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Sample records for agonist-induced receptor internalization

  1. Differential β-arrestin2 requirements for constitutive and agonist-induced internalization of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Gyombolai, Pál; Boros, Eszter; Hunyady, László; Turu, Gábor

    2013-06-15

    CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) undergoes both constitutive and agonist-induced internalization, but the underlying mechanisms of these processes and the role of β-arrestins in the regulation of CB1R function are not completely understood. In this study, we followed CB1R internalization using confocal microscopy and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer measurements in HeLa and Neuro-2a cells. We found that upon activation CB1R binds β-arrestin2 (β-arr2), but not β-arrestin1. Furthermore, both the expression of dominant-negative β-arr2 (β-arr2-V54D) and siRNA-mediated knock-down of β-arr2 impaired the agonist-induced internalization of CB1R. In contrast, neither β-arr2-V54D nor β-arr2-specific siRNA had a significant effect on the constitutive internalization of CB1R. However, both constitutive and agonist-induced internalization of CB1R were impaired by siRNA-mediated depletion of clathrin heavy chain. We conclude that although clathrin is required for both constitutive and agonist-stimulated internalization of CB1R, β-arr2 binding is only required for agonist-induced internalization of the receptor suggesting that the molecular mechanisms underlying constitutive and agonist-induced internalization of CB1R are different.

  2. C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors regulates their agonist-induced clathrin-mediated internalization and G-protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Hishinuma, Shigeru; Nozawa, Hiroki; Akatsu, Chizuru; Shoji, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    It has been suggested that the agonist-induced internalization of G-protein-coupled receptors from the cell surface into intracellular compartments regulates cellular responsiveness. We previously reported that Gq/11 -protein-coupled human histamine H1 receptors internalized via clathrin-dependent mechanisms upon stimulation with histamine. However, the molecular determinants of H1 receptors responsible for agonist-induced internalization remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the roles of the intracellular C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors tagged with hemagglutinin (HA) at the N-terminal in histamine-induced internalization in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The histamine-induced internalization was evaluated by the receptor binding assay with [(3) H]mepyramine and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy with an anti-HA antibody. We found that histamine-induced internalization was inhibited under hypertonic conditions or by pitstop, a clathrin terminal domain inhibitor, but not by filipin or nystatin, disruptors of the caveolar structure and function. The histamine-induced internalization was also inhibited by truncation of a single amino acid, Ser487, located at the end of the intracellular C-terminal of H1 receptors, but not by its mutation to alanine. In contrast, the receptor-G-protein coupling, which was evaluated by histamine-induced accumulation of [(3) H]inositol phosphates, was potentiated by truncation of Ser487, but was lost by its mutation to alanine. These results suggest that the intracellular C-terminal of human H1 receptors, which only comprises 17 amino acids (Cys471-Ser487), plays crucial roles in both clathrin-dependent internalization of H1 receptors and G-protein signaling, in which truncation of Ser487 and its mutation to alanine are revealed to result in biased signaling toward activation of G-proteins and clathrin-mediated internalization, respectively.

  3. Plasma membrane cholesterol level and agonist-induced internalization of δ-opioid receptors; colocalization study with intracellular membrane markers of Rab family.

    PubMed

    Brejchova, Jana; Vosahlikova, Miroslava; Roubalova, Lenka; Parenti, Marco; Mauri, Mario; Chernyavskiy, Oleksandr; Svoboda, Petr

    2016-08-01

    Decrease of cholesterol level in plasma membrane of living HEK293 cells transiently expressing FLAG-δ-OR by β-cyclodextrin (β-CDX) resulted in a slight internalization of δ-OR. Massive internalization of δ-OR induced by specific agonist DADLE was diminished in cholesterol-depleted cells. These results suggest that agonist-induced internalization of δ-OR, which has been traditionally attributed exclusively to clathrin-mediated pathway, proceeds at least partially via membrane domains. Identification of internalized pools of FLAG-δ-OR by colocalization studies with proteins of Rab family indicated the decreased presence of receptors in early endosomes (Rab5), late endosomes and lysosomes (Rab7) and fast recycling vesicles (Rab4). Slow type of recycling (Rab11) was unchanged by cholesterol depletion. As expected, agonist-induced internalization of oxytocin receptors was totally suppressed in β-CDX-treated cells. Determination of average fluorescence lifetime of TMA-DPH, the polar derivative of hydrophobic membrane probe diphenylhexatriene, in live cells by FLIM indicated a significant alteration of the overall PM structure which may be interpreted as an increased "water-accessible space" within PM area. Data obtained by studies of HEK293 cells transiently expressing FLAG-δ-OR by "antibody feeding" method were extended by analysis of the effect of cholesterol depletion on distribution of FLAG-δ-OR in sucrose density gradients prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing FLAG-δ-OR. Major part of FLAG-δ-OR was co-localized with plasma membrane marker Na,K-ATPase and β-CDX treatment resulted in shift of PM fragments containing both FLAG-δ-OR and Na,K-ATPase to higher density. Thus, the decrease in content of the major lipid constituent of PM resulted in increased density of resulting PM fragments.

  4. Imaging Agonist-Induced D2/D3 Receptor Desensitization and Internalization In Vivo with PET/fMRI.

    PubMed

    Sander, Christin Y; Hooker, Jacob M; Catana, Ciprian; Rosen, Bruce R; Mandeville, Joseph B

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of dopamine receptor desensitization and internalization, thereby proposing a new technique for non-invasive, in vivo measurements of receptor adaptations. The D2/D3 agonist quinpirole, which induces receptor internalization in vitro, was administered at graded doses in non-human primates while imaging with simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A pronounced temporal divergence between receptor occupancy and fMRI signal was observed: occupancy remained elevated while fMRI responded transiently. Analogous experiments with an antagonist (prochlorperazine) and a lower-affinity agonist (ropinirole) exhibited reduced temporal dissociation between occupancy and function, consistent with a mechanism of desensitization and internalization that depends upon drug efficacy and affinity. We postulated a model that incorporates internalization into a neurovascular-coupling relationship. This model yielded in vivo desensitization/internalization rates (0.2/min for quinpirole) consistent with published in vitro measurements. Overall, these results suggest that simultaneous PET/fMRI enables characterization of dynamic neuroreceptor adaptations in vivo, and may offer a first non-invasive method for assessing receptor desensitization and internalization.

