Science.gov

Sample records for agonist win55212-2 win

  1. An NMDA antagonist (LY 235959) attenuates abstinence-induced withdrawal of planarians following acute exposure to a cannabinoid agonist (WIN 55212-2).

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Gomez, Teresa; Raffa, Robert B

    2007-03-01

    The mechanisms that facilitate the development and expression of cannabinoid physical dependence in humans and other mammals are poorly understood. The present experiments used a planarian model to provide evidence that pharmacological antagonism of NMDA receptors significantly attenuates the development of cannabinoid physical dependence. Abstinence-induced withdrawal from the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2 (10 microM) was manifested as a significant (P<0.05) decrease in the rate of planarian spontaneous locomotor velocity (pLMV) when WIN 55212-2 (10 microM)-exposed planarians were placed into drug-free water. No change in pLMV occurred when WIN 55212-2 (10 microM)-exposed planarians were placed into water containing WIN 55212-2 (10 microM). WIN 55212-2 (10 microM)-exposed planarians placed into water containing LY 235959 (1 or 10 microM) did not display withdrawal (no significant difference, P>0.05, in pLMV). In addition, withdrawal was not observed (no significant difference, P>0.05, in pLMV) in planarians that were co-exposed to a solution containing WIN 55212-2 (10 microM) and LY 235959 (10 microM). The present results reveal that NMDA receptor activation mediates the development of cannabinoid physical dependence and the expression of cannabinoid withdrawal in planarians.

  2. A nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME) attenuates abstinence-induced withdrawal from both cocaine and a cannabinoid agonist (WIN 55212-2) in Planaria.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Rodriguez, Tonatiu; Baron, David A; Raffa, Robert B

    2006-07-12

    We previously reported that planarians (Dugesia dorotocephala) that have been exposed to cocaine for 1 h undergo abstinence-induced withdrawal when placed into cocaine-free, but not cocaine-containing, water. We now report that planarians also display dose-related abstinence-induced withdrawal following exposure to the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2, but not its inactive enantiomer (WIN 55212-3). The withdrawal from WIN 55212-2 was manifested as a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the rate of planarian spontaneous locomotor activity over a 5-min observation period, using a recently designed metric (pLMV). We also report that withdrawal from cocaine (80 microM) or WIN 55212-2 (10 microM) was attenuated by the selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME (L-nitro-arginine methyl ester), which had no effect of its own on pLMV. These results suggest a common NO-dependent pathway of withdrawal from cocaine and WIN 55212-2 in Planaria.

  3. The interaction of cannabinoid receptor agonists, CP55940 and WIN55212-2 with membranes using solid state 2H NMR

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Pavlopoulos, Spiro; Yang, De-Ping; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Two key commonly used cannabinergic agonists, CP55940 and WIN55212-2, are investigated for their effects on the lipid membrane bilayer using 2H solid state NMR, and the results are compared with our earlier work with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). To study the effects of these ligands we used hydrated bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) deuterated at the 2′ and 16′ positions of both acyl chains with deuterium atoms serving as probes for the dynamic and phase changes at the membrane interface and at the bilayer center respectively. All three cannabinergic ligands lower the phospholipid membrane phase transition temperature, increase the lipid sn-2 chain order parameter at the membrane interface and decrease the order at the center of the bilayer. Our studies show that the cannabinoid ligands induce lateral phase separation in the lipid membrane at physiological temperatures. During the lipid membrane phase transition, the cooperative dynamic process whereby the C-2H segments at the interface and center of the bilayer spontaneously reach the fast exchange regime (2H NMR timescale) is distinctively modulated by the two cannabinoids. Specifically, CP55940 is slightly more efficient at inducing liquid crystalline-type 2H NMR spectral features at the membrane interface compared to WIN55212-2. In contrast, WIN55212-2 has a far superior ability to induce liquid crystalline-type spectral features at the center of the bilayer, and it increases the order parameter of the sn-1 chain in addition to the sn-2 chain of the lipids. These observations suggest the cannabinoid ligands may influence lipid membrane domain formations and there may be contributions to their cannabinergic activities through lipid membrane microdomain related mechanisms. Our work demonstrates that experimental design strategies utilizing specifically deuterium labeled lipids yield more detailed insights concerning the properties of lipid bilayers. PMID:21129361

  4. Alterations in the intrinsic burst activity of Purkinje neurons in offspring maternally exposed to the CB1 cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Mohammad; Mahnam, Amin; Sheibani, Vahid; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2014-01-01

    Burst firing plays an important role in normal neuronal function and dysfunction. In Purkinje neurons, where the firing rate and discharge pattern encode the timing signals necessary for motor function, any alteration in firing properties, including burst activity, may affect the motor output. Therefore, we examined whether maternal exposure to the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55212-2 (WIN) may affect the burst firing properties of cerebellar Purkinje cells in offspring. Whole-cell somatic patch-clamp recordings were made from cerebellar slices of adult male rats that were exposed to WIN prenatally. WIN exposure during pregnancy induced long-term alterations in the burst firing behavior of Purkinje neurons in rat offspring as evidenced by a significant increase in the mean number of spikes per burst (p < 0.05) and the prolongation of burst firing activity (p < 0.01). The postburst afterhyperpolarization potential (p < 0.001), the mean intraburst interspike intervals (p < 0.001) and the mean intraburst firing frequency (p < 0.001) were also significantly increased in the WIN-treated group. Prenatal exposure to WIN enhanced the firing irregularity as reflected by a significant decrease in the coefficient of variation of the intraburst interspike interval (p < 0.05). Furthermore, whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings revealed that prenatal WIN exposure significantly enhanced Ca(2+) channel current amplitude in offspring Purkinje neurons compared to control cells. Overall, the data presented here strongly suggest that maternal exposure to cannabinoids can induce long-term changes in complex spike burst activity, which in turn may lead to alterations in neuronal output.

  5. Effects of Cannabinoid Exposure during Adolescence on the Conditioned Rewarding Effects of WIN 55212-2 and Cocaine in Mice: Influence of the Novelty-Seeking Trait.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arias, M; Roger-Sánchez, C; Vilanova, I; Revert, N; Manzanedo, C; Miñarro, J; Aguilar, M A

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent exposure to cannabinoids enhances the behavioural effects of cocaine, and high novelty-seeking trait predicts greater sensitivity to the conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by this drug. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of novelty-seeking on the effects of adolescent cannabinoid exposure. Adolescent male mice were classified as high or low novelty seekers (HNS and LNS) in the hole-board test. First, we evaluated the CPP induced by the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2 (0.05 and 0.075 mg/kg, i.p.) in HNS and LNS mice. Then, HNS and LNS mice were pretreated i.p. with vehicle, WIN 55212-2 (0.1 mg/kg), or cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg) and were subsequently conditioned with WIN 55212-2 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) or cocaine (1 or 6 mg/kg, i.p.). Only HNS mice conditioned with the 0.075 mg/kg dose acquired CPP with WIN 55212-2. Adolescent exposure to this cannabinoid agonist increased the rewarding effects of 1 mg/kg of cocaine in both HNS and LNS mice, and in HNS mice it also increased the reinstating effect of a low dose of cocaine. Our results endorse a role for individual differences such as a higher propensity for sensation-seeking in the development of addiction.

  6. Effects of Cannabinoid Exposure during Adolescence on the Conditioned Rewarding Effects of WIN 55212-2 and Cocaine in Mice: Influence of the Novelty-Seeking Trait

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Arias, M.; Roger-Sánchez, C.; Vilanova, I.; Revert, N.; Manzanedo, C.; Miñarro, J.; Aguilar, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent exposure to cannabinoids enhances the behavioural effects of cocaine, and high novelty-seeking trait predicts greater sensitivity to the conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by this drug. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of novelty-seeking on the effects of adolescent cannabinoid exposure. Adolescent male mice were classified as high or low novelty seekers (HNS and LNS) in the hole-board test. First, we evaluated the CPP induced by the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2 (0.05 and 0.075 mg/kg, i.p.) in HNS and LNS mice. Then, HNS and LNS mice were pretreated i.p. with vehicle, WIN 55212-2 (0.1 mg/kg), or cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg) and were subsequently conditioned with WIN 55212-2 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) or cocaine (1 or 6 mg/kg, i.p.). Only HNS mice conditioned with the 0.075 mg/kg dose acquired CPP with WIN 55212-2. Adolescent exposure to this cannabinoid agonist increased the rewarding effects of 1 mg/kg of cocaine in both HNS and LNS mice, and in HNS mice it also increased the reinstating effect of a low dose of cocaine. Our results endorse a role for individual differences such as a higher propensity for sensation-seeking in the development of addiction. PMID:26881125

  7. Destructive Effects of Prenatal WIN 55212-2 Exposure on Central Nervous System of Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mohammad; Divsalar, Kouros; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2012-01-01

    Background Cannabinoid, particularly hashish and WIN 55212-2 (WIN), consumption during embryonic period may affect fetal growth, and the development of motor functioning, memory and cognitive functions. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effects of WIN 55212-2 during embryonic period on behavioral responses, as well as tissue and memory changes among neonatal rats. Methods WIN treated groups subcutaneously received daily doses of 0.5 or 1 mg/kg WIN suspended in 1% Tween-80-saline (1 ml/kg) from days 5 to 20 of pregnancy. The vehicle group received 1% Tween-80-saline from days 5 to 20 of pregnancy. Three, five and seven weeks after birth, the effects of maternal WIN consumption on infants' body weight, mortality, histological changes, motor functioning, and memory function were assessed. Findings Prenatal WIN consumption was associated with atrophy of cerebellum cortex in granular and Purkinje cells layers. WIN treatment of pregnant rats produced a significant decrease in the rearing frequency of the offspring, but significantly increased the grooming frequency at 22, 36 and 50 days of age. During the acquisition trials, approach latencies were not significantly different between all groups of rats (50 days old). When the trial was repeated 24 hours and seven days later (retention trial), the avoidance latencies of the WIN-exposed group were significantly shorter than those of the control and vehicle animals. The mortality percent was increased significantly and litter size was decreased significantly in WIN (1 mg/kg) treated rats compared to the control, vehicle and WIN (0.5 mg/kg) treatment groups. Conclusion These findings suggested that prenatal exposure to WIN probably induces long-term alterations in histological, motor functioning, and learning and memory parameters. PMID:24494131

  8. Benzophenanthridine alkaloid, piperonyl butoxide and (S)-methoprene action at the cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1-receptor) pathway of mouse brain: Interference with [(3)H]CP55940 and [(3)H]SR141716A binding and modification of WIN55212-2-dependent inhibition of synaptosomal l-glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Dhopeshwarkar, Amey Sadashiv; Nicholson, Russell Alfred

    2014-01-15

    Benzophenanthridine alkaloids (chelerythrine and sanguinarine) inhibited binding of [(3)H]SR141716A to mouse brain membranes (IC50s: <1µM). Piperonyl butoxide and (S)-methoprene were less potent (IC50s: 21 and 63µM respectively). Benzophenanthridines and piperonyl butoxide were more selective towards brain CB1 receptors versus spleen CB2 receptors. All compounds reduced Bmax of [(3)H]SR141716A binding to CB1 receptors, but only methoprene and piperonyl butoxide increased Kd (3-5-fold). Benzophenanthridines increased the Kd of [(3)H]CP55940 binding (6-fold), but did not alter Bmax. (S)-methoprene increased the Kd of [(3)H]CP55940 binding (by almost 4-fold) and reduced Bmax by 60%. Piperonyl butoxide lowered the Bmax of [(3)H]CP55940 binding by 50%, but did not influence Kd. All compounds reduced [(3)H]SR141716A and [(3)H]CP55940 association with CB1 receptors. Combined with a saturating concentration of SR141716A, only piperonyl butoxide and (S)-methoprene increased dissociation of [(3)H]SR141716A above that of SR141716A alone. Only piperonyl butoxide increased dissociation of [(3)H]CP55940 to a level greater than CP55940 alone. Binding results indicate predominantly allosteric components to the study compounds action. 4-Aminopyridine-(4-AP-) evoked release of l-glutamate from synaptosomes was partially inhibited by WIN55212-2, an effect completely neutralized by AM251, (S)-methoprene and piperonyl butoxide. With WIN55212-2 present, benzophenanthridines enhanced 4-AP-evoked l-glutamate release above 4-AP alone. Modulatory patterns of l-glutamate release (with WIN-55212-2 present) align with previous antagonist/inverse agonist profiling based on [(35)S]GTPγS binding. Although these compounds exhibit lower potencies compared to many classical CB1 receptor inhibitors, they may have potential to modify CB1-receptor-dependent behavioral/physiological outcomes in the whole animal.

  9. Effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist and antagonist ligands on production of inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 in endotoxemic mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, S R; Terminelli, C; Denhardt, G

    2000-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that mice primed with Corynebacterium parvum produce higher levels of inflammatory cytokines than unprimed mice upon challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Herein, we describe experiments in which two cannabinoid (CB) agonists, WIN 55212-2 [(R)-(+)-[2, 3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]1, 4-benzoxazin-6-yl](1-naphthyl)methanone) and HU-210 [(-)-11-hydroxy-delta(8) tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethylheptyl], were examined for their effects on LPS-induced cytokines in C. parvum-primed and unprimed mice. These agonists have been reported to bind selectively to the CB2 and CB1 receptor subtypes, respectively. WIN 55212-2 (3.1-50 mg/kg i.p.) and HU-210 (0.05-0.4 mg/kg i.p.) decreased serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-12 (IL-12) and increased IL-10 when administered to mice before LPS. The drugs also protected C. parvum mice (but not unprimed mice) against the lethal effects of LPS. The protection afforded to C. parvum mice could not be attributed to the higher levels of IL-10 present in these mice after agonist treatment. The WIN 55212-2- and HU-210-mediated changes in the responsiveness of mice to LPS were antagonized by SR141716A [N-(piperdin-1-yl)-5-(4-chloropheny)-1-(2, 4-dichloropheny)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide hydrochloride], a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, but not by SR144528 [N-[(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo[2.2. 1]heptan-2-yl]5-(4-choro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)p yrazole-3 -carboxamide], a selective antagonist at the CB2 receptor. Therefore, both CB agonists modulated LPS responses through the CB1 receptor. Surprisingly, SR141716A itself modulated cytokine responses in a manner identical with that of WIN 55212-2 and HU-210 when administered alone to mice. The agonist-like effects of SR141716A, which were more striking in unprimed than in primed mice, suggested that the antagonist also could function as a partial agonist at the CB1 receptor. Our findings indicate a role

  10. Characterization of cannabinoid agonists and apparent pA2 analysis of cannabinoid antagonists in rhesus monkeys discriminating Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Lance R

    2006-12-01

    Cannabinoid CB(1) receptors are hypothesized to mediate the discriminative stimulus effects of cannabinoids. This study characterized a Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC; 0.1 mg/kg i.v.) discriminative stimulus and examined antagonism of cannabinoid agonists in rhesus monkeys. High levels of responding on the Delta(9)-THC lever were produced by cannabinoid agonists with the following rank order potency: CP 55940 [(-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexanol] > Delta(9)-THC = WIN 55212-2 [(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl)methanone mesylate salt] > arachidonylcyclopropylamide = (R)-methanandamide. A CB(2)-selective agonist, AM 1241 [(R)-3-(2-iodo-5-nitrobenzoyl)-1-(1-methyl-2-piperidinylmethyl)-1H-indole], and noncannabinoids (cocaine, ketamine, midazolam, and morphine) did not produce high levels of Delta(9)-THC lever responding. The CB(1)-selective antagonist SR 141716A [N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] surmountably antagonized the discriminative stimulus effects of Delta(9)-THC and CP 55940, and Schild analysis was consistent with a simple, competitive interaction (apparent pA(2) values were 6.1 and 6.7, respectively). SR 141716A surmountably antagonized WIN 55212-2; however, larger doses disrupted responding, precluding Schild analysis. The CB(1)-selective antagonist AM 251 surmountably antagonized Delta(9)-THC, CP 55940, and WIN 55212-2, and Schild analysis was consistent with a simple, competitive interaction (apparent pA(2) values were 6.3, 6.1, and 6.2, respectively). The CB(2)-selective antagonist SR 144528 [N-[(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo(2.2.1)heptan-2-yl]5-(4-chloro-3-methyl-phenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrazole-3-carboxamide] did not modify the Delta(9)-THC discriminative stimulus. These results demonstrate that the discriminative stimulus effects of Delta(9)-THC are

  11. Chronic Cannabinoid Administration in Vivo Compromises Extinction of Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Mao, Sheng-Chun; Chen, Po-See; Gean, Po-Wu

    2008-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are critically involved in the extinction of fear memory. Here we examined the effects of repeated cannabinoid administration on the extinction of fear memory in rats and on inhibitory synaptic transmission in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) slices. Rats were treated with the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN 10 mg/kg, i.p.)…

  12. Induction of proteinuria by cannabinoid receptors 1 signaling activation in CB1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Shih, Ya-Hsueh; Ho, Cheng; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2015-02-01

    Proteinuria is not only a sign of kidney damage but is also involved in the progression of renal disease as an independent pathologic factor. Although patients with mutated type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1) polymorphism are associated with renal microvascular damage, the biologic role of CB1 signaling in proteinuria remains uncharacterized till now. Herein, we investigate whether CB1 participates in glomerular proteinuria in CB1 transgenic mice and treatment with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 rat, neither of which are diabetic models. The CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher kidney weight and urinary protein concentrations but not blood glucose levels compared with the wild-type group. A combination of laser-capture microsdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunohistochemical validation revealed that CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in renal glomeruli than that of the wild-type group. Geneticorpharmacological activation of CB1 by transgenic CB1 mice or treatment with WIN55212-2 reduced nephrin expression in the renal glomeruli compared with that of the wild-type group in the glomerular mesanglium. Taken together, CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 induced proteinuria with upregulation of CB1 resulting in impaired nephrin expression, by inducing excess VEGF reaction in the renal glomeruli. Genetic and pharmacological manipulation of CB1 signaling revealed VEGF-dependent nephrin depression of glomerulopathy. Controlling CB1 activity can be used an alternative strategy for sustaining renal function in the presence of CB1 activation.

  13. Functional activity of the cannabinoid 1 receptor is not affected by opioid antagonists in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background WIN55212-2 is a synthetic cannabinoid agonist and selective to cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors, which are distributed mainly in the central nervous system. Opioid receptors and CB1 receptors have several similarities in terms of their intracellular signal transduction mechanisms, distributions, and pharmacological action. Several studies have therefore sought to describe the functional interactions between opioids and cannabinoids at the cellular and behavioral levels. The present study investigated agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding by WIN55212-2 in rat brain membranes and determined the antagonism by selective opioid antagonists at the level of receptor-ligand interaction and intracellular signal transduction. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (male, n = 20) were euthanized for the preparation of brain membranes. In agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding by WIN55212-2, the values of EC50 and maximum stimulation (% over basal) were determined in the absence or presence of the µ, κ and δ opioid receptor antagonists naloxone (20 nM), norbinaltorphimine (3 nM), and naltrindole (3 nM), respectively. Ke values for opioid antagonist inhibition in the absence or presence of each opioid receptor antagonist were calculated using the following equation: [nanomolar antagonist] / (dose ratio of EC50 - 1). Results In WIN55212-2-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in the rat brain membranes, the values of EC50 and maximum stimulation (% over basal) were 154 ± 39.5 nM and 27.6 ± 5.3% over basal, respectively. Addition of selective opioid antagonists did not produce a significant rightward shift in the WIN55212-2 concentration-response curve, and Ke values were not applicable. Conclusions Our results suggest that the functional activity of WIN55212-2-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding was not affected by opioid antagonists in the rat brain membranes. Although the exact mechanism remains unclear, our results may partially elucidate their actions. PMID:23560193

  14. The combined inhibitory effect of the adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors on cAMP accumulation in the hippocampus is additive and independent of A1 receptor desensitization.

    PubMed

    Serpa, André; Correia, Sara; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M; Cascalheira, José F

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors are highly expressed in hippocampus where they trigger similar transduction pathways. We investigated how the combined acute activation of A1 and CB1 receptors modulates cAMP accumulation in rat hippocampal slices. The CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 (0.3-30 μM) decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation with an EC50 of 6.6±2.7 μM and an Emax of 31%±2%, whereas for the A1 agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10-150 nM), an EC50 of 35±19 nM, and an Emax of 29%±5 were obtained. The combined inhibitory effect of WIN55212-2 (30 μM) and CPA (100 nM) on cAMP accumulation was 41%±6% (n=4), which did not differ (P>0.7) from the sum of the individual effects of each agonist (43%±8%) but was different (P<0.05) from the effects of CPA or WIN55212-2 alone. Preincubation with CPA (100 nM) for 95 min caused desensitization of adenosine A1 activity, which did not modify the effect of WIN55212-2 (30 μM) on cAMP accumulation. In conclusion, the combined effect of CB1 and A1 receptors on cAMP formation is additive and CB1 receptor activity is not affected by short-term A1 receptor desensitization.

  15. Functional responses to the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 in neonatal rats of both genders: influence of weaning.

    PubMed

    Borcel, Erika; Pérez-Alvarez, Laura; de Ceballos, María L; Ramirez, Belén G; Marco, Eva Maria; Fernández, Beatriz; Rubio, Marina; Guaza, Carmen; Viveros, Ma-Paz

    2004-07-01

    We have studied behavioural, biochemical and endocrine responses to the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) in neonatal rats, as well as the effects of weaning on such responses. We used preweanling rats (20 days of age), 25-day-old weaned rats (weaning at Day 22) and 25-day-old nonweaned rats of both sexes. The behavioural effects of WIN were assessed in the nociceptive tail immersion test and in the open field. We also analysed the effect of weaning on corticosterone responses to WIN (radioimmunoassay) as well as on WIN-stimulated [35S] GTPgammaS binding in periaqueductal grey (PAG) and striatum. The cannabinoid agonist induced a modest increase in pain thresholds, whereas the effect of the drug on open-field activity, particularly on vertical activity, was much more marked. The weaning process appeared to reduce the baseline nociceptive latencies of the female rats. No significant effect of weaning on the behavioural responses to WIN was found. However, the group of weaned females (but not males) showed a significantly reduced WIN-stimulated [35S] GTPgammaS binding in the striatum. The cannabinoid agonist significantly increased the corticosterone levels of 25-day-old rats with the effect being more marked in weaned than in nonweaned animals. The results suggest that the weaning process might produce some sexually dimorphic developmental changes in CB1 receptor function.

  16. Cannabinergic aminoalkylindoles, including AM678=JWH018 found in 'Spice', examined using drug (Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) discrimination for rats.

    PubMed

    Järbe, Torbjörn U C; Deng, Hongfen; Vadivel, Subramanian K; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2011-09-01

    We examined four different cannabinergic aminoalkylindole ligands, including one drug (AM678=JWH018) found in herbal 'Spice' concoctions, for their ability to substitute for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and the ability of the cannabinoid receptor 1-selective antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant to block the substitution, 30 and 90 min after intraperitoneal injection. Rats trained to discriminate the effects of vehicle from those produced by 3 mg/kg of THC were used. The order of potency was: AM5983≥AM678>AM2233>WIN55212-2 at both test intervals. AM5983 and AM678 appeared eight times more potent than THC, followed by AM2233 (about twice as potent as THC), and WIN55212-2 approximately THC at the 30-min test interval. The aminoalkylindoles showed reduced potency (i.e. an increased ED50 value) at the longer injection-to-test interval of 90 min compared with testing at 30 min. The rightward shifts by coadministration of rimonabant were approximately 8-fold to 12-fold for AM5983 and AM678, compared with an approximately 3-fold rightward shift for the WIN55212-2 curve. AM2233 (1.8 mg/kg) substitution was also blocked by 1 mg/kg of rimonabant. In conclusion, AM5983 and AM678=JWH018 are potent cannabimimetics derived from an aminoalkylindole template. WIN55212-2 seemed to interact differently with rimonabant, compared with either AM5983 or AM678, indicating potential differences in the mechanism(s) of action among cannabinergic aminoalkylindoles.

  17. Enhancement of Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla Neuronal Nitric-Oxide Synthase–Nitric-Oxide Signaling Mediates the Central Cannabinoid Receptor 1-Evoked Pressor Response in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Our recent studies implicated brainstem GABAergic signaling in the central cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R)-mediated pressor response in conscious rats. Given the well established link between neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling and GABAergic transmission in brainstem cardiovascular regulating areas, we elucidated the role of nNOS-generated NO in the central CB1R-elicited pressor response. Compared with vehicle, intracisternal (i.c.) microinjection of the CB1R agonist (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl) methanone mesylate (WIN55212-2) (15 μg/rat) significantly enhanced nNOS phosphorylation as well as the total nitrate and nitrite content in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) at 5, 10, and 30 min, which paralleled the elicited pressor response. These findings were corroborated by: 1) the parallel dose-related increases in blood pressure and RVLM-NO levels, measured in real time by in vivo electrochemistry, elicited by intra-RVLM WIN55212-2 (100, 200, or 300 pmol /80 nl; n = 5) in conscious rats; and 2) the significantly higher phosphorylated nNOS (p-nNOS) levels in the WIN55212-2-injected RVLM compared with the contralateral RVLM. Subsequent neurochemical studies showed that WIN55212-2 (15 μg/rat i.c.) significantly increased the number and percentage of neurons immunostained for nNOS (nitroxidergic neurons) and c-Fos (marker of neuronal activity) within the RVLM. The increases in blood pressure and the neurochemical responses elicited by intracisternal WIN55212-2 were attenuated by prior central CB1R blockade by N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 30 μg/rat i.c.) or selective nNOS inhibition by Nω-propyl-L-arginine (1 μg/rat i.c.). These findings implicate RVLM p-nNOS/NO signaling as a molecular mechanism in the central CB1R-evoked pressor effect in conscious rats. PMID:22366659

  18. Cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 inhibits rat cortical dialysate gamma-aminobutyric acid levels.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, L; Tomasini, M C; Cassano, T; Bebe, B W; Siniscalchi, A; O'Connor, W T; Magee, P; Tanganelli, S; Cuomo, V; Antonelli, T

    2001-10-15

    The effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 (0.1-5 mg/kg i.p.) on endogenous extracellular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in the cerebral cortex of the awake rat was investigated by using microdialysis. WIN 55,212-2 (1 and 5 mg/kg i.p.) was associated with a concentration-dependent decrease in dialysate GABA levels (-16% +/- 4% and -26% +/- 4% of basal values, respectively). The WIN 55,212-2 (5 mg/kg i.p.) induced-inhibition was counteracted by a dose (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) of the CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716A, which by itself was without effect on cortical GABA levels. These findings suggest that cannabinoids decrease cortical GABA levels in vivo, an action that might underlie some of the cognitive and behavioral effects of acute exposure to marijuana.

  19. Neuroprotection by the cannabinoid agonist WIN-55212 in an in vivo newborn rat model of acute severe asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Orgado, José; Fernández-Frutos, Beatriz; González, Rita; Romero, Eva; Urigüen, Leire; Romero, Julián; Viveros, M Paz

    2003-06-10

    This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of the cannabinoid agonist WIN-55212 after inducing acute severe asphyxia in newborn rats. The left common carotid artery was ligated in anaesthetised 7-day-old Wistar rats, which were then asphyxiated by inhaling 100% nitrogen for 10 min. Pups recovering from asphyxia were s.c. administered vehicle (n=23), WIN-55212 (0.1 mg/kg, n=18), or WIN-55212 plus the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 (3 mg/kg, n=10). Pups undergoing a sham operation served as controls (n=12). Coronal sections of the brain were obtained on the 14th day after surgery and observed under light microscope after Nissl or Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) staining, to respectively quantify surviving or degenerating neurones in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and parietal cortex. Acute asphyxia led to early neurone loss amounting to 19% in the hippocampus and 29% in the cortex (both ANOVA P<0.05 vs. control). Delayed neurone loss occurred in the proportions 13% in the hippocampus and 20% in the cortex (both ANOVA P<0.05 vs. control). Neuronal loss was fully prevented by WIN-55212 administration. Co-administration of SR141716 failed to modify the protective effect of WIN-55212 on early neuronal death, but abolished the WIN-55212-induced prevention of delayed neuronal death. We conclude that when administered after acute severe asphyxia in newborn rats, WIN-55212 shows a neuroprotective effect, reducing both early and delayed neurone loss. This effect is achieved through two parallel CB1-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

  20. The effect of spinally administered WIN 55,212-2, a cannabinoid agonist, on thermal pain sensitivity in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Jahanabadi, Samane; Hadian, Mohamad Reza; Shamsaee, Javad; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Abdollahi, Alireza; Dehpour, Ahmadreza; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a common complication of diabetes that leads to allodynia, impaired nerve conduction, and progressive sensory loss. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of a high-affinity cannabinoid receptors agonist, WIN 55,212-2, on thermal hyperalgesia, nerve conduction velocity and sciatic nerve histopathology in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced in rats using a single dose of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg IP). Results: Intrathecal (IT) administration of WIN55, 212-2 (1, 10, 100 µg/10 µl, IT), produced antinociceptive effects in the hot plate test and also improved nerve conduction velocity (100 µg/10 µl, IT) and sciatic nerve histology. Conclusion: These data show that cannabinoids have potent antinociceptive effects through direct actions in the spinal dorsal horn of nociceptive pathway. This suggests that intrathecally administered cannabinoids may offer hopeful strategies for the treatment of diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:27279983

  1. Differential Effects of the Cannabinoid Agonist WIN55,212-2 on Delay and Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Central cannabinoid-1 receptors (CB1R) play a role in the acquisition of delay eyeblink conditioning but not trace eyeblink conditioning in humans and animals. However, it is not clear why trace conditioning is immune to the effects of cannabinoid receptor compounds. The current study examined the effects of variants of delay and trace conditioning procedures to elucidate the factors that determine the effects of CB1R agonists on eyeblink conditioning. In Experiment 1 rats were administered the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 during delay, long delay, or trace conditioning. Rats were impaired during delay and long delay but not trace conditioning; the impairment was greater for long delay than delay conditioning. Trace conditioning was further examined in Experiment 2 by manipulating the trace interval and keeping constant the conditioned stimulus (CS) duration. It was found that when the trace interval was 300 ms or less WIN55,212-2 administration impaired the rate of learning. Experiment 3 tested whether the trace interval duration or the relative durations of the CS and trace interval were critical parameters influencing the effects of WIN55,212-2 on eyeblink conditioning. Rats were not impaired with a 100 ms CS, 200 ms trace paradigm but were impaired with a 1000 ms CS, 500 ms trace paradigm, indicating that the duration of the trace interval does not matter but the proportion of the interstimulus interval occupied by the CS relative to the trace period is critical. Taken together the results indicate that cannabinoid agonists affect cerebellar learning the CS is longer than the trace interval. PMID:24128358

  2. Enhanced self-administration of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 in olfactory bulbectomized rats: evaluation of possible serotonergic and dopaminergic underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Amchova, Petra; Kucerova, Jana; Giugliano, Valentina; Babinska, Zuzana; Zanda, Mary T.; Scherma, Maria; Dusek, Ladislav; Fadda, Paola; Micale, Vincenzo; Sulcova, Alexandra; Fratta, Walter; Fattore, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Depression has been associated with drug consumption, including heavy or problematic cannabis use. According to an animal model of depression and substance use disorder comorbidity, we combined the olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) model of depression with intravenous drug self-administration procedure to verify whether depressive-like rats displayed altered voluntary intake of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN, 12.5 μg/kg/infusion). To this aim, olfactory-bulbectomized (OBX) and sham-operated (SHAM) Lister Hooded rats were allowed to self-administer WIN by lever-pressing under a continuous [fixed ratio 1 (FR-1)] schedule of reinforcement in 2 h daily sessions. Data showed that both OBX and SHAM rats developed stable WIN intake; yet, responses in OBX were constantly higher than in SHAM rats soon after the first week of training. In addition, OBX rats took significantly longer to extinguish the drug-seeking behavior after vehicle substitution. Acute pre-treatment with serotonin 5HT1B receptor agonist, CGS-12066B (2.5–10 mg/kg), did not significantly modify WIN intake in OBX and SHAM Lister Hooded rats. Furthermore, acute pre-treatment with CGS-12066B (10 and 15 mg/kg) did not alter responses in parallel groups of OBX and SHAM Sprague Dawley rats self-administering methamphetamine under higher (FR-2) reinforcement schedule with nose-poking as operandum. Finally, dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of OBX rats did not increase in response to a WIN challenge, as in SHAM rats, indicating a dopaminergic dysfunction in bulbectomized rats. Altogether, our findings suggest that a depressive-like state may alter cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist-induced brain reward function and that a dopaminergic rather than a 5-HT1B mechanism is likely to underlie enhanced WIN self-administration in OBX rats. PMID:24688470

  3. Chronic cannabinoid agonist (WIN 55,212-2) exposure alters hippocampal dentate gyrus spine density in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Candelaria-Cook, Felicha Teresa; Hamilton, Derek Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Chronic abuse of drugs can result in vast negative repercussions on behavioral and biological systems by altering underlying neurocircuitry. Long-term cannabinoid administration in rats leads to detrimental cellular and dendritic morphology changes. Previous studies have found that chronic treatment with delta-9-THC selectively decreases dendritic morphology and spine density in the dentate gyrus of young rats (Rubino et al., 2009), however, whether these changes are specific to a particular developmental age is not known. The present study evaluated the effects of chronic exposure (7 or 21 days) to WIN 55, 212-2 (i.p., 3.7 mg/kg), a potent cannabinoid agonist, on dendritic morphology of dentate gyrus neurons in adult rats. Upon completion of treatment brains were processed for Golgi-Cox staining. No significant effects of WIN 55, 212-2 exposure were observed for dendritic branching or length. Spine density was quantified in the inner (proximal), middle, and outer (distal) thirds of the dendritic fields selected to approximate the spatial loci of afferents comprising the associational-commissural pathway, medial perforant path, and lateral perforant path, respectively. Compared to vehicle controls there was a significant reduction in spine density (~1 spine/10μm) in the inner and middle dendritic segments. The spine density reduction was significant in inner segments following 7 days of treatment. These results suggest that chronic cannabinoid treatment specifically alters spine density in the dendritic targets of the associational-commissural afferents and medial perforant path projections, but not lateral perforant path. The resulting loss of dendritic spine density may be an important factor underlying cannabinoid induced memory impairments. PMID:24183783

  4. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor stimulation and blockade on food consumption and body weight in rats treated with a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2

    PubMed Central

    Radziszewska, Elżbieta; Bojanowska, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and endocannabinoids are involved in appetite control. Recently we have demonstrated that cannabinoid (CB)1 receptor antagonist and GLP-1 receptor agonist synergistically suppress food intake in the rat. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of GLP-1 receptor stimulation or blockade on feeding behavior in rats treated with WIN 55,212-2, a CB1 receptor agonist. Material/Methods Experiments were performed on adult male Wistar rats. In the first experiment the effects of increasing doses (0.5–4.0 mg/kg) of WIN 55,212-2 injected intraperitoneally on 24-hour food consumption were tested. In further experiments a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, exendin (9-39), and WIN 55,212-2 or a GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4, and WIN 55,212-2 were injected intraperitoneally at subthreshold doses (that alone did not change food intake and body weight) to investigate whether these agents may interact to affect food intake in rats. Results WIN 55,212-2 administered at low doses (0.5–2 mg/kg) did not markedly change 24-hour food consumption; however, at the highest dose, daily food intake was inhibited. Combined administration of WIN 55,212-2 and exendin (9-39) did not change the amount of food consumed compared to either the control group or to each agent injected alone. Combined injection of WIN 55,212-2 and exendin-4 at subthreshold doses resulted in a significant decrease in food intake and body weight in rats. Conclusions Stimulation of the peripheral CB1 receptor by its agonist WIN 55,212-2 can induce anorexigenic effects or potentiate, even at a subthreshold dose, the effects of exendin-4, a known anorectic agent. Hence, this dual action of the cannabinoid system should be considered in the medical use of CB1 agonists. PMID:23291632

  5. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 regulates glutamate transmission in rat cerebral cortex: an in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, L; Tomasini, M C; Gessa, G L; Bebe, B W; Tanganelli, S; Antonelli, T

    2001-08-01

    The effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 on endogenous extracellular glutamate levels in the prefrontal cortex of the awake rat and in primary cultures of rat cerebral cortex neurons were investigated. In the prefrontal cortex WIN 55,212-2 (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p.) increased dialysate glutamate levels from of the awake rat, while the lower (0.01 mg/kg) and the higher (2 mg/kg) doses were ineffective. Furthermore, the WIN 55,212-2 (0.1 mg/kg)- induced increase of dialysate glutamate levels was counteracted by pretreatment with the selective CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716A (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) and by the local perfusion with a low-calcium Ringer solution (Ca(2+) 0.2 mM). In primary cultures of rat cerebral cortex neurons, WIN 55,212-2 (0.01--100 nM) increased extracellular glutamate levels, displaying a bell-shaped concentration-response curve. The facilitatory effect of WIN 55,212-2 (1 nM) was fully counteracted by SR141716A (10 nM), by the replacement of the normal Krebs Ringer-bicarbonate buffer with a low Ca(2+) medium (0.2 mM) and by the IP(3) receptor antagonist xestospongin C (1 microM). These in vivo and in vitro findings suggest an increase in cortical glutamatergic transmission by CB(1) receptors, an effect that may underlie some of the psychoactive and behavioural actions of acute exposure to marijuana.

  6. Characterization of two cloned human CB1 cannabinoid receptor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi-Carmona, M; Calandra, B; Shire, D; Bouaboula, M; Oustric, D; Barth, F; Casellas, P; Ferrara, P; Le Fur, G

    1996-08-01

    We have investigated the pharmacology of two central human cannabinoid receptor isoforms, designated CB1 and CB1A, stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, designated as CHO-CB1 and CHO-CB1A, respectively. In direct binding assays on isolated membranes the agonist [3H]CP 55,940 bound in a saturable and highly specific manner to both cannabinoid receptor isoforms. Competition binding experiments performed with other commonly used receptor agonists showed the following rank order of potency: CP 55,940 > tetrahydrocannabinol > WIN 55212-2 > anandamide. Except for the endogenous ligand anandamide (CB1, Ki = 359.6 nM vs. CB1A, Ki = 298 nM), these agonists bound to CB1A (CP 55,940, WIN 55212-2 and delta 9-THC, Ki = 7.24,345 and 26.7 nM, respectively) with about 3-fold less affinity than to CB1 (CP 55,940, WIN 55212-2 and delta 9-THC, Ki = 2.26, 93 and 7.1 nM, respectively). The cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716A also bound to CB1A (Ki = 43.3 nM) with slightly less affinity than to CB1 (Ki = 4.9 nM). Cannabinoid receptor-linked second messenger system studies performed in the CHO-CB1 and CHO-CB1A cells showed that both receptors mediated their action through the agonist-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. This activity was totally blocked by pretreatment with PTX. Additionally, both isoforms activated mitogen-activated protein kinase. The selective antagonist SR 141716A was able to selectively block these responses in both cell lines, to an extent that reflected its binding characteristics. Our results show that the amino-truncated and -modified CB1 isoform CB1A exhibits all the properties of CB1 to a slightly attenuated extent.

  7. Modulation of cytokine responses in Corynebacterium parvum-primed endotoxemic mice by centrally administered cannabinoid ligands.

    PubMed

    Smith, S R; Terminelli, C; Denhardt, G

    2001-08-01

    The cannabinoid receptor agonists [(-)-11-hydoxy-Delta(8)tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethylheptyl] (HU-210) and [(R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)methyl[pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl](1-naphthalenyl) methanone] (WIN 55212-2) were previously shown to downregulate inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-12) and to upregulate antiinflammatory interleukin-10 when administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) to mice before an endotoxin challenge. Cytokine modulation coincided with the onset of behavioral changes that are associated with cannabinoid agonist activated central cannabinoid CB(1) receptors. Both effects were antagonized by [N-(piperdin-1-yl)-5-(4-chloropheny)-1-(2,4-dichloropheny)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide hydrochloride] (SR141716A) a selective cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist. In the present study, we have investigated further the apparent role of central CB(1) cannabinoid receptors in cytokine modulation by HU-210 and WIN 55212-2. When administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), the drugs modulated cytokine responses at doses that were threefold to fourfold lower than those found effective by the i.p. route. SR141716A blocked cytokine modulation when coadministered centrally with the agonists, while a selective cannabinoid CB(2) receptor antagonist, (N-[(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-yl]5-(4-choro-3 methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrazole-3-carboxamide) (SR144528) had no effect. Surprisingly, SR144528 was found to modulate cytokines itself when injected i.c.v. PMID:11672577

  8. The non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 attenuates responses of C-fiber nociceptors in a murine model of cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Uhelski, Megan L.; Cain, David M.; Harding-Rose, Catherine; Simone, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Pain from cancer can be severe, difficult to treat, and greatly diminishes patients’ quality of life. It is therefore important to gain new information on the mechanisms of cancer pain and develop new treatment strategies. We have used a murine model of bone cancer pain to investigate underlying peripheral neural mechanisms and novel treatment approaches. In this model, implantation of fibrosarcoma cells into and around the calcaneous bone produces mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice. C-fiber nociceptors in tumor-bearing mice develop spontaneous ongoing activity and sensitization to thermal stimuli. However, it is unclear whether sensitization of nociceptors to mechanical stimuli underlies the mechanical hyperalgesia seen in tumor-bearing mice. We therefore examined responses of C-fiber nociceptors to suprathreshold mechanical stimuli in tumor-bearing mice and found they did not differ from those of C-nociceptors in control mice. Thus, sensitization of C-fiber nociceptors to mechanical stimulation does not appear to underlie tumor-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia in this murine model of bone cancer pain. We also examined the effect of the non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55, 212-2, on spontaneous activity and responses evoked by mechanical stimuli of C-fiber nociceptors innervating the tumor-bearing paw. Selective CB1 and CB2 antagonists were administered to determine the contribution of each receptor subtype to the effects of WIN 55,212-2. Intraplantar administration of WIN 55,212-2 attenuated spontaneous discharge and responses evoked by mechanical stimulation of C-fiber nociceptors. These effects were inhibited by prior intraplantar administration of selective CB1 (AM281) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists but not by vehicle. These results indicate that activation of either CB1 or CB2 receptors reduced the spontaneous activity of C-fiber nociceptors associated with tumor growth as well as their evoked responses. Our results provide

  9. Mitigation win-win

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Dominic; Lucas, Amanda; Barnes, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Win-win messages regarding climate change mitigation policies in agriculture tend to oversimplify farmer motivation. Contributions from psychology, cultural evolution and behavioural economics should help to design more effective policy.

  10. Cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 and fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 may protect against cognitive impairment in rats of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion via PI3K/AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Su, Shao-Hua; Wang, Yue-Qing; Wu, Yi-Fang; Wang, Da-Peng; Lin, Qi; Hai, Jian

    2016-10-15

    The present study further investigated the protective effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597 (URB) on chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH)-induced cognitive impairment in rats. Spatial learning and memory were assessed with the Morris water maze and by measuring Long-term potentiation. The expression of microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP)-2, growth-associated protein-43 (GAP)-43, synaptophysin, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), FAAH, N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D(NAPE-PLD) and monoacyl glycerol lipase (MGL) as well as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathway molecules and downstream targets including AKT, phosphorylated (p-)AKT, cyclic AMP response element- binding protein (CREB), p-CREB, Bcl-2-associated death protein (BAD), p-BAD, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, p-GSK-3β, forkhead box protein (FOXO) 3A and p-FOXO3A was determined by western blotting. WIN and URB treatment improved learning and memory performance, effects that were abolished by co-administration of the PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002. Moreover, WIN and URB reversed the decreases in MAP-2 and synaptophysin expression resulting from CCH, and stimulated BDNF and CB1 expression as well as CREB, FOXO3A, GSK-3β, and BAD phosphorylation, confirming that WIN and URB mediate neuroprotection by preventing neuronal apoptosis and improving cognition via PI3K/AKT signaling. These findings suggest that WIN and URB are promising agents for therapeutic management of CCH. PMID:27424778

  11. WIN 55,212-2, Agonist of Cannabinoid Receptors, Prevents Amyloid β1-42 Effects on Astrocytes in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aldasoro, Martin; Iradi, Antonio; Obrador, Elena; Mauricio, Maria D.; Vila, Jose Mª; Marchio, Patricia; Valles, Soraya L.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer´s disease (AD), a neurodegenerative illness involving synaptic dysfunction with extracellular accumulation of Aβ1-42 toxic peptide, glial activation, inflammatory response and oxidative stress, can lead to neuronal death. Endogenous cannabinoid system is implicated in physiological and physiopathological events in central nervous system (CNS), and changes in this system are related to many human diseases, including AD. However, studies on the effects of cannabinoids on astrocytes functions are scarce. In primary cultured astrocytes we studied cellular viability using MTT assay. Inflammatory and oxidative stress mediators were determined by ELISA and Western-blot techniques both in the presence and absence of Aβ1-42 peptide. Effects of WIN 55,212-2 (a synthetic cannabinoid) on cell viability, inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress were also determined. Aβ1-42 diminished astrocytes viability, increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels and p-65, COX-2 and iNOS protein expression while decreased PPAR-γ and antioxidant enzyme Cu/Zn SOD. WIN 55,212-2 pretreatment prevents all effects elicited by Aβ1-42. Furthermore, cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 also increased cell viability and PPAR-γ expression in control astrocytes. In conclusion cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 increases cell viability and anti-inflammatory response in cultured astrocytes. Moreover, WIN 55,212-2 increases expression of anti-oxidant Cu/Zn SOD and is able to prevent inflammation induced by Aβ1-42 in cultured astrocytes. Further studies would be needed to assess the possible beneficial effects of cannabinoids in Alzheimer's disease patients. PMID:25874692

  12. What's so Hard about Win-Win?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluestein, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The win-win approach to solving conflicts, which has become popular in the business world, should be a natural for the school environment. Win-win thinking can foster a cooperative school climate by meeting educators' and students' needs for dignity, belonging, and respect. Yet win-win thinking faces a number of obstacles in schools, writes…

  13. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor signaling dichotomously modulates inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission in rat inner retina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Han; Wu, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Miao, Yanying; Zhang, Chuan-Qiang; Dong, Ling-Dan; Yang, Xiong-Li; Wang, Zhongfeng

    2016-01-01

    In the inner retina, ganglion cells (RGCs) integrate and process excitatory signal from bipolar cells (BCs) and inhibitory signal from amacrine cells (ACs). Using multiple labeling immunohistochemistry, we first revealed the expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) at the terminals of ACs and BCs in rat retina. By patch-clamp techniques, we then showed how the activation of this receptor dichotomously regulated miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), mediated by GABAA receptors and glycine receptors, and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), mediated by AMPA receptors, of RGCs in rat retinal slices. WIN55212-2 (WIN), a CB1R agonist, reduced the mIPSC frequency due to an inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels no matter whether AMPA receptors were blocked. In contrast, WIN reduced the mEPSC frequency by suppressing T-type Ca(2+) channels only when inhibitory inputs to RGCs were present, which could be in part due to less T-type Ca(2+) channels of cone BCs, presynaptic to RGCs, being in an inactivation state under such condition. This unique feature of CB1R-mediated retrograde regulation provides a novel mechanism for modulating excitatory synaptic transmission in the inner retina. Moreover, depolarization of RGCs suppressed mIPSCs of these cells, an effect that was eliminated by the CB1R antagonist SR141716, suggesting that endocannabinoid is indeed released from RGCs.

  14. Altered CB receptor-signaling in prefrontal cortex from an animal model of depression is reversed by chronic fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gaztelumendi, Antonio; Rojo, M Luisa; Pazos, Angel; Díaz, Alvaro

    2009-03-01

    Bilateral olfactory bulbectomy in the rat (OBX) induces behavioral, neurochemical, and structural abnormalities similar to those observed in human depression that are normalized after chronic, but not acute, treatment with antidepressants. In our study, OBX animals exhibited significant increases in both CB(1) receptor density ([(3)H]CP55490 binding) and functionality (stimulation of [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding by the cannabinoid (CB) agonist WIN 55212-2) at the prefrontal cortex (PFC). After chronic treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day, 14 days, s.c.), OBX-induced hyperactivity in the open-field test was fully abolished. Interestingly, chronic fluoxetine fully reversed the enhanced CB(1)-receptor signaling in PFC observed following OBX. The CB agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (5 mg/kg, i.p., 1 day) did not produce any behavioral effect in sham-operated animals but returned locomotor activity to control values in OBX rats. As both acute administration of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and chronic fluoxetine elicited a similar behavioral effect in the OBX rat, it is not unlikely that the regionally selective enhancement of CB(1) receptor-signaling in the PFC could be related with the altered OBX behavior. Our findings reinforce the utility of this animal model to further investigating the implication of the endocannabinoid system in the modulation of emotional processes and its potential role in the adaptive responses to chronic antidepressants.

  15. Small Wins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhatigan, James J.; Schuh, John H.

    2003-01-01

    Examines how it easy for people to overlook small successes when they are overwhelmed by and preoccupied with large projects and goals. Explores the concept of "small wins" in organizational theory, which have the potential to become a prominent part of institutional culture and impact organizational behavior and change. (GCP)

  16. Effect of interaction between acute administration of morphine and cannabinoid compounds on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents of magnocellular neurons of supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Yousefpour, Mitra; Naderi, Nima; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Opioids and cannabinoids are two important compounds that have been shown to influence the activity of magnocellular neurons (MCNs) of supraoptic nucleus (SON). The interaction between opioidergic and cannabinoidergic systems in various structures of the brain and spinal cord is now well established, but not in the MCNs of SON. Materials and methods: In this study, whole cell patch clamp recording of neurons in rat brain slice was used to investigate the effect of acute morphine and cannabinoid administration on spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory spostsynaptic currents (sIPSCs and sEPSCs) in MCNs. Results: Bath application of morphine produced an increase in sEPSCs frequency and a decrease in sIPSCs frequency. In contrast, bath application of URB597 (fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor) produced a decrease in sEPSCs frequency but an increase in sIPSCs frequency. WIN55212-2 (cannabinoid receptor agonist) decreased both sIPSCs and sEPSCs frequencies of MCNs. Co-application of morphine and URB597 attenuated the effect of morphine on MCNs. Conclusion: Taken together, these data indicated that at the cellular level, pharmacological augmentation of endocannabinoids could attenuate morphine effects on MCNs. PMID:27482350

  17. Retrograde release of endocannabinoids inhibits presynaptic GABA release to second-order baroreceptive neurons in NTS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Bonham, Ann C; Dean, Caron; Hopp, Francis A; Hillard, Cecilia J; Seagard, Jeanne L

    2010-12-01

    In prior studies, we found that activation of cannabinoid-1 receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) prolonged baroreflex-induced sympathoinhibition in rats. In many regions of the central nervous system, activation of cannabinoid-1 receptors presynaptically inhibits γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release, disinhibiting postsynaptic neurons. To determine if cannabinoid-1 receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition of GABA release occurs in the NTS, we recorded miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in anatomically identified second-order baroreceptive NTS neurons in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and tetrodotoxin. The cannabinoid-1 receptor agonists, WIN 55212-2 (0.3-30 μM) and methanandamide (3 μM) decreased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that was blocked by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist, N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 251, 5 μM). Importantly, depolarization of second-order baroreceptive neurons decreased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents; an effect which was blocked by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist. The data indicate that depolarization of second-order baroreceptive NTS neurons induces endocannabinoid release from the neurons, leading to activation of presynaptic cannabinoid-1 receptors, inhibition of GABA release and subsequent enhanced baroreflex signaling in the NTS. The data suggest that endocannabinoid signaling in the NTS regulates short-term synaptic plasticity and provide a mechanism for endocannabinoid modulation of central baroreflex control.

  18. Ethanol modulates facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in cerebellar Purkinje cells in vivo in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mao-Cheng; Bing, Yan-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Acute ethanol overdose can induce dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation and cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory synaptic responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in urethane-anesthetized mice, using in vivo patch-clamp recordings. Under voltage-clamp conditions, ethanol (300 mM) decreased the amplitude, half-width, rise time and decay time of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in PCs. The ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was dose-dependent, with an IC50 of 148.5 mM. Notably, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents were significantly abrogated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists, AM251 and O-2050, as well as by the CB1 agonist WIN55212-2. Moreover, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was prevented by cerebellar surface perfusion of the PKA inhibitors H-89 and Rp-cAMP, but not by intracellular administration of the PKA inhibitor PKI. Our present results indicate that ethanol inhibits the facial stimulation-evoked outward currents by activating presynaptic CB1 receptors via the PKA signaling pathway. These findings suggest that ethanol overdose impairs sensory information processing, at least in part, by inhibiting GABA release from molecular layer interneurons onto PCs. PMID:27489024

  19. Ethanol modulates facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in cerebellar Purkinje cells in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mao-Cheng; Bing, Yan-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Acute ethanol overdose can induce dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation and cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory synaptic responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in urethane-anesthetized mice, using in vivo patch-clamp recordings. Under voltage-clamp conditions, ethanol (300 mM) decreased the amplitude, half-width, rise time and decay time of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in PCs. The ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was dose-dependent, with an IC50 of 148.5 mM. Notably, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents were significantly abrogated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists, AM251 and O-2050, as well as by the CB1 agonist WIN55212-2. Moreover, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was prevented by cerebellar surface perfusion of the PKA inhibitors H-89 and Rp-cAMP, but not by intracellular administration of the PKA inhibitor PKI. Our present results indicate that ethanol inhibits the facial stimulation-evoked outward currents by activating presynaptic CB1 receptors via the PKA signaling pathway. These findings suggest that ethanol overdose impairs sensory information processing, at least in part, by inhibiting GABA release from molecular layer interneurons onto PCs. PMID:27489024

  20. Winning Conditions?

    PubMed

    Green, Esther; Moody, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    The authors of the paper, "The Patient Experience in Ontario 2020: What is Possible?", framed both the current state as well as the future of what patient experience might look like in five years. To ensure intention is catalyzed into meaningful change to improve experience and outcomes, we suggest four winning conditions. The first is to change the language; patients are people too, irrespective of their disease or illness; person-centred is inclusive language and ought to be the focus. The second condition is focused on leaders who play a critical role to establish, build and embed person-centred within the organization. The third and fourth winning conditions are building the evidence base and using effective and meaningful engagement, moving beyond advice, to partnership, respectively. Person-centred care is not the flavour of the month, it is here to stay. Ontarians are important actors in the system not only as users of the system but owners as well. To those who might argue that it is costly to do this work, what are the costs to not engage? Are we satisfied not only as administrators, and clinicians, but as patients at some point, to maintain the status quo? PMID:26888319

  1. Novel Song-Stimulated Dendritic Spine Formation and Arc/Arg 3.1 Expression in Zebra Finch Auditory Telencephalon are Disrupted by Cannabinoid Agonism

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Marcoita T; Soderstrom, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids are well-established to alter processes of sensory perception; however neurophysiological mechanisms responsible remain unclear. Arc, an immediate-early gene (IEG) product involved in dendritic spine dynamics and necessary for plasticity changes such as long-term potentiation, is rapidly induced within zebra finch caudal medial nidopallium (NCM) following novel song exposure, a response that habituates after repeated stimuli. Arc appears unique in its rapid postsynaptic dendritic expression following excitatory input. Previously, we found that vocal development-altering cannabinoid treatments are associated with elevated dendritic spine densities in motor- (HVC) and learning-related (Area X) song regions of zebra finch telencephalon. Given Arc’s dendritic morphological role, we hypothesized that cannabinoid-altered spine densities may involve Arc-related signaling. To test this, we examined the ability of the cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN) to: (1) acutely disrupt song-induced Arc expression; (2) interfere with habituation to auditory stimuli and; (3) alter dendritic spine densities in auditory regions. We found that WIN (3 mg/kg) acutely reduced Arc expression within both NCM and Field L2 in an antagonist-reversible manner. WIN did not alter Arc expression in thalamic auditory relay Nucleus Ovoidalis (Ov), suggesting cannabinoid signaling selectively alters responses to auditory stimulation. Novel song stimulation rapidly increased dendritic spine densities within auditory telencephalon, an effect blocked by WIN pretreatments. Taken together, cannabinoid inhibition of both Arc induction and its habituation to repeated stimuli, combined with prevention of rapid increases in dendritic spine densities, implicates cannabinoid signaling in modulation of physiological processes important to auditory responsiveness and memory. PMID:24134952

  2. Epileptiform activity in the CA1 region of the hippocampus becomes refractory to attenuation by cannabinoids in part because of endogenous γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Messer, Ricka D; Levine, Eric S

    2012-07-01

    The anticonvulsant properties of marijuana have been known for centuries. The recently characterized endogenous cannabinoid system thus represents a promising target for novel anticonvulsant agents; however, administration of exogenous cannabinoids has shown mixed results in both human epilepsy and animal models. The ability of cannabinoids to attenuate release of both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters may explain the variable effects of cannabinoids in different models of epilepsy, but this has not been well explored. Using acute mouse brain slices, we monitored field potentials in the CA1 region of the hippocampus to characterize systematically the effects of the cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN) on evoked basal and epileptiform activity. WIN, acting presynaptically, significantly reduced the amplitude and slope of basal field excitatory postsynaptic potentials as well as stimulus-evoked epileptiform responses induced by omission of magnesium from the extracellular solution. In contrast, the combination of omission of magnesium plus elevation of potassium induced an epileptiform response that was refractory to attenuation by WIN. The effect of WIN in this model was partially restored by blocking γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B) ), but not GABA(A) , receptors. Subtle differences in models of epileptiform activity can profoundly alter the efficacy of cannabinoids. Endogenous GABA(B) receptor activation played a role in the decreased cannabinoid sensitivity observed for epileptiform activity induced by omission of magnesium plus elevation of potassium. These results suggest that interplay between presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors with overlapping downstream targets may underlie the variable efficacy of cannabinoids in different models of epilepsy.

