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Sample records for agonist-induced receptor internalization

  1. Agonist-induced desensitization of dopamine D1 receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity is temporally and biochemically separated from D1 receptor internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, G Y; Trogadis, J; Stevens, J; Bouvier, M; O'Dowd, B F; George, S R

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine D1 receptor was investigated by using c-myc epitope-tagged D1 receptors expressed in Sf9 (fall armyworm ovary) cells. Treatment of D1 receptors with 10 microM dopamine for 15 min led to a loss of the dopamine-detected high-affinity state of the receptor accompanying a 40% reduction in the ability of the receptor to mediate maximal dopamine stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity. After 60 min of agonist exposure, 45 min after the occurrence of desensitization, 28% of the cell surface receptors were internalized into an intracellular light vesicular membrane fraction as determined by radioligand binding and supported by photoaffinity labeling, immunocytochemical staining, and immunoblot analysis. Pretreatment of cells with concanavalin A or sucrose completely blocked agonist-induced D1 receptor internalization without preventing agonist-induced desensitization, indicating a biochemical separation of these processes. Collectively, these findings indicate that the desensitization of D1 receptor-coupled adenylyl cyclase activity and D1 receptor internalization are temporarily and biochemically distinct mechanisms regulating D1 receptor function following agonist activation. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479745

  2. Plasma membrane cholesterol level and agonist-induced internalization of δ-opioid receptors; colocalization study with intracellular membrane markers of Rab family.

    PubMed

    Brejchova, Jana; Vosahlikova, Miroslava; Roubalova, Lenka; Parenti, Marco; Mauri, Mario; Chernyavskiy, Oleksandr; Svoboda, Petr

    2016-08-01

    Decrease of cholesterol level in plasma membrane of living HEK293 cells transiently expressing FLAG-δ-OR by β-cyclodextrin (β-CDX) resulted in a slight internalization of δ-OR. Massive internalization of δ-OR induced by specific agonist DADLE was diminished in cholesterol-depleted cells. These results suggest that agonist-induced internalization of δ-OR, which has been traditionally attributed exclusively to clathrin-mediated pathway, proceeds at least partially via membrane domains. Identification of internalized pools of FLAG-δ-OR by colocalization studies with proteins of Rab family indicated the decreased presence of receptors in early endosomes (Rab5), late endosomes and lysosomes (Rab7) and fast recycling vesicles (Rab4). Slow type of recycling (Rab11) was unchanged by cholesterol depletion. As expected, agonist-induced internalization of oxytocin receptors was totally suppressed in β-CDX-treated cells. Determination of average fluorescence lifetime of TMA-DPH, the polar derivative of hydrophobic membrane probe diphenylhexatriene, in live cells by FLIM indicated a significant alteration of the overall PM structure which may be interpreted as an increased "water-accessible space" within PM area. Data obtained by studies of HEK293 cells transiently expressing FLAG-δ-OR by "antibody feeding" method were extended by analysis of the effect of cholesterol depletion on distribution of FLAG-δ-OR in sucrose density gradients prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing FLAG-δ-OR. Major part of FLAG-δ-OR was co-localized with plasma membrane marker Na,K-ATPase and β-CDX treatment resulted in shift of PM fragments containing both FLAG-δ-OR and Na,K-ATPase to higher density. Thus, the decrease in content of the major lipid constituent of PM resulted in increased density of resulting PM fragments.

  3. A pH-sensitive fluor, CypHer 5, used to monitor agonist-induced G protein-coupled receptor internalization in live cells.

    PubMed

    Adie, E J; Kalinka, S; Smith, L; Francis, M J; Marenghi, A; Cooper, M E; Briggs, M; Michael, N P; Milligan, G; Game, S

    2002-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of proteins involved in transmembrane signal transduction and are actively studied because of their suitability as therapeutic small-molecule drug targets. Agonist activation of GPCRs almost invariably results in the receptor being desensitized. One of the key events in receptor desensitization is the sequestration of the receptor from the cell surface into acidic intracellular endosomes. Therefore, a convenient, generic, and noninvasive monitor of this process is desirable. A novel, pH-sensitive, red-excited fluorescent dye, CypHer 5, was synthesized. This dye is non-fluorescent at neutral pH and is fluorescent at acidic pH. Anti-epitope antibodies labeled with this dye were internalized in an agonist concentration- and time-dependent manner, following binding on live cells to a range of GPCRs that had been modified to incorporate the epitope tags in their extracellular N-terminal domain. This resulted in a large signal increase over background. When protonated, the red fluorescence of CypHer 5 provides a generic reagent suitable for monitoring the internalization of GPCRs into acidic vesicles. This approach should be amenable to the study of many other classes of cell surface receptors that also internalize following stimulation.

  4. Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail of the lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor prevents agonist-induced uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Yagüe, J; Rodríguez, M C; Segaloff, D L; Ascoli, M

    1992-04-15

    An agonist-induced change in the functional properties of a constant number of receptors seems to be a ubiquitous phenomenon involved in the regulation of cell surface receptors. Although the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon (called uncoupling or desensitization) have been studied in detail using beta 2-adrenergic receptors it is unclear if the models derived from these studies are applicable to other members of the family of G protein-coupled receptors. Since it has been shown previously that truncation of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor results in a delay in the onset of agonist-induced uncoupling (Bouvier, M., Hausdorff, W.P., De Blasi, A., O'Dowd, B.F., Kobilka, B.K., Caron , M.G., and Lefkowitz, R.J. (1988) Nature 333, 370-373), we now present experiments designed to test the effects of a similar truncation of the lutropin/choriogonadotropin (LH/CG) receptor on its functional properties. The results presented herein show that (i) clonal lines of human embryonic kidney cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding for the wild-type (rLHR-wt) or a mutant receptor truncated at amino acid residue 631 (rLHR-t631) express functional LH/CG receptors as judged by their ability to bind hCG and to respond to it with increased cAMP accumulation; (ii) a preincubation of the cells expressing rLHR-wt with hCG leads to a reduction in the ability of hCG to activate adenylylcyclase; and (iii) this reduction is severely blunted in cells expressing rLHR-t631. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the LH/CG receptor is necessary for agonist-induced uncoupling.

  5. Identification of a Ser/Thr cluster in the C-terminal domain of the human prostaglandin receptor EP4 that is essential for agonist-induced beta-arrestin1 recruitment but differs from the apparent principal phosphorylation site.

    PubMed Central

    Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Hermosilla, Ricardo; Rehwald, Mathias; Rönnstrand, Lars; Schülein, Ralf; Wernstedt, Christer; Püschel, Gerhard Paul

    2004-01-01

    hEP4-R (human prostaglandin E2 receptor, subtype EP4) is a G(s)-linked heterotrimeric GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor). It undergoes agonist-induced desensitization and internalization that depend on the presence of its C-terminal domain. Desensitization and internalization of GPCRs are often linked to agonist-induced beta-arrestin complex formation, which is stabilized by phosphorylation. Subsequently beta-arrestin uncouples the receptor from its G-protein and links it to the endocytotic machinery. The C-terminal domain of hEP4-R contains 38 Ser/Thr residues that represent potential phosphorylation sites. The present study aimed to analyse the relevance of these Ser/Thr residues for agonist-induced phosphorylation, interaction with beta-arrestin and internalization. In response to agonist treatment, hEP4-R was phosphorylated. By analysis of proteolytic phosphopeptides of the wild-type receptor and mutants in which groups of Ser/Thr residues had been replaced by Ala, the principal phosphorylation site was mapped to a Ser/Thr-containing region comprising residues 370-382, the presence of which was necessary and sufficient to obtain full agonist-induced phosphorylation. A cluster of Ser/Thr residues (Ser-389-Ser-390-Thr-391-Ser-392) distal to this site, but not the principal phosphorylation site, was essential to allow agonist-induced recruitment of beta-arrestin1. However, phosphorylation greatly enhanced the stability of the beta-arrestin1-receptor complexes. For maximal agonist-induced internalization, phosphorylation of the principal phosphorylation site was not required, but both beta-arrestin1 recruitment and the presence of Ser/Thr residues in the distal half of the C-terminal domain were necessary. PMID:14709160

  6. Peripheral endothelin B receptor agonist-induced antinociception involves endogenous opioids in mice.

    PubMed

    Quang, Phuong N; Schmidt, Brian L

    2010-05-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) produced by various cancers is known to be responsible for inducing pain. While ET-1 binding to ETAR on peripheral nerves clearly mediates nociception, effects from binding to ETBR are less clear. The present study assessed the effects of ETBR activation and the role of endogenous opioid analgesia in carcinoma pain using an orthotopic cancer pain mouse model. mRNA expression analysis showed that ET-1 was nearly doubled while ETBR was significantly down-regulated in a human oral SCC cell line compared to normal oral keratinocytes (NOK). Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell culture treated with an ETBR agonist (10(-4)M, 10(-5)M, and 10(-6) M BQ-3020) significantly increased the production of beta-endorphin without any effects on leu-enkephalin or dynorphin. Cancer inoculated in the hind paw of athymic mice with SCC induced significant pain, as indicated by reduction of paw withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimulation, compared to sham-injected and NOK-injected groups. Intratumor administration of 3mg/kg BQ-3020 attenuated cancer pain by approximately 50% up to 3h post-injection compared to PBS-vehicle and contralateral injection, while intratumor ETBR antagonist BQ-788 treatment (100 and 300microg/kg and 3mg/kg) had no effects. Local naloxone methiodide (500microg/kg) or selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist (CTOP, 500microg/kg) injection reversed ETBR agonist-induced antinociception in cancer animals. We propose that these results demonstrate that peripheral ETBR agonism attenuates carcinoma pain by modulating beta-endorphins released from the SCC to act on peripheral opioid receptors found in the cancer microenvironment.

  7. Agonist induced constitutive receptor activation as a novel regulatory mechanism. Mu receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Sadée, W; Wang, Z

    1995-01-01

    We propose the hypothesis that certain G protein coupled receptors can become constitutively activated during agonist stimulation so that the receptor remains active even after the agonist is removed. This new paradigm of receptor regulation may account for some long term effects of neurotransmitters and hormones. We have tested the hypothesis that constitutive mu receptor activation represents a crucial step driving narcotic tolerance and dependence. Our results indeed support the conversion of mu to a constitutively active state, mu*, observed in neuroblastoma SK-N-SH and SH-SY5Y tissue culture, in U293 cells transfected with the mu receptor gene, and in vivo. Constitutive mu activation may result from receptor phosphorylation to yield mu*, and further, in vivo studies indicate that formation of mu* could account for narcotic tolerance and dependence.

  8. Neurokinin B- and specific tachykinin NK3 receptor agonists-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Daoui, Samira; Naline, Emmanuel; Lagente, Vincent; Emonds-Alt, Xavier; Advenier, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether neurokinin B (NKB) or specific agonists of tachykinin NK3 receptors, [MePhe7]NKB and senktide, were able to induce airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea-pigs. The effects of these compounds were compared to those of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA) and the preferential tachykinin NK1 ([Sar9, Met(02)11]SP) or NK2 ([βAla8]NKA (4-10)) receptor agonists.In guinea-pigs pretreated with phosphoramidon (10−4 M aerosol for 10 min) and salbutamol (8.7×10−3 M for 10 min), all tachykinins administrated by aerosol (3×10−7 to 10−4 M) induced airway hyperresponsiveness 24 h later, displayed by an exaggerated response to the bronchoconstrictor effect of acetylcholine (i.v.). The rank order of potency was: [βAla8]NKA (4-10)>NKA=NKB=senktide=[MePhe7]NKB=[Sar9,Met(02)11]SP>SP.Airway hyperresponsiveness induced by [MePhe7]NKB was prevented by the tachykinin NK3 (SR 142801) and NK2 (SR 48968) receptor antagonists.Bronchoconstriction induced by tachykinins administered by aerosol was also determined. SP, NKA, NKB and the tachykinin NK1 and NK2 receptor agonist induced bronchoconstriction. The rank order of potency was: NKA=[βAla8]NKA (4-10)>NKB=SP=[Sar9,Met(02)11]SP. Under similar conditions, and for concentrations which induce airway hyperresponsiveness, senktide and [MePhe7]NKB failed to induce bronchoconstriction.It is concluded that tachykinin NK3-receptor stimulation can induce airway hyperresponsiveness and that this effect is not related to the ability of tachykinins to induce bronchoconstriction. PMID:10780997

  9. Proteolytic cleavage of the urokinase receptor substitutes for the agonist-induced chemotactic effect.

    PubMed Central

    Resnati, M; Guttinger, M; Valcamonica, S; Sidenius, N; Blasi, F; Fazioli, F

    1996-01-01

    Physiological concentrations of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) stimulated a chemotactic response in human monocytic THP-1 through binding to the urokinase receptor (uPAR). The effect did not require the protease moiety of uPA, as stimulation was achieved also with the N-terminal fragment (ATF), while the 33 kDa low molecular weight uPA was ineffective. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed association of uPAR with intracellular kinase(s), as demonstrated by in vitro kinase assays. Use of specific antibodies identified p56/p59hck as a kinase associated with uPAR in THP-1 cell extracts. Upon addition of ATF, p56/p59hck activity was stimulated within 2 min and returned to normal after 30 min. Since uPAR lacks an intracellular domain capable of interacting with intracellular kinase, activation of p56/p59hck must require a transmembrane adaptor. Evidence for this was strongly supported by the finding that a soluble form of uPAR (suPAR) was capable of inducing chemotaxis not only in THP-1 cells but also in cells lacking endogenous uPAR (IC50, 5 pM). However, activity of suPAR require chymotrypsin cleavage between the N-terminal domain D1 and D2 + D3. Chymotrypsin-cleaved suPAR also induced activation of p56/p59hck in THP-1 cells, with a time course comparable with ATF. Our data show that uPA-induced signal transduction takes place via uPAR, involves activation of intracellular tyrosine kinase(s) and requires an as yet undefined adaptor capable of connecting the extracellular ligand binding uPAR to intracellular transducer(s). Images PMID:8612581

  10. Parabrachial Nucleus Contributions to Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist-Induced Hypophagia

    PubMed Central

    Swick, Jennifer C; Alhadeff, Amber L; Grill, Harvey J; Urrea, Paula; Lee, Stephanie M; Roh, Hyunsun; Baird, John-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Exendin-4 (Ex4), a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist approved to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus, is well known to induce hypophagia in human and animal models. We evaluated the contributions of the hindbrain parabrachial nucleus (PBN) to systemic Ex4-induced hypophagia, as the PBN receives gustatory and visceral afferent relays and descending input from several brain nuclei associated with feeding. Rats with ibotenic-acid lesions targeted to the lateral PBN (PBNx) and sham controls received Ex4 (1 μg/kg) before 24 h home cage chow or 90 min 0.3 M sucrose access tests, and licking microstructure was analyzed to identify components of feeding behavior affected by Ex4. PBN lesion efficacy was confirmed using conditioned taste aversion (CTA) tests. As expected, sham control but not PBNx rats developed a CTA. In sham-lesioned rats, Ex4 reduced chow intake within 4 h of injection and sucrose intake within 90 min. PBNx rats did not show reduced chow or sucrose intake after Ex4 treatment, indicating that the PBN is necessary for Ex4 effects under the conditions tested. In sham-treated rats, Ex4 affected licking microstructure measures associated with hedonic taste evaluation, appetitive behavior, oromotor coordination, and inhibitory postingestive feedback. Licking microstructure responses in PBNx rats after Ex4 treatment were similar to sham-treated rats with the exception of inhibitory postingestive feedback measures. Together, the results suggest that the PBN critically contributes to the hypophagic effects of systemically delivered GLP-1R agonists by enhancing visceral feedback. PMID:25703200

  11. Agonist-induced functional desensitization of the mu-opioid receptor is mediated by loss of membrane receptors rather than uncoupling from G protein.

    PubMed

    Pak, Y; Kouvelas, A; Scheideler, M A; Rasmussen, J; O'Dowd, B F; George, S R

    1996-11-01

    The effects of acute exposure of the opioid peptide [D-Ala2,N-MePhe4, Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO) on the mu-opioid receptor were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K-1 and baby hamster kidney stable transfectants. In the CHO cell line, acute 1-hr treatment with DAMGO decreased the density of receptors without affecting the affinity or proportion of agonist-detected sites and attenuated the ability of the agonist to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. In contrast, similar 1-hr treatment of baby hamster kidney cells did not affect receptor density or agonist ability to inhibit cAMP accumulation, but longer duration of agonist exposure resulted in a reduction in membrane receptor, identical to the CHO cells. These results suggested that for the mu-opioid receptor, alteration in receptor density was the major determinant for the observed agonist-induced desensitization. Consistent with this notion, the ratio of the DAMGO concentration yielding half-maximal occupation of the mu receptor to that yielding half-maximal functional response was < 1. This suggests the necessity for a high mu receptor occupancy rate for maximal functional response, so that any loss of cell surface opioid-binding sites was a critical determinant in reducing the maximal response. This hypothesis was further supported by the observation that irreversible inactivation of fixed proportions of opioid-binding sites with beta-chlorn-altrexamine demonstrated that there were few spare receptors, which is in contrast to what has been reported for other G protein-coupled receptors, including the delta-opioid receptor. Taken together, these data suggest that the opioid agonist DAMGO has a high affinity for the mu receptor but must occupy > 70% of the available receptors to generate the maximal second messenger-linked response.

  12. The two subtype 1 somatostatin receptors of rainbow trout, Tsst1A and Tsst1B, possess both distinct and overlapping ligand binding and agonist-induced regulation features.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun-Yang; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Slagter, Barton J; Sheridan, Mark A

    2004-07-01

    In the present study, two isoforms of somatostatin receptor subtype one, previously obtained from the brain of rainbow trout, Tsst1A and Tsst1B, were stably transfected in the Chinese hamster ovary cell line (CHO-K1) and their binding properties were characterized. High affinity binding of somatostatin by expressed receptors was saturable and ligand selective. Both Tsst1A and Tsst1B preferentially bound peptides derived from preprosomatostatin I (PPSS I; e.g., SS-14-I) over those derived from PPSS II (containing Tyr7, Gly10-SS-14-I at their C-terminus; e.g., SS-25-II). The rank order of ligand affinities for Tsst1A was SS-28-I>SS-14-I>SS-26-I?SS-28-II>SS-14-II>SS-25-II. The rank order for Tsst1B was SS-14-I>SS-28-I>SS-26-1?SS-28-II>SS-25-II>SS-14-II. Agonist-induced regulation of Tsst1A and Tsst1B was also investigated. After 30 min of SS-14-I exposure, both Tsst1A and Tsst1B underwent rapid internalization; ca. 60% of membrane Tsst1A was internalized and only about 40% of membrane Tsst1B was internalized. Prolonged agonist exposure (up to 48 h) induced up-regulation of membrane-expressed Tsst1A, but had no effect on Tsst1B. These results indicate that Tsst1s display both distinct and overlapping ligand binding and agonist-induced regulation features. Such features may form the basis of ligand-selection and have important consequences on target organ responsiveness. PMID:15253878

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonist-induced down-regulation of hepatic glucocorticoid receptor expression in SD rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiang; Li Ming; Sun Weiping; Bi Yan; Cai Mengyin; Liang Hua; Yu Qiuqiong; He Xiaoying; Weng Jianping

    2008-04-18

    It was reported that glucocorticoid production was inhibited by fenofibrate through suppression of type-1 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression in liver. The inhibition might be a negative-feedback regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}), which is quickly induced by glucocorticoid in the liver. However, it is not clear if GR expression is changed by fenofibrate-induced PPAR{alpha} activation. In this study, we tested this possibility in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. GR expression was reduced by fenofibrate in a time- and does-dependent manner. The inhibition was observed in liver, but not in fat and muscle. The corticosterone level in the blood was increased significantly by fenofibrate. These effects of fenofibrate were abolished by PPAR{alpha} inhibitor MK886, suggesting that fenofibrate activated through PPAR{alpha}. In conclusion, inhibition of GR expression may represent a new molecular mechanism for the negative feedback regulation of GR activity by PPAR{alpha}.

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates agonist-induced pulmonary edema in mice with targeted disruption of the gene for natriuretic peptide receptor-A

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Whei; Green, Sabrina; Grinnell, Katie L.; Machan, Jason T.; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits agonist-induced pulmonary edema formation, but the signaling pathway responsible is not well defined. To investigate the role of the particulate guanylate cyclase-linked receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), we measured acute lung injury responses in intact mice and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) with normal and disrupted expression of NPR-A. NPR-A wild-type (NPR-A+/+), heterozygous (NPR-A+/−), and knockout (NPR-A−/−) mice were anesthetized and treated with thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lung injury was assessed by lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight and by protein and cell concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. No difference in pulmonary edema formation was seen between NPR-A genotypes under baseline conditions. TRAP and LPS increased lung W/D weight and BAL fluid cell counts more in NPR-A−/− mice than in NPR-A+/− or NPR-A+/+ mice, but no genotype-related differences were seen in TRAP-induced increases in bloodless lung W/D weight or LPS-induced increases in BAL protein concentration. Pretreatment with ANP infusion completely blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and blunted LPS-induced increases in BAL cell counts and protein concentration in both NPR-A−/− and NPR-A+/+ mice. Thrombin decreased transmembrane electrical resistance in monolayers of PMVECs in vitro, and this effect was attenuated by ANP in PMVECs isolated from both genotypes. Administration of the NPR-C-specific ligand, cANF, also blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and LPS-induced increases in BAL cell count and protein concentration in NPR-A+/+ and NPR-A−/− mice. We conclude that ANP is capable of attenuating agonist-induced lung edema in the absence of NPR-A. The protective effect of ANP on agonist-induced lung injury and pulmonary barrier function may be mediated by NPR-C. PMID:23195629

  15. Novel role of cortactin in G protein-coupled receptor agonist-induced nuclear export and degradation of p21Cip1

    PubMed Central

    Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Rao, Gadiparthi N.

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) stimulates phosphorylation of cortactin on Y421 and Y446 residues in a time-dependent manner and phosphorylation at Y446 but not Y421 residue is required for MCP1-induced CDK-interacting protein 1 (p21Cip1) nuclear export and degradation in facilitating human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC) proliferation. In addition, MCP1-induced cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation, p21Cip1 degradation and HASMC proliferation are dependent on Fyn activation. Upstream to Fyn, MCP1 stimulated C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) and Gi/o and inhibition of either one of these molecules using their specific antagonists or inhibitors attenuated MCP1-induced cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation, p21Cip1 degradation and HASMC proliferation. Cortactin phosphorylation at Y446 residue is also required for another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonist, thrombin-induced p21Cip1 nuclear export and its degradation in promoting HASMC proliferation. Quite interestingly, the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) agonist, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-induced p21Cip1 degradation and HASMC proliferation do not require cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation. Together, these findings demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin at Y446 residue is selective for only GPCR but not RTK agonist-induced nuclear export and proteolytic degradation of p21Cip1 in HASMC proliferation. PMID:27363897

  16. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca(2+) signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca(2+) overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca(2+) signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  17. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P.; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca2+ signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca2+ overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca2+ signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca2+ oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  18. Block of NMDA receptor channels by endogenous neurosteroids: implications for the agonist induced conformational states of the channel vestibule

    PubMed Central

    Vyklicky, Vojtech; Krausova, Barbora; Cerny, Jiri; Balik, Ales; Zapotocky, Martin; Novotny, Marian; Lichnerova, Katarina; Smejkalova, Tereza; Kaniakova, Martina; Korinek, Miloslav; Petrovic, Milos; Kacer, Petr; Horak, Martin; Chodounska, Hana; Vyklicky, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate synaptic plasticity, and their dysfunction is implicated in multiple brain disorders. NMDARs can be allosterically modulated by numerous compounds, including endogenous neurosteroid pregnanolone sulfate. Here, we identify the molecular basis of the use-dependent and voltage-independent inhibitory effect of neurosteroids on NMDAR responses. The site of action is located at the extracellular vestibule of the receptor’s ion channel pore and is accessible after receptor activation. Mutations in the extracellular vestibule in the SYTANLAAF motif disrupt the inhibitory effect of negatively charged steroids. In contrast, positively charged steroids inhibit mutated NMDAR responses in a voltage-dependent manner. These results, in combination with molecular modeling, characterize structure details of the open configuration of the NMDAR channel. Our results provide a unique opportunity for the development of new therapeutic neurosteroid-based ligands to treat diseases associated with dysfunction of the glutamate system. PMID:26086919

  19. Increase in caveolae and caveolin-1 expression modulates agonist-induced contraction and store- and receptor-operated Ca(2+) entry in pulmonary arteries of pulmonary hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hai-Xia; Mu, Yun-Ping; Gui, Long-Xin; Yan, Fu-Rong; Lin, Da-Cen; Sham, James S K; Lin, Mo-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a major component protein associated with caveolae in the plasma membrane and has been identified as a regulator of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and receptor-operated Ca(2+) entry (ROCE). However, the contributions of caveolae/Cav-1 of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) to the altered Ca(2+) signaling pathways in pulmonary arteries (PAs) during pulmonary hypertension (PH) have not been fully characterized. The present study quantified caveolae number and Cav-1 expression, and determined the effects of caveolae disruption on ET-1, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and 1-Oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol (OAG)-induced contraction in PAs and Ca(2+) influx in PASMCs of chronic hypoxia (CH)- and monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH rats. We found that the number of caveolae, and the Cav-1 mRNA and protein levels were increased significantly in PASMCs in both PH models. Disruption of caveolae by cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) significantly inhibited the contractile response to ET-1, CPA and OAG in PAs of control rats. ET-1, SOCE and ROCE-mediated contractile responses were enhanced, and their susceptibility to MβCD suppression was potentiated in the two PH models. MβCD-induced inhibition was reversed by cholesterol repletion. Introduction of Cav-1 scaffolding domain peptide to mimic Cav-1 upregulation caused significant increase in CPA- and OAG-induced Ca(2+) entry in PASMCs of control, CH and MCT-treated groups. Our results suggest that the increase in caveolae and Cav-1 expression in PH contributes to the enhanced agonist-induced contraction of PA via modulation of SOCE and ROCE; and targeting caveolae/Cav-1 in PASMCs may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PH. PMID:27311393

  20. mGlu2/3 agonist-induced hyperthermia: an in vivo assay for detection of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonism and its relation to antidepressant-like efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gleason, S D; Li, X; Smith, I A; Ephlin, J D; Wang, X-S; Heinz, B A; Carter, J H; Baez, M; Yu, J; Bender, D M; Witkin, J M

    2013-08-01

    An assay to detect the on-target effects of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists in vivo would be valuable in guiding dosing regimens for the exploration of biological effects of potential therapeutic import. Multiple approaches involving blockade of mGlu2/3 receptor agoinist-driven behavioral effects in mice and rats were investigated. Most of these methods failed to provide a useful method of detection of antagonists in vivo (e.g., locomotor activity). In contrast, the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 produced dose-dependent increases in body temperature of mice. The hyperthermic effects of LY379268 was abolished in mGlu2 and in mGlu2/3 receptor null mice but not in mGlu3 null mice. Hyperthermia was not produced by an mGlu8 receptor agonist. Agonist-induced hyperthermia was prevented in a dose-dependent manner by structurally-distinct mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists. The blockade was stereo-specific. Moreover, this biological readout was responsive to both orthosteric and to negative allosteric modulators of mGlu2/3 receptors. Antagonism of agonist-induced hyperthermia predicted antidepressant-like efficacy in the mouse forced swim test. As with the hyperthermic response, the antidepressant-like effects of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists were shown to be due to mGlu2 and not to mGlu3 or mGlu8 receptors through the use of receptor knock-out mice. The ability to rapidly assess on-target activity of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists enables determination of parameters for setting efficacy doses in vivo. In turn, efficacy-related data in the preclinical laboratory can help to set expectations of therapeutic potential and dosing in humans. PMID:23574174

  1. Yokukansan Increases 5-HT1A Receptors in the Prefrontal Cortex and Enhances 5-HT1A Receptor Agonist-Induced Behavioral Responses in Socially Isolated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Yamaguchi, Takuji; Nishi, Akinori; Ikarashi, Yasushi; Hattori, Tomohisa; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The traditional Japanese medicine yokukansan has an anxiolytic effect, which occurs after repeated administration. In this study, to investigate the underlying mechanisms, we examined the effects of repeated yokukansan administration on serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor density and affinity and its expression at both mRNA and protein levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of socially isolated mice. Moreover, we examined the effects of yokukansan on a 5-HT1A receptor-mediated behavioral response. Male mice were subjected to social isolation stress for 6 weeks and simultaneously treated with yokukansan. Thereafter, the density and affinity of 5-HT1A receptors were analyzed by a receptor-binding assay. Levels of 5-HT1A receptor protein and mRNA were also measured. Furthermore, (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT; a 5-HT1A receptor agonist) was injected intraperitoneally, and rearing behavior was examined. Social isolation stress alone did not affect 5-HT1A receptor density or affinity. However, yokukansan significantly increased receptor density and decreased affinity concomitant with unchanged protein and mRNA levels. Yokukansan also enhanced the 8-OH-DPAT-induced decrease in rearing behavior. These results suggest that yokukansan increases 5-HT1A receptors in the PFC of socially isolated mice and enhances their function, which might underlie its anxiolytic effects. PMID:26681968

  2. GABAB1 receptor subunit isoforms exert a differential influence on baseline but not GABAB receptor agonist-induced changes in mice.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Laura H; Bettler, Bernhard; Kaupmann, Klemens; Cryan, John F

    2006-12-01

    GABA(B) receptor agonists produce hypothermia and motor incoordination. Two GABA(B(1)) receptor subunit isoforms exist, but because of lack of specific molecular or pharmacological tools, the relevance of these isoforms in controlling basal body temperature, locomotor activity, or in vivo responses to GABA(B) receptor agonists has been unknown. Here, we used mice deficient in the GABA(B(1a)) and GABA(B(1b)) subunit isoforms to examine the influence of these isoforms on both baseline motor behavior and body temperature and on the motor-incoordinating and hypothermic responses to the GABA(B) receptor agonists l-baclofen and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). GABA(B(1b))(-/-) mice were hyperactive in a novel environment and showed slower habituation than either GABA(B(1a))(-/-) or wild-type mice. GABA(B(1b))(-/-) mice were hyperactive throughout the circadian dark phase. Hypothermia in response to l-baclofen (6 and 12 mg/kg) or GHB (1 g/kg), baclofen-induced ataxia as determined on the fixed-speed Rotarod, and GHB-induced hypolocomotion were significantly, but for the most part similarly, attenuated in both GABA(B(1a))(-/-) and GABA(B(1b))(-/-) mice. We conclude that l-baclofen and GHB are nonselective for either GABA(B(1)) receptor isoform in terms of in vivo responses. However, GABA(B(1)) receptor isoforms have distinct and different roles in mediating locomotor behavioral responses to a novel environment. Therefore, GABA(B(1a)) and GABA(B(1b)) isoforms are functionally relevant molecular variants of the GABA(B(1)) receptor subunit, which are differentially involved in specific neurophysiological processes and behaviors.

  3. Impact of D2 Receptor Internalization on Binding Affinity of Neuroimaging Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ningning; Guo, Wen; Kralikova, Michaela; Jiang, Man; Schieren, Ira; Narendran, Raj; Slifstein, Mark; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Laruelle, Marc; Javitch, Jonathan A; Rayport, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic dopamine (DA) levels seem to affect the in vivo binding of many D2 receptor radioligands. Thus, release of endogenous DA induced by the administration of amphetamine decreases ligand binding, whereas DA depletion increases binding. This is generally thought to be due to competition between endogenous DA and the radioligands for D2 receptors. However, the temporal discrepancy between amphetamine-induced increases in DA as measured by microdialysis, which last on the order of 2 h, and the prolonged decrease in ligand binding, which lasts up to a day, has suggested that agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization may contribute to the sustained decrease in D2 receptor-binding potential seen following a DA surge. To test this hypothesis, we developed an in vitro system showing robust agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization following treatment with the agonist quinpirole. Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were stably co-transfected with human D2 receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and arrestin 3. Agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and radioligand competition binding. The binding of seven D2 antagonists and four agonists to the surface and internalized receptors was measured in intact cells. All the imaging ligands bound with high affinity to both surface and internalized D2 receptors. Affinity of most of the ligands to internalized receptors was modestly lower, indicating that internalization would reduce the binding potential measured in imaging studies carried out with these ligands. However, between-ligand differences in the magnitude of the internalization-associated affinity shift only partly accounted for the data obtained in neuroimaging experiments, suggesting the involvement of mechanisms beyond competition and internalization. PMID:19956086

  4. Evidence for the participation of peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors in GABAA agonists-induced nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Hernández, Mariana; Feria-Morales, Luis Alberto; Torres-López, Jorge Elías; Cervantes-Durán, Claudia; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Rocha-González, Héctor Isaac

    2014-07-01

    The activation of GABAA receptor by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) in primary afferent fibers produces depolarization. In normal conditions this depolarization causes a reduction in the release of neurotransmitters. Therefore, this depolarization remains inhibitory. However, previous studies have suggested that in inflammatory pain, GABA shifts its signaling from inhibition to excitation by an increased GABA-induced depolarization. The contribution of peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors to the inflammatory pain is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible pronociceptive role of peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors in the formalin test. Formalin (0.5%) injection into the dorsum of the right hind paw produced flinching behavior in rats. Ipsilateral local peripheral pre-treatment (-10min) with exogenous GABA (0.003-0.03µg/paw) or common GABAA receptor agonists muscimol (0.003-0.03µg/paw), diazepam (0.017-0.056µg/paw) or phenobarbital (1-100µg/paw) significantly increased 0.5% formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. The pronociceptive effects of GABA (0.03µg/paw), muscimol (0.03µg/paw), diazepam (0.056µg/paw) and phenobarbital (100µg/paw) were prevented by either the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (0.01-0.1µg/paw) or selective α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptor inverse agonist L-655,708 (0.017-0.17µg/paw). The α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptor protein was expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and dorsal spinal cord of naïve rats. The formalin injection did not modify α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptor expression. Overall, these results suggest that peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors play a pronociceptive role in the rat formalin test. PMID:24726872

  5. Rapid agonist-induced loss of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin opioid receptor sites in NG108-15, but not SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, R.I.; Lameh, J.; Sadee, W. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have measured {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites on intact SK-N-SH and NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells, respectively, in culture. Use of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin ({beta}E) as a tracer, together with {beta}E(6-31) to block high-affinity non-opioid binding in both cell lines, permitted the measurement of cell surface {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites. Labeling was at {delta} sites in NG108-15 cells and predominantly at {mu} sites in SK-N-SH cells. Pretreatment with the {mu} and {delta} agonist, DADLE, caused a rapid loss of cell surface {delta} receptor sites in NG108-15 cells, but failed to reduce significantly {mu} receptor density in SK-N-SH cells.

  6. Non-NMDA and NMDA receptor agonists induced excitation and their differential effect in activation of superior salivatory nucleus neurons in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Oskutyte, Diana; Satoh, Yoshihide; Murakami, Toshiki

    2008-02-29

    We investigated the effects of the ionophoretic application of ionotropic non-NMDA receptor agonist (AMPA) and NMDA receptor agonist (NMDA) on extracellularly recorded and antidromically identified superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) neurons. A great majority (93%) of SSN neurons was induced to fire by ionophoretic application of AMPA, and they were classified into high firing rate (more than 6 spikes/s), and low firing rate (less than 3 spikes/s) neurons. No clear differences were found between high firing rate and low firing rate neurons according their fibre type and histological locations. Of the SSN neurons that excited by AMPA, 22% (4/18) and 50% (5/9) of the neurons also were induced to fire following ionophoretic application of the NMDA receptor agonist NMDA in different concentrations, 20 mM and 100 mM, respectively. In neurons that induced firing by AMPA and by NMDA, AMPA-evoked firings were induced by the lower intensities of applied current and had higher mean firing rates than NMDA-evoked firing. Neurons that were induced firing by AMPA and by NMDA had B fibre and C fibre axons as well as those that induced firing only by AMPA. Neurons that were fired only by AMPA were found in whole SSN area, whereas neurons that were induced firing by AMPA and by NMDA were mainly found in intermediate SSN area. In conclusion, activation of ionotoropic non-NMDA receptor has a greater excitatory effect on the SSN neurons than that of ionotropic of NMDA receptor. Our data support the view that non-NMDA receptor plays a major role, whereas NMDA receptor plays a minor role, in the activation of SSN neurons.

  7. Using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) to Characterize Agonist-Induced Arrestin Recruitment to Modified and Unmodified G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Donthamsetti, Prashant; Quejada, Jose Rafael; Javitch, Jonathan A; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Lambert, Nevin A

    2015-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent ∼25% of current drug targets. Ligand binding to these receptors activates G proteins and arrestins, which are involved in differential signaling pathways. Because functionally selective or biased ligands activate one of these two pathways, they may be superior medications for certain diseases states. The identification of such ligands requires robust drug screening assays for both G protein and arrestin activity. This unit describes protocols for two bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based assays used to monitor arrestin recruitment to GPCRs. One assay requires modification of GPCRs by fusion to a BRET donor or acceptor moiety, whereas the other can detect arrestin recruitment to unmodified GPCRs.

  8. Using bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET) to characterize agonist-induced arrestin recruitment to modified and unmodified G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)

    PubMed Central

    Donthamsetti, Prashant; Quejada, Jose Rafael; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Lambert, Nevin A.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent ~25% of current drug targets. Ligand binding to these receptors activates G proteins and arrestins, which are involved in differential signaling pathways. Functionally selective or biased ligands activate one of these two pathways and may be superior medications for certain diseases states. The identification of these ligands requires robust drug screening assays for both G protein and arrestin activity. Here we describe in detail the technical aspects of two bioluminescence resonance energy (BRET)-based assays that can be used to monitor arrestin recruitment to GPCRs. One assay requires modification of GPCRs by fusion to a BRET donor or acceptor moiety, whereas the other can detect recruitment of arrestin to unmodified GPCRs. PMID:26331887

  9. The role of D1 and D2 receptors in dopamine agonist-induced modulation of affective defense behavior in the cat.

    PubMed

    Sweidan, S; Edinger, H; Siegel, A

    1990-07-01

    The role of D1 and D2 dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes in mediating DAergic modulation of affective defense behavior in the cat has been investigated in the present study. Feline affective defense, characterized mainly by autonomic arousal, ear retraction, hissing and paw striking, was elicited by electrical stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamus. Following the establishment of a stable threshold current for eliciting the hissing response of the behavior, the effect of systemic (IP) administration of various DAergic agonists and antagonists on the hissing threshold was determined. The injection of the nonselective DA agonist apomorphine (1.0, 0.3 and 0.1 mg/kg) facilitated hissing in a dose-related manner. This effect was mimicked by the D-2 selective agonist LY 171555 (0.1, 0.03 and 0.01 mg/kg) but not by the D1-selective agonist SKF 38393 (1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg), and was blocked by the nonselective and the D2-selective antagonists haloperidol (0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg) and spiperone (0.2 mg/kg), respectively. The D1-selective antagonist SCH 23390 blocked apomorphine-induced facilitation only at a high dose (0.5 mg/kg). In addition, the injection of haloperidol (1.0 mg/kg), spiperone (0.2 mg/kg) or SCH 23390 (0.1 mg/kg) alone inhibited the behavior. It was therefore concluded that DAergic facilitation of affective defense behavior is mainly mediated by the D2 receptors, but that activation of the D1 receptors may play a "permissive" role. The interaction between the D1 and D2 receptors in mediating this facilitation and the behavioral specificity of the effect are discussed. PMID:1974065

  10. Receptor-Selective Agonists Induce Emesis and Fos Expression in the Brain and Enteric Nervous System of the Least Shrew (Cryptotis parva)

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Andrew P.; Chebolu, Seetha; Darmani, Nissar A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on the mechanisms of emesis has implicated multiple neurotransmitters via both central (dorsal vagal complex) and peripheral (enteric neurons and enterochromaffin cells) anatomical substrates. Taking advantage of advances in receptor-specific agonists, and utilizing Fos expression as a functional activity marker, this study demonstrates a strong, but incomplete, overlap in anatomical substrates for a variety of emetogens. We used cisplatin and specific agonists to 5-HT3 serotonergic, D2/D3 dopaminergic, and NK1 tachykininergic receptors to induce vomiting in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva), and quantified the resulting Fos expression. The least shrew is a small mammal whose responses to emetic challenges are very similar to its human counterparts. In all cases, the enteric nervous system, nucleus of the solitary tract, and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus demonstrated significantly increased Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-IR). However, Fos-IR induction was notably absent from the area postrema following the dopaminergic and NK1 receptor-specific agents. Two brain nuclei not usually discussed regarding emesis, the dorsal raphe nucleus and paraventricular thalamic nucleus, also demonstrated increased emesis-related Fos-IR. Taken together, these data suggest the dorsal vagal complex is part of a common pathway for a variety of distinct emetogens, but there are central emetic substrates, both medullary and diencephalic, that can be accessed without directly stimulating the area postrema. PMID:19699757

  11. Administration of caffeine inhibited adenosine receptor agonist-induced decreases in motor performance, thermoregulation, and brain neurotransmitter release in exercising rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xinyan; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of an adenosine receptor agonist on caffeine-induced changes in thermoregulation, neurotransmitter release in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, and endurance exercise performance in rats. One hour before the start of exercise, rats were intraperitoneally injected with either saline alone (SAL), 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine and saline (CAF), a non-selective adenosine receptor agonist (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine [NECA]: 0.5 mg kg(-1)) and saline (NECA), or the combination of caffeine and NECA (CAF+NECA). Rats ran until fatigue on the treadmill with a 5% grade at a speed of 18 m min(-1) at 23 °C. Compared to the SAL group, the run time to fatigue (RTTF) was significantly increased by 52% following caffeine administration and significantly decreased by 65% following NECA injection (SAL: 91 ± 14.1 min; CAF: 137 ± 25.8 min; NECA: 31 ± 13.7 min; CAF+NECA: 85 ± 11.8 min; p<0.05). NECA decreased the core body temperature (Tcore), oxygen consumption, which is an index of heat production, tail skin temperature, which is an index of heat loss, and extracellular dopamine (DA) release at rest and during exercise. Furthermore, caffeine injection inhibited the NECA-induced decreases in the RTTF, Tcore, heat production, heat loss, and extracellular DA release. Neither caffeine nor NECA affected extracellular noradrenaline or serotonin release. These results support the findings of previous studies showing improved endurance performance and overrides in body limitations after caffeine administration, and imply that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may be associated with the adenosine receptor blockade-induced increases in brain DA release.

  12. Administration of caffeine inhibited adenosine receptor agonist-induced decreases in motor performance, thermoregulation, and brain neurotransmitter release in exercising rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xinyan; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of an adenosine receptor agonist on caffeine-induced changes in thermoregulation, neurotransmitter release in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, and endurance exercise performance in rats. One hour before the start of exercise, rats were intraperitoneally injected with either saline alone (SAL), 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine and saline (CAF), a non-selective adenosine receptor agonist (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine [NECA]: 0.5 mg kg(-1)) and saline (NECA), or the combination of caffeine and NECA (CAF+NECA). Rats ran until fatigue on the treadmill with a 5% grade at a speed of 18 m min(-1) at 23 °C. Compared to the SAL group, the run time to fatigue (RTTF) was significantly increased by 52% following caffeine administration and significantly decreased by 65% following NECA injection (SAL: 91 ± 14.1 min; CAF: 137 ± 25.8 min; NECA: 31 ± 13.7 min; CAF+NECA: 85 ± 11.8 min; p<0.05). NECA decreased the core body temperature (Tcore), oxygen consumption, which is an index of heat production, tail skin temperature, which is an index of heat loss, and extracellular dopamine (DA) release at rest and during exercise. Furthermore, caffeine injection inhibited the NECA-induced decreases in the RTTF, Tcore, heat production, heat loss, and extracellular DA release. Neither caffeine nor NECA affected extracellular noradrenaline or serotonin release. These results support the findings of previous studies showing improved endurance performance and overrides in body limitations after caffeine administration, and imply that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may be associated with the adenosine receptor blockade-induced increases in brain DA release. PMID:26604076

  13. Agonist-induced activation of histamine H3 receptor signals to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 through PKC-, PLD-, and EGFR-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiangru; Ye, Lingyan; Liao, Yuan; Jin, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Bing; Sun, Yi; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-04-01

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3R), abundantly expressed in the central and the peripheral nervous system, has been recognized as a promising target for the treatment of various important CNS diseases including narcolepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The H3R acts via Gi/o -proteins to inhibit adenylate cyclase activity and modulate MAPK activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for H3R mediation of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) remain to be elucidated. In this study, using HEK293 cells stably expressing human H3R and mouse primary cortical neurons endogenously expressing mouse H3R, we found that the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2 was significantly blocked by both the pertussis toxin and the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Upon stimulation by H3R agonist histamine or imetit, H3R was shown to rapidly induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation via PLC/PKC-, PLDs-, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation-dependent pathways. Furthermore, it was also indicated that while the βγ-subunits play a key role in H3R-activated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, β-arrestins were not required for ERK1/2 activation. In addition, when the cultured mouse cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation conditions (OGD), imetit exhibited neuroprotective properties through the H3R. Treatment of cells with the inhibitor UO126 abolished these protective effects. This suggests a possible neuroprotective role of the H3R-mediated ERK1/2 pathway under hypoxia conditions. These observations may provide new insights into the pharmacological effects and the physiological functions modulated by the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2. Histamine H3 receptors are abundantly expressed in the brain and play important roles in various CNS physiological functions. However, the underlying mechanisms for H3R-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 remain largely unknown. Here

  14. Agonist-induced activation of histamine H3 receptor signals to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 through PKC-, PLD-, and EGFR-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiangru; Ye, Lingyan; Liao, Yuan; Jin, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Bing; Sun, Yi; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-04-01

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3R), abundantly expressed in the central and the peripheral nervous system, has been recognized as a promising target for the treatment of various important CNS diseases including narcolepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The H3R acts via Gi/o -proteins to inhibit adenylate cyclase activity and modulate MAPK activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for H3R mediation of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) remain to be elucidated. In this study, using HEK293 cells stably expressing human H3R and mouse primary cortical neurons endogenously expressing mouse H3R, we found that the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2 was significantly blocked by both the pertussis toxin and the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Upon stimulation by H3R agonist histamine or imetit, H3R was shown to rapidly induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation via PLC/PKC-, PLDs-, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation-dependent pathways. Furthermore, it was also indicated that while the βγ-subunits play a key role in H3R-activated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, β-arrestins were not required for ERK1/2 activation. In addition, when the cultured mouse cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation conditions (OGD), imetit exhibited neuroprotective properties through the H3R. Treatment of cells with the inhibitor UO126 abolished these protective effects. This suggests a possible neuroprotective role of the H3R-mediated ERK1/2 pathway under hypoxia conditions. These observations may provide new insights into the pharmacological effects and the physiological functions modulated by the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2. Histamine H3 receptors are abundantly expressed in the brain and play important roles in various CNS physiological functions. However, the underlying mechanisms for H3R-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 remain largely unknown. Here

  15. DCG-IV but not other group-II metabotropic receptor agonists induces microglial BDNF mRNA expression in the rat striatum. Correlation with neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Venero, J L; Santiago, M; Tomás-Camardiel, M; Matarredona, E R; Cano, J; Machado, A

    2002-01-01

    We have previously described a neuroprotective action of (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2'3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV), an agonist for group-II metabotropic receptors, on dopaminergic nerve terminals against the degeneration induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). This effect was accompanied by an up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in the rat striatum. We have now analyzed the phenotypic nature of the BDNF mRNA-expressing cells in response to intrastriatal injection of DCG-IV. Dual in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that microglial cells but not astrocytes were responsible for this induction. Subsequent analysis demonstrated that this effect was accompanied by striking loss of striatal glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) mRNA and massive appearance of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis. A dose-response study demonstrated that doses of DCG-IV as low as 5 nmol was very toxic in terms GAD mRNA and apoptosis. 0.5 nmol of DCG-IV did not induce toxicity at all in terms of GAD mRNA and apoptosis. Activation of group-II metabotropic receptors in striatum with N-Acetyl-Asp-Glu (NAAG; a mGlu3 agonist) and (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (a mGlu2 and mGlu3 agonist) did not induce neither loss of GAD mRNA nor appearance of apoptosis (doses up to 20 nmol). In additional experiments, NAAG, in contrast to DCG-IV, failed to protect the striatal dopaminergic system against the degeneration induced by MPP+ as studied by microdialysis. Finally, we studied the mechanism by which DCG-IV is highly toxic. For that, selective antagonists of either metabotropic--(R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine and LY 341495--or ionotropic (N-methyl-D-aspartate, NMDA)--DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP-5) glutamate receptors --were co-administered with DCG-IV. Only AP-5 highly protected the striatum against the degeneration induced by DCG-IV. Since DCG-IV also activates the NMDA receptor at

  16. 86Rb+ Efflux Mediated by α4β2*-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors with High and Low Sensitivity to Stimulation by Acetylcholine Display Similar Agonist-Induced Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael J.; Meinerz, Natalie M.; Brown, Robert W. B.; Collins, Allan C.

    2010-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) assembled from α4 and β2 subunits are the most densely expressed subtype in the brain. Concentration-effect curves for agonist activation of α4β2*-nAChR are biphasic. This biphasic agonist sensitivity is ascribed to differences in subunit stoichiometry. The studies described here evaluated desensitization elicited by low concentrations of epibatidine, nicotine, cytisine or methylcarbachol of brain α4β2-nAChR function measured with acetylcholine stimulated 86Rb+ efflux from mouse thalamic synaptosomes. Each agonist elicited concentration-dependent desensitization. The agonists differed in potency. However, IC50 values for each agonist for desensitization of 86Rb+ efflux both with high (EC50≈3 μM) and low (EC50≈ 150 μM) acetylcholine sensitivity were not significantly different. Concentrations required to elicit desensitization were higher that their respective KD values for receptor binding. Even though the two components of α4β2*-nAChR mediated 86Rb+ efflux from mouse brain differ markedly in EC50 values for agonist activation, they are equally sensitive to desensitization by exposure to low agonist concentrations. Mice were also chronically treated with nicotine by continuous infusion of 0, 0.5 or 4.0 mg/kg/hr and desensitization induced by nicotine was evaluated. Consistent with previous results, chronic nicotine treatment increased the density of epibatidine binding sites. Acute exposure to nicotine also elicited concentration-dependent desensitization of both high sensitivity and low sensitivity acetylcholine-stimulated 86Rb+ efflux from cortical and thalamic synaptosomes. Although chronic nicotine treatment reduced maximal 86Rb+ efflux from thalamus, IC50 values in both brain regions were unaffected by chronic nicotine treatment. PMID:20599770

  17. GLYX-13, a NMDA receptor glycine-site functional partial agonist, induces antidepressant-like effects without ketamine-like side effects.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Nicholson, Katherine L; Balster, Robert L; Leander, J David; Stanton, Patric K; Gross, Amanda L; Kroes, Roger A; Moskal, Joseph R

    2013-04-01

    Recent human clinical studies with the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine have revealed profound and long-lasting antidepressant effects with rapid onset in several clinical trials, but antidepressant effects were preceded by dissociative side effects. Here we show that GLYX-13, a novel NMDAR glycine-site functional partial agonist, produces an antidepressant-like effect in the Porsolt, novelty induced hypophagia, and learned helplessness tests in rats without exhibiting substance abuse-related, gating, and sedative side effects of ketamine in the drug discrimination, conditioned place preference, pre-pulse inhibition and open-field tests. Like ketamine, the GLYX-13-induced antidepressant-like effects required AMPA/kainate receptor activation, as evidenced by the ability of NBQX to abolish the antidepressant-like effect. Both GLYX-13 and ketamine persistently (24 h) enhanced the induction of long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission and the magnitude of NMDAR-NR2B conductance at rat Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in vitro. Cell surface biotinylation studies showed that both GLYX-13 and ketamine led to increases in both NR2B and GluR1 protein levels, as measured by Western analysis, whereas no changes were seen in mRNA expression (microarray and qRT-PCR). GLYX-13, unlike ketamine, produced its antidepressant-like effect when injected directly into the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). These results suggest that GLYX-13 produces an antidepressant-like effect without the side effects seen with ketamine at least in part by directly modulating NR2B-containing NMDARs in the MPFC. Furthermore, the enhancement of 'metaplasticity' by both GLYX-13 and ketamine may help explain the long-lasting antidepressant effects of these NMDAR modulators. GLYX-13 is currently in a Phase II clinical development program for treatment-resistant depression. PMID:23303054

  18. Engineered G protein coupled receptors reveal independent regulation of internalization, desensitization and acute signaling

    PubMed Central

    Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Lieberman, Michael D; Elliott, Heather H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    Background The physiological regulation of G protein-coupled receptors, through desensitization and internalization, modulates the length of the receptor signal and may influence the development of tolerance and dependence in response to chronic drug treatment. To explore the importance of receptor regulation, we engineered a series of Gi-coupled receptors that differ in signal length, degree of agonist-induced internalization, and ability to induce adenylyl cyclase superactivation. All of these receptors, based on the kappa opioid receptor, were modified to be receptors activated solely by synthetic ligands (RASSLs). This modification allows us to compare receptors that have the same ligands and effectors, but differ only in desensitization and internalization. Results Removal of phosphorylation sites in the C-terminus of the RASSL resulted in a mutant that was resistant to internalization and less prone to desensitization. Replacement of the C-terminus of the RASSL with the corresponding portion of the mu opioid receptor eliminated the induction of AC superactivation, without disrupting agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. Surprisingly, removal of phosphorylation sites from this chimera resulted in a receptor that is constitutively internalized, even in the absence of agonist. However, the receptor still signals and desensitizes in response to agonist, indicating normal G-protein coupling and partial membrane expression. Conclusions These studies reveal that internalization, desensitization and adenylyl cyclase superactivation, all processes that decrease chronic Gi-receptor signals, are independently regulated. Furthermore, specific mutations can radically alter superactivation or internalization without affecting the efficacy of acute Gi signaling. These mutant RASSLs will be useful for further elucidating the temporal dynamics of the signaling of G protein-coupled receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15707483

  19. Lowering bile acid pool size with a synthetic farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist induces obesity and diabetes through reduced energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Horai, Yasushi; Houten, Sander M; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Sugizaki, Taichi; Arita, Eri; Mataki, Chikage; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tanigawara, Yusuke; Schoonjans, Kristina; Itoh, Hiroshi; Auwerx, Johan

    2011-07-29

    We evaluated the metabolic impact of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation by administering a synthetic FXR agonist (GW4064) to mice in which obesity was induced by a high fat diet. Administration of GW4064 accentuated body weight gain and glucose intolerance induced by the high fat diet and led to a pronounced worsening of the changes in liver and adipose tissue. Mechanistically, treatment with GW4064 decreased bile acid (BA) biosynthesis, BA pool size, and energy expenditure, whereas reconstitution of the BA pool in these GW4064-treated animals by BA administration dose-dependently reverted the metabolic abnormalities. Our data therefore suggest that activation of FXR with synthetic agonists is not useful for long term management of the metabolic syndrome, as it reduces the BA pool size and subsequently decreases energy expenditure, translating as weight gain and insulin resistance. In contrast, expansion of the BA pool size, which can be achieved by BA administration, could be an interesting strategy to manage the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Preferential involvement of mitochondria in Toll-like receptor 3 agonist-induced neuroblastoma cell apoptosis, but not in inhibition of cell growth.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Tai, Ming-Hong; Liou, Chia-Wei; Huang, Sheng-Teng; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Hung-Yi; Wang, Pei-Wen

    2012-04-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) can mediate its therapeutic effect through Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) expressed on tumor cells including neuroblastoma. We used synthetic dsRNA polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)] as a TLR3 agonist to treat TLR3-expressing SK-N-AS neuroblatoma (NB) cells. We found up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins glucose-regulated protein 78 and inositol-requiring enzyme 1. Bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of ER function, effectively blocked poly(I:C)-induced activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3, MnSOD and glutathione peroxidase 1 and reduced poly(I:C)-induced SK-N-AS apoptosis. Pan caspase inhibitor and inhibitor of caspase-9, but not of caspase-8, inhibited poly(I:C)-induced activated caspase-3 expression. Rho zero (ρ(0))-SK-N-AS cells were resistant to poly(I:C)-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis, but not to inhibition of cell growth, as compared to parent SK-N-AS cells. Taking together, these findings suggest that mitochondria are preferentially involved in poly(I:C)-induced NB cell apoptosis, but not in inhibition of cell growth. A crosstalk between mitochondria and ER is implicated.

  1. A pivotal role of FOS-mediated BECN1/Beclin 1 upregulation in dopamine D2 and D3 receptor agonist-induced autophagy activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Da; Cao, Yu-Lan; Li, Qian; Yang, Ya-Ping; Jin, Mengmeng; Chen, Dong; Wang, Fen; Wang, Guang-Hui; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). BECN1/Beclin 1 acts as a critical regulator of autophagy and other cellular processes; yet, little is known about the function and regulation of BECN1 in PD. In this study, we report that dopamine D2 and D3 receptor (DRD2 and DRD3) activation by pramipexole and quinpirole could enhance BECN1 transcription and promote autophagy activation in several cell lines, including PC12, MES23.5 and differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, and also in tyrosine hydroxylase positive primary midbrain neurons. Moreover, we identified a novel FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog) binding sequence (5′-TGCCTCA-3′) in the rat and human Becn1/BECN1 promoter and uncovered an essential role of FOS binding in the enhancement of Becn1 transcription in PC12 cells in response to the dopamine agonist(s). In addition, we demonstrated a critical role of intracellular Ca2+ elevation, followed by the enhanced phosphorylation of CAMK4 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) and CREB (cAMP responsive element binding protein) in the increases of FOS expression and autophagy activity. More importantly, pramipexole treatment ameliorated the SNCA/α-synuclein accumulation in rotenone-treated PC12 cells that overexpress wild-type or A53T mutant SNCA by promoting autophagy flux. This effect was also demonstrated in the substantia nigra and the striatum of SNCAA53T transgenic mice. The inhibition of SNCA accumulation by pramipexole was attenuated by cotreatment with the DRD2 and DRD3 antagonists and Becn1 siRNAs. Thus, our findings suggest that DRD2 and DRD3 agonist(s) may induce autophagy activation via a BECN1-dependent pathway and have the potential to reduce SNCA accumulation in PD. PMID:26649942

  2. Intrinsic relative activities of κ opioid agonists in activating Gα proteins and internalizing receptor: Differences between human and mouse receptors.

    PubMed

    DiMattio, Kelly M; Ehlert, Frederick J; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-08-15

    Several investigators recently identified biased κ opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [(35)S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi-G) and receptor internalization (RAi-I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi-G - logRAi-I, RAi-G/RAi-I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1-17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed.

  3. Intrinsic Relative Activities of Opioid Agonists in Activating Gα proteins and Internalizing Receptor: Differences between Human and Mouse Receptors

    PubMed Central

    DiMattio, Kelly M.; Ehlert, Frederick J.; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators recently identified biased opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi−G) and receptor internalization (RAi−I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi−G − Log RAi−I, RAi−G/RAi−I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1–17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed. PMID:26057692

  4. Role of G Protein–Coupled Receptor Kinases 2 and 3 in μ-Opioid Receptor Desensitization and Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Janet D.; Sanderson, Helen S.; Cooke, Alexandra E.; Ostovar, Mehrnoosh; Tsisanova, Elena; Withey, Sarah L.; Chavkin, Charles; Husbands, Stephen M.; Kelly, Eamonn; Henderson, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    There is ongoing debate about the role of G protein–coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in agonist-induced desensitization of the μ-opioid receptor (MOPr) in brain neurons. In the present paper, we have used a novel membrane-permeable, small-molecule inhibitor of GRK2 and GRK3, Takeda compound 101 (Cmpd101; 3-[[[4-methyl-5-(4-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-yl] methyl] amino]-N-[2-(trifuoromethyl) benzyl] benzamidehydrochloride), to study the involvement of GRK2/3 in acute agonist-induced MOPr desensitization. We observed that Cmpd101 inhibits the desensitization of the G protein–activated inwardly-rectifying potassium current evoked by receptor-saturating concentrations of methionine-enkephalin (Met-Enk), [d-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO), endomorphin-2, and morphine in rat and mouse locus coeruleus (LC) neurons. In LC neurons from GRK3 knockout mice, Met-Enk–induced desensitization was unaffected, implying a role for GRK2 in MOPr desensitization. Quantitative analysis of the loss of functional MOPrs following acute agonist exposure revealed that Cmpd101 only partially reversed MOPr desensitization. Inhibition of extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2, protein kinase C, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, or GRK5 did not inhibit the Cmpd101-insensitive component of desensitization. In HEK 293 cells, Cmpd101 produced almost complete inhibition of DAMGO-induced MOPr phosphorylation at Ser375, arrestin translocation, and MOPr internalization. Our data demonstrate a role for GRK2 (and potentially also GRK3) in agonist-induced MOPr desensitization in the LC, but leave open the possibility that another, as yet unidentified, mechanism of desensitization also exists. PMID:26013542

  5. Rapid internalization and recycling of the human neuropeptide Y Y(1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Gicquiaux, Hervé; Lecat, Sandra; Gaire, Mireille; Dieterlen, Alain; Mély, Yves; Takeda, Kenneth; Bucher, Bernard; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2002-02-22

    Desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) involves receptor phosphorylation and reduction in the number of receptors at the cell surface. The neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y(1) receptor undergoes fast desensitization. We examined agonist-induced signaling and internalization using NPY Y(1) receptors fused to green fluorescent protein (EGFP). When expressed in HEK293 cells, EGFP-hNPY Y(1) receptors were localized at the plasma membrane, desensitized rapidly as assessed using calcium responses, and had similar properties compared to hNPY Y(1) receptors. Upon agonist challenge, the EGFP signal decreased rapidly (t(1/2) = 107 +/- 3 s) followed by a slow recovery. This decrease was blocked by BIBP3226, a Y(1) receptor antagonist, or by pertussis toxin, in agreement with Y(1) receptor activation. Internalization of EGFP-hNPY Y(1) receptors to acidic endosomal compartments likely accounts for the decrease in the EGFP signal, being absent after pretreatment with monensin. Concanavalin A and hypertonic sucrose, which inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis, blocked the decrease in fluorescence. After agonist, intracellular EGFP signals were punctate and co-localized with transferrin-Texas Red, a marker of clathrin-associated internalization and recycling, but not with LysoTracker Red, a lysosomal pathway marker, supporting receptor trafficking to recycling endosomes rather than the late endosomal/lysosomal pathway. Pulse-chase experiments revealed no receptor degradation after internalization. The slow recovery of fluorescence was unaffected by cycloheximide or actinomycin D, indicating that de novo synthesis of receptors was not limiting. Use of a multicompartment model to fit our fluorescence data allows simultaneous determination of internalization and recycling rate constants. We propose that rapid internalization of receptors via the clathrin-coated pits recycling pathway may largely account for the rapid desensitization of NPY Y(1) receptors. PMID:11741903

  6. Comparison of the kinetics and extent of muscarinic M1-M5receptor internalization, recycling and downregulation in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells

    PubMed Central

    Thangaraju, Arunkumar; Sawyer, Gregory W.

    2010-01-01

    We characterized agonist-induced internalization, recycling and downregulation of each muscarinic receptor subtype (M1 – M5) stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The radioligands [3H]QNB and [3H]NMS were used to measure the total and plasma membrane populations of muscarinic receptors, respectively. Following carbachol treatment (1 mM), the rank orders for the rate of carbachol-induced internalization of the muscarinic subtypes were M2 > M4 = M5 > M3 = M1, respectively. Unlike the M2 receptor, M1, M3, M4 and M5 receptors recycled back to the plasma membrane after one-hour carbachol treatment. The receptor downregulation elicited to 24-hour carbachol treatment was similar for M2, M3, M4 and M5 receptors, whereas that for the M1 receptor was greater. Our results indicate that there are subtype-specific differences in the rate and extent of agonist-induced muscarinic receptor internalization, recycling and downregulation in CHO cells. PMID:21044619

  7. Agonist-Activated Bombyx Corazonin Receptor Is Internalized via an Arrestin-Dependent and Clathrin-Independent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingwen; Shen, Zhangfei; Jiang, Xue; Yang, Huipeng; Huang, Haishan; Jin, Lili; Chen, Yajie; Shi, Liangen; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-07-19

    Agonist-induced internalization plays a key role in the tight regulation of the extent and duration of G protein-coupled receptor signaling. Previously, we have shown that the Bombyx corazonin receptor (BmCrzR) activates both Gαq- and Gαs-dependent signaling cascades. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of the internalization and desensitization of BmCrzR remain to be elucidated. Here, vectors for expressing BmCrzR fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) at the C-terminal end were used to further characterize BmCrzR internalization. We found that the BmCrzR heterologously expressed in HEK-293 and BmN cells was rapidly internalized from the plasma membrane into the cytoplasm in a concentration- and time-dependent manner via a β-arrestin (Kurtz)-dependent and clathrin-independent pathway in response to agonist challenge. While most of the internalized receptors were recycled to the cell surface via early endosomes, some others were transported to lysosomes for degradation. Assays using RNA interference revealed that both GRK2 and GRK5 were essentially involved in the regulation of BmCrzR phosphorylation and internalization. Further investigations indicated that the identified cluster of Ser/Thr residues ((411)TSS(413)) was responsible for GRK-mediated phosphorylation and internalization. This is the first detailed investigation of the internalization and trafficking of Bombyx corazonin receptors. PMID:27348044

  8. Assessment of receptor internalization and recycling.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Jennifer A

    2004-01-01

    Internalization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) occurs in response to agonist activation of the receptors and causes a redistribution of receptors away from the plasma membrane toward endosomes. Internalization of lower-affinity small molecule GPCRs such as muscarinic acetylcholine and adrenergic receptors has been measured using hydrophilic antagonist radioligands that are membrane impermeant. In contrast, internalization of peptide hormone receptors is assessed by measuring the internalization of a radiolabeled- or fluorescently labeled peptide hormone. More recently, the use of epitope-tagged receptors has allowed the measurement of changes in receptor subcellular distribution by the use of immunoassay and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. This chapter describes each of these approaches to the measurement of receptor internalization and describes the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  9. Agonist-induced activation releases peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta from its inhibition by palmitate-induced nuclear factor-kappaB in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mireia; Laguna, Juan C; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel

    2005-05-01

    The mechanisms by which elevated levels of free fatty acids cause insulin resistance are not well understood, but there is a strong correlation between insulin resistance and intramyocellular lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle. In addition, accumulating evidence suggests a link between inflammation and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this work was to study whether the exposure of skeletal muscle cells to palmitate affected peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) beta/delta activity. Here, we report that exposure of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells to 0.75 mM palmitate reduced (74%, P<0.01) the mRNA levels of the PPARbeta/delta-target gene pyruvatedehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK-4), which is involved in fatty acid utilization. This reduction was not observed in the presence of the PPARbeta/delta agonist L-165041. This drug prevented palmitate-induced nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation. Increased NF-kappaB activity after palmitate exposure was associated with enhanced protein-protein interaction between PPARbeta/delta and p65. Interestingly, treatment with the PPARbeta/delta agonist L-165041 completely abolished this interaction. These results indicate that palmitate may reduce fatty acid utilization in skeletal muscle cells by reducing PPARbeta/delta signaling through increased NF-kappaB activity.

  10. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation Regulates Post-endocytic Trafficking of the D2 Dopamine Receptor*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Yoon; Dipace, Concetta; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Sibley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-mediated phosphorylation in agonist-induced desensitization, arrestin association, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking of the D2 dopamine receptor (DAR). Agonist activation of D2 DARs results in rapid and sustained receptor phosphorylation that is solely mediated by GRKs. A survey of GRKs revealed that only GRK2 or GRK3 promotes D2 DAR phosphorylation. Mutational analyses resulted in the identification of eight serine/threonine residues within the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor that are phosphorylated by GRK2/3. Simultaneous mutation of these eight residues results in a receptor construct, GRK(-), that is completely devoid of agonist-promoted GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation. We found that both wild-type (WT) and GRK(-) receptors underwent a similar degree of agonist-induced desensitization as assessed using [35S]GTPγS binding assays. Similarly, both receptor constructs internalized to the same extent in response to agonist treatment. Furthermore, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to directly assess receptor association with arrestin3, we found no differences between the WT and GRK(-) receptors. Thus, phosphorylation is not required for arrestin-receptor association or agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. In contrast, when we examined recycling of the D2 DARs to the cell surface, subsequent to agonist-induced endocytosis, the GRK(-) construct exhibited less recycling in comparison with the WT receptor. This impairment appears to be due to a greater propensity of the GRK(-) receptors to down-regulate once internalized. In contrast, if the receptor is highly phosphorylated, then receptor recycling is promoted. These results reveal a novel role for GRK-mediated phosphorylation in regulating the post-endocytic trafficking of a G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:19332542

  11. Effects of oxytocin on serotonin 1B agonist-induced autism-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Sarah K; Gray, Andrew C; Woehrle, Nancy S

    2016-11-01

    Social impairments in autism remain poorly understood and without approved pharmacotherapies. Novel animals models are needed to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate novel treatments for the social deficits in autism. Recently, serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1B) agonist challenge in mice was shown to induce autism-like behaviors including perseveration, reduced prepulse inhibition, and delayed alternation deficits. However, the effects of 5-HT1B agonists on autism-related social behaviors in mice remain unknown. Here, we examine the effects of 5-HT1B agonist challenge on sociability and preference for social novelty in mice. We also examine the effects of 5-HT1B agonist treatment on average rearing duration, a putative rodent measure of non-selective attention. Non-selective attention is an associated feature of autism that is also not well understood. We show that 5-HT1B receptor activation reduces sociability, preference for social novelty, and rearing in mice. In addition, we examine the ability of oxytocin, an off-label treatment for the social impairments in autism, to reverse 5-HT1B agonist-induced social and attention deficits in mice. We show that oxytocin restores social novelty preference in mice treated with a 5-HT1B agonist. We also show that oxytocin attenuates 5-HT1B agonist-induced sociability and rearing deficits in mice. Our results suggest that 5-HT1B agonist challenge provides a useful pharmacological mouse model for aspects of autism, and implicate 5-HT1B in autism social and attention deficits. Moreover, our findings suggest that oxytocin may treat the social deficits in autism through a mechanism involving 5-HT1B.

