclear factor I binding using cloned terminal fragments of the Ad2 genome and a set of deletion mutants. Binding of nuclear factor I protects nucleotides 19-42 of Ad2 DNA against DNase I digestion. Filter binding assays show that deletion of the first 23 nucleotides does not impair binding while a deletion of 24 nucleotides reduces binding severely. However, binding studies on Ad12 DNA indicate that nucleotide 24 can be mutated. Fragments containing the first 40 bp are bound normally while the first 38 bp are insufficient to sustain binding. Taken together, these results indicate that the minimal recognition site of nuclear factor I contains 15 or 16 nucleotides, located from nucleotide 25 to nucleotide 39 or 40 of the Ad2 DNA. This site contains two of the four conserved nucleotide sequences in this region. Sequences flanking the minimal recognition site may reduce the binding affinity of nuclear factor I. In accordance with these binding studies, DNA replication of a fragment that carries the sequence of the terminal 40 nucleotides of Ad2 at one molecular end is enhanced by nuclear factor I in an in vitro replication system. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:4040852

  9. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  10. Use of 2-aminopurine as a fluorescent tool for characterizing antibiotic recognition of the bacterial rRNA A-site

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Christopher M.; Kaul, Malvika; Pilch, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    Spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques have been employed to characterize the impact of incorporation of the fluorescent base analog 2-aminopurine into the 1492 or 1493 position of an E. coli rRNA A-site model oligonucleotide, as well as the energetics and dynamics associated with recognition of this A-site model oligomer by aminoglycoside antibiotics. The results of these studies indicate that incorporation of 2AP into either the 1492 or 1493 position does not perturb the structure or stability of the host RNA or its aminoglycoside binding affinity. In addition, the results also highlight drug-induced reduction in the mobilities of the bases at both positions 1492 and 1493 as a potentially key determinant of bactericidal potency. PMID:18431442

  11. Remote Meta-C–H Activation Using a Pyridine-Based Template: Achieving Site-Selectivity via the Recognition of Distance and Geometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The pyridyl group has been extensively employed to direct transition-metal-catalyzed C–H activation reactions in the past half-century. The typical cyclic transition states involved in these cyclometalation processes have only enabled the activation of ortho-C–H bonds. Here, we report that pyridine is adapted to direct meta-C–H activation of benzyl and phenyl ethyl alcohols through engineering the distance and geometry of a directing template. This template takes advantage of a stronger σ-coordinating pyridine to recruit Pd catalysts to the desired site for functionalization. The U-shaped structure accommodates the otherwise highly strained cyclophane-like transition state. This development illustrates the potential of achieving site selectivity in C–H activation via the recognition of distal and geometric relationship between existing functional groups and multiple C–H bonds in organic molecules. PMID:27162997

  12. Non-specificity and synergy at the binding site of the carboplatin-induced DNA adduct via molecular dynamics simulations of the MutSα-DNA recognition complex

    PubMed Central

    Negureanu, Lacramioara; Salsbury, Freddie R

    2013-01-01

    MutSα is the most abundant mismatch binding factor of human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. MMR maintain genetic stability by recognizing and repairing DNA defects. Failure to accomplish their function may lead to cancer. In addition, MutSα recognizes at least some types of DNA damage making it a target for anticancer agents. Here, complementing scarce experimental data, we report unique hydrogen bonding motifs associated with the recognition of the carboplatin induced DNA damage by MutSα. These data predict that carboplatin and cisplatin induced damaging DNA adducts are recognized by MutSα in a similar manner. Our simulations also indicate that loss of base pairing at the damage site results in (1) non-specific binding and (2) changes in the atomic flexibility at the lesion site and beyond. To further quantify alterations at MutSα-DNA interface in response to damage recognition non-bonding interactions and salt bridges were investigated. These data indicate (1) possible different packing and (2) disruption of the salt bridges at the MutSα-DNA interface in the damaged complex. These findings (1) underscore the general observation of disruptions at the MutSα-DNA interface and (2) highlight the nature of the anticancer effect of the carboplatin agent. The analysis was carried out from atomistic simulations. PMID:23799640

  13. Dissecting functions of the N-terminal domain and GAS-site recognition in STAT3 nuclear trafficking.

    PubMed

    Martincuks, Antons; Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Haan, Serge; Herrmann, Andreas; Küster, Andrea; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, inflammation and cancer progression. Cytokine-induced gene transcription greatly depends on tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 on a single tyrosine residue with subsequent nuclear accumulation and specific DNA sequence (GAS) recognition. In this study, we analyzed the roles of the conserved STAT3 N-terminal domain (NTD) and GAS-element binding ability of STAT3 in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Our results demonstrate the nonessential role of GAS-element recognition for both cytokine-induced and basal nuclear import of STAT3. Substitution of five key amino acids within the DNA-binding domain rendered STAT3 unable to bind to GAS-elements while still maintaining the ability for nuclear localization. In turn, deletion of the NTD markedly decreased nuclear accumulation upon IL-6 treatment resulting in a prolonged accumulation of phosphorylated dimers in the cytoplasm, at the same time preserving specific DNA recognition ability of the truncation mutant. Observed defect in nuclear localization could not be explained by flawed importin-α binding, since both wild-type and NTD deletion mutant of STAT3 could precipitate both full-length and autoinhibitory domain (∆IBB) deletion mutants of importin-α5, as well as ∆IBB-α3 and ∆IBB-α7 isoforms independently of IL-6 stimulation. Despite its inability to translocate to the nucleus upon IL-6 stimulation, the NTD lacking mutant still showed nuclear accumulation in resting cells similar to wild-type upon inhibition of nuclear export by leptomycin B. At the same time, blocking the nuclear export pathway could not rescue cytoplasmic trapping of phosphorylated STAT3 molecules without NTD. Moreover, STAT3 mutant with dysfunctional SH2 domain (R609Q) also localized in the nucleus of unstimulated cells after nuclear export blocking, while upon cytokine treatment the

  14. Design, synthesis, and functional activity of labeled CD1d glycolipid agonists.

    PubMed

    Jervis, Peter J; Polzella, Paolo; Wojno, Justyna; Jukes, John-Paul; Ghadbane, Hemza; Garcia Diaz, Yoel R; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Cox, Liam R

    2013-04-17

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are restricted by CD1d molecules and activated upon CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipids to T cell receptors (TCRs) located on the surface of the cell. Because the cytokine response profile is governed by the structure of the glycolipid, we sought a method for labeling various glycolipids to study their in vivo behavior. The prototypical CD1d agonist, α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer) 1, instigates a powerful immune response and the generation of a wide range of cytokines when it is presented to iNKT cell TCRs by CD1d molecules. Analysis of crystal structures of the TCR-α-GalCer-CD1d ternary complex identified the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid side chain, and more specifically the pro-S hydrogen at this position, as a site for incorporating a label. We postulated that modifying the glycolipid in this way would exert a minimal impact on the TCR-glycolipid-CD1d ternary complex, allowing the labeled molecule to function as a good mimic for the CD1d agonist under investigation. To test this hypothesis, the synthesis of a biotinylated version of the CD1d agonist threitol ceramide (ThrCer) was targeted. Both diastereoisomers, epimeric at the label tethering site, were prepared, and functional experiments confirmed the importance of substituting the pro-S, and not the pro-R, hydrogen with the label for optimal activity. Significantly, functional experiments revealed that biotinylated ThrCer (S)-10 displayed behavior comparable to that of ThrCer 5 itself and also confirmed that the biotin residue is available for streptavidin and antibiotin antibody recognition. A second CD1d agonist, namely α-GalCer C20:2 4, was modified in a similar way, this time with a fluorescent label. The labeled α-GalCer C20:2 analogue (11) again displayed functional behavior comparable to that of its unlabeled substrate, supporting the notion that the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid amide chain should be a suitable site for attaching

  15. Design, Synthesis, and Functional Activity of Labeled CD1d Glycolipid Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are restricted by CD1d molecules and activated upon CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipids to T cell receptors (TCRs) located on the surface of the cell. Because the cytokine response profile is governed by the structure of the glycolipid, we sought a method for labeling various glycolipids to study their in vivo behavior. The prototypical CD1d agonist, α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer) 1, instigates a powerful immune response and the generation of a wide range of cytokines when it is presented to iNKT cell TCRs by CD1d molecules. Analysis of crystal structures of the TCR−α-GalCer–CD1d ternary complex identified the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid side chain, and more specifically the pro-S hydrogen at this position, as a site for incorporating a label. We postulated that modifying the glycolipid in this way would exert a minimal impact on the TCR–glycolipid–CD1d ternary complex, allowing the labeled molecule to function as a good mimic for the CD1d agonist under investigation. To test this hypothesis, the synthesis of a biotinylated version of the CD1d agonist threitol ceramide (ThrCer) was targeted. Both diastereoisomers, epimeric at the label tethering site, were prepared, and functional experiments confirmed the importance of substituting the pro-S, and not the pro-R, hydrogen with the label for optimal activity. Significantly, functional experiments revealed that biotinylated ThrCer (S)-10 displayed behavior comparable to that of ThrCer 5 itself and also confirmed that the biotin residue is available for streptavidin and antibiotin antibody recognition. A second CD1d agonist, namely α-GalCer C20:2 4, was modified in a similar way, this time with a fluorescent label. The labeled α-GalCer C20:2 analogue (11) again displayed functional behavior comparable to that of its unlabeled substrate, supporting the notion that the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid amide chain should be a suitable site for

  16. Distinct Roles for Interfacial Hydration in Site-Specific DNA Recognition by ETS-Family Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Xhani, Suela; Esaki, Shingo; Huang, Kenneth; Erlitzki, Noa; Poon, Gregory M K

    2017-03-15

    The ETS family of transcription factors is a functionally heterogeneous group of gene regulators that share a structurally conserved, eponymous DNA-binding domain. Unlike other ETS homologs, such as Ets-1, DNA recognition by PU.1 is highly sensitive to its osmotic environment due to excess interfacial hydration in the complex. To interrogate interfacial hydration in the two homologs, we mutated a highly conserved tyrosine residue, which is exclusively engaged in coordinating a well-defined water contact between the protein and DNA among ETS proteins, to phenylalanine. The loss of this water-mediated contact blunted the osmotic sensitivity of PU.1/DNA binding, but did not alter binding under normo-osmotic conditions, suggesting that PU.1 has evolved to maximize osmotic sensitivity. The homologous mutation in Ets-1, which was minimally sensitive to osmotic stress due to a sparsely hydrated interface, reduced DNA-binding affinity at normal osmolality but the complex became stabilized by osmotic stress. Molecular dynamics simulations of wildtype and mutant PU.1 and Ets-1 in their free and DNA-bound states, which recapitulated experimental features of the proteins, showed that abrogation of this tyrosine-mediated water contact perturbed the Ets-1/DNA complex not through disruption of interfacial hydration, but by inhibiting local dynamics induced specifically in the bound state. Thus, a configurationally identical water-mediated contact plays mechanistically distinct roles in mediating DNA recognition by structurally homologous ETS transcription factors.

  17. A Tail of Two Sites: A Bipartite Mechanism for Recognition of Notch Ligands by Mind Bomb E3 Ligases

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Brian J.; Schnute, Björn; Ohlenhard, Nadja; Zimmerman, Brandon; Miles, Laura; Beglova, Natalia; Klein, Thomas; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mind bomb (Mib) proteins are large, multi-domain E3 ligases that promote ubiquitination of the cytoplasmic tails of Notch ligands. This ubiquitination step marks the ligand proteins for epsin-dependent endocytosis, which is critical for in vivo Notch receptor activation. We present here crystal structures of the substrate recognition domains of Mib1, both in isolation and in complex with peptides derived from Notch ligands. The structures, in combination with biochemical, cellular and in vivo assays, show that Mib1 contains two independent substrate recognition domains that engage two distinct epitopes from the cytoplasmic tail of the ligand Jagged1, one in the intracellular membrane proximal region and the other near the C-terminus. Together, these studies provide new insights into the mechanism of ubiquitin transfer by Mind bomb E3 ligases, illuminate a key event in ligand-induced activation of Notch receptors, and identify a potential new target for therapeutic modulation of Notch signal transduction in disease. PMID:25747658

  18. Isopropylamino and isobutylamino groups as recognition sites for carbohydrates: acyclic receptors with enhanced binding affinity toward β-galactosides.

    PubMed

    Mazik, Monika; Sonnenberg, Claudia

    2010-10-01

    Binding motifs observed in the crystal structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes, in particular the participation of the isopropyl/isobutyl side chain of valine/leucine in the formation of van der Waals contacts, have inspired the design of new artificial carbohydrate receptors. The new compounds, containing a trisubstituted triethylbenzene core, were expected to recognize sugar molecules through a combination of NH···O and OH···N hydrogen bonds, CH···π interactions, and numerous van der Waals contacts. (1)H NMR spectroscopic titrations in competitive and noncompetitive media, as well as binding studies in two-phase systems, such as dissolution of solid carbohydrates in apolar media and phase transfer of sugars from aqueous into organic solvents, revealed effective recognition of neutral carbohydrates and β- vs α-anomer binding preferences in the recognition of glycosides as well as significantly increased binding affinity of the receptors toward β-galactoside in comparison with the previously described receptors.

  19. Serotonergic agonists behave as partial agonists at the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Rinken, A; Ferré, S; Terasmaa, A; Owman, C; Fuxe, K

    1999-02-25

    RAT dopamine D2short receptors expressed in CHO cells were characterized by activation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding. There were no significant differences between the maximal effects seen in activation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding caused by dopaminergic agonists, but the effects of 5-HT, 8OH-DPAT and 5-methoxytryptamine amounted to 47 +/- 7%, 43 +/- 5% and 70 +/- 7% of the dopamine effect, respectively. The dopaminergic antagonist (+)butaclamol inhibited activations of both types of ligands with equal potency (pA2 = 8.9 +/- 0.1), indicating that only one type of receptor is involved. In competition with [3H]raclopride binding, dopaminergic agonists showed 53 +/- 2% of the binding sites in the GTP-dependent high-affinity state, whereas 5-HT showed only 20 +/- 3%. Taken together, the results indicate that serotonergic agonists behave as typical partial agonists for D2 receptors with potential antiparkinsonian activity.

  20. Water participation in molecular recognition and protein-ligand association: Probing the drug binding site "Sudlow I" in human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Lawatia, Najla; Steinbrecher, Thomas; Abou-Zied, Osama K.

    2012-03-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) plays an important role in the transport and disposition of endogenous and exogenous ligands present in blood. Its capacity to reversibly bind a large variety of drugs results in its prevailing role in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In this work, we used 7-hydroxyquinoline (7HQ) as a probe to study the binding nature of one of the major drug binding sites of HSA (Sudlow I) and to reveal the local environment around the probe in the binding site. The interaction between 7HQ and HSA at a physiological pH of 7.2 was investigated using steady-state and lifetime spectroscopic measurements, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations methods. The fluorescence results indicate a selective interaction between 7HQ and the Trp214 residue. The reduction in both the intensity and lifetime of the Trp214 fluorescence upon probe binding indicates the dominant role of static quenching. Molecular docking and MD simulations show that 7HQ binds in Sudlow site I close to Trp214, confirming the experimental results, and pinpoint the dominant role of hydrophobic interaction in the binding site. Electrostatic interactions were also found to be important in which two water molecules form strong hydrogen bonds with the polar groups of 7HQ. Detection of water in the binding site agrees with the absorption and fluorescence results that show the formation of a zwitterion tautomer of 7HQ. The unique spectral signatures of 7HQ in water make this molecule a potential probe for detecting the presence of water in nanocavities of proteins. Interaction of 7HQ with water in the binding site shows that water molecules can be crucial for molecular recognition and association in protein binding sites.

  1. Shape-selective recognition of DNA abasic sites by metallohelices: inhibition of human AP endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Malina, Jaroslav; Scott, Peter; Brabec, Viktor

    2015-06-23

    Loss of a base in DNA leading to creation of an abasic (AP) site leaving a deoxyribose residue in the strand, is a frequent lesion that may occur spontaneously or under the action of various physical and chemical agents. Progress in the understanding of the chemistry and enzymology of abasic DNA largely relies upon the study of AP sites in synthetic duplexes. We report here on interactions of diastereomerically pure metallo-helical 'flexicate' complexes, bimetallic triple-stranded ferro-helicates [Fe2(NN-NN)3](4+) incorporating the common NN-NN bis(bidentate) helicand, with short DNA duplexes containing AP sites in different sequence contexts. The results show that the flexicates bind to AP sites in DNA duplexes in a shape-selective manner. They preferentially bind to AP sites flanked by purines on both sides and their binding is enhanced when a pyrimidine is placed in opposite orientation to the lesion. Notably, the Λ-enantiomer binds to all tested AP sites with higher affinity than the Δ-enantiomer. In addition, the binding of the flexicates to AP sites inhibits the activity of human AP endonuclease 1, which is as a valid anticancer drug target. Hence, this finding indicates the potential of utilizing well-defined metallo-helical complexes for cancer chemotherapy.

  2. Promiscuous glycan site recognition by antibodies to the high-mannose patch of gp120 broadens neutralization of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Sok, Devin; Doores, Katie J.; Briney, Bryan; Le, Khoa M.; Saye-Francisco, Karen F.; Ramos, Alejandra; Kulp, Daniel W.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Menis, Sergey; Wickramasinghe, Lalinda; Seaman, Michael S.; Schief, William R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) that target the high-mannose patch centered around the glycan at position 332 on HIV Env are promising vaccine leads and therapeutic candidates as they effectively protect against mucosal SHIV challenge and strongly suppress SHIV viraemia in established infection in macaque models. However, these antibodies demonstrate varying degrees of dependency on the N332 glycan site and the origins of their neutralization breadth are not always obvious. By measuring neutralization on an extended range of glycan site viral variants, we found that some bnMAbs can utilize alternate N-linked glycans in the absence of the N332 glycan site and therefore neutralize a substantial number of viruses lacking the site. Furthermore, many of the antibodies can neutralize viruses in which the N332 glycan site is shifted to the 334 position. Finally, we found that a combination of three antibody families that target the high-mannose patch can lead to 99% neutralization coverage of a large panel of viruses containing the N332/334 glycan site and up to 66% coverage for viruses that lack the N332/334 glycan site. The results indicate that a diverse response against the high-mannose patch may provide near equivalent coverage as a combination of bnMAbs targeting multiple epitopes. Additionally, the ability of some bnMAbs to utilize other N-linked glycan sites can help counter neutralization escape mediated by shifting of glycosylation sites. Overall, this work highlights the importance of promiscuous glycan binding properties in bnMAbs to the high-mannose patch for optimal anti-viral activity either in protective or therapeutic modalities. PMID:24828077

  3. Insights into a highly conserved network of hydrogen bonds in the agonist binding site of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a structural and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Alexandre; Graton, Jérôme; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2014-10-01

    Structural and theoretical studies on the geometrical features of a hydrogen-bond network occurring in the binding site of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and composed of interconnected WxPD (Trp-x-Pro-Asp) and SWyz (Ser-Trp-yz) sequences from loops A and B, respectively, have been carried out. Multiple sequence alignments using as template the sequence of the apoform of Aplysia californica acetylcholine binding protein (Ac-AChBP) show the strict conservation of serine and tryptophan residues of the loop B SWyz sequence. Considering a sample of 19 high resolution AChBP structures, the strong conformational preferences of the key tryptophan residue has been pointing out, whatever the form, free or bounded, of AChBP. The geometry of the motif hydrogen-bond network has been characterized through the analyses of seven distances. The robustness of the various hydrogen-bond interactions is pointed out, the one involving the aspartate carboxylate group and the serine residue being the shortest of the network. The role of a cooperative effect involving a NH(His145)…OH (Ser142) hydrogen bond is highlighted. Density functional theory calculations on several simplified models based on the motif hydrogen-bond network allow probing the importance of the various hydrogen-bond interactions. The removal of the Ser142 hydroxyl group induces strong structural rearrangements, in agreement with the structural observations. Molecular electrostatic potential calculations on model systems highlight the importance of a cooperative effect in the whole hydrogen-bond network. More precisely, the key role of the Ser142 hydroxyl group, involved in several hydrogen bonds, is underlined.

  4. Na/sup +/ channels as sites of action of the cardioactive agent DPI 201-106 with agonist and antagonist enantiomers

    SciTech Connect

    Romey, G.; Quast, U.; Pauron, D.; Frelin, C.; Renaud, J.F.; Lazdunski, M.

    1987-02-01

    This paper shows the interaction of the cardiotonic agent 4-(3-(4-diphenylmethyl-1-piperazinyl)-2-hydroxypropoxy)-1H-indole-2-carbonitrile (DPI 201-106) and its optic enantiomers R-DPI (205-429) and S-DPI (205-430) with the Na/sup +/ channel of a variety of excitable cells. Voltage-clamp experiments show that DPI 201-106 acts on neuroblastoma cells and rat cardiac cells. S-DPI (205-430) increases the peak Na/sup +/ current, slows down the kinetics of Na/sup +/ channel inactivation, and is cardiotonic on heart cells. Conversely, R-DPI (205-429) reduces the peak Na/sup +/ current and blocks Na/sup +/ channel activity and cardiac contractions. Binding experiments using radioactively labeled toxins indicate that DPI 201-106 and its enantiomers do not interact with sites already identified for tetrodotoxin or sea anemone and scorpion toxins. DPI 201-106 and its enantiomers inhibit binding of a /sup 3/H-labeled batrachotoxin derivative, (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxinin A 20-..cap alpha..-benzoate, to brain membranes. The dissociation constant of the complex formed between the Na/sup +/ channel and both R-DPI and S-DPI is K/sub d/ approx. 100 nM. /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake experiments using different cell types have shown that R and S enantiomers of DPI 201-106 are active on the different Na/sup +/ channel subtypes with similar IC/sub 50/ values. These results are discussed in relation with the cardiotonic properties of DPI 201-106 that are not accompanied by cardiotoxic effects.

  5. Communication between the Zinc and Nickel Sites in Dimeric HypA: Metal Recognition and pH Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, R.; Perovic, I; Martin-Diaconescu, V; O’Brien, K; Chivers, P; Sondej Pochapsky, S; Pochapsky, T; Maroney, M

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a pathogen that colonizes the human stomach, requires the nickel-containing metalloenzymes urease and NiFe-hydrogenase to survive this low pH environment. The maturation of both enzymes depends on the metallochaperone, HypA. HypA contains two metal sites, an intrinsic zinc site and a low-affinity nickel binding site. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that the structure of the intrinsic zinc site of HypA is dynamic and able to sense both nickel loading and pH changes. At pH 6.3, an internal pH that occurs during acid shock, the zinc site undergoes unprecedented ligand substitutions to convert from a Zn(Cys){sub 4} site to a Zn(His){sub 2}(Cys){sub 2} site. NMR spectroscopy shows that binding of Ni(II) to HypA results in paramagnetic broadening of resonances near the N-terminus. NOEs between the {beta}-CH{sub 2} protons of Zn cysteinyl ligands are consistent with a strand-swapped HypA dimer. Addition of nickel causes resonances from the zinc binding motif and other regions to double, indicating more than one conformation can exist in solution. Although the structure of the high-spin, 5-6 coordinate Ni(II) site is relatively unaffected by pH, the nickel binding stoichiometry is decreased from one per monomer to one per dimer at pH = 6.3. Mutation of any cysteine residue in the zinc binding motif results in a zinc site structure similar to that found for holo-WT-HypA at low pH and is unperturbed by the addition of nickel. Mutation of the histidines that flank the CXXC motifs results in a zinc site structure that is similar to holo-WT-HypA at neutral pH (Zn(Cys){sub 4}) and is no longer responsive to nickel binding or pH changes. Using an in vitro urease activity assay, it is shown that the recombinant protein is sufficient for recovery of urease activity in cell lysate from a HypA deletion mutant, and that mutations in the zinc-binding motif result in a decrease in recovered urease activity. The results are interpreted in terms of a model

  6. [Melatonin receptor agonist].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland and is involved in the regulation of human sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms. The melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus play a pivotal role in the sleep-wake regulation. Based on the fact that MT1 receptors are involved in human sleep onset process, melatonin receptor agonists have been developed to treat insomnia. In this article, we first reviewed functions of melatonin receptors with special reference to MT1 and MT2, and properties and clinical application of melatonin receptor agonists as hypnotics.

  7. Modeling of recognition sites of nucleic acid bases aaand amide side chains of amino acids. Combination of experimental and theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelkovsky, V. S.; Stepanian, S. G.; Galetich, I. K.; Kosevich, M. V.; Adamowicz, L.

    2002-09-01

    A combined experimental-theoretical approach to modeling of building blocks of recognition complexes formed by nucleic acid bases and the amino-acids side-chain amino group is reviewed. The approach includes the temperature dependent field-ionization mass spectrometry and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The mass spectrometric technique allows determination of interaction enthalpies of biomolecules in the gas phase, and the results it produces are directly comparable to the results obtained through theoretical modeling. In our works we have analyzed both thermodynamic and structural aspects of the recognition complexes of four canonical nucleic acid bases and acrylamide, which models the side chain of asparagine and glutamine. It has been shown that all bases can interact with amide group of the amino acids via their Watson-Crick sites when being incorporated into a single strand DNA or RNA. Stability of the complexes studied, expressed as -Δ H (kJ mole^{-1}) decreases as: m^9Gua (-59.5) > m^1Cyt (-57.0) > m^9Ade (-52.0) gg m^1Ura (-40.6). We have determined that in the double stranded DNA only purine bases can be recognized.

  8. Structural elements of ligand recognition site in secretory phospho-lipase A2 and structure-based design of specific inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nagendra; Somvanshi, Rishi K; Sharma, Sujata; Dey, Sharmistha; Kaur, Punit; Singh, Tej P

    2007-01-01

    Phospholipases A2 (phosphotide 2-acylhydrolases, PLA2s, EC 3.1.1.4) are widely distributed enzymes in the animal world. They catalyze the hydrolysis of the sn-2 acyl ester linkage of phospholipids, producing fatty acids and lysophospholipids. The mammalian type II secreted phospholipase A2 (PLA2-II) is one of the most extensively studied member of low molecular weight (13-18 kDa) PLA2s. PLA2-II contains 120-125 amino acid residues and seven disulphide bridges. The important features of overall structure of PLA2-II contain an N-terminal helix, H1 (residues: 2-12), an external loop (residues: 14-23), a calcium binding loop (Ca2+-loop, residues: 25-35), a second alpha-helix, H2 (residues: 40-55), a short two stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet referred to as beta-wing (residues: 75-84), a third alpha-helix, H3 (residues: 90-108) which is antiparallel to H2 and two single helical turns, SH4 (residues: 114-117) and SH5 (residues: 121-125). The three-dimensional structure of PLA2-II has defined a conserved active site within a hydrophobic channel lined by invariant hydrophobic residues. The active site residues His48, Asp49, Tyr52 and Asp99 are directly connected to the channel. An important water molecule that bridges His48 and Asp49 through hydrogen bonds is a part of catalytic network. Based on the structures of various complexes of group II PLA2, the ligand-recognition site has been divided into six subsites consisting of residues 2-10 (subsite 1), residues 17-23 (subsite 2), residues 28-32 (subsite 3), residues 48-52 (subsite 4), residues 68-70 (subsite 5) and residues 98-106 (subsite 6). It is observed that most of the currently available ligands saturate only part of the ligand-recognition site leaving a wide scope to improve the ligand complementarity. Naturally, the ligands that interact with the largest number of subsites would also correspond to the maximum affinity. Therefore, for the design of potent inhibitors of PLA2, the stereochemical knowledge of the

  9. Convenient and Precise Strategy for Mapping N-Glycosylation Sites Using Microwave-Assisted Acid Hydrolysis and Characteristic Ions Recognition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cheng; Qu, Jingyao; Meisner, Jeffrey; Zhao, Xinyuan; Li, Xu; Wu, Zhigang; Zhu, Hailiang; Yu, Zaikuan; Li, Lei; Guo, Yuxi; Song, Jing; Wang, Peng George

    2015-08-04

    N-glycosylation is one of the most prevalence protein post-translational modifications (PTM) which is involved in several biological processes. Alternation of N-glycosylation is associated with cellular malfunction and development of disease. Thus, investigation of protein N-glycosylation is crucial for diagnosis and treatment of disease. Currently, deglycosylation with peptide N-glycosidase F is the most commonly used technique in N-glycosylation analysis. Additionally, a common error in N-glycosylation site identification, resulting from protein chemical deamidation, has largely been ignored. In this study, we developed a convenient and precise approach for mapping N-glycosylation sites utilizing with optimized TFA hydrolysis, ZIC-HILIC enrichment, and characteristic ions of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) from higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation. Using this method, we identified a total of 257 N-glycosylation sites and 144 N-glycoproteins from healthy human serum. Compared to deglycosylation with endoglycosidase, this strategy is more convenient and efficient for large scale N-glycosylation sites identification and provides an important alternative approach for the study of N-glycoprotein function.

  10. Structure-Based Mutagenesis of the Substrate-Recognition Domain of Nrdp1/FLRF Identifies the Binding Site for the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ErbB3

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyain,S.; Leahy, D.

    2007-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degrading protein 1 (Nrdp1) mediates the ligand-independent degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor family member ErbB3/HER3. By regulating cellular levels of ErbB3, Nrdp1 influences ErbB3-mediated signaling, which is essential for normal vertebrate development. Nrdp1 belongs to the tripartite or RBCC (RING, B-box, coiled-coil) family of ubiquitin ligases in which the RING domain is responsible for ubiquitin ligation and a variable C-terminal region mediates substrate recognition. We report here the 1.95 A crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Nrdp1 and show that this domain is sufficient to mediate ErbB3 binding. Furthermore, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to map regions of the Nrdp1 surface that are important for interacting with ErbB3 and mediating its degradation in transfected cells. The ErbB3-binding site localizes to a region of Nrdp1 that is conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, in contrast to ErbB3, which is only found in vertebrates. This observation suggests that Nrdp1 uses a common binding site to recognize its targets in different species.

  11. Structure-based mutagenesis of the substrate-recognition domain of Nrdp1/FLRF identifies the binding site for the receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB3

    PubMed Central

    Bouyain, Samuel; Leahy, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degrading protein 1 (Nrdp1) mediates the ligand-independent degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor family member ErbB3/HER3. By regulating cellular levels of ErbB3, Nrdp1 influences ErbB3-mediated signaling, which is essential for normal vertebrate development. Nrdp1 belongs to the tripartite or RBCC (RING, B-box, coiled-coil) family of ubiquitin ligases in which the RING domain is responsible for ubiquitin ligation and a variable C-terminal region mediates substrate recognition. We report here the 1.95 Å crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Nrdp1 and show that this domain is sufficient to mediate ErbB3 binding. Furthermore, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to map regions of the Nrdp1 surface that are important for interacting with ErbB3 and mediating its degradation in transfected cells. The ErbB3-binding site localizes to a region of Nrdp1 that is conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, in contrast to ErbB3, which is only found in vertebrates. This observation suggests that Nrdp1 uses a common binding site to recognize its targets in different species. PMID:17384230

  12. Structure-based mutagenesis of the substrate-recognition domain of Nrdp1/FLRF identifies the binding site for the receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB3.

    PubMed

    Bouyain, Samuel; Leahy, Daniel J

    2007-04-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degrading protein 1 (Nrdp1) mediates the ligand-independent degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor family member ErbB3/HER3. By regulating cellular levels of ErbB3, Nrdp1 influences ErbB3-mediated signaling, which is essential for normal vertebrate development. Nrdp1 belongs to the tripartite or RBCC (RING, B-box, coiled-coil) family of ubiquitin ligases in which the RING domain is responsible for ubiquitin ligation and a variable C-terminal region mediates substrate recognition. We report here the 1.95 A crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Nrdp1 and show that this domain is sufficient to mediate ErbB3 binding. Furthermore, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to map regions of the Nrdp1 surface that are important for interacting with ErbB3 and mediating its degradation in transfected cells. The ErbB3-binding site localizes to a region of Nrdp1 that is conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, in contrast to ErbB3, which is only found in vertebrates. This observation suggests that Nrdp1 uses a common binding site to recognize its targets in different species.

  13. GABAB receptor agonist baclofen improves methamphetamine-induced cognitive deficit in mice.

    PubMed

    Arai, Sawako; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Ibi, Daisuke; Nagai, Taku; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2009-01-05

    In this study, we investigated the effects of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor agonists on the methamphetamine-induced impairment of recognition memory in mice. Repeated treatment with methamphetamine at a dose of 1 mg/kg for 7 days induced an impairment of recognition memory. Baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist, ameliorated the repeated methamphetamine-induced cognitive impairment, although gaboxadol, a GABA(A) receptor agonist, had no significant effect. GABA(B) receptors may constitute a putative new target in treating cognitive deficits in patients suffering from schizophrenia, as well as methamphetamine psychosis.

  14. Exploring the role of water in molecular recognition: predicting protein ligandability using a combinatorial search of surface hydration sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Brennan, Paul E.; Huggins, David J.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between any two biological molecules must compete with their interaction with water molecules. This makes water the most important molecule in medicine, as it controls the interactions of every therapeutic with its target. A small molecule binding to a protein is able to recognize a unique binding site on a protein by displacing bound water molecules from specific hydration sites. Quantifying the interactions of these water molecules allows us to estimate the potential of the protein to bind a small molecule. This is referred to as ligandability. In the study, we describe a method to predict ligandability by performing a search of all possible combinations of hydration sites on protein surfaces. We predict ligandability as the summed binding free energy for each of the constituent hydration sites, computed using inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory. We compared the predicted ligandability with the maximum observed binding affinity for 20 proteins in the human bromodomain family. Based on this comparison, it was determined that effective inhibitors have been developed for the majority of bromodomains, in the range from 10 to 100 nM. However, we predict that more potent inhibitors can be developed for the bromodomains BPTF and BRD7 with relative ease, but that further efforts to develop inhibitors for ATAD2 will be extremely challenging. We have also made predictions for the 14 bromodomains with no reported small molecule K d values by isothermal titration calorimetry. The calculations predict that PBRM1(1) will be a challenging target, while others such as TAF1L(2), PBRM1(4) and TAF1(2), should be highly ligandable. As an outcome of this work, we assembled a database of experimental maximal K d that can serve as a community resource assisting medicinal chemistry efforts focused on BRDs. Effective prediction of ligandability would be a very useful tool in the drug discovery process.

  15. Molecularly imprinted protein recognition cavities bearing exchangeable binding sites for postimprinting site-directed introduction of reporter molecules for readout of binding events.

    PubMed

    Sunayama, Hirobumi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-11-26

    Protein-imprinted cavities bearing exchangeable domains to be used for postimprinting fluorophore introduction to transform binding events into fluorescence changes were constructed in molecularly imprinted polymer (MIPs) matrixes prepared on glass substrates. Copolymerization was performed with acrylamide, N,N'-methylenebisaclylamide, and a newly designed functional group-exchangeable monomer, ({[2-(2-methacrylamido)ethyldithio]ethylcarbamoyl}methoxy)acetic acid (MDTA), in the presence of a model basic protein, lysozyme (Lyso); MDTA can interact with Lyso and assemble close to Lyso in the resulting polymer. After removal of Lyso, followed by a disulfide reduction to cleave the (ethylcarbamoylmethoxy)acetic acid moiety from the MDTA residues, the exposed thiol groups within the imprinted cavities were modified by aminoethylpyridyldisulfide to be transformed into aminoethyl groups that function as active sites for amine-reactive fluorophores. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was then coupled with the aminoethyl groups, yielding site specifically FITC-modified signaling imprinted cavities for Lyso binding. Because the in-cavity fluorescent labeling was achieved via a disulfide linkage, it was easy to remove, exchange, and/or replace amine-reactive fluorophores. This facilitated the screening of fluorophores to select the highest readout for binding events, replace fluorophores when photobleaching occurred, and introduce other functions. The proposed molecular imprinting process, combined with postimprinting modifications, is expected to provide an affordable route to develop multifunctional MIPs for specific detection of protein binding events.

  16. Melatonin agonists and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sally A; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Dawson, Drew

    2010-02-01

    The ability of melatonin to shift biological rhythms is well known. As a result, melatonin has been used in the treatment of various circadian rhythm sleep disorders, such as advanced and delayed sleep phase disorders, jet lag and shiftwork disorder. The current evidence for melatonin being efficacious in the treatment of primary insomnia is less compelling. The development of agents that are selective for melatonin receptors provides opportunity to further elucidate the actions of melatonin and its receptors and to develop novel treatments for specific types of sleep disorders. The agonists reviewed here - ramelteon, tasimelteon and agomelatine - all appear to be efficacious in the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders and some types of insomnia. However, further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of action, particularly for insomnia. Clinical application of the agonists requires a good understanding of their phase-dependent properties. Long-term effects of melatonin should be evaluated in large-scale, independent randomized controlled trials.

  17. Beta-Adrenergic Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Barisione, Giovanni; Baroffio, Michele; Crimi, Emanuele; Brusasco, Vito

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonists are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptoms-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. In this article, we first review the basic mechanisms by which the β2-adrenergic system contributes to the control of airway smooth muscle tone. Then, we go on describing the structural characteristics of β2-AR and the molecular basis of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and mechanisms of its desensitization/ dysfunction. In particular, phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A and β-adrenergic receptor kinase are examined in detail. Finally, we discuss the pivotal role of inhaled β2-AR agonists in the treatment of asthma and the concerns about their safety that have been recently raised. PMID:27713285

  18. Interplay of signal recognition particle and trigger factor at L23 near the nascent chain exit site on the Escherichia coli ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Ullers, Ronald S.; Houben, Edith N.G.; Raine, Amanda; ten Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Brunner, Joseph; Oudega, Bauke; Harms, Nellie; Luirink, Joen

    2003-01-01

    As newly synthesized polypeptides emerge from the ribosome, they interact with chaperones and targeting factors that assist in folding and targeting to the proper location in the cell. In Escherichia coli, the chaperone trigger factor (TF) binds to nascent polypeptides early in biosynthesis facilitated by its affinity for the ribosomal proteins L23 and L29 that are situated around the nascent chain exit site on the ribosome. The targeting factor signal recognition particle (SRP) interacts specifically with the signal anchor (SA) sequence in nascent inner membrane proteins (IMPs). Here, we have used photocross-linking to map interactions of the SA sequence in a short, in vitro–synthesized, nascent IMP. Both TF and SRP were found to interact with the SA with partially overlapping binding specificity. In addition, extensive contacts with L23 and L29 were detected. Both purified TF and SRP could be cross-linked to L23 on nontranslating ribosomes with a competitive advantage for SRP. The results suggest a role for L23 in the targeting of IMPs as an attachment site for TF and SRP that is close to the emerging nascent chain. PMID:12756233

  19. Molecular recognition of taxol by microtubules. Kinetics and thermodynamics of binding of fluorescent taxol derivatives to an exposed site.

    PubMed

    Díaz, J F; Strobe, R; Engelborghs, Y; Souto, A A; Andreu, J M

    2000-08-25

    We have determined the kinetic scheme and the reaction rates of binding to microtubules of two fluorescent taxoids, 7-O-[N-(4'-fluoresceincarbonyl)-l-alanyl]Taxol (Flutax-1) and 7-O-[N-(2,7-difluoro-4'-fluoresceincarbonyl)-l-alanyl]Taxol (Flutax-2). Flutax-1 and Flutax-2 bind to microtubules with high affinity (K(a) approximately 10(7) m(-1), 37 degrees C). The binding mechanism consists of a fast bimolecular reaction followed by at least two monomolecular rearrangements, which were characterized with stopped-flow techniques. The kinetic constants of the bimolecular reaction were 6.10 +/- 0.22 x 10(5) m(-1) s(-1) and 13.8 +/- 1.8 x 10(5) m(-1) s(-1) at 37 degrees C, respectively. A second slow binding step has been measured employing the change of fluorescence anisotropy of the probe. The reversal of this reaction is the rate-limiting step of dissociation. A third step has been detected using small angle x-ray scattering and involves a 2-nm increase in the diameter of microtubules. It is suggested that the first step entails the binding of the Taxol moiety and the second a relative immobilization of the fluorescent probe. The equilibrium and some kinetic measurements required the use of stabilized cross-linked microtubules, which preserved taxoid binding. The results indicate that the Taxol binding site is directly accessible, in contrast with its location at lumen in the current model of microtubules. An alternative structural model is considered in which the binding site is located between protofilaments, accessible from the microtubule surface.

  20. Differential recognition of Old World and New World arenavirus envelope glycoproteins by subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P).

    PubMed

    Burri, Dominique J; da Palma, Joel Ramos; Seidah, Nabil G; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Cendron, Laura; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The arenaviruses are an important family of emerging viruses that includes several causative agents of severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans that represent serious public health problems. A crucial step of the arenavirus life cycle is maturation of the envelope glycoprotein precursor (GPC) by the cellular subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P). Comparison of the currently known sequences of arenavirus GPCs revealed the presence of a highly conserved aromatic residue at position P7 relative to the SKI-1/S1P cleavage side in Old World and clade C New World arenaviruses but not in New World viruses of clades A and B or cellular substrates of SKI-1/S1P. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure-function analysis, we found that residue Y285 of SKI-1/S1P, distal from the catalytic triad, is implicated in the molecular recognition of the aromatic "signature residue" at P7 in the GPC of Old World Lassa virus. Using a quantitative biochemical approach, we show that Y285 of SKI-1/S1P is crucial for the efficient processing of peptides derived from Old World and clade C New World arenavirus GPCs but not of those from clade A and B New World arenavirus GPCs. The data suggest that during coevolution with their mammalian hosts, GPCs of Old World and clade C New World viruses expanded the molecular contacts with SKI-1/S1P beyond the classical four-amino-acid recognition sequences and currently occupy an extended binding pocket.

  1. Characterization of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri LexA: recognition of the LexA binding site.