  3. Differential Effects of Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist on Social Discrimination and Contextual Fear in Amygdala and Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 5 [mu]g/side) microinjected into the hippocampus or the amygdala would differentially affect memory processes in a neutral vs. an aversive task. In the aversive contextual fear task, WIN into the basolateral amygdala impaired fear acquisition/consolidation, but not retrieval.…

  4. Cannabinoid-Induced Chemotaxis in Bovine Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murataeva, Natalia; Li, Shimin; Oehler, Olivia; Miller, Sally; Dhopeshwarkar, Amey; Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Bonanno, Joseph A.; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; McHugh, Douglas; Straiker, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors are found in abundance in the vertebrate eye, with most tissue types expressing this receptor. However, the function of CB1 receptors in corneal epithelial cells (CECs) is poorly understood. Interestingly, the corneas of CB1 knockout mice heal more slowly after injury via a mechanism proposed to involve protein kinase B (Akt) activation, chemokinesis, and cell proliferation. The current study examined the role of cannabinoids in CEC migration in greater detail. Methods. We determined the role of CB1 receptors in corneal healing. We examined the consequences of their activation on migration and proliferation in bovine CECs (bCECs). We additionally examined the mRNA profile of cannabinoid-related genes and CB1 protein expression as well as CB1 signaling in bovine CECs. Results. We now report that activation of CB1 with physiologically relevant concentrations of the synthetic agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN) induces bCEC migration via chemotaxis, an effect fully blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716. The endogenous agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) also enhances migration. Separately, mRNA for most cannabinoid-related proteins are present in bovine corneal epithelium and cultured bCECs. Notably absent are CB2 receptors and the 2-AG synthesizing enzyme diglycerol lipase-α (DAGLα). The signaling profile of CB1 activation is complex, with inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Lastly, CB1 activation does not induce bCEC proliferation, but may instead antagonize EGF-induced proliferation. Conclusions. In summary, we find that CB1-based signaling machinery is present in bovine cornea and that activation of this system induces chemotaxis. PMID:26024113

  5. Short- and long-term effects of cannabinoids on the extinction of contextual fear memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Pamplona, Fabrício A; Bitencourt, Rafael M; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2008-07-01

    Facilitation of memory extinction by manipulation of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system has been recently studied in several paradigms. Our previous results pointed to facilitation of contextual fear memory extinction by a low dose of a cannabinoid agonist, with a suggestion of short-term effects. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the effects of cannabinoid drugs in the short- and long-term extinction of conditioned fear using an extended extinction protocol. Male Wistar rats were placed in a conditioning chamber and after 3min received a footshock (1.5mA, 1s). On the next day, they received i.p. drug treatment (WIN55212-2 0.25mg/kg, AM404 10mg/kg, SR141716A 1mg/kg) and were re-exposed to the conditioning chamber for 30min (extinction training). No-Extinction groups received the same drug treatment, but were exposed for 3min to the conditioning chamber. A drug-free test of contextual memory (3min) was performed 7 days later. The cannabinoid agonist WI55212-2 and the inhibitor of eCB metabolism/uptake AM404 facilitated short-term extinction. In addition, long-term effects induced by treatments with WIN55212 and AM404 were completely divergent to those of SR141716A treatment. The present results confirm and extend previous findings showing that the eCB system modulates short-term fear memory extinction with long-lasting consequences.

  6. Acute hypertension reveals depressor and vasodilator effects of cannabinoids in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Ho, W-S Vanessa; Gardiner, Sheila M

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose The cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids can be influenced by anaesthesia and can differ in chronic hypertension, but the extent to which they are influenced by acute hypertension in conscious animals has not been determined. Experimental approach We examined cardiovascular responses to intravenous administration of anandamide and the synthetic cannabinoid, (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone (WIN55212-2), in conscious male Wistar rats made acutely hypertensive by infusion of angiotensin II (AII) and arginine vasopressin (AVP). Rats were chronically instrumented for measurement of arterial blood pressure and vascular conductances in the renal, mesenteric and hindquarters beds. Key results Anandamide dose-dependently decreased the mean arterial blood pressure of rats made hypertensive by AII-AVP infusion, but not normotensive rats. Interestingly, acute hypertension also revealed a hypotensive response to WIN55212-2, which caused hypertension in normotensive animals. The enhanced depressor effects of the cannabinoids in acute hypertension were associated with increased vasodilatation in hindquarters, renal and mesenteric vascular beds. Treatment with URB597, which inhibits anandamide degradation by fatty acid amide hydrolase, potentiated the depressor and mesenteric vasodilator responses to anandamide. Furthermore, haemodynamic responses to WIN55212-2, but not to anandamide, were attenuated by the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251 [N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophen yl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide]. Conclusions and implications These results broadly support the literature showing that the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids can be exaggerated in hypertension, but highlight the involvement of non-CB1 receptor-mediated mechanisms in the actions of anandamide. PMID:19133994

  7. TASK-3 knockout mice exhibit exaggerated nocturnal activity, impairments in cognitive functions, and reduced sensitivity to inhalation anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Linden, Anni-Maija; Sandu, Cristina; Aller, M Isabel; Vekovischeva, Olga Y; Rosenberg, Per H; Wisden, William; Korpi, Esa R

    2007-12-01

    The TASK-3 channel is an acid-sensitive two-pore-domain K+ channel, widely expressed in the brain and probably involved in regulating numerous neuronal populations. Here, we characterized the behavioral and pharmacological phenotypes of TASK-3 knockout (KO) mice. Circadian locomotor activity measurements revealed that the nocturnal activity of the TASK-3 KO mice was increased by 38% (P < 0.01) compared with wild-type littermate controls, light phase activity being similar. Although TASK-3 channels are abundant in cerebellar granule cells, the KO mice performed as well as the wild-type mice in walking on a rotating rod or along a 1.2-cm-diameter beam. However, they fell more frequently from a narrower 0.8-cm beam. The KO mice showed impaired working memory in the spontaneous alternation task, with the alternation percentage being 62 +/- 3% for the wild-type mice and 48 +/- 4% (P < 0.05) for the KO mice. Likewise, during training for the Morris water-maze spatial memory task, the KO mice were slower to find the hidden platform, and in the probe trial, the female KO mice visited fewer times the platform quadrant than the male KO and wild-type mice. In pharmacological tests, the TASK-3 KO mice showed reduced sensitivity to the inhalation anesthetic halothane and the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212-2 mesylate [(R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone mesylate] but unaltered responses to the alpha2 adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine, the i.v. anesthetic propofol, the opioid receptor agonist morphine, and the local anesthetic lidocaine. Overall, our results suggest important contributions of TASK-3 channels in the neuronal circuits regulating circadian rhythms, cognitive functions, and mediating specific pharmacological effects.

  8. Pharmacological characterization of emerging synthetic cannabinoids in HEK293T cells and hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Costain, Willard J; Tauskela, Joseph S; Rasquinha, Ingrid; Comas, Tanya; Hewitt, Melissa; Marleau, Vincent; Soo, Evelyn C

    2016-09-01

    There has been a worldwide proliferation of synthetic cannabinoids that have become marketed as legal alternatives to cannabis (marijuana). Unfortunately, there is a dearth of information about the pharmacological effects of many of these emerging synthetic cannabinoids (ESCs), which presents a challenge for regulatory authorities that need to take such scientific evidence into consideration in order to regulate ECSs as controlled substances. We aimed to characterize the pharmacological properties of ten ESCs using two cell based assays that enabled the determination of potency and efficacy relative to a panel of well-characterized cannabinoids. Agonist-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels was monitored in live HEK293T cells transfected with human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) and pGloSensor-22F. Pharmacological analysis of this data indicated that all of the ESCs tested were full agonists, with the following rank order of potency: Win 55212-2≈5F-PB-22≈AB-PINACA≈EAM-2201≈MAM-2201>JWH-250≈ PB-22>AKB48 N-(5FP)>AKB-48≈STS-135>XLR-11. Assessment of agonist-stimulated depression of Ca(2+) transients was also used to confirm the efficacy of five ESCs (XLR-11, JWH-250, AB-PINACA, 5F-PB-22, and MAM-2201) in cultured primary hippocampal neurons. This work aims to help inform decisions made by regulatory agencies concerned with the profusion of these poorly characterized recreational drugs. PMID:27260125

  9. TASK-3 knockout mice exhibit exaggerated nocturnal activity, impairments in cognitive functions, and reduced sensitivity to inhalation anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Linden, Anni-Maija; Sandu, Cristina; Aller, M Isabel; Vekovischeva, Olga Y; Rosenberg, Per H; Wisden, William; Korpi, Esa R

    2007-12-01

    The TASK-3 channel is an acid-sensitive two-pore-domain K+ channel, widely expressed in the brain and probably involved in regulating numerous neuronal populations. Here, we characterized the behavioral and pharmacological phenotypes of TASK-3 knockout (KO) mice. Circadian locomotor activity measurements revealed that the nocturnal activity of the TASK-3 KO mice was increased by 38% (P < 0.01) compared with wild-type littermate controls, light phase activity being similar. Although TASK-3 channels are abundant in cerebellar granule cells, the KO mice performed as well as the wild-type mice in walking on a rotating rod or along a 1.2-cm-diameter beam. However, they fell more frequently from a narrower 0.8-cm beam. The KO mice showed impaired working memory in the spontaneous alternation task, with the alternation percentage being 62 +/- 3% for the wild-type mice and 48 +/- 4% (P < 0.05) for the KO mice. Likewise, during training for the Morris water-maze spatial memory task, the KO mice were slower to find the hidden platform, and in the probe trial, the female KO mice visited fewer times the platform quadrant than the male KO and wild-type mice. In pharmacological tests, the TASK-3 KO mice showed reduced sensitivity to the inhalation anesthetic halothane and the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212-2 mesylate [(R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone mesylate] but unaltered responses to the alpha2 adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine, the i.v. anesthetic propofol, the opioid receptor agonist morphine, and the local anesthetic lidocaine. Overall, our results suggest important contributions of TASK-3 channels in the neuronal circuits regulating circadian rhythms, cognitive functions, and mediating specific pharmacological effects. PMID:17875609

  10. Prenatal exposure to the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 alters migration of early-born glutamatergic neurons and GABAergic interneurons in the rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Saez, Trinidad M M; Aronne, María P; Caltana, Laura; Brusco, Alicia H

    2014-05-01

    The endocannabinoid system, composed of cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoids, and synthesis and degradation enzymes, is present since early stages of brain development. During this period, the endocannabinoid system is involved in the regulation of neural progenitor proliferation and specification as well as the migration and differentiation of pyramidal neurons and interneurons. Marijuana consumption during pregnancy represents a serious risk in relation to the fetal brain development since Δ(9) -tetrahidrocannabinol, the main active compound of cannabis, can reach the fetus through placenta and hemato-encephalic barrier. Cohort studies performed on children and adolescents of mothers who consumed marijuana during pregnancy reported cognitive and comportamental abnormalities. In the present study, we examined the expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 R during corticogenesis in radially and tangentially migrating post-mitotic neurons. We found that prenatal exposure to WIN impaired tangential and radial migration of post-mitotic neurons in the dorsal pallium. In addition, we described alterations of two transcription factors associated with proliferating and newly post-mitotic glutamatergic cells in the dorsal pallium, Tbr1 and Tbr2, and disruption in the number of Cajal-Retzius cells. The present results contribute to the knowledge of neurobiological substrates that determine neuro-comportamental changes that will persist through post-natal life.

  11. Endocannabinoid modulation of hyperaemia evoked by physiologically relevant stimuli in the rat primary somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ho, W-SV; Patel, S; Thompson, JR; Roberts, CJ; Stuhr, KL; Hillard, CJ

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: In vitro studies demonstrate that cannabinoid CB1 receptors subserve activity-dependent suppression of inhibition in the neocortex. To examine this mechanism in vivo, we assessed the effects of local changes in CB1 receptor activity on somatosensory cortex neuronal activation by whisker movement in rats. Experimental approach: Laser Doppler flowmetry and c-Fos immunohistochemistry were used to measure changes in local blood flow and neuronal activation, respectively. All drugs were applied directly to the cranium above the whisker barrel fields of the primary somatosensory cortex. Key results: The CB1 receptor agonist WIN55212-2 potentiated the hyperaemia induced by whisker movement and this potentiation was occluded by bicuculline. The CB1 receptor antagonists, rimonabant and AM251, inhibited hyperaemic responses to whisker movement; indicating that activation of endogenous CB1 receptors increased during whisker movement. Whisker movement-induced expression of c-Fos protein in neurons of the whisker barrel cortex was inhibited by rimonabant. Movement of the whiskers increased the 2-arachidonoylglycerol content in the contralateral, compared to the ipsilateral, sensory cortex. Conclusions and implications: These results support the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signalling is recruited during physiologically relevant activation of the sensory cortex. These data support the hypothesis that the primary effect of CB1 receptor activation within the activated whisker barrel cortex is to inhibit GABA release, resulting in disinhibition of neuronal activation. These studies provide physiological data involving endocannabinoid signalling in activity-dependent regulation of neuronal activation and provide a mechanistic basis for the effects of cannabis use on sensory processing in humans. This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids. To view the editorial for this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00831.x PMID

  12. JWH-018 in rhesus monkeys: differential antagonism of discriminative stimulus, rate-decreasing, and hypothermic effects

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jesse S.; McMahon, Lance R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Several effects of the abused synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 were compared to those of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) in rhesus monkeys. JWH-018 (0.1 mg/kg i.v.) was established as a discriminative stimulus and rimonabant was used to examine mechanisms responsible for discrimination as well as operant response rate-decreasing and hypothermic effects. JWH-018 dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding (ED50 = 0.01 mg/kg) and decreased response rate (ED50 = 0.064 mg/kg). Among various cannabinoids, the relative potency for producing discriminative stimulus and rate-decreasing effects was the same: CP-55940 = JWH-018 > Δ9-THC = WIN-55212-2 = JWH-073. The benzodiazepine agonist midazolam and the NMDA antagonist ketamine did not exert JWH-018 like discriminative stimulus effects up to doses that disrupted responding. JWH-018 and 9-THC decreased rectal temperature by 2.2 and 2.8 °C, respectively; the doses decreasing temperature by 2 °C were 0.21 and 1.14 mg/kg, respectively. Antagonism did not differ between JWH-018 and 9-THC, but did differ among effects. The apparent affinities of rimonabant calculated in the presence of JWH-018 and Δ9-THC were not different from each other for antagonism of discriminative stimulus effects (6.58 and 6.59, respectively) or hypothermic effects (7.08 and 7.19, respectively). Apparent affinity estimates are consistent with the same receptors mediating the discriminative stimulus and hypothermic effects of both JWH-018 and Δ9-THC. However, there was more limited and less orderly antagonism of rate-decreasing effects, suggesting that an additional receptor mechanism is involved in mediating the effects of cannabinoid on response rate. Overall, these results strongly suggest that JWH-018 and Δ9-THC act at the same receptors to produce several of their shared psychopharmacological effects. PMID:24972243

  13. JWH-018 in rhesus monkeys: differential antagonism of discriminative stimulus, rate-decreasing, and hypothermic effects.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jesse S; McMahon, Lance R

    2014-10-01

    Several effects of the abused synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 were compared to those of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) in rhesus monkeys. JWH-018 (0.1 mg/kg i.v.) was established as a discriminative stimulus and rimonabant was used to examine mechanisms responsible for discrimination as well as operant response rate-decreasing and hypothermic effects. JWH-018 dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding (ED50=0.01 mg/kg) and decreased response rate (ED50=0.064 mg/kg). Among various cannabinoids, the relative potency for producing discriminative stimulus and rate-decreasing effects was the same: CP-55940=JWH-018>Δ9-THC=WIN-55212-2=JWH-073. The benzodiazepine agonist midazolam and the NMDA antagonist ketamine did not exert JWH-018 like discriminative stimulus effects up to doses that disrupted responding. JWH-018 and Δ9-THC decreased rectal temperature by 2.2 and 2.8°C, respectively; the doses decreasing temperature by 2°C were 0.21 and 1.14 mg/kg, respectively. Antagonism did not differ between JWH-018 and Δ9-THC, but did differ among effects. The apparent affinities of rimonabant calculated in the presence of JWH-018 and Δ9-THC were not different from each other for antagonism of discriminative stimulus effects (6.58 and 6.59, respectively) or hypothermic effects (7.08 and 7.19, respectively). Apparent affinity estimates are consistent with the same receptors mediating the discriminative stimulus and hypothermic effects of both JWH-018 and Δ9-THC. However, there was more limited and less orderly antagonism of rate-decreasing effects, suggesting that an additional receptor mechanism is involved in mediating the effects of cannabinoids on response rate. Overall, these results strongly suggest that JWH-018 and Δ9-THC act at the same receptors to produce several of their shared psychopharmacological effects.

  14. Successful Undergraduate Research: Creating Win-Win-Win

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guswa, A. J.; Rhodes, A. L.

    2003-12-01

    Undergraduate involvement in research has the potential to advance science, enhance education, strengthen the research community, and raise general awareness of the importance and impact of scientific understanding. Rather than being competing objectives, these goals are synergistic. Effective research experiences are those that create win-win-win situations: benefits to the student, benefits to the project, and benefits to the scientific community. When structured appropriately, undergraduate research fits into a learner-centered paradigm that puts emphasis on student learning, rather than instructor teaching. Under such a paradigm the student and professor learn together, constructing knowledge by integrating information with critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, and use this knowledge to address issues in real-life contexts. Creating such a learning environment requires that the professor be vested in the outcome of the research, that the student take a meta-cognitive approach to the project and work at a level appropriate to her abilities, and that the student understand how her contribution fits into the project and the larger field. All of these factors lead to greater independence, confidence, and productivity on the part of the student. By providing undergraduates with these experiences, we introduce not only future scientists but also non-scientists to the excitement of discovery and the value of scientific research. Currently, we involve undergraduates in our research on the hydrology and geochemistry of a tropical montane cloud forest in Monteverde, Costa Rica. At the start of each student's involvement, we provide her with the big picture: our project goals, the relevant social issues, and the importance of watershed research. Each student then articulates her own educational and project objectives. Together, we choose tasks that match her skills and interests with our scholarly work. Specific activities range from literature review to

  15. The Importance of Teaching a Win-Win Philosophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Alan J.

    Most people are raised in a traditional environment which teaches that someone-winning implies that someone-loses. However, psychology and the examples provided in the Watergate scandal demonstrate that such a philosophy is neither productive nor beneficial. A "win-win" philosophy of cooperation, not competition, is needed for individuals to…

  16. Biofuels: A win-win strategy

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This article looks at the overall goal of stabilizing global climate change while achieving a sustainable energy future. On Earth Day 1993, President Clinton announced that the U.S. would comply with the Rio accord and bring U.S. greenhouse gas emissions back to 1990 levels by the year 2000. Since the transportation sector accounts for over 30 percent of domestic CO{sub 2} emissions, the large-scale use and deployment of biofuels would be a useful tool in achieving the Administration`s goals of limiting greenhouse gases. Biofuels such as ethanol, methanol, and biodiesel are expected to have lower emissions of greenhouse gases than those derived from petroleum or other fossil fuels. This marked difference is due to the {open_quotes}CO{sub 2} recycling effect{close_quotes} associated with the growth process of biomass renewable resources such as trees and grasses. This article covers the following topics: global climate change an future energy consumption, reducing greenhouse transportation sector emissions: improving fuel economy and switching to low-carbon emission fuel sources; integration of fuel economy and alternative fuels; biofuels as a transportation strategy for mitigating global climate change; a win-win strategy: biofuels reduce carbon dioxide while promoting sustainable economic growth; increasing biofuels utilization through government and industry cooperation. 5 figs.

  17. Award Winning Science Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Showalter, Victor M.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    This is a collection of reports of student award winning science projects that have appeared in "The Science Teacher." Grade levels 7-12 are represented with projects categorized as follows: biology, chemistry and physics, earth-space science, and miscellaneous. In each section the abstracts are arranged in order of increasing complexity beginning…

  18. Rimonabant-induced Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol withdrawal in rhesus monkeys: discriminative stimulus effects and other withdrawal signs.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jennifer L; McMahon, Lance R

    2010-07-01

    Marijuana-dependent individuals report using marijuana to alleviate withdrawal, suggesting that pharmacotherapy of marijuana withdrawal could promote abstinence. To identify potential pharmacotherapies for marijuana withdrawal, this study first characterized rimonabant-induced Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) withdrawal in rhesus monkeys by using drug discrimination and directly observable signs. Second, drugs were examined for their capacity to modify cannabinoid withdrawal. Monkeys receiving chronic Delta(9)-THC (1 mg/kg/12 h s.c.) discriminated the cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg i.v.) under a fixed ratio schedule of stimulus-shock termination. The discriminative stimulus effects of rimonabant were dose-dependent (ED(50) = 0.25 mg/kg) and accompanied by head shaking. In the absence of chronic Delta(9)-THC treatment (i.e., in nondependent monkeys), a larger dose (3.2 mg/kg) of rimonabant produced head shaking and tachycardia. Temporary discontinuation of Delta(9)-THC treatment resulted in increased responding on the rimonabant lever, head shaking, and activity during the dark cycle. The rimonabant discriminative stimulus was attenuated fully by Delta(9)-THC (at doses larger than mg/kg/12 h) and the cannabinoid agonist CP 55940 [5-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-2-[5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexyl]phenol], and partially by the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2 [(R)-(+)-[2, 3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone mesylate] and the alpha(2)-adrenergic agonist clonidine. In contrast, a benzodiazepine (diazepam) and monoamine agonist (cocaine) did not attenuate the rimonabant discriminative stimulus. Head shaking was attenuated by all test compounds. These results show that the discriminative stimulus effects of rimonabant in Delta(9)-THC-treated monkeys are a more pharmacologically selective measure of cannabinoid withdrawal than rimonabant-induced head shaking. These results suggest

  19. The Win-Win of Adult Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, J. Richard

    2012-01-01

    Adult degree programs have been seen as a win-win solution for private colleges and adult learners, but their innovative and often-entrepreneurial postures are not a natural fit with governance structures in more traditional institutions. Through narrative and illustrative vignettes, this chapter presents an overview of efforts employed by some…

  20. Lederman wins Fermi award

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Leon Lederman has received the 1992 Enrico Fermi Award, presented in recognition of a lifetime of achievement in nuclear energy. This article briefly details Lederman's award-winning work (1988 Nobel Proze in Physics) in high-energy physics -- his discovery of the upsilon particle and the muon neutrino. His leadership in the creation of the superconducting accelerator at Fermilab and his leadership in science education of society are also cited with respect to the Enrico Fermi Award. Specifics on the award and its presentation are included in this article.

  1. Wins, winning and winners: the commercial advertising of lottery gambling.

    PubMed

    McMullan, John L; Miller, Delthia

    2009-09-01

    This study analyzed a sample of 920 lottery ads that were placed or played in Atlantic Canada from January 2005 to December 2006. A content analysis, involving quantitative and qualitative techniques, was conducted to examine the design features, exposure profiles and focal messages of these ads and to explore the connections between lottery advertising and consumer culture. We found that there was an "ethos of winning" in these commercials that provided the embedded words, signs, myths, and symbols surrounding lottery gambling and conveyed a powerful imagery of plentitude and certitude in a world of potential loss where there was little reference to the actual odds of winning. The tangible and emotional qualities in the ads were especially inviting to young people creating a positive orientation to wins, winning and winners, and lottery products that, in turn, reinforced this form of gambling as part of youthful consumption practices. We concluded that enticing people with the prospects of huge jackpots, attractive consumer goods and easy wins, showcasing top prize winners, and providing dubious depictions that winning is life-changing was narrow and misleading and exploited some of the factors associated with at-risk gambling.

  2. Dysregulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and associated signaling networks in brains of cocaine addicts and cocaine-treated rodents.

    PubMed

    Álvaro-Bartolomé, M; García-Sevilla, J A

    2013-09-01

    The endocannabinoid system is implicated in the neurobiology of cocaine addiction. This study evaluated the status of cannabinoid (CB) CB1 and CB2 receptors, the endocytic cycle of CB1 receptors, G protein-coupled receptor regulatory kinases (GRK), and associated signaling (mammalian target of rapamicin (mTOR) and 70kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K)) in brain cortices of drug abusers and cocaine- and cannabinoid-treated rodents. The main results indicate that in cocaine adddicts, but not in mixed cocaine/opiate or opiate abusers, CB1 receptor protein in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was reduced (-44%, total homogenate) with a concomitant receptor redistribution and/or internalization (decreases in membranes and increases in cytosol). In cocaine addicts, the reductions of CB1 receptors and GRK2/3/5 (-26% to -30%) indicated receptor desensitization. CB2 receptor protein was not significantly altered in the PFC of cocacine addicts. Chronic cocaine in mice and rats also reduced CB1 receptor protein (-41% and -80%) in the cerebral cortex inducing receptor redistribution and/or internalization. The CB1 receptor agonist WIN55212-2 caused receptor downregulation (decreases in membranes and cytosol) and the antagonists rimonabant and AM281 induced opposite effects (receptor upregulation in membranes and cytosol). Rimonabant and AM281 also behaved as inverse agonists on the activation of mTOR and its target p70S6K. Chronic cocaine in mice was associated with tolerance to the acute activation of mTOR and p70S6K. In long-term cocaine addicts, mTOR and p70S6K activations were not altered when compared with controls, indicating that CB1 receptor signaling was dampened. The dysregulation of CB1 receptor, GRK2/3/5, and mTOR/p70S6K signaling by cocaine may contribute to alterations of neuroplasticity and/or neurotoxicity in brains of cocaine addicts.

  3. Comparison of the pharmacology and signal transduction of the human cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Felder, C C; Joyce, K E; Briley, E M; Mansouri, J; Mackie, K; Blond, O; Lai, Y; Ma, A L; Mitchell, R L

    1995-09-01

    The recently cloned CB2 cannabinoid receptor subtype was stably transfected into AtT-20 and Chinese hamster ovary cells to compare the binding and signal transduction properties of this receptor with those of the CB1 receptor subtype. The binding of [3H]CP 55,940 to both CB1 and CB2 was of similar high affinity (2.6 and 3.7 nM, respectively) and saturable. In competitive binding experiments, (-)-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and CP 55,940 were equipotent at the CB1 and CB2 receptors, but WIN 55212-2 and cannabinol bound with higher affinity to the CB2 than the CB1 receptor. HU 210 had a higher affinity for the CB1 receptor. Anandamide, a recently identified endogenous cannabinoid agonist, was essentially equipotent at both receptor subtypes. The structurally related fatty acid ethanolamides dihomo-gamma-linolenylethanolamide and mead ethanolamide also bound with relatively equal affinity to both receptors, but adrenylethanolamide had a higher affinity for the CB1 receptor. The rank order of potency and efficacy for binding of the selected agonists to the CB1 and CB2 receptors was mimicked in functional inhibition of cAMP accumulation experiments for all compounds tested. Both CB1 and CB2 receptors couple to the inhibition of cAMP accumulation that was pertussis toxin sensitive. SR141716A, a CB1 receptor antagonist, was a poor antagonist at the CB2 receptor in both binding and functional inhibition of cAMP accumulation experiments. When expressed in AtT-20 cells, the CB1 receptor mediated an inhibition of Q-type calcium channels and an activation of inward rectifying potassium channels. In contrast, the CB2 receptor did not modulate the activity of either channel under identical assay conditions. Similar to results obtained for CB1 receptor, the CB2 receptor did not couple to the activation of phospholipases A2, C, or D or to the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Except for its inability to couple to the modulation of Q-type calcium channels or inwardly rectifying

  4. Dysregulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and associated signaling networks in brains of cocaine addicts and cocaine-treated rodents.

    PubMed

    Álvaro-Bartolomé, M; García-Sevilla, J A

    2013-09-01

    The endocannabinoid system is implicated in the neurobiology of cocaine addiction. This study evaluated the status of cannabinoid (CB) CB1 and CB2 receptors, the endocytic cycle of CB1 receptors, G protein-coupled receptor regulatory kinases (GRK), and associated signaling (mammalian target of rapamicin (mTOR) and 70kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K)) in brain cortices of drug abusers and cocaine- and cannabinoid-treated rodents. The main results indicate that in cocaine adddicts, but not in mixed cocaine/opiate or opiate abusers, CB1 receptor protein in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was reduced (-44%, total homogenate) with a concomitant receptor redistribution and/or internalization (decreases in membranes and increases in cytosol). In cocaine addicts, the reductions of CB1 receptors and GRK2/3/5 (-26% to -30%) indicated receptor desensitization. CB2 receptor protein was not significantly altered in the PFC of cocacine addicts. Chronic cocaine in mice and rats also reduced CB1 receptor protein (-41% and -80%) in the cerebral cortex inducing receptor redistribution and/or internalization. The CB1 receptor agonist WIN55212-2 caused receptor downregulation (decreases in membranes and cytosol) and the antagonists rimonabant and AM281 induced opposite effects (receptor upregulation in membranes and cytosol). Rimonabant and AM281 also behaved as inverse agonists on the activation of mTOR and its target p70S6K. Chronic cocaine in mice was associated with tolerance to the acute activation of mTOR and p70S6K. In long-term cocaine addicts, mTOR and p70S6K activations were not altered when compared with controls, indicating that CB1 receptor signaling was dampened. The dysregulation of CB1 receptor, GRK2/3/5, and mTOR/p70S6K signaling by cocaine may contribute to alterations of neuroplasticity and/or neurotoxicity in brains of cocaine addicts. PMID:23727505

  5. Creating a winning organizational culture.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Robert James

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the idea of how to create a winning organizational culture. By definition, a winning organizational culture is one that is able to make current innovations stick, while continuously changing based on the demands of the marketplace. More importantly, the article explores the notion that a winning organizational culture can have a profound impact on the conscious of the workforce, helping each individual to become a better, more productive person, who provides important services and products to the community. To form a basis toward defining the structure of what a winning organization culture looks like, 4 experts were asked 12 questions related to the development of an organizational culture. Three of the experts have worked intimately within the health care industry, while a fourth has been charged with turning around an organization that has had a losing culture for 17 years. The article provides insight into the role that values, norms, goals, leadership style, familiarity, and hiring practices play in developing a winning organizational culture. The article also emphasizes the important role that leaders perform in developing an organizational culture.

  6. Cannabinoid receptor agonists reduce the short-term mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress linked to excitotoxicity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rangel-López, E; Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Pinzón, E; Torres, I; Serratos, I N; Castellanos, P; Wajner, M; Souza, D O; Santamaría, A

    2015-01-29

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is involved in a considerable number of physiological processes in the Central Nervous System. Recently, a modulatory role of cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists on the reduction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation has been demonstrated. Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous analog of glutamate and excitotoxic metabolite produced in the kynurenine pathway (KP), selectively activates NMDAr and has been shown to participate in different neurodegenerative disorders. Since the early pattern of toxicity exerted by this metabolite is relevant to explain the extent of damage that it can produce in the brain, in this work we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and other agonists (anandamide or AEA, and CP 55,940 or CP) on early markers of QUIN-induced toxicity in rat striatal cultured cells and rat brain synaptosomes. WIN, AEA and CP exerted protective effects on the QUIN-induced loss of cell viability. WIN also preserved the immunofluorescent signals for neurons and CBr labeling that were decreased by QUIN. The QUIN-induced early mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation were also partially or completely prevented by WIN pretreatment, but not when this CBr agonist was added simultaneously with QUIN to brain synaptosomes. These findings support a neuroprotective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by agents inducing excitotoxic processes.

  7. Weight-Control Information Network (WIN)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Reducing Childhood Obesity The Weight-control Information Network (WIN) Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table of ... here are tips from the Weight-control Information Network (WIN), an information service of the National Institute ...

  8. Cannabinoid receptor-independent actions of the aminoalkylindole WIN 55,212-2 on trigeminal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J; Patwardhan, Amol; Akopian, Armen N; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Flores, Christopher M

    2004-01-01

    The prototypical aminoalkylindole cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 (WIN-2) has been shown to produce antihyperalgesia through a peripheral mechanism of action. However, it is not known whether WIN-2 exerts this action directly via cannabinoid receptors located on primary afferents or if other, perhaps indirect or noncannabinoid, mechanisms are involved. To address this question, we have examined the specific actions of WIN-2 on trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons in vitro by quantifying its ability to modulate the evoked secretion of the proinflammatory neuropeptide CGRP as well as the inflammatory mediator-induced generation of cAMP. WIN-2 evoked CGRP release from TG neurons in vitro (EC50=26 μM) in a concentration- and calcium-dependent manner, which was mimicked by the cannabinoid receptor-inactive enantiomer WIN 55,212-3 (WIN-3). Moreover, WIN-2-evoked CGRP release was attenuated by the nonselective cation channel blocker ruthenium red but not by the vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine, suggesting that, unlike certain endogenous and synthetic cannabinoids, WIN-2 is not a TRPV1 agonist but rather acts at an as yet unidentified cation channel. The inhibitory effects of WIN-2 on TG neurons were also examined. WIN-2 neither inhibited capsaicin-evoked CGRP release nor did it inhibit forskolin-, isoproteranol- or prostaglandin E2-stimulated cAMP accumulation. On the other hand, WIN-2 significantly inhibited (EC50=1.7 μM) 50 mM K+-evoked CGRP release by approximately 70%. WIN-2 inhibition of 50 mM K+-evoked CGRP release was not reversed by antagonists of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor, but was mimicked in magnitude and potency (EC50=2.7 μM) by its cannabinoid-inactive enantiomer WIN-3. These findings indicate that WIN-2 exerts both excitatory and inhibitory effects on TG neurons, neither of which appear to be mediated by CB1, CB2 or TRPV1 receptors, but by a novel calcium-dependent mechanism. The ramifications of these results are discussed in relation

  9. Building a Winning Recruiting Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Sherrie Gong

    2002-01-01

    Building a winning recruiting team is essential to the well being of virtually every organization. Putting together a great mix of people to represent an organization and bring in new talent can serve an organization well when competition is fierce or demand is down. (GCP)

  10. Do quantum strategies always win?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Namit; Benjamin, Colin

    2015-11-01

    In a seminal paper, Meyer (Phys Rev Lett 82:1052, 1999) described the advantages of quantum game theory by looking at the classical penny flip game. A player using a quantum strategy can win against a classical player almost 100 % of the time. Here we make a slight modification to the quantum game, with the two players sharing an entangled state to begin with. We then analyze two different scenarios: First in which quantum player makes unitary transformations to his qubit, while the classical player uses a pure strategy of either flipping or not flipping the state of his qubit. In this case, the quantum player always wins against the classical player. In the second scenario, we have the quantum player making similar unitary transformations, while the classical player makes use of a mixed strategy wherein he either flips or not with some probability " p." We show that in the second scenario, 100 % win record of a quantum player is drastically reduced and for a particular probability " p" the classical player can even win against the quantum player. This is of possible relevance to the field of quantum computation as we show that in this quantum game of preserving versus destroying entanglement a particular classical algorithm can beat the quantum algorithm.

  11. 1988 Award Winning Summer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Briefly described are four award winning summer programs including a Massachusetts Girl Scout camp which mainstreams girls with disabilities; a New York camp serving siblings of children with disabilities; a Texas camp which utilizes volunteers to serve disabled children who may have serious medical conditions; and a California camp offering…

  12. IRA Award-Winning Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifert, Mary

    1984-01-01

    Summarizes award-winning research produced by Andrew M.Hess, Sirkka-Liisa Rauramo, Richard L. Allington, Donna E. Alvermann and David A. Hayes, Lesley M. Morrow and Carol S. Weinstein, Taffy E. Raphael and Bonnie B. Armbruster, Nancy Nelson Spivey, and Courtney B. Cazden. (FL)

  13. Award Winning Summer Programs--1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Four award-winning summer programs provide opportunities for disabled children. Agassiz Village integrates physically disabled, inner-city, suburban, and rural campers. Camp Challenge serves hearing-impaired children and their families. Minspeak provides hands-on experience with assistive equipment and techniques for nonspeaking children, parents,…

  14. REDUCED INFARCT SIZE AND ACCUMULATION OF MICROGLIA IN RATS TREATED WITH WIN 55,212-2 AFTER NEONATAL STROKE

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-López, David; Faustino, Joel; Derugin, Nikita; Wendland, Michael; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Moro, Maria A.; Vexler, Zinaida S.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids have emerged as brain protective agents under neurodegenerative conditions. Many neuroprotective actions of cannabinoids depend on the activation of specific receptors, cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and type 2 (CB2R). The aim of the present study was to determine whether the CB2R and CB1R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) protects neonatal brain against focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion and whether anti-inflammatory mechanisms play a role in protection. 7-day-old rats were subjected to 90 minutes middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and injured rats identified by diffusion-weighted MRI during the occlusion. After reperfusion rats were subcutaneously administered 1mg/kg of WIN or vehicle twice daily until sacrifice. MCAO led to increased mRNA expression of CB2R (but not CB1R), chemokine receptors (CCR2 and CX3CR1) and cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα), as well as increased protein expression of chemokines MCP-1 and MIP-1α and microglial activation 24 hours after MCAO. WIN administration significantly reduced microglial activation at this point and attenuated infarct volume and microglial accumulation and proliferation in the injured cortex 72 hours after MCAO. Cumulatively, our results show that the cannabinoid agonist WIN protects against neonatal focal stroke in part due to inhibitory effects on microglia. PMID:22285309

  15. The Methods Behind PH WINS

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers—a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  16. 26 CFR 1.50B-1 - Definitions of WIN expenses and WIN employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Definitions of WIN expenses and WIN employees. 1.50B-1 Section 1.50B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Expenses of Work Incentive Programs § 1.50B-1 Definitions of WIN expenses and WIN employees. (a)...

  17. Partnering at Superfund sites -- a win-win situation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, M.G.; Ohlinger, B.

    1994-12-31

    Combining today`s litigious society with shrinking profit margins for Superfund contractors results in adversarial relationships among all parties involved in Superfund site remediation, such as regulatory agencies, designers, contractors, suppliers and owners. These negative relationships have a detrimental effect on the project at hand. Partnering is an available solution to the problem and creates a win-win situation for everyone. This presentation defines partnering, describes the process and gives real-world examples from two Superfund Sites, citing successes and giving tips on how to make partnering work for you. Partnering is working at the Bofors-Nobel Superfund Site in Muskegon, Michigan. Located six miles east of downtown Muskegon, the 85-acre Bofors site includes an active chemical production facility, an unused landfill, and abandoned sludge lagoons. Used for chemical manufacturing since the early 1960s, soil and groundwater at Bofors-Nobel are contaminated with pesticides, dye intermediates, aromatic hydrocarbons, and chlorinated organic compounds. Within 13 miles of the Bofors site is the Ott/Story/Cordova Superfund site. The 1.35 mgd groundwater treatment facility under construction there will surpass the capacity of the Bofors plant by nearly a quarter-million gallons per day. The 20-acre Ott/Story/Cordova site sits on more than 1 billion gallons of groundwater contaminated with chlorides, phenols, volatile organic compounds, and heavy metals which have percolated through the sandy soil of wastewater lagoons.

  18. Ways to Win at Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Amanda P.; Cho, Sun-Joo; Nichols, Sally

    2016-01-01

    This teaching tip identifies ways to "WIN" at vocabulary learning. Specifically, the approach conveys three morphological strategies in the mnemonic "WIN." These three strategies remind students to find smaller units of meaning within bigger words, look for those units in other words that they know, and notice the context. Each…

  19. Differential regulation of behavioral tolerance to WIN55,212-2 by GASP1.

    PubMed

    Martini, Lene; Thompson, Dawn; Kharazia, Viktor; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2010-05-01

    Cannabinoid agonists have shown some promise clinically as analgesics, in particular for cancer pain, in which they have the additional benefit of decreasing nausea. However, as for most other drugs, the long-term use of cannabinoids is limited by the development of tolerance. Several molecular mechanisms have been proposed to explain drug tolerance, including receptor downregulation. The cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors can be downregulated in vitro through an interaction with the G-protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein1, GASP1, that targets CB1 receptors for degradation after their agonist-mediated endocytosis. To investigate whether GASP1-mediated postendocytic sorting of the CB1 receptor contributes to tolerance to cannabinoid drugs in vivo, we generated a mouse with a disruption of GASP1. In wild-type mice, repeated administration of the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 promoted downregulation of CB1 receptor levels and concomitant tolerance to the effects of drug on antinociception, motor incoordination, and locomotor hypoactivity. In contrast, GASP1 knockout mice did not develop tolerance to any of these effects and showed no significant receptor downregulation. Taken together, this study provides evidence that GASP1 regulates CB1 receptor downregulation in vivo, and that postendocytic receptor trafficking has a key role in the development of tolerance to WIN55,212-2.

  20. A natural history of "agonist".

    PubMed

    Russo, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    This paper constructs a brief history of the biochemical term agonist by exploring the multiple meanings of the root agôn in ancient Greek literature and describing how agonist first appeared in the scientific literature of the 20th century in the context of neurophysiologists' debates about the existence and properties of cellular receptors. While the narrow scientific definition of agonist may appear colorless and dead when compared with the web of allusions spun by the ancient Greek agôn, the scientific power and creativity of agonist actually resides precisely in its exact, restricted meaning for biomedical researchers.

  1. Winning consensus on social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasan, Sameet; Xie, J.; Korniss, G.; Szymanski, Boleslaw

    2011-03-01

    The adoption of a specific behavior (opinion) by a population of individuals is influenced dramatically by the social network through which the individuals interact. Here, we show the conditions under which a randomly distributed sub-population of committed agents -- nodes on the network that consistently profess a unique opinion and are not influenceable to change -- can win over an entire population of individuals initially opposed to that opinion. We model the opinion dynamics by a variant of the Naming Game (Baronchelli et al. (2006)), which effectively captures the persistence of dominant opinions. Given this model, we demonstrate that in the asymptotic network size limit, there exists a critical value p c of the fraction of committed agents, above which the network-state attains consensus, and below which the network-state converges to a non-consensus fixed point. We also discuss finite size corrections to p c and the scaling of consensus times for finite networks. Support by ARL, ONR.

  2. Winning Strategies in Congested Traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Járai-Szabó, Ferenc; Néda, Zoltán

    2012-09-01

    One-directional traffic on two-lanes is modeled in the framework of a spring-block type model. A fraction q of the cars are allowed to change lanes, following simple dynamical rules, while the other cars keep their initial lane. The advance of cars, starting from equivalent positions and following the two driving strategies is studied and compared. As a function of the parameter q the winning probability and the average gain in the advancement for the lane-changing strategy is computed. An interesting phase-transition like behavior is revealed and conclusions are drawn regarding the conditions when the lane changing strategy is the better option for the drivers.

  3. Winning a competition predicts dishonest behavior.

    PubMed

    Schurr, Amos; Ritov, Ilana

    2016-02-16

    Winning a competition engenders subsequent unrelated unethical behavior. Five studies reveal that after a competition has taken place winners behave more dishonestly than competition losers. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that winning a competition increases the likelihood of winners to steal money from their counterparts in a subsequent unrelated task. Studies 3a and 3b demonstrate that the effect holds only when winning means performing better than others (i.e., determined in reference to others) but not when success is determined by chance or in reference to a personal goal. Finally, study 4 demonstrates that a possible mechanism underlying the effect is an enhanced sense of entitlement among competition winners.

  4. Can a near win kindle motivation? The impact of nearly winning on motivation for unrelated rewards.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Monica; Kim, JeeHye Christine

    2015-06-01

    Common intuition and research suggest that winning is more motivating than losing. However, we propose that just failing to obtain a reward (i.e., nearly winning it) in one task leads to broader, positive motivational effects on subsequent unrelated tasks relative to clearly losing or actually obtaining the reward. We manipulated a near-win experience using a game app in Experiments 1 through 3 and a lottery in Experiment 4. Our findings showed that nearly winning in one task subsequently led participants to walk faster to get to a chocolate bar (Experiment 1), salivate more for money (Experiment 2), and increase their effort to earn money in a card-sorting task (Experiment 3). A field study (Experiment 4) demonstrated that nearly winning led people to subsequently spend more money on desirable consumer products. Finally, our findings showed that when the activated motivational state was dampened in an intervening task, the nearly-winning effect was attenuated.

  5. Can a near win kindle motivation? The impact of nearly winning on motivation for unrelated rewards.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Monica; Kim, JeeHye Christine

    2015-06-01

    Common intuition and research suggest that winning is more motivating than losing. However, we propose that just failing to obtain a reward (i.e., nearly winning it) in one task leads to broader, positive motivational effects on subsequent unrelated tasks relative to clearly losing or actually obtaining the reward. We manipulated a near-win experience using a game app in Experiments 1 through 3 and a lottery in Experiment 4. Our findings showed that nearly winning in one task subsequently led participants to walk faster to get to a chocolate bar (Experiment 1), salivate more for money (Experiment 2), and increase their effort to earn money in a card-sorting task (Experiment 3). A field study (Experiment 4) demonstrated that nearly winning led people to subsequently spend more money on desirable consumer products. Finally, our findings showed that when the activated motivational state was dampened in an intervening task, the nearly-winning effect was attenuated. PMID:25940671

  6. Involvement of TRPV1 channels in the activity of the cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 in an acute rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Fabio; Gambino, Giuditta; Rizzo, Valerio; Ferraro, Giuseppe; Sardo, Pierangelo

    2016-05-01

    The exogenous cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2, (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl) pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-Yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone (WIN), has revealed to play a role on modulating the hyperexcitability phenomena in the hippocampus. Cannabinoid-mediated mechanisms of neuroprotection have recently been found to imply the modulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a cationic channel subfamily that regulate synaptic excitation. In our study, we assessed the influence of pharmacological manipulation of TRPV1 function, alone and on WIN antiepileptic activity, in the Maximal Dentate Activation (MDA) acute model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Our results showed that the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, increased epileptic outcomes; whilst antagonizing TRPV1 with capsazepine exerts a protective role on paroxysmal discharge. When capsaicin is co-administered with WIN effective dose of 10mg/kg is able to reduce its antiepileptic strength, especially on the triggering of MDA response. Accordingly, capsazepine at the protective dose of 2mg/kg managed to potentiate WIN antiepileptic effects, when co-treated. Moreover, WIN subeffective dose of 5mg/kg was turned into effective when capsazepine comes into play. This evidence suggests that systemic administration of TRPV1-active drugs influences electrically induced epilepsy, with a noticeable protective activity for capsazepine. Furthermore, results from the pharmacological interaction with WIN support an interplay between cannabinoid and TRPV1 signaling that could represent a promising approach for a future pharmacological strategy to challenge hyperexcitability-based diseases.

  7. A Win-Win-Win Proposition -- Academia and Industry Working Together for Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogswell, J.

    2011-12-01

    geoscience, to include having applied real problem solving via a robust field camp experience. In addition, we look for the maturity and ability to conduct independent research, to integrate broad suites of data, and to work as a team. We look for the ability to communicate results. We do not look for a focus on petroleum. We have many decades of experience in how to best develop that particular discipline quickly, to meet current and future business conditions. There are recurring themes that facilitate successful transition from Academia to a practicing industry geoscientist. These themes include giving students a good grounding in STEM, not just geology; one-on-one mentoring; sharing our passion for the science by sharing our research; and sharing the entire breadth of career opportunities. Similar best practices have been identified to encourage under-represented minority students and women to study STEM. Perhaps this is a suite of habits we should be practicing more broadly. This suite of habits takes extra time, extra effort, and extra money. But if geoscience mentors in Academia, Industry, and professional societies work together, we will be able to create a win for Academia, a win for Industry, and a win for students. (1) Gonzales and Keane, 2011, "Status of the Geoscience Workforce -- 2011," AGI, p. 123.

  8. Teaching Win-Win Better Prepares Students for Subsequent Experiences in Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Alan J.

    The psychology of competition and winning, especially in relation to learning and motivation, is discussed. The Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) approach to coursework is proposed as a means of using the winning philosophy in education. Also suggested is the inclusion into coursework design of a form of rhetoric developed by Carl Rogers…

  9. Serial agonistic attacks by greylag goose families, Anser anser, against the same opponent

    PubMed Central

    Scheiber, Isabella B.R.; Kotrschal, Kurt; Weiß, Brigitte M.

    2011-01-01

    It is known from primates that alliance partners may support each other’s interests in competition with others, for example, through repeated agonistic attacks against a particular individual. We examined serial aggressive interactions between greylag goose families and other flock members. We found that repeated attacks towards the same individual were common and that up to five serial attacks by family members followed an initial attack. Family size did not affect the frequency of such serial attacks. Juvenile geese evidently benefited most from active social support through serial attacks. About 60% of the juveniles’ lost primary interactions were subsequently reversed by another family member. This may be one of the reasons why juveniles rank higher in the social hierarchy than would be expected from their age and size alone. Losses in serial attacks predominantly occurred against other, presumably higher-ranking, family geese and ganders. We propose three major functions/consequences of serial attacks. Analogous to primates, serial attacks in greylag geese may serve to reinforce a losing experience of an opponent defeated in a preceding attack. On the side of the winning family, serial attacks may reinforce the experience of winning. Both winning and losing experiences are linked with physiological consequences in higher vertebrates, affecting the future social performance of winners or losers. Finally, serial attacks may signal the agonistic potential of a family to other flock members. This is supported by heart rate data, which indicate that greylags are competent to interpret third-party relationships. PMID:21984838

  10. The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine is a critical mediator of cell death program induced by WIN/TRAIL combined treatment in osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Notaro, Antonietta; Sabella, Selenia; Pellerito, Ornella; Vento, Renza; Calvaruso, Giuseppe; Giuliano, Michela

    2016-03-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a multi-functional protein which modulates cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. In cancer cells, SPARC behaves as a tumor promoter in a number of tumors, but it can also act as a tumor suppressor factor. Our previous results showed that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 (WIN), a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist, is able to sensitize osteosarcoma MG63 cells to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis which is accompanied with endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress induction and the increase in autophagic markers. In the present investigation, we studied the role of SPARC in WIN/TRAIL-induced apoptosis demonstrating that WIN increased the level of SPARC protein and mRNA in a time-dependent manner. This event was functional to WIN/TRAIL-dependent apoptosis as demonstrated by RNA interfering analysis which indicated that SPARC-silenced cells were less sensitive to cytotoxic effects induced by the combined treatment. Our experiments also demonstrate that SPARC interacts with caspase-8 thus probably favoring its translocation to plasma membrane and the activation of extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, our results are the first to show that WIN-dependent increase in the level of SPARC plays a critical role in sensitizing osteosarcoma cells to TRAIL action.

  11. A synthetic cannabinoid agonist promotes oligodendrogliogenesis during viral encephalitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Solbrig, Marylou V.; Fan, Yijun; Hermanowicz, Neal; Morgese, Maria Grazia; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Chronic CNS infection by several families of viruses can produce deficits in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatal function. Cannabinoid drugs have been long known for their anti-inflammatory properties and their ability to modulate adult neuro and gliogenesis. Therefore, we explored the effects of systemic administration of the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2(WIN) on prefrontal cortex(PFC) and striatal cytogenesis in a viral model of CNS injury and inflammation based on Borna Disease (BD) virus encephalitis. Active BrdU+ progenitor populations were significantly decreased 1 week after BrdU labeling in BD rats [p<0.001 compared to uninfected (NL)controls] while less than 5% of BrdU+ cells colabeled for BDV protein. Systemic WIN (1mg/kg i.p. twice daily x7 days) increased the survival of BrdU+ cells in striatum (p<0.001) and PFC of BD rats, with differential regulation of labeled oligodendroglia precursors versus microglia/macrophages. WIN increased the percentage of BrdU +oligodendrocyte precursor cells and decreased BrdU+ED-1-labeled phagocytic cells, without producing pro- or antiviral effects. BDV infection decreased the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide(AEA) in striatum (p<0.05 compared to NL rats), whereas 2-AG levels were unchanged. Our findings indicate that: 1)viral infection is accompanied by alterations of AEA transmission in the striatum, but new cell protection by WIN appears independent of its effect on endocannbinoid levels; and 2)chronic WIN treatment alters the gliogenic cascades associated with CNS injury, promoting oligodendrocyte survival. Limiting reactive gliogenesis and macrophage activity in favor of oliogodendroglia development has significance for demyelinating diseases. Moreover, the ability of cannabinoids to promote the development of biologically supportive or symbiotic oligodendroglia may generalize to other microglia-driven neurodegenerative syndromes including NeuroAIDS and diseases of aging. PMID:20832403

  12. Regulation of MMP-9 by a WIN-Binding Site in the Monocyte-Macrophage System Independent from Cannabinoid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Wolf, Susanne; Synwoldt, Peggy; Pahl, Andreas; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Ullrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The cannabinoid system is known to be involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes. Therefore, drugs targeting cannabinoid receptors are considered as candidates for anti-inflammatory and tissue protective therapy. We demonstrated that the prototypical cannabinoid agonist R(+)WIN55,212-2 (WIN) reduced the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in a murine model of cigarette-smoke induced lung inflammation. In experiments using primary cells and cell lines of the monocyte-macrophage-system we found that binding of the cannabinoid-receptor agonist WIN to a stereo-selective, specific binding site in cells of the monocyte-macrophage-system induced a significant down-regulation of MMP-9 secretion and disturbance of intracellular processing, which subsequently down-regulated MMP-9 mRNA expression via a ERK1/2-phosphorylation-dependent pathway. Surprisingly, the anti-inflammatory effect was independent from classical cannabinoid receptors. Our experiments supposed an involvement of TRPV1, but other yet unidentified sites are also possible. We conclude that cannabinoid-induced control of MMP-9 in the monocyte-macrophage system via a cannabinoid-receptor independent pathway represents a general option for tissue protection during inflammation, such as during lung inflammation and other diseases associated with inflammatory tissue damage. PMID:23139770

  13. Involvement of dorsal hippocampal and medial septal nicotinic receptors in cross state-dependent memory between WIN55, 212-2 and nicotine or ethanol in mice.