  12. Desensitization and Internalization of Endothelin Receptor A

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Florian; Seidel, Thorsten; Schulz, Uwe; Gummert, Jan; Milting, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin receptor A (ETA), a G protein-coupled receptor, mediates endothelin signaling, which is regulated by GRK2. Three Ser and seven Thr residues recently proven to be phosphoacceptor sites are located in the C-terminal extremity (CTE) of the receptor following its palmitoylation site. We created various phosphorylation-deficient ETA mutants. The phospholipase C activity of mutant receptors in HEK-293 cells was analyzed during continuous endothelin stimulation to investigate the impact of phosphorylation sites on ETA desensitization. Total deletion of phosphoacceptor sites in the CTE affected proper receptor regulation. However, proximal and distal phosphoacceptor sites both turned out to be sufficient to induce WT-like desensitization. Overexpression of the Gαq coupling-deficient mutant GRK2-D110A suppressed ETA-WT signaling but failed to decrease phospholipase C activity mediated by the phosphorylation-deficient mutant ETA-6PD. In contrast, GRK2-WT acted on both receptors, whereas the kinase-inactive mutant GRK2-D110A/K220R failed to inhibit signaling of ETA-WT and ETA-6PD. This demonstrates that ETA desensitization involves at least two autonomous GRK2-mediated components: 1) a phosphorylation-independent signal decrease mediated by blocking of Gαq and 2) a mechanism involving phosphorylation of Ser and Thr residues in the CTE of the receptor in a redundant fashion, able to incorporate either proximal or distal phosphoacceptor sites. High level transfection of GRK2 variants influenced signaling of ETA-WT and ETA-6PD and hints at an additional phosphorylation-independent regulatory mechanism. Furthermore, internalization of mRuby-tagged receptors was observed with ETA-WT and the phosphorylation-deficient mutant ETA-14PD (lacking 14 phosphoacceptor sites) and turned out to be based on a phosphorylation-independent mechanism. PMID:24064210

  13. Agonist-induced activation of rat mesenteric resistance vessels: comparison between noradrenaline and vasopressin

    SciTech Connect

    Cauvin, C.; Weir, S.W.; Wallnoefer, A.R.; Rueegg, U.P.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of noradrenaline (NA, 10(-5) M) and (arginine8)vasopressin (AVP, 10(-7) M) on tension in Ca2+-free medium and on membrane potential, and the inhibition of NA- and AVP-induced contractions by isradipine, have been compared in mesenteric resistance vessels (MRVs) from Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. The release of intracellular Ca2+ by AVP contributed significantly less to its tension development than does that by NA. Nonetheless, the concentration-response curves for inhibition by isradipine of NA- and AVP-induced tonic tension were nearly identical. Similarly, these two agonists produced the same degree of membrane depolarization. In addition, both agonists were able to stimulate large contractions in vessels previously depolarized by 80 mM K+. AVP also stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx into rat cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. In contrast to the stimulation of /sup 45/Ca influx by KCl depolarization, the agonist-stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx was insensitive to inhibition by organic Ca2+ antagonists. It is concluded that Ca2+ entry through receptor-operated Ca2+-permeable channels (ROCs) may contribute to agonist-induced activation of rat aortic and MRV smooth muscle.

  14. Preferred recycling pathway by internalized PGE2 EP4 receptor following agonist stimulation in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to enhanced EP4 receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2016-06-21

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator abundantly produced in injured tissues, sensitizes nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) through its four EP receptors (EP1-4). Our prior study showed that PGE2 or EP4 agonist stimulates EP4 externalization and this event was not only suppressed by the inhibitor of anterograde export, but also by the recycling inhibitor (St-Jacques and Ma, 2013). These data suggest that EP4 recycling also contributes to agonist-enhanced EP4 surface abundance. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using antibody-feeding-based internalization assay, recycling assay and FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We observed that selective EP4 agonist 1-hydroxy-PGE1 (1-OH-PGE1) or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 internalization in cultured DRG neuron. Internalized EP4 was predominantly localized in the early endosomes and recycling endosomes, but rarely in the late endosomes and lysosomes. These observations were confirmed by FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We further revealed that 1-OH-PGE1 or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 recycling. Double exposures to 1-OH-PGE1 induced a greater increase in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release than a single exposure or vehicle exposure, an event blocked by pre-treatment with the recycling inhibitor monensin. Our data suggest that EP4 recycling contributes to agonist-induced cell surface abundance and consequently enhanced receptor sensitivity. Facilitating EP4 externalization and recycling is a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-induced nociceptor sensitization.

  15. G Protein Beta 5 Is Targeted to D2-Dopamine Receptor-Containing Biochemical Compartments and Blocks Dopamine-Dependent Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Octeau, J. Christopher; Schrader, Joseph M.; Masuho, Ikuo; Sharma, Meenakshi; Aiudi, Christopher; Chen, Ching-Kang; Kovoor, Abraham; Celver, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    G beta 5 (Gbeta5, Gβ5) is a unique G protein β subunit that is thought to be expressed as an obligate heterodimer with R7 regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins instead of with G gamma (Gγ) subunits. We found that D2-dopamine receptor (D2R) coexpression enhances the expression of Gβ5, but not that of the G beta 1 (Gβ1) subunit, in HEK293 cells, and that the enhancement of expression occurs through a stabilization of Gβ5 protein. We had previously demonstrated that the vast majority of D2R either expressed endogenously in the brain or exogenously in cell lines segregates into detergent-resistant biochemical fractions. We report that when expressed alone in HEK293 cells, Gβ5 is highly soluble, but is retargeted to the detergent-resistant fraction after D2R coexpression. Furthermore, an in-cell biotin transfer proximity assay indicated that D2R and Gβ5 segregating into the detergent-resistant fraction specifically interacted in intact living cell membranes. Dopamine-induced D2R internalization was blocked by coexpression of Gβ5, but not Gβ1. However, the same Gβ5 coexpression levels had no effect on agonist-induced internalization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR), cell surface D2R levels, dopamine-mediated recruitment of β-arrestin to D2R, the amplitude of D2R-G protein coupling, or the deactivation kinetics of D2R-activated G protein signals. The latter data suggest that the interactions between D2R and Gβ5 are not mediated by endogenously expressed R7 RGS proteins. PMID:25162404

  16. G protein beta 5 is targeted to D2-dopamine receptor-containing biochemical compartments and blocks dopamine-dependent receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Octeau, J Christopher; Schrader, Joseph M; Masuho, Ikuo; Sharma, Meenakshi; Aiudi, Christopher; Chen, Ching-Kang; Kovoor, Abraham; Celver, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    G beta 5 (Gbeta5, Gβ5) is a unique G protein β subunit that is thought to be expressed as an obligate heterodimer with R7 regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins instead of with G gamma (Gγ) subunits. We found that D2-dopamine receptor (D2R) coexpression enhances the expression of Gβ5, but not that of the G beta 1 (Gβ1) subunit, in HEK293 cells, and that the enhancement of expression occurs through a stabilization of Gβ5 protein. We had previously demonstrated that the vast majority of D2R either expressed endogenously in the brain or exogenously in cell lines segregates into detergent-resistant biochemical fractions. We report that when expressed alone in HEK293 cells, Gβ5 is highly soluble, but is retargeted to the detergent-resistant fraction after D2R coexpression. Furthermore, an in-cell biotin transfer proximity assay indicated that D2R and Gβ5 segregating into the detergent-resistant fraction specifically interacted in intact living cell membranes. Dopamine-induced D2R internalization was blocked by coexpression of Gβ5, but not Gβ1. However, the same Gβ5 coexpression levels had no effect on agonist-induced internalization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR), cell surface D2R levels, dopamine-mediated recruitment of β-arrestin to D2R, the amplitude of D2R-G protein coupling, or the deactivation kinetics of D2R-activated G protein signals. The latter data suggest that the interactions between D2R and Gβ5 are not mediated by endogenously expressed R7 RGS proteins. PMID:25162404

  17. RGS2 modulates the activity and internalization of dopamine D2 receptors in neuroblastoma N2A cells.

    PubMed

    Luessen, Deborah J; Hinshaw, Tyler P; Sun, Haiguo; Howlett, Allyn C; Marrs, Glen; McCool, Brian A; Chen, Rong

    2016-11-01

    Dysregulated expression and function of dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) are implicated in drug addiction, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. In the current study, we examined whether D2Rs are modulated by regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2), a member of the RGS family that regulates G protein signaling via acceleration of GTPase activity. Using neuroblastoma 2a (N2A) cells, we found that RGS2 was immunoprecipitated by aluminum fluoride-activated Gαi2 proteins. RGS2 siRNA knockdown enhanced membrane [(35)S] GTPγS binding to activated Gαi/o proteins, augmented inhibition of cAMP accumulation and increased ERK phosphorylation in the presence of a D2/D3R agonist quinpirole when compared to scrambled siRNA treatment. These data suggest that RGS2 is a negative modulator of D2R-mediated Gαi/o signaling. Moreover, RGS2 knockdown slightly increased constitutive D2R internalization and markedly abolished quinpirole-induced D2R internalization assessed by immunocytochemistry. RGS2 knockdown did not compromise agonist-induced β-arrestin membrane recruitment; however, it prevents β-arrestin dissociation from the membrane after prolonged quinpirole treatment during which time β-arrestin moved away from the membrane in control cells. Additionally, confocal microscopy analysis of β-arrestin post-endocytic fate revealed that quinpirole treatment caused β-arrestin to translocate to the early and the recycling endosome in a time-dependent manner in control cells whereas translocation of β-arrestin to these endosomes did not occur in RGS2 knockdown cells. The impaired β-arrestin translocation likely contributed to the abolishment of quinpirole-stimulated D2R internalization in RGS2 knockdown cells. Thus, RGS2 is integral for β-arrestin-mediated D2R internalization. The current study revealed a novel regulation of D2R signaling and internalization by RGS2 proteins.

  18. Agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity requires shear and a Rac1-dependent signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Michael Keegan; Liu, Junling; Kim, Kyungho; Shen, Bo; Stojanovic-Terpo, Aleksandra; Zheng, Yi; Cho, Jaehyung

    2014-01-01

    Activated platelets facilitate blood coagulation by exposing phosphatidylserine (PS) and releasing microvesicles (MVs). However, the potent physiological agonists thrombin and collagen poorly induce PS exposure when a single agonist is used. To obtain a greater procoagulant response, thrombin is commonly used in combination with glycoprotein VI agonists. However, even under these conditions, only a percentage of platelets express procoagulant activity. To date, it remains unclear why platelets poorly expose PS even when stimulated with multiple agonists and what the signaling pathways are of soluble agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity. Here we show that physiological levels of shear present in blood significantly enhance agonist-induced platelet PS exposure and MV release, enabling low doses of a single agonist to induce full-scale platelet procoagulant activity. PS exposed on the platelet surface was immediately released as MVs, revealing a tight coupling between the 2 processes under shear. Using platelet-specific Rac1−/− mice, we discovered that Rac1 plays a common role in mediating the low-dose agonist-induced procoagulant response independent of platelet aggregation, secretion, and the apoptosis pathway. Platelet-specific Rac1 function was not only important for coagulation in vitro but also for fibrin accumulation in vivo following laser-induced arteriolar injury. PMID:25079357

  19. Insulin receptors internalize by a rapid, saturable pathway requiring receptor autophosphorylation and an intact juxtamembrane region

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The effect of receptor occupancy on insulin receptor endocytosis was examined in CHO cells expressing normal human insulin receptors (CHO/IR), autophosphorylation- and internalization-deficient receptors (CHO/IRA1018), and receptors which undergo autophosphorylation but lack a sequence required for internalization (CHO/IR delta 960). The rate of [125I]insulin internalization in CHO/IR cells at 37 degrees C was rapid at physiological concentrations, but decreased markedly in the presence of increasing unlabeled insulin (ED50 = 1-3 nM insulin, or 75,000 occupied receptors/cell). In contrast, [125I]insulin internalization by CHO/IRA1018 and CHO/IR delta 960 cells was slow and was not inhibited by unlabeled insulin. At saturating insulin concentrations, the rate of internalization by wild-type and mutant receptors was similar. Moreover, depletion of intracellular potassium, which has been shown to disrupt coated pit formation, inhibited the rapid internalization of [125I]insulin at physiological insulin concentrations by CHO/IR cells, but had little or no effect on [125I]insulin uptake by CHO/IR delta 960 and CHO/IRA1018 cells or wild-type cells at high insulin concentrations. These data suggest that the insulin-stimulated entry of the insulin receptor into a rapid, coated pit-mediated internalization pathway is saturable and requires receptor autophosphorylation and an intact juxtamembrane region. Furthermore, CHO cells also contain a constitutive nonsaturable pathway which does not require receptor autophosphorylation or an intact juxtamembrane region; this second pathway is unaffected by depletion of intracellular potassium, and therefore may be independent of coated pits. Our data suggest that the ligand-stimulated internalization of the insulin receptor may require specific saturable interactions between the receptor and components of the endocytic system. PMID:1757462

  20. Functional selectivity of dopamine D1 receptor agonists in regulating the fate of internalized receptors *

    PubMed Central

    Ryman-Rasmussen, Jessica P.; Griffith, Adam; Oloff, Scott; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Brown, Justin T.; Goddard, William A.; Mailman, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that D1 agonists can cause functionally selective effects when the endpoints of receptor internalization and adenylate cyclase activation are compared. The present study was designed to probe the phenomenon of functional selectivity at the D1 receptor further by testing the hypothesis that structurally dissimilar agonists with efficacies at these endpoints that equal or exceed those of dopamine would differ in ability to influence receptor fate after internalization, a functional endpoint largely unexplored for the D1 receptor. We selected two novel agonists of therapeutic interest that meet these criteria (the isochroman A-77636, and the isoquinoline dinapsoline), and compared the fates of the D1 receptor after internalization in response to these two compounds with that of dopamine. We found that dopamine caused the receptor to be rapidly recycled to the cell surface within 1 h of removal. Conversely, A-77636 caused the receptor to be retained intracellularly up to 48 h after agonist removal. Most surprisingly, the D1 receptor recovered to the cell surface 48 h after removal of dinapsoline. Taken together, these data indicate that these agonists target the D1 receptor to different intracellular trafficking pathways, demonstrating that the phenomenon of functional selectivity at the D1 receptor is operative for cellular events that are temporally downstream of immediate receptor activation. We hypothesize that these differential effects result from interactions of the synthetic ligands with aspects of the D1 receptor that are distal from the ligand binding domain. PMID:17067639

  1. P2Y1 receptor activation elicits its partition out of membrane rafts and its rapid internalization from human blood vessels: implications for receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Norambuena, Andrés; Poblete, M Inés; Donoso, M Verónica; Espinoza, C Sofía; González, Alfonso; Huidobro-Toro, J Pablo

    2008-12-01

    The nucleotide P2Y(1) receptor (P2Y(1)R) is expressed in both the endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its plasma membrane microregionalization and internalization in human tissues remain unknown. We report on the role of membrane rafts in P2Y(1)R signaling by using sodium carbonate or OptiPrep sucrose density gradients, Western blot analysis, reduction of tissue cholesterol content, and vasomotor assays of endothelium-denuded human chorionic arteries. In tissue extracts prepared either in sodium carbonate or OptiPrep, approximately 20 to 30% of the total P2Y(1)R mass consistently partitioned into raft fractions and correlated with vasomotor activity. Vessel treatment with methyl beta-cyclodextrin reduced the raft partitioning of the P2Y(1)R and obliterated the P2Y(1)R-mediated contractions but not the vasomotor responses elicited by either serotonin or KCl. Perfusion of chorionic artery segments with 100 nM 2-methylthio ADP or 10 nM [[(1R,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-[6-amino-2-(methylthio)-9H-purin-9-yl] 2,3dihydroxybicyclo[3.1.0]hex-1-yl]methyl] diphosphoric acid mono ester trisodium salt (MRS 2365), a selective P2Y(1)R agonist, not only displaced within 4 min the P2Y(1)R localization out of membrane rafts but also induced its subsequent internalization. 2'-Deoxy-N(6)-methyladenosine 3',5'-bisphosphate tetrasodium salt (MRS 2179), a specific P2Y(1)R antagonist, did not cause a similar displacement but blocked the agonist-induced exit from rafts. Neither adenosine nor uridine triphosphate displaced the P2Y(1)R from the membrane raft, further evidencing the pharmacodynamics of the receptor-ligand interaction. Vascular reactivity assays showed fading of the ligand-induced vasoconstrictions, a finding that correlated with the P2Y(1)R exit from raft domains and internalization. These results demonstrate in intact human vascular smooth muscle the association of the P2Y(1)R to membrane rafts, highlighting the role of this microdomain in P2Y(1)R signaling.

  2. Dual pathways of internalization of the cholecystokinin receptor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Receptor molecules play a major role in the desensitization of agonist- stimulated cellular responses. For G protein-coupled receptors, rapid desensitization occurs via receptor phosphorylation, sequestration, and internalization, yet the cellular compartments in which these events occur and their interrelationships are unclear. In this work, we focus on the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor, which has been well characterized with respect to phosphorylation. We have used novel fluorescent and electron-dense CCK receptor ligands and an antibody to probe receptor localization in a CCK receptor-bearing CHO cell line. In the unstimulated state, receptors were diffusely distributed over the plasmalemma. Agonist occupation stimulated endocytosis via both clathrin-dependent and independent pathways. The former was predominant, leading to endosomal and lysosomal compartments, as well as recycling to the plasmalemma. The clathrin-independent processes led to a smooth vesicular compartment adjacent to the plasmalemma resembling caveolae, which did not transport ligand deeper within the cell. Potassium depletion largely eliminated clathrin-dependent endocytosis, while not interfering with agonist-stimulated receptor movement into subplasmalemmal smooth vesicle compartments. These cellular endocytic events can be related to the established cycle of CCK receptor phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which we have previously described (Klueppelberg, U. G., L. K. Gates, F. S. Gorelick, and L. J. Miller. 1991. J. Biol. Chem. 266:2403-2408; Lutz, M. P., D. I. Pinon, L. K. Gates, S. Shenolikar, and L. J. Miller. 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268:12136-12142). The rapid onset and peak of receptor phosphorylation after agonist occupation correlates best with a plasmalemmal localization, while stimulated receptor phosphatase activity correlates best with receptor residence in intracellular compartments. We postulate that the smooth vesicular compartment adjacent to the plasmalemma functions for

  3. Endosome acidification and receptor trafficking: bafilomycin A1 slows receptor externalization by a mechanism involving the receptor's internalization motif.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L S; Dunn, K W; Pytowski, B; McGraw, T E

    1993-01-01

    To examine the relationship between endosome acidification and receptor trafficking, transferrin receptor trafficking was characterized in Chinese hamster ovary cells in which endosome acidification was blocked by treatment with the specific inhibitor of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, bafilomycin A1. Elevating endosome pH slowed the receptor externalization rate to approximately one-half of control but did not affect receptor internalization kinetics. The slowed receptor externalization required the receptor's cytoplasmic domain and was largely eliminated by substitutions replacing either of two aromatic amino acids within the receptor's cytoplasmic YTRF internalization motif. These results confirm, using a specific inhibitor of the vacuolar proton pump, that proper endosome acidification is necessary to maintain rapid recycling of intracellular receptors back to the plasma membrane. Moreover, receptor return to the plasma membrane is slowed in the absence of proper endosome acidification by a signal-dependent mechanism involving the receptor's cytoplasmic tyrosine-containing internalization motif. These results, in conjunction with results from other studies, suggest that the mechanism for clustering receptors in plasma membrane clathrin-coated pits may be an example of a more general mechanism that determines the dynamic distribution of membrane proteins among various compartments with luminal acidification playing a crucial role in this process. Images PMID:8167408

  4. The mechanosensitive APJ internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis: A new molecular mechanism of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    He, Lu; Chen, Linxi; Li, Lanfang

    2016-05-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor APJ elicits cellular response to diverse extracellular stimulus. Accumulating evidence reveals that APJ receptor plays a prominent role in the cardiomyocyte adapting to hypertrophic stimulation. At present, it remains obscure that the regulatory mechanism of APJ receptor in myocardial hypertrophy. The natural endogenous ligands apelin and Elabela as well as agonists maintain high affinity for the APJ receptor and drive its internalization. Ligand-activated receptor internalization is mainly performed by clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway. Simultaneously, clathrin-mediated endocytosis takes participate in the occurrence and development of cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, we hypothesize that natural ligands and agonists induce the mechanosensitive APJ internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. APJ internalization may contribute to the development of cardiac hypertrophy. The mechanosensitive APJ internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis may be a new molecular mechanism of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27063076

  5. Dynamics of receptor-mediated nanoparticle internalization into endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Barakat, Abdul I

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles offer a promising medical tool for targeted drug delivery, for example to treat inflamed endothelial cells during the development of atherosclerosis. To inform the design of such therapeutic strategies, we develop a computational model of nanoparticle internalization into endothelial cells, where internalization is driven by receptor-ligand binding and limited by the deformation of the cell membrane and cytoplasm. We specifically consider the case of nanoparticles targeted against ICAM-1 receptors, of relevance for treating atherosclerosis. The model computes the kinetics of the internalization process, the dynamics of binding, and the distribution of stresses exerted between the nanoparticle and the cell membrane. The model predicts the existence of an optimal nanoparticle size for fastest internalization, consistent with experimental observations, as well as the role of bond characteristics, local cell mechanical properties, and external forces in the nanoparticle internalization process.

  6. Analysis of receptor tyrosine kinase internalization using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hill, Kristen S; Elferink, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    The internalization of activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) by endocytosis and their subsequent down regulation in lysosomes plays a critical role in regulating the duration and intensity of downstream signaling events. Uncoupling of the RTK cMet from ligand-induced degradation was recently shown to correlate with sustained receptor signaling and increased cell tumorigenicity, suggesting that the corruption of these endocytic mechanisms could contribute to increased cMet signaling in metastatic cancers. To understand how cMet signaling for normal cell growth is controlled by endocytosis and how these mechanisms are dysregulated in metastatic cancers, we developed flow cytometry-based assays to examine cMet internalization.

  7. Endothelium-Independent Effect of Fisetin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyun Dong; Sohn, Uy Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Fisetin, a natural flavonoid found in a variety of vegetables and fruits, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of fisetin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Fisetin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction suggesting as a possible anti-hypertensive on the agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, fisetin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels suggesting the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of fisetin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function. PMID:26759702

  8. The Inhibitory Effect of Shikonin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyun Dong; Kim, Hyeong-Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2015-01-01

    Shikonin, a natural flavonoid found in the roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of shikonin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Shikonin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction suggesting as a possible anti-hypertensive on the agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, shikonin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels suggesting the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and the inhibition of MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of shikonin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function. PMID:25995821

  9. Endothelium-Independent Effect of Fisetin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyun Dong; Sohn, Uy Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Fisetin, a natural flavonoid found in a variety of vegetables and fruits, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of fisetin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Fisetin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction suggesting as a possible anti-hypertensive on the agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, fisetin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels suggesting the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of fisetin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function.

  10. Targeting Insulin Receptor with a Novel Internalizing Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Iaboni, Margherita; Fontanella, Raffaela; Rienzo, Anna; Capuozzo, Maria; Nuzzo, Silvia; Santamaria, Gianluca; Catuogno, Silvia; Condorelli, Gerolama; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Esposito, Carla Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based aptamers are emerging as therapeutic antagonists of disease-associated proteins such as receptor tyrosine kinases. They are selected by an in vitro combinatorial chemistry approach, named Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX), and thanks to their small size and unique chemical characteristics, they possess several advantages over antibodies as diagnostics and therapeutics. In addition, aptamers that rapidly internalize into target cells hold as well great potential for their in vivo use as delivery tools of secondary therapeutic agents. Here, we describe a nuclease resistant RNA aptamer, named GL56, which specifically recognizes the insulin receptor (IR). Isolated by a cell-based SELEX method that allows enrichment for internalizing aptamers, GL56 rapidly internalizes into target cells and is able to discriminate IR from the highly homologous insulin-like growth factor receptor 1. Notably, when applied to IR expressing cancer cells, the aptamer inhibits IR dependent signaling. Given the growing interest in the insulin receptor as target for cancer treatment, GL56 reveals a novel molecule with great translational potential as inhibitor and delivery tool for IR-dependent cancers. PMID:27648925

  11. Targeting Insulin Receptor with a Novel Internalizing Aptamer.

    PubMed

    Iaboni, Margherita; Fontanella, Raffaela; Rienzo, Anna; Capuozzo, Maria; Nuzzo, Silvia; Santamaria, Gianluca; Catuogno, Silvia; Condorelli, Gerolama; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Esposito, Carla Lucia

    2016-09-20

    Nucleic acid-based aptamers are emerging as therapeutic antagonists of disease-associated proteins such as receptor tyrosine kinases. They are selected by an in vitro combinatorial chemistry approach, named Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX), and thanks to their small size and unique chemical characteristics, they possess several advantages over antibodies as diagnostics and therapeutics. In addition, aptamers that rapidly internalize into target cells hold as well great potential for their in vivo use as delivery tools of secondary therapeutic agents. Here, we describe a nuclease resistant RNA aptamer, named GL56, which specifically recognizes the insulin receptor (IR). Isolated by a cell-based SELEX method that allows enrichment for internalizing aptamers, GL56 rapidly internalizes into target cells and is able to discriminate IR from the highly homologous insulin-like growth factor receptor 1. Notably, when applied to IR expressing cancer cells, the aptamer inhibits IR dependent signaling. Given the growing interest in the insulin receptor as target for cancer treatment, GL56 reveals a novel molecule with great translational potential as inhibitor and delivery tool for IR-dependent cancers.

  12. Targeting Insulin Receptor with a Novel Internalizing Aptamer.

    PubMed

    Iaboni, Margherita; Fontanella, Raffaela; Rienzo, Anna; Capuozzo, Maria; Nuzzo, Silvia; Santamaria, Gianluca; Catuogno, Silvia; Condorelli, Gerolama; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Esposito, Carla Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based aptamers are emerging as therapeutic antagonists of disease-associated proteins such as receptor tyrosine kinases. They are selected by an in vitro combinatorial chemistry approach, named Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX), and thanks to their small size and unique chemical characteristics, they possess several advantages over antibodies as diagnostics and therapeutics. In addition, aptamers that rapidly internalize into target cells hold as well great potential for their in vivo use as delivery tools of secondary therapeutic agents. Here, we describe a nuclease resistant RNA aptamer, named GL56, which specifically recognizes the insulin receptor (IR). Isolated by a cell-based SELEX method that allows enrichment for internalizing aptamers, GL56 rapidly internalizes into target cells and is able to discriminate IR from the highly homologous insulin-like growth factor receptor 1. Notably, when applied to IR expressing cancer cells, the aptamer inhibits IR dependent signaling. Given the growing interest in the insulin receptor as target for cancer treatment, GL56 reveals a novel molecule with great translational potential as inhibitor and delivery tool for IR-dependent cancers. PMID:27648925

  13. Alpha-tocopherol inhibits agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion to cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Faruqi, R; de la Motte, C; DiCorleto, P E

    1994-01-01

    Antioxidants have been proposed to be anti-atherosclerotic agents; however, the mechanisms underlying their beneficial effects are poorly understood. We have examined the effect of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-tcp) on one cellular event in atherosclerotic plaque development, monocyte adhesion to stimulated endothelial cells (ECs). Human umbilical vein ECs were pretreated with alpha-tcp before stimulation with known agonists of monocyte adhesion: IL-1 (10 ng/ml), LPS (10 ng/ml), thrombin (30 U/ml), or PMA (10 nM). Agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion, but not basal adhesion, was inhibited in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by alpha-tcp. The IC50 of alpha-tcp on an IL-1-induced response was 45 microM. The inhibition correlated with a decrease in steady state levels of E-selectin mRNA and cell surface expression of E-selectin which is consistent with the ability of a monoclonal antibody to E-selectin to inhibit monocytic cell adhesion in this system. Probucol (50 microM) and N-acetylcysteine (20 mM) also inhibited agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion; whereas, several other antioxidants had no significant effect. Protein kinase C (PKC) does not appear to play a role in the alpha-tcp effect since no suppression of phosphorylation of PKC substrates was observed. Activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B is reported to be necessary but not sufficient for E-selectin expression in EC. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays failed to show an alpha-tcp-induced decrease in activation of this transcription factor after cytokine stimulation. It has been hypothesized that alpha-tcp acts as an anti-atherosclerotic molecule by inhibiting generation of oxidized LDL--a putative triggering molecule in the atherosclerotic process. Our results point to a novel alternative mechanism of action of alpha-tcp. Images PMID:7518838

  14. TGF-β-activated Kinase 1 (Tak1) Mediates Agonist-induced Smad Activation and Linker Region Phosphorylation in Embryonic Craniofacial Neural Crest-derived Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Yumoto, Kenji; Thomas, Penny S.; Lane, Jamie; Matsuzaki, Kouichi; Inagaki, Maiko; Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun; Scott, Gregory J.; Ray, Manas K.; Ishii, Mamoru; Maxson, Robert; Mishina, Yuji; Kaartinen, Vesa

    2013-01-01

    Although the importance of TGF-β superfamily signaling in craniofacial growth and patterning is well established, the precise details of its signaling mechanisms are still poorly understood. This is in part because of the concentration of studies on the role of the Smad-dependent (so-called “canonical”) signaling pathways relative to the Smad-independent ones in many biological processes. Here, we have addressed the role of TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (Tak1, Map3k7), one of the key mediators of Smad-independent (noncanonical) TGF-β superfamily signaling in craniofacial development, by deleting Tak1 specifically in the neural crest lineage. Tak1-deficient mutants display a round skull, hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, and cleft palate resulting from a failure of palatal shelves to appropriately elevate and fuse. Our studies show that in neural crest-derived craniofacial ecto-mesenchymal cells, Tak1 is not only required for TGF-β- and bone morphogenetic protein-induced p38 Mapk activation but also plays a role in agonist-induced C-terminal and linker region phosphorylation of the receptor-mediated R-Smads. Specifically, we demonstrate that the agonist-induced linker region phosphorylation of Smad2 at Thr-220, which has been shown to be critical for full transcriptional activity of Smad2, is dependent on Tak1 activity and that in palatal mesenchymal cells TGFβRI and Tak1 kinases mediate both overlapping and distinct TGF-β2-induced transcriptional responses. To summarize, our results suggest that in neural crest-derived ecto-mesenchymal cells, Tak1 provides a critical point of intersection in a complex dialogue between the canonical and noncanonical arms of TGF-β superfamily signaling required for normal craniofacial development. PMID:23546880

  15. Analysis of Chemokine Receptor Trafficking by Site-Specific Biotinylation.

    PubMed

    Liebick, Marcel; Schläger, Christian; Oppermann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors undergo internalization and desensitization in response to ligand activation. Internalized receptors are either preferentially directed towards recycling pathways (e.g. CCR5) or sorted for proteasomal degradation (e.g. CXCR4). Here we describe a method for the analysis of receptor internalization and recycling based on specific Bir A-mediated biotinylation of an acceptor peptide coupled to the receptor, which allows a more detailed analysis of receptor trafficking compared to classical antibody-based detection methods. Studies on constitutive internalization of the chemokine receptors CXCR4 (12.1% ± 0.99% receptor internalization/h) and CCR5 (13.7% ± 0.68%/h) reveals modulation of these processes by inverse (TAK779; 10.9% ± 0.95%/h) or partial agonists (Met-CCL5; 15.6% ± 0.5%/h). These results suggest an actively driven internalization process. We also demonstrate the advantages of specific biotinylation compared to classical antibody detection during agonist-induced receptor internalization, which may be used for immunofluorescence analysis as well. Site-specific biotinylation may be applicable to studies on trafficking of transmembrane proteins, in general.

  16. Analysis of Chemokine Receptor Trafficking by Site-Specific Biotinylation

    PubMed Central

    Liebick, Marcel; Schläger, Christian; Oppermann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors undergo internalization and desensitization in response to ligand activation. Internalized receptors are either preferentially directed towards recycling pathways (e.g. CCR5) or sorted for proteasomal degradation (e.g. CXCR4). Here we describe a method for the analysis of receptor internalization and recycling based on specific Bir A-mediated biotinylation of an acceptor peptide coupled to the receptor, which allows a more detailed analysis of receptor trafficking compared to classical antibody-based detection methods. Studies on constitutive internalization of the chemokine receptors CXCR4 (12.1% ± 0.99% receptor internalization/h) and CCR5 (13.7% ± 0.68%/h) reveals modulation of these processes by inverse (TAK779; 10.9% ± 0.95%/h) or partial agonists (Met-CCL5; 15.6% ± 0.5%/h). These results suggest an actively driven internalization process. We also demonstrate the advantages of specific biotinylation compared to classical antibody detection during agonist-induced receptor internalization, which may be used for immunofluorescence analysis as well. Site-specific biotinylation may be applicable to studies on trafficking of transmembrane proteins, in general. PMID:27310579

  17. Human transferrin receptor triggers an alternative Tacaribe virus internalization pathway.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Julieta S; Martínez, María G; Forlenza, María B; Whittaker, Gary R; Candurra, Nélida A

    2016-02-01

    Tacaribe virus (TCRV) entry occurs by receptor-mediated endocytosis. To explore the entry mechanism used by TCRV, the inhibitory effects of drugs and dominant negative (DN) constructions affecting the main endocytic pathways were analyzed. In cells lacking the human transferrin receptor (hTfR), compounds and DN proteins that impair clathrin-mediated endocytosis were shown to reduce virus internalization without affecting virion binding. In contrast, in cells expressing the hTfR, compounds that affect clathrin-mediated endocytosis did not affect TCRV infection. Destabilization of cholesterol-rich plasma membrane microdomains by treatment with nystatin was not able to block virus entry in the presence of hTfR. However methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which extracts cholesterol from cell membranes, reduced virus internalization in cells expressing the hTfR. Inhibition of dynamin and neutralization of the pH of intracellular vesicles reduced virus internalization in all cell lines tested. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in cells expressing the hTfR, TCRV internalization depends on the presence of cholesterol, dynamin and acidic intracellular vesicles, while in the rest of the cell lines analyzed, clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the main TCRV entry pathway and, as expected, depends on dynamin and acidic intracellular vesicles. These results represent an important contribution to the characterization of the arenavirus replication cycle. PMID:26559962

  18. Agonist-induced redistribution of calponin in contractile vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, C A; Takahashi, K; Tao, T; Morgan, K G

    1994-11-01

    Calponin is a thin filament-associated protein that has been implicated in playing an auxiliary regulatory role in smooth muscle contraction. We have used immunofluorescence and digital imaging microscopy to determine the cellular distribution of calponin in single cells freshly isolated from the ferret portal vein. In resting cells calponin is distributed throughout the cytosol, associated with filamentous structures, and is excluded from the nuclear area of the cell. The ratio of surface cortex-associated calponin to cytosol-associated calponin (R) was found to be 0.639 +/- 0.021. Upon depolarization of the cell with physiological saline solution containing 96 mM K+, the distribution of calponin did not change from that of a resting cell (R = 0.678 +/- 0.025, P = 0.369). Upon stimulation with an agonist (10 microM phenylephrine) that is known to activate protein kinase C (PKC) in these cells, the cellular distribution of calponin changed from primarily cytosolic to primarily surface cortex associated (R = 1.24 +/- 0.085, P < 0.001). This agonist-induced redistribution of calponin was partially inhibited by the PKC inhibitor calphostin, overlapped in time with PKC translocation, and preceded contraction of these cells. These results suggest that the physiological function of calponin may be to mediate agonist-activated contraction via a PKC-dependent pathway. PMID:7526695

  19. Agonist-induced ADP-ribosylation of a cytosolic protein in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bruene, B.; Molina Y Vedia, L.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1990-05-01

    {alpha}-Thrombin and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate stimulated the mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation of a 42-kDa cytosolic protein of human platelets. This effect was mediated by protein kinase C activation and was inhibited by protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine. It also was prevented by prostacyclin, which is known to inhibit the phospholipase C-induced formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol, which is one of the endogenous activators of protein kinase C. On sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 42-kDa protein that is ADP-ribosylated by {alpha}-thrombin was clearly distinct from the {alpha} subunits of membrane-bound inhibitory and stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins, respectively G{sub i{alpha}} and G{sub s{alpha}}; the 47-kDa protein that is phosphorylated by protein kinase C in platelets; and the 39-kDa protein that has been shown to be endogenously ADP-ribosylated by agents that release nitric oxide. This information shows that agonist-induced activation of protein kinase leads to the ADP-ribosylation of a specific protein. This covalent modification might have a functional role in platelet activation.

  20. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  1. Early maternal deprivation and neonatal single administration with a cannabinoid agonist induce long-term sex-dependent psychoimmunoendocrine effects in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Ricardo; Arranz, Lorena; Marco, Eva-María; Moreno, Enrique; Puerto, Marta; Guaza, Carmen; De la Fuente, Mónica; Viveros, Maria-Paz

    2007-07-01

    Maternal deprivation [24h on postnatal day 9] might represent an animal model of schizophrenia and behavioural and neurochemical alterations observed in adulthood may be mediated by hippocampal impairments induced by abnormally increased glucocorticoids due to neonatal stress. We aimed to provide new data for psychoimmunoendocrine characterization of this animal model by evaluating its effects in adolescent rats of both genders. In previous studies we found that cannabinoid compounds counteracted the enhanced impulsivity of maternally deprived animals and that the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 showed neuroprotective properties in neonatal rats. So, we hypothesised that this compound could counteract at least some of the detrimental effects that we expected to find in maternally deprived animals. Accordingly, the drug was administered immediately after the maternal deprivation period. Maternally deprived males showed significantly decreased motor activity in the holeboard and the plus-maze. The cannabinoid agonist induced, exclusively in males, a significant anxiogenic-like effect, which was reversed by maternal deprivation. In the forced swimming test, both treatments independently induced depressive-like responses. Maternal deprivation reduced immunological function whereas the drug exerted tissue-dependent effects on the immune parameters analysed. Maternally deprived females showed reduced corticosterone levels whereas the cannabinoid agonist increased hormone concentration in all groups. In general, the results show detrimental effects of both treatments as well as intriguing interactions, notably in relation to emotional behaviour and certain immunological responses.

  2. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Quantification of Receptor Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has been widely used as a single molecule imaging technique to study various fundamental aspects of cell biology, owing to its ability to selectively excite a very thin fluorescent volume immediately above the substrate on which the cells are grown. However, TIRF microscopy has found little use in high content screening due to its complexity in instrumental setup and experimental procedures. Inspired by the recent demonstration of label-free evanescent wave biosensors for cell phenotypic profiling and drug screening with high throughput, we had hypothesized and demonstrated that TIRF imaging is also amenable to receptor pharmacology profiling. This paper reviews key considerations and recent applications of TIRF imaging for pharmacology profiling. PMID:25922915

  3. The peptide hemopressin acts through CB1 cannabinoid receptors to reduce food intake in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Garron T; Mancini, Giacomo; Lutz, Beat; Luckman, Simon M

    2010-05-26

    Hemopressin is a short, nine amino acid peptide (H-Pro-Val-Asn-Phe-Lys-Leu-Leu-Ser-His-OH) isolated from rat brain that behaves as an inverse agonist at the cannabinoid receptor CB(1), and is shown here to inhibit agonist-induced receptor internalization in a heterologous cell model. Since this peptide occurs naturally in the rodent brain, we determined its effect on appetite, an established central target of cannabinoid signaling. Hemopressin dose-dependently decreases night-time food intake in normal male rats and mice, as well as in obese ob/ob male mice, when administered centrally or systemically, without causing any obvious adverse side effects. The normal, behavioral satiety sequence is maintained in male mice fasted overnight, though refeeding is attenuated. The anorectic effect is absent in CB(1) receptor null mutant male mice, and hemopressin can block CB(1) agonist-induced hyperphagia in male rats, providing strong evidence for antagonism of the CB(1) receptor in vivo. We speculate that hemopressin may act as an endogenous functional antagonist at CB(1) receptors and modulate the activity of appetite pathways in the brain.

  4. Phosphorylation of threonine 333 regulates trafficking of the human sst5 somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed

    Petrich, Aline; Mann, Anika; Kliewer, Andrea; Nagel, Falko; Strigli, Anne; Märtens, Jan Carlo; Pöll, Florian; Schulz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The frequent overexpression of the somatostatin receptors sst2 and sst5 in neuroendocrine tumors provides the molecular basis for therapeutic application of novel multireceptor somatostatin analogs. Although the phosphorylation of the carboxyl-terminal region of the sst2 receptor has been studied in detail, little is known about the agonist-induced regulation of the human sst5 receptor. Here, we have generated phosphosite-specific antibodies for the carboxyl-terminal threonines 333 (T333) and 347 (T347), which enabled us to selectively detect either the T333-phosphorylated or the T347-phosphorylated form of sst5. We show that agonist-mediated phosphorylation occurs at T333, whereas T347 is constitutively phosphorylated in the absence of agonist. We further demonstrate that the multireceptor somatostatin analog pasireotide and the sst5-selective ligand L-817,818 but not octreotide or KE108 were able to promote a detectable T333 phosphorylation. Interestingly, BIM-23268 was the only sst5 agonist that was able to stimulate T333 phosphorylation to the same extent as natural somatostatin. Agonist-induced T333 phosphorylation was dose-dependent and selectively mediated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2. Similar to that observed for the sst2 receptor, phosphorylation of sst5 occurred within seconds. However, unlike that seen for the sst2 receptor, dephosphorylation and recycling of sst5 were rapidly completed within minutes. We also identify protein phosphatase 1γ as G protein-coupled receptor phosphatase for the sst5 receptor. Together, we provide direct evidence for agonist-selective phosphorylation of carboxyl-terminal T333. In addition, we identify G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation and protein phosphatase 1γ-mediated dephosphorylation of T333 as key regulators of rapid internalization and recycling of the human sst5 receptor.

  5. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na+ in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na+-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na+ sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na+ increased cell surface [3H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na+ by Cs+ or NH4+ inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na+ over Cs+. Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  6. B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Internalization Are Mutually Exclusive Events

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ping; Araujo, Elizabeth; Zhao, Tong; Zhang, Miao; Massenburg, Don; Veselits, Margaret; Doyle, Colleen; Dinner, Aaron R; Clark, Marcus R

    2006-01-01

    Engagement of the B cell antigen receptor initiates two concurrent processes, signaling and receptor internalization. While both are required for normal humoral immune responses, the relationship between these two processes is unknown. Herein, we demonstrate that following receptor ligation, a small subpopulation of B cell antigen receptors are inductively phosphorylated and selectively retained at the cell surface where they can serve as scaffolds for the assembly of signaling molecules. In contrast, the larger population of non-phosphorylated receptors is rapidly endocytosed. Each receptor can undergo only one of two mutually exclusive fates because the tyrosine-based motifs that mediate signaling when phosphorylated mediate internalization when not phosphorylated. Mathematical modeling indicates that the observed competition between receptor phosphorylation and internalization enhances signaling responses to low avidity ligands. PMID:16719564

  7. The Inhibitory Effect of Apigenin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility via Calcium Desensitization-Related Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyun Dong; Kim, Hyeong-Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2014-01-01

    Apigenin, a natural flavonoid found in a variety of vegetables and fruits, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of apigenin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Apigenin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2 mimetic- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction, which suggests that apigenin could be an anti-hypertensive that reduces agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, apigenin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels, which suggests the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase and MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of apigenin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function. PMID:24753814

  8. alpha-2 Macroglobulin receptor/Ldl receptor-related protein(Lrp)- dependent internalization of the urokinase receptor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The GPI-anchored urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) does not internalize free urokinase (uPA). On the contrary, uPAR-bound complexes of uPA with its serpin inhibitors PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1) or PN-1 (protease nexin-1) are readily internalized in several cell types. Here we address the question whether uPAR is internalized as well upon binding of uPA-serpin complexes. Both LB6 clone 19 cells, a mouse cell line transfected with the human uPAR cDNA, and the human U937 monocytic cell line, express in addition to uPAR also the endocytic alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP/alpha 2-MR) which is required to internalize uPAR-bound uPA-PAI-1 and uPA-PN-1 complexes. Downregulation of cell surface uPAR molecules in U937 cells was detected by cytofluorimetric analysis after uPA-PAI-1 and uPA-PN-1 incubation for 30 min at 37 degrees C; this effect was blocked by preincubation with the ligand of LRP/alpha 2-MR, RAP (LRP/alpha 2-MR- associated protein), known to block the binding of the uPA complexes to LRP/alpha 2-. MR. Downregulation correlated in time with the intracellular appearance of uPAR as assessed by confocal microscopy and immuno-electron microscopy. After 30 min incubation with uPA-PAI-1 or uPA-PN-1 (but not with free uPA), confocal microscopy showed that uPAR staining in permeabilized LB6 clone 19 cells moved from a mostly surface associated to a largely perinuclear position. This effect was inhibited by the LRP/alpha 2-MR RAP. Perinuclear uPAR did not represent newly synthesized nor a preexisting intracellular pool of uPAR, since this fluorescence pattern was not modified by treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, and since in LB6 clone 19 cells all of uPAR was expressed on the cell surface. Immuno-electron microscopy confirmed the plasma membrane to intracellular translocation of uPAR, and its dependence on LRP/alpha 2-MR in LB6 clone 19 cells only after

  9. Activated Scavenger Receptor A Promotes Glial Internalization of Aβ

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei-wei; Wang, Shao-wei; Xu, Peng-xin; Yu, Xiao-lin; Liu, Rui-tian

    2014-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates have a pivotal role in pathological processing of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The clearance of Aβ monomer or aggregates is a causal strategy for AD treatment. Microglia and astrocytes are the main macrophages that exert critical neuroprotective roles in the brain. They may effectively clear the toxic accumulation of Aβ at the initial stage of AD, however, their functions are attenuated because of glial overactivation. In this study, we first showed that heptapeptide XD4 activates the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) on the glia by increasing the binding of Aβ to SR-A, thereby promoting glial phagocytosis of Aβ oligomer in microglia and astrocytes and triggering intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades. Moreover, XD4 enhances the internalization of Aβ monomers to microglia and astrocytes through macropinocytosis or SR-A-mediated phagocytosis. Furthermore, XD4 significantly inhibits Aβ oligomer-induced cytotoxicity to glial cells and decreases the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, in vitro and in vivo. Our findings may provide a novel strategy for AD treatment by activating SR-A. PMID:24718459

  10. Protease-activated Receptor-4 Signaling and Trafficking Is Regulated by the Clathrin Adaptor Protein Complex-2 Independent of β-Arrestins.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas H; Coronel, Luisa J; Li, Julia G; Dores, Michael R; Nieman, Marvin T; Trejo, JoAnn

    2016-08-26

    Protease-activated receptor-4 (PAR4) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for thrombin and is proteolytically activated, similar to the prototypical PAR1. Due to the irreversible activation of PAR1, receptor trafficking is intimately linked to signal regulation. However, unlike PAR1, the mechanisms that control PAR4 trafficking are not known. Here, we sought to define the mechanisms that control PAR4 trafficking and signaling. In HeLa cells depleted of clathrin by siRNA, activated PAR4 failed to internalize. Consistent with clathrin-mediated endocytosis, expression of a dynamin dominant-negative K44A mutant also blocked activated PAR4 internalization. However, unlike most GPCRs, PAR4 internalization occurred independently of β-arrestins and the receptor's C-tail domain. Rather, we discovered a highly conserved tyrosine-based motif in the third intracellular loop of PAR4 and found that the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2) is important for internalization. Depletion of AP-2 inhibited PAR4 internalization induced by agonist. In addition, mutation of the critical residues of the tyrosine-based motif disrupted agonist-induced PAR4 internalization. Using Dami megakaryocytic cells, we confirmed that AP-2 is required for agonist-induced internalization of endogenous PAR4. Moreover, inhibition of activated PAR4 internalization enhanced ERK1/2 signaling, whereas Akt signaling was markedly diminished. These findings indicate that activated PAR4 internalization requires AP-2 and a tyrosine-based motif and occurs independent of β-arrestins, unlike most classical GPCRs. Moreover, these findings are the first to show that internalization of activated PAR4 is linked to proper ERK1/2 and Akt activation. PMID:27402844

  11. G Protein independent phosphorylation and internalization of the δ-opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Faye A.; Zelnik, Jennifer C.; Traynor, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Agonist activation of the δ-opioid receptor leads to internalization via Gβγ recruitment of G protein coupled receptor kinase-2, which phosphorylates the receptor at several sites, including Ser363, allowing β-arrestin binding and localization to clathrin coated pits. Using HEK cells expressing a δ-opioid receptor we tested the hypothesis that prevention of receptor coupling to G protein by treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) will block these processes. PTX treatment did not reduce phosphorylation of δ-opioid receptor Ser363 in response to the agonist DPDPE, or recruitment of β-arrestin 2-GFP to the membrane and only slowed, but did not prevent, DPDPE-induced internalization. Similarly PTX treatment only partially prevented the ability of the δ-opioid peptide agonists deltorphin II and [Met5]enkephalin and the non-peptide agonist BW373U86 to induce receptor internalization. No internalization was seen with morphine, oxymorphindole or the putative δ1-opioid agonist TAN-67 in the presence or absence of PTX, even though TAN-67 showed a strong activation of G protein, as measured by [35S]GTPγS binding. The ability of an agonist to stimulate phosphorylation at Ser363 was predictive of its capacity to induce internalization. The results suggest a role for G protein in δ-opioid receptor internalization, but show that alternative G protein independent pathways exist. PMID:19344370

  12. International Union of Pharmacology. LXIII. Retinoid X receptors.

    PubMed

    Germain, Pierre; Chambon, Pierre; Eichele, Gregor; Evans, Ronald M; Lazar, Mitchell A; Leid, Mark; De Lera, Angel R; Lotan, Reuben; Mangelsdorf, David J; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2006-12-01

    The physiological effects of retinoic acids (RAs) are mediated by members of two families of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoid X receptors (RXRs), which are encoded by three distinct human genes, RXRalpha, RXRbeta, and RXRgamma. RARs bind both all-trans- and 9-cis-RA, whereas only the 9-cis-RA stereoisomer binds to RXRs. As RXR/RAR heterodimers, these receptors control the transcription of RA target genes through binding to RA-response elements. This review is focused on the structure, mode of action, ligands, expression, and pharmacology of RXRs. Given their role as common partners to many other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, these receptors have been the subject of intense scrutiny. Moreover, and despite numerous studies since their initial discovery, RXRs remain enigmatic nuclear receptors, and there is still no consensus regarding their role. Indeed, multiple questions about the actual biological role of RXRs and the existence of an endogenous ligand have still to be answered. PMID:17132853

  13. Comparison of the involvement protein kinase C in agonist-induced contractions in mouse aorta and corpus cavernosum

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liming; Teixeira, Cleber E; Webb, R. Clinton; Leite, Romulo

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the regulation of vascular smooth muscle contraction. However, the role of PKC in erectile function is poorly understood. This study investigated whether PKC mediates agonist-induced contractions in mouse penile tissue (corpora cavernosa). We also compared the effects of PKC activators and inhibitors on contractile responses in mouse corpus cavernosum with those in mouse aorta. Aortic rings and corpus cavernosal strips from C57BL/6J mice was isolated, mounted in the organ bath for isometric tension recording. Our data showed that a PKCα/β selective inhibitor, Gö6976 (10 µM), inhibited phenylephrine and 9,11-dideoxy-11α,9α-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F2α (U46619, a thromboxane mimetic)-induced contractions in mouse aorta, reducing the maximum contraction from 123 ± 2% of KCl-induced maximum contraction to 7 ± 2% and 13 ± 1%, respectively. A non-selective PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine (30 µM), also significantly reduced phenylephrine-and U46619-induced maximum contractions in mouse aorta. However, Gö6976 and chelerythrine had no significant effects on phenylephrine-and U46619-induced contractions in corpus cavernosum. Furthermore, a PKC activator, phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (0.1 µM), significantly increased contractions in aorta (208 ± 14% of KCl-induced maximum contraction) but failed to cause contractions in corpus cavernosum at 1 and 10 µM. Western blot analysis data suggested that protein expression of PKC was similar in aorta and corpus cavernosum. Taken together, our data indicate that PKC does not have a significant role in agonist-induced contractions in mouse corpus cavernosum, whereas it mediates the contractile response to agonists in the aorta. PMID:18614166

  14. Optimizing transmembrane domain helicity accelerates insulin receptor internalization and lateral mobility.

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, E; Yamada, K; Thatte, H S; Backer, J M; Golan, D E; Kahn, C R; Shoelson, S E

    1993-01-01

    Transmembrane (TM) domains of integral membrane proteins are generally thought to be helical. However, a Gly-Pro sequence within the TM domain of the insulin receptor is predicted to act as a helix breaker. CD analyses of model TM peptides in a lipid-like environment show that substitution of Gly and Pro by Ala enhances helicity. On this basis, Gly933 and Pro934 within the TM domain of the intact human insulin receptor were mutated to Ala (G-->A, P-->A, GP-->AA) to assess effects of altered helicity on receptor functions. Mutated and wild-type receptors, expressed stably in cultured CHO cells at equivalent levels, were properly assembled, biosynthetically processed, and exhibited similar affinities for insulin. Receptor autophosphorylation and substrate kinase activity in intact cells and soluble receptor preparations were indistinguishable. In contrast, insulin-stimulated receptor internalization was accelerated 2-fold for the GP-->AA mutant, compared to a wild-type control or the G-->A and P-->A mutants. Insulin degradation, which occurs during receptor endocytosis and recycling, was similarly elevated in cells transfected with GP-->AA mutant receptors. Fluorescence photobleaching recovery measurements showed that the lateral mobility of GP-->AA mutant receptors was also increased 2- to 3-fold. These results suggest that lateral mobility directly influences rates of insulin-mediated receptor endocytosis and that rates of endocytosis and lateral mobility are retarded by a kinked TM domain in the wild-type receptor. Invariance of Gly-Pro within insulin receptor TM domain sequences suggests a physiologic advantage for submaximal rates of receptor internalization. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8390680

  15. ERK5 activation by Gq-coupled muscarinic receptors is independent of receptor internalization and β-arrestin recruitment.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, Guzmán; Cabezudo, Sofía; García-Hoz, Carlota; Tobin, Andrew B; Mayor, Federico; Ribas, Catalina

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to activate both G protein- and β-arrestin-dependent signalling cascades. The initiation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways is a key downstream event in the control of cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Both G proteins and β-arrestins have been reported to mediate context-specific activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK MAPKs. Recently, the activation of ERK5 MAPK by Gq-coupled receptors has been described to involve a direct interaction between Gαq and two novel effectors, PKCζ and MEK5. However, the possible contribution of β-arrestin towards this pathway has not yet been addressed. In the present work we sought to investigate the role of receptor internalization processes and β-arrestin recruitment in the activation of ERK5 by Gq-coupled GPCRs. Our results show that ERK5 activation is independent of M1 or M3 muscarinic receptor internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that phosphorylation-deficient muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors are still able to fully activate the ERK5 pathway, despite their reported inability to recruit β-arrestins. Indeed, the overexpression of Gαq, but not that of β-arrestin1 or β-arrestin2, was found to potently enhance ERK5 activation by GPCRs, whereas silencing of β-arrestin2 expression did not affect the activation of this pathway. Finally, we show that a β-arrestin-biased mutant form of angiotensin II (SII; Sar1-Ile4-Ile8 AngII) failed to promote ERK5 phosphorylation in primary cardiac fibroblasts, as compared to the natural ligand. Overall, this study shows that the activation of ERK5 MAPK by model Gq-coupled GPCRs does not depend on receptor internalization, β-arrestin recruitment or receptor phosphorylation but rather is dependent on Gαq-signalling.

  16. Down-regulation of insulin receptors is related to insulin internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, D.; Carpentier, J.L.; Gorden, P.; Orci, L. )

    1989-11-01

    In the present study, we have tested the influence of inhibition of endocytosis by hypertonic medium on the regulation of cell surface insulin receptors. We show that active internalization of {sup 125}I-insulin is markedly inhibited by hypertonic media and that, in parallel, cell surface invaginations are significantly diminished. These two events are accompanied by a marked inhibition of cell surface insulin receptor down-regulation. These data provide further strong evidence that receptor-mediated endocytosis is the major mechanism by which insulin receptors are regulated at the surface of target cells.

  17. Retromer terminates the generation of cAMP by internalized PTH-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Feinstein, Timothy N.; Wehbi, Vanessa L.; Ardura, Juan; Wheeler, David S.; Ferrandon, Sebastien; Gardella, Thomas J.; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Generation of cAMP by G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) and its termination is currently thought to occur exclusively at the plasma membrane of cells. Under existing models of receptor regulation, this signal is primarily restricted by desensitizationof the receptors through their binding to β-arrestins. However, this paradigm is not consistent with recent observations that the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTHR) continues to stimulate cAMP production even after receptor internalization, as β-arrestins are known to rapidly bind and internalize activated PTHR. Here we show that β-arrestin1 binding prolongs rather than terminates cAMP generation by PTHR, and that cAMP generation correlates with the persistence of arrestin-receptor complexes on endosomes. We found that PTHR signaling is instead turned-off by the retromer complex, which regulates traffic of internalized receptor from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus. Thus, binding by the retromer complex regulates sustained cAMP generation triggered by an internalized GPCR. PMID:21445058

  18. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  19. Propranolol Restricts the Mobility of Single EGF-Receptors on the Cell Surface before Their Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Carolina; Linke, Max; Sanchez, Paula; González, Alfonso; Schaap, Iwan A. T.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in morphogenesis, proliferation and cell migration. Its up-regulation during tumorigenesis makes this receptor an interesting therapeutic target. In the absence of the ligand, the inhibition of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase activity by propranolol treatment leads to internalization of empty/inactive receptors. The molecular events involved in this endocytosis remain unknown. Here, we quantified the effects of propranolol on the mobility of single quantum-dot labelled receptors before the actual internalization took place. The single receptors showed a clear stop-and-go motion; their diffusive tracks were continuously interrupted by sub-second stalling events, presumably caused by transient clustering. In the presence of propranolol we found that: i) the diffusion rate reduced by 22 %, which indicates an increase in drag of the receptor. Atomic force microscopy measurements did not show an increase of the effective membrane tension, such that clustering of the receptor remains the likely mechanism for its reduced mobility. ii) The receptor got frequently stalled for longer periods of multiple seconds, which may signal the first step of the internalization process. PMID:24349439

  20. Influence of cadmium on isolated peritoneal macrophage populations: cadmium inhibits Fc receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro experiments were performed to examine the effect of cadmium on adherent phagocytic cell populations. The authors were able to demonstrate, in vitro, a phagocytic defect that was originally observed in an in vivo system. Using in vitro methodologies, cadmium was found to inhibit opsonin-dependent but not opsonin-independent phagocytosis in two different populations of macrophages. The receptors through which the opsonized /sup 51/Cr-ElgG were internalized were characterized as Fc receptors. They were able to demonstrate that cadmium could reversibly inhibit internalization of Fc receptors. This mechanism, rather than an alteration of the receptors' binding capabilities, was responsible for the observed inhibition of Fc mediated (opsonin-dependent) phagocytosis in both populations of macrophages tested. The defect was not specific for cadmium per se. Zinc treatment caused a similar inhibition of Fc receptor mediated phagocytosis.

  1. Agonist-induced restoration of hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive improvement in a model of cholinergic denervation

    PubMed Central

    Van Kampen, Jackalina M.; Eckman, Christopher B.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic innervation of the hippocampus and severe neuronal loss within the hippocampal CA1 region are early hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease, and are strongly correlated with cognitive status. Various therapeutic approaches involve attempts to enhance neurotransmission or to provide some level of neuroprotection for remaining cells. An alternative approach may involve the generation of new cells to replace those lost in AD. Indeed, a simple shift in the balance between cell generation and cell loss may slow disease progression and possibly even reverse existing cognitive deficits. One potential neurogenic regulator might be acetylcholine, itself, which has been shown to play a critical role in hippocampal development. Here, we report the effects of various cholinergic compounds on indices of hippocampal neurogenesis, demonstrating a significant induction following pharmacological activation of muscarinic M1 receptors, located on hippocampal progenitors in the adult brain. This is the first report that a small-molecule agonist may induce neurogenesis in the hippocampal CA1 region. Furthermore, such treatment reversed deficits in markers of neurogenesis and spatial working memory triggered by cholinergic denervation in a rodent model. This study suggests the use of small molecule, receptor agonists may represent a novel means to trigger the restoration of specific neuronal populations lost to a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. PMID:20026137

  2. Agonists-induced platelet activation varies considerably in healthy male individuals: studies by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Panzer, Simon; Höcker, Lisa; Koren, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    Flow cytometric evaluation of platelet function extends our understanding of platelets' role in various clinical conditions associated with either bleeding disorders, thrombosis, or monitoring of antiplatelet therapy. The use of suboptimal concentrations of various agonists may allow assessing the "activatability" of platelets. We determined platelet responsiveness to thrombin-receptor-activating peptide-6, arachidonic acid, adenosine 5c-diphosphate (ADP), epinephrine, collagen, and ristocetin at suboptimal concentrations by determination of P-selectin expression and binding of PAC-1 in 26 healthy male individuals. The response varied considerably from one individual to the next. However, within individuals, responses to all agonists except collagen correlated strongly (p<0.05), suggesting a global variability of platelet responses. Moreover, P-selectin expression and PAC-1 binding were strongly correlated (p<0.05). Interestingly, with epinephrine, PAC-1 positive events outnumbered P-selectin positive events, while this was not seen with the other agonists. Thus, epinephrine may specifically affect the conformational switch mechanism and receptor clustering. Our data indicate that the in vitro response to suboptimal concentrations of agonists varies, but individuals with selective platelet defects may still be identified based on data obtained with the various agonists. PMID:16283308

  3. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  4. The F-BAR Protein PACSIN2 Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Anthony, Eloise C.; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling via growth factor receptors, including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, is key to various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell survival, and cell migration. In a variety of human diseases such as cancer, aberrant expression and activation of growth factor receptors can lead to disturbed signaling. Intracellular trafficking is crucial for proper signaling of growth factor receptors. As a result, the level of cell surface expression of growth factor receptors is an important determinant for the outcome of downstream signaling. BAR domain-containing proteins represent an important family of proteins that regulate membrane dynamics. In this study, we identify a novel role for the F-BAR protein PACSIN2 in the regulation of EGF receptor signaling. We show that internalized EGF as well as the (activated) EGF receptor translocated to PACSIN2-positive endosomes. Furthermore, loss of PACSIN2 increased plasma membrane expression of the EGF receptor in resting cells and increased EGF-induced phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. As a consequence, EGF-induced activation of Erk and Akt as well as cell proliferation were enhanced in PACSIN2-depleted cells. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel role for the F-BAR-domain protein PACSIN2 in regulating EGF receptor surface levels and EGF-induced downstream signaling. PMID:23129763

  5. Cardiac β2-Adrenergic Receptor Phosphorylation at Ser355/356 Regulates Receptor Internalization and Functional Resensitization

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ru; Zheng, Qingqing; Li, Lan; Yang, Wenbing; Ding, Lu; Xue, Feng; Fan, Junming; Gong, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that β2-adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) can be phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and protein kinase A (PKA), affecting β2AR internalization and desensitization. However, the exact physiological function of β2ARs in cardiomyocytes is unknown. In this study, we showed that neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes had different contraction and internalization responses to sustained or repeated, transient agonist stimulation. Specifically, short-time stimulation (10 min) with epinephrine or norepinephrine increased the cardiomyocyte contraction rate, reaching a maximum at 5 min, followed by a slow decline. When the agonist was re-added after a 60-min wash-out period, the increase in the cardiomyocyte contraction rate was similar to the initial response. In contrast, when cardiomyocytes were exposed continuously to epinephrine or norepinephrine for 60 min, the second agonist stimulation did not increase the contraction response. These results indicated that continuous β2AR stimulation caused functional desensitization. Phosphorylation of β2ARs at serine (Ser)355/356 GRK phosphorylation sites, but not at Ser345/346 PKA phosphorylation sites increased with continuous epinephrine stimulation for 60 min. Accordingly, β2AR internalization increased. Interestingly, β2AR internalization was blocked by mutations at the GRK phosphorylation sites, but not by mutations at the PKA phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, inhibition of β2AR dephosphorylation by okadaic acid, a phosphatase 2A inhibitor, impaired the recovery of internalized β2ARs and reduced the cardiomyocyte contraction rate in response to epinephrine. Finally, epinephrine treatment induced the physical interaction of β-arrestin with internalized β2ARs in cardiomyocytes. Together, these data revealed the essential role of the Ser355/356 phosphorylation status of β2ARs in regulating receptor internalization and physiological resensitization in neonatal

  6. Cardiac β2-Adrenergic Receptor Phosphorylation at Ser355/356 Regulates Receptor Internalization and Functional Resensitization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaofang; Gu, Xuejiang; Zhao, Ru; Zheng, Qingqing; Li, Lan; Yang, Wenbing; Ding, Lu; Xue, Feng; Fan, Junming; Gong, Yongsheng; Wang, Yongyu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that β2-adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) can be phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and protein kinase A (PKA), affecting β2AR internalization and desensitization. However, the exact physiological function of β2ARs in cardiomyocytes is unknown. In this study, we showed that neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes had different contraction and internalization responses to sustained or repeated, transient agonist stimulation. Specifically, short-time stimulation (10 min) with epinephrine or norepinephrine increased the cardiomyocyte contraction rate, reaching a maximum at 5 min, followed by a slow decline. When the agonist was re-added after a 60-min wash-out period, the increase in the cardiomyocyte contraction rate was similar to the initial response. In contrast, when cardiomyocytes were exposed continuously to epinephrine or norepinephrine for 60 min, the second agonist stimulation did not increase the contraction response. These results indicated that continuous β2AR stimulation caused functional desensitization. Phosphorylation of β2ARs at serine (Ser)355/356 GRK phosphorylation sites, but not at Ser345/346 PKA phosphorylation sites increased with continuous epinephrine stimulation for 60 min. Accordingly, β2AR internalization increased. Interestingly, β2AR internalization was blocked by mutations at the GRK phosphorylation sites, but not by mutations at the PKA phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, inhibition of β2AR dephosphorylation by okadaic acid, a phosphatase 2A inhibitor, impaired the recovery of internalized β2ARs and reduced the cardiomyocyte contraction rate in response to epinephrine. Finally, epinephrine treatment induced the physical interaction of β-arrestin with internalized β2ARs in cardiomyocytes. Together, these data revealed the essential role of the Ser355/356 phosphorylation status of β2ARs in regulating receptor internalization and physiological resensitization in neonatal

  7. Discovery of Regulators of Receptor Internalization with High-Throughput Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Phillip H.; Fisher, Gregory W.; Simons, Peter C.; Strouse, J. Jacob; Foutz, Terry; Waggoner, Alan S.; Jarvik, Jonathan; Sklar, Larry A.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a platform combining fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) technology with high-throughput flow cytometry to detect real-time protein trafficking to and from the plasma membrane in living cells. The hybrid platform facilitates drug discovery for trafficking receptors such as G protein-coupled receptors and was validated with the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) system. When a chemical library containing ∼1200 off-patent drugs was screened against cells expressing FAP-tagged β2ARs, all 33 known β2AR-active ligands in the library were successfully identified, together with a number of compounds that might regulate receptor internalization in a nontraditional manner. Results indicated that the platform identified ligands of target proteins regardless of the associated signaling pathway; therefore, this approach presents opportunities to search for biased receptor modulators and is suitable for screening of multiplexed targets for improved efficiency. The results revealed that ligands may be biased with respect to the rate or duration of receptor internalization and that receptor internalization may be independent of activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. PMID:22767611

  8. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVIII. Histamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chazot, Paul L.; Cowart, Marlon; Gutzmer, Ralf; Leurs, Rob; Liu, Wai L. S.; Stark, Holger; Thurmond, Robin L.; Haas, Helmut L.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a developmentally highly conserved autacoid found in most vertebrate tissues. Its physiological functions are mediated by four 7-transmembrane G protein–coupled receptors (H1R, H2R, H3R, H4R) that are all targets of pharmacological intervention. The receptors display molecular heterogeneity and constitutive activity. H1R antagonists are long known antiallergic and sedating drugs, whereas the H2R was identified in the 1970s and led to the development of H2R-antagonists that revolutionized stomach ulcer treatment. The crystal structure of ligand-bound H1R has rendered it possible to design new ligands with novel properties. The H3R is an autoreceptor and heteroreceptor providing negative feedback on histaminergic and inhibition on other neurons. A block of these actions promotes waking. The H4R occurs on immuncompetent cells and the development of anti-inflammatory drugs is anticipated. PMID:26084539

  9. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVIII. Histamine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Panula, Pertti; Chazot, Paul L; Cowart, Marlon; Gutzmer, Ralf; Leurs, Rob; Liu, Wai L S; Stark, Holger; Thurmond, Robin L; Haas, Helmut L

    2015-07-01

    Histamine is a developmentally highly conserved autacoid found in most vertebrate tissues. Its physiological functions are mediated by four 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (H1R, H2R, H3R, H4R) that are all targets of pharmacological intervention. The receptors display molecular heterogeneity and constitutive activity. H1R antagonists are long known antiallergic and sedating drugs, whereas the H2R was identified in the 1970s and led to the development of H2R-antagonists that revolutionized stomach ulcer treatment. The crystal structure of ligand-bound H1R has rendered it possible to design new ligands with novel properties. The H3R is an autoreceptor and heteroreceptor providing negative feedback on histaminergic and inhibition on other neurons. A block of these actions promotes waking. The H4R occurs on immuncompetent cells and the development of anti-inflammatory drugs is anticipated.