    PubMed

    Yang, M-K; Yang, Y-C; Hsu, C-H

    2002-12-01

    Levels of l exA transcripts are markedly increased upon exposure of Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovar citri ( X. a. pv. citri) to the DNA-damaging agent mitomycin C. Preliminary electrophoretic mobility-shift data led us to propose that binding of LexA protein to the sequence upstream of the lexA coding region is responsible for low promoter activity in the uniduced state. We determined that the LexA protein binds to the region located between the transcription start site and the translation initiation codon of the lexA gene of X. a. pv. citri. Using a DNase I footprinting technique, we identified a 19-bp palindromic sequence, TTAGTAGTAATACTACTAA (TTAGN(11)CTAA), located in this region as the binding sequence for the LexA protein of X. a. pv. citri, and showed that the two halves of the palindrome have to be in the inverted repeat orientation to permit binding of LexA. We also showed that almost any mutation in this sequence, including changes in the length of the spacer region of the palindrome, destroyed its ability to bind LexA both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin

    PubMed Central

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G.; Johnson, Troy A.; Zianni, Michael R.; Arias, Cesar A.; Ladbury, John E.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-01-01

    LiaR is a ‘master regulator’ of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structural basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaRD191N increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. Crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons. PMID:25897118

  3. Natively glycosylated HIV-1 Env structure reveals new mode for antibody recognition of the CD4-binding site

    PubMed Central

    West, Anthony P; Schamber, Michael; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Seaman, Michael S; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 vaccine design is informed by structural studies elucidating mechanisms by which broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize and/or accommodate N-glycans on the trimeric envelope glycoprotein (Env). Variability in high-mannose and complex-type Env glycoforms leads to heterogeneity that usually precludes visualization of the native glycan shield. We present 3.5-Å- and 3.9-Å-resolution crystal structures of the HIV-1 Env trimer with fully processed and native glycosylation, revealing a glycan shield of high-mannose and complex-type N-glycans, which we used to define complete epitopes of two bNAbs. Env trimer was complexed with 10-1074 (against the V3-loop) and IOMA, a new CD4-binding site (CD4bs) antibody. Although IOMA derives from VH1-2*02, the germline gene of CD4bs-targeting VRC01-class bNAbs, its light chain lacks the short CDRL3 that defines VRC01-class bNAbs. Thus IOMA resembles 8ANC131-class/VH1-46–derived CD4bs bNAbs, which have normal-length CDRL3s. The existence of bNAbs that combine features of VRC01-class and 8ANC131-class antibodies has implications for immunization strategies targeting VRC01-like bNAbs. PMID:27617431

  4. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin

    DOE PAGES

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G.; ...

    2015-04-19

    LiaR is a ‘master regulator’ of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structuralmore » basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaRD191N increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. The crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons.« less

  5. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G.; Johnson, Troy A.; Zianni, Michael R.; Arias, Cesar A.; Ladbury, John E.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-04-19

    LiaR is a ‘master regulator’ of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structural basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaRD191N increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. The crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons.

  6. Recognition of the high affinity binding site in rev-response element RNA by the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 rev protein.

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, S; Pritchard, C; Mann, D A; Karn, J; Gait, M J

    1992-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 rev protein binds with high affinity to a bubble structure located within the rev-response element (RRE) RNA in stemloop II. After this initial interaction, additional rev molecules bind to the RRE RNA in an ordered assembly process which requires a functional bubble structure, since mutations in the bubble sequence that reduce rev affinity block multiple complex formation. We have used synthetic chemistry to characterize the interaction between rev protein and its high affinity binding site. A minimal synthetic duplex RNA (RBC6) carrying the bubble and 12 flanking base pairs is able to bind rev with 1 to 1 stoichiometry and with high affinity. When the bubble structure is inserted into synthetic RNA molecules carrying longer stretches of flanking double-stranded RNA, rev forms additional complexes resembling the multimers observed with the RRE RNA. The ability of rev to bind to RBC6 analogues containing functional group modifications on base and sugar moieties of nucleoside residues was also examined. The results provide strong evidence that the bubble structure contains specific configurations of non-Watson--Crick G:G and G:A base pairs and suggest that high affinity recognition of RRE RNA by rev requires hydrogen bonding to functional groups in the major groove of a distorted RNA structure. Images PMID:1282702

  7. Mating type-specific cell-cell recognition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: cell wall attachment and active sites of a- and alpha-agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Cappellaro, C; Baldermann, C; Rachel, R; Tanner, W

    1994-01-01

    Mating type-specific agglutination of Saccharomyces cerevisiae a and alpha cells depends on the heterophilic interaction of two cell surface glycoproteins, the gene products of AG alpha 1 and AGA2. Evidence is presented with immunogold labelling that the alpha-agglutinin is part of the outer fimbrial cell wall coat. The a-agglutinin is bound via two S-S bridges (Cys7 and Cys50) to a cell wall component, most probably the gene product of AGA1. His273 of alpha-agglutinin has previously been shown to be essential for a- and alpha-agglutinin interaction and a model based on two opposing ion-pairs had been proposed. By site-directed mutagenesis this possibility has now been excluded. With the help of various peptides, either chemically synthesized, obtained by proteolysis of intact glycosylated a-agglutinin or prepared from a fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli, the biologically active region of a-agglutinin was located at the C-terminus of the molecule. A peptide consisting of the C-terminal 10 amino acids (GSPIN-TQYVF) was active in nanomolar concentrations. Saccharide moieties, therefore, are not essential for the mating type-specific cell-cell interaction; glycosylated peptides are, however, four to five times more active than non-glycosylated ones. Comparisons of the recognition sequences of the S. cerevisiae agglutinins with that of the Dictyostelium contact site A glycoprotein (gp80), as well as with those of the various families of cell adhesion molecules of higher eucaryotes, have been made and are discussed. Images PMID:7957044

  8. 5-HT1 agonists reduce 5-hydroxytryptamine release in rat hippocampus in vivo as determined by brain microdialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, T.; Bramwell, S. R.; Grahame-Smith, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    1. An intracerebral perfusion method, brain microdialysis, was used to assess changes of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release in the ventral hippocampus of the chloral hydrate-anaesthetized rat in response to systemic administration of a variety of 5-HT1 receptor agonists. 2. A stable output of reliably detectable endogenous 5-HT was measured in dialysates collected from ventral hippocampus with the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, citalopram, present in the perfusion medium. 3. Under these conditions the putative 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) caused a dose-dependent (5-250 micrograms kg-1, s.c.) reduction of 5-HT in hippocampal dialysates. 4. Similarly, the putative 5-HT1A agonists gepirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.), ipsapirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) and buspirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) markedly reduced levels of 5-HT in hippocampal perfusates whereas their common metabolite 1-(2-pyrimidinyl) piperazine (5 mg kg-1, s.c.), which does not bind to central 5-HT1A recognition sites, had no effect. 5. 5-Methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H-indole (RU 24969), a drug with reported high affinity for brain 5-HT1B binding sites, also produced a dose-dependent (0.25-5 mg kg-1, s.c.) decrease of hippocampal 5-HT output. 6. These data are direct biochemical evidence that systemically administered putative 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B agonists markedly inhibit 5-HT release in rat ventral hippocampus in vivo. PMID:2466516

  9. Dopamine D1 receptor stimulation modulates the formation and retrieval of novel object recognition memory: Role of the prelimbic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pezze, Marie A.; Marshall, Hayley J.; Fone, Kevin C.F.; Cassaday, Helen J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that dopamine D1 receptor antagonists impair novel object recognition memory but the effects of dopamine D1 receptor stimulation remain to be determined. This study investigated the effects of the selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF81297 on acquisition and retrieval in the novel object recognition task in male Wistar rats. SKF81297 (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg s.c.) given 15 min before the sampling phase impaired novel object recognition evaluated 10 min or 24 h later. The same treatments also reduced novel object recognition memory tested 24 h after the sampling phase and when given 15 min before the choice session. These data indicate that D1 receptor stimulation modulates both the encoding and retrieval of object recognition memory. Microinfusion of SKF81297 (0.025 or 0.05 μg/side) into the prelimbic sub-region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in this case 10 min before the sampling phase also impaired novel object recognition memory, suggesting that the mPFC is one important site mediating the effects of D1 receptor stimulation on visual recognition memory. PMID:26277743

  10. Dopamine D1 receptor stimulation modulates the formation and retrieval of novel object recognition memory: Role of the prelimbic cortex.

    PubMed

    Pezze, Marie A; Marshall, Hayley J; Fone, Kevin C F; Cassaday, Helen J

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that dopamine D1 receptor antagonists impair novel object recognition memory but the effects of dopamine D1 receptor stimulation remain to be determined. This study investigated the effects of the selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF81297 on acquisition and retrieval in the novel object recognition task in male Wistar rats. SKF81297 (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg s.c.) given 15 min before the sampling phase impaired novel object recognition evaluated 10 min or 24 h later. The same treatments also reduced novel object recognition memory tested 24 h after the sampling phase and when given 15 min before the choice session. These data indicate that D1 receptor stimulation modulates both the encoding and retrieval of object recognition memory. Microinfusion of SKF81297 (0.025 or 0.05 μg/side) into the prelimbic sub-region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in this case 10 min before the sampling phase also impaired novel object recognition memory, suggesting that the mPFC is one important site mediating the effects of D1 receptor stimulation on visual recognition memory.

  11. Characterization of an acromesomelic dysplasia, Grebe type case: novel mutation affecting the recognition motif at the processing site of GDF5.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Garcia, Monica; Garcia-Canto, Eva; Fenollar-Cortes, Maria; Aytes, Antonio Perez; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José

    2016-09-01

    Acromesomelic dysplasia, Grebe type is a very rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by severe dwarfism with marked micromelia and deformation of the upper and lower limbs, with a proximodistal gradient of severity. CDMP1 gene mutations have been associated with Grebe syndrome, Hunter-Thompson syndrome, Du Pan syndrome and brachydactyly type C. The proband is a 4-year-old boy, born of consanguineous Pakistani parents. Radiographic imaging revealed features typical of Grebe syndrome: severe shortening of the forearms with an acromesomelic pattern following a proximodistal gradient, with distal parts more severely affected than medial parts; hypoplastic hands, with the phalangeal zone more affected than the metacarpal zone; and severe hypoplastic tibial/femoral zones in both limbs. After molecular analyses, the p.Arg377Trp variant in a homozygous pattern was identified in the CDMP1 gene in the affected child. In silico and structural analyses predicted the p.Arg377Trp amino acid change to be pathogenic. Of the 34 mutations described in the CDMP1 gene, four different missense mutations have been associated with Grebe syndrome. The CDMP1 gene encodes growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5), which plays a role in regulation of limb patterning, joint formation and distal bone growth. Homozygous mutations in the mature domain of GDF5 result in severe limb malformations such as the Grebe type or the Hunter-Thompson type of acromesomelic chondrodysplasia. The p.Arg377Trp mutation is located within the recognition motif at the processing site of GDF5 where the sequence RRKRR changes to WRKRR. The genotype-phenotype correlation allowed not only confirmation of the clinical diagnosis but also appropriate genetic counselling to be offered to this family.

  12. Spermine improves recognition memory deficit in a rodent model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Velloso, Nádia A; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Gomes, Guilherme M; Rubin, Maribel A; Canas, Paula M; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Mello, Carlos F

    2009-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with motor and cognitive impairment. Intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid (QA) causes neurodegeneration, glial proliferation and cognitive impairment in animals, which are similar to these seen in human HD. Since polyamines improve memory in cognitive tasks, we now tested if the post-training intrastriatal administration of spermine, an agonist of the polyamine site at the NMDA receptor, reverses the deficits in the object recognition task induced by QA. Bilateral striatal injections of QA (180 or 360 nmol/site) caused object recognition impairment, neuronal death and reactive astrogliosis. A single injection of spermine (0.1 and 1 nmol/site), 5 days after QA injection, reversed QA-induced impairment of object recognition task. Spermine (0.1 nmol/site) also inhibited QA-induced reactive astrogliosis measured by a semi-quantitative determination of GFAP immunolabelling, but did not alter neuronal death, measured by a semi-quantitative determination of fluoro-Jade C staining. These results suggest that polyamine binding sites may be considered a novel therapeutic target to prevent reactive astrogliosis and mnemonic deficits in HD.

  13. Agonist-receptor-arrestin, an alternative ternary complex with high agonist affinity.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V V; Pals-Rylaarsdam, R; Benovic, J L; Hosey, M M; Onorato, J J

    1997-11-14

    The rapid decrease of a response to a persistent stimulus, often termed desensitization, is a widespread biological phenomenon. Signal transduction by numerous G protein-coupled receptors appears to be terminated by a strikingly uniform two-step mechanism, most extensively characterized for the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR), m2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor (m2 mAChR), and rhodopsin. The model predicts that activated receptor is initially phosphorylated and then tightly binds an arrestin protein that effectively blocks further G protein interaction. Here we report that complexes of beta2AR-arrestin and m2 mAChR-arrestin have a higher affinity for agonists (but not antagonists) than do receptors not complexed with arrestin. The percentage of phosphorylated beta2AR in this high affinity state in the presence of full agonists varied with different arrestins and was enhanced by selective mutations in arrestins. The percentage of high affinity sites also was proportional to the intrinsic activity of an agonist, and the coefficient of proportionality varies for different arrestin proteins. Certain mutant arrestins can form these high affinity complexes with unphosphorylated receptors. Mutations that enhance formation of the agonist-receptor-arrestin complexes should provide useful tools for manipulating both the efficiency of signaling and rate and specificity of receptor internalization.

  14. Agonist-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper looks at ion channels as an example of the pharmacologist's stock in trade, the action of an agonist on a receptor to produce a response. Looked at in this way, ion channels have been helpful because they are still the only system which is simple enough for quantitative investigation of transduction mechanisms. A short history is given of attempts to elucidate what happens between the time when agonist first binds, and the time when the channel opens. PMID:16402101

  15. An isocytidine derivative with a 2-amino-6-methylpyridine unit for selective recognition of the CG interrupting site in an antiparallel triplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hidenori; Taniguchi, Yosuke; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2014-11-03

    Sequence-specific recognition of duplex DNA mediated by triple helix formation offers a potential basis for oligonucleotide therapy and biotechnology. However, triplex formation is limited mostly to homopurine strands, due to poor stabilization at CG or TA base pairs in the target duplex DNA sequences. Several non-natural nucleosides have been designed for the recognition of CG or TA base pairs within an antiparallel triplex DNA. Nevertheless, problems including low selectivity and high dependence on the neighboring bases remain unsolved. We thus synthesized N(2)-arylmethyl isodC derivatives and incorporated them into triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) for the selective recognition of the CG base pair within antiparallel triplex DNA. It was shown that an isodC derivative bearing a 2-amino-6-methylpyridine moiety (AP-isodC) recognizes the CG base pair with high selectivity in antiparallel triplex DNA irrespective of the flanking base pairs.

  16. Benzodiazepine agonist and inverse agonist actions on GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. II. Chronic effects of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, K.J.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Mice were made tolerant to and dependent on ethanol by administration of a liquid diet. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-dependent uptake of 36Cl- by mouse cortical microsacs was used to study the actions of benzodiazepine (BZ) agonists and inverse agonists. Chronic exposure to ethanol attenuated the ability of a BZ agonist, flunitrazepam, to augment muscimol-stimulated uptake of 36Cl- and enhanced the actions of BZ inverse agonists, Ro15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,4)-benzodiazepine - 3-carboxylate) and DMCM (methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate), to inhibit GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. Augmentation of chloride flux by pentobarbital was not reduced by chronic ethanol exposure. Attenuation of flunitrazepam efficacy was transient and returned to control levels within 6 to 24 hr after withdrawal from ethanol, but increased sensitivity to Ro15-4513 was observed as long as 8 days after withdrawal. Chronic exposure to ethanol did not alter (3H)SR 95531 (2-(3'-carbethoxy-2'propyl)-3-amino-6-p-methoxyphenylpyridazinium bromide) binding to low-affinity GABAA receptors or muscimol stimulation of chloride flux; and did not alter (3H)Ro15-4513 or (3H)flunitrazepam binding to central BZ receptors or allosteric modulation of this binding by muscimol (i.e., muscimol-shift). These results suggest that chronic exposure to ethanol reduces coupling between BZ agonist sites and the chloride channel, and may be responsible for the development of cross-tolerance between ethanol and BZ agonists. In contrast, coupling between BZ inverse agonist sites and the chloride channel is increased.

  17. Modeling ligand recognition at the P2Y12 receptor in light of X-ray structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletta, Silvia; Sabbadin, Davide; von Kügelgen, Ivar; Hinz, Sonja; Katritch, Vsevolod; Hoffmann, Kristina; Abdelrahman, Aliaa; Straßburger, Jens; Baqi, Younis; Zhao, Qiang; Stevens, Raymond C.; Moro, Stefano; Müller, Christa E.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-08-01

    The G protein-coupled P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) is an important antithrombotic target and of great interest for pharmaceutical discovery. Its recently solved, highly divergent crystallographic structures in complex either with nucleotides (full or partial agonist) or with a nonnucleotide antagonist raise the question of which structure is more useful to understand ligand recognition. Therefore, we performed extensive molecular modeling studies based on these structures and mutagenesis, to predict the binding modes of major classes of P2Y12R ligands previously reported. Various nucleotide derivatives docked readily to the agonist-bound P2Y12R, but uncharged nucleotide-like antagonist ticagrelor required a hybrid receptor resembling the agonist-bound P2Y12R except for the top portion of TM6. Supervised molecular dynamics (SuMD) of ticagrelor binding indicated interactions with the extracellular regions of P2Y12R, defining possible meta-binding sites. Ureas, sulfonylureas, sulfonamides, anthraquinones and glutamic acid piperazines docked readily to the antagonist-bound P2Y12R. Docking dinucleotides at both agonist- and antagonist-bound structures suggested interactions with two P2Y12R pockets. Thus, our structure-based approach consistently rationalized the main structure-activity relationships within each ligand class, giving useful information for designing improved ligands.

  18. Rate constants of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors in rat brain medulla. Evaluation by competition kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, G.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1985-07-25

    The method of competition kinetics, which measures the binding kinetics of an unlabeled ligand through its effect on the binding kinetics of a labeled ligand, was employed to investigate the kinetics of muscarinic agonist binding to rat brain medulla pons homogenates. The agonists studied were acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and oxotremorine, with N-methyl-4-(TH)piperidyl benzilate employed as the radiolabeled ligand. Our results suggested that the binding of muscarinic agonists to the high affinity sites is characterized by dissociation rate constants higher by 2 orders of magnitude than those of antagonists, with rather similar association rate constants. Our findings also suggest that isomerization of the muscarinic receptors following ligand binding is significant in the case of antagonists, but not of agonists. Moreover, it is demonstrated that in the medulla pons preparation, agonist-induced interconversion between high and low affinity bindings sites does not occur to an appreciable extent.

  19. Crystal structure of a human cleavage factor CFI(m)25/CFI(m)68/RNA complex provides an insight into poly(A) site recognition and RNA looping.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Coseno, Molly; Gilmartin, Gregory M; Doublié, Sylvie

    2011-03-09

    Cleavage factor I(m) (CFI(m)) is a highly conserved component of the eukaryotic mRNA 3' processing machinery that functions in sequence-specific poly(A) site recognition through the collaboration of a 25 kDa subunit containing a Nudix domain and a larger subunit of 59, 68, or 72 kDa containing an RNA recognition motif (RRM). Our previous work demonstrated that CFI(m)25 is both necessary and sufficient for sequence-specific binding of the poly(A) site upstream element UGUA. Here, we report the crystal structure of CFI(m)25 complexed with the RRM domain of CFI(m)68 and RNA. The CFI(m)25 dimer is clasped on opposite sides by two CFI(m)68 RRM domains. Each CFI(m)25 subunit binds one UGUA element specifically. Biochemical analysis indicates that the CFI(m)68 RRMs serve to enhance RNA binding and facilitate RNA looping. The intrinsic ability of CFI(m) to direct RNA looping may provide a mechanism for its function in the regulation of alternative poly(A) site selection.

  20. Synthesis of a specific monolithic column with artificial recognition sites for L-glutamic acid via cryo-crosslinking of imprinted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Göktürk, Ilgım; Üzek, Recep; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a new molecular imprinting (MIP)-based monolithic cryogel column was prepared using chemically crosslinked molecularly imprinted nanoparticles, to achieve a simplified chromatographic separation (SPE) for a model compound, L-glutamic acid (L-Glu). Cryogelation through crosslinking of imprinted nanoparticles forms stable monolithic cryogel columns. This technique reduces the leakage of nanoparticles and increases the surface area, while protecting the structural features of the cryogel for stable and efficient recognition of the template molecule. A non-imprinted monolithic cryogel column (NIP) was also prepared, using non-imprinted nanoparticles produced without the addition of L-Glu during polymerization. The molecularly imprinted monolithic cryogel column (MIP) indicates apparent recognition selectivity and a good adsorption capacity compared to the NIP. Also, we have achieved a significant increase in the adsorption capacity, using the advantage of high surface area of the nanoparticles.

  1. A model of EcoRII restriction endonuclease action: the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpova, E. A.; Kubareva, E. A.; Shabarova, Z. A.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of interaction of restriction endonuclease EcoRII with DNA, we studied by native gel electrophoresis the binding of this endonuclease to a set of synthetic DNA-duplexes containing the modified or canonical recognition sequence 5'-d(CCA/TGG)-3'. All binding substrate or substrate analogues tested could be divided into two major groups: (i) duplexes that, at the interaction with endonuclease EcoRII, form two types of stable complexes on native gel in the absence of Mg2+ cofactor; (ii) duplexes that form only one type of complex, observed both in the presence and absence of Mg2+. Unlike the latter, duplexes under the first group can be hydrolyzed by endonuclease. Data obtained suggest that the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition sequence. A model of EcoRII endonuclease action is presented.

  2. Virtual screening of CB(2) receptor agonists from bayesian network and high-throughput docking: structural insights into agonist-modulated GPCR features.

    PubMed

    Renault, Nicolas; Laurent, Xavier; Farce, Amaury; El Bakali, Jamal; Mansouri, Roxane; Gervois, Philippe; Millet, Régis; Desreumaux, Pierre; Furman, Christophe; Chavatte, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    The relevance of CB(2)-mediated therapeutics is well established in the treatment of pain, neurodegenerative and gastrointestinal tract disorders. Recent works such as the crystallization of class-A G-protein-coupled receptors in a range of active states and the identification of specific anchoring sites for CB(2) agonists challenged us to design a reliable agonist-bound homology model of CB(2) receptor. Docking-scoring enrichment tests of a high-throughput virtual screening of 140 compounds led to 13 hits within the micromolar affinity range. Most of these hits behaved as CB(2) agonists, among which two novel full agonists emerged. Although the main challenge was a high-throughput docking run targeting an agonist-bound state of a CB(2) model, a prior 2D ligand-based Bayesian network was computed to enrich the input commercial library for 3D screening. The exclusive discovery of agonists illustrates the reliability of this agonist-bound state model for the identification of polar and aromatic amino acids as new agonist-modulated CB(2) features to be integrated in the wide activation pathway of G-protein-coupled receptors.

  3. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  4. Dopamine agonist therapy in hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Webster, J

    1999-12-01

    Introduction of the dopamine agonist bromocriptine heralded a major advance in the management of hyperprolactinemic disorders. Although its side effects of nausea, dizziness and headache and its short elimination half-life are limiting factors, its efficacy established it as a reference compound against the activity of which several dopamine agonists, like pergolide, lysuride, metergoline, terguride and dihydroergocristine, fell by the wayside. More recently, two new agents, cabergoline and quinagolide, have been introduced and appear to offer considerable advantages over bromocriptine. Cabergoline, an ergoline D2 agonist, has a long plasma half-life that enables once- or twice-weekly administration. Quinagolide, in contrast, is a nonergot D2 agonist with an elimination half-life intermediate between those of bromocriptine and cabergoline, allowing the drug to be administered once daily. Comparative studies indicate that cabergoline is clearly superior to bromocriptine in efficacy (prolactin suppression, restoration of gonadal function) and in tolerability. In similar studies, quinagolide appeared to have similar efficacy and superior tolerability to that of bromocriptine. Results of a small crossover study indicate that cabergoline is better tolerated, with a trend toward activity superior to that of quinagolide. In hyperprolactinemic men and in women not seeking to become pregnant, cabergoline may be regarded as the treatment of choice.

  5. A unique binding epitope for salvinorin A, a non-nitrogenous kappa opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Kane, Brian E; Nieto, Marcelo J; McCurdy, Christopher R; Ferguson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Salvinorin A is a potent kappa opioid receptor (KOP) agonist with unique structural and pharmacological properties. This non-nitrogenous ligand lacks nearly all the structural features commonly associated with opioid ligand binding and selectivity. This study explores the structural basis to salvinorin A binding and selectivity using a combination of chimeric and single-point mutant opioid receptors. The experiments were designed based on previous models of salvinorin A that locate the ligand within a pocket formed by transmembrane (TM) II, VI, and VII. More traditional sites of opioid recognition were also explored, including the highly conserved aspartate in TM III (D138) and the KOP selectivity site E297, to determine the role, if any, that these residues play in binding and selectivity. The results indicate that salvinorin A recognizes a cluster of residues in TM II and VII, including Q115, Y119, Y312, Y313, and Y320. Based on the position of these residues within the receptor, and prior study on salvinorin A, a model is proposed that aligns the ligand vertically, between TM II and VII. In this orientation, the ligand spans residues that are spaced one to two turns down the face of the helices within the receptor cavity. The ligand is also in close proximity to EL-2 which, based on chimeric data, is proposed to play an indirect role in salvinorin A binding and selectivity.

  6. The pharmacological properties of the imidazobenzodiazepine, FG 8205, a novel partial agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tricklebank, M.D.; Honoré, T.; Iversen, S.D.; Kemp, J.A.; Knight, A.R.; Marshall, G.R.; Rupniak, N.M.J.; Singh, L.; Tye, S.; Watjen, F.; Wong, E.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    1 The pharmacological properties of the benzodiazepine receptor ligand, FG 8205 (7-chloro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-3-(5-isopropyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-4H- imidazol[1,5a][1,4]benzodiazepine) have been examined. 2 FG 8205 potently displaced [3H]-flumazenil binding in rat cortical membranes with a K1 of 3.3 nM, but was inactive at 13 neurotransmitter recognition sites. 3 Consistent with a partial agonist profile, the affinity of FG 8205 for the benzodiazepine recognition site was increased in the presence of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 300μM) by a degree (—log [IC50 in the presence of GABA/IC50 alone] = 0.34) significantly less than found for diazepam (0.46). FG 8205 also potentiated the inhibitory potency of the GABAA-receptor agonist, isoguvacine, on the hippocampal CA1 population spike and, again, the maximum shift (—log dose-ratio = 0.2) was significantly less than that seen with diazepam (0.4). 4 In anticonvulsant studies, the ED50 doses of FG 8205 and diazepam needed to antagonize seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) or by sound in audiogenic seizure prone mice were similar with values of 0.2–0.3 mgkg-1, i.p. However, even high doses of FG 8205 (50 mgkg-1) did not protect against seizures induced by electroshock. 5 FG 8205 released responding suppressed by footshock in a rat operant conditioned emotional response task over the dose range 0.5–50 mgkg-1 (i.p.). Similar doses of FG 8205 had a marked taming effect in cynomolgus monkeys. However, measures of sedation and ataxia (as measured by rotarod in the mouse, climbing behaviour in the rat, and by scoring arousal and co-ordination in primates) were slight and only transiently affected by FG 8205, and FG 8205 significantly antagonized the rotarod performance deficit induced by diazepam in the mouse. 6 While the potentiation by FG 8205 of the response to isoguvacine in the rat hippocampal slice and the anxiolytic-like effects of the compound in both rats and primates were reversed by the

  7. Macromolecular recognition: Recognition of polymer side chains by cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of cyclodextrins (CD) with water soluble polymers possessing guest residues has been investigated as model systems in biological molecular recognition. The selectivity of interaction of CD with polymer-carrying guest residues is controlled by polymer chains, i.e., the steric effect of polymer main chain, the conformational effect of polymer main chain, and multi-site interaction. Macroscopic assemblies have been also realized based on molecular recognition using polyacrylamide-based gels possessing CD and guest residues.

  8. In silico screening for agonists and blockers of the β2 adrenergic receptor: implications of inactive and activated state structures

    PubMed Central

    Costanzi, Stefano; Vilar, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Ten crystal structures of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) have been published, reflecting different signaling states. Here, through controlled docking experiments, we examined the implications of using inactive or activated structures on the in silico screening for agonists and blockers of the receptor. Specifically, we targeted the crystal structures solved in complex with carazolol (2RH1), the neutral antagonist alprenalol (3NYA), the irreversible agonist FAUC50 (3PDS) and the full agonist BI-167017 (3P0G). Our results indicate that activated structures favor agonists over blockers while inactive structures favor blockers over agonists. This tendency is more marked for activated than for inactive structures. Additionally, agonists tend to receive more favorable docking scores when docked at activated rather than inactive structures, while blockers do the opposite. Hence, the difference between the docking scores attained with an activated and an inactive structure is an excellent means for the classification of ligands into agonists and blockers, as we determined through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). With respect to virtual screening, all structures prioritized well agonists and blockers over non-binders. However, inactive structures worked better for blockers and activated structures worked better for agonists. Notably, the combination of individual docking experiments through receptor ensemble docking (RED) resulted in an excellent performance in the retrieval of both agonists and blockers. Finally, we demonstrated that the induced fit docking of agonists is a viable way of modifying an inactive crystal structure and bias it towards the in silico recognition of agonists rather than blockers. PMID:22170280

  9. Improved design of hammerhead ribozyme for selective digestion of target RNA through recognition of site-specific adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Masatora; Kurihara, Kei; Yamaguchi, Shota; Oyama, Yui; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2014-03-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is an endogenous regulatory mechanism involved in various biological processes. Site-specific, editing-state-dependent degradation of target RNA may be a powerful tool both for analyzing the mechanism of RNA editing and for regulating biological processes. Previously, we designed an artificial hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) for selective, site-specific RNA cleavage dependent on the A-to-I RNA editing state. In the present work, we developed an improved strategy for constructing a trans-acting HHR that specifically cleaves target editing sites in the adenosine but not the inosine state. Specificity for unedited sites was achieved by utilizing a sequence encoding the intrinsic cleavage specificity of a natural HHR. We used in vitro selection methods in an HHR library to select for an extended HHR containing a tertiary stabilization motif that facilitates HHR folding into an active conformation. By using this method, we successfully constructed highly active HHRs with unedited-specific cleavage. Moreover, using HHR cleavage followed by direct sequencing, we demonstrated that this ribozyme could cleave serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) mRNA extracted from mouse brain, depending on the site-specific editing state. This unedited-specific cleavage also enabled us to analyze the effect of editing state at the E and C sites on editing at other sites by using direct sequencing for the simultaneous quantification of the editing ratio at multiple sites. Our approach has the potential to elucidate the mechanism underlying the interdependencies of different editing states in substrate RNA with multiple editing sites.

  10. Improved design of hammerhead ribozyme for selective digestion of target RNA through recognition of site-specific adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masatora; Kurihara, Kei; Yamaguchi, Shota; Oyama, Yui; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is an endogenous regulatory mechanism involved in various biological processes. Site-specific, editing-state–dependent degradation of target RNA may be a powerful tool both for analyzing the mechanism of RNA editing and for regulating biological processes. Previously, we designed an artificial hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) for selective, site-specific RNA cleavage dependent on the A-to-I RNA editing state. In the present work, we developed an improved strategy for constructing a trans-acting HHR that specifically cleaves target editing sites in the adenosine but not the inosine state. Specificity for unedited sites was achieved by utilizing a sequence encoding the intrinsic cleavage specificity of a natural HHR. We used in vitro selection methods in an HHR library to select for an extended HHR containing a tertiary stabilization motif that facilitates HHR folding into an active conformation. By using this method, we successfully constructed highly active HHRs with unedited-specific cleavage. Moreover, using HHR cleavage followed by direct sequencing, we demonstrated that this ribozyme could cleave serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) mRNA extracted from mouse brain, depending on the site-specific editing state. This unedited-specific cleavage also enabled us to analyze the effect of editing state at the E and C sites on editing at other sites by using direct sequencing for the simultaneous quantification of the editing ratio at multiple sites. Our approach has the potential to elucidate the mechanism underlying the interdependencies of different editing states in substrate RNA with multiple editing sites. PMID:24448449

  11. Conjoint Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainerd, C. J.; Reyna, V. F.; Mojardin, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews some limiting properties of the process-dissociation model as it applies to the study of dual-process conceptions of memory. A second-generation model (conjoint recognition) is proposed to address these limitations and supply additional capabilities. Worked applications to data are provided. (Author/GCP)

  12. Novel diazabicycloalkane delta opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Loriga, Giovanni; Lazzari, Paolo; Manca, Ilaria; Ruiu, Stefania; Falzoi, Matteo; Murineddu, Gabriele; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Pinna, Giovanni; Pinna, Gérard Aimè

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the investigation of diazabicycloalkane cores as potential new scaffolds for the development of novel analogues of the previously reported diazatricyclodecane selective delta (δ) opioid agonists, as conformationally constrained homologues of the reference δ agonist (+)-4-[(αR)-α((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80). In particular, we have simplified the diazatricyclodecane motif of δ opioid agonist prototype 1a with bridged bicyclic cores. 3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptane, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane, and 3,10-diazabicyclo[4.3.1]decane were adopted as core motifs of the novel derivatives. The compounds were synthesized and biologically assayed as racemic (3-5) or diastereoisomeric (6,7) mixtures. All the novel compounds 3-7 showed δ agonism behaviour and remarkable affinity to δ receptors. Amongst the novel derivatives, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane based compound 4 evidenced improved δ affinity and selectivity relative to SNC80.

  13. Use-dependent inhibition of P2X3 receptors by nanomolar agonist.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Emily B; Brink, Thaddeus S; Bergson, Pamela; Voigt, Mark M; Cook, Sean P

    2005-08-10

    P2X3 receptors desensitize within 100 ms of channel activation, yet recovery from desensitization requires several minutes. The molecular basis for this slow rate of recovery is unknown. We designed experiments to test the hypothesis that this slow recovery is attributable to the high affinity (< 1 nM) of desensitized P2X3 receptors for agonist. We found that agonist binding to the desensitized state provided a mechanism for potent inhibition of P2X3 current. Sustained applications of 0.5 nM ATP inhibited > 50% of current to repetitive applications of P2X3 agonist. Inhibition occurred at 1000-fold lower agonist concentrations than required for channel activation and showed strong use dependence. No inhibition occurred without previous activation and desensitization. Our data are consistent with a model whereby inhibition of P2X3 by nanomolar [agonist] occurs by the rebinding of agonist to desensitized channels before recovery from desensitization. For several ATP analogs, the concentration required to inhibit P2X3 current inversely correlated with the rate of recovery from desensitization. This indicates that the affinity of the desensitized state and recovery rate primarily depend on the rate of agonist unbinding. Consistent with this hypothesis, unbinding of [32P]ATP from desensitized P2X3 receptors mirrored the rate of recovery from desensitization. As expected, disruption of agonist binding by site-directed mutagenesis increased the IC50 for inhibition and increased the rate of recovery.

  14. Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site recognition by the 5'-dRP/AP lyase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1).

    PubMed

    Khodyreva, S N; Prasad, R; Ilina, E S; Sukhanova, M V; Kutuzov, M M; Liu, Y; Hou, E W; Wilson, S H; Lavrik, O I

    2010-12-21

    The capacity of human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) to interact with intact apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA has been demonstrated. In cell extracts, sodium borohydride reduction of the PARP-1/AP site DNA complex resulted in covalent cross-linking of PARP-1 to DNA; the identity of cross-linked PARP-1 was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Using purified human PARP-1, the specificity of PARP-1 binding to AP site-containing DNA was confirmed in competition binding experiments. PARP-1 was only weakly activated to conduct poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis upon binding to AP site-containing DNA, but was strongly activated for poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis upon strand incision by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). By virtue of its binding to AP sites, PARP-1 could be poised for its role in base excision repair, pending DNA strand incision by APE1 or the 5'-dRP/AP lyase activity in PARP-1.

  15. Glycan Microheterogeneity at the PGT135 Antibody Recognition Site on HIV-1 gp120 Reveals a Molecular Mechanism for Neutralization Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Laura K.; Spencer, Daniel I. R.; Royle, Louise; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Doores, Katie J.

    2015-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been isolated that bind the glycan shield of the HIV-1 envelope spike. One such antibody, PGT135, contacts the intrinsic mannose patch of gp120 at the Asn332, Asn392, and Asn386 glycosylation sites. Here, site-specific glycosylation analysis of recombinant gp120 revealed glycan microheterogeneity sufficient to explain the existence of a minor population of virions resistant to PGT135 neutralization. Target microheterogeneity and antibody glycan specificity are therefore important parameters in HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:25878100

  16. Regulation of membrane cholecystokinin-2 receptor by agonists enables classification of partial agonists as biased agonists.

    PubMed

    Magnan, Rémi; Masri, Bernard; Escrieut, Chantal; Foucaud, Magali; Cordelier, Pierre; Fourmy, Daniel

    2011-02-25

    Given the importance of G-protein-coupled receptors as pharmacological targets in medicine, efforts directed at understanding the molecular mechanism by which pharmacological compounds regulate their presence at the cell surface is of paramount importance. In this context, using confocal microscopy and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, we have investigated internalization and intracellular trafficking of the cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R) in response to both natural and synthetic ligands with different pharmacological features. We found that CCK and gastrin, which are full agonists on CCK2R-induced inositol phosphate production, rapidly and abundantly stimulate internalization. Internalized CCK2R did not rapidly recycle to plasma membrane but instead was directed to late endosomes/lysosomes. CCK2R endocytosis involves clathrin-coated pits and dynamin and high affinity and prolonged binding of β-arrestin1 or -2. Partial agonists and antagonists on CCK2R-induced inositol phosphate formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation did not stimulate CCK2R internalization or β-arrestin recruitment to the CCK2R but blocked full agonist-induced internalization and β-arrestin recruitment. The extreme C-terminal region of the CCK2R (and more precisely phosphorylatable residues Ser(437)-Xaa(438)-Thr(439)-Thr(440)-Xaa(441)-Ser(442)-Thr(443)) were critical for β-arrestin recruitment. However, this region and β-arrestins were dispensable for CCK2R internalization. In conclusion, this study allowed us to classify the human CCK2R as a member of class B G-protein-coupled receptors with regard to its endocytosis features and identified biased agonists of the CCK2R. These new important insights will allow us to investigate the role of internalized CCK2R·β-arrestin complexes in cancers expressing this receptor and to develop new diagnosis and therapeutic strategies targeting this receptor.

  17. Substrate specificity of the agonist-stimulated release of polyunsaturated fatty acids from vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Garcia, M.C.; Sprecher, H. )

    1989-11-01

    Stimulation of vascular endothelial cells with agonists such as histamine and thrombin results in release of arachidonic acid from membrane lipids and subsequent eicosanoid synthesis. As shown previously, the agonist-stimulated deacylation is specific for arachidonate, eicosapentaenoate, and 5,8,11-eicosatrienoate. This study has utilized radiolabeled fatty acids differing in chain length and position of double bonds to further elucidate the fatty acyl specificity of agonist-stimulated deacylation. Replicate wells of confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 14C-labeled fatty acids and then challenged with histamine, thrombin, or the calcium ionophore A23187. Comparison of the results obtained with isomeric eicosatetraenoic fatty acids with initial double bonds at carbons 4, 5, or 6 indicated that the deacylation induced by all three agonists exhibited marked specificity for the cis-5 double bond. Lack of stringent chain length specificity was indicated by agonist-stimulated release of 5,8,11,14- tetraenoic fatty acids with 18, 19, 20, and 21 carbons. Release of 5,8,14-(14C)eicosatrienoate was two-to threefold that of 5,11,14-(14C)eicosatrienoate, thus indicating that the cis-8 double bond may also contribute to the stringent recognition by the agonist-sensitive phospholipase. The present study has also demonstrated that histamine, thrombin, and A23187 do not stimulate release of docosahexaenoate from endothelial cells.

  18. Conjoint recognition.

    PubMed

    Brainerd, C J; Reyna, V F; Mojardin, A H

    1999-01-01

    The process-dissociation model has stimulated important advances in the study of dual-process conceptions of memory. The authors review some limiting properties of that model and consider the degree of support for its parent theory (the recollection-familiarity distinction). A 2nd-generation model (conjoint recognition) is proposed that addresses these limitations and supplies additional capabilities, such as goodness-of-fit tests, the ability to measure dual processes for false-memory responses, and statistical procedures for testing within- and between-conditions hypotheses about its parameters. The conjoint-recognition model also implements an alternative theoretical interpretation (the identity-similarity distinction of fuzzy-trace theory). Worked applications to data are provided.

  19. Inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase is a distant IPK member with a singular inositide binding site for axial 2-OH recognition

    PubMed Central

    González, Beatriz; Baños-Sanz, Jose Ignacio; Villate, Maider; Brearley, Charles Alistair; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Inositol phosphates (InsPs) are signaling molecules with multiple roles in cells. In particular (InsP6) is involved in mRNA export and editing or chromatin remodeling among other events. InsP6 accumulates as mixed salts (phytate) in storage tissues of plants and plays a key role in their physiology. Human diets that are exclusively grain-based provide an excess of InsP6 that, through chelation of metal ions, may have a detrimental effect on human health. Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5 2-kinase (InsP5 2-kinase or Ipk1) catalyses the synthesis of InsP6 from InsP5 and ATP, and is the only enzyme that transfers a phosphate group to the axial 2-OH of the myo-inositide. We present the first structure for an InsP5 2-kinase in complex with both substrates and products. This enzyme presents a singular structural region for inositide binding that encompasses almost half of the protein. The key residues in substrate binding are identified, with Asp368 being responsible for recognition of the axial 2-OH. This study sheds light on the unique molecular mechanism for the synthesis of the precursor of inositol pyrophosphates. PMID:20453199

  20. Peptide recognition by heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) chromoshadow domains revisited: Plasticity in the pseudosymmetric histone binding site of human HP1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Qin, Su; Lei, Ming; Tempel, Wolfram; Zhang, Yuzhe; Loppnau, Peter; Li, Yanjun; Min, Jinrong

    2017-04-07

    Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), a highly conserved non-histone chromosomal protein in eukaryotes, plays important roles in the regulation of gene transcription. Each of the three human homologs of HP1 includes a chromoshadow domain (CSD). The CSD interacts with various proteins bearing the PXVXL motif but also with a region of histone H3 that bears the similar PXXVXL motif. The latter interaction has not yet been resolved in atomic detail. Here we demonstrate that the CSDs of all three human HP1 homologs have comparable affinities to the PXXVXL motif of histone H3. The HP1 C-terminal extension enhances the affinity, as does the increasing length of the H3 peptide. The crystal structure of the human HP1γ CSD (CSDγ) in complex with an H3 peptide suggests that recognition of H3 by CSDγ to some extent resembles CSD-PXVXL interaction. Nevertheless, the prolyl residue of the PXXVXL motif appears to play a role distinct from that of Pro in the known HP1β CSD-PXVXL complexes. We consequently generalize the historical CSD-PXVXL interaction model and expand the search scope for additional CSD binding partners.