    PubMed

    Alijanpour, S; Rezayof, A

    2013-08-15

    The present study examined whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus and medial septum (MS) are involved in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between WIN55, 212-2 (WIN, a non-selective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist) and nicotine or ethanol. Memory retrieval was measured in one-trial step-down type passive avoidance apparatus in male adult mice. Pre-training intraperitoneal administration of WIN (0.1-1mg/kg) dose-dependently impaired memory retrieval when it was tested 24h later. Pre-test systemic administration of nicotine (0.6 and 0.7mg/kg, s.c.) or ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) improved WIN-induced memory impairment, suggesting a cross state-dependent memory retrieval between the drugs. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (1 and 2μg/mouse) before systemic administration of an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) or ethanol (0.25g/kg) significantly reversed WIN-induced memory impairment. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (1 and 3μg/mouse) inhibited cross state-dependent memory between WIN and nicotine or ethanol. Moreover, pre-test intra-MS microinjection of nicotine (1 and 2μg/mouse) in combination with systemic administration of a lower dose of nicotine (0.5mg/kg), but not ethanol (0.25g/kg), improved memory impairment induced by pre-training administration of WIN. On the other hand, in the animals that received pre-training WIN and pre-test systemic administration of nicotine (0.7mg/kg), but not ethanol (0.5g/kg), pre-test intra-MS microinjection of mecamylamine (1-5μg/mouse) inhibited WIN-nicotine state-dependent memory retrieval. It should be noted that pre-test intra-CA1 or intra-MS microinjection of nicotine or mecamylamine by itself had no effect on memory retrieval and also could not reverse memory impairment induced by pre-training administration of WIN. It can be concluded that WIN and nicotine or WIN and ethanol can induce state-dependent memory retrieval. In

  14. Selective lack of tolerance to delayed gastric emptying after daily administration of WIN 55,212-2 in the rat.

    PubMed

    Abalo, R; Cabezos, P A; López-Miranda, V; Vera, G; González, C; Castillo, M; Fernández-Pujol, R; Martín, M I

    2009-09-01

    The use of cannabinoids to treat gastrointestinal (GI) motor disorders has considerable potential. However, it is not clear if tolerance to their actions develops peripherally, as it does centrally. The aim of this study was to examine the chronic effects of the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) on GI motility, as well as those in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems. WIN was administered for 14 days, at either non-psychoactive or psychoactive doses. Cardiovascular parameters were measured in anaesthetized rats, whereas central effects and alterations in GI motor function were assessed in conscious animals using the cannabinoid tetrad and non-invasive radiographic methods, respectively. Tests were performed after first (acute effects) and last (chronic effects) administration of WIN, and 1 week after discontinuing treatment (residual effects). Food intake and body weight were also recorded throughout treatment. Blood pressure and heart rate remained unchanged after acute or chronic administration of WIN. Central activity and GI motility were acutely depressed at psychoactive doses, whereas non-psychoactive doses only slightly reduced intestinal transit. Most effects were reduced after the last administration. However, delayed gastric emptying was not and could, at least partially, account for a concomitant reduction in food intake and body weight gain. The remaining effects of WIN administration in GI motility were blocked by the CB1 antagonist AM 251, which slightly accelerated motility when administered alone. No residual effects were found 1 week after discontinuing cannabinoid treatment. The different systems show differential sensitivity to cannabinoids and tolerance developed at different rates, with delayed gastric emptying being particularly resistant to attenuation upon chronic treatment. PMID:19413685

  15. Winning a competition predicts dishonest behavior.

    PubMed

    Schurr, Amos; Ritov, Ilana

    2016-02-16

    Winning a competition engenders subsequent unrelated unethical behavior. Five studies reveal that after a competition has taken place winners behave more dishonestly than competition losers. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that winning a competition increases the likelihood of winners to steal money from their counterparts in a subsequent unrelated task. Studies 3a and 3b demonstrate that the effect holds only when winning means performing better than others (i.e., determined in reference to others) but not when success is determined by chance or in reference to a personal goal. Finally, study 4 demonstrates that a possible mechanism underlying the effect is an enhanced sense of entitlement among competition winners. PMID:26831083

  16. Winning a competition predicts dishonest behavior

    PubMed Central

    Schurr, Amos; Ritov, Ilana

    2016-01-01

    Winning a competition engenders subsequent unrelated unethical behavior. Five studies reveal that after a competition has taken place winners behave more dishonestly than competition losers. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that winning a competition increases the likelihood of winners to steal money from their counterparts in a subsequent unrelated task. Studies 3a and 3b demonstrate that the effect holds only when winning means performing better than others (i.e., determined in reference to others) but not when success is determined by chance or in reference to a personal goal. Finally, study 4 demonstrates that a possible mechanism underlying the effect is an enhanced sense of entitlement among competition winners. PMID:26831083

  17. Differentiation between low- and high-efficacy CB1 receptor agonists using a drug discrimination protocol for rats

    PubMed Central

    LeMay, Brian J.; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Wood, JodiAnne; Vadivel, Subramanian K.; Zvonok, Alexander; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The “subjective high” from marijuana ingestion is likely due to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) activating the central cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) of the endocannabinoid signaling system. THC is a weak partial agonist according to in vitro assays, yet THC mimics the behavioral effects induced by more efficacious cannabinergics. This distinction may be important for understanding similarities and differences in the dose–effect spectra produced by marijuana/THC and designer cannabimimetics (“synthetic marijuana”). Objective We evaluated if drug discrimination is able to functionally detect/differentiate between a full, high-efficacy CB1R agonist [(±)AM5983] and the low-efficacy agonist THC in vivo. Materials and methods Rats were trained to discriminate between four different doses of AM5983 (0.10 to 0.56 mg/kg), and vehicle and dose generalization curves were determined for both ligands at all four training doses of AM5983. The high-efficacy WIN55,212-2 and the lower-efficacy (R)-(+)-methanandamide were examined at some AM5983 training conditions. Antagonism tests involved rimonabant and WIN55,212-2 and AM5983. The separate (S)- and (R)-isomers of (±)AM5983 were tested at one AM5983 training dose (0.30 mg/kg). The in vitro cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) assay examined AM5983 and the known CB1R agonist CP55,940. Results Dose generalization ed50 values increased as a function of the training dose of AM5983, but more so for the partial agonists. The order of potency was (R)-isomer > (±)AM5983 > (S)-isomer and AM5983 > WIN55,212-2 ≥ THC > (R)-(+)-methanandamide. Surmountable antagonism of AM5983 and WIN55,212-2 occurred with rimonabant. The cAMP assay confirmed the cannabinergic nature of AM5983 and CP55,940. Conclusions Drug discrimination using different training doses of a high-efficacy, full CB1R agonist differentiated between low- and high-efficacy CB1R agonists. PMID:24005529

  18. BMC Ecology image competition: the winning images

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    BMC Ecology announces the winning entries in its inaugural Ecology Image Competition, open to anyone affiliated with a research institute. The competition, which received more than 200 entries from international researchers at all career levels and a wide variety of scientific disciplines, was looking for striking visual interpretations of ecological processes. In this Editorial, our academic Section Editors and guest judge Dr Yan Wong explain what they found most appealing about their chosen winning entries, and highlight a few of the outstanding images that didn’t quite make it to the top prize. PMID:23517630

  19. Stellar students win fantastic prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    School students and teachers across Europe and around the world are discovering today who has won fantastic prizes in "Catch a Star", the international astronomical competition run by ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). CAS2008 artwork ESO PR Photo 14/08 One of the winning artworks "We were extremely impressed by the high quality of the entries, and the number of participants was even higher than last year. We wish to congratulate everybody who took part," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. "'Catch a Star' clearly shows astronomy's power to inspire and excite students of all ages," added Fernand Wagner, President of the EAAE. The top prize, of a week-long trip to Chile to visit the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal, was won by students Roeland Heerema, Liesbeth Schenkels, and Gerben Van Ranst from the Instituut Spijker in Hoogstraten, Belgium, together with their teacher Ann Verstralen. With their "story of aged binary stars... Live and Let Die", they take us on a vivid tour of the amazing zoo of binary stars, and the life and death of stars like our Sun. The students show how state-of-the-art telescopes, particularly those at ESO's sites of La Silla and Paranal, help us understand these stars. They take as an illustrative example the binary star system V390 Velorum. In the last phases of its life, V390 Velorum will shed its outer shell of gas and dust, turning from a celestial chrysalis into a beautiful cosmic butterfly. The students also involved other pupils from their school, showing them how to test their eyesight by observing the binary star system of Alcor and Mizar. But perhaps the most important discovery they made is that, as they write in their report, "Astronomy lives! Discoveries are being made each day and there is still very much to be found and learned by astronomers!" The team will travel to Chile and visit the ESO VLT - the world's most advanced optical/infrared telescope. At Paranal, they

  20. Stellar students win fantastic prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    School students and teachers across Europe and around the world are discovering today who has won fantastic prizes in "Catch a Star", the international astronomical competition run by ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). CAS2008 artwork ESO PR Photo 14/08 One of the winning artworks "We were extremely impressed by the high quality of the entries, and the number of participants was even higher than last year. We wish to congratulate everybody who took part," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. "'Catch a Star' clearly shows astronomy's power to inspire and excite students of all ages," added Fernand Wagner, President of the EAAE. The top prize, of a week-long trip to Chile to visit the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal, was won by students Roeland Heerema, Liesbeth Schenkels, and Gerben Van Ranst from the Instituut Spijker in Hoogstraten, Belgium, together with their teacher Ann Verstralen. With their "story of aged binary stars... Live and Let Die", they take us on a vivid tour of the amazing zoo of binary stars, and the life and death of stars like our Sun. The students show how state-of-the-art telescopes, particularly those at ESO's sites of La Silla and Paranal, help us understand these stars. They take as an illustrative example the binary star system V390 Velorum. In the last phases of its life, V390 Velorum will shed its outer shell of gas and dust, turning from a celestial chrysalis into a beautiful cosmic butterfly. The students also involved other pupils from their school, showing them how to test their eyesight by observing the binary star system of Alcor and Mizar. But perhaps the most important discovery they made is that, as they write in their report, "Astronomy lives! Discoveries are being made each day and there is still very much to be found and learned by astronomers!" The team will travel to Chile and visit the ESO VLT - the world's most advanced optical/infrared telescope. At Paranal, they

  1. Agonist-trafficking and hallucinogens.

    PubMed

    González-Maeso, Javier; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2009-01-01

    Seven transmembrane domain receptors, also termed G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represent the most common molecular target for therapeutic drugs. The generally accepted pharmacological model for GPCR activation is the ternary complex model, in which GPCRs exist in a dynamic equilibrium between the active and inactive conformational states. However, the demonstration that different agonists sometimes elicit a different relative activation of two signaling pathways downstream of the same receptor has led to a revision of the ternary complex model. According to this agonist- trafficking model, agonists stabilize distinct activated receptor conformations that preferentially activate specific signaling pathways. Hallucinogenic drugs and non-hallucinogenic drugs represent an attractive experimental system with which to study agonist-trafficking of receptor signaling. Thus many of the behavioral responses induced by hallucinogenic drugs, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin or mescaline, depend on activation of serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT2ARs). In contrast, this neuropsychological state in humans is not induced by closely related chemicals, such as lisuride or ergotamine, despite their similar in vitro activity at the 5-HT2AR. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, as well as unresolved questions, regarding agonist-trafficking and the mechanism of action of hallucinogenic drugs.

  2. Make Win-Win a Reality: Delighting the Customer be Implementing Oracle HR - Integration Update to Fall 1997 Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, J.; Shope, S.

    1998-01-01

    Implementing Oracle Human Resources Management System (HRMS) using a customer and integration approach provides the organization an enormous oppurtunity to create a win-win situation for customers, the HR department and the enterprise.

  3. Japan's Winning Margins. Management, Training, and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorriman, John; Kenjo, Takashi

    This book explains the fundamental reasons for Japan's astonishing commercial success in relation to its Western competitors. Chapter 1 is an introduction. Chapter 2 discusses implications of Japanese history for education, training, and management. Chapter 3 looks at the first winning margin--education. It covers the following: Japan's long…

  4. l985 IRA Award Winning Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farstrup, Alan E.

    1986-01-01

    Summarizes award winning research reports dealing with (1) learning disabilities and reading; (2) teaching critical reading in Brazil; (3) culture, language, school, and literacy; (4) the development of discourse-synthesizing abilities; (5) the acquisition of word meaning from context by high and low ability children; and (6) reciprocal teaching.…

  5. Comparing Natural Language Retrieval: WIN and FREESTYLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard-Schoch, Teresa

    1995-01-01

    Compares two natural language processing search engines, WIN (WESTLAW Is Natural) and FREESTYLE, developed by LEXIS. Legal issues in natural language queries were presented to identical libraries in both systems. Results showed that the editorials enhanced relevance; a search would be more thorough using both databases; and if only one system were…

  6. Garden Grove's Newsy Web Site Wins Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article details the construction and content of the Garden Grove (CA) High School Web site. The site wins the January 2009 "Tech Directions" Web Site of the Month. It provides information on the school's academic programs, administrative and teaching staff, guidance department, and athletics and other extracurricular activities, in addition…

  7. What Game Stats Can Reveal about Winning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Ree K.

    1983-01-01

    A technique for evaluating the relationship between game statistics and outcomes of contests is proposed. The technique can be used to determine the relationship between selected game factors and winning or to determine how often various results of certain instances of play occur in a contest. (PP)

  8. ASBO's Award-Winning Architectural Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Photographs and descriptions of four award-winning projects selected at the Association of School Business Officials' annual meeting: (1) Stafford Community Educational Complex (Texas), (2) Father Flanagan Alternative High School (Nebraska), (3) Davis Middle School (Wyoming), and (4) Lake Washington Vocational Technical Institute (Washington).…

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of human WINS1 and mouse Wins2, homologous to Drosophila segment polarity gene Lines (Lin).

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2002-08-01

    WNT signaling molecules play key roles in carcinogenesis and embryogenesis. Drosophila segment polarity gene Lines (Lin) is essential for Wnt/Wingless-dependent patterning in dorsal epidermis and also for hindgut development. With Wnt signaling, Lin accumulates in the nucleus to modulate transcription of Wnt target genes through association with beta-catenin/Armadillo and TCF/Pangolin. Here, human WINS1 and mouse Wins2, encoding proteins with Drosophila Lin homologous domain, were isolated using bioinformatics and cDNA-PCR. Human WINS1 encoded 757-amino-acid protein, and mouse Wins2 encoded 498-amino-acid protein. Human WINS1 and mouse Wins2 showed 60.0% total-amino-acid identity. Lin homologous domain of WINS1 and Wins2 showed 29.4% and 27.2% amino-acid identity with that of Drosphila Lin, respectively. In the human chromosome 15q26 region, WINS1 gene was clustered with ASB7 gene encoding ankyrin repeat and SOCS box-containing protein 7. Human WINS1 mRNA of 2.8-kb in size was expressed in adult testis, prostate, spleen, thymus, skeletal muscle, fetal kidney and brain. This is the first report on molecular cloning and initial characterization of human WINS1 and mouse Wins2 PMID:12119551

  10. Vascular Dysfunction in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease: Effects of CB1R and CB2R Cannabinoid Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Villalba, Nuria; Prieto, Dolores; Brera, Begoña; Martín-Moreno, Ana M.; Tejerina, Teresa; de Ceballos, María L.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence of altered vascular function, including cerebrovascular, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transgenic models of the disease. Indeed vasoconstrictor responses are increased, while vasodilation is reduced in both conditions. β-Amyloid (Aβ) appears to be responsible, at least in part, of alterations in vascular function. Cannabinoids, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents, induce vasodilation both in vivo and in vitro. We have demonstrated a beneficial effect of cannabinoids in models of AD by preventing glial activation. In this work we have studied the effects of these compounds on vessel density in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice, line 2576, and on altered vascular responses in aortae isolated ring. First we showed increased collagen IV positive vessels in AD brain compared to control subjects, with a similar increase in TgAPP mice, which was normalized by prolonged oral treatment with the CB1/CB2 mixed agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and the CB2 selective agonist JWH-133 (JWH). In Tg APP mice the vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine and the thromboxane agonist U46619 was significantly increased, and no change in the vasodilation to acetylcholine (ACh) was observed. Tg APP displayed decreased vasodilation to both cannabinoid agonists, which were able to prevent decreased ACh relaxation in the presence of Aβ. In summary, we have confirmed and extended the existence of altered vascular responses in Tg APP mice. Moreover, our results suggest that treatment with cannabinoids may ameliorate the vascular responses in AD-type pathology.

  11. Vascular Dysfunction in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease: Effects of CB1R and CB2R Cannabinoid Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Villalba, Nuria; Prieto, Dolores; Brera, Begoña; Martín-Moreno, Ana M.; Tejerina, Teresa; de Ceballos, María L.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence of altered vascular function, including cerebrovascular, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transgenic models of the disease. Indeed vasoconstrictor responses are increased, while vasodilation is reduced in both conditions. β-Amyloid (Aβ) appears to be responsible, at least in part, of alterations in vascular function. Cannabinoids, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents, induce vasodilation both in vivo and in vitro. We have demonstrated a beneficial effect of cannabinoids in models of AD by preventing glial activation. In this work we have studied the effects of these compounds on vessel density in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice, line 2576, and on altered vascular responses in aortae isolated ring. First we showed increased collagen IV positive vessels in AD brain compared to control subjects, with a similar increase in TgAPP mice, which was normalized by prolonged oral treatment with the CB1/CB2 mixed agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and the CB2 selective agonist JWH-133 (JWH). In Tg APP mice the vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine and the thromboxane agonist U46619 was significantly increased, and no change in the vasodilation to acetylcholine (ACh) was observed. Tg APP displayed decreased vasodilation to both cannabinoid agonists, which were able to prevent decreased ACh relaxation in the presence of Aβ. In summary, we have confirmed and extended the existence of altered vascular responses in Tg APP mice. Moreover, our results suggest that treatment with cannabinoids may ameliorate the vascular responses in AD-type pathology. PMID:27695396

  12. Influence of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor mechanism on WIN55,212-2-induced amnesia in rat dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jamali-Raeufy, Nida; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of both N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) and MK-801 on WIN55,212-2(WIN)-induced amnesia in rats. Step-through inhibitory avoidance of memory was used to examine the retrieval of memory, 24 h after training. All drugs were injected bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus (intra-CA1) of rats. Pretraining and posttraining or pretesting administration of the nonselective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist, WIN (0.5 µg/rat), decreased the step-through latency. However, amnesia induced by pretraining or posttraining injections of WIN was reversed by a pretest administration of WIN (0.25 and 0.5 µg/rat). Pretest microinjections of different doses of NMDA (0.1, 0.5, and 1 µg/rat) elicited no response, but NMDA (0.5 and 1 µg/rat) did induce full recovery from amnesia induced by WIN (0.5 µg/rat). The posttraining and pretest injection of a higher dose of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 (MK; 4 µg/rat), caused an impairment in the memory retrieval. However, amnesia induced by posttraining injections of MK (4 µg/rat) was reversed by a pretest administration of MK (4 µg/rat). In addition, pretest administration of different doses of the antagonist (2 and 4 µg/rat) induced full recovery of WIN-induced amnesia, but did not influence memory recovery in the subjects, which had received posttraining (0.5 µg/rat) and pretest WIN (0.25 and 0.5 µg/rat). Pretesting coadministration of ineffective doses of WIN (0.1 µg/rat) with NMDA (0.1 µg/rat), but not with MK (1 µg/rat), restored WIN-induced (0.5 µg/rat) amnesia. It can be concluded that the NMDA receptor mechanism located in the dorsal hippocampus may be involved in WIN-induced amnesia.

  13. Win-shift and win-stay learning in the rainbow lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus).

    PubMed

    Sulikowski, Danielle; Burke, Darren

    2011-05-01

    The tendency to win-shift (to better learn to avoid, rather than return to, recently rewarded locations) has been demonstrated in a variety of nectarivorous birds and in honeybees. It is hypothesized to be a cognitive adaptation to the depleting nature of nectar. In the present study we report the first attempt to test for a win-shift bias in a nectarivorous parrot, the rainbow lorikeet (Trichoglossus hematodus). This species differs from others tested for a win-shift bias in that it is a facultative, rather than an obligate, nectarivore. We tested a captive-reared population of the birds on a shift/stay task at long and short retention intervals. The data show no evidence of either a win-shift or a win-stay bias. The birds demonstrated efficient spatial search ability and above chance performance for both shift and stay contingencies at long and short delays. These data suggest that an innate tendency to win-shift may not be present in all avian nectarivores, or that the role experience plays in shaping such behaviors is different for different species.

  14. The "big win" and resistance to extinction when gambling.

    PubMed

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N; Sauter, John M; King, Brent M

    2004-11-01

    One hypothesis for the reason a person might become a pathological gambler is that the individual initially experiences a big win, which creates a fallacious expectation of winning, which may then lead to persistent gambling despite suffering large losses. Although this hypothesis has been around for several decades, only one controlled empirical study has addressed it, and that study reported null results. In the present experiment, the authors tested the "big win" hypothesis by having 4 groups of participants with little to no experience gambling play a computer-simulated slot machine for credits that were exchangeable for cash. One group experienced a large win on the very 1st play. Another experienced a large win on the 5th play. A 3rd group experienced 2 small wins on the 2nd and 5th plays. No other winning outcomes were programmed. The 4th group never experienced a win. The authors observed a significant effect of group. Participants who experienced a large win on the 1st play quit playing the simulation earlier than participants who experienced a large win on the 5th play. These results appear to question the "big win" as an explanation for pathological gambling. They are more consistent with a behavioral theory of gambling behavior. The present study should also promote the use of laboratory-based research to test long-standing hypotheses in the gambling literature.

  15. Novel diazabicycloalkane delta opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Loriga, Giovanni; Lazzari, Paolo; Manca, Ilaria; Ruiu, Stefania; Falzoi, Matteo; Murineddu, Gabriele; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Pinna, Giovanni; Pinna, Gérard Aimè

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the investigation of diazabicycloalkane cores as potential new scaffolds for the development of novel analogues of the previously reported diazatricyclodecane selective delta (δ) opioid agonists, as conformationally constrained homologues of the reference δ agonist (+)-4-[(αR)-α((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80). In particular, we have simplified the diazatricyclodecane motif of δ opioid agonist prototype 1a with bridged bicyclic cores. 3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptane, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane, and 3,10-diazabicyclo[4.3.1]decane were adopted as core motifs of the novel derivatives. The compounds were synthesized and biologically assayed as racemic (3-5) or diastereoisomeric (6,7) mixtures. All the novel compounds 3-7 showed δ agonism behaviour and remarkable affinity to δ receptors. Amongst the novel derivatives, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane based compound 4 evidenced improved δ affinity and selectivity relative to SNC80.

  16. WinGene/WinPep: user-friendly software for the analysis of amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Hennig, L

    1999-06-01

    WinGene1.0/WinPep1.2 is a pair of Microsoft Windows programs designed to read nucleotide or amino acid sequence data. These versatile programs have the following capabilities: (i) searches for open reading frames and their translation, (ii) assisting the design of primers for PCR and (iii) calculation of molecular weight, isoelectric point and molar absorbtion coefficients of polypeptides. Furthermore, hydropathic plots and helical wheel displays are easily produced. The programs run with an intuitive Windows interface, contain a comprehensive help file and enable data exchange with other applications by means of the Copy&Paste command. The software is free for academic and noncommercial users.

  17. Why do winners keep winning? Androgen mediation of winner but not loser effects in cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Rui F.; Silva, Ana; Canário, Adelino V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Animal conflicts are influenced by social experience such that a previous winning experience increases the probability of winning the next agonistic interaction, whereas a previous losing experience has the opposite effect. Since androgens respond to social interactions, increasing in winners and decreasing in losers, we hypothesized that socially induced transient changes in androgen levels could be a causal mediator of winner/loser effects. To test this hypothesis, we staged fights between dyads of size-matched males of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). After the first contest, winners were treated with the anti-androgen cyproterone acetate and losers were supplemented with 11-ketotestosterone. Two hours after the end of the first fight, two contests were staged simultaneously between the winner of the first fight and a naive male and between the loser of first fight and another naive male. The majority (88%) of control winners also won the second interaction, whereas the majority of control losers (87%) lost their second fight, thus confirming the presence of winner/loser effects in this species. As predicted, the success of anti-androgen-treated winners in the second fight decreased significantly to chance levels (44%), but the success of androgenized losers (19%) did not show a significant increase. In summary, the treatment with anti-androgen blocks the winner effect, whereas androgen administration fails to reverse the loser effect, suggesting an involvement of androgens on the winner but not on the loser effect. PMID:19324741

  18. On the effects of CP 55-940 and other cannabinoid receptor agonists in C6 and U373 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ortega, A; Rangel-López, E; Hidalgo-Miranda, A; Morales, A; Ruiz-García, E; Meneses-García, A; Herrera-Gómez, A; Aguilar-Ponce, J L; González-Herrera, I G; Guevara-Salazar, P; Prospero-García, O; Del Angel, S A

    2015-10-01

    Cannabinoid receptor (CBs) agonists affect the growth of tumor cells via activation of deadly cascades. The spectrum of action of these agents and the precise role of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) on oncogenic processes remain elusive. Herein we compared the effects of synthetic (CP 55-940 and WIN 55,212-2) and endogenous (anandamide or AEA) CBs agonists (10-20 μM) on morphological changes, cell viability, and induction of apoptosis in primary astrocytes and in two glioblastoma cell lines (C6 and U373 cells) in order to characterize their possible differential actions on brain tumor cells. None of the CBs agonist tested induced changes in cell viability or morphology in primary astrocytes. In contrast, CP 55-940 significantly decreased cell viability in C6 and U373 cells at 5 days of treatment, whereas AEA and WIN 55,212-2 moderately decreased cell viability in both cell lines. Treatment of U373 and C6 for 3 and 5 days with AEA or WIN 55,212-2 produced discrete morphological changes in cell bodies, whereas the exposure to CP 55-940 induced soma degradation. CP 55-940 also induced apoptosis in both C6 and U373 cell lines. Our results support a more effective action of CP 55-940 to produce cell death of both cell lines through apoptotic mechanisms. Comparative aspects between cannabinoids with different profiles are necessary for the design of potential treatments against glial tumors.

  19. The Relationship between Teachers' and Principals' Decision-Making Power: Is It a Win-Win Situation or a Zero-Sum Game?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Jianping; Xia, Jiangang

    2012-01-01

    Is the power relationship between public school teachers and principals a win-win situation or a zero-sum game? By applying hierarchical linear modeling to the 1999-2000 nationally representative Schools and Staffing Survey data, we found that both the win-win and zero-sum-game theories had empirical evidence. The decision-making areas…

  20. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  1. Cannabinoid agonists rearrange synaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses and depress motoneuron activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-05-01

    Impairment of motor skills is one of the most common acute adverse effects of cannabis. Related studies have focused mainly on psychomotor alterations, and little is known about the direct impact of cannabinoids (CBs) on motoneuron physiology. As key modulators of synaptic function, CBs regulate multiple neuronal functions and behaviors. Presynaptic CB1 mediates synaptic strength depression by inhibiting neurotransmitter release, via a poorly understood mechanism. The present study examined the effect of CB agonists on excitatory synaptic inputs incoming to hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) in vitro and in vivo. The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and the synthetic CB agonist WIN 55,212-2 rapidly and reversibly induced short-term depression (STD) of glutamatergic synapses on motoneurons by a presynaptic mechanism. Presynaptic effects were fully reversed by the CB1-selective antagonist AM281. Electrophysiological and electron microscopy analysis showed that WIN 55,212-2 reduced the number of synaptic vesicles (SVs) docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. Given that AM281 fully abolished depolarization-induced depression of excitation, motoneurons can be feasible sources of CBs, which in turn act as retrograde messengers regulating synaptic function. Finally, microiontophoretic application of the CB agonist O-2545 reversibly depressed, presumably via CB1, glutamatergic inspiratory-related activity of HMNs in vivo. Therefore, evidence support that CBs, via presynaptic CB1, induce excitatory STD by reducing the readily releasable pool of SVs at excitatory synapses, then attenuating motoneuron activity. These outcomes contribute a possible mechanistic basis for cannabis-associated motor performance disturbances such as ataxia, dysarthria and dyscoordination.

  2. Cannabinoid agonists rearrange synaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses and depress motoneuron activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-05-01

    Impairment of motor skills is one of the most common acute adverse effects of cannabis. Related studies have focused mainly on psychomotor alterations, and little is known about the direct impact of cannabinoids (CBs) on motoneuron physiology. As key modulators of synaptic function, CBs regulate multiple neuronal functions and behaviors. Presynaptic CB1 mediates synaptic strength depression by inhibiting neurotransmitter release, via a poorly understood mechanism. The present study examined the effect of CB agonists on excitatory synaptic inputs incoming to hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) in vitro and in vivo. The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and the synthetic CB agonist WIN 55,212-2 rapidly and reversibly induced short-term depression (STD) of glutamatergic synapses on motoneurons by a presynaptic mechanism. Presynaptic effects were fully reversed by the CB1-selective antagonist AM281. Electrophysiological and electron microscopy analysis showed that WIN 55,212-2 reduced the number of synaptic vesicles (SVs) docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. Given that AM281 fully abolished depolarization-induced depression of excitation, motoneurons can be feasible sources of CBs, which in turn act as retrograde messengers regulating synaptic function. Finally, microiontophoretic application of the CB agonist O-2545 reversibly depressed, presumably via CB1, glutamatergic inspiratory-related activity of HMNs in vivo. Therefore, evidence support that CBs, via presynaptic CB1, induce excitatory STD by reducing the readily releasable pool of SVs at excitatory synapses, then attenuating motoneuron activity. These outcomes contribute a possible mechanistic basis for cannabis-associated motor performance disturbances such as ataxia, dysarthria and dyscoordination. PMID:25595101

  3. Using Win-Win Strategies to Implement Health in All Policies: A Cross-Case Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Agnes; Renahy, Emilie; O’Campo, Patricia; Muntaner, Carles; Freiler, Alix; Shankardass, Ketan

    2016-01-01

    Background In spite of increasing research into intersections of public policy and health, little evidence shows how policy processes impact the implementation of Health in All Policies (HiAP) initiatives. Our research sought to understand how and why strategies for engaging partners from diverse policy sectors in the implementation of HiAP succeed or fail in order to uncover the underlying social mechanisms contributing to sustainable implementation of HiAP. Methods In this explanatory multiple case study, we analyzed grey and peer-review literature and key informant interviews to identify mechanisms leading to implementation successes and failures in relation to different strategies for engagement across three case studies (Sweden, Quebec and South Australia), after accounting for the role of different contextual conditions. Findings Our results yielded no support for the use of awareness-raising or directive strategies as standalone approaches for engaging partners to implement HiAP. However, we found strong evidence that mechanisms related to “win-win” strategies facilitated implementation by increasing perceived acceptability (or buy-in) and feasibility of HiAP implementation across sectors. Win-win strategies were facilitated by mechanisms related to several activities, including: the development of a shared language to facilitate communication between actors from different sectors; integrating health into other policy agendas (eg., sustainability) and use of dual outcomes to appeal to the interests of diverse policy sectors; use of scientific evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of HiAP; and using health impact assessment to make policy coordination for public health outcomes more feasible and to give credibility to policies being developed by diverse policy sectors. Conclusion Our findings enrich theoretical understanding in an under-unexplored area of intersectoral action. They also provide policy makers with examples of HiAP across wealthy

  4. Best Practices of Award-Winning Elementary School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    Which practices set award-winning principals apart from their equally hard-working peers? Using survey results and contributions from 35 award-winning elementary school principals nationwide, this essential text examines over 100 field-based practices recognized as the best for the elementary school principalship. Organized around seven themes…

  5. Setting Win Limits: An Alternative Approach to "Responsible Gambling"?

    PubMed

    Walker, Douglas M; Litvin, Stephen W; Sobel, Russell S; St-Pierre, Renée A

    2015-09-01

    Social scientists, governments, and the casino industry have all emphasized the need for casino patrons to "gamble responsibly." Strategies for responsible gambling include self-imposed time limits and loss limits on gambling. Such strategies help prevent people from losing more than they can afford and may help prevent excessive gambling behavior. Yet, loss limits also make it more likely that casino patrons leave when they are losing. Oddly, the literature makes no mention of "win limits" as a potential approach to responsible gambling. A win limit would be similar to a loss limit, except the gambler would leave the casino upon reaching a pre-set level of winnings. We anticipate that a self-imposed win limit will reduce the gambler's average loss and, by default, also reduce the casino's profit. We test the effect of a self-imposed win limit by running slot machine simulations in which the treatment group of players has self-imposed and self-enforced win and loss limits, while the control group has a self-imposed loss limit or no limit. We find that the results conform to our expectations: the win limit results in improved player performance and reduced casino profits. Additional research is needed, however, to determine whether win limits could be a useful component of a responsible gambling strategy.

  6. The relationship between women's basketball performance and will to win.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, B; Lawson, P; Pezer, V

    1980-06-01

    An analysis of the determinants of athletic performance indicated that "desire" or "Will to Win" was an important factor while an interactionist approach to personality suggested that differences in "Will to Win" might be expected both for different sports and at different levels of performance within a sport. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relationship between "Will to Win" and performance in an eight-team women's basketball tournament. Players completed a 14-item "Will to Win" questionnaire. Team and individual scores were compared with various indices of performance. Results revealed that between two competing teams, the game was more likely to be won by the team with the higher average "Will to Win". The correlation between the mean "Will to Win" score for a team and its position of finish in a tournament was not significant. An ANOVA and Newman-Keuls comparisons revealed that the last place team had to "Will to Win" score that was significantly lower than five of the seven other competing teams. Data obtained on individual players indicated a significant but low correlation between "Will to Win" and the mean number of points scored by a player.

  7. Collaborative Service Learning: A Winning Proposition for Industry and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutsinger, Christy A.; Pookulangara, Sanjukta; Tran, Gina; Duncan, Kim

    2004-01-01

    Collaboration between industry and academia creates a win-win situation for individuals and communities. Through innovative partnering, students apply knowledge to real-world situations, institutions increase program visibility, and businesses receive innovative solutions to complex problems. This article provides a roadmap for implementing a…

  8. No effect of blue on winning contests in judo

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Peter D; Preenen, Paul T.Y

    2008-01-01

    A study by Rowe et al. reported a winning bias for judo athletes wearing a blue outfit relative to those wearing a white one during the 2004 Olympics. It was suggested that blue is associated with a higher likelihood of winning through differential effects of colour on opponent visibility and/or an intimidating effect on the opponent. However, we argue that there is no colour effect on winning in judo. We show that alternative factors, namely allocation biases, asymmetries in prior experience and differences in recovery time are possible confounding factors in the analysis of Rowe et al. After controlling for these factors, we found no difference in blue and white wins. We further analysed contest outcomes of 71 other major judo tournaments and also found no winning bias. Our findings have implications for sports policy makers: they suggest that a white–blue outfit pairing ensures an equal level of play. PMID:18270157

  9. Beta-agonists and animal welfare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of beta-agonists in animal feed is a high profile topic within the U.S. as consumers and activist groups continue to question its safety. The only beta-agonist currently available for use in swine is ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC). This is available as Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health – FDA a...

  10. [Adrenergic beta-agonist intoxication].

    PubMed

    Carrola, Paulo; Devesa, Nuno; Silva, José Manuel; Ramos, Fernando; Alexandrino, Mário B; Moura, José J

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe two clinical cases (father and daughter), observed in the Hospital Urgency with distal tremors, anxiety, palpitations, nausea, headaches and dizziness, two hours after ingestión of cow liver. They also had leucocytosis (with neutrophylia), hypokalemia and hyperglycaemia. After treatment with potassium i.v. and propranolol, the symptoms disappeared. The symptoms recurred at home because the patients didn't take the prescribed medication and persisted for five days, with spontaneous disappearance. The serum of both patients revealed the presence of clenbuterol (65 hg/ml - father and 58 hg/ml - daughter). The animal's liver had a concentration of 1,42 mg/kg. Clenbuterol is a ß-adrenergic agonist with low specificity, with some veterinary indications. However, this substance has been illegally used as a growth's promotor. We intend to alert doctors for this problem, particularly those that work in the Urgency.

  11. Win-Win-Win

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Nancy Mann

    2012-01-01

    Two years ago, members of a strategic planning committee at Woodberry Forest School set a goal to re-engage African-American and Hispanic alumni, many of whom had lost touch with the Virginia boarding school for boys. One of the committee's ideas was to launch a mentoring program to connect current minority students with minority alumni. Two years…

  12. β2-agonist therapy in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Page, Clive P; Rogliani, Paola; Matera, M Gabriella

    2013-04-01

    β2-Agonists are effective bronchodilators due primarily to their ability to relax airway smooth muscle (ASM). They exert their effects via their binding to the active site of β2-adrenoceptors on ASM, which triggers a signaling cascade that results in a number of events, all of which contribute to relaxation of ASM. There are some differences between β2-agonists. Traditional inhaled short-acting β2-agonists albuterol, fenoterol, and terbutaline provide rapid as-needed symptom relief and short-term prophylactic protection against bronchoconstriction induced by exercise or other stimuli. The twice-daily β2-agonists formoterol and salmeterol represent important advances. Their effective bronchodilating properties and long-term improvement in lung function offer considerable clinical benefits to patients. More recently, a newer β2-agonist (indacaterol) with a longer pharmacodynamic half-life has been discovered, with the hopes of achieving once-daily dosing. In general, β2-agonists have an acceptable safety profile, although there is still controversy as to whether long-acting β2-agonists may increase the risk of asthma mortality. In any case, they can induce adverse effects, such as increased heart rate, palpitations, transient decrease in PaO2, and tremor. Desensitization of β2-adrenoceptors that occurs during the first few days of regular use of β2-agonist treatment may account for the commonly observed resolution of the majority of these adverse events after the first few doses. Nevertheless, it can also induce tolerance to bronchoprotective effects of β2-agonists and has the potential to reduce bronchodilator sensitivity to them. Some novel once-daily β2-agonists (olodaterol, vilanterol, abediterol) are under development, mainly in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid or a long-acting antimuscarinic agent. PMID:23348973

  13. Enterococcal Endocarditis: Can We Win the War?

    PubMed Central

    Munita, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of enterococcal infections has long been recognized as an important clinical challenge, particularly in the setting of infective endocarditis (IE). Furthermore, the increase prevalence of isolates exhibiting multidrug resistance (MDR) to traditional anti-enterococcal antibiotics such as ampicillin, vancomycin and aminoglycosides (high-level resistance) poses immense therapeutic dilemmas in hospitals around the world. Unlike IE caused by most isolates of Enterococcus faecalis, which still retain susceptibility to ampicillin and vancomycin, the emergence and dissemination of a hospital-associated genetic clade of multidrug resistant Enterococcus faecium, markedly limits the therapeutic options. The best treatment of IE MDR enterococcal endocarditis is unknown and the paucity of antibiotics with bactericidal activity against these organisms is a cause of serious concern. Although it appears that we are winning the war against E. faecalis, the battle rages on against isolates of multidrug-resistant E. faecium. PMID:22661339

  14. Will architecture win the technology wars?

    PubMed

    Alberthal, L; Manzi, J; Curtis, G; Davidow, W H; Timko, J W; Nadler, D; Davis, L L

    1993-01-01

    Success today flows to the company that establishes proprietary architectural control over a broad, fast-moving, competitive space, Charles R. Morris and Charles H. Ferguson claim in "How Architecture Wins Technology Wars" (March-April 1993). No single vendor can keep pace with the outpouring of cheap, powerful, mass-produced components, so customers have been stitching together their own local systems solutions. Architectures impose order on the system and make interconnections possible. An architectural controller has power over the standard by which the entire information package is assembled. Because of the popularity of Microsoft's Windows, for example, companies like Lotus must conform their software to its parameters to be able to compete for market share. Proprietary architectural control has broader implications for organizational structure too: architectural competition is giving rise to a new form of business organization. PMID:10126152

  15. Antinociceptive effects of the selective CB2 agonist MT178 in inflammatory and chronic rodent pain models.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Saponaro, Giulia; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-06-01

    Cannabinoid CB(2) receptor activation by selective agonists has been shown to produce analgesic effects in preclinical models of inflammatory, neuropathic, and bone cancer pain. In this study the effect of a novel CB(2)agonist (MT178) was evaluated in different animal models of pain. First of all, in vitro competition binding experiments performed on rat, mouse, or human CB receptors revealed a high affinity, selectivity, and potency of MT178. The analgesic properties of the novel CB(2) agonist were evaluated in various in vivo experiments, such as writhing and formalin assays, showing a good efficacy comparable with that produced by the nonselective CB agonist WIN 55,212-2. A dose-dependent antiallodynic effect of the novel CB(2) compound in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy was found. In a bone cancer pain model and in the acid-induced muscle pain model, MT178 was able to significantly reduce mechanical hyperalgesia in a dose-related manner. Notably, MT178 failed to provoke locomotor disturbance and catalepsy, which were observed following the administration of WIN 55,212-2. CB(2) receptor mechanism of action was investigated in dorsal root ganglia where MT178 mediated a reduction of [(3)H]-d-aspartate release. MT178 was also able to inhibit capsaicin-induced substance P release and NF-κB activation. These results demonstrate that systemic administration of MT178 produced a robust analgesia in different pain models via CB(2) receptors, providing an interesting approach to analgesic therapy in inflammatory and chronic pain without CB(1)-mediated central side effects.

  16. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  17. What decides if a smarter army can win a battle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Linda; Sen, Surajit

    2007-03-01

    We study the kinetics associated with a ``war'' in which an attacking army attempts to win over a spatially dispersed defender on a 2D lattice. The levels of engagement are comparable in our study. The conflicting parties can annihilate, win or lose at any given site depending upon certain preselected rules of engagement. The attacker possesses higher intelligence, which is manifested through the moves of the attackers. We show that an ``intelligent'' attacker with subcritical number of attackers cannot win in the engagement.

  18. The WIN 3.5 meter telescope project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Matt; Pilachowski, Caty

    1990-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Indiana University-National Optical Astronomy Observatories ('WIN') 3.5-m aperture telescope project's design concepts and development status are assessed. The WIN telescope employs a wide field of view in order to take advantage of recent advancements in multiobject fiber-optic spectroscopy. A novel support system is under development for the borosilicate honeycomb primary mirror blank which acts solely on the mirror's rear surface; mirror temperature will be actively controlled. The WIN telescope's control system will use a distributed, easily expanded and upgraded network of microprocessors connected to a master computer via serial bus.

  19. The evolution of beta2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Sears, M R

    2001-08-01

    Beta-agonists have been widely used in the treatment of asthma for many years Although concerns have been expressed over their safety based largely upon epidemics of increased mortality in asthmatics associated with high doses of isoprenaline in the 1960s and fenoterol in the 1970s and 1980s, the specific beta2-agonists are vital drugs in asthma management. The short-acting beta2-agonists have an important prophylactic role in the prevention of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and are essential in the emergency treatment of severe asthma. However, little if any benefit seems to be derived from regular use of short-acting beta2-agonists and regular or frequent use can increase the severity of the condition. The development of beta2-agonists with long-acting properties, such as salmeterol and formoterol, has provided advantages over short-acting beta-agonists, such as prolonged bronchodilation, reduced day- and night-time symptoms and improved quality of sleep, and has reduced the requirement for short-acting beta2-agonists as relief medication. Both drugs are well tolerated and, when added to inhaled corticosteroids, produce greater mprovement in lung function than increased steroid dose alone. Because of its rapid onset of action, formoterol also has the potential to be used for as-needed bronchodilator therapy in asthma.

  20. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  1. Monoterpenoid agonists of TRPV3

    PubMed Central

    Vogt-Eisele, A K; Weber, K; Sherkheli, M A; Vielhaber, G; Panten, J; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transient receptor potential (TRP) V3 is a thermosensitive ion channel expressed predominantly in the skin and neural tissues. It is activated by warmth and the monoterpene camphor and has been hypothesized to be involved in skin sensitization. A selection of monoterpenoid compounds was tested for TRPV3 activation to establish a structure-function relationship. The related channel TRPM8 is activated by cool temperatures and a number of chemicals, among them the monoterpene (-)-menthol. The overlap of the receptor pharmacology between the two channels was investigated. Experimental approach: Transfected HEK293 cells were superfused with the test substances. Evoked currents were measured in whole cell patch clamp measurements. Dose-response curves for the most potent agonists were obtained in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Key results: Six monoterpenes significantly more potent than camphor were identified: 6-tert-butyl-m-cresol, carvacrol, dihydrocarveol, thymol, carveol and (+)-borneol. Their EC50 is up to 16 times lower than that of camphor. All of these compounds carry a ring-located hydroxyl group and neither activates TRPM8 to a major extent. Conclusions and implications: Terpenoids have long been recognized as medically and pharmacologically active compounds, although their molecular targets have only partially been identified. TRPV3 activation may be responsible for several of the described effects of terpenoids. We show here that TRPV3 is activated by a number of monoterpenes and that a secondary hydroxyl-group is a structural requirement. PMID:17420775

  2. Irish Team Wins SEA & SPACE Super Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-09-01

    A secondary school team from Ireland has won a trip to Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana, and to ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Cerro Paranal, Chile. The trip is the Super-Prize for the Sea & Space Newspaper Competition , organised within the framework of the European Week for Scientific and Technological Culture. ESO PR Photo 33/98 ESO PR Photo 33/98 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 434 pix - 568k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 1627 pix - 6.7Mb] The presentation of prize certificates to the winning Irish team (right) in Lisbon, on August 31, 1998, by ESO, ESA and EAAE representatives. Stephen Kearney, Cian Wilson (both aged 16 years), Eamonn McKeogh (aged 17 years) together with their teacher, John Daly of Blackrock College in Dublin, prepared their newspaper, Infinitus , on marine and space themes, and came first in the national round of the competition. Together with other students from all over Europe, they were invited to present their winning newspaper to a jury consisting of representatives of the organisers, during a special programme of events at the Gulbenkian Planetarium and EXPO '98 in Lisbon, from 28-31 August, 1998. The Irish team scored highly in all categories of the judging, which included scientific content and originality and creativity of the articles. Their look at Irish contributions to sea and space research also proved popular in a ballot by fellow student competitors. This vote was also taken into account by the judges. The jury was very impressed by the high quality of the national entries and there were several close runners-up. The width and depth was amazing and the variety of ideas and formats presented by the sixteen teams was enormous. A poster competition was organised for younger students, aged 10 to 13 and winning entries at national level are on display at the Oceanophilia Pavilion at EXPO '98. The SEA & SPACE project is a joint initiative of the European Space Agency (ESA) , the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , and the

  3. BMC Ecology Image Competition 2016: the winning images.

    PubMed

    Simundza, Julia; Palmer, Matthew; Settele, Josef; Jacobus, Luke M; Hughes, David P; Mazzi, Dominique; Blanchet, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 BMC Ecology Image Competition marked another celebration of the astounding biodiversity, natural beauty, and biological interactions documented by talented ecologists worldwide. For our fourth annual competition, we welcomed guest judge Dr. Matthew Palmer of Columbia University, who chose the winning image from over 140 entries. In this editorial, we highlight the award winning images along with a selection of highly commended honorable mentions. PMID:27503341

  4. [Safety of beta-agonists in asthma].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa, Teodoro J

    2014-01-01

    Beta 2 agonist bronchodilators (β2A) are very important part in the pharmacotherapy of bronchial asthma, a disease that progresses in the world in an epidemic way. The β2A are prescribed to millions of people around the world, therefore the safety aspects is of public interest. Short-Acting β2 Agonists (SABAs), such as albuterol inhaler, according to current evidence, confirming its safety when used as a quick-relief or rescue medication. The long-acting β2 agonists (LABAs) The long-acting bronchodilators β2A (Long acting β2 Agonists or LABAs) are used associated with inhaled corticosteroids as controller drugs for asthma exacerbationsaccess, for safety reasons LABAs are not recommended for use as monotherapy.

  5. Role of cAMP signalling in winner and loser effects in crayfish agonistic encounters.

    PubMed

    Momohara, Yuto; Minami, Hiroki; Kanai, Akihiro; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2016-07-01

    For territorial animals, establishment of status-dependent dominance order is essential to maintain social stability. In agonistic encounters of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, a difference of body length of 3-7% is enough for larger animals to become dominant. Despite a physical disadvantage, small winners of the first pairings were more likely to win subsequent conflicts with larger inexperienced animals. In contrast, the losers of the first pairings rarely won subsequent conflicts with smaller naive animals. Such experiences of previous winning or losing affected agonistic outcomes for a long period. The winner effects lasted more than 2 weeks and the loser effect lasted about 10 days. Injection of 5HT1 receptor antagonist into the dominant animals 15-30 min after establishment of dominance order blocked the formation of the winner effects. In contrast, injection of adrenergic-like octopamine receptor antagonist into subordinate animals blocked the formation of the loser. 5HT1 receptors are negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase and adrenergic-like octopamine receptors are positively coupled. Consistent with this, dominant animals failed to show the winner effect when injected with pCPT-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, and subordinate animals failed to show a loser effect when injected with adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ 22536. These results suggest that an increase and decrease of cAMP concentration is essential in mediating loser and winner effects, respectively. Furthermore, formation of the loser effect was blocked by injection of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H89, suggesting long-term memory of the loser effect is dependent on the cAMP-PKA signalling pathway. PMID:27086724

  6. Dopamine receptor partial agonists and addiction.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fabricio A; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2015-04-01

    Many drugs abused by humans acutely facilitate, either directly or indirectly, dopamine neurotransmission in the mesolimbic pathway. As a consequence dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists have been widely investigated as putative pharmacological therapies for addiction. This general strategy, however, has had only limited success due in part to poor treatment adherence and efficacy and the significant adverse effects of dopaminergic medications. In this perspective, we discuss the potential therapeutic use of dopamine receptor partial agonists in addiction, developed initially as antipsychotic agents. Recent research indicates that the dopamine D2 receptor partial agonists, such as aripiprazole, also shows useful ancillary efficacy in several animal models of psychostimulant and opioid addiction. Notably, these findings suggest that unlike full dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists these compounds have low abuse liability and are generally well tolerated. Indeed, partial dopamine agonists attenuate the rewarding properties of opioids without interfering with their analgesic effects. Herein we discuss the utility and potential of dopamine receptor partial agonists as treatments for both stimulant and non-stimulant drug addiction.

  7. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Thomas, Merlin C

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARalpha agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARgamma agonists, and more recently dual PPARalpha/gamma coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARgamma receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  8. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna C.; Thomas, Merlin C.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARα agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARγ agonists, and more recently dual PPARα/γ coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARγ receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:18288280

  9. Cosmic Bubble Image Wins NRAO Contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-10-01

    A striking image of an enormous bubble blown into the dusty gas disk of our own Milky Way galaxy has won first place in the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's second annual Radio Astronomy Image Contest. Dr. Jayanne English of the University of Manitoba led the team that made the winning image using data from the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico and Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. Cosmic Bubble Image Giant "Bubble" in Milky Way's Gas CREDIT: English et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for large files and full information English and her collaborators Jeroen Stil and Russ Taylor, from the University of Calgary, will share the grand prize of $1,000 from Associated Universities, Inc., the research corporation that operates the observatory for the NSF. "We congratulate Dr. English for producing an outstanding image that beautifully illustrates the power of our radio telescopes," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. The image contest is part of a broader NRAO effort to make radio astronomical data and images easily accessible and widely available to scientists, students, teachers, the general public, news media and science-education professionals. That effort includes an expanding image gallery on the observatory's Web site. English's winning image shows a giant bubble in the Milky Way's dusty gas disk. The bubble has been sculpted by the wind and radiation force from a few dozen hot, massive stars along with the explosive force of supernova explosions from dying stars. The bubble, seen in the faint radio glow of hydrogen gas, is some 30,000 light-years from Earth and measures 1,100 by 520 light-years. If the bubble, in the constellation Vulpecula, were visible to human eyes, it would appear to be eight times the diameter of the full Moon in the sky. The image was made using data collected as part of the VLA Galactic Plane Survey (VGPS), a set of systematic observations of the Milky Way. This survey, led by

  10. PNNL wins Four Technology Transfer Awards

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Julie A.; McMakin, Andrea H.

    2006-06-01

    PNNL wins 4 Technology Transfer Awards Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has received four 2006 Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards from the Federal Laboratory Consortium - a nationwide network of more than 700 major federal laboratories and centers as well as their parent departments and agencies that provides a forum to develop strategies and opportunities for linking technology with the mission and the marketplace. The FLC presents its Awards for Excellence in Technology Transfer to federal laboratory employees who have done outstanding work in transferring U.S. government-sponsored technologies to the public and private sectors. Since 1984, when the awards program was established, Pacific Northwest has earned 62 of these awards, far more than any other national laboratory. This year, PNNL won all four of the nominations that were submitted--the most that any laboratory can submit. PNNL was recognized for transferring technologies that treat and cure cancer, uniquely analyze massive sets of data, increase surgical implant success rates, and neutralize toxic chemicals from the environment. Through collaboration with PNNL researchers and access to facilities at PNNL, IsoRay Medical, Inc. (http://www.isoray.com), expanded its brachytherapy technology for treating prostate and other cancers. The medical isotope ?seed? products are available at more than 17 implant centers nationwide. More than 40 organizations, including Fortune 500 companies, are using the Starlight information visualization software to mine and interpret massive amounts of data. Bacterin International licensed bioactive thin-film coatings which reduce infection rates associated with surgical implants. Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Silica (SAMMS), a process for removing mercury and other toxic chemicals from the environment, was licensed to Steward Advanced Materials for use in coal-fired power plants, municipal incinerators, and other plants.

  11. WINS. Market Simulation Tool for Facilitating Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad

    2012-10-30

    Integrating 20% or more wind energy into the system and transmitting large sums of wind energy over long distances will require a decision making capability that can handle very large scale power systems with tens of thousands of buses and lines. There is a need to explore innovative analytical and implementation solutions for continuing reliable operations with the most economical integration of additional wind energy in power systems. A number of wind integration solution paths involve the adoption of new operating policies, dynamic scheduling of wind power across interties, pooling integration services, and adopting new transmission scheduling practices. Such practices can be examined by the decision tool developed by this project. This project developed a very efficient decision tool called Wind INtegration Simulator (WINS) and applied WINS to facilitate wind energy integration studies. WINS focused on augmenting the existing power utility capabilities to support collaborative planning, analysis, and wind integration project implementations. WINS also had the capability of simulating energy storage facilities so that feasibility studies of integrated wind energy system applications can be performed for systems with high wind energy penetrations. The development of WINS represents a major expansion of a very efficient decision tool called POwer Market Simulator (POMS), which was developed by IIT and has been used extensively for power system studies for decades. Specifically, WINS provides the following superiorities; (1) An integrated framework is included in WINS for the comprehensive modeling of DC transmission configurations, including mono-pole, bi-pole, tri-pole, back-to-back, and multi-terminal connection, as well as AC/DC converter models including current source converters (CSC) and voltage source converters (VSC); (2) An existing shortcoming of traditional decision tools for wind integration is the limited availability of user interface, i.e., decision

  12. The effect of WIN 55,212-2 suggests a cannabinoid-sensitive component in the early toxicity induced by organic acids accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I and in related disorders of propionate metabolism in rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Serratos, I N; Seminotti, B; Ribeiro, C A J; Leipnitz, G; Souza, D O; Wajner, M; Santamaría, A

    2015-12-01

    Several physiological processes in the CNS are regulated by the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists have been involved in the modulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation. Glutaric (GA), 3-hydroxyglutaric (3-OHGA), methylmalonic (MMA) and propionic (PA) acids are endogenous metabolites produced and accumulated in the brain of children affected by severe organic acidemias (OAs) with neurodegeneration. Oxidative stress and excitotoxicity have been involved in the toxic pattern exerted by these organic acids. Studying the early pattern of toxicity exerted by these metabolites is crucial to explain the extent of damage that they can produce in the brain. Herein, we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) on early markers of GA-, 3-OHGA-, MMA- and PA-induced toxicity in brain synaptosomes from adult (90-day-old) and adolescent (30-day-old) rats. As pre-treatment, WIN exerted protective effects on the GA- and MMA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation induced by all metabolites. Our findings support a protective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by toxic metabolites involved in OAs.

  13. beta2-Agonists at the Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Kenneth D

    2006-01-01

    The different approaches that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) had adopted to beta2-agonists and the implications for athletes are reviewed by a former Olympic team physician who later became a member of the Medical Commission of the IOC (IOC-MC). Steadily increasing knowledge of the effects of inhaled beta2-agonists on health, is concerned with the fact that oral beta2-agonists may be anabolic, and rapid increased use of inhaled beta2-agonists by elite athletes has contributed to the changes to the IOC rules. Since 2001, the necessity for athletes to meet IOC criteria (i.e., that they have asthma and/or exercise-induced asthma [EIA]) has resulted in improved management of athletes. The prevalence of beta2-agonist use by athletes mirrors the known prevalence of asthma symptoms in each country, although athletes in endurance events have the highest prevalence. The age-of-onset of asthma/EIA in elite winter athletes may be atypical. Of the 193 athletes at the 2006 Winter Olympics who met th IOC's criteria, only 32.1% had childhood asthma and 48.7% of athletes reported onset at age 20 yr or older. These findings lead to speculation that years of intense endurance training may be a causative factor in bronchial hyperreactivity. The distinction between oral (prohibited in sports) and inhaled salbutamol is possible, but athletes must be warned that excessive use of inhaled salbutamol can lead to urinary concentrations similar to those observed after oral administration. This article provides justification that athletes should provide evidence of asthma or EIA before being permitted to use inhaled beta2-agonists. PMID:17085798

  14. Highlights from the 2015 WIN Symposium: novel targets, innovative agents, and advanced technologies—a WINning strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Schilsky, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide innovative networking (WIN) consortium comprises a global alliance of 28 academic and clinical cancer centres, 11 pharmaceutical and technology companies and five charitable or health payer organisations. Since its inception the consortium has striven to provide a forum for all of its members to network, share information and experience, and perform clinical trials with the overarching goal of advancing the care of patients with cancer through the use of precision medicine. The annual 2-day WIN Symposium is the most visible output of the consortium and provides an opportunity for around 400 experts and other delegates to meet and discuss the latest research and initiatives in personalised cancer medicine. The seventh WIN Symposium, held in Paris, France, 29–30 June 2015, consisted of nine plenary and eight poster sessions that covered the overarching theme of novel targets, innovative agents, and advanced technologies being a winning strategy. Highlights included discussions of immune mechanisms and ways to target the cancer immunome and systems biology approaches to supporting personalised cancer. The latest data from the BATTLE-2 and WINther trials were discussed, and round table discussions were held that focused on how best to design the next generation of clinical trials, which included SPRING, SUMMER, and BOOSTER being initiated by the WIN Consortium. PMID:26316885

  15. Highlights from the 2015 WIN Symposium: novel targets, innovative agents, and advanced technologies-a WINning strategy?

    PubMed

    Schilsky, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide innovative networking (WIN) consortium comprises a global alliance of 28 academic and clinical cancer centres, 11 pharmaceutical and technology companies and five charitable or health payer organisations. Since its inception the consortium has striven to provide a forum for all of its members to network, share information and experience, and perform clinical trials with the overarching goal of advancing the care of patients with cancer through the use of precision medicine. The annual 2-day WIN Symposium is the most visible output of the consortium and provides an opportunity for around 400 experts and other delegates to meet and discuss the latest research and initiatives in personalised cancer medicine. The seventh WIN Symposium, held in Paris, France, 29-30 June 2015, consisted of nine plenary and eight poster sessions that covered the overarching theme of novel targets, innovative agents, and advanced technologies being a winning strategy. Highlights included discussions of immune mechanisms and ways to target the cancer immunome and systems biology approaches to supporting personalised cancer. The latest data from the BATTLE-2 and WINther trials were discussed, and round table discussions were held that focused on how best to design the next generation of clinical trials, which included SPRING, SUMMER, and BOOSTER being initiated by the WIN Consortium.

  16. Emphasis Placed on Winning in Athletics by Male High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apgar, Fred M.