  10. Internalization mechanism of neuropeptide Y bound to its Y1 receptor investigated by high resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Noémie; Didier, Pascal; Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Bucher, Bernard; Mély, Yves

    2015-06-01

    The neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays numerous biological roles that are mediated by a family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Among the latter, the NPY Y1 subtype receptor undergoes a rapid desensitization following agonist exposure. This desensitization was suggested to result from a rapid clathrin-dependent internalization of Y1 and its recycling at the plasma membrane via sorting/early endosomes (SE/EE) and recycling endosomes (RE). Herein, to validate and quantitatively consolidate the mechanism of NPY internalization, we quantitatively investigated the NPY-induced internalization of the Y1 receptor by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), a super-resolution imaging technique that can resolve EE and SE, which are below the resolution limit of conventional optical microscopes. Using Cy5-labeled NPY, we could monitor with time the internalization and recycling of NPY on HEK293 cells stably expressing eGFP-labeled Y1 receptors. Furthermore, by discriminating the SE/EE from the larger RE by their sizes and monitoring these two populations as a function of time, we could firmly consolidate the kinetic model describing the internalization mechanism of the Y1 receptors as the basis for their rapid desensitization following agonist exposure.

  11. nAChR agonist-induced cognition enhancement: integration of cognitive and neuronal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sarter, Martin; Parikh, Vinay; Howe, William M

    2009-10-01

    The identification and characterization of drugs for the treatment of cognitive disorders has been hampered by the absence of comprehensive hypotheses. Such hypotheses consist of (a) a precisely defined cognitive operation that fundamentally underlies a range of cognitive abilities and capacities and, if impaired, contributes to the manifestation of diverse cognitive symptoms; (b) defined neuronal mechanisms proposed to mediate the cognitive operation of interest; (c) evidence indicating that the putative cognition enhancer facilitates these neuronal mechanisms; (d) and evidence indicating that the cognition enhancer facilitates cognitive performance by modulating these underlying neuronal mechanisms. The evidence on the neuronal and attentional effects of nAChR agonists, specifically agonists selective for alpha4beta2* nAChRs, has begun to support such a hypothesis. nAChR agonists facilitate the detection of signals by augmenting the transient increases in prefrontal cholinergic activity that are necessary for a signal to gain control over behavior in attentional contexts. The prefrontal microcircuitry mediating these effects include alpha4beta2* nAChRs situated on the terminals of thalamic inputs and the glutamatergic stimulation of cholinergic terminals via ionotropic glutamate receptors. Collectively, this evidence forms the basis for hypothesis-guided development and characterization of cognition enhancers.

  12. The atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine promote down-regulation and display functional selectivity at human 5-HT7 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Andressen, K W; Manfra, O; Brevik, C H; Ulsund, A H; Vanhoenacker, P; Levy, F O; Krobert, K A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Classically, ligands of GPCRs have been classified primarily upon their affinity and efficacy to activate a signal transduction pathway. Recent reports indicate that the efficacy of a particular ligand can vary depending on the receptor-mediated response measured (e.g. activating G proteins, other downstream responses, internalization). Previously, we reported that inverse agonists induce both homo- and heterologous desensitization, similar to agonist stimulation, at the Gs-coupled 5-HT7 receptor. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether different inverse agonists at the 5-HT7 receptor also induce internalization and/or degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. Experimental Approach HEK293 cells expressing 5-HT7(a, b or d) receptors were pre-incubated with 5-HT, clozapine, olanzapine, mesulergine or SB269970 and their effects upon receptor density, AC activity, internalization, recruitment of β-arrestins and lysosomal trafficking were measured. Key Results The agonist 5-HT and three out of four inverse agonists tested increased internalization independently of β-arrestin recruitment. Among these, only the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine promoted lysosomal sorting and reduced 5-HT7 receptor density (∼60% reduction within 24 h). Inhibition of lysosomal degradation with chloroquine blocked the clozapine- and olanzapine-induced down-regulation of 5-HT7 receptors. Incubation with SB269970 decreased both 5-HT7(b) constitutive internalization and receptor density but increased 5-HT7(d) receptor density, indicating differential ligand regulation among the 5-HT7 splice variants. Conclusions and Implications Taken together, we found that various ligands differentially activate regulatory processes governing receptor internalization and degradation in addition to signal transduction. Thus, these data extend our understanding of functional selectivity at the 5-HT7 receptor. PMID:25884989

  13. Microplate-compatible total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy for receptor pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghan; Zaytseva, Natalya V.; Wu, Qi; Li, Min; Fang, Ye

    2013-05-01

    We report the use of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for analyzing receptor pharmacology and the development of a microplate-compatible TIRF imaging system. Using stably expressed green fluorescence protein tagged β2-adrenergic receptor as the reporter, we found that the activation of different receptors results in distinct kinetic signatures of the TIRF intensity of cells. These TIRF signatures closely resemble the characteristics of their respective label-free dynamic mass redistribution signals in the same cells. This suggests that TIRF in microplate can be used for profiling and screening drugs.

  14. The globoside receptor triggers structural changes in the B19 virus capsid that facilitate virus internalization.

    PubMed

    Bönsch, Claudia; Zuercher, Christoph; Lieby, Patricia; Kempf, Christoph; Ros, Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Globoside (Gb4Cer), Ku80 autoantigen, and α5β1 integrin have been identified as cell receptors/coreceptors for human parvovirus B19 (B19V), but their role and mechanism of interaction with the virus are largely unknown. In UT7/Epo cells, expression of Gb4Cer and CD49e (integrin alpha-5) was high, but expression of Ku80 was insignificant. B19V colocalized with Gb4Cer and, to a lesser extent, with CD49e. However, only anti-Gb4Cer antibodies could disturb virus attachment. Only a small proportion of cell-bound viruses were internalized, while the majority became detached from the receptor. When added to uninfected cells, the receptor-detached virus showed superior cell binding capacity and infectivity. Attachment of B19V to cells triggered conformational changes in the capsid leading to the accessibility of the N terminus of VP1 (VP1u) to antibodies, which was maintained in the receptor-detached virus. VP1u became similarly accessible to antibodies following incubation of B19V particles with increasing concentrations of purified Gb4Cer. The receptor-mediated exposure of VP1u is critical for virus internalization, since capsids lacking VP1 could bind to cells but were not internalized. Moreover, an antibody against the N terminus of VP1u disturbed virus internalization, but only when present during and not after virus attachment, indicating the involvement of this region in binding events required for internalization. These results suggest that Gb4Cer is not only the primary receptor for B19V attachment but also the mediator of capsid rearrangements required for subsequent interactions leading to virus internalization. The capacity of the virus to detach and reattach again would enhance the probability of productive infections.

  15. Co-migration and internalization of transferrin and its receptor on K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The incorporation of iron into human cells involves the binding of diferric transferrin to a specific cell surface receptor. We studied the process of endocytosis in K562, a human erythroid cell line, by using tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled transferrin (TRITC- transferrin) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled Fab fragments of goat antireceptor IgG preparation (FITC-Fab-antitransferrin receptor antibody). Because the antireceptor antibody and transferrin bind to different sites on the transferrin receptor molecule it was possible to simultaneously and independently follow ligand and receptor. At 4 degrees C, the binding of TRITC-transferrin or FITC-Fab antitransferrin receptor antibody exhibited diffuse membrane fluorescence. At 20 degrees C, the binding of TRITC-transferrin was followed by the rapid formation of aggregates. However, the FITC-Fab antitransferrin receptor did not show similar aggregation at 20 degrees C unless transferrin was present. In the presence of transferrin, the FITC-Fab antitransferrin receptor antibody formed aggregates at the same sites and within the same time period as TRITC transferrin, indicating co-migration. Although the diffuse surface staining of either label was removed by proteolysis, the larger aggregates were not susceptible to enzyme degradation, indicating that they were intracellular. The internal location of the aggregates was also demonstrated using permeabilized cells that had been preincubated with transferrin and fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde. These cells showed aggregated receptor in the interior of the cell when reacted with fluorescein-labeled antibody to the receptor. This indicated that the transferrin and the transferrin receptor co-internalize and migrate to the same structures within the cell. PMID:6309864

  16. G-protein Receptor Kinase 5 Regulates the Cannabinoid Receptor 2-induced Up-regulation of Serotonin 2A Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Jade M.; Carrasco, Gonzalo A.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported that cannabinoid agonists can up-regulate and enhance the activity of serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFCx). Increased expression and activity of cortical 5-HT2A receptors has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and schizophrenia. Here we report that repeated CP55940 exposure selectively up-regulates GRK5 proteins in rat PFCx and in a neuronal cell culture model. We sought to examine the mechanism underlying the regulation of GRK5 and to identify the role of GRK5 in the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced activity of 5-HT2A receptors. Interestingly, we found that cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5 involves CB2 receptors, β-arrestin 2, and ERK1/2 signaling because treatment with CB2 shRNA lentiviral particles, β-arrestin 2 shRNA lentiviral particles, or ERK1/2 inhibitor prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5. Most importantly, we found that GRK5 shRNA lentiviral particle treatment prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced 5-HT2A receptor-mediated calcium release. Repeated cannabinoid exposure was also associated with enhanced phosphorylation of CB2 receptors and increased interaction between β-arrestin 2 and ERK1/2. These latter phenomena were also significantly inhibited by GRK5 shRNA lentiviral treatment. Our results suggest that sustained activation of CB2 receptors, which up-regulates 5-HT2A receptor signaling, enhances GRK5 expression; the phosphorylation of CB2 receptors; and the β-arrestin 2/ERK interactions. These data could provide a rationale for some of the adverse effects associated with repeated cannabinoid agonist exposure. PMID:23592773

  17. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIII. The parathyroid hormone receptors--family B G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gardella, Thomas J; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The type-1 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR1) is a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the actions of two polypeptide ligands; parathyroid hormone (PTH), an endocrine hormone that regulates the levels of calcium and inorganic phosphate in the blood by acting on bone and kidney, and PTH-related protein (PTHrP), a paracrine-factor that regulates cell differentiation and proliferation programs in developing bone and other tissues. The type-2 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR2) binds a peptide ligand, called tuberoinfundibular peptide-39 (TIP39), and while the biologic role of the PTHR2/TIP39 system is not as defined as that of the PTHR1, it likely plays a role in the central nervous system as well as in spermatogenesis. Mechanisms of action at these receptors have been explored through a variety of pharmacological and biochemical approaches, and the data obtained support a basic "two-site" mode of ligand binding now thought to be used by each of the family B peptide hormone GPCRs. Recent crystallographic studies on the family B GPCRs are providing new insights that help to further refine the specifics of the overall receptor architecture and modes of ligand docking. One intriguing pharmacological finding for the PTHR1 is that it can form surprisingly stable complexes with certain PTH/PTHrP ligand analogs and thereby mediate markedly prolonged cell signaling responses that persist even when the bulk of the complexes are found in internalized vesicles. The PTHR1 thus appears to be able to activate the Gα(s)/cAMP pathway not only from the plasma membrane but also from the endosomal domain. The cumulative findings could have an impact on efforts to develop new drug therapies for the PTH receptors.

  18. Regulatory mechanisms that modulate signalling by G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, S K; Grady, E F; Bunnett, N W

    1997-01-01

    The large and functionally diverse group of G-protein-coupled receptors includes receptors for many different signalling molecules, including peptide and non-peptide hormones and neuro-transmitters, chemokines, prostanoids and proteinases. Their principal function is to transmit information about the extracellular environment to the interior of the cell by interacting with the heterotrimeric G-proteins, and they thereby participate in many aspects of regulation. Cellular responses to agonists of these receptors are usually rapidly attenuated. Mechanisms of signal attenuation include removal of agonists from the extracellular fluid, receptor desensitization, endocytosis and down-regulation. Agonists are removed by dilution, uptake by transporters and enzymic degradation. Receptor desensitization is mediated by receptor phosphorylation by G-protein receptor kinases and second-messenger kinases, interaction of phosphorylated receptors with arrestins and receptor uncoupling from G-proteins. Agonist-induced receptor endocytosis also contributes to desensitization by depleting the cell surface of high-affinity receptors, and recycling of internalized receptors contributes to resensitization of cellular responses. Receptor down-regulation is a form of desensitization that occurs during continuous, long-term exposure of cells to receptor agonists. Down-regulation, which may occur during the development of drug tolerance, is characterized by depletion of the cellular receptor content, and is probably mediated by alterations in the rates of receptor degradation and synthesis. These regulatory mechanisms are important, as they govern the ability of cells to respond to agonists. A greater understanding of the mechanisms that modulate signalling may lead to the development of new therapies and may help to explain the mechanism of drug tolerance. PMID:9078236

  19. Beryllium competitively inhibits brain myo-inositol monophosphatase, but unlike lithium does not enhance agonist-induced inositol phosphate accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Faraci, W S; Zorn, S H; Bakker, A V; Jackson, E; Pratt, K

    1993-01-01

    Despite limiting side-effects, lithium is the drug of choice for the treatment of bipolar depression. Its action may be due, in part, to its ability to dampen phosphatidylinositol turnover by inhibiting myo-inositol monophosphatase. Beryllium has been identified as a potent inhibitor of partially purified myo-inositol monophosphatase isolated from rat brain (Ki = 150 nM), bovine brain (Ki = 35 nM), and from the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH (Ki = 85 nM). It is over three orders of magnitude more potent than LiCl (Ki = 0.5-1.2 mM). Kinetic analysis reveals that beryllium is a competitive inhibitor of myo-inositol monophosphatase, in contrast with lithium which is an uncompetitive inhibitor. Inhibition of exogenous [3H]inositol phosphate hydrolysis by beryllium (IC50 = 250-300 nM) was observed to the same maximal extent as that seen with lithium in permeabilized SK-N-SH cells, reflecting inhibition of cellular myo-inositol monophosphatase. However, in contrast with that observed with lithium, agonist-induced accumulation of inositol phosphate was not observed with beryllium in permeabilized and non-permeabilized SK-N-SH cells and in rat brain slices. Similar results were obtained in permeabilized SK-N-SH cells when GTP-gamma-S was used as an alternative stimulator of inositol phosphate accumulation. The disparity in the actions of beryllium and lithium suggest that either (1) selective inhibition of myo-inositol monophosphatase does not completely explain the action of lithium on the phosphatidylinositol cycle, or (2) that uncompetitive inhibition of myo-inositol monophosphatase is a necessary requirement to observe functional lithium mimetic activity. PMID:8387266

  20. Polyubiquitination of Prolactin Receptor Stimulates Its Internalization, Postinternalization Sorting, and Degradation via the Lysosomal Pathway▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Bentley; Barriere, Herve; Carbone, Christopher J.; Banerjee, Anamika; Swaminathan, Gayathri; Plotnikov, Alexander; Xu, Ping; Peng, Junmin; Goffin, Vincent; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Fuchs, Serge Y.

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitination of the receptor that mediates signaling induced by the polypeptide pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL) has been shown to lead to the degradation of this receptor and to the ensuing negative regulation of cellular responses to PRL. However, the mechanisms of PRL receptor (PRLr) proteolysis remain largely to be determined. Here we provide evidence that PRLr is internalized and primarily degraded via the lysosomal pathway. Ubiquitination of PRLr is essential for the rapid internalization of PRLr, which proceeds through a pathway dependent on clathrin and the assembly polypeptide 2 (AP2) adaptor complexes. Recruitment of AP2 to PRLr is stimulated by PRLr ubiquitination, which also is required for the targeting of already internalized PRLr to the lysosomal compartment. While mass spectrometry analysis revealed that both monoubiquitination and polyubiquitination (via both K48- and K63-linked chains) occur on PRLr, the results of experiments using forced expression of ubiquitin mutants indicate that PRLr polyubiquitination via K63-linked chains is important for efficient interaction of PRLr with AP2 as well as for efficient internalization, postinternalization sorting, and proteolytic turnover of PRLr. We discuss how specific ubiquitination may regulate early and late stages of endocytosis of PRLr and of related receptors to contribute to the negative regulation of the magnitude and duration of downstream signaling. PMID:18573876

  1. Phosphorylation and Internalization of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors LPA1, LPA2, and LPA3

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío; Hernández-Méndez, Aurelio; Campos-Martínez, Gisselle A.; Meizoso-Huesca, Aldo; García-Sáinz, J. Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Results The lysophosphatidic acid receptors LPA1, LPA2, and LPA3 were individually expressed in C9 cells and their signaling and regulation were studied. Agonist-activation increases intracellular calcium concentration in a concentration-dependent fashion. Phorbol myristate acetate markedly inhibited LPA1- and LPA3-mediated effect, whereas that mediated by LPA2 was only partially diminished; the actions of the phorbol ester were inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide I and by overnight incubation with the protein kinase C activator, which leads to down regulation of this protein kinase. Homologous desensitization was also observed for the three LPA receptors studied, with that of LPA2 receptors being consistently of lesser magnitude; neither inhibition nor down-regulation of protein kinase C exerted any effect on homologous desensitization. Activation of LPA1–3 receptors induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation; this effect was markedly attenuated by inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase activity, suggesting growth factor receptor transactivation in this effect. Lysophosphatidic acid and phorbol myristate acetate were able to induce LPA1–3 phosphorylation, in time- and concentration-dependent fashions. It was also clearly observed that agonists and protein kinase C activation induced internalization of these receptors. Phosphorylation of the LPA2 subtype required larger concentrations of these agents and its internalization was less intense than that of the other subtypes. Conclusion Our data show that these three LPA receptors are phosphoproteins whose phosphorylation state is modulated by agonist-stimulation and protein kinase C-activation and that differences in regulation and cellular localization exist, among the subtypes. PMID:26473723

  2. Visualization of distinct patterns of subcellular redistribution of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 and gqalpha /G11alpha induced by agonist stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Drmota, T; Novotny, J; Gould, G W; Svoboda, P; Milligan, G

    1999-01-01

    The rat thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (TRHR-1) was modified by the addition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed stably in HEK293 cells. Extensive overlap of plasma membrane distribution of autofluorescent TRHR-1-GFP with that of the phosphoinositidase C-linked G-proteins Gqalpha/G11alpha, identified by indirect immunofluorescence, was monitored concurrently. Addition of thyrotropin-releasing hormone resulted in rapid separation of TRHR-1-GFP and Gqalpha/G11alpha signals as the receptor was internalized. This situation persisted for more than an hour. At longer time periods a fraction of the cellular Gqalpha/G11alpha was also internalized, although much of the Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity remained associated with the plasma membrane. Parallel experiments, in which the cellular distribution of TRHR-1-GFP and Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity were monitored in sucrose-gradient fractions following cell disruption, also demonstrated a rapid, agonist-induced movement of TRHR-1-GFP away from the plasma membrane to low-density vesicular fractions. At later time points, a fraction of the cellular Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity was also redistributed to overlapping, but non-identical, low-density-vesicle-containing fractions. Pretreatment of the cells with cytochalasin D or nocodazole prevented agonist-induced redistribution of G-protein but not TRHR-1-GFP, further indicating resolution of the mechanics of these two processes. The combination of a GFP-modified receptor and immunostaining of the G-proteins activated by that receptor allows, for the first time, concurrent analysis of the varying dynamics and bases of internalization and redistribution of two elements of the same signal-transduction cascade. PMID:10333499

  3. Alanine-261 in intracellular loop III of the human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor is crucial for G-protein coupling and receptor internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Myburgh, D B; Millar, R P; Hapgood, J P

    1998-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a decapeptide that regulates reproductive function via binding to the GnRH receptor, which is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For several members of this family, the C-terminal domain of intracellular loop III is important in ligand-mediated coupling to G-proteins; mutations in that region can lead to constitutive activity. A specific alanine residue is involved in certain GPCRs, the equivalent of which is Ala-261 in the GnRH receptor. Mutation of this residue to Leu, Ile, Lys, Glu or Phe in the human GnRH receptor did not result in constitutive activity and instead led to complete uncoupling of the receptor (failure to support GnRH-stimulated inositol phosphate production). When this residue was mutated to Gly, Pro, Ser or Val, inositol phosphate production was still supported. All the mutants retained the ability to bind ligand, and the affinity for ligand, where measured, was unchanged. These results show that Ala-261 cannot be involved in ligand binding but is critical for coupling of the receptor to its cognate G-protein. Coupling is also dependent on the size of the residue in position 261. When the amino acid side chain has a molecular mass of less than 40 Da efficient coupling is still possible, but when its molecular mass exceeds 50 Da the receptor is uncoupled. Internalization studies on the Ala261-->Lys mutant showed a marked decrease in receptor internalization compared with the wild type, indicating that coupling is necessary for effective receptor internalization in the GnRH receptor system. Activation of protein kinase C (with PMA), but not protein kinase A (with forskolin) markedly increased the internalization of the mutant receptor while having a small effect on the wild-type receptor. PMID:9560319

  4. Dual mode of glucagon receptor internalization: role of PKCα, GRKs and β-arrestins.

    PubMed

    Krilov, Lada; Nguyen, Amy; Miyazaki, Teruo; Unson, Cecilia G; Williams, Russell; Lee, Norman H; Ceryak, Susan; Bouscarel, Bernard

    2011-12-10

    Glucagon levels are elevated in diabetes and some liver diseases. Increased glucagon secretion leads to abnormal stimulation of glucagon receptors (GRs) and consequent elevated glucose production in the liver. Blocking glucagon receptor signaling has been proposed as a potential treatment option for diabetes and other conditions associated with hyperglycemia. Elucidating mechanisms of GR desensitization and downregulation may help identify new drug targets besides GR itself. The present study explores the mechanisms of GR internalization and the role of PKCα, GPCR kinases (GRKs) and β-arrestins therein. We have reported previously that PKCα mediates GR phosphorylation and desensitization. While the PKC agonist, PMA, did not affect GR internalization when tested alone, it increased glucagon-mediated GR internalization by 25-40% in GR-expressing HEK-293 cells (HEK-GR cells). In both primary hepatocytes and HEK-GR cells, glucagon treatment recruited PKCα to the plasma membrane where it colocalized with GR. We also observed that overexpression of GRK2, GRK3, or GRK5 enhanced GR internalization. In addition, we found that GR utilizes both clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis in HEK-GR cells. Glucagon triggered translocation of both β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 from the cytosol to the perimembrane region, and overexpression of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 increased GR internalization. Furthermore, both β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 colocalized with GR and with Cav-1, suggesting the possible involvement of these arrestins in GR internalization.

  5. Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Promotes Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Miguel, Anitza San; Puertollano, Rosa

    2006-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking plays an important role in the regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). To address if cellular kinases regulate EGFR internalization, we used anisomycin, a potent activator of kinase cascades in mammalian cells, especially the stress-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase subtypes. Here, we report that activation of p38 MAP kinase by anisomycin is sufficient to induce internalization of EGFR. Anisomycin and EGF employ different mechanisms to promote EGFR endocytosis as anisomycin-induced internalization does not require tyrosine kinase activity or ubiquitination of the receptor. In addition, anisomycin treatment did not result in delivery and degradation of EGFR at lysosomes. Incubation with a specific inhibitor of p38, or depletion of endogenous p38 by small interfering RNAs, abolished anisomycin-induced internalization of EGFR while having no effect on transferrin endocytosis, indicating that the effect of p38 activation on EGFR endocytosis is specific. Interestingly, inhibition of p38 activation also abolished endocytosis of EGFR induced by UV radiation. Our results reveal a novel role for p38 in the regulation of EGFR endocytosis and suggest that stimulation of EGFR internalization by p38 might represent a general mechanism to prevent generation of proliferative or anti-apoptotic signals under stress conditions. PMID:16683917

  6. Free fatty acids and protein kinase C activation induce GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor 4) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Takei, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-01-15

    GPR120, free fatty acid receptor 4, is a recently deorphanized G protein-coupled receptor that seems to play cardinal roles in the regulation of metabolism and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In the present work a GPR120-Venus fusion protein was expressed in HEK293 Flp-In T-REx cells and its function (increase in intracellular calcium) and phosphorylation were studied. It was observed that the fusion protein migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels as a band with a mass of ≈70-75kDa, although other bands of higher apparent weight (>130kDa) were also detected. Cell stimulation with docosahexaenoic acid or α-linolenic acid induced concentration-dependent increases in intracellular calcium and GPR120 phosphorylation. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol esters also induced a marked receptor phosphorylation but did not alter the ability of 1µM docosahexaenoic acid to increase the intracellular calcium concentration. Phorbol ester-induced GPR120 phosphorylation, but not that induced with docosahexaenoic acid, was blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors (bis-indolyl-maleimide I and Gö 6976) suggesting that conventional kinase isoforms mediate this action. The absence of effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on agonist-induced GPR120 phosphorylation indicates that this kinase does not play a major role in agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation. Docosahexaenoic acid action was associated with marked GPR120 internalization whereas that induced with phorbol esters was smaller at early times. PMID:24239485

  7. The syndecan family of proteoglycans. Novel receptors mediating internalization of atherogenic lipoproteins in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fuki, I V; Kuhn, K M; Lomazov, I R; Rothman, V L; Tuszynski, G P; Iozzo, R V; Swenson, T L; Fisher, E A; Williams, K J

    1997-01-01

    Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been shown to participate in lipoprotein catabolism, but the roles of specific proteoglycan classes have not been examined previously. Here, we studied the involvement of the syndecan proteoglycan family. First, transfection of CHO cells with expression vectors for several syndecan core proteins produced parallel increases in the cell association and degradation of lipoproteins enriched in lipoprotein lipase, a heparan-binding protein. Second, a chimeric construct, FcR-Synd1, that consists of the ectodomain of the IgG Fc receptor Ia linked to the highly conserved transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of syndecan-1 directly mediated efficient internalization, in a process triggered by ligand clustering. Third, internalization of lipase-enriched lipoproteins via syndecan-1 and of clustered IgGs via the chimera showed identical kinetics (t1/2 = 1 h) and identical dose-response sensitivities to cytochalasin B, which disrupts microfilaments, and to genistein, which inhibits tyrosine kinases. In contrast, internalization of the receptor-associated protein, which proceeds via coated pits, showed a t1/2 < 15 min, limited sensitivity to cytochalasin B, and complete insensitivity to genistein. Thus, syndecan proteoglycans can directly mediate ligand catabolism through a pathway with characteristics distinct from coated pits, and might act as receptors for atherogenic lipoproteins and other ligands in vivo. PMID:9294130

  8. Fluorophore assisted light inactivation (FALI) of recombinant 5-HT3A receptor constitutive internalization and function

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Luo, Guoxiang; Davis, Margaret I.; Hales, Tim G.; Lovinger, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins and molecules are now widely used to tag and visualize proteins resulting in an improved understanding of protein trafficking, localization, and function. In addition, fluorescent tags have also been used to inactivate protein function in a spatially and temporally-defined manner, using a technique known as fluorophore-assisted light inactivation (FALI) or chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI). In this study we tagged the serotonin3 A subunit with the α-bungarotoxin binding sequence (BBS) and subsequently labeled 5-HT3A/BBS receptors with fluorescently conjugated α-bungarotoxin in live cells. We show that 5-HT3A/BBS receptors are constitutively internalized in the absence of an agonist and internalization as well as receptor function are inhibited by fluorescence. The fluorescence-induced disruption of function and internalization was reduced with oxygen radical scavengers suggesting the involvement of reactive oxygen species, implicating the FALI process. Furthermore, these data suggest that intense illumination during live-cell microscopy may result in inadvertent FALI and inhibition of protein trafficking. PMID:21338684

  9. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    PubMed Central

    YE, RICHARD D.; BOULAY, FRANÇOIS; WANG, JI MING; DAHLGREN, CLAES; GERARD, CRAIG; PARMENTIER, MARC; SERHAN, CHARLES N.; MURPHY, PHILIP M.

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation. The three human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2/ALX, and FPR3) share significant sequence homology and are encoded by clustered genes. Collectively, these receptors bind an extraordinarily numerous and structurally diverse group of agonistic ligands, including N-formyl and nonformyl peptides of different composition, that chemoattract and activate phagocytes. N-formyl peptides, which are encoded in nature only by bacterial and mitochondrial genes and result from obligatory initiation of bacterial and mitochondrial protein synthesis with N-formylmethionine, is the only ligand class common to all three human receptors. Surprisingly, the endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide annexin 1 and its N-terminal fragments also bind human FPR1 and FPR2/ALX, and the anti-inflammatory eicosanoid lipoxin A4 is an agonist at FPR2/ALX. In comparison, fewer agonists have been identified for FPR3, the third member in this receptor family. Structural and functional studies of the FPRs have produced important information for understanding the general pharmacological principles governing all leukocyte chemoattractant receptors. This article aims to provide an overview of the discovery and pharmacological characterization of FPRs, to introduce an International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR)-recommended nomenclature, and to discuss unmet challenges, including the mechanisms used by these receptors to bind diverse ligands and mediate different biological functions. PMID:19498085

  10. Identification of distinct c-terminal domains of the Bombyx adipokinetic hormone receptor that are essential for receptor export, phosphorylation and internalization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haishan; Deng, Xiaoyan; He, Xiaobai; Yang, Wen; Li, Guo; Shi, Ying; Shi, Liangen; Mei, Lijuan; Gao, Jimin; Zhou, Naiming

    2011-09-01

    Neuropeptides of the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) family play important roles in insect hemolymph sugar homeostasis, larval lipolysis and storage-fat mobilization. Our previous studies have shown that the adipokinetic hormone receptor (AKHR), a Gs-coupled receptor, induces intracellular cAMP accumulation, calcium mobilization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation upon agonist stimulation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate the internalization and desensitization of AKHR remain largely unknown. In the current study we made a construct to express AKHR fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) at its C-terminal end to further characterize AKHR internalization. In stable AKHR-EGFP-expressing HEK-293 cells, AKHR-EGFP was mainly localized at the plasma membrane and was rapidly internalized in a dose- and time-dependent manner via the clathrin-coated pit pathway upon agonist stimulation, and internalized receptors were slowly recovered to the cell surface after the removal of AKH peptides. The results derived from RNA interference and arrestin translocation demonstrated that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and 5 (GRK2/5) and β-arrestin2 were involved in receptor phosphorylation and internalization. Furthermore, experiments using deletion and site-directed mutagenesis strategies identified the three residues (Thr356, Ser359 and Thr362) responsible for GRK-mediated phosphorylation and internalization and the C-terminal domain from residue-322 to residue-342 responsible for receptor export from ER. This is the first detailed investigation of the internalization and trafficking of insect G protein-coupled receptors.

  11. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Regulating sst3 Somatostatin Receptor Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Günther, Thomas; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The human somatostatin receptor 3 (sst3) is expressed in about 50% of all neuroendocrine tumors and hence a promising target for multireceptor somatostatin analogs. The sst3 receptor is unique among ssts in that it exhibits a very long intracellular C-terminal tail containing a huge number of potential phosphate acceptor sites. Consequently, our knowledge about the functional role of the C-terminal tail in sst3 receptor regulation is very limited. Here, we have generated a series of phosphorylation-deficient mutants that enabled us to determine crucial sites for its agonist-induced β-arrestin mobilization, internalization, and down-regulation. Based on this information, we generated phosphosite-specific antibodies for C-terminal Ser(337)/Thr(341), Thr(348), and Ser(361) that enabled us to investigate the temporal patterns of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We found that the endogenous ligand somatostatin induced a rapid and robust phosphorylation that was completely blocked by the sst3 antagonist NVP-ACQ090. The stable somatostatin analogs pasireotide and octreotide promoted clearly less phosphorylation compared with somatostatin. We also show that sst3 phosphorylation occurred within seconds to minutes, whereas dephosphorylation of the sst3 receptor occurred at a considerable slower rate. In addition, we also identified G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3 and protein phosphatase 1α and 1β as key regulators of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively. Thus, we here define the C-terminal phosphorylation motif of the human sst3 receptor that regulates its agonist-promoted phosphorylation, β-arrestin recruitment, and internalization of this clinically relevant receptor.

  12. Isolating and characterizing three alternatively spliced mu opioid receptor variants: mMOR-1A, mMOR-1O and mMOR-1P

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Bolan, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Annie-Kim; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Extensive alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the mu opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, has demonstrated an array of splice variants in mouse, rat and human. Three classes of splice variants have been identified: full length 7 transmembrane (TM) domain variants with C-terminal splicing, truncated 6TM variants and single TM variants. The current studies isolates and characterizes an additional three full length C-terminal splice variants generated from the mouse OPRM1 gene: mMOR-1A, mMOR-1O and mMOR-1P. Using RT-qPCR, we demonstrated differential expression of these variants' mRNAs among selected brain regions, supporting region-specific alternative splicing. When expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, all the variants displayed high mu binding affinity and selectivity with subtle differences in the affinities toward some agonists. [35S]γGTP binding assays revealed marked differences in agonist-induced G protein activation in both potency and efficacy among the variants. Together with the previous studies of mu agonist-induced phosphorylation and internalization in several carboxyl terminal splice variants, the current studies further suggest the existence of biased signaling of various agonists within each individual variant and/or among different variants. PMID:24375714

  13. Mutations in the WSAWSE and cytosolic domains of the erythropoietin receptor affect signal transduction and ligand binding and internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Quelle, D E; Quelle, F W; Wojchowski, D M

    1992-01-01

    The terminal development of erythroid progenitor cells is promoted in part through the interaction of erythropoietin (EPO) with its cell surface receptor. This receptor and a growing family of related cytokine receptors share homologous extracellular features, including a well-conserved WSXWS motif. To explore the functional significance of this motif in the murine EPO receptor, five WSAWSE mutants were prepared and their signal-transducing, ligand binding, and endocytotic properties were compared. EPO receptors mutated at tryptophan residues (W-232, W-235----G; W-235----G; W-235----F) failed to mediate EPO-induced growth or pp100 phosphorylation, while S-236----T and E-237----K mutants exhibited partial to full activity (50 to 100% of wild-type growth and induced phosphorylation). Ligand affinity was reduced for mutant receptors (two- to fivefold), yet expression at the cell surface for all receptors was nearly equivalent. Also, the ability of mutated receptors to internalize ligand was either markedly reduced or abolished (W-235----F), indicating a role for the WSAWSE region in hormone internalization. Interestingly, receptor forms lacking 97% of the cytosolic domain (no signal-transducing capacity; binding affinity reduced two- to threefold) internalized EPO efficiently. This and all WSAWSE receptor forms studied also mediated specific cross-linking of 125I-EPO to three accessory membrane proteins (M(r)s, 120,000, 105,000, and 93,000). These findings suggest that the WSAWSE domain of the EPO receptor is important for EPO-induced signal transduction and ligand internalization. In contrast, although the cytosolic domain is required for growth signaling, it appears nonessential for efficient endocytosis. Images PMID:1406645

  14. Cryptococcus neoformans is internalized by receptor-mediated or 'triggered' phagocytosis, dependent on actin recruitment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both 'zipper' (receptor-mediated) and 'trigger' (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  15. Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors correlates with the formation of a continuous internal water pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuguang; Filipek, Slawomir; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Vogel, Horst

    2014-09-09

    Recent crystal structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have revealed ordered internal water molecules, raising questions about the functional role of those waters for receptor activation that could not be answered by the static structures. Here, we used molecular dynamics simulations to monitor--at atomic and high temporal resolution--conformational changes of central importance for the activation of three prototypical GPCRs with known crystal structures: the adenosine A2A receptor, the β2-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin. Our simulations reveal that a hydrophobic layer of amino acid residues next to the characteristic NPxxY motif forms a gate that opens to form a continuous water channel only upon receptor activation. The highly conserved tyrosine residue Y(7.53) undergoes transitions between three distinct conformations representative of inactive, G-protein activated and GPCR metastates. Additional analysis of the available GPCR crystal structures reveals general principles governing the functional roles of internal waters in GPCRs.

  16. Internalization and vacuolar targeting of the brassinosteroid hormone receptor BRI1 are regulated by ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Martins, Sara; Dohmann, Esther M N; Cayrel, Anne; Johnson, Alexander; Fischer, Wolfgang; Pojer, Florence; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Jaillais, Yvon; Chory, Joanne; Geldner, Niko; Vert, Grégory

    2015-01-21

    Brassinosteroids are plant steroid hormones that control many aspects of plant growth and development, and are perceived at the cell surface by the plasma membrane-localized receptor kinase BRI1. Here we show that BRI1 is post-translationally modified by K63 polyubiquitin chains in vivo. Using both artificial ubiquitination of BRI1 and generation of an ubiquitination-defective BRI1 mutant form, we demonstrate that ubiquitination promotes BRI1 internalization from the cell surface and is essential for its recognition at the trans-Golgi network/early endosomes (TGN/EE) for vacuolar targeting. Finally, we demonstrate that the control of BRI1 protein dynamics by ubiquitination is an important control mechanism for brassinosteroid responses in plants. Altogether, our results identify ubiquitination and K63-linked polyubiquitin chain formation as a dual targeting signal for BRI1 internalization and sorting along the endocytic pathway, and highlight its role in hormonally controlled plant development.

  17. Kinetic analysis of internalization, recycling and redistribution of atrial natriuretic factor-receptor complex in cultured vascular smooth-muscle cells. Ligand-dependent receptor down-regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, K N

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of internalization, sequestration and metabolic degradation of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF)-receptor complex were studied in rat thoracic aortic smooth-muscle (RTASM) cells. These parameters were directly determined by measuring 125I-ANF binding to total, intracellular and cell-surface receptors. Pretreatment of cells with the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine and the energy depleter dinitrophenol led to an increase in the intracellular 125I-ANF radioactivity. After 60 min incubation at 37 degrees C, cell-associated 125I-ANF radioactivity fell rapidly in chloroquine-treated cells (> 85%) compared with the controls (< 45%). 125I-ANF radioactivity increased to a peak of 65% of the initial level within 15 min in chloroquine-treated cells compared with only 22% in the control cells. During the initial incubation period at 37 degrees C, chloroquine inhibited the release of both intact and degraded 125I-ANF in a time-dependent manner. However, at later incubation times, the effect of chloroquine was diminished and release of both degraded and intact ligand was resumed. Extracellular unlabelled ANF did not affect the release of degraded 125I-ANF but it accelerated the release of intact ANF by a retroendocytotic mechanism. After the endocytosis, about 30-40% of ANF receptors were restored to the cell surface from the internalized pool of receptors. The restoration was blocked by chloroquine or dinitrophenol but not by cycloheximide. Exposure of RTASM cells to unlabelled ANF resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent loss of ANF receptors. Unlabelled ANF (10 nM) induced a loss of more than 52% of 125I-ANF binding, and a complete loss occurred at micromolar concentrations. It is inferred that ANF-induced down-regulation of its receptor resulted primarily from an increased rate in internalization and metabolic degradation of ligand-receptor complex by receptor-mediated endocytotic mechanisms. PMID:1445281

  18. Smoke carcinogens cause bone loss through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and induction of CYP1 enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Smoking is a major risk factor for osteoporosis and fracture. Here, we show that smoke toxins and environmental chemicals such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin (TCDD), and 3-methyl cholanthrene, which are well known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonists, induce osteocla...

  19. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. [corrected]. LXXXIX. Update on the extended family of chemokine receptors and introducing a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M; Graham, Gerard J; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Murphy, Philip M; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145-176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human Genome

  20. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  1. The chemokine receptor CCR1 is constitutively active, which leads to G protein-independent, β-arrestin-mediated internalization.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, C Taylor; Salanga, Catherina L; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Trejo, JoAnn; Handel, Tracy M

    2013-11-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by their associated ligands has been extensively studied, and increasing structural information about the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand-dependent receptor activation is beginning to emerge with the recent expansion in GPCR crystal structures. However, some GPCRs are also able to adopt active conformations in the absence of agonist binding that result in the initiation of signal transduction and receptor down-modulation. In this report, we show that the CC-type chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) exhibits significant constitutive activity leading to a variety of cellular responses. CCR1 expression is sufficient to induce inhibition of cAMP formation, increased F-actin content, and basal migration of human and murine leukocytes. The constitutive activity leads to basal phosphorylation of the receptor, recruitment of β-arrestin-2, and subsequent receptor internalization. CCR1 concurrently engages Gαi and β-arrestin-2 in a multiprotein complex, which may be accommodated by homo-oligomerization or receptor clustering. The data suggest the presence of two functional states for CCR1; whereas receptor coupled to Gαi functions as a canonical GPCR, albeit with high constitutive activity, the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex is required for G protein-independent constitutive receptor internalization. The pertussis toxin-insensitive uptake of chemokine by the receptor suggests that the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex may be related to a potential scavenging function of the receptor, which may be important for maintenance of chemokine gradients and receptor responsiveness in complex fields of chemokines during inflammation.

  2. Malaria inhibits surface expression of complement receptor-1 in monocyte/macrophages causing decreased immunecomplex internalization

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Arias, Cristina; Lopez, Jean Pierre; Hernandez-Perez, Jean Nikolae; Bautista-Ojeda, Maria Dolores; Branch, OraLee; Rodriguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) expressed on the surface of phagocytic cells binds complement-bound IC playing an important role in the clearance of circulating immunecomplexes (IC). This receptor is critical to prevent accumulation of IC, which can contribute to inflammatory pathology. Accumulation of circulating IC is frequently observed during malaria, although the factors contributing to this accumulation are not clearly understood. We have observed that the surface expression of CR1 on monocyte/macrophages and B cells is strongly reduced in mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model. Monocyte/macrophages from these infected mice present a specific inhibition of complement-mediated internalization of IC caused by the decreased CR1 expression. Accordingly, mice show accumulation of circulating IC and deposition of IC in the kidneys that inversely correlates with the decrease in CR1 surface expression. Our results indicate that malaria induces a significant decrease on surface CR1 expression in the monocyte/macrophage population that results in deficient internalization of IC by monocyte/macrophages. To determine whether this phenomenon is found in human malaria patients, we have analyzed 92 patients infected with either P. falciparum (22) or P. vivax (70), the most prevalent human malaria parasites. The levels of surface CR1 on peripheral monocyte/macrophages and B cells of these patients show a significant decrease compared to uninfected control individuals in the same area. We propose that this decrease in CR1 plays an essential role in impaired IC clearance during malaria. PMID:23440418

  3. G protein-coupled receptor internalization assays in the high-content screening format.

    PubMed

    Haasen, Dorothea; Schnapp, Andreas; Valler, Martin J; Heilker, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    High-content screening (HCS), a combination of fluorescence microscopic imaging and automated image analysis, has become a frequently applied tool to study test compound effects in cellular disease-modeling systems. This chapter describes the measurement of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization in the HCS format using a high-throughput, confocal cellular imaging device. GPCRs are the most successful group of therapeutic targets on the pharmaceutical market. Accordingly, the search for compounds that interfere with GPCR function in a specific and selective way is a major focus of the pharmaceutical industry today. This chapter describes methods for the ligand-induced internalization of GPCRs labeled previously with either a fluorophore-conjugated ligand or an antibody directed against an N-terminal tag of the GPCR. Both labeling techniques produce robust assay formats. Complementary to other functional GPCR drug discovery assays, internalization assays enable a pharmacological analysis of test compounds. We conclude that GPCR internalization assays represent a valuable medium/high-throughput screening format to determine the cellular activity of GPCR ligands.

  4. Structural/functional relationships between internal and external MSH receptors: modulation of expression in Cloudman melanoma cells by UVB radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, A.K.; Orlow, S.J.; Bolognia, J.L.; Pawelek, J.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Expression of internal receptors for MSH is an important criterion for responsiveness to MSH by Cloudman melanoma cells. Here, we show that internal and external receptors for MSH are of identical molecular weights (50-53 kDa) and share common antigenic determinants, indicating a structural relationship between the 2 populations of molecules. The internal receptors co-purified with a sub-cellular fraction highly enriched for small vesicles, many of which were coated. Ultraviolet B light (UVB) acted synergistically with MSH to increase tyrosinase activity and melanin content of cultured Cloudman melanoma cells, consistent with previous findings in the skin of mice and guinea pigs. Preceding the rise in tyrosinase activity in cultured cells, UVB elicited a decrease in internal MSH binding sites and a concomitant increase in external sites. The time frame for the UVB effects on MSH receptors and melanogenesis, 48 hours, was similar to that for a response to solar radiation in humans. Together, the results indicate a key role for MSH receptors in the induction of melanogenesis by UVB and suggest a potential mechanism of action for UVB: redistribution of MSH receptors with a resultant increase in cellular responsiveness to MSH.

  5. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase blocks agonist-induced Ca2+ sensitization of myosin phosphorylation and force in guinea-pig ileum

    PubMed Central

    Swärd, Karl; Dreja, Karl; Susnjar, Marija; Hellstrand, Per; Hartshorne, David J; Walsh, Michael P

    2000-01-01

    Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle contraction involves the small GTPase RhoA, inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) and enhanced myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation. A potential effector of RhoA is Rho-associated kinase (ROK).The role of ROK in Ca2+ sensitization was investigated in guinea-pig ileum.Contraction of permeabilized muscle strips induced by GTPγS at pCa 6.5 was inhibited by the kinase inhibitors Y-27632, HA1077 and H-7 with IC50 values that correlated with the known Ki values for inhibition of ROK. GTPγS also increased LC20 phosphorylation and this was prevented by HA1077. Contraction and LC20 phosphorylation elicited at pCa 5.75 were, however, unaffected by HA1077.Pre-treatment of intact tissue strips with HA1077 abolished the tonic component of carbachol-induced contraction and the sustained elevation of LC20 phosphorylation, but had no effect on the transient or sustained increase in [Ca2+]i induced by carbachol.LC20 phosphorylation and contraction dynamics suggest that the ROK-mediated increase in LC20 phosphorylation is due to MLCP inhibition, not myosin light chain kinase activation.In the absence of Ca2+, GTPγS stimulated 35S incorporation from [35S]ATPγS into the myosin targeting subunit of MLCP (MYPT). The enhanced thiophosphorylation was inhibited by HA1077. No thiophosphorylation of LC20 was detected.These results indicate that ROK mediates agonist-induced increases in myosin phosphorylation and force by inhibiting MLCP activity through phosphorylation of MYPT. Under Ca2+-free conditions, ROK does not appear to phosphorylate LC20in situ, in contrast to its ability to phosphorylate myosin in vitro. In particular, ROK activation is essential for the tonic phase of agonist-induced contraction. PMID:10618150

  6. Identification of three internalization sequences in the cytoplasmic tail of the 46 kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Denzer, K; Weber, B; Hille-Rehfeld, A; Figura, K V; Pohlmann, R

    1997-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of the human 46 kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR 46) is necessary for rapid internalization of the receptor and sufficient to mediate internalization of a resident plasma membrane protein. To localize the internalization sequences within the 67 amino acids of the cytoplasmic tail, the tail was progressively shortened from its C-terminus, internal deletions of between four and eight amino acids were introduced into the tail, and individual residues were substituted by alanine, glycine or serine. Three sequences were identified that contribute to the internalization of MPR 46. The first is located within the 23 juxtamembrane cytoplasmic residues of the tail. It contains four essential residues within a heptapeptide and does not resemble known internalization signals. The second sequence contains as a critical residue Tyr-45. The third region is located within the C-terminal seven residues and contains a di-leucine pair as essential residues. The first and third sequences were shown to function as autonomous internalization sequences. Substitution of critically important residues within a single internalization sequence was tolerated, with no or only a moderate decrease in the internalization rate. When essential residues from two or all three internalization sequences were substituted, however, the internalization rate was decreased by more than 60% and 90% respectively. This indicates that the autonomous internalization signals in the cytoplasmic tail of MPR 46 function in an additive manner, but are partly redundant. PMID:9291124

  7. Green fluorescent protein fused to peptide agonists of two dissimilar G protein-coupled receptors: novel ligands of the bradykinin B2 (rhodopsin family) receptor and parathyroid hormone PTH1 (secretin family) receptor.

    PubMed

    Charest-Morin, Xavier; Fortin, Jean-Philippe; Bawolak, Marie-Thérèse; Lodge, Robert; Marceau, François

    2013-10-01

    We hypothesized that peptide hormone sequences that stimulate and internalize G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) could be prolonged with a functional protein cargo. To verify this, we have selected two widely different pairs of peptide hormones and GPCRs that nevertheless share agonist-induced arrestin-mediated internalization. For the parathyroid hormone (PTH) PTH1 receptor (PTH1R) and the bradykinin (BK) B2 receptor (B2R), we have designed fusion proteins of the agonists PTH1-34 and maximakinin (MK, a BK homologue) with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), thus producing candidate high molecular weight ligands. According to docking models of each hormone to its receptor, EGFP was fused either at the N-terminus (MK) or C-terminus (PTH1-34) of the ligand; the last construction is also secretable due to inclusion of the preproinsulin signal peptide and has been produced as a conditioned medium. EGFP-MK has been produced as a lysate of transfected cells. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for GFP, average concentrations of 1.5 and 1670 nmol/L, respectively, of ligand were found in these preparations. The functional properties and potential of these analogs for imaging receptor-expressing cells were examined. Microscopic and cytofluorometric evidence of specific binding and internalization of both fusion proteins was obtained using recipient HEK 293a cells that expressed the cognate recombinant receptor. Endosomal colocalization studies were conducted (Rab5, Rab7, β-arrestin1). Evidence of agonist signaling was obtained (expression of c-Fos, cyclic AMP responsive element (CRE) reporter gene for PTH1-34-EGFP). The constructs PTH1-34-EGFP and EGFP-MK represent bona fide agonists that support the feasibility of transporting protein cargoes inside cells using GPCRs.

  8. Dopamine agonist-induced penile erection and yawning: a comparative study in outbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Corda, Maria Giuseppa; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Piludu, Maria Antonietta; Löber, Stefan; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter; Argiolas, Antonio; Giorgi, Osvaldo

    2013-08-01

    The effects on penile erection and yawning of subcutaneous (SC) injections of the mixed dopamine D1/D2-like agonist apomorphine (0.02-0.2 mg/kg) were studied in outbred Roman high- (RHA) and low-avoidance (RLA) male rats, two lines selectively bred for their respectively rapid versus poor acquisition of the active avoidance response in the shuttle-box, and compared with the effects observed in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Apomorphine dose-response curves were bell-shaped in all rat lines/strains. Notably, more penile erections and yawns were recorded mainly in the ascending part of these curves (e.g., apomorphine 0.02-0.08 mg/kg) in both RLA and RHA rats compared to SD rats, with RLA rats showing the higher response (especially for yawning) with respect to RHA rats. Similar results were found with PD-168,077 (0.02-0.2 mg/kg SC), a D4 receptor agonist, which induced penile erection but not yawning. In all rat lines/strains, apomorphine responses were markedly reduced by the D2 antagonist L-741,626, but not by the D3 antagonist, SB277011A, whereas the D4 antagonists L-745,870 and FAUC213 elicited a partial, yet statistically significant, inhibitory effect. In contrast, the pro-erectile effect of PD-168,077 was completely abolished by L-745,870 and FAUC213, as expected. The present study confirms and extends previously reported differences in dopamine transmission between RLA and RHA rats and between the SD strain and the Roman lines. Moreover, it confirms previous studies supporting the view that dopamine receptors of the D2 subtype play a predominant role in the pro-yawning and pro-erectile effect of apomorphine, and that the selective stimulation of D4 receptors induces penile erection.

  9. Receptor Crosslinking: A General Method to Trigger Internalization and Lysosomal Targeting of Therapeutic Receptor:Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Paul R; Sayers, Edward J; Magnusson, Johannes P; Alexander, Cameron; Borri, Paola; Watson, Peter; Jones, Arwyn T

    2015-01-01

    A major unmet clinical need is a universal method for subcellular targeting of bioactive molecules to lysosomes. Delivery to this organelle enables either degradation of oncogenic receptors that are overexpressed in cancers, or release of prodrugs from antibody–drug conjugates. Here, we describe a general method that uses receptor crosslinking to trigger endocytosis and subsequently redirect trafficking of receptor:cargo complexes from their expected route, to lysosomes. By incubation of plasma membrane receptors with biotinylated cargo and subsequent addition of streptavidin to crosslink receptor:cargo–biotin complexes, we achieved rapid and selective lysosomal targeting of transferrin, an anti-MHC class I antibody, and the clinically approved anti-Her2 antibody trastuzumab. These three protein ligands each target a receptor with a distinct cellular function and intracellular trafficking profile. Importantly, we confirmed that crosslinking of trastuzumab increased lysosomal degradation of its cognate oncogenic receptor Her2 in breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474. These data suggest that crosslinking could be exploited for a wide range of target receptors, for navigating therapeutics through the endolysosomal pathway, for significant therapeutic benefit. PMID:26412588

  10. Effect of a toggle switch mutation in TM6 of the human adenosine A3 receptor on Gi protein-dependent signalling and Gi-independent receptor internalization

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Leigh A; Kellam, Barrie; Briddon, Stephen J; Hill, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The highly conserved tryptophan (W6.48) in transmembrane domain 6 of GPCRs has been shown to play a central role in forming an active conformation in response to agonist binding. We set out to characterize the effect of this mutation on the efficacy of two agonists at multiple signalling pathways downstream of the adenosine A3 receptor. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Residue W6.48 in the human adenosine A3 receptor fused to yellow fluorescent protein was mutated to phenylalanine and expressed in CHO-K1 cells containing a cAMP response element reporter gene. The effects on agonist-mediated receptor internalization were monitored by automated confocal microscopy and image analysis. Further experiments were carried out to investigate agonist-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, inhibition of [3H]-cAMP accumulation and β-arrestin2 binding. KEY RESULTS NECA was able to stimulate agonist-mediated internalization of the W6.48F mutant receptor, while the agonist HEMADO was inactive. Investigation of other downstream signalling pathways indicated that G-protein coupling was impaired for both agonists tested. Mutation of W6.48F therefore resulted in differential effects on agonist efficacy, and introduced signalling pathway bias for HEMADO at the adenosine A3 receptor. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Investigation of the pharmacology of the W6.48F mutant of the adenosine A3 receptor confirms that this region is important in forming the active conformation of the receptor for stimulating a number of different signalling pathways and that mutations in this residue can lead to changes in agonist efficacy and signalling bias. PMID:24750014

  11. Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/PKB signalling: initiation by the D2S receptor and role in quinpirole-induced behavioural activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Ting; Ruan, Nan-Yu; Chen, Jin-Chung; Lin, Tzu-Yung

    2012-09-24

    The short and long isoforms of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S and D2L respectively) are highly expressed in the striatum. Functional D2 receptors activate an intracellular signalling pathway that includes a cAMP-independent route involving Akt/GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3). To investigate the Akt/GSK3 response to the seldom-studied D2S receptor, we established a rat D2S receptor-expressing cell line [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293/rD2S]. We found that in HEK-293/rD2S cells, the D2/D3 agonists bromocriptine and quinpirole significantly induced Akt and GSK3 phosphorylation, as well as ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) activation. The D2S receptor-induced Akt signals were profoundly inhibited by the internalization blockers monodansyl cadaverine and concanavalin A. Activation of the D2S receptor in HEK-293/rD2S cells appeared to trigger Akt/phospho-Akt translocation to the cell membrane. In addition to our cell culture experiments, we studied D2 receptor-dependent Akt in vivo by systemic administration of the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole. The results show that quinpirole evoked Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation in the ventral striatum. Furthermore, intra-accumbens administration of wortmannin, a PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) inhibitor, significantly suppressed the quinpirole-evoked behavioural activation. Overall, we demonstrate that activation of the dopamine D2S receptor stimulates Akt/GSK3 signalling. In addition, in vivo Akt activity in the ventral striatum appears to play an important role in systemic D2/D3 agonist-induced behavioural activation.

  12. Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/PKB signalling: initiation by the D2S receptor and role in quinpirole-induced behavioural activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han-Ting; Ruan, Nan-Yu; Chen, Jin-Chung; Lin, Tzu-Yung

    2012-01-01

    The short and long isoforms of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S and D2L respectively) are highly expressed in the striatum. Functional D2 receptors activate an intracellular signalling pathway that includes a cAMP-independent route involving Akt/GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3). To investigate the Akt/GSK3 response to the seldom-studied D2S receptor, we established a rat D2S receptor-expressing cell line [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293/rD2S]. We found that in HEK-293/rD2S cells, the D2/D3 agonists bromocriptine and quinpirole significantly induced Akt and GSK3 phosphorylation, as well as ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) activation. The D2S receptor-induced Akt signals were profoundly inhibited by the internalization blockers monodansyl cadaverine and concanavalin A. Activation of the D2S receptor in HEK-293/rD2S cells appeared to trigger Akt/phospho-Akt translocation to the cell membrane. In addition to our cell culture experiments, we studied D2 receptor-dependent Akt in vivo by systemic administration of the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole. The results show that quinpirole evoked Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation in the ventral striatum. Furthermore, intra-accumbens administration of wortmannin, a PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) inhibitor, significantly suppressed the quinpirole-evoked behavioural activation. Overall, we demonstrate that activation of the dopamine D2S receptor stimulates Akt/GSK3 signalling. In addition, in vivo Akt activity in the ventral striatum appears to play an important role in systemic D2/D3 agonist-induced behavioural activation. PMID:22909302

  13. Lupus risk variants in the PXK locus alter B-cell receptor internalization

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Samuel E.; Foley, Corinne; Lu, Xiaoming; Patel, Zubin H.; Zoller, Erin E.; Magnusen, Albert F.; Williams, Adrienne H.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Comeau, Mary E.; Marion, Miranda C.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Adler, Adam; Shen, Nan; Nath, Swapan; Stevens, Anne M.; Freedman, Barry I.; Tsao, Betty P.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kamen, Diane L.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Reveille, John D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A.; Moser, Kathy L.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Petri, Michelle; Scofield, R. Hal; Kimberly, Robert P.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Binjoo, Young; Choi, Jeongim; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Namjou, Bahram; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Harley, Isaac T. W.; Harley, John B.; Kottyan, Leah C.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies have identified variants in PXK that confer risk for humoral autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus), rheumatoid arthritis and more recently systemic sclerosis. While PXK is involved in trafficking of epidermal growth factor Receptor (EGFR) in COS-7 cells, mechanisms linking PXK to lupus pathophysiology have remained undefined. In an effort to uncover the mechanism at this locus that increases lupus-risk, we undertook a fine-mapping analysis in a large multi-ancestral study of lupus patients and controls. We define a large (257kb) common haplotype marking a single causal variant that confers lupus risk detected only in European ancestral populations and spans the promoter through the 3′ UTR of PXK. The strongest association was found at rs6445972 with P < 4.62 × 10−10, OR 0.81 (0.75–0.86). Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, we demonstrate that one signal drives the genetic association in the region. Bayesian analysis confirms our results, identifying a 95% credible set consisting of 172 variants spanning 202 kb. Functionally, we found that PXK operates on the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR); we confirmed that PXK influenced the rate of BCR internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that individuals carrying the risk haplotype exhibited a decreased rate of BCR internalization, a process known to impact B cell survival and cell fate. Taken together, these data define a new candidate mechanism for the genetic association of variants around PXK with lupus risk and highlight the regulation of intracellular trafficking as a genetically regulated pathway mediating human autoimmunity. PMID:25620976

  14. Agonist-promoted ubiquitination differentially regulates receptor trafficking of endothelin type A and type B receptors.

    PubMed

    Terada, Koji; Horinouchi, Takahiro; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Higashi, Tsunehito; Nepal, Prabha; Horiguchi, Mika; Karki, Sarita; Hatate, Chizuru; Hoshi, Akimasa; Harada, Takuya; Mai, Yosuke; Ohba, Yusuke; Miwa, Soichi

    2014-12-19

    Two types of G protein-coupled receptors for endothelin-1 (ET-1), ET type A receptor (ETAR) and ETBR, closely resemble each other, but upon ET-1 stimulation, they follow totally different intracellular trafficking pathways; ETAR is recycled back to plasma membrane, whereas ETBR is targeted to lysosome for degradation. However, the mechanisms for such different fates are unknown. Here we demonstrated that ETBR but not ETAR was ubiquitinated on the cell surface following ET-1 stimulation and that ETBR was internalized and degraded in lysosome more rapidly than ETAR. The mutant ETBR (designated "5KR mutant") in which 5 lysine residues in the C-tail were substituted to arginine was not ubiquitinated, and its rates of internalization and degradation after ET-1 stimulation became slower, being comparable with those of ETAR. Confocal microscopic study showed that following ET-1 stimulation, ETAR and 5KR mutant of ETBR were co-localized mainly with Rab11, a marker of recycling endosome, whereas ETBR was co-localized with Rab7, a marker of late endosome/lysosome. In the 5KR mutant, ET-1-induced ERK phosphorylation and an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration upon repetitive ET-1 stimulation were larger. A series of ETBR mutants (designated "4KR mutant"), in which either one of 5 arginine residues of the 5KR mutant was reverted to lysine, were normally ubiquitinated, internalized, and degraded, with ERK phosphorylation being normalized. These results demonstrate that agonist-induced ubiquitination at either lysine residue in the C-tail of ETBR but not ETAR switches intracellular trafficking from recycling to plasma membrane to targeting to lysosome, causing decreases in the cell surface level of ETBR and intracellular signaling.

  15. Intranasally Administered Neuropeptide S (NPS) Exerts Anxiolytic Effects Following Internalization Into NPS Receptor-Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Irina A; Dine, Julien; Yen, Yi-Chun; Buell, Dominik R; Herrmann, Leonie; Holsboer, Florian; Eder, Matthias; Landgraf, Rainer; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Experiments in rodents revealed neuropeptide S (NPS) to constitute a potential novel treatment option for anxiety diseases such as panic and post-traumatic stress disorder. However, both its cerebral target sites and the molecular underpinnings of NPS-mediated effects still remain elusive. By administration of fluorophore-conjugated NPS, we pinpointed NPS target neurons in distinct regions throughout the entire brain. We demonstrated their functional relevance in the hippocampus. In the CA1 region, NPS modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. NPS is taken up into NPS receptor-expressing neurons by internalization of the receptor–ligand complex as we confirmed by subsequent cell culture studies. Furthermore, we tracked internalization of intranasally applied NPS at the single-neuron level and additionally demonstrate that it is delivered into the mouse brain without losing its anxiolytic properties. Finally, we show that NPS differentially modulates the expression of proteins of the glutamatergic system involved inter alia in synaptic plasticity. These results not only enlighten the path of NPS in the brain, but also establish a non-invasive method for NPS administration in mice, thus strongly encouraging translation into a novel therapeutic approach for pathological anxiety in humans. PMID:22278093

  16. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A; Harty, Breanne L; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C; Monk, Kelly R; Peeters, Miriam C; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential.

  17. Prolactin receptor-mediated internalization of imaging agents detects epithelial ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Karthik M.

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic malignant tumors. Diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) presents two main challenges. The first challenge is detecting low volume (< 1 g) and early stage (≤ stage II) masses to prevent rapid progression to late stages and ultimately death. The second challenge is differentiating malignant from benign tissue to avoid costly and invasive surgeries (19.5 surgeries are required to find 1 cancer even with multiple screenings). First-line diagnostic tests such as ultrasound and serum marker tests (e.g. CA-125) aid in diagnosis but they lack the sensitivity and specificity required to overcome both challenges. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a second-line diagnostic aided by gadolinium based contrast agents (CAs), offers higher resolution pictures for classifying indeterminate ovarian masses. But as currently practiced, MRI still lacks the sensitivity and specificity required to alter patient outcomes. In this work we develop a new paradigm for EOC diagnosis that targets the prolactin receptor (PRLR) - a cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor that is over-expressed in moderate to high levels on > 98% of epithelial ovarian cancers. Upon binding of native ligands to PRLR, the ligand:PRLR complex is internalized by cells. By conjugating gadolinium-chelates, molecules normally used as contrast agents diagnostically, to human placental lactogen (hPL), a native ligand of PRLR, we show that MRI becomes highly sensitive and specific for detecting PRLR (+) tumors in a nude mouse model of EOC. We further establish the adaptability of this approach for fluorescence-based imaging techniques using an hPL conjugated Cy5.5 dye. We conclude that molecular imaging of PRLR with hPL-conjugated imaging agents can address the current challenges that limit EOC diagnosis.

  18. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B.; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A.; Harty, Breanne L.; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C.; Monk, Kelly R.; Peeters, Miriam C.; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W.; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A.; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W.; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential. PMID:25713288

  19. The interplay between plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPases in agonist-induced temporal Ca(2+) dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Figen Amber; Ozgur, Ekin Ozge; Ozgur, Erol; Ugur, Mehmet

    2014-12-01

    A change in the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) functions as a transmitter for signal transduction and shows a broad temporal pattern. Even genetically homogeneous cell types show different Ca(2+) response patterns under permanent agonist stimulation. In Ca(2+) signaling, the dynamics of the Ca(2+) release from the Ca(2+) channels during continuous agonist stimulation and the simultaneous effect of the pumps are unclear. In this study, the dynamic interaction of the Ca(2+) ATPases in the plasma membrane (PMCA) and the endoplasmic reticulum membrane (SERCA) during continuous ACh stimulation is monitored using Fluo-3 and Fura-2 loaded HEK 293 cells. We characterize Ca(2+) release patterns at the sub-maximal and maximal stimulation doses in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). We analyze the responses regarding their types, oscillation frequency and response times. La(3+) (PMCA blocker) do not change the frequency and time courses in sub-maximal ACh treatment, while with the maximal stimulation oscillation frequency increase as oscillations superimpose on robust release, and response time of [Ca(2+)]i is elongated. A similar effect of La(3+) is observed in quantal Ca(2+) release phenomenon. In the presence of CPA, a SERCA blocker, oscillations are completely abolished, but response time does not change. We also observe that during continuous receptor stimulation, Ca(2+) release do not cease. These data may suggest that Ca(2+) release continues during agonist stimulation, but SERCA and PMCA form a new steady state and return [Ca(2+)]i to its physiological concentration. PMID:25331516

  20. Sustained Receptor Stimulation Leads to Sequestration of Recycling Endosomes in a Classical Protein Kinase C- and Phospholipase D-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak-Baldys, Jolanta; Baldys, Aleksander; Raymond, John R.; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable insight has been garnered on initial mechanisms of endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins and their subsequent trafficking through the endosomal compartment. It is also well established that ligand stimulation of many plasma membrane receptors leads to their internalization. However, stimulus-induced regulation of endosomal trafficking has not received much attention. In previous studies, we showed that sustained stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) with phorbol esters led to sequestration of recycling endosomes in a juxtanuclear region. In this study, we investigated whether G-protein-coupled receptors that activate PKC exerted effects on endosomal trafficking. Stimulation of cells with serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) led to sequestration of the 5-HT receptor (5-HT2AR) into a Rab11-positive juxtanuclear compartment. This sequestration coincided with translocation of PKC as shown by confocal microscopy. Mechanistically the observed sequestration of 5-HT2AR was shown to require continuous PKC activity because it was inhibited by pretreatment with classical PKC inhibitor Gö6976 and could be reversed by posttreatment with this inhibitor. In addition, classical PKC autophosphorylation was necessary for receptor sequestration. Moreover inhibition of phospholipase D (PLD) activity and inhibition of PLD1 and PLD2 using dominant negative constructs also prevented this process. Functionally this sequestration did not affect receptor desensitization or resensitization as measured by intracellular calcium increase. However, the PKC- and PLD-dependent sequestration of receptors resulted in co-sequestration of other plasma membrane proteins and receptors as shown for epidermal growth factor receptor and protease activated receptor-1. This led to heterologous desensitization of those receptors and diverted their cellular fate by protecting them from agonist-induced degradation. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel role for sustained receptor

  1. Functional Analysis of Free Fatty Acid Receptor GPR120 in Human Eosinophils: Implications in Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Yasunori; Ueki, Shigeharu; Takeda, Masahide; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Tamaki, Mami; Moritoki, Yuki; Oyamada, Hajime; Itoga, Masamichi; Kayaba, Hiroyuki; Omokawa, Ayumi; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that eosinophils play an important role in metabolic homeostasis through Th2 cytokine production. GPR120 (FFA4) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for long-chain fatty acids that functions as a regulator of physiological energy metabolism. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether human eosinophils express GPR120 and, if present, whether it possesses a functional capacity on eosinophils. Eosinophils isolated from peripheral venous blood expressed GPR120 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with a synthetic GPR120 agonist, GW9508, induced rapid down-regulation of cell surface expression of GPR120, suggesting ligand-dependent receptor internalization. Although GPR120 activation did not induce eosinophil chemotactic response and degranulation, we found that GW9508 inhibited eosinophil spontaneous apoptosis and Fas receptor expression. The anti-apoptotic effect was attenuated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors and was associated with inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Eosinophil response investigated using ELISpot assay indicated that stimulation with a GPR120 agonist induced IL-4 secretion. These findings demonstrate the novel functional properties of fatty acid sensor GPR120 on human eosinophils and indicate the previously unrecognized link between nutrient metabolism and the immune system. PMID:25790291

  2. Flumazenil decreases surface expression of α4β2δ GABAA receptors by increasing the rate of receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Kuver, Aarti; Smith, Sheryl S

    2016-01-01

    Increases in expression of α4βδ GABAA receptors (GABARs), triggered by fluctuations in the neurosteroid THP (3α-OH-5α[β]-pregnan-20-one), are associated with changes in mood and cognition. We tested whether α4βδ trafficking and surface expression would be altered by in vitro exposure to flumazenil, a benzodiazepine ligand which reduces α4βδ expression in vivo. We first determined that flumazenil (100 nM-100 μM, IC50=∼1 μM) acted as a negative modulator, reducing GABA (10 μM)-gated current in the presence of 100 nM THP (to increase receptor efficacy), assessed with whole cell patch clamp recordings of recombinant α4β2δ expressed in HEK-293 cells. Surface expression of recombinant α4β2δ receptors was detected using a 3XFLAG reporter at the C-terminus of α4 (α4F) using confocal immunocytochemical techniques following 48 h exposure of cells to GABA (10 μM)+THP (100 nM). Flumazenil (10 μM) decreased surface expression of α4F by ∼60%, while increasing its intracellular accumulation, after 48 h. Reduced surface expression of α4β2δ after flumazenil treatment was confirmed by decreases in the current responses to 100 nM of the GABA agonist gaboxadol. Flumazenil-induced decreases in surface expression of α4β2δ were prevented by the dynamin blocker, dynasore, and by leupeptin, which blocks lysosomal enzymes, suggesting that flumazenil is acting to increase endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the receptor. Flumazenil increased the rate of receptor removal from the cell surface by 2-fold, assessed using botulinum toxin B to block insertion of new receptors. These findings may suggest new therapeutic strategies for regulation of α4β2δ expression using flumazenil.