  5. Involvement of tyrosine residues located in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor in agonist-induced down-regulation of the receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Valiquette, M; Bonin, H; Hnatowich, M; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J; Bouvier, M

    1990-01-01

    Chronic exposure of various cell types to adrenergic agonists leads to a decrease in cell surface beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2AR) number. Sequestration of the receptor away from the cell surface as well as a down-regulation of the total number of cellular receptors are believed to contribute to this agonist-mediated regulation of receptor number. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not well characterized. Recently, tyrosine residues located in the cytoplasmic tails of several membrane receptors, such as the low density lipoprotein and mannose-6-phosphate receptors, have been suggested as playing an important role in the agonist-induced internalization of these receptors. Accordingly, we assessed the potential role of two tyrosine residues in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2AR in agonist-induced sequestration and down-regulation of the receptor. Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 of the human beta 2AR were replaced with alanine residues by site-directed mutagenesis and both wild-type and mutant beta 2AR were stably expressed in transformed Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The mutation dramatically decreased the ability of the beta 2AR to undergo isoproterenol-induced down-regulation. However, the substitution of Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 did not affect agonist-induced sequestration of the receptor. These results suggest that tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of human beta 2AR are crucial determinants involved in its down-regulation. PMID:2164220

  6. GLP-1 receptor agonist-induced polyarthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Maria Luisa; Monami, Matteo; Sati, Lavinia; Marchionni, Niccolò; Di Bari, Mauro; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2014-08-01

    Occasional cases of bilateral, symmetrical, seronegative polyarthritis have been reported in patients treated with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (Crickx et al. in Rheumatol Int, 2013). We report here a similar case observed during treatment with a GLP-1 receptor agonist. A 42-year-old man with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin 1,500 mg/day and liraglutide 1.8 mg/day. After 6 months from the beginning of treatment, the patient complained of bilateral arthralgia (hands, feet, ankles, knees, and hips). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and leukocytes were increased. Rheumatoid factor, anticyclic citrullinated protein antibody, antinuclear antibodies, anti-Borrelia, and burgdorferi antibodies were all negative, and myoglobin and calcitonin were normal. Liraglutide was withdrawn, and the symptoms completely disappeared within 1 week, with normalization of ESR, CRP, fibrinogen, and leukocytes. Previously described cases of polyarthritis associated with DPP4 inhibitors had been attributed to a direct effect of the drugs on inflammatory cells expressing the enzyme. The present case, occurred during treatment with a GLP-1 receptor agonists, suggests a possibly different mechanism, mediated by GLP-1 receptor stimulation, which deserved further investigation.

  7. Opiate agonist-induced re-distribution of Wntless, a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein, in rat striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Reyes, B A S; Vakharia, K; Ferraro, T N; Levenson, R; Berrettini, W H; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2012-01-01

    Wntless (WLS), a mu-opioid receptor (MOR) interacting protein, mediates Wnt protein secretion that is critical for neuronal development. We investigated whether MOR agonists induce re-distribution of WLS within rat striatal neurons. Adult male rats received either saline, morphine or [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) directly into the lateral ventricles. Following thirty minutes, brains were extracted and tissue sections were processed for immunogold silver detection of WLS. In saline-treated rats, WLS was distributed along the plasma membrane and within the cytoplasmic compartment of striatal dendrites as previously described. The ratio of cytoplasmic to total dendritic WLS labeling was 0.70±0.03 in saline-treated striatal tissue. Morphine treatment decreased this ratio to 0.48±0.03 indicating a shift of WLS from the intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane. However, following DAMGO treatment, the ratio was 0.85±0.05 indicating a greater distribution of WLS intracellularly. The difference in the re-distribution of the WLS following different agonist exposure may be related to DAMGO's well known ability to induce internalization of MOR in contrast to morphine, which is less effective in producing receptor internalization. Furthermore, these data are consistent with our hypothesis that MOR agonists promote dimerization of WLS and MOR, thereby preventing WLS from mediating Wnt secretion. In summary, our findings indicate differential agonist-induced trafficking of WLS in striatal neurons following distinct agonist exposure. Adaptations in WLS trafficking may represent a novel pharmacological target in the treatment of opiate addiction and/or pain.

  8. Agonist-induced internalisation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is mediated by the Gαq pathway.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Aiysha; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and an important target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Upon stimulation with agonist, the GLP-1R signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways to stimulate insulin secretion. The agonist-induced GLP-1R internalisation has recently been shown to be important for insulin secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying GLP-1R internalisation remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the role of GLP-1R downstream signalling pathways in its internalisation. Agonist-induced human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) internalisation and activity were examined using a number of techniques including immunoblotting, ELISA, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays to determine cAMP production, intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and ERK phosphorylation. Agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation is dependent on caveolin-1 and dynamin. Inhibition of the Gαq pathway but not the Gαs pathway affected hGLP-1R internalisation. Consistent with this, hGLP-1R mutant T149M and small-molecule agonists (compound 2 and compound B), which activate only the Gαs pathway, failed to induce internalisation of the receptor. Chemical inhibitors of the Gαq pathway, PKC and ERK phosphorylation significantly reduced agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation. These inhibitors also suppressed agonist-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation demonstrating that the phosphorylated ERK acts downstream of the Gαq pathway in the hGLP-1R internalisation. In summary, agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation is mediated by the Gαq pathway. The internalised hGLP-1R stimulates insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, indicating the importance of GLP-1 internalisation for insulin secretion.

  9. Adenosine-A1 receptor agonist induced hyperalgesic priming type II.

    PubMed

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2016-03-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala, N-Me-Phe, Gly-ol]-enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of transition to chronic pain that we have termed type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, type II hyperalgesic priming differs from type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that, as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study, we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms, as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor.

  10. Adenosine-A1 Receptor Agonist Induced Hyperalgesic Priming Type II

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Levine, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of the transition to chronic pain that we have termed Type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to Type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, Type II hyperalgesic priming differs from Type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced Type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced Type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the Type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. PMID:26588695

  11. A single mutation of the neurokinin-2 (NK2) receptor prevents agonist-induced desensitization. Divergent conformational requirements for NK2 receptor signaling and agonist-induced desensitization in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, K; Chollet, A

    1995-11-17

    Receptor activation and agonist-induced desensitization of the human neurokinin-2 (NK2) receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes have been investigated. When neurokinin A (NKA) was applied repeatedly at 5-min intervals, the second and subsequent applications gave no responses. This desensitization was not observed with the specific agonists (Lys3, Gly8-R-gamma-lactam-Leu9)NKA(3-10) (GR64349) or (Nle10)-NKA(4-10). However, in the presence of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, stimulation with GR64349 or (Nle10)-NKA(4-10) induced receptor desensitization. In contrast, the protein kinase C inhibitor Ro-31-8220 was not able to enhance GR64349-mediated desensitization. We created a mutation (F248S) in the third cytoplasmic loop of NK2 that impairs NKA-induced desensitization. In the presence of either staurosporine or Ro-31-8220, the mutant receptor was desensitized in response to NKA application but not to GR64349. Also, truncation mutants delta 62 and delta 87, lacking serine and threonine residues in the cytoplasmic COOH-terminal tail, were functionally active and were partially resistant to desensitization. These observations indicate that 1) there are different conformational requirements for NK2 receptor signalling and agonist-induced desensitization, 2) the third intracellular loop and the cytoplasmic tail of NK2 are functional domains important for agonist-induced desensitization, and 3) some agonists at the NK2 receptor cause much more desensitization than others and suggest that this might result from phosphorylation by receptor-specific kinases and other non-identified protein kinases.