  1. Discovery of a novel site of opioid action at the innate immune pattern-recognition receptor TLR4 and its role in addiction.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jonathan Henry W; Watkins, Linda R; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Opioids have historically, and continue to be, an integral component of pain management. However, despite pharmacokinetic and dynamic optimization over the past 100 years, opioids continue to produce many undesirable side effects such as tolerance, reward, and dependence. As such, opioids are liable for addiction. Traditionally, opioid addiction was viewed as a solely neuronal process, and while substantial headway has been made into understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms mediating this process, research has however, been relatively ambivalent to how the rest of the central nervous system (CNS) responds to opioids. Evidence over the past 20 years has clearly demonstrated the importance of the immunocompetent cells of the CNS (glia) in many aspects of opioid pharmacology. Particular focus has been placed on microglia and astrocytes, who in response to opioids, become activated and release inflammatory mediators. Importantly, the mechanism underlying immune activation is beginning to be elucidated. Evidence suggests an innate immune pattern-recognition receptor (toll-like receptor 4) as an integral component underlying opioid-induced glial activation. The subsequent proinflammatory response may be viewed akin to neurotransmission creating a process termed central immune signaling. Translationally, we are beginning to appreciate the importance of central immune signaling as it contributes to many behavioral actions of addiction including reward, withdrawal, and craving. As such, the aim of this chapter is to review and integrate the neuronal and central immune signaling perspective of addiction.

  2. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I-III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the identification of DDR binding sites on collagen III. Using sets of overlapping triple-helical peptides, the Collagen II and Collagen III Toolkits, we located several DDR2 binding sites on both collagens. The interaction of DDR1 with Toolkit peptides was more restricted, with DDR1 mainly binding to peptides containing the GVMGFO motif. Triple-helical peptides containing the GVMGFO motif induced DDR1 transmembrane signalling, and DDR1 binding and receptor activation occurred with the same amino acid requirements as previously defined for DDR2. While both DDRs exhibit the same specificity for binding the GVMGFO motif, which is present only in fibrillar collagens, the two receptors display distinct preferences for certain non-fibrillar collagens, with the basement membrane collagen IV being exclusively recognised by DDR1. Based on our recent crystal structure of a DDR2-collagen complex, we designed mutations to identify the molecular determinants for DDR1 binding to collagen IV. By replacing five amino acids in DDR2 with the corresponding DDR1 residues we were able to create a DDR2 construct that could function as a collagen IV receptor.

  3. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  4. Crystal structure of human U1 snRNP, a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle, reveals the mechanism of 5' splice site recognition.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-02

    U1 snRNP binds to the 5' exon-intron junction of pre-mRNA and thus plays a crucial role at an early stage of pre-mRNA splicing. We present two crystal structures of engineered U1 sub-structures, which together reveal at atomic resolution an almost complete network of protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions within U1 snRNP, and show how the 5' splice site of pre-mRNA is recognised by U1 snRNP. The zinc-finger of U1-C interacts with the duplex between pre-mRNA and the 5'-end of U1 snRNA. The binding of the RNA duplex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between U1-C and the RNA backbone around the splice junction but U1-C makes no base-specific contacts with pre-mRNA. The structure, together with RNA binding assays, shows that the selection of 5'-splice site nucleotides by U1 snRNP is achieved predominantly through basepairing with U1 snRNA whilst U1-C fine-tunes relative affinities of mismatched 5'-splice sites.

  5. Centrally acting hypotensive agents with affinity for 5-HT1A binding sites inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in calf hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Schoeffter, P.; Hoyer, D.

    1988-01-01

    1. A number of centrally acting hypotensive agents and other ligands with high affinity for 5-hydroxytryptamine1A (5-HT1A) recognition sites have been tested on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in calf hippocampus, a functional model for 5-HT1A-receptors. 2. Concentration-dependent inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was elicited by the reference 5-HT1-receptor agonists (mean EC50 value, nM): 5-HT (22), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, 3.2), 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 8.6), N,N-dipropyl-5-carboxamidotryptamine (DP-5-CT, 2.3), 1-[2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-piperazine (PAPP or LY 165163, 20), 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H indole (RU 24969, 20), buspirone (65) and ipsapirone (56). Emax amounted to 18-20% inhibition for all but the latter two agonists (14%). 3. The following hypotensive agents with high affinity for 5-HT1A sites were potent agonists in this system (mean EC50 value, nM): flesinoxan (24), indorenate (99), erythro-1-(1-[2-(1,4-benzodioxan-2-yl)-2-hydroxyethyl]-4-piperidyl )- 2-benzimidazolinone (R 28935, 2.5), urapidil (390) and 5-methyl-urapidil (3.5). The first two agents were full agonists, whereas the latter three acted as partial agonists with 60-80% efficacy. 4. Metergoline and methysergide behaved as full agonists and cyanopindolol as a partial agonist with low efficacy. Spiroxatrine and 2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)aminomethyl- 1,4-benzodioxane (WB 4101) which bind to 5-HT1A sites with nanomolar affinity, were agonists and inhibited potently forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in calf hippocampus, showing mean EC50 values of 23 and 15 nM, respectively. Spiroxatrine and WB 4101 yielded 90% and 50% efficacy, respectively. 5. Spiperone and methiothepin (each 1 microM) caused rightward shifts of the concentration-effect curve to 8-OH-DPAT, without loss of the maximal effect, as did the partial agonist cyanopindolol (0.1 microM) and the

  6. Structural and Biochemical Studies Reveal a Putative FtsZ Recognition Site on the Z-ring Stabilizer ZapD

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hwajung; Min, Kyungjin; Mikami, Bunzo; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    FtsZ, a tubulin homologue, is an essential protein of the Z-ring assembly in bacterial cell division. It consists of two domains, the N-terminal and C-terminal core domains, and has a conserved C-terminal tail region. Lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments and several Z-ring associated proteins (Zaps) are necessary for modulating Z-ring formation. ZapD, one of the positive regulators of Z-ring assembly, directly binds to the C-terminal tail of FtsZ and promotes stable Z-ring formation during cytokinesis. To gain structural and functional insights into how ZapD interacts with the C-terminal tail of FtsZ, we solved two crystal structures of ZapD proteins from Salmonella typhimurium (StZapD) and Escherichia coli (EcZapD) at a 2.6 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively. Several conserved residues are clustered on the concave sides of the StZapD and EcZapD dimers, the suggested FtsZ binding site. Modeled structures of EcZapD-EcFtsZ and subsequent binding studies using bio-layer interferometry also identified the EcFtsZ binding site on EcZapD. The structural insights and the results of bio-layer interferometry assays suggest that the two FtsZ binding sites of ZapD dimer might be responsible for the binding of ZapD dimer to two protofilaments to hold them together. PMID:27871169

  7. Crystal structure of the DNA binding domain of the transcription factor T-bet suggests simultaneous recognition of distant genome sites

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ce Feng; Brandt, Gabriel S.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Naumova, Natalia; Lazarevic, Vanja; Hwang, Eun Sook; Dekker, Job; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor T-bet (Tbox protein expressed in T cells) is one of the master regulators of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. It plays a central role in T-cell lineage commitment, where it controls the TH1 response, and in gene regulation in plasma B-cells and dendritic cells. T-bet is a member of the Tbox family of transcription factors; however, T-bet coordinately regulates the expression of many more genes than other Tbox proteins. A central unresolved question is how T-bet is able to simultaneously recognize distant Tbox binding sites, which may be located thousands of base pairs away. We have determined the crystal structure of the Tbox DNA binding domain (DBD) of T-bet in complex with a palindromic DNA. The structure shows a quaternary structure in which the T-bet dimer has its DNA binding regions splayed far apart, making it impossible for a single dimer to bind both sites of the DNA palindrome. In contrast to most other Tbox proteins, a single T-bet DBD dimer binds simultaneously to identical half-sites on two independent DNA. A fluorescence-based assay confirms that T-bet dimers are able to bring two independent DNA molecules into close juxtaposition. Furthermore, chromosome conformation capture assays confirm that T-bet functions in the direct formation of chromatin loops in vitro and in vivo. The data are consistent with a looping/synapsing model for transcriptional regulation by T-bet in which a single dimer of the transcription factor can recognize and coalesce distinct genetic elements, either a promoter plus a distant regulatory element, or promoters on two different genes. PMID:27791029

  8. Sh-I-048A, an in vitro non-selective super-agonist at the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors: the approximated activation of receptor subtypes may explain behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Obradović, Aleksandar Lj; Joksimović, Srđan; Poe, Michael M; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Varagic, Zdravko; Namjoshi, Ojas; Batinić, Bojan; Radulović, Tamara; Marković, Bojan; Roth, Brian L; Sieghart, Werner; Cook, James M; Savić, Miroslav M

    2014-03-20

    Enormous progress in understanding the role of four populations of benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAA receptors was paralleled by the puzzling findings suggesting that substantial separation of behavioral effects may be accomplished by apparently non-selective modulators. We report on SH-I-048A, a newly synthesized chiral positive modulator of GABAA receptors characterized by exceptional subnanomolar affinity, high efficacy and non-selectivity. Its influence on behavior was assessed in Wistar rats and contrasted to that obtained with 2mg/kg diazepam. SH-I-048A reached micromolar concentrations in brain tissue, while the unbound fraction in brain homogenate was around 1.5%. The approximated electrophysiological responses, which estimated free concentrations of SH-I-048A or diazepam are able to elicit, suggested a similarity between the 10mg/kg dose of the novel ligand and 2mg/kg diazepam; however, SH-I-048A was relatively more active at α1- and α5-containing GABAA receptors. Behaviorally, SH-I-048A induced sedative, muscle relaxant and ataxic effects, reversed mechanical hyperalgesia 24h after injury, while it was devoid of clear anxiolytic actions and did not affect water-maze performance. While lack of clear anxiolytic actions may be connected with an enhanced potentiation at α1-containing GABAA receptors, the observed behavior in the rotarod, water maze and peripheral nerve injury tests was possibly affected by its prominent action at receptors containing the α5 subunit. The current results encourage further innovative approaches aimed at linking in vitro and in vivo data in order to help define fine-tuning mechanisms at four sensitive receptor populations that underlie subtle differences in behavioral profiles of benzodiazepine site ligands.

  9. Rational antigen modification as a strategy to upregulate or downregulate antigen recognition.

    PubMed

    Abrams, S I; Schlom, J

    2000-02-01

    Recent and rapid advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of antigen recognition by CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes have led to the birth of possibilities for site-directed, rational modification of cognate antigenic determinants. This immunologic concept has vast biomedical implications for regulation of host immunity against the pathogenesis of diverse disease processes. The upregulation of antigen-specific T-cell responses by 'agonistic' peptides would be most desirable in response to invasive pathogenic challenges, such as infectious and neoplastic disease, while the downregulation of antigen-specific T-cell responses by 'antagonistic' peptides would be most efficacious during inappropriate pathologic consequences, such as autoimmunity. The capacity to experimentally manipulate intrinsic properties of cognate peptide ligands to appropriately alter the nature, course and potency of cellular immune interactions has important potential in both preventive and therapeutic clinical paradigms.

  10. Dopamine receptor agonists, partial agonists and psychostimulant addiction.

    PubMed

    Pulvirenti, L; Koob, G F

    1994-10-01

    Despite the epidemic growth of psychostimulant addiction over the past years, few pharmacological means of intervention are available to date for clinical treatment. This is of importance since the withdrawal syndrome that follows abstinence from drugs such as cocaine and the amphetamines is characterized, among other symptoms, by intense craving for the abused drug, and this is considered a critical factor leading into relapse of drug use. In this article, Luigi Pulvirenti and George Koob focus on the modulatory role shown by drugs acting at the dopamine receptor on the various phases of psychostimulant dependence in preclinical models and in human studies, and suggest that a class of compounds with partial agonist properties at the dopamine receptor may have therapeutic potential.

  11. The glycine transport inhibitor sarcosine is an NMDA receptor co-agonist that differs from glycine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai Xia; Hyrc, Krzysztof; Thio, Liu Lin

    2009-01-01

    Sarcosine is an amino acid involved in one-carbon metabolism and a promising therapy for schizophrenia because it enhances NMDA receptor (NMDAR) function by inhibiting glycine uptake. The structural similarity between sarcosine and glycine led us to hypothesize that sarcosine is also an agonist like glycine. We examined this possibility using whole-cell recordings from cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons. We found that sarcosine is an NMDAR co-agonist at the glycine binding site. However, sarcosine differed from glycine because less NMDAR desensitization occurred with sarcosine than with glycine as the co-agonist. This finding led us to examine whether the physiological effects of NMDAR activation with these two co-agonists are the same. The difference in desensitization probably accounts for rises in intracellular Ca2+, as assessed by the fluorescent indicator fura-FF, being larger when NMDAR activation occurred with sarcosine than with glycine. In addition, Ca2+-activated K+ currents following NMDAR activation were larger with sarcosine than with glycine. Compared to glycine, NMDAR-mediated autaptic currents decayed faster with sarcosine suggesting that NMDAR deactivation also differs with these two co-agonists. Despite these differences, NMDAR-dependent neuronal death as assessed by propidium iodide was similar with both co-agonists. The same was true for neuronal bursting. Thus, sarcosine may enhance NMDAR function by more than one mechanism and may have different effects from other NMDAR co-agonists. PMID:19433577

  12. Exploring the binding site of the human muscarinic M3 receptor: Homology modeling and docking study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostopovici, Liliana; Mracec, Maria; Mracec, Mircea; Borota, Ana

    The human muscarinic M3 receptor (hM3) and its interactions with selective agonists and antagonists were investigated by means of combined homology and docking approach. Also, two pharmacophoric models for the hM3 agonist and antagonist binding sites were proposed. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of hM3 receptor was modeled based on the high-resolution X-ray structure of bovine rhodopsin from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). To validate the reliability of the model obtained, the main chain torsion angles phi (?) and psi (?) were examined in a Ramachandran plot, and all omega angles were measured for peptidic bond planarity. The characteristics of the active site, the position, and the orientation of ligands in situ, as well as the binding modes of the representative agonists and antagonists, were analyzed by applying a molecular docking technique using the AutoDock 3.0.5 program. Specific interactions responsible for recognition of the hM3 receptor, like ionic bond formed between protonated amine of the ligands and the Asp3.6 side chain were identified. Structure-reactivity relationships have been explained by analyzing the 3D structure of the hM3 model and the ligand conformations resulted from molecular docking simulation.

  13. Beta-agonists and animal welfare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of beta-agonists in animal feed is a high profile topic within the U.S. as consumers and activist groups continue to question its safety. The only beta-agonist currently available for use in swine is ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC). This is available as Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health – FDA a...

  14. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride.

  15. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  16. News Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

  17. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  18. 2-Dialkynyl derivatives of (N)-methanocarba nucleosides: 'Clickable' A(3) adenosine receptor-selective agonists.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Dilip K; Chinn, Moshe; Yoo, Lena S; Kang, Dong Wook; Luecke, Hans; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-01-15

    We modified a series of (N)-methanocarba nucleoside 5'-uronamides to contain dialkyne groups on an extended adenine C2 substituent, as synthetic intermediates leading to potent and selective A(3) adenosine receptor (AR) agonists. The proximal alkyne was intended to promote receptor recognition, and the distal alkyne reacted with azides to form triazole derivatives (click cycloaddition). Click chemistry was utilized to couple an octadiynyl A(3)AR agonist to azido-containing fluorescent, chemically reactive, biotinylated, and other moieties with retention of selective binding to the A(3)AR. A bifunctional thiol-reactive crosslinking reagent was introduced. The most potent and selective novel compound was a 1-adamantyl derivative (K(i) 6.5nM), although some of the click products had K(i) values in the range of 200-400nM. Other potent, selective derivatives (K(i) at A(3)AR innM) were intended as possible receptor affinity labels: 3-nitro-4-fluorophenyl (10.6), alpha-bromophenacyl (9.6), thiol-reactive isothiazolone (102), and arylisothiocyanate (37.5) derivatives. The maximal functional effects in inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP were measured, indicating that this class of click adducts varied from partial to full A(3)AR agonist compared to other widely used agonists. Thus, this strategy provides a general chemical approach to linking potent and selective A(3)AR agonists to reporter groups of diverse structure and to carrier moieties.

  19. CB(1) receptor allosteric modulators display both agonist and signaling pathway specificity.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Gemma L; Horswill, James G; Anavi-Goffer, Sharon; Reggio, Patricia H; Bolognini, Daniele; Abood, Mary E; McAllister, Sean; Strange, Phillip G; Stephens, Gary J; Pertwee, Roger G; Ross, Ruth A

    2013-02-01

    We have previously identified allosteric modulators of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor (Org 27569, PSNCBAM-1) that display a contradictory pharmacological profile: increasing the specific binding of the CB(1) receptor agonist [(3)H]CP55940 but producing a decrease in CB(1) receptor agonist efficacy. Here we investigated the effect one or both compounds in a broad range of signaling endpoints linked to CB(1) receptor activation. We assessed the effect of these compounds on CB(1) receptor agonist-induced [(35)S]GTPγS binding, inhibition, and stimulation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and β-arrestin recruitment. We also investigated the effect of these allosteric modulators on CB(1) agonist binding kinetics. Both compounds display ligand dependence, being significantly more potent as modulators of CP55940 signaling as compared with WIN55212 and having little effect on [(3)H]WIN55212 binding. Org 27569 displays biased antagonism whereby it inhibits: agonist-induced guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding, simulation (Gα(s)-mediated), and inhibition (Gα(i)-mediated) of cAMP production and β-arrestin recruitment. In contrast, it acts as an enhancer of agonist-induced ERK phosphorylation. Alone, the compound can act also as an allosteric agonist, increasing cAMP production and ERK phosphorylation. We find that in both saturation and kinetic-binding experiments, the Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1 appeared to influence only orthosteric ligand maximum occupancy rather than affinity. The data indicate that the allosteric modulators share a common mechanism whereby they increase available high-affinity CB(1) agonist binding sites. The receptor conformation stabilized by the allosterics appears to induce signaling and also selectively traffics orthosteric agonist signaling via the ERK phosphorylation pathway.

  20. Pattern recognitions receptors in immunodeficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Mortaz, Esameil; Adcock, Ian M; Tabarsi, Payam; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Movassaghi, Masoud; Garssen, Johan; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Velayati, Aliakbar

    2017-01-14

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize common microbial or host-derived macromolecules and have important roles in early activation and response of the immune system. Initiation of the innate immune response starts with the recognition of microbial structures called pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Recognition of PAMPs is performed by germline-encoded receptors expressed mainly on immune cells termed pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Several classes of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are involved in the pathogenesis of diseases, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs), C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), and Nod-like receptors (NLRs). Patients with primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) affecting TLR signaling can elucidate the importance of these proteins in the human immune system. Defects in interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) lead to susceptibility to infections with bacteria, while mutations in nuclear factor-κB essential modulator (NEMO) and other downstream mediators generally induce broader susceptibility to bacteria, viruses, and fungi. In contrast, TLR3 signaling defects are associated with susceptibility to herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis. Other PIDs induce functional alterations of TLR signaling pathways, such as common variable immunodeficiency in which plasmacytoid dendritic cell defects enhance defective responses of B cells to shared TLR agonists. Altered TLR responses to TLR2 and 4 agonists are seen in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Enhanced TLR responses, meanwhile, are seen for TLRs 5 and 9 in CGD, TLRs 4, 7/8, and 9 in XLA, TLRs 2 and 4 in hyper IgE syndrome (HIES), and for most TLRs in adenosine deaminase deficiency. In this review we provide the reader with an update on the role of TLRs and downstream signaling pathways in PID disorders.

  1. Agonist actions of neonicotinoids on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed by cockroach neurons.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianguo; Galligan, James J; Hollingworth, Robert M

    2007-07-01

    The agonist actions of seven commercial neonicotinoid insecticides and nicotine were studied on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed by neurons isolated from the three thoracic ganglia of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Single electrode voltage clamp recording was used to measure agonist-induced inward currents. Acetylcholine, nicotine and all neonicotinoids tested, except thiamethoxam, caused inward currents which were blocked reversibly by methyllycaconitine, a nAChR antagonist. Based on maximum inward currents, neonicotinoids could be divided into two subgroups: (1) those with a heterocyclic ring in their electronegative pharmacophore moiety (i.e. nicotine, imidacloprid and thiacloprid) were relatively weak partial agonists causing only 20-25% of the maximum ACh current and (2) open chain compounds (i.e. acetamiprid, dinotefuran, nitenpyram, and clothiandin) which were much more effective agonists producing 60-100% of the maximum ACh current. These compounds also elicited different symptoms of poisoning in American cockroaches with excitatory responses evident for the low efficacy agonists but depressive and paralytic responses predominating for the most efficacious agonists. No correlation was observed between agonist affinity and efficacy on these nAChRs. Thiamethoxam, even at 100 microM, failed to cause an inward current and showed no competitive interaction with other neonicotinoids on nAChRs, indicating that it is not a direct-acting agonist or antagonist. Despite the probable presence of multiple subtypes of nAChRs on cockroach neurons, competition studies between neonicotinoids did not reveal evidence that separate binding sites exist for the tested compounds. The size of inward currents induced by co-application of neonicotinoid pairs at equal concentration (100 microM) were predominantly determined by the one with higher binding affinity as indicated by EC(50) values, rather than by the one with higher binding efficacy as

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of the peptide recognition at the consensus binding site of the constant fragment of human immunoglobulin G: the energy landscape analysis of a hot spot at the intermolecular interface.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, Gennady M; Bouzida, Djamal; Gehlhaar, Daniel K; Rejto, Paul A; Freer, Stephan T; Rose, Peter W

    2002-08-15

    Monte Carlo simulations of molecular recognition at the consensus binding site of the constant fragment (Fc) of human immunoglobulin G (Ig) protein have been performed to analyze structural and thermodynamic aspects of binding for the 13-residue cyclic peptide DCAWHLGELVWCT. The energy landscape analysis of a hot spot at the intermolecular interface using alanine scanning and equilibrium-simulated tempering dynamics with the simplified, knowledge-based energy function has enabled the role of the protein hot spot residues in providing the thermodynamic stability of the native structure to be determined. We have found that hydrophobic interactions between the peptide and the Met-252, Ile-253, His-433, and His-435 protein residues are critical to guarantee the thermodynamic stability of the crystallographic binding mode of the complex. Binding free energy calculations, using a molecular mechanics force field and a solvation energy model, combined with alanine scanning have been conducted to determine the energetic contribution of the protein hot spot residues in binding affinity. The conserved Asn-434, Ser-254, and Tyr-436 protein residues contribute significantly to the binding affinity of the peptide-protein complex, serving as an energetic hot spot at the intermolecular interface. The results suggest that evolutionary conserved hot spot protein residues at the intermolecular interface may be partitioned in fulfilling thermodynamic stability of the native binding mode and contributing to the binding affinity of the complex.

  3. Recognition properties of a panel of human recombinant Fab fragments to the CD4 binding site of gp120 that show differing abilities to neutralize human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Roben, P; Moore, J P; Thali, M; Sodroski, J; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R

    1994-01-01

    Six recombinant human Fab fragments that were derived from the same human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individual and are directed against the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein were studied. A range of neutralizing activity against the HIV-1 (HXBc2) isolate was observed, with Fab b12 exhibiting the greatest potency among the Fabs tested. The neutralizing potency of Fab b12 was better than that of monoclonal whole antibodies directed against the third variable (V3) region of gp120. To explore the basis for the efficient neutralizing activity of b12, the recognition of a panel of HIV-1 gp120 mutants by the six Fabs was studied. The patterns of sensitivity to particular gp120 amino acid changes were similar for all six Fabs to those seen for anti-CD4bs monoclonal antibodies derived from HIV-1-infected individuals by conventional means. In addition, recognition by Fab b12 demonstrated an atypical sensitivity to changes in the V1 and V2 variable regions. Next, the binding of the Fabs to monomeric gp120 and to the envelope glycoprotein complex was examined. Neither the binding properties of the b12 Fab to monomeric gp120 nor the ability of the Fab to compete with soluble CD4 for monomeric gp120 binding appeared to account for the greater neutralizing potency. However, both quantitative and qualitative differences between the binding of b12 and that of less potent Fabs to the cell surface envelope glycoprotein complex were observed. Relative to less potently neutralizing Fabs, Fab b12 exhibited a higher affinity for a subpopulation of cell surface envelope glycoproteins, the conformation of which was best approximated by the mature gp120 glycoprotein. Apparently, subtle differences in the gp120 epitope recognized allow some members of the group of anti-CD4bs antibodies to bind to the functionally relevant envelope glycoprotein complex and to neutralize virus more efficiently. Images PMID:7518527

  4. [Safety of beta-agonists in asthma].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa, Teodoro J

    2014-01-01

    Beta 2 agonist bronchodilators (β2A) are very important part in the pharmacotherapy of bronchial asthma, a disease that progresses in the world in an epidemic way. The β2A are prescribed to millions of people around the world, therefore the safety aspects is of public interest. Short-Acting β2 Agonists (SABAs), such as albuterol inhaler, according to current evidence, confirming its safety when used as a quick-relief or rescue medication. The long-acting β2 agonists (LABAs) The long-acting bronchodilators β2A (Long acting β2 Agonists or LABAs) are used associated with inhaled corticosteroids as controller drugs for asthma exacerbationsaccess, for safety reasons LABAs are not recommended for use as monotherapy.

  5. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna C.; Thomas, Merlin C.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARα agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARγ agonists, and more recently dual PPARα/γ coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARγ receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:18288280

  6. Long-term studies of dopamine agonists.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Jean P

    2002-02-26

    Dopamine agonists have long been used as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). In more recent years these drugs have also been proved safe and effective as initial therapy in lieu of levodopa in the treatment of PD. Long-term levodopa therapy is associated with motor complications, including fluctuating response patterns and dyskinesia. By initially introducing a dopamine agonist as symptomatic drug therapy, it may be possible to postpone the use of levodopa and delay or prevent the development of motor complications. Recently, four clinical trials have explored this hypothesis by comparing the long-term response and side effects of levodopa with dopamine agonist therapy. The drugs studied have included ropinirole, pramipexole, cabergoline, and pergolide. In each of these projects, the occurrence of motor complications, such as wearing off and dyskinesia, was significantly less in the subjects assigned to initiation of therapy with a dopamine agonist. The addition of levodopa could be postponed by many months or even several years. Therefore, these long-term studies of dopamine agonists support the initiation of a dopamine agonist instead of levodopa in an effort to postpone levodopa-related motor complications. This therapeutic approach may be particularly appropriate in PD patients with a long treatment horizon on the basis of age and general good health. The extension phase of the long-term study comparing pramipexole with levodopa is ongoing, and follow-up information may help to establish the value of this treatment strategy.

  7. Differentiation of δ, μ, and κ opioid receptor agonists based on pharmacophore development and computed physicochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filizola, Marta; Villar, Hugo O.; Loew, Gilda H.

    2001-04-01

    Compounds that bind with significant affinity to the opioid receptor types, δ, μ, and κ, with different combinations of activation and inhibition at these three receptors could be promising behaviorally selective agents. Working on this hypothesis, the chemical moieties common to three different sets of opioid receptor agonists with significant affinity for each of the three receptor types δ, μ, or κ were identified. Using a distance analysis approach, common geometric arrangements of these chemical moieties were found for selected δ, μ, or κ opioid agonists. The chemical and geometric commonalities among agonists at each opioid receptor type were then compared with a non-specific opioid recognition pharmacophore recently developed. The comparison provided identification of the additional requirements for activation of δ, μ, and κ opioid receptors. The distance analysis approach was able to clearly discriminate κ-agonists, while global molecular properties for all compounds were calculated to identify additional requirements for activation of δ and μ receptors. Comparisons of the combined geometric and physicochemical properties calculated for each of the three sets of agonists allowed the determination of unique requirements for activation of each of the three opioid receptors. These results can be used to improve the activation selectivity of known opioid agonists and as a guide for the identification of novel selective opioid ligands with potential therapeutic usefulness.

  8. STING Agonists Induce an Innate Antiviral Immune Response against Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang; Zhao, Xuesen; Wang, Jianghua; Liu, Fei; Xu, Chunxiao; Wei, Lai; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Block, Timothy M.; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2014-01-01

    Chronicity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is due to the failure of a host to mount a sufficient immune response to clear the virus. The aim of this study was to identify small-molecular agonists of the pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-mediated innate immune response to control HBV infection. To achieve this goal, a coupled mouse macrophage and hepatocyte culture system mimicking the intrahepatic environment was established and used to screen small-molecular compounds that activate macrophages to produce cytokines, which in turn suppress HBV replication in a hepatocyte-derived stable cell line supporting HBV replication in a tetracycline-inducible manner. An agonist of the mouse stimulator of interferon (IFN) genes (STING), 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), was found to induce a robust cytokine response in macrophages that efficiently suppressed HBV replication in mouse hepatocytes by reducing the amount of cytoplasmic viral nucleocapsids. Profiling of cytokines induced by DMXAA and agonists of representative Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in mouse macrophages revealed that, unlike TLR agonists that induced a predominant inflammatory cytokine/chemokine response, the STING agonist induced a cytokine response dominated by type I IFNs. Moreover, as demonstrated in an HBV hydrodynamic mouse model, intraperitoneal administration of DMXAA significantly induced the expression of IFN-stimulated genes and reduced HBV DNA replication intermediates in the livers of mice. This study thus proves the concept that activation of the STING pathway induces an antiviral cytokine response against HBV and that the development of small-molecular human STING agonists as immunotherapeutic agents for treatment of chronic hepatitis B is warranted. PMID:25512416

  9. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabolsi, Ali; Khashab, Niveen; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Friedman, Douglas C.; Colvin, Michael T.; Cotí, Karla K.; Benítez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Olsen, John-Carl; Belowich, Matthew E.; Carmielli, Raanan; Khatib, Hussam A.; Goddard, William A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2010-01-01

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication.

  10. Computational Prediction and Biochemical Analyses of New Inverse Agonists for the CB1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) G-protein coupled receptor is a potential therapeutic target for obesity. The previously predicted and experimentally validated ensemble of ligand-free conformations of CB1 [Scott, C. E. et al. Protein Sci.2013, 22, 101−11323184890; Ahn, K. H. et al. Proteins2013, 81, 1304–131723408552] are used here to predict the binding sites for known CB1-selective inverse agonists including rimonabant and its seven known derivatives. This binding pocket, which differs significantly from previously published models, is used to identify 16 novel compounds expected to be CB1 inverse agonists by exploiting potential new interactions. We show experimentally that two of these compounds exhibit inverse agonist properties including inhibition of basal and agonist-induced G-protein coupling activity, as well as an enhanced level of CB1 cell surface localization. This demonstrates the utility of using the predicted binding sites for an ensemble of CB1 receptor structures for designing new CB1 inverse agonists. PMID:26633590

  11. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  12. Unique Contributions of an Arginine Side Chain to Ligand Recognition in a Glutamate-gated Chloride Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Lynagh, Timothy; Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate recognition by neurotransmitter receptors often relies on Arg residues in the binding site, leading to the assumption that charge-charge interactions underlie ligand recognition. However, assessing the precise chemical contribution of Arg side chains to protein function and pharmacology has proven to be exceedingly difficult in such large and complex proteins. Using the in vivo nonsense suppression approach, we report the first successful incorporation of the isosteric, titratable Arg analog, canavanine, into a neurotransmitter receptor in a living cell, utilizing a glutamate-gated chloride channel from the nematode Haemonchus contortus. Our data unveil a surprisingly small contribution of charge at a conserved arginine side chain previously suggested to form a salt bridge with the ligand, glutamate. Instead, our data show that Arg contributes crucially to ligand sensitivity via a hydrogen bond network, where Arg interacts both with agonist and with a conserved Thr side chain within the receptor. Together, the data provide a new explanation for the reliance of neurotransmitter receptors on Arg side chains and highlight the exceptional capacity of unnatural amino acid incorporation for increasing our understanding of ligand recognition. PMID:28096462

  13. Ligand-binding domain of an α7-nicotinic receptor chimera and its complex with agonist.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Xing; Huang, Sun; Bren, Nina; Noridomi, Kaori; Dellisanti, Cosma D; Sine, Steven M; Chen, Lin

    2011-09-11

    The α(7) acetylcholine receptor (AChR) mediates pre- and postsynaptic neurotransmission in the central nervous system and is a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric and inflammatory disorders. We determined the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of a receptor chimera constructed from the human α(7) AChR and Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), which shares 64% sequence identity and 71% similarity with native α(7). We also determined the structure with bound epibatidine, a potent AChR agonist. Comparison of the structures revealed molecular rearrangements and interactions that mediate agonist recognition and early steps in signal transduction in α(7) AChRs. The structures further revealed a ring of negative charge within the central vestibule, poised to contribute to cation selectivity. Structure-guided mutational studies disclosed distinctive contributions to agonist recognition and signal transduction in α(7) AChRs. The structures provide a realistic template for structure-aided drug design and for defining structure-function relationships of α(7) AChRs.

  14. Purine (N)-Methanocarba Nucleoside Derivatives Lacking an Exocyclic Amine as Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purine (N)-methanocarba-5′-N-alkyluronamidoriboside A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) agonists lacking an exocyclic amine resulted from an unexpected reaction during a Sonogashira coupling and subsequent aminolysis. Because the initial C6-Me and C6-styryl derivatives had unexpectedly high A3AR affinity, other rigid nucleoside analogues lacking an exocyclic amine were prepared. Of these, the C6-Me-(2-phenylethynyl) and C2-(5-chlorothienylethynyl) analogues were particularly potent, with human A3AR Ki values of 6 and 42 nM, respectively. Additionally, the C2-(5-chlorothienyl)-6-H analogue was potent and selective at A3AR (MRS7220, Ki 60 nM) and also completely reversed mouse sciatic nerve mechanoallodynia (in vivo, 3 μmol/kg, po). The lack of a C6 H-bond donor while maintaining A3AR affinity and efficacy could be rationalized by homology modeling and docking of these hypermodified nucleosides. The modeling suggests that a suitable combination of stabilizing features can partially compensate for the lack of an exocyclic amine, an otherwise important contributor to recognition in the A3AR binding site. PMID:26890707

  15. The structural basis for agonist and partial agonist action on a β(1)-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Warne, Tony; Moukhametzianov, Rouslan; Baker, Jillian G; Nehmé, Rony; Edwards, Patricia C; Leslie, Andrew G W; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Tate, Christopher G

    2011-01-13

    β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that activate intracellular G proteins upon binding catecholamine agonist ligands such as adrenaline and noradrenaline. Synthetic ligands have been developed that either activate or inhibit βARs for the treatment of asthma, hypertension or cardiac dysfunction. These ligands are classified as either full agonists, partial agonists or antagonists, depending on whether the cellular response is similar to that of the native ligand, reduced or inhibited, respectively. However, the structural basis for these different ligand efficacies is unknown. Here we present four crystal structures of the thermostabilized turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) β(1)-adrenergic receptor (β(1)AR-m23) bound to the full agonists carmoterol and isoprenaline and the partial agonists salbutamol and dobutamine. In each case, agonist binding induces a 1 Å contraction of the catecholamine-binding pocket relative to the antagonist bound receptor. Full agonists can form hydrogen bonds with two conserved serine residues in transmembrane helix 5 (Ser(5.42) and Ser(5.46)), but partial agonists only interact with Ser(5.42) (superscripts refer to Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering). The structures provide an understanding of the pharmacological differences between different ligand classes, illuminating how GPCRs function and providing a solid foundation for the structure-based design of novel ligands with predictable efficacies.

  16. Muscimol as an ionotropic GABA receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Graham A R

    2014-10-01

    Muscimol, a psychoactive isoxazole from Amanita muscaria and related mushrooms, has proved to be a remarkably selective agonist at ionotropic receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. This historic overview highlights the discovery and development of muscimol and related compounds as a GABA agonist by Danish and Australian neurochemists. Muscimol is widely used as a ligand to probe GABA receptors and was the lead compound in the development of a range of GABAergic agents including nipecotic acid, tiagabine, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol, (Gaboxadol(®)) and 4-PIOL.

  17. The evolution of species recognition in competitive and mating contexts: the relative efficacy of alternative mechanisms of character displacement.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kenichi W; Grether, Gregory F

    2013-05-01

    Sympatric divergence in traits affecting species recognition can result from selection against cross-species mating (reproductive character displacement, RCD) or interspecific aggression (agonistic character displacement, ACD). When the same traits are used for species recognition in both contexts, empirically disentangling the relative contributions of RCD and ACD to observed character shifts may be impossible. Here, we develop a theoretical framework for partitioning the effects of these processes. We show that when both mate and competitor recognition depend on the same trait, RCD sets the pace of character shifts. Moreover, RCD can cause divergence in competitor recognition, but ACD cannot cause divergence in mate recognition. This asymmetry arises because males with divergent recognition traits may avoid needless interspecific conflicts, but suffer reduced attractiveness to conspecific females. Therefore, the key empirical issue is whether the same or different traits are used for mate recognition and competitor recognition.

  18. Biased signaling by peptide agonists of protease activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Kok, W Mei; Lim, Junxian; Wu, Kai-Chen; Liu, Ligong; Hill, Timothy A; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2017-02-07

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is associated with metabolism, obesity, inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, pain, cancer and other diseases. The extracellular N-terminus of PAR2 is a common target for multiple proteases, which cleave it at different sites to generate different N-termini that activate different PAR2-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. There are no synthetic PAR2 ligands that reproduce the same signaling profiles and potencies as proteases. Structure-activity relationships here for 26 compounds spanned a signaling bias over 3 log units, culminating in three small ligands as biased agonist tools for interrogating PAR2 functions. DF253 (2f-LAAAAI-NH2) triggered PAR2-mediated calcium release (EC50 2 μM) but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation (EC50 > 100 μM) in CHO cells transfected with hPAR2. AY77 (Isox-Cha-Chg-NH2) was a more potent calcium-biased agonist (EC50 40 nM, Ca2+; EC50 2 μM, ERK1/2), while its analogue AY254 (Isox-Cha-Chg-A-R-NH2) was an ERK-biased agonist (EC50 2 nM, ERK1/2; EC50 80 nM, Ca2+). Signaling bias led to different functional responses in human colorectal carcinoma cells (HT29). AY254, but not AY77 or DF253, attenuated cytokine-induced caspase 3/8 activation, promoted scratch-wound healing and induced IL-8 secretion, all via PAR2-ERK1/2 signaling. Different ligand components were responsible for different PAR2 signaling and functions, clues that can potentially lead to drugs that modulate different pathway-selective cellular and physiological responses.

  19. Pharmacological Profiles of Alpha 2 Adrenergic Receptor Agonists Identified Using Genetically Altered Mice and Isobolographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fairbanks, Carolyn A.; Stone, Laura S.; Wilcox, George L.

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous, descending noradrenergic fibers convey powerful analgesic control over spinal afferent circuitry mediating the rostrad transmission of pain signals. These fibers target alpha 2 adrenergic receptors (α2ARs) on both primary afferent terminals and secondary neurons, and their activation mediates substantial inhibitory control over this transmission, rivaling that of opioid receptors which share similar a similar pattern of distribution. The terminals of primary afferent nociceptive neurons and secondary spinal dorsal horn neurons express α2AAR and α2CAR subtypes, respectively. Spinal delivery of these agents serves to reduce their side effects, which are mediated largely at supraspinal sites, by concentrating the drugs at the spinal level. Targeting these spinal α2ARs with one of five selective therapeutic agonists, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, brimonidine, ST91 and moxonidine, produces significant antinociception that can work in concert with opioid agonists to yield synergistic antinociception. Application of several genetically altered mouse lines had facilitated identification of the primary receptor subtypes that likely mediate the antinociceptive effects of these agents. This review provides first an anatomical description of the localization of the three subtypes in the central nervous system, second a detailed account of the pharmacological history of each of these six primary agonists, and finally a comprehensive report of the specific interactions of other GPCR agonists with each of the six principal α2AR agonists featured. PMID:19393691

  20. Corepressors of agonist-bound nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, Igor; Aneskievich, Brian J.

    2007-09-15

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) rely on coregulator proteins to modulate transcription of target genes. NR coregulators can be broadly subdivided into coactivators which potentiate transcription and corepressors which silence gene expression. The prevailing view of coregulator action holds that in the absence of agonist the receptor interacts with a corepressor via the corepressor nuclear receptor (CoRNR, 'corner') box motifs within the corepressor. Upon agonist binding, a conformational change in the receptor causes the shedding of corepressor and the binding of a coactivator which interacts with the receptor via NR boxes within the coregulator. This view was challenged with the discovery of RIP140 which acts as a NR corepressor in the presence of agonist and utilizes NR boxes. Since then a number of other corepressors of agonist-bound NRs have been discovered. Among them are LCoR, PRAME, REA, MTA1, NSD1, and COPR1 Although they exhibit a great diversity of structure, mechanism of repression and pathophysiological function, these corepressors frequently have one or more NR boxes and often recruit histone deacetylases to exert their repressive effects. This review highlights these more recently discovered corepressors and addresses their potential functions in transcription regulation, disease pharmacologic responses and xenobiotic metabolism.

  1. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  2. Correction for Inhibition Leads to an Allosteric Co-Agonist Model for Pentobarbital Modulation and Activation of α1β3γ2L GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Alexis M.; Forman, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pentobarbital, like propofol and etomidate, produces important general anesthetic effects through GABAA receptors. Photolabeling also indicates that pentobarbital binds to some of the same sites where propofol and etomidate act. Quantitative allosteric co-agonist models for propofol and etomidate account for modulatory and agonist effects in GABAA receptors and have proven valuable in establishing drug site characteristics and for functional analysis of mutants. We therefore sought to establish an allosteric co-agonist model for pentobarbital activation and modulation of α1β3γ2L receptors, using a novel approach to first correct pentobarbital activation data for inhibitory effects in the same concentration range. Methods Using oocyte-expressed α1β3γ2L GABAA receptors and two-microelectrode voltage-clamp, we quantified modulation of GABA responses by a low pentobarbital concentration and direct effects of high pentobarbital concentrations, the latter displaying mixed agonist and inhibitory effects. We then isolated and quantified pentobarbital inhibition in activated receptors using a novel single-sweep “notch” approach, and used these results to correct steady-state direct activation for inhibition. Results Combining results for GABA modulation and corrected direct activation, we estimated receptor open probability and optimized parameters for a Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric co-agonist model. Inhibition by pentobarbital was consistent with two sites with IC50s near 1 mM, while co-agonist model parameters suggest two allosteric pentobarbital agonist sites characterized by KPB ≈ 5 mM and high efficacy. The results also indicate that pentobarbital may be a more efficacious agonist than GABA. Conclusions Our novel approach to quantifying both inhibitory and co-agonist effects of pentobarbital provides a basis for future structure-function analyses of GABAA receptor mutations in putative pentobarbital binding sites. PMID:27110714

  3. Image Recognition Based on Biometric Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuliang; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Chenglian; Guo, Yongning; Lin, Xueyun

    2011-09-01

    A new method, biomimetric pattern recognition, is mentioned to recognize images. At first, the image is pretreatment and feature extraction, then a high vector is got. A biomimetric pattern recognition model is designed. The judgment function is used to discriminate the classification of the samples. It is showed that the method is effective for little samples by experiment. It would be useful in many fields in future.