  3. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIX. Angiotensin Receptors: Interpreters of Pathophysiological Angiotensinergic Stimuli [corrected].

    PubMed

    Karnik, Sadashiva S; Unal, Hamiyet; Kemp, Jacqueline R; Tirupula, Kalyan C; Eguchi, Satoru; Vanderheyden, Patrick M L; Thomas, Walter G

    2015-10-01

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) produced hormone peptides regulate many vital body functions. Dysfunctional signaling by receptors for RAS peptides leads to pathologic states. Nearly half of humanity today would likely benefit from modern drugs targeting these receptors. The receptors for RAS peptides consist of three G-protein-coupled receptors—the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor), the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2 receptor), the MAS receptor—and a type II trans-membrane zinc protein—the candidate angiotensin IV receptor (AngIV binding site). The prorenin receptor is a relatively new contender for consideration, but is not included here because the role of prorenin receptor as an independent endocrine mediator is presently unclear. The full spectrum of biologic characteristics of these receptors is still evolving, but there is evidence establishing unique roles of each receptor in cardiovascular, hemodynamic, neurologic, renal, and endothelial functions, as well as in cell proliferation, survival, matrix-cell interaction, and inflammation. Therapeutic agents targeted to these receptors are either in active use in clinical intervention of major common diseases or under evaluation for repurposing in many other disorders. Broad-spectrum influence these receptors produce in complex pathophysiological context in our body highlights their role as precise interpreters of distinctive angiotensinergic peptide cues. This review article summarizes findings published in the last 15 years on the structure, pharmacology, signaling, physiology, and disease states related to angiotensin receptors. We also discuss the challenges the pharmacologist presently faces in formally accepting newer members as established angiotensin receptors and emphasize necessary future developments.

  4. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIX. Angiotensin Receptors: Interpreters of Pathophysiological Angiotensinergic Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Hamiyet; Kemp, Jacqueline R.; Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Eguchi, Satoru; Vanderheyden, Patrick M. L.; Thomas, Walter G.

    2015-01-01

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) produced hormone peptides regulate many vital body functions. Dysfunctional signaling by receptors for RAS peptides leads to pathologic states. Nearly half of humanity today would likely benefit from modern drugs targeting these receptors. The receptors for RAS peptides consist of three G-protein–coupled receptors—the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor), the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2 receptor), the MAS receptor—and a type II trans-membrane zinc protein—the candidate angiotensin IV receptor (AngIV binding site). The prorenin receptor is a relatively new contender for consideration, but is not included here because the role of prorenin receptor as an independent endocrine mediator is presently unclear. The full spectrum of biologic characteristics of these receptors is still evolving, but there is evidence establishing unique roles of each receptor in cardiovascular, hemodynamic, neurologic, renal, and endothelial functions, as well as in cell proliferation, survival, matrix-cell interaction, and inflammation. Therapeutic agents targeted to these receptors are either in active use in clinical intervention of major common diseases or under evaluation for repurposing in many other disorders. Broad-spectrum influence these receptors produce in complex pathophysiological context in our body highlights their role as precise interpreters of distinctive angiotensinergic peptide cues. This review article summarizes findings published in the last 15 years on the structure, pharmacology, signaling, physiology, and disease states related to angiotensin receptors. We also discuss the challenges the pharmacologist presently faces in formally accepting newer members as established angiotensin receptors and emphasize necessary future developments. PMID:26315714

  5. The involvement of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in β2-adrenoceptor agonist-induced vasodilatation on rat diaphragmatic microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Han-Yu

    1997-01-01

    The effects of glibenclamide (GLB), a blocker of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, on diaphragmatic microcirculation in male Sprague-Dawley rats were assessed under basal conditions and after β2-adrenoceptor-agonist stimulation. In addition, forskolin was used to bypass β-adrenoceptors and GTP-binding proteins (G-protein) to explore the possible mechanism of GLB effects. For comparison, the relationships between KATP channel activity and cyclic GMP-mediated vasodilator responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were also assessed. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with urethane and mechanically ventilated. The left hemi-diaphragm of each rat was prepared and microvascular blood flow (QLDF) was recorded with laser-Doppler flowmetry during continuous superfusion with bicarbonate-buffered, prewarmed Ringer solution. The drugs were topically applied to the surface of the hemi-diaphragm. Salbutamol (0.32–32 μM), terbutaline (0.32 μM–0.32 μM) and forskolin (0.32–10 μM) each elicited a concentration-dependent increase in QLDF. Baseline microvascular blood flow was unaffected by a 30 min suffusion of 1 μM GLB (295±51 mV vs 325±62 mV, P=0.738). The vasodilator response elicited by salbutamol (0.32 μM, 1 μM and 3.2 μM), was significantly attenuated by a 30 min superfusion with 1 μM GLB; this salbutamol-induced vasodilatation was mediated via an interaction with β-adrenoceptor receptors, as in other experiments it was greatly inhibited by 30-min superfusion with propranolol (10 μM). Similarly, following 30-min superfusion with GLB (1 μM), the terbutaline (1 μM, 3.2 μM and 10 μM)-induced vasodilator response was almost abolished and the vasodilator responses induced by incremental concentrations of forskolin (0.32 μM, 1 μM and 3.2 μM) were also significantly attenuated. Cromakalim (1.5 μM, 3 μM and 3.2 μM) produced an increase of QLDF in a dose-dependent manner

  6. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation, impairs signal transduction associated with muscarinic acetylcholine and metabotropic glutamate receptors: possible action on G alpha(q/11).

    PubMed

    Blanc, E M; Kelly, J F; Mark, R J; Waeg, G; Mattson, M P

    1997-08-01

    Considerable data indicate that oxidative stress and membrane lipid peroxidation contribute to neuronal degeneration in an array of age-related neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast, the impact of subtoxic levels of membrane lipid peroxidation on neuronal function is largely unknown. We now report that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation, disrupts coupling of muscarinic cholinergic receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors to phospholipase C-linked GTP-binding proteins in cultured rat cerebrocortical neurons. At subtoxic concentrations, HNE markedly inhibited GTPase activity, inositol phosphate release, and elevation of intracellular calcium levels induced by carbachol (muscarinic agonist) and (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenyl glycine (metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist). Maximal impairment of agonist-induced responses occurred within 30 min of exposure to HNE. Other aldehydes, including malondialdehyde, had little effect on agonist-induced responses. Antioxidants that suppress lipid peroxidation did not prevent impairment of agonist-induced responses by HNE, whereas glutathione, which is known to bind and detoxify HNE, did prevent impairment of agonist-induced responses. HNE itself did not induce oxidative stress. Immunoprecipitation-western blot analysis using an antibody to HNE-protein conjugates showed that HNE can bind to G alpha(q/11). HNE also significantly suppressed inositol phosphate release induced by aluminum fluoride. Collectively, our data suggest that HNE plays a role in altering receptor-G protein coupling in neurons under conditions of oxidative stress that may occur both normally, and before cell degeneration and death in pathological settings. PMID:9231714

  7. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor: A Key Bridging Molecule of External and Internal Chemical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jijing; Feng, Yu; Fu, Hualing; Xie, Heidi Qunhui; Jiang, Joy Xiaosong; Zhao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a highly evolutionary conserved, ligand-activated transcription factor that is best known to mediate the toxicities of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. Phenotype of AhR-null mice, together with the recent discovery of a variety of endogenous and plant-derived ligands, point to the integral roles of AhR in normal cell physiology, in addition to its roles in sensing the environmental chemicals. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about AhR signaling pathways, its ligands and AhR-mediated effects on cell specialization, host defense and detoxification. AhR-mediated health effects particularly in liver, immune, and nervous systems, as well as in tumorgenesis are discussed. Dioxin-initiated embryotoxicity and immunosuppressive effects in fish and birds are reviewed. Recent data demonstrate that AhR is a convergence point of multiple signaling pathways that inform the cell of its external and internal environments. As such, AhR pathway is a promising potential target for therapeutics targeting nervous, liver, and autoimmune diseases through AhR ligand-mediated interventions and other perturbations of AhR signaling. Additionally, using available laboratory data obtained on animal models, AhR-centered adverse outcome pathway analysis is useful in reexamining known and potential adverse outcomes of specific or mixed compounds on wildlife. PMID:26079192

  8. Involvement of PRMT1 in hnRNPQ activation and internalization of insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Hiroaki

    2008-07-25

    Insulin signaling in skeletal L6 myotubes is known to be affected by arginine methylation catalyzed by protein N-arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1), however, the mechanism by which this occurs has not yet been defined. This study aimed to determine the exact substrate involved in the methylation and regulating insulin signaling in cells. Insulin enhanced arginine methylation of a 66-kDa protein (p66) concomitant with translocation of PRMT1 to the membrane fraction. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified p66 as a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, hnRNPQ that was bound to and methylated by PRMT1. Pharmacological inhibition of methylation (MTA) and small interfering RNA against PRMT1 (PRMT1-siRNA) attenuated insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of hnRNPQ and insulin receptor (IR), and the interaction between hnRNPQ and IR. MTA, PRMT1-siRNA, and hnRNPQ-siRNA inhibited internalization of IR in the same manner. These data suggest that the PRMT1-mediated methylation of hnRNPQ is implicated in IR trafficking and insulin signaling in skeletal L6 myotubes.

  9. The human insulin receptor mRNA contains a functional internal ribosome entry segment

    PubMed Central

    Spriggs, Keith A.; Cobbold, Laura C.; Ridley, Simon H.; Coldwell, Mark; Bottley, Andrew; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E.; Siddle, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA translation is an important mechanism determining the level of expression of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Translation is most commonly initiated by cap-dependent scanning, but many eukaryotic mRNAs contain internal ribosome entry segments (IRESs), providing an alternative means of initiation capable of independent regulation. Here, we show by using dicistronic luciferase reporter vectors that the 5′-UTR of the mRNA encoding human insulin receptor (hIR) contains a functional IRES. RNAi-mediated knockdown showed that the protein PTB was required for maximum IRES activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that PTB1, PTB2 and nPTB, but not unr or PTB4, bound to hIR mRNA, and deletion mapping implicated a CCU motif 448 nt upstream of the initiator AUG in PTB binding. The IR-IRES was functional in a number of cell lines, and most active in cells of neuronal origin, as assessed by luciferase reporter assays. The IRES was more active in confluent than sub-confluent cells, but activity did not change during differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts to adipocytes. IRES activity was stimulated by insulin in sub-confluent cells. The IRES may function to maintain expression of IR protein in tissues such as the brain where mRNA translation by cap-dependent scanning is less effective. PMID:19654240

  10. Evidence of involvement of the mannose receptor in the internalization of Streptococcus pneumoniae by Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The ability of S. pneumoniae to generate infections depends on the restrictions imposed by the host’s immunity, in order to prevent the bacterium from spreading from the nasopharynx to other tissues, such as the brain. Some authors claim that strains of S. pneumoniae, which fail to survive in the bloodstream, can enter the brain directly from the nasal cavity by axonal transport through the olfactory and/or trigeminal nerves. However, from the immunological point of view, glial cells are far more responsive to bacterial infections than are neurons. This hypothesis is consistent with several recent reports showing that bacteria can infect glial cells from the olfactory bulb and trigeminal ganglia. Since our group previously demonstrated that Schwann cells (SCs) express a functional and appropriately regulated mannose receptor (MR), we decided to test whether SCs are involved in the internalization of S. pneumoniae via MR. Results Immediately after the interaction step, as well as 3 h later, the percentage of association was approximately 56.5%, decreasing to 47.2% and 40.8% after 12 and 24 h, respectively. Competition assays by adding a 100-fold excess of mannan prior to the S. pneumoniae infection reduced the number of infected cells at 3 and 24 h. A cytochemistry assay with Man/BSA-FITC binding was performed in order to verify a possible overlap between mannosylated ligands and internalized bacteria. Incubation of the SCs with Man/BSA-FITC resulted in a large number of intracellular S. pneumoniae, with nearly complete loss of the capsule. Moreover, the anti-pneumococcal antiserum staining colocalized with the internalized man/BSA-FITC, suggesting that both markers are present within the same endocytic compartment of the SC. Conclusions Our data offer novel evidence that SCs could be essential for pneumococcal cells to escape phagocytosis and killing by innate immune cells. On the other hand, the results also support the idea that SCs are

  11. Anti-receptor antibodies designed to elicit "internal image"-bearing anti-idiotypes: a possible AIDS vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, D S; Schoolnik, G K

    1987-07-01

    Two obstacles hinder the development of an AIDS vaccine: (1) the AIDS virus exhibits extensive amino acid heterogeneity between isolates and (2) antibodies elicited by virus during the course of natural infection are often non-neutralizing. A vaccine designed to induce anti-idiotypic antibodies against the virus' receptor on T-cells, T4, should, in principle, overcome these obstacles. Such antibody could contain an "internal image" of T4 and bind the receptor binding domain of the virus. Since this domain is both critical to function and, therefore, poorly susceptible to antigenic variation, anti-receptor anti-idiotypic antibodies may demonstrate broad, strain-independent crossreactivity and block viral adherence.

  12. Cross-Desensitization and Cointernalization of H1 and H2 Histamine Receptors Reveal New Insights into Histamine Signal Integration

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Natalia; Fernandez, Natalia; Notcovich, Cintia; Monczor, Federico; Simaan, May; Baldi, Alberto; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Davio, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor signaling does not result from sequential activation of a linear pathway of proteins/enzymes, but rather from complex interactions of multiple, branched signaling routes, i.e., signaling networks. In this work we present an exhaustive study of the cross-talk between H1 and H2 histamine receptors (H1R and H2R) in U937 cells and Chinese hamster ovary-transfected cells. By desensitization assays we demonstrated the existence of a crossdesensitization between both receptors independent of protein kinase A or C. H1R-agonist stimulation inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in U937 cells following treatment of 48 hours. H1R-induced antiproliferative and apoptotic response was inhibited by an H2R agonist suggesting that the cross-talk between both receptors modifies their function. Binding and confocal microscopy studies revealed cointernalization of both receptors upon treatment with the agonists. To evaluate potential heterodimerization of the receptors, sensitized emission fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments were performed in human embryonic kidney 293T cells using H1R-cyan fluorescent protein and H2R-yellow fluorescent protein. To our knowledge these findings may represent the first demonstration of agonist-induced heterodimerization of the H1R and H2R. In addition, we also show that the inhibition of the internalization process did not prevent receptor crossdesensitization, which was mediated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2. Our study provides new insights into the complex signaling network mediated by histamine and further knowledge for the rational use of its ligands. PMID:23462507

  13. Statins and PPAR{alpha} agonists induce myotoxicity in differentiated rat skeletal muscle cultures but do not exhibit synergy with co-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy E. . E-mail: Timothy_Johnson@merck.com; Zhang, Xiaohua; Shi, Shu; Umbenhauer, Diane R.

    2005-11-01

    Statins and fibrates (weak PPAR{alpha} agonists) are prescribed for the treatment of lipid disorders. Both drugs cause myopathy, but with a low incidence, 0.1-0.5%. However, combined statin and fibrate therapy can enhance myopathy risk. We tested the myotoxic potential of PPAR subtype selective agonists alone and in combination with statins in a differentiated rat myotube model. A pharmacologically potent experimental PPAR{alpha} agonist, Compound A, induced myotoxicity as assessed by TUNEL staining at a minimum concentration of 1 nM, while other weaker PPAR{alpha} compounds, for example, WY-14643, Gemfibrozil and Bezafibrate increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, the PPAR{gamma} agonist Rosiglitazone caused little or no cell death at up to 10 {mu}M and the PPAR{delta} ligand GW-501516 exhibited comparatively less myotoxicity than that seen with Compound A. An experimental statin (Compound B) and Atorvastatin also increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei and co-treatment with WY-14643, Gemfibrozil or Bezafibrate had less than a full additive effect on statin-induced cell killing. The mechanism of PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced cell death was different from that of statins. Unlike statins, Compound A and WY-14643 did not activate caspase 3/7. In addition, mevalonate and geranylgeraniol reversed the toxicity caused by statins, but did not prevent the cell killing induced by WY-14643. Furthermore, unlike statins, Compound A did not inhibit the isoprenylation of rab4 or rap1a. Interestingly, Compound A and Compound B had differential effects on ATP levels. Taken together, these observations support the hypothesis that in rat myotube cultures, PPAR{alpha} agonism mediates in part the toxicity response to PPAR{alpha} compounds. Furthermore, PPAR{alpha} agonists and statins cause myotoxicity through distinct and independent pathways.

  14. Thymol, a dietary monoterpene phenol abrogates mitochondrial dysfunction in β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarcted rats by inhibiting oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nagoor Meeran, M F; Jagadeesh, G S; Selvaraj, P

    2016-01-25

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested to be one of the important pathological events in isoproterenol (ISO), a synthetic catecholamine and β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarction (MI). In this context, we have evaluated the impact of thymol against ISO induced oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction involved in the pathology of mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pre and co-treated with thymol (7.5 mg/kg body weight) daily for 7 days. Isoproterenol (100 mg/kg body weight) was subcutaneously injected into rats on 6th and 7th day to induce MI. To explore the extent of cardiac mitochondrial damage, the activities/levels of cardiac marker enzymes, mitochondrial lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants, lipids, calcium, adenosine triphosphate and multi marker enzymes were evaluated. Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats showed a significant increase in the activities of cardiac diagnostic markers, heart mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, lipids, calcium, and a significant decrease in the activities/levels of heart mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, isocitrate, malate, α-ketoglutarate and NADH-dehydrogenases, cytochrome-C-oxidase, and adenosine triphosphate. Thymol pre and co-treatment showed near normalized effects on all the biochemical parameters studied. Transmission electron microscopic findings and mitochondrial swelling studies confirmed our biochemical findings. The in vitro study also revealed the potent free-radical scavenging activity of thymol. Thus, thymol attenuates the involvement of ISO against oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. PMID:26721194

  15. Structure of Adenovirus Complexed with Its Internalization Receptor, αvβ5 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Charles Y.; Mathias, Patricia; Nemerow, Glen R.; Stewart, Phoebe L.

    1999-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of soluble recombinant integrin αvβ5 bound to human adenovirus types 2 and 12 (Ad2 and -12) has been determined at ∼21-Å resolution by cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM). The αvβ5 integrin is known to promote Ad cell entry. Cryo-EM has shown that the integrin-binding RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) protrusion of the Ad2 penton base protein is highly mobile (P. L. Stewart, C. Y. Chiu, S. Huang, T. Muir, Y. Zhao, B. Chait, P. Mathias, and G. R. Nemerow, EMBO J. 16:1189–1198, 1997). Sequence analysis indicated that the Ad12 RGD surface loop is shorter than that of Ad2 and probably less flexible, hence more suitable for structural characterization of the Ad-integrin complex. The cryo-EM structures of the two virus-receptor complexes revealed a ring of integrin density above the penton base of each virus serotype. As expected, the integrin density in the Ad2 complex was diffuse while that in the Ad12 complex was better defined. The integrin consists of two discrete subdomains, a globular domain with an RGD-binding cleft ∼20 Å in diameter and a distal domain with extended, flexible tails. Kinetic analysis of Ad2 interactions with αvβ5 indicated ∼4.2 integrin molecules bound per penton base at close to saturation. These results suggest that the precise spatial arrangement of five RGD protrusions on the penton base promotes integrin clustering and the signaling events required for virus internalization. PMID:10400774

  16. Palmitoylation of the recombinant human A1 adenosine receptor: enhanced proteolysis of palmitoylation-deficient mutant receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Z; Ni, Y; Szabo, G; Linden, J

    1999-01-01

    Palmitoylation of the recombinant human A(1) adenosine receptor (A(1)AR) expressed in HEK-293 cells is demonstrated by showing that hexahistidine (His(6))/Asp-Tyr-Lys-Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp-Lys (FLAG) (H/F) A(1)ARs, purified to homogeneity from cells metabolically labelled with [(3)H]palmitate, incorporate tritium into a 38-42 kDa receptor glycoprotein. The amount of palmitoylation is not affected by incubation of cells with the A(1)AR-selective agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA). A(1)AR palmitoylation is abolished by treatment with neutral hydroxylamine or by mutation of Cys-309 to Ala (C(309)-->A). Based on Western blotting and pulse-chase experiments with [(35)S]methionine, at least 90% of wild-type receptors are palmitoylated and turn over with a t1/2 of 6.4 h. Of the C(309)-->A mutated receptors, 40% appear to turn over like wild-type receptors, with a t1/2 of 7.1 h, and 60% appear to be rapidly cleaved to form a 25 kDa receptor fragment that turns over with a t1/2 of 0.8 h. In HEK-293 cell lines expressing similar numbers of wild-type or C(309)-->A mutant A(1)Rs, there is little difference in the kinetics of CPA-induced receptor internalization (1 h), down-regulation (24 h), inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, or activation of co-transfected G-protein-activated inward rectifier K(+)/cardiac inward rectifying K(+) (GIRK1/CIR K(+)) channels. Also unaffected by palmitoylation is guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]-triphosphate ([S]GTP)-sensitive binding to membranes by the agonist (125)I-labelled aminobenzyladenosine. The results suggest that palmitoylation has little effect on receptor-effector coupling, agonist-induced internalization or down-regulation. We speculate that palmitoylation may divert newly synthesized A(1)ARs from a pathway leading to rapid degradation. PMID:10455026

  17. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIII. The Parathyroid Hormone Receptors—Family B G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The type-1 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR1) is a family B G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the actions of two polypeptide ligands; parathyroid hormone (PTH), an endocrine hormone that regulates the levels of calcium and inorganic phosphate in the blood by acting on bone and kidney, and PTH-related protein (PTHrP), a paracrine-factor that regulates cell differentiation and proliferation programs in developing bone and other tissues. The type-2 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR2) binds a peptide ligand, called tuberoinfundibular peptide-39 (TIP39), and while the biologic role of the PTHR2/TIP39 system is not as defined as that of the PTHR1, it likely plays a role in the central nervous system as well as in spermatogenesis. Mechanisms of action at these receptors have been explored through a variety of pharmacological and biochemical approaches, and the data obtained support a basic “two-site” mode of ligand binding now thought to be used by each of the family B peptide hormone GPCRs. Recent crystallographic studies on the family B GPCRs are providing new insights that help to further refine the specifics of the overall receptor architecture and modes of ligand docking. One intriguing pharmacological finding for the PTHR1 is that it can form surprisingly stable complexes with certain PTH/PTHrP ligand analogs and thereby mediate markedly prolonged cell signaling responses that persist even when the bulk of the complexes are found in internalized vesicles. The PTHR1 thus appears to be able to activate the Gαs/cAMP pathway not only from the plasma membrane but also from the endosomal domain. The cumulative findings could have an impact on efforts to develop new drug therapies for the PTH receptors. PMID:25713287

  18. Ligand-induced internalization of the orexin OX1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors assessed via N-terminal SNAP and CLIP-tagging

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Richard J; Pediani, John D; Milligan, Graeme

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Many G protein-coupled receptors internalize following agonist binding. The studies were designed to identify novel means to effectively quantify this process using the orexin OX1 receptor and the cannabinoid CB1 receptor as exemplars. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The human OX1 and CB1 receptors were modified to incorporate both epitope tags and variants (SNAP and CLIP) of the enzyme O6-alkylguanine-DNA-alkyltransferase within their extracellular, N-terminal domain. Cells able to regulate expression of differing amounts of these constructs upon addition of an antibiotic were developed and analysed. KEY RESULTS Cell surface forms of each receptor construct were detected by both antibody recognition of the epitope tags and covalent binding of fluorophores to the O6-alkylguanine-DNA-alkyltransferase variants. Receptor internalization in response to agonists but not antagonists could be monitored by each approach but sensitivity was up to six- to 10-fold greater than other approaches when employing a novel, time-resolved fluorescence probe for the SNAP tag. Sensitivity was not enhanced, however, for the CLIP tag, possibly due to higher levels of nonspecific binding. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These studies demonstrate that highly sensitive and quantitative assays that monitor cell surface CB1 and OX1 receptors and their internalization by agonists can be developed based on introduction of variants of O6-alkylguanine-DNA-alkyltransferase into the N-terminal domain of the receptor. This should be equally suitable for other G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:21175569

  19. Estrogen, nitric oxide, and hypertension differentially modulate agonist-induced contractile responses in female transgenic (mRen2)27 hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Brosnihan, K Bridget; Li, Ping; Figueroa, Jorge P; Ganten, Detlev; Ferrario, Carlos M

    2008-05-01

    Clinical trials revealed that estrogen may result in cardiovascular risk in patients with coronary heart disease, despite earlier studies demonstrating that estrogen provided cardiovascular protection. It is possible that the preexisting condition of hypertension and the ability of estrogen to activate the renin-angiotensin system could confound its beneficial effects. Our hypothesis is that the attenuation of estrogen to agonist-induced vasoconstrictor responses through the activation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) is impaired by hypertension. We investigated the effects of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) replacement in normotensive Sprague-Dawley (SD) and (mRen2)27 hypertensive transgenic (TG) rats on contractile responses to three vasoconstrictors, angiotensin II (ANG II), serotonin (5-HT), and phenylephrine (PE), and on the modulatory role of vascular NO to these responses. The aorta was isolated from ovariectomized SD and TG rats treated chronically with 5 mg E(2) or placebo (P). The isometric tension of the aortic rings was measured in organ chambers, and endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the rat aorta was detected using Western blot analysis. E(2) treatment increased eNOS expression in the SD and TG aorta and reduced ANG II- and 5-HT- but not PE-induced contractions in SD and TG rats. The inhibition of NOS with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester enhanced ANG II-, 5-HT-, and PE-induced contractions in P-treated and ANG II and PE responses in E(2)-treated SD and TG rats. Only the responses to 5-HT were augmented in hypertensive rats. In conclusion, this study shows that the preexisting condition of hypertension augmented the vascular responsiveness of 5-HT, whereas the attenuation of estrogen by ANG II and 5-HT vascular responses was not impaired by hypertension. The adrenergic agonist was unresponsive to estrogen treatment. The contribution of NO as a factor contributing to the relative refractoriness of the vascular responses is dependent on the nature of the

  20. Stimulus-response coupling in monocytes infected with Leishmania. Attenuation of calcium transients is related to defective agonist-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates.

    PubMed

    Olivier, M; Baimbridge, K G; Reiner, N E

    1992-02-15

    Mononuclear phagocytes infected with Leishmania have been shown to have defective responses to extracellular stimuli. To investigate the potential relationship of these findings to alterations in calcium-dependent signaling pathways, the regulation of [Ca2+]i concentrations was examined in human peripheral blood monocytes infected with amastigotes of Leishmania donovani. Measurements of [Ca2+]i in fura-2-loaded monocytes were made at the single cell level by microfluorimetry. In normal monocytes, resting [Ca2+]i was 56 +/- 2 nM (mean +/- SEM). In contrast, in monocytes infected with Leishmania there was an approximately twofold increase in basal [Ca2+]i (122 +/- 5 nM, p less than 0.01 vs control). Treatment of cells with pertussis toxin before infection did not abrogate infection-induced increases in basal [Ca2+]i, suggesting that this effect was not mediated via the activation of a G protein coupled to phospholipase C. However, elevated resting [Ca2+]i did correlate with increased rates of 45Ca2+ uptake by infected monocytes. As expected, in response to treatment with 10(-7) M FMLP, control monocytes showed rapid net increases in [Ca2+]i of 303 +/- 19 nM. In contrast, net transients of [Ca2+]i in infected monocytes in response to FMLP were attenuated to only 137 +/- 9 nM (p less than 0.01 vs control). This result was not related to excess buffering of [Ca2+]i in infected cells as both control and infected monocytes showed equivalent transients of [Ca2+]i in response to the calcium ionophore A23187. Rather, inhibition of agonist-induced calcium release in infected cells appeared related to defective generation of second messenger because compared to control cells labeled with myo-[2-3H]inositol, little accumulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate was detected in infected monocytes. Attenuation of inositol phosphate accumulation and calcium release in response to chemotactic peptide correlated with decreased FMLP-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production

  1. Homologous desensitization of human histamine H₃ receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Espinoza, Angélica; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Histamine H₃ receptors (H₃Rs) modulate the function of the nervous system at the pre- and post-synaptic levels. In this work we aimed to determine whether, as other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), H₃Rs desensitize in response to agonist exposure. By using CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with the human H₃R (hH3R) we show that functional responses (inhibition of forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation in intact cells and stimulation of [(35)S]-GTPγS binding to cell membranes) were markedly reduced after agonist exposure. For cAMP accumulation assays the effect was significant at 60 min with a maximum at 90 min. Agonist exposure resulted in decreased binding sites for the radioligand [(3)H]-N-methyl-histamine ([(3)H]-NMHA) to intact cells and modified the sub-cellular distribution of H₃Rs, as detected by sucrose density gradients and [(3)H]-NMHA binding to cell membranes, suggesting receptor internalization. The reduction in the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation observed after agonist pre-incubation was prevented by incubation in hypertonic medium or in ice-cold medium. Agonist-induced loss in binding sites was also prevented by hypertonic medium or incubation at 4 °C, but not by filipin III, indicating clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Immunodetection showed that CHO-K1 cells express GPCR kinases (GRKs) 2/3, and both the GRK general inhibitor ZnCl₂ and a small interfering RNA against GRK-2 reduced receptor desensitization. Taken together these results indicate that hH₃Rs experience homologous desensitization upon prolonged exposure to agonists, and that this process involves the action of GRK-2 and internalization via clathrin-coated vesicles.

  2. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface. PMID:23580642

  3. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface.

  4. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXII: Nomenclature and Classification of Hydroxy-carboxylic Acid Receptors (GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B).

    PubMed

    Offermanns, Stefan; Colletti, Steven L; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Semple, Graeme; Wise, Alan; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2011-06-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptors GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B share significant sequence homology and form a small group of receptors, each of which is encoded by clustered genes. In recent years, endogenous ligands for all three receptors have been described. These endogenous ligands have in common that they are hydroxy-carboxylic acid metabolites, and we therefore have proposed that this receptor family be named hydroxy-carboxylic acid (HCA) receptors. The HCA(1) receptor (GPR81) is activated by 2-hydroxy-propanoic acid (lactate), the HCA(2) receptor (GPR109A) is a receptor for the ketone body 3-hydroxy-butyric acid, and the HCA(3) receptor (GPR109B) is activated by the β-oxidation intermediate 3-hydroxy-octanoic acid. HCA(1) and HCA(2) receptors are found in most mammalian species, whereas the HCA(3) receptor is present only in higher primates. The three receptors have in common that they are expressed in adipocytes and are coupled to G(i)-type G-proteins mediating antilipolytic effects in fat cells. HCA(2) and HCA(3) receptors are also expressed in a variety of immune cells. HCA(2) is a receptor for the antidyslipidemic drug nicotinic acid (niacin) and related compounds, and there is an increasing number of synthetic ligands mainly targeted at HCA(2) and HCA(3) receptors. The aim of this article is to give an overview on the discovery and pharmacological characterization of HCAs, and to introduce an International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR)-recommended nomenclature. We will also discuss open questions regarding this receptor family as well as their physiological role and therapeutic potential.

  5. Quantitative analysis of G-protein-coupled receptor internalization using DnaE intein-based assay.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Chen, Linjie; Zhang, Yaping; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest family of cell surface receptors, are involved in many physiological processes. They represent highly important therapeutic targets for drug discovery. Currently, there are numerous cell-based assays developed for the pharmacological profiling of GPCRs and the identification of novel agonists and antagonists. However, the development of new, faster, easier, and more cost-effective approaches to detect GPCR activity remains highly desirable. β-arrestin-dependent internalization has been demonstrated to be a common mechanism for most GPCRs. Here we describe a novel assay for quantitative analysis of GPCR internalization based on DnaE intein-mediated reconstitution of fragmented Renilla luciferase or Firefly luciferase when activated GPCRs interact with β-arrestin2 or Rab5. Further validation, using functionally divergent GPCRs, showed that EC50 values obtained for the known agonists and antagonists were in close agreement with the results of previous reports. This suggests that this assay is sensitive enough to permit quantification of GPCR internalization. Compared with conventional assays, this novel assay system is cost-effective, rapid, and easy to manipulate. These advantages may allow this assay to be used universally as a functional cell-based system for GPCR characterization and in the screening process of drug discovery. PMID:26928549

  6. N-METHYL-d-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS AND LARGE CONDUCTANCE CALCIUM-SENSITIVE POTASSIUM CHANNELS INHIBIT THE RELEASE OF OPIOID PEPTIDES THAT INDUCE μ-OPIOID RECEPTOR INTERNALIZATION IN THE RAT SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    SONG, B.; MARVIZÓN, J. C. G.

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the μ-opioid receptor, we measured μ-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced μ-opioid receptor internalization in half of the μ-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-d-aspartate (IC50=2 μM), and N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. μ-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-d-aspartate did not affect μ-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-d-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase μ-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-d-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked μ-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since μ-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  7. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and large conductance calcium-sensitive potassium channels inhibit the release of opioid peptides that induce mu-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Song, B; Marvizón, J C G

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the mu-opioid receptor, we measured mu-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced mu-opioid receptor internalization in half of the mu-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-D-aspartate (IC50=2 microM), and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. mu-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-D-aspartate did not affect mu-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-D-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase mu-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-D-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked mu-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since mu-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptors destined for the nucleus are internalized via a clathrin-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    De Angelis Campos, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Andrade, Carolina de; Miranda de Goes, Alfredo; Nathanson, Michael H.; Gomes, Dawidson A.

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} EGF and its receptor translocates to the nucleus in liver cells. {yields} Real time imaging shows that EGF moves to the nucleus. {yields} EGF moves with its receptor to the nucleus. {yields} Dynamin and clathrin are necessary for EGFR nuclear translocation. -- Abstract: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) transduces its actions via the EGF receptor (EGFR), which can traffic from the plasma membrane to either the cytoplasm or the nucleus. However, the mechanism by which EGFR reaches the nucleus is unclear. To investigate these questions, liver cells were analyzed by immunoblot of cell fractions, confocal immunofluorescence and real time confocal imaging. Cell fractionation studies showed that EGFR was detectable in the nucleus after EGF stimulation with a peak in nuclear receptor after 10 min. Movement of EGFR to the nucleus was confirmed by confocal immunofluorescence and labeled EGF moved with the receptor to the nucleus. Small interference RNA (siRNA) was used to knockdown clathrin in order to assess the first endocytic steps of EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells. A mutant dynamin (dynamin K44A) was also used to determine the pathways for this traffic. Movement of labeled EGF or EGFR to the nucleus depended upon dynamin and clathrin. This identifies the pathway that mediates the first steps for EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells.

  9. Luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor overexpressed in granulosa cells from polycystic ovary syndrome ovaries is functionally active.

    PubMed

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Gordon, Uma D; López Bernal, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with anovulatory infertility. Luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR), which is critical for ovulation, has been suggested to be expressed prematurely in the ovarian follicles of women with PCOS. This study aimed to analyse the expression and activity of LHCGR in ovarian granulosa cells from PCOS patients and the involvement of ARF6 small GTPase in LHCGR internalization. Granulosa cells (GC) isolated from follicular fluid collected during oocyte retrieval from normal women (n = 19) and women with PCOS (n = 17) were used to study differences in LHCGR protein expression and activity between normal and PCOS patients. LHCGR expression is up-regulated in GC from PCOS women. LHCGR in PCOS GC is functionally active, as shown by increased cAMP production upon human gonadotrophin (HCG)-stimulation. Moreover, ARF6 is highly expressed in GC from PCOS patients and HCG-stimulation increases the concentrations of active ARF6. The inhibition of ARF6 activation attenuates HCG-induced LHCGR internalization in both normal and PCOS GC, indicating that there are no alterations in LHCGR internalisation in GC from PCOS. In conclusion, the expression and activation of LHCGR and ARF6 are up-regulated in GC from PCOS women but the mechanism of agonist-induced LHCGR internalization is unaltered. PMID:27061682

  10. Cryptococcus neoformans Is Internalized by Receptor-Mediated or ‘Triggered’ Phagocytosis, Dependent on Actin Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both ‘zipper’ (receptor-mediated) and ‘trigger’ (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  11. [TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS IN COSMONAUT'S PERIPHERAL BLOOD CELLS AFTER LONG-DURATION MISSIONS TO THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION].

    PubMed

    Berendeeva, T A; Ponomarev, S A; Antropova, E N; Rykova, M P

    2015-01-01

    Studies of Toll-like receptors (TLR) in 20 cosmonauts-members of long-duration (124-199-day) missions to the International space station evidenced changes in relative and absolute counts of peripheral blood monocytes with TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 on the surface, expression of TLR2 and TLR6 genes, and genes of molecules involved in the TLR signaling pathway and TLR-related NF-KB-, JNK/p38- and IRF pathways on the day of return to Earth. The observed changes displayed individual variability.

  12. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXVIII. G Protein-Coupled Receptor List: Recommendations for New Pairings with Cognate Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen P. H.; Sharman, Joanna L.; Pawson, Adam J.; Benson, Helen E.; Monaghan, Amy E.; Liew, Wen Chiy; Mpamhanga, Chidochangu P.; Bonner, Tom I.; Neubig, Richard R.; Pin, Jean Philippe; Spedding, Michael; Harmar, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR) published a catalog of all of the human gene sequences known or predicted to encode G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), excluding sensory receptors. This review updates the list of orphan GPCRs and describes the criteria used by NC-IUPHAR to recommend the pairing of an orphan receptor with its cognate ligand(s). The following recommendations are made for new receptor names based on 11 pairings for class A GPCRs: hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors [HCA1 (GPR81) with lactate, HCA2 (GPR109A) with 3-hydroxybutyric acid, HCA3 (GPR109B) with 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid]; lysophosphatidic acid receptors [LPA4 (GPR23), LPA5 (GPR92), LPA6 (P2Y5)]; free fatty acid receptors [FFA4 (GPR120) with omega-3 fatty acids]; chemerin receptor (CMKLR1; ChemR23) with chemerin; CXCR7 (CMKOR1) with chemokines CXCL12 (SDF-1) and CXCL11 (ITAC); succinate receptor (SUCNR1) with succinate; and oxoglutarate receptor [OXGR1 with 2-oxoglutarate]. Pairings are highlighted for an additional 30 receptors in class A where further input is needed from the scientific community to validate these findings. Fifty-seven human class A receptors (excluding pseudogenes) are still considered orphans; information has been provided where there is a significant phenotype in genetically modified animals. In class B, six pairings have been reported by a single publication, with 28 (excluding pseudogenes) still classified as orphans. Seven orphan receptors remain in class C, with one pairing described by a single paper. The objective is to stimulate research into confirming pairings of orphan receptors where there is currently limited information and to identify cognate ligands for the remaining GPCRs. Further information can be found on the IUPHAR Database website (http://www.iuphar-db.org). PMID:23686350

  13. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXVIII. G protein-coupled receptor list: recommendations for new pairings with cognate ligands.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Anthony P; Alexander, Stephen P H; Sharman, Joanna L; Pawson, Adam J; Benson, Helen E; Monaghan, Amy E; Liew, Wen Chiy; Mpamhanga, Chidochangu P; Bonner, Tom I; Neubig, Richard R; Pin, Jean Philippe; Spedding, Michael; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-07-01

    In 2005, the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR) published a catalog of all of the human gene sequences known or predicted to encode G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), excluding sensory receptors. This review updates the list of orphan GPCRs and describes the criteria used by NC-IUPHAR to recommend the pairing of an orphan receptor with its cognate ligand(s). The following recommendations are made for new receptor names based on 11 pairings for class A GPCRs: hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors [HCA₁ (GPR81) with lactate, HCA₂ (GPR109A) with 3-hydroxybutyric acid, HCA₃ (GPR109B) with 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid]; lysophosphatidic acid receptors [LPA₄ (GPR23), LPA₅ (GPR92), LPA₆ (P2Y5)]; free fatty acid receptors [FFA4 (GPR120) with omega-3 fatty acids]; chemerin receptor (CMKLR1; ChemR23) with chemerin; CXCR7 (CMKOR1) with chemokines CXCL12 (SDF-1) and CXCL11 (ITAC); succinate receptor (SUCNR1) with succinate; and oxoglutarate receptor [OXGR1 with 2-oxoglutarate]. Pairings are highlighted for an additional 30 receptors in class A where further input is needed from the scientific community to validate these findings. Fifty-seven human class A receptors (excluding pseudogenes) are still considered orphans; information has been provided where there is a significant phenotype in genetically modified animals. In class B, six pairings have been reported by a single publication, with 28 (excluding pseudogenes) still classified as orphans. Seven orphan receptors remain in class C, with one pairing described by a single paper. The objective is to stimulate research into confirming pairings of orphan receptors where there is currently limited information and to identify cognate ligands for the remaining GPCRs. Further information can be found on the IUPHAR Database website (http://www.iuphar-db.org).

  14. Time-course of the internalization and recycling of neurokinin 1 receptors in rat dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueren; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G

    2002-07-19

    Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization in dorsal horn neurons is important for intracellular signaling in nociception. Since the rates of NK1R internalization and recycling vary substantially, particularly between cultured and native cells, it is imperative to characterize them in dorsal horn neurons. When rat spinal cord slices were incubated at 35 degrees C with 1 microM substance P (SP), NK1Rs in lamina I neurons internalized rapidly following apparent exponential association kinetics (half-life=71 s). Confocal images of neuronal somas at different incubation times revealed that NK1Rs were uniformly distributed at the cell surface up to 30 s and formed aggregates at the membrane by 60 s. NK1R-containing endosomes migrated to the cell interior at 90-120 s, and were found throughout the cytoplasm at 300 s and thereafter. Upon elimination of SP, NK1Rs recycled back to the cell surface following an apparent linear time-course. Recycling was slower than internalization, being completed in 60-90 min. Confocal microscopy revealed that NK1R-containing endosomes docked at the cell surface 45 min after the elimination of SP. NK1Rs still formed aggregates at the cell surface at 60 min, but were once again uniformly distributed along the membrane by 90 min. NK1R internalization and recycling also occurred in lamina I dendrites. NK1R-containing endosomes in dendrites did not migrate to the cytoplasm. These results show that NK1R internalization and recycling are considerably faster in dorsal horn neurons than in cultured cells, and that most NK1Rs in dorsal horn neurons are internalized when NK1R-mediated hyperalgesia is more severe.

  15. Methylation of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Promoter in Preschoolers: Links with Internalizing Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parade, Stephanie H.; Ridout, Kathryn K.; Seifer, Ronald; Armstrong, David A.; Marsit, Carmen J.; McWilliams, Melissa A.; Tyrka, Audrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that early adversity is linked to methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene, "NR3C1," which is a key regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Yet no prior work has considered the contribution of methylation of "NR3C1" to emerging behavior problems and psychopathology in…

  16. A role for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in the initiation of agonist-induced contractions of dog tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, T; Hirata, M; Ito, Y

    1985-09-01

    To elucidate the role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins-P3) in the initiation of agonist-induced contraction of the smooth muscle cells of the dog trachea, we investigated the effects of acetylcholine (ACh) on the concentrations of Ins-P3, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI-P2) or phosphatidic acid (PA). The effects of Ins-P3 on the Ca2+ stored in the smooth muscle cells were also studied in saponin-permeabilized smooth muscle cells. A half maximal or maximal Ca2+ accumulation into the cells was observed in the dispersed single, smooth muscle cells treated by saponin, in free Ca2+ concentrations of 4.6 X 10(-7) or 5 X 10(-5)M, respectively. The ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation was maximal at 0.63 nmol/10(5) cells. Effects of Ins-P3 on stored Ca2+ were observed at a free Ca2+ concentration of 3.7 X 10(-7)M, which induces about half maximal ATP-dependent Ca2+-accumulation. Ins-P3 released the Ca2+ accumulated by ATP, in a dose-dependent manner. About 40% of the total Ca2+ was released following application of 3 microM Ins-P3. The release of stored Ca2+ induced by application of Ins-P3 was followed by its re-uptake into the smooth muscle cells. Thus, the stored Ca2+ was repeatedly released with repetitive applications of Ins-P3. Application of ACh (10(-5)M) to the dog trachea stimulated the production of Ins-P3 in the soluble fraction and 10s after this application, the relative amount of Ins-P3 was 290% of the control value. 6 Concomitantly, ACh (10- 5 M) either reduced or increased the contents ofphosphatidyl inositol 4,5-biphosphate (PI-P2) or phosphatidic acid (PA) in the lipid fraction ofthe smooth muscle cells to 60% or to 350% of the control value, respectively, thereby indicating that ACh stimulates the phosphodiesteric hydrolysis of PI-P2. 7 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 10- 5M) also reduced or increased the contents of PI-P2 or PA to 80 or to 200% of the control values, respectively. However, neither histamine (10-5M), in the presence or absence of

  17. Regulation of glutamate receptor internalization by the spine cytoskeleton is mediated by its PKA-dependent association with CPG2.

    PubMed

    Loebrich, Sven; Djukic, Biljana; Tong, Zachary J; Cottrell, Jeffrey R; Turrigiano, Gina G; Nedivi, Elly

    2013-11-19

    A key neuronal mechanism for adjusting excitatory synaptic strength is clathrin-mediated endocytosis of postsynaptic glutamate receptors (GluRs). The actin cytoskeleton is critical for clathrin-mediated endocytosis, yet we lack a mechanistic understanding of its interaction with the endocytic process and how it may be regulated. Here we show that F-actin in dendritic spines physically binds the synaptic nuclear envelope 1 gene product candidate plasticity gene 2 (CPG2) in a PKA-dependent manner, and that this association is required for synaptic GluR internalization. Mutating two PKA sites on CPG2 disrupts its cytoskeletal association, attenuating GluR endocytosis and affecting the efficacy of synaptic transmission in vivo. These results identify CPG2 as an F-actin binding partner that functionally mediates interaction of the spine cytoskeleton with postsynaptic endocytosis. Further, the regulation of CPG2/F-actin association by PKA provides a gateway for cellular control of synaptic receptor internalization through second messenger signaling pathways. Recent identification of human synaptic nuclear envelope 1 as a risk locus for bipolar disorder suggests that CPG2 could play a role in synaptic dysfunction underlying neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:24191017

  18. Regulation of glutamate receptor internalization by the spine cytoskeleton is mediated by its PKA-dependent association with CPG2

    PubMed Central

    Loebrich, Sven; Djukic, Biljana; Tong, Zachary J.; Cottrell, Jeffrey R.; Turrigiano, Gina G.; Nedivi, Elly

    2013-01-01

    A key neuronal mechanism for adjusting excitatory synaptic strength is clathrin-mediated endocytosis of postsynaptic glutamate receptors (GluRs). The actin cytoskeleton is critical for clathrin-mediated endocytosis, yet we lack a mechanistic understanding of its interaction with the endocytic process and how it may be regulated. Here we show that F-actin in dendritic spines physically binds the synaptic nuclear envelope 1 gene product candidate plasticity gene 2 (CPG2) in a PKA-dependent manner, and that this association is required for synaptic GluR internalization. Mutating two PKA sites on CPG2 disrupts its cytoskeletal association, attenuating GluR endocytosis and affecting the efficacy of synaptic transmission in vivo. These results identify CPG2 as an F-actin binding partner that functionally mediates interaction of the spine cytoskeleton with postsynaptic endocytosis. Further, the regulation of CPG2/F-actin association by PKA provides a gateway for cellular control of synaptic receptor internalization through second messenger signaling pathways. Recent identification of human synaptic nuclear envelope 1 as a risk locus for bipolar disorder suggests that CPG2 could play a role in synaptic dysfunction underlying neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:24191017

  19. Effect of size and conformation of the ligand on asialoglycoprotein receptor-mediated ligand internalization and degradation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Chang, T.M.

    1987-05-01

    The rates of internalization and degradation of /sup 125/-I-labeled desialylated cyanogen bromide fragment I of orosomucoid (AS-CNBr-I) and its reduced and carboxymethylated derivative (AS-RC-CNBr-I) were compared with those of /sup 125/I-labeled asialoorosomucoid (ASOR) in rat hepatocytes. At 30 nM the rates of internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-AS-CNBr-I were greater than those of /sup 125/I-ASOR. /sup 125/I-AS-RC-CNBr-I also had a lower rate of internalization and degradation. In contrast to /sup 125/I-ASOR, when degradation was inhibited by 5 ..mu..M colchicine there was a significant intracellular accumulation of the smaller ligands. At 4/sup 0/C the hepatocytes were found to bind the fragmented ligands more than /sup 125/I-ASOR. Incubation of the cells with bound ligand at 37/sup 0/ indicated that diacytosis of /sup 125/I-ASOR was greater than the smaller ligands. Colchincine markedly enhanced diacytosis of /sup 125/I-ASOR. On the other hand, there were marked accumulation of the smaller ligands by colchicine. These results suggest that the rates of internalization, degradation and diacytosis of the ligand are affected by the size and conformation of the ligand through different rates of receptor binding and intracellular transport.

  20. Identifying bias in CCR1 antagonists using radiolabelled binding, receptor internalization, β-arrestin translocation and chemotaxis assays

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, A; Gauntner, T D; Fazzini, A; Alley, K M; Pyen, D S; Ahn, J; Ha, S J; Willett, A; Sansom, S E; Yarfi, J L; Bachovchin, K A; Mazzoni, M R; Merritt, J R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Investigators have suggested that the chemokine receptor CCR1 plays a role in multiple myeloma. Studies using antisense and neutralizing antibodies to CCR1 showed that down-regulation of the receptor altered disease progression in a mouse model. More recently, experiments utilizing scid mice injected with human myeloma cells demonstrated that the CCR1 antagonist BX471 reduced osteolytic lesions, while the CCR1 antagonist MLN-3897 prevented myeloma cell adhesion to osteoclasts. However, information is limited regarding the pharmacology of CCR1 antagonists in myeloma cells. Experimental Approach We compared several well-studied CCR1 antagonists including AZD4818, BX471, CCX354, CP-481715, MLN-3897 and PS899877 for their ability to inhibit binding of [125I]-CCL3 in vitro using membranes prepared from RPMI 8226 cells, a human multiple myeloma cell line that endogenously expresses CCR1. In addition, antagonists were assessed for their ability to modulate CCL3-mediated internalization of CCR1 and CCL3-mediated cell migration using RPMI 8226 cells. As many GPCRs signal through β–arrestin-dependent pathways that are separate and distinct from those driven by G-proteins, we also evaluated the compounds for their ability to alter β-arrestin translocation. Key Results There were clear differences between the CCR1 antagonists in their ability to inhibit CCL3 binding to myeloma cells, as well as in their ability to inhibit G–protein-dependent and -independent functional responses. Conclusions and Implications Our studies demonstrate that tissue phenotype seems to be relevant with regards to CCR1. Moreover, it appears that for CCR1 antagonists, inhibition of β-arrestin translocation is not necessarily linked to chemotaxis or receptor internalization. PMID:24990525

  1. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVI. Pattern Recognition Receptors in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Selinda; Ferguson, Brian; Symmons, Martyn F.; Boyle, Joseph P.; Monie, Tom P.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Toll, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, as the first described pattern recognition receptor (PRR) in 1996, many families of these receptors have been discovered and characterized. PRRs play critically important roles in pathogen recognition to initiate innate immune responses that ultimately link to the generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of PRRs leads to the induction of immune and inflammatory genes, including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. It is increasingly clear that many PRRs are linked to a range of inflammatory, infectious, immune, and chronic degenerative diseases. Several drugs to modulate PRR activity are already in clinical trials and many more are likely to appear in the near future. Here, we review the different families of mammalian PRRs, the ligands they recognize, the mechanisms of activation, their role in disease, and the potential of targeting these proteins to develop the anti-inflammatory therapeutics of the future. PMID:25829385

  2. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVI. Pattern recognition receptors in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Clare E; Orr, Selinda; Ferguson, Brian; Symmons, Martyn F; Boyle, Joseph P; Monie, Tom P

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Toll, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, as the first described pattern recognition receptor (PRR) in 1996, many families of these receptors have been discovered and characterized. PRRs play critically important roles in pathogen recognition to initiate innate immune responses that ultimately link to the generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of PRRs leads to the induction of immune and inflammatory genes, including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. It is increasingly clear that many PRRs are linked to a range of inflammatory, infectious, immune, and chronic degenerative diseases. Several drugs to modulate PRR activity are already in clinical trials and many more are likely to appear in the near future. Here, we review the different families of mammalian PRRs, the ligands they recognize, the mechanisms of activation, their role in disease, and the potential of targeting these proteins to develop the anti-inflammatory therapeutics of the future.

  3. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of polypeptide hormones is a regulated process: inhibition of (125I)iodoinsulin internalization in hypoinsulinemic diabetes of rat and man

    SciTech Connect

    Carpentier, J.L.; Robert, A.; Grunberger, G.; van Obberghen, E.; Freychet, P.; Orci, L.; Gorden, P.

    1986-07-01

    Much data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis is regulated in states of hormone excess. Thus, in hyperinsulinemic states there is an accelerated loss of cell surface insulin receptors. In the present experiments we addressed this question in hypoinsulinemic states, in which insulin binding to cell surface receptors is generally increased. In hepatocytes obtained from hypoinsulinemic streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, (/sup 125/I)iodoglucagon internalization was increased, while at the same time (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin internalization was decreased. The defect in (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin internalization was corrected by insulin treatment of the animal. In peripheral blood monocytes from patients with type I insulinopenic diabetes, internalization of (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin was impaired; this defect was not present in insulin-treated patients. These data in the hypoinsulinemic rat and human diabetes suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis is regulated in states of insulin deficiency as well as insulin excess. Delayed or reduced internalization of the insulin-receptor complex could amplify the muted signal caused by deficient hormone secretion.

  4. Characterization of Thrombin-Bound Dabigatran Effects on Protease-Activated Receptor-1 Expression and Signaling In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Buxin; Soto, Antonio G.; Coronel, Luisa J.; Goss, Ashley; van Ryn, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin, the key effector protease of the coagulation cascade, drives fibrin deposition and activates human platelets through protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1). These processes are critical to the progression of thrombotic diseases. Thrombin is the main target of anticoagulant therapy, and major efforts have led to the discovery of new oral direct inhibitors of thrombin. Dabigatran is the first oral anticoagulant licensed for the prevention of thromboembolisms associated with orthopedic surgery and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran is a direct thrombin inhibitor that effectively blocks thrombin’s catalytic activity but does not preclude thrombin’s exosites and binding to fibrinogen. Thus, we hypothesized that catalytically inactive thrombin retains the capacity to bind to PAR1 through exosite-I and may modulate its function independent of receptor cleavage and activation. Here, we report that dabigatran at clinically relevant concentrations is an effective and acute inhibitor of thrombin-induced PAR1 cleavage, activation, internalization, and β-arrestin recruitment in vitro. Interestingly, prolonged exposure to catalytic inactive thrombin incubated with dabigatran at 20-fold higher therapeutic concentration resulted in increased PAR1 cell-surface expression, which correlated with higher detectable levels of ubiquitinated receptor. These findings are consistent with ubiquitin function as a negative regulator of PAR1 constitutive internalization. Increased PAR1 expression also enhanced agonist-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis and endothelial barrier permeability. Thus, catalytically inactive thrombin appears to modulate PAR1 function in vitro by stabilizing receptor cell-surface expression; but given the high clearance rate of thrombin, the high concentration of dabigatran required to achieve this effect the in vivo physiologic relevance is unknown. PMID:25934730

  5. The amino terminus of GLUT4 functions as an internalization motif but not an intracellular retention signal when substituted for the transferrin receptor cytoplasmic domain

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the amino-terminal cytoplasmic domain of GLUT4 contains a phenylalanine-based targeting motif that determines its steady state distribution between the surface and the interior of cells (Piper, R. C., C. Tai, P. Kuleza, S. Pang, D. Warnock, J. Baenziger, J. W. Slot, H. J. Geuze, C. Puri, and D. E. James. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 121:1221). To directly measure the effect that the GLUT4 amino terminus has on internalization and subsequent recycling back to the cell surface, we constructed chimeras in which this sequence was substituted for the amino-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the human transferrin receptor. The chimeras were stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells and their endocytic behavior characterized. The GLUT4-transferrin receptor chimera was recycled back to the cell surface with a rate similar to the transferrin receptor, indicating that the GLUT4 sequence was not promoting intracellular retention of the chimera. The GLUT4-transferrin receptor chimera was internalized at half the rate of the transferrin receptor. Substitution of an alanine for phenylalanine at position 5 slowed internalization of the chimera by twofold, to a level characteristic of bulk membrane internalization. However, substitution of a tyrosine increased the rate of internalization to the level of the transferrin receptor. Neither of these substitutions significantly altered the rate at which the chimeras were recycled back to the cell surface. These results demonstrate that the major function of the GLUT4 amino-terminal domain is to promote the effective internalization of the protein from the cell surface, via a functional phenylalanine-based internalization motif, rather than retention of the transporter within intracellular structures. PMID:8120093

  6. Fc gamma receptor IIb on target B cells promotes rituximab internalization and reduces clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sean H; Vaughan, Andrew T; Ashton-Key, Margaret; Williams, Emily L; Dixon, Sandra V; Chan, H T Claude; Beers, Stephen A; French, Ruth R; Cox, Kerry L; Davies, Andrew J; Potter, Kathleen N; Mockridge, C Ian; Oscier, David G; Johnson, Peter W M; Cragg, Mark S; Glennie, Martin J

    2011-09-01

    The anti-CD20 mAb rituximab is central to the treatment of B-cell malignancies, but resistance remains a significant problem. We recently reported that resistance could be explained, in part, by internalization of rituximab (type I anti-CD20) from the surface of certain B-cell malignancies, thus limiting engagement of natural effectors and increasing mAb consumption. Internalization of rituximab was most evident in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), but the extent of internalization was heterogeneous within each disease. Here, we show that the inhibitory FcγRIIb on target B cells promotes this process and is largely responsible for the observed heterogeneity across a range of B-cell malignancies. Internalization correlated strongly with FcγRIIb expression on normal and malignant B cells, and resulted in reduced macrophage phagocytosis of mAb-coated targets. Furthermore, transfection of FcγRIIb into FcγRIIb negative Ramos cells increased internalization of rituximab in a dose-dependent manner. Target-cell FcγRIIb promoted rituximab internalization in a cis fashion and was independent of FcγRIIb on neighboring cells. It became phosphorylated and internalized along with CD20:anti-CD20 complexes before lysosomal degradation. In MCL patients, high FcγRIIb expression predicted less durable responses after rituximab-containing regimens. Therefore, target-cell FcγRIIb provides a potential biomarker of response to type I anti-CD20 mAb.

  7. Identification and Quantification of a New Family of Peptide Endocannabinoids (Pepcans) Showing Negative Allosteric Modulation at CB1 Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Mark; Chicca, Andrea; Tamborrini, Marco; Eisen, David; Lerner, Raissa; Lutz, Beat; Poetz, Oliver; Pluschke, Gerd; Gertsch, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    The α-hemoglobin-derived dodecapeptide RVD-hemopressin (RVDPVNFKLLSH) has been proposed to be an endogenous agonist for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). To study this peptide, we have raised mAbs against its C-terminal part. Using an immunoaffinity mass spectrometry approach, a whole family of N-terminally extended peptides in addition to RVD-Hpα were identified in rodent brain extracts and human and mouse plasma. We designated these peptides Pepcan-12 (RVDPVNFKLLSH) to Pepcan-23 (SALSDLHAHKLRVDPVNFKLLSH), referring to peptide length. The most abundant Pepcans found in the brain were tested for CB1 receptor binding. In the classical radioligand displacement assay, Pepcan-12 was the most efficacious ligand but only partially displaced both [3H]CP55,940 and [3H]WIN55,212-2. The data were fitted with the allosteric ternary complex model, revealing a cooperativity factor value α < 1, thus indicating a negative allosteric modulation. Dissociation kinetic studies of [3H]CP55,940 in the absence and presence of Pepcan-12 confirmed these results by showing increased dissociation rate constants induced by Pepcan-12. A fluorescently labeled Pepcan-12 analog was synthesized to investigate the binding to CB1 receptors. Competition binding studies revealed Ki values of several Pepcans in the nanomolar range. Accordingly, using competitive ELISA, we found low nanomolar concentrations of Pepcans in human plasma and ∼100 pmol/g in mouse brain. Surprisingly, Pepcan-12 exhibited potent negative allosteric modulation of the orthosteric agonist-induced cAMP accumulation, [35S]GTPγS binding, and CB1 receptor internalization. Pepcans are the first endogenous allosteric modulators identified for CB1 receptors. Given their abundance in the brain, Pepcans could play an important physiological role in modulating endocannabinoid signaling. PMID:22952224

  8. Unit Title: Imaging the Insertion of Superecliptic pHluorin Labeled Dopamine D2 Receptor Using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kathryn M.; Li, Yun; Lin, Da-Ting

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of mechanisms governing receptor insertion to the plasma membrane (PM) requires an experimental approach with excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. Here we present a strategy that enables dynamic visualization of insertion events for dopamine D2 receptors into the PM. This approach includes tagging a pH-sensitive GFP, superecliptic pHluorin, to the extracellular domain of the receptor. By imaging pHluorin-tagged receptors under total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), we were able to directly visualize individual receptor insertion events into the PM in cultured neurons. This novel imaging approach can be applied to both secreted proteins and many membrane proteins with an extracellular domain labeled with superecliptic pHluorin, and will ultimately allow for detailed dissections of the key mechanisms governing secretion of soluble proteins or the insertion of different membrane proteins to the PM. PMID:25559003

  9. Shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization of protease-activated receptor 1 can be separated by mutation of putative phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Hammes, S R; Shapiro, M J; Coughlin, S R

    1999-07-20

    The thrombin receptor PAR1 becomes rapidly phosphorylated upon activation by either thrombin or exogenous SFLLRN agonist peptide. Substitution of alanine for all serine and threonine residues in the receptor's cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail ablated phosphorylation and yielded a receptor defective in both shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization. These observations suggested that activation-dependent phosphorylation of PAR1's cytoplasmic tail is required for both shutoff and agonist-triggered internalization. To identify the phosphorylation site(s) that are necessary for these functions, we generated three mutant receptors in which alanine was substituted for serine and threonine residues in the amino-terminal, middle, and carboxyl-terminal thirds of PAR1's cytoplasmic tail. When stably expressed in fibroblasts, all three mutated receptors were rapidly phosphorylated in response to agonist, while a mutant in which all serines and threonines in the cytoplasmic tail were converted to alanines was not. This result suggests that phosphorylation can occur at multiple sites in PAR1's cytoplasmic tail. Alanine substitutions in the N-terminal and C-terminal portions of the tail had no effect on either receptor shutoff or agonist-triggered internalization. By contrast, alanine substitutions in the "middle" serine cluster between Ser(391) and Ser(406) yielded a receptor with considerably slower shutoff of signaling after thrombin activation than the wild type. Surprisingly, this same mutant was indistinguishable from the wild type in agonist-triggered internalization and degradation. Overexpression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) and GRK3 "suppressed" the shutoff defect of the S --> A (391-406) mutant, consistent with this defect being due to altered receptor phosphorylation. These results suggest that specific phosphorylation sites are required for rapid receptor shutoff, but phosphorylation at multiple alternative sites is sufficient for agonist

  10. Morphine-induced mu opioid receptor trafficking enhances reward yet prevents compulsive drug use.

    PubMed

    Berger, Amy Chang; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2011-07-01

    Morphine, heroin and other commonly abused opioids induce little mu opioid receptor (MOR) trafficking compared to endogenous opioids. We utilized knock-in mice expressing a mutant recycling MOR (RMOR) that desensitizes and is internalized in response to morphine to show that facilitating MOR trafficking not only enhances morphine reward but, despite this, reduces the development of addiction-like behaviours. To demonstrate this, we developed a novel model of the transition from controlled to compulsive drug use that recapitulates many features of human addiction, including persistent drug seeking despite adverse consequences and a decreased preference for alternative rewards. These behaviours emerged spontaneously in wild-type but not RMOR mice, and their intensity predicted the reinstatement of morphine seeking after extended abstinence, while prior morphine intake did not. These results confirm previous findings in the rat that addiction can be dissociated from both reward and consumption. Most importantly, these results demonstrate that one can simultaneously reduce the 'addictiveness' of morphine and enhance its desirable effects by promoting agonist-induced MOR trafficking.

  11. International Validation of Two Human Recombinant Estrogen Receptor (ERa) Binding Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    An international validation study has been successfully completed for 2 competitive binding assays using human recombinant ERa. Assays evaluated included the Freyberger-Wilson (FW) assay using a full length human ER, and the Chemical Evaluation and Research Institute (CERI) assay...

  12. Role of FQQI motif in the internalization, trafficking, and signaling of guanylyl-cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A in cultured murine mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Mani, Indra; Garg, Renu; Pandey, Kailash N

    2016-01-01

    Binding of the cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to transmembrane guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP in target cells. To delineate the critical role of an endocytic signal in intracellular sorting of the receptor, we have identified a FQQI (Phe(790), Gln(791), Gln(792), and Ile(793)) motif in the carboxyl-terminal region of NPRA. Mouse mesangial cells (MMCs) were transiently transfected with the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-tagged wild-type (WT) and mutant constructs of eGFP-NPRA. The mutation FQQI/AAAA, in the eGFP-NPRA cDNA sequence, markedly attenuated the internalization of mutant receptors by almost 49% compared with the WT receptor. Interestingly, we show that the μ1B subunit of adaptor protein-1 binds directly to a phenylalanine-based FQQI motif in the cytoplasmic tail of the receptor. However, subcellular trafficking indicated that immunofluorescence colocalization of the mutated receptor with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1), lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and Rab 11 marker was decreased by 57% in early endosomes, 48% in lysosomes, and 42% in recycling endosomes, respectively, compared with the WT receptor in MMCs. The receptor containing the mutated motif (FQQI/AAAA) also produced a significantly decreased level of intracellular cGMP during subcellular trafficking than the WT receptor. The coimmunoprecipitation assay confirmed a decreased level of colocalization of the mutant receptor with subcellular compartments during endocytic processes. The results suggest that the FQQI motif is essential for the internalization and subcellular trafficking of NPRA during the hormone signaling process in intact MMCs.

  13. DNA binding to human leukocytes. Evidence for a receptor-mediated association, internalization, and degradation of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, R M; Gabor, G T; Merritt, M M

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that white blood cells possess DNA on their outer membranes. In this study we set out to determine whether exogenous DNA bound to cells in a fashion compatible with a ligand receptor union. Purified populations of white blood cells; neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN), adherent mononuclear cells (ADMC), rosetting lymphocytes (E+ cells), and nonrosetting lymphocytes (E- cells) were incubated with radiolabeled lambda phage DNA in increasing concentrations. Binding of [3H]DNA was a saturable process and was inhibited by excess cold DNA and prior trypsinization of the cells. Rate zonal density centrifugation of purified cell membrane preparations confirmed that DNA was binding to the outer cell surface. The dissociation constant for all four cell types was approximately 10(-9) M, and from 0.81 X 10(3) to 2.6 X 10(3) molecules of lambda phage DNA bound to each cell depending upon cell type. Binding was not competitively inhibited by RNA, polydeoxyadenylic acid-polydeoxythymidylic acid (poly [d(A).d(T)]), or mononucleotides. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE)-separated proteins from PMN, ADMC, E+, and E- cells were electrophoretically blotted onto nitrocellulose sheets; a probe of biotin-labeled DNA indicated a single species of DNA-binding molecule migrating in a position consistent with a molecular weight of 30,000. Isotopic and immunofluorescent studies indicate that DNA is internalized and degraded to oligonucleotides; this process is inhibited by cycloheximide. These results support the notion that there is a common binding site for DNA on white blood cells, that the stoichiometry of the association is compatible with a ligand receptor relationship, and that this apparent receptor is responsible for the endocytosis and degradation of exogenous DNA. Images PMID:3001145

  14. Melanocortin 5 receptor signaling and internalization: role of MAPK/ERK pathway and β-arrestins 1/2.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Adriana R; Almeida, Henrique; Gouveia, Alexandra M

    2012-09-25

    The Melanocortin 5 receptor (MC5R) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that exhibits high affinity for α-MSH. Here we present evidence for MC5R-GFP internalization and subsequent recycling to cell surface, in α-MSH-stimulated HeLa cells. This melanocortin induces a biphasic activation of ERK1/2 with an early peak at 15min, a G(i)-protein driven, β-arrestins 1/2 independent process, and a late sustained activation that is regulated by β-arrestins 1/2. ERK1/2 lead to downstream phosphorylation of 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinases (p90RSK) and mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1). Only a small fraction (10%) of phosphorylated p90RSK and ERK1/2 translocates to the nucleus inducing c-Fos expression. α-MSH also activates CREB through cAMP/PKA pathway. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, where MC5R is endogenously expressed, α-MSH also induces phosphorylation and cytosolic retention of the same signaling molecules. These findings provide new evidence on the signaling mechanisms underlying MC5R biological response to α-MSH.