  12. hvTRA, a novel TRAIL receptor agonist, induces apoptosis and sustained growth retardation in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Fleten, Karianne G; Flørenes, Vivi Ann; Prasmickaite, Lina; Hill, Oliver; Sykora, Jaromir; Mælandsmo, Gunhild M; Engesæter, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, new treatment options for malignant melanoma patients have enhanced the overall survival for selected patients. Despite new hope, most melanoma patients still relapse with drug-resistant tumors or experience intrinsic resistance to the therapy. Therefore, novel treatment modalities beneficial for subgroups of patients are needed. TRAIL receptor agonists have been suggested as promising candidates for use in cancer treatment as they preferentially induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Unfortunately, the first generation of TRAIL receptor agonists showed poor clinical efficacy. hvTRA is a second-generation TRAIL receptor agonist with improved composition giving increased potency, and in the present study, we showed hvTRA-induced activation of apoptosis leading to an efficient and sustained reduction in melanoma cell growth in cell lines and xenograft models. Furthermore, the potential of hvTRA in a clinical setting was demonstrated by showing efficacy on tumor cells harvested from melanoma patients with lymph node metastasis in an ex vivo drug sensitivity assay. Inhibition of mutated BRAF has been shown to regulate proteins in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, making the cells more susceptible for apoptosis induction. In an attempt to increase the efficacy of hvTRA, combination treatment with the mutated BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib was investigated. A synergistic effect by the combination was observed for several cell lines in vitro, and an initial cytotoxic effect was observed in vivo. Unfortunately, the initial increased reduction in tumor growth compared with hvTRA mono treatment was not sustained, and this was related to downregulation of the DR5 level by vemurafenib. Altogether, the presented data imply that hvTRA efficiently induce apoptosis and growth delay in melanoma models and patient material, and the potential of this TRAIL receptor agonist should be further evaluated for treatment of subgroups of melanoma patients.

  13. hvTRA, a novel TRAIL receptor agonist, induces apoptosis and sustained growth retardation in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fleten, Karianne G; Flørenes, Vivi Ann; Prasmickaite, Lina; Hill, Oliver; Sykora, Jaromir; Mælandsmo, Gunhild M; Engesæter, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, new treatment options for malignant melanoma patients have enhanced the overall survival for selected patients. Despite new hope, most melanoma patients still relapse with drug-resistant tumors or experience intrinsic resistance to the therapy. Therefore, novel treatment modalities beneficial for subgroups of patients are needed. TRAIL receptor agonists have been suggested as promising candidates for use in cancer treatment as they preferentially induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Unfortunately, the first generation of TRAIL receptor agonists showed poor clinical efficacy. hvTRA is a second-generation TRAIL receptor agonist with improved composition giving increased potency, and in the present study, we showed hvTRA-induced activation of apoptosis leading to an efficient and sustained reduction in melanoma cell growth in cell lines and xenograft models. Furthermore, the potential of hvTRA in a clinical setting was demonstrated by showing efficacy on tumor cells harvested from melanoma patients with lymph node metastasis in an ex vivo drug sensitivity assay. Inhibition of mutated BRAF has been shown to regulate proteins in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, making the cells more susceptible for apoptosis induction. In an attempt to increase the efficacy of hvTRA, combination treatment with the mutated BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib was investigated. A synergistic effect by the combination was observed for several cell lines in vitro, and an initial cytotoxic effect was observed in vivo. Unfortunately, the initial increased reduction in tumor growth compared with hvTRA mono treatment was not sustained, and this was related to downregulation of the DR5 level by vemurafenib. Altogether, the presented data imply that hvTRA efficiently induce apoptosis and growth delay in melanoma models and patient material, and the potential of this TRAIL receptor agonist should be further evaluated for treatment of subgroups of melanoma patients. PMID:28028438

  14. Benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist-induced kindling of rats alters learning and glutamate binding.

    PubMed

    Rössler, A S; Schröder, H; Dodd, R H; Chapouthier, G; Grecksch, G

    2000-09-01

    Kindling, recognized as a model of epilepsy, can be obtained by applications of repeated nonconvulsive stimulations that finally lead to generalized seizures. Epileptics often show cognitive impairments. The present work analyzed the learning performance of male Wistar rats kindled with a convulsant inverse agonist of the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex, methyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCM). This compound is also known to have an action on learning processes. It was thus interesting to verify if beta-CCM kindling had the same impairing action on learning as other kindling agents, such as pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). A two-way active-avoidance shuttle-box learning task was chosen, because a deficit was found after PTZ kindling in this learning model. On the other hand, hippocampal glutamate binding, has previously been shown to be modified by both seizures and learning. Thus, the level of glutamate binding was also measured in the present study. Results showed that fully kindled rats had poorer learning performance after the third day of test than controls or not fully kindled animals. L-[3H] glutamate binding to hippocampal membrane fractions of the fully kindled animals was significantly higher when compared with controls, whereas L-[3H] glutamate binding of not fully kindled subjects did not differ from that of controls. Neuronal plasticity changes are a possible explanation for the correlation between kindling, learning deficits, and increased glutamate binding.

  15. CL316,243, a β3-adrenergic receptor agonist, induces muscle hypertrophy and increased strength

    PubMed Central

    Puzzo, Daniela; Raiteri, Roberto; Castaldo, Clotilde; Capasso, Raffaele; Pagano, Ester; Tedesco, Mariateresa; Gulisano, Walter; Drozd, Lisaveta; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Palmeri, Agostino; Scotto, Pietro; Miniaci, Maria Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Studies in vitro have demonstrated that β3-adrenergic receptors (β3-ARs) regulate protein metabolism in skeletal muscle by promoting protein synthesis and inhibiting protein degradation. In this study, we evaluated whether activation of β3-ARs by the selective agonist CL316,243 modifies the functional and structural properties of skeletal muscles of healthy mice. Daily injections of CL316,243 for 15 days resulted in a significant improvement in muscle force production, assessed by grip strength and weight tests, and an increased myofiber cross-sectional area, indicative of muscle hypertrophy. In addition, atomic force microscopy revealed a significant effect of CL316,243 on the transversal stiffness of isolated muscle fibers. Interestingly, the expression level of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) downstream targets and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was also found to be enhanced in tibialis anterior and soleus muscles of CL316,243 treated mice, in accordance with previous data linking β3-ARs to mTOR and NOS signaling pathways. In conclusion, our data suggest that CL316,243 systemic administration might be a novel therapeutic strategy worthy of further investigations in conditions of muscle wasting and weakness associated with aging and muscular diseases. PMID:27874066