  4. Optical Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Jutamulia, Suganda

    2008-10-01

    Contributors; Preface; 1. Pattern recognition with optics Francis T. S. Yu and Don A. Gregory; 2. Hybrid neural networks for nonlinear pattern recognition Taiwei Lu; 3. Wavelets, optics, and pattern recognition Yao Li and Yunglong Sheng; 4. Applications of the fractional Fourier transform to optical pattern recognition David Mendlovic, Zeev Zalesky and Haldum M. Oxaktas; 5. Optical implementation of mathematical morphology Tien-Hsin Chao; 6. Nonlinear optical correlators with improved discrimination capability for object location and recognition Leonid P. Yaroslavsky; 7. Distortion-invariant quadratic filters Gregory Gheen; 8. Composite filter synthesis as applied to pattern recognition Shizhou Yin and Guowen Lu; 9. Iterative procedures in electro-optical pattern recognition Joseph Shamir; 10. Optoelectronic hybrid system for three-dimensional object pattern recognition Guoguang Mu, Mingzhe Lu and Ying Sun; 11. Applications of photrefractive devices in optical pattern recognition Ziangyang Yang; 12. Optical pattern recognition with microlasers Eung-Gi Paek; 13. Optical properties and applications of bacteriorhodopsin Q. Wang Song and Yu-He Zhang; 14. Liquid-crystal spatial light modulators Aris Tanone and Suganda Jutamulia; 15. Representations of fully complex functions on real-time spatial light modulators Robert W. Cohn and Laurence G. Hassbrook; Index.

  5. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  6. Kin Recognition in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wall, Daniel

    2016-09-08

    The ability of bacteria to recognize kin provides a means to form social groups. In turn these groups can lead to cooperative behaviors that surpass the ability of the individual. Kin recognition involves specific biochemical interactions between a receptor(s) and an identification molecule(s). Recognition specificity, ensuring that nonkin are excluded and kin are included, is critical and depends on the number of loci and polymorphisms involved. After recognition and biochemical perception, the common ensuing cooperative behaviors include biofilm formation, quorum responses, development, and swarming motility. Although kin recognition is a fundamental mechanism through which cells might interact, microbiologists are only beginning to explore the topic. This review considers both molecular and theoretical aspects of bacterial kin recognition. Consideration is also given to bacterial diversity, genetic relatedness, kin selection theory, and mechanisms of recognition.

  7. Multimodal eye recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Thomas, N. L.; Delp, Edward J., III

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometrics use more than one means of biometric identification to achieve higher recognition accuracy, since sometimes a unimodal biometric is not good enough used to do identification and classification. In this paper, we proposed a multimodal eye recognition system, which can obtain both iris and sclera patterns from one color eye image. Gabor filter and 1-D Log-Gabor filter algorithms have been applied as the iris recognition algorithms. In sclera recognition, we introduced automatic sclera segmentation, sclera pattern enhancement, sclera pattern template generation, and sclera pattern matching. We applied kernelbased matching score fusion to improve the performance of the eye recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed eye recognition method can achieve better performance compared to unimodal biometric identification, and the accuracy of our proposed kernel-based matching score fusion method is higher than two classic linear matching score fusion methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  8. Template-imprinted nanostructured surfaces for protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Shi, H; Tsai, W B; Garrison, M D; Ferrari, S; Ratner, B D

    1999-04-15

    Synthetic materials capable of selectively recognizing proteins are important in separations, biosensors and the development of biomedical materials. The technique of molecular imprinting creates specific recognition sites in polymers by using template molecules. Molecular recognition is attributed to binding sites that complement molecules in size, shape and chemical functionality. But attempts to imprint proteins have met with only limited success. Here we report a method for imprinting surfaces with protein-recognition sites. We use radio-frequency glow-discharge plasma deposition to form polymeric thin films around proteins coated with disaccharide molecules. The disaccharides become covalently attached to the polymer film, creating polysaccharide-like cavities that exhibit highly selective recognition for a variety of template proteins, including albumin, immunoglobulin G, lysozyme, ribonuclease and streptavidin. Direct imaging of template recognition is achieved by patterning a surface at the micrometre scale with imprinted regions.

  9. Interaction of a radiolabeled agonist with cardiac muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Harden, T.K.; Meeker, R.B.; Martin, M.W.

    1983-12-01

    The interaction of a radiolabeled muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist, (methyl-/sup 3/H)oxotremorine acetate ((/sup 3/H)OXO), with a washed membrane preparation derived from rat heart, has been studied. In binding assays at 4 degrees C, the rate constants for association and dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO were 2 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 and 5 X 10(-3) min-1, respectively, Saturation binding isotherms indicated that binding was to a single population of sites with a Kd of approximately 300 pM. The density of (/sup 3/H)OXO binding sites (90-100 fmol/mg of protein) was approximately 75% of that determined for the radiolabeled receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate. Both muscarinic receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO with high affinity and Hill slopes of approximately one. Guanine nucleotides completely inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO. This effect was on the maximum binding (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)OXO with no change occurring in the Kd; the order of potency for five nucleotides was guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio-triphosphate) greater than 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate greater than GTP greater than or equal to guanosine/diphosphate greater than GMP. The (/sup 3/H)OXO-induced interaction of muscarinic receptors with a guanine nucleotide binding protein was stable to solubilization. That is, membrane receptors that were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)OXO could be solubilized with digitonin, and the addition of guanine nucleotides to the soluble, (/sup 3/H)OXO-labeled complex resulted in dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO from the receptor. Pretreatment of membranes with relatively low concentrations of N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)OXO binding by 85% with no change in the Kd of (/sup 3/H)OXO, and with no effect on (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding.

  10. Protospacer recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shiraz A.; Erdmann, Susanne; Mojica, Francisco J.M.; Garrett, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) were originally characterized for CRISPR-Cas systems that were classified on the basis of their CRISPR repeat sequences. A few short 2–5 bp sequences were identified adjacent to one end of the protospacers. Experimental and bioinformatical results linked the motif to the excision of protospacers and their insertion into CRISPR loci. Subsequently, evidence accumulated from different virus- and plasmid-targeting assays, suggesting that these motifs were also recognized during DNA interference, at least for the recently classified type I and type II CRISPR-based systems. The two processes, spacer acquisition and protospacer interference, employ different molecular mechanisms, and there is increasing evidence to suggest that the sequence motifs that are recognized, while overlapping, are unlikely to be identical. In this article, we consider the properties of PAM sequences and summarize the evidence for their dual functional roles. It is proposed to use the terms protospacer associated motif (PAM) for the conserved DNA sequence and to employ spacer acqusition motif (SAM) and target interference motif (TIM), respectively, for acquisition and interference recognition sites. PMID:23403393

  11. Identification of an extracellular segment of the oxytocin receptor providing agonist-specific binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Hawtin, S R; Howard, H C; Wheatley, M

    2001-03-01

    The effects of the peptide hormone oxytocin are mediated by oxytocin receptors (OTRs) expressed by the target tissue. The OTR is a member of the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Defining differences between the interaction of agonists and antagonists with the OTR at the molecular level is of fundamental importance, and is addressed in this study. Using truncated and chimaeric receptor constructs, we establish that a small 12-residue segment in the distal portion of the N-terminus of the human OTR provides important epitopes which are required for agonist binding. In contrast, this segment does not contribute to the binding site for antagonists, whether peptide or non-peptide. It does, however, have a role in agonist-induced OTR signalling. Oxytocin is also an agonist at the vasopressin V(1a) receptor (V(1a)R). A chimaeric receptor (V(1a)R(N)-OTR) was engineered in which the N-terminus of the OTR was substituted by the corresponding, but unrelated, sequence from the N-terminus of the V(1a)R. We show that the V(1a)R N-terminus present in V(1a)R(N)-OTR fully restored both agonist binding and intracellular signalling to a dysfunctional truncated OTR construct. The N-terminal segment does not, however, contribute to receptor-selective agonism between the OTR and the V(1a)R. Our data establish a key role for the distal N-terminus of the OTR in providing agonist-specific binding epitopes.

  12. Crystal Structures of the Nuclear Receptor, Liver Receptor Homolog 1, Bound to Synthetic Agonists.

    PubMed

    Mays, Suzanne G; Okafor, C Denise; Whitby, Richard J; Goswami, Devrishi; Stec, Józef; Flynn, Autumn R; Dugan, Michael C; Jui, Nathan T; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-12-02

    Liver receptor homolog 1 (NR5A2, LRH-1) is an orphan nuclear hormone receptor that regulates diverse biological processes, including metabolism, proliferation, and the resolution of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Although preclinical and cellular studies demonstrate that LRH-1 has great potential as a therapeutic target for metabolic diseases and cancer, development of LRH-1 modulators has been difficult. Recently, systematic modifications to one of the few known chemical scaffolds capable of activating LRH-1 failed to improve efficacy substantially. Moreover, mechanisms through which LRH-1 is activated by synthetic ligands are entirely unknown. Here, we use x-ray crystallography and other structural methods to explore conformational changes and receptor-ligand interactions associated with LRH-1 activation by a set of related agonists. Unlike phospholipid LRH-1 ligands, these agonists bind deep in the pocket and do not interact with residues near the mouth nor do they expand the pocket like phospholipids. Unexpectedly, two closely related agonists with similar efficacies (GSK8470 and RJW100) exhibit completely different binding modes. The dramatic repositioning is influenced by a differential ability to establish stable face-to-face π-π-stacking with the LRH-1 residue His-390, as well as by a novel polar interaction mediated by the RJW100 hydroxyl group. The differing binding modes result in distinct mechanisms of action for the two agonists. Finally, we identify a network of conserved water molecules near the ligand-binding site that are important for activation by both agonists. This work reveals a previously unappreciated complexity associated with LRH-1 agonist development and offers insights into rational design strategies.

  13. Antagonism by 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetraline and other serotonin agonists of muscarinic M1-type receptors coupled to inositol phospholipid breakdown in human IMR-32 and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.J. Karolinska Institutet ); Ahlgren, P.C. ); O'Neill, C. )

    1991-01-01

    IMR-32 and SK-N-MC cells were found to contain ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate specific binding sites inhibited by pirenzepine in a manner suggesting the presence of both M1-type and M2-type muscarinic receptor recognition sites. Neither cell had detectable ({sup 3}H)8-OH-DPAT binding sites. Carbachol stimulated the rate of inositol phospholipid breakdown in IMR-32 and SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma cells with an EC{sub 50} value of about 50 {mu}M in both cases. Pirenzepine inhibited the carbachol stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown in both cells with Hill slopes of unity and IC{sub 50} values of 15 nM (IMR-32) and 12 nM (SK-N-MC). The 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT competitively inhibited carbachol-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown with pA{sub 2} values of 5.78 (IMR-32) and 5.61 (SK-N-MC). The 5-HT agonists 5-MeODMT and buspirone at micromolar concentrations inhibited carbachol-stimulated breakdown in IMR-32 cells. The inhibition by 8-OH-DPAT and 5-MeODMT was not affected by preincubation with (-)alprenolol. 5-HT was without effect on either basal or carbachol-stimulated breakdown. It is concluded that IMR-32 and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells express muscarinic M1-type but not serotoninergic receptors coupled to phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. 8-OH-DPAT acts as a weak antagonist at these muscarinic receptors.

  14. Agonistic and reproductive interactions in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, P M

    1984-12-01

    Reproductive and agonistic behaviors in Siamese fighting fish were investigated in eight experiments, and some consequences and determinants of these sequences were isolated. First, fights and the formation of dominance-subordinancy relations were studied. Second, it was determined that large body size as well as males' prior residency in a tank produced an agonistic advantage; the magnitude of this advantage was positively related to the duration of residency. Third, the prior-residency effect in Bettas was determined by males' familiarity with visual and/or tactile cues in their home tanks. Fourth, dominant males had greater access to living space and were more likely to display at a mirror, build nests, and approach females than were subordinates. Finally, it was discovered that chemical cues associated with presumedly inert plastic tank dividers influence Bettas' social behavior.

  15. Agonists block currents through acetylcholine receptor channels.

    PubMed Central

    Sine, S M; Steinbach, J H

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the effects of high concentrations of cholinergic agonists on currents through single acetylcholine receptor (AChR) channels on clonal BC3H1 cells. We find that raised concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh; above 300 microM) or carbamylcholine (Carb; above 1,000 microM) produce a voltage- and concentration-dependent reduction in the mean single-channel current. Raised concentrations of suberyldicholine (Sub; above 3 microM) produce a voltage- and concentration-dependent increase in the number of brief duration low-conductance interruptions of open-channel currents. These observations can be quantitatively described by a model in which agonist molecules enter and transiently occlude the ion-channel of the AChR. PMID:6478036

  16. Ropinirole, a non-ergoline dopamine agonist.

    PubMed

    Jost, Wolfgang H; Angersbach, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    Dopamine agonists have become indispensable in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. In every-day practice, however, the decision to select the best compound for an individual patient is rendered difficult because of the large number of substances available on the market. This review article provides a closer look at the experimental and clinical studies with ropinirole published so far. Ropinirole is a non-ergoline dopamine agonist which has been proven to be effective in both, monotherapy and combination therapy of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. In addition to ameliorating bradykinesia, rigor, and tremor, ropinirole facilitates the daily life and improves depressive moods of patients with Parkinson's disease. The long-term complications of levodopa are avoided, and problems commonly associated with levodopa treatment are reduced. Ropinirole appears to have a neuroprotective effect. In addition to Parkinson's disease, ropinirole has also been used successfully in the treatment of restless legs syndrome.

  17. The identification of orally bioavailable thrombopoietin agonists.

    PubMed

    Munchhof, Michael J; Antipas, Amy S; Blumberg, Laura C; Brissette, William H; Brown, Matthew F; Casavant, Jeffrey M; Doty, Jonathan L; Driscoll, James; Harris, Thomas M; Wolf-Gouveia, Lilli A; Jones, Christopher S; Li, Qifang; Linde, Robert G; Lira, Paul D; Marfat, Anthony; McElroy, Eric; Mitton-Fry, Mark; McCurdy, Sandra P; Reiter, Lawrence A; Ripp, Sharon L; Shavnya, Andrei; Thomasco, Lisa M; Trevena, Kristen A

    2009-03-01

    Recently, we disclosed a series of potent pyrimidine benzamide-based thrombopoietin receptor agonists. Unfortunately, the structural features required for the desired activity conferred physicochemical properties that were not favorable for the development of an oral agent. The physical properties of the series were improved by replacing the aminopyrimidinyl group with a piperidine-4-carboxylic acid moiety. The resulting compounds possessed favorable in vivo pharmacokinetic properties, including good bioavailability.

  18. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-08

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits.

  19. Pharmacology of the inhibitory glycine receptor: agonist and antagonist actions of amino acids and piperidine carboxylic acid compounds.

    PubMed

    Schmieden, V; Betz, H

    1995-11-01

    To define structure-activity relations for ligands binding to the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR), the agonistic and antagonistic properties of alpha- and beta-amino acids were analyzed at the recombinant human alpha 1 GlyR expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The agonistic activity of alpha-amino acids exhibited a marked stereoselectivity and was highly susceptible to substitutions at the C alpha-atom. In contrast, alpha-amino acid antagonism was not enantiomer dependent and was influenced little by C alpha-atom substitutions. The beta-amino acids taurine, beta-aminobutyric acid (beta-ABA), and beta-aminoisobutyric acid (beta-AIBA) are partial agonists at the GlyR. Low concentrations of these compounds competitively inhibited glycine responses, whereas higher concentrations elicited a significant membrane current. Nipecotic acid, which contains a trans-beta-amino acid configuration, behaved as purely competitive GlyR antagonist. Our data are consistent with the existence of a common binding site for all amino acid agonists and antagonists, at which the functional consequences of binding depend on the particular conformation a given ligand adopts within the binding pocket. In the case of beta-amino acids, the trans conformation appears to mediate antagonistic receptor binding, and the cis conformation appears to mediate agonistic receptor binding. This led us to propose that the partial agonist activity of a given beta-amino acid is determined by the relative mole fractions of the respective cis/trans conformers.

  20. Guanine nucleotide regulation of dopamine receptor agonist affinity states in rat estradiol-induced pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, T.; Falardeau, P.

    1987-08-31

    The authors have investigated dopamine (DA) receptor agonist high- and low-affinity states in female rate estradiol-induced prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary tumors and intact pituitary tissue. Estradiol treatment increased the anterior pituitary weight 9-fold and plasma prolactin levels 74-fold and these measures are correlated (R = 0.745, n = 73, p < 0.001). Competition for (/sup 3/H)-spiperone binding to the DA receptor by apomorphine was compared in normal and adenomatous pituitary tissue. The inhibition constants (Ki) and the proportions of the two apomorphine sites are unchanged in tumors compared to intact pituitary tissue. Guanosine 5'-(..beta..-..gamma..-imino)triphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) causes complete conversion of the high into low affinity dopaminergic agonist site in normal pituitary and in tumors. These results suggest that rats with primary estradiol-induced pituitary tumors have normal and functional DA receptors. 9 references, 2 tables.

  1. BMS-933043, a Selective α7 nAChR Partial Agonist for the Treatment of Cognitive Deficits Associated with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    King, Dalton; Iwuagwu, Christiana; Cook, Jim; McDonald, Ivar M; Mate, Robert; Zusi, F Christopher; Hill, Matthew D; Fang, Haiquan; Zhao, Rulin; Wang, Bei; Easton, Amy E; Miller, Regina; Post-Munson, Debra; Knox, Ronald J; Gallagher, Lizbeth; Westphal, Ryan; Molski, Thaddeus; Fan, Jingsong; Clarke, Wendy; Benitex, Yulia; Lentz, Kimberley A; Denton, Rex; Morgan, Daniel; Zaczek, Robert; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bristow, Linda J; Macor, John E; Olson, Richard E

    2017-03-09

    The therapeutic treatment of negative symptoms and cognitive dysfunction associated with schizophrenia is a significant unmet medical need. Preclinical literature indicates that α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor agonists may provide an effective approach to treating cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. We report herein the discovery and evaluation of 1c (BMS-933043), a novel and potent α7 nACh receptor partial agonist with high selectivity against other nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes (>100-fold) and the 5-HT3A receptor (>300-fold). In vivo activity was demonstrated in a preclinical model of cognitive impairment, mouse novel object recognition. BMS-933043 has completed Phase I clinical trials.

  2. Structural basis for sulfation-dependent self-glycan recognition by the human immune-inhibitory receptor Siglec-8

    PubMed Central

    Pröpster, Johannes M.; Yang, Fan; Rabbani, Said; Ernst, Beat; Allain, Frédéric H.-T.

    2016-01-01

    Siglec-8 is a human immune-inhibitory receptor that, when engaged by specific self-glycans, triggers eosinophil apoptosis and inhibits mast cell degranulation, providing an endogenous mechanism to down-regulate immune responses of these central inflammatory effector cells. Here we used solution NMR spectroscopy to dissect the fine specificity of Siglec-8 toward different sialylated and sulfated carbohydrate ligands and determined the structure of the Siglec-8 lectin domain in complex with its prime glycan target 6′-sulfo sialyl Lewisx. A canonical motif for sialic acid recognition, extended by a secondary motif formed by unique loop regions, recognizing 6-O–sulfated galactose dictates tight specificity distinct from other Siglec family members and any other endogenous glycan recognition receptors. Structure-guided mutagenesis revealed key contacts of both interfaces to be equally essential for binding. Our work provides critical structural and mechanistic insights into how Siglec-8 selectively recognizes its glycan target, rationalizes the functional impact of site-specific glycan sulfation in modulating this lectin–glycan interaction, and will enable the rational design of Siglec-8–targeted agonists to treat eosinophil- and mast cell-related allergic and inflammatory diseases, such as asthma. PMID:27357658

  3. Moreland Recognition Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreland Elementary School District, San Jose, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Recognition for special effort and achievement has been noted as a component of effective schools. Schools in the Moreland School District have effectively improved standards of discipline and achievement by providing forty-six different ways for children to receive positive recognition. Good…

  4. Disruption of a putative intersubunit electrostatic bond enhances agonist efficacy at the human α1 glycine receptor.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Brian T; Todorovic, Jelena; Kirson, Dean; Allen, Hunter M; Bayly, Michelle D; Mihic, S John

    2017-02-15

    Partial agonists have lower efficacies than compounds considered 'full agonists', eliciting submaximal responses even at saturating concentrations. Taurine is a partial agonist at the glycine receptor (GlyR), a member of the cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. The molecular mechanisms responsible for agonism are not fully understood but evidence suggests that efficacy at these receptors is determined by conformational changes that occur early in the process of receptor activation. We previously identified a residue located near the human α1 glycine binding site (aspartate-97; D97) that, when mutated to arginine (D97R), results in GlyR channels opening spontaneously with a high open probability, mimicking the effects of saturating glycine concentrations on wildtype GlyR. This D97 residue is hypothesized to form an electrostatic interaction with arginine-119 on an adjacent subunit, stabilizing the channel in a shut state. Here we demonstrate that the disruption of this putative bond increases the efficacy of partial agonists including taurine, as well as two other β-amino acid partial agonists, β-aminobutyric acid (β-ABA) and β-aminoisobutyric acid (β-AIBA). Even the subtle charge-conserving mutation of D97 to glutamate (D97E) markedly affects partial agonist efficacy. Mutation to the neutral alanine residue in the D97A mutant mimics the effects seen with D97R, indicating that charge repulsion does not significantly affect these findings. Our findings suggest that the determination of efficacy following ligand binding to the glycine receptor may involve the disruption of an intersubunit electrostatic interaction occurring near the agonist binding site.

  5. Structure-Based Design of Human TLR8-Specific Agonists with Augmented Potency and Adjuvanticity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Human Toll-like receptor 8 (hTLR8) is expressed in myeloid dendritic cells, monocytes, and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Engagement by TLR8 agonists evokes a distinct cytokine profile which favors the development of type 1 helper T cells. Crystal structures of the ectodomain of hTLR8 cocrystallized with two regioisomers of a dual TLR7/8-agonistic N1-substituted imidazoquinolines showed subtle differences in their interactions in the binding site of hTLR8. We hypothesized that the potency of a previously reported best-in-class pure TLR8 agonist, 3-pentylquinoline-2-amine, could be further enhanced by “designing in” functional groups that would mimic key intermolecular interactions that we had observed in the crystal structures. We performed a focused exploration of decorating the quinoline core with alkylamino groups at all possible positions. These studies have led to the identification of a novel TLR8 agonist that was ∼20-fold more potent than the parent compound and displays prominent adjuvantic activity in a rabbit model of immunization. PMID:26351878

  6. Dopamine D1 receptor-agonist interactions: A mutagenesis and homology modeling study.

    PubMed

    Mente, Scot; Guilmette, Edward; Salafia, Michelle; Gray, David

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that regulates intracellular signaling via agonist activation. Although the number of solved GPCR X-ray structures has been steadily increasing, still no structure of the D1 receptor exists. We have used site-directed mutagenesis of 12 orthosteric vicinity residues of possible importance to G protein-coupled activation to examine the function of prototypical orthosteric D1 agonists and partial agonists. We find that residues from four different regions of the D1 receptor make significant contributions to agonist function. All compounds studied, which are catechol-amines, are found to interact with the previously identified residues: the conserved D103(3.32), as well as the trans-membrane V serine residues. Additional key interactions are found for trans-membrane VI residues F288(6.51), F289(6.52) and N292(6.55), as well as the extra-cellular loop residue L190(ECL2). Molecular dynamics simulations of a D1 homology model have been used to help put the ligand-residue interactions into context. Finally, we considered the rescaling of fold-shift data as a method to account for the change in the size of the mutated side-chain and found that this rescaling helps to relate the calculated ligand-residue energies with observed experimental fold-shifts.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein LprG (Rv1411c) binds triacylated glycolipid agonists of Toll-like receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drage, Michael G.; Tsai, Han-Chun; Pecora, Nicole D.; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Arida, Ahmad R.; Shukla, Supriya; Rojas, Roxana E.; Seshadri, Chetan; Moody, D. Branch; Boom, W. Henry; Sacchettini, James C.; Harding, Clifford V.

    2010-09-27

    Knockout of lprG results in decreased virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in mice. MTB lipoprotein LprG has TLR2 agonist activity, which is thought to be dependent on its N-terminal triacylation. Unexpectedly, here we find that nonacylated LprG retains TLR2 activity. Moreover, we show LprG association with triacylated glycolipid TLR2 agonists lipoarabinomannan, lipomannan and phosphatidylinositol mannosides (which share core structures). Binding of triacylated species was specific to LprG (not LprA) and increased LprG TLR2 agonist activity; conversely, association of glycolipids with LprG enhanced their recognition by TLR2. The crystal structure of LprG in complex with phosphatidylinositol mannoside revealed a hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the three alkyl chains of the ligand. In conclusion, we demonstrate a glycolipid binding function of LprG that enhances recognition of triacylated MTB glycolipids by TLR2 and may affect glycolipid assembly or transport for bacterial cell wall biogenesis.

  8. Insights on the role of boron containing moieties in the design of new potent and efficient agonists targeting the β2 adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin A; Arias-Montaño, José A; Correa-Basurto, José; Hernández-Martínez, Christian F; López-Cabrera, Yessica; Castillo-Hernández, Maria C; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia I; Trujillo-Ferrara, José G

    2015-02-15

    The development of β2 adrenoceptor (β2AR) agonists is of increasing interest because of their wide-ranging applications in medicine, particularly for the treatment of pulmonary diseases. Regarding the relaxation of smooth muscle that lines airways of mammals, some boron-containing adducts have demonstrated greater potency and efficacy compared to well-known boron-free compounds. We herein report the design and synthesis as well as the chemical and pharmacological characterization of a new boron-containing compound: ((R)-6-((S)-2-(tert-butylammonio)-1-hydroxyethyl)-2-hydroxy-2-isobutyl-4H-benzo[d][1,3,2] dioxaborinin-2-uide). Compared to its precursor (salbutamol), this compound induced relaxation of smooth muscle in guinea pig tracheal rings with greater potency and efficacy (EC50⩽28.02nM). Theoretical studies suggest the potential selectivity of this boron containing compound on the orthosteric site of beta adrenoceptors and/or signaling pathways, as well as the importance of the tetracoordinated boron atom in its structure for binding recognition properties.

  9. Use of the TRPV1 Agonist Capsaicin to Provide Long-Term Analgesia in a Rat Limb Fracture/Open Repair, Internal Fixation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    W81XWH-10-2-0093 TITLE: Use of the TRPV1 Agonist Capsaicin to Provide Long-Term Analgesia in a Rat Limb Fracture/Open Repair, Internal Fixation Model...2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30September2010-29September2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of the TRPV1 Agonist Capsaicin to...capsaicin around the fracture site. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Femur fracture, Rat Model, Pain, Capsaicin, Trauma, TRPV1 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  10. Discovery of G Protein-Biased EP2 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To identify G protein-biased and highly subtype-selective EP2 receptor agonists, a series of bicyclic prostaglandin analogues were designed and synthesized. Structural hybridization of EP2/4 dual agonist 5 and prostacyclin analogue 6, followed by simplification of the ω chain enabled us to discover novel EP2 agonists with a unique prostacyclin-like scaffold. Further optimization of the ω chain was performed to improve EP2 agonist activity and subtype selectivity. Phenoxy derivative 18a showed potent agonist activity and excellent subtype selectivity. Furthermore, a series of compounds were identified as G protein-biased EP2 receptor agonists. These are the first examples of biased ligands of prostanoid receptors. PMID:26985320

  11. Sports doping: emerging designer and therapeutic β2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Georgakopoulos, C; Sterk, S; Nielen, M W F

    2013-10-21

    Beta2-adrenergic agonists, or β2-agonists, are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptom-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. The use of β2-agonists is prohibited in sports by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) due to claimed anabolic effects, and also, is prohibited as growth promoters in cattle fattening in the European Union. This paper reviews the last seven-year (2006-2012) literature concerning the development of novel β2-agonists molecules either by modifying the molecule of known β2-agonists or by introducing moieties producing indole-, adamantyl- or phenyl urea derivatives. New emerging β2-agonists molecules for future therapeutic use are also presented, intending to emphasize their potential use for doping purposes or as growth promoters in the near future.

  12. Agonistic behavior in food animals: review of research and techniques.

    PubMed

    McGlone, J J

    1986-04-01

    One type of social behavior--agonistic behavior--is commonly observed among food animals. Agonistic behaviors are those behaviors which cause, threaten to cause or seek to reduce physical damage. Agonistic behavior is comprised of threats, aggression and submission. While any one of these divisions of agonistic behavior may be observed alone, they usually are found, in sequence, from the start to the end of an interaction. Food animals may show interspecific or intraspecific agonistic behaviors. Interspecific agonistic behavior has not been extensively studied but it is agriculturally important because farm workers may become injured or killed by aggressive food animals. Types of intraspecific agonistic behavior are: when animals are brought together, intermale fighting, resource defense, inter-gender fighting and aberrant aggression. Common pitfalls in research on agonistic behavior among food animals include too few replicates to detect a biological difference, the assumptions of the analysis are not met, only aggression and not submission or other agonistic behavior components are measured, incomplete description of the behaviors are reported and a complete, quantitive ethogram did not form the basis for selecting behavioral measures.

  13. Computational modeling toward understanding agonist binding on dopamine 3.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaxue; Lu, Xuefeng; Yang, Chao-Yie; Huang, Zhimin; Fu, Wei; Hou, Tingjun; Zhang, Jian

    2010-09-27

    The dopamine 3 (D3) receptor is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of nervous system disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, and current research interests primarily focus on the discovery/design of potent D3 agonists. Herein, a well-designed computational protocol, which combines pharmacophore identification, homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was employed to understand the agonist binding on D3 aiming to provide insights into the development of novel potent D3 agonists. We (1) identified the chemical features required in effective D3 agonists by pharmacophore modeling based upon 18 known diverse D3 agonists; (2) constructed the three-dimensional (3D) structure of D3 based on homology modeling and the pharmacophore hypothesis; (3) identified the binding modes of the agonists to D3 by the correlation between the predicted binding free energies and the experimental values; and (4) investigated the induced fit of D3 upon agonist binding through MD simulations. The pharmacophore models of the D3 agonists and the 3D structure of D3 can be used for either ligand- or receptor-based drug design. Furthermore, the MD simulations further give the insight that the long and flexible EL2 acts as a "door" for agonist binding, and the "ionic lock" at the bottom of TM3 and TM6 is essential to transduce the activation signal.

  14. Pattern recognition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Technique operates regardless of pattern rotation, translation or magnification and successfully detects out-of-register patterns. It improves accuracy and reduces cost of various optical character recognition devices and page readers and provides data input to computer.

  15. Sigma-1 receptor agonists as therapeutic drugs for cognitive impairment in neuropsychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Niitsu, Tomihisa; Iyo, Masaomi; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a core feature of patients with neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and psychotic depression. The drugs currently used to treat cognitive impairment have significant limitations, ensuring that the search for more effective therapies remains active. Endoplasmic reticulum protein sigma-1 receptors are unique binding sites in the brain that exert a potent effect on multiple neurotransmitter systems. Accumulating evidence suggests that sigma-1 receptors play a role in both the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases, and the mechanistic action of some therapeutic drugs, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), donepezil and neurosteroids. Among SSRIs, fluvoxamine, a potent sigma-1 receptor agonist, has the highest affinity at sigma-1 receptors. Sigma-1 receptor agonists greatly potentiate nerve-growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, an effect that is antagonized by treatment with the selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist NE-100. Furthermore, phencyclidine (PCP)-induced cognitive impairment, associated with animal models of schizophrenia is significantly improved by sub-chronic administration of sigma-1 receptor agonists such as fluvoxamine, SA4503 (cutamesine) and donepezil. This effect is antagonized by co-administration of NE-100. A positron emission tomography (PET) study using the specific sigma-1 receptor ligand [11C]SA4503 demonstrates that fluvoxamine and donepezil bind to sigma-1 receptors in the healthy human brain. In clinical studies, some sigma-1 receptor agonists, including fluvoxamine, donepezil and neurosteroids, improve cognitive impairment and clinical symptoms in neuropsychiatric diseases. In this article, we review the recent findings on sigma-1 receptor agonists as potential therapeutic drugs for the treatment of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia and psychotic depression.

  16. High-affinity σ1 protein agonist reduces clinical and pathological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Oxombre, B; Lee-Chang, C; Duhamel, A; Toussaint, M; Giroux, M; Donnier-Maréchal, M; Carato, P; Lefranc, D; Zéphir, H; Prin, L; Melnyk, P; Vermersch, P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Selective agonists of the sigma-1 receptor (σ1 protein) are generally reported to protect against neuronal damage and modulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Human and rodent lymphocytes possess saturable, high-affinity binding sites for compounds binding to the σ1 protein and potential immunomodulatory properties have been described for σ1 protein ligands. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is recognized as a valuable model of the inflammatory aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we have assessed the role of a σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, in EAE. Experimental Approach EAE was induced in SJL/J female mice by active immunization with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139–151 peptide. The σ1 protein agonist was injected i.p. at the time of immunization (day 0). Disease severity was assessed clinically and by histopathological evaluation of the CNS. Phenotyping of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells were performed by flow cytometry in spleen and cervical lymph nodes. Key Results Prophylactic treatment of EAE mice with the σ1 protein agonist prevented mononuclear cell accumulation and demyelination in brain and spinal cord and increased T2 B-cells and regulatory T-cells, resulting in an overall reduction in the clinical progression of EAE. Conclusions and Implications This σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, decreased the magnitude of inflammation in EAE. This effect was associated with increased proportions of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells with potential immunoregulatory functions. Targeting of the σ1 protein might thus provide new therapeutic opportunities in MS. PMID:25521311

  17. Heterologous Expression in Remodeled C. elegans: A Platform for Monoaminergic Agonist Identification and Anthelmintic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Law, Wenjing; Wuescher, Leah M.; Ortega, Amanda; Hapiak, Vera M.; Komuniecki, Patricia R.; Komuniecki, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Monoamines, such as 5-HT and tyramine (TA), paralyze both free-living and parasitic nematodes when applied exogenously and serotonergic agonists have been used to clear Haemonchus contortus infections in vivo. Since nematode cell lines are not available and animal screening options are limited, we have developed a screening platform to identify monoamine receptor agonists. Key receptors were expressed heterologously in chimeric, genetically-engineered Caenorhabditis elegans, at sites likely to yield robust phenotypes upon agonist stimulation. This approach potentially preserves the unique pharmacologies of the receptors, while including nematode-specific accessory proteins and the nematode cuticle. Importantly, the sensitivity of monoamine-dependent paralysis could be increased dramatically by hypotonic incubation or the use of bus mutants with increased cuticular permeabilities. We have demonstrated that the monoamine-dependent inhibition of key interneurons, cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscle inhibited locomotion and caused paralysis. Specifically, 5-HT paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT receptor null animals expressing either nematode, insect or human orthologues of a key Gαo-coupled 5-HT1-like receptor in the cholinergic motor neurons. Importantly, 8-OH-DPAT and PAPP, 5-HT receptor agonists, differentially paralyzed the transgenic animals, with 8-OH-DPAT paralyzing mutant animals expressing the human receptor at concentrations well below those affecting its C. elegans or insect orthologues. Similarly, 5-HT and TA paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT or TA receptor null animals, respectively, expressing either C. elegans or H. contortus 5-HT or TA-gated Cl- channels in either C. elegans cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscles. Together, these data suggest that this heterologous, ectopic expression screening approach will be useful for the identification of agonists for key monoamine receptors from parasites and could have broad application for the identification

  18. D-Cycloserine: Agonist turned antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lanthorn, T H

    1994-10-01

    D-Cycloserine can enhance activation of the NMDA receptor complex and could enhance the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). In animals and humans, D-cycloserine can enhance performance in learning and memory tasks. This enhancing effect can disappear during repeated administration. The enhancing effects are also lost when higher doses are used, and replaced by behavioral and biochemical effects like those produced by NMDA antagonists. It has been reported that NMDA agonists, applied before or after tetanic stimulation, can block the induction of LTP. This may be the result of feedback inhibition of second messenger pathways stimulated by receptor activation. This may explain the antagonist-like effects of glycine partial agonists like D-cycloserine. In clinical trials of D-cycloserine in age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) and Alzheimer's disease, chronic treatment provided few positive effects on learning and memory. This may be due to inhibition of second messenger pathways following chronic stimulation of the receptor complex.

  19. Inverse agonist properties of atypical antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Akam, Elizabeth; Strange, Philip G

    2004-06-01

    Mechanisms of action of several atypical antipsychotic drugs have been examined at the D(2) dopamine receptor expressed in CHO cells. The drugs tested were found to exhibit inverse agonist activity at the D(2) dopamine receptor based on their effects to potentiate forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. Each of the antipsychotic drugs tested (clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone) increased cAMP accumulation to the same extent. The increase in cAMP was also similar to that seen with typical antipsychotic drugs. Inverse agonism at the D(2) dopamine receptor seems, therefore, to be a property common to all classes of antipsychotic drugs. The effect of sodium ions on the binding of the drugs to the receptor was also assessed. Each of the atypical antipsychotic drugs tested here bound with higher affinity in the absence of sodium ions. Previous studies have shown that some antipsychotic drugs are insensitive to sodium ions and some bind with higher affinity in the presence of sodium ions. Given that all of these antipsychotic drugs are inverse agonists, it may be concluded that this sodium ion sensitivity is unrelated to mechanisms of inverse agonism.

  20. Viral cell recognition and entry.

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, M. G.

    1994-01-01

    Rhinovirus infection is initiated by the recognition of a specific cell-surface receptor. The major group of rhinovirus serotypes attach to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). The attachment process initiates a series of conformational changes resulting in the loss of genomic RNA from the virion. X-ray crystallography and sequence comparisons suggested that a deep crevice or canyon is the site on the virus recognized by the cellular receptor molecule. This has now been verified by electron microscopy of human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14) and HRV16 complexed with a soluble component of ICAM-1. A hydrophobic pocket underneath the canyon is the site of binding of various hydrophobic drug compounds that can inhibit attachment and uncoating. This pocket is also associated with an unidentified, possibly cellular in origin, "pocket factor." The pocket factor binding site overlaps the binding site of the receptor. It is suggested that competition between the pocket factor and receptor regulates the conformational changes required for the initiation of the entry of the genomic RNA into the cell. PMID:7849588

  1. Proline-rich Sequence Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Schlundt, Andreas; Sticht, Jana; Piotukh, Kirill; Kosslick, Daniela; Jahnke, Nadin; Keller, Sandro; Schuemann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Freund, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The tumor maintenance protein Tsg101 has recently gained much attention because of its involvement in endosomal sorting, virus release, cytokinesis, and cancerogenesis. The ubiquitin-E2-like variant (UEV) domain of the protein interacts with proline-rich sequences of target proteins that contain P(S/T)AP amino acid motifs and weakly binds to the ubiquitin moiety of proteins committed to sorting or degradation. Here we performed peptide spot analysis and phage display to refine the peptide binding specificity of the Tsg101 UEV domain. A mass spectrometric proteomics approach that combines domain-based pulldown experiments, binding site inactivation, and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was then used to delineate the relative importance of the peptide and ubiquitin binding sites. Clearly “PTAP” interactions dominate target recognition, and we identified several novel binders as for example the poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1), Sec24b, NFκB2, and eIF4b. For PABP1 and eIF4b the interactions were confirmed in the context of the corresponding full-length proteins in cellular lysates. Therefore, our results strongly suggest additional roles of Tsg101 in cellular regulation of mRNA translation. Regulation of Tsg101 itself by the ubiquitin ligase TAL (Tsg101-associated ligase) is most likely conferred by a single PSAP binding motif that enables the interaction with Tsg101 UEV. Together with the results from the accompanying article (Kofler, M., Schuemann, M., Merz, C., Kosslick, D., Schlundt, A., Tannert, A., Schaefer, M., Lührmann, R., Krause, E., and Freund, C. (2009) Proline-rich sequence recognition: I. Marking GYF and WW domain assembly sites in early spliceosomal complexes. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 8, 2461–2473) on GYF and WW domain pathways our work defines major proline-rich sequence-mediated interaction networks that contribute to the modular assembly of physiologically relevant protein complexes. PMID:19542561

  2. Molecular determinants of agonist selectivity in glutamate-gated chloride channels which likely explain the agonist selectivity of the vertebrate glycine and GABAA-ρ receptors.