  15. GABA-induced uncoupling of GABA/benzodiazepine site interactions is mediated by increased GABAA receptor internalization and associated with a change in subunit composition.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M L; Ferreri, M C; Gravielle, M C

    2014-01-17

    Persistent activation of GABAA receptors triggers compensatory changes in receptor function that are relevant to physiological, pathological and pharmacological conditions. Chronic treatment of cultured neurons with GABA for 48h has been shown to produce a down-regulation of receptor number and an uncoupling of GABA/benzodiazepine site interactions with a half-time of 24-25h. Down-regulation is the result of a transcriptional repression of GABAA receptor subunit genes and depends on activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels. The mechanism of this uncoupling is currently unknown. We have previously demonstrated that a single brief exposure of rat primary neocortical cultures to GABA for 5-10min (t½=3min) initiates a process that results in uncoupling hours later (t½=12h) without a change in receptor number. Uncoupling is contingent upon GABAA receptor activation and independent of voltage-gated calcium influx. This process is accompanied by a selective decrease in subunit mRNA levels. Here, we report that the brief GABA exposure induces a decrease in the percentage of α3-containing receptors, a receptor subtype that exhibits a high degree of coupling between GABA and benzodiazepine binding sites. Initiation of GABA-induced uncoupling is prevented by co-incubation of GABA with high concentrations of sucrose suggesting that it is dependent on a receptor internalization step. Moreover, results from immunocytochemical and biochemical experiments indicate that GABA exposure causes an increase in GABAA receptor endocytosis. Together, these data suggest that the uncoupling mechanism involves an initial increase in receptor internalization followed by activation of a signaling cascade that leads to selective changes in receptor subunit levels. These changes might result in the assembly of receptors with altered subunit compositions that display a lower degree of coupling between GABA and benzodiazepine sites. Uncoupling might represent a homeostatic mechanism

  16. Delta opioid receptor analgesia: recent contributions from pharmacology and molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte Lina

    2012-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors represent a promising target for the development of novel analgesics. A number of tools have been developed recently that have significantly improved our knowledge of delta receptor function in pain control. These include several novel delta agonists with potent analgesic properties, as well as genetic mouse models with targeted mutations in the delta opioid receptor gene. Also, recent findings have further documented the regulation of delta receptor function at cellular level, which impacts on the pain-reducing activity of the receptor. These regulatory mechanisms occur at transcriptional and post-translational levels, along agonist-induced receptor activation, signaling and trafficking, or in interaction with other receptors and neuromodulatory systems. All these tools for in vivo research, as well as proposed mechanisms at molecular level, have tremendously increased our understanding of delta receptor physiology, and contribute to designing innovative strategies for the treatment of chronic pain and other diseases such as mood disorders. PMID:21836459

  17. An Ultra-High Fluorescence Enhancement and High Throughput Assay for Revealing Expression and Internalization of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Wang, Xiaojuan; Cheng, Tiantian; Xia, Yongqing; Lao, Jun; Ge, Baosheng; Ren, Hao; Khan, Naseer Ullah; Huang, Fang

    2016-04-18

    Revealing chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression, distribution, and internalization levels in different cancers helps to evaluate cancer progression or prognosis and to set personalized treatment strategy. We here describe a sensitive and high-throughput immunoassay for determining CXCR4 expression and distribution in cancer cells. The assay is accessible to a wide range of users in an ordinary lab only by dip-coating poly(styrene-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) spheres on the glass substrate. The self- assembled spheres form three-dimensional photonic colloidal crystals which enhance the fluorescence of CF647 and Alexa Fluor 647 by a factor of up to 1000. CXCR4 in cells is detected by using the sandwich immunoassay, where the primary antibody recognizes CXCR4 and the secondary antibody is labeled with CF647. With the newly established assay, we quantified the total expression of CXCR4, its distribution on the cell membrane and cytoplasm, and revealed their internalization level upon SDF-1α activation in various cancer cells, even for those with extremely low expression level. PMID:26879206

  18. Biology and function of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor: report of an international and interdisciplinary conference.

    PubMed

    Esser, Charlotte

    2012-08-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor present in many cells. The AhR links environmental chemical stimuli with adaptive responses, such as detoxification, cellular homoeostasis or immune responses. Furthermore, novel roles of AhR in physiological and genetic functions are being discovered. This is a report of a recent meeting in Düsseldorf. The meeting highlighted that AhR research has moved from its focus on toxic effects of dioxins and other environmental pollutants to its biological roles. For instance, it was recently discovered that AhR-responsive elements in retrotransposons contribute to the functional structure of the genome. Other exciting new reports concerned the way plant-derived compounds in our diet are necessary for a fully functioning immune system of the gut. Also, human brain tumours use the AhR system to gain growth advantages. Other aspects covered were neurotoxicology, the circadian rhythm, or the breadth of the adaptive and innate immune system (hematopoietic stem cells, dendritic cells, T cells, mast cells). Finally, the meeting dealt with the discovery of new xenobiotic and natural ligands and their use in translational medicine, or cancer biology and AhR.

  19. Alpha1a-Adrenoceptor Genetic Variant Triggers Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Hyperproliferation and Agonist Induced Hypertrophy via EGFR Transactivation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gradinaru, Irina; Babaeva, Ekaterina; Schwinn, Debra A; Oganesian, Anush

    2015-01-01

    α1a Adrenergic receptors (α1aARs) are the predominant AR subtype in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). α1aARs in resistance vessels are crucial in the control of blood pressure, yet the impact of naturally occurring human α1aAR genetic variants in cardiovascular disorders remains poorly understood. To this end, we present novel findings demonstrating that 3D cultures of vascular SMCs expressing human α1aAR-247R (247R) genetic variant demonstrate significantly increased SMC contractility compared with cells expressing the α1aAR-WT (WT) receptor. Stable expression of 247R genetic variant also triggers MMP/EGFR-transactivation dependent serum- and agonist-independent (constitutive) hyperproliferation and agonist-dependent hypertrophy of SMCs. Agonist stimulation reduces contractility Using pathway-specific inhibitors we determined that the observed hyperproliferation of 247R-expressing cells is triggered via β-arrestin1/Src/MMP-2/EGFR/ERK-dependent mechanism. MMP-2-specific siRNA inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation indicating MMP-2 involvement in 247R-triggered hyperproliferation in SMCs. β-arrestin1-specific shRNA also inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation but did not affect hypertrophy in 247R-expressing SMCs, indicating that agonist-dependent hypertrophy is independent of β-arrestin1. Our data reveal that in different cardiovascular cells the same human receptor genetic variant can activate alternative modulators of the same signaling pathway. Thus, our findings in SMCs demonstrate that depending on the type of cells expressing the same receptor (or receptor variant), different target-specific inhibitors could be used to modulate aberrant hyperproliferative or hypertrophic pathways in order to restore normal phenotype.

  20. Single-domain antibodies that compete with the natural ligand fibroblast growth factor block the internalization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Veggiani, Gianluca; Ossolengo, Giuseppe; Aliprandi, Marisa; Cavallaro, Ugo; Marco, Ario de

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Recombinant antibodies for FGFR1 were isolated from a llama naive library in VHH format. {yields} These antibodies compete with the natural ligand FGF-2 for the same epitope on FGFR1. {yields} The antibody competition inhibits the FGF-2-dependent internalization of FGFR1. -- Abstract: Single-domain antibodies in VHH format specific for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) were isolated from a phage-display llama naive library. In particular, phage elution in the presence of the natural receptor ligand fibroblast growth factor (FGF) allowed for the identification of recombinant antibodies that compete with FGF for the same region on the receptor surface. These antibodies posses a relatively low affinity for FGFR1 and were never identified when unspecific elution conditions favoring highly affine binders were applied to panning procedures. Two populations of competitive antibodies were identified that labeled specifically the receptor-expressing cells in immunofluorescence and recognize distinct epitopes. Antibodies from both populations effectively prevented FGF-dependent internalization and nuclear accumulation of the receptor in cultured cells. This achievement indicates that these antibodies have a capacity to modulate the receptor physiology and, therefore, constitute powerful reagents for basic research and a potential lead for therapeutic applications.

  1. Characterization of IgA and IgM binding and internalization by surface-expressed human Fcα/μ receptor.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Esther M; Trinh, K Ryan; Lim, Hana; Wims, Letitia A; Morrison, Sherie L

    2011-09-01

    The Fcα/μ receptor (Fcα/μR) is an unusual Fc receptor in that it binds to two different antibody isotypes, IgA and IgM. This receptor is of interest because it is thought to be involved in the capture of IgA- and IgM-immune complexes and antigen presentation. To further characterize this receptor, we were able to stably express human Fcα/μR on the surface of the 293T cell line. Using this system, we determined the affinity of the interactions of the receptor with IgA and IgM, which led to novel insights including the important finding that IgM polymers can bind to human Fcα/μR in the absence of J chain. This is in contrast to the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), which requires the presence of J chain to bind to polymeric IgA and IgM. The dissociation constants (K(d)) of all of the different human IgA isotypes and allotypes for human Fcα/μR were determined, and we show that the N-linked glycans on IgA1 are not required for binding to the receptor. In addition, we demonstrate that IgA can be rapidly internalized by human Fcα/μR in the presence of cross-linking antibody.

  2. PPAR Agonist-Induced Reduction of Mcp1 in Atherosclerotic Plaques of Obese, Insulin-Resistant Mice Depends on Adiponectin-Induced Irak3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Arnould, Thierry; Tsatsanis, Christos; Holvoet, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists are used to treat dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. In this study, we examined molecular mechanisms that explain differential effects of a PPARα agonist (fenofibrate) and a PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) on macrophages during obesity-induced atherogenesis. Twelve-week-old mice with combined leptin and LDL-receptor deficiency (DKO) were treated with fenofibrate, rosiglitazone or placebo for 12 weeks. Only rosiglitazone improved adipocyte function, restored insulin sensitivity, and inhibited atherosclerosis by decreasing lipid-loaded macrophages. In addition, it increased interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-3 (Irak3) and decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (Mcp1) expressions, indicative of a switch from M1 to M2 macrophages. The differences between fenofibrate and rosiglitazone were independent of Pparγ expression. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), we identified the rosiglitazone-associated increase in adiponectin as cause of the increase in Irak3. Interestingly, the deletion of Irak3 in BMDM (IRAK3−/− BMDM) resulted in activation of the canonical NFκB signaling pathway and increased Mcp1 protein secretion. Rosiglitazone could not decrease the elevated Mcp1 secretion in IRAK3−/− BMDM directly and fenofibrate even increased the secretion, possibly due to increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. Furthermore, aortic extracts of high-fat insulin-resistant LDL-receptor deficient mice, with lower adiponectin and Irak3 and higher Mcp1, showed accelerated atherosclerosis. In aggregate, our results emphasize an interaction between PPAR agonist-mediated increase in adiponectin and macrophage-associated Irak3 in the protection against atherosclerosis by PPAR agonists. PMID:23620818

  3. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIX. Cannabinoid Receptors and Their Ligands: Beyond CB1 and CB2

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, A. C.; Abood, M. E.; Alexander, S. P. H.; Di Marzo, V.; Elphick, M. R.; Greasley, P. J.; Hansen, H. S.; Kunos, G.; Mackie, K.; Mechoulam, R.; Ross, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    There are at least two types of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). Ligands activating these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) include the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, numerous synthetic compounds, and endogenous compounds known as endocannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists have also been developed. Some of these ligands activate or block one type of cannabinoid receptor more potently than the other type. This review summarizes current data indicating the extent to which cannabinoid receptor ligands undergo orthosteric or allosteric interactions with non-CB1, non-CB2 established GPCRs, deorphanized receptors such as GPR55, ligand-gated ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and other ion channels or peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors. From these data, it is clear that some ligands that interact similarly with CB1 and/or CB2 receptors are likely to display significantly different pharmacological profiles. The review also lists some criteria that any novel “CB3” cannabinoid receptor or channel should fulfil and concludes that these criteria are not currently met by any non-CB1, non-CB2 pharmacological receptor or channel. However, it does identify certain pharmacological targets that should be investigated further as potential CB3 receptors or channels. These include TRP vanilloid 1, which possibly functions as an ionotropic cannabinoid receptor under physiological and/or pathological conditions, and some deorphanized GPCRs. Also discussed are 1) the ability of CB1 receptors to form heteromeric complexes with certain other GPCRs, 2) phylogenetic relationships that exist between CB1/CB2 receptors and other GPCRs, 3) evidence for the existence of several as-yet-uncharacterized non-CB1, non-CB2 cannabinoid receptors; and 4) current cannabinoid receptor nomenclature. PMID:21079038

  4. Stabilizing effects of G protein on the active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor differ depending on G protein type.

    PubMed

    Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) trigger various cellular and physiological responses upon the ligand binding. The ligand binding induces conformational change in GPCRs which allows G protein to interact with the receptor. The interaction of G protein also affects the active conformation of GPCRs. In this study, we have investigated the effects of Gαi1, Gαo and chimeric Gαqi5 on the active conformation of the adenosine A1 receptor, as each Gα showed difference in the interaction with adenosine A1 receptor. The conformational changes in the adenosine A1 receptor were detected as the agonist-induced decreases in efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins (FPs) fused at the two intracellular domains of the adenosine A1 receptor. Amplitudes of the agonist-induced FRET decreases were subtle when the FP-tagged adenosine A1 receptor was expressed alone, whereas they were significantly enhanced when co-expressed with Gαi1Gβ1Gγ22 (Gi1) or Gαqi5Gβ1Gγ22 (Gqi5) but not with GαοGβ1Gγ22 (Go). The enhancement of the agonist-induced FRET decrease in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly larger than that of Gi1. Furthermore, the FRET recovery upon the agonist removal in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly slower than that of Gi1. From these results it was revealed that the agonist-bound active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor is unstable without the binding of G protein and that the stabilizing effects of G protein differ depending on the types of G protein.

  5. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: upregulation, age-related effects and associations with drug use

    PubMed Central

    Melroy-Greif, W. E.; Stitzel, J. A.; Ehringer, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that exogenously bind nicotine. Nicotine produces rewarding effects by interacting with these receptors in the brain’s reward system. Unlike other receptors, chronic stimulation by an agonist induces an upregulation of receptor number that is not due to increased gene expression in adults; while upregulation also occurs during development and adolescence there have been some opposing findings regarding a change in corresponding gene expression. These receptors have also been well studied with regard to human genetic associations and, based on evidence suggesting shared genetic liabilities between substance use disorders, numerous studies have pointed to a role for this system in comorbid drug use. This review will focus on upregulation of these receptors in adulthood, adolescence and development, as well as the findings from human genetic association studies which point to different roles for these receptors in risk for initiation and continuation of drug use. PMID:26351737

  6. Non-ionotropic signaling by the NMDA receptor: controversy and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Gray, John A; Zito, Karen; Hell, Johannes W

    2016-01-01

    Provocative emerging evidence suggests that the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor can signal in the absence of ion flux through the receptor. This non-ionotropic signaling is thought to be due to agonist-induced conformational changes in the receptor, independently of channel opening. Non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling has been proposed to be sufficient to induce synaptic long-term depression (LTD), directly challenging the decades-old model that prolonged low-level calcium influx is required to induce LTD. Here, we briefly review these recent findings, focusing primarily on the potential role of non-ionotropic signaling in NMDA receptor-mediated LTD. Further reports concerning additional roles of non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling are also discussed. If validated, this new view of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling will usher in an exciting new era of exploring synapse function and dysfunction. PMID:27303637

  7. Non-ionotropic signaling by the NMDA receptor: controversy and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Gray, John A; Zito, Karen; Hell, Johannes W

    2016-01-01

    Provocative emerging evidence suggests that the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor can signal in the absence of ion flux through the receptor. This non-ionotropic signaling is thought to be due to agonist-induced conformational changes in the receptor, independently of channel opening. Non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling has been proposed to be sufficient to induce synaptic long-term depression (LTD), directly challenging the decades-old model that prolonged low-level calcium influx is required to induce LTD. Here, we briefly review these recent findings, focusing primarily on the potential role of non-ionotropic signaling in NMDA receptor-mediated LTD. Further reports concerning additional roles of non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling are also discussed. If validated, this new view of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling will usher in an exciting new era of exploring synapse function and dysfunction.

  8. Non-ionotropic signaling by the NMDA receptor: controversy and opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Gray, John A.; Zito, Karen; Hell, Johannes W.

    2016-01-01

    Provocative emerging evidence suggests that the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor can signal in the absence of ion flux through the receptor. This non-ionotropic signaling is thought to be due to agonist-induced conformational changes in the receptor, independently of channel opening. Non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling has been proposed to be sufficient to induce synaptic long-term depression (LTD), directly challenging the decades-old model that prolonged low-level calcium influx is required to induce LTD. Here, we briefly review these recent findings, focusing primarily on the potential role of non-ionotropic signaling in NMDA receptor-mediated LTD. Further reports concerning additional roles of non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling are also discussed. If validated, this new view of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling will usher in an exciting new era of exploring synapse function and dysfunction. PMID:27303637

  9. Alterations in detergent solubility of heterotrimeric G proteins after chronic activation of G(i/o)-coupled receptors: changes in detergent solubility are in correlation with onset of adenylyl cyclase superactivation.

    PubMed

    Bayewitch, M L; Nevo, I; Avidor-Reiss, T; Levy, R; Simonds, W F; Vogel, Z

    2000-04-01

    Prolonged G(i/o) protein-coupled receptor activation has been shown to lead to receptor internalization and receptor desensitization. In addition, it is well established that although acute activation of these receptors leads to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase (AC), long-term activation results in increased AC activity (especially evident on removal of the inhibitory agonist), a phenomenon defined as AC superactivation or sensitization. Herein, we show that chronic exposure to agonists of G(i)-coupled receptors also leads to a decrease in cholate detergent solubility of G protein subunits, and that antagonist treatment after such chronic agonist exposure leads to a time-dependent reversal of the cholate insolubility. With Chinese hamster ovary and COS cells transfected with several G(i/o)-coupled receptors (i.e., mu- and kappa-opioid, and m(4)-muscarinic), we observed that although no overall change occurred in total content of G(alphai)- and beta(1)-subunits, chronic agonist treatment led to a marked reduction in the ability of 1% cholate to solubilize G(betagamma) as well as G(alphai). This solubility shift is exclusively observed with G(alphai), and was not seen with G(alphas). The disappearance and reappearance of G(alphai) and G(betagamma) subunits from and to the detergent-soluble fractions occur with similar time courses as observed for the onset and disappearance of AC superactivation. Lastly, pertussis toxin, which blocks acute and chronic agonist-induced AC inhibition and superactivation, also blocks the shift in detergent solubility. These results suggest a correlation between the solubility shift of the heterotrimeric G(i) protein and the generation of AC superactivation.

  10. Discovery of LAS101057: A Potent, Selective, and Orally Efficacious A2B Adenosine Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The structure−activity relationships for a series of pyrazine-based A2B adenosine receptor antagonists are described. From this work, LAS101057 (17), a potent, selective, and orally efficacious A2B receptor antagonist, was identified as a clinical development candidate. LAS101057 inhibits agonist-induced IL-6 production in human fibroblasts and is active in an ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mouse model after oral administration, reducing airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, Th2 cytokine production, and OVA-specific IgE levels. PMID:24900298

  11. (−)-Epigallocatechin gallate causes internalization of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Seiji; Nagao, Tomokazu; To, Satoshi; Joe, Andrew K.; Shimizu, Masahito; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kozawa, Osamu; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Weinstein, I.Bernard

    2008-01-01

    We recently found that the inhibitory effect of (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with alterations in lipid organization in the plasma membrane of colon cancer cells. Since changes in lipid organizations are thought to play a role in the trafficking of several membrane proteins, in this study we examined the effects of EGCG on cellular localization of the EGFR in SW480 cells. Treatment of the cells for 30 min with as little as 1 μg/ml of EGCG caused a decrease in cell surface-associated EGFRs and this was associated with internalization of EGFRs into endosomal vesicles. Similar effects were seen with a green fluorescent protein (GFP)–EGFR fusion protein. As expected, the EGFR protein was phosphorylated at tyrosine residues, ubiquitinated and partially degraded when the cells were treated with EGF, but treatment with EGCG caused none of these effects. The loss of EGFRs from the cell surface induced by treating the cells with EGF for 30 min persisted for at least 2 h. However, the loss of EGFRs from the cell surface induced by temporary exposure to EGCG was partially restored within 1–2 h. These studies provide the first evidence that EGCG can induce internalization of EGFRs into endosomes, which can recycle back to the cell surface. This sequestrating of inactivated EGFRs into endosomes may explain, at least in part, the ability of EGCG to inhibit activation of the EGFR and thereby exert anticancer effects. PMID:18586691

  12. Internalization and degradation of human alpha-A interferon bound to bovine MDBK cells: regulation of the decay and resynthesis of receptors.

    PubMed

    Branca, A A; D'Alessandro, S B; Baglioni, C

    1983-01-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled human interferon alpha-A (HuIFN-alpha A) to receptors of bovine MDBK cells was investigated. About 4-fold more 125I-interferon was bound at 37 degrees C than at 0 degrees C. To establish whether the cell-bound IFN was internalized, the cells were treated with diluted acetic acid, a procedure known to remove polypeptides bound to the cell surface. About 80% of the IFN bound at 0 degrees C was dissociated from the cells by this treatment, whereas only 45% of that bound after a 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C was dissociated. Release of cell-bound 125I-interferon by cells washed and incubated in fresh medium was next examined at the two temperatures. At 0 degrees C, up to 50% of cell-bound IFN was released into the medium over a 2 h period, whereas at 37 degrees C the cell-bound radioactivity was slowly released over several hours as acid-soluble degradation products. Interferon was therefore internalized and degraded by MDBK cells incubated at 37 degrees C, but not by cells incubated at 0 degrees C. The increased binding at 37 degrees C could possibly be explained by the internalization of IFN/receptor complexes and by the recycling of the receptors to the cell surface. This recycling was limited, however, since incubation of MDBK cells with unlabeled IFN led to a rapid decrease or down regulation of available receptors. Recovery of binding activity was prevented by the addition of inhibitors of protein and RNA synthesis, suggesting that de novo synthesis of receptors was required. The half-life of the IFN receptor in the presence of cycloheximide was about 3 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Acute inflammation induces segmental, bilateral, supraspinally mediated opioid release in the rat spinal cord, as measured by μ-opioid receptor internalization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure opioid release in the spinal cord during acute and long-term inflammation using μ-opioid receptor (MOR) internalization. In particular, we determined whether opioid release occurs in the segments receiving the noxious signals or in the entire spinal cord, and whether it involves supraspinal signals. Internalization of neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1Rs) was measured to track the intensity of the noxious stimulus. Rats received peptidase inhibitors intrathecally to protect opioids from degradation. Acute inflammation of the hindpaw with formalin induced moderate MOR internalization in the L5 segment bilaterally, whereas NK1R internalization occurred only ipsilaterally. MOR internalization was restricted to the lumbar spinal cord, regardless of whether the peptidase inhibitors were injected in a lumbar or thoracic site. Formalin-induced MOR internalization was substantially reduced by isoflurane anesthesia. It was also markedly reduced by a lidocaine block of the cervical-thoracic spinal cord (which did not affect the evoked NK1R internalization) indicating that spinal opioid release is mediated supraspinally. In the absence of peptidase inhibitors, formalin and hindpaw clamp induced a small amount of MOR internalization, which was significantly higher than in controls. To study spinal opioid release during chronic inflammation, we injected Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in the hindpaw and peptidase inhibitors intrathecally. Two days later, no MOR or NK1R internalization was detected. Furthermore, CFA inflammation decreased MOR internalization induced by clamping the inflamed hindpaw. These results show that acute inflammation, but not chronic inflammation, induce segmental opioid release in the spinal cord that involves supraspinal signals. PMID:19298846

  14. Role of Cysteine Residues in the Carboxyl-Terminus of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Intracellular Traffic and Postendocytic Processing.

    PubMed

    Melo-Nava, Brenda; Casas-González, Patricia; Pérez-Solís, Marco A; Castillo-Badillo, Jean; Maravillas-Montero, José L; Jardón-Valadez, Eduardo; Zariñán, Teresa; Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo; Gallay, Nathalie; Reiter, Eric; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications occurring during the biosynthesis of G protein-coupled receptors include glycosylation and palmitoylation at conserved cysteine residues located in the carboxyl-terminus of the receptor. In a number of these receptors, these modifications play an important role in receptor function and particularly, in intracellular trafficking. In the present study, the three cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the human FSHR were replaced with glycine by site-directed mutagenesis. Wild-type and mutant (Cys627/629/655Gly) FSHRs were then transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells and analyzed for cell-surface plasma membrane expression, agonist-stimulated signaling and internalization, and postendocytic processing in the absence and presence of lysosome and/or proteasome inhibitors. Compared with the wild-type FSHR, the triple mutant FSHR exhibited ~70% reduction in plasma membrane expression as well as a profound attenuation in agonist-stimulated cAMP production and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Incubation of HEK-293 cells expressing the wild-type FSHR with 2-bromopalmitate (palmitoylation inhibitor) for 6 h, decreased plasma membrane expression of the receptor by ~30%. The internalization kinetics and β-arrestin 1 and 2 recruitment were similar between the wild-type and triple mutant FSHR as disclosed by assays performed in non-equilibrium binding conditions and by confocal microscopy. Cells expressing the mutant FSHR recycled the internalized FSHR back to the plasma membrane less efficiently than those expressing the wild-type FSHR, an effect that was counteracted by proteasome but not by lysosome inhibition. These results indicate that replacement of the cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the FSHR, impairs receptor trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane and its recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface following agonist-induced internalization. Since in the FSHR these

  15. Role of Cysteine Residues in the Carboxyl-Terminus of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Intracellular Traffic and Postendocytic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Nava, Brenda; Casas-González, Patricia; Pérez-Solís, Marco A.; Castillo-Badillo, Jean; Maravillas-Montero, José L.; Jardón-Valadez, Eduardo; Zariñán, Teresa; Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo; Gallay, Nathalie; Reiter, Eric; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications occurring during the biosynthesis of G protein-coupled receptors include glycosylation and palmitoylation at conserved cysteine residues located in the carboxyl-terminus of the receptor. In a number of these receptors, these modifications play an important role in receptor function and particularly, in intracellular trafficking. In the present study, the three cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the human FSHR were replaced with glycine by site-directed mutagenesis. Wild-type and mutant (Cys627/629/655Gly) FSHRs were then transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells and analyzed for cell-surface plasma membrane expression, agonist-stimulated signaling and internalization, and postendocytic processing in the absence and presence of lysosome and/or proteasome inhibitors. Compared with the wild-type FSHR, the triple mutant FSHR exhibited ~70% reduction in plasma membrane expression as well as a profound attenuation in agonist-stimulated cAMP production and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Incubation of HEK-293 cells expressing the wild-type FSHR with 2-bromopalmitate (palmitoylation inhibitor) for 6 h, decreased plasma membrane expression of the receptor by ~30%. The internalization kinetics and β-arrestin 1 and 2 recruitment were similar between the wild-type and triple mutant FSHR as disclosed by assays performed in non-equilibrium binding conditions and by confocal microscopy. Cells expressing the mutant FSHR recycled the internalized FSHR back to the plasma membrane less efficiently than those expressing the wild-type FSHR, an effect that was counteracted by proteasome but not by lysosome inhibition. These results indicate that replacement of the cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the FSHR, impairs receptor trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane and its recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface following agonist-induced internalization. Since in the FSHR these

  16. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXIII: classification of prostanoid receptors, updating 15 years of progress.

    PubMed

    Woodward, D F; Jones, R L; Narumiya, S

    2011-09-01

    It is now more than 15 years since the molecular structures of the major prostanoid receptors were elucidated. Since then, substantial progress has been achieved with respect to distribution and function, signal transduction mechanisms, and the design of agonists and antagonists (http://www.iuphar-db.org/DATABASE/FamilyIntroductionForward?familyId=58). This review systematically details these advances. More recent developments in prostanoid receptor research are included. The DP(2) receptor, also termed CRTH2, has little structural resemblance to DP(1) and other receptors described in the original prostanoid receptor classification. DP(2) receptors are more closely related to chemoattractant receptors. Prostanoid receptors have also been found to heterodimerize with other prostanoid receptor subtypes and nonprostanoids. This may extend signal transduction pathways and create new ligand recognition sites: prostacyclin/thromboxane A(2) heterodimeric receptors for 8-epi-prostaglandin E(2), wild-type/alternative (alt4) heterodimers for the prostaglandin FP receptor for bimatoprost and the prostamides. It is anticipated that the 15 years of research progress described herein will lead to novel therapeutic entities. PMID:21752876

  17. Stimulation of glutamate receptors in the ventral tegmental area is necessary for serotonin-2 receptor-induced increases in mesocortical dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Pehek, E A; Hernan, A E

    2015-04-01

    Modulation of dopamine (DA) released by serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptors has been implicated in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. The mesocortical DA system has been implicated particularly in the cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. Agonism at 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with increases in cortical DA release. Evidence indicates that 5-HT2A receptors in the cortex regulate mesocortical DA release through stimulation of a "long-loop" feedback system from the PFC to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and back. However, a causal role for VTA glutamate in the 5-HT2-induced increases in PFC DA has not been established. The present study does so by measuring 5-HT2 agonist-induced DA release in the cortex after infusions of glutamate antagonists into the VTA of the rat. Infusions of a combination of a N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) (AP-5: 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid) and an AMPA/kainate (CNQX: 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) receptor antagonist into the VTA blocked the increases in cortical DA produced by administration of the 5-HT2 agonist DOI [(±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine] (2.5mg/kg s.c.). These results demonstrate that stimulation of glutamate receptors in the VTA is necessary for 5-HT2 agonist-induced increases in cortical DA.

  18. Stimulation of glutamate receptors in the ventral tegmental area is necessary for serotonin-2 receptor-induced increases in mesocortical dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Pehek, E A; Hernan, A E

    2015-04-01

    Modulation of dopamine (DA) released by serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptors has been implicated in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. The mesocortical DA system has been implicated particularly in the cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. Agonism at 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with increases in cortical DA release. Evidence indicates that 5-HT2A receptors in the cortex regulate mesocortical DA release through stimulation of a "long-loop" feedback system from the PFC to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and back. However, a causal role for VTA glutamate in the 5-HT2-induced increases in PFC DA has not been established. The present study does so by measuring 5-HT2 agonist-induced DA release in the cortex after infusions of glutamate antagonists into the VTA of the rat. Infusions of a combination of a N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) (AP-5: 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid) and an AMPA/kainate (CNQX: 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) receptor antagonist into the VTA blocked the increases in cortical DA produced by administration of the 5-HT2 agonist DOI [(±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine] (2.5mg/kg s.c.). These results demonstrate that stimulation of glutamate receptors in the VTA is necessary for 5-HT2 agonist-induced increases in cortical DA. PMID:25637799

  19. Preliminary study on the inhibition of nuclear internalization of Tat peptides by conjugation with a receptor-specific peptide and fluorescent dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Duanwen; Liang, Kexiang; Ye, Yunpeng; Tetteh, Elizabeth; Achilefu, Samuel

    2006-02-01

    Numerous studies have shown that basic Tat peptide (48-57) internalized non-specifically in cells and localized in the nucleus. However, localization of imaging agents in cellular nucleus is not desirable because of the potential mutagenesis. When conjugated to the peptides that undergo receptor-mediated endocytosis, Tat peptide could target specific cells or pathologic tissue. We tested this hypothesis by incorporating a somatostatin receptor-avid peptide (octreotate, Oct) and two different fluorescent dyes, Cypate 2 (Cy2) and fluorescein 5'-carboxlic acid (5-FAM), into the Tat-peptide sequence. In addition to the Cy2 or 5-FAM-labeled Oct conjugated to Tat peptide (Tat) to produce Tat-Oct-Cypate2 or Tat-Oct-5-FAM, we also labeled the Tat the Tat peptide with these dyes (Tat-Cy2 and Tat-5-FAM) to serve as positive control. A somatostatin receptor-positive pancreatic tumor cell line, AR42J, was used to assess cell internalization. The results show that Tat-5-FAM and Tat-Cypate2 localized in both nucleus and cytoplasm of the cells. In contrast to Tat-Oct-Cypate2, which localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, Tat-Oct-5-FAM internalized in the cytoplasm but not in the nucleus of AR42J cells. The internalizations were inhibited by adding non-labeled corresponding peptides, suggesting that the endocytoses of each group of labeled and the corresponding unlabeled compounds occurred through a common pathway. Thus, fluorescent probes and endocytosis complex between octreotate and somatostatin receptors in cytoplasm could control nuclear internalization of Tat peptides.

  20. Proteasome inhibition blocks ligand-induced dynamic processing and internalization of epidermal growth factor receptor via altered receptor ubiquitination and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kesarwala, Aparna H; Samrakandi, Mustapha M; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2009-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR), a member of the EGF superfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases, is a critical regulator of cell growth and an important target for single agent and combination anticancer therapeutics. To further investigate the dynamics of ligand-induced EGFR processing and regulation noninvasively, we developed a chimeric EGFR-firefly luciferase (FLuc) fusion reporter to directly monitor processing of EGFR in real-time. In a stable HeLa cell line expressing the reporter at physiologically relevant levels, bioluminescence imaging continuously monitored reporter dynamics, correlating with the ligand-induced response of endogenous EGFR as determined by Western blot, subcellular localization of an EGFR-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein, and validated pharmacologic responses. The signaling competency of the reporter was confirmed by gene rescue experiments in EGFR-null cells. Bioluminescence analysis further showed that proteasome inhibition with bortezomib or MG132 attenuated overall ligand-induced degradation of EGFR. In cells expressing EGFR-GFP, pretreatment with proteasome inhibitors trapped essentially all of the receptor at the cell membrane both before and after ligand-induced activation with EGF. Furthermore, proteasome inhibition enhanced receptor ubiquitination in both the basal and ligand-activated states as well as delayed the processing of ligand-activated phosphorylation of the receptor, kinetically correlating with attenuated receptor degradation. These observations point to a potential mechanism for the synergistic therapeutic effects of combination EGFR- and proteasome-targeted therapies.

  1. Unexpected antipsychotic-like activity with the muscarinic receptor ligand (5R,6R)6-(3-propylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane .

    PubMed

    Bymaster, F P; Shannon, H E; Rasmussen, K; Delapp, N W; Mitch, C H; Ward, J S; Calligaro, D O; Ludvigsen, T S; Sheardown, M J; Olesen, P H; Swedberg, M D; Sauerberg, P; Fink-Jensen, A

    1998-09-01

    (5R,6R)6-(3-propylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3 .2.1]octane (PTAC) is a potent muscarinic receptor ligand with high affinity for central muscarinic receptors and no or substantially less affinity for a large number of other receptors or binding sites including dopamine receptors. The ligand exhibits partial agonist effects at muscarinic M2 and M4 receptors and antagonist effects at muscarinic M1, M3 and M5 receptors. PTAC inhibited conditioned avoidance responding, dopamine receptor agonist-induced behavior and D-amphetamine-induced FOS protein M5 expression in the nucleus accumbens without inducing catalepsy, tremor or salivation at pharmacologically relevant doses. The effect of PTAC on conditioned avoidance responding and dopamine receptor agonist-induced behavior was antagonized by the acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine. The compound selectively inhibited dopamine cell firing (acute administration) as well as the number of spontaneously active dopamine cells (chronic administration) in the limbic ventral tegmental area (A10) relative to the non-limbic substantia nigra, pars compacta (A9). The results demonstrate that PTAC exhibits functional dopamine receptor antagonism despite its lack of affinity for the dopamine receptors and indicate that muscarinic receptor partial agonists may be an important new approach in the medical treatment of schizophrenia.

  2. Transferrin receptor functions as a signal-transduction molecule for its own recycling via increases in the internal Ca2+ concentration.

    PubMed

    Sainte-Marie, J; Lafont, V; Pécheur, E I; Favero, J; Philippot, J R; Bienvenüe, A

    1997-12-15

    Transferrin binding to its receptor modulates transferrin receptor (Tf-R) recycling rates in several cells [Klausner, R. D., Van Renswoude, J., Ashwell, G., Kempf, C., Schechter, A., Dean, A. & Bridges, K. R. (1983a) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 4715-4724; Gironès, N. & Davis, R. J. (1989) Biochem. J. 264, 35-46; Sainte-Marie, J., Vidal, M., Bette-Bobillo, P., Philippot, J. R. & Bienvenüe, A. (1991) Eur. J. Biochem. 201, 295-302]. To delineate the mechanism of this regulation, we hypothesized that the binding of the ligand to its receptor could lead to activation of several second-messenger pathways, which may redundantly stimulate recycling of the receptor. The effects of different regulators of Ca2+ flux or concentrations were investigated on the Tf-R-recycling pathway; these studies were carried out in two cell types. Perhexiline, a calcium antagonist, slowed receptor recycling in comparison with the control by more than 80% in L2C cells and by 60% in Jurkat cells (B and T lymphoblasts, respectively) but did not affect their internalization rate. Perhexiline thus trapped considerable amounts of Tf-R in the internal compartment. Ca2+ chelators, such as EGTA or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N,N'-tetraacetic acid, and a Ca2+-channel inhibitor (Ni2+) decreased drastically the recycling rate of Tf-R. Tf-R recycling was shown to be slowed by a calmodulin antagonist. Conversely, artificial elevation of free internal Ca2+ in L2C cells, using lectin, accelerated the recycling rate. These results suggest that the intracellular Ca2+ concentration plays an important role in the outward flow of transferrin receptors. Consequently, we examined the role of transferrin in internal free Ca2+ regulation. The addition of transferrin or anti-(Tf-R) Ig specifically elicited a rise in [Ca2+], as demonstrated by inefficacy of apotransferrin or irrelevant antibodies. These results suggest that Ca2+ is a regulator of Tf-R recycling and that Tf-R seems to function as a signal

  3. Trafficking properties of the D5 dopamine receptor.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Dawn; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2011-05-01

    Dopamine receptors are important for diverse biological functions and are important pharmacological targets in human medicine. Signal transduction from the dopamine receptors is controlled at many levels, including by the process of receptor trafficking. Little is known regarding the endocytic and postendocytic trafficking properties of the D5 dopamine receptor. Here, we show that endocytosis of the D5 receptor can be achieved both homologously, through direct receptor activation by agonist, and also heterologously, due to independent activation of protein kinase C (PKC). In contrast, the D1 receptor is endocytosed only in response to agonist but not PKC activation. We have identified the residue in the third intracellular loop of the D5 receptor that is both necessary for PKC-mediated endocytosis of the D5 receptor and sufficient to induce PKC-mediated endocytosis when introduced to the D1 receptor. In addition, we show that endocytosis of D5 through both pathways is dependent on clathrin and dynamin but that only agonist-induced endocytosis engages β-arrestin 2. Together, these data show that the D5 receptor shows a trafficking profile distinct from that of any of the other dopamine receptors.

  4. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of insulin in lower vertebrates: internalization and intracellular processing of 125I-insulin in isolated hepatocytes of lamprey and frog.

    PubMed

    Lappova, Y L; Leibush, B N

    1995-10-01

    The binding of 125I-insulin to cellular insulin receptors and the internalization of insulin-receptor complexes have been studied in isolated hepatocytes of frog and lamprey. Two classes of binding sites (Kd 10(-9) and 10(-8) M) were found in cells of both species. The molecular weight of the insulin receptor alpha-subunit was 130 kDa in both species. Internalization of bound 125I-insulin in both species was found in the temperature range 0 to 20 degrees. Cells "loaded" with 125I-insulin were used to estimate the fate of the internalized ligand. Release of internalized ligand from frog cells increased at temperatures ranging from 0 to 20 degrees. At 0 degrees the degraded 125I-insulin was 5%, at 5 degrees 7%, and at 20 degrees 17% of total radioactivity accumulated in the medium. In lamprey hepatocytes there was neither radioactivity accumulation in the incubation medium nor release from cells at all temperatures studied. The intracellular degradation of internalized 125I-insulin in frog hepatocytes was much lower than that in lamprey cells. In frog hepatocytes the specific binding of 125I-insulin was increased twofold in the presence of the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine. In contrast no increase was found in lamprey hepatocytes. In conclusion, the processing pathways of internalized insulin in the cells of ectothermal and endothermal vertebrates are generally similar but in ectothermal animals all events take place at lower temperatures and at lower rates. The peculiarities of insulin processing in lamprey hepatocytes most likely result from the transformation of hepatocytes during the nonfeeding prespawning period. PMID:8575649

  5. Agonist-independent desensitization and internalization of the human platelet-activating factor receptor by coumermycin-gyrase B-induced dimerization.

    PubMed

    Perron, Amelie; Chen, Zhang-Guo; Gingras, Denis; Dupre, Denis J; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2003-07-25

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid with potent and diverse physiological actions, particularly as a mediator of inflammation. We have reported previously that mutant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) affect the functional properties of coexpressed wild-type human PAF receptor (hPAFR) (Le Gouill, C., Parent, J. L., Caron, C. A., Gaudreau, R., Volkov, L., Rola-Pleszczynski, M., and Stankova, J. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 12548-12554). Increasing evidence suggests that dimerization of GPCRs may play an important role in the regulation of their biological activity. Additional data have also suggested that dimerization may be important in the subsequent internalization of the delta-opioid receptor. To investigate the specific role of dimerization in the internalization process of GPCRs, we generated a fusion protein of hPAFR and bacterial DNA gyrase B (GyrB), dimerized through the addition of coumermycin. We found that dimerization potentiates PAF-induced internalization of hPAFR-GyrB in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing c-Myc-hPAFR-GyrB. Coumermycin-driven dimerization was also sufficient to induce an agonist-independent sequestration process in an arrestin- and clathrin-independent manner. Moreover, the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine and GF109203X blocked the coumermycin-induced desensitization of hPAFR-GyrB, suggesting the implication of protein kinase C in the molecular mechanism mediating the agonist-independent desensitization of the receptor. Taken together, these findings suggest a novel mechanism of GPCR desensitization and internalization triggered by dimerization. PMID:12756251

  6. TLR7 agonist induced repression of hepatocellular carcinoma via the TLR7-IKK-NF-κB-IL6 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    REN, XINGBIN; WANG, FEI; JI, BAOJU; GAO, CHUNHAI

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key members of innate immunity, involved in the defense against diseases, and evidence has revealed that TLR4/5 is involved in the carcinogenesis of hepatic cancer. TLR7 belongs to the TLR family, and its roles in immune-associated hepatic diseases have been well characterized; however, the consequences of agonist targeting of TLR7 in hepatic cancer have not previously been reported. The present study aimed to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of Imiquimod, a TLR7 agonist, on hepatic carcinogenesis by affecting the self-renewal of hepatic cancer stem cells. To detect the effects of this TLR7 agonist on hepatic cancer cells an MTT assay, mammosphere formation assay, ALDEFLUOR™ fluorescence-based stem cell sorting was used, and the potential signaling involved in the mechanism was investigated by western blot analysis. The TLR7 agonist Imiquimod demonstrated inhibitory effects on the cell proliferation and mammosphere formation of hepatic cells and stem cells, and decreased stem cell number (P<0.01). These effects may be achieved via the TLR7/IκB kinase/nuclear factor-κB/interleukin-6 signaling pathway, with decreased levels of Snail expression. The present study demonstrated the effects and mechanisms of the TLR7 agonist on hepatic cancer occurred via suppression of the self-renewal of cancer stem cells, indicating novel potential functions of the TLR7 agonist in the treatment of HCC. PMID:27123047

  7. Estrogen Receptor Alpha Is Expressed in Mesenteric Mesothelial Cells and Is Internalized in Caveolae upon Freund's Adjuvant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Petra; Szabó, Arnold; Katz, Sándor; Likó, István; Patócs, Attila; L.Kiss, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Transformation of epithelial cells into connective tissue cells (epithelial-mesenchymal transition, EMT) is a complex mechanism involved in tumor metastasis, and in normal embryogenesis, while type II EMT is mainly associated with inflammatory events and tissue regenaration. In this study we examined type II EMT at the ultrastructural and molecular level during the inflammatory process induced by Freund's adjuvant treatment in rat mesenteric mesothelial cells. We found that upon the inflammatory stimulus mesothelial cells lost contact with the basal lamina and with each other, and were transformed into spindle-shaped cells. These morphological changes were accompanied by release of interleukins IL-1alpha, -1beta and IL-6 and by secretion of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) into the peritoneal cavity. Mesothelial cells also expressed estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) as shown by immunolabeling at the light and electron microscopical levels, as well as by quantitative RT-PCR. The mRNA level of ER-α showed an inverse correlation with the secretion of TGF-β. At the cellular and subcellular levels ER-α was colocalized with the coat protein caveolin-1 and was found in the plasma membrane of mesothelial cells, in caveolae close to multivesicular bodies (MVBs) or in the membrane of these organelles, suggesting that ER-α is internalized via caveola-mediated endocytosis during inflammation. We found asymmetric, thickened, electron dense areas on the limiting membrane of MVBs (MVB plaques) indicating that these sites may serve as platforms for collecting and organizing regulatory proteins. Our morphological observations and biochemical data can contribute to form a potential model whereby ER-α and its caveola-mediated endocytosis might play role in TGF-β induced type II EMT in vivo. PMID:24244516

  8. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and PAR2 mediate relaxation of guinea pig internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Che

    2014-02-10

    Activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and PAR2 stimulates contraction of the rat but relaxation of the guinea pig colon. The aim of the present study was to investigate PAR effects on internal anal sphincter (IAS) motility. We measured relaxation of isolated muscle strips from the guinea pig IAS caused by PAR agonists using isometric transducers. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the existence of PAR. In the IAS, thrombin and PAR1 peptide agonists TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2 evoked moderate to marked relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, trypsin and PAR2 peptide agonists 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2, SLIGRL-NH2 and SLIGKV-NH2 produced relaxation. In contrast, both PAR1 and PAR2 inactive control peptides did not elicit relaxation. Furthermore, the selective PAR1 antagonist vorapaxar and PAR2 antagonist GB 83 specifically inhibited thrombin and trypsin-induced relaxations, respectively. RT-PCR revealed the presence of PAR1 and PAR2 in the IAS. This indicates that PAR1 and PAR2 mediate the IAS relaxation. The relaxant responses of TFLLR-NH2 and trypsin were attenuated by N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), indicating involvement of NO. These responses were not affected by tetrodotoxin, implying that the PAR effects are not neurally mediated. On the other hand, PAR4 agonists GYPGKF-NH2, GYPGQV-NH2 and AYPGKF-NH2 did not cause relaxation or contraction, suggesting that PAR4 is not involved in the sphincter motility. Taken together, these results demonstrate that both PAR1 and PAR2 mediate relaxation of the guinea pig IAS through the NO pathway. PAR1 and PAR2 may regulate IAS tone and might be potential therapeutic targets for anal motility disorders. PMID:24631471

  9. Stabilin-1 and Stabilin-2 are specific receptors for the cellular internalization of phosphorothioate-modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Colton M.; Donner, Aaron J.; Blank, Emma E.; Egger, Andrew W.; Kellar, Brianna M.; Østergaard, Michael E.; Seth, Punit P.; Harris, Edward N.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorothioate (PS)-modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been extensively investigated over the past three decades as pharmacological and therapeutic agents. One second generation ASO, Kynamro™, was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and over 35 second generation PS ASOs are at various stages of clinical development. In this report, we show that the Stabilin class of scavenger receptors, which were not previously thought to bind DNA, do bind and internalize PS ASOs. With the use of primary cells from mouse and rat livers and recombinant cell lines each expressing Stabilin-1 and each isoform of Stabilin-2 (315-HARE and 190-HARE), we have determined that PS ASOs bind with high affinity and these receptors are responsible for bulk, clathrin-mediated endocytosis within the cell. Binding is primarily dependent on salt-bridge formation and correct folding of the intact protein receptor. Increased internalization rates also enhanced ASO potency for reducing expression of the non-coding RNA Malat-1, in Stabilin-expressing cell lines. A more thorough understanding of mechanisms by which ASOs are internalized in cells and their intracellular trafficking pathways will aid in the design of next generation antisense agents with improved therapeutic properties. PMID:26908652

  10. In silico analysis of the binding of agonists and blockers to the β2-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Karpiak, Joel; Berk, Barkin; Costanzi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a complex phenomenon. Here, we applied Induced Fit docking (IFD) in tandem with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to generate hypotheses on the conformational changes induced to the β2-adrenergic receptor by agonist binding, preliminary to the sequence of events that characterize activation of the receptor. This analysis, corroborated by a follow-up molecular dynamics study, suggested that agonists induce subtle movements to the fifth transmembrane domain (TM5) of the receptor. Furthermore, molecular dynamics also highlighted a correlation between movements of TM5 and the second extracellular loop (EL2), suggesting that freedom of motion of EL2 is required for the agonist-induced TM5 displacement. Importantly, we also showed that the IFD/LDA procedure can be used as a computational means to distinguish agonists from blockers on the basis of the differential conformational changes induced to the receptor. In particular, the two most predictive models obtained are based on the RMSD induced to Ser207 and on the counterclockwise rotation induced to TM5. PMID:21334234

  11. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVII. G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor and Its Pharmacologic Modulators.

    PubMed

    Prossnitz, Eric R; Arterburn, Jeffrey B

    2015-07-01

    Estrogens are critical mediators of multiple and diverse physiologic effects throughout the body in both sexes, including the reproductive, cardiovascular, endocrine, nervous, and immune systems. As such, alterations in estrogen function play important roles in many diseases and pathophysiological conditions (including cancer), exemplified by the lower prevalence of many diseases in premenopausal women. Estrogens mediate their effects through multiple cellular receptors, including the nuclear receptor family (ERα and ERβ) and the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family (GPR30/G protein-coupled estrogen receptor [GPER]). Although both receptor families can initiate rapid cell signaling and transcriptional regulation, the nuclear receptors are traditionally associated with regulating gene expression, whereas GPCRs are recognized as mediating rapid cellular signaling. Estrogen-activated pathways are not only the target of multiple therapeutic agents (e.g., tamoxifen, fulvestrant, raloxifene, and aromatase inhibitors) but are also affected by a plethora of phyto- and xeno-estrogens (e.g., genistein, coumestrol, bisphenol A, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). Because of the existence of multiple estrogen receptors with overlapping ligand specificities, expression patterns, and signaling pathways, the roles of the individual receptors with respect to the diverse array of endogenous and exogenous ligands have been challenging to ascertain. The identification of GPER-selective ligands however has led to a much greater understanding of the roles of this receptor in normal physiology and disease as well as its interactions with the classic estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ and their signaling pathways. In this review, we describe the history and characterization of GPER over the past 15 years focusing on the pharmacology of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds that have been employed to unravel the biology of this most recently recognized estrogen receptor.

  12. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVII. G Protein–Coupled Estrogen Receptor and Its Pharmacologic Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are critical mediators of multiple and diverse physiologic effects throughout the body in both sexes, including the reproductive, cardiovascular, endocrine, nervous, and immune systems. As such, alterations in estrogen function play important roles in many diseases and pathophysiological conditions (including cancer), exemplified by the lower prevalence of many diseases in premenopausal women. Estrogens mediate their effects through multiple cellular receptors, including the nuclear receptor family (ERα and ERβ) and the G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) family (GPR30/G protein–coupled estrogen receptor [GPER]). Although both receptor families can initiate rapid cell signaling and transcriptional regulation, the nuclear receptors are traditionally associated with regulating gene expression, whereas GPCRs are recognized as mediating rapid cellular signaling. Estrogen-activated pathways are not only the target of multiple therapeutic agents (e.g., tamoxifen, fulvestrant, raloxifene, and aromatase inhibitors) but are also affected by a plethora of phyto- and xeno-estrogens (e.g., genistein, coumestrol, bisphenol A, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). Because of the existence of multiple estrogen receptors with overlapping ligand specificities, expression patterns, and signaling pathways, the roles of the individual receptors with respect to the diverse array of endogenous and exogenous ligands have been challenging to ascertain. The identification of GPER-selective ligands however has led to a much greater understanding of the roles of this receptor in normal physiology and disease as well as its interactions with the classic estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ and their signaling pathways. In this review, we describe the history and characterization of GPER over the past 15 years focusing on the pharmacology of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds that have been employed to unravel the biology of this most recently recognized estrogen receptor. PMID

  13. Systemic treatment with a 5HT1a agonist induces anti-oxidant protection and preserves the retina from mitochondrial oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Manas R; Ahmed, Chulbul M; Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Han, Pingyang; Li, Hong; Jivanji, Hiral; Mao, Haoyu; Lewin, Alfred S

    2015-11-01

    Chronic oxidative stress contributes to age related diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD). Earlier work showed that the 5-hydroxy-tryptamine 1a (5HT1a) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) protects retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells from hydrogen peroxide treatment and mouse retinas from oxidative insults including light injury. In our current experiments, RPE derived cells subjected to mitochondrial oxidative stress were protected from cell death by the up-regulation of anti-oxidant enzymes and of the metal ion chaperone metallothionein. Differentiated RPE cells were resistant to oxidative stress, and the expression of genes for protective proteins was highly increased by oxidative stress plus drug treatment. In mice treated with 8-OH-DPAT, the same genes (MT1, HO1, NqO1, Cat, Sod1) were induced in the neural retina, but the drug did not affect the expression of Sod2, the gene for manganese superoxide dismutase. We used a mouse strain deleted for Sod2 in the RPE to accelerate age-related oxidative stress in the retina and to test the impact of 8-OH-DPAT on the photoreceptor and RPE degeneration developed in these mice. Treatment of mice with daily injections of the drug led to increased electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes in dark-adapted mice and to a slight improvement in visual acuity. Most strikingly, in mice treated with a high dose of the drug (5 mg/kg) the structure of the RPE and Bruch's membrane and the normal architecture of photoreceptor outer segments were preserved. These results suggest that systemic treatment with this class of drugs may be useful in preventing geographic atrophy, the advanced form of dry AMD, which is characterized by RPE degeneration.

  14. Prostaglandins and muscarinic agonists induce cyclic AMP attenuation by two distinct mechanisms in the pregnant-rat myometrium. Interaction between cyclic AMP and Ca2+ signals.

    PubMed Central

    Goureau, O; Tanfin, Z; Harbon, S

    1990-01-01

    In pregnant-rat myometrium (day 21 of gestation), isoprenaline-induced cyclic AMP accumulation, resulting from receptor-mediated activation of adenylate cyclase, was negatively regulated by prostaglandins [PGE2, PGF2 alpha; EC50 (concn. giving 50% of maximal response) = 2 nM] and by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (EC50 = 2 microM). PG-induced inhibition was prevented by pertussis-toxin treatment, supporting the idea that it was mediated by the inhibitory G-protein Gi through the inhibitory pathway of the adenylate cyclase. Both isoprenaline-induced stimulation and PG-evoked inhibition of cyclic AMP were insensitive to Ca2+ depletion. By contrast, carbachol-evoked attenuation of cyclic AMP accumulation was dependent on Ca2+ and was insensitive to pertussis toxin. The inhibitory effect of carbachol was mimicked by ionomycin. Indirect evidence was thus provided for the enhancement of cyclic AMP degradation by a Ca2(+)-dependent phosphodiesterase activity in the muscarinic-mediated effect. The attenuation of cyclic AMP elicited by carbachol coincided with carbachol-stimulated inositol phosphate (InsP3, InsP2 and InsP) generation, which displayed an almost identical EC50 (3 microM) and was similarly unaffected by pertussis toxin. Both carbachol effects were reproduced by oxotremorine, whereas pilocarpine (a partial muscarinic agonist) failed to induce any decrease in cyclic AMP accumulation and concurrently was unable to stimulate the generation of inositol phosphates. These data support our proposal for a carbachol-mediated enhancement of a Ca2(+)-dependent phosphodiesterase activity, compatible with the rises in Ca2+ associated with muscarinic-induced increased generation of inositol phosphates. They further illustrate that a cross-talk between the two major transmembrane signalling systems contributed to an ultimate decrease in cyclic AMP in the pregnant-rat myometrium near term. PMID:1700899

  15. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XC. multisite pharmacology: recommendations for the nomenclature of receptor allosterism and allosteric ligands.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Arthur; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Catterall, William A; Fabbro, Doriano; Burris, Thomas P; Cidlowski, John A; Olsen, Richard W; Peters, John A; Neubig, Richard R; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Sexton, Patrick M; Kenakin, Terry P; Ehlert, Frederick J; Spedding, Michael; Langmead, Christopher J

    2014-10-01

    Allosteric interactions play vital roles in metabolic processes and signal transduction and, more recently, have become the focus of numerous pharmacological studies because of the potential for discovering more target-selective chemical probes and therapeutic agents. In addition to classic early studies on enzymes, there are now examples of small molecule allosteric modulators for all superfamilies of receptors encoded by the genome, including ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, and receptor tyrosine kinases. As a consequence, a vast array of pharmacologic behaviors has been ascribed to allosteric ligands that can vary in a target-, ligand-, and cell-/tissue-dependent manner. The current article presents an overview of allostery as applied to receptor families and approaches for detecting and validating allosteric interactions and gives recommendations for the nomenclature of allosteric ligands and their properties.

  16. Investigation of folate-conjugated fluorescent silica nanoparticles for targeting delivery to folate receptor-positive tumors and their internalization mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong; Lou, Changchun; Xu, Mingming; Wu, Chunhui; Miyoshi, Hirokazu; Liu, Yiyao

    2011-01-01

    Multifunctionalized nanoparticles (NPs) are emerging as ideal tools for gene/drug delivery, bioimaging, labeling, or intracellular tracking in biomedical applications, and have attracted considerable attention owing to their unique advantages. In this study, fluorescent silica NPs were synthesized by a modified Stöber method using conjugates of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and maleimide-fluorescein isothiocyanate (maleimide-FITC). Mean diameters of the NPs were controlled between 212–2111 nm by regulating MPS concentration in the reaction mixture. Maleimide-FITC molecules were doped into NPs or conjugated to the surface of NPs through the chemical reaction of maleimide and thiol groups. The data showed that the former NPs are better than the latter by comparing their fluorescence intensity. Furthermore, folate molecules were linked to the FITC-doped silica NPs by using polyethylene glycol (PEG) (NH2-PEG-maleimide) as a spacer, thus forming folate receptor targeting fluorescent NPs, referred to as NPs(FITC)-PEG-Folate. The quantitative analysis of cellular internalization into different cancer cells showed that the delivery efficiency of KB cells (folate receptor-positive cells) is more than six-fold higher than that of A549 cells (folate receptor-negative cells). The delivery efficiency of KB cells decreased significantly after free folate addition to the cell culture medium because the folate receptors were occupied by the free folate. The NPs endocytosis mechanism was also investigated. It was shown that clathrin, an inhibitor of cell phagocytosis, markedly decreased the NPs uptake into KB cells, suggesting that it plays an important role in NPs cellular internalization. These results demonstrated that the novel particles of NPs(FITC)-PEG-Folate are promising for fluorescent imaging or targeting delivery to folate receptor-positive tumors. PMID:21976977

  17. Heteromers of μ-δ opioid receptors: new pharmacology and novel therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Wakako; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that heteromerization between μ (MOP) and δ (DOP) opioid receptors modulates the signalling properties of the individual receptors. For example, whereas activation of MOP receptors by an agonist induces G protein-mediated signalling, the same agonist induces β-arrestin-mediated signalling in the context of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer. Moreover, heteromer-mediated signalling is allosterically modulated by a combination of MOP and DOP receptor ligands. This has implications in analgesia given that morphine-induced antinociception can be potentiated by DOP receptor ligands. Recently reagents selectively targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer such as bivalent ligands, antibodies or membrane permeable peptides have been generated; these reagents are enabling studies to elucidate the contribution of endogenously expressed heteromers to analgesia as well as to the development of side-effects associated with chronic opioid use. Recent advances in drug screening technology have led to the identification of a MOP-DOP receptor heteromer-biased agonist that activates both G protein-mediated and β-arrestin-mediated signalling. Moreover, this heteromer-biased agonist exhibits potent antinociceptive activity but with reduced side-effects, suggesting that ligands targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer form a basis for the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of pain. In this review, we summarize findings regarding the biological and functional characteristics of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer and the in vitro and in vivo properties of heteromer-selective ligands. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24571499

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors with Tyrosine Kinase Domain Mutations Exhibit Reduced Cbl Association, Poor Ubiquitylation, and Down-regulation but Are Efficiently Internalized

    PubMed Central

    Padrón, David; Sato, Mitsuo; Shay, Jerry W.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; Roth, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Some non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase domain mutations require altered signaling through the EGFR for cell survival and are exquisitely sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. EGFR down-regulation was impaired in two NSCLCs with EGFR tyrosine kinase domain mutations. The mutant receptors were poorly ubiquitylated and exhibited decreased association with the ubiquitin ligase Cbl. Over-expression of Cbl increased the degradation of EGFR. Treatment with geldanamycin, an inhibitor of the chaperone heat shock protein 90, also increased both wild-type and mutant EGFR degradation without affecting internalization. The down-regulation of the mutant EGFRs was still impaired when they were stably expressed in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Thus, the mutations that altered signaling also decreased the interaction of EGFRs with the mechanisms responsible for endosomal sorting. PMID:17699773

  19. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXV. Nomenclature, Classification, and Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Melatonin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Delagrange, Philippe; Krause, Diana N.; Sugden, David; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Olcese, James

    2010-01-01

    The hormone melatonin (5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine) is synthesized primarily in the pineal gland and retina, and in several peripheral tissues and organs. In the circulation, the concentration of melatonin follows a circadian rhythm, with high levels at night providing timing cues to target tissues endowed with melatonin receptors. Melatonin receptors receive and translate melatonin's message to influence daily and seasonal rhythms of physiology and behavior. The melatonin message is translated through activation of two G protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2, that are potential therapeutic targets in disorders ranging from insomnia and circadian sleep disorders to depression, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. This review summarizes the steps taken since melatonin's discovery by Aaron Lerner in 1958 to functionally characterize, clone, and localize receptors in mammalian tissues. The pharmacological and molecular properties of the receptors are described as well as current efforts to discover and develop ligands for treatment of a number of illnesses, including sleep disorders, depression, and cancer. PMID:20605968

  20. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1-mediated effects in the rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Tica, Andrei A; Dun, Erica C; Tica, Oana S; Gao, Xin; Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Oprea, Tudor I; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2011-11-01

    G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER), also named GPR30, has been previously identified in the female reproductive system. In this study, GPER expression was found in the female rat myometrium by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Using GPER-selective ligands, we assessed the effects of the GPER activation on resting membrane potential and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in rat myometrial cells, as well as on contractility of rat uterine strips. G-1, a specific GPER agonist, induced a concentration-dependent depolarization and increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in myometrial cells. The depolarization was abolished in Na(+)-free saline. G-1-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase was markedly decreased by nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, by Ca(2+)-free or Na(+)-free saline. Intracellular administration of G-1 produced a faster and transitory increase in [Ca(2+)](i), with a higher amplitude than that induced by extracellular application, supporting an intracellular localization of the functional GPER in myometrial cells. Depletion of internal Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin produced a robust store-activated Ca(2+) entry; the Ca(2+) response to G-1 was similar to the constitutive Ca(2+) entry and did not seem to involve store-operated Ca(2+) entry. In rat uterine strips, administration of G-1 increased the frequency and amplitude of contractions and the area under the contractility curve. The effects of G-1 on membrane potential, [Ca(2+)](i), and uterine contractility were prevented by pretreatment with G-15, a GPER antagonist, further supporting the involvement of GPER in these responses. Taken together, our results indicate that GPER is expressed and functional in rat myometrium. GPER activation produces depolarization, elevates [Ca(2+)](i) and increases contractility in myometrial cells.

  1. Roles of Dopamine D₂ Receptor Subregions in Interactions with β-Arrestin2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohan; Choi, Bo-Gil; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2016-09-01

    β-Arrestins are one of the protein families that interact with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The roles of β-arrestins are multifaceted, as they mediate different processes including receptor desensitization, endocytosis, and G protein-independent signaling. Thus, determining the GPCR regions involved in the interactions with β-arrestins would be a preliminary step in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the selective direction of each function. In the current study, we determined the roles of the N-terminus, intracellular loops, and C-terminal tail of a representative GPCR in the interaction with β-arrestin2. For this, we employed dopamine D₂ and D₃ receptors (D₂R and D₃R, respectively), since they display distinct agonist-induced interactions with β-arrestins. Our results showed that the second and third intracellular loops of D₂R are involved in the agonist-induced translocation of β-arrestins toward plasma membranes. In contrast, the N- and C-termini of D₂R exerted negative effects on the basal interaction with β-arrestins.

  2. Roles of Dopamine D2 Receptor Subregions in Interactions with β-Arrestin2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohan; Choi, Bo-Gil; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2016-01-01

    β-Arrestins are one of the protein families that interact with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The roles of β-arrestins are multifaceted, as they mediate different processes including receptor desensitization, endocytosis, and G protein-independent signaling. Thus, determining the GPCR regions involved in the interactions with β-arrestins would be a preliminary step in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the selective direction of each function. In the current study, we determined the roles of the N-terminus, intracellular loops, and C-terminal tail of a representative GPCR in the interaction with β-arrestin2. For this, we employed dopamine D2 and D3 receptors (D2R and D3R, respectively), since they display distinct agonist-induced interactions with β-arrestins. Our results showed that the second and third intracellular loops of D2R are involved in the agonist-induced translocation of β-arrestins toward plasma membranes. In contrast, the N- and C-termini of D2R exerted negative effects on the basal interaction with β-arrestins. PMID:27068263

  3. PAF-receptor is preferentially expressed in a distinct synthetic phenotype of smooth muscle cells cloned from human internal thoracic artery: Functional implications in cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Stengel, Dominique; O'Neil, Caroline; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Karabina, Sonia-Athina; Durand, Herve; Caplice, Noel M.; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Ninio, Ewa . E-mail: ninio@chups.jussieu.fr

    2006-08-04

    Platelet-activating-Factor (PAF) and its structural analogues formed upon low density lipoprotein oxidation are involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and may signal through PAF-receptor (PAF-R) expressed in human macrophages and in certain smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media, but rarely in the intima of human plaques. Our aim was to determine which SMC phenotype expresses PAF-R and whether this receptor is functional in cell migration. Circulating SMC progenitors and two phenotypically distinct clones of proliferative, epithelioid phenotype vs contractile, spindle-shaped SMCs from the media of adult internal thoracic artery were studied for the presence of PAF-receptor (PAF-R). The levels of specific mRNA were obtained by reverse transcription/real-time PCR, the protein expression was deduced from immunohistochemistry staining, and the functional transmigration assay was performed by Boyden chamber-type chemotaxis assay. Only SMCs of spindle-shape and synthetic phenotype expressed both mRNA and PAF-R protein and in the functional test migrated at low concentrations of PAF. Two unrelated, specific PAF-R antagonists inhibited PAF-induced migration, but did not modify the migration initiated by PDGF. The presence of functional PAF-R in arterial spindle-shaped SMCs of synthetic phenotype may be important for their migration from the media into the intima and atherosclerotic plaques formation.

  4. Alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity by opiates and the subsequent effect of this alteration on opiate tolerance and dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether there is an alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity following opiate administration, and whether this alteration has any influence on the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Behavioral hypersensitivity to direct-acting dopamine agonists was observed in mice following acute or chronic morphine administration. Acute levorphanol administration also resulted in potentiation of dopamine agonist-induced behaviors. An increase in density of dopamine receptors, as measured by (/sup 3/H)butyrophenone binding accompanied the development of behavioral hypersensitivity. This increase was localized to the striatum, an area important in the mediation of dopamine-agonist induced behaviors. Naloxone or LiCl coadministered with the opiates prevented the development of hypersensitivity and the increase in density of dopamine receptors. Coadministration of lithium enhanced the development of acute and chronic tolerance. Lithium enhanced the development of dependence as determined by naloxone-induced hypothermia in chronically morphine-treated mice. Apomorphine enhanced naloxone-induced withdrawal in acutely dependent mice. This enhancement was blocked by coadministration of lithium with the opiates. These results suggest that dopamine receptor supersensitivity influences the degree of tolerance and dependence.

  5. Discovery of 3-arylpropionic acids as potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1) with high selectivity against all other known S1P receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Huo, Pei; Doherty, George; Toth, Lesile; Hale, Jeffrey J; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Quackenbush, Elizabeth; Wickham, Alexandra; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2006-07-15

    A series of 3-arylpropionic acids were synthesized as S1P1 receptor agonists. Structure-activity relationship studies on the pendant phenyl ring revealed several structural features offering selectivity of S1P1 binding against S1P2-5. These highly selective S1P1 agonists induced peripheral blood lymphocyte lowering in mice and one of them was found to be efficacious in a rat skin transplantation model, supporting that S1P1 agonism is primarily responsible for the immunosuppressive efficacy observed in preclinical animal models.

  6. An internally modulated, thermostable, pH-sensitive Cys loop receptor from the hydrothermal vent worm Alvinella pompejana.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Puneet; Horlacher, Reinhold; Bertrand, Daniel; Krause, Ryoko; Marger, Fabrice; Welte, Wolfram

    2014-05-23

    Cys loop receptors (CLRs) are commonly known as ligand-gated channels that transiently open upon binding of neurotransmitters to modify the membrane potential. However, a class of cation-selective bacterial homologues of CLRs have been found to open upon a sudden pH drop, suggesting further ligands and more functions of the homologues in prokaryotes. Here we report an anion-selective CLR from the hydrothermal vent annelid worm Alvinella pompejana that opens at low pH. A. pompejana expressed sequence tag databases were explored by us, and two full-length CLR sequences were identified, synthesized, cloned, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and studied by two-electrode voltage clamp. One channel, named Alv-a1-pHCl, yielded functional receptors and opened upon a sudden pH drop but not by other known agonists. Sequence comparison showed that both CLR proteins share conserved characteristics with eukaryotic CLRs, such as an N-terminal helix, a cysteine loop motif, and an intracellular loop intermediate in length between the long loops of other eukaryotic CLRs and those of prokaryotic CLRs. Both full-length Alv-a1-pHCl and a truncated form, termed tAlv-a1-pHCl, lacking 37 amino-terminal residues that precede the N-terminal helix, formed functional channels in oocytes. After pH activation, tAlv-a1-pHCl showed desensitization and was not modulated by ivermectin. In contrast, pH-activated, full-length Alv-a1-pHCl showed a marked rebound current and was modulated significantly by ivermectin. A thermostability assay indicated that purified tAlv-a1-pHCl expressed in Sf9 cells denatured at a higher temperature than the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. PMID:24719323

  7. Internalization of RGD peptide conjugates of near-infrared fluorescent probes in different cell lines occurs via different integrin receptor subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, S.; Xu, B.; Ye, Y.; Liang, K.; Achilefu, S.