  16. Proteolytic cleavage of the urokinase receptor substitutes for the agonist-induced chemotactic effect.

    PubMed Central

    Resnati, M; Guttinger, M; Valcamonica, S; Sidenius, N; Blasi, F; Fazioli, F

    1996-01-01

    Physiological concentrations of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) stimulated a chemotactic response in human monocytic THP-1 through binding to the urokinase receptor (uPAR). The effect did not require the protease moiety of uPA, as stimulation was achieved also with the N-terminal fragment (ATF), while the 33 kDa low molecular weight uPA was ineffective. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed association of uPAR with intracellular kinase(s), as demonstrated by in vitro kinase assays. Use of specific antibodies identified p56/p59hck as a kinase associated with uPAR in THP-1 cell extracts. Upon addition of ATF, p56/p59hck activity was stimulated within 2 min and returned to normal after 30 min. Since uPAR lacks an intracellular domain capable of interacting with intracellular kinase, activation of p56/p59hck must require a transmembrane adaptor. Evidence for this was strongly supported by the finding that a soluble form of uPAR (suPAR) was capable of inducing chemotaxis not only in THP-1 cells but also in cells lacking endogenous uPAR (IC50, 5 pM). However, activity of suPAR require chymotrypsin cleavage between the N-terminal domain D1 and D2 + D3. Chymotrypsin-cleaved suPAR also induced activation of p56/p59hck in THP-1 cells, with a time course comparable with ATF. Our data show that uPA-induced signal transduction takes place via uPAR, involves activation of intracellular tyrosine kinase(s) and requires an as yet undefined adaptor capable of connecting the extracellular ligand binding uPAR to intracellular transducer(s). Images PMID:8612581

  17. Toll-like receptor agonists induce inflammation and cell death in a model of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rydberg, Camilla; Månsson, Anne; Uddman, Rolf; Riesbeck, Kristian; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. The present study describes TLR expression and function in healthy and malignant airway epithelial cells. The squamous cell carcinoma cell line Detroit-562 was compared with the healthy bronchial epithelial cell line NL-20 and primary human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs). TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5 were present in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Consistent with this, Detroit-562 expressed TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5, whereas NL-20 expressed mainly TLR3 and HNECs expressed TLR2-5. In Detroit-562, Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C) and flagellin, ligands for TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5, respectively, induced an up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), an increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion and a decrease in cell viability. Additionally, poly(I:C) affected IL-1β production and the migratory behaviour of Detroit-562. NL-20 responded with a slight increase in IL-8 secretion upon poly(I:C) stimulation. Poly(I:C) induced a small increase in IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 production in HNECs, while Pam3CSK4 increased viability. The TLR signalling was transcription-dependent, but the pathways involved differed among TLRs as well as cells. In Detroit-562, TLR2 and TLR5 activation was mediated via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-, p38-, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)- and nuclear factor (NF)-κB-related pathways, while TLR3 was dependent on NF-κB. In NL-20, TLR3 signalled via p38, and in HNECs, NF-κB, JNK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) appeared to be involved. We found that TLR agonists induced a robust response in HNSCCs, characterized by generation of inflammation and cell death. A similar response was not seen in normal epithelial cells. Thus, the TLR system should be considered an important target in future antitumour immunotherapy. PMID:19740321

  18. Effects of 5-HT1A Receptor Stimulation on D1 Receptor Agonist-Induced Striatonigral Activity and Dyskinesia in Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the value of 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) agonists for dyskinesias that arise with long-term L-DOPA therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Yet, how 5-HT1AR stimulation directly influences the dyskinetogenic D1 receptor (D1R)-expressing striatonigral pathway remains largely unknown. To directly examine this, one cohort of hemiparkinsonian rats received systemic injections of Vehicle + Vehicle, Vehicle + the D1R agonist SKF81297 (0.8 mg/kg), or the 5-HT1AR agonist ±8-OH-DPAT (1.0 mg/kg) + SKF81297. Rats were examined for changes in abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs), rotations, striatal preprodynorphin (PPD), and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD; 65 and 67) mRNA via RT-PCR. In the second experiment, hemiparkinsonian rats received intrastriatal pretreatments of Vehicle (aCSF), ±8-OH-DPAT (7.5 mM), or ±8-OH-DPAT + the 5-HT1AR antagonist WAY100635 (4.6 mM), followed by systemic Vehicle or SKF81297 after which AIMs, rotations, and extracellular striatal glutamate and nigral GABA efflux were measured by in vivo microdialysis. Results revealed D1R agonist-induced AIMs were reduced by systemic and intrastriatal 5-HT1AR stimulation while rotations were enhanced. Although ±8-OH-DPAT did not modify D1R agonist-induced increases in striatal PPD mRNA, the D1R/5-HT1AR agonist combination enhanced GAD65 and GAD67 mRNA. When applied locally, ±8-OH-DPAT alone diminished striatal glutamate levels while the agonist combination increased nigral GABA efflux. Thus, presynaptic 5-HT1AR stimulation may attenuate striatal glutamate levels, resulting in diminished D1R-mediated dyskinetic behaviors, but maintain or enhance striatal postsynaptic factors ultimately increasing nigral GABA levels and rotational activity. The current findings offer a novel mechanistic explanation for previous results concerning 5-HT1AR agonists for the treatment of dyskinesia. PMID:23496922

  19. The platelet fibrinogen receptor: an immunogold-surface replica study of agonist-induced ligand binding and receptor clustering

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to its receptor, a heterodimer consisting of the plasma-membrane glycoproteins (GP) IIb and IIIa. Although the GPIIb-IIIa complex is present on the surface of unstimulated platelets, it binds fibrinogen only after platelet activation. We have used an immunogold-surface replica technique to study the distribution of GPIIb-IIIa and bound fibrinogen over broad areas of surface membranes in unstimulated, as well as thrombin-activated and ADP-activated human platelets. We found that the immunogold-labeled GPIIb-IIIa was monodispersed over the surface of unstimulated platelets, although the cell surface lacked immunoreactive fibrinogen. On thrombin-stimulated platelets, approximately 65% of the GPIIb-IIIa molecules were in clusters within the plane of the membrane. Fibrinogen, which had been released from the alpha-granules of these cells, bound to GPIIb-IIIa on the cell surface and was similarly clustered. To determine whether the receptors clustered before ligand binding, or as a consequence thereof, we studied the surface distribution of GPIIb-IIIa after stimulation with ADP, which causes activation of the fibrinogen receptor function of GPIIb-IIIa without inducing the release of fibrinogen. In the absence of added fibrinogen, the unoccupied, yet binding-competent receptors on ADP-stimulated platelets were monodispersed. The addition of fibrinogen caused the GPIIb-IIIa molecules to cluster on the cell surface. Clustering was also induced by the addition of the GPIIb-IIIa-binding domains of fibrinogen, namely the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser on the alpha-chain or the gamma-chain decapeptide gamma 402-411. These results show that receptor occupancy causes clustering of GPIIb-IIIa in activated platelets. PMID:3584243

  20. A naturally occurring GIP receptor variant undergoes enhanced agonist-induced desensitization, which impairs GIP control of adipose insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Sameer; Patel, Rajesh T; Bruno, Joanne; Panhwar, Muhammad Siyab; Wen, Jennifer; McGraw, Timothy E

    2014-10-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), an incretin hormone secreted from gastrointestinal K cells in response to food intake, has an important role in the control of whole-body metabolism. GIP signals through activation of the GIP receptor (GIPR), a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Dysregulation of this pathway has been implicated in the development of metabolic disease. Here we demonstrate that GIPR is constitutively trafficked between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments of both GIP-stimulated and unstimulated adipocytes. GIP induces a downregulation of plasma membrane GIPR by slowing GIPR recycling without affecting internalization kinetics. This transient reduction in the expression of GIPR in the plasma membrane correlates with desensitization to the effects of GIP. A naturally occurring variant of GIPR (E354Q) associated with an increased incidence of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in humans responds to GIP stimulation with an exaggerated downregulation from the plasma membrane and a delayed recovery of GIP sensitivity following cessation of GIP stimulation. This perturbation in the desensitization-resensitization cycle of the GIPR variant, revealed in studies of cultured adipocytes, may contribute to the link of the E354Q variant to metabolic disease.