    PubMed

    Blarre, Thomas; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Acher, Francine C; Kehoe, JacSue

    2014-01-01

    Orthologous Cys-loop glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluClR's) have been cloned and described electrophysiologically and pharmacologically in arthropods and nematodes (both members of the invertebrate ecdysozoan superphylum). Recently, GluClR's from Aplysia californica (a mollusc from the lophotrochozoan superphylum) have been cloned and similarly studied. In spite of sharing a common function, the ecdysozoan and lophotrochozoan receptors have been shown by phylogenetic analyses to have evolved independently. The recent crystallization of the GluClR from C. elegans revealed the binding pocket of the nematode receptor. An alignment of the protein sequences of the nematode and molluscan GluClRs showed that the Aplysia receptor does not contain all of the residues defining the binding mode of the ecdysozoan receptor. That the two receptors have slightly different binding modes is not surprising since earlier electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments had suggested that they were differentially responsive to certain agonists. Knowledge of the structure of the C. elegans GluClR has permitted us to generate a homology model of the binding pocket of the Aplysia receptor. We have analyzed the differences between the two binding modes and evaluated the relative significance of their non-common residues. We have compared the GluClRs electrophysiologically and pharmacologically and we have used site-directed mutagenesis on both receptor types to test predictions made from the model. Finally, we propose an explanation derived from the model for why the nematode receptors are gated only by glutamate, whereas the molluscan receptors can also be activated by β-alanine, GABA and taurine. Like the Aplysia receptor, the vertebrate glycine and GABAA-ρ receptors also respond to these other agonists. An alignment of the sequences of the molluscan and vertebrate receptors shows that the reasons we have given for the ability of the other agonists to activate the Aplysia

  3. 2-(2-Piperidyl)- and 2-(2-pyrrolidyl)chromans as nicotine agonists: synthesis and preliminary pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Efange, S M; Tu, Z; von Hohenberg, K; Francesconi, L; Howell, R C; Rampersad, M V; Todaro, L J; Papke, R L; Kung, M P

    2001-12-20

    As part of an effort to develop a new class of subtype selective nicotine agonists, we have synthesized and tested a group of 12 hydroxylated 2-(2-piperidyl)- and 2-(2-pyrrolidyl)chromans. In rat brain membranes, all 12 compounds displayed poor affinity for [(125)I]-alpha-bunagarotoxin binding sites. In contrast, three compounds, 17c, 24, and 26, displayed moderate to high affinity for [(3)H]cytisine binding sites, while three (17b, 18b,c) and six (17a,d,e and 18a,d,e) compounds showed weak and poor affinity, respectively, for these same sites. In subsequent studies, compounds 17a and 17c were found to stimulate the efflux of (86)Rb(+) from rat cortical synaptosomes, an indication of agonist activity. Further, both 17c and 26 displayed high intrinsic activity in stimulating the release of [(3)H]dopamine from striatal synaptosomes; however, only 17c was effective at stimulating the release of [(3)H]acetylcholine from cortical synaptosomes, suggesting differential selectivity. In cloned human nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes, both 17c and 26 activated alpha7 and alpha3beta2 receptor subtypes in a dose-dependent manner, but 26 was clearly the more potent agonist. Last, neither compound displayed dose-dependent activation of alpha4beta2 nAChRs. We conclude that 2-(2-azacyclic)chromans appear to be a promising new class of nicotine agonists.

  4. Fates of endocytosed somatostatin sst2 receptors and associated agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, J A; Kaur, R; Dodgeon, I; Edwardson, J M; Humphrey, P P

    1998-01-01

    Somatostatin agonists are rapidly and efficiently internalized with the somatostatin sst2 receptor. The fate of internalized agonists and receptors is of critical importance because the rate of ligand recycling back to the cell surface can limit the amount of radioligand accumulated inside the cells, whereas receptor recycling might be of vital importance in providing the cell surface with dephosphorylated, resensitized receptors. Furthermore the accumulation of radioisotope-conjugated somatostatin agonists inside cancer cells resulting from receptor-mediated internalization has been used as a treatment for cancers that overexpress somatostatin receptors. In the present study, radio-iodinated agonists at the sst2 somatostatin receptor were employed to allow quantitative analysis of the fate of endocytosed agonist. After endocytosis, recycling back to the cell surface was the main pathway for both 125I-labelled somatostatin-14 (SRIF-14) and the more stable agonist 125I-labelled cyclo(N-Me-Ala-Tyr-d-Trp-Lys-Abu-Phe) (BIM-23027; Abu stands for aminobutyric acid), accounting for 75-85% of internalized ligand when re-endocytosis of radioligand was prevented. We have shown that there is a dynamic cycling of both somatostatin agonist ligands and receptors between the cell surface and internal compartments both during agonist treatment and after surface-bound agonist has been removed, unless steps are taken to prevent the re-activation of receptors by recycled agonist. Internalization leads to increased degradation of 125I-labelled SRIF-14 but not 125I-labelled BIM-23027. The concentration of recycled agonist accumulating in the extracellular medium was sufficient to re-activate the receptor, as measured both by the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase and the recovery of surface receptor number after internalization. PMID:9820803

  5. Effects of kappa opioid agonists alone and in combination with cocaine on heart rate and blood pressure in conscious squirrel monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Charles W.; Graczyk, Zofi; Gilman, Joanne P.; Negus, S. Stevens; Bergman, Jack; Mello, Nancy K.; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    As kappa agonists have been proposed as treatments for cocaine abuse, the cardiovascular effects of the kappa opioid receptor agonists ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) and enadoline were investigated in conscious squirrel monkeys. Both EKC and enadoline increased heart rate with little effect on blood pressure. This effect appeared to be specific for kappa receptors as the mu opioid agonist morphine did not mimic the effects of the kappa agonists. The opioid antagonist naltrexone, at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg, blocked the effect of EKC. An action at both central and peripheral receptors may be responsible for the heart rate increase following kappa agonist treatment. The ganglionic blocker chlorisondamine partially antagonized the effect of EKC on heart rate, suggesting central involvement, while the peripherally-acting agonist ICI 204,448 ((±)-1-[2,3-(Dihydro-7-methyl-1H-inden-4-yl)oxy]-3-[(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-butanol hydrochloride) also increased heart rate, supporting a peripheral site of action. When given in combination with cocaine, EKC produced effects that were sub-additive, suggesting that the kappa agonists may be used safely as cocaine abuse treatments. PMID:17707792

  6. Exploring the DNA-recognition potential of homeodomains.

    PubMed

    Chu, Stephanie W; Noyes, Marcus B; Christensen, Ryan G; Pierce, Brian G; Zhu, Lihua J; Weng, Zhiping; Stormo, Gary D; Wolfe, Scot A

    2012-10-01

    The recognition potential of most families of DNA-binding domains (DBDs) remains relatively unexplored. Homeodomains (HDs), like many other families of DBDs, display limited diversity in their preferred recognition sequences. To explore the recognition potential of HDs, we utilized a bacterial selection system to isolate HD variants, from a randomized library, that are compatible with each of the 64 possible 3' triplet sites (i.e., TAANNN). The majority of these selections yielded sets of HDs with overrepresented residues at specific recognition positions, implying the selection of specific binders. The DNA-binding specificity of 151 representative HD variants was subsequently characterized, identifying HDs that preferentially recognize 44 of these target sites. Many of these variants contain novel combinations of specificity determinants that are uncommon or absent in extant HDs. These novel determinants, when grafted into different HD backbones, produce a corresponding alteration in specificity. This information was used to create more explicit HD recognition models, which can inform the prediction of transcriptional regulatory networks for extant HDs or the engineering of HDs with novel DNA-recognition potential. The diversity of recovered HD recognition sequences raises important questions about the fitness barrier that restricts the evolution of alternate recognition modalities in natural systems.

  7. Synthesis, activity, and docking study of phenylthiazole acids as potential agonists of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Taijin; Shi, Min; Ye, Haoyu

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-mediated transcription factor playing key roles in glucose and lipid homeostasis, and PPARγ ligands possess therapeutic potential in these as well as other areas. In this study, a series of phenylthiazole acids have been synthesized and evaluated for agonistic activity by a convenient fluorescence polarization-based PPARγ ligand screening assay. Compound 4t, as a potential PPARγ agonist with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) 0.75±0.20 μM, exhibited in vitro potency comparable with a 0.83±0.14 μM of the positive control rosiglitazone. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicated that phenylthiazole acid 4t interacted with the amino acid residues of the active site of the PPARγ complex in a stable manner, consistent with the result of the in vitro ligand assay. PMID:27313447

  8. Estrogen receptor agonists for attenuation of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Haque, Azizul; Banik, Naren L.; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Ray, Swapan K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent results from laboratory investigations and clinical trials indicate important roles for estrogen receptor (ER) agonists in protecting the central nervous system (CNS) from noxious consequences of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative processes in several CNS disorders including spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are associated with activation of microglia and astrocytes, which drive the resident neuroinflammatory response. During neurodegenerative processes, activated microglia and astrocytes cause deleterious effects on surrounding neurons. The inhibitory activity of ER agonists on microglia activation might be a beneficial therapeutic option for delaying the onset or progression of neurodegenerative injuries and diseases. Recent studies suggest that ER agonists can provide neuroprotection by modulation of cell survival mechanisms, synaptic reorganization, regenerative responses to axonal injury, and neurogenesis process. The anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions of ER agonists are mediated mainly via two ERs known as ERα and ERβ. Although some studies have suggested that ER agonists may be deleterious to some neuronal populations, the potential clinical benefits of ER agonists for augmenting cognitive function may triumph over the associated side effects. Also, understanding the modulatory activities of ER agonists on inflammatory pathways will possibly lead to the development of selective anti-inflammatory molecules with neuroprotective roles in different CNS disorders such as SCI, MS, PD, and AD in humans. Future studies should be concentrated on finding the most plausible molecular pathways for enhancing protective functions of ER agonists in treating neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative injuries and diseases in the CNS. PMID:25245209

  9. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  10. A novel non-opioid binding site for endomorphin-1.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, I; Toth, F; Biyashev, D; Szatmari, I; Monory, K; Tomboly, C; Toth, G; Benyhe, S; Borsodi, A

    2016-08-01

    Endomorphins are natural amidated opioid tetrapeptides with the following structure: Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-1), and Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-2). Endomorphins interact selectively with the μ-opioid or MOP receptors and exhibit nanomolar or sub-nanomolar receptor binding affinities, therefore they suggested to be endogenous agonists for the μ-opioid receptors. Endomorphins mediate a number of characteristic opioid effects, such as antinociception, however there are several physiological functions in which endomorphins appear to act in a fashion that does not involve binding to and activation of the μ-opioid receptor. Our recent data indicate that a radiolabelled [(3)H]endomorphin-1 with a specific radioactivity of 2.35 TBq/mmol - prepared by catalytic dehalogenation of the diiodinated peptide precursor in the presence of tritium gas - is able to bind to a second, naloxone insensitive recognition site in rat brain membranes. Binding heterogeneity, i.e., the presence of higher (Kd = 0.4 nM / Bmax = 120 fmol/mg protein) and lower (Kd = 8.2 nM / Bmax = 432 fmol/mg protein) affinity binding components is observed both in saturation binding experiments followed by Schatchard analysis, and in equilibrium competition binding studies. The signs of receptor multiplicity, e.g., curvilinear Schatchard plots or biphasic displacement curves are seen only if the non-specific binding is measured in the presence of excess unlabeled endomorphin-1 and not in the presence of excess unlabeled naloxone. The second, lower affinity non-opioid binding site is not recognized by heterocyclic opioid alkaloid ligands, neither agonists such as morphine, nor antagonists such as naloxone. On the contrary, endomorphin-1 is displaced from its lower affinity, higher capacity binding site by several natural neuropeptides, including methionine-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, nociceptin-orphanin FQ, angiotensin and FMRF-amide. This naloxone-insensitive, consequently non-opioid binding site seems

  11. Neuroprotection by Alpha 2-Adrenergic Agonists in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghua; Kimelberg, Harold K.

    2005-01-01

    Ischemic brain injury is implicated in the pathophysiology of stroke and brain trauma, which are among the top killers worldwide, and intensive studies have been performed to reduce neural cell death after cerebral ischemia. Alpha 2-adrenergic agonists have been shown to improve the histomorphological and neurological outcome after cerebral ischemic injury when administered during ischemia, and recent studies have provided considerable evidence that alpha 2-adrenergic agonists can protect the brain from ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, alpha 2-adrenergic agonists are promising potential drugs in preventing cerebral ischemic injury, but the mechanisms by which alpha 2-adrenergic agonists exert their neuroprotective effect are unclear. Activation of both the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor and imidazoline receptor may be involved. This mini review examines the recent progress in alpha 2-adrenergic agonists - induced neuroprotection and its proposed mechanisms in cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:18369397

  12. Recognition and home care of low birth weight neonates: a qualitative study of knowledge, beliefs and practices of mothers in Iganga-Mayuge Health and Demographic Surveillance Site, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal mortality has remained persistently high worldwide. In Uganda, neonatal deaths account for 50% of all infant deaths. Low birth weight is associated with a higher risk of death during the neonatal period. Failure to recognize low birth weight and inappropriate home care practices increase the risk of morbidity and mortality in this high risk group. This study explored mothers’ knowledge, beliefs and practices in recognising and providing home care for low birth weight babies. Methods The study was carried out in Eastern Uganda. In-depth interviews were conducted with sixteen mothers of small babies who delivered in health facilities (10) or at home (6) two months prior to the study. Interviews were conducted in mothers’ homes using the local language. Interviewer notes and audio recordings were transcribed and translated to English. Content analysis was done using Atlas-ti software. Results Recognition of low birth weight by mothers when a baby is not weighed was difficult. Mothers were aware of the causes of low birth weight though some mothers believed in the influence of supernatural powers. Mothers who delivered in hospital had better knowledge of appropriate home care practices for low birth weight babies compared to mothers who delivered at home or in a lower level health facility. Practices related to cord care and keeping the baby warm were good while poor practices were noted concerning initiation and exclusive breast feeding, and bathing the baby. Low birth weight was not appreciated as a danger sign in newborns and therefore mothers did not seek health care. Some mothers who initiated good care practices for low birth weight newborns in the facilities did not sustain them at home. Conclusions Recognition of low birth weight is still poor. This leads to inappropriate home care practices for these high risk newborns. Mothers’ knowledge and care practices can be improved through health education, and this should be extended to the

  13. Expression of intron-containing C. elegans heat shock genes in mouse cells demonstrates divergence of 3' splice site recognition sequences between nematodes and vertebrates, and an inhibitory effect of heat shock on the mammalian splicing apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, R J; Russnak, R H; Jones, D; Mathias, C; Candido, E P

    1987-01-01

    Splicing of a pair of intron-containing heat shock genes from Caenorhabditis elegans has been studied in transfected mouse cells. The hsp16-1 and hsp16-48 genes of C. elegans encode 16,000 Da heat shock polypeptides. Each gene contains a short intron of 52 (hsp16-1) or 55 (hsp16-48) base pairs. When these genes were introduced into mouse cells, they were efficiently induced following heat shock, but splicing of the introns was abnormal. In mouse cells, cleavage of the hsp16 transcripts occurred at the correct 5' splice sites, but the 3' splice sites were located at AG dinucleotides downstream of the correct sites. This aberrant splicing was not solely due to the small size of the C. elegans introns, since a hsp16-1 gene containing an intron enlarged by tandem duplication showed exactly the same splicing pattern. The mouse cells thus seem to be unable to recognize the natural 3' splice sites of the C. elegans transcripts. The efficiency of splicing was greatly reduced under heat shock conditions, and unspliced transcripts accumulated in the nucleus. During a subsequent recovery period at 37 degrees C, these transcripts were spliced and transported to the cytoplasm. Images PMID:3588308

  14. Thromboxane agonist (U46619) potentiates norepinephrine efflux from adrenergic nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Trachte, G.J.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of the synthetic thromboxane/prostaglandin (PG) H2 agonist U46619 on the electrically stimulated rabbit isolated vas deferens was examined to test for thromboxane influences on adrenergic nerves. U46619 effects on force generation, (/sup 3/H) norepinephrine release and norepinephrine-induced contractions were assessed to determine the mechanism of action. U46619 maximally enhanced adrenergic force generation 135 +/- 24% at a concentration of 100 nM. U46619 potentiated maximal contractile effects of exogenously administered norepinephrine 16 +/- 4% and augmented (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine release from electrically stimulated preparations 142 +/- 44%. A competitive thromboxane/PGH2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548, significantly shifted the concentration-response curve for U46619 to the right in a concentration-dependent manner and blocked U46619-induced tritium release. Thus, U46619 appears to potentiate neurotransmitter release by interacting with thromboxane/PGH2 receptors. Because SQ29548 did not prevent the potentiation of norepinephrine contractions by U46619, the postjunctional effect may be independent of thromboxane/PGH2 receptors. We interpret these results to be indicative of both pre- and postjunctional sites of action of U46619. The physiological importance of these thromboxane effects is unknown currently.

  15. Intracellular calcium strongly potentiates agonist-activated TRPC5 channels

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Nathaniel T.; Kaczmarek, J. Stefan

    2009-01-01

    TRPC5 is a calcium (Ca2+)-permeable nonselective cation channel expressed in several brain regions, including the hippocampus, cerebellum, and amygdala. Although TRPC5 is activated by receptors coupled to phospholipase C, the precise signaling pathway and modulatory signals remain poorly defined. We find that during continuous agonist activation, heterologously expressed TRPC5 currents are potentiated in a voltage-dependent manner (∼5-fold at positive potentials and ∼25-fold at negative potentials). The reversal potential, doubly rectifying current–voltage relation, and permeability to large cations such as N-methyl-d-glucamine remain unchanged during this potentiation. The TRPC5 current potentiation depends on extracellular Ca2+: replacement by Ba2+ or Mg2+ abolishes it, whereas the addition of 10 mM Ca2+ accelerates it. The site of action for Ca2+ is intracellular, as simultaneous fura-2 imaging and patch clamp recordings indicate that potentiation is triggered at ∼1 µM [Ca2+]. This potentiation is prevented when intracellular Ca2+ is tightly buffered, but it is promoted when recording with internal solutions containing elevated [Ca2+]. In cell-attached and excised inside-out single-channel recordings, increases in internal [Ca2+] led to an ∼10–20-fold increase in channel open probability, whereas single-channel conductance was unchanged. Ca2+-dependent potentiation should result in TRPC5 channel activation preferentially during periods of repetitive firing or coincident neurotransmitter receptor activation. PMID:19398778

  16. Agonist Derived Molecular Probes for A2A Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Jarvis, Michael F.; Williams, Michael; Hutchison, Alan J.; Barrington, William W.; Stiles, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The adenosine agonist 2-(4-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino)-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680) was recently reported to be selective for the A2A adenosine receptor subtype, which mediates its hypotensive action. To investigate structurelactivity relationships at a distal site, CGS21680 was derivatized using a functionalized congener approach. The carboxylic group of CGS21680 has been esterified to form a methyl ester, which was then treated with ethylenediamine to produce an amine congener. The amine congener was an intermediate for acylation reactions, in which the reactive acyl species contained a reported group, or the precursor for such. For radioiodination, derivatives of p-hydroxyphenylpropionic, 2-thiophenylacetic, and p-aminophenylacetic acids were prepared. The latter derivative (PAPA-APEC) was iodinated electrophilically using [125I]iodide resulting in a radioligand which was used for studies of competition of binding to striatal A, adenosine receptors in bovine brain. A biotin conjugate and an aryl sulfonate were at least 350-fold selective for A, receptors. For spectroscopic detection, a derivative of the stable free radical tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) was prepared. For irreversible inhibition of receptors, meta- and para-phenylenediisothiocyanate groups were incorporated in the analogs. We have demonstrated that binding at A2A receptors is relatively insensitive to distal structural changes at the 2-position, and we report high affinity molecular probes for receptor characterization by radioactive, spectroscopic and affinity labelling methodology. PMID:2561548

  17. Molecular Recognition and Specific Interactions for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Chung; Kang, Dae Joon

    2008-01-01

    Molecular recognition and specific interactions are reliable and versatile routes for site-specific and well-oriented immobilization of functional biomolecules on surfaces. The control of surface properties via the molecular recognition and specific interactions at the nanoscale is a key element for the nanofabrication of biosensors with high sensitivity and specificity. This review intends to provide a comprehensive understanding of the molecular recognition- and specific interaction-mediated biosensor fabrication routes that leads to biosensors with well-ordered and controlled structures on both nanopatterned surfaces and nanomaterials. Herein self-assembly of the biomolecules via the molecular recognition and specific interactions on nanoscaled surfaces as well as nanofabrication techniques of the biomolecules for biosensor architecture are discussed. We also describe the detection of molecular recognition- and specific interaction-mediated molecular binding as well as advantages of nanoscale detection. PMID:27873889

  18. Quantifying agonist activity at G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Frederick J; Suga, Hinako; Griffin, Michael T

    2011-12-26

    When an agonist activates a population of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), it elicits a signaling pathway that culminates in the response of the cell or tissue. This process can be analyzed at the level of a single receptor, a population of receptors, or a downstream response. Here we describe how to analyze the downstream response to obtain an estimate of the agonist affinity constant for the active state of single receptors. Receptors behave as quantal switches that alternate between active and inactive states (Figure 1). The active state interacts with specific G proteins or other signaling partners. In the absence of ligands, the inactive state predominates. The binding of agonist increases the probability that the receptor will switch into the active state because its affinity constant for the active state (K(b)) is much greater than that for the inactive state (K(a)). The summation of the random outputs of all of the receptors in the population yields a constant level of receptor activation in time. The reciprocal of the concentration of agonist eliciting half-maximal receptor activation is equivalent to the observed affinity constant (K(obs)), and the fraction of agonist-receptor complexes in the active state is defined as efficacy (ε) (Figure 2). Methods for analyzing the downstream responses of GPCRs have been developed that enable the estimation of the K(obs) and relative efficacy of an agonist. In this report, we show how to modify this analysis to estimate the agonist K(b) value relative to that of another agonist. For assays that exhibit constitutive activity, we show how to estimate K(b) in absolute units of M(-1). Our method of analyzing agonist concentration-response curves consists of global nonlinear regression using the operational model. We describe a procedure using the software application, Prism (GraphPad Software, Inc., San Diego, CA). The analysis yields an estimate of the product of K(obs) and a parameter proportional to efficacy (

  19. [Prosopagnosia and facial expression recognition].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews clinical neuropsychological studies that have indicated that the recognition of a person's identity and the recognition of facial expressions are processed by different cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. The fusiform gyrus, especially the right fusiform gyrus, plays an important role in the recognition of identity. The superior temporal sulcus, amygdala, and medial frontal cortex play important roles in facial-expression recognition. Both facial recognition and facial-expression recognition are highly intellectual processes that involve several regions of the brain.

  20. Social recognition in wild fish populations

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Ashley J.W; Webster, Michael M; Hart, Paul J.B

    2007-01-01

    The ability of animals to gather information about their social and physical environment is essential for their ecological function. Odour cues are an important component of this information gathering across taxa. Recent laboratory studies have revealed the importance of flexible chemical cues in facilitating social recognition of fishes. These cues are known to be mediated by recent habitat experience and fishes are attracted to individuals that smell like themselves. However, to be relevant to wild populations, where animals may move and forage freely, these cues would have to be temporally flexible and allow spatial resolution. Here, we present data from a study of social recognition in wild populations of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Focal fish preferentially associated with conspecifics from the same habitat as themselves. These preferences were changed and updated following translocation of the focal fish to a different site. Further investigation revealed that association preferences changed after 3 h of exposure to different habitat cues. In addition to temporal flexibility, the cues also allowed a high degree of spatial resolution: fish taken from sites 200 m apart produced cues that were sufficiently different to enable the focal fish to discriminate and associate with fish captured near their own home site. The adaptive benefits of this social recognition mechanism remain unclear, though they may allow fish to orient within their social environment and gain current local information. PMID:17284411

  1. Agonistic behavior in males and females: effects of an estrogen receptor beta agonist in gonadectomized and gonadally intact mice

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Amy E. Clipperton; Cragg, Cheryl L.; Wood, Alexis J.; Pfaff, Donald W.; Choleris, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Summary Affiliative and agonistic social interactions are mediated by gonadal hormones. Research with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) or beta (ERβ) knockout (KO) mice show that long-term inactivation of ERα decreases, while inactivation of ERβ increases, male aggression. Opposite effects were found in female αERKO and βERKO mice. The role of acute activation of ERα or ERβ in the agonistic responses of adult non-KO mice is unknown. We report here the effects of the ERβ selective agonist WAY-200070 on agonistic and social behavior in gonadally intact and gonadectomized (gonadex) male and female CD-1 mice towards a gonadex, same-sex intruder. All 15 min resident-intruder tests were videotaped for comprehensive behavioral analysis. Separate analyses assessed: 1) effects of WAY-200070 on each sex and gonadal condition; 2) differences between sexes, and between gonadally intact and gonadex mice, in untreated animals. Results show that in gonadally intact male and female mice WAY-200070 increased agonistic behaviors such as pushing down and aggressive grooming, while leaving attacks unaffected. In untreated mice, males attacked more than females, and gonadex animals showed less agonistic behavior than same-sex, gonadally intact mice. Overall, our detailed behavioral analysis suggested that in gonadally intact male and female mice, ERβ mediates patterns of agonistic behavior that are not directly involved in attacks. This suggests that specific aspects of aggressive behavior are acutely mediated by ERβ in adult mice. Our results also showed that, in resident-intruder tests, female mice spend as much time in intrasexual agonistic interactions as males, but use agonistic behaviors that involve extremely low levels of direct attacks. This non-attack aggression in females is increased by acute activation of ERβ. Thus, acute activation of ERβ similarly mediates agonistic behavior in adult male and female CD-1 mice. PMID:20129736

  2. Chiral recognition applications of molecularly imprinted polymers: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Maier, Norbert M; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2007-09-01

    Molecular imprinting technology offers the unique opportunity to tailor chiral stationary phases with predefined chiral recognition properties by employing the enantiomers of interest as binding-site-forming templates. Added advantages, such as ease of preparation, chemical robustness, low-cost production, and the possibility of shaping molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in various self-supporting formats, render them attractive materials for a broad range of chiral recognition applications. In this review a critical overview on recent developments in the field of MIP-based chiral recognition applications is given, focusing on separation techniques and molecular sensing. Inherent limitations associated with the use of enantioselective MIP materials in high-performance separation techniques are outlined, including binding site heterogeneity and slow mass transfer characteristics. The prospects of MIP materials as versatile recognition elements for the design of enantioselective sensor systems are highlighted.

  3. In vivo pharmacological profile of S 38093, a novel histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Panayi, Fany; Sors, Aurore; Bert, Lionel; Martin, Brigitte; Rollin-Jego, Gaelle; Billiras, Rodolphe; Carrié, Isabelle; Albinet, Karine; Danober, Laurence; Rogez, Nathalie; Thomas, Jean-Yves; Pira, Luigi; Bertaina-Anglade, Valérie; Lestage, Pierre

    2017-03-14

    S 38093, a novel histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist, was tested in a series of neurochemical and behavioral paradigms designed to evaluate its procognitive and arousal properties. In intracerebral microdialysis studies performed in rats, S 38093 dose-dependently increased histamine extracellular levels in the prefrontal cortex and facilitated cholinergic transmission in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats after acute and chronic administration (10mg/kg i.p.). Acute oral administration of S 38093 at 0.1mg/kg significantly improved spatial working memory in rats in the Morris water maze test. The compound also displayed cognition enhancing properties in the two-trial object recognition task in rats, in a natural forgetting paradigm at 0.3 and 1mg/kg p.o. and in a scopolamine-induced memory deficit situation at 3mg/kg p.o. The property of S 38093 to promote episodic memory was confirmed in a social recognition test in rats at 0.3 and 1mg/kg i.p. Arousal properties of S 38093 were assessed in freely moving rats by using electroencephalographic recordings: at 3 and 10mg/kg i.p., S 38093 significantly reduced slow wave sleep delta power and induced at the highest dose a delay in sleep latency. S 38093 at 10mg/kg p.o. also decreased the barbital-induced sleeping time in rats. Taken together these data indicate that S 38093, a novel H3 inverse agonist, displays cognition enhancing at low doses and arousal properties at higher doses in rodents.

  4. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and PAMs as adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Monica M; Björkholm, Carl; Malmerfelt, Anna; Möller, Annie; Påhlsson, Ninni; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Feltmann, Kristin; Jardemark, Kent; Schilström, Björn; Svensson, Torgny H

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine has been found to improve cognition and reduce negative symptoms in schizophrenia and a genetic and pathophysiological link between the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and schizophrenia has been demonstrated. Therefore, there has been a large interest in developing drugs affecting the α7 nAChRs for schizophrenia. In the present study we investigated, in rats, the effects of a selective α7 agonist (PNU282987) and a α7 positive allosteric modulator (PAM; NS1738) alone and in combination with the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone for their utility as adjunct treatment in schizophrenia. Moreover we also investigated their utility as adjunct treatment in depression in combination with the SSRI citalopram. We found that NS1738 and to some extent also PNU282987, potentiated a subeffective dose of risperidone in the conditioned avoidance response test. Both drugs also potentiated the effect of a sub-effective concentration of risperidone on NMDA-induced currents in pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, NS1738 and PNU282987 enhanced recognition memory in the novel object recognition test, when given separately. Both drugs also potentiated accumbal but not prefrontal risperidone-induced dopamine release. Finally, PNU282987 reduced immobility in the forced swim test, indicating an antidepressant-like effect. Taken together, our data support the utility of drugs targeting the α7 nAChRs, perhaps especially α7 PAMs, to potentiate the effect of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Moreover, our data suggest that α7 agonists and PAMs can be used to ameliorate cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia and depression.

  5. Recognition of malondialdehyde-modified proteins by the C terminus of complement factor H is mediated via the polyanion binding site and impaired by mutations found in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Uchida, Koji; Varjosalo, Markku; Jokela, Reija; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2014-02-14

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a severe thrombotic microangiopathy characterized by uncontrolled complement activation against endothelial and blood cells. Mutations in the C-terminal target recognition domains 19-20 of complement regulator factor H (FH) are strongly associated with aHUS, but the mechanisms triggering disease onset have remained unresolved. Here we report that several aHUS-related mutations alter the binding of FH19-20 to proteins where lysines have reacted with malondialdehyde (MDA). Although FH19-20 did not interact with MDA-modified hexylamine, lysine-containing peptides, or a proteolytically degraded protein, it bound to MDA-modified polylysine. This suggests that FH19-20 recognizes only clustered MDA adducts. Binding of MDA-modified BSA to FH19-20 was ionic by nature, depended on positive residues of FH19-20, and competed with the polyanions heparin and DNA. This could not be explained with the mainly neutral adducts known to form in MDA modification. When positive charges of lysines were eliminated by acetic anhydride instead of MDA, the acetylated BSA started to bind FH19-20. Together, these results indicate that negative charges on the modified proteins dominate the interaction with FH19-20. This is beneficial for the physiological function of FH because by binding to the negative charges of the modified target, FH could prevent excess complement activation initiated by naturally occurring antibodies recognizing MDA epitopes with multiple different structures. We propose that oxidative stress leading to formation of MDA adducts is a common feature for triggers of aHUS and that failure of FH in protecting MDA-modified surfaces from complement activation is involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  6. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation.

  7. Automatic object recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranganath, H. S.; Mcingvale, Pat; Sage, Heinz

    1988-01-01

    Geometric and intensity features are very useful in object recognition. An intensity feature is a measure of contrast between object pixels and background pixels. Geometric features provide shape and size information. A model based approach is presented for computing geometric features. Knowledge about objects and imaging system is used to estimate orientation of objects with respect to the line of sight.

  8. Units of Word Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa, Carol M.; And Others

    Both psychologists and reading specialists have been interested in whether words are processed letter by letter or in larger units. A reaction time paradigm was used to evaluate these options with interest focused on potential units of word recognition which might be functional within single syllable words. The basic paradigm involved presenting…

  9. Optical Character Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Converso, L.; Hocek, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems, focusing on their components (the computer, the scanner, the OCR, and the output device); how the systems work; and features to consider in selecting a system. A list of 26 questions to ask to evaluate systems for potential purchase is included. (JDD)

  10. Automated Optical Target Recognition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    A multi-resolution signal processing approach to object recognition is presented using an optical correlator for generating a wavelet transform . The...This report presents an overview of continuous and discrete wavelet transforms. Both digital and optical implementations of the discrete wavelet ... transform are discussed. Examples of typical wavelet basis functions are compared and the constraints imposed by optical implementations are discussed

  11. Teaching Word Recognition Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Mildred A., Comp.

    A series of articles with the chief emphasis on phonics as a means of analyzing words is presented. Various articles pertain to elementary, secondary, and college level instruction. The first of the five parts into which the volume is divided is comprised of a single article which gives an excellent overview of the field of word recognition. Part…

  12. View Invariant Gait Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, Richard D.; Goffredo, Michela; Carter, John N.; Nixon, Mark S.

    Recognition by gait is of particular interest since it is the biometric that is available at the lowest resolution, or when other biometrics are (intentionally) obscured. Gait as a biometric has now shown increasing recognition capability. There are many approaches and these show that recognition can achieve excellent performance on current large databases. The majority of these approaches are planar 2D, largely since the early large databases featured subjects walking in a plane normal to the camera view. To extend deployment capability, we need viewpoint invariant gait biometrics. We describe approaches where viewpoint invariance is achieved by 3D approaches or in 2D. In the first group, the identification relies on parameters extracted from the 3D body deformation during walking. These methods use several video cameras and the 3D reconstruction is achieved after a camera calibration process. On the other hand, the 2D gait biometric approaches use a single camera, usually positioned perpendicular to the subject’s walking direction. Because in real surveillance scenarios a system that operates in an unconstrained environment is necessary, many of the recent gait analysis approaches are orientated toward view-invariant gait recognition.

  13. Automatic aircraft recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmam, Hatem; Kim, Jijoong

    2002-08-01

    Automatic aircraft recognition is very complex because of clutter, shadows, clouds, self-occlusion and degraded imaging conditions. This paper presents an aircraft recognition system, which assumes from the start that the image is possibly degraded, and implements a number of strategies to overcome edge fragmentation and distortion. The current vision system employs a bottom up approach, where recognition begins by locating image primitives (e.g., lines and corners), which are then combined in an incremental fashion into larger sets of line groupings using knowledge about aircraft, as viewed from a generic viewpoint. Knowledge about aircraft is represented in the form of whole/part shape description and the connectedness property, and is embedded in production rules, which primarily aim at finding instances of the aircraft parts in the image and checking the connectedness property between the parts. Once a match is found, a confidence score is assigned and as evidence in support of an aircraft interpretation is accumulated, the score is increased proportionally. Finally a selection of the resulting image interpretations with the highest scores, is subjected to competition tests, and only non-ambiguous interpretations are allowed to survive. Experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of the current recognition system are given.

  14. N-terminal galanin-(1-16) fragment is an agonist at the hippocampal galanin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisone, G.; Berthold, M.; Bedecs, K.; Unden, A.; Bartfai, T.; Bertorelli, R.; Consolo, S.; Crawley, J.; Martin, B.; Nilsson, S.; )

    1989-12-01

    The galanin N-terminal fragment (galanin-(1-16)) has been prepared by solid-phase synthesis and by enzymic cleavage of galanin by endoproteinase Asp-N. This peptide fragment displaced {sup 125}I-labeled galanin in receptor autoradiography experiments on rat forebrain and spinal cord and in equilibrium binding experiments from high-affinity binding sites in the ventral hippocampus with an IC50 of approximately 3 nM. In tissue slices of the same brain area, galanin-(1-16), similarly to galanin, inhibited the muscarinic agonist-stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids. Upon intracerebroventricular administration, galanin-(1-16) (10 micrograms/15 microliters) also inhibited the scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.)-evoked release of acetylcholine, as studied in vivo by microdialysis. Substitution of (L-Trp2) for (D-Trp2) resulted in a 500-fold loss in affinity as compared with galanin-(1-16). It is concluded that, in the ventral hippocampus, the N-terminal galanin fragment (galanin-(1-16)) is recognized by the galanin receptors controlling acetylcholine release and muscarinic agonist-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown as a high-affinity agonist and that amino acid residue (Trp2) plays an important role in the receptor-ligand interactions.

  15. γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is not an agonist of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Connelly, William M; Errington, Adam C; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents.

  16. gamma-Aminobutyric acid agonists and antagonists alter chloride flux across brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Allan, A M; Harris, R A

    1986-05-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, increases membrane chloride conductance. Previously, we reported that GABA increases 36Cl- uptake by membrane vesicles (microsacs) prepared from mouse brain. Employing this technique, we found that the GABAA agonists, muscimol, isoguvacine, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-C)pyridine-3-ol, and 3-amino-1-propane sulfonate, all produced a concentration-dependent increase in 36Cl- influx, but baclofen, a GABAB agonist, failed to alter 36Cl- flux. Inhibition of GABA-dependent 36Cl- influx was produced by the convulsant drugs, bicuculline, picrotoxin, and pentylenetetrazole. Ion specificity was demonstrated by a failure of GABA agonists to stimulate influx of 45Ca2+, 86Rb+, 22Na+, or 35SO4(2). GABA-stimulated uptake of 36Cl- was largest in cortex and cerebellum and smaller in hippocampus and striatum. There was little difference in sensitivity to GABA among the areas. Analysis of subcellular fractions prepared from mouse brain demonstrated that the GABA-dependent 36Cl- influx was enriched in the synaptosomal fraction. The nonspecific (GABA-independent) uptake of 36Cl- was enriched in the myelin fraction. These experiments provide evidence for a functional coupling among GABA receptors and the chloride ionophore and suggest that the GABA-activated chloride channel is a site of action for several convulsant compounds.

  17. Important pharmacophoric features of pan PPAR agonists: common chemical feature analysis and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Sandeep; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2009-09-01

    HipHop program was used to generate a common chemical feature hypothesis for pan Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) agonists. The top scoring hypothesis (hypo-1) was found to differentiate the pan agonists (actives) from subtype-specific and dual PPAR agonists (inactives). The importance of individual features in hypo-1 was assessed by deleting a particular feature to generate a new hypothesis and observing its discriminating ability between 'actives' and 'inactives'. Deletion of aromatic features AR-1 (hypo-1b), AR-2 (hypo-1e) and a Hydrophobic feature HYD-1 (hypo-1c) individually did not affect the discriminating power of the hypo-1 significantly. However, deletion of a Hydrogen Bond Acceptor (HBA) feature (hypo-1f) in the hydrophobic tail group was found to be highly detrimental for the specificity of hypo-1 leading to high hit rate of 'inactives'. Since hypo-1 did not produce any useful hits from the database search, hypo-1b, hypo-1c and hypo-1e were used for virtual screening leading to the identification of new potential pan PPAR ligands. The docking studies were used to predict the binding pose of the proposed molecules in PPARgamma active site.

  18. Potential role for the VDR agonist elocalcitol in metabolic control: Evidences in human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Antinozzi, Cristina; Corinaldesi, Clarissa; Giordano, Carla; Pisano, Annalinda; Cerbelli, Bruna; Migliaccio, Silvia; Di Luigi, Luigi; Stefanantoni, Katia; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Minisola, Salvatore; Valesini, Guido; Riccieri, Valeria; Lenzi, Andrea; Crescioli, Clara

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin D plays a pivotal role to maintain skeletal muscle integrity and health. Vitamin D deficiency characterizes inflammatory myopathy (IM) and diabetes, often overlapping diseases involving skeletal muscle damage. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists likely exert beneficial effects in both IM and metabolic disturbances. We aim to evaluate in vitro the effect of elocalcitol, a non-hypercalcemic VDR agonist, on the biomolecular metabolic machinery of human skeletal muscle cells (Hfsmc), vs. insulin (I). We analyzed GLUT4, Flotillin-1, Caveolin-3 and Caveolin-1 cell expression/localization; mTOR, AKT, ERK and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation; IL-6 myokine release; VDR expression. We investigated in vivo vitamin D status in IM subjects, evaluating VDR muscular expression and serum vitamin D with metabolism-related parameters, as glycemia, triglycerides, cholesterol, resistin and adiponectin. In Hfsmc, elocalcitol exerted an I-like effect, promoting GLUT4 re-localization in Flotillin-1, Caveolin-3 and Caveolin-1 positive sites and mTOR, AKT, ERK, 4E-BP1 activation; it enhanced IL-6 myokine release. IM subjects, all normoglycemic, showed VDR/vitamin D deficiency that, together with high lipidemic and resistin profile, possibly increases the risk to develop metabolic diseases. VDR agonists as elocalcitol may be therapeutic tools for skeletal muscle integrity/function maintenance, an indispensable condition for health homeostasis.

  19. Synthetic RORγ agonists regulate multiple pathways to enhance antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Liu, Xikui; Moisan, Jacques; Wang, Yahong; Lesch, Charles A.; Spooner, Chauncey; Morgan, Rodney W.; Zawidzka, Elizabeth M.; Mertz, David; Bousley, Dick; Majchrzak, Kinga; Kryczek, Ilona; Taylor, Clarke; Van Huis, Chad; Skalitzky, Don; Hurd, Alexander; Aicher, Thomas D.; Toogood, Peter L.; Glick, Gary D.; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Zou, Weiping; Carter, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RORγt is the key transcription factor controlling the development and function of CD4+ Th17 and CD8+ Tc17 cells. Across a range of human tumors, about 15% of the CD4+ T cell fraction in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are RORγ+ cells. To evaluate the role of RORγ in antitumor immunity, we have identified synthetic, small molecule agonists that selectively activate RORγ to a greater extent than the endogenous agonist desmosterol. These RORγ agonists enhance effector function of Type 17 cells by increasing the production of cytokines/chemokines such as IL-17A and GM-CSF, augmenting expression of co-stimulatory receptors like CD137, CD226, and improving survival and cytotoxic activity. RORγ agonists also attenuate immunosuppressive mechanisms by curtailing Treg formation, diminishing CD39 and CD73 expression, and decreasing levels of co-inhibitory receptors including PD-1 and TIGIT on tumor-reactive lymphocytes. The effects of RORγ agonists were not observed in RORγ−/− T cells, underscoring the selective on-target activity of the compounds. In vitro treatment of tumor-specific T cells with RORγ agonists, followed by adoptive transfer to tumor-bearing mice is highly effective at controlling tumor growth while improving T cell survival and maintaining enhanced IL-17A and reduced PD-1 in vivo. The in vitro effects of RORγ agonists translate into single agent, immune system-dependent, antitumor efficacy when compounds are administered orally in syngeneic tumor models. RORγ agonists integrate multiple antitumor mechanisms into a single therapeutic that both increases immune activation and decreases immune suppression resulting in robust inhibition of tumor growth. Thus, RORγ agonists represent a novel immunotherapy approach for cancer. PMID:28123897

  20. School IPM Recognition and Certification

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Schools and school districts can get support and recognition for implementation of school IPM. EPA is developing a program to provide recognition for school districts that are working towards or have achieved a level of success with school IPM programs.

  1. [Histrelin acetate--the first once yearly LHRH agonist].

    PubMed

    Altarac, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    Long-acting synthetic luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonists have become the mainstay for androgen-deprivation therapy, because they avoid the physical and psychological discomfort associated with orchidectomy and lack the potential cardiotoxicity associated with estrogens such as diethylstilbestrol. Currently available luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonist analogues include leuprolide, goserelin, triptorelin, degarelix and buserelin were administered as either intramuscular or subcutaneous depot injections on a 1, 2, 3 or 6 months basis. Histrelin acetate is the first long-acting luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonist available as a once-yearly subcutaneous implant.