    2006-02-01

    Expression of integrin α vβ 3 is upregulated in a number of cancers including colon, pancreas, lung and breast. Previous studies demonstrated that near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes designed to target α vβ 3 accumulated both in vitro and in vivo in α vβ 3-positive tumor cells. To evaluate the selectivity of some NIR-labeled RGD peptides for α vβ 3, the molecular probes were incubated in different cells, including the α vβ 3-positive U87 and A549 cells, and α vβ 3-negative HT29 cells. Whereas the RGD compounds tested internalized in the A549 cells, their uptake by the HT29 cell line, which is positive for α vβ 5 and α vβ 6, was low. The uptake of these probes in U87 depended on the structural features of the compounds. Further studies with functional blocking antibodies showed that the internalization in the α vβ 3-positive cells may be mediated by different integrin receptor subtypes. The preliminary results suggest that the internalization of linear RGD peptides is mediated by the α vβ 3 heterodimer but rearrangement of the peptide sequence could alter the selectivity of the molecular probes for different integrin subunits in the dimeric α and β proteins. Thus, a careful choice of RGD peptides can be used to monitor the functional status of different integrins in cells and tissues.

  8. Regulation of bradykinin receptor gene expression in human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Phagoo, S B; Yaqoob, M; Herrera-Martinez, E; McIntyre, P; Jones, C; Burgess, G M

    2000-06-01

    In WI-38 human fibroblasts, interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) increased bradykinin B(1) receptor mRNA, which peaked between 2 and 4 h, remaining elevated for 20 h. Binding of the bradykinin B(1) receptor selective ligand [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin, also increased, peaking at 4 h and remaining elevated for 20 h. The B(max) value for [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin rose from 280+/-102 fmol/mg (n=3) to 701+/-147 fmol/mg (n=3), but the K(D) value remained unaltered (control, 1.04+/-0.33 nM (n=3); interleukin-1 beta, 0.88+/-0.41 nM (n=3)). The interleukin-1 beta-induced [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin binding sites were functional receptors, as bradykinin B(1) receptor agonist-induced responses increased in treated cells. Bradykinin B(2) receptor mRNA and [3H]bradykinin binding were upregulated by interleukin-1 beta, but not TNF-alpha. The effect of interleukin-1 beta on bradykinin B(2) receptors was smaller than for bradykinin B(1) receptors. Cycloheximide prevented interleukin-1 beta-mediated increases in B(1) and B(2) binding, but not mRNA suggesting that de novo synthesis of a transcriptional activator was unnecessary.

  9. Impact of Concanavalin-A-Mediated Cytoskeleton Disruption on Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 Internalization and Cell Surface Expression in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Samuel Burke; Pratt, Jonathan; Beauchemin, David; Haidara, Khadidja; Annabi, Borhane

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) is a multiligand endocytic receptor, which plays a pivotal role in controlling cytoskeleton dynamics during cancer cell migration. Its rapid endocytosis further allows efficient clearance of extracellular ligands. Concanavalin-A (ConA) is a lectin used to trigger in vitro physiological cellular processes, including cytokines secretion, nitric oxide production, and T-lymphocytes activation. Given that ConA exerts part of its effects through cytoskeleton remodeling, we questioned whether it affected LRP-1 expression, intracellular trafficking, and cell surface function in grade IV U87 glioblastoma cells. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we found that loss of the cell surface 600-kDa mature form of LRP-1 occurs upon ConA treatment. Consequently, internalization of the physiological α2-macroglobulin and the synthetic angiopep-2 ligands of LRP-1 was also decreased. Silencing of known mediators of ConA, such as the membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase, and the Toll-like receptors (TLR)-2 and TLR-6 was unable to rescue ConA-mediated LRP-1 expression decrease, implying that the loss of LRP-1 was independent of cell surface relayed signaling. The ConA-mediated reduction in LRP-1 expression was emulated by the actin cytoskeleton-disrupting agent cytochalasin-D, but not by the microtubule inhibitor nocodazole, and required both lysosomal- and ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation. Our study implies that actin cytoskeleton integrity is required for proper LRP-1 cell surface functions and that impaired trafficking leads to specialized compartmentation and degradation. Our data also strengthen the biomarker role of cell surface LRP-1 functions in the vectorized transport of therapeutic angiopep bioconjugates into brain cancer cells. PMID:27226736

  10. Serotonin Receptors in the Medulla Oblongata of the Human Fetus and Infant: The Analytic Approach of the International Safe Passage Study

    PubMed Central

    Folkerth, Rebecca D.; Paterson, David S.; Broadbelt, Kevin G.; Dan Zaharie, S.; Hewlett, Richard H.; Dempers, Johan J.; Burger, Elsie; Wadee, Shabbir; Schubert, Pawel; Wright, Colleen; Sens, Mary Ann; Nelsen, Laura; Randall, Bradley B.; Tran, Hoa; Geldenhuys, Elaine; Elliott, Amy J.; Odendaal, Hein J.; Kinney, Hannah C.

    2016-01-01

    The Safe Passage Study is an international, prospective study of approximately 12 000 pregnancies to determine the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) upon stillbirth and the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). A key objective of the study is to elucidate adverse effects of PAE upon binding to serotonin (5-HT) 1A receptors in brainstem homeostatic networks postulated to be abnormal in unexplained stillbirth and/or SIDS. We undertook a feasibility assessment of 5-HT1A receptor binding using autoradiography in the medulla oblongata (6 nuclei in 27 cases). 5-HT1A binding was compared to a reference dataset from the San Diego medical examiner’s system. There was no adverse effect of postmortem interval ≤100 h. The distribution and quantitated values of 5-HT1A binding in Safe Passage Study cases were essentially identical to those in the reference dataset, and virtually identical between stillbirths and live born fetal cases in grossly non-macerated tissues. The pattern of binding was present at mid-gestation with dramatic changes in binding levels in the medullary 5-HT nuclei over the second half of gestation; there was a plateau at lower levels in the neonatal period and into infancy. This study demonstrates feasibility of 5-HT1A binding analysis in the medulla in the Safe Passage Study. PMID:27634962

  11. 64Cu antibody-targeting of the T-cell receptor and subsequent internalization enables in vivo tracking of lymphocytes by PET.

    PubMed

    Griessinger, Christoph M; Maurer, Andreas; Kesenheimer, Christian; Kehlbach, Rainer; Reischl, Gerald; Ehrlichmann, Walter; Bukala, Daniel; Harant, Maren; Cay, Funda; Brück, Jürgen; Nordin, Renate; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Schaller, Martin; Röcken, Martin; Pichler, Bernd J; Kneilling, Manfred

    2015-01-27

    T cells are key players in inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and immunotherapy. Thus, holistic and noninvasive in vivo characterizations of the temporal distribution and homing dynamics of lymphocytes in mammals are of special interest. Herein, we show that PET-based T-cell labeling facilitates quantitative, highly sensitive, and holistic monitoring of T-cell homing patterns in vivo. We developed a new T-cell receptor (TCR)-specific labeling approach for the intracellular labeling of mouse T cells. We found that continuous TCR plasma membrane turnover and the endocytosis of the specific (64)Cu-monoclonal antibody (mAb)-TCR complex enables a stable labeling of T cells. The TCR-mAb complex was internalized within 24 h, whereas antigen recognition was not impaired. Harmful effects of the label on the viability, DNA-damage and apoptosis-necrosis induction, could be minimized while yielding a high contrast in in vivo PET images. We were able to follow and quantify the specific homing of systemically applied (64)Cu-labeled chicken ovalbumin (cOVA)-TCR transgenic T cells into the pulmonary and perithymic lymph nodes (LNs) of mice with cOVA-induced airway delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction (DTHR) but not into pulmonary and perithymic LNs of naïve control mice or mice diseased from turkey or pheasant OVA-induced DTHR. Our protocol provides consequent advancements in the detection of small accumulations of immune cells in single LNs and specific homing to the sites of inflammation by PET using the internalization of TCR-specific mAbs as a specific label of T cells. Thus, our labeling approach is applicable to other cells with constant membrane receptor turnover.

  12. Internalization of Leishmania mexicana complex amastigotes via the Fc receptor is required to sustain infection in murine cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Kima, P E; Constant, S L; Hannum, L; Colmenares, M; Lee, K S; Haberman, A M; Shlomchik, M J; McMahon-Pratt, D

    2000-03-20

    We show here that maintenance of Leishmania infections with Leishmania mexicana complex parasites (Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania pifanoi) is impaired in the absence of circulating antibody. In these studies, we used mice genetically altered to contain no circulating antibody, with and without functional B cells. This experimental design allowed us to rule out a critical role for B cell antigen presentation in Leishmania pathogenesis. In addition, we show that mice lacking the common gamma chain of Fc receptors (FcgammaRI, FcepsilonRI, and FcgammaRIII) are similarly refractory to infection with these parasites. These observations establish a critical role for antibody in the pathogenesis associated with infection by members of the L. mexicana complex.

  13. PDGF-induced receptor phosphorylation and phosphoinositide hydrolysis are unaffected by protein kinase C activation in mouse swiss 3T3 and human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sturani, E.; Vicentini, L.M.; Zippel, R.; Toschi, L.; Pandiella-Alonso, A.; Comoglio, P.M.; Meldolesi, J.

    1986-05-29

    Short (1-10 min) pretreatment of intact cells with activators of protein kinase C (e.g. phorbol-12 myristate, 13-acetate, PMA) affects the activity of a variety of surface receptors (for growth factors, hormones and neurotransmitters), with inhibition of transmembrane signal generation. In two types of fibroblasts it is demonstrated that the PDGF receptor is unaffected by PMA. Exposure to PMA at concentrations up to 100 nM for 10 min failed to inhibit either one of the agonist-induced, receptor-coupled responses of PDGF: the autophosphorylation of receptor molecules at tyrosine residues, and the hydrolysis of membrane polyphosphoinositides. In contrast, the EGF receptor autophosphorylation (in A 431 cells) and the bombesin-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis were readily inhibited by PMA.

  14. The Internalization of Neurotensin by the Low-Affinity Neurotensin Receptors (NTSR2 and vNTSR2) Activates ERK 1/2 in Glioma Cells and Allows Neurotensin-Polyplex Transfection of tGAS1.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Sarmiento, Alberto E; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Segovia, José

    2015-08-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant primary brain tumor and is very resistant to treatment; hence, it has a poor prognosis. Neurotensin receptor type 1 (NTSR1) plays a key role in cancer malignancy and has potential therapeutic applications. However, the presence and function of neurotensin (NTS) receptors in glioblastoma is not clearly established. RT-PCR assays showed that healthy (non-tumor) astroglial cells and C6 glioma cells express NTSR2 and its isoform (vNTSR2) rather than NTSR1. In glioma cells, NTS promotes the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK 1/2), an effect that was completely abolished by blocking the internalization of the NTS/NTSR complex. We demonstrated pharmacologically that the internalization is dependent on the activation of NTSR2 receptors and it was prevented by levocabastine, a NTSR2 receptor antagonist. The internalization of NTSR2 and vNTSR2 was further demonstrated by its ability to mediate gene transfer (transfection) via the NTS-polyplex system. Expression of reporter transgenes and of the pro-apoptotic soluble form of growth arrest specific 1 (tGAS1) was observed in glioma cells. A significant reduction on the viability of C6 cells was determined when tGAS1 was transfected into glioma cells. Conversely, astroglial cells could neither internalize NTS nor activate ERK 1/2 and could not be transfected by the NTS-polyplex. These results demonstrate that the internalization process of NTSR2 receptors is a key regulator necessary to trigger the activation of the ERK 1/2. Our data support a new internalization pathway in glioma C6 cells that involve NTSR2/vNTSR2, which can be used to selectively transfer therapeutic genes using the NTS-polyplex system.

  15. Disabled-2 is a negative immune regulator of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated Toll-like receptor 4 internalization and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Wei-Shan; Ling, Pin; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a pivotal role in the host response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we elucidated whether the endocytic adaptor protein Disabled-2 (Dab2), which is abundantly expressed in macrophages, plays a role in LPS-stimulated TLR4 signaling and trafficking. Molecular analysis and transcriptome profiling of RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells expressing short-hairpin RNA of Dab2 revealed that Dab2 regulated the TLR4/TRIF pathway upon LPS stimulation. Knockdown of Dab2 augmented TRIF-dependent interferon regulatory factor 3 activation and the expression of subsets of inflammatory cytokines and interferon-inducible genes. Dab2 acted as a clathrin sponge and sequestered clathrin from TLR4 in the resting stage of macrophages. Upon LPS stimulation, clathrin was released from Dab2 to facilitate endocytosis of TLR4 for triggering the TRIF-mediated pathway. Dab2 functions as a negative immune regulator of TLR4 endocytosis and signaling, supporting a novel role for a Dab2-associated regulatory circuit in controlling the inflammatory response of macrophages to endotoxin. PMID:27748405

  16. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  17. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 4-Linked Janus Kinase 2 Signaling Contributes to Internalization of Brucella abortus by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Ju; Kim, Dong Hyeok; Kim, Dae Geun; Lee, Hu Jang; Min, Wongi; Rhee, Man Hee; Cho, Jae Youl; Watarai, Masahisa

    2013-01-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular pathogen that uses a crafty strategy to invade and proliferate within host cells, but the distinct signaling pathways associated with phagocytic mechanisms of B. abortus remain unclear. The present study was performed to test the hypothesis that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-linked signaling interacting with Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) plays an essential role in B. abortus phagocytosis by macrophages. The effects of TLR4-JAK2 signaling on B. abortus phagocytosis in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells were observed through an infection assay and confocal microscopy. We determined that the uptake of B. abortus was negatively affected by the dysfunction of TLR4 and JAK2. F-actin polymerization detected by flow cytometry and F-actin assay was amplified for B. abortus entry, whereas that event was attenuated by the disruption of TLR4 and JAK2. Importantly, JAK2 phosphorylation and actin skeleton reorganization were suppressed immediately after B. abortus infection in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from TLR4−/− mice, showing the cooperation of JAK2 with TLR4. Furthermore, small GTPase Cdc42 participated in the intermediate pathway of TLR4-JAK2 signaling on B. abortus phagocytosis. Consequently, TLR4-associated JAK2 activation in the early cellular signaling events plays a pivotal role in B. abortus-induced phagocytic processes in macrophages, implying the pathogenic significance of JAK2-mediated entry. Here, we elucidate that this specific phagocytic mechanism of B. abortus might provide achievable strategies for inhibiting B. abortus invasion. PMID:23630962

  19. Increased desensitization of dopamine D₂ receptor-mediated response in the ventral tegmental area in the absence of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, R; Foster, J D; Metaxas, A; Ledent, C; Hourani, S M O; Kitchen, I; Chen, Y

    2011-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptors interact to provide additional regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitter signaling. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are expressed at a high density in striatal neurons, where they closely interact with dopamine D₂ receptors and modulate effects of dopamine and responses to psychostimulants. A(2A) receptors are expressed at much lower densities in other forebrain neurons but play a more prominent yet opposing role to striatal receptors in response to psychostimulants in mice. It is, therefore, possible that A(2A) receptors expressed at low levels elsewhere in the brain may also regulate neurotransmitter systems and modulate neuronal functions. Dopamine D₂ receptors play an important role in autoinhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dopamine release in other brain areas. Here, we examined the effect of A(2A) receptor deletion on D₂ receptor-mediated inhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons in the VTA. Spontaneous activity of dopamine neurons was recorded in midbrain slices, and concentration-dependent effects of the dopamine D₂ receptor agonist, quinpirole, was compared between wild-type and A(2A) knockout mice. The potency of quinpirole applied in single concentrations and the expression of D₂ receptors were not altered in the VTA of the knockout mice. However, quinpirole applied in stepwise escalating concentrations caused significantly reduced maximal inhibition in A(2A) knockout mice, indicating an enhanced agonist-induced desensitization of D₂ receptors in the absence of A(2A) receptors. The A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS21680, did not exert any effect on dopamine neuron firing or response to quinpirole, revealing a novel non-pharmacological interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors and dopaminergic neurotransmission in midbrain dopamine neurons. Altered D₂ receptor desensitization may result in changes in dopamine neuron firing rate and pattern and dopamine

  20. Ligand binding and internalization by the rat hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor does not generate polyphosphoinositide derived second messengers

    SciTech Connect

    Medh, J.D.; Haynes, P.A.; Weigel, P.H.; LaBelle, E.F. )

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the effects of asialoorosomucoid (ASOR) on the hydrolysis of ({sup 32}P)-inositol phospholipids in isolated rat hepatocytes. When internalization of ASOR is maximal at 310 molecules/cell/sec, there is neither a decrease in the amount of ({sup 32}P)-phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}) not an increase in ({sup 32}P)-phosphatidic acid (PA) up to 30 min after stimulation. On the other hand, 10-{sup 6}M vasopressin, which was used as a positive control, caused a 35-40% decrease in the level of ({sup 32}P)-PIP{sub 2} and a 70-80% increase in ({sup 32}P)-PA within 30 sec. Addition of orosomucoid or ASOR, even at concentrations 1000-times the K{sub d}, did not change the levels of any of the six phospholipids tested. Similarly, addition of ASOR did not increase the levels of soluble ({sup 3}H)-inositol phosphates, whereas vasopressin caused a 6-fold increase in ({sup 3}H)-inositol-1,4-diphosphate (IP{sub 2}) and a 4-fold increase in ({sup 3}H)-inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP{sub 3}) in isolated rat hepatocytes prelabeled with ({sup 3}H)-inositol.

  1. IFN-alpha/beta-dependent cross-priming induced by specific toll-like receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Durand, Vanessa; Wong, Simon Y C; Tough, David F; Le Bon, Agnes

    2006-04-12

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors that have been identified as crucial in the initiation of innate immune responses against pathogens. They are thought to be involved in shaping appropriate adaptive immune responses, although their precise contribution has not yet been fully characterised. Our aim was to investigate in vivo the effect of different TLR stimuli on cellular immune responses. We examined the ability of a range of TLR stimuli to induce CD8+ T cell responses against a model soluble protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA). We found that TLR 3, TLR 4, and TLR 9 agonists induced functional cross-priming, and that this process was dependent on IFN-alpha/beta signalling pathway. PMID:16823911

  2. Dendrite-selective redistribution of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 following agonist stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baudouin, Stéphane J; Pujol, Fabien; Nicot, Arnaud; Kitabgi, Patrick; Boudin, Hélène

    2006-10-01

    The chemokine SDF-1 is a secreted protein that plays a critical role in several aspects of neuron development through interaction with its unique receptor CXCR4. A key mechanism that controls neuron responsiveness to extracellular signals during neuronal growth is receptor endocytosis. Since we previously reported that SDF-1 regulates axon development without affecting the other neurites, we asked whether this could correlate with a compartment-selective trafficking of CXCR4. We thus studied CXCR4 behavior upon SDF-1 exposure in rat hippocampus slices and in transfected neuron cultures. A massive agonist-induced redistribution of CXCR4 in endosomes was observed in dendrites whereas no modification was evidenced in axons. Our data suggest that CXCR4 trafficking may play a role in mediating selective effects of SDF-1 on distinct neuronal membrane subdomains.

  3. Attenuated migration by green tea extract (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG): involvement of 67 kDa laminin receptor internalization in macrophagic cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuezhi; Guo, Xingzhi; Chen, Li; Guo, Minxia; Peng, Ning; Li, Rui

    2014-08-01

    Excessive activation of the microglia in the brain is involved in the development of several neurodegenerative diseases. Previous studies have indicated that (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major active constituent of green tea, exhibits potent suppressive effects on the activation of microglia. As the 67 kDa laminin receptor (67LR) is a key element in cellular activation and migration, we investigated the effect of EGCG on cell migration and 67LR in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophagic RAW264.7 cells. The presence of EGCG (1-25 μM) markedly attenuated LPS-induced cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. However, the total amount of 67LR protein in the RAW264.7 cells was unaffected by EGCG, as revealed by Western blot analysis. In addition, confocal immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that EGCG caused a marked membrane translocation of 67LR from the membrane surface towards the cytoplasm. Cell-surface biotinylation analysis confirmed that EGCG induced a significant internalization of 67LR by 24-68% in a dose-dependent manner. This study helps to explain the pharmacological action of EGCG on 67LR, suggesting its potential use in the treatment of diseases associated with macrophage/microglia activation, such as neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.

  4. A comparison of the behavioural effects of 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor agonists in the pigeon.

    PubMed

    Wolff, M C; Leander, J D

    2000-08-01

    Activity at the 5-HT2A receptor versus that of the 5-HT2C receptor was studied in three behavioural paradigms. In pigeons trained to discriminate 0.32 mg/kg of 1-(2,5-diemethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) (a mixed 5-HT2A/C receptor agonist) from vehicle, quipazine (0.1-1 mg/kg) and m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) (1-3 mg/kg) substituted for DOI in a dose-related manner, and this generalization was blocked by MDL100907 (0.0001-0.01 mg/kg), a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist. RO60-0175 (a relatively selective 5-HT2C agonist) induced partial substitution at 3 mg/kg that was antagonized by both MDL100907 and by 3 mg/kg of SB242084, a relatively selective 5-HT2C antagonist. MK212 (a mixed 5-HT2C/A agonist) induced partial substitution that was antagonized by SB242084, but not by MDL100907. On a progressive ratio 5 operant schedule (PR5) for food reinforcement, DOI, quipazine, mCPP, MK212 and R060-0175 decreased the break point; mCPP, DOI, MK212 and quipazine also induced vomiting. Although MDL100907 antagonized both the reductions of break point and vomiting, SB242084 only partially attenuated the decrease in break point observed with MK212 and DOI, and was unable to eliminate vomiting. Thus pharmacological activity at the 5-HT2A receptor can be behaviourally distinguished from pharmacological activity at the 5-HT2C receptor in the pigeon. Furthermore, the decrease in the break point of a PR5 schedule induced by 5-HT2C receptor agonists may be related to decreased appetite, whereas that induced by 5-HT2A receptor agonists may be due to unrelated factors, such as emesis. PMID:11103887

  5. Structure of the agonist-bound neurotensin receptor.

    PubMed

    White, Jim F; Noinaj, Nicholas; Shibata, Yoko; Love, James; Kloss, Brian; Xu, Feng; Gvozdenovic-Jeremic, Jelena; Shah, Priyanka; Shiloach, Joseph; Tate, Christopher G; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2012-10-25

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13-amino-acid peptide that functions as both a neurotransmitter and a hormone through the activation of the neurotensin receptor NTSR1, a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In the brain, NTS modulates the activity of dopaminergic systems, opioid-independent analgesia, and the inhibition of food intake; in the gut, NTS regulates a range of digestive processes. Here we present the structure at 2.8 Å resolution of Rattus norvegicus NTSR1 in an active-like state, bound to NTS(8-13), the carboxy-terminal portion of NTS responsible for agonist-induced activation of the receptor. The peptide agonist binds to NTSR1 in an extended conformation nearly perpendicular to the membrane plane, with the C terminus oriented towards the receptor core. Our findings provide, to our knowledge, the first insight into the binding mode of a peptide agonist to a GPCR and may support the development of non-peptide ligands that could be useful in the treatment of neurological disorders, cancer and obesity.

  6. P2X-mediated AMPA receptor internalization and synaptic depression is controlled by two CaMKII phosphorylation sites on GluA1 in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pougnet, Johan-Till; Compans, Benjamin; Martinez, Audrey; Choquet, Daniel; Hosy, Eric; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity at excitatory synapses can be induced either by synaptic release of glutamate or the release of gliotransmitters such as ATP. Recently, we showed that postsynaptic P2X2 receptors activated by ATP released from astrocytes downregulate synaptic AMPAR, providing a novel mechanism by which glial cells modulate synaptic activity. ATP- and lNMDA-induced depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus are additive, suggesting distinct molecular pathways. AMPARs are homo-or hetero-tetramers composed of GluA1-A4. Here, we first show that P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition is dependent on the subunit composition of AMPAR. GluA3 homomers are insensitive and their presence in heteromers alters P2X-mediated inhibition. Using a mutational approach, we demonstrate that the two CaMKII phosphorylation sites S567 and S831 located in the cytoplasmic Loop1 and C-terminal tail of GluA1 subunits, respectively, are critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition recorded from co-expressing Xenopus oocytes and removal of surface AMPAR at synapses of hippocampal neurons imaged by the super-resolution dSTORM technique. Finally, using phosphorylation site-specific antibodies, we show that P2X-induced depression in hippocampal slices produces a dephosphorylation of the GluA1 subunit at S567, contrary to NMDAR-mediated LTD. These findings indicate that GluA1 phosphorylation of S567 and S831 is critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR internalization and ATP-driven synaptic depression. PMID:27624155

  7. P2X-mediated AMPA receptor internalization and synaptic depression is controlled by two CaMKII phosphorylation sites on GluA1 in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pougnet, Johan-Till; Compans, Benjamin; Martinez, Audrey; Choquet, Daniel; Hosy, Eric; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity at excitatory synapses can be induced either by synaptic release of glutamate or the release of gliotransmitters such as ATP. Recently, we showed that postsynaptic P2X2 receptors activated by ATP released from astrocytes downregulate synaptic AMPAR, providing a novel mechanism by which glial cells modulate synaptic activity. ATP- and lNMDA-induced depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus are additive, suggesting distinct molecular pathways. AMPARs are homo-or hetero-tetramers composed of GluA1-A4. Here, we first show that P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition is dependent on the subunit composition of AMPAR. GluA3 homomers are insensitive and their presence in heteromers alters P2X-mediated inhibition. Using a mutational approach, we demonstrate that the two CaMKII phosphorylation sites S567 and S831 located in the cytoplasmic Loop1 and C-terminal tail of GluA1 subunits, respectively, are critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition recorded from co-expressing Xenopus oocytes and removal of surface AMPAR at synapses of hippocampal neurons imaged by the super-resolution dSTORM technique. Finally, using phosphorylation site-specific antibodies, we show that P2X-induced depression in hippocampal slices produces a dephosphorylation of the GluA1 subunit at S567, contrary to NMDAR-mediated LTD. These findings indicate that GluA1 phosphorylation of S567 and S831 is critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR internalization and ATP-driven synaptic depression. PMID:27624155

  8. Regulation of GABAA Receptor Dynamics by Interaction with Purinergic P2X2 Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Triller, Antoine; Sieghart, Werner; Sarto-Jackson, Isabella

    2011-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) in the spinal cord are evolving as an important target for drug development against pain. Purinergic P2X2 receptors (P2X2Rs) are also expressed in spinal cord neurons and are known to cross-talk with GABAARs. Here, we investigated a possible “dynamic” interaction between GABAARs and P2X2Rs using co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells along with co-localization and single particle tracking studies in spinal cord neurons. Our results suggest that a significant proportion of P2X2Rs forms a transient complex with GABAARs inside the cell, thus stabilizing these receptors and using them for co-trafficking to the cell surface, where P2X2Rs and GABAARs are primarily located extra-synaptically. Furthermore, agonist-induced activation of P2X2Rs results in a Ca2+-dependent as well as an apparently Ca2+-independent increase in the mobility and an enhanced degradation of GABAARs, whereas P2X2Rs are stabilized and form larger clusters. Antagonist-induced blocking of P2XRs results in co-stabilization of this receptor complex at the cell surface. These results suggest a novel mechanism where association of P2X2Rs and GABAARs could be used for specific targeting to neuronal membranes, thus providing an extrasynaptic receptor reserve that could regulate the excitability of neurons. We further conclude that blocking the excitatory activity of excessively released ATP under diseased state by P2XR antagonists could simultaneously enhance synaptic inhibition mediated by GABAARs. PMID:21343285

  9. Inhibition of Estrogen Receptor-DNA Binding by the "Pure" Antiestrogen ICI 164,384 Appears to be Mediated by Impaired Receptor Dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawell, Stephen E.; White, Roger; Hoare, Susan; Sydenham, Mark; Page, Martin; Parker, Malcolm G.

    1990-09-01

    Many estrogen-antagonist and -agonist ligands have been synthesized, some of which have proved clinically important in the treatment of hormone-dependent breast tumors and endocrine disorders. Here we show that the "pure" antiestrogen ICI 164,384 inhibits mouse estrogen receptor-DNA binding in vitro. The effects of this steroid on DNA binding can be overcome by addition of an anti-receptor antibody whose epitope lies N-terminal to the receptor DNA-binding domain. Since this antibody is also capable of restoring DNA-binding activity to receptor mutants that either lack the dimerization domain or bear deleterious mutations within it, we propose that ICI 164,384 reduces DNA binding by interfering with receptor dimerization. In contrast, when complexed with the antagonist/partial agonist tamoxifen, the estrogen receptor is capable of binding to DNA in vitro, but tamoxifen does not promote the agonist-induced conformational change obtained with estradiol. The implications of these data are discussed in relation to the in vivo properties of these drugs.

  10. Pharmacology of the Adenosine A3 Receptor in the Vasculature and Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Low, Leanne M.; Rose’Meyer, Roselyn B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Essential hypertension is considered to be a multifactorial disorder and its aetiology has yet to be clearly identified. As the adenosine receptors have a significant role in mediating vasodilation, alterations in their structures or signalling pathways may be involved in the development of hypertension. This study aimed to measure the expression of adenosine A3 receptors in a range of cardiovascular tissues and determine whether they could be altered with essential hypertension, and to functionally test responses to adenosine A3 receptor agonists in coronary blood vessels using the isolated perfused heart preparation. Methods mRNA samples from cardiovascular tissues and a range of blood vessels were collected from 10 week old male spontaneously hypertensive rats and age-gender matched Wistar rats (n = 8). The Langendorff heart perfusion preparation was used to characterise adenosine A3 receptor mediated coronary vasodilation in the rat heart. Results Adenosine A3 receptor agonists induced coronary vasodilation. The expression of adenosine A3 receptors in cardiovascular tissues was altered in a tissue-specific pattern. Specifically, down-regulation of adenosine A3 receptor expression occurred in hypertensive hearts, which might be associated with attenuated vasodilator responses observed in coronary vessels to adenosine A3 receptor agonists. Conclusions This study demonstrated alterations in the expression of adenosine A3 receptors occurred in a tissue specific mode, and reduced adenosine A3 receptor mediated coronary vasodilation in hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats. Our findings with regard to changes in the adenosine A3 receptor in hypertensive hearts suggest that adenosine A3 receptor might play a role in the physiopathology of essential hypertension and potentially open the way to pharmacologic manipulation of vasomotor activity by the use of adenosine A3 receptor agonists. PMID:26907173

  11. Cholesterol reduction by methyl-β-cyclodextrin attenuates the delta opioid receptor-mediated signaling in neuronal cells but enhances it in non-neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Xu, Wei; Yoon, Su-In; Chen, Chongguang; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been shown to be located in and regulated by lipid rafts/caveolae in caveolin-rich non-neuronal cells. Here, we found that caveolin-1 level was very low in rat brain and undetectable in NG108-15 cells, which endogenously express delta opioid receptors (DOR). Rat caudate putamen (CPu) membranes, NG108-15 cells and CHO cells stably transfected with FLAG-mouse-DOR (CHO-FLAG-mDOR) were homogenized, sonicated in a detergent-free 0.5 M Na2CO3 buffer and fractionated through discontinuous or continuous sucrose density gradients. About 70% of opioid receptors in CPu and DOR in both cell lines were present in low-density (5-20% sucrose) membrane-domains enriched in cholesterol and ganglioside M1 (GM1), characteristics of lipid rafts in plasma membranes. In both cells, stimulation with permeable or non-permeable full agonists, but not with partial or inverse agonists, for 30 min shifted ∼25% of DORs out of rafts, by a naloxone-reversible and pertussis toxin-insensitive mechanism, which may undergo internalization. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) treatment greatly reduced cholesterol and shifted DOR to higher-density fractions and decreased DPDPE affinities. MCD treatment attenuated DPDPE-induced [35S]GTPγS binding in CPu and NG108-15 cells, but enhanced it in CHO-FLAG-mDOR cells. In CHO-FLAG-mDOR cells, Gαi co-immunoprecipitated with caveolin-1, which was shown to inhibit Gαi/o, and MCD treatment dramatically reduced the association leading to disinhibition. Thus, although localization in rafts and agonist-induced shift of DOR are independent of caveolin-1, lipid rafts sustain DOR-mediated signaling in caveolin-deficient neuronal cells, but appear to inhibit it in caveolin-enriched non-neuronal cells. Cholesterol-dependent association of caveolin-1 with and the resulting inhibition of G proteins may be a contributing factor. PMID:17141202

  12. Altered phosphorylation and desensitization patterns of a human beta 2-adrenergic receptor lacking the palmitoylated Cys341.

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, S; Mouillac, B; Bonin, H; Bouvier, M

    1993-01-01

    Exposure of beta 2-adrenergic receptors to agonists causes a rapid desensitization of the receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase, associated with an increased phosphorylation of the receptor. Agonist-promoted phosphorylation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2AR) by protein kinase A and the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK) is believed to promote a functional uncoupling of the receptor from the guanyl nucleotide regulatory protein Gs. More recently, palmitoylation of Cys341 of the receptor has also been proposed to play an important role in the coupling of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor to Gs. Here we report that substitution of the palmitoylated cysteine by a glycine (Gly341 beta 2 AR) using site directed mutagenesis leads to a receptor being highly phosphorylated and largely uncoupled from Gs. In Chinese hamster fibroblasts (CHW), stably transfected with the human receptor cDNAs, the basal phosphorylation level of Gly341 beta 2AR was found to be approximately 4 times that of the wild type receptor. This elevated phosphorylation level was accompanied by a depressed ability of the receptor to stimulate the adenylyl cyclase and to form a guanyl nucleotide-sensitive high affinity state for agonists. Moreover, exposure of this unpalmitoylated receptor to an agonist did not promote any further phosphorylation or uncoupling. A modest desensitization of the receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase response was observed but resulted from the agonist-induced sequestration of the unpalmitoylated receptor and could be blocked by concanavalin A. This contrasts with the agonist-promoted phosphorylation and uncoupling of the wild type receptor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8381352

  13. The autoimmunity-associated gene PTPN22 potentiates toll-like receptor-driven, type 1 interferon-dependent immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaya; Shaked, Iftach; Stanford, Stephanie M; Zhou, Wenbo; Curtsinger, Julie M; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Shaheen, Zachary R; Cheng, Genhong; Sawatzke, Kristy; Campbell, Amanda M; Auger, Jennifer L; Bilgic, Hatice; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Schmeling, David O; Balfour, Henry H; Hasegawa, Kiminori; Chan, Andrew C; Corbett, John A; Binstadt, Bryce A; Mescher, Matthew F; Ley, Klaus; Bottini, Nunzio; Peterson, Erik J

    2013-07-25

    Immune cells sense microbial products through Toll-like receptors (TLR), which trigger host defense responses including type 1 interferons (IFNs) secretion. A coding polymorphism in the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene is a susceptibility allele for human autoimmune and infectious disease. We report that Ptpn22 selectively regulated type 1 IFN production after TLR engagement in myeloid cells. Ptpn22 promoted host antiviral responses and was critical for TLR agonist-induced, type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of inflammation in colitis and arthritis. PTPN22 directly associated with TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and promotes TRAF3 lysine 63-linked ubiquitination. The disease-associated PTPN22W variant failed to promote TRAF3 ubiquitination, type 1 IFN upregulation, and type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of arthritis. The findings establish a candidate innate immune mechanism of action for a human autoimmunity "risk" gene in the regulation of host defense and inflammation.

  14. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  15. Regulation of carbohydrate metabolism by the farnesoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Stayrook, Keith R; Bramlett, Kelli S; Savkur, Rajesh S; Ficorilli, James; Cook, Todd; Christe, Michael E; Michael, Laura F; Burris, Thomas P

    2005-03-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4) is a nuclear hormone receptor that functions as the bile acid receptor. In addition to the critical role FXR plays in bile acid metabolism and transport, it regulates a variety of genes important in lipoprotein metabolism. We demonstrate that FXR also plays a role in carbohydrate metabolism via regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene expression. Treatment of either H4IIE or MH1C1 rat hepatoma cell lines as well as primary rat or human hepatocytes with FXR agonists led to stimulation of PEPCK mRNA expression to levels comparable to those obtained with glucocorticoid receptor agonists. We examined the physiological significance of FXR agonist-induced enhancement of PEPCK expression in primary rat hepatocytes. In addition to inducing PEPCK expression in primary hepatocytes, FXR agonists stimulated glucose output to levels comparable to those observed with a glucocorticoid receptor agonist. Consistent with these observations, treatment of C57BL6 mice with GW4064 significantly increased hepatic PEPCK expression. Activation of FXR initiated a cascade involving induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and TRB3 expression that is consistent with stimulation of PEPCK gene expression via interference with a pathway that may involve Akt-dependent phosphorylation of Forkhead/winged helix transcription factor (FOXO1). The FXR-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha-TRB3 pathway was conserved in rat hepatoma cell lines, mice, as well as primary human hepatocytes. Thus, in addition to its role in the regulation of lipid metabolism, FXR regulates carbohydrate metabolism.

  16. Does the kappa opioid receptor system contribute to pain aversion?

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Catherine M.; Taylor, Anna M. W.; Cook, Christopher; Ong, Edmund; Morón, Jose A.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the endogenous peptide-ligand dynorphin have received significant attention due the involvement in mediating a variety of behavioral and neurophysiological responses, including opposing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse including opioids. Accumulating evidence indicates this system is involved in regulating states of motivation and emotion. Acute activation of the KOR produces an increase in motivational behavior to escape a threat, however, KOR activation associated with chronic stress leads to the expression of symptoms indicative of mood disorders. It is well accepted that KOR can produce analgesia and is engaged in chronic pain states including neuropathic pain. Spinal studies have revealed KOR-induced analgesia in reversing pain hypersensitivities associated with peripheral nerve injury. While systemic administration of KOR agonists attenuates nociceptive sensory transmission, this effect appears to be a stress-induced effect as anxiolytic agents, including delta opioid receptor agonists, mitigate KOR agonist-induced analgesia. Additionally, while the role of KOR and dynorphin in driving the dysphoric and aversive components of stress and drug withdrawal has been well characterized, how this system mediates the negative emotional states associated with chronic pain is relatively unexplored. This review provides evidence that dynorphin and the KOR system contribute to the negative affective component of pain and that this receptor system likely contributes to the high comorbidity of mood disorders associated with chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:25452729

  17. In vitro and in vivo comparison of two non-peptide tachykinin NK3 receptor antagonists: Improvements in efficacy achieved through enhanced brain penetration or altered pharmacological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Lee A; Langmead, Christopher J; Dada, Adeshola; Watson, Jeannette M; Wu, Zining; de la Flor, Raúl; Jones, Gareth A; Cluderay, Jane E; Southam, Eric; Murkitt, Graham S; Hill, Mark D; Jones, Declan N C; Davies, Ceri H; Hagan, Jim J; Smith, Paul W

    2010-02-10

    Clinical evaluation of tachykinin NK(3) receptor antagonists has provided support for the therapeutic utility of this target in schizophrenia. However, these studies have not been entirely conclusive, possibly because of the pharmacokinetic limitations of these molecules. In the search for tachykinin NK(3) receptor antagonists with improved properties, we have discovered GSK172981 and GSK256471. Both compounds demonstrated high affinity for recombinant human (pK(i) values 7.7 and 8.9, respectively) and native guinea pig (pK(i) values 7.8 and 8.4, respectively) tachykinin NK(3) receptors. In vitro functional evaluations revealed GSK172981 to be a competitive antagonist (pA(2)=7.2) at cloned human tachykinin NK(3) receptor whereas GSK256471 diminished the neurokinin B-induced E(max) response, indicative of non-surmountable antagonist pharmacology (pA(2)=9.2). GSK172981 also exhibited a competitive profile in antagonizing neurokinin B-stimulated neuronal activity recorded from the guinea pig medial habenula slices (apparent pK(B)=8.1), whilst GSK256471 abolished the agonist-induced response. Central nervous system penetration by GSK172981 and GSK256471 was indicated by dose-dependent ex vivo tachykinin NK(3) receptor occupancy in medial prefrontal cortex (ED(50) values of 0.8 and 0.9 mg/kg, i.p., respectively) and the dose-dependent attenuation of agonist-induced "wet dog shake" behaviours in guinea pigs. Finally, in vivo microdialysis studies demonstrated that acute GSK172981 (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and GSK256471 (1mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated haloperidol-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the guinea pig nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these in vitro and in vivo characterisations of the tachykinin NK(3) receptor antagonists GSK172981 and GSK256471 support their potential utility in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  18. Functional selectivity of muscarinic receptor antagonists for inhibition of M3-mediated phosphoinositide responses in guinea pig urinary bladder and submandibular salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Carl P; Gupta, Paul; Napier, Carolyn M; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R A John

    2004-09-01

    Binding and functional affinities of the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor antagonists darifenacin, tolterodine, oxybutynin, and atropine were assessed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the human recombinant M2 (CHO-m2) or M3 (CHO-m3) receptors, and in guinea pig bladder and submandibular gland. In [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride binding studies in CHO cells, darifenacin displayed selectivity (14.8-fold) for the M3 versus M2 mACh receptor subtype. Oxybutynin was nonselective, whereas atropine and tolterodine were weakly M2-selective (5.1- and 6.6-fold, respectively). Antagonist functional affinity estimates were determined by the inhibition of agonist-induced [3H]inositol phosphate accumulation in CHO-m3 cells and antagonism of the agonist-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in CHO-m2 cells. Darifenacin was the most M3-selective antagonist (32.4-fold), whereas oxybutynin, atropine, and tolterodine exhibited lesser selectivity. Functional affinity estimates in guinea pig urinary bladder and submandibular salivary gland using indices of phosphoinositide turnover revealed that oxybutynin, darifenacin, and tolterodine each displayed selectivity for the response in the bladder, relative to that seen in the submandibular gland (9.3-, 7.9-, and 7.4-fold, respectively). In contrast, atropine displayed a similar affinity in both tissues. These data demonstrate that in bladder, compared with submandibular gland from a single species, the mACh receptor antagonists darifenacin, tolterodine, and oxybutynin display selectivity to inhibit agonist-mediated phosphoinositide responses. It is proposed that both responses are mediated via M3 mACh receptor activation and that differential functional affinities displayed by some, but not all, antagonists are indicative of the influence of cell background upon the pharmacology of the M3 mACh receptor. PMID:15140916

  19. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  20. Role of histamine H1-and H2-receptors in the cardiovascular system of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K

    1980-01-01

    The effects of histamine were examined on the circulation of the blood-perfused heart, kidney, intestine, and hindlimb of rabbits. Single intrarterial injections of drugs were made into the perfusion system of the coronary, renal, mesenteric, or femoral vascular bed. In the hearts, histamine caused dose-dependent positive inotropic and chronotropic responses and vaso-constriction. 2-Methylhistamine, a relatively selective histamine H1-receptor agonist, produced vascular effects very similar to those of histamine, but had no cardiac actions at low and negative inotropic responses at high doses. 4-Methylhistamine, a relatively selective histamine H2-receptor agonist, induced slight vasodilatation and positive inotropic and chronotropic responses. In the renal, mesenteric, and femoral vascular beds, histamine and 2-methylhistamine caused vasoconstriction, while 4-methylhistamine induced slight vasodilatation. Mepyramine, a selective H1-receptor antagonist, blocked the vasoconstriction in response to histamine and 2-methylhistamine, but not the positive inotropic and chronotropic responses to histamine. The combined action of mepyramine and cimetidine (a selective H2-receptor antagonist) eliminated all cardiac and vascular effects of histamine. These results strongly support the view that in the cardiovascular system of the rabbit, H1-receptors mediate negative inotropic effects and vasoconstriction, whereas H2-receptors are responsible for positive inotropic and chronotropic effects and vasodilatation.

  1. Mutations in the 'DRY' motif of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor result in biased receptor variants.

    PubMed

    Gyombolai, Pál; Tóth, András D; Tímár, Dániel; Turu, Gábor; Hunyady, László

    2015-02-01

    The role of the highly conserved 'DRY' motif in the signaling of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) was investigated by inducing single-, double-, and triple-alanine mutations into this site of the receptor. We found that the CB1R-R3.50A mutant displays a partial decrease in its ability to activate heterotrimeric Go proteins (∼80% of WT CB1R (CB1R-WT)). Moreover, this mutant showed an enhanced basal β-arrestin2 (β-arr2) recruitment. More strikingly, the double-mutant CB1R-D3.49A/R3.50A was biased toward β-arrs, as it gained a robustly increased β-arr1 and β-arr2 recruitment ability compared with the WT receptor, while its G-protein activation was decreased. In contrast, the double-mutant CB1R-R3.50A/Y3.51A proved to be G-protein-biased, as it was practically unable to recruit β-arrs in response to agonist stimulus, while still activating G-proteins, although at a reduced level (∼70% of CB1R-WT). Agonist-induced ERK1/2 activation of the CB1R mutants showed a good correlation with their β-arr recruitment ability but not with their G-protein activation or inhibition of cAMP accumulation. Our results suggest that G-protein activation and β-arr binding of the CB1R are mediated by distinct receptor conformations, and the conserved 'DRY' motif plays different roles in the stabilization of these conformations, thus mediating both G-protein- and β-arr-mediated functions of CB1R.

  2. Preclinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of AZD3783, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minli; Zhou, Diansong; Wang, Yi; Maier, Donna L; Widzowski, Daniel V; Sobotka-Briner, Cynthia D; Brockel, Becky J; Potts, William M; Shenvi, Ashok B; Bernstein, Peter R; Pierson, M Edward

    2011-11-01

    The preclinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetic properties of (2R)-6-methoxy-8-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-N-(4-morpholin-4-ylphenyl)chromane-2-carboxamide (AZD3783), a potent 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B (5-HT(1B)) receptor antagonist, were characterized as part of translational pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic hypothesis testing in human clinical trials. The affinity of AZD3783 to the 5-HT(1B) receptor was measured in vitro by using membrane preparations containing recombinant human or guinea pig 5-HT(1B) receptors and in native guinea pig brain tissue. In vivo antagonist potency of AZD3783 for the 5HT(1B) receptor was investigated by measuring the blockade of 5-HT(1B) agonist-induced guinea pig hypothermia. The anxiolytic-like potency was assessed using the suppression of separation-induced vocalization in guinea pig pups. The affinity of AZD3783 for human and guinea pig 5-HT(1B) receptor (K(i), 12.5 and 11.1 nM, respectively) was similar to unbound plasma EC(50) values for guinea pig receptor occupancy (11 nM) and reduction of agonist-induced hypothermia (18 nM) in guinea pig. Active doses of AZD3783 in the hypothermia assay were similar to doses that reduced separation-induced vocalization in guinea pig pups. AZD3783 demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic properties. The predicted pharmacokinetic parameters (total plasma clearance, 6.5 ml/min/kg; steady-state volume of distribution, 6.4 l/kg) were within 2-fold of the values observed in healthy male volunteers after a single 20-mg oral dose. This investigation presents a direct link between AZD3783 in vitro affinity and in vivo receptor occupancy to preclinical disease model efficacy. Together with predicted human pharmacokinetic properties, we have provided a model for the quantitative translational pharmacology of AZD3783 that increases confidence in the optimal human receptor occupancy required for antidepressant and anxiolytic effects in patients.

  3. Up-regulation of 5-HT2B receptor density and receptor-mediated glycogenolysis in mouse astrocytes by long-term fluoxetine administration.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ebenezer K C; Peng, Liang; Chen, Ye; Yu, Albert C H; Hertz, Leif

    2002-02-01

    The effects were studied of short-term (1 week) versus long-term (2-3 weeks) fluoxetine treatment of primary cultures of mouse astrocytes, differentiated by treatment with dibutyryl cyclic AMP. From previous experiments it is known that acute treatment with fluoxetine stimulates glycogenolysis and increases free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i]) in these cultures, whereas short-term (one week) treatment with 10 microM down-regulates the effects on glycogen and [Ca2+]i, when fluoxetine administration is renewed (or when serotonin is administered). Moreover, antagonist studies have shown that these responses are evoked by activation of a 5-HT2, receptor that is different from the 5-HT2A receptor and therefore at that time tentatively were interpreted as being exerted on 5-HT2C receptors. In the present study the cultures were found by RT-PCR to express mRNA for 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors, but not for the 5-HT2C receptor, identifying the 5-HT2 receptor activated by fluoxetine as the 5-HT2B receptor, the most recently cloned 5-Ht2 receptor and a 5-HT receptor known to be more abundant in human, than in rodent, brain. Both short-term and long-term treatment with fluoxetine increased the specific binding of [3H]mesulergine, a ligand for alL three 5-HT2 receptors. Long-term treatment with fluoxetine caused an agonist-induced up-regulation of the glycogenolytic response to renewed administration of fluoxetine, whereas short-term treatment abolished the fluoxetine-induced hydrolysis of glycogen. Thus, during a treatment period similar to that required for fluoxetine's clinical response to occur, 5-HT2B-mediated effects are initially down-regulated and subsequently up-regulated. PMID:11930908

  4. Local receptors as novel regulators for peripheral clock expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Changhao; Sui, Guiping; Archer, Simon N.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Aitken, Karen; Bagli, Darius; Chen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian circadian control is determined by a central clock in the brain suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and synchronized peripheral clocks in other tissues. Increasing evidence suggests that SCN-independent regulation of peripheral clocks also occurs. We examined how activation of excitatory receptors influences the clock protein PERIOD 2 (PER2) in a contractile organ, the urinary bladder. PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE-knock-in mice were used to report real-time PER2 circadian dynamics in the bladder tissue. Rhythmic PER2 activities occurred in the bladder wall with a cycle of ∼24 h and peak at ∼12 h. Activation of the muscarinic and purinergic receptors by agonists shifted the peak to an earlier time (7.2±2.0 and 7.2±0.9 h, respectively). PER2 expression was also sensitive to mechanical stimulation. Aging significantly dampened PER2 expression and its response to the agonists. Finally, muscarinic agonist-induced smooth muscle contraction also exhibited circadian rhythm. These data identified novel regulators, endogenous receptors, in determining local clock activity, in addition to mediating the central control. Furthermore, the local clock appears to reciprocally align receptor activity to circadian rhythm for muscle contraction. The interaction between receptors and peripheral clock represents an important mechanism for maintaining physiological functions and its dysregulation may contribute to age-related organ disorders.—Wu, C., Sui, G., Archer, S. N., Sassone-Corsi, P., Aitken, K., Bagli, D., Chen, Y. Local receptors as novel regulators for peripheral clock expression. PMID:25145629

  5. Senktide-induced gerbil foot tapping behaviour is blocked by selective tachykinin NK1 and NK3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, Monika; Kristensson, Elin; Adolfsson, Rebecka; Leffler, Agnes; Ahlstedt, Ingela; Engberg, Susanna; Drmota, Tomas; Sigfridsson, Kalle; Jussila, Rainer; de Verdier, Jennie; Novén, Anna; Johansson, Anders; Påhlman, Ingrid; von Mentzer, Bengt; Lindström, Erik

    2007-12-22

    Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of tachykinin NK(1) receptor agonists induces tapping of the hind legs in gerbils, so-called gerbil foot tapping, which is thought to reflect a fear-related response. The aim of the present study was to examine how ligands selective for NK(1), NK(2) and NK(3) receptors affect the gerbil foot tap response. Agonists selective for NK receptor subtypes were administered i.c.v. and the gerbil foot tap response was monitored. The effect of systemically administered antagonists was also studied. The interaction of ligands with gerbil NK(1) receptors was evaluated using autoradiography on gerbil brain slices with [(3)H]-Sar,Met(O(2))-substance P or [(3)H]GR205171 as radioligand. The effects of ligands on NK(1) and NK(3) receptor-mediated increases in intracellular calcium in vitro were studied in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the cloned gerbil receptors. The selective NK(1) receptor agonist ASMSP and the selective NK(3) receptor agonist senktide induced dose-dependent increases in gerbil foot tapping with similar potency. The maximal effect of senktide was approximately 40% of the maximal response evoked by ASMSP. The effects of ASMSP and senktide were blocked by administration of the selective NK(1) receptor antagonist CP99,994 (10 micromol/kg s.c.). The effects of senktide, but not ASMSP, were blocked by administration of the selective NK(3) receptor antagonist SB223412 (50 micromol/kg i.p.). Senktide did not displace NK(1) receptor radioligand binding and was >1000-fold less potent than ASMSP at activating gerbil NK(1) receptors. The selective NK(3) receptor agonist senktide evokes fear-related gerbil foot tapping, an effect which probably involves indirect enhancement of NK(1) receptor signalling.

  6. Evaluation of agonist selectivity for the NMDA receptor ion channel in bilayer lipid membranes based on integrated single-channel currents.

    PubMed

    Hirano, A; Sugawara, M; Umezawa, Y; Uchino, S; Nakajima-Iijima, S

    2000-06-01

    A new method for evaluating chemical selectivity of agonists to activate the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was presented by using typical agonists NMDA, L-glutamate and (2S, 3R, 4S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-IV) and the mouse epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor incorporated in bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) as an illustrative example. The method was based on the magnitude of an agonist-induced integrated single-channel current corresponding to the number of total ions passed through the open channel. The very magnitudes of the integrated single-channel currents were compared with the different BLMs as a new measure of agonist selectivity. The epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor was partially purified from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor and incorporated in BLMs formed by the tip-dip method. The agonist-induced integrated single-channel currents were obtained at 50 microM agonist concentration, where the integrated current for NMDA was shown to reach its saturated value. The obtained integrated currents were found to be (4.5 +/- 0.55) x 10(-13) C/s for NMDA, (5.8 +/- 0.72) x 10(-13) C/s for L-glutamate and (6.6 +/- 0.61) x 10(-13) C/s for L-CCG-IV, respectively. These results suggest that the agonist selectivity in terms of the total ion flux through the single epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor is in the order of L-CCG-IV approximately = L-glutamate > NMDA.

  7. New insights into receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Poste, G

    1984-11-01

    This review provides a brief summary of certain recent advances in our understanding of receptor regulation, signal transduction, and the diverse pathways by which receptor-ligand complexes are internalized and delivered to specific organelles, together with recycling of receptors back to the cell surface. Emphasis is also given to the importance of methodological advances in receptor isolation, immunologic analysis of receptor structure and function, the development of new instrumentation for microchemical characterization of very small amounts of receptor material, and the increasing use of genetic engineering techniques to isolate the genes for receptors and their regulatory subunits, to transfer such genes between cells, and to study receptor function by creating structurally modified receptors via subtle changes in gene structure. PMID:6151557

  8. Role of Prostaglandin D2 and DP1 Receptor on Japanese Cedar Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoshiyuki; Kidani, Yujiro; Goto, Kumiko; Furue, Shingo; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Inagaki, Naoki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Shichijo, Michitaka

    2016-05-01

    Although we previously demonstrated the contribution of the DP1receptor in nasal obstruction using animals sensitized with ovalbumin in the presence of adjuvant, the contribution of the DP1receptor in sneezing is unclear. Here, we developed a mouse model of Japanese cedar (JC:Cryptomeria japonica) pollinosis to evaluate the symptoms of sneezing. To achieve this, we used JC pollen crude extract in the absence of adjuvant to sensitize mice to develop a model closer to the pathophysiology of human JC pollinosis. The immunologic and pharmacologic features of this model are highly similar to those observed in JC pollinosis in humans. Using this model, we found that DP1receptor antagonists suppressed JC pollen extract-induced sneezing and that a DP1receptor agonist induced sneezing. Moreover, JC pollen extract-induced sneezing was diminished in DP1receptor knockout mice. In conclusion, we developed a novel mouse model of allergic rhinitis that closely mimics human JC pollinosis. A strong contribution of DP1receptor signaling to sneezing was demonstrated using this model, suggesting that DP1receptor antagonists could suppress sneezing and nasal obstruction, and therefore these agents could be a new therapeutic option for allergic rhinitis.

  9. Role of Prostaglandin D2 and DP1 Receptor on Japanese Cedar Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoshiyuki; Kidani, Yujiro; Goto, Kumiko; Furue, Shingo; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Inagaki, Naoki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Shichijo, Michitaka

    2016-05-01

    Although we previously demonstrated the contribution of the DP1receptor in nasal obstruction using animals sensitized with ovalbumin in the presence of adjuvant, the contribution of the DP1receptor in sneezing is unclear. Here, we developed a mouse model of Japanese cedar (JC:Cryptomeria japonica) pollinosis to evaluate the symptoms of sneezing. To achieve this, we used JC pollen crude extract in the absence of adjuvant to sensitize mice to develop a model closer to the pathophysiology of human JC pollinosis. The immunologic and pharmacologic features of this model are highly similar to those observed in JC pollinosis in humans. Using this model, we found that DP1receptor antagonists suppressed JC pollen extract-induced sneezing and that a DP1receptor agonist induced sneezing. Moreover, JC pollen extract-induced sneezing was diminished in DP1receptor knockout mice. In conclusion, we developed a novel mouse model of allergic rhinitis that closely mimics human JC pollinosis. A strong contribution of DP1receptor signaling to sneezing was demonstrated using this model, suggesting that DP1receptor antagonists could suppress sneezing and nasal obstruction, and therefore these agents could be a new therapeutic option for allergic rhinitis. PMID:26945086

  10. Characterization of NPY receptors mediating contraction in rat intramyocardial coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Prieto, D; García-Sacristán, A; Simonsen, U

    1998-09-25

    In vitro experiments in a microvascular myograph were designed in order to characterize the receptor subtypes and the mechanisms underlying the contractions induced by neuropeptide Y (NPY) in rat coronary small arteries. The rank order of potency for NPY-receptor agonist-induced increases in tension in endothelium-intact preparations was polypeptide Y (PYY)> NPY > or = [Leu31Pro34]NPY, while NPY(13-36) only induced small contractions at the highest concentration applied. The selective neuropeptide Y1 receptor antagonist, BIBP 3226, caused rightward shifts in the concentration-response curves for NPY and the slope of the Schild plot was not significantly different from unity. The pA2 value for BIBP 3226 against NPY was 7.88+/-0.15 (n = 6). We have earlier shown that endothelial cell removal does not change the contractile responses induced by NPY, but indomethacin (3 x 10(-6) M) significantly reduced the contractions induced by the peptide. In contrast, the thromboxane receptor antagonist, SQ29548, which abolished the contractions induced by the thromboxane analogue, U46619, did not change the concentration-response curves for NPY. In conclusion, the present study suggests that Y1 receptors mediate NPY-induced contractions in rat coronary resistance arteries, and that a non-thromboxane prostanoid is involved in the contractile mechanism.

  11. Differential regulation of somatostatin receptor dephosphorylation by β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2.

    PubMed

    Kliewer, Andrea; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is tightly regulated by coordinated phosphorylation of intracellular serine and threonine residues. Although the mechanisms of agonist-induced phosphorylation have been deciphered for many GPCRs, the regulation of their dephosphorylation remains poorly understood. Using a combination of siRNA knockdown screening and phosphosite-specific antibodies, we have recently identified the catalytic subunit β of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1β) as major constituent of the GPCR phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of the sst2 somatostatin receptor. However, PP1-targeting subunits specifically required for GPCR dephosphorylation have not been identified so far. Here, we show that siRNA knockdown of β-arrestin1 strongly inhibits sst2 receptor dephosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that β-arrestin1 and PP1β exist as constitutive complex that mediates rapid dephosphorylation of sst2 receptors at or near the plasma membrane. By contrast, β-arrestin2 is not essential for rapid sst2 receptor dephosphorylation. Together, these findings reveal a novel scaffolding function of β-arrestin1 that facilitates efficient targeting of PP1β to phosphorylated GPCRs.

  12. Receptor number and caveolar co-localization determine receptor coupling efficiency to adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Xiang, Y; Regan, J W; Insel, P A

    2001-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that many signaling molecules localize in microdomains of the plasma membrane, particularly caveolae. In this study, overexpression of adenylyl cyclase was used as a functional probe of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) compartmentation. We found that three endogenous receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes couple with different levels of efficiency to the activation of adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6), which localizes to caveolin-rich membrane fractions. Overexpression of AC6 enhanced the maximal cAMP response to beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR)-selective activation 3.7-fold, to beta(2)AR-selective activation only 1.6-fold and to prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) not at all. Therefore, the rank order of efficacy in coupling to AC6 is beta(1)AR > beta(2)AR > prostaglandin E(2) receptor (EP(2)R). beta(2)AR coupling efficiency was greater when we overexpressed the receptor or blocked its desensitization by expressing betaARKct, an inhibitor of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activation, but was not significantly greater when cells were treated with pertussis toxin. Assessment of receptor and AC expression indicated co-localization of AC5/6, beta(1)AR, and beta(2)AR, but not EP(2)R, in caveolin-rich membranes and caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates, likely explaining the observed activation of AC6 by betaAR subtypes but lack thereof by PGE(2). When cardiomyocytes were stimulated with a betaAR agonist, beta(2)AR were no longer found in caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates; an effect that was blocked by expression of betaARKct. Thus, agonist-induced translocation of beta(2)AR out of caveolae causes a sequestration of receptor from effector and likely contributes to the lower efficacy of beta(2)AR coupling to AC6 as compared with beta(1)AR, which do not similarly translocate. Therefore, spatial co-localization is a key determinant of efficiency of coupling by particular extracellular signals to activation of GPCR-linked effectors. PMID:11533056

  13. Receptor number and caveolar co-localization determine receptor coupling efficiency to adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Xiang, Y; Regan, J W; Insel, P A

    2001-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that many signaling molecules localize in microdomains of the plasma membrane, particularly caveolae. In this study, overexpression of adenylyl cyclase was used as a functional probe of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) compartmentation. We found that three endogenous receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes couple with different levels of efficiency to the activation of adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6), which localizes to caveolin-rich membrane fractions. Overexpression of AC6 enhanced the maximal cAMP response to beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR)-selective activation 3.7-fold, to beta(2)AR-selective activation only 1.6-fold and to prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) not at all. Therefore, the rank order of efficacy in coupling to AC6 is beta(1)AR > beta(2)AR > prostaglandin E(2) receptor (EP(2)R). beta(2)AR coupling efficiency was greater when we overexpressed the receptor or blocked its desensitization by expressing betaARKct, an inhibitor of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activation, but was not significantly greater when cells were treated with pertussis toxin. Assessment of receptor and AC expression indicated co-localization of AC5/6, beta(1)AR, and beta(2)AR, but not EP(2)R, in caveolin-rich membranes and caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates, likely explaining the observed activation of AC6 by betaAR subtypes but lack thereof by PGE(2). When cardiomyocytes were stimulated with a betaAR agonist, beta(2)AR were no longer found in caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates; an effect that was blocked by expression of betaARKct. Thus, agonist-induced translocation of beta(2)AR out of caveolae causes a sequestration of receptor from effector and likely contributes to the lower efficacy of beta(2)AR coupling to AC6 as compared with beta(1)AR, which do not similarly translocate. Therefore, spatial co-localization is a key determinant of efficiency of coupling by particular extracellular signals to activation of GPCR-linked effectors.

  14. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCV. Recent Advances in the Understanding of the Pharmacology and Biological Roles of Relaxin Family Peptide Receptors 1–4, the Receptors for Relaxin Family Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Halls, Michelle L.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Sutton, Steve W.; Dschietzig, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin, insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), relaxin-3, and INSL5 are the cognate ligands for the relaxin family peptide (RXFP) receptors 1–4, respectively. RXFP1 activates pleiotropic signaling pathways including the signalosome protein complex that facilitates high-sensitivity signaling; coupling to Gαs, Gαi, and Gαo proteins; interaction with glucocorticoid receptors; and the formation of hetero-oligomers with distinctive pharmacological properties. In addition to relaxin-related ligands, RXFP1 is activated by Clq-tumor necrosis factor-related protein 8 and by small-molecular-weight agonists, such as ML290 [2-isopropoxy-N-(2-(3-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl)benzamide], that act allosterically. RXFP2 activates only the Gαs- and Gαo-coupled pathways. Relaxin-3 is primarily a neuropeptide, and its cognate receptor RXFP3 is a target for the treatment of depression, anxiety, and autism. A variety of peptide agonists, antagonists, biased agonists, and an allosteric modulator target RXFP3. Both RXFP3 and the related RXFP4 couple to Gαi/Gαo proteins. INSL5 has the properties of an incretin; it is secreted from the gut and is orexigenic. The expression of RXFP4 in gut, adipose tissue, and β-islets together with compromised glucose tolerance in INSL5 or RXFP4 knockout mice suggests a metabolic role. This review focuses on the many advances in our understanding of RXFP receptors in the last 5 years, their signal transduction mechanisms, the development of novel compounds that target RXFP1–4, the challenges facing the field, and current prospects for new therapeutics. PMID:25761609

  15. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCV. Recent advances in the understanding of the pharmacology and biological roles of relaxin family peptide receptors 1-4, the receptors for relaxin family peptides.

    PubMed

    Halls, Michelle L; Bathgate, Ross A D; Sutton, Steve W; Dschietzig, Thomas B; Summers, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin, insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), relaxin-3, and INSL5 are the cognate ligands for the relaxin family peptide (RXFP) receptors 1-4, respectively. RXFP1 activates pleiotropic signaling pathways including the signalosome protein complex that facilitates high-sensitivity signaling; coupling to Gα(s), Gα(i), and Gα(o) proteins; interaction with glucocorticoid receptors; and the formation of hetero-oligomers with distinctive pharmacological properties. In addition to relaxin-related ligands, RXFP1 is activated by Clq-tumor necrosis factor-related protein 8 and by small-molecular-weight agonists, such as ML290 [2-isopropoxy-N-(2-(3-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl)benzamide], that act allosterically. RXFP2 activates only the Gα(s)- and Gα(o)-coupled pathways. Relaxin-3 is primarily a neuropeptide, and its cognate receptor RXFP3 is a target for the treatment of depression, anxiety, and autism. A variety of peptide agonists, antagonists, biased agonists, and an allosteric modulator target RXFP3. Both RXFP3 and the related RXFP4 couple to Gα(i)/Gα(o) proteins. INSL5 has the properties of an incretin; it is secreted from the gut and is orexigenic. The expression of RXFP4 in gut, adipose tissue, and β-islets together with compromised glucose tolerance in INSL5 or RXFP4 knockout mice suggests a metabolic role. This review focuses on the many advances in our understanding of RXFP receptors in the last 5 years, their signal transduction mechanisms, the development of novel compounds that target RXFP1-4, the challenges facing the field, and current prospects for new therapeutics.

  16. Receptor-G Protein Interaction Studied by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer: Lessons from Protease-Activated Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman; Pin, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Since its development, the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) approach has been extensively applied to study G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in real-time and in live cells. One of the major aspects of GPCRs investigated in considerable details is their physical coupling to the heterotrimeric G proteins. As a result, new concepts have emerged, but few questions are still a matter of debate illustrating the complexity of GPCR-G protein interactions and coupling. Here, we summarized the recent advances on our understanding of GPCR-G protein coupling based on BRET approaches and supported by other FRET-based studies. We essentially focused on our recent studies in which we addressed the concept of preassembly vs. the agonist-dependent interaction between the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and its cognate G proteins. We discussed the concept of agonist-induced conformational changes within the preassembled PAR1-G protein complexes as well as the critical question how the multiple coupling of PAR1 with two different G proteins, Gαi1 and Gα12, but also β-arrestin 1, can be regulated. PMID:22737145

  17. Molecular determinants for drug-receptor interactions. 8. Anisotropic and internal motions in morphine, nalorphine, oxymorphone, naloxone and naltrexone in aqueous solution by carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.

    1989-02-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) were measured for morphine, oxymorphone, nalorphine, naloxone and naltrexone as hydrochloride salts in 2H 2O solution. The data refer to the molecules in the N-equatorial configuration. The experimental T1 values were interpreted using a model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body with superimposed internal motions of the flexible N-methyl, N-methyl-allyl and N-methyl-cyclopropyl fragments. The calculated internal motional rates were found to markedly decrease on passing from agonists to mixed (nalorphine) and pure (naloxone, naltrexone) antagonists. For these latter the observed trend of the internal flexibility about NC and CC bonds of the N-substituents is discussed in terms of a correlation with their relative antagonistic potencies. In fact, such an evidence of decreasing internal conformational dynamics in the order nalorphine, naloxone, naltrexone, appeared interestingly in line with the "two-state" model of opiate receptor operation mode proposed by Snyder.