  1. Modification of kappa-opioid receptor agonist-induced antinociception by diabetes in the mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Kamei, Junzo

    2005-05-01

    The supraspinal and spinal antinociceptive effects of several kappa-opioid receptor agonists were examined in diabetic and non-diabetic mice using the tail-flick assay. The antinociception induced by intrathecal (i.t.), but not intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.), CI-977, a highly selective kappa(1)-opioid receptor agonist, in diabetic mice was less than that in non-diabetic mice. The antinociceptive effects of ICI-199,441 and R-84760, high potency kappa(1)-opioid receptor agonists, given i.c.v., but not i.t., were attenuated in diabetic mice compared to those in non-diabetic mice. On the other hand, the antinociceptive effects of the new kappa-opioid receptor agonist TRK-820, which has high affinity for kappa(2)- and/or kappa(3)-opioid receptors, injected both i.c.v. and i.t. in diabetic mice were markedly less than those in non-diabetic mice. These results indicate that the antinociceptive effects of those kappa-opioid receptor agonists in diabetic mice are altered in a region-specific manner in the central nervous system (CNS). The dysfunction of kappa-opioid receptor subtypes in diabetic mice may underlie this CNS region-specific variation in the effects of these kappa-opioid receptor agonists.

  2. Effects of central histamine receptors blockade on GABA(A) agonist-induced food intake in broiler cockerels.

    PubMed

    Morteza, Zendehdel; Vahhab, Babapour; Hossein, Jonaidi

    2008-02-01

    In this study, the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v) injection of H1, H2 and H3 antagonists on feed intake induced by GABA(A) agonist was evaluated. In Experiment 1, the animals received chloropheniramine, a H1 antagonist and then muscimol, a GABA(A) agonist. In Experiment 2, chickens received famotidine, a H2 receptor antagonist, prior to injection of muscimol. Finally in Experiment 3, the birds were injected with thioperamide, a H3 receptor antagonist and muscimol. Cumulative food intake was measured 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after injections. The results of this study indicated that effects of muscimol on food intake inhibited by pretreatment with chloropheneramine maleate (p < or = 0.05), significantly, while the famotidine and thioperamide were ineffective. These results suggest the existence of H1-receptor mediated histamine-GABA(A) receptor interaction on food intake in broiler cockerels.

  3. Reversion of muscarinic autoreceptor agonist-induced acetylcholine decrease and learning impairment by dynorphin A (1–13), an endogenous κ-opioid receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Hiramatsu, Masayuki; Murasawa, Hiroyasu; Mori, Hiromasa; Kameyama, Tsutomu

    1998-01-01

    We investigated whether carbachol, a muscarinic receptor agonist, induces learning and memory impairment, and if so, dynorphin A (1–13), an endogenous κ-opioid receptor agonist, ameliorates the impairment of learning and memory induced by carbachol, by use of a step-through type passive avoidance task.Carbachol induced a dose-related dual response. Carbachol (1.66 pmol per rat) administered directly into the hippocampus significantly shortened the step-through latency, while lower (0.166 pmol per rat) and higher (16.6 pmol per rat) doses of carbachol did not induce learning or memory impairment.Dynorphin A (1–13) (0.5 nmol per rat, i.c.v.) administered 5 min after carbachol injection significantly reversed carbachol-induced impairment of learning and memory.Perfusion with carbachol (3×10−4 M) significantly decreased acetylcholine release in the hippocampus during perfusion as determined by in vivo brain microdialysis. This decrease in acetylcholine release was suppressed by co-perfusion with a low dose of atropine (10−7 M).Dynorphin A (1–13) (0.5 nmol per rat, i.c.v.) immediately before carbachol perfusion completely blocked this decrease in extracellular acetylcholine concentration induced by carbachol.These antagonistic effects of dynorphin A (1–13) were abolished by treatment with nor-binaltorphimine (5.44 nmol per rat, i.c.v.), a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist, 5 min before dynorphin A (1–13) treatment.These results suggest that the neuropeptide dynorphin A (1–13) ameliorates the carbachol-induced impairment of learning and memory, accompanied by attenuation of the reductions in acetylcholine release which may be associated with dysfunction of presynaptic cholinergic neurones via κ-opioid receptors. PMID:9535021

  4. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P.; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca2+ signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca2+ overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca2+ signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca2+ oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  5. Inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase potentiates AT2 receptor agonist-induced natriuresis in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Sabuhi, Rifat; Asghar, Mohammad; Hussain, Tahir

    2010-10-01

    A positive association between renin-angiotensin system, especially AT1 receptor, and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular/renal diseases has been suggested. However, the role of oxidative stress, especially superoxide radicals in renal sodium handling in response to AT1 and AT2 receptors, is not known. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the role of NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX), a major superoxide radical producing enzyme, in AT1 and AT2 receptor function on natriuresis/diuresis in Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats under anesthesia were intravenously infused with NOX inhibitor apocynin (3.5 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), the AT1 receptor antagonist candesartan (100 μg/kg; bolus), and the AT2 receptor agonist CGP-42112A (1 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) alone and in combinations. Candesartan alone significantly increased urinary flow (UF; μl/30 min) by 53 and urinary Na excretion (U(Na)V; μmol/min) by 0.4 over basal. Preinfusion of apocynin had no effect on the net increase in UF or U(Na)V in response to candesartan. On the other hand, apocynin preinfusion caused profound increases in CGP-42112A-induced UF by 72, U(Na)V by 1.14, and fractional excretion of Na by 7.8. Apocynin and CGP-42112A alone did not cause significant increase in UF or U(Na)V over the basal. CGP-42112A infusion in the presence of apocynin increased urinary nitrite/nitrates and cGMP over basal. The infusion of candesartan, apocynin, and CGP-42112A alone or in combinations had no effect on the blood pressure or the glomerular filtration rate, suggesting tubular effects on natriuresis/diuresis. The data suggest that NOX may have an antagonistic role in AT2 receptor-mediated natriuresis/diuresis possibly via neutralizing nitric oxide and thereby influence fluid-Na homeostasis.