  2. Reverse engineering of the selective agonist TBPB unveils both orthosteric and allosteric modes of action at the M₁ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Keov, Peter; Valant, Celine; Devine, Shane M; Lane, J Robert; Scammells, Peter J; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2013-09-01

    Recent interest in the M₁ muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (mAChR) has led to the discovery of various selective agonists for the receptor. The novel selective agonist 1-(1'-(2-methylbenzyl)-1,4'-bipiperidin-4-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2(3H)-1 (TBPB) displays unprecedented functional selectivity at the M₁ mAChR. This functional selectivity has been described to stem from sole interaction with an allosteric site, although the evidence for such a mechanism is equivocal. To delineate TBPB's mechanism of action, several truncated variants of TBPB were synthesized and characterized. Binding experiments with [³H]N-methylscopolamine at the M₁, M₂, M₃, and M₄ mAChRs revealed radioligand displacement in a manner consistent with a competitive binding mode at the orthosteric site by TBPB and fragment derivatives. Cell-based functional assays of fragment derivatives of TBPB identified both agonistic and antagonistic moieties, one of which, 1-(1-cyclohexylpiperidin-4-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2(3H)-1 (VCP794), lost agonistic selectivity for the M₁ mAChR. Further interaction experiments between TBPB or its antagonist fragments with ACh also indicated a mechanism consistent with competitive binding at mAChRs. However, interaction with an allosteric site by an antagonist fragment of TBPB was demonstrated via its ability to retard radioligand dissociation. To reconcile this dual orthosteric/allosteric pharmacological behavior, we propose that TBPB is a bitopic ligand, interacting with both the orthosteric site and an allosteric site, at the M₁ mAChR. This mechanism may also be the case for other selective agonists for mAChRs, and should be taken into consideration in the profiling and classification of new novel selective agonists for this receptor family.

  3. Agonist-specific conformational changes in the α1-γ2 subunit interface of the GABA A receptor.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Megan M; Lim, You Bin; Bracamontes, John; Steinbach, Joe Henry; Akk, Gustav

    2012-08-01

    The GABA(A) receptor undergoes conformational changes upon the binding of agonist that lead to the opening of the channel gate and a flow of small anions across the cell membrane. Besides the transmitter GABA, allosteric ligands such as the general anesthetics pentobarbital and etomidate can activate the receptor. Here, we have investigated the agonist specificity of structural changes in the extracellular domain of the receptor. We used the substituted cysteine accessibility method and focused on the γ2(S195C) site (loop F). We show that modification of the site with (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) results in an enhanced response to GABA, indicating accessibility of the resting receptor to the modifying agent. Coapplication of GABA or muscimol, but not of gabazine, with MTSES prevented the effect, suggesting that GABA and muscimol elicit a conformational change that reduces access to the γ2(S195C) site. Exposure of the receptors to MTSES in the presence of the allosteric activators pentobarbital and etomidate resulted in an enhanced current response indicating accessibility and labeling of the γ2(S195C) site. However, comparison of the rates of modification indicated that labeling in the presence of etomidate was significantly faster than that in the presence of pentobarbital or gabazine or in resting receptors. We infer from the data that the structure of the α1-γ2 subunit interface undergoes agonist-specific conformational changes.

  4. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  5. Structural Investigation for Optimization of Anthranilic Acid Derivatives as Partial FXR Agonists by in Silico Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meimei; Yang, Xuemei; Lai, Xinmei; Kang, Jie; Gan, Huijuan; Gao, Yuxing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a three level in silico approach was applied to investigate some important structural and physicochemical aspects of a series of anthranilic acid derivatives (AAD) newly identified as potent partial farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists. Initially, both two and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (2D- and 3D-QSAR) studies were performed based on such AAD by a stepwise technology combined with multiple linear regression and comparative molecular field analysis. The obtained 2D-QSAR model gave a high predictive ability (R2train = 0.935, R2test = 0.902, Q2LOO = 0.899). It also uncovered that number of rotatable single bonds (b_rotN), relative negative partial charges (RPC−), oprea's lead-like (opr_leadlike), subdivided van der Waal’s surface area (SlogP_VSA2) and accessible surface area (ASA) were important features in defining activity. Additionally, the derived3D-QSAR model presented a higher predictive ability (R2train = 0.944, R2test = 0.892, Q2LOO = 0.802). Meanwhile, the derived contour maps from the 3D-QSAR model revealed the significant structural features (steric and electronic effects) required for improving FXR agonist activity. Finally, nine newly designed AAD with higher predicted EC50 values than the known template compound were docked into the FXR active site. The excellent molecular binding patterns of these molecules also suggested that they can be robust and potent partial FXR agonists in agreement with the QSAR results. Overall, these derived models may help to identify and design novel AAD with better FXR agonist activity. PMID:27070594

  6. Predicted Structures of Agonist and Antagonist Bound Complexes of Adenosine A3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Riley, Lindsay; Abrol, Ravinder; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Goddard, William A.

    2011-01-01

    We used the GEnSeMBLE Monte Carlo method to predict ensemble of the 20 best packings (helix rotations and tilts) based on the neutral total energy (E) from a vast number (10 trillion) of potential packings for each of the 4 subtypes of the adenosine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are involved in many cytoprotective functions. We then used the DarwinDock Monte Carlo methods to predict the binding pose for the human A3 adenosine receptor (hAA3R) for subtype selective agonists and antagonists. We find that all four A3 agonists stabilize the 15th lowest conformation of apo-hAA3R while also binding strongly to the 1st and 3rd. In contrast the four A3 antagonists stabilize the 2nd or 3rd lowest conformation. These results show that different ligands can stabilize different GPCR conformations, which will likely affect function, complicating the design of functionally unique ligands. Interestingly all agonists lead to a trans χ1 angle for W6.48 that experiments on other GPCRs associate with G-protein activation while all 20 apo-AA3R conformations have a W6.48 gauche+ χ1 angle associated experimentally with inactive GPCRs for other systems. Thus docking calculations have identified critical ligand-GPCR structures involved with activation. We find that the predicted binding site for selective agonist Cl-IB-MECA to the predicted structure of hAA3R shows favorable interactions to three subtype variable residues, I2536.58, V169EL2, and Q167EL2, while the predicted structure for hAA2AR shows weakened to the corresponding amino acids: T2566.58, E169EL2, and L167EL2, explaining the observed subtype selectivity. PMID:21488099

  7. Dihydromorphine-peptide hybrids with delta receptor agonistic and mu receptor antagonistic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.B.; Medzihradsky, F.; Woods, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    The actions of two morphine derivatives with short peptide side chains were evaluated upon the contraction of the isolated mouse vas deferens and upon displacement of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat brain membranes. NIH-9833 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl) was a potent agonist upon the vas deferens. Its EC50 for inhibition of the twitch was 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. Both naltrexone (10/sup -7/ M) a relatively nonselective opioid antagonist, and ICI-174864 (10/sup -/' M) a highly selective delta receptor antagonist, blocked the actions of NIH-9833 which indicates that this drug is a delta receptor agonist. In contrast, NIH-9835 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-glycyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl), which differs from NIH-9835 by the presence of a single amino acid residue, was devoid of opioid agonistic activity but was a potent antagonist of the inhibitory actions on the vas deferens of morphine and sufentanil. NIH-9833 and NIH-9835 were potent displacers of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat cerebral membranes with EC50's of 0.58 nM and 1.7 nM, respectively. The observation that addition of a single glycyl group changes a dihydromorphine-peptide analog from a potent delta receptor agonist to an equally potent mu receptor antagonist suggests that the two receptor sites might be structurally quite similar.

  8. Predicted structures of agonist and antagonist bound complexes of adenosine A3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Riley, Lindsay; Abrol, Ravinder; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Goddard, William A

    2011-06-01

    We used the GEnSeMBLE Monte Carlo method to predict ensemble of the 20 best packings (helix rotations and tilts) based on the neutral total energy (E) from a vast number (10 trillion) of potential packings for each of the four subtypes of the adenosine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are involved in many cytoprotective functions. We then used the DarwinDock Monte Carlo methods to predict the binding pose for the human A(3) adenosine receptor (hAA(3)R) for subtype selective agonists and antagonists. We found that all four A(3) agonists stabilize the 15th lowest conformation of apo-hAA(3)R while also binding strongly to the 1st and 3rd. In contrast the four A(3) antagonists stabilize the 2nd or 3rd lowest conformation. These results show that different ligands can stabilize different GPCR conformations, which will likely affect function, complicating the design of functionally unique ligands. Interestingly all agonists lead to a trans χ1 angle for W6.48 that experiments on other GPCRs associate with G-protein activation while all 20 apo-AA(3)R conformations have a W6.48 gauche+ χ1 angle associated experimentally with inactive GPCRs for other systems. Thus docking calculations have identified critical ligand-GPCR structures involved with activation. We found that the predicted binding site for selective agonist Cl-IB-MECA to the predicted structure of hAA(3)R shows favorable interactions to three subtype variable residues, I253(6.58), V169(EL2), and Q167(EL2), while the predicted structure for hAA(2A)R shows weakened to the corresponding amino acids: T256(6.58), E169(EL2), and L167(EL2), explaining the observed subtype selectivity.

  9. Agonist and antagonist binding to rat brain muscarinic receptors: influence of aging

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwitz, D.; Egozi, Y.; Henis, Y.I.; Kloog, Y.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1987-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the binding properties of muscarinic receptors in six brain regions in mature and old rats of both sexes by employing direct binding of (/sup 3/H)-antagonist as well as of the labeled natural neurotransmitter, (/sup 3/H)-acetylcholine (( /sup 3/H)-AcCh). In addition, age-related factors were evaluated in the modulation processes involved in agonist binding. The results indicate that as the rat ages the density of the muscarinic receptors is altered differently in the various brain regions: it is decreased in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and olfactory bulb of both male and female rats, but is increased (58%) in the brain stem of senescent males while no significant change is observed for females. The use of the highly sensitive technique measuring direct binding of (/sup 3/H)-AcCh facilitated the separate detection of age-related changes in the two classes (high- and low-affinity) of muscarinic agonist binding sites. In old female rats the density of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)-AcCh binding sites was preserved in all tissues studied, indicating that the decreases in muscarinic receptor density observed with (/sup 3/H)-antagonist represent a loss of low-affinity agonist binding sites. In contrast, (/sup 3/H)-AcCh binding is decreased in the hypothalamus and increased in the brain stem of old male rats. These data imply sexual dimorphism of the aging process in central cholinergic mechanisms.

  10. Visual Recognition Memory across Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Emily J. H.; Pascalis, Olivier; Eacott, Madeline J.; Herbert, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the development of representational flexibility in visual recognition memory during infancy using the Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task. In Experiment 1, 6- and 9-month-old infants exhibited recognition when familiarization and test occurred in the same room, but showed no evidence of recognition when…

  11. International Recognition of Vocational Qualifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imrie, Bradford W.

    Certain issues are relevant to the international recognition of vocational qualifications: (1) the assumption that each country does or should value vocational education and training; (2) the quality of the national system and the implications for international recognition of qualifications, including recognition of the accrediting and awarding…

  12. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  13. Speech Recognition: A General Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Sopena, Luis

    Speech recognition is one of five main areas in the field of speech processing. Difficulties in speech recognition include variability in sound within and across speakers, in channel, in background noise, and of speech production. Speech recognition can be used in a variety of situations: to perform query operations and phone call transfers; for…

  14. Characterization of a novel bivalent morphinan possessing kappa agonist and micro agonist/antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuemei; Xiong, Wennan; Zhang, Ao; Negus, S Stevens; Neumeyer, John L; Bidlack, Jean M

    2005-11-01

    Previous research has shown that compounds with mixed kappa and mu activity may have utility for the treatment of cocaine abuse and dependence. The present study characterizes the pharmacological profile of a bivalent morphinan that was shown to be a kappa opioid receptor agonist and a mu opioid receptor agonist/antagonist. MCL-145 [bis(N-cyclobutylmethylmorphinan) fumarate] is related to the morphinan cyclorphan and its N-cyclobutylmethyl derivative MCL-101 [3-hydroxy-N-cyclobutylmethyl morphinan S-(+)-mandelate]. MCL-145 consists of two morphinans connected by a spacer at the 3-hydroxy position. This compound had K(i) values of 0.078 and 0.20 nM for the kappa and mu opioid receptors, respectively, using radioligand binding assays as shown by Neumeyer et al. in 2003. In the guanosine 5'-O -(3-[(35) S]thiotriphosphate) binding assay, MCL-145 produced an E(max) value of 80% for the kappa opioid receptor and 42% for the mu opioid receptor. The EC(50) values obtained for this compound were 4.3 and 3.1 nM for the kappa and mu opioid receptors, respectively. In vivo MCL-145 produced a full dose-response curve in the 55 degrees C warm water tail-flick test and was equipotent to morphine. The agonist properties of MCL-145 were antagonized by the mu-selective antagonist beta-funaltrexamine and the kappa-selective antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. MCL-145 also acted as a mu antagonist, as measured by the inhibition of morphine-induced antinociception.

  15. Face photo-sketch synthesis and recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaogang; Tang, Xiaoou

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel face photo-sketch synthesis and recognition method using a multiscale Markov Random Fields (MRF) model. Our system has three components: 1) given a face photo, synthesizing a sketch drawing; 2) given a face sketch drawing, synthesizing a photo; and 3) searching for face photos in the database based on a query sketch drawn by an artist. It has useful applications for both digital entertainment and law enforcement. We assume that faces to be studied are in a frontal pose, with normal lighting and neutral expression, and have no occlusions. To synthesize sketch/photo images, the face region is divided into overlapping patches for learning. The size of the patches decides the scale of local face structures to be learned. From a training set which contains photo-sketch pairs, the joint photo-sketch model is learned at multiple scales using a multiscale MRF model. By transforming a face photo to a sketch (or transforming a sketch to a photo), the difference between photos and sketches is significantly reduced, thus allowing effective matching between the two in face sketch recognition. After the photo-sketch transformation, in principle, most of the proposed face photo recognition approaches can be applied to face sketch recognition in a straightforward way. Extensive experiments are conducted on a face sketch database including 606 faces, which can be downloaded from our Web site (http://mmlab.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/facesketch.html).

  16. Face recognition increases during saccade preparation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai; Rizak, Joshua D; Ma, Yuan-ye; Yang, Shang-chuan; Chen, Lin; Hu, Xin-tian

    2014-01-01

    Face perception is integral to human perception system as it underlies social interactions. Saccadic eye movements are frequently made to bring interesting visual information, such as faces, onto the fovea for detailed processing. Just before eye movement onset, the processing of some basic features, such as the orientation, of an object improves at the saccade landing point. Interestingly, there is also evidence that indicates faces are processed in early visual processing stages similar to basic features. However, it is not known whether this early enhancement of processing includes face recognition. In this study, three experiments were performed to map the timing of face presentation to the beginning of the eye movement in order to evaluate pre-saccadic face recognition. Faces were found to be similarly processed as simple objects immediately prior to saccadic movements. Starting ∼ 120 ms before a saccade to a target face, independent of whether or not the face was surrounded by other faces, the face recognition gradually improved and the critical spacing of the crowding decreased as saccade onset was approaching. These results suggest that an upcoming saccade prepares the visual system for new information about faces at the saccade landing site and may reduce the background in a crowd to target the intended face. This indicates an important role of pre-saccadic eye movement signals in human face recognition.

  17. SAR of α7 nicotinic receptor agonists derived from tilorone: exploration of a novel nicotinic pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Schrimpf, Michael R; Sippy, Kevin B; Briggs, Clark A; Anderson, David J; Li, Tao; Ji, Jianguo; Frost, Jennifer M; Surowy, Carol S; Bunnelle, William H; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Meyer, Michael D

    2012-02-15

    The well-known interferon-inducer tilorone was found to possess potent affinity for the agonist site of the α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor (K(i)=56 nM). SAR investigations determined that both basic sidechains are essential for potent activity, however active monosubstituted derivatives can also be prepared if the flexible sidechains are replaced with conformationally rigidified cyclic amines. Analogs in which the fluorenone core is replaced with either dibenzothiophene-5,5-dioxide or xanthenone also retain potent activity.

  18. Further Studies on 2-Arylacetamide Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones: Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of 4,6-Disubstituted Analogues as Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Dahlgren, Claes; Graziano, Alessia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Zerbinati, Serena; Vergelli, Claudia; Quinn, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) play an essential role in the regulation of endogenous inflammation and immunity. In the present studies, a large series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives bearing an arylacetamide chain at position 2 was synthesized and tested for FPR agonist activity. The pyridazin-3(2H)-one ring was confirmed to be an appropriate scaffold to support FPR agonist activity, and its modification at the 4 and 6 positions led to the identification of additional active agonists, which induced intracellular Ca2+ flux in HL-60 cells transfected with either FPR1, FPR2, or FPR3. Seven formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1)-specific and several mixed FPR1/FPR2 dual agonists were identified with low micromolar EC50 values. Furthermore, these agonists also activated human neutrophils, inducing intracellular Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis. Finally, molecular docking studies indicated that the most potent pyridazin-3(2H)-ones overlapped in their best docking poses with fMLF and WKYMVM peptides in the FPR1 and FPR2 ligand binding sites, respectively. Thus, pyridazinone-based compounds represent potential lead compounds for further development of selective and/or potent FPR agonists. PMID:23685570

  19. Octopaminergic agonists for the cockroach neuronal octopamine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Eto, Morifusa

    2003-01-01

    The compounds 1-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine-2-thione and 2-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine showed the almost same activity as octopamine in stimulating adenylate cyclase of cockroach thoracic nervous system among 70 octopamine agonists, suggesting that only these compounds are full octopamine agonists and other compounds are partial octopamine agonists. The quantitative structure-activity relationship of a set of 22 octopamine agonists against receptor 2 in cockroach nervous tissue, was analyzed using receptor surface modeling. Three-dimensional energetics descriptors were calculated from receptor surface model/ligand interaction and these three-dimensional descriptors were used in quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis. A receptor surface model was generated using some subset of the most active structures and the results provided useful information in the characterization and differentiation of octopaminergic receptor.

  20. (R)-(-)-10-methyl-11-hydroxyaporphine: a highly selective serotonergic agonist.

    PubMed

    Cannon, J G; Mohan, P; Bojarski, J; Long, J P; Bhatnagar, R K; Leonard, P A; Flynn, J R; Chatterjee, T K

    1988-02-01

    Prior work in these laboratories identified (+/-)-5-hydroxy-6-methyl-2- (di-n-propylamino)tetralin as a dopaminergic agonist prodrug. The ortho methyl hydroxy aromatic substitution pattern in this molecule has now been incorporated into the aporphine ring system to give a congener of the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine in which the position 10 OH group has been replaced by methyl. Preparation of the target compound involved acid-catalyzed rearrangement of the 3-(1-phenyltetrazolyl) ether of morphine and subsequent molecular modification of the product, the 10-(1-phenyltetrazolyl) ether of (R)-(-)-apomorphine. Surprisingly, the target compound elicited no responses in any assays for effects at dopamine receptors, but rather it displayed pharmacological properties consistent with its being a serotonergic agonist with a high degree of selectivity for 5-HT1A receptors similar to the serotonergic agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin.

  1. Partial agonist therapy in schizophrenia: relevance to diminished criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Gavaudan, Gilles; Magalon, David; Cohen, Julien; Lançon, Christophe; Léonetti, Georges; Pélissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure

    2010-11-01

    Pathological gambling (PG), classified in the DSM-IV among impulse control disorders, is defined as inappropriate, persistent gaming for money with serious personal, family, and social consequences. Offenses are frequently committed to obtain money for gambling. Pathological gambling, a planned and structured behavioral disorder, has often been described as a complication of dopamine agonist treatment in patients with Parkinson's disease. It has never been described in patients with schizophrenia receiving dopamine agonists. We present two patients with schizophrenia, previously treated with antipsychotic drugs without any suggestion of PG, who a short time after starting aripiprazole, a dopamine partial agonist, developed PG and criminal behavior, which totally resolved when aripiprazole was discontinued. Based on recent advances in research on PG and adverse drug reactions to dopamine agonists in Parkinson's disease, we postulate a link between aripiprazole and PG in both our patients with schizophrenia and raise the question of criminal responsibility.

  2. Agonist Replacement for Stimulant Dependence: A Review of Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Rush, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Stimulant use disorders are an unrelenting public health concern worldwide. Agonist replacement therapy is among the most effective strategies for managing substance use disorders including nicotine and opioid dependence. The present paper reviewed clinical data from human laboratory self-administration studies and clinical trials to determine whether agonist replacement therapy is a viable strategy for managing cocaine and/or amphetamine use disorders. The extant literature suggests that agonist replacement therapy may be effective for managing stimulant use disorders, however, the clinical selection of an agonist replacement medication likely needs to be based on the pharmacological mechanism of the medication and the stimulant abused by patients. Specifically, dopamine releasers appear most effective for reducing cocaine use whereas dopamine reuptake inhibitors appear most effective for reducing amphetamine use. PMID:23574440

  3. Selecting agonists from single cells infected with combinatorial antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Yea, Kyungmoo; Xie, Jia; Ruiz, Diana; Wilson, Ian A; Lerner, Richard A

    2013-05-23

    We describe a system for direct selection of antibodies that are receptor agonists. Combinatorial antibody libraries in lentiviruses are used to infect eukaryotic cells that contain a fluorescent reporter system coupled to the receptor for which receptor agonist antibodies are sought. In this embodiment of the method, very large numbers of candidate antibodies expressing lentivirus and eukaryotic reporter cells are packaged together in a format where each is capable of replication, thereby forging a direct link between genotype and phenotype. Following infection, cells that fluoresce are sorted and the integrated genes encoding the agonist antibodies recovered. We validated the system by illustrating its ability to generate rapidly potent antibody agonists that are complete thrombopoietin phenocopies. The system should be generalizable to any pathway where its activation can be linked to production of a selectable phenotype.

  4. Agonist pharmacology of two Drosophila GABA receptor splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The Drosophila melanogaster gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunits, RDLac and DRC 17-1-2, form functional homo-oligomeric receptors when heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The subunits differ in only 17 amino acids, principally in regions of the N-terminal domain which determine agonist pharmacology in vertebrate ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors. A range of conformationally restricted GABA analogues were tested on the two homo-oligomers and their agonists pharmacology compared with that of insect and vertebrate iontropic GABA receptors. 2. The actions of GABA, isoguvacine and isonipecotic acid on RDLac and DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers were compared, by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp. All three compounds were full agonists of both receptors, but were 4-6 fold less potent agonists of DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers than of RDLac. However, the relative potencies of these agonists on each receptor were very similar. 3. A more complete agonist profile was established for RDLac homo-oligomers. The most potent agonists of these receptors were GABA, muscimol and trans-aminocrotonic acid (TACA), which were approximately equipotent. RDLac homo-oligomers were fully activated by a range of GABA analogues, with the order of potency: GABA > ZAPA ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid) > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid > or = isonipecotic acid > or = cis-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) > beta-alanine. 3-Aminopropane sulphonic acid (3-APS), a partial agonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, was the weakest agonist tested and 100 fold less potent than GABA. 4. SR95531, an antagonist of vertebrate GABAA receptors, competitively inhibited the GABA responses of RDLac homo-oligomers, which have previously been found to insensitive to bicuculline. However, its potency (IC50 500 microM) was much reduced when compared to GABAA receptors. 5. The agonist pharmacology of Drosophila RDLac homo-oligomers exhibits aspects of the characteristic pharmacology of

  5. Audio-visual gender recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Xu, Xun; Huang, Thomas S.

    2007-11-01

    Combining different modalities for pattern recognition task is a very promising field. Basically, human always fuse information from different modalities to recognize object and perform inference, etc. Audio-Visual gender recognition is one of the most common task in human social communication. Human can identify the gender by facial appearance, by speech and also by body gait. Indeed, human gender recognition is a multi-modal data acquisition and processing procedure. However, computational multimodal gender recognition has not been extensively investigated in the literature. In this paper, speech and facial image are fused to perform a mutli-modal gender recognition for exploring the improvement of combining different modalities.

  6. Beta2-agonists and exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sandra D; Caillaud, Corinne; Brannan, John D

    2006-01-01

    Beta2-agonists taken immediately before exercise provide significant protection against exercise- induced asthma (EIA) in most patients. However, when they are taken daily, there are some negative aspects regarding severity, control, and recovery from EIA. First, there is a significant minority (15-20%) of asthmatics whose EIA is not prevented by beta2-agonists, even when inhaled corticosteroids are used concomitantly. Second, with daily use, there is a decline in duration of the protective effect of long-acting beta2-agonists. Third, if breakthrough EIA occurs, recovery of lung function is slower in response to a beta2-agonist, and additional doses are often required to achieve pre-exercise values. If a person who takes a beta2-agonist daily experiences problems with exercise, then the physician should consider changing the treatment regimen to achieve better control of EIA. These problems likely result from desensitization of the beta2-receptor on the mast cell, which enhances mediator release, and on the bronchial smooth muscle, which enhances the bronchoconstrictor response and delays recovery from EIA. These effects are reversed within 72 h after cessation of a beta2-agonists. The important clinical question is: Are we actually compromising the beneficial effects of beta2-agonists on the prevention and recovery from EIA by prescribing them daily? Patients with EIA need to ensure that their doses of inhaled corticosteroid or other anti-inflammatory therapy are optimized so that, if necessary, a beta2-agonist can be used intermittently as prophylactic medication with greater confidence in the outcome.

  7. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  8. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  9. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    DOEpatents

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  10. Opioid receptor agonists reduce brain edema in stroke.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Hezhen; Shah, Kaushik; Karamyan, Vardan T; Abbruscato, Thomas J

    2011-04-06

    Cerebral edema is a leading cause of mortality in stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to assess a non-selective opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, in decreasing reducing brain edema formation using both in vitro and in vivo models of stroke. For the in situ model of ischemia, hippocampal slices were exposed to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) conditions and we observed that hippocampal water content was increased, compared to normoxia. Treatment with the mu agonist, Tyr-D-Ala', N-CH, -Phe4, Glyol-Enkephalin (DAMGO), delta opioid agonists, D-pen(2), D-phe(5) enkephalin (DPDPE), and kappa agonist, U50 488, all significantly decreased brain slice water gain. Interestingly, the non-selective agonist, biphalin, exhibited a statistically significant (P<0.01) greater effect in decreasing water content in OGD-exposed hippocampal slices, compared with mu, delta, and kappa selective opioid agonists. Moreover, biphalin exhibited anti-edematous effects in a dose responsive manner. The non-selective opioid antagonist, naloxone, returned the water content nearly back to original OGD values for all opioid agonist treatments, supporting that these effects were mediated by an opioid receptor pathway. Furthermore, biphalin significantly decreased edema (53%) and infarct (48%) ratios, and neuronal recovery from stroke, compared with the vehicle-treated groups in a 12h permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of focal ischemia. Biphalin also significantly decreased the cell volume increase in primary neuronal cells exposed to OGD condition. These data suggest that opioid receptor activation may provide neuroprotection during stroke and further investigations are needed in the development of novel opioid agonist as efficacious treatments for brain ischemia.

  11. Recognition of teaching excellence.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Dana; Piascik, Peggy; Medina, Melissa; Pittenger, Amy; Rose, Renee; Creekmore, Freddy; Soltis, Robert; Bouldin, Alicia; Schwarz, Lindsay; Scott, Steven

    2010-11-10

    The 2008-2009 Task Force for the Recognition of Teaching Excellence was charged by the AACP Council of Faculties Leadership to examine teaching excellence by collecting best practices from colleges and schools of pharmacy, evaluating the literature to identify evidence-based criteria for excellent teaching, and recommending appropriate means to acknowledge and reward teaching excellence. This report defines teaching excellence and discusses a variety of ways to assess it, including student, alumni, peer, and self-assessment. The task force identifies important considerations that colleges and schools must address when establishing teaching recognition programs including the purpose, criteria, number and mix of awards, frequency, type of award, and method of nominating and determining awardees. The report concludes with recommendations for the academy to consider when establishing and revising teaching award programs.

  12. Homology recognition funnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dominic; Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2009-10-01

    The recognition of homologous sequences of DNA before strand exchange is considered to be the most puzzling stage of homologous recombination. A mechanism for two homologous dsDNAs to recognize each other from a distance in electrolytic solution without unzipping had been proposed in an earlier paper [A. A. Kornyshev and S. Leikin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 366 (2001)]. In that work, the difference in the electrostatic interaction energy between homologous duplexes and between nonhomologous duplexes, termed the recognition energy, has been calculated. That calculation was later extended in a series of papers to account for torsional elasticity of the molecules. A recent paper [A. A. Kornyshev and A. Wynveen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 4683 (2009)] investigated the form of the potential well that homologous DNA molecules may feel when sliding along each other. A simple formula for the shape of the well was obtained. However, this latter study was performed under the approximation that the sliding molecules are torsionally rigid. Following on from this work, in the present article we investigate the effect of torsional flexibility of the molecules on the shape of the well. A variational approach to this problem results in a transcendental equation that is easily solved numerically. Its solutions show that at large interaxial separations the recognition well becomes wider and shallower, whereas at closer distances further unexpected features arise related to an abrupt change in the mean azimuthal alignment of the molecules. The energy surface as a function of interaxial separation and the axial shift defines what we call the recognition funnel. We show that it depends dramatically on the patterns of adsorption of counterions on DNA.

  13. Molecularly imprinted polymers for biomolecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Molinelli, Alexandra; Janotta, Markus; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2005-01-01

    Molecular imprinting of polymers is a concept for the synthetic formation of structurally organized materials providing binding sites with molecular selectivity. Compared to biological receptors, these polymeric recognition systems have the advantage of superior chemical and mechanical stability with potential applications in areas such as biomimetic catalysis and engineering, biomedical analysis, sensor technology, or the food industry. In particular, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) providing selectivity for biorelated molecules are gaining substantial importance. In this context, a self-assembly approach for the synthesis of imprinted polymers against the flavonol quercetin is presented, which is exemplary for the biologically relevant group of flavonoid compounds. The creation of synthetic selective recognition sites for this biomolecule is demonstrated by comparing the separation capabilities of imprinted and nonimprinted polymer particles for several structurally related molecules via high-performance liquid chromatography experiments. The developed quercetin-MIP enables selective extraction of quercetin even from complex mixtures, demonstrating the potential for designing biomimetic recognition materials with improved selectivity for biomolecules with tunable functionality at a nanoscale.

  14. Behavioural effects of selective tachykinin agonists in midbrain dopamine regions.

    PubMed

    Stoessl, A J; Szczutkowski, E; Glenn, B; Watson, I

    1991-11-29

    The effects of selective NK-1, NK-2 and NK-3 tachykinin agonists in midbrain dopamine cell containing regions were investigated in the rat. The NK-3 agonist senktide induced locomotion, rearing and sniffing following infusion into the substantia nigra pars compacta, and to a lesser extent in the ventral tegmental area. These behavioural responses were not seen following infusion of the selective NK-1 agonist [Sar9,Met (O2)11]SP or the NK-2 agonist [N1e10]NKA4-10. In contrast, grooming was induced only by the NK-1 agonist administered into the substantia nigra. Yawning, chewing mouth movements and wet dog shakes were all seen following infusion of senktide into the ventral tegmental area. These findings suggest that (i) dopamine-mediated behavioural responses seen following tachykinin administration into the midbrain are dependent upon stimulation of NK-3 tachykinin receptors, (ii) tachykinin-induced grooming is mediated by stimulation of NK-1 receptors and (iii) some of the previously described 5-HT mediated behaviours seen following administration of NK-3 tachykinin agonists are probably generated by stimulation of 5-HT cell bodies in the ventral tegmental area.

  15. Histamine H3-receptor inverse agonists as novel antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Ito, Chihiro

    2009-06-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) that is resistant to treatment with dopamine (DA) D2 antagonists may involve changes other than those in the dopaminergic system. Recently, histamine (HA), which regulates arousal and cognitive functions, has been suggested to act as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Four HA receptors-H1, H2, H3, and H4-have been identified. Our recent basic and clinical studies revealed that brain HA improved the symptoms of SZ. The H3 receptor is primarily localized in the central nervous system, and it acts not only as a presynaptic autoreceptor that modulates the HA release but also as a presynaptic heteroreceptor that regulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as monoamines and amino acids. H3-receptor inverse agonists have been considered to improve cognitive functions. Many atypical antipsychotics are H3-receptor antagonists. Imidazole-containing H3-receptor inverse agonists inhibit not only cytochrome P450 but also hERG potassium channels (encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene). Several imidazole H3-receptor inverse agonists also have high affinity for H4 receptors, which are expressed at high levels in mast cells and leukocytes. Clozapine is an H4-receptor agonist; this agonist activity may be related to the serious side effect of agranulocytosis caused by clozapine. Therefore, selective non-imidazole H3-receptor inverse agonists can be considered as novel antipsychotics that may improve refractory SZ.

  16. Metamorphopsia and letter recognition.

    PubMed

    Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C; Bex, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Acuity is the most commonly used measure of visual function, and reductions in acuity are associated with most eye diseases. Metamorphopsia--a perceived distortion of visual space--is another common symptom of visual impairment and is currently assessed qualitatively using Amsler (1953) charts. In order to quantify the impact of metamorphopsia on acuity, we measured the effect of physical spatial distortion on letter recognition. Following earlier work showing that letter recognition is tuned to specific spatial frequency (SF) channels, we hypothesized that the effect of distortion might depend on the spatial scale of visual distortion just as it depends on the spatial scale of masking noise. Six normally sighted observers completed a 26 alternate forced choice (AFC) Sloan letter identification task at five different viewing distances, and the letters underwent different levels of spatial distortion. Distortion was controlled using spatially band-pass filtered noise that spatially remapped pixel locations. Noise was varied over five spatial frequencies and five magnitudes. Performance was modeled with logistic regression and worsened linearly with increasing distortion magnitude and decreasing letter size. We found that retinal SF affects distortion at midrange frequencies and can be explained with the tuning of a basic contrast sensitivity function, while object-centered distortion SF follows a similar pattern of letter object recognition sensitivity and is tuned to approximately three cycles per letter (CPL). The interaction between letter size and distortion makes acuity an unreliable outcome for metamorphopsia assessment.

  17. Metamorphopsia and letter recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acuity is the most commonly used measure of visual function, and reductions in acuity are associated with most eye diseases. Metamorphopsia—a perceived distortion of visual space—is another common symptom of visual impairment and is currently assessed qualitatively using Amsler (1953) charts. In order to quantify the impact of metamorphopsia on acuity, we measured the effect of physical spatial distortion on letter recognition. Following earlier work showing that letter recognition is tuned to specific spatial frequency (SF) channels, we hypothesized that the effect of distortion might depend on the spatial scale of visual distortion just as it depends on the spatial scale of masking noise. Six normally sighted observers completed a 26 alternate forced choice (AFC) Sloan letter identification task at five different viewing distances, and the letters underwent different levels of spatial distortion. Distortion was controlled using spatially band-pass filtered noise that spatially remapped pixel locations. Noise was varied over five spatial frequencies and five magnitudes. Performance was modeled with logistic regression and worsened linearly with increasing distortion magnitude and decreasing letter size. We found that retinal SF affects distortion at midrange frequencies and can be explained with the tuning of a basic contrast sensitivity function, while object-centered distortion SF follows a similar pattern of letter object recognition sensitivity and is tuned to approximately three cycles per letter (CPL). The interaction between letter size and distortion makes acuity an unreliable outcome for metamorphopsia assessment. PMID:25453116

  18. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-1 Selective Agonist Enhances Collateral Growth and Protects against Subsequent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Li, Fuying; Yui, Daishi; Miki, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    increased after CCAO. Administration of the S1PR1 selective agonist significantly increased cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the diameter of leptomeningeal collateral vessels (42.9 ± 2.6 μm) compared with the controls (27.6 ± 5.7 μm; P < 0.01). S1PR1 inverse agonist administration diminished the effect of the S1PR1 agonist (P < 0.001). After pMCAO, S1PR1 agonist pretreated animals showed significantly smaller infarct volume (17.5% ± 4.0% vs. 7.7% ± 4.0%, P < 0.01) and better functional recovery than vehicle-treated controls. Conclusions These results suggest that S1PR1 is one of the principal regulators of leptomeningeal collateral recruitment at the site of increased shear stress and provide evidence that an S1PR1 selective agonist has a role in promoting collateral growth and preventing of ischemic damage and neurological dysfunction after subsequent stroke in patients with intracranial major artery stenosis or occlusion. PMID:26367258

  19. Ligand-Specific Roles for Transmembrane 5 Serine Residues in the Binding and Efficacy of Dopamine D1 Receptor Catechol Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Chemel, Benjamin R.; Bonner, Lisa A.; Watts, Val J.

    2012-01-01

    To refine further the structure-activity relationships of D1 dopamine receptor agonists, we investigated the roles of three conserved serine residues [Ser198(5.42), Ser199(5.43), and Ser202(5.46)] in agonist binding and receptor activation. These transmembrane domain 5 (TM5) residues are believed to engage catechol ligands through polar interactions. We stably expressed wild-type or mutant (S198A, S199A, and S202A) D1 receptors in human embryonic kidney cells. These receptors were expressed at similar levels (approximately 2000 fmol/mg) and bound the radioligand [3H]R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH 23390), although S198A and S199A displayed significant losses of affinity compared with that for wild-type receptors. The endogenous agonist, dopamine, had losses of potency at each of the mutant receptors. We tested cyclohexyl-substituted isochroman, carbocyclic, and chroman bicyclic dopamine analogs and found that the mutations affected the chroman to a lesser extent than the other compounds. These results support our hypothesis that the decreased D1 activity of chroman analogs results from a ligand intramolecular hydrogen bond that impairs the ability of the catechol to engage the receptor. Sensitivities of these rigid catechol agonists to the effects of the serine mutations were dependent on ligand geometry, particularly with respect to the rotameric conformation of the ethylamine side chain and the distance between the amino group and each catechol hydroxyl. Functional experiments in striatal tissue suggest that the ability to engage TM5 serines is largely correlated with agonist efficacy for cAMP stimulation. These results provide a new understanding of the complexities of D1 ligand recognition and agonist activation and have implications for the design of rigid catechol ligands. PMID:22334593

  20. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  1. Determination of the utility of remote sensing data for land use/cover analysis in the lower Appalachia region: Assessing the utility of remote sensing data for archeological site recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, N. V.

    1983-01-01

    Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data were gathered by NASA/ERL over a portion of the lower Ohio River and the middle Mississippi River valleys on April 11, 1982. CIR imagery accompanied the 10 and 30 meter resolution TMS data sets. This area is somewhat unique archeologically as there exists a concentration of sites with major features such as mounds, earthworks, and villages. It was the primary purpose of this study to determine the utility of TMS data in identifying signatures which are distinctly archeological. TMS data were processed using the NASA/ERL software package ELAS. No signatures that were distinctly archeological were detected, due in large part to the complexity of the land cover and land use practices. However, as more sophisticated classification techniques were employed, the classes which were related to archeological features were narrowed. TMS data could certainly be of assistance to a trained archeologist/interpreter in narrowing an area which has to be field-surveyed as anomalous features can be recognized within a particular environmental context.

  2. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.

    1989-08-01

    During the past year, further studies on mAChR were conducted. These studies included verification of the difference in pituitary distribution based on ligand charge. The pituitary localization of TRB. A neutral mAChR ligand, was verified. The lack of QNB blockade of TRB uptake was tested by blockage with scopolamine, another mAChR antagonist and by testing the effect in a different strain of rat. Neither scopolamine or change of rat strain had any effect. We concluded that TRB uptake in pituitary is not a receptor-mediated process. Further studies were conducted with an additional quaternized mAChR ligand: MQNB. Pituitary localization of MQNB, like MTRB, could be blocked by pretreatment with QNB. We have tentatively concluded that permanent charge on a mAChR antagonist changes the mechanism of uptake in the pituitary. Time course studies and the effects of DES on myocardial uptake are reported. A brief report on preliminary results of evaluation of quaternized mAChR ligands in the heart is included. In a limited series of such ligands, we have observed a single binding site and a difference in B{sub max} values: QNB competition studies yield larger B{sub max} values than studies with {sup 3}H-NMS. Progress in the synthesis of D{sub 2} agonists includes solving a synthetic problem and preparation of the cold'' analogue of N-0437 using procedures applicable to eventual synthesis with {sup 11}C-CH{sub 3}I. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Recognition of Monomers and Polymers by Cyclodextrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenz, Gerhard

    Cyclodextrins (CDs), cyclic oligomers consisting of 6, 7, 8, or more α(1 → 4)-linked glucose units, are readily available, water-soluble organic host compounds that are able to complex organic guest molecules if the latter contain a suitable hydrophobic binding site. The main driving forces are nonpolar interactions such as hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions. CDs are able to recognize the thickness, polarity, and chirality of monomeric and polymeric guest molecules. In addition, functional groups can be covalently attached to CDs to modify or improve the molecular recognition capability of CDs. In this review, the binding potentials of the most important CDs and CD derivatives are summarized, and general rules for the recognition of monomeric and polymeric guests are derived. A supramolecular tool box of water-soluble hosts and guests is provided, which allows the assembly of many sophisticated supramolecular structures, as well as rotaxanes and polyrotaxanes.