  18. Spinal 5-HT7 receptor activation induces long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, M S; Mitchell, G S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acute intermittent hypoxia elicits a form of serotonin-dependent respiratory plasticity known as phrenic long term facilitation (pLTF). Episodic spinal serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptor activation on or near phrenic motor neurons is necessary for pLTF. A hallmark of pLTF is the requirement for serotonin-dependent synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and activation of its high affinity receptor, TrkB. Activation of spinal Gs protein-coupled adenosine 2A receptors (GsPCRs) elicits a unique form of long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation (PMF), but via unique mechanisms (BDNF independent TrkB trans-activation). We hypothesized that other GsPCRs elicit PMF, specifically serotonin-7 (5-HT7) receptors, which are expressed in phrenic motor neurons. Cervical spinal (C4) injections of a selective 5-HT7 receptor agonist, AS-19 (10 μm, 5 μl; 3 × 5 min), in anaesthetized, vagotomized and ventilated male Sprague–Dawley rats elicited long-lasting PMF (>120 min), an effect prevented by pretreatment with a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (SB 269970; 5 mm, 7 μl). GsPCR activation ‘trans-activates’ TrkB by increasing synthesis of an immature TrkB isoform. Spinal injection of a TrkB inhibitor (k252a) and siRNAs that prevent TrkB (but not BDNF) mRNA translation both blocked 5-HT7 agonist-induced PMF, confirming a requirement for TrkB synthesis and activity. k252a affected late PMF (≥90 min) only. Spinal inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway blocked 5-HT7 agonist-induced PMF, whereas MEK/ERK inhibition delayed, but did not block, PMF. An understanding of signalling mechanisms giving rise to PMF may guide development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat ventilatory control disorders associated with respiratory insufficiency, such as spinal injury and motor neuron disease. PMID:21242254

  19. Pharmacological characterisation of the goldfish somatostatin sst5 receptor.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Caroline; Feuerbach, Dominik; Lin, Xinwei; Peter, Richard; Hoyer, Daniel

    2002-02-01

    Somatostatin (somatotropin release inhibiting factor, SRIF), exerts its effects via specific G protein coupled receptors of which five subtypes have been cloned (sst1-5). Recently, SRIF receptors have also been cloned from fish tissues. In this study, goldfish sst5 receptors (gfsst5) were expressed and characterised in the Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line, that harbours the luciferase reporter gene driven by the serum responsive element (CCL39-SRE-Luci). The agonist radioligands [125I]-LTT-SRIF-28 ([Leu8, DTrp22, 125I-Tyr25]SRIF-28) and [125I][Tyr10]cortistatin-14 labelled similar receptor densities with high affinity and in a saturable manner (pKd: 9.99-9.71; Bmax: 300-350 fmol mg-1). 5'-Guanylyl-imidodiphosphate inhibited radioligand binding to some degree (38.5-57.9%). In competition binding studies, the pharmacological profile of SRIF binding sites defined with [125I]LTT-SRIF-28 and [125I][Tyr10]cortistatin-14 correlated significantly (r2=0.97, n=20). Pharmacological profiles of human and mouse sst5 receptors expressed in CCL39 cells correlated markedly less with those of the gfsst5 profile (r2=0.52-0.78, n > or = b16). Functional expression of the gfsst5 receptor was examined by measurement of agonist-induced luciferase expression and stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS ([35S]guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) binding. Profiles were similar to those achieved in radioligand binding studies (r2=0.81-0.93, n=20), although relative potency (pEC50) was reduced compared to pKd values. Relative efficacy profiles of luciferase expression and [35S]GTPgammaS binding, were rather divergent (r2=0.48, n=20) with peptides showing full agonism at one pathway and absence of agonism at the other. BIM 23056 (D-Phe-Phe-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Val-Phe-D-Nal-NH2) acted as an antagonist on the effects of SRIF-14 (pKB=6.74 +/- 0.23) on stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Pertussis toxin abolished the effect of SRIF-14 on luciferase expression and [35S]GTPgammaS binding suggesting

  20. The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 reduces cocaine self-administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Reddy, India A; Weikop, Pia; Graham, Devon L; Stanwood, Gregg D; Wortwein, Gitta; Galli, Aurelio; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The ability of the GLP-1 system to decrease food intake in rodents has been well described and parallels results from clinical trials. GLP-1 receptors are expressed in the brain, including within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Dopaminergic neurons in the VTA project to the NAc, and these neurons play a pivotal role in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. Based on the anatomical distribution of GLP-1 receptors in the brain and the well-established effects of GLP-1 on food reward, we decided to investigate the effect of the GLP-1 analogue exendin-4 on cocaine- and dopamine D1-receptor agonist-induced hyperlocomotion, on acute and chronic cocaine self-administration, on cocaine-induced striatal dopamine release in mice and on cocaine-induced c-fos activation. Here, we report that GLP-1 receptor stimulation reduces acute and chronic cocaine self-administration and attenuates cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. In addition, we show that peripheral administration of exendin-4 reduces cocaine-induced elevation of striatal dopamine levels and striatal c-fos expression implicating central GLP-1 receptors in these responses. The present results demonstrate that the GLP-1 system modulates cocaine's effects on behavior and dopamine homeostasis, indicating that the GLP-1 receptor may be a novel target for the pharmacological treatment of drug addiction.

  1. (/sup 3/H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine binding to A1 adenosine receptors of intact rat ventricular myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, D.; Lohse, M.J.; Schwabe, U.

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was the identification of A1 adenosine receptors in intact rat ventricular myocytes, which are thought to mediate the negative inotropic effects of adenosine. The adenosine receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine was used as radioligand. Binding of the radioligand to intact myocytes was rapid, reversible, and saturable with a binding capacity of 40,000 binding sites per cell. The dissociation constant of the radioligand was 0.48 nM. The adenosine receptor antagonists 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, xanthine amine congener, and theophylline were competitive inhibitors with affinities in agreement with results obtained for A1 receptors in other tissues. Competition experiments using the adenosine receptor agonists R-N(6)-phenylisopropyladenosine, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, and S-N(6)-phenylisopropyladenosine gave monophasic displacement curves with Ki values of 50 nM, 440 nM, and 4,300 nM, which agreed well with the GTP-inducible low affinity state in cardiac membranes. The low affinity for agonists was not due to agonist-induced desensitization, and correlated well with the corresponding IC50 values for the inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. It is suggested that only a low affinity state of A1 receptors can be detected in intact rat myocytes due to the presence of high concentrations of guanine nucleotides in intact cells.

  2. Letter: Iatrogenic lipomatosis: a rare manifestation of treatment with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist.

    PubMed

    Femia, Alisa; Klein, Peter A

    2010-04-15

    Lipomas are common benign neoplasms of adipose tissue. Lipomatosis, the progressive appearance of multiple lipomas, is most often associated with specific congenital, familial, or idiopathic syndromes. In one reported case, the development of multiple lipomas occurred as a result of treatment with rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonist. We report a second case of lipomatosis occurring as a result of treatment with a PPAR gamma agonist. This case occurred in a 77-year-old woman who developed multiple lipomas two years after beginning treatment with pioglitazone, a PPAR gamma agonist. Histopathologic examination confirmed these lesions to be lipomas. Within four weeks of discontinuation of pioglitazone, regression of the lipomas began. We describe a case of PPAR agonist-induced lipoma formation, review relevant literature, and provide a molecular mechanism for this side effect.

  3. Mixed nicotinic and muscarinic features of cholinergic receptor coupled to secretion in bovine chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, M.H.; Pollard, H.B.; Heldman, E. )

    1991-06-01

    Acetylcholine evokes release from cultured bovine chromaffin cells by a mechanism that is believed to be classically nicotinic. However, the authors found that the full muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-M (Oxo-M) induced a robust catecholamine (CA) secretion. By contrast, muscarine, pilocarpine, bethanechol, and McN-A-343 did not elicit any secretory response. Desensitization of the response to nicotine by Oxo-M and desensitization of the response to Oxo-M by nicotine suggest that both nicotine and Oxo-M were acting at the same receptor. Additional experiments supporting this conclusion show that nicotine-induced secretion and Oxo-M-induced secretion were similarly blocked by various muscarinic and nicotinic antagonists. Moreover, secretion induced by nicotine and Oxo-M were Ca{sup 2+} dependent, and both agonists induced {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake. Equilibrium binding studies showed that ({sup 3}H)Oxo-M bound to chromaffin cell membranes with a K{sub d} value of 3.08 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M and a Hill coefficient of 1.00, suggesting one binding site for this ligand. Nicotine inhibited Oxo-M binding in a noncompetitive manner, suggesting that both ligands bind at two different sites on the same receptor. They propose that the receptor on bovine chromaffin cells that is coupled to secretion represents an unusual cholinergic receptor that has both nicotinic and muscarinic features.

  4. Fluorescent knock-in mice to decipher the physiopathological role of G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ceredig, Rhian A.; Massotte, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate most physiological functions but are also critically involved in numerous pathological states. Approximately a third of marketed drugs target GPCRs, which places this family of receptors in the main arena of pharmacological pre-clinical and clinical research. The complexity of GPCR function demands comprehensive appraisal in native environment to collect in-depth knowledge of receptor physiopathological roles and assess the potential of therapeutic molecules. Identifying neurons expressing endogenous GPCRs is therefore essential to locate them within functional circuits whereas GPCR visualization with subcellular resolution is required to get insight into agonist-induced trafficking. Both remain frequently poorly investigated because direct visualization of endogenous receptors is often hampered by the lack of appropriate tools. Also, monitoring intracellular trafficking requires real-time visualization to gather in-depth knowledge. In this context, knock-in mice expressing a fluorescent protein or a fluorescent version of a GPCR under the control of the endogenous promoter not only help to decipher neuroanatomical circuits but also enable real-time monitoring with subcellular resolution thus providing invaluable information on their trafficking in response to a physiological or a pharmacological challenge. This review will present the animal models and discuss their contribution to the understanding of the physiopathological role of GPCRs. We will also address the drawbacks associated with this methodological approach and browse future directions. PMID:25610398

  5. Mixed nicotinic and muscarinic features of cholinergic receptor coupled to secretion in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shirvan, M H; Pollard, H B; Heldman, E

    1991-01-01

    Acetylcholine evokes release from cultured bovine chromaffin cells by a mechanism that is believed to be classically nicotinic. However, we found that the full muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-M (Oxo-M) induced a robust catecholamine (CA) secretion. By contrast, muscarine, pilocarpine, bethanechol, and McN-A-343 did not elicit any secretory response. Desensitization of the response to nicotine by Oxo-M and desensitization of the response to Oxo-M by nicotine suggest that both nicotine and Oxo-M were acting at the same receptor. Additional experiments supporting this conclusion show that nicotine-induced secretion and Oxo-M-induced secretion were similarly blocked by various muscarinic and nicotinic antagonists. Moreover, secretion induced by nicotine and Oxo-M were Ca2+ dependent, and both agonists induced 45Ca2+ uptake. Equilibrium binding studies showed that [3H]Oxo-M bound to chromaffin cell membranes with a Kd value of 3.08 x 10(-8) M and a Hill coefficient of 1.00, suggesting one binding site for this ligand. Nicotine inhibited Oxo-M binding in a noncompetitive manner, suggesting that both ligands bind at two different sites on the same receptor. We propose that the receptor on bovine chromaffin cells that is coupled to secretion represents an unusual cholinergic receptor that has both nicotinic and muscarinic features. Images PMID:2052567

  6. A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in red: live cell imaging of the kappa opioid receptor-tdTomato fusion protein (KOPR-tdT) in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Chiu, Yi-Ting; Chen, Chongguang; Wang, Yujun; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In contrast to green fluorescent protein and variants (GFPs), red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) have rarely been employed for generation of GPCR fusion proteins, likely because of formation of aggregates and cell toxicity of some RFPs. Among all the RFPs available, tdTomato (tdT), one of the non-aggregating RFP, has the highest brightness score (about 3 times that of eGFP) and unsurpassed photostability. Methods We fused tdT to the KOPR C-terminus. The KOPR-tdT cDNA construct was transfected into Neuro2A mouse neuroblastoma cell line (Neuro2A cells) and rat cortical primary neurons for characterization of pharmacological properties and imaging studies on KOPR trafficking. Results KOPR-tdT retained KOPR properties (cell surface expression, ligand binding, agonist-induced signaling and internalization) when expressed in Neuro2A cells and rat primary cortical neurons. Live cell imaging of KOPR-tdT enables visualization of time course of agonist-induced internalization of KOPR in real time for 60 min, without photobleaching and apparent cell toxicity. U50,488H-induced KOPR internalization occurred as early as 4 min and plateaued at about 30 min. A unique pattern of internalized KOPR in processes of primary neurons was induced by U50,488H. Discussion tdT is an alternative to, or even a better tool than, GFPs for fusing to GPCR for trafficking studies, because tdT has higher brightness and thus better resolution and less photobleaching problems due to reduced laser power used. It also has advantages associated with its longer-wavelength emission including spectral separation from autofluorescence and GFPs, reduced cell toxicity the laser may impose, and greater tissue penetration. These advantages of tdT over GPFs may be critical for live cell imaging studies of GPCRs in vitro and for studying GPCRs in vivo because of their low abundance. PMID:23856011

  7. Opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP improves effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Hormann, Inis; Roscher, Mareike; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma are the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, having a very poor prognosis. The enhanced radio- and chemoresistance of glioblastoma and the glioblastoma stem cells might be the main reason why conventional therapies fail. The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Downregulation of cAMP sensitizes tumor cells for anti-cancer treatment. Opioid receptor agonists triggering opioid receptors can activate inhibitory Gi proteins, which, in turn, block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. In this study, we show that downregulation of cAMP by opioid receptor activation improves the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma. The µ-opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone sensitizes glioblastoma as well as the untreatable glioblastoma stem cells for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and activation of apoptosis pathways by reversing deficient caspase activation and deficient downregulation of XIAP and Bcl-xL, playing critical roles in glioblastomas’ resistance. Blocking opioid receptors using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or increasing intracellular cAMP by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) strongly reduced opioid receptor agonist-induced sensitization for doxorubicin. In addition, the opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux, whereas doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in glioblastomas. Furthermore, opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone inhibited tumor growth significantly in vivo. Our findings suggest that opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP is a promising strategy to inhibit tumor growth and to improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma and in killing glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:24626197

  8. Serotonin 2A and 2B receptor-induced phrenic motor facilitation: differential requirement for spinal NADPH oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, P.M.; Vinit, S.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) facilitates phrenic motor output by a mechanism that requires spinal serotonin (type 2) receptor activation, NADPH oxidase activity and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Episodic spinal serotonin (5-HT) receptor activation alone, without changes in oxygenation, is sufficient to elicit NADPH oxidase-dependent phrenic motor facilitation (pMF). Here we investigated: 1) whether serotonin 2A and/or 2B (5-HT2a/b) receptors are expressed in identified phrenic motor neurons, and 2) which receptor subtype is capable of eliciting NADPH-oxidase-dependent pMF. In anesthetized, artificially ventilated adult rats, episodic C4 intrathecal injections (3 × 6µl injections, 5 min intervals) of a 5-HT2a (DOI) or 5-HT2b (BW723C86) receptor agonist elicited progressive and sustained increases in integrated phrenic nerve burst amplitude (i.e. pMF), an effect lasting at least 90 minutes post-injection for both receptor subtypes. 5-HT2a and 5-HT2b receptor agonist-induced pMF were both blocked by selective antagonists (ketanserin and SB206553, respectively), but not by antagonists to the other receptor subtype. Single injections of either agonist failed to elicit pMF, demonstrating a need for episodic receptor activation. Phrenic motor neurons retrogradely labeled with cholera toxin B fragment expressed both 5-HT2a and 5-HT2b receptors. Pre-treatment with NADPH oxidase inhibitors (apocynin and DPI) blocked 5-HT2b, but not 5-HT2a-induced pMF. Thus, multiple spinal type 2 serotonin receptors elicit pMF, but they act via distinct mechanisms that differ in their requirement for NADPH oxidase activity. PMID:21223996

  9. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCII. Urotensin II, urotensin II-related peptide, and their receptor: from structure to function.

    PubMed

    Vaudry, Hubert; Leprince, Jérôme; Chatenet, David; Fournier, Alain; Lambert, David G; Le Mével, Jean-Claude; Ohlstein, Eliot H; Schwertani, Adel; Tostivint, Hervé; Vaudry, David

    2015-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a cyclic neuropeptide that was first isolated from the urophysis of teleost fish on the basis of its ability to contract the hindgut. Subsequently, UII was characterized in tetrapods including humans. Phylogenetic studies and synteny analysis indicate that UII and its paralogous peptide urotensin II-related peptide (URP) belong to the somatostatin/cortistatin superfamily. In mammals, the UII and URP genes are primarily expressed in cholinergic neurons of the brainstem and spinal cord. UII and URP mRNAs are also present in various organs notably in the cardiovascular, renal, and endocrine systems. UII and URP activate a common G protein-coupled receptor, called UT, that exhibits relatively high sequence identity with somatostatin, opioid, and galanin receptors. The UT gene is widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and in peripheral tissues including the retina, heart, vascular bed, lung, kidney, adrenal medulla, and skeletal muscle. Structure-activity relationship studies and NMR conformational analysis have led to the rational design of a number of peptidic and nonpeptidic UT agonists and antagonists. Consistent with the wide distribution of UT, UII has now been shown to exert a large array of biologic activities, in particular in the CNS, the cardiovascular system, and the kidney. Here, we review the current knowledge concerning the pleiotropic actions of UII and discusses the possible use of antagonists for future therapeutic applications.

  10. The hippocampal NMDA receptors may be involved in acquisition, but not expression of ACPA-induced place preference.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Sharaf-Dolgari, Elmira; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the functional interactions between the endocannabinoid and glutamate systems in the hippocampus. The present study was made to test whether N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors of the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) are implicated in ACPA (a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist)-induced place preference. Using a 3-day schedule of conditioning, it was found that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of ACPA (0.02mg/kg) caused a significant conditioned place preference (CPP) in male albino NMRI mice. Intra-CA1 microinjection of the NMDA or D-[1]-2-amino-7-Phosphonoheptanoic acid (D-AP7, NMDA receptor antagonist), failed to induce CPP or CPA (condition place aversion), while NMDA (0.5μg/mouse) potentiated the ACPA (0.01mg/kg)-induced CPP; and D-AP7 (a specific NMDA receptor antagonist; 0.5 and 1μg/mouse) reversed the ACPA (0.02mg/kg)-induced CPP. Moreover, microinjection of different doses of glutamatergic agents on the testing day did not alter the expression of ACPA-induced place preference. None of the treatments, with the exception of ACPA (0.04mg/kg), had an effect on locomotor activity. In conclusion, these observations provide evidence that glutamate NMDA receptors of the CA1 may be involved in the potentiation of ACPA rewarding properties in the acquisition, but not expression, of CPP in mice.

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  12. Skewed pattern of Toll-like receptor 4-mediated cytokine production in human neonatal blood: Low LPS-induced IL-12p70 and high IL-10 persist throughout the first month of life

    PubMed Central

    Belderbos, M.E.; van Bleek, G.M.; Levy, O.; Blanken, M.O.; Houben, M.L.; Schuijff, L.; Kimpen, J.L.L.; Bont, L.

    2010-01-01

    Newborns are highly susceptible to infectious diseases, which may be due to impaired immune responses. This study aims to characterize the ontogeny of neonatal TLR-based innate immunity during the first month of life. Cellularity and Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist-induced cytokine production were compared between cord blood obtained from healthy neonates born after uncomplicated gestation and delivery (n=18), neonatal venous blood obtained at the age of one month (n=96), and adult venous blood (n=17). Cord blood TLR agonist-induced production of the Th1-polarizing cytokines IL-12p70 and IFN-α was generally impaired, but for TLR3, 7 and 9 agonists, rapidly increased to adult levels during the first month of life. In contrast, TLR4 demonstrated a slower maturation, with low LPS-induced IL-12p70 production and high IL-10 production up until the age of one month. Polarization in neonatal cytokine responses to LPS could contribute to neonatal susceptibility to severe bacterial infection. PMID:19648060

  13. Stoichiometry for α-bungarotoxin block of α7 acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    daCosta, Corrie J. B.; Free, Chris R.; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    α-Bungarotoxin (α-Btx) binds to the five agonist binding sites on the homopentameric α7-acetylcholine receptor, yet the number of bound α-Btx molecules required to prevent agonist-induced channel opening remains unknown. To determine the stoichiometry for α-Btx blockade, we generate receptors comprised of wild-type and α-Btx-resistant subunits, tag one of the subunit types with conductance mutations to report subunit stoichiometry, and following incubation with α-Btx, monitor opening of individual receptor channels with defined subunit stoichiometry. We find that a single α-Btx-sensitive subunit confers nearly maximal suppression of channel opening, despite four binding sites remaining unoccupied by α-Btx and accessible to the agonist. Given structural evidence that α-Btx locks the agonist binding site in an inactive conformation, we conclude that the dominant mechanism of antagonism is non-competitive, originating from conformational arrest of the binding sites, and that the five α7 subunits are interdependent and maintain conformational symmetry in the open channel state. PMID:26282895

  14. Yawning and locomotor behavior induced by dopamine receptor agonists in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Min; Collins, Gregory T; Paul, Noel M; Grundt, Peter; Newman, Amy H; Xu, Ming; Grandy, David K; Woods, James H; Katz, Jonathan L

    2010-05-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) agonist-induced yawning in rats seems to be mediated by DA D3 receptors, and low doses of several DA agonists decrease locomotor activity, an effect attributed to presynaptic D2 receptors. Effects of several DA agonists on yawning and locomotor activity were examined in rats and mice. Yawning was reliably produced in rats, and by the cholinergic agonist, physostigmine, in both the species. However, DA agonists were ineffective in producing yawning in Swiss-Webster or DA D2R and DA D3R knockout or wild-type mice. The drugs significantly decreased locomotor activity in rats at one or two low doses, with activity returning to control levels at higher doses. In mice, the drugs decreased locomotion across a 1000-10 000-fold range of doses, with activity at control levels (U-91356A) or above control levels [(+/-)-7-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin HBr, quinpirole] at the highest doses. Low doses of agonists decreased locomotion in all mice except the DA D2R knockout mice, but were not antagonized by DA D2R or D3R antagonists (L-741 626, BP 897, or PG01037). Yawning does not provide a selective in-vivo indicator of DA D3R agonist activity in mice. Decreases in mouse locomotor activity by the DA agonists seem to be mediated by D2 DA receptors.

  15. Identification, characterization, and regulation of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor on bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Synaptic input to bovine adrenal chromaffin cells is mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and results in secretion of catecholamines. Three probes previously shown to recognize AChRs on neurons were used to identify the AChR on bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in culture: monoclonal antibody mAb 35, a toxin that blocks receptor function, and the agonist nicotine. Competition for {sup 3}H-nicotine binding was used to measure the affinity of cholinergic ligands, and revealed the pharmacological profile expected for a neuronal-type AChR. At steady state the rate both of receptor insertion into and loss from the plasma membrane is about 3%/hour, resulting in a half-life in the surface of about 24 hours. Exposure to the anti-AChR antibody results in a loss of AChRs from the surface of the cells through a process that has the characteristics of antigenic modulation. The number of AChRs on the surface of the chromaffin cells can also be modulated by agonists and hormones, including glucocotricoids. Catecholamines, three peptides that may be secreted by chromaffin cells, and K{sup +}-induced secretion reduce agonist-induced catecholamine release by decreasing the number of AChRs, providing a mechanism for autoregulation.

  16. Structural Determinants for the Binding of Morphinan Agonists to the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaojing; Campomanes, Pablo; Kless, Achim; Schapitz, Inga; Wagener, Markus; Koch, Thomas; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic descriptions of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) noncovalently binding with two of its prototypical morphinan agonists, morphine (MOP) and hydromorphone (HMP), are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Subtle differences between the binding modes and hydration properties of MOP and HMP emerge from the calculations. Alchemical free energy perturbation calculations show qualitative agreement with in vitro experiments performed in this work: indeed, the binding free energy difference between MOP and HMP computed by forward and backward alchemical transformation is 1.2±1.1 and 0.8±0.8 kcal/mol, respectively, to be compared with 0.4±0.3 kcal/mol from experiment. Comparison with an MD simulation of μOR covalently bound with the antagonist β-funaltrexamine hints to agonist-induced conformational changes associated with an early event of the receptor's activation: a shift of the transmembrane helix 6 relative to the transmembrane helix 3 and a consequent loss of the key R165-T279 interhelical hydrogen bond. This finding is consistent with a previous proposal suggesting that the R165-T279 hydrogen bond between these two helices indicates an inactive receptor conformation. PMID:26280453

  17. Stoichiometry for α-bungarotoxin block of α7 acetylcholine receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacosta, Corrie J. B.; Free, Chris R.; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-08-01

    α-Bungarotoxin (α-Btx) binds to the five agonist binding sites on the homopentameric α7-acetylcholine receptor, yet the number of bound α-Btx molecules required to prevent agonist-induced channel opening remains unknown. To determine the stoichiometry for α-Btx blockade, we generate receptors comprised of wild-type and α-Btx-resistant subunits, tag one of the subunit types with conductance mutations to report subunit stoichiometry, and following incubation with α-Btx, monitor opening of individual receptor channels with defined subunit stoichiometry. We find that a single α-Btx-sensitive subunit confers nearly maximal suppression of channel opening, despite four binding sites remaining unoccupied by α-Btx and accessible to the agonist. Given structural evidence that α-Btx locks the agonist binding site in an inactive conformation, we conclude that the dominant mechanism of antagonism is non-competitive, originating from conformational arrest of the binding sites, and that the five α7 subunits are interdependent and maintain conformational symmetry in the open channel state.

  18. Stoichiometry for α-bungarotoxin block of α7 acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    daCosta, Corrie J B; Free, Chris R; Sine, Steven M

    2015-08-18

    α-Bungarotoxin (α-Btx) binds to the five agonist binding sites on the homopentameric α7-acetylcholine receptor, yet the number of bound α-Btx molecules required to prevent agonist-induced channel opening remains unknown. To determine the stoichiometry for α-Btx blockade, we generate receptors comprised of wild-type and α-Btx-resistant subunits, tag one of the subunit types with conductance mutations to report subunit stoichiometry, and following incubation with α-Btx, monitor opening of individual receptor channels with defined subunit stoichiometry. We find that a single α-Btx-sensitive subunit confers nearly maximal suppression of channel opening, despite four binding sites remaining unoccupied by α-Btx and accessible to the agonist. Given structural evidence that α-Btx locks the agonist binding site in an inactive conformation, we conclude that the dominant mechanism of antagonism is non-competitive, originating from conformational arrest of the binding sites, and that the five α7 subunits are interdependent and maintain conformational symmetry in the open channel state.

  19. X-ray structures of AMPA receptor-cone snail toxin complexes illuminate activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Dürr, Katharina L; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-08-29

    AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors are crucial to the structural and dynamic properties of the brain, to the development and function of the central nervous system, and to the treatment of neurological conditions from depression to cognitive impairment. However, the molecular principles underlying AMPA receptor activation have remained elusive. We determined multiple x-ray crystal structures of the GluA2 AMPA receptor in complex with a Conus striatus cone snail toxin, a positive allosteric modulator, and orthosteric agonists, at 3.8 to 4.1 angstrom resolution. We show how the toxin acts like a straightjacket on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) "gating ring," restraining the domains via both intra- and interdimer cross-links such that agonist-induced closure of the LBD "clamshells" is transduced into an irislike expansion of the gating ring. By structural analysis of activation-enhancing mutants, we show how the expansion of the LBD gating ring results in pulling forces on the M3 helices that, in turn, are coupled to ion channel gating. PMID:25103405

  20. Rapid Remodeling of Invadosomes by Gi-coupled Receptors: DISSECTING THE ROLE OF Rho GTPases.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, Katarzyna M; Leyton-Puig, Daniela; Argenzio, Elisabetta; Boumeester, Anja J; van Butselaar, Bram; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I; van Leeuwen, Frank N; Innocenti, Metello; Jalink, Kees; Moolenaar, Wouter H

    2016-02-26

    Invadosomes are actin-rich membrane protrusions that degrade the extracellular matrix to drive tumor cell invasion. Key players in invadosome formation are c-Src and Rho family GTPases. Invadosomes can reassemble into circular rosette-like superstructures, but the underlying signaling mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that Src-induced invadosomes in human melanoma cells (A375M and MDA-MB-435) undergo rapid remodeling into dynamic extracellular matrix-degrading rosettes by distinct G protein-coupled receptor agonists, notably lysophosphatidic acid (LPA; acting through the LPA1 receptor) and endothelin. Agonist-induced rosette formation is blocked by pertussis toxin, dependent on PI3K activity and accompanied by localized production of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, whereas MAPK and Ca(2+) signaling are dispensable. Using FRET-based biosensors, we show that LPA and endothelin transiently activate Cdc42 through Gi, concurrent with a biphasic decrease in Rac activity and differential effects on RhoA. Cdc42 activity is essential for rosette formation, whereas G12/13-mediated RhoA-ROCK signaling suppresses the remodeling process. Our results reveal a Gi-mediated Cdc42 signaling axis by which G protein-coupled receptors trigger invadosome remodeling, the degree of which is dictated by the Cdc42-RhoA activity balance. PMID:26740622

  1. The Internal Region Leucine-rich Repeat 6 of Decorin Interacts with Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein-1, Modulates Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β-dependent Signaling, and Inhibits TGF-β-dependent Fibrotic Response in Skeletal Muscles*

    PubMed Central

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Santander, Cristian; Cofré, Catalina; Acuña, Maria José; Melo, Francisco; Brandan, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Decorin is a small proteoglycan, composed of 12 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) that modulates the activity of transforming growth factor type β (TGF-β) and other growth factors, and thereby influences proliferation and differentiation in a wide array of physiological and pathological processes, such as fibrosis, in several tissues and organs. Previously we described two novel modulators of the TGF-β-dependent signaling pathway: LDL receptor-related protein (LRP-1) and decorin. Here we have determined the regions in decorin that are responsible for interaction with LRP-1 and are involved in TGF-β-dependent binding and signaling. Specifically, we used decorin deletion mutants, as well as peptides derived from internal LRR regions, to determine the LRRs responsible for these decorin functions. Our results indicate that LRR6 and LRR5 participate in the interaction with LRP-1 and TGF-β as well as in its dependent signaling. Furthermore, the internal region (LRR6i), composed of 11 amino acids, is responsible for decorin binding to LRP-1 and subsequent TGF-β-dependent signaling. Furthermore, using an in vivo approach, we also demonstrate that the LRR6 region of decorin can inhibit TGF-β mediated action in response to skeletal muscle injury. PMID:22203668

  2. Reengineering the collision coupling and diffusion mode of the A2A-adenosine receptor: palmitoylation in helix 8 relieves confinement.

    PubMed

    Keuerleber, Simon; Thurner, Patrick; Gruber, Christian W; Zezula, Jürgen; Freissmuth, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The A(2A)-adenosine receptor undergoes restricted collision coupling with its cognate G protein G(s) and lacks a palmitoylation site at the end of helix 8 in its intracellular C terminus. We explored the hypothesis that there was a causal link between the absence of a palmitoyl moiety and restricted collision coupling by introducing a palmitoylation site. The resulting mutant A(2A)-R309C receptor underwent palmitoylation as verified by both mass spectrometry and metabolic labeling. In contrast to the wild type A(2A) receptor, the concentration-response curve for agonist-induced cAMP accumulation was shifted to the left with increasing expression levels of A(2A)-R309C receptor, an observation consistent with collision coupling. Single particle tracking of quantum dot-labeled receptors confirmed that wild type and mutant A(2A) receptor differed in diffusivity and diffusion mode; agonist activation resulted in a decline in mean square displacement of both receptors, but the drop was substantially more pronounced for the wild type receptor. In addition, in the agonist-bound state, the wild type receptor was frequently subject to confinement events (estimated radius 110 nm). These were rarely seen with the palmitoylated A(2A)-R309C receptor, the preferred diffusion mode of which was a random walk in both the basal and the agonist-activated state. Taken together, the observations link restricted collision coupling to diffusion limits imposed by the absence of a palmitoyl moiety in the C terminus of the A(2A) receptor. The experiments allowed for visualizing local confinement of an agonist-activated G protein-coupled receptor in an area consistent with the dimensions of a lipid raft. PMID:23071116

  3. Mutation D816V Alters the Internal Structure and Dynamics of c-KIT Receptor Cytoplasmic Region: Implications for Dimerization and Activation Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Elodie; Chauvot de Beauchêne, Isaure; Perahia, David; Auclair, Christian; Tchertanov, Luba

    2011-01-01

    The type III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) KIT plays a crucial role in the transmission of cellular signals through phosphorylation events that are associated with a switching of the protein conformation between inactive and active states. D816V KIT mutation is associated with various pathologies including mastocytosis and cancers. D816V-mutated KIT is constitutively active, and resistant to treatment with the anti-cancer drug Imatinib. To elucidate the activating molecular mechanism of this mutation, we applied a multi-approach procedure combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, normal modes analysis (NMA) and binding site prediction. Multiple 50-ns MD simulations of wild-type KIT and its mutant D816V were recorded using the inactive auto-inhibited structure of the protein, characteristic of type III RTKs. Computed free energy differences enabled us to quantify the impact of D816V on protein stability in the inactive state. We evidenced a local structural alteration of the activation loop (A-loop) upon mutation, and a long-range structural re-organization of the juxta-membrane region (JMR) followed by a weakening of the interaction network with the kinase domain. A thorough normal mode analysis of several MD conformations led to a plausible molecular rationale to propose that JMR is able to depart its auto-inhibitory position more easily in the mutant than in wild-type KIT and is thus able to promote kinase mutant dimerization without the need for extra-cellular ligand binding. Pocket detection at the surface of NMA-displaced conformations finally revealed that detachment of JMR from the kinase domain in the mutant was sufficient to open an access to the catalytic and substrate binding sites. PMID:21698178

  4. Characterization of Inhibitors of Glucocorticoid Receptor Nuclear Translocation: A Model of Cytoplasmic Dynein-Mediated Cargo Transport

    PubMed Central

    Daghestani, Hikmat N.; Zhu, Guangyu; Shinde, Sunita N.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Agonist-induced glucocorticoid receptor [GR] transport from the cytoplasm to the nucleus was used as a model to identify dynein-mediated cargo transport inhibitors. Cell-based screening of the library of pharmacologically active compound (LOPAC)-1280 collection identified several small molecules that stalled the agonist-induced transport of GR-green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a concentration-dependent manner. Fluorescent images of microtubule organization, nuclear DNA staining, expression of GR-GFP, and its subcellular distribution were inspected and quantified by image analysis to evaluate the impact of compounds on cell morphology, toxicity, and GR transport. Given the complexity of the multi-protein complex involved in dynein-mediated cargo transport and the variety of potential mechanisms for interruption of that process, we therefore developed and validated a panel of biochemical assays to investigate some of the more likely intracellular target(s) of the GR transport inhibitors. Although the apomorphine enantiomers exhibited the most potency toward the ATPase activities of cytoplasmic dynein, myosin, and the heat-shock proteins (HSPs), their apparent lack of specificity made them unattractive for further study in our quest. Other molecules appeared to be nonspecific inhibitors that targeted reactive cysteines of proteins. Ideally, specific retrograde transport inhibitors would either target dynein itself or one of the other important proteins associated with the transport process. Although the hits from the cell-based screen of the LOPAC-1280 collection did not exhibit this desired profile, this screening platform provided a promising phenotypic system for the discovery of dynein/HSP modulators. PMID:21919741

  5. Allosteric equilibrium model explains steady-state coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Ugur, O; Onaran, H O

    1997-05-01

    We used a simple experimental approach to clarify some contradictory predictions of the collision coupling and equilibrium models (e.g. ternary complex, two-state ternary complex or quinternary complex), which describe G-protein-mediated beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in essentially different manners. Analysis of the steady-state coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes showed that: (1) in the absence of an agonist, Gpp(NH)p (a hydrolysis-resistant analogue of GTP) can activate adenylate cyclase very slowly; (2) this activity reaches a steady state in approx. 5 h, the extent of activity depending on the concentration of the nucleotide; (3) isoprenaline-activated steady-state adenylate cyclase can be inactivated by propranolol (a competitive antagonist that relaxes the receptor activation), in the presence of Gpp(NH)p (which provides a virtual absence of GTPase) and millimolar concentrations of Mg2+ (the rate of this inactivation is relatively fast); (4) increasing the concentration of Gpp(NH)p can saturate the steady-state activity of adenylate cyclase. The saturated enzyme activity was lower than that induced by isoprenaline under the same conditions. This additional agonist-induced activation was reversible. In the light of these results, we conclude that agonist can also activate the guanine nucleotide-saturated system in the absence of GTPase by a mechanism other than guanine nucleotide exchange. We explain these phenomena in the framework of a quinternary complex model as an agonist-induced and receptor-mediated dissociation of guanine nucleotide-saturated residual heterotrimer, the equilibrium concentration of which is not necessarily zero. These results, which suggest a continuous interaction between receptor and G-protein, can hardly be accommodated by the collision coupling model that was originally suggested for the present experimental system and then applied to many other G-protein systems. Therefore we

  6. Allosteric equilibrium model explains steady-state coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, O; Onaran, H O

    1997-01-01

    We used a simple experimental approach to clarify some contradictory predictions of the collision coupling and equilibrium models (e.g. ternary complex, two-state ternary complex or quinternary complex), which describe G-protein-mediated beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in essentially different manners. Analysis of the steady-state coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes showed that: (1) in the absence of an agonist, Gpp(NH)p (a hydrolysis-resistant analogue of GTP) can activate adenylate cyclase very slowly; (2) this activity reaches a steady state in approx. 5 h, the extent of activity depending on the concentration of the nucleotide; (3) isoprenaline-activated steady-state adenylate cyclase can be inactivated by propranolol (a competitive antagonist that relaxes the receptor activation), in the presence of Gpp(NH)p (which provides a virtual absence of GTPase) and millimolar concentrations of Mg2+ (the rate of this inactivation is relatively fast); (4) increasing the concentration of Gpp(NH)p can saturate the steady-state activity of adenylate cyclase. The saturated enzyme activity was lower than that induced by isoprenaline under the same conditions. This additional agonist-induced activation was reversible. In the light of these results, we conclude that agonist can also activate the guanine nucleotide-saturated system in the absence of GTPase by a mechanism other than guanine nucleotide exchange. We explain these phenomena in the framework of a quinternary complex model as an agonist-induced and receptor-mediated dissociation of guanine nucleotide-saturated residual heterotrimer, the equilibrium concentration of which is not necessarily zero. These results, which suggest a continuous interaction between receptor and G-protein, can hardly be accommodated by the collision coupling model that was originally suggested for the present experimental system and then applied to many other G-protein systems. Therefore we

  7. Genetics of Taste Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Bosak, Natalia P.; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R.; Nelson, Theodore M.

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical “tastes” as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  8. Genetics of taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Bosak, Natalia P; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R; Nelson, Theodore M

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical "tastes" as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  9. Substitution of the cysteine 438 residue in the cytoplasmic tail of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor alters signal transduction activity.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Patricia; Roncero, Isabel; Blázquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2005-04-01

    Several G-protein-coupled receptors contain cysteine residues in the C-terminal tail that may modulate receptor function. In this work we analysed the substitution of Cys438 by alanine in the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLPR), which led to a threefold decrease in cAMP production, although endocytosis and cellular redistribution of GLP-1 receptor agonist-induced processes were unaffected. Additionally, cysteine residues in the C-terminal tail of several G-protein-coupled receptors were found to act as substrates for palmitoylation, which might modify the access of protein kinases to this region. His-tagged GLP-1 receptors incorporated 3H-palmitate. Nevertheless, substitution of Cys438 prevented the incorporation of palmitate. Accordingly, we also investigated the effect of substitution of the consensus sequence by protein kinase C (PKC) Ser431/432 in both wild-type and Ala438 GLP-1 receptors. Substitution of Ser431/432 by alanine did not modify the ability of wild-type receptors to stimulate adenylate cyclase or endocytosis and recycling processes. By contrast, the substitution of Ser431/432 by alanine in the receptor containing Ala438 increased the ability to stimulate adenylate cyclase. All types of receptors were mainly internalised through coated pits. Thus, cysteine 438 in the cytoplasmic tail of the GLP-1 receptor would regulate its interaction with G-proteins and the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. Palmitoylation of this residue might control the access of PKC to Ser431/432.

  10. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders. PMID:26340537

  11. Prostanoid receptors mediating contraction in rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Root, James A; Davey, Dorren A; Af Forselles, Kerry J

    2015-12-15

    Selective prostaglandin EP1 antagonists have been suggested for the treatment of bladder dysfunction. This study assessed the contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes in human and non-human bladder in vitro. Classical tissue bath studies were conducted using bladder strips exposed to prostanoid agonists and antagonists. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contracted rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle strips (pEC50 7.91±0.06 (n=7), 6.40±0.13 (n=7), and 6.07±0.11 (n=5), respectively). The EP1 receptor antagonist, PF2907617 (300nM), caused a rightward shift of the PGE2 concentration-response curve in the rat bladder only (pKB 8.40±0.15, n=3). PGE2 responses in rat and macaque bladders, but not human, were antagonised by the EP3 antagonist CJ24979 (1µM). Sulprostone, a mixed EP1/EP3/FP receptor agonist, induced potent contractions of rat bladder muscle (pEC50 7.94±0.31, n=6). The FP receptor agonist, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), induced bladder contraction in all species tested, but with a lower potency in rat. The selective FP receptor agonist latanoprost caused potent contractions of macaque and human bladder strips only. SQ29548, a selective TP antagonist, and GW848687X, a mixed EP1/TP antagonist caused rightward shifts of the concentration-response curves to the selective TP agonist, U46619 (pKB estimates 8.53±0.07 and 7.56±0.06, n=3, respectively). Responses to U46619 were absent in rat preparations. These data suggest significant species differences exist in bladder contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes. We conclude that the EP1 subtype does not represent the best approach to the clinical treatment of bladder disorders targeting inhibition of smooth muscle contraction.

  12. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J.; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders. PMID:26340537

  13. Syndecan-2 Exerts Antifibrotic Effects by Promoting Caveolin-1–mediated Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor I Internalization and Inhibiting Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Gochuico, Bernadette R.; Yu, Guoying; Tang, Xiaomeng; Osorio, Juan C.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Risquez, Cristobal F.; Patel, Avignat S.; Shi, Ying; Wathelet, Marc G.; Goodwin, Andrew J.; Haspel, Jeffrey A.; Ryter, Stefan W.; Billings, Eric M.; Kaminski, Naftali; Morse, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Alveolar transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signaling and expression of TGF-β1 target genes are increased in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and in animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. Internalization and degradation of TGF-β receptor TβRI inhibits TGF-β signaling and could attenuate development of experimental lung fibrosis. Objectives: To demonstrate that after experimental lung injury, human syndecan-2 confers antifibrotic effects by inhibiting TGF-β1 signaling in alveolar epithelial cells. Methods: Microarray assays were performed to identify genes differentially expressed in alveolar macrophages of patients with IPF versus control subjects. Transgenic mice that constitutively overexpress human syndecan-2 in macrophages were developed to test the antifibrotic properties of syndecan-2. In vitro assays were performed to determine syndecan-2–dependent changes in epithelial cell TGF-β1 signaling, TGF-β1, and TβRI internalization and apoptosis. Wild-type mice were treated with recombinant human syndecan-2 during the fibrotic phase of bleomycin-induced lung injury. Measurements and Main Results: We observed significant increases in alveolar macrophage syndecan-2 levels in patients with IPF. Macrophage-specific overexpression of human syndecan-2 in transgenic mice conferred antifibrotic effects after lung injury by inhibiting TGF-β1 signaling and downstream expression of TGF-β1 target genes, reducing extracellular matrix production and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis. In vitro, syndecan-2 promoted caveolin-1–dependent internalization of TGF-β1 and TβRI in alveolar epithelial cells, which inhibited TGF-β1 signaling and epithelial cell apoptosis. Therapeutic administration of human syndecan-2 abrogated lung fibrosis in mice. Conclusions: Alveolar macrophage syndecan-2 exerts antifibrotic effects by promoting caveolin-1–dependent TGF-β1 and TβRI internalization and inhibiting TGF-β1 signaling in alveolar epithelial

  14. Effects of chronic alcohol drinking on receptor-binding, internalization, and degradation of human immunodeficiency virus 1 envelope protein gp120 in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashok K; Jiang, Yin; Gupta, Shveta

    2007-12-01

    Although alcohol drinking increases susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, possible mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol are not yet known. Since the HIV envelope protein gp120 plays a key role in progression of HIV infection, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the toxicity and degradation of gp120 in hepatocytes isolated from liver of alcohol-preferring rats drinking either 15% ethanol in water or pure water for 70 days. The hypothesis was that alcohol drinking augmented the toxicity, but suppressed degradation of gp120. Hepatocytes from water-drinking rats (C-cells) or ethanol-drinking rats (Et-cells) were treated with laptacystin, anti-CD4 antibodies, CCR5 antagonist, or mannose, followed by [(125)I]gp120 or native gp120. At predetermined intervals, control (C) and ethanol exposed (Et) cells were analyzed for toxicity and degradation of gp120. In C-cells, [(125)I]gp120 binding and internalization peaked within 5-45 min and remained elevated for up to 10h and then decreased gradually. In Et-cells, [(125)I]gp120 binding peaked comparably to C-cells, but the binding remained to the peak level throughout the experimental period. C-cells exhibited the lysosomal/ubiquitin-mediated degradation of intracellular gp120, resulting in released gp120 fragments into the incubation medium that suppressed gp120-CD4 binding, improved cell viability, and inhibited gp120-induced apoptosis. Ethanol drinking suppressed gp120 degradation in and release of gp120 fragments from hepatocytes. The incubation medium of Et-cells did not suppress gp120-CD4 binding or the gp120-mediated apoptosis in hepatocytes. Thus, chronic alcohol drinking augmented the adverse effects of gp120 possibly by suppressing its degradation in hepatocytes. The present observation also suggests that a number of CCR5 or ubiquitin-based therapeutic drugs may not be effective in suppressing HIV infection in alcohol-drinking subjects.

  15. Characterization of two cloned human CB1 cannabinoid receptor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi-Carmona, M; Calandra, B; Shire, D; Bouaboula, M; Oustric, D; Barth, F; Casellas, P; Ferrara, P; Le Fur, G

    1996-08-01

    We have investigated the pharmacology of two central human cannabinoid receptor isoforms, designated CB1 and CB1A, stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, designated as CHO-CB1 and CHO-CB1A, respectively. In direct binding assays on isolated membranes the agonist [3H]CP 55,940 bound in a saturable and highly specific manner to both cannabinoid receptor isoforms. Competition binding experiments performed with other commonly used receptor agonists showed the following rank order of potency: CP 55,940 > tetrahydrocannabinol > WIN 55212-2 > anandamide. Except for the endogenous ligand anandamide (CB1, Ki = 359.6 nM vs. CB1A, Ki = 298 nM), these agonists bound to CB1A (CP 55,940, WIN 55212-2 and delta 9-THC, Ki = 7.24,345 and 26.7 nM, respectively) with about 3-fold less affinity than to CB1 (CP 55,940, WIN 55212-2 and delta 9-THC, Ki = 2.26, 93 and 7.1 nM, respectively). The cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716A also bound to CB1A (Ki = 43.3 nM) with slightly less affinity than to CB1 (Ki = 4.9 nM). Cannabinoid receptor-linked second messenger system studies performed in the CHO-CB1 and CHO-CB1A cells showed that both receptors mediated their action through the agonist-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. This activity was totally blocked by pretreatment with PTX. Additionally, both isoforms activated mitogen-activated protein kinase. The selective antagonist SR 141716A was able to selectively block these responses in both cell lines, to an extent that reflected its binding characteristics. Our results show that the amino-truncated and -modified CB1 isoform CB1A exhibits all the properties of CB1 to a slightly attenuated extent.

  16. Characteristics of muscarinic receptors that selectively couple to inhibition of adenylate cyclase or stimulation of phospholipase C on NG108-15 and 1321N1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to establish whether different muscarinic receptor proteins selectively couple to different second messenger response system. Although both second messenger response systems are fully functional in both cell lines, activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors only results in inhibition of adenylate cyclase in NG108-15 neuroblastoma {times} glioma cells and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell types were covalently labeled with ({sup 3}H)Propylbenzilylcholine mustard (({sup 3}H)PBCM) and the mobilities of the ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species of both cells were compared by SDS-PAGE. 1321N1 and NG108-15 cells each primarily expressed a single ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species with an apparent size of approximately 92,000 and 66,000 Da, respectively. ({sup 3}H)PBCM labelling was completely inhibited by 1 {mu}M atropine or by down-regulation of muscarinic receptors by an overnight incubation with carbachol. The apparent size of the ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species of both cell lines was not altered by treatment with a series of protease inhibitors or by treatment with dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide. Another approach for determining differences in the muscarinic receptors of 2 cells lines was to study agonist-induced alteration of muscarinic receptor number. Exposure of both cell types to agonists resulted in rapid loss of muscarinic receptors from cell surface without change of total cellular muscarinic receptors followed by subsequently loss of receptors from cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell lines were regulated by agonist with similar properties.

  17. Physiological functions of transient receptor potential channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Ru; Lin, Mo-Jun; Sham, James S K

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) gene superfamily, which consists of 7 subfamilies with at least 28 mammalian homologues, is known to encode a wide variety of cation channels with diverse biophysical properties, activation mechanisms, and physiological functions. Recent studies have identified multiple TRP channel subtypes, belonging to the canonical (TRPC), melastatin-related (TRPM), and vanilloid-related (TRPV) subfamilies, in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). They operate as specific Ca(2+) pathways responsive to stimuli, including Ca(2+) store depletion, receptor activation, reactive oxygen species, growth factors, and mechanical stress. Increasing evidence suggests that these channels play crucial roles in agonist-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell proliferation, vascular remodeling, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. This chapter highlighted and discussed these putative physiological functions of TRP channels in pulmonary vasculatures. Since Ca(2+) ions regulate many cellular processes via specific Ca(2+) signals, future investigations of these novel channels will likely uncover more important regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary vascular functions in health and in disease states. PMID:20204726

  18. Identification and functional characterization of natural human melanocortin 1 receptor mutant alleles in Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Mohsin; Sires Campos, Julia; Tariq, Nabeela; Herraiz Serrano, Cecilia; Yousaf, Rizwan; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; Yousaf, Sairah; Waryah, Yar M; Dad, Haseeb A; Blue, Elizabeth M; Sobreira, Nara; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Kausar, Tasleem; Ali, Muhammad; Waryah, Ali M; Riazuddin, Saima; Shaikh, Rehan S; García-Borrón, José C; Ahmed, Zubair M

    2015-11-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a Gs protein-coupled receptor of the melanocyte's plasma membrane, is a major determinant of skin pigmentation and phototype. Upon activation by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone, MC1R triggers the cAMP cascade to stimulate eumelanogenesis. We used whole-exome sequencing to identify causative alleles in Pakistani families with skin and hair hypopigmentation. Six MC1R mutations segregated with the phenotype in seven families, including a p.Val174del in-frame deletion and a p.Tyr298* nonsense mutation, that were analyzed for function in heterologous HEK293 cells. p.Tyr298* MC1R showed no agonist-induced signaling to the cAMP or ERK pathways, nor detectable agonist binding. Conversely, signaling was comparable for p.Val174del and wild-type in HEK cells overexpressing the proteins, but binding analysis suggested impaired cell surface expression. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging studies revealed reduced plasma membrane expression of p.Val174del and p.Tyr298*. Therefore, p.Tyr298* was a total loss-of-function (LOF) allele, while p.Val174del displayed a partial LOF attribute.

  19. Carbamylcholine and phorbol esters desensitize muscarinic receptors by different mechanisms in rat pancreatic acini.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, L M; Paquette, B; Larose, L; Morisset, J

    1990-01-01

    Pretreatment of rat pancreatic acini with phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), a protein kinase C (PK-C) activator, caused the desensitization of carbamylcholine (CBC)-induced amylase release in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The less potent phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) also provoked a desensitization, but the inactive 4-alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate had no effect. PMA or PDBu also significantly reduced subsequent amylase release induced by caerulein or secretin in contrast to CBC, which only reduced amylase release induced by CBC or secretin. Preincubation of acini with PMA did not lead to a decrease in PMA or A23187-stimulated amylase release. A 3 h resting period did not restore the desensitization induced by PMA or PDBu. Pretreatment with PMA did not cause changes in muscarinic receptor high- and low-affinity populations as observed with CBC pretreatment. The PK-C inhibitor H-7 completely prevented the desensitization induced by PDBu but not that induced by CBC. TMB-8, another PK-C inhibitor, also completely prevented the desensitization induced by PDBu but only partially that induced by CBC. These results suggest that phorbol esters can induce desensitization of muscarinic receptor-stimulated amylase release by a different mechanism than that involved in muscarinic agonist-induced desensitization.

  20. Computational Prediction and Biochemical Analyses of New Inverse Agonists for the CB1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Scott, Caitlin E; Ahn, Kwang H; Graf, Steven T; Goddard, William A; Kendall, Debra A; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-01-25

    Human cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) G-protein coupled receptor is a potential therapeutic target for obesity. The previously predicted and experimentally validated ensemble of ligand-free conformations of CB1 [Scott, C. E. et al. Protein Sci. 2013 , 22 , 101 - 113 ; Ahn, K. H. et al. Proteins 2013 , 81 , 1304 - 1317] are used here to predict the binding sites for known CB1-selective inverse agonists including rimonabant and its seven known derivatives. This binding pocket, which differs significantly from previously published models, is used to identify 16 novel compounds expected to be CB1 inverse agonists by exploiting potential new interactions. We show experimentally that two of these compounds exhibit inverse agonist properties including inhibition of basal and agonist-induced G-protein coupling activity, as well as an enhanced level of CB1 cell surface localization. This demonstrates the utility of using the predicted binding sites for an ensemble of CB1 receptor structures for designing new CB1 inverse agonists.

  1. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonists activate CFTR in intestinal organoids and subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vijftigschild, Lodewijk A W; Berkers, Gitte; Dekkers, Johanna F; Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D; Matthes, Elizabeth; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; Hensen, Chantal E; Heida-Michel, Sabine; Geerdink, Margot; Janssens, Hettie M; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Bronsveld, Inez; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Jonge, Hugo R; Hanrahan, John W; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that people with cystic fibrosis (CF) who express CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene mutations associated with residual function may benefit from G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-targeting drugs that can activate and enhance CFTR function.We used intestinal organoids to screen a GPCR-modulating compound library and identified β2-adrenergic receptor agonists as the most potent inducers of CFTR function.β2-Agonist-induced organoid swelling correlated with the CFTR genotype, and could be induced in homozygous CFTR-F508del organoids and highly differentiated primary CF airway epithelial cells after rescue of CFTR trafficking by small molecules. The in vivo response to treatment with an oral or inhaled β2-agonist (salbutamol) in CF patients with residual CFTR function was evaluated in a pilot study. 10 subjects with a R117H or A455E mutation were included and showed changes in the nasal potential difference measurement after treatment with oral salbutamol, including a significant improvement of the baseline potential difference of the nasal mucosa (+6.35 mV, p<0.05), suggesting that this treatment might be effective in vivo Furthermore, plasma that was collected after oral salbutamol treatment induced CFTR activation when administered ex vivo to organoids.This proof-of-concept study suggests that organoids can be used to identify drugs that activate CFTR function in vivo and to select route of administration. PMID:27471203

  2. Structural Determinants for the Binding of Morphinan Agonists to the μ-Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kless, Achim; Schapitz, Inga; Wagener, Markus; Koch, Thomas; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic descriptions of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) noncovalently binding with two of its prototypical morphinan agonists, morphine (MOP) and hydromorphone (HMP), are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Subtle differences between the binding modes and hydration properties of MOP and HMP emerge from the calculations. Alchemical free energy perturbation calculations show qualitative agreement with in vitro experiments performed in this work: indeed, the binding free energy difference between MOP and HMP computed by forward and backward alchemical transformation is 1.2±1.1 and 0.8±0.8 kcal/mol, respectively, to be compared with 0.4±0.3 kcal/mol from experiment. Comparison with an MD simulation of μOR covalently bound with the antagonist β-funaltrexamine hints to agonist-induced conformational changes associated with an early event of the receptor’s activation: a shift of the transmembrane helix 6 relative to the transmembrane helix 3 and a consequent loss of the key R165-T279 interhelical hydrogen bond. This finding is consistent with a previous proposal suggesting that the R165-T279 hydrogen bond between these two helices indicates an inactive receptor conformation. PMID:26280453

  3. Evidence for the pharmacological similarity between the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor and postsynaptic muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, D. M.; Marek, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty antagonist substances with varying potencies for central and peripheral postsynaptic muscarinic receptors have been examined for effects on the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor. This has been monitored by measuring the stimulating effects of the substances on acetylcholine synthesis by rat neocortical tissue prisms. Dose-response curves for selected agents showed that maximal stimulation of synthesis was to 136-140% of the value without an antagonist. At a concentration of 1 microM, 17 of the substances caused a significant increase in synthesis, whilst at 0.01 microM significant stimulation occurred with only atropine, dexetimide, N-methyl-piperdin-4-yl (R)-2-cyclohexyl-2-hydroxyl-2-phenylacetate, quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and scopolamine. Linear regression analysis between synthesis values obtained with the substances and published data for the effects on either cholinoceptor-agonist induced contraction of guinea-pig ileum or the binding of [3H]-QNB to rat forebrain membranes gave correlation coefficients of r = 0.84 (P less than 0.01), and r = 0.75 (P less than 0.02) respectively. The results provide no indication of a pharmacological difference between the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor and central and peripheral postsynaptic muscarinic receptors. PMID:7186824

  4. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    PubMed

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Galantamine, an acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor used to treat dementia symptoms, also acts as an allosteric potentiating ligand (APL) at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study was designed to evaluate the allosteric effect of galantamine on nAChR regulation of nigrostrial dopaminergic neuronal function in the hemiparkinsonian rat model established by unilateral nigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection. Methamphetamine, a dopamine releaser, induced ipsilateral rotation, whereas dopamine agonists apomorphine (a non-selective dopamine receptor agonist), SKF38393 (a selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist), and quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist) induced contralateral rotation. When 6-OHDA-injected rats were co-treated with nomifensine, a dopamine transporter inhibitor, a more pronounced and a remarkable effect of nicotine and galantamine was observed. Under these conditions, the combination of nomifensine with nicotine or galantamine induced the ipsilateral rotation similar to the methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior, indicating that nicotine and galantamine also induce dopamine release from striatal terminals. Both nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotations were significantly blocked by flupenthixol (an antagonist of both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors) and mecamylamine (an antagonist of nAChRs), suggesting that galantamine modulation of nAChRs on striatal dopaminergic terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated movement. Immunohistochemical staining showed that α4 nAChRs were highly expressed on striatal dopaminergic terminals, while no α7 nAChRs were detected. Pretreatment with the α4 nAChR antagonist dihydroxy-β-erythroidine significantly inhibited nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotational behaviors, whereas pretreatment with the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine was ineffective. Moreover, the α4 nAChR agonist ABT-418 induced ipsilateral rotation, while the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 had no

  5. Assessing the lipid requirements of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Sauls, Daniel; Machu, Tina K; Blanton, Michael P

    2006-04-01

    The lipid requirements of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) were assessed by reconstituting purified receptors into lipid vesicles of defined composition and by using photolabeling with 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine ([125I]TID) to determine functionality. Earlier studies demonstrated that nAChRs reconstituted into membranes containing phosphatidylcholine (PC), the anionic lipid phosphatidic acid (PA), and cholesterol (CH) are particularly effective at stabilizing the nAChR in the resting (closed) state that is capable of undergoing agonist-induced conformational transitions (i.e., functionality). The present studies demonstrate that (1) there is no obligatory requirement for PC, (2) increasing the CH content serves to increase the degree to which nAChRs are stabilized in the resting state, and this effect saturates at approximately 35 mol % (molar lipid percentage), and (3) the effect of increasing levels of PA saturates at approximately 12 mol % and in the absence of PA nAChRs are stabilized in the desensitized state (i.e., nonfunctional). Native Torpedo membranes contain approximately 35 mol % CH but less than 1 mol % PA, suggesting that other anionic lipids may substitute for PA. We report that (1) phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), anionic lipids that are abundant in native Torpedo membranes, also stabilize the receptor in the resting state although with reduced efficacy (approximately 50-60%) compared to PA, and (2) for nAChRs reconstituted into PA/CH membranes at different lipid-protein molar ratios, receptor functionality decreases rapidly below approximately 65 lipids per receptor. Collectively, these results are consistent with a functional requirement of a single shell of lipids surrounding the nAChR and specific anionic lipid- and sterol (CH)-protein interactions.

  6. Cellular receptors and HCV entry.

    PubMed

    Flint, Mike; Tscherne, Donna M

    2009-01-01

    After attachment to specific receptors on the surfaces of target cells, hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles are thought to be internalized to endosomes, where low pH induces fusion between the viral and cellular membranes, delivering the HCV genome into the cytoplasm. Here, we describe methods to study the early events in HCV infection; the interactions with cellular receptors and the mechanism of entry.

  7. The influence of allosteric modulators and transmembrane mutations on desensitisation and activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chatzidaki, Anna; D'Oyley, Jarryl M.; Gill-Thind, JasKiran K.; Sheppard, Tom D.; Millar, Neil S.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by binding at an extracellular orthosteric site. Previous studies have described several positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that are selective for homomeric α7 nAChRs. These include type I PAMs, which exert little or no effect on the rate of receptor desensitisation, and type II PAMs, which cause a dramatic loss of agonist-induced desensitisation. Here we report evidence that transmembrane mutations in α7 nAChRs have diverse effects on receptor activation and desensitisation by allosteric ligands. It has been reported previously that the L247T mutation, located toward the middle of the second transmembrane domain (at the 9′ position), confers reduced levels of desensitisation. In contrast, the M260L mutation, located higher up in the TM2 domain (at the 22′ position), does not show any difference in desensitisation compared to wild-type receptors. We have found that in receptors containing the L247T mutation, both type I PAMs and type II PAMs are converted into non-desensitising agonists. In contrast, in receptors containing the M260L mutation, this effect is seen only with type II PAMs. These findings, indicating that the M260L mutation has a selective effect on type II PAMs, have been confirmed both with previously described PAMs and also with a series of novel α7-selective PAMs. The novel PAMs examined in this study have close chemical similarity but diverse pharmacological properties. For example, they include compounds displaying effects on receptor desensitisation that are typical of classical type I and type II PAMs but, in addition, they include compounds with intermediate properties. PMID:25998276

  8. Inhibition of cation channel function at the nicotinic acethylcholine receptor from Torpedo: Agonist self-inhibition and anesthetic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Modulation of the nicotinic acethylcholine receptor from Torpedo by cholinergic agonists, local anesthetics, and n-alkanols was studied using {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux studies in sealed native Torpedo electroplaque membrane vesicles. Reliable concentration-response and kinetic data were obtained using manual ten sec filtration assays in vesicles partially blocked with alpha-bungarotoxin to remove spare receptors and quenched-flow assays to assess initial {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux rates or the rate of drug-induced receptor inactivation. Concentration response relationships for the agonists acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine, phenyltrimethylammonium, and (-)-nicotine are all bell-shape due to stimulation of cation channel opening at low concentrations and inhibition of channels at higher concentrations. The rate of agonist-induced fast desensitization (k{sub d}) increases with (acetylcholine) in parallel with channel activation, suggesting that desensitization proceeds from the open state and/or states in rapid equilibrium with it. At self-inhibitory acetylcholine concentrations, a new rapid inactivation (rate = k{sub f}) is observed before fast desensitization. The rate and extent of rapid inactivation is compatible with bimolecular association between acethylcholine and inhibitory site with K{sub B} = 40 mM.

  9. Activation mechanism of AMPA receptors illuminated by complexes with cone snail toxin, allosteric potentiator and orthosteric agonists

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Dürr, Katharina L.; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors are crucial to the structural and dynamical properties of the brain, to the development and function of the central nervous system and to the treatment of neurological conditions from depression to cognitive impairment. However, the molecular principles underlying AMPA receptor activation have remained elusive. Here we determine multiple x-ray crystal structures of the GluA2 AMPA receptor in complex with a Conus striatus cone snail toxin, a positive allosteric modulator and orthosteric agonists at 3.8 – 4.1 Å resolution. We show how the toxin acts like a ‘straight jacket’ on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) “gating ring”, restraining the domains via both intra and interdimer cross links such that agonist-induced closure of the LBD “clamshells” is transduced into an iris-like expansion of the gating ring. By structural analysis of activation-enhancing mutants, we show how the expansion of the LBD gating ring results in ‘pulling’ forces on the M3 helices that, in turn, are coupled to ion channel gating. PMID:25103405

  10. Protective effects of a glucocorticoid on downregulation of pulmonary beta 2-adrenergic receptors in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, J C; Nishikawa, M; Shirasaki, H; Miyayasu, K; Barnes, P J

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo effects of a glucocorticoid on beta-agonist-induced downregulation of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors (determined by [125I]iodocyanopindolol binding), mRNA expression (assessed by Northern blotting), and gene transcription (using nuclear run-on assays) in rat lung. Dexamethasone (Dex) (0.2 mg/kg/d, days 1-8) increased beta 1- and beta 2-receptor numbers by 70 and 69% above control, respectively, but did not change their mRNA expression. Isoproterenol (Iso) (0.96 mg/kg/d, days 2-8) decreased beta 1- and beta 2-receptor numbers by 48 and 51%, respectively, and also reduced mRNA expression by 69 and 57%, respectively. The combination of Dex and Iso resulted in no net change in beta 2-receptor number and its mRNA expression, although there was a significant reduction in beta 1-receptor number and mRNA expression. The mapping of beta 1- and beta 2-receptors by receptor autoradiography confirmed these findings over alveoli, epithelium, endothelium, and airway and vascular smooth muscle. We also measured the activation of the transcription factor, cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. CREB-like DNA-binding activity was decreased after Iso treatment but this decrease was prevented after treatment with Dex. Nuclear run-on assays revealed that the transcription rate of the beta 1-receptor gene did not alter after Dex treatment, but was reduced after Iso treatment. The transcription rate of the beta 2-receptor gene was increased after Dex treatment by approximately twofold, but there was no change after Iso treatment. We conclude that glucocorticoids can prevent homologous downregulation of beta 2-receptor number and mRNA expression at the transcriptional level without affecting beta 1-receptors and that the transcription factor CREB may be involved in this phenomenon. Such an effect may have clinical implications for preventing the development of tolerance to beta 2-agonists in

  11. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  12. Somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1985-01-01

    It is now well established that the biological actions of tetradecapeptide somatostatin (somatostatin-14, S-14) are receptor-mediated. These receptors were first quantified in GH4C pituitary tumor cells using [125I-Tyr1] S-14 as radioligand which was found to exhibit high non-specific binding to membrane receptor preparations from normal tissues. Our studies have shown that [125I-Tyr11] S-14 in which the radiolabel is situated away from the N-terminus exhibits significantly lower non-specific binding and therefore is more suitable for S-14 receptor studies. In the CNS, highest concentration of S-14 receptors was found in the cerebral cortex, followed by thalamus, hypothalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus while medulla-pons, cerebellum and spinal cord exhibited negligible binding. Outside the CNS membrane receptors for S-14 have been characterized in pituitary, adrenal cortex and pancreatic acini. In all these tissues a single class of high affinity binding sites for S-14 were present, the receptors in pancreatic acinar cells exhibiting significantly greater affinity for binding S-14 than in other tissues.

  13. Bupropion-induced inhibition of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and neurons from dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Gómez, Elizabeth; Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Mihailescu, Stefan; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacological activity of bupropion was compared between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus neurons. The inhibitory activity of bupropion was studied on GH3-α7 cells by Ca2+ influx, as well as on neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus and interneurons from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 region by using a whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. In addition, the interaction of bupropion with the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was determined by [3H]imipramine competition binding assays and molecular docking. The fast component of acetylcholine- and choline-induced currents from both brain regions was inhibited by methyllycaconitine, indicating the participation of α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Choline-induced currents in hippocampal interneurons were partially inhibited by 10 µM bupropion, a concentration that could be reached in the brain during clinical administration. Additionally, both agonist-induced currents were reversibly inhibited by bupropion at concentrations that coincide with its inhibitory potency (IC50=54 µM) and binding affinity (Ki=63 µM) for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from heterologous cells. The [3H]imipramine competition binding and molecular docking results support a luminal location for the bupropion binding site(s). This study may help to understand the mechanisms of actions of bupropion at neuronal and molecular levels related with its therapeutic actions on depression and for smoking cessation.

  14. Candida glabrata binds to glycosylated and lectinic receptors on the coronary endothelial luminal membrane and inhibits flow sense and cardiac responses to agonists.

    PubMed

    Torres-Tirado, David; Knabb, Maureen; Castaño, Irene; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Rubio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata (CG) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that initiates infection by binding to host cells via specific lectin-like adhesin proteins. We have previously shown the importance of lectin-oligosaccharide binding in cardiac responses to flow and agonists. Because of the lectinic-oligosaccharide nature of CG binding, we tested the ability of CG to alter the agonist- and flow-induced changes in cardiac function in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed strong attachment of CG to the coronary endothelium, even after extensive washing. CG shifted the coronary flow vs. auricular-ventricular (AV) delay relationship upward, indicating that greater flow was required to achieve the same AV delay. This effect was completely reversed with mannose, partially reversed with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, but hyaluronan had no effect. Western blot analysis was used to determine binding of CG to isolated coronary endothelial luminal membrane (CELM) receptors, and the results indicate that flow-sensitive CELM receptors, ANG II type I, α-adrenergic 1A receptor, endothelin-2, and VCAM-1 bind to CG. In addition, CG inhibited agonist-induced effects of bradykinin, angiotensin, and phenylephrine on AV delay, coronary perfusion pressure, and left ventricular pressure. Mannose reversed the inhibitory effects of CG on the agonist responses. These results suggest that CG directly binds to flow-sensitive CELM receptors via lectinic-oligosaccharide interactions with mannose and disrupts the lectin-oligosaccharide binding necessary for flow-induced cardiac responses.