    1977-01-01

    Data obtained in this study indicate that male high school students place no greater emphasis on winning than on all the other dimensions of interscholastic athletics, though athletes placed greater emphasis on winning than did nonathletes. (MB)

  17. Similar anxiolytic effects of agonists targeting serotonin 5-HT1A or cannabinoid CB receptors on zebrafish behavior in novel environments

    PubMed Central

    Connors, Kristin A.; Valenti, Theodore W.; Lawless, Kelly; Sackerman, James; Onaivi, Emmanuel S.; Brooks, Bryan W.; Gould, Georgianna G.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine are present and bioaccumulate in aquatic ecosystems have spurred studies of fish serotonin transporters (SERTs) and changes in SSRI-sensitive behaviors as adverse outcomes relevant for risk assessment. Many SSRIs also act at serotonin 5-HT1A receptors. Since capitolizing on this action may improve treatments of clinical depression and other psychiatric disorders, novel multimodal drugs that agonize 5-HT1A and block SERT were introduced. In mammals both 5-HT1A and CB agonists, such as buspirone and WIN55,212-2, reduce anxious behaviors. Immunological and behavioral evidence suggests that 5-HT1A-like receptors may function similarly in zebrafish (Danio rerio), yet their pharmacological properties are not well characterized. Herein we compared the density of [3H] 8-hydroxy-2-di-n-propylamino tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) binding to 5-HT1A-like sites in the zebrafish brain, to that of simalarly Gαi/o-coupled cannabinoid receptors. [3H] 8-OH-DPAT specific binding was 176 ± 8, 275 ± 32, and 230 ± 36 fmol/mg protein in the hypothalamus, optic tectum, and telencephalon. [3H] WIN55,212-2 binding density was higher in those same brain regions at 6 ± 0.3, 5.5 ± 0.4 and 7.3 ± 0.3 pm/mg protein. The aquatic light-dark plus maze was used to examine behavioral effects of 5-HT1A and CB receptor agonists on zebrafish novelty-based anxiety. With acute exposure to the 5-HT1A partial-agonist buspirone (50 mg/L), or dietary exposure to WIN55,212-2 (7 μg/week) zebrafish spent more time in and/or entered white arms more often than controls (p < 0.05). Acute exposure to WIN55,212-2 at 0.5-50 mg/L, reduced mobility. These behavioral findings suggest that azipirones, like cannabinoid agonists, have anxiolytic and/or sedative properties on fish in novel environments. These observations highlight the need to consider potential ecological risks of azapirones and multimodal antidepressants in the future. PMID

  18. BMC Ecology image competition 2014: the winning images.

    PubMed

    Harold, Simon; Henderson, Caspar; Baguette, Michel; Bonsall, Michael B; Hughes, David; Settele, Josef

    2014-08-29

    BMC Ecology showcases the winning entries from its second Ecology Image Competition. More than 300 individual images were submitted from an international array of research scientists, depicting life on every continent on earth. The journal's Editorial Board and guest judge Caspar Henderson outline why their winning selections demonstrated high levels of technical skill and aesthetic sense in depicting the science of ecology, and we also highlight a small selection of highly commended images that we simply couldn't let you miss out on.

  19. BMC Ecology image competition 2014: the winning images

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    BMC Ecology showcases the winning entries from its second Ecology Image Competition. More than 300 individual images were submitted from an international array of research scientists, depicting life on every continent on earth. The journal’s Editorial Board and guest judge Caspar Henderson outline why their winning selections demonstrated high levels of technical skill and aesthetic sense in depicting the science of ecology, and we also highlight a small selection of highly commended images that we simply couldn’t let you miss out on. PMID:25178017

  20. Winning the jackpot and depression: Money cannot buy happiness.

    PubMed

    Nisslé, Sonja; Bschor, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Life event research examines the effect of life events on the course of psychiatric diseases, but the published literature considers almost only negative events. We describe the cases of two female patients who had to be hospitalized for depression after lottery winnings of over 1M DM. The 4-year follow-up shows a good outcome in both patients. Case analyses suggest that in both patients, winning was a life event relevant to the development of the depressive episode. Desirable life events might influence the course of a psychiatric illness just as negative events do. (Int J Psych Clin Pract 2002; 6: 183-186).

  1. Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) program computer software design description

    SciTech Connect

    Pertzborn, N.F.

    1997-03-26

    The Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) Program System Design Description contains a discussion of the design details for the WinCal product. Information in this document will assist a developer in maintaining the WinCal system. The content of this document follows the guidance in WHC-CM-3-10, Software Engineering Standards, Standard for Software User Documentation.

  2. Abstinence and Relapse Rates Following a College Campus-Based Quit & Win Contest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Janet L.; An, Larry; Luo, Xianghua; Scherber, Robyn M.; Berg, Carla J.; Golden, Dave; Ehlinger, Edward P.; Murphy, Sharon E.; Hecht, Stephen S.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To conduct and evaluate Quit & Win contests at 2 2-year college and 2 4-year university campuses. Participants: During Spring semester, 2006, undergraduates (N = 588) interested in quitting smoking signed up for a Quit & Win 30-day cessation contest for a chance to win a lottery prize. Methods: Participants (N = 588) completed a…

  3. A Study of the Relationship of Overindebtedness and Garnishment to Employability Among Milwaukee WIN Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youmans, Rita L.; Miller, Arlene

    This study was designed to ascertain if removal of the threat of garnishment for back debts would increase the employability of WIN enrollees. The pre- and post-WIN debt records of 75 enrollees in Milwaukee WIN were examined intensively during 1969-70. One group of 25 who anticipated garnishment were given financial counseling and granted loans to…

  4. Identification of Selective ERRγ Inverse Agonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jina; Im, Chun Young; Yoo, Eun Kyung; Ma, Min Jung; Kim, Sang-Bum; Hong, Eunmi; Chin, Jungwook; Hwang, Hayoung; Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Nam Doo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Lee, In-Kyu; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin

    2016-01-12

    GSK5182 (4) is currently one of the lead compounds for the development of estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) inverse agonists. Here, we report the design, synthesis, pharmacological and in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity (ADMET) properties of a series of compounds related to 4. Starting from 4, a series of analogs were structurally modified and their ERRγ inverse agonist activity was measured. A key pharmacophore feature of this novel class of ligands is the introduction of a heterocyclic group for A-ring substitution in the core scaffold. Among the tested compounds, several of them are potent ERRγ inverse agonists as determined by binding and functional assays. The most promising compound, 15g, had excellent binding selectivity over related subtypes (IC50 = 0.44, >10, >10, and 10 μM at the ERRγ, ERRα, ERRβ, and ERα subtypes, respectively). Compound 15g also resulted in 95% transcriptional repression at a concentration of 10 μM, while still maintaining an acceptable in vitro ADMET profile. This novel class of ERRγ inverse agonists shows promise in the development of drugs targeting ERRγ-related diseases.

  5. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  6. Aminergic control of social status in crayfish agonistic encounters.

    PubMed

    Momohara, Yuto; Kanai, Akihiro; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2013-01-01

    Using pairings of male crayfish Procambarus clarkii with a 3-7% difference in size, we confirmed that physically larger crayfish were more likely to win encounters (winning probability of over 80%). Despite a physical disadvantage, small winners of the first pairings were more likely to win their subsequent conflicts with larger naive animals (winning probability was about 70%). By contrast, the losers of the first pairings rarely won their subsequent conflicts with smaller naive animals (winning probability of 6%). These winner and loser effects were mimicked by injection of serotonin and octopamine. Serotonin-injected naive small crayfish were more likely to win in pairings with untreated larger naive crayfish (winning probability of over 60%), while octopamine-injected naive large animals were beaten by untreated smaller naive animals (winning probability of 20%). Furthermore, the winner effects of dominant crayfish were cancelled by the injection of mianserin, an antagonist of serotonin receptors and were reinforced by the injection of fluoxetin, serotonin reuptake inhibitor, just after the establishment of social order of the first pairings. Injection of octopamine channel blockers, phentolamine and epinastine, by contrast, cancelled the loser effects. These results strongly suggested that serotonin and octopamine were responsible for winner and loser effects, respectively.

  7. Aminergic Control of Social Status in Crayfish Agonistic Encounters

    PubMed Central

    Momohara, Yuto; Kanai, Akihiro; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2013-01-01

    Using pairings of male crayfish Procambarus clarkii with a 3–7% difference in size, we confirmed that physically larger crayfish were more likely to win encounters (winning probability of over 80%). Despite a physical disadvantage, small winners of the first pairings were more likely to win their subsequent conflicts with larger naive animals (winning probability was about 70%). By contrast, the losers of the first pairings rarely won their subsequent conflicts with smaller naive animals (winning probability of 6%). These winner and loser effects were mimicked by injection of serotonin and octopamine. Serotonin-injected naive small crayfish were more likely to win in pairings with untreated larger naive crayfish (winning probability of over 60%), while octopamine-injected naive large animals were beaten by untreated smaller naive animals (winning probability of 20%). Furthermore, the winner effects of dominant crayfish were cancelled by the injection of mianserin, an antagonist of serotonin receptors and were reinforced by the injection of fluoxetin, serotonin reuptake inhibitor, just after the establishment of social order of the first pairings. Injection of octopamine channel blockers, phentolamine and epinastine, by contrast, cancelled the loser effects. These results strongly suggested that serotonin and octopamine were responsible for winner and loser effects, respectively. PMID:24058575

  8. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064

    SciTech Connect

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Navas, III, Frank; Parks, Derek J.; Spearing, Paul K.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  9. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064.

    PubMed

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Navas, Frank; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Bruce Wisely, G

    2009-08-15

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  10. A SAS Interface for Bayesian Analysis with WinBUGS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; McArdle, John J.; Wang, Lijuan; Hamagami, Fumiaki

    2008-01-01

    Bayesian methods are becoming very popular despite some practical difficulties in implementation. To assist in the practical application of Bayesian methods, we show how to implement Bayesian analysis with WinBUGS as part of a standard set of SAS routines. This implementation procedure is first illustrated by fitting a multiple regression model…

  11. Economic Education Experiences of Award Winning Alaska Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Monica, Ed.

    Award-winning economic education projects devised by Alaska teachers included three elementary (K-6) projects and three second level (7-12) ones. Faith Greenough's students (Chinook Elementary School, Anchorage) compared Tlingit traditional and market economies in Alaska, so economics became an integrated part of elementary instruction. Marie…

  12. To Win a Nuclear War: The Pentagon's secret war plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kaku, M.; Axelrod, D.

    1986-01-01

    Kaku and Axelrod trace the evolution of the strategies and technologies of nuclear war planning, and the personalities of the planners, through post-war foreign policy from the Berlin Crisis to Star Wars. To Win a Nuclear War takes readers beyond the details of the costs of nuclear attack into the attitudes of war planners and Presidents from Eisenhower to Reagan.

  13. The Minnesota Heart Health Program Community Quit and Win Contests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lando, Harry A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The Minnesota Heart Health Program's Quit and Win smoking cessation contests occurred between 1982 and 1989. The contests used large prizes to encourage smokers to quit smoking. Evaluations indicated that the contests succeeded in recruiting relatively large proportions of smokers in entire communities, and abstinence outcomes were encouraging.…

  14. How ARPA-e is "Winning the Future"

    ScienceCinema

    Obama, Barack; Chu, Steven; Majumdar, Arun

    2016-07-12

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) is answering the President's call to "Win the Future". By directly funding some of the most groundbreaking discoveries in science and technology, we're encouraging the development of the most advanced clean tech innovations out there today.

  15. How ARPA-e is "Winning the Future"

    SciTech Connect

    Obama, Barack; Chu, Steven; Majumdar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) is answering the President's call to "Win the Future". By directly funding some of the most groundbreaking discoveries in science and technology, we're encouraging the development of the most advanced clean tech innovations out there today.

  16. Beyond the Basics: Award-Winning Scholastic Newspapers Define Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    2001-01-01

    Considers how a scholastic newspaper staff becomes "Award-Winning." Notes that it is important to consider developing effective and functional infographic formats; editing type and page designs with an eye for consistency; writing stories that are all targeted to their teen audience; or modernizing design to keep pace with current publication…

  17. WinDAM C earthen embankment internal erosion analysis software

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two primary causes of dam failure are overtopping and internal erosion. For the purpose of evaluating dam safety for existing earthen embankment dams and proposed earthen embankment dams, Windows Dam Analysis Modules C (WinDAM C) software will simulate either internal erosion or erosion resulting f...

  18. Winning the Future: Improving Education for the Latino Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The White House, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In his State of the Union, the President made it clear that the most important contest this country faces today is not between Democrats and Republicans, but with competitors around the world for the jobs and industries of our time. To win that contest and secure prosperity for all Americans, the nation must out-innovate, out-educate, and…

  19. Winning Through Cooperation: Competitive Insanity--Cooperative Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlick, Terry

    How games influence the psychological and social development of children is examined. It is pointed out that the current emphasis on competition and winning at all costs is harmful and that competition is not instinctive but a learned response to society's expectations. Other cultures such as the Eskimo and Chinese are presented as examples of…

  20. Blackboard Wins Payment from Competitor in Patent Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    A federal jury in Texas awarded Blackboard Inc. $3.1-million last month, saying that a smaller Canadian competitor, Desire2Learn Inc., had infringed Blackboard's patent for a system of delivering course materials online. The case has been closely watched by campus-technology officials, many of whom feared that a Blackboard win could stifle…

  1. Seven Surprising Things about Award-Winning Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorr, Pamela Wheaton

    2005-01-01

    There are many myths about award-winning schools. Most attribute outstanding school success to money or luck--generous state dollars, corporate sponsorships, that one-in-a-million principal who could run a small country in his spare time. Sure, these things help, but the 20 schools that walked away with this year's Intel and Scholastic Schools of…

  2. The Probability of Winning a Lotto Jackpot Twice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noone, Emeric T., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Proposes lotto games as a source of problems and exercises for classroom activities as well as applications of basic probability concepts in a practical setting which leads to a greater understanding of the remote chance anyone has of winning a lottery game. (KHR)

  3. Innovations in Continuing Education. 1982 Award-Winning New Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Univ. Continuing Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Descriptions are provided of the eight programs selected as award-winning innovations on the basis of universal application and potential for greatest impact for the improvement of continuing education. Each description contains this information: program name, name of principal person, name and institution to whom award would be made, source of…

  4. Steal These Ideas! Winning Activities from Real Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several winning activities for students in the classroom. These activities include: (1) making Abraham Lincoln costumes; (2) creating frosty scenes from torn-paper collage for a grammar activity; (3) listening to Dr. Martin Luther King's "I have a Dream" speech; (4) hosting an architectural challenge for a kindergarten class;…

  5. Winning is not enough: ventral striatum connectivity during physical aggression.

    PubMed

    Buades-Rotger, Macià; Brunnlieb, Claudia; Münte, Thomas F; Heldmann, Marcus; Krämer, Ulrike M

    2016-03-01

    Social neuroscience studies have shown that the ventral striatum (VS), a highly reward-sensitive brain area, is activated when participants win competitive tasks. However, in these settings winning often entails both avoiding punishment and punishing the opponent. It is thus unclear whether the rewarding properties of winning are mainly associated to punishment avoidance, or if punishing the opponent can be additionally gratifying. In the present paper we explored the neurophysiological correlates of each outcome, aiming to better understand the development of aggression episodes. We previously introduced a competitive reaction time task that separates both effects: in half of the won trials, participants can physically punish their opponent (active trials), whereas in the other half they can only avoid a punishment (passive trials). We performed functional connectivity analysis seeded in the VS to test for differential network interactions in active compared to passive trials. The VS showed greater connectivity with areas involved in reward valuation (orbitofrontal cortex), arousal (dorsal thalamus and posterior insula), attention (inferior occipital gyrus), and motor control (supplementary motor area) in active compared to passive trials, whereas connectivity between the VS and the inferior frontal gyrus decreased. Interindividual variability in connectivity strength between VS and posterior insula was related to aggressive behavior, whereas connectivity between VS and supplementary motor area was related to faster reaction times in active trials. Our results suggest that punishing a provoking opponent when winning might adaptively favor a "competitive state" in the course of an aggressive interaction.

  6. Winning is not enough: ventral striatum connectivity during physical aggression.

    PubMed

    Buades-Rotger, Macià; Brunnlieb, Claudia; Münte, Thomas F; Heldmann, Marcus; Krämer, Ulrike M

    2016-03-01

    Social neuroscience studies have shown that the ventral striatum (VS), a highly reward-sensitive brain area, is activated when participants win competitive tasks. However, in these settings winning often entails both avoiding punishment and punishing the opponent. It is thus unclear whether the rewarding properties of winning are mainly associated to punishment avoidance, or if punishing the opponent can be additionally gratifying. In the present paper we explored the neurophysiological correlates of each outcome, aiming to better understand the development of aggression episodes. We previously introduced a competitive reaction time task that separates both effects: in half of the won trials, participants can physically punish their opponent (active trials), whereas in the other half they can only avoid a punishment (passive trials). We performed functional connectivity analysis seeded in the VS to test for differential network interactions in active compared to passive trials. The VS showed greater connectivity with areas involved in reward valuation (orbitofrontal cortex), arousal (dorsal thalamus and posterior insula), attention (inferior occipital gyrus), and motor control (supplementary motor area) in active compared to passive trials, whereas connectivity between the VS and the inferior frontal gyrus decreased. Interindividual variability in connectivity strength between VS and posterior insula was related to aggressive behavior, whereas connectivity between VS and supplementary motor area was related to faster reaction times in active trials. Our results suggest that punishing a provoking opponent when winning might adaptively favor a "competitive state" in the course of an aggressive interaction. PMID:25759287

  7. Tight Focus on Instruction Wins Texas District Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    It took a while for four-time finalist Aldine, Texas, to win the Broad Prize for Urban Education. But it took even longer to craft the system that ultimately put the district over the top. Educators in Aldine district have been working for more than a decade to refine their "managed instruction" system. Reviewers examined how the school district,…

  8. Win, Women, and Money: Collegiate Athletics Today and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyquist, Ewald B.

    1979-01-01

    Problems associated with collegiate athletics involve winning at any cost, accommodating women, and financing sports in an era of declining resources and rising costs. Abuses in athletics programs, presidential responsibility, research of the problems and its results, and predictions for the future are examined with regard to these issues. (JMD)

  9. Recent advances in the discovery of alpha1-adrenoceptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The alpha(1) adrenoceptors are three of nine well-characterized receptors that are activated by epinephrine and norepinephrine. Agonists acting at the alpha(1) adrenoceptors produce numerous physiological effects, and are used therapeutically for several indications. Many known alpha(1) adrenoceptor agonists are alpha(1A) selective, but the discovery of highly selective alpha(1B) and alpha(1D) adrenoceptor agonists has proven to be an extremely difficult goal to achieve. This review will focus on recent advances in the discovery, development and clinical utility of subtype-specific alpha(1) agonists as well as contributions to our understanding of agonist-receptor interactions.

  10. Increased agonist affinity at the mu-opioid receptor induced by prolonged agonist exposure

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Clark, Mary J.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.; Traynor, John R.; Williams, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to high-efficacy agonists results in desensitization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Desensitized receptors are thought to be unable to couple to G-proteins, preventing downstream signaling, however the changes to the receptor itself are not well characterized. In the current study, confocal imaging was used to determine whether desensitizing conditions cause a change in agonist-receptor interactions. Using rapid solution exchange, the binding kinetics of fluorescently labeled opioid agonist, dermorphin Alexa594 (derm A594), to MORs was measured in live cells. The affinity of derm A594 binding increased following prolonged treatment of cells with multiple agonists that are known to cause receptor desensitization. In contrast, binding of a fluorescent antagonist, naltrexamine Alexa 594, was unaffected by similar agonist pre-treatment. The increased affinity of derm A594 for the receptor was long-lived and partially reversed after a 45 min wash. Treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin did not alter the increase in affinity of the derm A594 for MOR. Likewise the affinity of derm A594 for MORs expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from arrestin 1 and 2 knockout animals increased following treatment of the cells with the desensitization protocol. Thus, opioid receptors were “imprinted” with a memory of prior agonist exposure that was independent of G-protein activation or arrestin binding that altered subsequent agonist-receptor interactions. The increased affinity suggests that acute desensitization results in a long lasting but reversible conformational change in the receptor. PMID:23447620

  11. Agonistic and reproductive interactions in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, P M

    1984-12-01

    Reproductive and agonistic behaviors in Siamese fighting fish were investigated in eight experiments, and some consequences and determinants of these sequences were isolated. First, fights and the formation of dominance-subordinancy relations were studied. Second, it was determined that large body size as well as males' prior residency in a tank produced an agonistic advantage; the magnitude of this advantage was positively related to the duration of residency. Third, the prior-residency effect in Bettas was determined by males' familiarity with visual and/or tactile cues in their home tanks. Fourth, dominant males had greater access to living space and were more likely to display at a mirror, build nests, and approach females than were subordinates. Finally, it was discovered that chemical cues associated with presumedly inert plastic tank dividers influence Bettas' social behavior.

  12. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits. PMID:26832440

  13. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits.

  14. BMC Ecology Image Competition 2015: the winning images.

    PubMed

    Potenski, Catherine J; Porzecanski, Ana Luz; Baguette, Michel; Clobert, Jean; Hughes, David; Settele, Josef

    2015-07-29

    For the third time, BMC Ecology is delighted to announce the winners of our Image Competition. This year featured entries from all over the world and showcased not only the creativity and talent of the participants, but also the exquisite beauty and diversity of our planet. We are pleased to present the winning selections of the editorial board of the journal and guest judge Dr. Ana Luz Porzecanski, as well as some highly commended images that are sure to impress.

  15. Breach, Leach and Transport-Multiple Species WIN

    2005-12-01

    BLTMSIN-WIN is a Windows-based preprocessor for the Breach, Leach, and Transport - Multiple Species (BLT-MS) code developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for performance assessment analyses of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It is based, in part, on the preprocessor that the NRC developed, BLTMSIN. The code is written in Fortran and compiled with the Lahey Fortran compiler.

  16. The way to win in cross-border alliances.

    PubMed

    Bleeke, J; Ernst, D

    1991-01-01

    Global competition has paved the way to new corporate combinations--and opened up new pitfalls along the way. In "The Way to Win in Cross-Border Alliances," Joel Bleeke and David Ernst offer the unconventional lessons of their study of 49 cross-border alliances. For example, alliances between a weak and a strong company usually don't work; but fifty-fifty ownership of joint ventures actually improves decision making. PMID:10114925

  17. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist reduces L-DOPA-induced motor fluctuation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Lu; Yang, Xinxin; Ma, Yaping; Wu, Na; Liu, Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) has been used as an effective drug for treating dopamine depletion-induced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long-term administration of L-DOPA produces motor complications. L-DOPA has also been found to modify the two key signaling cascades, protein kinase A/dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), in striatal neurons, which are thought to play a pivotal role in forming motor complications. In the present study, we tested the possible effect of a CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist on L-DOPA-stimulated abnormal behavioral and signaling responses in vivo. Intermittent L-DOPA administration for 3 weeks induced motor fluctuation in a rat model of PD induced by intrastriatal infusion of dopamine-depleting neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). A single injection of a CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN-55,212-2 had no effect on L-DOPA-induced motor fluctuation. However, chronic injections of WIN-55,212-2 significantly attenuated abnormal behavioral responses to L-DOPA in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Similarly, chronic injections of WIN-55,212-2 influence the L-DOPA-induced alteration of DARPP-32 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation status in striatal neurons. These data provide evidence for the active involvement of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the regulation of L-DOPA action during PD therapy.

  18. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist reduces L-DOPA-induced motor fluctuation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lu; Yang, Xinxin; Ma, Yaping; Wu, Na; Liu, Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) has been used as an effective drug for treating dopamine depletion-induced Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, long-term administration of L-DOPA produces motor complications. L-DOPA has also been found to modify the two key signaling cascades, protein kinase A/dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), in striatal neurons, which are thought to play a pivotal role in forming motor complications. In the present study, we tested the possible effect of a CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist on L-DOPA-stimulated abnormal behavioral and signaling responses in vivo. Intermittent L-DOPA administration for 3 weeks induced motor fluctuation in a rat model of PD induced by intrastriatal infusion of dopamine-depleting neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). A single injection of a CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN-55,212-2 had no effect on L-DOPA-induced motor fluctuation. However, chronic injections of WIN-55,212-2 significantly attenuated abnormal behavioral responses to L-DOPA in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Similarly, chronic injections of WIN-55,212-2 influence the L-DOPA-induced alteration of DARPP-32 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation status in striatal neurons. These data provide evidence for the active involvement of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the regulation of L-DOPA action during PD therapy. PMID:25395834

  19. Agonist-Directed Desensitization of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Vasiliy; Jin, Yan; Sun, Haiyan; Ferrie, Ann M.; Wu, Qi; Fang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists with reduced tachyphylaxis may offer new therapeutic agents with improved tolerance profile. However, receptor desensitization assays are often inferred at the single signaling molecule level, thus ligand-directed desensitization is poorly understood. Here we report a label-free biosensor whole cell assay with microfluidics to determine ligand-directed desensitization of the β2AR. Together with mechanistic deconvolution using small molecule inhibitors, the receptor desensitization and resensitization patterns under the short-term agonist exposure manifested the long-acting agonism of salmeterol, and differentiated the mechanisms of agonist-directed desensitization between a full agonist epinephrine and a partial agonist pindolol. This study reveals the cellular mechanisms of agonist-selective β2AR desensitization at the whole cell level. PMID:21541288

  20. Sports doping: emerging designer and therapeutic β2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Georgakopoulos, C; Sterk, S; Nielen, M W F

    2013-10-21

    Beta2-adrenergic agonists, or β2-agonists, are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptom-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. The use of β2-agonists is prohibited in sports by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) due to claimed anabolic effects, and also, is prohibited as growth promoters in cattle fattening in the European Union. This paper reviews the last seven-year (2006-2012) literature concerning the development of novel β2-agonists molecules either by modifying the molecule of known β2-agonists or by introducing moieties producing indole-, adamantyl- or phenyl urea derivatives. New emerging β2-agonists molecules for future therapeutic use are also presented, intending to emphasize their potential use for doping purposes or as growth promoters in the near future.

  1. Modulation of Innate Immune Responses via Covalently Linked TLR Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the synthesis of novel adjuvants for vaccine development using multivalent scaffolds and bioconjugation chemistry to spatially manipulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. TLRs are primary receptors for activation of the innate immune system during vaccination. Vaccines that contain a combination of small and macromolecule TLR agonists elicit more directed immune responses and prolong responses against foreign pathogens. In addition, immune activation is enhanced upon stimulation of two distinct TLRs. Here, we synthesized combinations of TLR agonists as spatially defined tri- and di-agonists to understand how specific TLR agonist combinations contribute to the overall immune response. We covalently conjugated three TLR agonists (TLR4, 7, and 9) to a small molecule core to probe the spatial arrangement of the agonists. Treating immune cells with the linked agonists increased activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and enhanced and directed immune related cytokine production and gene expression beyond cells treated with an unconjugated mixture of the same three agonists. The use of TLR signaling inhibitors and knockout studies confirmed that the tri-agonist molecule activated multiple signaling pathways leading to the observed higher activity. To validate that the TLR4, 7, and 9 agonist combination would activate the immune response to a greater extent, we performed in vivo studies using a vaccinia vaccination model. Mice vaccinated with the linked TLR agonists showed an increase in antibody depth and breadth compared to mice vaccinated with the unconjugated mixture. These studies demonstrate how activation of multiple TLRs through chemically and spatially defined organization assists in guiding immune responses, providing the potential to use chemical tools to design and develop more effective vaccines. PMID:26640818

  2. An explicit classical strategy for winning a {{CHSH}}_{q} game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivoluska, Matej; Plesch, Martin

    2016-02-01

    A CHSH q game is a generalization of the standard two player CHSH game, with q different input and output options. In contrast to the binary game, the best classical and quantum winning strategies are not known exactly. In this paper we provide a constructive classical strategy for winning a CHSH q game, with q being a prime. Our construction achieves a winning probability better than \\frac{1}{22}{q}-\\frac{2{3}}, which is in contrast with the previously known constructive strategies achieving only the winning probability of O({q}-1).

  3. Small Molecule Bax Agonists for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Meiguo; Li, Rui; Xie, Maohua; Park, Dongkyoo; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Sica, Gabriel L.; Corsino, Patrick E.; Zhou, Jia; Ding, Chunyong; White, Mark A.; Magis, Andrew T.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Curran, Walter J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Deng, Xingming

    2014-01-01

    Bax, a central death regulator, is required at the decisional stage of apoptosis. We recently identified serine 184 (S184) of Bax as a critical functional switch controlling its proapoptotic activity. Here, we employed the structural pocket around S184 as a docking site to screen the NCI library of small molecules using the UCSF-DOCK program suite. Three compounds, small molecule Bax agonists SMBA1, SMBA2 and SMBA3, induce conformational changes in Bax by blocking S184 phosphorylation, facilitating Bax insertion into mitochondrial membranes and forming Bax oligomers. The latter leads to cytochrome c release and apoptosis in human lung cancer cells, which occurs in a Bax- but not Bak-dependent fashion. SMBA1 potently suppresses lung tumor growth via apoptosis by selectively activating Bax in vivo without significant normal tissue toxicity. Development of Bax agonists as a new class of anti-cancer drugs offers a strategy for the treatment of lung cancer and other Bax-expressing malignancies. PMID:25230299

  4. Short and long-lasting behavioral consequences of agonistic encounters between male Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Trannoy, Séverine; Penn, Jill; Lucey, Kenia; Popovic, David; Kravitz, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    In many animal species, learning and memory have been found to play important roles in regulating intra- and interspecific behavioral interactions in varying environments. In such contexts, aggression is commonly used to obtain desired resources. Previous defeats or victories during aggressive interactions have been shown to influence the outcome of later contests, revealing loser and winner effects. In this study, we asked whether short- and/or long-term behavioral consequences accompany victories and defeats in dyadic pairings between male Drosophila melanogaster and how long those effects remain. The results demonstrated that single fights induced important behavioral changes in both combatants and resulted in the formation of short-term loser and winner effects. These decayed over several hours, with the duration depending on the level of familiarity of the opponents. Repeated defeats induced a long-lasting loser effect that was dependent on de novo protein synthesis, whereas repeated victories had no long-term behavioral consequences. This suggests that separate mechanisms govern the formation of loser and winner effects. These studies aim to lay a foundation for future investigations exploring the molecular mechanisms and circuitry underlying the nervous system changes induced by winning and losing bouts during agonistic encounters. PMID:27071097

  5. Short and long-lasting behavioral consequences of agonistic encounters between male Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Trannoy, Séverine; Penn, Jill; Lucey, Kenia; Popovic, David; Kravitz, Edward A

    2016-04-26

    In many animal species, learning and memory have been found to play important roles in regulating intra- and interspecific behavioral interactions in varying environments. In such contexts, aggression is commonly used to obtain desired resources. Previous defeats or victories during aggressive interactions have been shown to influence the outcome of later contests, revealing loser and winner effects. In this study, we asked whether short- and/or long-term behavioral consequences accompany victories and defeats in dyadic pairings between male Drosophila melanogaster and how long those effects remain. The results demonstrated that single fights induced important behavioral changes in both combatants and resulted in the formation of short-term loser and winner effects. These decayed over several hours, with the duration depending on the level of familiarity of the opponents. Repeated defeats induced a long-lasting loser effect that was dependent on de novo protein synthesis, whereas repeated victories had no long-term behavioral consequences. This suggests that separate mechanisms govern the formation of loser and winner effects. These studies aim to lay a foundation for future investigations exploring the molecular mechanisms and circuitry underlying the nervous system changes induced by winning and losing bouts during agonistic encounters.

  6. Early maternal deprivation and neonatal single administration with a cannabinoid agonist induce long-term sex-dependent psychoimmunoendocrine effects in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Ricardo; Arranz, Lorena; Marco, Eva-María; Moreno, Enrique; Puerto, Marta; Guaza, Carmen; De la Fuente, Mónica; Viveros, Maria-Paz

    2007-07-01

    Maternal deprivation [24h on postnatal day 9] might represent an animal model of schizophrenia and behavioural and neurochemical alterations observed in adulthood may be mediated by hippocampal impairments induced by abnormally increased glucocorticoids due to neonatal stress. We aimed to provide new data for psychoimmunoendocrine characterization of this animal model by evaluating its effects in adolescent rats of both genders. In previous studies we found that cannabinoid compounds counteracted the enhanced impulsivity of maternally deprived animals and that the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 showed neuroprotective properties in neonatal rats. So, we hypothesised that this compound could counteract at least some of the detrimental effects that we expected to find in maternally deprived animals. Accordingly, the drug was administered immediately after the maternal deprivation period. Maternally deprived males showed significantly decreased motor activity in the holeboard and the plus-maze. The cannabinoid agonist induced, exclusively in males, a significant anxiogenic-like effect, which was reversed by maternal deprivation. In the forced swimming test, both treatments independently induced depressive-like responses. Maternal deprivation reduced immunological function whereas the drug exerted tissue-dependent effects on the immune parameters analysed. Maternally deprived females showed reduced corticosterone levels whereas the cannabinoid agonist increased hormone concentration in all groups. In general, the results show detrimental effects of both treatments as well as intriguing interactions, notably in relation to emotional behaviour and certain immunological responses.

  7. Wellbore inertial navigation system (WINS) software development and test results

    SciTech Connect

    Wardlaw, R. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    The structure and operation of the real-time software developed for the Wellbore Inertial Navigation System (WINS) application are described. The procedure and results of a field test held in a 7000-ft well in the Nevada Test Site are discussed. Calibration and instrumentation error compensation are outlined, as are design improvement areas requiring further test and development. Notes on Kalman filtering and complete program listings of the real-time software are included in the Appendices. Reference is made to a companion document which describes the downhole instrumentation package.

  8. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  9. GLP-1 agonist treatment: implications for diabetic retinopathy screening.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, Lakshminarayanan; Humphreys, Tracy; Hariman, Christian; Walker, Adrian B; Varughese, George I

    2011-12-01

    Rapid improvement in glycaemic control induced by GLP-1 agonist therapy could be yet another illustration of transient or permanent progression of diabetic retinopathy, similar to documented examples such as pregnancy and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Specific guidelines would be needed to monitor this paradoxical phenomenon during treatment with GLP-1 agonists. PMID:21906831

  10. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  11. Interactions between cannabinoid receptor agonists and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys discriminating fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) enhance some (antinociceptive) but not other (positive reinforcing) effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, suggesting that cannabinoids might be combined with opioids to treat pain without increasing, and possibly decreasing, abuse. The degree to which cannabinoids enhance antinociceptive effects of opioids varies across drugs insofar as Δ(9)-THC and the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 increase the potency of some mu opioid receptor agonists (e.g., fentanyl) more than others (e.g., nalbuphine). It is not known whether interactions between cannabinoids and opioids vary similarly for other (abuse-related) effects. This study examined whether Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 differentially impact the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine in monkeys (n=4) discriminating 0.01mg/kg of fentanyl (s.c.) from saline. Fentanyl (0.00178-0.0178mg/kg) and nalbuphine (0.01-0.32mg/kg) dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding. Neither Δ(9)-THC (0.032-1.0mg/kg) nor CP55940 (0.0032-0.032mg/kg) enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl or nalbuphine; however, doses of Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 that shifted the nalbuphine dose-effect curve markedly to the right and/or down were less effective or ineffective in shifting the fentanyl dose-effect curve. The mu opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.032mg/kg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine similarly. These data indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine are more sensitive to attenuation by cannabinoids than those of fentanyl. That the discriminative stimulus effects of some opioids are more susceptible to modification by drugs from other classes has implications for developing maximally effective therapeutic drug mixtures with reduced abuse liability. PMID:27184925

  12. DESIGN AND CALIBRATION OF THE EPA PM 2.5 WELL IMPACTOR NINETY-SIX (WINS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA well-type impactor ninety-six (WINS) was designed and calibrated to serve as a particle size separation device for the EPA reference method sampler for particulate matter under 2.5 um aerodynamic diameter. The WINS was designed to operate downstream of a PM10 inlet at a...

  13. Analysis of Elements of Award-Winning Dissertations in Education, 2005-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Charlotte E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare common criteria and characteristics for award-winning dissertations utilized by prominent national educational organizations. Formal and informal criteria for award-winning dissertations were examined and compared to distinguish commonalities in the dissertations and award processes.…

  14. EVALUATION OF THE LOADING CHARACTERISTICS OF THE EPA WINS PM 2.5 SEPARATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The loading characteristics of the USEPA WINS (Well Impactor Ninety Six) PM2.5 separator was an important design consideration during the separator's development. In recognition that all inertial separators eventually overload, the loading surface of the WINS was designed to be...

  15. Best Practices for High School Classrooms: What Award-Winning Secondary Teachers Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Randi

    This book provides guidance on high-impact teaching practices, offering first-hand accounts of award-winning teachers. Nine chapters include: (1) "Award-Winning Words of Wisdom," with topics: "High School Teaching Tips" (Jenny W. Holmstrom); "What Is a Good Teacher?" (Carey Jenkins); "Student Creativity" (Ronald W. Poplau); "Breaking Stereotypes…

  16. The Orphan among Us: An Examination of Orphans in Newbery Award Winning Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattix, April A.

    2012-01-01

    Orphan stories in children's literature are rich and complex, and they have historically permeated the pages of children's books. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of orphans as protagonists in children's award-winning literature through content analysis. This study utilizes all the Newbery Award winning books…

  17. Who Wins? Who Pays? The Economic Returns and Costs of a Bachelor's Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Alva, Jorge Klor; Schneider, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Given the importance of a college education to entering and staying in the middle class and the high cost of obtaining a bachelor's degree, "Who Wins? and Who Pays?" are questions being asked today at kitchen tables and in the halls of government throughout the nation. Using publicly available data, the authors look at who wins and who pays…

  18. 26 CFR 31.3402(q)-1 - Extension of withholding to certain gambling winnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Payers of winnings subject to withholding must file a return as required in paragraph (f) of this section... drawing is held in the State X lottery in which a winning ticket is selected. The person holding the... State X before February 1, 1978. Until the ticket is presented, State X does not know the identity...

  19. Teach for America and Teacher Ed: Heads They Win, Tails We Lose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labaree, David

    2010-01-01

    Teach for America (TFA) is a marvel at marketing, offering elite college students a win-win option: by becoming corps members, they can do good and do well at the same time. Teacher education (TE) programs are in a hopeless position in trying to compete with TFA for prospective students. They cannot provide students with the opportunity to do…

  20. 26 CFR 1.6011-3 - Requirement of statement from payees of certain gambling winnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... gambling winnings. 1.6011-3 Section 1.6011-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Requirement of statement from payees of certain gambling winnings. (a) General rule. Except as provided in..., wagering pool, lottery, or other wagering transaction (including a parimutuel pool with respect to...

  1. 26 CFR 1.6011-3 - Requirement of statement from payees of certain gambling winnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... gambling winnings. 1.6011-3 Section 1.6011-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Requirement of statement from payees of certain gambling winnings. (a) General rule. Except as provided in..., wagering pool, lottery, or other wagering transaction (including a parimutuel pool with respect to...

  2. 26 CFR 1.6011-3 - Requirement of statement from payees of certain gambling winnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... gambling winnings. 1.6011-3 Section 1.6011-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... of statement from payees of certain gambling winnings. (a) General rule. Except as provided in..., wagering pool, lottery, or other wagering transaction (including a parimutuel pool with respect to...

  3. 26 CFR 1.6011-3 - Requirement of statement from payees of certain gambling winnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... gambling winnings. 1.6011-3 Section 1.6011-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Requirement of statement from payees of certain gambling winnings. (a) General rule. Except as provided in..., wagering pool, lottery, or other wagering transaction (including a parimutuel pool with respect to...

  4. Jackpot? Gender Differences in the Effects of Lottery Wins on Separation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boertien, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    In this study, information on small to modest lottery wins from the British Household Panel Survey (N = 2,563) was used to investigate the effect of income on separation. The analysis demonstrated that money matters within relationships. Lottery wins temporarily reduced the odds of separation after men won. Men spent more on leisure and became…

  5. Near-Miss Effects on Response Latencies and Win Estimations of Slot Machine Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Mark R.; Schreiber, James E.

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined the degree to which slot machine near-miss trials, or trials that displayed 2 of 3 winning symbols on the payoff line, affected response times and win estimations of 12 recreational slot machine players. Participants played a commercial slot machine in a casino-like laboratory for course extra-credit points. Videotaped…

  6. An Assessment of WIN and Welfare Tax Credits. Final Report No. 1001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, David; And Others

    As an overall assessment of the Work Incentive (WIN) and Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) tax credit programs, the project reported sought answers to the following questions: (1) To what degree are tax credits a factor in employer decisions to hire WIN registrations and welfare recipients? (2) What are the differences in usage of the…

  7. Award Winning Energy Education Activities for Elementary and High School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Helen H., Ed.

    This publication contains descriptions of the winning entries to the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) Teacher Participation Contest conducted in 1976. This was a nationwide contest for the design of activities around energy themes at any grade level, K-12. The ten winning entries described here are: (1) Energy Units for Primary Grades;…

  8. Cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Das, S K; Paria, B C; Chakraborty, I; Dey, S K

    1995-05-01

    Using RNA (Northern) blot hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrate that the brain-type cannabinoid receptor (CB1-R) mRNA, but not the spleen-type cannabinoid receptor (CB2-R) mRNA, is expressed in the mouse uterus and that this organ has the capacity to synthesize the putative endogenous cannabinoid ligand, anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide). The psychoactive cannabinoid component of marijuana--delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)--or anandamide, but not the inactive and nonpsychoactive cannabidiol (CBD), inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in the mouse uterus, which was prevented by pertussis toxin pretreatment. These results suggest that uterine CB1-R is coupled to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and is biologically active. Autoradiographic studies identified ligand binding sites ([3H]anandamide) in the uterine epithelium and stromal cells, suggesting that these cells are perhaps the targets for cannabinoid action. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H]WIN 55212-2, another cannabinoid receptor ligand, showed a single class of high-affinity binding sites in the endometrium with an apparent Kd of 2.4 nM and Bmax of 5.4 x 10(9) molecules per mg of protein. The gene encoding lactoferrin is an estrogen-responsive gene in the mouse uterus that was rapidly and transiently up-regulated by THC, but not by CBD, in ovariectomized mice in the absence of ovarian steroids. This effect, unlike that of 17 beta-estradiol (E2), was not influenced by a pure antiestrogen, ICI 182780, suggesting that the THC-induced uterine lactoferrin gene expression does not involve estrogen receptors. We propose that the uterus is a new target for cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling.

  9. Cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed Central

    Das, S K; Paria, B C; Chakraborty, I; Dey, S K

    1995-01-01

    Using RNA (Northern) blot hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrate that the brain-type cannabinoid receptor (CB1-R) mRNA, but not the spleen-type cannabinoid receptor (CB2-R) mRNA, is expressed in the mouse uterus and that this organ has the capacity to synthesize the putative endogenous cannabinoid ligand, anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide). The psychoactive cannabinoid component of marijuana--delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)--or anandamide, but not the inactive and nonpsychoactive cannabidiol (CBD), inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in the mouse uterus, which was prevented by pertussis toxin pretreatment. These results suggest that uterine CB1-R is coupled to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and is biologically active. Autoradiographic studies identified ligand binding sites ([3H]anandamide) in the uterine epithelium and stromal cells, suggesting that these cells are perhaps the targets for cannabinoid action. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H]WIN 55212-2, another cannabinoid receptor ligand, showed a single class of high-affinity binding sites in the endometrium with an apparent Kd of 2.4 nM and Bmax of 5.4 x 10(9) molecules per mg of protein. The gene encoding lactoferrin is an estrogen-responsive gene in the mouse uterus that was rapidly and transiently up-regulated by THC, but not by CBD, in ovariectomized mice in the absence of ovarian steroids. This effect, unlike that of 17 beta-estradiol (E2), was not influenced by a pure antiestrogen, ICI 182780, suggesting that the THC-induced uterine lactoferrin gene expression does not involve estrogen receptors. We propose that the uterus is a new target for cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7753807

  10. Cannabinoids inhibit the activation of ERK MAPK in PMA/Io-stimulated mouse splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Faubert Kaplan, Barbara L; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2003-10-01

    The mechanism of action of immune suppression by cannabinoids involves suppression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) production in phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io)-stimulated lymphocytes. This decrease in IL-2 was due to inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) transcription factors, both of which depend on proteins that are regulated by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase subgroup of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK MAPK). Thus, the objective of the present study was to characterize the effects of cannabinoid compounds on ERK MAPK under conditions where IL-2 expression was suppressed. Using the MEK inhibitor PD098059 in order to assess the role of ERK MAPK in PMA/Io-stimulated splenocytes (SPLC), it was determined that IL-2 production and expression of c-fos and c-jun nuclear protein expression depended on activation of ERK MAPK. In response to PMA/Io, expression of nuclear phosphorylated ERK MAPK was rapidly induced, peaked at approximately 15 min, and was sustained for up to 240 min. Pretreatment with cannabinol (CBN) inhibited expression of phosphorylated ERK MAPK at several time points up to 240 min post cellular activation. Furthermore, WIN-55212-2, a synthetic cannabinoid, inhibited expression of phosphorylated ERK MAPK at 240 min post cellular activation. CBN did not induce activation of ERK MAPK in the absence of PMA/Io. Collectively, these studies suggest that cannabinoid-induced inhibition of IL-2 in PMA/Io-stimulated splenocytes might be due, in part, to inhibition of ERK MAPK activation.

  11. Using sound to unmask losses disguised as wins in multiline slot machines.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Mike J; Collins, Karen; Harrigan, Kevin A; Graydon, Candice; Fugelsang, Jonathan A

    2015-03-01

    Losses disguised as wins (LDWs) are slot machine outcomes where participants bet on multiple lines and win back less than their wager. Despite losing money, the machine celebrates these outcomes with reinforcing sights and sounds. Here, we sought to show that psychophysically and psychologically, participants treat LDWs as wins, but that we could expose LDWs as losses by using negative sounds as feedback. 157 participants were allocated into one of three conditions: a standard sound condition where LDWs, despite being losses, are paired with winning sights and sounds; a silent condition, where LDWs are paired with silence; and a negative sound condition where LDWs and regular losses are both followed by a negative sound. After viewing a paytable, participants conducted 300 spins on a slot machine simulator while heart rate deceleration (HRD) and skin conductance responses (SCRs) were monitored. Participants were then shown 20 different spin outcomes including LDWs and asked whether they had won or lost on that outcome. Participants then estimated on how many spins (out of 300) they won more than they wagered. SCRs were similar for losses and LDWs (both smaller than actual wins). HRD, however, was steeper for both wins and LDWs, compared to losses. In the standard condition, a majority of participants (mis)categorized LDWs as wins, and significantly overestimated the number of times they actually won. In the negative sound condition, this pattern was reversed; most participants correctly categorized LDWs as losses, and they gave high-fidelity win estimates. We conclude that participants both think and physiologically react to LDWs as though they are wins, a miscategorization that misleads them to think that they are winning more often than they actually are. Sound can be used to effectively prevent this misconception and unmask the disguise of LDWs. PMID:24198088

  12. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation. PMID:22269613

  13. [PPAR receptors and insulin sensitivity: new agonists in development].

    PubMed

    Pégorier, J-P

    2005-04-01

    Thiazolidinediones (or glitazones) are synthetic PPARgamma (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors gamma) ligands with well recognized effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The clinical use of these PPARgamma agonists in type 2 diabetic patients leads to an improved glycemic control and an inhanced insulin sensitivity, and at least in animal models, to a protective effect on pancreatic beta-cell function. However, they can produce adverse effects, generally mild or moderate, but some of them (mainly peripheral edema and weight gain) may conduct to treatment cessation. Several pharmacological classes are currently in pre-clinical or clinical development, with the objective to retain the beneficial metabolic properties of PPARgamma agonists, either alone or in association with the PPARalpha agonists (fibrates) benefit on lipid profile, but devoid of the side-effects on weight gain and fluid retention. These new pharmacological classes: partial PPARgamma agonists, PPARgamma antagonists, dual PPARalpha/PPARgamma agonists, pan PPARalpha/beta(delta)/gamma agonists, RXR receptor agonists (rexinoids), are presented in this review. Main results from in vitro cell experiments and animal model studies are discussed, as well as the few published short-term studies in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:15959400

  14. Antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists.

    PubMed

    Labrie, F; Bélanger, A; Kelly, P A; Séguin, C; Cusan, L; Lefebvre, F A; Reeves, J J; Lemay, A; Faure, N; Gourdeau, Y; Raynaud, J P

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms responsible for the antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists. Large doses of the LHRH agonist LHRH-EA lead to a marked reduction of testicular and secondary sex organ weight, LH receptor levels, and plasma testosterone concentration. A marked inhibition of basal testicular and testosterone concentrations is obtained after daily administration of the LHRH agonists at doses greater than 10 ng. Treatment with low doses of the LHRH agonist can lead to an increased steroidogenic response to LH. Treatment with low doses of LHRH agonists could stimulate Leydig cell function while high doses are history. A study of the effects of longterm treatment with an LHRH agonsist on spermatogenesis revelaed that testis, prostate, and seminal vesicle weight decreased and plasma LH and FSH levels increased over 12 weeks. Comparison of the effects of increasing doses of LHRH agonist on testicular and ovarian gonadotropin receptors and steroidogenesis in male rats indicates that single or repeated administration of LHRH agonists can lead to loss of testicular LH receptors in the absence of the pituitary gland. The loss of ovarian gonadotropin receptors in female rats is also investigated. Antifertility effects of LHRH ethylamide are accompanied by a marked loss of LH/hCG and FSH receptors in ovarian tissue. The injection of 1,3, or 10 ng LHRH-EA in intact rats has no significant effect on ovarian LH receptor levels. A study of the direct action of LHRH agonists at the ovarian level demonstrates a close relationship between the binding activity of a large series of LHRH agonists and antagonists in the anterior pituitary gland and the ovary. Inhibition of testicular steroidogenesis in man by treatment with a potent LHRH agonist is also demonstrated. Intranasal administration of LHRH ethylamide has luteolytic effects in normal women. Daily administration of LHRH-EA inhibited ovulation in all but 2 of 89 treatment

  15. WinMod: An expert advisor for investment casting

    SciTech Connect

    Bivens, H.P.; Williamson, G.A. Jr.; Luger, G.F.; Erdmann, R.G.; Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Anderson, D.J.

    1998-04-01

    Investment casting is an important method for fabricating a variety of high quality components in mechanical systems. Cast components, unfortunately, have a large design and gate/runner build time associated with their fabrication. In addition, casting engineers often require many years of actual experience in order to consistently pour high quality castings. Since 1989, Sandia National Laboratories has been investigating casting technology and software that will reduce the time overhead involved in producing quality casts. Several companies in the casting industry have teamed up with Sandia to form the FASTCAST Consortium. One result of this research and the formation of the FASTCAST consortium is the creation of the WinMod software, an expert casting advisor that supports the decision making process of the casting engineer through visualization and advice to help eliminate possible casting defects.

  16. Self-serving judgments about winning the lottery.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Julie E; Beggan, James K

    2004-05-01

    Although myths and stereotypes about lottery winners tend to be negative (e.g., winners become extravagant), people continue to spend billions of dollars buying lottery tickets in the hope of winning. The authors applied findings from the self-enhancement literature to understand this paradox. Eighty college students received class credit for their participation, in which they read a scenario that asked them to imagine that they, or a target other, had won a lottery. Participants' responses to a 34-item questionnaire displayed a self-serving bias, such that changes to the self were expected to be more positive than changes to the other. For several items, this effect was moderated by the participant's gender. The present research indicates that the pervasive tendency to display self-serving biases can apply to future-oriented processing, an under-researched topic.

  17. Effects of warming temperatures on winning times in the Boston marathon.

    PubMed

    Miller-Rushing, Abraham J; Primack, Richard B; Phillips, Nathan; Kaufmann, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    It is not known whether global warming will affect winning times in endurance events, and counterbalance improvements in race performances that have occurred over the past century. We examined a time series (1933-2004) from the Boston Marathon to test for an effect of warming on winning times by men and women. We found that warmer temperatures and headwinds on the day of the race slow winning times. However, 1.6°C warming in annual temperatures in Boston between 1933 and 2004 did not consistently slow winning times because of high variability in temperatures on race day. Starting times for the race changed to earlier in the day beginning in 2006, making it difficult to anticipate effects of future warming on winning times. However, our models indicate that if race starting times had not changed and average race day temperatures had warmed by 0.058°C/yr, a high-end estimate, we would have had a 95% chance of detecting a consistent slowing of winning marathon times by 2100. If average race day temperatures had warmed by 0.028°C/yr, a mid-range estimate, we would have had a 64% chance of detecting a consistent slowing of winning times by 2100.

  18. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  19. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  20. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25437461

  1. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25326839

  2. PPAR dual agonists: are they opening Pandora's Box?

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Rose, Madhankumar; Ganti, Subrahmanya S; Krishan, Pawan; Singh, Manjeet

    2007-08-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the major cause of mortality in patients of diabetes mellitus. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of nuclear hormone receptor superfamily comprising of three subtypes such as PPARalpha, PPARgamma and PPARdelta/beta. Activation of PPARalpha reduces triglycerides and involves in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPARgamma causes insulin sensitization and enhances glucose metabolism, whereas activation of PPARdelta enhances fatty acid metabolism. Current therapeutic strategies available for the treatment of diabetes do not inhibit the associated secondary cardiovascular complications. Hence, the development of multimodal drugs which can reduce hyperglycemia and concomitantly inhibit the progression of secondary cardiovascular complications may offer valuable therapeutic option. Several basic and clinical studies have exemplified the beneficial effects of PPARalpha and PPARgamma ligands in preventing the cardiovascular risks. The PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists are developed to increase insulin sensitivity and simultaneously prevent diabetic cardiovascular complications. Such compounds are under clinical trials and proposed for treatment of Type II diabetes with secondary cardiovascular complications. However, PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists such as muraglitazar, tesaglitazar and ragaglitazar have been noted to produce several cardiovascular risks and carcinogenicity, which raised number of questions about the clinical applications of dual agonists in diabetes and its associated complications. The ongoing basic studies have elucidated the cardio protective role of PPARdelta. Therefore, further studies are on the track to develop PPARalpha/delta and PPAR gamma/delta dual agonists and PPARalpha/gamma/delta pan agonists for the treatment of diabetic cardiovascular complications. The present review critically analyzes the protective and detrimental effect of PPAR agonists in

  3. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  4. Social Contingencies and College Quit and Win Contest: A Qualitative Inquiry

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J.L.; Bengtson, J.E.; Ghidei, W.; Schreier, M.; Wang, Q.; Luo, X.; Lust, K.; Ahluwalia, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the social contingencies associated with participation in a college Quit and Win contest to promote smoking cessation. Methods Six focus groups (N = 27)were conducted with college students who participated in a Quit and Win research trial. Results Themes included: 1) participants reluctant to disclose quit decision; 2) perception of little support in their quit attempt, and 3) the social environment as a trigger for relapse. Conclusion Although Quit and Win contests appear to motivate an initial quit attempt, the reluctance of smokers to disclose their quit attempt limits the potential positive impact of social support when utilizing this public service campaign. PMID:25564836

  5. NETPATH-WIN: an interactive user version of the mass-balance model, NETPATH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    El-Kadi, A. I.; Plummer, L.N.; Aggarwal, P.

    2011-01-01

    NETPATH-WIN is an interactive user version of NETPATH, an inverse geochemical modeling code used to find mass-balance reaction models that are consistent with the observed chemical and isotopic composition of waters from aquatic systems. NETPATH-WIN was constructed to migrate NETPATH applications into the Microsoft WINDOWS® environment. The new version facilitates model utilization by eliminating difficulties in data preparation and results analysis of the DOS version of NETPATH, while preserving all of the capabilities of the original version. Through example applications, the note describes some of the features of NETPATH-WIN as applied to adjustment of radiocarbon data for geochemical reactions in groundwater systems.

  6. Pharmacogenetics of beta2 adrenergic receptor agonists in asthma management.

    PubMed

    Ortega, V E

    2014-07-01

    Beta2 (β2) adrenergic receptor agonists (beta agonists) are a commonly prescribed treatment for asthma despite the small increase in risk for life-threatening adverse responses associated with long-acting beta agonist (LABA). The concern for life-threatening adverse effects associated with LABA and the inter-individual variability of therapeutic responsiveness to LABA-containing combination therapies provide the rationale for pharmacogenetic studies of beta agonists. These studies primarily evaluated genes within the β2-adrenergic receptor and related pathways; however, recent genome-wide studies have identified novel loci for beta agonist response. Recent studies have identified a role for rare genetic variants in determining beta agonist response and, potentially, the risk for rare, adverse responses to LABA. Before genomics research can be applied to the development of genetic profiles for personalized medicine, it will be necessary to continue adapting to the analysis of an increasing volume of genetic data in larger cohorts with a combination of analytical methods and in vitro studies.