  4. In search of a recognition memory engram

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M.W.; Banks, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    A large body of data from human and animal studies using psychological, recording, imaging, and lesion techniques indicates that recognition memory involves at least two separable processes: familiarity discrimination and recollection. Familiarity discrimination for individual visual stimuli seems to be effected by a system centred on the perirhinal cortex of the temporal lobe. The fundamental change that encodes prior occurrence within the perirhinal cortex is a reduction in the responses of neurones when a stimulus is repeated. Neuronal network modelling indicates that a system based on such a change in responsiveness is potentially highly efficient in information theoretic terms. A review is given of findings indicating that perirhinal cortex acts as a storage site for recognition memory of objects and that such storage depends upon processes producing synaptic weakening. PMID:25280908

  5. Molecular Determinants of Species-Specific Agonist and Antagonist Activity of A Substituted Flavone towards the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Henry, E. C.; Gasiewicz, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates the toxicity of dioxins and related xenobiotics. Other chemicals also bind the AhR to elicit either agonist or antagonist responses. Here we used site-directed mutagenesis within the ligand binding domain of murine AhR to probe for specific residues that might interact differentially with the antagonist 3’-methoxy-4’-nitroflavone (MNF) compared with the prototypical agonist TCDD. Reduced 3 H-TCDD binding, dioxin-response element (DRE) binding, and transcriptional activity were observed for several point mutants. One mutation, R355I, changed the response to MNF from antagonist to agonist. Notably, Ile is the residue found in the guinea pig AhR, towards which MNF has partial agonist activity in contrast to its strong antagonist activity in mouse. A similar reversal of response to MNF was observed in chimeric AhRs in which the C-terminal region of mAhR was replaced with the guinea pig C-terminal region. These data demonstrate that different amino acids can be important in binding of different AhR ligands and can mediate distinct responses. The ultimate response of the AhR also depends on how other portions of the receptor protein are functionally coupled to the initial ligand binding event. PMID:18294953

  6. Major neurotransmitter systems in dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala control social recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Garrido Zinn, Carolina; Clairis, Nicolas; Silva Cavalcante, Lorena Evelyn; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Social recognition memory (SRM) is crucial for reproduction, forming social groups, and species survival. Despite its importance, SRM is still relatively little studied. Here we examine the participation of the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) and the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and that of dopaminergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems in both structures in the consolidation of SRM. Male Wistar rats received intra-CA1 or intra-BLA infusions of different drugs immediately after the sample phase of a social discrimination task and 24-h later were subjected to a 5-min retention test. Animals treated with the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin, into either the CA1 or BLA were unable to recognize the previously exposed juvenile (familiar) during the retention test. When infused into the CA1, the β-adrenoreceptor agonist, isoproterenol, the D1/D5 dopaminergic receptor antagonist, SCH23390, and the H2 histaminergic receptor antagonist, ranitidine, also hindered the recognition of the familiar juvenile 24-h later. The latter drug effects were more intense in the CA1 than in the BLA. When infused into the BLA, the β-adrenoreceptor antagonist, timolol, the D1/D5 dopamine receptor agonist, SKF38393, and the H2 histaminergic receptor agonist, ranitidine, also hindered recognition of the familiar juvenile 24-h later. In all cases, the impairment to recognize the familiar juvenile was abolished by the coinfusion of agonist plus antagonist. Clearly, both the CA1 and BLA, probably in that order, play major roles in the consolidation of SRM, but these roles are different in each structure vis-à-vis the involvement of the β-noradrenergic, D1/D5-dopaminergic, and H2-histaminergic receptors therein. PMID:27482097

  7. Molecular mechanics calculations on muscarinic agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooijman, Huub; Kanters, Jan A.; Kroon, Jan

    1990-10-01

    Molecular mechanics calculations have been performed on the conformation freedom with respect to the torsion angles OCCN and COCC of acetylcholine, α( R-methylacetylcholine,β( S)-methylacetylcholine, α( R),β( S)-diemthylacetylcholine and muscarine, in order to obtain information about the active conformation and its interaction with the muscarinic cholinergic receptor. Muscarine has a rather flexible ring system, which makes modelling of the receptor site on the active conformation of this particular ligand a difficult problem. A common minimum for these compounds was found at {+ gauche,anti}), which is identified with the active conformation. However, OCCN angles of up to 120° can be accommodated in the receptor site. The reduced cholinergic activity of the α-methyl derivatives is probably caused by unfavourable interactions between the α-methyl group and the receptor site. The apparent contradictory high activity of the 2-acetyloxycyclopropylammonium ion can be explained by the distorted geometry of α substitution.

  8. Acquisition, Retention, and Recall of Memory After Injection of RS67333, a 5-HT4 Receptor Agonist, Into the Nucleus Basalis Magnocellularis of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Orsetti, Marco; Dellarole, Anna; Ferri, Simona; Ghi, Piera

    2003-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT4 subtype receptor is predominantly localized into anatomical structures linked to memory and cognition. A few experimental studies report that the acute systemic administration of selective 5-HT4 agonists has ameliorative effects on memory performance, and that these effects are reversed by contemporary administration of 5-HT4 receptor antagonists. To verify whether this procognitive action occurs via the activation of the cholinergic nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM)-cortical pathways, we examined the effects of RS67333, a selective partial agonist of the 5-HT4 receptor, on rat performance in a place recognition task upon local administration of the drug into the NBM area. The intra-NBM administration of RS67333 enhances the acquisition (200–500 ng/0.5 μL) and the consolidation (40–200 ng/0.5 μL) of the place recognition memory. These effects are reversed by pretreatment with the selective 5-HT4 receptor antagonist RS39604 (300 ng/0.5μL). Conversely, the recall of memory is not affected by the 5-HT4 agonist. Our results indicate that 5-HT4 receptors located within the NBM may play a role in spatial memory and that the procognitive effect of RS67333 is due, at least in part, to the potentiation of the activity of cholinergic NBM-cortical pathways. PMID:14557615

  9. Specific recognition of rpsO mRNA and 16S rRNA by Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S15 relies on both mimicry and site differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mathy, Nathalie; Pellegrini, Olivier; Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Ehresmann, Chantal; Portier, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ribosomal protein S15 binds to 16S rRNA, during ribosome assembly, and to its own mRNA (rpsO mRNA), affecting autocontrol of its expression. In both cases, the RNA binding site is bipartite with a common subsite consisting of a G•U/G-C motif. The second subsite is located in a three-way junction in 16S rRNA and in the distal part of a stem forming a pseudoknot in Escherichia coli rpsO mRNA. To determine the extent of mimicry between these two RNA targets, we determined which amino acids interact with rpsO mRNA. A plasmid carrying rpsO (the S15 gene) was mutagenized and introduced into a strain lacking S15 and harbouring an rpsO–lacZ translational fusion. Analysis of deregulated mutants shows that each subsite of rpsO mRNA is recognized by a set of amino acids known to interact with 16S rRNA. In addition to the G•U/G-C motif, which is recognized by the same amino acids in both targets, the other subsite interacts with amino acids also involved in contacts with helix H22 of 16S rRNA, in the region adjacent to the three-way junction. However, specific S15–rpsO mRNA interactions can also be found, probably with A(−46) in loop L1 of the pseudoknot, demonstrating that mimicry between the two targets is limited. PMID:15101974

  10. Substrate recognition by ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP.

    PubMed

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein complex ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a site-specific endoribonuclease essential for the survival of the eukaryotic cell. RNase MRP closely resembles RNase P (a universal endoribonuclease responsible for the maturation of the 5' ends of tRNA) but recognizes distinct substrates including pre-rRNA and mRNA. Here we report the results of an in vitro selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP substrates starting from a pool of random sequences. The results indicate that RNase MRP cleaves single-stranded RNA and is sensitive to sequences in the immediate vicinity of the cleavage site requiring a cytosine at the position +4 relative to the cleavage site. Structural implications of the differences in substrate recognition by RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  11. Dihydrocodeine/Agonists for Alcohol Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, Albrecht; Müller, Markus; Frietsch, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol addiction too often remains insufficiently treated. It shows the same profile as severe chronic diseases, but no comparable, effective basic treatment has been established up to now. Especially patients with repeated relapses, despite all therapeutic approaches, and patients who are not able to attain an essential abstinence to alcohol, need a basic medication. It seems necessary to acknowledge that parts of them need any agonistic substance, for years, possibly lifelong. For >14 years, we have prescribed such substances with own addictive character for these patients. Methods: We present a documented best possible practice, no designed study. Since 1997, we prescribed Dihydrocodeine (DHC) to 102 heavily alcohol addicted patients, later, also Buprenorphine, Clomethiazole (>6 weeks), Baclofen, and in one case Amphetamine, each on individual indication. This paper focuses on the data with DHC, especially. The Clomethiazole-data has been submitted to a German journal. The number of treatments with the other substances is still low. Results: The 102 patients with the DHC treatment had 1367 medically assisted detoxifications and specialized therapies before! The 4 years-retention rate was 26.4%, including 2.8% successfully terminated treatments. In our 12-steps scale on clinical impression, we noticed a significant improvement from mean 3.7 to 8.4 after 2 years. The demand for medically assisted detoxifications in the 2 years remaining patients was reduced by 65.5%. Mean GGT improved from 206.6 U/l at baseline to 66.8 U/l after 2 years. Experiences with the other substances are similar but different in details. Conclusion: Similar to the Italian studies with GHB and Baclofen, we present a new approach, not only with new substances, but also with a new setting and much more trusting attitude. We observe a huge improvement, reaching an almost optimal, stable, long term status in around 1/4 of the patients already. Many further

  12. Effects of N-Glycosylation of the human cation channel TRPA1 on agonist-sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Egan, Timothy James; Acuña, Mario A; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Urech, David

    2016-08-31

    Determining the functional significance of post-translational modifications advances our understanding of many broadly-expressed proteins, and particularly ion channels. The enzymes that catalyze these modifications are often expressed in a cell-type specific manner, resulting in considerable structural diversity among post-translationally modified proteins that are expressed across a variety of cell types. TRP channels exhibit notably variable behavior between cell types in vitro and in vivo , and they are frequently modified with N-glycans that contribute to protein function. TRPA1 possesses two putative N-linked glycosylation sites at N747 and N753 that have not yet been studied in detail. Here, we show that both of these sites can be modified with an N-glycan and that the glycan at position N747 modulates agonist-sensitivity of TRPA1 in vitro Additionally, we found that N-glycosylation also modulates cooperative effects of temperature and the agonist cinnamaldehyde on TRPA1 channel activation. Collectively, these findings suggest a dynamic role played by the N-glycosylation of human TRPA1. They also provide further evidence of the versatility of N-glycans and will assist in efforts to fully understand the complex regulation of TRPA1 activity.

  13. Effects of N-glycosylation of the human cation channel TRPA1 on agonist-sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Timothy J.; Acuña, Mario A.; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Urech, David

    2016-01-01

    Determining the functional significance of post-translational modifications advances our understanding of many broadly-expressed proteins, and particularly ion channels. The enzymes that catalyse these modifications are often expressed in a cell-type specific manner, resulting in considerable structural diversity among post-translationally modified proteins that are expressed across a variety of cell types. TRP channels exhibit notably variable behaviour between cell types in vitro and in vivo, and they are frequently modified with N-glycans that contribute to protein function. TRPA1 possesses two putative N-linked glycosylation sites at Asn747 and Asn753 that have not yet been studied in detail. In the present study, we show that both of these sites can be modified with an N-glycan and that the glycan at position Asn747 modulates agonist-sensitivity of TRPA1 in vitro. Additionally, we found that N-glycosylation also modulates cooperative effects of temperature and the agonist cinnamaldehyde (CA) on TRPA1 channel activation. Collectively, these findings suggest a dynamic role played by the N-glycosylation of human TRPA1. They also provide further evidence of the versatility of N-glycans and will assist in efforts to fully understand the complex regulation of TRPA1 activity. PMID:27582506

  14. Anti-nociception mediated by a κ opioid receptor agonist is blocked by a δ receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A M W; Roberts, K W; Pradhan, A A; Akbari, H A; Walwyn, W; Lutfy, K; Carroll, F I; Cahill, C M; Evans, C J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The opioid receptor family comprises four structurally homologous but functionally distinct sub-groups, the μ (MOP), δ (DOP), κ (KOP) and nociceptin (NOP) receptors. As most opioid agonists are selective but not specific, a broad spectrum of behaviours due to activation of different opioid receptors is expected. In this study, we examine whether other opioid receptor systems influenced KOP-mediated antinociception. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used a tail withdrawal assay in C57Bl/6 mice to assay the antinociceptive effect of systemically administered opioid agonists with varying selectivity at KOP receptors. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to analyse the interactions of the other opioid receptors in modulating KOP-mediated antinociception. KEY RESULTS Etorphine, a potent agonist at all four opioid receptors, was not anti-nociceptive in MOP knockout (KO) mice, although etorphine is an efficacious KOP receptor agonist and specific KOP receptor agonists remain analgesic in MOP KO mice. As KOP receptor agonists are aversive, we considered KOP-mediated antinociception might be a form of stress-induced analgesia that is blocked by the anxiolytic effects of DOP receptor agonists. In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with the DOP antagonist, naltrindole (10 mg·kg−1), unmasked etorphine (3 mg·kg−1) antinociception in MOP KO mice. Further, in wild-type mice, KOP-mediated antinociception by systemic U50,488H (10 mg·kg−1) was blocked by pretreatment with the DOP agonist SNC80 (5 mg·kg−1) and diazepam (1 mg·kg−1). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Systemic DOP receptor agonists blocked systemic KOP antinociception, and these results identify DOP receptor agonists as potential agents for reversing stress-driven addictive and depressive behaviours mediated through KOP receptor activation. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles

  15. Automatic Speech Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potamianos, Gerasimos; Lamel, Lori; Wölfel, Matthias; Huang, Jing; Marcheret, Etienne; Barras, Claude; Zhu, Xuan; McDonough, John; Hernando, Javier; Macho, Dusan; Nadeu, Climent

    Automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a critical component for CHIL services. For example, it provides the input to higher-level technologies, such as summarization and question answering, as discussed in Chapter 8. In the spirit of ubiquitous computing, the goal of ASR in CHIL is to achieve a high performance using far-field sensors (networks of microphone arrays and distributed far-field microphones). However, close-talking microphones are also of interest, as they are used to benchmark ASR system development by providing a best-case acoustic channel scenario to compare against.

  16. Studies on molecular recognition of thymidines with molecularly imprinted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-He; Luo, Ai-Qin; Sun, Li-Quan

    2009-07-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with excellent molecular recognition ability have been used in chemical sensors, chromatographic separation and biochemical analyses. Thymidine is an important part of DNA for biomolecular recognition and the intermediate of many medicines. The polymers imprinted with the template of thymidine and 5'-Otosylthymidine have been prepared, using a non-proton solvent, acetonitrile as the porogen. Direct imprinting with thymidine could not form strong molecular interaction sites in this system. Relative MIPs were obtained by bulk polymerization and their adsorption capacities were investigated. The adsorption capacities of MIP (P2) and nonimprinted polymer (P20) for thymidine are 0.120 mg•g-1and 0.103 mg•g-1, respectively. The imprinting factor is 1.17. As 5'-O-tosylthymidine is more soluble than thymidine moiety in acetonitrile and give rise to more sites of molecular recognition. The results demonstrated that the imprinted polymers were able to bind and recognize thymidine moderately in acetonitrile. MIPs imprinted with 5'-O-tosylthymidine like nature enzymes displayed some recognition ability to its analogues. The insoluble derivatives in the non-proton solvent can be an effective template to prepare efficient imprinting recognition sites.

  17. Genetic specificity of face recognition.

    PubMed

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Plomin, Robert

    2015-10-13

    Specific cognitive abilities in diverse domains are typically found to be highly heritable and substantially correlated with general cognitive ability (g), both phenotypically and genetically. Recent twin studies have found the ability to memorize and recognize faces to be an exception, being similarly heritable but phenotypically substantially uncorrelated both with g and with general object recognition. However, the genetic relationships between face recognition and other abilities (the extent to which they share a common genetic etiology) cannot be determined from phenotypic associations. In this, to our knowledge, first study of the genetic associations between face recognition and other domains, 2,000 18- and 19-year-old United Kingdom twins completed tests assessing their face recognition, object recognition, and general cognitive abilities. Results confirmed the substantial heritability of face recognition (61%), and multivariate genetic analyses found that most of this genetic influence is unique and not shared with other cognitive abilities.

  18. [Comparative studies of face recognition].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2012-07-01

    Every human being is proficient in face recognition. However, the reason for and the manner in which humans have attained such an ability remain unknown. These questions can be best answered-through comparative studies of face recognition in non-human animals. Studies in both primates and non-primates show that not only primates, but also non-primates possess the ability to extract information from their conspecifics and from human experimenters. Neural specialization for face recognition is shared with mammals in distant taxa, suggesting that face recognition evolved earlier than the emergence of mammals. A recent study indicated that a social insect, the golden paper wasp, can distinguish their conspecific faces, whereas a closely related species, which has a less complex social lifestyle with just one queen ruling a nest of underlings, did not show strong face recognition for their conspecifics. Social complexity and the need to differentiate between one another likely led humans to evolve their face recognition abilities.

  19. Structural and functional studies of the modulator NS9283 reveal agonist-like mechanism of action at α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jeppe A; Ahring, Philip K; Kastrup, Jette S; Gajhede, Michael; Balle, Thomas

    2014-09-05

    Modulation of Cys loop receptor ion channels is a proven drug discovery strategy, but many underlying mechanisms of the mode of action are poorly understood. We report the x-ray structure of the acetylcholine-binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis with NS9283, a stoichiometry selective positive modulator that targets the α4-α4 interface of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Together with homology modeling, mutational data, quantum mechanical calculations, and pharmacological studies on α4β2 nAChRs, the structure reveals a modulator binding mode that overlaps the α4-α4 interface agonist (acetylcholine)-binding site. Analysis of contacts to residues known to govern agonist binding and function suggests that modulation occurs by an agonist-like mechanism. Selectivity for α4-α4 over α4-β2 interfaces is determined mainly by steric restrictions from Val-136 on the β2-subunit and favorable interactions between NS9283 and His-142 at the complementary side of α4. In the concentration ranges where modulation is observed, its selectivity prevents NS9283 from directly activating nAChRs because activation requires coordinated action from more than one interface. However, we demonstrate that in a mutant receptor with one natural and two engineered α4-α4 interfaces, NS9283 is an agonist. Modulation via extracellular binding sites is well known for benzodiazepines acting at γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors. Like NS9283, benzodiazepines increase the apparent agonist potency with a minimal effect on efficacy. The shared modulatory profile along with a binding site located in an extracellular subunit interface suggest that modulation via an agonist-like mechanism may be a common mechanism of action that potentially could apply to Cys loop receptors beyond the α4β2 nAChRs.

  20. GABA receptor agonists: pharmacological spectrum and therapeutic actions.

    PubMed

    Bartholini, G

    1985-01-01

    From the data discussed in this review it appears that GABA receptor agonists exhibit a variety of actions in the central nervous system, some of which are therapeutically useful (Table V). GABA receptor agonists, by changing the firing rate of the corresponding neurons accelerate noradrenaline turnover without changes in postsynaptic receptor density and diminish serotonin liberation with an up-regulation of 5HT2 receptors. These effects differ from those of tricyclic antidepressants which primarily block monoamine re-uptake and cause down-regulation of beta-adrenergic and 5HT2 receptors. The GABA receptor agonist progabide has been shown to exert an antidepressant action which is indistinguishable from that of imipramine in patients with major affective disorders. The fact that: (a) GABA receptor agonists and tricyclic antidepressants affect noradrenergic and serotonergic transmission differently; and (b) tricyclic antidepressants alter GABA-related parameters challenges the classical monoamine hypothesis of depression and suggests that GABA-mediated mechanisms play a role in mood disorders. Decreases in cellular excitability produced by GABAergic stimulation leads to control of seizures in practically all animal models of epilepsy. GABA receptor agonists have a wide spectrum as they antagonize not only seizures which are dependent on decreased GABA synaptic activity but also convulsant states which are apparently independent of alterations in GABA-mediated events. These results in animals are confirmed in a wide range of human epileptic syndromes. GABA receptor agonists decrease dopamine turnover in the basal ganglia and antagonize neuroleptic-induced increase in dopamine release. On repeated treatment, progabide prevents or reverses the neuroleptic-induced up-regulation of dopamine receptors in the rat striatum and antagonizes the concomitant supersensitivity to dopaminomimetics. Behaviorally, GABA receptor agonists diminish the stereotypies induced by

  1. Sparsity Motivated Automated Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-29

    been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of such methods for automatic target...Sparsity-based methods have recently been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of...have recently been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of such methods for

  2. Defining protein electrostatic recognition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Roberts, Victoria A.

    The objective is to elucidate the nature of electrostatic forces controlling protein recognition processes by using a tightly coupled computational and interactive computer graphics approach. The TURNIP program was developed to determine the most favorable precollision orientations for two molecules by systematic search of all orientations and evaluation of the resulting electrostatic interactions. TURNIP was applied to the transient interaction between two electron transfer metalloproteins, plastocyanin and cytochrome c. The results suggest that the productive electron-transfer complex involves interaction of the positive region of cytochrome c with the negative patch of plastocyanin, consistent with experimental data. Application of TURNIP to the formation of the stable complex between the HyHEL-5 antibody and its protein antigen lysozyme showed that long-distance electrostatic forces guide lysozyme toward the HyHEL-5 binding site, but do not fine tune its orientation. Determination of docked antigen/antibody complexes requires including steric as well as electrostatic interactions, as was done for the U10 mutant of the anti-phosphorylcholine antibody S107. The graphics program Flex, a convenient desktop workstation program for visualizing molecular dynamics and normal mode motions, was enhanced. Flex now has a user interface and was rewritten to use standard graphics libraries, so as to run on most desktop workstations.

  3. Intracerebroventricular administration of kappa-agonists induces convulsions in mice.

    PubMed

    Bansinath, M; Ramabadran, K; Turndorf, H; Shukla, V K

    1991-07-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of kappa-agonists (PD 117302, U-50488H and U-69593) induced convulsions in a dose-related manner in mice. The dose at which 50% of animals convulsed (CD50) was in nmol ranges for all opioids. Among the opioids used, PD 117302 was the most potent convulsant. ICV administration of either vehicle alone or U-53445E, a non-kappa-opioid (+) enantiomer of U-50488H did not induce convulsions. The convulsive response of kappa-agonists was differentially susceptible for antagonism by naloxone and/or MR 2266. Collectively, these findings support the view that convulsions induced by kappa-agonists in mice involve stereospecific opioid receptor mechanisms. Furthermore, the convulsant effect of kappa-agonists could not be modified by pretreatment with MK-801, ketamine, muscimol or baclofen. It is concluded that kappa-opioid but not NMDA or GABA receptor mechanisms are involved in convulsions induced by kappa-agonists. These results are the first experimental evidence implicating stereospecific kappa-receptor mechanisms in opioid-induced convulsions in mice.

  4. Biological chiral recognition: the substrate's perspective.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Vidyasankar; Abrol, Ravinder

    2005-01-01

    A novel stereocenter-recognition (SR) model has been proposed recently for describing the stereoselectivity of biological and other macromolecules towards substrates that have multiple stereocenters, based on the topology of substrate stereocenters (Sundaresan and Abrol, Prot Sci 11:1330-1339, 2002). The SR model provides the minimum number of substrate locations interacting with receptor sites that need to be considered for understanding stereoselectivity characteristics. Interactions between substrate locations and receptor sites may be binding, nonbinding or repulsive in nature and may occur in a many-to-one or one-to-many fashion, but for a receptor to be stereoselective, its interactions with substrate stereoisomers have to involve a minimum number of locations, in the correct geometry. The SR model is topologically rigorous, explains several previous experimental observations, and is predictive in nature. It predicts that stereoselectivity towards a substrate with N stereocenters in a linear structure involves a minimum of N + 2 substrate locations, distributed over all stereocenters in the substrate, such that effectively at least three locations per stereocenter interact with one or more receptor sites. This article uses the SR model to provide an insight into the chiral recognition process from a substrate's perspective that is intuitive and simple, furnishing a rigorous stereochemical basis for explaining stereoselectivity characteristics of many biological systems.

  5. Sudden Event Recognition: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Suriani, Nor Surayahani; Hussain, Aini; Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf

    2013-01-01

    Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1) the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2) frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3) the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4) various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition. PMID:23921828

  6. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  7. Partial Agonist and Antagonist Activities of a Mutant Scorpion β-Toxin on Sodium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Karbat, Izhar; Ilan, Nitza; Zhang, Joel Z.; Cohen, Lior; Kahn, Roy; Benveniste, Morris; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion β-toxin 4 from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css4) enhances the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels through a voltage sensor trapping mechanism by binding the activated state of the voltage sensor in domain II and stabilizing it in its activated conformation. Here we describe the antagonist and partial agonist properties of a mutant derivative of this toxin. Substitution of seven different amino acid residues for Glu15 in Css4 yielded toxin derivatives with both increased and decreased affinities for binding to neurotoxin receptor site 4 on sodium channels. Css4E15R is unique among this set of mutants in that it retained nearly normal binding affinity but lost its functional activity for modification of sodium channel gating in our standard electrophysiological assay for voltage sensor trapping. More detailed analysis of the functional effects of Css4E15R revealed weak voltage sensor trapping activity, which was very rapidly reversed upon repolarization and therefore was not observed in our standard assay of toxin effects. This partial agonist activity of Css4E15R is observed clearly in voltage sensor trapping assays with brief (5 ms) repolarization between the conditioning prepulse and the test pulse. The effects of Css4E15R are fit well by a three-step model of toxin action involving concentration-dependent toxin binding to its receptor site followed by depolarization-dependent activation of the voltage sensor and subsequent voltage sensor trapping. Because it is a partial agonist with much reduced efficacy for voltage sensor trapping, Css4E15R can antagonize the effects of wild-type Css4 on sodium channel activation and can prevent paralysis by Css4 when injected into mice. Our results define the first partial agonist and antagonist activities for scorpion toxins and open new avenues of research toward better understanding of the structure-function relationships for toxin action on sodium channel voltage sensors and toward potential toxin

  8. Partial agonist and antagonist activities of a mutant scorpion beta-toxin on sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Karbat, Izhar; Ilan, Nitza; Zhang, Joel Z; Cohen, Lior; Kahn, Roy; Benveniste, Morris; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Scorpion β-toxin 4 from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css4) enhances the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels through a voltage sensor trapping mechanism by binding the activated state of the voltage sensor in domain II and stabilizing it in its activated conformation. Here we describe the antagonist and partial agonist properties of a mutant derivative of this toxin. Substitution of seven different amino acid residues for Glu(15) in Css4 yielded toxin derivatives with both increased and decreased affinities for binding to neurotoxin receptor site 4 on sodium channels. Css4(E15R) is unique among this set of mutants in that it retained nearly normal binding affinity but lost its functional activity for modification of sodium channel gating in our standard electrophysiological assay for voltage sensor trapping. More detailed analysis of the functional effects of Css4(E15R) revealed weak voltage sensor trapping activity, which was very rapidly reversed upon repolarization and therefore was not observed in our standard assay of toxin effects. This partial agonist activity of Css4(E15R) is observed clearly in voltage sensor trapping assays with brief (5 ms) repolarization between the conditioning prepulse and the test pulse. The effects of Css4(E15R) are fit well by a three-step model of toxin action involving concentration-dependent toxin binding to its receptor site followed by depolarization-dependent activation of the voltage sensor and subsequent voltage sensor trapping. Because it is a partial agonist with much reduced efficacy for voltage sensor trapping, Css4(E15R) can antagonize the effects of wild-type Css4 on sodium channel activation and can prevent paralysis by Css4 when injected into mice. Our results define the first partial agonist and antagonist activities for scorpion toxins and open new avenues of research toward better understanding of the structure-function relationships for toxin action on sodium channel voltage sensors and toward

  9. Selective anxiolytics: are the actions related to partial "agonist" activity or a preferential affinity for benzodiazepine receptor subtypes?

    PubMed

    Gee, K W; Yamamura, H I

    1983-01-01

    Both pharmacological and biochemical evidence support the existence of BZ receptor subtypes. Determination of the molecular basis of BZ receptor heterogeneity requires additional research. The physiological significance of BZ receptor subtypes is not currently understood. One hypothesis presented to explain the unique pharmacological effects of CL 218872 suggests that CL 218872 has preferential affinity for a BZ receptor subtype (i.e., type I sites) that mediates the anxiolytic effects of the clinically active BZs. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed to account for these observations and is based upon the possibility that CL 218872 may act as a partial agonist at the BZ receptor. The partial agonist theory is supported by behavioral evidence and the relatively small differences in affinity of the BZ receptor subtypes discriminated by CL 218872 at physiological temperatures. In addition, in vivo binding studies suggest that occupancy of type II BZ receptor subtypes (i.e., those with low affinity for CL 218872) is necessary for CL 218872 to produce minimal anticonflict activity (4). Unlike certain other neurotransmitter systems, it is difficult to correlate the heterogeneous binding properties of BZ receptor ligands with their agonist/antagonist potential at BZ receptor. For example, CL 218872 discriminates BZ receptor subtypes and acts as an agonist at the BZ receptor. Beta-carbolines such as PCC also discriminate receptor subtypes, yet they act as antagonists at the BZ receptor. Compounding the complexity, neither the nature nor the existence of an endogenous ligand is known. So, the designation of agonist or antagonist effects is made on a purely functional basis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. p-( sup 125 I)iodoclonidine, a novel radiolabeled agonist for studying central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.M.; Siegel, B.W. )

    1990-09-01

    Unlabeled p-iodoclonidine was efficacious in attenuating forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells. Maximal attenuation was 76 +/- 3%, with an EC50 of 347 +/- 60 nM. Comparable values of epinephrine were 72 +/- 3% and 122 +/- 22 nM. Responses to both agonists were abolished by 10 microM phentolamine. Therefore, p-iodoclonidine is an agonist in a cell culture model system of the neuronal alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. p-(125I)Iodoclonidine binding to membranes were measured using various regions of the rat brain. The agonist labeled a single population of sites present on cerebral cortical membranes, which was saturable (Bmax = 230 fmol/mg of protein) and possessed high affinity for the ligand (Kd = 0.6 nM). Binding was largely specific (93% at 0.6 nM). A variety of alpha 2-adrenergic agonists and antagonists were shown to compete for the binding of the radioligand. The binding of p-(125I)iodoclonidine was much less sensitive to agents that interact with alpha 1-adrenergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic receptors. Approximately 65% of the binding was sensitive to guanine nucleotides. Association kinetics using 0.4 nM radioligand were biphasic (37% associate rapidly, with kobs = 0.96 min-1, with the remainder binding more slowly, with kobs = 0.031 min-1) and reached a plateau by 90 min at 25 degrees. Dissociation kinetics were also biphasic, with 30% of the binding dissociating rapidly (k1 = 0.32 min-1) and the remainder dissociating 50-fold more slowly (k2 = 0.006 min-1). Agonist binding is, therefore, uniquely complex and probably reflects the conformational changes that accompany receptor activation.

  11. Methadone-related opioid agonist pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction. History, recent molecular and neurochemical research and future in mainstream medicine.

    PubMed

    Kreek, M J

    2000-01-01

    In 1963, Professor Vincent P. Dole at the Rockefeller University formed a small team to develop a pharmacotherapy for the management of heroin addiction. They hypothesized that heroin addiction is a disease of the brain with behavioral manifestations, and not merely a personality disorder or criminal behavior and began to address the specific question of whether a long-acting opioid agonist could be used in the long-term maintenance treatment of heroin addiction. Over the next 35 years, many studies documented the safety, efficacy and effectiveness of methadone pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction, but Federal regulations and stigmatization of heroin addiction prevented implementation of treatment. Finally, in 1999, NIH published a report unequivocally supporting methadone maintenance pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction. Two other effective opioid agonist treatments have been developed: the even longer acting opioid agonist l-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) has been approved for pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction, and still under study is the opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine-naloxone combination. A variety of studies, both laboratory based and clinical, have revealed the mechanisms of action of long-acting opioid agonists in treatment, including prevention of disruption of molecular, cellular and physiologic events and, in fact, allowing normalization of those functions disrupted by chronic heroin use. Recent molecular biological studies have revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms of the human mu opioid receptor gene; the mu opioid receptor is the site of action of heroin, the major opiate drug of abuse, analgesic agents such as morphine, and the major treatment agents for heroin addiction. These findings support the early hypotheses of our laboratory that addiction may be due to a combination of genetic, drug-induced and environmental (including behavioral) factors and also, that atypical stress responsivity may contribute to the acquisition and

  12. Kappa Opioid Receptor-Mediated Disruption of Novel Object Recognition: Relevance for Psychostimulant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Jason J.; Reilley, Kate J.; McLaughlin, Jay P.

    2012-01-01

    Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonists are potentially valuable as therapeutics for the treatment of psychostimulant reward as they suppress dopamine signaling in reward circuitry to repress drug seeking behavior. However, KOR agonists are also associated with sedation and cognitive dysfunction. The extent to which learning and memory disruption or hypolocomotion underlie KOR agonists’ role in counteracting the rewarding effects of psychostimulants is of interest. C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with vehicle (saline, 0.9%), the KOR agonist (trans)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1- pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl] benzeneacetamide (U50,488), or the peripherally-restricted agonist D-Phe-D-Phe-D-lle-D-Arg- NH2 (ffir-NH2), through central (i.c.v.) or peripheral (i.p.) routes of administration. Locomotor activity was assessed via activity monitoring chambers and rotorod. Cognitive performance was assessed in a novel object recognition task. Prolonged hypolocomotion was observed following administration of 1.0 and 10.0, but not 0.3 mg/kg U50,488. Central, but not peripheral, administration of ffir-NH2 (a KOR agonist that does not cross the blood-brain barrier) also reduced motor behavior. Systemic pretreatment with the low dose of U50,488 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly impaired performance in the novel object recognition task. Likewise, ffir-NH2 significantly reduced novel object recognition after central (i.c.v.), but not peripheral (i.p.), administration. U50,488- and ffir-NH2-mediated deficits in novel object recognition were prevented by pretreatment with KOR antagonists. Cocaine-induced conditioned place preference was subsequently assessed and was reduced by pretreatment with U50,488 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.). Together, these results suggest that the activation of centrally-located kappa opioid receptors may induce cognitive and mnemonic disruption independent of hypolocomotor effects which may contribute to the KOR-mediated suppression of psychostimulant reward. PMID:22900234

  13. Robust Bioinformatics Recognition with VLSI Biochip Microsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lue, Jaw-Chyng L.; Fang, Wai-Chi

    2006-01-01

    A microsystem architecture for real-time, on-site, robust bioinformatic patterns recognition and analysis has been proposed. This system is compatible with on-chip DNA analysis means such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR)amplification. A corresponding novel artificial neural network (ANN) learning algorithm using new sigmoid-logarithmic transfer function based on error backpropagation (EBP) algorithm is invented. Our results show the trained new ANN can recognize low fluorescence patterns better than the conventional sigmoidal ANN does. A differential logarithmic imaging chip is designed for calculating logarithm of relative intensities of fluorescence signals. The single-rail logarithmic circuit and a prototype ANN chip are designed, fabricated and characterized.

  14. Pattern recognition and massively distributed computing.

    PubMed

    Davies, E Keith; Glick, Meir; Harrison, Karl N; Richards, W Graham

    2002-12-01

    A feature of Peter Kollman's research was his exploitation of the latest computational techniques to devise novel applications of the free energy perturbation method. He would certainly have seized upon the opportunities offered by massively distributed computing. Here we describe the use of over a million personal computers to perform virtual screening of 3.5 billion druglike molecules against protein targets by pharmacophore pattern matching, together with other applications of pattern recognition such as docking ligands without any a priori knowledge about the binding site location.

  15. Novel nonsecosteroidal VDR agonists with phenyl-pyrrolyl pentane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Xue, Jingwei; Zhao, Zekai; Zhang, Can

    2013-11-01

    In order to find the vitamin D receptor (VDR) ligand whose VDR agonistic activity is separated from the calcemic activity sufficiently, novel nonsecosteroidal analogs with phenyl-pyrrolyl pentane skeleton were synthesized and evaluated for the VDR binding affinity, antiproliferative activity in vitro and serum calcium raising ability in vivo (tacalcitol used as control). Among them, several compounds showed varying degrees of VDR agonistic and growth inhibition activities of the tested cell lines. The most effective compound 2g (EC₅₀: 1.06 nM) exhibited stronger VDR agonistic activity than tacalcitol (EC₅₀: 7.05 nM), inhibited the proliferations of HaCaT and MCF-7 cells with IC₅₀ of 2.06 μM and 0.307 μM (tacalcitol: 2.07 μM and 0.057 μM) and showed no significant effect on serum calcium.

  16. Compulsive eating and weight gain related to dopamine agonist use.

    PubMed

    Nirenberg, Melissa J; Waters, Cheryl

    2006-04-01

    Dopamine agonists have been implicated in causing compulsive behaviors in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). These have included gambling, hypersexuality, hobbyism, and other repetitive, purposeless behaviors ("punding"). In this report, we describe 7 patients in whom compulsive eating developed in the context of pramipexole use. All of the affected patients had significant, undesired weight gain; 4 had other comorbid compulsive behaviors. In the 5 patients who lowered the dose of pramipexole or discontinued dopamine agonist treatment, the behavior remitted and no further weight gain occurred. Physicians should be aware that compulsive eating resulting in significant weight gain may occur in PD as a side-effect of dopamine agonist medications such as pramipexole. Given the known risks of the associated weight gain and obesity, further investigation is warranted.

  17. NMR spectroscopy of the ligand binding core of ionotropic glutamate receptor 2 bound to 5-substituted willardiine partial agonists

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Oswald, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate receptors mediate neuronal intercommunication in the central nervous system by coupling extracellular neurotransmitter-receptor interactions to ion channel conductivity. To gain insight into structural and dynamical factors that underlie this coupling, solution NMR experiments were performed on the bi-lobed ligand-binding core of glutamate receptor 2 in complexes with a set of willardiine partial agonists. These agonists are valuable for studying structure-function relationships because their 5-position substituent size is correlated with ligand efficacy and extent of receptor desensitization whereas the substituent electronegativity is correlated with ligand potency. NMR results show that the protein backbone amide chemical shift deviations correlate mainly with efficacy and extent of desensitization. Pronounced deviations occur at specific residues in the ligand-binding site and in the two helical segments that join the lobes by a disulfide bond. Experiments detecting conformational exchange show that micro- to millisecond timescale motions also occur near the disulfide bond and vary largely with efficacy and extent of desensitization. These results thus identify regions displaying structural and dynamical dissimilarity arising from differences in ligand-protein interactions and lobe closure which may play a critical role in receptor response. Furthermore, measures of line broadening and conformational exchange for a portion of the ligand-binding site correlate with ligand EC50 data. These results do not have any correlate in the currently available crystal structures and thus provide a novel view of ligand-binding events that may be associated with agonist potency differences. PMID:18387631

  18. The Legal Recognition of Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Meulder, Maartje

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an analytical overview of the different types of explicit legal recognition of sign languages. Five categories are distinguished: constitutional recognition, recognition by means of general language legislation, recognition by means of a sign language law or act, recognition by means of a sign language law or act including…

  19. Captive female gorilla agonistic relationships with clumped defendable food resources.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jennifer; Lockard, Joan S

    2006-07-01

    Minimal feeding competition among female mountain gorillas (Gorilla gorilla beringei) has resulted in egalitarian social relationships with poorly defined agonistic dominance hierarchies. Thus, gorillas are generally viewed as non-competitive egalitarian folivores that have had little need to develop effective competitive strategies to access food resources. However, this generalization is inconsistent with more recent research indicating that most gorillas are frugivorous, feeding on patchily distributed food resources. The current study at Howletts Wild Animal Park, Kent, England, explores the effects of clumped and defendable foods on female gorilla agonistic relationships among three groups of western lowland gorillas (G. g. gorilla), conditions that are predicted to lead to well-differentiated agonistic dominance hierarchies among female primates. The Howletts gorillas foraged all day on low-energy/-nutrient, high-fiber foods widely distributed around their enclosure by the keepers. However, they also had periodic access to high-energy foods (e.g., nuts, raisins, strawberries, etc.) that the keepers would spread in a clumped and defendable patch. Frequencies of agonistic and submissive behaviors between females and proximity data were gathered. High-status females were found to monopolize the food patch and kept the low-status females at bay with cough-grunt threat vocalizations or by chasing them away. Agonistic interactions were initiated mostly by females of high status; these were directed towards females of low status and were generally not reciprocal. In addition, females of low status engaged in submissive behaviors the most often, which they directed primarily at females of high status, especially in response to aggression by the latter. Agonistic interactions between high- and low-status females had decided outcomes more often than not, with low-status females the losers. Competition over highly desirable foods distributed in defendable clumps at

  20. Endogenous regulators of G protein signaling differentially modulate full and partial mu-opioid agonists at adenylyl cyclase as predicted by a collision coupling model.

    PubMed

    Clark, M J; Linderman, J J; Traynor, J R

    2008-05-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate the endogenous GTPase activity of Galpha(i/o) proteins to increase the rate of deactivation of active Galpha-GTP and Gbetagamma signaling molecules. Previous studies have suggested that RGS proteins are more effective on less efficiently coupled systems such as with partial agonist responses. To determine the role of endogenous RGS proteins in functional responses to mu-opioid agonists of different intrinsic efficacy, Galpha(i/o) subunits with a mutation at the pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive cysteine (C351I) and with or without a mutation at the RGS binding site (G184S) were stably expressed in C6 glioma cells expressing a mu-opioid receptor. Cells were treated overnight with PTX to inactivate endogenous G proteins. Maximal inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase by the low-efficacy partial agonists buprenorphine and nalbuphine was increased in cells expressing RGS-insensitive Galpha(o)(CIGS), Galpha(i2)(CIGS), or Galpha(i3)(CIGS) compared with their Galpha(CI) counterparts, but the RGS-insensitive mutation had little or no effect on the maximal inhibition by the higher efficacy agonists DAMGO and morphine. The potency of all the agonists to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase was increased in cells expressing RGS-insensitive Galpha(o)(CIGS), Galpha(i2)(CIGS), or Galpha(i3)(CIGS), regardless of efficacy. These data are comparable with predictions based on a collision coupling model. In this model, the rate of G protein inactivation, which is modulated by RGS proteins, and the rate of G protein activation, which is affected by agonist intrinsic efficacy, determine the maximal agonist response and potency at adenylyl cyclase under steady state conditions.

  1. Recognition sequences of restriction endonucleases and methylases--a review.

    PubMed

    Kessler, C; Neumaier, P S; Wolf, W

    1985-01-01

    The properties and sources of all known endonucleases and methylases acting site-specifically on DNA are listed. The enzymes are crossindexed (Table I), classified according to homologies within their recognition sequences (Table II), and characterized within Table II by the cleavage and methylation positions, the number of recognition sites on the DNA of the bacteriophages lambda, phi X174 and M13mp7, the viruses Ad2 and SV40, the plasmids pBR322 and pBR328 and the microorganisms from which they originate. Other tabulated properties of the restriction endonucleases include relaxed specificities (Table III), the structure of the restriction fragment ends (Table IV), and the sensitivity to different kinds of DNA methylation (Table V). Table VI classifies the methylases according to the nature of the methylated base(s) within their recognition sequences. This table also comprises those restriction endonucleases, which are known to be inhibited by the modified nucleotides. Furthermore, this review includes a restriction map of bacteriophage lambda DNA based on sequence data. Table VII lists the exact nucleotide positions of the cleavage sites, the length of the generated fragments ordered according to size, and the effects of the Escherichia coli dam- and dcmI-coded methylases M X Eco dam and M X Eco dcmI on the particular recognition sites.

  2. NLRP7 and related inflammasome activating pattern recognition receptors and their function in host defense and disease.

    PubMed

    Radian, Alexander D; de Almeida, Lucia; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Host defense requires the maturation and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 and the induction of pyroptotic cell death, which depends on the activation of inflammatory Caspases within inflammasomes by innate immune cells. Several cytosolic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) have been implicated in this process in response to infectious and sterile agonists. Here we summarize the current knowledge on inflammasome-organizing PRRs, emphasizing the recently described NLRP7, and their implications in human disease.