  15. Checking the STEP-Associated Trafficking and Internalization of Glutamate Receptors for Reduced Cognitive Deficits: A Machine Learning Approach-Based Cheminformatics Study and Its Application for Drug Repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Salma; Goyal, Sukriti; Shanker, Asheesh; Grover, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease, a lethal neurodegenerative disorder that leads to progressive memory loss, is the most common form of dementia. Owing to the complexity of the disease, its root cause still remains unclear. The existing anti-Alzheimer’s drugs are unable to cure the disease while the current therapeutic options have provided only limited help in restoring moderate memory and remain ineffective at restricting the disease’s progression. The striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) has been shown to be involved in the internalization of the receptor, N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDR) and thus is associated with the disease. The present study was performed using machine learning algorithms, docking protocol and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to develop STEP inhibitors, which could be novel anti-Alzheimer’s molecules. Methods The present study deals with the generation of computational predictive models based on chemical descriptors of compounds using machine learning approaches followed by substructure fragment analysis. To perform this analysis, the 2D molecular descriptors were generated and machine learning algorithms (Naïve Bayes, Random Forest and Sequential Minimization Optimization) were utilized. The binding mechanisms and the molecular interactions between the predicted active compounds and the target protein were modelled using docking methods. Further, the stability of the protein-ligand complex was evaluated using MD simulation studies. The substructure fragment analysis was performed using Substructure fingerprint (SubFp), which was further explored using a predefined dictionary. Results The present study demonstrates that the computational methodology used can be employed to examine the biological activities of small molecules and prioritize them for experimental screening. Large unscreened chemical libraries can be screened to identify potential novel hits and accelerate the drug discovery process. Additionally, the

  16. Acetylcholine receptor in planar lipid bilayers. Characterization of the channel properties of the purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Labarca, P; Lindstrom, J; Montal, M

    1984-04-01

    The properties of the channel of the purified acetylcholine receptor (AChR) were investigated after reconstitution in planar lipid bilayers. The time course of the agonist-induced conductance exhibits a transient peak that relaxes to a steady state value. The macroscopic steady state membrane conductance increases with agonist concentration, reaching saturation at 10(-5) M for carbamylcholine (CCh). The agonist-induced membrane conductance was inhibited by d-tubocurarine (50% inhibition, IC50, at approximately 10(-6) M) and hexamethonium (IC50 approximately 10(-5) M). The single channel conductance, gamma, is ohmic and independent of the agonist. At 0.3 M monovalent salt concentrations, gamma = 28 pS for Na+, 30 pS for Rb+, 38 pS for Cs+, and 50 pS for NH+4. The distribution of channel open times was fit by a sum of two exponentials, reflecting the existence of two distinct open states. tau o1 and tau o2, the fast and slow components of the distribution of open times, are independent of the agonist concentration: for CCh this was verified in the range of 10(-6) M less than C less than 10(-3)M. tau 01 and tau o2 are approximately three times longer for suberyldicholine ( SubCh ) than for CCh. tau o1 and tau o2 are moderately voltage dependent, increasing as the applied voltage in the compartment containing agonist is made more positive with respect to the other. At desensitizing concentrations of agonist, the AChR channel openings occurred in a characteristic pattern of sudden paroxysms of channel activity followed by quiescent periods. A local anesthetic derivative of lidocaine ( QX -222) reduced both tau o1 and tau o2. This effect was dependent on both the concentration of QX -222 and the applied voltage. Thus, the AChR purified from Torpedo electric organ and reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers exhibits ion conduction and kinetic and pharmacological properties similar to AChR in intact muscle postsynaptic membranes.

  17. Link between D sub 1 and D sub 2 dopamine receptors is reduced in schizophrenia and Huntington diseased brain

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, P.; Niznik, H.B.; Guan, H.C.; Booth, G.; Ulpian, C. )

    1989-12-01

    Dopamine receptor types D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} can oppose enhance each other's actions for electrical, biochemical, and psychomotor effects. The authors report a D{sub 1}-D{sub 2} interaction in homogenized tissue as revealed by ligand binding. D{sub 2} agonists lowered the binding of ({sup 3}H)raclopride to D{sub 2} receptors in striatal and anterior pituitary tissues. Pretreating the tissue with the D{sub 1}-selective antagonist SCH 23390 prevented the agonist-induced decrease in ({sup 3}H)raclopride binding to D{sub 2} sites in the striatum but not in the anterior pituitary, which has no D{sub 1} receptors. Conversely, a dopamine-induced reduction in the binding of ({sup 3}H)SCH 23390 to D{sub 1} receptors could be prevented by the D{sub 2}-selective antagonist eticlopride. Receptor photolabeling experiments confirmed both these D{sub 1}-D{sub 2} interactions. The blocking effect by SCH 23390 was similar to that produced by a nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide analogue, and SCH 23390 reduced the number of agonist-labeled D{sub 2} receptors in the high-affinity state. Thus, the D{sub 1}-D{sub 2} link may be mediated by guanine nucleotide-binding protein components. The link may underlie D{sub 1}-D{sub 2} interactions influencing behavior, since the link was missing in over half the postmortem striata from patients with schizophrenia and Huntington disease (both diseases that show some hyperdopamine signs) but was present in human control, Alzheimer, and Parkinson striata.

  18. Mu-opioid receptor down-regulation and tolerance are not equally dependent upon G-protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Benedict A; Shen, Ji; Stafford, Kristi; Patel, Minesh; Yoburn, Byron C

    2002-05-01

    In the present study, the contribution of pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G(i/o)-proteins to opioid tolerance and mu-opioid receptor down-regulation in the mouse were examined. Mice were injected once intracerebroventricularly and intrathecally with PTX (0.1 microg/site). Controls were treated with saline. On the 10th day following PTX treatment, continuous subcutaneous infusion of etorphine (150 or 200 microg/kg/day) or morphine (40 mg/kg/day+25 mg slow-release pellet) was begun. Control mice were implanted with inert placebo pellets. Pumps and pellets were removed 3 days later, and mice were tested for morphine analgesia or mu-opioid receptor density was determined in the whole brain, spinal cord, and midbrain. Both infusion doses of etorphine produced significant tolerance (ED50 shift=approximately 4-6-fold) and down-regulation of mu-opioid receptors (approximately 20-35%). Morphine treatment also produced significant tolerance (ED50 shift= approximately 5-8-fold), but no mu-opioid receptor down-regulation. PTX dramatically reduced the acute potency of morphine and blocked the further development of tolerance by both etorphine and morphine treatments. However, PTX had no effect on etorphine-induced mu-opioid receptor down-regulation in brain, cord, or midbrain. These results suggest that PTX-sensitive G-proteins have a minimal role in agonist-induced mu-opioid receptor density regulation in vivo, but are critical in mediating acute and chronic functional effects of opioids such as analgesia and tolerance.

  19. Somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Srikant, C B

    1997-12-01

    The diverse biological effects of somatostatin (SRIF) are mediated by a family of G protein-coupled receptors (termed sst) that are encoded by five nonallelic genes located on separate chromosomes. The receptors can be further divided into two subfamilies: sst(2,3,5) react with octapeptide and hexapeptide SRIF analogues and belong to one subclass; sst(1,4) react poorly with these compounds and fall into another subclass. This review focuses on the molecular pharmacology and function of these receptors, with particular emphasis on the ligand-binding domain, subtype-selective analogues, agonist-dependent receptor regulation and desensitization responses, subtype-specific effector coupling, and signal transduction pathways responsible for inhibiting cell secretion and cell growth or induction of apoptosis.

  20. Identification of Anabolic Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators with Reduced Activities in Reproductive Tissues and Sebaceous Glands

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Azriel; Harada, Shun-Ichi; Kimmel, Donald B.; Bai, Chang; Chen, Fang; Rutledge, Su Jane; Vogel, Robert L.; Scafonas, Angela; Gentile, Michael A.; Nantermet, Pascale V.; McElwee-Witmer, Sheila; Pennypacker, Brenda; Masarachia, Patricia; Sahoo, Soumya P.; Kim, Yuntae; Meissner, Robert S.; Hartman, George D.; Duggan, Mark E.; Rodan, Gideon A.; Towler, Dwight A.; Ray, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Androgen replacement therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of frailty; however, androgens pose risks for unwanted effects including virilization and hypertrophy of reproductive organs. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) retain the anabolic properties of androgens in bone and muscle while having reduced effects in other tissues. We describe two structurally similar 4-aza-steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands, Cl-4AS-1, a full agonist, and TFM-4AS-1, which is a SARM. TFM-4AS-1 is a potent AR ligand (IC50, 38 nm) that partially activates an AR-dependent MMTV promoter (55% of maximal response) while antagonizing the N-terminal/C-terminal interaction within AR that is required for full receptor activation. Microarray analyses of MDA-MB-453 cells show that whereas Cl-4AS-1 behaves like 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), TFM-4AS-1 acts as a gene-selective agonist, inducing some genes as effectively as DHT and others to a lesser extent or not at all. This gene-selective agonism manifests as tissue-selectivity: in ovariectomized rats, Cl-4AS-1 mimics DHT while TFM-4AS-1 promotes the accrual of bone and muscle mass while having reduced effects on reproductive organs and sebaceous glands. Moreover, TFM-4AS-1 does not promote prostate growth and antagonizes DHT in seminal vesicles. To confirm that the biochemical properties of TFM-4AS-1 confer tissue selectivity, we identified a structurally unrelated compound, FTBU-1, with partial agonist activity coupled with antagonism of the N-terminal/C-terminal interaction and found that it also behaves as a SARM. TFM-4AS-1 and FTBU-1 represent two new classes of SARMs and will allow for comparative studies aimed at understanding the biophysical and physiological basis of tissue-selective effects of nuclear receptor ligands. PMID:19846549

  1. Agonist self-inhibition at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor a nonspecific action

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Firestone, L.L.; Miller, K.W.

    1987-05-19

    Agonist concentration-response relationships at nicotinic postsynaptic receptors were established by measuring /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from acetylcholine receptor rich native Torpedo membrane vesicles under three different conditions: (1) integrated net ion efflux (in 10 s) from untreated vesicles, (2) integrated net efflux from vesicles in which most acetylcholine sites were irreversibly blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin, and (3) initial rates of efflux (5-100 ms) from vesicles that were partially blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin. Exposure to acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine, phenyltrimethylammonium, or (-)-nicotine over 10/sup 8/-fold concentration ranges results in bell-shaped ion flux response curves due to stimulation of acetylcholine receptor channel opening at low concentrations and inhibition of channel function at 60-2000 times higher concentrations. Concentrations of agonists that inhibit their own maximum /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux by 50% (K/sub B/ values) are 110, 211, 3.0, 39, and 8.9 mM, respectively, for the agonists listed above. For acetylcholine and carbamylcholine, K/sub B/ values determined from both 10-s and 15-ms efflux measurements are the same, indicating that the rate of agonist-induced desensitization increases to maximum at concentrations lower than those causing self-inhibition. For all partial and full agonists studied, Hill coefficients for self-inhibition are close to 1.0. Concentrations of agonists up to 8 times K/sub B/ did not change the order parameter reported by a spin-labeled fatty acid incorporated in Torpedo membranes. The authors conclude that agonist self-inhibition cannot be attributed to a general nonspecific membrane perturbation. Instead, these results are consistent with a saturable site of action either at the lipid-protein interface or on the acetylcholine receptor protein itself.

  2. Identification of anabolic selective androgen receptor modulators with reduced activities in reproductive tissues and sebaceous glands.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Azriel; Harada, Shun-Ichi; Kimmel, Donald B; Bai, Chang; Chen, Fang; Rutledge, Su Jane; Vogel, Robert L; Scafonas, Angela; Gentile, Michael A; Nantermet, Pascale V; McElwee-Witmer, Sheila; Pennypacker, Brenda; Masarachia, Patricia; Sahoo, Soumya P; Kim, Yuntae; Meissner, Robert S; Hartman, George D; Duggan, Mark E; Rodan, Gideon A; Towler, Dwight A; Ray, William J

    2009-12-25

    Androgen replacement therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of frailty; however, androgens pose risks for unwanted effects including virilization and hypertrophy of reproductive organs. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) retain the anabolic properties of androgens in bone and muscle while having reduced effects in other tissues. We describe two structurally similar 4-aza-steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands, Cl-4AS-1, a full agonist, and TFM-4AS-1, which is a SARM. TFM-4AS-1 is a potent AR ligand (IC(50), 38 nm) that partially activates an AR-dependent MMTV promoter (55% of maximal response) while antagonizing the N-terminal/C-terminal interaction within AR that is required for full receptor activation. Microarray analyses of MDA-MB-453 cells show that whereas Cl-4AS-1 behaves like 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), TFM-4AS-1 acts as a gene-selective agonist, inducing some genes as effectively as DHT and others to a lesser extent or not at all. This gene-selective agonism manifests as tissue-selectivity: in ovariectomized rats, Cl-4AS-1 mimics DHT while TFM-4AS-1 promotes the accrual of bone and muscle mass while having reduced effects on reproductive organs and sebaceous glands. Moreover, TFM-4AS-1 does not promote prostate growth and antagonizes DHT in seminal vesicles. To confirm that the biochemical properties of TFM-4AS-1 confer tissue selectivity, we identified a structurally unrelated compound, FTBU-1, with partial agonist activity coupled with antagonism of the N-terminal/C-terminal interaction and found that it also behaves as a SARM. TFM-4AS-1 and FTBU-1 represent two new classes of SARMs and will allow for comparative studies aimed at understanding the biophysical and physiological basis of tissue-selective effects of nuclear receptor ligands.

  3. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Stéphane; Noble, Florence; Marie, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors (OR) are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization, and post-endocytic fate of the receptor. PMID:25566076

  4. Lipoxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Recchia, Irene; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO) and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL). In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1). This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed. PMID:17767357

  5. Olfactory receptor neuron profiling using sandalwood odorants.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Stephan; Monastyrskaia, Katherine; Schilling, Boris

    2004-07-01

    The mammalian olfactory system can discriminate between volatile molecules with subtle differences in their molecular structures. Efforts in synthetic chemistry have delivered a myriad of smelling compounds of different qualities as well as many molecules with very similar olfactive properties. One important class of molecules in the fragrance industry are sandalwood odorants. Sandalwood oil and four synthetic sandalwood molecules were selected to study the activation profile of endogenous olfactory receptors when exposed to compounds from the same odorant family. Dissociated rat olfactory receptor neurons were exposed to the sandalwood molecules and the receptor activation studied by monitoring fluxes in the internal calcium concentration. Olfactory receptor neurons were identified that were specifically stimulated by sandalwood compounds. These neurons expressed olfactory receptors that can discriminate between sandalwood odorants with slight differences in their molecular structures. This is the first study in which an important class of perfume compounds was analyzed for its ability to activate endogenous olfactory receptors in olfactory receptor neurons.

  6. Hunting Viral Receptors Using Haploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Sirika; Carette, Jan E.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have evolved intricate mechanisms to gain entry into the host cell. Identification of critical receptors has enabled insights into virus particle internalization, host and tissue tropism, and viral pathogenesis. In this review we discuss the most commonly employed methods for virus receptor discovery, specifically highlighting the use of forward genetic screens in human haploid cells. The ability to generate true knockout alleles at high saturation provides a sensitive means to study virus-host interactions. As an example, haploid genetic screens identified the lysosomal proteins, NPC1 and LAMP1, as intracellular receptors for Ebola virus and Lassa virus, respectively. From these studies emerges the notion that receptor usage by these viruses is highly dynamic involving a programmed switch from cell surface receptor to intracellular receptor. Broad application of genetic knockout approaches will chart functional landscapes of receptors and endocytic pathways hijacked by viruses. PMID:26958914

  7. Molecular properties of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    HAGA, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which comprise five subtypes (M1-M5 receptors), are expressed in both the CNS and PNS (particularly the target organs of parasympathetic neurons). M1-M5 receptors are integral membrane proteins with seven transmembrane segments, bind with acetylcholine (ACh) in the extracellular phase, and thereafter interact with and activate GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in the intracellular phase: M1, M3, and M5 receptors interact with Gq-type G proteins, and M2 and M4 receptors with Gi/Go-type G proteins. Activated G proteins initiate a number of intracellular signal transduction systems. Agonist-bound muscarinic receptors are phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases, which initiate their desensitization through uncoupling from G proteins, receptor internalization, and receptor breakdown (down regulation). Recently the crystal structures of M2 and M3 receptors were determined and are expected to contribute to the development of drugs targeted to muscarinic receptors. This paper summarizes the molecular properties of muscarinic receptors with reference to the historical background and bias to studies performed in our laboratories. PMID:23759942

  8. Structural basis for receptor subtype-specific regulation revealed by a chimeric beta 3/beta 2-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Liggett, S B; Freedman, N J; Schwinn, D A; Lefkowitz, R J

    1993-01-01

    The physiological significance of multiple G-protein-coupled receptor subtypes, such as the beta-adrenergic receptors (beta ARs), remains obscure, since in many cases several subtypes activate the same effector and utilize the same physiological agonists. We inspected the deduced amino acid sequences of the beta AR subtypes for variations in the determinants for agonist regulation as a potential basis for subtype differentiation. Whereas the beta 2AR has a C terminus containing 11 serine and threonine residues representing potential sites for beta AR kinase phosphorylation, which mediates rapid agonist-promoted desensitization, only 3 serines are present in the comparable region of the beta 3AR, and they are in a nonfavorable context. The beta 3AR also lacks sequence homology in regions which are important for agonist-mediated sequestration and down-regulation of the beta 2AR, although such determinants are less well defined. We therefore tested the idea that the agonist-induced regulatory properties of the two receptors might differ by expressing both subtypes in CHW cells and exposing them to the agonist isoproterenol. The beta 3AR did not display short-term agonist-promoted functional desensitization or sequestration, or long-term down-regulation. To assign a structural basis for these subtype-specific differences in agonist regulation, we constructed a chimeric beta 3/beta 2AR which comprised the beta 3AR up to proline-365 of the cytoplasmic tail and the C terminus of the beta 2AR. When cells expressing this chimeric beta 3/beta 2AR were exposed to isoproterenol, functional desensitization was observed. Whole-cell phosphorylation studies showed that the beta 2AR displayed agonist-dependent phosphorylation, but no such phosphorylation could be demonstrated with the beta 3AR, even when beta AR kinase was overexpressed. In contrast, the chimeric beta 3/beta 2AR did display agonist-dependent phosphorylation, consistent with its functional desensitization. In

  9. Mechanisms underlying developmental changes in the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors in cultured cerebellar granule cells: homologous desensitization and interactive effects involving N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Aronica, E; Dell'Albani, P; Condorelli, D F; Nicoletti, F; Hack, N; Balázs, R

    1993-11-01

    Glutamate receptors coupled to polyphosphoinositide (PPI) hydrolysis (metabotropic glutamate receptors, mGluR), are highly efficient during the early stages of postnatal life and are thought to be involved in developmental plasticity. The dramatic decrease with age in mGluR activity suggests the existence of mechanisms that down-regulate this receptor after a certain stage of neuronal maturation. In cultured cerebellar granule neurons grown under conditions that promote the survival and maturation of cells (serum-containing medium with 25 mM K+), enzymatic depletion of extracellular glutamate prevented the age-dependent decrease in mGluR agonist-stimulated PPI hydrolysis that normally occurs after 4 days of maturation in vitro, suggesting that mGluR activity declines as a result of developmental changes affecting homologous desensitization. This was borne out by the observation that glutamate at low concentrations (1-10 microM) readily desensitized mGluR at 7 days but not at 4 days in culture. Furthermore, the critical period during which the high sensitivity to agonist-induced desensitization of mGluR developed coincided with the period when phorbol ester-activated protein kinase C acquired the ability to suppress mGluR activity. The developmental pattern of mGluR agonist-induced PPI hydrolysis was similar in granule cells grown under "trophic" and "nontrophic" conditions (in cultures in 25 mM K+ and in a medium containing "low" K+, in this study, 10 mM, respectively). However, the developmental decline in the response to mGluR stimulation after 4 days in vitro was not prevented in cells grown in 10 mM K+ by the removal of extracellular glutamate; rather, it could be counteracted by treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) (EC50, approximately 4 microM), which blocked the development of mGluR desensitization. The effect was NMDA receptor mediated and required DNA transcription and protein synthesis. However, NMDA exerted a different effect in cells grown in 25 m

  10. Topographical evaluation of behavioural phenotype in a line of mice with targeted gene deletion of the D2 dopamine receptor.

    PubMed

    Clifford, J J; Usiello, A; Vallone, D; Kinsella, A; Borrelli, E; Waddington, J L

    2000-01-28

    The phenotype of spontaneous and dopamine D2-like agonist-induced behaviour was assessed topographically in a line of mice with targeted gene deletion of the D1 receptor. An ethologically-based, rapid time-sampling behavioural check-list technique was used to resolve and quantify all behaviours in the natural repertoire of the mouse. Relative to wildtypes [D2+/+], D2-null [D2-/-] mice evidenced over a 1 h period of initial exploration modest but significant reductions in locomotion, grooming, rearing free and rearing to wall; rearing seated, sniffing, sifting and stillness were not altered. Individual elements of behaviour habituated similarly over a 6 h period for both genotypes. The dose-dependent induction of stereotyped sniffing and ponderous locomotion by the D2-like agonist RU 24213 (0.1-12.5 mg/kg) in wildtypes was essentially absent in D2-null mice. The ethogram of spontaneous behaviour in D2-null mice was characterised by only modest reductions in, and topographical shifts between, certain individual elements of behaviour. Essential abolition of D2-like agonist responsivity in D2-null mice vis-à-vis considerable preservation of spontaneous behavioural topography suggests compensatory processes subsequent to developmental absence of the D2 receptor that are able to sustain function under naturalistic, tonic conditions but not during phasic challenge. PMID:10698004

  11. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valauskas, Edward J.; Crosby, John, IV; Haycock, Ken; Oh, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Includes the following international reports: International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions; Special Libraries Association; and Trends and Issues in Library and Information Services in Canada, 1998. (AEF)

  12. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-lipid interactions: Mechanistic insight and biological function.

    PubMed

    Baenziger, John E; Hénault, Camille M; Therien, J P Daniel; Sun, Jiayin

    2015-09-01

    Membrane lipids are potent modulators of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo. Lipids influence nAChR function by both conformational selection and kinetic mechanisms, stabilizing varying proportions of activatable versus non-activatable conformations, as well as influencing the transitions between these conformational states. Of note, some membranes stabilize an electrically silent uncoupled conformation that binds agonist but does not undergo agonist-induced conformational transitions. The uncoupled nAChR, however, does transition to activatable conformations in relatively thick lipid bilayers, such as those found in lipid rafts. In this review, we discuss current understanding of lipid-nAChR interactions in the context of increasingly available high resolution structural and functional data. These data highlight different sites of lipid action, including the lipid-exposed M4 transmembrane α-helix. Current evidence suggests that lipids alter nAChR function by modulating interactions between M4 and the adjacent transmembrane α-helices, M1 and M3. These interactions have also been implicated in both the folding and trafficking of nAChRs to the cell surface. We review current mechanistic understanding of lipid-nAChR interactions, and highlight potential biological roles for lipid-nAChR interactions in modulating the synaptic response. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:25791350

  13. Effects of retinoic acid receptor-selective agonists on human nasal epithelial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Million, K; Tournier, F; Houcine, O; Ancian, P; Reichert, U; Marano, F

    2001-12-01

    Retinoids play a critical role in the maintenance of the mucociliary phenotype of epithelial cells in the upper respiratory tract. To determine the role of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in the regulation of epithelial differentiation, we tested the effect of the synthetic retinoids CD336, CD2019, and CD666, selective agonists for RARalpha, RARbeta, and RARgamma, respectively, during differentiation of human nasal epithelial (HNE) cells in vitro. Using glutamylated tubulin and transglutaminase I (Tg I) as markers of ciliated cell and squamous cell differentiation, respectively, we showed that retinoic acid (RA) stimulated mucociliary differentiation and, in parallel, inhibited squamous cell differentiation. The agonists of the three RARs independently induced ciliogenesis and inhibited squamous cell differentiation by downregulating Tg I expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Antagonists specific for the three RARs abolished the effects of the corresponding agonists, demonstrating an RAR-specific mediated effect. Moreover, treatment of retinoid-deficient cultures with RAR agonists induced conversion of the squamous-like phenotype into a ciliated phenotype. In conclusion, all three RARs are potentially involved in the differentiating effects of RA in respiratory epithelial cells.

  14. Antipsychotics differ in their ability to internalise human dopamine D2S and human serotonin 5-HT1A receptors in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Loock, Timothé; Cussac, Didier

    2008-02-26

    Antipsychotic drugs act preferentially via dopamine D(2) receptor blockade, but interaction with serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptors has attracted interest as additional target for antipsychotic treatment. As receptor internalisation is considered crucial for drug action, we tested the propensity of antipsychotics to internalise human (h)D(2S) receptors and h5-HT(1A) receptors. Agonist-induced internalisation of hemaglutinin (HA)-tagged hD(2S) and HA-h5-HT(1A) receptors expressed in HEK293 cells was increased by coexpression of G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2 and beta-arrestin2. At the HA-hD(2S) receptor, dopamine, quinpirole and bromocriptine behaved as full agonists, while S(-)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-n-propylpiperidine [(-)-3PPP] and sarizotan were partial agonists. The typical antipsychotic, haloperidol, and the atypical compounds, olanzapine, nemonapride, ziprasidone and clozapine did not internalise HA-hD(2S) receptors, whereas aripiprazole potently internalised these receptors (>50% relative efficacy). Among antipsychotics with combined D(2)/5-HT(1A) properties, bifeprunox and (3-exo)-8-benzoyl-N-[[(2S)7-chloro-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-1-yl]methyl]-8-azabicyclo-[3.2.1]octane-3-methanamine (SSR181507) partially internalised HA-hD(2S) receptors, piperazine, 1-(2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-5-yl)-4-[[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-pyridinyl]methyl (SLV313) and N-[(2,2-dimethyl-2,3-dihydro-benzofuran-7-yloxy)ethyl]-3-(cyclopent-1-enyl)-benzylamine (F15063) were inactive. At the HA-h5-HT(1A) receptor, serotonin, (+)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin [(+)-8-OH-DPAT] and sarizotan were full agonists, buspirone acted as partial agonist. (-)-Pindolol showed little activity and no internalising properties were manifested for the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY100635). Most antipsychotics induced HA-h5-HT(1A) receptor internalisation, with an efficacy rank order: nemonapride>F15063>SSR181507

  15. Calcium signalling through nucleotide receptor P2Y2 in cultured human vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Viana, F; de Smedt, H; Droogmans, G; Nilius, B

    1998-08-01

    Microfluorometric measurements in Fura-2-loaded single cultured human vascular endothelial cells were used to characterize the intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i responses triggered by extracellular application of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and other nucleotides. Application of ATP or uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) gave rise to dose-dependent elevations of [Ca2+]i in all the cells tested. At saturating concentrations of agonist, the [Ca2+]i response was biphasic, with an early peak and a sustained plateau. Unlike peak responses, the sustained Ca2+ plateau was sensitive to removal of Ca2+ from the external medium. Mn2+ quenching revealed the presence of Ca2+ influx during the agonist-induced calcium plateau. The agonist-evoked calcium plateau was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the Cl-channel blocker NPPB, by the divalent cation Ni2+ and by the imidazole antimycotic econazole. Previously, these compounds have been shown to block store-operated Ca2+ entry. The two phases of the agonist-evoked [Ca2+]i response were blocked by the specific phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 and by intracellular injection of low molecular weight heparin, suggesting the involvement of IP3-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores. The pharmacological profile of the response, using different nucleotides and analogues, ATP = UTP > ADP = UDP, and no responses to P2X1 and P2Y1 agonists, suggested the involvement of P2Y2 receptors. The expression of mRNA for the P2Y2 receptor was detected by RT-PCR analysis. These results indicate that P2Y2 receptors linked to intracellular Ca2+ mobilization are present in human vascular endothelial cells. The initial [Ca2+]i mobilization is followed by a phase of elevated [Ca2+]i influx.

  16. Structure-activity relationships of vanilloid receptor agonists for arteriolar TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Á; Lizanecz, E; Bakó, P; Rutkai, I; Ruzsnavszky, F; Magyar, J; Pórszász, R; Kark, T; Facskó, A; Papp, Z; Édes, I; Tóth, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) plays a role in the activation of sensory neurons by various painful stimuli and is a therapeutic target. However, functional TRPV1 that affect microvascular diameter are also expressed in peripheral arteries and we attempted to characterize this receptor. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Sensory TRPV1 activation was measured in rats by use of an eye wiping assay. Arteriolar TRPV1-mediated smooth muscle specific responses (arteriolar diameter, changes in intracellular Ca2+) were determined in isolated, pressurized skeletal muscle arterioles obtained from the rat and wild-type or TRPV1−/− mice and in canine isolated smooth muscle cells. The vascular pharmacology of the TRPV1 agonists (potency, efficacy, kinetics of action and receptor desensitization) was determined in rat isolated skeletal muscle arteries. KEY RESULTS Capsaicin evoked a constrictor response in isolated arteries similar to that mediated by noradrenaline, this was absent in arteries from TRPV1 knockout mice and competitively inhibited by TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810. Capsaicin increased intracellular Ca2+ in the arteriolar wall and in isolated smooth muscle cells. The TRPV1 agonists evoked similar vascular constrictions (MSK-195 and JYL-79) or were without effect (resiniferatoxin and JYL-273), although all increased the number of responses (sensory activation) in the eye wiping assay. Maximal doses of all agonists induced complete desensitization (tachyphylaxis) of arteriolar TRPV1 (with the exception of capsaicin). Responses to the partial agonist JYL-1511 suggested 10% TRPV1 activation is sufficient to evoke vascular tachyphylaxis without sensory activation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Arteriolar TRPV1 have different pharmacological properties from those located on sensory neurons in the rat. PMID:21883148

  17. Patient selection for personalized peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are malignant solid tumors originating from neuroendocrine cells dispersed throughout the body. Differentiated neuroendocrine tumors overexpress somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), which enable the diagnosis using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. Internalization and retention within the tumor cell are important for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using the same peptide. The use of the same DOTA-peptide for SSTR PET/CT using (68)Ga and for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using therapeutic radionuclides like (177)Lu and (90)Y offers a unique theranostic advantage.

  18. Roles of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β subunits in function of human α4-containing nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Qiang; Yu, Kewei; Hu, Jun; Kuo, Yen-Ping; Segerberg, Marsha; St John, Paul A; Lukas, Ronald J

    2006-01-01

    Naturally expressed nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) containing α4 subunits (α4*-nAChR) in combination with β2 subunits (α4β2-nAChR) are among the most abundant, high-affinity nicotine binding sites in the mammalian brain. β4 subunits are also richly expressed and colocalize with α4 subunits in several brain regions implicated in behavioural responses to nicotine and nicotine dependence. Thus, α4β4-nAChR also may exist and play important functional roles. In this study, properties were determined of human α4β2- and α4β4-nAChR heterologously expressed de novo in human SH-EP1 epithelial cells. Whole-cell currents mediated via human α4β4-nAChR have ∼4-fold higher amplitude than those mediated via human α4β2-nAChR and exhibit much slower acute desensitization and functional rundown. Nicotinic agonists induce peak whole-cell current responses typically with higher functional potency at α4β4-nAChR than at α4β2-nAChR. Cytisine and lobeline serve as full agonists at α4β4-nAChR but are only partial agonists at α4β2-nAChR. However, nicotinic antagonists, except hexamethonium, have comparable affinities for functional α4β2- and α4β4-nAChR. Whole-cell current responses show stronger inward rectification for α4β2-nAChR than for α4β4-nAChR at a positive holding potential. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that human nAChR β2 or β4 subunits can combine with α4 subunits to generate two forms of α4*-nAChR with distinctive physiological and pharmacological features. Diversity in α4*-nAChR is of potential relevance to nervous system function, disease, and nicotine dependence. PMID:16825297

  19. The cytoplasmic tails of protease-activated receptor-1 and substance P receptor specify sorting to lysosomes versus recycling.

    PubMed

    Trejo, J; Coughlin, S R

    1999-01-22

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for thrombin, protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), is activated when thrombin cleaves its amino-terminal exodomain. The irreversibility of this proteolytic mechanism raises the question of how desensitization and resensitization are accomplished for thrombin signaling. PAR1 is phosphorylated, uncoupled from signaling, and internalized after activation like classic GPCRs. However, unlike classic GPCRs, which internalize and recycle, activated PAR1 is sorted to lysosomes. To identify the signals that specify the distinct sorting of PAR1, we constructed chimeras between PAR1 and the substance P receptor. Wild-type substance P receptor internalized and recycled after activation; PAR1 bearing the cytoplasmic tail of the substance P receptor (P/S) behaved similarly. By contrast, wild-type PAR1 and a substance P receptor bearing the cytoplasmic tail of PAR1 (S/P) sorted to lysosomes after activation. Consistent with these observations, PAR1 and the S/P chimera were effectively down-regulated by their respective agonists as assessed by both receptor protein levels and signaling. Substance P receptor and the P/S chimera showed little down-regulation. These data suggest that the cytoplasmic tails of PAR1 and substance P receptor specify their distinct intracellular sorting patterns after activation and internalization. Moreover, by altering the trafficking fates of PAR1 and substance P receptor, one can dictate the efficiency with which a cell maintains responsiveness to PAR1 or substance P receptor agonists over time.

  20. SEIZURE ACTIVITY INVOLVED IN THE UP-REGULATION OF BDNF mRNA EXPRESSION BY ACTIVATION OF CENTRAL MU OPIOID RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, H. N.; KO, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical-induced seizures up-regulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of endogenous opioids preferentially activating μ opioid receptor (MOR) could also increase BDNF mRNA expression. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent i.c.v. administration of synthetic MOR-selective agonists in rats can modulate both seizure activity and up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression. Effects and potencies of i.c.v. administration of morphine and [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), were directly investigated by scoring behavioral seizures and measuring BDNF mRNA expression. In addition, effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and antiepileptic drugs, diazepam, phenobarbital, and valproate, on i.c.v. MOR agonist-induced behavioral seizures and up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression were determined. A single i.c.v. administration of morphine (10–100 μg) or DAMGO (0.15–1.5 μg) dose-dependently elicited behavioral seizures and increased BDNF mRNA expression in the widespread brain regions. However, subcutaneous administration of MOR agonists neither produced behavioral seizures nor increased BDNF mRNA expression. Pretreatment with naloxone 1 mg/kg significantly reduced behavioral seizure scores and the up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression elicited by i.c.v. morphine or DAMGO. Similarly, diazepam 10 mg/kg and phenobarbital 40 mg/kg significantly blocked i.c.v. MOR agonist-induced actions. Pretreatment with valproate 300 mg/kg only attenuated behavioral seizures, but it did not affect morphine-induced increase of BDNF mRNA expression. This study provides supporting evidence that seizure activity plays an important role in the up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression elicited by central MOR activation and that decreased inhibitory action of GABAergic system through the modulation on GABA receptor synaptic function by central MOR activation is involved in its regulation of BDNF m

  1. CC-Chemokine Ligand 2 (CCL2) Suppresses High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Internalization and Cholesterol Efflux via CC-Chemokine Receptor 2 (CCR2) Induction and p42/44 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Activation in Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Run-Lu; Huang, Can-Xia; Bao, Jin-Lan; Jiang, Jie-Yu; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Shu-Xian; Cai, Wei-Bin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Jing-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Ling

    2016-09-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) has been proposed to be internalized and to promote reverse cholesterol transport in endothelial cells (ECs). However, the mechanism underlying these processes has not been studied. In this study, we aim to characterize HDL internalization and cholesterol efflux in ECs and regulatory mechanisms. We found mature HDL particles were reduced in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), which was associated with an increase in CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). In cultured primary human coronary artery endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, we determined that CCL2 suppressed the binding (4 °C) and association (37 °C) of HDL to/with ECs and HDL cellular internalization. Furthermore, CCL2 inhibited [(3)H]cholesterol efflux to HDL/apoA1 in ECs. We further found that CCL2 induced CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression and siRNA-CCR2 reversed CCL2 suppression on HDL binding, association, internalization, and on cholesterol efflux in ECs. Moreover, CCL2 induced p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation via CCR2, and p42/44 MAPK inhibition reversed the suppression of CCL2 on HDL metabolism in ECs. Our study suggests that CCL2 was elevated in CAD patients. CCL2 suppressed HDL internalization and cholesterol efflux via CCR2 induction and p42/44 MAPK activation in ECs. CCL2 induction may contribute to impair HDL function and form atherosclerosis in CAD.

  2. CC-Chemokine Ligand 2 (CCL2) Suppresses High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Internalization and Cholesterol Efflux via CC-Chemokine Receptor 2 (CCR2) Induction and p42/44 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Activation in Human Endothelial Cells *

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Run-Lu; Huang, Can-Xia; Bao, Jin-Lan; Jiang, Jie-Yu; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Shu-Xian; Cai, Wei-Bin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Jing-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Ling

    2016-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) has been proposed to be internalized and to promote reverse cholesterol transport in endothelial cells (ECs). However, the mechanism underlying these processes has not been studied. In this study, we aim to characterize HDL internalization and cholesterol efflux in ECs and regulatory mechanisms. We found mature HDL particles were reduced in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), which was associated with an increase in CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). In cultured primary human coronary artery endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, we determined that CCL2 suppressed the binding (4 °C) and association (37 °C) of HDL to/with ECs and HDL cellular internalization. Furthermore, CCL2 inhibited [3H]cholesterol efflux to HDL/apoA1 in ECs. We further found that CCL2 induced CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression and siRNA-CCR2 reversed CCL2 suppression on HDL binding, association, internalization, and on cholesterol efflux in ECs. Moreover, CCL2 induced p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation via CCR2, and p42/44 MAPK inhibition reversed the suppression of CCL2 on HDL metabolism in ECs. Our study suggests that CCL2 was elevated in CAD patients. CCL2 suppressed HDL internalization and cholesterol efflux via CCR2 induction and p42/44 MAPK activation in ECs. CCL2 induction may contribute to impair HDL function and form atherosclerosis in CAD. PMID:27458015

  3. A peripheral neuroimmune link: glutamate agonists upregulate NMDA NR1 receptor mRNA and protein, vimentin, TNF-alpha, and RANTES in cultured human synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    McNearney, Terry A; Ma, Yinghong; Chen, Yueping; Taglialatela, Giulio; Yin, Huaizhi; Zhang, Wen-Ru; Westlund, Karin N

    2010-03-01

    Human primary and clonal synovial cells were incubated with glutamate receptor agonists to assess their modulating influence on glutamate receptors N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) NR1 and NR2 and inflammatory cytokines to determine potential for paracrine or autocrine (neurocrine) upregulation of glutamate receptors, as has been shown for bone and chondrocytes. Clonal SW982 synoviocytes constitutively express vimentin, smooth muscle actin (SMA), and NMDA NR1 and NR2. Coincubation (6 h) with glutamate agonists NMDA (5 microM), and the NMDA NR1 glycine site activator (+/-)1-aminocyclopentane-cis-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (5 muM), significantly increases cellular mRNA and protein levels of glutamate receptors, as well as increasing vimentin, SMA, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted), assessed qualitatively and quantitatively with nucleotide amplification, image analysis of immunocytochemical staining, fluorescein-activated cell sorting, Western blotting, and immunoassays. Human primary synovial cells harvested from patients with arthritic conditions also constitutively expressed NMDA NR1 with increases after agonist treatment. Glutamate receptor agonist-induced increases were blocked by the noncompetitive glutamate antagonist MK-801 (8 microg/ml) and NR1 blocking antibody. Coincubation with glutamate agonists and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a protein kinase C activator, significantly enhanced mean levels of TNF-alpha and RANTES in SW982 cell supernatants compared with incubation with either agent alone. Increases were diminished with protein kinase inhibitor and NR1 blocking antibody. The functional activation of glutamate receptors on human synoviocytes establishes a neurogenic cell signaling link between neurotransmitter glutamate released from nerve terminals and target cells in the joint capsule. The influence of glutamate on subsequent release of cellular proinflammatory mediators in non

  4. Defects in muscarinic receptor-coupled signal transduction in isolated parotid gland cells after in vivo irradiation: evidence for a non-DNA target of radiation

    PubMed Central

    Coppes, R P; Meter, A; Latumalea, S P; Roffel, A F; Kampinga, H H

    2005-01-01

    Radiation-induced dysfunction of normal tissue, an unwanted side effect of radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer, is usually considered to be caused by impaired loss of cell renewal due to sterilisation of stem cells. This implies that the onset of normal tissue damage is usually determined by tissue turnover rate. Salivary glands are a clear exception to this rule: they have slow turnover rates (>60 days), yet develop radiation-induced dysfunction within hours to days. We showed that this could not be explained by a hypersensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis or necrosis of the differentiated cells. In fact, salivary cells are still capable of amylase secretion shortly after irradiation while at the same time water secretion seems specifically and severely impaired. Here, we demonstrate that salivary gland cells isolated after in vivo irradiation are impaired in their ability to mobilise calcium from intracellular stores (Ca2+i), the driving force for water secretion, after exposure to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonists. Using radioligand-receptor-binding assays it is shown that radiation caused no changes in receptor density, receptor affinity nor in receptor-G-protein coupling. However, muscarinic acetylcholine agonist-induced activation of protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), measured as translocation to the plasma membrane, was severely affected in irradiated cells. Also, the phorbol ester PMA could no longer induce PKCα translocation in irradiated cells. Our data hence indicate that irradiation specifically interferes with PKCα association with membranes, leading to impairment of intracellular signalling. To the best of our knowledge, these data for the first time suggest that, the cells' capacity to respond to a receptor agonist is impaired after irradiation. PMID:15668705

  5. PKC-mediated inhibitory feedback of the cholecystokinin 1 receptor controls the shape of oscillatory Ca²⁺ signals.

    PubMed

    Willems, Peter H G M; Pahle, Jürgen; Stalpers, Xenia L; Mugahid, Douaa; Nikolaew, Alexander; Koopman, Werner J H; Kummer, Ursula

    2015-06-01

    Translation of extracellular hormonal input into cellular responses is often mediated by repetitive increases in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]c ). Amplitude, duration and frequency of these so-called [Ca(2+) ]c oscillations then carry information about the nature and concentration of the extracellular signalling molecule. At present, there are different hypotheses concerning the induction and control of these oscillations. Here, we investigated the role of agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation in this process using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing a variant of the cholecystokinin 1 receptor (CCK1R) lacking the four consensus sites for protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation and deficient in CCK-induced receptor phosphorylation (CCK1R-mt cells). In the presence of cholecystokinin-(26-33)-peptide amide (CCK-8), these cells displayed Ca(2+) oscillations with a much more pronounced bursting dynamics rather than the dominant spiking dynamics observed in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the wild-type CCK1R. The bursting behaviour returned to predominantly spiking behaviour following removal of extracellular Ca(2+) , suggesting that CCK-8-induced, PKC-mediated CCK1R phosphorylation inhibits Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane. To gain mechanistic insight into the underlying mechanism we developed a mathematical model able to reproduce the experimental observations. From the model we conclude that binding of CCK-8 to the CCK1R leads to activation of PKC which subsequently phosphorylates the receptor to inhibit the receptor-mediated influx of Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane. Receptor-specific differences in this feedback mechanism may, at least in part, explain the observation that different agonists evoke [Ca(2+) ]c oscillations with different kinetics in the same cell type. PMID:25779353

  6. Expression of a functional g protein-coupled receptor 54-kisspeptin autoregulatory system in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Quaynor, Samuel; Hu, Lian; Leung, Po Ki; Feng, Hao; Mores, Nadia; Krsmanovic, Lazar Z; Catt, Kevin J

    2007-12-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) and its endogenous ligand, kisspeptin, are essential for activation and regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Analysis of RNA extracts from individually identified hypothalamic GnRH neurons with primers for GnRH, kisspeptin-1, and GPR54 revealed expression of all three gene products. Also, constitutive and GnRH agonist-induced bioluminescence resonance energy transfer between Renilla luciferase-tagged GnRH receptor and GPR54 tagged with green fluorescent protein, expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, revealed heterooligomerization of the two receptors. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings from identified GnRH neurons showed initial depolarizing effects of kisspeptin on membrane potential, followed by increased action potential firing. In perifusion studies, treatment of GT1-7 neuronal cells with kisspeptin-10 increased GnRH peak amplitude and duration. The production and secretion of kisspeptin in cultured hypothalamic neurons and GT1-7 cells were detected by a specific RIA and was significantly reduced by treatment with GnRH. The expression of kisspeptin and GPR54 mRNAs in identified hypothalamic GnRH neurons, as well as kisspeptin secretion, indicate that kisspeptins may act as paracrine and/or autocrine regulators of the GnRH neuron. Stimulation of GnRH secretion by kisspeptin and the opposing effects of GnRH on kisspeptin secretion indicate that GnRH receptor/GnRH and GPR54/kisspeptin autoregulatory systems are integrated by negative feedback to regulate GnRH and kisspeptin secretion from GnRH neurons.

  7. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, combined with bimolecular fluorescence complementation, reveals the effects of β-arrestin complexes and endocytic targeting on the membrane mobility of neuropeptide Y receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, Laura E.; Briddon, Stephen J.; Holliday, Nicholas D.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis are powerful ways to study mobility and stoichiometry of G protein coupled receptor complexes, within microdomains of single living cells. However, relating these properties to molecular mechanisms can be challenging. We investigated the influence of β-arrestin adaptors and endocytosis mechanisms on plasma membrane diffusion and particle brightness of GFP-tagged neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors. A novel GFP-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) system also identified Y1 receptor-β-arrestin complexes. Diffusion co-efficients (D) for Y1 and Y2-GFP receptors in HEK293 cell plasma membranes were 2.22 and 2.15 × 10− 9 cm2 s− 1 respectively. At a concentration which promoted only Y1 receptor endocytosis, NPY treatment reduced Y1-GFP motility (D 1.48 × 10− 9 cm2 s− 1), but did not alter diffusion characteristics of the Y2-GFP receptor. Agonist induced changes in Y1 receptor motility were inhibited by mutations (6A) which prevented β-arrestin recruitment and internalisation; conversely they became apparent in a Y2 receptor mutant with increased β-arrestin affinity. NPY treatment also increased Y1 receptor-GFP particle brightness, changes which indicated receptor clustering, and which were abolished by the 6A mutation. The importance of β-arrestin recruitment for these effects was illustrated by reduced lateral mobility (D 1.20–1.33 × 10− 9 cm2 s− 1) of Y1 receptor-β-arrestin BiFC complexes. Thus NPY-induced changes in Y receptor motility and brightness reflect early events surrounding arrestin dependent endocytosis at the plasma membrane, results supported by a novel combined BiFC/FCS approach to detect the underlying receptor-β-arrestin signalling complex. PMID:22487268

  8. Functional inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors assembled from concatenated homo- and heteromeric subunits.

    PubMed

    Alzayady, Kamil J; Wagner, Larry E; Chandrasekhar, Rahul; Monteagudo, Alina; Godiska, Ronald; Tall, Gregory G; Joseph, Suresh K; Yule, David I

    2013-10-11

    Vertebrate genomes code for three subtypes of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3R1, -2, and -3). Individual IP3R monomers are assembled to form homo- and heterotetrameric channels that mediate Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. IP3R subtypes are regulated differentially by IP3, Ca(2+), ATP, and various other cellular factors and events. IP3R subtypes are seldom expressed in isolation in individual cell types, and cells often express different complements of IP3R subtypes. When multiple subtypes of IP3R are co-expressed, the subunit composition of channels cannot be specifically defined. Thus, how the subunit composition of heterotetrameric IP3R channels contributes to shaping the spatio-temporal properties of IP3-mediated Ca(2+) signals has been difficult to evaluate. To address this question, we created concatenated IP3R linked by short flexible linkers. Dimeric constructs were expressed in DT40-3KO cells, an IP3R null cell line. The dimeric proteins were localized to membranes, ran as intact dimeric proteins on SDS-PAGE, and migrated as an ∼1100-kDa band on blue native gels exactly as wild type IP3R. Importantly, IP3R channels formed from concatenated dimers were fully functional as indicated by agonist-induced Ca(2+) release. Using single channel "on-nucleus" patch clamp, the channels assembled from homodimers were essentially indistinguishable from those formed by the wild type receptor. However, the activity of channels formed from concatenated IP3R1 and IP3R2 heterodimers was dominated by IP3R2 in terms of the characteristics of regulation by ATP. These studies provide the first insight into the regulation of heterotetrameric IP3R of defined composition. Importantly, the results indicate that the properties of these channels are not simply a blend of those of the constituent IP3R monomers.

  9. Expression and functionality of Toll-like receptor 3 in the megakaryocytic lineage

    PubMed Central

    D’Atri, L. P.; Etulain, J.; Rivadeneyra, L.; Lapponi, M. J.; Centurion, M.; Cheng, K.; Yin, H.; Schattner, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background In addition to their key role in hemostasis, platelets and megakaryocytes also regulate immune and inflammatory responses, in part through their expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Among the TLRs, TLR3 recognizes double-stranded (ds) RNA associated with viral infection. Thrombocytopenia is a frequent complication of viral infection. However, the expression and functionality of TLR3 in megakaryocytes and platelets is not yet well understood. Objective To study the expression and functionality of TLR3 in the megakaryocytic lineage. Methods and Results RT-PCR, flow cytometric, and immunofluorescence assays showed that TLR3 is expressed in CD34+ cells, megakaryocytes, and platelets. Immunoblotting assays showed that stimulation of megakaryocytes with two synthetic agonists of TLR3, Poly(I:C) and Poly(A:U), activated the NF-κB, PI3K/Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 pathways. TLR3-megakaryocyte activation resulted in reduced platelet production in vitro and IFN-β release through the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways. TLR3 ligands potentiated the aggregation mediated by classical platelet agonists. This effect was also observed for ATP release, but not for P-selectin or CD40L membrane exposure, indicating that TLR3 activation was not involved in alpha granule release. In addition, TLR3 agonists induced activation of the NF-κB, PI3K/Akt, and ERK1/2 pathways in platelets. Reduction of platelet production and platelet fibrinogen binding mediated by Poly(I:C) or Poly(A:U) were prevented by the presence of an inhibitor of TLR3/dsRNA complex. Conclusions Our findings indicate that functional TLR3 is expressed in CD34+ cells, megakaryocytes, and platelets, and suggest a potential role for this receptor in the megakaryo/thrombopoiesis alterations that occur in viral infections. PMID:25594115

  10. Activated Müller Cells Involved in ATP-Induced Upregulation of P2X7 Receptor Expression and Retinal Ganglion Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ying; Xie, Yuting; Xue, Bo; Guan, Huaijin

    2016-01-01

    P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), an ATP-gated ion channel, plays an important role in glaucomatous retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptotic death, in which activated retinal Müller glial cells may be involved by releasing ATP. In the present study, we investigated whether and how activated Müller cells may induce changes in P2X7R expression in RGCs by using immunohistochemistry and Western blot techniques. Intravitreal injection of DHPG, a group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR I) agonist, induced upregulation of GFAP expression, suggestive of Müller cell activation (gliosis), as we previously reported. Accompanying Müller cell activation, P2X7R protein expression was upregulated, especially in the cells of ganglion cell layer (GCL), which was reversed by coinjection of brilliant blue G (BBG), a P2X7R blocker. In addition, intravitreal injection of ATP also induced upregulation of P2X7R protein expression. Similar results were observed in cultured retinal neurons by ATP treatment. Moreover, both DHPG and ATP intravitreal injection induced a reduction in the number of fluorogold retrogradely labeled RGCs, and the DHPG effect was partially rescued by coinjection of BBG. All these results suggest that activated Müller cells may release ATP and, in turn, induce upregulation of P2X7R expression in the cells of GCL, thus contributing to RGC death. PMID:27738636

  11. STIM2 enhances receptor-stimulated Ca2+ signaling by promoting recruitment of STIM1 to the endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ling Ong, Hwei; Brito de Souza, Lorena; Zheng, Changyu; Tai Cheng, Kwong; Liu, Xibao; Goldsmith, Corinne; Feske, Stefan; Ambudkar, Indu S.

    2015-01-01

    A central component of receptor-evoked Ca2+ signaling is store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), which is activated by the assembly of STIM1-Orai1 channels in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membrane (PM) (ER-PM) junctions in response to depletion of ER-Ca2+. We report that STIM2 enhances agonist-mediated activation of SOCE by promoting STIM1 clustering in ER-PM junctions at low stimulus intensities. Targeted deletion of STIM2 in mouse salivary glands diminished fluid secretion in vivo and SOCE activation in dispersed salivary acinar cells stimulated with low concentrations of muscarinic receptor agonists. STIM2 knockdown in HEK293 cells diminished agonist-induced Ca2+ signaling and nuclear translocation of NFAT. STIM2 lacking five C-terminal amino acid residues did not promote formation of STIM1 puncta at low concentrations of agonist, whereas coexpression of STIM2 with STIM1 mutant lacking the polybasic region, STIM1ΔK, resulted in coclustering of both proteins. Together, our findings suggest that STIM2 recruits STIM1 to ER-PM junctions at low stimulus intensities when ER-Ca2+ stores are mildly depleted, thus increasing the sensitivity of Ca2+ signaling to agonists. PMID:25587190

  12. Characterisation of Signalling by the Endogenous GPER1 (GPR30) Receptor in an Embryonic Mouse Hippocampal Cell Line (mHippoE-18)

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Nicholas J.; Bayliss, Asha L.; Reale, Vincenzina; Evans, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen can modulate neuronal development and signalling by both genomic and non-genomic pathways. Many of its rapid, non-genomic effects on nervous tissue have been suggested to be mediated via the activation of the estrogen sensitive G-protein coupled receptor (GPER1 or GPR30). There has been much controversy over the cellular location, signalling properties and endogenous activators of GPER1. Here we describe the pharmacology and signalling properties of GPER1 in an immortalized embryonic hippocampal cell line, mHippoE-18. This cell line does not suffer from the inherent problems associated with the study of this receptor in native tissue or the problems associated with heterologously expression in clonal cell lines. In mHippoE-18 cells, 17β-Estradiol can mediate a dose-dependent rapid potentiation of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP levels but does not appear to activate the ERK1/2 pathway. The effect of 17β-Estradiol can be mimicked by the GPER1 agonist, G1, and also by tamoxifen and ICI 182,780 which activate GPER1 in a variety of other preparations. The response is not mimicked by the application of the classical estrogen receptor agonists, PPT, (an ERα agonist) or DPN, (an ERβ agonist), further suggesting that this effect of 17β-Estradiol is mediated through the activation of GPER1. However, after exposure of the cells to the GPER1 specific antagonists, G15 and G36, the stimulatory effects of the above agonists are replaced by dose-dependent inhibitions of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP levels. This inhibitory effect is mimicked by aldosterone in a dose-dependent way even in the absence of the GPER1 antagonists. The results are discussed in terms of possible “Biased Antagonism” whereby the antagonists change the conformation of the receptor resulting in changes in the agonist induced coupling of the receptor to different second messenger pathways. PMID:26998610

  13. Environmental Ligands of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Their Effects in Models of Adult Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vondráček, Jan; Machala, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of environmental and dietary ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in mature liver parenchymal cells is well appreciated, while considerably less attention has been paid to their impact on cell populations exhibiting phenotypic features of liver progenitor cells. Here, we discuss the results suggesting that the consequences of the AhR activation in the cellular models derived from bipotent liver progenitors could markedly differ from those in hepatocytes. In contact-inhibited liver progenitor cells, the AhR agonists induce a range of effects potentially linked with tumor promotion. They can stimulate cell cycle progression/proliferation and deregulate cell-to-cell communication, which is associated with downregulation of proteins forming gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes (such as connexin 43, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and plakoglobin), as well as with reduced cell adhesion and inhibition of intercellular communication. At the same time, toxic AhR ligands may affect the activity of the signaling pathways contributing to regulation of liver progenitor cell activation and/or differentiation, such as downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin and TGF-β signaling, or upregulation of transcriptional targets of YAP/TAZ, the effectors of Hippo signaling pathway. These data illustrate the need to better understand the potential role of liver progenitors in the AhR-mediated liver carcinogenesis and tumor promotion. PMID:27274734

  14. Environmental Ligands of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Their Effects in Models of Adult Liver Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Vondráček, Jan; Machala, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of environmental and dietary ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in mature liver parenchymal cells is well appreciated, while considerably less attention has been paid to their impact on cell populations exhibiting phenotypic features of liver progenitor cells. Here, we discuss the results suggesting that the consequences of the AhR activation in the cellular models derived from bipotent liver progenitors could markedly differ from those in hepatocytes. In contact-inhibited liver progenitor cells, the AhR agonists induce a range of effects potentially linked with tumor promotion. They can stimulate cell cycle progression/proliferation and deregulate cell-to-cell communication, which is associated with downregulation of proteins forming gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes (such as connexin 43, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and plakoglobin), as well as with reduced cell adhesion and inhibition of intercellular communication. At the same time, toxic AhR ligands may affect the activity of the signaling pathways contributing to regulation of liver progenitor cell activation and/or differentiation, such as downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin and TGF-β signaling, or upregulation of transcriptional targets of YAP/TAZ, the effectors of Hippo signaling pathway. These data illustrate the need to better understand the potential role of liver progenitors in the AhR-mediated liver carcinogenesis and tumor promotion.

  15. Prostacyclin receptor expression on platelets of humans with type 2 diabetes is inversely correlated with hemoglobin A1c levels.

    PubMed

    Knebel, Stephanie M; Sprague, Randy S; Stephenson, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate platelet aggregation can result in thrombosis and tissue ischemia. When compared to healthy human platelets, those of humans with type 2 diabetes (DM2) exhibit increased aggregation when stimulated. Activation of the platelet prostacyclin receptor (IPR) results in cAMP accumulation and inhibition of platelet aggregation. We hypothesized that DM2 platelets express decreased IPR when compared to platelets of healthy humans, resulting in decreased IPR agonist-induced cAMP accumulation. We measured IPR expression with radioligand binding of [(3)H]-iloprost, a stable prostacyclin analog, and with Western blotting of the IPR protein. Iloprost-stimulated platelet cAMP levels were used to identify the functional response to IPR activation. IPR binding, expression of the IPR protein and the levels of cAMP in platelets incubated with iloprost were significantly decreased in DM2 platelets when compared to platelets of healthy humans. IPR expression decreased in platelets as glycemic control of the subjects worsened, as indicated by increased hemoglobin A1c levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that reduced IPR expression in DM2 platelets may contribute to platelet hyperactivity in humans with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25617843

  16. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates nociceptive signaling through direct phosphorylation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Tej K.; Keller, Jason; Kesavapany, Sashi; Agarwal, Nitin; Kuner, Rohini; Pant, Harish C.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Brady, Roscoe O.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a ligand-gated cation channel highly expressed in small-diameter sensory neurons, is activated by heat, protons, and capsaicin. The phosphorylation of TRPV1 provides a versatile regulation of intracellular calcium levels and is critical for TRPV1 function in responding to a pain stimulus. We have previously reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity regulates nociceptive signaling. In this article we report that the Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at threonine-407 can modulate agonist-induced calcium influx. Inhibition of Cdk5 activity in cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons resulted in a significant reduction of TRPV1-mediated calcium influx, and this effect could be reversed by restoring Cdk5 activity. Primary nociceptor-specific Cdk5 conditional-knockout mice showed reduced TRPV1 phosphorylation, resulting in significant hypoalgesia. Thus, the present study indicates that Cdk5-mediated TRPV1 phosphorylation is important in the regulation of pain signaling. PMID:17194758

  17. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation. PMID:25132732

  18. Vascular kinin B1 and B2 receptor-mediated effects in the rat isolated perfused kidney–differential regulations

    PubMed Central

    Bagaté, Karim; Develioglu, Leyla; Imbs, Jean-Louis; Michel, Bruno; Helwig, Jean-Jacques; Barthelmebs, Mariette

    1999-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) and analogs acting preferentially at kinin B1 or B2 receptors were tested on the rat isolated perfused kidney. Kidneys were perfused in an open circuit with Tyrode's solution. Kidneys preconstricted with prostaglandin F2α were used for the analysis of vasodilator responses.BK induced a concentration-dependent renal relaxation (pD2=8.9±0.4); this vasodilator response was reproduced by a selective B2 receptor agonist, Tyr(Me)8-BK (pD2=9.0±0.1) with a higher maximum effect (Emax=78.9±6.6 and 55.8±4.3% of ACh-induced relaxation respectively, n=6 and 19, P<0.02). Icatibant (10 nM), a selective B2 receptor antagonist, abolished BK-elicited relaxation. Tachyphylaxis of kinin B2 receptors appeared when repeatedly stimulated at 10 min intervals.Des-Arg9-BK, a selective B1 receptor agonist, induced concentration-dependent vasoconstriction at micromolar concentration. Maximum response was enhanced in the presence of lisinopril (1 μM) and inhibited by R 715 (8 μM), a selective B1 receptor antagonist. Des-Arg9-[Leu8]-BK behaved as an agonist.A contractile response to des-Arg9-BK occurred after 1 h of perfusion and increased with time by a factor of about three over a 3 h perfusion. This post-isolation sensitization to des-Arg9-BK was abolished by dexamethasone (DEX, 30 mg kg−1 i.p., 3 h before the start of the experiment and 10 μM in perfusate) and actinomycin D (2 μM). Acute exposure to DEX (10 μM) had no effect on sensitized des-Arg9-BK response, in contrast to indomethacin (30 μM) that abolished it. DEX pretreatment however had no effect on BK-induced renal vasodilation.Present results indicate that the main renal vascular response to BK consists of relaxation linked to the activation of kinin B2 receptors which rapidly desensitize. Renal B1 receptors are also present and are time-dependently sensitized during the in vitro perfusion of the rat kidneys. PMID:10588918

  19. Radiopharmaceuticals for somatostatin receptor imaging.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Renata; Maecke, Helmut R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the developments and briefly characterize the somatostatin analogs which are currently used for somatostatin receptor imaging in clinical routine or in early phase clinical trials. Somatostatin (sst) receptor targeting with radiolabeled peptides has become an integral part in nuclear oncology during the last 20 years. This integration process has been initiated in Europe with the introduction to the market of 111In-DTPA-DPhe1-octreotide [111In-pentetreotide]. Introducing 99mTc in somatostatin receptor targeting radiopeptides resulted in much better image quality, higher sensitivity of tumor detection and lower mean effective dose for the examined patient. The next generation are 68Ga labeled somatostatin analogs. Due to the spatial resolution of PET technique and increasing number of PET scanners, the PET or PET/CT technique became very important in somatostatin receptor imaging. Until up to a couple of years ago the analogs of somatostatin were constructed aiming at their agonistic behavior, expecting that their internalization with the receptor acti-vated by the radiolabeled ligand and its retention within the tumor cell are crucial for efficient imaging and therapy. Recently it has been shown that the antagonists recognize more binding sites at the tumor cell membrane and hence offer an improved diagnostic efficacy, especially when the density of sst receptors is low. This approach may in future improve diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor imaging techniques. The developments in tracer design are followed by the improvements in imaging techniques. The new SPECT scanners offer resolution close to that of PET, which might open a new era for 99mTc and other SPECT radiotracers. PMID:27479790

  20. International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kenn; Habermann, Ulla; Chowdhury, Omar Faruque; Guerra, Iraida Manzanilla

    1998-01-01

    Includes "Introduction to International Perspectives" (Allen); "Volunteerism in the Welfare State: The Case of Denmark" (Habermann); "Grassroots Organizing in Bangladesh" (Chowdhury); and "Volunteerism in Latin America" (Guerra). (SK)

  1. The LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its codiscoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life. PMID:19299327

  2. Investigation of the role of sigma1-receptors in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate dependent calcium signaling in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Abou-Lovergne, A; Collado-Hilly, M; Monnet, F P; Koukoui, O; Prigent, S; Coquil, J F; Dupont, G; Combettes, L

    2011-07-01

    In hepatocytes, as in other cell types, Ca(2+) signaling is subject to complex regulations, which result largely from the intrinsic characteristics of the different inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP(3)R) isoforms and from their interactions with other proteins. Although sigma1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) are widely expressed in the liver, their involvement in hepatic Ca(2+) signaling remains unknown. We here report that in this cell type Sig-1R interact with type 1 isoforms of the InsP(3) receptors (InsP(3)R-1). These results obtained by immunoprecipitation experiments are confirmed by the observation that Sig-1R proteins and InsP(3)R-1 colocalize in hepatocytes. However, Sig-1R ligands have no effect on InsP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release in hepatocytes. This can be explained by the rather low expression level expression of InsP(3)R-1. In contrast, we find that Sig-1R ligands can inhibit agonist-induced Ca(2+) signaling via an inhibitory effect on InsP(3) synthesis. We show that this inhibition is due to the stimulation of PKC activity by Sig-1R, resulting in the well-known down-regulation of the signaling pathway responsible for the transduction of the extracellular stimulus into InsP(3) synthesis. The PKC sensitive to Sig-1R activity belongs to the family of conventional PKC, but the precise molecular mechanism of this regulation remains to be elucidated.

  3. Inhibitory effects of cytoskeleton disrupting drugs and GDP-locked Rab mutants on bradykinin B₂ receptor cycling.

    PubMed

    Charest-Morin, Xavier; Fortin, Sébastien; Lodge, Robert; Roy, Caroline; Gera, Lajos; Gaudreault, René C; Marceau, François

    2013-05-01

    The bradykinin (BK) B₂ receptor (B₂R) is G protein coupled and phosphorylated upon agonist stimulation; its endocytosis and recycling are documented. We assessed the effect of drugs that affect the cytoskeleton on B2R cycling. These drugs were targeted to tubulin (paclitaxel, or the novel combretastatin A-4 mimetic 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl-4-(2-oxoimidazolidin-1-yl)benzenesulfonate [IMZ-602]) and actin (cytochalasin D). Tubulin ligands did not alter agonist-induced receptor endocytosis, as shown using antibodies reactive with myc-tagged B₂Rs (microscopy, cytofluorometry), but rather reduced the progression of the ligand-receptor-β-arrestin complex from the cell periphery to the interior. The 3 fluorescent probes of this complex (B2R-green fluorescent protein [B2R-GFP], the fluorescent agonist fluorescein-5-thiocarbamoyl-D-Arg-[Hyp³, Igl⁵, Oic⁷, Igl⁸]-BK and β-arrestin2-GFP) were condensed in punctuate structures that remained close to the cell surface in the presence of IMZ-602. Cytochalasin D selectively inhibited the recycling of endocytosed B₂R-GFP (B₂R-GFP imaging, [³H]BK binding). Dominant negative (GDP-locked)-Rab5 and -Rab11 reproduced the effects of inhibitors of tubulin and actin, respectively, on the cycling of B₂R-GFP. GDP-locked-Rab4 also inhibited B₂R-GFP recycling to the cell surface. Consistent with the displacement of cargo along specific cytoskeletal elements, Rab5-associated progression of the endocytosed BK B₂R follows microtubules toward their (-) end, while its recycling progresses along actin fibers to the cell surface. However, tubulin ligands do not suppress the tested desensitization or resensitization mechanisms of the B₂R.

  4. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptors in lamb isolated coronary resistance arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, U.; Prieto, D.; Rivera, L.; Hernández, M.; Mulvany, M. J.; García-Sacristán, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. In vitro experiments in a microvascular myograph were designed to characterize postjunctional muscarinic receptors producing contraction both in the presence and absence of the endothelium in coronary resistance arteries (normalized diameter of 150-450 microns), isolated from the left ventricle of hearts from 3-6 month old lambs. Preferential muscarinic receptor antagonists were used to determine the receptor subtype: pirenzepine (M1 receptor), AFDX 116 (M2 receptor), 4-DAMP and pFHHSiD (M3 receptor). 2. The rank order of potency for muscarinic agonist-induced increases in tension in endothelium-intact preparations was oxotremorine-M = methacholine = acetylcholine (ACh) > carbachol. Removal of the endothelium increased the potency of ACh, but this procedure did not change either the sensitivity or maximal response to carbachol. 3. The contractile response to ACh was reproducible. Incubation with 3 x 10(-7)-3 x 10(-6) M pirenzepine induced non-parallel rightward shifts and depressed the maximum of the concentration-response curve to ACh in endothelium-intact arteries. The slope by Schild analysis was 2.9 +/- 0.8 (P < 0.05, n = 7). Atropine, AFDX 116, 4-DAMP and pFHHSiD produced parallel rightward shifts of the curves to ACh and the slopes of the Schild plots were not significantly different from unity. The pKB values for the antagonists from plots constrained to unity in endothelium-intact segments were: atropine (9.4), 4-DAMP (9.0), pFHHSiD (7.9) and AFDX 116 (6.2). 4. In endothelium-denuded arteries, pirenzepine, AFDX 116 and pFHHSiD caused concentration-dependent, parallel rightward displacements of the concentration-response curves to ACh and the slopes of the Schild plots were not significantly different from unity. The plots constrained to a slope of unity gave the following pKB values: pFHHSiD (8.7), pirenzepine (7.5) and AFDX 116 (6.2). 5. In the presence of the endothelium, low concentrations of pirenzepine (10(-9)-10(-7) M) produced leftward shifts of

  5. Directed Molecular Evolution of an Engineered Gammaretroviral Envelope Protein with Dual Receptor Use Shows Stable Maintenance of Both Receptor Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Friis, Kristina Pagh; Iturrioz, Xavier; Thomsen, Jonas; Alvear-Perez, Rodrigo; Bahrami, Shervin; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have previously reported the construction of a murine leukemia virus-based replication-competent gammaretrovirus (SL3-AP) capable of utilizing the human G protein-coupled receptor APJ (hAPJ) as its entry receptor and its natural receptor, the murine Xpr1 receptor, with equal affinities. The apelin receptor has previously been shown to function as a coreceptor for HIV-1, and thus, adaptation of the viral vector to this receptor is of significant interest. Here, we report the molecular evolution of the SL3-AP envelope protein when the virus is cultured in cells harboring either the Xpr1 or the hAPJ receptor. Interestingly, the dual receptor affinity is maintained even after 10 passages in these cells. At the same time, the chimeric viral envelope protein evolves in a distinct pattern in the apelin cassette when passaged on D17 cells expressing hAPJ in three separate molecular evolution studies. This pattern reflects selection for reduced ligand-receptor interaction and is compatible with a model in which SL3-AP has evolved not to activate hAPJ receptor internalization. IMPORTANCE Few successful examples of engineered retargeting of a retroviral vector exist. The engineered SL3-AP envelope is capable of utilizing either the murine Xpr1 or the human APJ receptor for entry. In addition, SL3-AP is the first example of an engineered retrovirus retaining its dual tropism after several rounds of passaging on cells expressing only one of its receptors. We demonstrate that the virus evolves toward reduced ligand-receptor affinity, which sheds new light on virus adaptation. We provide indirect evidence that such reduced affinity leads to reduced receptor internalization and propose a novel model in which too rapid