  7. Pairwise agonist scanning predicts cellular signaling responses to combinatorial stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Manash S; Purvis, Jeremy E; Brass, Lawrence F; Diamond, Scott L

    2010-07-01

    Prediction of cellular response to multiple stimuli is central to evaluating patient-specific clinical status and to basic understanding of cell biology. Cross-talk between signaling pathways cannot be predicted by studying them in isolation and the combinatorial complexity of multiple agonists acting together prohibits an exhaustive exploration of the complete experimental space. Here we describe pairwise agonist scanning (PAS), a strategy that trains a neural network model based on measurements of cellular responses to individual and all pairwise combinations of input signals. We apply PAS to predict calcium signaling responses of human platelets in EDTA-treated plasma to six different agonists (ADP, convulxin, U46619, SFLLRN, AYPGKF and PGE(2)) at three concentrations (0.1, 1 and 10 x EC(50)). The model predicted responses to sequentially added agonists, to ternary combinations of agonists and to 45 different combinations of four to six agonists (R = 0.88). Furthermore, we use PAS to distinguish between the phenotypic responses of platelets from ten donors. Training neural networks with pairs of stimuli across the dose-response regime represents an efficient approach for predicting complex signal integration in a patient-specific disease milieu. PMID:20562863

  8. Perception of specific trigeminal chemosensory agonists

    PubMed Central

    Frasnelli, J; Albrecht, J; Bryant, B; Lundström, JN

    2011-01-01

    The intranasal trigeminal system is a third chemical sense in addition to olfaction and gustation. As opposed to smell and taste, we still lack knowledge on the relationship between receptor binding and perception for the trigeminal system. We therefore investigated the sensitivity of the intranasal trigeminal system towards agonists of the trigeminal receptors TRPM8 and TRPA1 by assessing subjects’ ability to identify which nostril has been stimulated in a monorhinal stimulation design. We summed the number of correct identifications resulting in a lateralization score. Stimuli were menthol (activating TRPM8 receptors), eucalyptol (TRPM8), mustard oil (TRPA1) and two mixtures thereof (menthol/eucalyptol and menthol/mustard oil). In addition, we examined the relationship between intensity and lateralization scores and investigated whether intensity evaluation and lateralization scores of the mixtures show additive effects. All stimuli were correctly lateralized significantly above chance. Across subjects the lateralization scores for single compounds activating the same receptor showed a stronger correlation than stimuli activating different receptors. Although single compounds were isointense, the mixture of menthol and eucalyptol (activating only TRPM8) was perceived as weaker and was lateralized less accurately than the mixture of menthol and mustard oil (activating both TRPM8 and TRPA1) suggesting suppression effects in the former mixture. In conclusion, sensitivity of different subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons seems to be related, but only to a certain degree. The large coherence in sensitivity between various intranasal trigeminal stimuli suggests that measuring sensitivity to one single trigeminal chemical stimulus may be sufficient to generally assess the trigeminal system’s chemosensitivity. Further, for stimuli activating the same receptor a mixture suppression effect appears to occur similar to that observed in the other chemosensory

  9. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  10. Contingency management is efficacious in opioid-dependent outpatients not maintained on agonist pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Petry, Nancy M; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2013-12-01

    Contingency management (CM) is an empirically supported intervention for substance dependence, but it has not been evaluated systematically in non maintained opioid-dependent patients. This retrospective analysis examined whether CM was effective in opioid-dependent patients initiating intensive outpatient psychosocial treatment. In the primary trial (Petry, N. M., Weinstock, J., & Alessi, S. M. [2011]. A randomized trial of contingency management delivered in the context of group counseling. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 79, 686-696), substance-abusing patients (n = 239) at two community-based clinics were randomized to standard care (SC) or SC with CM for 12 weeks; in the CM condition, patients earned opportunities to win prizes for attending treatment and submitting drug-negative samples. For this analysis, patients were further classified as non-opioid-dependent (n = 159), opioid-dependent and not receiving maintenance therapy (n = 33), or opioid-dependent and on methadone or Suboxone maintenance therapy (n = 47). Main effects of opioid dependence/maintenance status, treatment condition, and their interaction were evaluated with respect to attendance and abstinence outcomes. Opioid-dependent patients receiving maintenance pharmacotherapy attended treatment on fewer days and achieved less abstinence than their opioid-dependent counterparts who were not on opioid agonist therapy, with Cohen's d effect sizes of 0.63 and 0.61 for attendance and abstinence outcomes, respectively. Nonmaintained opioid-dependent patients evidenced similar outcomes as substance abusing patients who were not opioid-dependent. CM also improved retention and abstinence (d = .26 and .40, respectively), with no interaction effects with opioid dependence/maintenance status noted. These data suggest that CM may be an effective psychosocial intervention potentially suitable for the growing population of opioid-dependent patients, including those not receiving maintenance

  11. How we use WinRho in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Stotler, Brie A; Schwartz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease that affects children and adults. WinRho SDF is a D immune globulin product that is Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of ITP in D+ pediatric and adult patients. WinRho is a plasma-derived biologic product dispensed from blood banks. Transfusion medicine physicians serve as a resource to health care providers regarding blood component and derivative usage and, as such, should be familiar with the use of WinRho for ITP, including the dosage, administration, and contraindications. This report details the transfusion medicine consultation practice and guidelines at a tertiary care academic medical center for the usage of WinRho SDF in patients with ITP. PMID:26094894

  12. 10 to 1: Bugs Win in NASA Study, One-Year Mission Video Miniseries Highlights Microbes

    NASA Video Gallery

    Bugs are winning out, and that’s a good thing according to NASA’s Human Research Program. As part of NASA’s One-Year Mission, researchers are studying how microbes living on astronauts’ skin, insid...

  13. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF THE USEPA WINS PM 2.5 SEPARATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors affecting the performance of the US EPA WINS PM2.5 separator have been systematically evaluated. In conjunction with the separator's laboratory calibrated penetration curve, analysis of the governing equation that describes conventional impactor performance was used to ...

  14. How we use WinRho in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Stotler, Brie A; Schwartz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease that affects children and adults. WinRho SDF is a D immune globulin product that is Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of ITP in D+ pediatric and adult patients. WinRho is a plasma-derived biologic product dispensed from blood banks. Transfusion medicine physicians serve as a resource to health care providers regarding blood component and derivative usage and, as such, should be familiar with the use of WinRho for ITP, including the dosage, administration, and contraindications. This report details the transfusion medicine consultation practice and guidelines at a tertiary care academic medical center for the usage of WinRho SDF in patients with ITP.

  15. Relationship between team assists and win-loss record in The National Basketball Association.

    PubMed

    Melnick, M J

    2001-04-01

    Using research methodology for analysis of secondary data, statistical data for five National Basketball Association (NBA) seasons (1993-1994 to 1997-1998) were examined to test for a relationship between team assists (a behavioral measure of teamwork) and win-loss record. Rank-difference correlation indicated a significant relationship between the two variables, the coefficients ranging from .42 to .71. Team assist totals produced higher correlations with win-loss record than assist totals for the five players receiving the most playing time ("the starters"). A comparison of "assisted team points" and "unassisted team points" in relationship to win-loss record favored the former and strongly suggested that how a basketball team scores points is more important than the number of points it scores. These findings provide circumstantial support for the popular dictum in competitive team sports that "Teamwork Means Success-Work Together, Win Together."

  16. RXR Partial Agonist CBt-PMN Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Type 2 Diabetes without the Side Effects of RXR Full Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treating insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in rodents, currently known retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonists induce significant adverse effects. Here we introduce a novel RXR partial agonist CBt-PMN (11b), which shows a potent glucose-lowering effect and improvements of insulin secretion and glucose tolerance without the serious adverse effects caused by RXR full agonists. We suggest that RXR partial agonists may be a new class of antitype 2 diabetes drug candidates. PMID:24900488

  17. Anxiety-like behavior induced by histaminergic agents can be prevented by cannabinoidergic WIN55,212-2 injected into the dorsal hippocampus in mice.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Nasehi, Mohammad; Piri, Morteza; Bina, Payvand

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the effects of the histaminergic system and cannabinoid receptor agents on anxiety-related behaviors and their interactions using the hole-board test on mice. Bilateral intra-CA1 administration of the CB1/CB2 receptor agonist, WIN55, 212-2 (0.1-0.5microg/mouse) did not modify exploratory behaviors in mice. On the other hand, intra-CA1 administration of CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251 (25 and 50ng/mouse) or histamine, pyrilamine and ranitidine (5-10microg/mouse) decreased the amount of head-dipping and increased the first head-dip, suggesting an anxiogenic-like response. Furthermore, our present data indicated that the co-administration of WIN55, 212-2 (0.25microg/mouse) with histaminergic agents, decreased the anxiogenic-like response of an effective dose (5microg/mouse) of histamine and pyrilamine, but not that of ranitidine. In addition, the results demonstrated that co-administration of an ineffective dose of AM251 (15ng/mouse) with histaminergic drugs did not alter the response induced by an ineffective dose (3.75microg/mouse) of either histamine or pyrilamine and ranitidine. In all experiments and doses, locomotor activity and other exploratory behaviors were not significantly changed. In conclusion, our results showed that there is a chance of partial interaction between the cannabinoidergic and the histaminergic systems of the dorsal hippocampus on anxiogenic/anxiolytic-like behaviors in hole-board test.

  18. Combinatorial study of WInZnO films deposited by rf magnetron co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byeong-Yun; Park, Jae-Cheol; Lee, Young-Jun; Cha, Sang-Jun; Kim, Joo-Hyung; Kim, Kwang-Young; Kim, Tae-Won; Heo, Gi-Seok

    2011-09-15

    The compositional dependence of co-sputtered tungsten indium zinc oxide (WInZnO) film properties was first investigated by means of a combinatorial technique. Indium zinc oxide (IZO) and WO{sub 3} targets were used with different target power. W composition ratio [W/(In+Zn+W)] was varied between 3 and 30 at% and film thickness was reduced as the sample position moved toward WO{sub 3} target. Furthermore, the optical bandgap energy increased gradually, which might be affected by the reduction in film thickness. All the WInZnO films showed an amorphous phase regardless of the W/(In+Zn+W) ratio. As the W/(In+Zn+W) ratio in WInZnO films increased, the carrier concentration was restricted, causing the increase in electrical resistivity. W cations worked as oxygen binders in determining the electronic properties, resulting in suppressing the formation of oxygen vacancies. Consequentially, W metal cations were effectively incorporated into the WInZnO films as a suppressor against the oxygen vacancies and the carrier generation by employing the combinatorial technique. - Graphical abstract: The film thickness and the sheet resistance (R{sub s}) with respect to the sample position of WInZnO films, which is compositionally graded by rf power for each target, are exhibited. Highlights: > The compositional dependence of co-sputtered WInZnO film properties is first investigated. > W cations work as oxygen binders in determining the electronic properties. > All the WInZnO films show an amorphous phase regardless of the W/(In+Zn+W) ratio. > W metal cations are effectively incorporated into the WInZnO films by the combinatorial technique.

  19. Dihydrocodeine/Agonists for Alcohol Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, Albrecht; Müller, Markus; Frietsch, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol addiction too often remains insufficiently treated. It shows the same profile as severe chronic diseases, but no comparable, effective basic treatment has been established up to now. Especially patients with repeated relapses, despite all therapeutic approaches, and patients who are not able to attain an essential abstinence to alcohol, need a basic medication. It seems necessary to acknowledge that parts of them need any agonistic substance, for years, possibly lifelong. For >14 years, we have prescribed such substances with own addictive character for these patients. Methods: We present a documented best possible practice, no designed study. Since 1997, we prescribed Dihydrocodeine (DHC) to 102 heavily alcohol addicted patients, later, also Buprenorphine, Clomethiazole (>6 weeks), Baclofen, and in one case Amphetamine, each on individual indication. This paper focuses on the data with DHC, especially. The Clomethiazole-data has been submitted to a German journal. The number of treatments with the other substances is still low. Results: The 102 patients with the DHC treatment had 1367 medically assisted detoxifications and specialized therapies before! The 4 years-retention rate was 26.4%, including 2.8% successfully terminated treatments. In our 12-steps scale on clinical impression, we noticed a significant improvement from mean 3.7 to 8.4 after 2 years. The demand for medically assisted detoxifications in the 2 years remaining patients was reduced by 65.5%. Mean GGT improved from 206.6 U/l at baseline to 66.8 U/l after 2 years. Experiences with the other substances are similar but different in details. Conclusion: Similar to the Italian studies with GHB and Baclofen, we present a new approach, not only with new substances, but also with a new setting and much more trusting attitude. We observe a huge improvement, reaching an almost optimal, stable, long term status in around 1/4 of the patients already. Many further

  20. The physician/hospital joint venture: developing a win/win strategy for success. Part III: Structuring and negotiating the deal.

    PubMed

    Shorr, A S

    1987-08-01

    This four part series, "The Physician/Hospital Joint Venture: Developing a Win/Win Strategy," examines the philosophical basis of marketing to physicians, the options for the organization in formulating a strategy for joint venture development, structuring and negotiating the deal, and finally how to build the physician loyalty and commitment essential for the joint venture's continued success. In this third part of the series, the author examines the elements essential to structure a successful joint venture and key issues that need to be addressed during the negotiation process.

  1. The physician/hospital joint venture. Developing a win/win strategy for success. Part II: Joint venture strategies and considerations.

    PubMed

    Shorr, A S

    1987-05-01

    This four part series, "The Physician/Hospital Joint Venture: Developing a Win/Win Strategy," examines the philosophical basis of marketing to physicians, the options for the organization in formulating a strategy for joint venture development, structuring and negotiating the deal, and finally how to build the physician loyalty and commitment essential for the joint venture's continued success. In this second part of the series, the author examines the internal and external issues that must be addressed to ensure success and the types of information that must be gathered.

  2. The physician/hospital joint venture. Developing a win/win strategy for success. Part I: The first step: developing the environment.

    PubMed

    Shorr, A B

    1987-02-01

    This four part series, "The Physician/Hospital Joint Venture: Developing a Win/Win Strategy," will examine the philosophical basis of marketing to physicians, the options for the organization in formulating a strategy for joint venture development, structuring and negotiating the deal, and finally how to build the physician loyalty and commitment essential for the joint venture's continued success. In this first article, the author emphasizes the organization's need to develop a strategic plan that includes a program for attracting physicians. It also points out the need for sensitivity to physicians' concerns and provides examples of successes and failures.

  3. WinHAP2: an extremely fast haplotype phasing program for long genotype sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The haplotype phasing problem tries to screen for phenotype associated genomic variations from millions of candidate data. Most of the current computer programs handle this problem with high requirements of computing power and memory. By replacing the computation-intensive step of constructing the maximum spanning tree with a heuristics of estimated initial haplotype, we released the WinHAP algorithm version 1.0, which outperforms the other algorithms in terms of both running speed and overall accuracy. Results This work further speeds up the WinHAP algorithm to version 2.0 (WinHAP2) by utilizing the divide-and-conquer strategy and the OpenMP parallel computing mode. WinHAP2 can phase 500 genotypes with 1,000,000 SNPs using just 12.8 MB in memory and 2.5 hours on a personal computer, whereas the other programs require unacceptable memory or running times. The parallel running mode further improves WinHAP2's running speed with several orders of magnitudes, compared with the other programs, including Beagle, SHAPEIT2 and 2SNP. Conclusions WinHAP2 is an extremely fast haplotype phasing program which can handle a large-scale genotyping study with any number of SNPs in the current literature and at least in the near future. PMID:24884701

  4. Hydrograph sensitivity to estimates of map impervious cover: a WinHSPF BASINS case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endreny, Theodore A.; Somerlot, Christopher; Hassett, James M.

    2003-04-01

    The BASINS geographic information system hydrologic toolkit was designed to compute total maximum daily loads, which are often derived by combining water quantity estimates with pollutant concentration estimates. In this paper the BASINS toolkit PLOAD and WinHSPF sub-models are briefly described, and then a 0·45 km2 headwater watershed in the New York Croton River area is used for a case study illustrating a full WinHSPF implementation. The goal of the Croton study was to determine the sensitivity of WinHSPF hydrographs to changes in land cover map inputs. This scenario occurs when scaling the WinHSPF model from the smaller 0·45 km2 watershed to the larger 1000 km2 management basin of the entire Croton area. Methods used to test model sensitivity include first calibrating the WinHSPF hydrograph using research-monitored precipitation and discharge data together with high spatial resolution and accuracy land cover data of impervious and pervious areas, and then swapping three separate land cover files, known as GIRAS, MRLC, and DOQQ data, into the calibrated model. Research results indicated that the WinHSPF land cover swapping had peak flow sensitivity in December 2001 hydrographs between 35% underestimation and 20% overestimation, and that errors in land-cover-derived runoff ratios for storm totals and peak flows tracked with the land cover data estimates of impervious area.

  5. Honokiol: A non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist from nature☆

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Atanas G.; Wang, Jian N.; Gu, Shi P.; Bu, Jing; Kramer, Matthias P.; Baumgartner, Lisa; Fakhrudin, Nanang; Ladurner, Angela; Malainer, Clemens; Vuorinen, Anna; Noha, Stefan M.; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Schuster, Daniela; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M.; Heiss, Elke H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are clinically used to counteract hyperglycemia. However, so far experienced unwanted side effects, such as weight gain, promote the search for new PPARγ activators. Methods We used a combination of in silico, in vitro, cell-based and in vivo models to identify and validate natural products as promising leads for partial novel PPARγ agonists. Results The natural product honokiol from the traditional Chinese herbal drug Magnolia bark was in silico predicted to bind into the PPARγ ligand binding pocket as dimer. Honokiol indeed directly bound to purified PPARγ ligand-binding domain (LBD) and acted as partial agonist in a PPARγ-mediated luciferase reporter assay. Honokiol was then directly compared to the clinically used full agonist pioglitazone with regard to stimulation of glucose uptake in adipocytes as well as adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. While honokiol stimulated basal glucose uptake to a similar extent as pioglitazone, it did not induce adipogenesis in contrast to pioglitazone. In diabetic KKAy mice oral application of honokiol prevented hyperglycemia and suppressed weight gain. Conclusion We identified honokiol as a partial non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist in vitro which prevented hyperglycemia and weight gain in vivo. General significance This observed activity profile suggests honokiol as promising new pharmaceutical lead or dietary supplement to combat metabolic disease, and provides a molecular explanation for the use of Magnolia in traditional medicine. PMID:23811337

  6. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  7. Sound production during agonistic behavior of male Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Thorin; Kravitz, Edward A

    2011-01-01

    Male Drosophila fruit flies acquire and defend territories in order to attract females for reproduction. Both, male-directed agonistic behavior and female-directed courtship consist of series of recurrent stereotypical components. Various studies demonstrated the importance of species-specific sound patterns generated by wing vibration as being critical for male courtship success. In this study we analyzed the patterns and importance of sound signals generated during agonistic interactions of male Drosophila melanogaster. In contrast to acoustic courtship signals that consist of sine and pulse patterns and are generated by one extended wing, agonistic signals lack sine-like components and are generally produced by simultaneous movements of both wings. Though intra-pulse oscillation frequencies (carrier frequency) are identical, inter-pulse intervals are twice as long and more variable in aggression signals than in courtship songs, where their precise temporal pattern serves species recognition. Acoustic signals accompany male agonistic interactions over their entire course but occur particularly often after tapping behavior which is a major way to identify the gender of the interaction partner. Since similar wing movements may either be silent or generate sound and wing movements with sound have a greater impact on the subsequent behavior of a receiver, sound producing wing movements seem to be generated intentionally to serve as a specific signal during fruit fly agonistic encounters. PMID:20953152

  8. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C.; Konger, Raymond L.; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  9. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Harrison, Kathleen A; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C; Konger, Raymond L; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-04-12

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  10. Tolerance with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists: time for reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Grove, A; Lipworth, B J

    1995-01-01

    1. In spite of the widespread use of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of asthma controversy continues regarding their possible role in increasing asthma mortality and morbidity. There is however no evidence available to suggest that tolerance to the bronchodilator or anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs is responsible for the deleterious effects reported with the regular use of bronchodilators. 2. There is no conclusive evidence to suggest that tolerance develops to the bronchodilator effects of short-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. Tolerance does however appear to develop to the anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs. 3. With regard to the long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, there is evidence to suggest that tolerance develops both to their anti-bronchoconstrictor, and bronchodilator effects. Tolerance was however demonstrated in the presence of improved symptom control, therefore the clinical relevance of this phenomenon is uncertain. 4. Systemic corticosteroids can modulate lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor function both preventing, and reversing tolerance. The situation regarding the effects of systemic or inhaled corticosteroids on modulating bronchodilator responses in asthmatics is less clear. There is some evidence to suggest that inhaled corticosteroids are unable to prevent bronchodilator or systemic tolerance to long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. 5. On the basis of the current evidence, the British Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of asthma appear appropriate with regard to their recommendations for the use of long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:7742147

  11. Current issues with beta2-adrenoceptor agonists: historical background.

    PubMed

    Tattersfield, Anne E

    2006-01-01

    The discovery that dessicated adrenal glands had beneficial effects in asthma arose in 1900 following a vogue for studying organotherapy at the end of the 19th century. The adrenal hormone adrenaline was found to have sympathomimetic properties and was isolated and synthesized in 1901. The first nonselective beta-agonist, isoproterenol, was isolated in 1940, followed by the development of selective beta2-agonists in the 1960s and the introduction of the long-acting beta2-agonists in the 1990s. The introduction of beta2-selectivity reduced adverse effects, as did developments in inhaler technology that allowed subjects to inhale much smaller doses of drug selectively to the airways. The beta2-agonists are some of the more important drugs to have been developed in the 20th century. Excessive doses can cause problems, and attempts to maximize the benefit from beta2-agonists and to reduce adverse effects has led to considerable epidemiological, clinical, and mechanistic research over the last 50 yr.

  12. Effects of a Novel CB1 Agonist on Visual Attention in Male Rats: Role of Strategy and Expectancy in Task Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rikki L. A.; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Stewart, William N.; Bow, Joshua P.; Bajaj, Shama; Makriyannis, Alexandros; McLaughlin, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of cannabinoid CB1 agonists (including Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychoactive component of marijuana) on attention are uncertain, with reports of impairments, no effects, and occasionally performance enhancements. To better understand these effects, we sought to uncover a role of changing online (within-session) strategy as a possible mediator of the effects of the novel, potent CB1 agonist AM 4054, on a model of sustained attention in male Sprague–Dawley rats. In this operant, two-choice reaction time (RT) task, AM 4054 decreased accuracy in an asymmetric manner; that is, performance was spared on one lever but impaired on the other. Furthermore, this pattern was enhanced by the outcome of the previous trial such that AM 4054 strengthened a win-stay strategy on the “preferred” lever and a lose-shift strategy on the “nonpreferred” lever. This pattern is often found in tests of expectancy; therefore, in a second experiment AM 4054 enhanced expectancy that we engendered by altering the probability of the two stimulus cues. Accuracy was impaired in reporting the less frequent cue, but only after two or more presentations of the more frequent cue. Taking the results of the experiments together, AM 4054 engendered expectancy by increasing the role of previous trial location and outcome on performance of future trials, diminishing stimulus control (and therefore, accuracy). This novel effect of CB1 receptor agonism may contribute to the deleterious effects of cannabinoids on attention. PMID:24099361

  13. Multiphase fluid simulation tools for winning remediation solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Deschaine, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    Releases of petroleum product such as gasoline and diesel fuels from normal operating practices to aquifers are common. The costs to remediate these releases can run in the billions of dollars. Solutions to remediate these releases usually consist of some form of multiphase (air, water, oil) fluid movement, whether it be a multiphase high vacuum extraction system, bioslurping, groundwater pump and treat system, an air sparging system, a soil vapor extraction system, a free product recovery system, bioremediation or the like. The software being tested in Test Drive, Multiphase Organic Vacuum Enhanced Recovery Simulator (MOVER) is a computer simulation tool that will give the practitioner the ability to design high vacuum enhanced multiple phase recovery systems and bioslurping systems, which are often the low cost effective remediation approach. It will also allow for the comparison of various proposed remediation approaches and technologies so the best solution can be chosen for a site. This is a key competitive advantage to translate conceptual ideas into winning bids.

  14. Internet Reporting of Weekly Physical Activity Behaviors: The WIN Study

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Tyson; Frierson, Georita M.; Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine; Morrow, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Self-report measures have been validated and are widely used. Interest currently lies in the development of simple, valid methods that can be used in any location to determine level of PA in large populations/samples. The purpose of this report is to illustrate tracking of physical activity behaviors and musculoskeletal injury reports on a weekly basis via the Internet. Methods The Women’s Injury Study (WIN) methodology includes use of BRFSS-related physical activity items that are completed online by more than 800 women weekly for an average of 3 years. Results With more than 45,000 weekly physical activity and injury logs, the percentage of total logs submitted via online records is 91%. Self-reported pedometer steps are consistent with similar, smaller research samples. Conclusions This report suggests that Internet tracking is a viable means of assessing nearly real-time physical activity, describes the process of developing and monitoring self-reported physical activity behaviors via the Internet, and provides recommendations for others considering such methods. PMID:20683095

  15. Small wins matter in advocacy movements: giving voice to patients.

    PubMed

    Jason, Leonard A

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the various players are delineated in a story of a contested illness and patient advocacy, played out within the corridors of federal power. It is suggested that the mistreatment and negative attitudes that health care providers and others have towards those with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is possibly due to the social construction of this illness as being a "Yuppie flu" disease. Institutional factors are identified that created these norms and attributions, as well as the multiple stakeholders and constituent groups invested in exerting pressure on policy makers to effect systemic change. This article also provides examples of how the field of Community Psychology, which is fundamentally committed to/based on listening to and giving voice to patients, is broadly relevant to patient activism communities. This approach focused, over time, on epidemiological studies, the name, the case definition, and ultimately the change in CFS leadership at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Keys to this "small wins" approach were coalition building, use of "oppositional experts" (professionals in the scientific community who support patient advocacy goals) to challenge federal research, and taking advantage of developing events/shifts in power. Ultimately, this approach can result in significant scientific and policy gains, and changes in medical and public perception of an illness.

  16. International land deals, local people's livelihood, and environment nexus (How to create win-win land deals in Ethiopia?)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklemariam Gebremeskel, Dereje; Witlox, Frank; Azadi, Hossein; Haile, Mitiku; Nyssen, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Following the global raise in demand for food and biofuel production, transnational companies are acquiring large scale agricultural land in developing countries such as Ethiopia. Considering land as one of the factors to be outsourced for development, the government of Ethiopia is supplying millions of hectares of land to transnational companies in the form of longterm lease. Many of the companies which engage in large scale land acquisition are of Indian, Chinese, Ethiopian diaspora, German, Malaysian, Italian, British, Dutch, Turkish, and Saudi-Arabian origin. The boom in the acquisition of farm land in the country has sparked an all-rounded debate among civil society groups, international institutions, nongovernmental organizations and independent development experts. The common reflections concerning the land deals in Ethiopia and elsewhere contain much rhetoric and hype which lack analysis of the real situation "on the ground" giving different connotations such as 'land grabbing', 'agricultural outsourcing', 'neo-colonialism', 'agrarian colonialism', and 'land underdevelopment'. However, deforestation, soil degradation, marginalization of local indigenous communities, and minimally unfair gains from investment by the host country are among the real points of concern arising out of the long term land lease contracts. Scientific evidence is lacking concerning the pragmatic impacts of large scale agricultural land acquisitions by transnational companies upon the natural environment (forest and land), local peoples' livelihood, and the contacting parties (the host country and the companies). The major objective of this study is to investigate the impacts in the context of Ethiopia, orienting to reinvent win-win land use models which constitute sustainable land use, local peoples' livelihood and the company-host country interests. To achieve this overall objective, the study employs a number of methods and methodologies constituting both qualitative and

  17. Cannabis agonist injection effect on the coupling architecture in cortex of WAG/Rij rats during absence seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sysoeva, Marina V.; Kuznetsova, Galina D.; van Rijn, Clementina M.; Sysoev, Ilya V.

    2016-04-01

    WAG/Rij rats are well known genetic model of absence epilepsy, which is traditionally considered as a nonconvulsive generalised epilepsy of unknown aetiology. In current study the effect of (R)-(+)-WIN 55,212-2 (cannabis agonist) injection on the coupling between different parts of cortex was studied on 27 male 8 month old rats using local field potentials. Recently developed non-linear adapted Granger causality approach was used as a primary method. It was shown that first 2 hours after the injection the coupling between most channel pairs rises in comparison with the spontaneous activity, whilst long after the injection (2-6 hours) it drops down. The coupling increase corresponds to the mentioned before treatment effect, when the number and the longitude of seizures significantly decreases. However the subsequent decrease of the coupling in the cortex is accompanied by the dramatic increase of the longitude and the number of seizures. This assumes the hypothesis that a relatively higher coupling in the cortical network can prevent the seizure propagation and generalisation.

  18. Confounding of the Comparative Safety of Prenatal Opioid Agonist Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brogly, Susan B; Hahn, Kristen A; Diaz, Sonia Hernandez; Werler, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal opioid agonist therapy with methadone or buprenorphine prevents maternal illicit opioid use and withdrawal and improves pregnancy outcomes compared to heroin use alone. Historically, methadone has been the first-line opioid agonist therapy for pregnant opioid dependent women; in recent years buprenorphine has become first-line treatment for some opioid dependent pregnant women. While there is some evidence of better outcomes in neonates exposed to buprenorphine vs. methadone, the effect of confounding from differences in women who use buprenorphine and methadone has not been carefully examined in most studies. This review explores mechanisms by which confounding can arise in measuring associations between prenatal buprenorphine vs. methadone exposure on neonatal outcomes using a graphical approach, directed acyclic graphs. The goal of this paper is to facilitate better understanding of the factors influencing neonatal abstinence syndrome and accurate assessment of the comparative safety of opioid agonist therapies on the neonate. PMID:27547489

  19. Adenosine receptor agonists for promotion of dermal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Valls, María D.; Cronstein, Bruce N.; Montesinos, M. Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex process that involves a well coordinated, highly regulated series of events including inflammation, tissue formation, revascularization and tissue remodeling. However, this orderly sequence is impaired in certain pathophysiological conditions such as diabetes mellitus, venous insufficiency, chronic glucocorticoid use, aging and malnutrition. Together with proper wound care, promotion of the healing process is the primary objective in the management of chronic poorly healing wounds. Recent studies have demonstrated that A2A adenosine receptor agonists promote wound healing in normal and diabetic animals and one such agonist, Sonedenoson, is currently being evaluated as a prospective new therapy of diabetic foot ulcers. We will review the mechanisms by which adenosine receptor activation affects the function of the cells and tissues that participate in wound healing, emphasizing the potential beneficial impact of adenosine receptor agonists in diabetic impaired healing. PMID:19041853

  20. Design, evaluation, and comparison of ghrelin receptor agonists and inverse agonists as suitable radiotracers for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Constance; Bergmann, Ralf; Pietzsch, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-04-18

    Ghrelin agonist and inverse agonist radiotracers, suitable for positron emission tomography (PET), were developed to study the behavior of ghrelin receptor ligands in vivo and for further design of druggable peptides. The target peptides were synthesized on solid support and conjugated to the bifunctional chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane,1-glutaric acid-4,7-acetic acid (NODAGA), which is known to form a stable complex with Ga(3+). Complexation with (68)Ga could be achieved under mild conditions and led to radiotracers with high radiochemical purity and specific activity. The biological activity of the radiotracers was evaluated in vitro by an inositol phosphate turnover assay. Pharmacokinetic profile and metabolic stability of the (68)Ga-NODAGA-radiotracers were investigated by small animal PET in rodent. Ghrelin derived agonists presented very high kidney accumulation, negligible tissue distribution, fast blood clearance, and poor stability in blood. Contrarily, the inverse agonist radiotracer exhibited very high stability in blood, large diffusion in tissues, reasonable kidney and liver metabolism, and slow blood clearance. This pharmacokinetic profile makes the ghrelin inverse agonist motif KwFwLL-CONH(2) suitable for further development of radiotracers and a promising lead to design peptide-based therapeutics against obesity. PMID:22372770

  1. How could we realize a win-win strategy on irrigation price policy? Evaluation of a pilot reform project in Hebei Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinxia; Zhang, Lijuan; Huang, Jikun

    2016-08-01

    The challenge of increasing irrigation prices while increasing farmers' income exists not only in China but in other countries as well. The overall goal of this paper is to evaluate whether a win-win strategy can be realized in a pilot reform in Hebei, China. The data came from a two-round field survey in 2009 and 2012, which indicated that the key mechanism of the pilot reform was that farmers received similar returns (including reallocated, increased irrigation fees and a government subsidy), but paid different irrigation fees; the difference between the returned money and payment was treated as an incentive for farmers to reduce their use of irrigation. The econometric results showed that in pilot reformed villages, local farmers' groundwater application for irrigating wheat and cotton could decrease by 21% each. If no subsidies are granted, roughly half of the region's farmers would lose money due to the reform. However, most farmers who receive subsidies were able to earn money in the pilot reformed villages. If several issues are properly resolved (such as selecting more representative villages, increasing the subsidy value, and negatively linking the subsidy with water use), it would be possible for more regions to realize a win-win price reform strategy.

  2. Chronic exposure to WIN55,212-2 affects more potently spatial learning and memory in adolescents than in adult rats via a negative action on dorsal hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abboussi, Oualid; Tazi, Abdelouahhab; Paizanis, Eleni; El Ganouni, Soumaya

    2014-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies show an increase in cannabis use among adolescents, especially in Morocco for being one of the major producers in the world. The neurobiological consequences of chronic cannabis use are still poorly understood. In addition, brain plasticity linked to ontogeny portrays adolescence as a period of vulnerability to the deleterious effects of drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavioral neurogenic effects of chronic exposure to the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 during adolescence, by evaluating the emotional and cognitive performances, and the consequences on neurogenesis along the dorso-ventral axis of the hippocampus in adult rats. WIN55,212 was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) once daily for 20 days to adolescent (27-30 PND) and adult Wistar rats (54-57 PND) at the dose of 1mg/kg. Following a 20 day washout period, emotional and cognitive functions were assessed by the Morris water maze test and the two-way active avoidance test. Twelve hours after, brains were removed and hippocampal neurogenesis was assessed using the doublecortin (DCX) as a marker for cell proliferation. Our results showed that chronic WIN55,212-2 treatment significantly increased thigmotaxis early in the training process whatever the age of treatment, induced spatial learning and memory deficits in adolescent but not adult rats in the Morris water maze test, while it had no significant effect in the active avoidance test during multitrial training in the shuttle box. In addition, the cognitive deficits assessed in adolescent rats were positively correlated to a decrease in the number of newly generated neurons in dorsal hippocampus. These data suggest that long term exposure to cannabinoids may affect more potently spatial learning and memory in adolescent compared to adult rats via a negative action on hippocampal plasticity.

  3. Losing the battle but winning the war: uncertain outcomes reverse the usual effect of winning on testosterone.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Mehta, Pranjal H; Watson, Neil V

    2014-12-01

    The biosocial model of status predicts a competition effect (or winner-loser effect), whereby winning a competition should cause a rise in testosterone relative to losing. However, its applicability to women and the role of contextual factors, such as a decisive versus close match, have been overlooked. In two studies of female competition, we tested whether the winner-loser effect generalizes to dominance contests that model unstable social hierarchies, namely in close competitions wherein the winner-loser distinction is unsettled (Study 1) and in competitions in which the outcome is uncertain (Study 2). In both studies we found evidence for a reverse winner-loser effect whereby losers experienced a net increase in testosterone compared to winners. Moreover, the rise in testosterone was stronger in those competitors who reported being more surprised by the loss (Study 2). These results represent some of the first empirical evidence for the reverse effect of what is predicted by the biosocial model of status. We interpret these findings in terms of the dominance motivation that testosterone might subserve within unstable status hierarchies. PMID:25148788

  4. Agonist treatment in opioid use: advances and controversy.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Biju; Chand, Prabhat; Benegal, Vivek; Murthy, Pratima

    2012-06-01

    Opioid dependence is a chronic relapsing condition which requires comprehensive care; pharmacological agents form the mainstay of its long term treatment. The two most popular approaches are the harm reduction method using agonists and the complete abstinence method using antagonists. Currently, particularly from the harm minimization perspective and the low feasibility of an abstinence based approach, there is an increasing trend toward agonist treatment. The use of buprenorphine has gained popularity in view of its safety profile and the availability of the buprenorphine-naloxone combination has made it popular as a take-home treatment. This review outlines the pharmacological advances and controversies in this area. PMID:22813654

  5. Insect Nicotinic Receptor Agonists as Flea Adulticides in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dai Tan; Hsu, Walter H.; Martin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Fleas are significant ectoparasites of small animals. They can be a severe irritant to animals and serve as a vector for a number of infectious diseases. In this article, we discuss the pharmacological characteristics of four insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists used as fleacides in dogs and cats, which include three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, nitenpyram, and dinotefuran) and spinosad. Insect nAChR agonists are one of the most important new classes of insecticides, which are used to control sucking insects both on plants and on companion animals. These new compounds provide a new approach for practitioners to safely and effectively eliminate fleas. PMID:20646191

  6. Beta2-agonist extraction procedures for chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    dos Ramos, F J

    2000-06-01

    Normally, different procedures were necessary to prepare sample matrices for chromatographic determination of beta2-agonists. The present review includes sampling, pre-treatment and extraction/purification for urine, plasma, liver, meat, feeds, hair and milk powder, as previous steps for chromatographic analysis of beta2-agonists. Six methodologies were especially revised for extraction/purification namely, liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction (SPE), matrix solid-phase dispersion, immunoaffinity chromatography, dialysis and supercritical fluid extraction. SPE was discussed in detail and five mechanisms were described: adsorption, apolar, polar, ion-exchange and mixed phase. A brief conclusion in this field was also outlined.

  7. WinRho: Rh immune globulin prepared by ion exchange for intravenous use.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J M; Friesen, A D; Pollock, J M; Taylor, W E

    1980-01-01

    An Rh immune globulin [Rh IgG] for intravenous use, WinRho, has been prepared by the Winnipeg Rh Institute by a modification of the ion-exchange column method of Hoppe and colleagues. When administered to Rh-negative male and nonpregnant female volunteers WinRho was found to be nonpyrogenic, nontoxic, safe and protective against Rh alloimmunization. In a clinical trial with 240 microgram given at about 28 weeks' gestation and 120 microgram given after delivery to Rh-negative women at risk of Rh immunization WinRho was effective in preventing Rh immunization. Of the 870 women carrying Rh-positive fetuses who were treated with WinRho during pregnancy and were not tested several months after delivery 14 would have shown evidence of Rh immunization by the time of delivery if WinRho had been ineffective; none showed such evidence. Of the 1122 women carrying Rh-positive fetuses who were retested 4 to 6 months after delivery 83 would have shown evidence of Rh immunization at that time if WinRho had been ineffective; only 1 showed such evidence. The efficiency of yield of anti-D with the modified method of production, the fct that it can be given intravenously (a route that causes the patient less discomfort and immediately results in high anti-D levels) and the lower levels of contaminating IgA and IgM make WinRho the preparation of choice for preventing Rh immunization. PMID:6161687

  8. Structural Basis for WDR5 Interaction (Win) Motif Recognition in Human SET1 Family Histone Methyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Patel, Anamika; Skalnik, David G.; Cosgrove, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Translocations and amplifications of the mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) gene are associated with aggressive myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias in humans. MLL1 is a member of the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases, which are required for transcription of genes involved in hematopoiesis and development. MLL1 associates with a subcomplex containing WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30 (WRAD), which together form the MLL1 core complex that is required for sequential mono- and dimethylation of H3K4. We previously demonstrated that WDR5 binds the conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif of MLL1 in vitro, an interaction that is required for the H3K4 dimethylation activity of the MLL1 core complex. In this investigation, we demonstrate that arginine 3765 of the MLL1 Win motif is required to co-immunoprecipitate WRAD from mammalian cells, suggesting that the WDR5-Win motif interaction is important for the assembly of the MLL1 core complex in vivo. We also demonstrate that peptides that mimic SET1 family Win motif sequences inhibit H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex with varying degrees of efficiency. To understand the structural basis for these differences, we determined structures of WDR5 bound to six different naturally occurring Win motif sequences at resolutions ranging from 1.9 to 1.2 Å. Our results reveal that binding energy differences result from interactions between non-conserved residues C-terminal to the Win motif and to a lesser extent from subtle variation of residues within the Win motif. These results highlight a new class of methylation inhibitors that may be useful for the treatment of MLL1-related malignancies. PMID:22665483

  9. Suppression of Stra8 Expression in the Mouse Gonad by WIN 18,4461

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Evanoff, Ryan; Snyder, Elizabeth; Kent, Travis; Mitchell, Debra; Small, Christopher; Amory, John K.; Griswold, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Bis-(dichloroacetyl)-diamines (BDADs) are compounds that inhibit spermatogenesis and function as male contraceptives in many species; however, their mechanism of action has yet to be fully investigated. It has been proposed that BDADs may function via inhibition of testicular retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis. We employed an organ culture technique and the expression of a marker for RA activity, Stra8 (stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8), to investigate if the BDAD WIN 18,446 inhibited the biosynthesis of RA from retinol (ROL) in neonatal and adult murine testis and in the embryonic murine gonad. After culturing either whole testes or germ cells isolated from mice at 2 days postpartum (dpp) with WIN 18,446 or with WIN 18,446 plus ROL, Stra8 expression was suppressed, demonstrating that WIN 18,446 inhibited the conversion of ROL to RA in both systems. We also utilized a transgenic mouse containing an RA-responsive LacZ reporter gene to demonstrate limited RA induction of LacZ expression in 2-dpp testes cultured with WIN 18,446 plus ROL. The expression of Stra8 was downregulated in adult mouse testis tubules cultured with WIN 18,446 when compared to tubules cultured with the vehicle control. WIN 18,446 also inhibited the conversion of ROL to RA in embryonic ovaries and testes cultured for 48 h. These murine results provide critical insights regarding how the BDADs can inhibit spermatogenesis by blocking the ability of vitamin A to drive germ cell development. In addition, these techniques will be useful for screening novel inhibitors of RA biosynthesis as potential male contraceptives. PMID:21209416

  10. Structural basis for WDR5 interaction (Win) motif recognition in human SET1 family histone methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Patel, Anamika; Skalnik, David G; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2012-08-10

    Translocations and amplifications of the mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) gene are associated with aggressive myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias in humans. MLL1 is a member of the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases, which are required for transcription of genes involved in hematopoiesis and development. MLL1 associates with a subcomplex containing WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30 (WRAD), which together form the MLL1 core complex that is required for sequential mono- and dimethylation of H3K4. We previously demonstrated that WDR5 binds the conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif of MLL1 in vitro, an interaction that is required for the H3K4 dimethylation activity of the MLL1 core complex. In this investigation, we demonstrate that arginine 3765 of the MLL1 Win motif is required to co-immunoprecipitate WRAD from mammalian cells, suggesting that the WDR5-Win motif interaction is important for the assembly of the MLL1 core complex in vivo. We also demonstrate that peptides that mimic SET1 family Win motif sequences inhibit H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex with varying degrees of efficiency. To understand the structural basis for these differences, we determined structures of WDR5 bound to six different naturally occurring Win motif sequences at resolutions ranging from 1.9 to 1.2 Å. Our results reveal that binding energy differences result from interactions between non-conserved residues C-terminal to the Win motif and to a lesser extent from subtle variation of residues within the Win motif. These results highlight a new class of methylation inhibitors that may be useful for the treatment of MLL1-related malignancies. PMID:22665483

  11. Involvement of dopamine D2 receptor signal transduction in the discriminative stimulus effects of the κ-opioid receptor agonist U-50,488H in rats.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tomohisa; Yoshizawa, Kazumi; Ueno, Tamami; Nishiwaki, Mizuki; Shimizu, Norifumi; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2013-08-01

    We have reported previously that the inhibition of both dopaminergic and psychotomimetic/hallucinogenic components plays a role in the discriminative stimulus effects of U-50,488H. However, the mechanisms that underlie the discriminative stimulus effects of U-50,488H, and especially the component that plays a significant role, have not yet been clarified. The present study was designed to further investigate the mechanism(s) of the discriminative stimulus effects of the κ-opioid receptor agonist U-50,488H in rats that had been trained to discriminate between 3.0 mg/kg U-50,488H and saline. The dopamine D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride, but not the D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390, generalized to the discriminative stimulus effects of U-50,488H. The mood-stabilizing agents lithium chloride and valproic acid, which have attenuating effects on the Akt/GSK3 pathway, also partially generalized to the discriminative stimulus effects of U-50,488H. In contrast, the 5-HT-related compound racemic 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2, and the μ-opioid receptor agonist morphine failed to generalize to the discriminative stimulus effects of U-50,488H. These results suggest that the inhibition of the dopaminergic activity mediated by the postsynaptic D2 receptor, followed by suppression of the Akt/GSK3 pathway may be critical for the induction of the discriminative stimulus effects induced by U-50,488H.

  12. Striatal versus hippocampal representations during win-stay maze performance.

    PubMed

    Berke, Joshua D; Breck, Jason T; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2009-03-01

    The striatum and hippocampus are widely held to be components of distinct memory systems that can guide competing behavioral strategies. However, some electrophysiological studies have suggested that neurons in both structures encode spatial information and may therefore make similar contributions to behavior. In rats well trained to perform a win-stay radial maze task, we recorded simultaneously from dorsal hippocampus and from multiple striatal subregions, including both lateral areas implicated in motor responses to cues and medial areas that work cooperatively with hippocampus in cognitive operations. In each brain region, movement through the maze was accompanied by the continuous sequential activation of sets of projection neurons. Hippocampal neurons overwhelmingly were active at a single spatial location (place cells). Striatal projection neurons were active at discrete points within the progression of every trial-especially during choices or following reward delivery-regardless of spatial position. Place-cell-type firing was not observed even for medial striatal cells entrained to the hippocampal theta rhythm. We also examined neural coding in earlier training sessions, when rats made use of spatial working memory to guide choices, and again found that striatal cells did not show place-cell-type firing. Prospective or retrospective encoding of trajectory was not observed in either hippocampus or striatum, at either training stage. Our results indicate that, at least in this task, dorsal hippocampus uses a spatial foundation for information processing that is not substantially modulated by spatial working memory demands. By contrast, striatal cells do not use such a spatial foundation, even in medial subregions that cooperate with hippocampus in the selection of spatial strategies. The progressive dominance of a striatum-dependent strategy does not appear to be accompanied by large changes in striatal or hippocampal single-cell representations, suggesting

  13. [Opinions of the participants of 'Quit and Win' competition concerning prizes motivating to refrain from smoking].

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Alina; Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Rzeźnicki, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Big antinicotine campaigns both in Poland and worldwide, are finished with a competition with prizes of different value. Psychologists say that a prize significantly motivates a person to certain kinds of behaviour. During educational activities carried out in the time of campaign, it is recommended to use techniques of psychological interaction that would release motives most beneficial to health. The aim of the work was to recognize frequency of being influenced mostly by the possibility of winning a prize before making a decision about quitting smoking and joining the competition, and learning the opinions of prize laureates concerning efficiency of 'Quit and Win' competitions. Empirical material comes from two sources. The first one is the selected fragments of a survey study carried out at Social and Preventive Medicine Department among 1700 participants of 'Quit and Win' competition that finished the 2nd International Antinicotine Campaign in Poland. The correctly filled survey was sent by 1285 people, that is 75.6%. The second source is a fragment of a survey study carried out in 2003 among 54 laureates of 'Quit and Win' competition in Poland. The completed survey was sent by majority of the laureates, that is 34 people (f = 0.63). Possibility of winning a prize as the most important reason for taking up the attempt to stop smoking and joining the competition was pointed to by 56 respondents (4.4%), whereas the remaining people chose other reasons as the most important ones. In the group of 34 respondents who were the laureates of competitions, majority, that is 22 people (f = 0.65) claimed the competition with prizes as a very effective method of reducing smoking. Half of the surveyed (17 people) claimed the possibility of winning a few prizes of high value would be more motivating than winning one of many prizes of smaller value. As the least attractive, prize gifts were pointed to. A prize in the form of a trip or holiday was considered very popular, as

  14. WIN 57273 is bactericidal for Legionella pneumophila grown in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, P H; Edelstein, M A

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial activity of WIN 57273, a new quinolone antimicrobial agent, was determined for 21 Legionella strains, using broth macrodilution and agar dilution testing methods; ciprofloxacin and erythromycin were tested as well. Three different buffered yeast extract media were used for the agar dilution studies, two of which were made with starch rather than charcoal. Broth macrodilution susceptibility testing was performed with buffered yeast extract broth and two Legionella pneumophila strains. Antimicrobial inhibition of L. pneumophila growth in guinea pig alveolar macrophages was also studied, using a method able to detect bacterial killing. The MICs for 90% of the 21 strains of Legionella spp. grown on buffered charcoal yeast extract medium were 0.125 microgram/ml for WIN 57273, 0.25 microgram/ml for ciprofloxacin, and 1.0 micrograms/ml for erythromycin. These MICs were falsely high, because of inhibition of drug activity by the medium used. Use of less drug-antagonistic, starch-containing media did not support good growth of the test strains. The broth macrodilution MICs for two strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 were less than or equal to 0.03 microgram/ml for WIN 57273 and ciprofloxacin and 0.125 microgram/ml for erythromycin. WIN 57273, ciprofloxacin, and erythromycin all inhibited growth of L. pneumophila in guinea pig alveolar macrophages at concentrations of 1 microgram/ml, but only WIN 57273 prevented regrowth or killed L. pneumophila after removal of extracellular antimicrobial agent. PMID:2619277

  15. Match statistics related to winning in the group stage of 2014 Brazil FIFA World Cup.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyou; Gomez, Miguel-Ángel; Lago-Peñas, Carlos; Sampaio, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Identifying match statistics that strongly contribute to winning in football matches is a very important step towards a more predictive and prescriptive performance analysis. The current study aimed to determine relationships between 24 match statistics and the match outcome (win, loss and draw) in all games and close games of the group stage of FIFA World Cup (2014, Brazil) by employing the generalised linear model. The cumulative logistic regression was run in the model taking the value of each match statistic as independent variable to predict the logarithm of the odds of winning. Relationships were assessed as effects of a two-standard-deviation increase in the value of each variable on the change in the probability of a team winning a match. Non-clinical magnitude-based inferences were employed and were evaluated by using the smallest worthwhile change. Results showed that for all the games, nine match statistics had clearly positive effects on the probability of winning (Shot, Shot on Target, Shot from Counter Attack, Shot from Inside Area, Ball Possession, Short Pass, Average Pass Streak, Aerial Advantage and Tackle), four had clearly negative effects (Shot Blocked, Cross, Dribble and Red Card), other 12 statistics had either trivial or unclear effects. While for the close games, the effects of Aerial Advantage and Yellow Card turned to trivial and clearly negative, respectively. Information from the tactical modelling can provide a more thorough and objective match understanding to coaches and performance analysts for evaluating post-match performances and for scouting upcoming oppositions.

  16. The emerging therapeutic roles of κ-opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark R; Kaye, Alan D; Kaye, Aaron J; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The current practice of μ-opioid receptor agonists such as morphine as the primary means of acute and chronic pain relief has several dangerous consequences that limit their effectiveness, including respiratory depression, gastrointestinal motility inhibition, addiction, tolerance, and abuse. Several other opioid receptors, notably the μ-opioid (KOP) receptor, have long been known to play a role in pain relief. Recent discoveries and advancements in laboratory techniques have allowed significant developments of KOP agonists as potential novel therapies for pain relief and other pathological processes. These drugs exhibit none of the classic opioid adverse effects and have displayed pronounced analgesia in several different scenarios. New formulations since 2014 have unveiled increased oral bioavailability, exceptional peripheral versus central selectivity, and a positive safety profile. Continued refinements of established μ-opioid agonist formulations have virtually eliminated the centrally mediated side effects of dysphoria and sedation that limited the applicability of previous KOP agonists. Further research is required to better elucidate the potential of these compounds in pain management, as well as in the mediation or modulation of other complex pathophysiological processes as therapeutic agents. PMID:27194194

  17. Systemic cancer immunotherapy with Toll-like receptor 7 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Hotz, Christian; Bourquin, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists represent a promising strategy for the immunotherapy of cancer. We have recently investigated the influence of TLR tolerance on the efficacy of systemic tumor treatment with TLR7 ligands. We propose that considering the kinetics of receptor sensitivity highly improves the outcome of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22720251

  18. Synthesis and immunostimulatory activity of substituted TLR7 agonists.

    PubMed

    Akinbobuyi, Babatope; Wang, Lei; Upchurch, Katherine C; Byrd, Matthew R; Chang, Charles A; Quintana, Jeremy M; Petersen, Rachel E; Seifert, Zacharie J; Boquin, José R; Oh, SangKon; Kane, Robert R

    2016-09-01

    Fifteen new substituted adenines were synthesized as potential TLR7 agonists. These compounds, along with 9 previously reported compounds, were analyzed for TLR7 activity and for the selective stimulation of B cell proliferation. Several functionalized derivatives exhibit significant activity, suggesting their potential for use as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27476423

  19. The emerging therapeutic roles of κ-opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark R; Kaye, Alan D; Kaye, Aaron J; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The current practice of μ-opioid receptor agonists such as morphine as the primary means of acute and chronic pain relief has several dangerous consequences that limit their effectiveness, including respiratory depression, gastrointestinal motility inhibition, addiction, tolerance, and abuse. Several other opioid receptors, notably the μ-opioid (KOP) receptor, have long been known to play a role in pain relief. Recent discoveries and advancements in laboratory techniques have allowed significant developments of KOP agonists as potential novel therapies for pain relief and other pathological processes. These drugs exhibit none of the classic opioid adverse effects and have displayed pronounced analgesia in several different scenarios. New formulations since 2014 have unveiled increased oral bioavailability, exceptional peripheral versus central selectivity, and a positive safety profile. Continued refinements of established μ-opioid agonist formulations have virtually eliminated the centrally mediated side effects of dysphoria and sedation that limited the applicability of previous KOP agonists. Further research is required to better elucidate the potential of these compounds in pain management, as well as in the mediation or modulation of other complex pathophysiological processes as therapeutic agents.

  20. Synthesis and immunostimulatory activity of substituted TLR7 agonists.

    PubMed

    Akinbobuyi, Babatope; Wang, Lei; Upchurch, Katherine C; Byrd, Matthew R; Chang, Charles A; Quintana, Jeremy M; Petersen, Rachel E; Seifert, Zacharie J; Boquin, José R; Oh, SangKon; Kane, Robert R

    2016-09-01

    Fifteen new substituted adenines were synthesized as potential TLR7 agonists. These compounds, along with 9 previously reported compounds, were analyzed for TLR7 activity and for the selective stimulation of B cell proliferation. Several functionalized derivatives exhibit significant activity, suggesting their potential for use as vaccine adjuvants.

  1. Activation of endplate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by agonists.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of a small molecule made in one cell with a large receptor made in another is the signature event of cell signaling. Understanding the structure and energy changes associated with agonist activation is important for engineering drugs, receptors and synapses. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a ∼300kD ion channel that binds the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists to elicit electrical responses in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This mini-review is in two sections. First, general concepts of skeletal muscle AChR operation are discussed in terms of energy landscapes for conformational change. Second, adult vs. fetal AChRs are compared with regard to interaction energies between ACh and agonist-site side chains, measured by single-channel electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations. The five aromatic residues that form the core of each agonist binding site can be divided into two working groups, a triad (led by αY190) that behaves similarly at all sites and a coupled pair (led by γW55) that has a large influence on affinity only in fetal AChRs. Each endplate AChR has 5 homologous subunits, two of α(1) and one each of β, δ, and either γ (fetal) or ϵ (adult). These nicotinic AChRs have only 2 functional agonist binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αγ or αϵ subunit interfaces. The receptor undergoes a reversible, global isomerization between structures called C and O. The C shape does not conduct ions and has a relatively low affinity for ACh, whereas O conducts cations and has a higher affinity. When both agonist sites are empty (filled only with water) the probability of taking on the O conformation (PO) is low, <10(-6). When ACh molecules occupy the agonist sites the C→O opening rate constant and C↔O gating equilibrium constant increase dramatically. Following a pulse of ACh at the nerve-muscle synapse, the endplate current rises rapidly

  2. Sex differences in opioid antinociception: kappa and 'mixed action' agonists.

    PubMed

    Craft, R M; Bernal, S A

    2001-08-01

    A number of investigators have shown that male animals are more sensitive than females to the antinociceptive effects of mu-opioid agonists. The present study was conducted to examine sex differences in opioid antinociception in the rat using agonists known to differ in selectivity for and efficacy at kappa- versus mu-receptors. Dose- and time-effect curves were obtained for s.c. U69593, U50488, ethylketazocine, (-)-bremazocine, (-)-pentazocine, butorphanol and nalbuphine on the 50 or 54 degrees C hotplate and warm water tail withdrawal assays; spontaneous locomotor activity was measured 32-52 min post-injection in the same rats. On the hotplate assay, only butorphanol (54 degrees C) and nalbuphine (50 degrees C) were significantly more potent in males than females. On the tail withdrawal assay, all agonists were significantly more potent or efficacious in males than females at one or both temperatures. In contrast, no agonist was consistently more potent in one sex or the other in decreasing locomotor activity. Estrous stage in female rats only slightly influenced opioid effects, accounting for an average of 2.6% of the variance in females' antinociceptive and locomotor responses to drug (50 degrees C experiment). These results suggest that (1) sex differences in antinociceptive effects of opioids are not mu-receptor-dependent, as they may occur with opioids known to have significant kappa-receptor-mediated activity; (2) the mechanisms underlying sex differences in kappa-opioid antinociception may be primarily spinal rather than supraspinal; (3) sex differences in antinociceptive effects of opioid agonists are not secondary to sex differences in their sedative effects. PMID:11418226

  3. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel indazolyl glucocorticoid receptor partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, John L; Sheppeck, James E; Wang, Jim; Dhar, T G Murali; Cavallaro, Cullen; Doweyko, Arthur M; Mckay, Lorraine; Cunningham, Mark D; Habte, Sium F; Nadler, Steven G; Dodd, John H; Somerville, John E; Barrish, Joel C

    2013-10-01

    SAR was used to further develop an indazole class of non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor agonists aided by a GR LBD (ligand-binding domain)-agonist co-crystal structure described in the accompanying paper. Progress towards discovering a dissociated GR agonist guided by human in vitro assays biased the optimization of this compound series towards partial agonists that possessed excellent selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors. PMID:23916594

  4. Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation And Agriculture, Trade-off Or Win-win Situation: Bioeconomic Farm Modelling In The Sudanian Area of Burkina Faso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Some, T. E.; Barbier, B.