  3. Switching cannabinoid response from CB(2) agonists to FAAH inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tourteau, Aurélien; Leleu-Chavain, Natascha; Body-Malapel, Mathilde; Andrzejak, Virginie; Barczyk, Amélie; Djouina, Madjid; Rigo, Benoit; Desreumaux, Pierre; Chavatte, Philippe; Millet, Régis

    2014-03-01

    A series of 3-carboxamido-5-aryl-isoxazoles designed as CB2 agonists were evaluated as FAAH inhibitors. The pharmacological results led to identify structure-activity relationships enabling to switch cannabinoid response from CB2 agonists to FAAH inhibitors. Two compounds were selected for their FAAH and/or CB2 activity, and evaluated in a colitis model for their anti-inflammatory activity. Results showed that compounds 10 and 11 inhibit the development of DSS-induced acute colitis in mice and then, are interesting leads to explore new drug candidates for IBD.

  4. Partial agonistic action of endomorphins in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Wu, H E; Narita, M

    2001-09-07

    The partial agonistic properties of endogenous mu-opioid peptides endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 for G-protein activation were determined in the mouse spinal cord, monitoring the increases in guanosine-5'-o-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding. The G-protein activation induced by endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin in the spinal cord was significantly, but partially, attenuated by co-incubation with endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2. The data indicates that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 are endogenous partial agonists for mu-opioid receptor in the mouse spinal cord.

  5. Synthesis and activity of small molecule GPR40 agonists.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Dulce M; Corbett, David F; Dwornik, Kate A; Goetz, Aaron S; Littleton, Thomas R; McKeown, Steve C; Mills, Wendy Y; Smalley, Terrence L; Briscoe, Celia P; Peat, Andrew J

    2006-04-01

    The first report on the identification and structure-activity relationships of a novel series of GPR40 agonists based on a 3-(4-{[N-alkyl]amino}phenyl)propanoic acid template is described. Structural modifications to the original screening hit yielded compounds with a 100-fold increase in potency at the human GPR40 receptor and pEC(50)s in the low nanomolar range. The carboxylic acid moiety is not critical for activity but typically elicits an agonistic response higher than those observed with carboxamide replacements. These compounds may prove useful in unraveling the therapeutic potential of this receptor for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes.

  6. Molecular modelling studies on the ORL1-receptor and ORL1-agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bröer, Britta M.; Gurrath, Marion; Höltje, Hans-Dieter

    2003-11-01

    The ORL1 ( opioid receptor like 1)- receptor is a member of the family of rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and represents an interesting new therapeutical target since it is involved in a variety of biomedical important processes, such as anxiety, nociception, feeding, and memory. In order to shed light on the molecular basis of the interactions of the GPCR with its ligands, the receptor protein and a dataset of specific agonists were examined using molecular modelling methods. For that purpose, the conformational space of a very potent non-peptide ORL1-receptor agonist (Ro 64-6198) with a small number of rotatable bonds was analysed in order to derive a pharmacophoric arrangement. The conformational analyses yielded a conformation that served as template for the superposition of a set of related analogues. Structural superposition was achieved by employing the program FlexS. Using the experimental binding data and the superposition of the ligands, a 3D-QSAR analysis applying the GRID/GOLPE method was carried out. After the ligand-based modelling approach, a 3D model of the ORL1-receptor has been constructed using homology modelling methods based on the crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin. A representative structure of the model taken from molecular dynamics simulations was used for a manual docking procedure. Asp-130 and Thr-305 within the ORL1-receptor model served as important hydrophilic interaction partners. Furthermore, a hydrophobic cavity was identified stabilizing the agonists within their binding site. The manual docking results were supported using FlexX, which identified the same protein-ligand interaction points.

  7. Noribogaine is a G-protein biased κ-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Emeline L; Milon, Nicolas; Heghinian, Mari D; Fishback, James; Schürer, Stephan C; Garamszegi, Nandor; Mash, Deborah C

    2015-12-01

    Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 μM after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors. Functional activities of noribogaine at G-protein and non G-protein pathways of the mu and kappa opioid receptors were characterized. Noribogaine was a weak mu antagonist with a functional inhibition constants (Ke) of 20 μM at the G-protein and β-arrestin signaling pathways. Conversely, noribogaine was a G-protein biased kappa agonist 75% as efficacious as dynorphin A at stimulating GDP-GTP exchange (EC50=9 μM) but only 12% as efficacious at recruiting β-arrestin, which could contribute to the lack of dysphoric effects of noribogaine. In turn, noribogaine functionally inhibited dynorphin-induced kappa β-arrestin recruitment and was more potent than its G-protein agonistic activity with an IC50 of 1 μM. This biased agonist/antagonist pharmacology is unique to noribogaine in comparison to various other ligands including ibogaine, 18-MC, nalmefene, and 6'-GNTI. We predict noribogaine to promote certain analgesic effects as well as anti-addictive effects at effective concentrations>1 μM in the brain. Because elevated levels of dynorphins are commonly observed and correlated with anxiety, dysphoric effects, and decreased dopaminergic tone, a therapeutically relevant functional inhibition bias to endogenously released dynorphins by noribogaine might be worthy of consideration for treating anxiety and substance related disorders.

  8. Automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy-Wilson, Carol

    2005-04-01

    Great strides have been made in the development of automatic speech recognition (ASR) technology over the past thirty years. Most of this effort has been centered around the extension and improvement of Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approaches to ASR. Current commercially-available and industry systems based on HMMs can perform well for certain situational tasks that restrict variability such as phone dialing or limited voice commands. However, the holy grail of ASR systems is performance comparable to humans-in other words, the ability to automatically transcribe unrestricted conversational speech spoken by an infinite number of speakers under varying acoustic environments. This goal is far from being reached. Key to the success of ASR is effective modeling of variability in the speech signal. This tutorial will review the basics of ASR and the various ways in which our current knowledge of speech production, speech perception and prosody can be exploited to improve robustness at every level of the system.

  9. Chemical recognition software

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  10. Chemical recognition software

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  11. Recognition Using Hybrid Classifiers.

    PubMed

    Osadchy, Margarita; Keren, Daniel; Raviv, Dolev

    2016-04-01

    A canonical problem in computer vision is category recognition (e.g., find all instances of human faces, cars etc., in an image). Typically, the input for training a binary classifier is a relatively small sample of positive examples, and a huge sample of negative examples, which can be very diverse, consisting of images from a large number of categories. The difficulty of the problem sharply increases with the dimension and size of the negative example set. We propose to alleviate this problem by applying a "hybrid" classifier, which replaces the negative samples by a prior, and then finds a hyperplane which separates the positive samples from this prior. The method is extended to kernel space and to an ensemble-based approach. The resulting binary classifiers achieve an identical or better classification rate than SVM, while requiring far smaller memory and lower computational complexity to train and apply.

  12. Early recognition of speech

    PubMed Central

    Remez, Robert E; Thomas, Emily F

    2013-01-01

    Classic research on the perception of speech sought to identify minimal acoustic correlates of each consonant and vowel. In explaining perception, this view designated momentary components of an acoustic spectrum as cues to the recognition of elementary phonemes. This conceptualization of speech perception is untenable given the findings of phonetic sensitivity to modulation independent of the acoustic and auditory form of the carrier. The empirical key is provided by studies of the perceptual organization of speech, a low-level integrative function that finds and follows the sensory effects of speech amid concurrent events. These projects have shown that the perceptual organization of speech is keyed to modulation; fast; unlearned; nonsymbolic; indifferent to short-term auditory properties; and organization requires attention. The ineluctably multisensory nature of speech perception also imposes conditions that distinguish language among cognitive systems. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:213–223. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1213 PMID:23926454

  13. The action of dopamine and vascular dopamine (DA1) receptor agonists on human isolated subcutaneous and omental small arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, A. D.; Sever, P. S.

    1989-01-01

    1. Human small arteries were obtained from surgical specimens and studied in vitro by use of a myograph technique. Following induction of tone with a potassium depolarizing solution, dopamine in the presence of beta-adrenoceptor and catecholamine uptake blockade relaxed isolated omental and subcutaneous arteries. Preincubation of tissues with phentolamine increased the maximum relaxation in response to dopamine. 2. The selective vascular dopamine receptor agonists, fenoldopam and SKF 38393 also relaxed isolated subcutaneous and omental arteries in a concentration-dependent manner. The order of potency for agonists was dopamine greater than fenoldopam greater than SKF 38393. 3. Dopamine-induced relaxation was competitively antagonized by SCH 23390, (R)- and (S)-sulpiride, and fenoldopam induced relaxation by SCH 23390 and (+)- but not (-)-butaclamol. 4. These results indicate the presence of vascular dopamine receptors (DA1 subtype) on human isolated resistance arteries from omental and subcutaneous sites. PMID:2474354

  14. Coordinate Transformations in Object Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Markus

    2006-01-01

    A basic problem of visual perception is how human beings recognize objects after spatial transformations. Three central classes of findings have to be accounted for: (a) Recognition performance varies systematically with orientation, size, and position; (b) recognition latencies are sequentially additive, suggesting analogue transformation…

  15. Automatic Recognition of Deaf Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdelhamied, Kadry; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a speech perception system for automatic recognition of deaf speech. Using a 2-step segmentation approach for 468 utterances by 2 hearing-impaired men and 2 normal-hearing men, rates as high as 93.01 percent and 81.81 percent recognition were obtained in recognizing from deaf speech isolated words and connected speech,…

  16. Computer image processing and recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, E. L.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic introduction to the concepts and techniques of computer image processing and recognition is presented. Consideration is given to such topics as image formation and perception; computer representation of images; image enhancement and restoration; reconstruction from projections; digital television, encoding, and data compression; scene understanding; scene matching and recognition; and processing techniques for linear systems.

  17. Electrophysiological correlates of voice learning and recognition.

    PubMed

    Zäske, Romi; Volberg, Gregor; Kovács, Gyula; Schweinberger, Stefan Robert

    2014-08-13

    Listeners can recognize familiar human voices from variable utterances, suggesting the acquisition of speech-invariant voice representations during familiarization. However, the neurocognitive mechanisms mediating learning and recognition of voices from natural speech are currently unknown. Using electrophysiology, we investigated how representations are formed during intentional learning of initially unfamiliar voices that were later recognized among novel voices. To probe the acquisition of speech-invariant voice representations, we compared a "same sentence" condition, in which speakers repeated the study utterances at test, and a "different sentence" condition. Although recognition performance was higher for same compared with different sentences, substantial voice learning also occurred for different sentences, with recognition performance increasing across consecutive study-test-cycles. During study, event-related potentials elicited by voices subsequently remembered elicited a larger sustained parietal positivity (∼250-1400 ms) compared with subsequently forgotten voices. This difference due to memory was unaffected by test sentence condition and may thus reflect the acquisition of speech-invariant voice representations. At test, voices correctly classified as "old" elicited a larger late positive component (300-700 ms) at Pz than voices correctly classified as "new." This event-related potential OLD/NEW effect was limited to the same sentence condition and may thus reflect speech-dependent retrieval of voices from episodic memory. Importantly, a speech-independent effect for learned compared with novel voices was found in beta band oscillations (16-17 Hz) between 290 and 370 ms at central and right temporal sites. Our results are a first step toward elucidating the electrophysiological correlates of voice learning and recognition.

  18. Pattern recognition in hyperspectral persistent imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, Dalton; Romano, Joao; Borel, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    We give updates on a persistent imaging experiment dataset, being considered for public release in a foreseeable future, and present additional observations analyzing a subset of the dataset. The experiment is a long-term collaborative effort among the Army Research Laboratory, Army Armament RDEC, and Air Force Institute of Technology that focuses on the collection and exploitation of longwave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imagery. We emphasize the inherent challenges associated with using remotely sensed LWIR hyperspectral imagery for material recognition, and show that this data type violates key data assumptions conventionally used in the scientific community to develop detection/ID algorithms, i.e., normality, independence, identical distribution. We treat LWIR hyperspectral imagery as Longitudinal Data and aim at proposing a more realistic framework for material recognition as a function of spectral evolution through time, and discuss limitations. The defining characteristic of a longitudinal study is that objects are measured repeatedly through time and, as a result, data are dependent. This is in contrast to cross-sectional studies in which the outcomes of a specific event are observed by randomly sampling from a large population of relevant objects in which data are assumed independent. Researchers in the remote sensing community generally assume the problem of object recognition to be cross-sectional. But through a longitudinal analysis of a fixed site with multiple material types, we quantify and argue that, as data evolve through a full diurnal cycle, pattern recognition problems are longitudinal in nature and that by applying this knowledge may lead to better algorithms.

  19. Pyrrolo- and pyridomorphinans: non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Clark, M J; Traynor, J R; Lewis, J W; Husbands, S M

    2014-08-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse.

  20. Conjoint recognition and phantom recollection.

    PubMed

    Brainerd, C J; Wright, R; Reyna, V F; Mojardin, A H

    2001-03-01

    A new methodology for measuring illusory conscious experience of the "presentation" of unstudied material (phantom recollection) is evaluated that extracts measurements directly from recognition responses, rather than indirectly from introspective reports. Application of this methodology in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm (Experiments 1 and 2) and in a more conventional paradigm (Experiment 3) showed that 2 processes (phantom recollection and familiarity) contribute to false recognition of semantically related distractors. Phantom recollection was the larger contributor to false recognition of critical distractors in the DRM paradigm, but surprisingly, it was also the larger contributor to false recognition of other types of distractors. Variability in false recognition was tied to variability in phantom recollection. Experimental control of phantom recollection was achieved with manipulations that were motivated by fuzzy-trace theory's hypothesis that the phenomenon is gist-based.

  1. Oxytocin (OT) and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) act on OT receptors and not AVP V1a receptors to enhance social recognition in adult Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Song, Zhimin; Larkin, Tony E; Malley, Maureen O'; Albers, H Elliott

    2016-05-01

    Social recognition is a fundamental requirement for all forms of social relationships. A majority of studies investigating the neural mechanisms underlying social recognition in rodents have investigated relatively neutral social stimuli such as juveniles or ovariectomized females over short time intervals (e.g., 2h). The present study developed a new testing model to study social recognition among adult males using a potent social stimulus. Flank gland odors are used extensively in social communication in Syrian hamsters and convey important information such as dominance status. We found that the recognition of flank gland odors after a 3min exposure lasted for at least 24h, substantially longer than the recognition of other social cues in rats and mice. Intracerebroventricular injections of OT and AVP prolonged the recognition of flank gland odor for up to 48h. Selective OTR but not V1aR agonists, mimicked these enhancing effects of OT and AVP. Similarly, selective OTR but not V1aR antagonists blocked recognition of the odors after 20min. In contrast, the recognition of non-social stimuli was not blocked by either the OTR or the V1aR antagonists. Our findings suggest both OT and AVP enhance social recognition via acting on OTRs and not V1aRs and that the recognition enhancing effects of OT and AVP are limited to social stimuli.

  2. Involvement of tyrosine residues located in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor in agonist-induced down-regulation of the receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Valiquette, M; Bonin, H; Hnatowich, M; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J; Bouvier, M

    1990-01-01

    Chronic exposure of various cell types to adrenergic agonists leads to a decrease in cell surface beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2AR) number. Sequestration of the receptor away from the cell surface as well as a down-regulation of the total number of cellular receptors are believed to contribute to this agonist-mediated regulation of receptor number. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not well characterized. Recently, tyrosine residues located in the cytoplasmic tails of several membrane receptors, such as the low density lipoprotein and mannose-6-phosphate receptors, have been suggested as playing an important role in the agonist-induced internalization of these receptors. Accordingly, we assessed the potential role of two tyrosine residues in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2AR in agonist-induced sequestration and down-regulation of the receptor. Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 of the human beta 2AR were replaced with alanine residues by site-directed mutagenesis and both wild-type and mutant beta 2AR were stably expressed in transformed Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The mutation dramatically decreased the ability of the beta 2AR to undergo isoproterenol-induced down-regulation. However, the substitution of Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 did not affect agonist-induced sequestration of the receptor. These results suggest that tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of human beta 2AR are crucial determinants involved in its down-regulation. PMID:2164220

  3. Agonist Binding and Desensitization of the μ-Opioid Receptor Is Modulated by Phosphorylation of the C-Terminal Tail Domain

    PubMed Central

    Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Bunzow, James R.; Williams, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Sustained activation of G protein–coupled receptors can lead to a rapid decline in signaling through acute receptor desensitization. In the case of the μ-opioid receptor (MOPr), this desensitization may play a role in the development of analgesic tolerance. It is understood that phosphorylation of MOPr promotes association with β-arrestin proteins, which then facilitates desensitization and receptor internalization. Agonists that induce acute desensitization have been shown to induce a noncanonical high-affinity agonist binding state in MOPr, conferring a persistent memory of prior receptor activation. In the current study, live-cell confocal imaging was used to investigate the role of receptor phosphorylation in agonist binding to MOPr. A phosphorylation cluster in the C-terminal tail of MOPr was identified as a mediator of agonist-induced affinity changes in MOPr. This site is unique from the primary phosphorylation cluster responsible for β-arrestin binding and internalization. Electrophysiologic measurements of receptor function suggest that both phosphorylation clusters may play a parallel role during acute receptor desensitization. Desensitization was unaffected by alanine mutation of either phosphorylation cluster, but was largely eliminated when both clusters were mutated. Overall, this work suggests that there are multiple effects of MOPr phosphorylation that appear to regulate MOPr function: one affecting β-arrestin binding and a second affecting agonist binding. PMID:25934731

  4. Recognition memory impairments caused by false recognition of novel objects.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Lok-Kin; Ryan, Jennifer D; Cowell, Rosemary A; Barense, Morgan D

    2013-11-01

    A fundamental assumption underlying most current theories of amnesia is that memory impairments arise because previously studied information either is lost rapidly or is made inaccessible (i.e., the old information appears to be new). Recent studies in rodents have challenged this view, suggesting instead that under conditions of high interference, recognition memory impairments following medial temporal lobe damage arise because novel information appears as though it has been previously seen. Here, we developed a new object recognition memory paradigm that distinguished whether object recognition memory impairments were driven by previously viewed objects being treated as if they were novel or by novel objects falsely recognized as though they were previously seen. In this indirect, eyetracking-based passive viewing task, older adults at risk for mild cognitive impairment showed false recognition to high-interference novel items (with a significant degree of feature overlap with previously studied items) but normal novelty responses to low-interference novel items (with a lower degree of feature overlap). The indirect nature of the task minimized the effects of response bias and other memory-based decision processes, suggesting that these factors cannot solely account for false recognition. These findings support the counterintuitive notion that recognition memory impairments in this memory-impaired population are not characterized by forgetting but rather are driven by the failure to differentiate perceptually similar objects, leading to the false recognition of novel objects as having been seen before.

  5. The Agonistic Approach: Reframing Resistance in Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitus, Kathrine

    2008-01-01

    The agonistic approach--aimed at embracing opposing perspectives as part of a qualitative research process and acknowledging that process as fundamentally political--sheds light on both the construction of and the resistance to research identities. This approach involves reflexively embedding interview situations into the ethnographic context as a…

  6. Once-weekly glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2015-07-01

    The once-weekly glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (QW GLP1RA) represent a major advancement in diabetes pharmaco-therapeutics. This review describes the basic, clinical, and comparative pharmacology of this novel class of drugs. It highlights the clinical placement and posology of these drugs.

  7. Use of ß-adrenergic agonists in hybrid catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ractopamine hydrochloride (RH) is a potent ß-adrenergic agonist that has been used in some species of fish to improve growth performance and dress out characteristics. While this metabolic modifier has been shown to have positive effects on growth of fish, little research has focused on the mechani...

  8. Dopamine agonists in prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Vrčić, Hrvoje; Stanić, Patrik; Ježek, Davor; Orešković, Slavko; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Pekez, Marijeta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to analyze the efficacy of different dopamine agonists in the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Cabergoline, quinagolide and bromocriptine are the most common dopamine agonists used. There are wide clinical variations among the trials in the starting time (from the day of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) to the day following oocyte retrieval); the duration of the treatment (4-21 days), the dose of cabergoline (0.5 mg or 0.25 mg orally) and in the regimens used. At present, the best known effective regimen is 0.5 mg of cabergoline for 8 days or rectal bromocriptine at a daily dose of 2.5 mg for 16 days. Dopamine agonists have shown significant evidences of their efficacy in the prevention of moderate and early-onset OHSS (9.41%), compared with a placebo (21.45%), which cannot be confirmed for the treatment of late OHSS. It would be advisable to start with the treatment on the day of hCG injection or preferably a few hours earlier. The use of dopamine agonists should be indicated in patients at high risk of OHSS, as well as in patients with a history of previous OHSS even without evident signs of the syndrome.

  9. [Alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists for the treatment of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Kulka, P J

    1996-04-25

    The antinociceptive effect of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists is mediated by activation of descending inhibiting noradrenergic systems, which modulates 'wide-dynamic-range' neurones. Furthermore, they inhibit the liberation of substance P and endorphines and activate serotoninergic neurones. Despite this variety of antinociceptive actions, there is still little experience with alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists as therapeutic agents for use in chronic pain syndromes. Studies in animals and patients have shown that the transdermal, epidural and intravenous administration of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine reduces pain intensity in neuropathic pain syndromes for periods varying from some hours up to 1 month. Patients suffering from lancinating or sharp pain respond best to this therapy. Topically applied clonidine (200-300 microg) relieves hyperalgesia in sympathetically maintained pain. Epidural administration of 300 microg clonidine dissolved in 5 ml NaCl 0.9 % has also been shown to be effective. In patients suffering from cancer pain tolerant to opioids, pain control has proved possible again with combinations of opioids and clonidine. In isolated cases clonidine has been administered epidurally at a dose of 1500 microg/day for almost 5 months without evidence for any histotoxic property of clonidine. Side effects often observed during administration of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists are dry mouth, sedation, hypotension and bradycardia. Therapeutic interventions are usually not required.

  10. Role of nicotine receptor partial agonists in tobacco cessation

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Nivedita; Chand, Prabhat; Murthy, Pratima

    2014-01-01

    One in three adults in India uses tobacco, a highly addictive substance in one or other form. In addition to prevention of tobacco use, offering evidence-based cessation services to dependent tobacco users constitutes an important approach in addressing this serious public health problem. A combination of behavioral methods and pharmacotherapy has shown the most optimal results in tobacco dependence treatment. Among currently available pharmacological agents, drugs that preferentially act on the α4 β2-nicotinic acetyl choline receptor like varenicline and cytisine appear to have relatively better cessation outcomes. These drugs are in general well tolerated and have minimal drug interactions. The odds of quitting tobacco use are at the very least doubled with the use of partial agonists compared with placebo and the outcomes are also superior when compared to nicotine replacement therapy and bupropion. The poor availability of partial agonists and specifically the cost of varenicline, as well as the lack of safety data for cytisine has limited their use world over, particularly in developing countries. Evidence for the benefit of partial agonists is more robust for smoking rather than smokeless forms of tobacco. Although more studies are needed to demonstrate their effectiveness in different populations of tobacco users, present literature supports the use of partial agonists in addition to behavioral methods for optimal outcome in tobacco dependence. PMID:24574554

  11. Dopamine receptor agonists for protection and repair in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Bonini, Sara A; Cenini, Giovanna; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Uberti, Daniela; Memo, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine agonists have been usually used as adjunctive therapy for the cure of Parkinson's disease. It is generally believed that treatment with these drugs is symptomatic rather than curative and it does not stop or delay the progression of neuronal degeneration. However, several dopamine agonists of the D2-receptor family have recently been shown to possess neuroprotective properties in different in vitro and in vivo experimental Parkinson's disease models. Here we summarize some recent molecular evidences underlining the wide pharmacological spectrum of dopamine agonists currently used for treating Parkinson's disease patients. In particular, the mechanism of action of different dopamine agonists does not always appear to be restricted to the stimulation of selective dopamine receptor subtypes since at least some of these drugs are endowed with antioxidant, antiapoptotic or neurotrophic properties. These neuroprotective activities are molecule-specific and may contribute to the clinical efficacy of these drugs for the treatment of chronic and progressive neurodegenerative diseases in which oxidative injury and/or protein misfolding and aggregation exert a primary role.

  12. Amylin and Amylin Agonists for Treating Psychiatric Diseases and Disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods and compositions for treating psychiatric diseases and disorders are disclosed. The methods provided generally involve the administration of an amylin or an amylin agonist to a subject in order to treat psychiatric diseases and disorders, and conditions associated with psychiatric diseases a...

  13. Euodenine A: a small-molecule agonist of human TLR4.

    PubMed

    Neve, Juliette E; Wijesekera, Hasanthi P; Duffy, Sandra; Jenkins, Ian D; Ripper, Justin A; Teague, Simon J; Campitelli, Marc; Garavelas, Agatha; Nikolakopoulos, George; Le, Phuc V; de A Leone, Priscila; Pham, Ngoc B; Shelton, Philip; Fraser, Neil; Carroll, Anthony R; Avery, Vicky M; McCrae, Christopher; Williams, Nicola; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-02-27

    A small-molecule natural product, euodenine A (1), was identified as an agonist of the human TLR4 receptor. Euodenine A was isolated from the leaves of Euodia asteridula (Rutaceae) found in Papua New Guinea and has an unusual U-shaped structure. It was synthesized along with a series of analogues that exhibit potent and selective agonism of the TLR4 receptor. SAR development around the cyclobutane ring resulted in a 10-fold increase in potency. The natural product demonstrated an extracellular site of action, which requires the extracellular domain of TLR4 to stimulate a NF-κB reporter response. 1 is a human-selective agonist that is CD14-independent, and it requires both TLR4 and MD-2 for full efficacy. Testing for immunomodulation in PBMC cells shows the induction of the cytokines IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p40 as well as suppression of IL-5 from activated PBMCs, indicating that compounds like 1 could modulate the Th2 immune response without causing lung damage.

  14. Development of a Single-Chain Peptide Agonist of the Relaxin-3 Receptor Using Hydrocarbon Stapling.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Keiko; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Tailhades, Julien; Shabanpoor, Fazel; Wong, Lilian L L; Ong-Pålsson, Emma E K; Kastman, Hanna E; Ma, Sherie; Gundlach, Andrew L; Rosengren, K Johan; Wade, John D; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2016-08-25

    Structure-activity studies of the insulin superfamily member, relaxin-3, have shown that its G protein-coupled receptor (RXFP3) binding site is contained within its central B-chain α-helix and this helical structure is essential for receptor activation. We sought to develop a single B-chain mimetic that retained agonist activity. This was achieved by use of solid phase peptide synthesis together with on-resin ruthenium-catalyzed ring closure metathesis of a pair of judiciously placed i,i+4 α-methyl, α-alkenyl amino acids. The resulting hydrocarbon stapled peptide was shown by solution NMR spectroscopy to mimic the native helical conformation of relaxin-3 and to possess potent RXFP3 receptor binding and activation. Alternative stapling procedures were unsuccessful, highlighting the critical need to carefully consider both the peptide sequence and stapling methodology for optimal outcomes. Our result is the first successful minimization of an insulin-like peptide to a single-chain α-helical peptide agonist which will facilitate study of the function of relaxin-3.

  15. Reversal of endotoxic shock with the calcium channel agonist BAY k 8644

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, N.; King, J.W.; Chernow, B.; Roth, B.L.

    1986-03-05

    The hypotension and diminished myocardial function observed in sepsis and endotoxin-induced shock are difficult to overcome pharmacologically. They previously demonstrated that a down regulation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors may contribute to the hypotension and diminished response to catecholamines seen in septic shock. They here demonstrate that the calcium channel agonist BAY k 8644 potently reverses the hypotension of experimental endotoxin (20 mg/kg Difico lipopolysaccharide) shock in rats. A dose as low as 10 ..mu..g/kg BAY k 8644 significantly elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP) in hypotensive rats. The maximum percentage increase in MAP was greater in endotoxin-treated rats compared with saline-treated controls (153% vs 120% increase respectively). BAY k 8644 also caused a dose-dependent decrease in heart rate of 37% in endotoxin-treated rats and 39% in controls. No difference in (/sup 3/H)-nitrendipine binding sites were detected comparing control and endotoxin-treated rates. These results demonstrate that calcium channel agonists might represent unique agents in pathologic states characterized by hypotension and diminished cardiac function.

  16. Cannabidiol is a partial agonist at dopamine D2High receptors, predicting its antipsychotic clinical dose

    PubMed Central

    Seeman, P

    2016-01-01

    Although all current antipsychotics act by interfering with the action of dopamine at dopamine D2 receptors, two recent reports showed that 800 to 1000 mg of cannabidiol per day alleviated the signs and symptoms of schizophrenia, although cannabidiol is not known to act on dopamine receptors. Because these recent clinical findings may indicate an important exception to the general rule that all antipsychotics interfere with dopamine at dopamine D2 receptors, the present study examined whether cannabidiol acted directly on D2 receptors, using tritiated domperidone to label rat brain striatal D2 receptors. It was found that cannabidiol inhibited the binding of radio-domperidone with dissociation constants of 11 nm at dopamine D2High receptors and 2800 nm at dopamine D2Low receptors, in the same biphasic manner as a dopamine partial agonist antipsychotic drug such as aripiprazole. The clinical doses of cannabidiol are sufficient to occupy the functional D2High sites. it is concluded that the dopamine partial agonist action of cannabidiol may account for its clinical antipsychotic effects. PMID:27754480

  17. Theoretical analysis of somatostatin receptor 5 with antagonists and agonists for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Santhosh Kumar; Babu, Sathya; Madhavan, Thirumurthy

    2017-02-02

    We report on SSTR5 receptor modeling and its interaction with reported antagonist and agonist molecules. Modeling of the SSTR5 receptor was carried out using multiple templates with the aim of improving the precision of the generated models. The selective SSTR5 antagonists, agonists and native somatostatin SRIF-14 were employed to propose the binding site of SSTR5 and to identify the critical residues involved in the interaction of the receptor with other molecules. Residues Q2.63, D3.32, Q3.36, C186, Y7.34 and Y7.42 were found to be highly significant for their strong interaction with the receptor. SSTR5 antagonists were utilized to perform a 3D quantitative structure-activity relationship study. A comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) was conducted using two different alignment schemes, namely the ligand-based and receptor-based alignment methods. The best statistical results were obtained for ligand-based ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] = 0.988, noc = 4) and receptor-guided methods (docked mode 1:[Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], noc = 5), (docked mode 2:[Formula: see text] = 0.555, [Formula: see text], noc = 5). Based on CoMFA contour maps, an electropositive substitution at [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] position and bulky group at [Formula: see text] position are important in enhancing molecular activity.

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 gene regulation by a PPAR alpha agonist in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Souissi, Imen Jguirim; Billiet, Ludivine; Cuaz-Perolin, Clarisse; Rouis, Mustapha

    2008-11-01

    MMP-12, a macrophage-specific matrix metalloproteinase with large substrate specificity, has been reported to be highly expressed in mice, rabbits and human atherosclerotic lesions. Increased MMP-12 from inflammatory macrophages is associated with several degenerative diseases such as atherosclerosis. In this manuscript, we show that IL-1{beta}, a proinflammatory cytokine found in atherosclerotic plaques, increases both mRNA and protein levels of MMP-12 in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), such as PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, are expressed in macrophages and because PPAR activation exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on vascular cells, we have investigated the effect of PPAR{alpha} and {gamma} isoforms on MMP-12 regulation in HMDM. Our results show that MMP-12 expression (mRNA and protein) is down regulated in IL-1{beta}-treated macrophages only in the presence of a specific PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647, in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, this inhibitory effect was abolished in IL-1{beta}-stimulated peritoneal macrophages isolated from PPAR{alpha}{sup -/-} mice and treated with the PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647. Moreover, reporter gene transfection experiments using different MMP-12 promoter constructs showed a reduction of the promoter activities by {approx} 50% in IL-1{beta}-stimulated PPAR{alpha}-pre-treated cells. However, MMP-12 promoter analysis did not reveal the presence of a PPRE response element. The IL-1{beta} effect is known to be mediated through the AP-1 binding site. Mutation of the AP-1 site, located at - 81 in the MMP-12 promoter region relative to the transcription start site, followed by transfection analysis, gel shift and ChIP experiments revealed that the inhibitory effect was the consequence of the protein-protein interaction between GW 647-activated PPAR{alpha} and c-Fos or c-Jun transcription factors, leading to inhibition of their binding to the AP-1 motif. These studies

  19. Unique Substrate Recognition Mechanism of the Botulinum Neurotoxin D Light Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiubiao; Chen, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are the most potent protein toxins in nature. Despite the potential to block neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction and cause human botulism, they are widely used in protein therapies. Among the seven botulinum neurotoxin serotypes, mechanisms of substrate recognition and specificity are known to a certain extent in the A, B, E, and F light chains, but not in the D light chain (LC/D). In this study, we addressed the unique substrate recognition mechanism of LC/D and showed that this serotype underwent hydrophobic interactions with VAMP-2 at its V1 motif. The LC/D B3, B4, and B5 binding sites specifically recognize the hydrophobic residues in the V1 motif of VAMP-2. Interestingly, we identified a novel dual recognition mechanism employed by LC/D in recognition of VAMP-2 sites at both the active site and distal binding sites, in which one site of VAMP-2 was recognized by two independent, but functionally similar LC/D sites that were complementary to each other. The dual recognition strategy increases the tolerance of LC/D to mutations and renders it a good candidate for engineering to improve its therapeutic properties. In conclusion, in this study, we identified a unique multistep substrate recognition mechanism by LC/D and provide insights for LC/D engineering and antitoxin development. PMID:23963459

  20. Delayed onset of vocal recognition in Australian sea lion pups ( Neophoca cinerea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, Benjamin J.; Ahonen, Heidi; Harcourt, Robert G.; Charrier, Isabelle

    2009-08-01

    In pinnipeds, maternal care strategies and colony density may influence a species’ individual recognition system. We examined the onset of vocal recognition of mothers by Australian sea lion pups ( Neophoca cinerea). At 2 months of age, pups responded significantly more to the calls of their own mothers than alien female calls demonstrating a finely tuned recognition system. However, newborn pups did not respond differentially to the calls of their mother from alien female calls suggesting that vocal recognition had not yet developed or is not yet expressed. These findings are in stark contrast to other otariid species where pups learn their mother’s voice before their first separation. Variance in colony density, pup movements, and natal site fidelity may have reduced selective pressures on call recognition in young sea lions, or alternatively, another sensory system may be used for recognition in the early stage of life.

  1. Melatonin receptor agonists: new options for insomnia and depression treatment.

    PubMed

    Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco

    2011-12-01

    The circadian nature of melatonin (MLT) secretion, coupled with the localization of MLT receptors to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, has led to numerous studies of the role of MLT in modulation of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms in humans. Although much more needs to be understood about the various functions exerted by MLT and its mechanisms of action, three therapeutic agents (ramelteon, prolonged-release MLT, and agomelatine) are already in use, and MLT receptor agonists are now appearing as new promising treatment options for sleep and circadian-rhythm related disorders. In this review, emphasis has been placed on medicinal chemistry strategies leading to MLT receptor agonists, and on the evidence supporting therapeutic efficacy of compounds undergoing clinical evaluation. A wide range of clinical trials demonstrated that ramelteon, prolonged-release MLT and tasimelteon have sleep-promoting effects, providing an important treatment option for insomnia and transient insomnia, even if the improvements of sleep maintenance appear moderate. Well-documented effects of agomelatine suggest that this MLT agonist offers an attractive alternative for the treatment of depression, combining efficacy with a favorable side effect profile. Despite a large number of high affinity nonselective MLT receptor agonists, only limited data on MT₁ or MT₂ subtype-selective compounds are available up to now. Administration of the MT₂-selective agonist IIK7 to rats has proved to decrease NREM sleep onset latency, suggesting that MT₂ receptor subtype is involved in the acute sleep-promoting action of MLT; rigorous clinical studies are needed to demonstrate this hypothesis. Further clinical candidates based on selective activation of MT₁ or MT₂ receptors are expected in coming years.

  2. Identification of raloxifene as a novel CB2 inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pritesh; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2013-05-24

    The purpose of the current study was to apply a high throughput assay to systematically screen a library of food and drug administration (FDA)-approved drugs as potential ligands for the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2). A cell-based, homogenous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) method for measuring changes in intracellular cAMP levels was validated and found to be suitable for testing ligands that may act on CB2. Among the 640 FDA-approved drugs screened, raloxifene, a drug used to treat/prevent post-menopausal osteoporosis, was identified for the first time to be a novel CB2 inverse agonist. Our results demonstrated that by acting on CB2, raloxifene enhances forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in a concentration-dependant manner. Furthermore, our data showed that raloxifene competes concentration-dependently for specific [(3)H]CP-55,940 binding to CB2. In addition, raloxifene pretreatment caused a rightward shift of the concentration-response curves of the cannabinoid agonists CP-55,940, HU-210, and WIN55,212-2. Raloxifene antagonism is most likely competitive in nature, as these rightward shifts were parallel and were not associated with any changes in the efficacy of cannabinoid agonists on CB2. Our discovery that raloxfiene is an inverse agonist for CB2 suggests that it might be possible to repurpose this FDA-approved drug for novel therapeutic indications for which CB2 is a target. Furthermore, identifying raloxifene as a CB2 inverse agonist also provides important novel mechanisms of actions to explain the known therapeutic effects of raloxifene.

  3. Imprinting of molecular recognition sites combined with π-donor-acceptor interactions using bis-aniline-crosslinked Au-CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles array on electrodes: Development of electrochemiluminescence sensor for the ultrasensitive and selective detection of 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yukun; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Xiaomin; Liu, Guiyang; Wang, Shuo

    2016-03-15

    A novel strategy is reported for the fabrication of bis-aniline-crosslinked Au nanoparticles (NPs)-CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) array composite by facil one-step co-electropolymerization of thioaniline-functionalized AuNPs and thioaniline-functionalized CdSe/ZnS QDs onto thioaniline-functionalized Au elctrodes (AuE). Stable and enhanced cathodic electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of CdSe/ZnS QDs is observed on the modified electrode in neutral solution, suggesting promising applications in ECL sensing. An advanced ECL sensor is explored for detection of 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) which quenches the ECL signal through electron-transfer pathway. The sensitive determination of MCPA with limit of detection (LOD) of 2.2 nmolL(-1) (S/N=3) is achieved by π-donor-acceptor interactions between MCPA and the bis-aniline bridging units. Impressively, the imprinting of molecular recognition sites into the bis-aniline-crosslinked AuNPs-CdSe/ZnS QDs array yields a functionalized electrode with an extremely sensitive response to MCPA in a linear range of 10 pmolL(-1)-50 μmolL(-1) with a LOD of 4.3 pmolL(-1 ()S/N=3). The proposed ECL sensor with high sensitivity, good selectivity, reproducibility and stability has been successfully applied for the determination of MCPA in real samples with satisfactory recoveries. In this study, ECL sensor combined the merits of QDs-ECL and molecularly imprinting technology is reported for the first time. The developed ECL sensor holds great promise for the fabrication of QDs-based ECL sensors with improved sensitivity and furthermore opens the door to wide applications of QDs-based ECL in food safety and environmental monitoring.

  4. Cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous agonist, anandamide.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, J; Felder, C C

    1998-05-01

    Cannabinoids are a class of compound found in marijuana which have been known for their therapeutic and psychoactive properties for at least 4000 years. Isolation of the active principle in marijuana, delta9-THC, provided the lead structure in the development of highly potent congeners which were used to probe for the mechanism of marijuana action. Cannabinoids were shown to bind to selective binding sites in brain tissue thereby regulating second messenger formation. Such studies led to the cloning of three cannabinoid receptor subtypes, CB1, CB2, and CB1A all of which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled plasma membrane receptors. Analogous to the discovery of endogenous opiates, isolation of cannabinoid receptors provided the appropriate tool to isolate an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, anandamide, from porcine brain. Recent studies indicate that anandamide is a member of a family of fatty acid ethanolamides that may represent a novel class of lipid neurotransmitters. This review discusses recent progress in cannabinoid research with a focus on the receptors for delta9-THC, their coupling to second messenger responses, and the endogenous lipid cannabimimetic, anandamide.

  5. Recognition of speech spectrograms.

    PubMed

    Greene, B G; Pisoni, D B; Carrell, T D

    1984-07-01

    The performance of eight naive observers in learning to identify speech spectrograms was studied over a 2-month period. Single tokens from a 50-word phonetically balanced (PB) list were recorded by several talkers and displayed on a Spectraphonics Speech Spectrographic Display system. Identification testing occurred immediately after daily training sessions. After approximately 20 h of training, naive subjects correctly identified the 50 PB words from a single talker over 95% of the time. Generalization tests with the same words were then carried out with different tokens from the original talker, new tokens from another male talker, a female talker, and finally, a synthetic talker. The generalization results for these talkers showed recognition performance at 91%, 76%, 76%, and 48%, respectively. Finally, generalization tests with a novel set of PB words produced by the original talker were also carried out to examine in detail the perceptual strategies and visual features that subjects abstracted from the training set. Our results demonstrate that even without formal training in phonetics or acoustics naive observers can learn to identify visual displays of speech at very high levels of accuracy. Analysis of subjects' performance in a verbal protocol task demonstrated that they rely on salient visual correlates of many phonetic features in speech.

  6. Molecular recognition effects in atomistic models of imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Eduardo M A; Herdes, Carmelo; van Tassel, Paul R; Sarkisov, Lev

    2011-01-01

    In this article we present a model for molecularly imprinted polymers, which considers both complexation processes in the pre-polymerization mixture and adsorption in the imprinted structures within a single consistent framework. As a case study we investigate MAA/EGDMA polymers imprinted with pyrazine and pyrimidine. A polymer imprinted with pyrazine shows substantial selectivity towards pyrazine over pyrimidine, thus exhibiting molecular recognition, whereas the pyrimidine imprinted structure shows no preferential adsorption of the template. Binding sites responsible for the molecular recognition of pyrazine involve one MAA molecule and one EGDMA molecule, forming associations with the two functional groups of the pyrazine molecule. Presence of these specific sites in the pyrazine imprinted system and lack of the analogous sites in the pyrimidine imprinted system is directly linked to the complexation processes in the pre-polymerization solution. These processes are quite different for pyrazine and pyrimidine as a result of both enthalpic and entropic effects.

  7. Synthesis and SAR of potent LXR agonists containing an indole pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Campobasso, Nino; Smallwood, Angela; Parks, Derek J.; Webb, Christine L.; Frank, Kelly A.; Nord, Melanie; Duraiswami, Chaya; Evans, Christopher; Jaye, Michael; Thompson, Scott K.

    2009-03-27

    A novel series of 1H-indol-1-yl tertiary amine LXR agonists has been designed. Compounds from this series were potent agonists with good rat pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, the crystal structure of an LXR agonist bound to LXR{alpha} will be disclosed.

  8. Intraperirhinal cortex administration of the synthetic cannabinoid, HU210, disrupts object recognition memory in rats.</