  6. CRM 1-mediated degradation and agonist-induced down-regulation of beta-adrenergic receptor mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ying; Lu, Huafei; Machida, Curtis A

    2006-10-01

    The beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1-AR) mRNAs are post-transcriptionally regulated at the level of mRNA stability and undergo accelerated agonist-mediated degradation via interaction of its 3' untranslated region (UTR) with RNA binding proteins, including the HuR nuclear protein. In a previous report [Kirigiti et al. (2001). Mol. Pharmacol. 60:1308-1324], we examined the agonist-mediated down-regulation of the rat beta1-AR mRNAs, endogenously expressed in the rat C6 cell line and ectopically expressed in transfectant hamster DDT1MF2 and rat L6 cells. In this report, we determined that isoproterenol treatment of neonatal rat cortical neurons, an important cell type expressing beta1-ARs in the brain, results in significant decreases in beta1-AR mRNA stability, while treatment with leptomycin B, an inhibitor of the nuclear export receptor CRM 1, results in significant increases in beta1-AR mRNA stability and nuclear retention. UV-crosslinking/immunoprecipitation and glycerol gradient fractionation analyses indicate that the beta1-AR 3' UTR recognize complexes composed of HuR and multiple proteins, including CRM 1. Cell-permeable peptides containing the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) were used as inhibitors of CRM 1-mediated nuclear export. When DDT1MF2 transfectants were treated with isoproterenol and peptide inhibitors, only the co-addition of the NES inhibitor reversed the isoproterenol-induced reduction of beta1-AR mRNA levels. Our results suggest that CRM 1-dependent NES-mediated mechanisms influence the degradation and agonist-mediated down-regulation of the beta1-AR mRNAs.

  7. Type I and II positive allosteric modulators differentially modulate agonist-induced up-regulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morten S; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-10-01

    Long-term treatment with nicotine or selective α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists increases the number of α7 nAChRs and this up-regulation may be involved in the mechanism underlying the sustained procognitive effect of these compounds. Here, we investigate the influence of type I and II α7 nAChR positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) on agonist-induced α7 nAChR up-regulation. We show that the type II PAMs, PNU-120596 (10 μM) or TQS (1 and 10 μM), inhibit up-regulation, as measured by protein levels, induced by the α7 nAChR agonist A-582941 (10 nM or 10 μM), in SH-EP1 cells stably expressing human α7 nAChR, whereas the type I PAMs AVL-3288 or NS1738 do not. Contrarily, neither type I nor II PAMs affect 10 μM nicotine-induced receptor up-regulation, suggesting that nicotine and A-582941 induce up-regulation through different mechanisms. We further show in vivo that 3 mg/kg PNU-120596 inhibits up-regulation of the α7 nAChR induced by 10 mg/kg A-582941, as measured by [(125)I]-bungarotoxin autoradiography, whereas 1 mg/kg AVL-3288 does not. Given that type II PAMs decrease desensitization of the receptor, whereas type I PAMs do not, these results suggest that receptor desensitization is involved in A-582941-induced up-regulation. Our results are the first to show an in vivo difference between type I and II α7 nAChR PAMs, and demonstrate an agonist-dependent effect of type II PAMs occurring on a much longer time scale than previously appreciated. Furthermore, our data suggest that nicotine and A-582941 induce up-regulation through different mechanisms, and that this confers differential sensitivity to the effects of α7 nAChR PAMs. These results may have implications for the clinical development of α7 nAChR PAMs.

  8. mGlu2/3 agonist-induced hyperthermia: an in vivo assay for detection of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonism and its relation to antidepressant-like efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gleason, S D; Li, X; Smith, I A; Ephlin, J D; Wang, X-S; Heinz, B A; Carter, J H; Baez, M; Yu, J; Bender, D M; Witkin, J M

    2013-08-01

    An assay to detect the on-target effects of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists in vivo would be valuable in guiding dosing regimens for the exploration of biological effects of potential therapeutic import. Multiple approaches involving blockade of mGlu2/3 receptor agoinist-driven behavioral effects in mice and rats were investigated. Most of these methods failed to provide a useful method of detection of antagonists in vivo (e.g., locomotor activity). In contrast, the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 produced dose-dependent increases in body temperature of mice. The hyperthermic effects of LY379268 was abolished in mGlu2 and in mGlu2/3 receptor null mice but not in mGlu3 null mice. Hyperthermia was not produced by an mGlu8 receptor agonist. Agonist-induced hyperthermia was prevented in a dose-dependent manner by structurally-distinct mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists. The blockade was stereo-specific. Moreover, this biological readout was responsive to both orthosteric and to negative allosteric modulators of mGlu2/3 receptors. Antagonism of agonist-induced hyperthermia predicted antidepressant-like efficacy in the mouse forced swim test. As with the hyperthermic response, the antidepressant-like effects of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists were shown to be due to mGlu2 and not to mGlu3 or mGlu8 receptors through the use of receptor knock-out mice. The ability to rapidly assess on-target activity of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists enables determination of parameters for setting efficacy doses in vivo. In turn, efficacy-related data in the preclinical laboratory can help to set expectations of therapeutic potential and dosing in humans.

  9. Identification of specific sites in the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminus of the Bombyx mori PBAN receptor crucial for ligand-induced internalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is mediated by the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR). Similar to other rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors, the silkmoth Bombyx mori PBANR (BmPBANR) undergoes agonist-induced internalization. Despite interest in developing...

  10. Evidence for the participation of peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors in GABAA agonists-induced nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Hernández, Mariana; Feria-Morales, Luis Alberto; Torres-López, Jorge Elías; Cervantes-Durán, Claudia; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Rocha-González, Héctor Isaac

    2014-07-05

    The activation of GABAA receptor by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) in primary afferent fibers produces depolarization. In normal conditions this depolarization causes a reduction in the release of neurotransmitters. Therefore, this depolarization remains inhibitory. However, previous studies have suggested that in inflammatory pain, GABA shifts its signaling from inhibition to excitation by an increased GABA-induced depolarization. The contribution of peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors to the inflammatory pain is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible pronociceptive role of peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors in the formalin test. Formalin (0.5%) injection into the dorsum of the right hind paw produced flinching behavior in rats. Ipsilateral local peripheral pre-treatment (-10min) with exogenous GABA (0.003-0.03µg/paw) or common GABAA receptor agonists muscimol (0.003-0.03µg/paw), diazepam (0.017-0.056µg/paw) or phenobarbital (1-100µg/paw) significantly increased 0.5% formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. The pronociceptive effects of GABA (0.03µg/paw), muscimol (0.03µg/paw), diazepam (0.056µg/paw) and phenobarbital (100µg/paw) were prevented by either the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (0.01-0.1µg/paw) or selective α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptor inverse agonist L-655,708 (0.017-0.17µg/paw). The α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptor protein was expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and dorsal spinal cord of naïve rats. The formalin injection did not modify α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptor expression. Overall, these results suggest that peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors play a pronociceptive role in the rat formalin test.