    2015-12-01

    Climate changes talks regularly underline that developing countries' agriculture could play a stronger role in GHGs mitigation strategies and benefit from the Kyoto Protocol program of subsidies. Scientists explain that agriculture can contribute to carbon mitigation by storing more carbon in the soil through greener cropping systems. In this context, a growing number of research projects have started to investigate how developing countries agriculture can contribute to these objectives. The clean development mechanism (CDM) proposed in the Kyoto protocol is one particular policy instrument that can incite farmers to mitigate the GHG balance towards more sequestration and less emission. Some economists such as Michael Porter think that environmental regulation lead to a win-win outcome, in which case subsidies are not necessary. If it is a trade-off between incomes and the environment, subsidies are required. CDM can be mobilized to support the mitigation strategy. Agriculture implies the use of inputs. Reducing the emission implies the reduction of those inputs which will in turn imply a yield decrease. The study aims to assess whether this measure will imply a trade-off between environmental and economic objectives or a win-win situation. I apply this study to the case of small farmers in Burkina Faso through environmental instruments such as the emissions limits and agroforestry using a bioeconomic model, in which the farmers maximize their utility subject to constraints. The study finds that the limitation of emissions in annual crops production involves a trade-off. by impacting negatively their net cash come. By integrating perennial crops in the farming system, the farmers' utility increases. Around 6,118 kg are sequestrated individually. By computing the value on this carbon balance, farmers' net cash incomes go better. Then practicing agroforestry is a win-win situation, as they reach a higher level of income, and reduce emissions. Policymakers must

  5. Cortical topography of event-related potentials to winning and losing in a video tennis game.

    PubMed

    Ivanitsky, A M; Kurnitskaya, I V; Sobotka, S

    1986-07-01

    The event-related potentials (ERP) in frontal and posterior associative cortex in right and left hemispheres were studied in two different outcomes of a television tennis game. These outcomes were 'win' and 'loss' of the ball, the first serving as a model of positive, the second as a model of negative emotional reactions. The ERPs consisted of 4 waves: P300, N600, P800, N1000. The most characteristic interhemispheric difference for 'win' was an increase of N600 in the left posterior associative cortex, and for 'loss', a decrease of P800 in the right frontal area. Thus, the positive and negative emotional reactions have specific spatio-temporal cortical organizations. The topography of ERP related to positive and negative emotions was disturbed in depressive patients. The patients revealed a larger negativity of the right posterior associative cortex and the left frontal cortex waves both at winning and losing the ball. PMID:3733492

  6. Turning a Spermatogenic Wave into a Tsunami: Synchronizing Murine Spermatogenesis Using WIN 18,4461

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Evanoff, Ryan; Mitchell, Debra; Kent, Travis; Small, Christopher; Amory, John K.; Griswold, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The BDADs (bis-[dichloroacetyl]-diamines) are compounds that can inhibit spermatogenesis via blocking the metabolism of vitamin A. We utilized one specific BDAD, WIN 18,446, to manipulate the endogenous production of retinoic acid (RA) in the testis to further investigate the action of this compound on mammalian sperm production. Transient treatment of adult male mice with WIN 18,446 blocked spermatogonial differentiation and induced significant changes in the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. WIN 18,446 treatment of neonatal mice also blocked spermatogonial differentiation and, followed by injection of RA, induced synchronous spermatogenesis in adulthood. The net result was pulsatile, rather than normal continuous, release of sperm from the seminiferous epithelium. This study describes a novel technique that can enrich for specific germ cell populations within the testis, representing a valuable new tool for studying spermatogenesis. PMID:23284139

  7. The WIN-speller: a new intuitive auditory brain-computer interface spelling application

    PubMed Central

    Kleih, Sonja C.; Herweg, Andreas; Kaufmann, Tobias; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Gerstner, Natascha; Kübler, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the usability of a new auditory Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) application for communication. We introduce a word based, intuitive auditory spelling paradigm the WIN-speller. In the WIN-speller letters are grouped by words, such as the word KLANG representing the letters A, G, K, L, and N. Thereby, the decoding step between perceiving a code and translating it to the stimuli it represents becomes superfluous. We tested 11 healthy volunteers and four end-users with motor impairment in the copy spelling mode. Spelling was successful with an average accuracy of 84% in the healthy sample. Three of the end-users communicated with average accuracies of 80% or higher while one user was not able to communicate reliably. Even though further evaluation is required, the WIN-speller represents a potential alternative for BCI based communication in end-users. PMID:26500476

  8. Tired winners: the effects of cognitive resources and prior winning on risky decision making.

    PubMed

    Kostek, John; Ashrafioun, Lisham

    2014-06-01

    Previous research has shown mixed results regarding the effects of cognitively draining tasks, sometimes reporting that the depletion of cognitive resources increases risk taking and other times reporting that depletion leads to increases in risk aversion. Additionally, evidence has been provided demonstrating that both winning and losing can increase future risk-taking. This experiment was designed to assess the interaction between cognitive resource depletion and outcomes in blackjack on risky decision making. A 2 × 2 between subjects design was employed in which 81 university undergraduates were randomized to either a cognitive resource depletion condition or control condition and then a winning condition or losing condition. Participants completed a self-report measure of decision making and then a completed a task in which they could make actual wagers to win a lottery. Evidence is provided for the conclusion that people become risk averse to lottery style gambles after cognitive depletion and losing. Research and clinical implications are discussed.

  9. Testosterone changes during vicarious experiences of winning and losing among fans at sporting events.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, P C; Dabbs, J M; Fielden, J A; Lutter, C D

    1998-08-01

    Basking in reflected glory, in which individuals increase their self-esteem by identifying with successful others, is usually regarded as a cognitive process that can affect behavior. It may also involve physiological processes, including changes in the production of endocrine hormones. The present research involved two studies of changes in testosterone levels among fans watching their favorite sports teams win or lose. In the first study, participants were eight male fans attending a basketball game between traditional college rivals. In the second study, participants were 21 male fans watching a televised World Cup soccer match between traditional international rivals. Participants provided saliva samples for testosterone assay before and after the contest. In both studies, mean testosterone level increased in the fans of winning teams and decreased in the fans of losing teams. These findings suggest that watching one's heroes win or lose has physiological consequences that extend beyond changes in mood and self-esteem.

  10. Synthesis and SAR of potent LXR agonists containing an indole pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Campobasso, Nino; Smallwood, Angela; Parks, Derek J.; Webb, Christine L.; Frank, Kelly A.; Nord, Melanie; Duraiswami, Chaya; Evans, Christopher; Jaye, Michael; Thompson, Scott K.

    2009-03-27

    A novel series of 1H-indol-1-yl tertiary amine LXR agonists has been designed. Compounds from this series were potent agonists with good rat pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, the crystal structure of an LXR agonist bound to LXR{alpha} will be disclosed.

  11. On winning the penalty shoot-out in soccer.

    PubMed

    McGarry, T; Franks, I M

    2000-06-01

    The penalty shoot-out is used to break tied games in the knock-out stages of soccer competition. The shoot-out, which consists of an alternating series of penalty kicks, is won by the team with the highest goal tally after n kicks per team (n = 5). In the event of a tie after five penalty kicks each, the shoot-out progresses to 'sudden death' by increasing n in iterative fashion (i.e. n = n + 1) until one team obtains a higher goal tally than the other after an equal number of kicks per team. The team to strike first is determined at the end of extra time by the toss of a coin. As each on-field player can be awarded only a single penalty kick, the line-up order in which the penalty kicks are taken allows for the possibility of tactical influence on the final outcome. Consequently, we report a probability analysis of the penalty shoot-out in soccer from which we identify the following pre- and post-game strategies. The best five ranked penalty takers from the on-field players should be assigned to the first five penalty kicks in their reverse order of ability. That is, the fifth best penalty taker should take the first penalty kick, the fourth best penalty taker should take the second penalty kick, and so on. In the event of sudden death, the next highest ranked on-field player should be assigned to the next penalty kick until the shoot-out ends. For this tactic to be successful, players should be ranked a priori on their penalty-taking ability. Similarly, goalkeepers should be ranked a priori on their penalty-stopping ability. These findings indicate that the tactical substitution of on-field players for higher ranked penalty takers, including higher ranked penalty stoppers (i.e. goalkeepers), with a view to an impending penalty shoot-out should be given due consideration. These results are of practical importance in that they are shown to maximize the likelihood of winning the penalty shoot-out under certain initial conditions.

  12. A win ratio approach to comparing continuous non-normal outcomes in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duolao; Pocock, Stuart

    2016-05-01

    Clinical trials are often designed to compare continuous non-normal outcomes. The conventional statistical method for such a comparison is a non-parametric Mann-Whitney test, which provides a P-value for testing the hypothesis that the distributions of both treatment groups are identical, but does not provide a simple and straightforward estimate of treatment effect. For that, Hodges and Lehmann proposed estimating the shift parameter between two populations and its confidence interval (CI). However, such a shift parameter does not have a straightforward interpretation, and its CI contains zero in some cases when Mann-Whitney test produces a significant result. To overcome the aforementioned problems, we introduce the use of the win ratio for analysing such data. Patients in the new and control treatment are formed into all possible pairs. For each pair, the new treatment patient is labelled a 'winner' or a 'loser' if it is known who had the more favourable outcome. The win ratio is the total number of winners divided by the total numbers of losers. A 95% CI for the win ratio can be obtained using the bootstrap method. Statistical properties of the win ratio statistic are investigated using two real trial data sets and six simulation studies. Results show that the win ratio method has about the same power as the Mann-Whitney method. We recommend the use of the win ratio method for estimating the treatment effect (and CI) and the Mann-Whitney method for calculating the P-value for comparing continuous non-Normal outcomes when the amount of tied pairs is small. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Win percentage: a novel measure for assessing the suitability of machine classifiers for biological problems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Selecting an appropriate classifier for a particular biological application poses a difficult problem for researchers and practitioners alike. In particular, choosing a classifier depends heavily on the features selected. For high-throughput biomedical datasets, feature selection is often a preprocessing step that gives an unfair advantage to the classifiers built with the same modeling assumptions. In this paper, we seek classifiers that are suitable to a particular problem independent of feature selection. We propose a novel measure, called "win percentage", for assessing the suitability of machine classifiers to a particular problem. We define win percentage as the probability a classifier will perform better than its peers on a finite random sample of feature sets, giving each classifier equal opportunity to find suitable features. Results First, we illustrate the difficulty in evaluating classifiers after feature selection. We show that several classifiers can each perform statistically significantly better than their peers given the right feature set among the top 0.001% of all feature sets. We illustrate the utility of win percentage using synthetic data, and evaluate six classifiers in analyzing eight microarray datasets representing three diseases: breast cancer, multiple myeloma, and neuroblastoma. After initially using all Gaussian gene-pairs, we show that precise estimates of win percentage (within 1%) can be achieved using a smaller random sample of all feature pairs. We show that for these data no single classifier can be considered the best without knowing the feature set. Instead, win percentage captures the non-zero probability that each classifier will outperform its peers based on an empirical estimate of performance. Conclusions Fundamentally, we illustrate that the selection of the most suitable classifier (i.e., one that is more likely to perform better than its peers) not only depends on the dataset and application but also on the

  14. Agonists and partial agonists of rhodopsin: retinal polyene methylation affects receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Reiner; Lüdeke, Steffen; Siebert, Friedrich; Sakmar, Thomas P; Hirshfeld, Amiram; Sheves, Mordechai

    2006-02-14

    Using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy, we have studied the impact of sites and extent of methylation of the retinal polyene with respect to position and thermodynamic parameters of the conformational equilibrium between the Meta I and Meta II photoproducts of rhodopsin. Deletion of methyl groups to form 9-demethyl and 13-demethyl analogues, as well as addition of a methyl group at C10 or C12, shifted the Meta I/Meta II equilibrium toward Meta I, such that the retinal analogues behaved like partial agonists. This equilibrium shift resulted from an apparent reduction of the entropy gain of the transition of up to 65%, which was only partially offset by a concomitant reduction of the enthalpy increase. The analogues produced Meta II photoproducts with relatively small alterations, while their Meta I states were significantly altered, which accounted for the aberrant transitions to Meta II. Addition of a methyl group at C14 influenced the thermodynamic parameters but had little impact on the position of the Meta I/Meta II equilibrium. Neutralization of the residue 134 in the E134Q opsin mutant increased the Meta II content of the 13-demethyl analogue, but not of the 9-demethyl analogue, indicating a severe impairment of the allosteric coupling between the conserved cytoplasmic ERY motif involved in proton uptake and the Schiff base/Glu 113 microdomain in the 9-demethyl analogue. The 9-methyl group appears therefore essential for the correct positioning of retinal to link protonation of the cytoplasmic motif with protonation of Glu 113 during receptor activation.

  15. The Work Incentive (WIN) Program and Related Experiences. A Review of Research with Policy Implications. R&D Monograph 49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    The aim of the research review reported here was to draw together empirical findings that illuminate the factors affecting Work Incentive Program (WIN) results and contribute to discussion of future welfare, work-training, and employment policies. (WIN, authorized in 1967, has sought to put people on Aid to Dependent Children (AFDC) to work…

  16. An alternative approach to confidence interval estimation for the win ratio statistic.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaodong; Tian, Hong; Mohanty, Surya; Tsai, Wei Yann

    2015-03-01

    Pocock et al. (2012, European Heart Journal 33, 176-182) proposed a win ratio approach to analyzing composite endpoints comprised of outcomes with different clinical priorities. In this article, we establish a statistical framework for this approach. We derive the null hypothesis and propose a closed-form variance estimator for the win ratio statistic in all pairwise matching situation. Our simulation study shows that the proposed variance estimator performs well regardless of the magnitude of treatment effect size and the type of the joint distribution of the outcomes.

  17. Representations in Award-Winning LGBTQ Young Adult Literature from 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Laura M

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and queer (LGBTQ) young adult (YA) literature is increasing in popularity, with novels like Bil Wright's Putting Makeup on the Fat Boy winning the two LGBTQ YA honors--the Lambda Literary and Stonewall Book Awards--as well awards commending their cultural diversity. Despite the upsurge of celebrated LGBTQ YA literature, a study of the protagonists in Lambda- and Stonewall-winning YA novels from 2000-2013 reveals three findings: the dominance of White, gay, male characters contradicts the trend toward strong female protagonists in mainstream YA; stories about lesbians are primarily tragic; and there are no bisexual protagonists. PMID:26264988

  18. In vivo labeling of cocaine receptors with sup 3 H-(-) cocaine, sup 3 H-WIN 35,065-2 and sup 3 H-WIN 35,428

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffel, U.; Boja, J.W.; Stathis, M.; Kuhar, M.J. )

    1990-02-26

    {sup 11}C-(-)cocaine (-COC) has recently been employed to image -COC binding sites in vivo using PET. Two analogs of -COC, WIN 35,065-2 (WIN-2) and WIN 35,428 (CFT), have been shown in vitro to exhibit higher affinity for the -COC receptor than -COC. The present study evaluates {sup 3}H-WIN-2 and {sup 3}H-CFT as in vivo receptor labels in mice with a view towards the use of these compounds as PET ligands for -COC receptors in the living human brain. {sup 3}H-labeled -COC, WIN-2 and CFT were injected i.v. into mice and their specific binding in the CNS determined. Peak striatal/cerebellar (S/C) ratios were reached at 5 minutes post injection with -COC (1.56), at 45 minutes with {sup 3}H-WIN-2 (3.30) and 60 minutes with {sup 3}H-CFT (4.0). The specificity of in vivo binding of {sup 3}H-WIN-2 and {sup 3}H-CFT was tested by pre-injection of various drugs. Binding of {sup 3}H-WIN-2 and {sup 3}H-CFT was dose-dependently blocked by cold WIN-2 and CFT, and by dopamine uptake site inhibitors (mazindol, GBR 12,909, nomifensine), but not by (+)COC, paroxetine and desipramine. The data indicate that {sup 3}H-WIN-2 and {sup 3}H-CFT exhibit improved in vivo binding (higher S/C ratios, longer retention time at the -COC receptor/dopamine transporter) compared to -COC and support their testing in PET studies.

  19. A Win-Win Effect for Both the Ferromagnetism and the Dopability of p-Type Doping in ZnO:(Cu+N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ling; Zhang, Wei-Feng

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the electronic structures and magnetic properties of ZnO doped with N, Cu, and (Cu+N) by using a first principles method and considering the strong correlation effect. It is interesting to compare these three systems. ZnO:N has weak p-type doping and unstable ferromagnetism, while ZnO:Cu becomes insulating due to the Jahn—Teller effect. Cu and N codoping can not only greatly improve the dopability of p-type doping accompanying the Jahn—Teller fading, but also enhance the ferromagnetism at the same time. The calculation results indicate that there is a win-win effect between N and Cu dopants in the ZnO:(Cu+N) system, which could possibly find applications in spintronics besides optoelectronics.

  20. Illegal use of beta-adrenergic agonists: European Community.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, H A; Noordam, M Y; van Dooren-Flipsen, M M; Schilt, R; Roos, A H

    1998-01-01

    The use of veterinary medicinal products within the European Community is governed by a series of directives and regulations that describe the requirements for safety, quality, and efficacy of these products. Veterinary therapeutic use of beta-agonists has only been approved in the case of clenbuterol for bronchodilatation in horses and calves and for tocolysis in cows. No beta-agonists have been permitted in the European Community for growth-promoting purposes in farm animals. Surveillance for the presence of residues of veterinary agents in food-producing animals and meat is regulated by the Directive 86/469/EEC containing specific guidelines for sampling procedures on farms and in slaughterhouses. The level and frequency of sampling is dependent on the category of compounds and animal species. When positive samples have been identified (above certain action levels), sampling intensity is increased. Results of monitoring programs in EU member states during 1992 and 1993 for the occurrence of residues of beta-agonists in food-producing animals vary substantially with respect to the percentages of positive samples, ranging from 0 to 7%. The variability is partly explained by differences in sampling strategies, detection methods, and action levels applied. Identification of the proper matrices for sampling and detection of beta-agonists is important. In the case of clenbuterol, hair and choroid retinal tissue are appropriate tissues because clenbuterol accumulates in these matrices. A clear decrease in the use of clenbuterol in cattle has been observed in The Netherlands, Germany, Northern Ireland, and Spanish Basque Country over the last 3 yr. This is partly due to intensified surveillance activities at farms and slaughterhouses by governmental agencies and production sector organizations. There are data on human intoxication following consumption of liver or meat from cattle treated with beta-agonists. At the concentrations of clenbuterol measured in contaminated

  1. Cell type and gene-specific activity of the retinoid inverse agonist AGN 193109: divergent effects from agonist at retinoic acid receptor gamma in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Thacher, S M; Nagpal, S; Klein, E S; Arefieg, T; Krasinski, G; DiSepio, D; Agarwal, C; Johnson, A; Eckert, R L; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-04-01

    Retinoids are important regulators of epithelial differentiation. AGN 193109 is a high-affinity antagonist and inverse agonist for the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Paradoxically, both AGN 193109 and retinoid agonists inhibit the expression of the differentiation marker MRP-8 in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). TTNPB, an RAR agonist, and AGN 193109 mutually antagonize MRP-8 inhibition at both mRNA and protein levels. We find that this antagonism, which is greatest at an AGN 193109:TTNPB ratio of about 10:1, is absent when either compound is in significant excess. The potent RARalpha-specific agonist, AGN 193836, has no effect on MRP-8 regulation. These data indicate that inverse agonists and agonists suppress MRP-8 in NHKs through RARgamma using distinct and mutually inhibitory mechanisms. The activity of AGN 193109 on MRP-8 is cell type specific. In differentiating ECE16-1 cervical cells, TTNPB inhibits while AGN 193109 induces MRP-8 mRNA levels. The effect of AGN 193109 on genes inhibited by retinoid agonists in NHKs is also selective; expression of the differentiation markers transglutaminase 1 and keratin 6 is not down-regulated by AGN 193109 whereas stromelysin-1 expression is suppressed. These results show a complex gene and cell context-specific interplay between agonist and inverse agonist for the regulation of gene expression.

  2. Agonist-antagonist combinations in opioid dependence: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The potential therapeutic benefits of co-administering opiate agonist and antagonist agents remain largely to be investigated. This paper focuses on the mechanisms of very low doses of naltrexone that help modulate the effects of methadone withdrawal and review pharmacological properties of the buprenorphine/naltrexone combination that support its clinical investigation. The bench-to-bedside development of the very low dose naltrexone treatment can serve as a translational paradigm to investigate and treat drug addiction. Further research on putative mechanisms elicited by the use of opioid agonist-antagonist combinations may lead to effective pharmacological alternatives to the gold standard methadone treatment, also useful for the management of the abuse of non opioid drugs and alcohol. PMID:22448305

  3. Orvinols with Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonist Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [35S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile. PMID:23438330

  4. Orvinols with mixed kappa/mu opioid receptor agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Greedy, Benjamin M; Bradbury, Faye; Thomas, Mark P; Grivas, Konstantinos; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Archambeau, Ashley; Bosse, Kelly; Clark, Mary J; Aceto, Mario; Lewis, John W; Traynor, John R; Husbands, Stephen M

    2013-04-25

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [(35)S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile.

  5. Grooming, rank, and agonistic support in tufted capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schino, Gabriele; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Visalberghi, Elisabetta

    2009-02-01

    Studies investigating the relation between allogrooming and social rank in capuchin monkeys (genus Cebus) have yielded inconsistent results. In this study, we investigated the relation between grooming, agonistic support, aggression and social rank in a captive group of tufted capuchin monkeys (C. apella). Differently from most previous studies, we based our analyses on a relatively large database and studied a group with known genealogical relationships. Tufted capuchin females did not exchange grooming for rank-related benefits such as agonistic support or reduced aggression. Coherently with this picture, they did not groom up the hierarchy and did not compete for accessing high-ranking grooming partners. It is suggested that a small group size, coupled with a strong kin bias, may make the exchange of grooming for rank-related benefits impossible or unprofitable, thus eliminating the advantages of grooming up the hierarchy. We provide several possible explanations for the heterogeneity of results across capuchin studies that have addressed similar questions.

  6. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site.

  7. Dopamine Agonists and the Suppression of Impulsive Motor Actions in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, S.A.; Claassen, D.O.; Huizenga, H.M.; Schewel, K.D.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Bashore, T.R.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The suppression of spontaneous motor impulses is an essential facet of cognitive control that is linked to frontal-basal ganglia circuitry. Basal ganglia dysfunction caused by Parkinson’s disease (PD) disrupts the proficiency of action suppression, but how pharmacotherapy for PD impacts impulsive motor control is poorly understood. Dopamine agonists improve motor symptoms of PD, but can also provoke impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICB). We investigated whether dopamine agonist medication has a beneficial or detrimental effect on impulsive action control in thirty-eight PD patients, half of whom had current ICB. Participants performed the Simon conflict task, which measures susceptibility to acting on spontaneous action impulses as well as the proficiency of suppressing these impulses. Compared to an off agonist state, patients on their agonist were no more susceptible to reacting impulsively, but were less proficient at suppressing the interference from the activation of impulsive actions. Importantly, agonist effects depended on baseline performance in the off agonist state; more proficient suppressors off agonist experienced a reduction in suppression on agonist, whereas less proficient suppressors off agonist showed improved suppression on agonist. Patients with active ICB were actually less susceptible to making fast, impulsive response errors than patients without ICB, suggesting that behavioral problems in this subset of patients may be less related to impulsivity in motor control. Our findings provide further evidence that dopamine agonist medication impacts specific cognitive control processes and that the direction of its effects depends on individual differences in performance off medication. PMID:22571461

  8. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site. PMID:27298318

  9. Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonists: The 6β-Naltrexamines

    PubMed Central

    Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Neal, Adrian P.; Bradbury, Faye A.; Purington, Lauren C.; Aceto, Mario D.; Harris, Louis S.; Lewis, John W.; Traynor, John R.; Husbands, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Ligands from the naltrexamine series have consistently demonstrated agonist activity at kappa opioid receptors (KOR), with varying activity at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Various 6β-cinnamoylamino derivatives were made with the aim of generating ligands with a KOR agonist/MOR partial agonist profile, as ligands with this activity may be of interest as treatment agents for cocaine abuse. The ligands all displayed the desired high affinity, non-selective binding in vitro and in the functional assays were high efficacy KOR agonists with some partial agonist activity at MOR. Two of the new ligands (12a, 12b) have been evaluated in vivo, with 12a acting as a KOR agonist, and therefore somewhat similar to the previously evaluated analogues 3–6, while 12b displayed predominant MOR agonist activity. PMID:19253970

  10. Octopaminergic agonists for the cockroach neuronal octopamine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Eto, Morifusa

    2003-01-01

    The compounds 1-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine-2-thione and 2-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine showed the almost same activity as octopamine in stimulating adenylate cyclase of cockroach thoracic nervous system among 70 octopamine agonists, suggesting that only these compounds are full octopamine agonists and other compounds are partial octopamine agonists. The quantitative structure-activity relationship of a set of 22 octopamine agonists against receptor 2 in cockroach nervous tissue, was analyzed using receptor surface modeling. Three-dimensional energetics descriptors were calculated from receptor surface model/ligand interaction and these three-dimensional descriptors were used in quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis. A receptor surface model was generated using some subset of the most active structures and the results provided useful information in the characterization and differentiation of octopaminergic receptor. Abbreviation: AEA arylethanolamine AII 2-(arylimino)imidazolidine AIO 2-(arylimino)oxazolidine AIT 2-(arylimino)thiazolidine APAT 2-(α-phenylethylamino)-2-thiazoline BPAT 2-(β-phenylethylamino)-2-thiazoline CAO 2-(3-chlorobenzylamino)-2-oxazoline DCAO 2-(3,5-dichlorobenzylamino)-2-oxazoline DET5 2-(2,6-diethylphenylimino)-5-methylthiazolidine DET6 2-(2,6-diethylphenylimino)thiazine EGTA ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid GFA genetic function approximation G/PLS genetic partial least squares IND 2-aminomethyl-2-indanol LAH lithium aluminum hydride MCSG maximum common subgroup MCT6 2-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenylimino)thiazine OA octopamine PLS partial least squares QSAR quantitative structure-activity relationship SBAT 2-(substituted benzylamino)-2-thiazoline SD the sum of squared deviations of the dependent variable values from their mean SPIT 3-(substituted phenyl)imidazolidine-2-thione THI 2-amino-1-(2-thiazoyl)ethanol TMS tetramethyl silane PMID:15841226

  11. Newspapers and newspaper ink contain agonists for the ah receptor.

    PubMed

    Bohonowych, Jessica E S; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T; Denison, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  12. Synthesis of fluorinated agonist of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Aliouane, Lucie; Chao, Sovy; Brizuela, Leyre; Pfund, Emmanuel; Cuvillier, Olivier; Jean, Ludovic; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Lequeux, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The bioactive metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a product of sphingosine kinases (SphKs), mediates diverse biological processes such as cell differentiation, proliferation, survival and angiogenesis. A fluorinated analogue of S1P receptor agonist has been synthesized by utilizing a ring opening reaction of oxacycles by a lithiated difluoromethylphosphonate anion as the key reaction. In vitro activity of this S1P analogue is also reported.

  13. A human platelet calcium calculator trained by pairwise agonist scanning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-02-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide.

  14. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline.

  15. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline. PMID:20030735

  16. Antipsychotic Induced Symptomatic Hyperprolactinemia: Are Dopamine Agonists Safe?

    PubMed Central

    Lertxundi, Unax; Domingo-Echaburu, Saioa; Peral, Javier; García, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Published literature shows that dopamine agonists can reverse antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia without worsening psychotic symptoms in the majority of schizophrenic patients. However, psychiatrists have been reluctant to use drugs with dopaminergic properties for fear of exacerbating psychiatric symptoms. There are reported cases of psychosis worsening published for both cabergoline and bromocriptine. Cabergoline has proven to be more effective and safe when used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but whether cabergoline is also safer than bromocriptine in antipsychotic induced hyperprolactinemia remains unproven.

  17. A human platelet calcium calculator trained by pairwise agonist scanning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-02-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide. PMID:25723389

  18. Improving the developability profile of pyrrolidine progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Kallander, Lara S.; Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Frazee, James S.; Stoy, Patrick; Johnson, Latisha; Lu, Qing; Hammond, Marlys; Barton, Linda S.; Patterson, Jaclyn R.; Azzarano, Leonard M.; Nagilla, Rakesh; Madauss, Kevin P.; Williams, Shawn P.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Duraiswami, Chaya; Grygielko, Eugene T.; Xu, Xiaoping; Laping, Nicholas J.; Bray, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Scott K.

    2010-09-17

    The previously reported pyrrolidine class of progesterone receptor partial agonists demonstrated excellent potency but suffered from serious liabilities including hERG blockade and high volume of distribution in the rat. The basic pyrrolidine amine was intentionally converted to a sulfonamide, carbamate, or amide to address these liabilities. The evaluation of the degree of partial agonism for these non-basic pyrrolidine derivatives and demonstration of their efficacy in an in vivo model of endometriosis is disclosed herein.

  19. A Human Platelet Calcium Calculator Trained by Pairwise Agonist Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide. PMID:25723389

  20. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  1. Increased flow precedes remote arteriolar dilations for some microapplied agonists.

    PubMed

    Frame, M D

    2000-04-01

    This study asks which occurs first in time for remote responses: a dilation or a remote change in flow. Arteriolar diameter (approximately 20 microm) and fluorescently labeled red blood cell (RBC) velocity were measured in the cremaster muscle of anesthetized (pentobarbital sodium, 70 mg/kg) hamsters (n = 51). Arterioles were locally stimulated for 60 s with micropipette-applied 10 microg/ml LM-609 (alpha(v)beta(3)-integrin agonist), 10(-3) M adenosine, or 10(-3) M 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1, nitric oxide donor) as remote response agonists or with 10(-3) M papaverine, which dilates only locally. Observations were made at a remote site 1,200 microm upstream. With LM-609 or adenosine, the RBC velocity increased first (within 5 s), and the remote dilation followed 5-7 s later. N-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM) blocked the LM-609 (100%) and adenosine (60%) remote dilations. SIN-1 induced a concurrent remote dilation and decrease in RBC velocity (approximately 10 s), suggesting the primary signal was to dilate. Papaverine had no remote effects. This study suggests that, although remote responses to some agonists are induced by primary signals to dilate, additionally, network changes in flow can stimulate extensive remote changes in diameter.

  2. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  3. Emerging strategies for exploiting cannabinoid receptor agonists as medicines.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2009-02-01

    Medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptor are already in the clinic. These are Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) and Sativex (Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol with cannabidiol). The first two of these medicines can be prescribed to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Marinol can also be prescribed to stimulate appetite, while Sativex is prescribed for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in adults with multiple sclerosis and as an adjunctive analgesic treatment for adult patients with advanced cancer. One challenge now is to identify additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a number of potential clinical applications for such agonists are mentioned in this review. A second challenge is to develop strategies that will improve the efficacy and/or the benefit-to-risk ratio of a cannabinoid receptor agonist. This review focuses on five strategies that have the potential to meet either or both of these objectives. These are strategies that involve: (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier; (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue; (iii) targeting up-regulated cannabinoid receptors; (iv) targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors; or (v) 'multi-targeting'. Preclinical data that justify additional research directed at evaluating the clinical importance of each of these strategies are also discussed. PMID:19226257

  4. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes. PMID:24038158

  5. Structure of the agonist-bound neurotensin receptor.

    PubMed

    White, Jim F; Noinaj, Nicholas; Shibata, Yoko; Love, James; Kloss, Brian; Xu, Feng; Gvozdenovic-Jeremic, Jelena; Shah, Priyanka; Shiloach, Joseph; Tate, Christopher G; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2012-10-25

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13-amino-acid peptide that functions as both a neurotransmitter and a hormone through the activation of the neurotensin receptor NTSR1, a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In the brain, NTS modulates the activity of dopaminergic systems, opioid-independent analgesia, and the inhibition of food intake; in the gut, NTS regulates a range of digestive processes. Here we present the structure at 2.8 Å resolution of Rattus norvegicus NTSR1 in an active-like state, bound to NTS(8-13), the carboxy-terminal portion of NTS responsible for agonist-induced activation of the receptor. The peptide agonist binds to NTSR1 in an extended conformation nearly perpendicular to the membrane plane, with the C terminus oriented towards the receptor core. Our findings provide, to our knowledge, the first insight into the binding mode of a peptide agonist to a GPCR and may support the development of non-peptide ligands that could be useful in the treatment of neurological disorders, cancer and obesity.

  6. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes.

  7. Winning in NCAA Women?s Soccer: Does the Gender of the Coach Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brush, Brian C.; Naples, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    While women's intercollegiate soccer has grown rapidly over the past three decades, men still hold nearly two-thirds of all head coaching positions in NCAA Division I women's soccer programs. This paper explores whether the gender of the head coach affects success in winning games. After considering various reasons why gender might matter, we…

  8. John Bardeen: The Only Person to Win Two Nobel Prizes in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoddeson, L.

    2011-01-01

    John Bardeen worked on the theory of solids throughout his physics career, winning two Nobel Prizes: the first in 1956 for the invention of the transistor with Walter Brattain and William Shockley; and the second in 1972 for the development with Leon Cooper and J Robert Schrieffer of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity.…

  9. Telling Tales about Gender: A Critical Analysis of Caldecott Medal-Winning Picturebooks, 1938-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Thomas; Hiller, Brittany

    2011-01-01

    In the world of children's literature, analyses of the distribution and representation of gender, biological sex, and gendered behavior in picturebooks often focused on Caldecott Award-winning literature. As the most prestigious award for American children's picturebooks, titles that receive this honor have a profound influence on the field of…

  10. Portraits of Learning 2007: We Present This Year's Winning Student Photos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This year's more than 4,000 Portraits of Learning entries attest to the growing comfort with digital technologies and visual arts that today's kids have. This article presents 12 winning student photos of the Portraits of Learning 2007. The winners emerged from the selection of subjects that varied wildly--from grasshoppers, giraffes, zebras, and…

  11. Occupational and School Selections: Experiences With The Portland WIN Voucher Training Program. Precis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunning, Bruce B.

    In 1974, vouchers for institutional vocational training were available in the Work Incentive Program (WIN) in Portland, Oregon, from April until the end of September. Voucher recipients were allowed up to six weeks in which to decide about a training occupation, locate an appropriate school, and make arrangements for enrollment. Relationships…

  12. Many Libraries Have Gone to Federated Searching to Win Users Back from Google. Is It Working?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    In the last issue, this journal asked a question on many librarians' minds, and it was pleased with the depth and variety of responses. As suggested by this journal editorial board member Oliver Pesch, readers were asked, "Many libraries have gone to federated searching to win users back from Google. Is it working?" Respondents approached the…

  13. Winning in the Rural Zone: How Cam Henderson Invented the Zone Defense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Bob

    1992-01-01

    Assesses the distinguished coaching career of Cam Henderson, who won over 611 games in 36 seasons of college basketball and coached over 151 college football wins at West Virginia colleges, mainly at Marshall University (Huntington). His influence has been so pervasive that Marshall University's basketball arena is named in his honor. (LP)

  14. Current developments in software for surface irrigation analysis:winSRFR4/SRFR5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WinSRFR is a software package for the hydraulic analysis of surface irrigation systems. The software can be used to conduct simulations, carry out design and operational analyses, and evaluate performance from field-measured data. Version 3.1 was released in 2009 and a new version, V. 4.1 is schedu...

  15. An Exploration of Sex-Role Stereotyping in Australian Award-Winning Children's Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kok, Jodi L. Y.; Findlay, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    A content analysis of 25 award-winning Australian picture books was conducted to examine whether the incidence of sex-role stereotyping had decreased in Australian picture books since the mid 1970s. Comparing a sample of books from the mid 1970s to a sample from the 2000s, three potential areas of stereotyping were assessed: ratios of male to…

  16. A Descriptive-Analytic Study of the Practice Field Behavior of a Winning Female Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Patt; Rife, Frank

    A winning collegiate field hockey coach was observed across seventeen practice sessions through one complete competitive season. A category system for the event recording of verbal and nonverbal behaviors delivered to the team and to the sixteen individual players produced descriptive-analytic information about relative behavior frequencies for…

  17. At Issue: An Award-Winning Community College Instructor's Approach to Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Hilarie B.

    2015-01-01

    The author presents themes that were identified from a case study that focused on the instructional practices of an award-winning community college composition/literature teacher. The themes for this case study focus on the importance of student-centered learning which involve: (1) writing peer response strategies; (2) student engagement in using…

  18. A Simple Effect Size Estimator for Single Case Designs Using WinBUGS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindskopf, David; Shadish, William; Hedges, Larry V.

    2012-01-01

    This conference presentation demonstrates a multilevel model for analyzing single case designs. The model is implemented in the Bayesian program WinBUGS. The authors show how it is possible to estimate a d-statistic like the one in Hedges, Pustejovsky and Shadish (2012) in this program. Results are demonstrated on an example.

  19. Deploying the Win TR-20 computational engine as a web service

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite its simplicity and limitations, the runoff curve number method remains a widely-used hydrologic modeling tool, and its use through the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) computer application WinTR-20 is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. To facilitate timely up...

  20. Inclusive College Teaching: A Study of How Four Award-Winning Faculty Employ Universal Design Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Carl S.

    2013-01-01

    Using universal design instruction (UDI) as a framework, this study explores the inclusive teaching practices of four award-winning humanities and social sciences faculty at a large urban Research I university located in the northeastern region of the United States. UDI, a framework used to assist teachers in creating proactively inclusive…

  1. Analysing the Subject of Peace in Award-Winning Children's and Adolescent Novels in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslan, Canan; Kepenekci, Yasemin Karaman; Güldenoglu, Bilge Nur Dogan; Karagül, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal how the concept of peace is addressed in the national award-winning novels written for secondary school students within the Republic of Turkey. Data for this study was obtained from child and youth literature award organizations, associations and publishers within Turkey. Each group which was researched has…

  2. 7 CFR 15f.25 - Will USDA pay my attorneys fees if I win?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 CFR part 1, subpart J. The ALJ must follow those rules, and not these Section 741 Complaint... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Will USDA pay my attorneys fees if I win? 15f.25... Request a Hearing, What Will Happen? How Will the Hearing Be Conducted? § 15f.25 Will USDA pay...

  3. 7 CFR 15f.25 - Will USDA pay my attorneys fees if I win?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 CFR part 1, subpart J. The ALJ must follow those rules, and not these Section 741 Complaint... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Will USDA pay my attorneys fees if I win? 15f.25... Request a Hearing, What Will Happen? How Will the Hearing Be Conducted? § 15f.25 Will USDA pay...

  4. 7 CFR 15f.25 - Will USDA pay my attorneys fees if I win?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 CFR part 1, subpart J. The ALJ must follow those rules, and not these Section 741 Complaint... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Will USDA pay my attorneys fees if I win? 15f.25... Request a Hearing, What Will Happen? How Will the Hearing Be Conducted? § 15f.25 Will USDA pay...

  5. 7 CFR 15f.25 - Will USDA pay my attorneys fees if I win?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 CFR part 1, subpart J. The ALJ must follow those rules, and not these Section 741 Complaint... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Will USDA pay my attorneys fees if I win? 15f.25... Request a Hearing, What Will Happen? How Will the Hearing Be Conducted? § 15f.25 Will USDA pay...

  6. 7 CFR 15f.25 - Will USDA pay my attorneys fees if I win?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 CFR part 1, subpart J. The ALJ must follow those rules, and not these Section 741 Complaint... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Will USDA pay my attorneys fees if I win? 15f.25... Request a Hearing, What Will Happen? How Will the Hearing Be Conducted? § 15f.25 Will USDA pay...

  7. Everybody WINs: Effectively Involving Business in Workforce Development. The First in a Series of Policy Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Carla J.; Herranz, Joaquin, Jr.

    As policymakers have begun reorienting the U.S. work force development system's priorities, a common theme has been the importance of work and training tied to real employment prospects. Workforce Innovation Networks (WINs) was created to test and advance the idea that local employer organizations can play important, productive roles in helping…

  8. Assessment of a WIN Quality Training Demonstration Project. Phase 1 Report: Characteristics of Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Richard N.

    A group of interested and academically qualified female Aid to Families with Dependent Children recipients was identified to participate in the assessment of a demonstration program to train female Work incentive Program (WIN) participants. Training for electronics technicians was conducted at DeVry Institute of Technology (Chicago) and Ohio…

  9. Results of a Test and Win Contest to Raise Radon Awareness in Urban and Rural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Rayens, Mary Kay; Kercsmar, Sarah E.; Robertson, Heather; Adkins, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radon is a leading cause of lung cancer, but few test their homes to determine radon levels. Purpose: The study assessed feasibility and success of a Test and Win Contest to promote radon testing in rural and urban communities. Methods: The prospective, quasi-experimental study tested a novel contest to raise radon awareness. Paid and…

  10. The Better Ways to Win a Grant: Tips from "T&L" Grant Guru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnow, Gary A.

    2008-01-01

    Funding from grants is often at the core of a successful technology plan, but writing proposals requires a bit of magic and a lot of time. Grants can be a good way for educators to collaborate on building strong programs, but some creative thinking is also required. In this article, the author provides tips on how to win a grant: (1) Find a…

  11. WinGraphics: An optimized windowing environment for interactive real-time simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Verboncoeur, J.P.; Vahedi, V.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a customized windowing environment, Win Graphics, which provides particle simulation codes with an interactive user interface. The environment supports real-time animation of the simulation, displaying multiple diagnostics as they evolve in time. In addition, keyboard and printer (PostScript and dot matrix) support is provided. This paper describes this environment.

  12. Winning or Losing against an Opposite-Sex Peer on a Gender-Based Competitive Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Stefanie; Thompson, J. Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Explored the effects on college students' mood and body image of a negative versus positive outcome in an opposite-sex, competitive peer interaction. Used one gender-neutral and one gender stereotypical task. There were no gender differences in reactions to winning or losing gender-neutral competitions, except marginally for depression. The…

  13. Transformational Teaching Experience of a Novice Teacher: A Narrative of an Award-Winning Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumi-Yeboah, Alex; James, Waynne

    2012-01-01

    This research investigates the transformational teaching experiences of a novice award-winning teacher. Data collection consisted primarily of interviews and observations. To support these methods, we utilized field notes and reflection journals to triangulate the data. To become a successful teacher, "the teacher" passed through transformational…

  14. Lose to Win: A Goal-Oriented Group for Overweight Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Roselyn

    1985-01-01

    Describes the Lose to Win Program, a weight loss program for third, fourth and fifth grade students. The program included nutrition education, exercise, and improving the self concept, and involved the use of rewards, and support of parents and school staff. (JAC)

  15. Winning Strategy: Set Benchmarks of Early Success to Build Momentum for the Long Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Jody

    2012-01-01

    Change is a highly personal experience. Everyone participating in the effort has different reactions to change, different concerns, and different motivations for being involved. The smart change leader sets benchmarks along the way so there are guideposts and pause points instead of an endless change process. "Early wins"--a term used to describe…

  16. The Portrayal of Older People in Award-Winning Literature for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dellmann-Jenkins, Mary; Yang, Lisa

    1997-01-01

    Examined illustrations for portrayal of older adult characters in Caldecott Medal-winning picture books, comparing 1972-83 and 1984-95 winners. Found that recent books portray elderly in a more positive manner than earlier winners. In addition, only two significant gender differences in a field of 36 possibilities were found over the entire…

  17. What! Another New Mandate? What Award-Winning Teachers Do When School Rules Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Randi

    These essays share award-winning teachers' strategies for adapting their classrooms to the ever-changing environment: "Professional Development Has Shaped Me and My Classroom" (Kay Wallace); "Teachers Go Back to School" (Steven T. Jackson); "Keeping Up With Change" (Caryn Smith Long); "Self-Reflection: Looking Over Your Own Shoulder" (Susan Barr);…

  18. Exercise in probability and statistics, or the probability of winning at tennis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Gaston

    1980-01-01

    The relationships between the probabilities p, x, s, and M, of winning, respectively, a point, a game, a set, or a match have been derived. The calculations are carried out under the assumption that these probabilities are averages. For example, x represents an average probability of winning a game when serving and receiving, and the same value of x is assumed to hold also for tie-break games. The formulas derived are for sets played with a tie-break game at the level of 6-6, as well as for the traditional rule requiring an advantage of two games to win a set. Matches to the best of three and five sets are considered. As is to be expected, a small advantage in the probability p of winning a point leads to advantages which are amplified by large factors : 2.5 for games, 7.1 for sets with tie-break at 6-6, 10.6 for matches to the best of three sets, and 13.3 for matches to the best of five sets. When sets are decided according to the traditional rule, the last three factors become, respectively, 7.4, 11.1, and 13.8. The theoretical calculations are compared with real and synthetic tennis scores and good agreement is found. The scatter of the data is seen to obey the predictions of a normal distribution. Some classroom problems are suggested at the end.

  19. A Study of Barriers to Employment for WIN Mandatory Welfare Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeckmann, Margaret

    A descriptive analysis was made of survey data collected on a sample of Work Incentive (WIN) Demonstration Program clients (i.e., mandatory welfare recipients who are required by law to register for employment and training as a condition of benefit receipt) participating in a special employment and training program called OPTIONS in Baltimore…

  20. Winning in sequential Parrondo games by players with short-term memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, K. W.; Ma, H. F.; Wu, D.; Lui, G. C.; Szeto, K. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The original Parrondo game, denoted as AB3, contains two independent games: A and B. The winning or losing of games A and B is defined by the change of one unit of capital. Game A is a losing game if played continuously, with winning probability p=0.5-ε , where ε =0.003 . Game B is also losing and has two coins: a good coin with winning probability {{p}\\text{g}}=0.75-ε is used if the player’s capital is not divisible by 3, otherwise a bad coin with winning probability {{p}\\text{b}}=0.1-ε is used. The Parrondo paradox refers to the situation where the mixture of games A and B in a sequence leads to winning in the long run. The paradox can be resolved using Markov chain analysis. We extend this setting of the Parrondo game to involve players with one-step memory. The player can win by switching his choice of A or B game in a Parrondo game sequence. If the player knows the identity of the game he plays and the state of his capital, then the player can win maximally. On the other hand, if the player does not know the nature of the game, then he is playing a (C, D) game, where either (C  =  A, D  =  B), or (C  =  B, D  =  A). For a player with one-step memory playing the AB3 game, he can achieve the highest expected gain with switching probability equal to 3/4 in the (C, D) game sequence. This result has been found first numerically and then proven analytically. Generalization to an AB mod(M) Parrondo game for other integers M has been made for the general domain of parameters {{p}\\text{b}}\\text{A}}<{{p}\\text{g}} . We find that for odd M the Parrondo effect does exist. However, for even M, there is no Parrondo effect for two cases: the initial game is A and the initial capital is even, or the initial game is B and the initial capital is odd. There is still a possibility of the Parrondo effect for the other two cases when M is even: the initial game is A and the initial capital is odd, or the initial game is B and the initial

  1. Better you lose than I do: neural networks involved in winning and losing in a real time strictly competitive game.

    PubMed

    Votinov, Mikhail; Pripfl, Juergen; Windischberger, Christian; Sailer, Uta; Lamm, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Many situations in daily life require competing with others for the same goal. In this case, the joy of winning is tied to the fact that the rival suffers. In this fMRI study participants played a competitive game against another player, in which every trial had opposite consequences for the two players (i.e., if one player won, the other lost, or vice versa). Our main aim was to disentangle brain activation for two different types of winning. Participants could either win a trial in a way that it increased their payoff; or they could win a trial in a way that it incurred a monetary loss to their opponent. Two distinct brain networks were engaged in these two types of winning. Wins with a monetary gain activated the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, an area associated with the processing of rewards. In contrast, avoidance of loss/other-related monetary loss evoked activation in areas related to mentalizing, such as the temporo-parietal junction and precuneus. However, both types of winnings shared activation in the striatum. Our findings extend recent evidence from neuroeconomics by suggesting that we consider our conspecifics' payoff even when we directly compete with them. PMID:26047332

  2. Better you lose than I do: neural networks involved in winning and losing in a real time strictly competitive game

    PubMed Central

    Votinov, Mikhail; Pripfl, Juergen; Windischberger, Christian; Sailer, Uta; Lamm, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Many situations in daily life require competing with others for the same goal. In this case, the joy of winning is tied to the fact that the rival suffers. In this fMRI study participants played a competitive game against another player, in which every trial had opposite consequences for the two players (i.e., if one player won, the other lost, or vice versa). Our main aim was to disentangle brain activation for two different types of winning. Participants could either win a trial in a way that it increased their payoff; or they could win a trial in a way that it incurred a monetary loss to their opponent. Two distinct brain networks were engaged in these two types of winning. Wins with a monetary gain activated the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, an area associated with the processing of rewards. In contrast, avoidance of loss/other-related monetary loss evoked activation in areas related to mentalizing, such as the temporo-parietal junction and precuneus. However, both types of winnings shared activation in the striatum. Our findings extend recent evidence from neuroeconomics by suggesting that we consider our conspecifics’ payoff even when we directly compete with them. PMID:26047332

  3. Meclizine is an agonist ligand for mouse constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and an inverse agonist for human CAR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wendong; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Ping; Schrader, William T; Moore, David D

    2004-10-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is a key regulator of xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. The ligand-binding domains of murine (m) and human (h) CAR are divergent relative to other nuclear hormone receptors, resulting in species-specific differences in xenobiotic responses. Here we identify the widely used antiemetic meclizine (Antivert; Bonine) as both an agonist ligand for mCAR and an inverse agonist for hCAR. Meclizine increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. Like the mCAR agonist 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, meclizine stimulates binding of steroid receptor coactivator 1 to the murine receptor in vitro. Meclizine administration to mice increases expression of CAR target genes in a CAR-dependent manner. In contrast, meclizine suppresses hCAR transactivation and inhibits the phenobarbital-induced expression of the CAR target genes, cytochrome p450 monooxygenase (CYP)2B10, CYP3A11, and CYP1A2, in primary hepatocytes derived from mice expressing hCAR, but not mCAR. The inhibitory effect of meclizine also suppresses acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in humanized CAR mice. These results demonstrate that a single compound can induce opposite xenobiotic responses via orthologous receptors in rodents and humans. PMID:15272053

  4. Additive antinociceptive effects of mixtures of the κ-opioid receptor agonist spiradoline and the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 in rats.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a significant clinical problem, and there is a need for pharmacotherapies that are more effective with fewer adverse effects than currently available medications. Cannabinoid receptor agonists enhance the antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists; it is unclear whether they impact the effects of agonists acting at other opioid receptors. κ-Opioid receptor agonists have antinociceptive effects, but their clinical use is precluded by adverse effects; however, their therapeutic potential might be realized if antinociceptive effects could be selectively enhanced. In this study, the antinociceptive effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 and the κ-opioid receptor agonist spiradoline, alone and in combination, were studied in rats (n=7) using a warm water tail-withdrawal procedure. When administered alone, CP55940 (0.032-1.0 mg/kg) and spiradoline (1.0-32.0 mg/kg) increased tail-withdrawal latency, and mixtures of CP55940 and spiradoline (ratios of 1 : 3, 1 : 1, and 3 : 1) produced additive effects. It remains to be determined whether this additive interaction between a κ-opioid receptor agonist and a cannabinoid receptor agonist is selective for antinociception and whether it can be generalized to other drugs. PMID:26292184

  5. Different serotonin receptor agonists have distinct effects on sound-evoked responses in inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M

    2006-11-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin has a complex set of effects on the auditory responses of neurons within the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain auditory nucleus that integrates a wide range of inputs from auditory and nonauditory sources. To determine whether activation of different types of serotonin receptors is a source of the variability in serotonergic effects, four selective agonists of serotonin receptors in the serotonin (5-HT) 1 and 5-HT2 families were iontophoretically applied to IC neurons, which were monitored for changes in their responses to auditory stimuli. Different agonists had different effects on neural responses. The 5-HT1A agonist had mixed facilitatory and depressive effects, whereas 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C agonists were both largely facilitatory. Different agonists changed threshold and frequency tuning in ways that reflected their effects on spike count. When pairs of agonists were applied sequentially to the same neurons, selective agonists sometimes affected neurons in ways that were similar to serotonin, but not to other selective agonists tested. Different agonists also differentially affected groups of neurons classified by the shapes of their frequency-tuning curves, with serotonin and the 5-HT1 receptors affecting proportionally more non-V-type neurons relative to the other agonists tested. In all, evidence suggests that the diversity of serotonin receptor subtypes in the IC is likely to account for at least some of the variability of the effects of serotonin and that receptor subtypes fulfill specialized roles in auditory processing. PMID:16870843

  6. Performance Indicators Related to Points Scoring and Winning in International Rugby Sevens

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Dean G.; Hopkins, Will G.; Pyne, David B.; Anson, Judith M.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of performance indicators related to scoring points and winning is needed to inform tactical approaches to international rugby sevens competition. The aim of this study was to characterize team performance indicators in international rugby sevens and quantify their relationship with a team’s points scored and probability of winning. Performance indicators of each team during 196 matches of the 2011/2012 International Rugby Board Sevens World Series were modeled for their linear relationships with points scored and likelihood of winning within (changes in team values from match to match) and between (differences between team values averaged over all matches) teams. Relationships were evaluated as the change and difference in points and probability of winning associated with a two within- and between-team standard deviations increase in performance indicator values. Inferences about relationships were assessed using a smallest meaningful difference of one point and a 10% probability of a team changing the outcome of a close match. All indicators exhibited high within-team match-to-match variability (intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.00 to 0.23). Excluding indicators representing points-scoring actions or events occurring on average less than once per match, 13 of 17 indicators had substantial clear within-team relationships with points scored and/or likelihood of victory. Relationships between teams were generally similar in magnitude but unclear. Tactics that increase points scoring and likelihood of winning should be based on greater ball possession, fewer rucks, mauls, turnovers, penalties and free kicks, and limited passing. Key points Successful international rugby sevens teams tend to maintain ball possession; more frequently avoid taking the ball into contact; concede fewer turnovers, penalties and free kicks; retain possession in scrums, rucks and mauls; and limit passing the ball. Selected performance indicators may be used

  7. Application of WinSRFR4 program to zigzag corrugated furrow irrigation in Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán Cañas, José; Moreno Perez, Maria Fatima; Garcia Moreno, Francisco Javier; Chipana, Rene

    2013-04-01

    Program WinSRFR4, developed by the Agricultural Research Service-U.S. Department of Agriculture, is used to perform surface irrigation evaluations, to establish appropriate irrigation parameters to get better irrigation efficiencies, to execute irrigation simulations and so to set several alternatives to the design of an irrigation. This paper aims to adapt WinSRFR4 program to zigzag corrugated furrow irrigation performed in the Andean regions of Bolivia. These irrigations are quite peculiar as they are carried out in areas with steep slope and with very low flow rates to avoid the risk of erosion. Besides of this, the flow rates are quite variable during the irrigation application. The greater length of the furrows is drawn on contours performing small jumps between consecutive contours. Available data are taken for seven irrigations for different periods of lettuce crop growth. First, a model that fits irrigations executed has been searched. For this, we have conducted a series of tests with the program WinSRFR4, being necessary to carry some simplifications given the peculiarity of this type of irrigation. The procedure consisted in determining the advance curves during irrigation. Later, the parameters of the Kostiakov - Lewis equation have been calculated by the method of Walker and Elliot. Although the furrow longitudinal profile was available, a mean slope was used at the time of establishing the model. WinSRFR provides a model of analyzed irrigation with a coefficient of determination ranged from R2 = 0.3520 to R2 = 0.9095. Finally, the errors obtained in the mass balances are between 2% and 14%. The model showed that application efficiencies ranged between 9% and 35%, rather poor, while runoff coefficients varied between 47% and 91%. Not too much importance is given to the fact that runoff occurs because runoff water is used in plots located at a lower level Irrigation simulations have been carried out using WinSRFR by changing the operation variables

  8. Defining Nicotinic Agonist Binding Surfaces through Photoaffinity Labeling†

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Maltby, David; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Zhang, Nanjing; Durkin, Kathleen A.; Presley, Jack; Talley, Todd T.; Taylor, Palmer; Burlingame, Alma L.; Casida, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChR) agonists are potential therapeutic agents for neurological dysfunction. In the present study, the homopentameric mollusk ACh binding protein (AChBP), used as a surrogate for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the nAChR, was specifically derivatized by the highly potent agonist azidoepibatidine (AzEPI) prepared as a photoaffinity probe and radioligand. One EPI-nitrene photoactivated molecule was incorporated in each subunit interface binding site based on analysis of the intact derivatized protein. Tryptic fragments of the modified AChBP were analyzed by collision-induced dissociation and Edman sequencing of radiolabeled peptides. Each specific EPI-nitrene-modified site involved either Tyr195 of loop C on the principal or (+)-face or Met116 of loop E on the complementary or (−)-face. The two derivatization sites were observed in similar frequency, providing evidence of the reactivity of the azido/nitrene probe substituent and close proximity to both residues. [3H]AzEPI binds to the α4β2 nAChR at a single high-affinity site and photoaffinity-labels only the α4 subunit, presumably modifying Tyr225 spatially corresponding to Tyr195 of AChBP. Phe137 of the β2 nAChR subunit, equivalent to Met116 of AChBP, conceivably lacks sufficient reactivity with the nitrene generated from the probe. The present photoaffinity labeling in a physiologically relevant condition combined with the crystal structure of AChBP allows development of precise structural models for the AzEPI interactions with AChBP and α4β2 nAChR. These findings enabled us to use AChBP as a structural surrogate to define the nAChR agonist site. PMID:17614369

  9. INSIGHT AGONISTES: A READING OF SOPHOCLES'S OEDIPUS THE KING.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Eugene J

    2015-07-01

    In this reading of Sophocles's Oedipus the King, the author suggests that insight can be thought of as the main protagonist of the tragedy. He personifies this depiction of insight, calling it Insight Agonistes, as if it were the sole conflicted character on the stage, albeit masquerading at times as several other characters, including gods, sphinxes, and oracles. This psychoanalytic reading of the text lends itself to an analogy between psychoanalytic process and Sophocles's tragic hero. The author views insight as always transgressing against, always at war with a conservative, societal, or intrapsychic chorus of structured elements. A clinical vignette is presented to illustrate this view of insight.

  10. Narrow SAR in odorant sensing Orco receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Romaine, Ian M; Taylor, Robert W; Saidu, Samsudeen P; Kim, Kwangho; Sulikowski, Gary A; Zwiebel, Laurence J; Waterson, Alex G

    2014-06-15

    The systematic exploration of a series of triazole-based agonists of the cation channel insect odorant receptor is reported. The structure-activity relationships of independent sections of the molecules are examined. Very small changes to the compound structure were found to exert a large impact on compound activity. Optimal substitutions were combined using a 'mix-and-match' strategy to produce best-in-class compounds that are capable of potently agonizing odorant receptor activity and may form the basis for the identification of a new mode of insect behavior modification. PMID:24813736

  11. Clenbuterol, a beta(2)-agonist, retards atrophy in denervated muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2) agonist, clenbuterol, on the protein content as well as on the contractile strength and the muscle fiber cross-sectional area of various denervated muscles from rats were investigated. It was found that denervated soleus, anterior tibialis, and gastrocnemius muscles, but not the extensor digitorum longus, of rats treated for 2-3 weeks with clenbuterol contained 95-110 percent more protein than denervated controls. The twofold difference in the protein content of denervated solei was paralleled by similar changes in contractile strength and muscle fiber cross-sectional area.

  12. INSIGHT AGONISTES: A READING OF SOPHOCLES'S OEDIPUS THE KING.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Eugene J

    2015-07-01

    In this reading of Sophocles's Oedipus the King, the author suggests that insight can be thought of as the main protagonist of the tragedy. He personifies this depiction of insight, calling it Insight Agonistes, as if it were the sole conflicted character on the stage, albeit masquerading at times as several other characters, including gods, sphinxes, and oracles. This psychoanalytic reading of the text lends itself to an analogy between psychoanalytic process and Sophocles's tragic hero. The author views insight as always transgressing against, always at war with a conservative, societal, or intrapsychic chorus of structured elements. A clinical vignette is presented to illustrate this view of insight. PMID:26198605

  13. Induction of depersonalization by the serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine.

    PubMed

    Simeon, D; Hollander, E; Stein, D J; DeCaria, C; Cohen, L J; Saoud, J B; Islam, N; Hwang, M

    1995-09-29

    Sixty-seven subjects, including normal volunteers and patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, and borderline personality disorder, received ratings of depersonalization after double-blind, placebo-controlled challenges with the partial serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP). Challenge with m-CPP induced depersonalization significantly more than did placebo. Subjects who became depersonalized did not differ in age, sex, or diagnosis from those who did not experience depersonalization. There was a significant correlation between the induction of depersonalization and increase in panic, but not nervousness, anxiety, sadness, depression, or drowsiness. This report suggests that serotonergic dysregulation may in part underlie depersonalization.

  14. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter. PMID:26585147

  15. Discovery of a potent and selective GPR120 agonist.

    PubMed

    Shimpukade, Bharat; Hudson, Brian D; Hovgaard, Christine Kiel; Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond

    2012-05-10

    GPR120 is a receptor of unsaturated long-chain fatty acids reported to mediate GLP-1 secretion, insulin sensitization, anti-inflammatory, and anti-obesity effects and is therefore emerging as a new potential target for treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic diseases. Further investigation is however hindered by the lack of suitable receptor modulators. Screening of FFA1 ligands provided a lead with moderate activity on GPR120 and moderate selectivity over FFA1. Optimization led to the discovery of the first potent and selective GPR120 agonist.

  16. Contamination with retinoic acid receptor agonists in two rivers in the Kinki region of Japan.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nakama, Koki; Sawada, Kazuko; Watanabe, Taro; Takagi, Mai; Sei, Kazunari; Yang, Min; Hirotsuji, Junji; Hu, Jianying; Nishikawa, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the agonistic activity against human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha in the Lake Biwa-Yodo River and the Ina River in the Kinki region of Japan. To accomplish this, a yeast two-hybrid assay was used to elucidate the spatial and temporal variations and potential sources of RARalpha agonist contamination in the river basins. RARalpha agonistic activity was commonly detected in the surface water samples collected along two rivers at different periods, with maximum all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) equivalents of 47.6 ng-atRA/L and 23.5 ng-atRA/L being observed in Lake Biwa-Yodo River and Ina River, respectively. The results indicated that RARalpha agonists are always present and widespread in the rivers. Comparative investigation of RARalpha and estrogen receptor alpha agonistic activities at 20 stations along each river revealed that the spatial variation pattern of RARalpha agonist contamination was entirely different from that of the estrogenic compound contamination. This suggests that the effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants, a primary source of estrogenic compounds, seemed not to be the cause of RARalpha agonist contamination in the rivers. Fractionation using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) directed by the bioassay found two bioactive fractions from river water samples, suggesting the presence of at least two RARalpha agonists in the rivers. Although a trial conducted to identify RARalpha agonists in the major bioactive fraction was not completed as part of this study, comparison of retention times in HPLC analysis and quantification with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the major causative contaminants responsible for the RARalpha agonistic activity were not RAs (natural RAR ligands) and 4-oxo-RAs, while 4-oxo-RAs were identified as the major RAR agonists in sewage in Beijing, China. These findings suggest that there are unknown RARalpha agonists with high

  17. Substituted isoxazole analogs of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist GW4064

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Parks, Derek J.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of alternately 3,5-substituted isoxazoles was prepared. Several of these analogs were potent full FXR agonists. A subset of this series, with a tether between the isoxazole ring and the 3-position aryl substituent, were equipotent FXR agonists to GW 4064 1a, with the 2,6-dimethyl phenol analog 1t having greater FRET FXR potency than GW 4064 1a.

  18. Substituted isoxazole analogs of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist GW4064.

    PubMed

    Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Parks, Derek J; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Wisely, G Bruce

    2009-06-01

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of alternately 3,5-substituted isoxazoles was prepared. Several of these analogs were potent full FXR agonists. A subset of this series, with a tether between the isoxazole ring and the 3-position aryl substituent, were equipotent FXR agonists to GW 4064 1a, with the 2,6-dimethyl phenol analog 1t having greater FRET FXR potency than GW 4064 1a.

  19. Discovery of potent and selective nonsteroidal indazolyl amide glucocorticoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sheppeck, James E; Gilmore, John L; Xiao, Hai-Yun; Dhar, T G Murali; Nirschl, David; Doweyko, Arthur M; Sack, Jack S; Corbett, Martin J; Malley, Mary F; Gougoutas, Jack Z; Mckay, Lorraine; Cunningham, Mark D; Habte, Sium F; Dodd, John H; Nadler, Steven G; Somerville, John E; Barrish, Joel C

    2013-10-01

    Modification of a phenolic lead structure based on lessons learned from increasing the potency of steroidal glucocorticoid agonists lead to the discovery of exceptionally potent, nonsteroidal, indazole GR agonists. SAR was developed to achieve good selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors with the ultimate goal of achieving a dissociated GR agonist as measured by human in vitro assays. The specific interactions by which this class of compounds inhibits GR was elucidated by solving an X-ray co-crystal structure. PMID:23953070

  20. A point-by-point analysis of performance in a fencing match: psychological processes associated with winning and losing streaks.

    PubMed

    Doron, Julie; Gaudreau, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to revisit the complex nature of serial dependency of performance during a match, examining the prospective associations between psychological processes and subsequent performance at the within-person level of analysis, and explore whether psychological processes are associated with the likelihood of winning series of points. A process-oriented sequential approach was used with 16 elite fencers during a simulated competition. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that serial dependency of performance fluctuates within a match. Results of a Bayesian multilevel structural equation model showed that prior performance subsequently influenced psychological processes. Although psychological processes did not predict performance in the subsequent point, successive winnings were associated with higher perceived control and task-oriented coping and lower negative affectivity compared with both losing streaks and nonstreaks. Overall, serial dependencies of performance are nonstationary during a match whereas psychological processes significantly differ in episodes of winning after winning versus losing after losing.

  1. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of a potent opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, compared to subtype-selective opioid receptor agonists for stroke treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Islam, Mohammad R; Karamyan, Vardan T.; Abbruscato, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    To meet the challenge of identification of new treatments for stroke, this study was designed to evaluate a potent, nonselective opioid receptor (OR) agonist, biphalin, in comparison to subtype selective OR agonists, as a potential neuroprotective drug candidate using in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. Our in vitro approach included mouse primary neuronal cells that were challenged with glutamate and hypoxic/aglycemic (H/A) conditions. We observed that 10 nM biphalin, exerted a statistically significant neuroprotective effect after glutamate challenge, compared to all selective opioid agonists, according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Moreover, 10 nM biphalin provided superior neuroprotection after H/A-reoxygenation compared to selective opioid agonists in all cases. Our in vitro investigations were supported by in vivo studies which indicate that the nonselective opioid agonist, biphalin, achieves enhanced neuroprotective potency compared to any of the selective opioid agonists, evidenced by reduced edema and infarct ratios. Reduction of edema and infarction was accompanied by neurological improvement of the animals in two independent behavioral tests. Collectively these data strongly suggest that concurrent agonist stimulation of mu, kappa and delta ORs with biphalin is neuroprotective and superior to neuroprotection by activation of any single OR subtype. PMID:25801116

  2. Effects of LAAM and methadone utilization in an opiate agonist treatment program.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, J F; Khattak, S

    2000-01-01

    The development and approval of levo-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) as a pharmacotherapeutic agent in opioid agonist therapy provided an alternative to methadone. Clinicians recognized the potential benefits that LAAM, a synthetic mu agonist with pharmacological properties which differ from those of methadone,could have in the treatment management of addicts in opioid agonist therapy. We report our experience utilizing LAAM from 1995 to 1999 at the Hines VA opioid agonist therapy clinic. The addition of LAAM to the clinic's treatment armamentarium has resulted in management options that have improved the areas of patient recruitment, patient retention, patient traffic, take-home medication, detoxification, and treatment outcomes.

  3. Trial Watch: Immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor agonists in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Iribarren, Kristina; Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Cremer, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Špíšek, Radek; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulating preclinical evidence indicates that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists efficiently boost tumor-targeting immune responses (re)initiated by most, if not all, paradigms of anticancer immunotherapy. Moreover, TLR agonists have been successfully employed to ameliorate the efficacy of various chemotherapeutics and targeted anticancer agents, at least in rodent tumor models. So far, only three TLR agonists have been approved by regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients. Moreover, over the past decade, the interest of scientists and clinicians in these immunostimulatory agents has been fluctuating. Here, we summarize recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of TLR agonists for cancer therapy. PMID:27141345

  4. Dopamine agonist-induced substance addiction: the next piece of the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    Traditional antiparkinson treatment strategies strive to balance the antiparkinson effects of dopaminergic drugs with the avoidance of motor response complications. Dopamine agonists have an established role in delaying the emergence of motor response complications or reducing motor "off" periods. The recent recognition of a range of "behavioural addictions" that are linked to dopamine agonist use has highlighted the role of dopamine in brain reward function and addiction disorders in general. Dopamine agonists have now even been linked occasionally to new substance addictions. The challenge now for the Parkinsonologist is to also balance the net benefits of using dopamine agonists for their motor effects with avoiding the harm from behavioural compulsions. PMID:20980151

  5. Analysis of agonist dissociation constants as assessed by functional antagonism in guinea pig left atria

    SciTech Connect

    Molenaar, P.; Malta, E.

    1986-04-01

    In electrically driven guinea pig left atria, positive inotropic responses to (-)-isoprenaline and the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist RO363 were obtained in the absence and in the presence of the functional antagonists adenosine, carbachol, gallopamil, nifedipine, and Ro 03-7894. Each of the functional antagonists reduced the maximum response to both agonists and produced nonparallel rightward shifts in the cumulative concentration effect curves. For both agonists, dissociation constants (KA) were calculated using the equation described by Furchgott (1966) for irreversible antagonism. For RO363, which is a partial agonist with high agonist activity, the equations outlined for functional interaction by Mackay (1981) were also employed to calculate KA values. The KA values obtained by each method were compared with the dissociation constants (KD) for the two agonists determined from their ability to displace the radioligand (-)-(/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol from beta 1-adrenoceptors in guinea pig left atrial membrane preparations. The estimates of KA varied substantially from KD values. The KD values were taken as more accurate estimates of the true values for the dissociation constants because a high degree of correlation exists between pKD and pD2 values for a number of other beta-adrenoceptor agonists that behave as partial agonists and between pKD and pKB values for a number of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. Thus, it appears that there are serious limitations in the current theory for using functional antagonism as a means of obtaining agonist dissociation constants.

  6. Changes in testosterone mediate the effect of winning on subsequent aggressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Carré, Justin M; Campbell, Jocelyn A; Lozoya, Elianna; Goetz, Stefan M M; Welker, Keith M

    2013-10-01

    Testosterone concentrations rise rapidly in the context of competitive interactions and remain elevated in winners relative to losers. Theoretical models suggest that this divergent neuroendocrine response serves to mediate future dominance behaviours. Although research in animal models provides compelling support for this model, evidence for its applicability to human social behaviour is limited. In the current study, men and women were randomly assigned to experience a series of victories or defeats, after which aggressive behaviour was assessed using a well-validated behavioural measure. Winning produced elevated testosterone concentrations relative to losing in men, but not women. More importantly, testosterone reactivity to competition mediated the effect of winning on subsequent aggressive behaviour in men, but not women. We discuss limitations of the current study (e.g., the status manipulation may have affected other variables not measured in the study including competitiveness and physical activity expended), as well as discuss a potential neural mechanism underlying the effect of testosterone reactivity on aggressive behaviour.

  7. The effect of uniform color on judging athletes' aggressiveness, fairness, and chance of winning.

    PubMed

    Krenn, Bjoern

    2015-04-01

    In the current study we questioned the impact of uniform color in boxing, taekwondo and wrestling. On 18 photos showing two athletes competing, the hue of each uniform was modified to blue, green or red. For each photo, six color conditions were generated (blue-red, blue-green, green-red and vice versa). In three experiments these 108 photos were randomly presented. Participants (N = 210) had to select the athlete that seemed to be more aggressive, fairer or more likely to win the fight. Results revealed that athletes wearing red in boxing and wrestling were judged more aggressive and more likely to win than athletes wearing blue or green uniforms. In addition, athletes wearing green were judged fairer in boxing and wrestling than athletes wearing red. In taekwondo we did not find any significant impact of uniform color. Results suggest that uniform color in combat sports carries specific meanings that affect others' judgments.

  8. I feel good whether my friends win or my foes lose: Brain mechanisms underlying feeling similarity

    PubMed Central

    Aue, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    People say they enjoy both seeing a preferred social group succeed and seeing an adversary social group fail. At the same time, they state they dislike seeing a preferred social group fail and seeing an adversary social group succeed. The current magnetic resonance imaging study investigated whether—and if so, how—such similarities in reported feeling states are reflected in neural activities. American football fans anticipated success and failure situations for their favorite or their adversary teams. The data support the idea that feeling similarities and divergences expressed in verbal reports carry with them significant neural similarities and differences, respectively. Desired (favorite team likely to win and adversary team likely to lose) rather than undesired (favorite team likely to lose and adversary team likely to win) outcomes were associated with heightened activity in the supramarginal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, insula, and cerebellum. Precuneus activity additionally distinguished anticipated desirable outcomes for favorite versus adversary teams. PMID:24912072

  9. Large sample inference for a win ratio analysis of a composite outcome based on prioritized components.

    PubMed

    Bebu, Ionut; Lachin, John M

    2016-01-01

    Composite outcomes are common in clinical trials, especially for multiple time-to-event outcomes (endpoints). The standard approach that uses the time to the first outcome event has important limitations. Several alternative approaches have been proposed to compare treatment versus control, including the proportion in favor of treatment and the win ratio. Herein, we construct tests of significance and confidence intervals in the context of composite outcomes based on prioritized components using the large sample distribution of certain multivariate multi-sample U-statistics. This non-parametric approach provides a general inference for both the proportion in favor of treatment and the win ratio, and can be extended to stratified analyses and the comparison of more than two groups. The proposed methods are illustrated with time-to-event outcomes data from a clinical trial.

  10. The one-dimensional minesweeper game: What are your chances of winning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Achach, M.; Coronel-Brizio, H. F.; Hernández-Montoya, A. R.; Huerta-Quintanilla, R.; Canto-Lugo, E.

    2016-04-01

    Minesweeper is a famous computer game consisting usually in a two-dimensional lattice, where cells can be empty or mined and gamers are required to locate the mines without dying. Even if minesweeper seems to be a very simple system, it has some complex and interesting properties as NP-completeness. In this paper and for the one-dimensional case, given a lattice of n cells and m mines, we calculate the winning probability. By numerical simulations this probability is also estimated. We also find out by mean of these simulations that there exists a critical density of mines that minimize the probability of winning the game. Analytical results and simulations are compared showing a very good agreement.

  11. The effect of uniform color on judging athletes' aggressiveness, fairness, and chance of winning.

    PubMed

    Krenn, Bjoern

    2015-04-01

    In the current study we questioned the impact of uniform color in boxing, taekwondo and wrestling. On 18 photos showing two athletes competing, the hue of each uniform was modified to blue, green or red. For each photo, six color conditions were generated (blue-red, blue-green, green-red and vice versa). In three experiments these 108 photos were randomly presented. Participants (N = 210) had to select the athlete that seemed to be more aggressive, fairer or more likely to win the fight. Results revealed that athletes wearing red in boxing and wrestling were judged more aggressive and more likely to win than athletes wearing blue or green uniforms. In addition, athletes wearing green were judged fairer in boxing and wrestling than athletes wearing red. In taekwondo we did not find any significant impact of uniform color. Results suggest that uniform color in combat sports carries specific meanings that affect others' judgments. PMID:25996111

  12. Workplace response to virtual caregiver support and remote home monitoring of elders: The WIN project.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Diane F; Tarlow, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Research has demonstrated the health and financial cost to working caregivers of older adults and the cost to business in lost productivity. This paper describes the implementation of the Worker Interactive Networking (WIN) project, a Web-based program designed to support employed caregivers at work. WIN innovatively linked working caregivers via the Internet to home to monitor elders' status using wireless sensor technology and included an online information and support group for a six-month period. Twenty-seven employees from thirteen business sites participated. Despite problems with wireless carrier service, feasibility outcomes were achieved. We were able to collect six months of continuous real time data wirelessly from multiple types of homes across 4 states. This model demonstrates that businesses can offer a similar program and not be overwhelmed by employee demand or abuse of technology access. Reluctance to consider home monitoring was apparent and was influenced by familial relationships and values of privacy and independence. PMID:17102349

  13. Salivary testosterone change following monetary wins and losses predicts future financial risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Apicella, Coren L; Dreber, Anna; Mollerstrom, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    While baseline testosterone has recently been implicated in risk-taking in men, less is known about the effects of changing levels of testosterone on financial risk. Here we attempt to influence testosterone in men by having them win or lose money in a chance-based competition against another male opponent. We employ two treatments where we vary the amount of money at stake so that we can directly compare winners to losers who earn the same amount, thereby abstracting from income effects. We find that men who experience a greater increase in bioactive testosterone take on more risk, an association that remains when controlling for whether the participant won the competition. In fact, whether subjects won the competition did not predict future risk. These results suggest that testosterone change, and thus individual differences in testosterone reactivity, rather than the act of winning or losing, influence financial risk-taking. PMID:24275004

  14. Structural complexes of the agonist, inverse agonist and antagonist bound C5a receptor: insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    PubMed

    Rana, Soumendra; Sahoo, Amita Rani; Majhi, Bharat Kumar

    2016-04-26

    The C5a receptor (C5aR) is a pharmacologically important G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that interacts with (h)C5a, by recruiting both the "orthosteric" sites (site1 at the N-terminus and site2 at the ECS, extra cellular surface) on C5aR in a two site-binding model. However, the complex pharmacological landscape and the distinguishing chemistry operating either at the "orthosteric" site1 or at the functionally important "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR are still not clear, which greatly limits the understanding of C5aR pharmacology. One of the major bottlenecks is the lack of an experimental structure or a refined model structure of C5aR with appropriately defined active sites. The study attempts to understand the pharmacology at the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR rationally by generating a highly refined full-blown model structure of C5aR through advanced molecular modeling techniques, and further subjecting it to automated docking and molecular dynamics (MD) studies in the POPC bilayer. The first series of structural complexes of C5aR respectively bound to a linear native peptide agonist ((h)C5a-CT), a small molecule inverse agonist (NDT) and a cyclic peptide antagonist (PMX53) are reported, apparently establishing the unique pharmacological landscape of the "orthosteric" site2, which also illustrates an energetically distinct but coherent competitive chemistry ("cation-π" vs. "π-π" interactions) involved in distinguishing the established ligands known for targeting the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR. Over a total of 1 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in the POPC bilayer, it is evidenced that while the agonist prefers a "cation-π" interaction, the inverse agonist prefers a "cogwheel/L-shaped" interaction in contrast to the "edge-to-face/T-shaped" type π-π interactions demonstrated by the antagonist by engaging the F275(7.28) of the C5aR. In the absence of a NMR or crystallographically guided model structure of C5aR, the computational model complexes not only

  15. Serotonergic agonists stimulate inositol lipid metabolism in rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Schaechter, M.; Godfrey, P.P.; Minchin, M.C.W.; McClue, S.J.; Young, M.M.

    1985-10-28

    The metabolism of inositol phospholipids in response to serotonergic agonists was investigated in rabbit platelets. In platelets prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)-inositol, in a medium containing 10 mM LiCl which blocks the enzyme inositol-1-phosphatase, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused a dose-dependent accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP). This suggests a phospholipase-C-mediated breakdown of phosphoinositides. Ketanserin, a selective 5-HT/sub 2/ antagonist, was a potent inhibitor of the 5-HT response, with a Ki of 28 nM, indicating that 5-HT is activating receptors of the 5-HT/sub 2/ type in the platelet. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and quipazine also caused dose-related increases in inositol phosphate levels, though these were considerably less than those produced by 5-HT. These results show that relatively small changes in phosphoinositide metabolism induced by serotonergic agonists can be investigated in the rabbit platelet, and this cell may therefore be a useful model for the study of some 5-HT receptors. 30 references, 4 figures.

  16. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John M.; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O.; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A.; Milner, Joshua D.; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K.; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  17. Agonistic induction of PPARγ reverses cigarette smoke–induced emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Ming; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Frazier, Michael V.; Porter, Paul; Seryshev, Alexander; Hong, Jeong-Soo; Song, Li-zhen; Zhang, Yiqun; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Whitehead, Lawrence; Zarinkamar, Nazanin; Perusich, Sarah; Corry, David B.; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    The development of emphysema in humans and mice exposed to cigarette smoke is promoted by activation of an adaptive immune response. Lung myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) derived from cigarette smokers activate autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cells. mDC-dependent activation of T cell subsets requires expression of the SPP1 gene, which encodes osteopontin (OPN), a pleiotropic cytokine implicated in autoimmune responses. The upstream molecular events that promote SPP1 expression and activate mDCs in response to smoke remain unknown. Here, we show that peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARG/Pparg) expression was downregulated in mDCs of smokers with emphysema and mice exposed to chronic smoke. Conditional knockout of PPARγ in APCs using Cd11c-Cre Ppargflox/flox mice led to spontaneous lung inflammation and emphysema that resembled the phenotype of smoke-exposed mice. The inflammatory phenotype of Cd11c-Cre Ppargflox/flox mice required OPN, suggesting an antiinflammatory mechanism in which PPARγ negatively regulates Spp1 expression in the lung. A 2-month treatment with a PPARγ agonist reversed emphysema in WT mice despite continual smoke exposure. Furthermore, endogenous PPARγ agonists were reduced in the plasma of smokers with emphysema. These findings reveal a proinflammatory pathway, in which reduced PPARγ activity promotes emphysema, and suggest that targeting this pathway in smokers could prevent and reverse emphysema. PMID:24569375

  18. A novel PPARgamma agonist monascin's potential application in diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2014-07-25

    Edible fungi of the Monascus species have been used as traditional Chinese medicine in eastern Asia for several centuries. Monascus-fermented products possess a number of functional secondary metabolites, including the anti-inflammatory pigments monascin and ankaflavin. Monascin has been shown to prevent or ameliorate several conditions, including hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and obesity. Recently, monascin has been shown to improve hyperglycemia, attenuate oxidative stress, inhibit insulin resistance, and suppress inflammatory cytokine production. In our recent study, we have found that monascin is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) agonist. The PPARgamma agonist activity had been investigated and its exerted benefits are inhibition of inflammation in methylglyoxal (MG)-treated rats, prevention of pancreas impairment causing advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), promotion of insulin expression in vivo and in vitro, and attenuated carboxymethyllysine (CML)-induced hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation in the past several years. Moreover, our studies also demonstrated that monascin also activated nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in pancreatic RIN-m5F cell line thereby invading methylglyoxal induced pancreas dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the chemo-preventive properties of monascin against metabolic syndrome through PPARgamma and Nrf2 pathways. PMID:24752777

  19. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist attenuates ILC2-dependent airway hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Galle-Treger, Lauriane; Suzuki, Yuzo; Patel, Nisheel; Sankaranarayanan, Ishwarya; Aron, Jennifer L.; Maazi, Hadi; Chen, Lin; Akbari, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a complex and chronic inflammatory disorder that is associated with airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and driven by Th2 cytokine secretion. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) produce large amounts of Th2 cytokines and contribute to the development of AHR. Here, we show that ILC2s express the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR), which is thought to have an anti-inflammatory role in several inflammatory diseases. We show that engagement of a specific agonist with α7nAChR on ILC2s reduces ILC2 effector function and represses ILC2-dependent AHR, while decreasing expression of ILC2 key transcription factor GATA-3 and critical inflammatory modulator NF-κB, and reducing phosphorylation of upstream kinase IKKα/β. Additionally, the specific α7nAChR agonist reduces cytokine production and AHR in a humanized ILC2 mouse model. Collectively, our data suggest that α7nAChR expressed by ILC2s is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ILC2-mediated asthma. PMID:27752043

  20. A novel PPARgamma agonist monascin's potential application in diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2014-07-25

    Edible fungi of the Monascus species have been used as traditional Chinese medicine in eastern Asia for several centuries. Monascus-fermented products possess a number of functional secondary metabolites, including the anti-inflammatory pigments monascin and ankaflavin. Monascin has been shown to prevent or ameliorate several conditions, including hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and obesity. Recently, monascin has been shown to improve hyperglycemia, attenuate oxidative stress, inhibit insulin resistance, and suppress inflammatory cytokine production. In our recent study, we have found that monascin is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) agonist. The PPARgamma agonist activity had been investigated and its exerted benefits are inhibition of inflammation in methylglyoxal (MG)-treated rats, prevention of pancreas impairment causing advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), promotion of insulin expression in vivo and in vitro, and attenuated carboxymethyllysine (CML)-induced hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation in the past several years. Moreover, our studies also demonstrated that monascin also activated nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in pancreatic RIN-m5F cell line thereby invading methylglyoxal induced pancreas dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the chemo-preventive properties of monascin against metabolic syndrome through PPARgamma and Nrf2 pathways.

  1. Mood disorders, circadian rhythms, melatonin and melatonin agonists.

    PubMed

    Quera Salva, M A; Hartley, S

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of circadian rhythms have led to an interest in the treatment of major depressive disorder with chronobiotic agents. Many tissues have autonomous circadian rhythms, which are orchestrated by the master clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNC). Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine) is secreted from the pineal gland during darkness. Melatonin acts mainly on MT1 and MT2 receptors, which are present in the SNC, regulating physiological and neuroendocrine functions, including circadian entrainment, referred to as the chronobiotic effet. Circadian rhythms has been shown to be either misaligned or phase shifted or decreased in amplitude in both acute episodes and relapse of major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder. Manipulation of circadian rhythms either using physical treatments (such as high intensity light) or behavioral therapy has shown promise in improving symptoms. Pharmacotherapy using melatonin and pure melatonin receptor agonists, while improving sleep, has not been shown to improve symptoms of depression. A novel antidepressant, agomelatine, combines 5HT2c antagonist and melatonin agonist action, and has shown promise in both acute treatment of MDD and in preventing relapse.

  2. Pindolol--the pharmacology of a partial agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, B J; Menninger, K; Bertholet, A

    1982-01-01

    1 Pindolol is a non-selective beta-adrenoceptor blocking agent; its affinity to adrenoceptors in guinea pig atria (beta 1) is not significantly different from that in guinea pig trachea (beta 1 + beta 2) and canine vascular smooth muscle (beta 2). 2 Pindolol displays a striking diversity of agonist activities in isolated tissues. Stimulant effects correspond to 40--50% of the maximum effects of isoprenaline in isolated kitten atria and guinea pig trachea and to only 10% in guinea pig atria. Effects in canine isolated mesenteric vessels are those of a full agonist, maximum responses equaling those of isoprenaline. These findings suggest that the stimulant effects of pindolol are exerted principally on beta 2-adrenoceptors. 3 Cardiac stimulation produced by pindolol in the dog is sufficient to compensate for the cardiac depression resulting from blockade of beta-adrenoceptors in the heart. Reductions in cardiac output and compensatory increases in total peripheral resistance do not occur or are much smaller than those produced by beta-adrenoceptor blocking agents lacking sympathomimetic activity. 4 Pindolol-induced relaxation of bronchial smooth muscle prevents or minimizes the bronchoconstrictor effects of injected spasmogens in the cat. 5 Pindolol has marked vasodilator activity, small doses reducing femoral and mesenteric vascular resistance by approximately 30%. Doses comparable to those used in hypertensive patients lower blood pressure by 20 mmHg in non-anaesthetized dogs. PMID:7049208

  3. Pharmacology and toxicology of Cannabis derivatives and endocannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Zaimovic, Amir; Gerra, Maria L; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cippitelli, Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Somaini, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    For centuries Cannabis sativa and cannabis extracts have been used in natural medicine. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main active ingredient of Cannabis. THC seems to be responsible for most of the pharmacological and therapeutic actions of cannabis. In a few countries THC extracts (i.e. Sativex) or THC derivatives such as nabilone, and dronabinol are used in the clinic for the treatment of several pathological conditions like chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. On the other hand the severe side effects and the high abuse liability of these agents represent a serious limitation in their medical use. In addition, diversion in the use of these active ingredients for recreational purpose is a concern. Over recent years, alternative approaches using synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists or agents acting as activators of the endocannabinoid systems are under scrutiny with the hope to develop more effective and safer clinical applications. Likely, in the near future few of these new molecules will be available for clinical use. The present article review recent study and patents with focus on the cannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of central nervous system disorders with emphasis on agonists. PMID:19832688

  4. Pharmacology and toxicology of Cannabis derivatives and endocannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Zaimovic, Amir; Gerra, Maria L; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cippitelli, Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Somaini, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    For centuries Cannabis sativa and cannabis extracts have been used in natural medicine. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main active ingredient of Cannabis. THC seems to be responsible for most of the pharmacological and therapeutic actions of cannabis. In a few countries THC extracts (i.e. Sativex) or THC derivatives such as nabilone, and dronabinol are used in the clinic for the treatment of several pathological conditions like chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. On the other hand the severe side effects and the high abuse liability of these agents represent a serious limitation in their medical use. In addition, diversion in the use of these active ingredients for recreational purpose is a concern. Over recent years, alternative approaches using synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists or agents acting as activators of the endocannabinoid systems are under scrutiny with the hope to develop more effective and safer clinical applications. Likely, in the near future few of these new molecules will be available for clinical use. The present article review recent study and patents with focus on the cannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of central nervous system disorders with emphasis on agonists.

  5. Identification of agonists for a group of human odorant receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Kristeller, Daniela C.; do Nascimento, João B. P.; Galante, Pedro A. F.; Malnic, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction plays a critical role in several aspects of the human life. Odorants are detected by hundreds of odorant receptors (ORs) which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are expressed in the olfactory sensory neurons of the nose. The information provided by the activation of different combinations of ORs in the nose is transmitted to the brain, leading to odorant perception and emotional and behavioral responses. There are ~400 intact human ORs, and to date only a small percentage of these receptors (~10%) have known agonists. The determination of the specificity of the human ORs will contribute to a better understanding of how odorants are discriminated by the olfactory system. In this work, we aimed to identify human specific ORs, that is, ORs that are present in humans but absent from other species, and their corresponding agonists. To do this, we first selected 22 OR gene sequences from the human genome with no counterparts in the mouse, rat or dog genomes. Then we used a heterologous expression system to screen a subset of these human ORs against a panel of odorants of biological relevance, including foodborne aroma volatiles. We found that different types of odorants are able to activate some of these previously uncharacterized human ORs. PMID:25784876

  6. How does agonistic behaviour differ in albino and pigmented fish?

    PubMed Central

    Horký, Pavel; Wackermannová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    In addition to hypopigmentation of the skin and red iris colouration, albino animals also display distinct physiological and behavioural alterations. However, information on the social interactions of albino animals is rare and has mostly been limited to specially bred strains of albino rodents and animals from unique environments in caves. Differentiating between the effects of albinism and domestication on behaviour in rodents can be difficult, and social behaviour in cave fish changes according to species-specific adaptations to conditions of permanent darkness. The agonistic behaviours of albino offspring of pigmented parents have yet to be described. In this study, we observed agonistic behaviour in albino and pigmented juvenile Silurus glanis catfish. We found that the total number of aggressive interactions was lower in albinos than in pigmented catfish. The distance between conspecifics was also analysed, and albinos showed a tendency towards greater separation from their same-coloured conspecifics compared with pigmented catfish. These results demonstrate that albinism can be associated with lower aggressiveness and with reduced shoaling behaviour preference, as demonstrated by a tendency towards greater separation of albinos from conspecifics. PMID:27114883

  7. John Bardeen: the only person to win two Nobel Prizes in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoddeson, L.

    2011-11-01

    John Bardeen worked on the theory of solids throughout his physics career, winning two Nobel Prizes: the first in 1956 for the invention of the transistor with Walter Brattain and William Shockley; and the second in 1972 for the development with Leon Cooper and J Robert Schrieffer of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity. The transistor made possible the information revolution; the BCS theory helped lay the microscopic foundation for the modern theory of condensed matter physics.

  8. Television spots win national award. Part of OSF Saint Francis Medical Center's branding effort.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2004-01-01

    "Miracles in Medicine," a series of award-winning television spots, was produced for OSF Saint Francis Medical Center, Peoria, Ill., by The Roberts Group, Inc., Waukesha, Wis. They are an integral part of a broader branding campaign, launched in May 2003, that includes newspaper, radio, and outdoor elements. The spots were deemed so successful, the branding effort was expanded to include Children's Hospital of Illinois.

  9. Television spots win national award. Part of OSF Saint Francis Medical Center's branding effort.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2004-01-01

    "Miracles in Medicine," a series of award-winning television spots, was produced for OSF Saint Francis Medical Center, Peoria, Ill., by The Roberts Group, Inc., Waukesha, Wis. They are an integral part of a broader branding campaign, launched in May 2003, that includes newspaper, radio, and outdoor elements. The spots were deemed so successful, the branding effort was expanded to include Children's Hospital of Illinois. PMID:15162576

  10. Highlights from the 2013 WIN Symposium: personalised cancer therapy from innovation to implementation.

    PubMed

    Schilsky, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    The Worldwide Innovative Networking (WIN) consortium is a global alliance of academic and industrial cancer researchers, clinicians, and cancer advocacy groups set up to promote innovations in personalised cancer therapy and to accelerate the translation of research in this discipline into the oncology clinic. One of its most important initiatives is the WIN symposia, which have been held in Paris each summer since 2009. The fifth WIN symposium, which was held 10-12 July 2013, took as its overall theme 'Personalised Cancer Therapy: From Innovation to Implementation'. Over 400 delegates, including a good number of representatives of patient groups as well as leading academic, industrial, and clinical scientists; students; and post-docs attended this symposium. Its scientific programme featured thirty presentations divided into four main plenary sessions, and there was also a wide-ranging poster session that encompassed all the topics covered in the plenaries. The programme structure followed the path of drug discovery, in that the first session covered assay development for personalised cancer medicine; the second, applications of genomics in oncology; the third, clinical development; and the fourth, the impact of personalised medicine on cancer care. PMID:24009643

  11. Winning and Losing Tree Species of Reassembly in Minnesota’s Mixed and Broadleaf Forests

    PubMed Central

    Hanberry, Brice B.; Palik, Brian J.; He, Hong S.

    2013-01-01

    We examined reassembly of winning and losing tree species, species traits including shade and fire tolerance, and associated disturbance filters and forest ecosystem types due to rapid forest change in the Great Lakes region since 1850. We identified winning and losing species by changes in composition, distribution, and site factors between historical and current surveys in Minnesota’s mixed and broadleaf forests. In the Laurentian Mixed Forest, shade-intolerant aspen replaced shade-intolerant tamarack as the most dominant tree species. Fire-tolerant white pine and jack pine decreased, whereas shade-tolerant ashes, maples, and white cedar increased. In the Eastern Broadleaf Forest, fire-tolerant white oaks and red oaks decreased, while shade-tolerant ashes, American basswood, and maples increased. Tamarack, pines, and oaks have become restricted to sites with either wetter or sandier and drier soils due to increases in aspen and shade-tolerant, fire-sensitive species on mesic sites. The proportion of shade-tolerant species increased in both regions, but selective harvest reduced the applicability of functional groups alone to specify winners and losers. Harvest and existing forestry practices supported aspen dominance in mixed forests, although without aspen forestry and with fire suppression, mixed forests will transition to a greater composition of shade-tolerant species, converging to forests similar to broadleaf forests. A functional group framework provided a perspective of winning and losing species and traits, selective filters, and forest ecosystems that can be generalized to other regions, regardless of species identity. PMID:23613911

  12. RSAC 6.2 with WinRP 2.0 User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley Schrader

    2005-09-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program (RSAC-6.2) calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Using a personal computer, a user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality accident. RSAC-6.2 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for resuspension, inhalation, immersion, ground surface, and ingestion pathways. WinRP 2.0, a windows based overlay to RSAC-6.2, assists users in creating and running RSAC-6.2 input files. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-6.2 and WinRP 2.0. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-6.2 and WinRP 2.0. These programs are designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

  13. Expressing gambling-related cognitive biases in motor behaviour: rolling dice to win prizes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Matthew S M; Bowden-Jones, Henrietta; Rogers, Robert D

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive perspectives on gambling propose that biased thinking plays a significant role in sustaining gambling participation and, in vulnerable individuals, gambling problems. One prominent set of cognitive biases include illusions of control involving beliefs that it is possible to influence random gaming events. Sociologists have reported that (some) gamblers believe that it is possible to throw dice in different ways to achieve gaming outcomes (e.g., 'dice-setting' in craps). However, experimental demonstrations of these phenomena are lacking. Here, we asked regular gamblers to roll a computer-simulated, but fair, 6 sided die for monetary prizes. Gamblers allowed the die to roll for longer when attempting to win higher value bets, and when attempting to hit high winning numbers. This behaviour was exaggerated in gamblers motivated to keep gambling following the experience of almost-winning in gambling games. These results suggest that gambling cognitive biases find expression in the motor behaviour of rolling dice for monetary prizes, possibly reflecting embodied substrates.

  14. Win-Stay-Lose-Learn Promotes Cooperation in the Spatial Prisoner's Dilemma Game

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongkui; Chen, Xiaojie; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Long; Perc, Matjaž

    2012-01-01

    Holding on to one's strategy is natural and common if the later warrants success and satisfaction. This goes against widespread simulation practices of evolutionary games, where players frequently consider changing their strategy even though their payoffs may be marginally different than those of the other players. Inspired by this observation, we introduce an aspiration-based win-stay-lose-learn strategy updating rule into the spatial prisoner's dilemma game. The rule is simple and intuitive, foreseeing strategy changes only by dissatisfied players, who then attempt to adopt the strategy of one of their nearest neighbors, while the strategies of satisfied players are not subject to change. We find that the proposed win-stay-lose-learn rule promotes the evolution of cooperation, and it does so very robustly and independently of the initial conditions. In fact, we show that even a minute initial fraction of cooperators may be sufficient to eventually secure a highly cooperative final state. In addition to extensive simulation results that support our conclusions, we also present results obtained by means of the pair approximation of the studied game. Our findings continue the success story of related win-stay strategy updating rules, and by doing so reveal new ways of resolving the prisoner's dilemma. PMID:22363470

  15. Highlights from the 2013 WIN Symposium: personalised cancer therapy from innovation to implementation

    PubMed Central

    Schilsky, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    The Worldwide Innovative Networking (WIN) consortium is a global alliance of academic and industrial cancer researchers, clinicians, and cancer advocacy groups set up to promote innovations in personalised cancer therapy and to accelerate the translation of research in this discipline into the oncology clinic. One of its most important initiatives is the WIN symposia, which have been held in Paris each summer since 2009. The fifth WIN symposium, which was held 10–12 July 2013, took as its overall theme ‘Personalised Cancer Therapy: From Innovation to Implementation’. Over 400 delegates, including a good number of representatives of patient groups as well as leading academic, industrial, and clinical scientists; students; and post-docs attended this symposium. Its scientific programme featured thirty presentations divided into four main plenary sessions, and there was also a wide-ranging poster session that encompassed all the topics covered in the plenaries. The programme structure followed the path of drug discovery, in that the first session covered assay development for personalised cancer medicine; the second, applications of genomics in oncology; the third, clinical development; and the fourth, the impact of personalised medicine on cancer care. PMID:24009643

  16. WIN1, a transcriptional activator of epidermal wax accumulation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Broun, Pierre; Poindexter, Patricia; Osborne, Erin; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Riechmann, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Epicuticular wax forms a layer of hydrophobic material on plant aerial organs, which constitutes a protective barrier between the plant and its environment. We report here the identification of WIN1, an Arabidopsis thaliana ethylene response factor-type transcription factor, which can activate wax deposition in overexpressing plants. We constitutively expressed WIN1 in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and found that leaf epidermal wax accumulation was up to 4.5-fold higher in these plants than in control plants. A significant increase was also found in stems. Interestingly, ≈50% of the additional wax could only be released by complete lipid extractions, suggesting that not all of the wax is superficial. Gene expression analysis indicated that a number of genes, such as CER1, KCS1, and CER2, which are known to be involved in wax biosynthesis, were induced in WIN1 overexpressors. This observation indicates that induction of wax accumulation in transgenic plants is probably mediated through an increase in the expression of genes encoding enzymes of the wax biosynthesis pathway. PMID:15070782

  17. Expressing gambling-related cognitive biases in motor behaviour: rolling dice to win prizes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Matthew S M; Bowden-Jones, Henrietta; Rogers, Robert D

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive perspectives on gambling propose that biased thinking plays a significant role in sustaining gambling participation and, in vulnerable individuals, gambling problems. One prominent set of cognitive biases include illusions of control involving beliefs that it is possible to influence random gaming events. Sociologists have reported that (some) gamblers believe that it is possible to throw dice in different ways to achieve gaming outcomes (e.g., 'dice-setting' in craps). However, experimental demonstrations of these phenomena are lacking. Here, we asked regular gamblers to roll a computer-simulated, but fair, 6 sided die for monetary prizes. Gamblers allowed the die to roll for longer when attempting to win higher value bets, and when attempting to hit high winning numbers. This behaviour was exaggerated in gamblers motivated to keep gambling following the experience of almost-winning in gambling games. These results suggest that gambling cognitive biases find expression in the motor behaviour of rolling dice for monetary prizes, possibly reflecting embodied substrates. PMID:23620161

  18. Applying the Quit & Win contest model in the Vietnamese community in Santa Clara County

    PubMed Central

    Lai, K. Q.; McPhee, S.; Jenkins, C.; Wong, C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the effectiveness of modifying and applying a Quit & Win contest model to Vietnamese Americans.
DESIGN—Uncontrolled trial, multicomponent program, including two Quit & Win incentive contests, smoking cessation classes, videotape broadcasts, and newspaper articles.
SUBJECTS AND SETTING—Vietnamese smokers living in Santa Clara County, California.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Contest participation rates and quit rates at six month follow up; saliva cotinine validation of quitting.
RESULTS—There were 57 eligible contest entrants to the 1995 contest, approximately 0.9% of the potential pool of smokers, and 32 entrants to the 1996 contest, approximately 0.5% of the potential pool. Overall, 48 of 49 (98%) individuals who said that they had quit smoking had validation of that fact by saliva cotinine testing. At six months, telephone follow up of 76 individuals revealed a self reported continued abstinence rate of 84.2%.
CONCLUSION—Modification and application of the Quit & Win contest model for Vietnamese resulted not only in reasonable participation by Vietnamese male smokers, but also good success in initial quitting and an unexpectedly high abstinence rate at six month follow up.


Keywords: cessation; intervention; Vietnamese Americans PMID:10841592

  19. Doubling Your Payoff: Winning Pain Relief Engages Endogenous Pain Inhibition1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Wiebke; Kwan, Saskia; Ahmed, Alysha-Karima; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract When in pain, pain relief is much sought after, particularly for individuals with chronic pain. In analogy to augmentation of the hedonic experience (“liking”) of a reward by the motivation to obtain a reward (“wanting”), the seeking of pain relief in a motivated state might increase the experience of pain relief when obtained. We tested this hypothesis in a psychophysical experiment in healthy human subjects, by assessing potential pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief “won” in a wheel of fortune game compared with pain relief without winning, exploiting the fact that the mere chance of winning induces a motivated state. The results show pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief obtained by winning in behaviorally assessed pain perception and ratings of pain intensity. Further, the higher participants scored on the personality trait novelty seeking, the more pain inhibition was induced. These results provide evidence that pain relief, when obtained in a motivated state, engages endogenous pain-inhibitory systems beyond the pain reduction that underlies the relief in the first place. Consequently, such pain relief might be used to improve behavioral pain therapy, inducing a positive, perhaps self-amplifying feedback loop of reduced pain and improved functionality. PMID:26464995

  20. Modulation of PPAR subtype selectivity. Part 2: Transforming PPARα/γ dual agonist into α selective PPAR agonist through bioisosteric modification.

    PubMed

    Zaware, Pandurang; Shah, Shailesh R; Pingali, Harikishore; Makadia, Pankaj; Thube, Baban; Pola, Suresh; Patel, Darshit; Priyadarshini, Priyanka; Suthar, Dinesh; Shah, Maanan; Jamili, Jeevankumar; Sairam, Kalapatapu V V M; Giri, Suresh; Patel, Lala; Patel, Harilal; Sudani, Hareshkumar; Patel, Hiren; Jain, Mukul; Patel, Pankaj; Bahekar, Rajesh

    2011-01-15

    A novel series of oxime containing benzyl-1,3-dioxane-r-2-carboxylic acid derivatives (6a-k) were designed as selective PPARα agonists, through bioisosteric modification in the lipophilic tail region of PPARα/γ dual agonist. Some of the test compounds (6a, 6b, 6c and 6f) showed high selectivity towards PPARα over PPARγ in vitro. Further, highly potent and selective PPARα agonist 6c exhibited significant antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic activity in vivo, along with its improved pharmacokinetic profile. Favorable in-silico interaction of 6c with PPARα binding pocket correlate its in vitro selectivity profile toward PPARα over PPARγ. Together, these results confirm discovery of novel series of oxime based selective PPARα agonists for the safe and effective treatment of various metabolic disorders. PMID:21195611

  1. Benzodiazepine Site Agonists Differentially Alter Acetylcholine Release in Rat Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Hambrecht-Wiedbusch, Viviane S.; Mitchell, Melinda F.; Firn, Kelsie A.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Background Agonist binding at the benzodiazepine site of γ-aminobutric acid type A receptors diminishes anxiety and insomnia by actions in the amygdala. The neurochemical effects of benzodiazepine-site agonists remain incompletely understood. Cholinergic neurotransmission modulates amygdala function, and in this study we tested the hypothesis that benzodiazepine-site agonists alter acetylcholine (ACh) release in the amygdala. Methods Microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography quantified ACh release in the amygdala of Sprague-Dawley rats (n=33). ACh was measured before and after IV administration (3 mg/kg) of midazolam or eszopiclone, with and without anesthesia. ACh in isoflurane-anesthetized rats during dialysis with Ringer’s solution(control) was compared to ACh release during dialysis with Ringer’s solution containing (100 μM) midazolam, diazepam, eszopiclone, or zolpidem. Results In unanesthetized rats, ACh in the amygdala was decreased by IV midazolam (−51.1%; P=0.0029; 95% CI= −73.0% to −29.2%) and eszopiclone (−39.6%; P=0.0222; 95% CI= −69.8% to −9.3%). In anesthetized rats, ACh in the amygdala was decreased by IV administration of midazolam (−46.2%; P=0.0041; 95% CI= −67.9% to −24.5%) and eszopiclone (−34.0%; P=0.0009; 95% CI= −44.7% to −23.3%), and increased by amygdala delivery of diazepam (43.2%; P=0.0434; 95% CI= 2.1% to 84.3%), and eszopiclone (222.2%; P=0.0159; 95% CI= 68.5% to 375.8%). Conclusions ACh release in the amygdala was decreased by IV delivery of midazolam and eszopiclone. Dialysis delivery directly into the amygdala caused either increased (eszopiclone and diazepam) or likely no significant change (midazolam and zolpidem) in ACh release. These contrasting effects of delivery route on ACh release support the interpretation that systemically administered midazolam and eszopiclone decrease ACh release in the amygdala by acting on neuronal systems outside of the amygdala. PMID:24842176

  2. Discriminative stimulus properties of indorenate, a serotonin agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Martínez, D N; López Cabrera, M; Sánchez, H; Ramírez, J I; Hong, E

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether indorenate, a serotonin-receptor agonist, can exert discriminative control over operant responses, to establish the temporal course of discriminative control and to compare its stimulus properties to a (5-HT)IA receptor agonist. [3H]-8-hydroxy-2-(di-N-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). DESIGN: Prospective animal study. ANIMALS: Ten male Wistar rats. INTERVENTIONS: Rats were trained to press either of 2 levers for sucrose solution according to a fixed ratio schedule, which was gradually increased. Rats were given injections of either indorenate or saline solution during discrimination training. Once they had achieved an 83% accuracy rate, rats underwent generalization tests after having received a different dose of indorenate, the training dose of indorenate at various intervals before the test, various doses of 8-OH-DPT, or NAN-190 administered before indorenate or 8-OH-DPAT. OUTCOME MEASURES: Distribution of responses between the 2 levers before the first reinforcer of the session, response rate for all the responses in the session, and a discrimination index that expressed the drug-appropriate responses as a proportion of the total responses. RESULTS: Indorenate administration resulted in discriminative control over operant responses, maintained at fixed ratio 10, at a dose of 10.0 mg/kg (but not 3.0 mg/kg). When the interval between the administration of indorenate and the start of the session was varied, the time course of its cue properties followed that of its described effects on 5-HT turnover. In generalization tests, the discrimination index was a function of the dose of indorenate employed; moreover, administration of 8-OH-DPAT (from 0.1 to 1.0 mg/kg) fully mimicked the stimulus properties of indorenate in a dose-dependent way. The (5-HT)IA antagonist NAN-190 prevented the stimulus generalization from indorenate to 8-OH-DPAT. Also, NAN-190 antagonized the stimulus control of indorenate when administered 45 minutes before

  3. Impact of Efficacy at the μ-Opioid Receptor on Antinociceptive Effects of Combinations of μ-Opioid Receptor Agonists and Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), enhance the antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists, which suggests that combining cannabinoids with opioids would improve pain treatment. Combinations with lower efficacy agonists might be preferred and could avoid adverse effects associated with large doses; however, it is unclear whether interactions between opioids and cannabinoids vary across drugs with different efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists alone and in combination with cannabinoid receptor agonists were studied in rhesus monkeys (n = 4) using a warm water tail withdrawal procedure. Etorphine, fentanyl, morphine, buprenorphine, nalbuphine, Δ9-THC, and CP 55,940 (2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol) each increased tail withdrawal latency. Pretreatment with doses of Δ9-THC (1.0 mg/kg) or CP 55,940 (0.032 mg/kg) that were ineffective alone shifted the fentanyl dose-effect curve leftward 20.6- and 52.9-fold, respectively, and the etorphine dose-effect curve leftward 12.4- and 19.6-fold, respectively. Δ9-THC and CP 55,940 shifted the morphine dose-effect curve leftward only 3.4- and 7.9-fold, respectively, and the buprenorphine curve only 5.4- and 4.1-fold, respectively. Neither Δ9-THC nor CP 55,940 significantly altered the effects of nalbuphine. Cannabinoid receptor agonists increase the antinociceptive potency of higher efficacy opioid receptor agonists more than lower efficacy agonists; however, because much smaller doses of each drug can be administered in combinations while achieving adequate pain relief and that other (e.g., abuse-related) effects of opioids do not appear to be enhanced by cannabinoids, these results provide additional support for combining opioids with cannabinoids to treat pain. PMID:25194020

  4. Yawning and locomotor behavior induced by dopamine receptor agonists in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Min; Collins, Gregory T; Paul, Noel M; Grundt, Peter; Newman, Amy H; Xu, Ming; Grandy, David K; Woods, James H; Katz, Jonathan L

    2010-05-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) agonist-induced yawning in rats seems to be mediated by DA D3 receptors, and low doses of several DA agonists decrease locomotor activity, an effect attributed to presynaptic D2 receptors. Effects of several DA agonists on yawning and locomotor activity were examined in rats and mice. Yawning was reliably produced in rats, and by the cholinergic agonist, physostigmine, in both the species. However, DA agonists were ineffective in producing yawning in Swiss-Webster or DA D2R and DA D3R knockout or wild-type mice. The drugs significantly decreased locomotor activity in rats at one or two low doses, with activity returning to control levels at higher doses. In mice, the drugs decreased locomotion across a 1000-10 000-fold range of doses, with activity at control levels (U-91356A) or above control levels [(+/-)-7-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin HBr, quinpirole] at the highest doses. Low doses of agonists decreased locomotion in all mice except the DA D2R knockout mice, but were not antagonized by DA D2R or D3R antagonists (L-741 626, BP 897, or PG01037). Yawning does not provide a selective in-vivo indicator of DA D3R agonist activity in mice. Decreases in mouse locomotor activity by the DA agonists seem to be mediated by D2 DA receptors.

  5. Prolonging Survival of Corneal Transplantation by Selective Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Yang; Han, Gencheng; Jia, Liang; Wang, Liqiang; Lei, Tian; Huang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most used therapy for eye disorders. Although the cornea is somewhat an immune privileged organ, immune rejection is still the major problem that reduces the success rate. Therefore, effective chemical drugs that regulate immunoreactions are needed to improve the outcome of corneal transplantations. Here, a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) selective agonist was systematically evaluated in mouse allogeneic corneal transplantation and compared with the commonly used immunosuppressive agents. Compared with CsA and the non-selective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist FTY720, the S1P1 selective agonist can prolong the survival corneal transplantation for more than 30 days with a low immune response. More importantly, the optimal dose of the S1P1 selective agonist was much less than non-selective S1P receptor agonist FTY720, which would reduce the dose-dependent toxicity in drug application. Then we analyzed the mechanisms of the selected S1P1 selective agonist on the immunosuppression. The results shown that the S1P1 selective agonist could regulate the distribution of the immune cells with less CD4+ T cells and enhanced Treg cells in the allograft, moreover the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines TGF-β1 and IL-10 unregulated which can reduce the immunoreactions. These findings suggest that S1P1 selective agonist may be a more appropriate immunosuppressive compound to effectively prolong mouse allogeneic corneal grafts survival. PMID:25216235

  6. Conformationally constrained farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists: Naphthoic acid-based analogs of GW 4064.

    PubMed

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Jones, Stacey A; Kaldor, Istvan; Liu, Yaping; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Iii, Frank Navas; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Wisely, G Bruce

    2008-08-01

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of stilbene replacements were prepared. The 6-substituted 1-naphthoic acid 1b was an equipotent FXR agonist with improved developability parameters relative to 1a. Analog 1b also reduced the severity of cholestasis in the ANIT acute cholestatic rat model.