  11. Rapid agonist-induced loss of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin opioid receptor sites in NG108-15, but not SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, R.I.; Lameh, J.; Sadee, W. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have measured {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites on intact SK-N-SH and NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells, respectively, in culture. Use of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin ({beta}E) as a tracer, together with {beta}E(6-31) to block high-affinity non-opioid binding in both cell lines, permitted the measurement of cell surface {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites. Labeling was at {delta} sites in NG108-15 cells and predominantly at {mu} sites in SK-N-SH cells. Pretreatment with the {mu} and {delta} agonist, DADLE, caused a rapid loss of cell surface {delta} receptor sites in NG108-15 cells, but failed to reduce significantly {mu} receptor density in SK-N-SH cells.

  12. Receptor-Selective Agonists Induce Emesis and Fos Expression in the Brain and Enteric Nervous System of the Least Shrew (Cryptotis parva)

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Andrew P.; Chebolu, Seetha; Darmani, Nissar A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on the mechanisms of emesis has implicated multiple neurotransmitters via both central (dorsal vagal complex) and peripheral (enteric neurons and enterochromaffin cells) anatomical substrates. Taking advantage of advances in receptor-specific agonists, and utilizing Fos expression as a functional activity marker, this study demonstrates a strong, but incomplete, overlap in anatomical substrates for a variety of emetogens. We used cisplatin and specific agonists to 5-HT3 serotonergic, D2/D3 dopaminergic, and NK1 tachykininergic receptors to induce vomiting in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva), and quantified the resulting Fos expression. The least shrew is a small mammal whose responses to emetic challenges are very similar to its human counterparts. In all cases, the enteric nervous system, nucleus of the solitary tract, and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus demonstrated significantly increased Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-IR). However, Fos-IR induction was notably absent from the area postrema following the dopaminergic and NK1 receptor-specific agents. Two brain nuclei not usually discussed regarding emesis, the dorsal raphe nucleus and paraventricular thalamic nucleus, also demonstrated increased emesis-related Fos-IR. Taken together, these data suggest the dorsal vagal complex is part of a common pathway for a variety of distinct emetogens, but there are central emetic substrates, both medullary and diencephalic, that can be accessed without directly stimulating the area postrema. PMID:19699757

  13. Administration of caffeine inhibited adenosine receptor agonist-induced decreases in motor performance, thermoregulation, and brain neurotransmitter release in exercising rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xinyan; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of an adenosine receptor agonist on caffeine-induced changes in thermoregulation, neurotransmitter release in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, and endurance exercise performance in rats. One hour before the start of exercise, rats were intraperitoneally injected with either saline alone (SAL), 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine and saline (CAF), a non-selective adenosine receptor agonist (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine [NECA]: 0.5 mg kg(-1)) and saline (NECA), or the combination of caffeine and NECA (CAF+NECA). Rats ran until fatigue on the treadmill with a 5% grade at a speed of 18 m min(-1) at 23 °C. Compared to the SAL group, the run time to fatigue (RTTF) was significantly increased by 52% following caffeine administration and significantly decreased by 65% following NECA injection (SAL: 91 ± 14.1 min; CAF: 137 ± 25.8 min; NECA: 31 ± 13.7 min; CAF+NECA: 85 ± 11.8 min; p<0.05). NECA decreased the core body temperature (Tcore), oxygen consumption, which is an index of heat production, tail skin temperature, which is an index of heat loss, and extracellular dopamine (DA) release at rest and during exercise. Furthermore, caffeine injection inhibited the NECA-induced decreases in the RTTF, Tcore, heat production, heat loss, and extracellular DA release. Neither caffeine nor NECA affected extracellular noradrenaline or serotonin release. These results support the findings of previous studies showing improved endurance performance and overrides in body limitations after caffeine administration, and imply that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may be associated with the adenosine receptor blockade-induced increases in brain DA release.

  14. Agonist-induced activation of histamine H3 receptor signals to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 through PKC-, PLD-, and EGFR-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiangru; Ye, Lingyan; Liao, Yuan; Jin, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Bing; Sun, Yi; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-04-01

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3R), abundantly expressed in the central and the peripheral nervous system, has been recognized as a promising target for the treatment of various important CNS diseases including narcolepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The H3R acts via Gi/o -proteins to inhibit adenylate cyclase activity and modulate MAPK activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for H3R mediation of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) remain to be elucidated. In this study, using HEK293 cells stably expressing human H3R and mouse primary cortical neurons endogenously expressing mouse H3R, we found that the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2 was significantly blocked by both the pertussis toxin and the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Upon stimulation by H3R agonist histamine or imetit, H3R was shown to rapidly induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation via PLC/PKC-, PLDs-, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation-dependent pathways. Furthermore, it was also indicated that while the βγ-subunits play a key role in H3R-activated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, β-arrestins were not required for ERK1/2 activation. In addition, when the cultured mouse cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation conditions (OGD), imetit exhibited neuroprotective properties through the H3R. Treatment of cells with the inhibitor UO126 abolished these protective effects. This suggests a possible neuroprotective role of the H3R-mediated ERK1/2 pathway under hypoxia conditions. These observations may provide new insights into the pharmacological effects and the physiological functions modulated by the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2. Histamine H3 receptors are abundantly expressed in the brain and play important roles in various CNS physiological functions. However, the underlying mechanisms for H3R-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 remain largely unknown. Here

  15. Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ Agonists Induce Cell Cycle Arrest through Transcriptional Regulation of Krüppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4)*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Zhou, Qibing; He, Huan; Zhao, Yahui; Liu, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a subgroup of ligand-activated nuclear receptors, plays critical roles in cell cycle regulation, differentiation, apoptosis, and invasion. PPARγ is involved in tumorigenesis and is a potent target for cancer therapy. PPARγ transactivation of KLF4 has been demonstrated in various studies; however, how PPARγ regulates KLF4 expression is not clear. In this study, we reveal that PPARγ regulates the expression of KLF4 by binding directly to the PPAR response element (PPRE) within the KLF4 promoter. The PPRE resides at −1657 to −1669 bp upstream of the KLF4 ATG codon, which is essential for the transactivation of troglitazone-induced KLF4 expression. Furthermore, we found that stable silencing of KLF4 obviously suppressed the G1/S arrest and anti-proliferation effects induced by PPARγ ligands. Taken together, our data indicate that up-regulation of KLF4 upon PPARγ activation is mediated through the PPRE in the KLF4 promoter, thus providing further insights into the PPARγ signal transduction pathway as well as a novel cancer therapeutic strategy. PMID:23275339

  16. Intranasal immunization with a mixture of PspA and a Toll-like receptor agonist induces specific antibodies and enhances bacterial clearance in the airways of mice.