  7. Agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity requires shear and a Rac1-dependent signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Michael Keegan; Liu, Junling; Kim, Kyungho; Shen, Bo; Stojanovic-Terpo, Aleksandra; Zheng, Yi; Cho, Jaehyung

    2014-01-01

    Activated platelets facilitate blood coagulation by exposing phosphatidylserine (PS) and releasing microvesicles (MVs). However, the potent physiological agonists thrombin and collagen poorly induce PS exposure when a single agonist is used. To obtain a greater procoagulant response, thrombin is commonly used in combination with glycoprotein VI agonists. However, even under these conditions, only a percentage of platelets express procoagulant activity. To date, it remains unclear why platelets poorly expose PS even when stimulated with multiple agonists and what the signaling pathways are of soluble agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity. Here we show that physiological levels of shear present in blood significantly enhance agonist-induced platelet PS exposure and MV release, enabling low doses of a single agonist to induce full-scale platelet procoagulant activity. PS exposed on the platelet surface was immediately released as MVs, revealing a tight coupling between the 2 processes under shear. Using platelet-specific Rac1−/− mice, we discovered that Rac1 plays a common role in mediating the low-dose agonist-induced procoagulant response independent of platelet aggregation, secretion, and the apoptosis pathway. Platelet-specific Rac1 function was not only important for coagulation in vitro but also for fibrin accumulation in vivo following laser-induced arteriolar injury. PMID:25079357

  8. TSH and Thyrotropic Agonists: Key Actors in Thyroid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Johannes W.; Landgrafe, Gabi; Fotiadou, Elisavet H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the reader with an overview of our current knowledge of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid feedback from a cybernetic standpoint. Over the past decades we have gained a plethora of information from biochemical, clinical, and epidemiological investigation, especially on the role of TSH and other thyrotropic agonists as critical components of this complex relationship. Integrating these data into a systems perspective delivers new insights into static and dynamic behaviour of thyroid homeostasis. Explicit usage of this information with mathematical methods promises to deliver a better understanding of thyrotropic feedback control and new options for personalised diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and targeted therapy, also by permitting a new perspective on the conundrum of the TSH reference range. PMID:23365787

  9. Proopiomelanocortin Deficiency Treated with a Melanocortin-4 Receptor Agonist.

    PubMed

    Kühnen, Peter; Clément, Karine; Wiegand, Susanna; Blankenstein, Oliver; Gottesdiener, Keith; Martini, Lea L; Mai, Knut; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko

    2016-07-21

    Patients with rare defects in the gene encoding proopiomelanocortin (POMC) have extreme early-onset obesity, hyperphagia, hypopigmentation, and hypocortisolism, resulting from the lack of the proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides melanocyte-stimulating hormone and corticotropin. In such patients, adrenal insufficiency must be treated with hydrocortisone early in life. No effective pharmacologic treatments have been available for the hyperphagia and obesity that characterize the condition. In this investigator-initiated, open-label study, two patients with proopiomelanocortin deficiency were treated with setmelanotide, a new melanocortin-4 receptor agonist. The patients had a sustainable reduction in hunger and substantial weight loss (51.0 kg after 42 weeks in Patient 1 and 20.5 kg after 12 weeks in Patient 2). PMID:27468060

  10. [Safety and tolerability of GLP-1 receptor agonists].

    PubMed

    Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1ra) are a new group of drugs with a glucose-lowering action due to their incretin effect. The GLP-1 receptor is expressed in various human tissues, which could be related to the pleiotropic effects of human GLP-1, as well as to the adverse effects described in patients treated with GLP-1ra. The risk of hypoglycaemia is low, which is one of the main considerations in the safety of this family of compounds and is also important to patients with diabetes. The most frequent adverse effect is nausea, which usually occurs at the start of treatment and is transient in 20-60% of affected patients. This article also reviews the information available on antibody formation, the potential effect on the thyroid gland, and the controversial association between this group of drugs with pancreatitis and cancer.

  11. [Safety and tolerability of GLP-1 receptor agonists].

    PubMed

    Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1ra) are a new group of drugs with a glucose-lowering action due to their incretin effect. The GLP-1 receptor is expressed in various human tissues, which could be related to the pleiotropic effects of human GLP-1, as well as to the adverse effects described in patients treated with GLP-1ra. The risk of hypoglycaemia is low, which is one of the main considerations in the safety of this family of compounds and is also important to patients with diabetes. The most frequent adverse effect is nausea, which usually occurs at the start of treatment and is transient in 20-60% of affected patients. This article also reviews the information available on antibody formation, the potential effect on the thyroid gland, and the controversial association between this group of drugs with pancreatitis and cancer.

  12. Locomotion induced by ventral tegmental microinjections of a nicotinic agonist.

    PubMed

    Museo, E; Wise, R A

    1990-03-01

    Bilateral microinjections of the nicotinic agonist cytisine (0.1, 1 or 10 nanomoles per side) into the ventral tegmental area increased locomotor activity. This increase in locomotion was antagonized by mecamylamine (2 mg/kg, IP), a nicotinic antagonist that readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, and by pimozide (0.3 mg/kg, IP), a central dopaminergic antagonist. Hexamethonium (2 mg/kg, IP), a nicotinic antagonist that, unlike mecamylamine, does not cross the blood-brain barrier, had no effect; this suggests that mecamylamine's attenuation of cytisine-induced locomotor activity resulted from a blockade of central and not peripheral nicotinic receptors. The data support the notion that nicotinic and dopaminergic substrates interact at the level of the VTA to produce increases in locomotor activity.

  13. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity.

    PubMed

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  14. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  15. Effects of dopamine agonists on hypothalamic defensive attack in cats.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Sato, T; Maki, S

    1985-07-01

    The effects of methamphetamine (MAT) and apomorphine (APO), dopamine agonists, were studied in 16 cats to evaluate their effects on threshold for defensive attack behavior elicited by electrical stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH). Directed attack and hissing were selected from elementary responses as constituting a defensive attack. Hissing threshold was measured in two situations, one with human provocation and the other without provocation. MAT administered systemically lowered the thresholds for all three types of responses in a dose-related manner (0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg). The effects of 1.0 mg/kg of APO were almost identical to those observed with 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg of MAT. These results suggest that MAT-induced aggressive behavior may be mediated by a dopamine-induced increase in the excitability of the VMH. PMID:4059404

  16. Antiinfective applications of toll-like receptor 9 agonists.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Arthur M

    2007-07-01

    The innate immune system detects pathogens by the presence of highly conserved pathogen-expressed molecules, which trigger host immune defenses. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 detects unmethylated CpG dinucleotides in bacterial or viral DNA, and can be stimulated for therapeutic applications with synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing immune stimulatory "CpG motifs." TLR9 activation induces both innate and adaptive immunity. The TLR9-induced innate immune activation can be applied in the prevention or treatment of infectious diseases, and the adaptive immune-enhancing effects can be harnessed for improving vaccines. This article highlights the current understanding of the mechanism of action of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, and provides an overview of the preclinical data and early human clinical trial results, applying these TLR9 agonists in the field of infectious diseases. PMID:17607015

  17. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  18. Asimadoline, a κ-Opioid Agonist, and Visceral Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Asimadoline is a potent κ-opioid receptor agonist with a diaryl acetamide structure. It has high affinity for the κ receptor, with IC50 of 5.6 nM (guinea pig) and 1.2 nM (human recombinant), and high selectively with κ: μ: δ binding ratios of 1:501:498 in human recombinant receptors. It acts as a complete agonist in in vitro assay. Asimadoline reduced sensation in response to colonic distension at subnoxious pressures in healthy volunteers and in IBS patients without alteration of colonic compliance. Asimadoline reduced satiation and enhanced the postprandial gastric volume (in female volunteers). However, there were no significant effects on gastrointestinal transit, colonic compliance, fasting or postprandial colonic tone. In a clinical trial in 40 patients with functional dyspepsia (Rome II), asimadoline did not significantly alter satiation or symptoms over 8 weeks. However, asimadoline, 0.5 mg, significantly decreased satiation in patients with higher postprandial fullness scores, and daily postprandial fullness severity (over 8 weeks); the asimadoline 1.0 mg group was borderline significant. In a clinical trial in patients with IBS, average pain 2 hours post-on-demand treatment with asimadoline was not significantly reduced. Post-hoc analyses suggest asimadoline was effective in mixed IBS. In a 12-week study in 596 patients, chronic treatment with asimadoline, 0.5 mg and 1.0 mg, was associated with adequate relief of pain and discomfort, improvement in pain score and number of pain free days in patients with IBS-D. The 1.0 mg dose was also efficacious in IBS-alternating. There were also weeks with significant reduction in bowel frequency and urgency. Asimadoline has been well tolerated in human trials to date. PMID:18715494

  19. Recent advances in the development of farnesoid X receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Elizabeth J.; Lindor, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are nuclear hormone receptors expressed in high amounts in body tissues that participate in bilirubin metabolism including the liver, intestines, and kidneys. Bile acids (BAs) are the natural ligands of the FXRs. FXRs regulate the expression of the gene encoding for cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase, which is the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis. In addition, FXRs play a critical role in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and regulation of insulin sensitivity. FXRs also modulate live growth and regeneration during liver injury. Preclinical studies have shown that FXR activation protects against cholestasis-induced liver injury. Moreover, FXR activation protects against fatty liver injury in animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and improved hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin sensitivity. Obeticholic acid (OCA), a 6α-ethyl derivative of the natural human BA chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) is the first-in-class selective FXR agonist that is ~100-fold more potent than CDCA. Preliminary human clinical trials have shown that OCA is safe and effective. In a phase II clinical trial, administration of OCA was well-tolerated, increased insulin sensitivity and reduced markers of liver inflammation and fibrosis in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and NAFLD. In two clinical trials of OCA in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a progressive cholestatic liver disease, OCA significantly reduced serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, an important disease marker that correlates well with clinical outcomes of patients with PBC. Together, these studies suggest that FXR agonists could potentially be used as therapeutic tools in patients suffering from nonalcoholic fatty and cholestatic liver diseases. Larger and Longer-term studies are currently ongoing. PMID:25705637

  20. Theory of partial agonist activity of steroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Carson C.; Ong, Karen M.; Kagan, Benjamin; Simons, S. Stoney

    2015-01-01

    The different amounts of residual partial agonist activity (PAA) of antisteroids under assorted conditions have long been useful in clinical applications but remain largely unexplained. Not only does a given antagonist often afford unequal induction for multiple genes in the same cell but also the activity of the same antisteroid with the same gene changes with variations in concentration of numerous cofactors. Using glucocorticoid receptors as a model system, we have recently succeeded in constructing from first principles a theory that accurately describes how cofactors can modulate the ability of agonist steroids to regulate both gene induction and gene repression. We now extend this framework to the actions of antisteroids in gene induction. The theory shows why changes in PAA cannot be explained simply by differences in ligand affinity for receptor and requires action at a second step or site in the overall sequence of reactions. The theory also provides a method for locating the position of this second site, relative to a concentration limited step (CLS), which is a previously identified step in glucocorticoid-regulated transactivation that always occurs at the same position in the overall sequence of events of gene induction. Finally, the theory predicts that classes of antagonist ligands may be grouped on the basis of their maximal PAA with excess added cofactor and that the members of each class differ by how they act at the same step in the overall gene induction process. Thus, this theory now makes it possible to predict how different cofactors modulate antisteroid PAA, which should be invaluable in developing more selective antagonists. PMID:25984562

  1. Agonistic and antagonistic estrogens in licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra).

    PubMed

    Simons, Rudy; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Mol, Loes A M; The, Susan A M; Bovee, Toine F H; Luijendijk, Teus J C; Verbruggen, Marian A; Gruppen, Harry

    2011-07-01

    The roots of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) are a rich source of flavonoids, in particular, prenylated flavonoids, such as the isoflavan glabridin and the isoflavene glabrene. Fractionation of an ethyl acetate extract from licorice root by centrifugal partitioning chromatography yielded 51 fractions, which were characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and screened for activity in yeast estrogen bioassays. One third of the fractions displayed estrogenic activity towards either one or both estrogen receptors (ERs; ERα and ERβ). Glabrene-rich fractions displayed an estrogenic response, predominantly to the ERα. Surprisingly, glabridin did not exert agonistic activity to both ER subtypes. Several fractions displayed higher responses than the maximum response obtained with the reference compound, the natural hormone 17β-estradiol (E(2)). The estrogenic activities of all fractions, including this so-called superinduction, were clearly ER-mediated, as the estrogenic response was inhibited by 20-60% by known ER antagonists, and no activity was found in yeast cells that did not express the ERα or ERβ subtype. Prolonged exposure of the yeast to the estrogenic fractions that showed superinduction did, contrary to E(2), not result in a decrease of the fluorescent response. Therefore, the superinduction was most likely the result of stabilization of the ER, yeast-enhanced green fluorescent protein, or a combination of both. Most fractions displaying superinduction were rich in flavonoids with single prenylation. Glabridin displayed ERα-selective antagonism, similar to the ERα-selective antagonist RU 58668. Whereas glabridin was able to reduce the estrogenic response of E(2) by approximately 80% at 6 × 10(-6) M, glabrene-rich fractions only exhibited agonistic responses, preferentially on ERα.

  2. Agonist-specific behaviour of the intracellular Ca2+ response in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chatton, J Y; Cao, Y; Stucki, J W

    1997-01-01

    A variety of agonists stimulate in hepatocytes a response that takes the shape of repetitive cytosolic free Ca2+ transients called Ca2+ oscillations. The shape of spikes and the pattern of oscillations in a given cell differ depending on the agonist of the phosphoinositide pathway that is applied. In this study, the response of individual rat hepatocytes to maximal stimulation by arginine vasopressin (AVP), phenylephrine and ADP was investigated by fluorescence microscopy and flash photolysis. Hepatocytes loaded with Ca2+-sensitive probes were stimulated with a first agonist to evoke a maximal response, and then a second agonist was added. When phenylephrine or ADP was used as the first agonist, AVP applied subsequently could elicit an additional response, which did not happen when AVP was first applied and phenylephrine or ADP was applied later. Cells microinjected with caged myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) were challenged with the different agonists and, when a maximal response was obtained, photorelease of IP3 was triggered. Cells maximally stimulated with AVP did not respond to IP3 photorelease, whereas those stimulated with phenylephrine or ADP responded with a fast Ca2+ spike above the elevated steady-state level, which was followed by an undershoot. In contrast, with all three agonists, IP3 photorelease triggered at the top of an oscillatory Ca2+ transient was able to mobilize additional Ca2+. These experiments indicate that the differential response of cells to agonists is found not only during Ca2+ oscillations but also during maximal agonist stimulation and that potency and efficacy differences exist among agonists. PMID:9371717

  3. Dissociated sterol-based liver X receptor agonists as therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Li, Sijia; Henke, Adam; Muse, Evan D; Cheng, Bo; Welzel, Gustav; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Wang, Danling; Roland, Jason; Glass, Christopher K; Tremblay, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR), a nuclear hormone receptor, is an essential regulator of immune responses. Activation of LXR-mediated transcription by synthetic agonists, such as T0901317 and GW3965, attenuates progression of inflammatory disease in animal models. However, the adverse effects of these conventional LXR agonists in elevating liver lipids have impeded exploitation of this intriguing mechanism for chronic therapy. Here, we explore the ability of a series of sterol-based LXR agonists to alleviate inflammatory conditions in mice without hepatotoxicity. We show that oral treatment with sterol-based LXR agonists in mice significantly reduces dextran sulfate sodium colitis-induced body weight loss, which is accompanied by reduced expression of inflammatory markers in the large intestine. The anti-inflammatory property of these agonists is recapitulated in vitro in mouse lamina propria mononuclear cells, human colonic epithelial cells, and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, treatment with LXR agonists dramatically suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression in a model of traumatic brain injury. Importantly, in both disease models, the sterol-based agonists do not affect the liver, and the conventional agonist T0901317 results in significant liver lipid accumulation and injury. Overall, these results provide evidence for the development of sterol-based LXR agonists as novel therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases.-Yu, S., Li, S., Henke, A., Muse, E. D., Cheng, B., Welzel, G., Chatterjee, A. K., Wang, D., Roland, J., Glass, C. K., Tremblay, M. Dissociated sterol-based liver X receptor agonists as therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27025962

  4. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    PubMed

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  5. A "win-win" scenario: the use of sustainable land management technologies to improve rural livelihoods and combat desertification in semi-arid lands in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mganga, Kevin; Musimba, Nashon; Nyariki, Dickson; Nyangito, Moses; Mwang'ombe, Agnes

    2014-05-01

    Dryland ecosystems support over 2 billion people and are major providers of critical ecosystems goods and services globally. However, desertification continues to pose a serious threat to the sustainability of the drylands and livelihoods of communities inhabiting them. The desertification problem is well exemplified in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs) in Kenya which cover approximately 80% of the total land area. This study aimed to 1) determine what agropastoralists attribute to be the causes of desertification in a semi-arid land in Kenya, 2) document sustainable land management (SLM) technologies being undertaken to improve livelihoods and combat desertification, and 3) identify the factors that influence the choice of the sustainable land management (SLM) technologies. Results show that agropastoralists inhabiting the semi-arid lands in southeastern Kenya mainly attribute desertification to the recurrent droughts and low amounts of rainfall. Despite the challenges posed by desertification and climate variability, agropastoralists in the study area are using a combination of SLM technologies notably dryland agroforestry using drought tolerant species (indigenous and exotic), grass reseeding using perennial native and drought tolerant grass species (vegetation reestablishment) and in-situ rainwater harvesting to improve livelihoods and by extension combat desertification. Interestingly, the choice and adoption of these SLM technologies is influenced more by the additional benefits the agropastoralists can derive from them. Therefore, it is rationale to conclude that success in dryland restoration and combating desertification lies in programs and technologies that offer a "win-win" scenario to the communities inhabiting the drylands. Key words: Agroforestry; Agropastoralists; Drylands; Grass Reseeding; Rainwater Harvesting

  6. Differences in Basic Non-Standard Situational Efficiency Indicators between Winning and Defeated European Senior Basketball Teams.

    PubMed

    Trninić, Marko; Perica, Ante; Jeličić, Mario

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the conducted research was to identify and explain the differences in basic non-standard situational efficiency indicators between winning and defeated European senior basketball teams. Discriminant analysis and Mann-Whitney U-test were used with the purpose of investigating the differences between winning and defeated teams in the domain of basic non-standard situational variables. The grouping variable distinguished 24 defeated teams from 24 winning teams participating in 2009/2010 season of Euroleague Top 16. The research clearly reveals the differences between the winning and defeated European senior basketball teams in the domain of non-standard situational variables of position and transition offense and defense. Eight situational efficiency indicators were used which include the overall number of successful and unsuccessful position and transition defenses and offenses. Based on the results obtained by parametric and non-parametric methods, it has been noticed that successful position defense is crucial for winning, and unsuccessful position offense is an indicator of defeat prediction. Therefore, practical aims in situational training must involve balanced development of relevant abilities and skills which determine successful simultaneous performance of multiple tasks in all the phases of game flow. Such process of sport preparation improves the overall actual quality of players and whole team performance. In conclusion, it is important to emphasize that the process of improving position and transition defense stimulates the development of position and transition offense, and vice versa.

  7. Comparison of game-related statistics in men's international championships between winning and losing teams according to margin of victory.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Jose M; Escalantel, Yolanda; Madera, Joaquin; Mansilla, Mirella; García-Hermoso, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to compare water polo game-related statistics by game outcome (winning and losing teams) and margins of victory (close games, unbalanced games, and very unbalanced games), and (ii) to identify characteristics that mark the differences in performances for each group of margin of victory. The game-related statistics of the 308 men's matches played in seven International Championships (Olympic Games, World and European Championships) were analysed. A cluster analysis established three groups (close games, unbalanced games, and very unbalanced games) according to the margin of victory. Differences between game outcomes (winning or losing teams) and margins of victory (close, unbalanced, and very unbalanced games) were determined using the chi-squared statistic, also calculating the effect sizes of the differences. A discriminant analysis was then performed applying the sample-splitting method according to game outcome (winning and losing teams) by margin of victory. It was found that the game-related statistics differentiate the winning from the losing teams in each final score group, with 7 (offensive and defensive) variables differentiating winners from losers in close games, 16 in unbalanced games, and 11 in very unbalanced games. In all three types of game, the game-related statistics were shown to discriminate performance (85% or more), with two variables being discriminatory by game outcome (winning or losing teams) in all three cases: shots and goalkeeper-blocked shots. PMID:25420372

  8. Comparison of game-related statistics in men's international championships between winning and losing teams according to margin of victory.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Jose M; Escalantel, Yolanda; Madera, Joaquin; Mansilla, Mirella; García-Hermoso, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to compare water polo game-related statistics by game outcome (winning and losing teams) and margins of victory (close games, unbalanced games, and very unbalanced games), and (ii) to identify characteristics that mark the differences in performances for each group of margin of victory. The game-related statistics of the 308 men's matches played in seven International Championships (Olympic Games, World and European Championships) were analysed. A cluster analysis established three groups (close games, unbalanced games, and very unbalanced games) according to the margin of victory. Differences between game outcomes (winning or losing teams) and margins of victory (close, unbalanced, and very unbalanced games) were determined using the chi-squared statistic, also calculating the effect sizes of the differences. A discriminant analysis was then performed applying the sample-splitting method according to game outcome (winning and losing teams) by margin of victory. It was found that the game-related statistics differentiate the winning from the losing teams in each final score group, with 7 (offensive and defensive) variables differentiating winners from losers in close games, 16 in unbalanced games, and 11 in very unbalanced games. In all three types of game, the game-related statistics were shown to discriminate performance (85% or more), with two variables being discriminatory by game outcome (winning or losing teams) in all three cases: shots and goalkeeper-blocked shots.

  9. Differences in game-related statistics of basketball performance by game location for men's winning and losing teams.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Miguel A; Lorenzo, Alberto; Barakat, Rubén; Ortega, Enrique; Palao, José M

    2008-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify game-related statistics that differentiate winning and losing teams according to game location. The sample included 306 games of the 2004-2005 regular season of the Spanish professional men's league (ACB League). The independent variables were game location (home or away) and game result (win or loss). The game-related statistics registered were free throws (successful and unsuccessful), 2- and 3-point field goals (successful and unsuccessful), offensive and defensive rebounds, blocks, assists, fouls, steals, and turnovers. Descriptive and inferential analyses were done (one-way analysis of variance and discriminate analysis). The multivariate analysis showed that winning teams differ from losing teams in defensive rebounds (SC = .42) and in assists (SC = .38). Similarly, winning teams differ from losing teams when they play at home in defensive rebounds (SC = .40) and in assists (SC = .41). On the other hand, winning teams differ from losing teams when they play away in defensive rebounds (SC = .44), assists (SC = .30), successful 2-point field goals (SC = .31), and unsuccessful 3-point field goals (SC = -.35). Defensive rebounds and assists were the only game-related statistics common to all three analyses.

  10. Neural correlates of dueling affective reactions to win–win choices

    PubMed Central

    Shenhav, Amitai; Buckner, Randy L.

    2014-01-01

    Win–win choices cause anxiety, often more so than decisions lacking the opportunity for a highly desired outcome. These anxious feelings can paradoxically co-occur with positive feelings, raising important implications for individual decision styles and general well-being. Across three studies, people chose between products that varied in personal value. Participants reported feeling most positive and most anxious when choosing between similarly high-valued products. Behavioral and neural results suggested that this paradoxical experience resulted from parallel evaluations of the expected outcome (inducing positive affect) versus the cost of choosing a response (inducing anxiety). Positive feelings were reduced when there was no high-value option, and anxiety was reduced when only one option was highly valued. Dissociable regions within the striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) tracked these dueling affective reactions during choice. Ventral regions, associated with stimulus valuation, tracked positive feelings and the value of the best item. Dorsal regions, associated with response valuation, tracked anxiety. In addition to tracking anxiety, the dorsal mPFC was associated with conflict during the current choice, and activity levels across individual items predicted whether that choice would later be reversed during an unexpected reevaluation phase. By revealing how win–win decisions elicit responses in dissociable brain systems, these results help resolve the paradox of win–win choices. They also provide insight into behaviors that are associated with these two forms of affect, such as why we are pulled toward good options but may still decide to delay or avoid choosing among them. PMID:25024178

  11. Differences between winning and defeated top quality basketball teams in final tournaments of European club championship.

    PubMed

    Trninić, S; Dizdar, D; Luksić, E

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this research was to identify parameters among the 12 indicators of situation-related efficiency that differentiated between the winning and defeated top quality teams which played in final tournaments of the European club championships from 1992 to 2000. The differences were confirmed by discriminant analysis, although the canonical correlation was here somewhat lower than in the previous similar research studies done on the so-called regular season games. The probable reason for the smaller differences obtained in the present study may be found in almost equal (high) quality of the teams competing in Final Fours. The highest discriminative power was obtained in the variable defensive rebounds, then in the variables field goal percentage and free throw percentage, whereas the variable assist had evidently smaller impact with regard to the referent studies. The obtained results suggested that the winning teams showed more of tactical discipline and responsibility in controlling inside positions for defensive rebounds, as well as in controlling play on offense and the ball until the required open shot chance, which considerably reduced game risks and resulted in a lower number of turnovers and in a higher shooting percentage. Such a type of decision-making in play require a high degree of reciprocal help of players on both defense and offense and a higher level of concentration and self-confidence when shooting field goals and free throws. The common denominator of the winning teams was a lower number of imbalanced states in their play (the organized style of play on defense and offense implied) and a higher level of collective outplaying the opponents with the controlled system of play, which enabled entire potential of the victorious teams to be expressed.

  12. Mimicking corticosterone's daily rhythm with specific receptor agonists: effects on food, water, and sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Devenport, L; Stith, R

    1992-06-01

    The endogenous pattern of type I and II corticosteroid receptor stimulation was systematically assembled from specific agonists in order to detect any unique receptor interactions in the control of ingestive behavior. The type II agonists dexamethasone (0, 5, or 25 micrograms/kg) or RU28362 (0, 5, or 25 micrograms/kg) were injected daily in the final hour of the light phase of the illumination cycle of adrenalectomized rats. This was carried out in the presence or absence of continuous aldosterone (type I agonist) infusion. Additional comparisons were made with sham-operated groups and animals receiving type II agonists by continuous infusion. Type II agonists increased the intake of 2% saline and the proportion of food taken at night, but had negligible effects on total food intake. Type II agonists did not interact with the type I agonist. Type II effects were greatly potentiated by continuous infusion, though administered at the same doses as acute injection. When the effects of type II receptor stimulation emerged, they always consisted of an exacerbation of the adrenalectomy syndrome, not a return to normal quantities or patterns. In contrast, type I receptor stimulation restored both the quantities and unique day-night patterns of saline, water, and food intake to values matching intact animals. The findings suggest that the behavioral significance of corticosterone's nocturnal peak of type II stimulation is small, and that its most important function may lie in the metabolic processes it instigates during its steady rise in the light phase.

  13. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist use in men without a cancer registry diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yong-fang; Goodwin, James S; Shahinian, Vahakn B

    2008-01-01

    Background Use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists has become popular for virtually all stages of prostate cancer. We hypothesized that some men receive these agents after only a limited work-up for their cancer. Such cases may be missed by tumor registries, leading to underestimates of the total extent of GnRH agonist use. Methods We used linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare data from 1993 through 2001 to identify GnRH agonist use in men with either a diagnosis of prostate cancer registered in SEER, or with a diagnosis of prostate cancer based only on Medicare claims (from the 5% control sample of Medicare beneficiaries residing in SEER areas without a registered diagnosis of cancer). The proportion of incident GnRH agonist users without a registry diagnosis of prostate cancer was calculated. Factors associated with lack of a registry diagnosis were examined in multivariable analyses. Results Of incident GnRH agonist users, 8.9% had no diagnosis of prostate cancer registered in SEER. In a multivariable logistic regression model, lack of a registry diagnosis of prostate cancer in GnRH agonist users was significantly more likely with increasing comorbidity, whereas it was less likely in men who had undergone either inpatient admission or procedures such as radical prostatectomy, prostate biopsy, or transurethral resection of the prostate. Conclusion Reliance solely on tumor registry data may underestimate the rate of GnRH agonist use in men with prostate cancer. PMID:18620606

  14. Use of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists in controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Muasher, S J

    1992-01-01

    The aim of ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) is the recruitment of multiple fertilizable healthy oocytes. Transfer of multiple embryos yields a better success rate than single-embryo transfers. Moreover, cryopreservation of excess pre-embryos allows patients an added opportunity to achieve a pregnancy without undergoing a repeat stimulated cycle. In the last 4 years, gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) agonists have been used widely as adjuncts to gonadotrophins for ovarian hyperstimulation. Advantages of Gn-RH agonist use include prevention of a premature luteinising hormone (LH) surge, suppression of endogenous basal LH levels and recruitment of a larger cohort of follicles. Gn-RH agonists can be used in a long (suppression) or a short (stimulatory, flare-up) protocol. In our clinic, the use of Gn-RH agonist suppression (starting in the mid-luteal phase) prior to ovarian hyperstimulation was demonstrated to be extremely beneficial in intermediate and high responder patients but not in low responders (defined endocrinologically as patients with a basal follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH]: LH ratio of 1:1 and a basal LH:FSH ratio of greater than or equal to 1.5, respectively). We have not been able to demonstrate any beneficial effects from the use of Gn-RH agonist suppression in low responder patients (defined endocrinologically as patients with a basal FSH greater than or equal to 15 mIU/ml). In such low responder patients, the use of a 'flare-up' Gn-RH agonist protocol (Gn-RH agonist starting on day 2 of the cycle, followed by gonadotrophins on day 4 of the cycle), taking advantage of the initial agonistic stimulatory effect of Gn-RH agonists on endogenous FSH and LH secretion, has provided significant improvements in stimulation characteristics and better pregnancy results. It should be emphasised that comparisons of results cannot be attempted due to the selective use of each protocol in different patient populations.

  15. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •TRPA1 agonists inhibited compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves. •This inhibition was not mediated by TRPA1 channels. •This efficacy was comparable to those of lidocaine and cocaine. •We found for the first time an ability of TRPA1 agonists to inhibit nerve conduction. -- Abstract: Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC{sub 50} values of 1.2 and 1.5 mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-α-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC{sub 50} = 0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other.

  16. Utility of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists in programs of ovarian hyperstimulation with intrauterine insemination.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, C L

    1993-09-01

    The GnRH agonists have practical and theoretic advantages for adjunctive use in ovulation induction. The IVF cycles demonstrate a decrease in the cancellation rate, an increase in the ease of scheduling, and an increase in the number of oocytes obtained per retrieval when GnRH agonists are employed. Other advantages, such as an improvement in the fertilization and cleavage rate, an increased length of the luteal phase, and an increased pregnancy rate, are suggested but not universally accepted. The utility of adding GnRH agonists to human menopausal gonadotropin-intrauterine insemination cycles is similarly in dispute. Although controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with both human menopausal gonadotropins alone and in conjunction with GnRH agonists have produced pregnancies when coupled with intrauterine insemination, it was demonstrated that there was a significantly greater pregnancy rate per cycle with the use of a GnRH agonist in a recalcitrant infertile population. Others did not substantiate this improvement in pregnancy rate per cycle in their patient population of regularly ovulating women undergoing their first controlled ovarian stimulation cycle either with or without GnRH agonist therapy. This suggests that women with ovulatory dysfunction, and particularly women who previously have not responded to therapy with human menopausal gonadotropin therapy, will reap the most benefits from the addition of a GnRH agonist to their ovulation induction regimen. The addition of a GnRH agonist to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation is a highly effective method of inducing pregnancy in a recalcitrant infertile population. Patients who did not conceive with human menopausal gonadotropins-intrauterine insemination may conceive with GnRH agonist-human menopausal gonadotropins-intrauterine insemination therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8403617

  17. Pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) measures inside-out signaling and patient-specific response to combinatorial platelet agonists.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Daniel T L; Diamond, Scott L

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the response of cells to multiple stimuli is vital for predicting donor specific responses and better understanding the signaling pathways involved. This is of particular importance in platelets because exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) occurs upon costimulation but not with a single agonist. Here, we describe a multiplexed pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) method of measuring platelet inside-out responses to all pairs of six platelet agonists (convulxin, SFLLRN, AYPGKF, ADP, U46619, and PGE(2)) used at their EC(50) concentrations. These agonists allowed exploration of platelet signaling downstream of GPVI, PAR-1, PAR-4, P2Y(1), P2Y(12), TP, and IP receptors. The three-color flow cytometry method simultaneously measured integrin α(IIb)β(3) activation with PAC-1 antibody, P-selectin exposure (via α granule release) with anti-P-selectin, and PS exposure with annexin V. These responses were consistent across a healthy male donor pool. In duplicate measurements with each donor, 4 of the 10 donors had a sufficiently unique 45-parameter (15 pairs × 3 colors) phenotype to self-cluster (P < 0.001). This method has the potential for efficiently scanning for patient specific responses across a broad agonist-receptor space.

  18. Pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) measures inside-out signaling and patient-specific response to combinatorial platelet agonists.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Daniel T L; Diamond, Scott L

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the response of cells to multiple stimuli is vital for predicting donor specific responses and better understanding the signaling pathways involved. This is of particular importance in platelets because exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) occurs upon costimulation but not with a single agonist. Here, we describe a multiplexed pairwise agonist scanning-flow cytometry (PAS-FC) method of measuring platelet inside-out responses to all pairs of six platelet agonists (convulxin, SFLLRN, AYPGKF, ADP, U46619, and PGE(2)) used at their EC(50) concentrations. These agonists allowed exploration of platelet signaling downstream of GPVI, PAR-1, PAR-4, P2Y(1), P2Y(12), TP, and IP receptors. The three-color flow cytometry method simultaneously measured integrin α(IIb)β(3) activation with PAC-1 antibody, P-selectin exposure (via α granule release) with anti-P-selectin, and PS exposure with annexin V. These responses were consistent across a healthy male donor pool. In duplicate measurements with each donor, 4 of the 10 donors had a sufficiently unique 45-parameter (15 pairs × 3 colors) phenotype to self-cluster (P < 0.001). This method has the potential for efficiently scanning for patient specific responses across a broad agonist-receptor space. PMID:23662898

  19. Analysis of the efficacy of possessions in boys' 16-and-under basketball teams: differences between winning and losing teams.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Enrique; Palao, José Manuel; Gómez, Miguel Angel; Lorenzo, Alberto; Cárdenas, David

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the ball possessions of winning and losing basketball teams in formative years (16 years and under). The sample was 3,897 ball possessions from 24 games of the boys' 16-and-under finals of the Andalusion Championship, Spain. The variables studied were game outcome, participation, and the initiation and end of each ball possession. Winning teams used more fast breaks and fewer set offenses in their ball possessions. Winning teams had shorter ball possessions and more passes and participating players. Dynamic game styles are necessary in youth basketball, focusing on continuously off-balancing the opponent through fast breaks and a high number of passes in set offenses.

  20. Agonist/antagonist modulation in a series of 2-aryl benzimidazole H4 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Savall, Brad M; Edwards, James P; Venable, Jennifer D; Buzard, Daniel J; Thurmond, Robin; Hack, Michael; McGovern, Patricia

    2010-06-01

    The present work details the transformation of a series of human histamine H(4) agonists into potent functional antagonists. Replacement of the aminopyrrolidine diamine functionality with a 5,6-fused pyrrolopiperidine ring system led to an antagonist. The dissection of this fused diamine led to the eventual replacement with heterocycles. The incorporation of histamine as the terminal amine led to a very potent and selective histamine H(4) agonist; whereas incorporation of the constrained histamine analog, spinacamine, modulated the functional activity to give a partial agonist. In two separate series, we demonstrate that constraining the terminal amino portion modulated the spectrum of functional activity of histamine H(4) ligands.

  1. Agonist-Specific Recruitment of Arrestin Isoforms Differentially Modify Delta Opioid Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Perroy, Julie; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Smith, Monique L.; Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Bana, Alia; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-specific recruitment of arrestins facilitates functional selectivity of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. Here, we describe agonist-selective recruitment of different arrestin isoforms to the delta opioid receptor in mice. A high-internalizing delta opioid receptor agonist (SNC80) preferentially recruited arrestin 2 and, in arrestin 2 knock-outs (KOs), we observed a significant increase in the potency of SNC80 to inhibit mechanical hyperalgesia and decreased acute tolerance. In contrast, the low-internalizing delta agonists (ARM390, JNJ20788560) preferentially recruited arrestin 3 with unaltered behavioral effects in arrestin 2 KOs. Surprisingly, arrestin 3 KO revealed an acute tolerance to these low-internalizing agonists, an effect never observed in wild-type animals. Furthermore, we examined delta opioid receptor–Ca2+ channel coupling in dorsal root ganglia desensitized by ARM390 and the rate of resensitization was correspondingly decreased in arrestin 3 KOs. Live-cell imaging in HEK293 cells revealed that delta opioid receptors are in pre-engaged complexes with arrestin 3 at the cell membrane and that ARM390 strengthens this membrane interaction. The disruption of these complexes in arrestin 3 KOs likely accounts for the altered responses to low-internalizing agonists. Together, our results show agonist-selective recruitment of arrestin isoforms and reveal a novel endogenous role of arrestin 3 as a facilitator of resensitization and an inhibitor of tolerance mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Agonists that bind to the same receptor can produce highly distinct signaling events and arrestins are a major mediator of this ligand bias. Here, we demonstrate that delta opioid receptor agonists differentially recruit arrestin isoforms. We found that the high-internalizing agonist SNC80 preferentially recruits arrestin 2 and knock-out (KO) of this protein results in increased efficacy of SNC80. In contrast, low-internalizing agonists (ARM390 and JNJ20788560

  2. Synthesis and characterization of photoactivatable peptide agonists of the human thrombin receptor.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, R; Cordier, Y; Rasmussen, U B; Schlesinger, Y; Gachet, C; Jaquinod, M; Tripet, B; Chong, P C; Pavirani, A

    1994-08-01

    Chemical synthesis and biochemical analysis of modified agonist peptides of the human thrombin receptor derived from the sequence SFLLRNP containing photoactivatable azido groups and biotin for sensitive detection is described. Substitution of leucine in position three with p-azidophenylalanine and extension of the C-terminus with a KGGK spacer containing biotin covalently linked to the side chain of the C-terminal lysine residue resulted in an active receptor agonist as determined by intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells. In contrast, substitution of phenylalanine in position two with p-azidophenylalanine reduced agonist activity significantly. PMID:8050586

  3. Evaluation of WIN 55,212-2 self-administration in rats as a potential cannabinoid abuse liability model

    PubMed Central

    Lefever, Timothy W.; Marusich, Julie A.; Antonazzo, Kateland R.; Wiley, Jenny L.

    2014-01-01

    Because Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been a false negative in rat intravenous self-administration procedures, evaluation of the abuse potential of candidate cannabinoid medications has proved difficult. One lab group has successfully trained self-administration of the aminoalkylindole WIN55,212-2 in rats; however, their results have not been independently replicated. The purpose of this study was to extend their model by using a within-subjects design, with the goal of establishing a robust method suitable for substitution testing of other cannabinoids. Male Long-Evans rats were trained to self-administer WIN55,212-2 (0.01 mg/kg/infusion) on a fixed ratio 3 schedule. Dose-effect curves for WIN55,212-2 were determined, followed by vehicle substitution and a dose-effect curve with THC. WIN55,212-2 self-administration was acquired; however, substitution with THC did not maintain responding above vehicle levels. Dose-dependent attenuation by rimonabant confirmed CB1 receptor mediation of WIN55,212-2’s reinforcing effects. Vehicle substitution resulted in a session-dependent decrease in responding (i.e., extinction). While this study provides systematic replication of previous studies, lack of substitution with THC is problematic and suggests that WIN55,212-2 self-administration may be of limited usefulness as a screening tool for detection of the reinforcing effects of potential cannabinoid medications. Clarification of underlying factors responsible for failure of THC to maintain self-administration in cannabinoid-trained rats is needed. PMID:24412835

  4. "Is This a Boy or a Girl?": Rethinking Sex-Role Representation in Caldecott Medal-Winning Picturebooks, 1938-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Thomas; Hiller, Brittany

    2011-01-01

    A number of previous studies have addressed gender role-stereotyping in Caldecott Award-winning picturebooks. Building upon the extensive scholarship examining representations of females in Caldecott books, this current study offers a critical investigation of how gender is represented in Caldecott Medal-winning literature from 1938 to 2011 by…

  5. PPARα agonist, fenofibrate, ameliorates age-related renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Nim; Lim, Ji Hee; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Hyung Wook; Park, Cheol Whee; Chang, Yoon Sik; Choi, Bum Soon

    2016-08-01

    The kidney ages quickly compared with other organs. Expression of senescence markers reflects changes in the energy metabolism in the kidney. Two important issues in aging are mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily. PPARα plays a major role as a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes involved in various processes. In this study, 18-month-old male C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups, the control group (n=7) and the fenofibrate-treated group (n=7) was fed the normal chow plus fenofibrate for 6months. The PPARα agonist, fenofibrate, improved renal function, proteinuria, histological change (glomerulosclerosis and tubular interstitial fibrosis), inflammation, and apoptosis in aging mice. This protective effect against age-related renal injury occurred through the activation of AMPK and SIRT1 signaling. The activation of AMPK and SIRT1 allowed for the concurrent deacetylation and phosphorylation of their target molecules and decreased the kidney's susceptibility to age-related changes. Activation of the AMPK-FOXO3a and AMPK-PGC-1α signaling pathways ameliorated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that activation of PPARα and AMPK-SIRT1 signaling may have protective effects against age-related renal injury. Pharmacological targeting of PPARα and AMPK-SIRT1 signaling molecules may prevent or attenuate age-related pathological changes in the kidney. PMID:27130813

  6. Object-horning in goitered gazelle: agonistic or marking behaviour?

    PubMed

    Blank, David; Yang, Weikang

    2014-03-01

    We studied object-horning behaviour in goitered gazelles in the natural, arid environment of Kazakhstan over a 6-year period. We found that object-horning was used by adult males mostly as a threat display during territorial conflicts. Therefore object-horning was observed most frequently in territorial single males during the rut in November-December. Object-horning, though, also had a marking effect, with the males' use of this behaviour leaving visible traces that advertized the location of preorbital and urination-defecation scent marks. Therefore, this pattern also was observed linked with preorbital marking and urination-defecation marking behaviours, especially during the rut. Goitered gazelle males chose the most abundant and eatable shrubs for object horning. In contrast to other gazelle species, object-horning in goitered gazelle was observed much more frequently and at the same rate as preorbital and urination-defecation scent markings. This, then, proved a more vigorous and aggressive level of rutting behaviour of the goitered gazelle compared to tropical gazelles, and most likely connected to the short rutting period in the studied species. We concluded, therefore, that object-horning was a manifold phenomenon that played a very important role in goitered gazelle agonistic displays, but without loosing the marking intention of this behaviour. PMID:24365541

  7. Therapeutic applications of TRAIL receptor agonists in cancer and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    TRAIL/Apo-2L is a member of the TNF superfamily first described as an apoptosis-inducing cytokine in 1995. Similar to TNF and Fas ligand, TRAIL induces apoptosis in caspase-dependent manner following TRAIL death receptor trimerization. Because tumor cells were shown to be particularly sensitive to this cytokine while normal cells/tissues proved to be resistant along with being able to synthesize and release TRAIL, it was rapidly appreciated that TRAIL likely served as one of our major physiologic weapons against cancer. In line with this, a number of research laboratories and pharmaceutical companies have attempted to exploit the ability of TRAIL to kill cancer cells by developing recombinant forms of TRAIL or TRAIL receptor agonists (e.g., receptor-specific mAb) for therapeutic purposes. In this review article we will describe the biochemical pathways used by TRAIL to induce different cell death programs. We will also summarize the clinical trials related to this pathway and discuss possible novel uses of TRAIL-related therapies. In recent years, the physiological importance of TRAIL has expanded beyond being a tumoricidal molecule to one critical for a number of clinical settings — ranging from infectious disease and autoimmunity to cardiovascular anomalies. We will also highlight some of these conditions where modulation of the TRAIL/TRAIL receptor system may be targeted in the future. PMID:26343199

  8. Glyoxalase 1 increases anxiety by reducing GABAA receptor agonist methylglyoxal

    PubMed Central

    Distler, Margaret G.; Plant, Leigh D.; Sokoloff, Greta; Hawk, Andrew J.; Aneas, Ivy; Wuenschell, Gerald E.; Termini, John; Meredith, Stephen C.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2012-01-01

    Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) expression has previously been associated with anxiety in mice; however, its role in anxiety is controversial, and the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that GLO1 increases anxiety by reducing levels of methylglyoxal (MG), a GABAA receptor agonist. Mice overexpressing Glo1 on a Tg bacterial artificial chromosome displayed increased anxiety-like behavior and reduced brain MG concentrations. Treatment with low doses of MG reduced anxiety-like behavior, while higher doses caused locomotor depression, ataxia, and hypothermia, which are characteristic effects of GABAA receptor activation. Consistent with these data, we found that physiological concentrations of MG selectively activated GABAA receptors in primary neurons. These data indicate that GLO1 increases anxiety by reducing levels of MG, thereby decreasing GABAA receptor activation. More broadly, our findings potentially link metabolic state, neuronal inhibitory tone, and behavior. Finally, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of GLO1 reduced anxiety, suggesting that GLO1 is a possible target for the treatment of anxiety disorders. PMID:22585572

  9. Therapeutic applications of TRAIL receptor agonists in cancer and beyond.

    PubMed

    Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P; Griffith, Thomas S

    2015-11-01

    TRAIL/Apo-2L is a member of the TNF superfamily first described as an apoptosis-inducing cytokine in 1995. Similar to TNF and Fas ligand, TRAIL induces apoptosis in caspase-dependent manner following TRAIL death receptor trimerization. Because tumor cells were shown to be particularly sensitive to this cytokine while normal cells/tissues proved to be resistant along with being able to synthesize and release TRAIL, it was rapidly appreciated that TRAIL likely served as one of our major physiologic weapons against cancer. In line with this, a number of research laboratories and pharmaceutical companies have attempted to exploit the ability of TRAIL to kill cancer cells by developing recombinant forms of TRAIL or TRAIL receptor agonists (e.g., receptor-specific mAb) for therapeutic purposes. In this review article we will describe the biochemical pathways used by TRAIL to induce different cell death programs. We will also summarize the clinical trials related to this pathway and discuss possible novel uses of TRAIL-related therapies. In recent years, the physiological importance of TRAIL has expanded beyond being a tumoricidal molecule to one critical for a number of clinical settings - ranging from infectious disease and autoimmunity to cardiovascular anomalies. We will also highlight some of these conditions where modulation of the TRAIL/TRAIL receptor system may be targeted in the future.

  10. Neurotensin agonist attenuates nicotine potentiation to cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Paul; Boules, Mona; Stennett, Bethany; Richelson, Elliott

    2014-03-01

    Tobacco usage typically precedes illicit drug use in adolescent and young adult populations. Several animal studies suggest nicotine increases the risk for subsequent cocaine abuse, and may be a negative prognostic factor for treatment of cocaine addiction; i.e., a "gateway drug". Neurotensin (NT) is a 13-amino acid neuropeptide that modulates dopamine, acetylcholine, glutamate, and GABA neurotransmission in brain reward pathways. NT69L, a NT(8-13) analog, blocks behavioral sensitization (an animal model for psychostimulant addiction) to nicotine, and nicotine self-administration in rats. The present study tested the effect of NT69L on the potentiating effects of nicotine on cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Male Wistar rats were injected daily for seven days with nicotine or saline (control) followed by four daily injections of cocaine. NT69L was administered 30 min prior to the last cocaine injection. Behavior was recorded with the use of activity chambers. Subchronic administration of nicotine enhanced cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in Wistar rats, consistent with an hypothesized gateway effect. These behavioral effects of cocaine were attenuated by pretreatment with NT69L. The effect of the neurotensin agonist on cocaine sensitization in the nicotine treated group indicated a possible therapeutic effect for cocaine addiction, even in the presence of enhanced behavioral sensitization induced by nicotine. PMID:25379267

  11. Lipid metabolome-wide effects of the PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Steven M; Reifsnyder, Peter R; Pan, Huei-ju; German, J Bruce; Leiter, Edward H

    2002-11-01

    Successful therapy for chronic diseases must normalize a targeted aspect of metabolism without disrupting the regulation of other metabolic pathways essential for maintaining health. Use of a limited number of single molecule surrogates for disease, or biomarkers, to monitor the efficacy of a therapy may fail to predict undesirable side effects. In this study, a comprehensive metabolomic assessment of lipid metabolites was employed to determine the specific effects of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonist rosiglitazone on structural lipid metabolism in a new mouse model of Type 2 diabetes. Dietary supplementation with rosiglitazone (200 mg/kg diet) suppressed Type 2 diabetes in obese (NZO x NON)F1 male mice, but chronic treatment markedly exacerbated hepatic steatosis. The metabolomic data revealed that rosiglitazone i) induced hypolipidemia (by dysregulating liver-plasma lipid exchange), ii) induced de novo fatty acid synthesis, iii) decreased the biosynthesis of lipids within the peroxisome, iv) substantially altered free fatty acid and cardiolipin metabolism in heart, and v) elicited an unusual accumulation of polyunsaturated fatty acids within adipose tissue. These observations suggest that the phenotypes induced by rosiglitazone are mediated by multiple tissue-specific metabolic variables. Because many of the effects of rosiglitazone on tissue metabolism were reflected in the plasma lipid metabolome, metabolomics has excellent potential for developing clinical assessments of metabolic response to drug therapy. PMID:12401879

  12. Agonist Derived Molecular Probes for A2A Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Jarvis, Michael F.; Williams, Michael; Hutchison, Alan J.; Barrington, William W.; Stiles, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The adenosine agonist 2-(4-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino)-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680) was recently reported to be selective for the A2A adenosine receptor subtype, which mediates its hypotensive action. To investigate structurelactivity relationships at a distal site, CGS21680 was derivatized using a functionalized congener approach. The carboxylic group of CGS21680 has been esterified to form a methyl ester, which was then treated with ethylenediamine to produce an amine congener. The amine congener was an intermediate for acylation reactions, in which the reactive acyl species contained a reported group, or the precursor for such. For radioiodination, derivatives of p-hydroxyphenylpropionic, 2-thiophenylacetic, and p-aminophenylacetic acids were prepared. The latter derivative (PAPA-APEC) was iodinated electrophilically using [125I]iodide resulting in a radioligand which was used for studies of competition of binding to striatal A, adenosine receptors in bovine brain. A biotin conjugate and an aryl sulfonate were at least 350-fold selective for A, receptors. For spectroscopic detection, a derivative of the stable free radical tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) was prepared. For irreversible inhibition of receptors, meta- and para-phenylenediisothiocyanate groups were incorporated in the analogs. We have demonstrated that binding at A2A receptors is relatively insensitive to distal structural changes at the 2-position, and we report high affinity molecular probes for receptor characterization by radioactive, spectroscopic and affinity labelling methodology. PMID:2561548

  13. Agonists and Antagonists of TGF-β Family Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chenbei

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family ligands and the realization that their bioactivities need to be tightly controlled temporally and spatially led to intensive research that has identified a multitude of extracellular modulators of TGF-β family ligands, uncovered their functions in developmental and pathophysiological processes, defined the mechanisms of their activities, and explored potential modulator-based therapeutic applications in treating human diseases. These studies revealed a diverse repertoire of extracellular and membrane-associated molecules that are capable of modulating TGF-β family signals via control of ligand availability, processing, ligand-receptor interaction, and receptor activation. These molecules include not only soluble ligand-binding proteins that were conventionally considered as agonists and antagonists of TGF-β family of growth factors, but also extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and proteoglycans that can serve as "sink" and control storage and release of both the TGF-β family ligands and their regulators. This extensive network of soluble and ECM modulators helps to ensure dynamic and cell-specific control of TGF-β family signals. This article reviews our knowledge of extracellular modulation of TGF-β growth factors by diverse proteins and their molecular mechanisms to regulate TGF-β family signaling.

  14. Minireview: Challenges and opportunities in development of PPAR agonists.

    PubMed

    Wright, Matthew B; Bortolini, Michele; Tadayyon, Moh; Bopst, Martin

    2014-11-01

    The clinical impact of the fibrate and thiazolidinedione drugs on dyslipidemia and diabetes is driven mainly through activation of two transcription factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-α and PPAR-γ. However, substantial differences exist in the therapeutic and side-effect profiles of specific drugs. This has been attributed primarily to the complexity of drug-target complexes that involve many coregulatory proteins in the context of specific target gene promoters. Recent data have revealed that some PPAR ligands interact with other non-PPAR targets. Here we review concepts used to develop new agents that preferentially modulate transcriptional complex assembly, target more than one PPAR receptor simultaneously, or act as partial agonists. We highlight newly described on-target mechanisms of PPAR regulation including phosphorylation and nongenomic regulation. We briefly describe the recently discovered non-PPAR protein targets of thiazolidinediones, mitoNEET, and mTOT. Finally, we summarize the contributions of on- and off-target actions to select therapeutic and side effects of PPAR ligands including insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular actions, inflammation, and carcinogenicity. PMID:25148456

  15. Hitting the Goalpost: Calculating the Fine Line Between Winning and Losing a Penalty Shootout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widenhorn, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The Portland Timbers won their first Major League Soccer (MLS) Cup Championship in December 2015. However, if it had not been for a kind double goalpost miss during a penalty shootout a few weeks earlier, the Timbers would never have been in the finals. On Oct. 30th, after what has been called "the greatest penalty kick shootout in MLS history," featuring a combined 22 penalties that included penalties by both goalkeepers, the Timbers won their first-round playoff against Sporting Kansas City. During the thrilling shootout, which can be watched, for example, for example on the MLS website, Sporting had two potentially game-winning penalties miss by the smallest of margins. One penalty bounced off the goalpost back into the field and another was an improbable double post miss. For a physicist, this prompts an interesting research question. Could we find an estimate by what distance the double post penalty shown in Fig. 1 failed to be the game winning shot?

  16. Changes in testosterone mediate the effect of winning on subsequent aggressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Carré, Justin M; Campbell, Jocelyn A; Lozoya, Elianna; Goetz, Stefan M M; Welker, Keith M

    2013-10-01

    Testosterone concentrations rise rapidly in the context of competitive interactions and remain elevated in winners relative to losers. Theoretical models suggest that this divergent neuroendocrine response serves to mediate future dominance behaviours. Although research in animal models provides compelling support for this model, evidence for its applicability to human social behaviour is limited. In the current study, men and women were randomly assigned to experience a series of victories or defeats, after which aggressive behaviour was assessed using a well-validated behavioural measure. Winning produced elevated testosterone concentrations relative to losing in men, but not women. More importantly, testosterone reactivity to competition mediated the effect of winning on subsequent aggressive behaviour in men, but not women. We discuss limitations of the current study (e.g., the status manipulation may have affected other variables not measured in the study including competitiveness and physical activity expended), as well as discuss a potential neural mechanism underlying the effect of testosterone reactivity on aggressive behaviour. PMID:23587440

  17. Winning big but feeling no better? The effect of lottery prizes on physical and mental health.

    PubMed

    Apouey, Benedicte; Clark, Andrew E

    2015-05-01

    We use British panel data to determine the exogenous impact of income on a number of individual health outcomes: general health status, mental health, physical health problems, and health behaviours (drinking and smoking). Lottery winnings allow us to make causal statements regarding the effect of income on health, as the amount won by winners is largely exogenous. Positive income shocks have no significant effect on self-assessed overall health, but a significant positive effect on mental health. This result seems paradoxical on two levels. First, there is a well-known gradient in health status in cross-sectional data, and second, general health should partly reflect mental health, so that we may expect both variables to move in the same direction. We propose a solution to the first apparent paradox by underlining the endogeneity of income. For the second, we show that lottery winnings are also associated with more smoking and social drinking. General health will reflect both mental health and the effect of these behaviours and so may not improve following a positive income shock.

  18. WINNING BIG BUT FEELING NO BETTER? THE EFFECT OF LOTTERY PRIZES ON PHYSICAL AND MENTAL HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Apouey, Benedicte; Clark, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We use British panel data to determine the exogenous impact of income on a number of individual health outcomes: general health status, mental health, physical health problems, and health behaviours (drinking and smoking). Lottery winnings allow us to make causal statements regarding the effect of income on health, as the amount won by winners is largely exogenous. Positive income shocks have no significant effect on self-assessed overall health, but a significant positive effect on mental health. This result seems paradoxical on two levels. First, there is a well-known gradient in health status in cross-sectional data, and second, general health should partly reflect mental health, so that we may expect both variables to move in the same direction. We propose a solution to the first apparent paradox by underlining the endogeneity of income. For the second, we show that lottery winnings are also associated with more smoking and social drinking. General health will reflect both mental health and the effect of these behaviours and so may not improve following a positive income shock. PMID:24677260

  19. Evaluation and improvement of wastewater treatment plant performance using BioWin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleyiblo, Oloche James; Cao, Jiashun; Feng, Qian; Wang, Gan; Xue, Zhaoxia; Fang, Fang

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the activated sludge model implemented in the BioWin® software was validated against full-scale wastewater treatment plant data. Only two stoichiometric parameters ( Y p/acetic and the heterotrophic yield ( Y H)) required calibration. The value 0.42 was used for Y p/acetic in this study, while the default value of the BioWin® software is 0.49, making it comparable with the default values of the corresponding parameter (yield of phosphorus release to substrate uptake ) used in ASM2, ASM2d, and ASM3P, respectively. Three scenarios were evaluated to improve the performance of the wastewater treatment plant, the possibility of wasting sludge from either the aeration tank or the secondary clarifier, the construction of a new oxidation ditch, and the construction of an equalization tank. The results suggest that construction of a new oxidation ditch or an equalization tank for the wastewater treatment plant is not necessary. However, sludge should be wasted from the aeration tank during wet weather to reduce the solids loading of the clarifiers and avoid effluent violations. Therefore, it is recommended that the design of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) should include flexibility to operate the plants in various modes. This is helpful in selection of the appropriate operating mode when necessary, resulting in substantial reductions in operating costs.

  20. Is It Necessary to Lie to Win a Controversial Public Debate? An Answer from Sociophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galam, Serge

    Controversial public debates driven by incomplete scientific data where nobody can claim absolute certainty, due to the current state of scientific knowledge, are studied. To adopt a cautious balanced attitude based on clear but inconclusive data appears to be a lose-out strategy. In contrast overstating arguments with incorrect claims which cannot be scientifically refuted appears to be necessary but not sufficient to eventually win a public debate. The underlying key mechanisms of these puzzling and unfortunate conclusions are identified using the Galam Unifying Frame (GUF) of opinion dynamics . It reveals that the existence of inflexible agents and their respective proportions are the instrumental parameters to determine the faith of incomplete scientific data in public debates. Acting on one's own inflexible proportion modifies the topology of the flow diagram, which in turn can make irrelevant the value of initial support. On the contrary focusing on open-minded agents may be useless given some topologies. Accordingly, the inflexibles rather than the data are found to drive the opinion of the population. The results shed a new but disturbing light on designing adequate strategies to win a public debate. The cases of global warming is briefly discussed.