    PubMed

    Oma, Keita; Zhao, Jizi; Ezoe, Hirokazu; Akeda, Yukihiro; Koyama, Shohei; Ishii, Ken J; Kataoka, Kosuke; Oishi, Kazunori

    2009-05-21

    To develop an effective nasal vaccine for Streptococcus pneumoniae, the effects of a panel of Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in combination with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) on induction of PspA-specific antibodies and bacterial clearance were compared in mice. Mice were nasally immunized with 10 microg of TLR agonist (TLR 2-4 and 9) and 2.5 microg of PspA once per week for 3 weeks. Significantly increased levels of PspA-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA in the airways and PspA-specific IgG in plasma were found in mice administered PspA plus each TLR agonist, compared with mice administered PspA alone. In a sub-lethal pneumonia model using a serotype 3 pneumococcal strain, bacterial density in the lungs of mice was significantly reduced in mice administered PspA plus each TLR agonist, compared with mice administered either PspA alone or phosphate-buffered saline alone 3h after bacterial challenge. Similarly, enhanced bacterial clearance was found in the nasopharynx of mice administered PspA plus each TLR agonist 1 day after infection with a serotype 19F strain. Our data suggest that PspA-specific antibody induced by nasal immunization with PspA plus TLR agonist is capable of reducing the bacterial load in both the nasopharynx and lungs after challenge with pneumococci with different serotypes. Despite the skewed Th1/Th2 immune responses, the effects of nasal immunization with PspA plus each TLR agonist on bacterial clearances from the lungs 3h after infection and from nasopharynx 1 day after infection in mice were equivalent.

  17. Molecular mechanism of R-bicalutamide switching from androgen receptor antagonist to agonist induced by amino acid mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongli; Han, Rui; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Zheng, Lifang

    2016-12-01

    R-bicalutamide, a first generation antiandrogen, was used to treat prostate cancer for decades. Although it is very effective at the beginning, resistance appears after 2-3 years of treatment. Mutation of androgen receptor (AR) is considered a main reason for drug resistance. It is reported that AR W741C, W741L, W741C_T877A, T877A, F876L, F876L_T877A and L701H mutations can convert R-bicalutamide from AR antagonist to agonist, but the switching mechanisms are not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to analyze the interaction mechanisms between R-bicalutamide and wild type/mutant ARs. The results indicate that helix H12, which lies on the top of AR LBD like a cover, plays a vital role in R-bicalutamide binding. When interacting with AR, the B-ring of R-bicalutamide pushes H12 aside, distorting the coactivator binding site (AF2) resulting in the inactivation of transcription. Several residue mutations appear to enlarge the distance between the B-ring of R-bicalutamide and H12, reducing steric clash, which is conducive to a closed H12 conformation, leading to the formation of the coactivator binding site AF2 and increased transcription. Hydrogen bond and per-residue free energy decomposition analyses are also investigated to explore the interacting mechanisms, and M895 is found to be a key residue in the antagonist mechanism. The obtained molecular mechanisms will aid rational screening and design of novel AR antagonists, even to mutant AR.

  18. Molecular mechanism of R-bicalutamide switching from androgen receptor antagonist to agonist induced by amino acid mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Han, Rui; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Zheng, Lifang

    2016-12-01

    R-bicalutamide, a first generation antiandrogen, was used to treat prostate cancer for decades. Although it is very effective at the beginning, resistance appears after 2-3 years of treatment. Mutation of androgen receptor (AR) is considered a main reason for drug resistance. It is reported that AR W741C, W741L, W741C_T877A, T877A, F876L, F876L_T877A and L701H mutations can convert R-bicalutamide from AR antagonist to agonist, but the switching mechanisms are not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to analyze the interaction mechanisms between R-bicalutamide and wild type/mutant ARs. The results indicate that helix H12, which lies on the top of AR LBD like a cover, plays a vital role in R-bicalutamide binding. When interacting with AR, the B-ring of R-bicalutamide pushes H12 aside, distorting the coactivator binding site (AF2) resulting in the inactivation of transcription. Several residue mutations appear to enlarge the distance between the B-ring of R-bicalutamide and H12, reducing steric clash, which is conducive to a closed H12 conformation, leading to the formation of the coactivator binding site AF2 and increased transcription. Hydrogen bond and per-residue free energy decomposition analyses are also investigated to explore the interacting mechanisms, and M895 is found to be a key residue in the antagonist mechanism. The obtained molecular mechanisms will aid rational screening and design of novel AR antagonists, even to mutant AR.

  19. Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes. Role of third intracellular m2 loop and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Honma, T; Lameh, J; Sadée, W

    1998-02-27

    Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine m2 receptors (hm2 receptors) and a hm2 receptor mutant lacking a central part of the third intracellular loop (I3-del m2 receptor) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells stably expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Agonist-induced internalization of up to 80-90% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by measuring loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding sites from the cell surface, and transfer of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites from the plasma membrane into the light-vesicle fractions separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Additionally, translocation of hm2 receptors with endocytic vesicles were visualized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 60-70% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by determining the loss of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in the cells. The half-time (t1/2) of internalization and down-regulation in the presence of 10(-4) M carbamylcholine was estimated to be 9.5 min and 2.3 h, respectively. The rates of both internalization and down-regulation of hm2 receptors in the presence of 10(-6) M or lower concentrations of carbamylcholine were markedly increased by coexpression of GRK2. Agonist-induced internalization of I3-del m2 receptors was barely detectable upon incubation of cells for 1 h, but agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 40-50% of I3-del m2 receptors occurred upon incubation with 10(-4) M carbamylcholine for 16 h. However, the rate of down-regulation was lower compared with wild type receptors (t1/2 = 9.9 versus 2.3 h). These results indicate that rapid internalization of hm2 receptors is facilitated by their phosphorylation with GRK2 and does not occur in the absence of the third intracellular loop, but down-regulation of hm2 receptors may occur through both GRK2-facilitating pathway and third intracellular loop-independent pathways.

  20. Mutation of Three Residues in the Third Intracellular Loop of the Dopamine D2 Receptor Creates an Internalization-defective Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Cecilea C.; Donthamsetti, Prashant; Lambert, Nevin A.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Neve, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Arrestins mediate desensitization and internalization of G protein-coupled receptors and also direct receptor signaling toward heterotrimeric G protein-independent signaling pathways. We previously identified a four-residue segment (residues 212–215) of the dopamine D2 receptor that is necessary for arrestin binding in an in vitro heterologous expression system but that also impairs receptor expression. We now describe the characterization of additional mutations at that arrestin binding site in the third intracellular loop. Mutating two (residues 214 and 215) or three (residues 213–215) of the four residues to alanine partially decreased agonist-induced recruitment of arrestin3 without altering activation of a G protein. Arrestin-dependent receptor internalization, which requires arrestin binding to β2-adaptin (the β2 subunit of the clathrin-associated adaptor protein AP2) and clathrin, was disproportionately affected by the three-residue mutation, with no agonist-induced internalization observed even in the presence of overexpressed arrestin or G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2. The disjunction between arrestin recruitment and internalization could not be explained by alterations in the time course of the receptor-arrestin interaction, the recruitment of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, or the receptor-induced interaction between arrestin and β2-adaptin, suggesting that the mutation impairs a property of the internalization complex that has not yet been identified. PMID:25336643

  1. Agonist-induced changes in the structure of the acetylcholine receptor M2 regions revealed by photoincorporation of an uncharged nicotinic noncompetitive antagonist.

    PubMed

    White, B H; Cohen, J B

    1992-08-05

    To characterize structural changes induced in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) by agonists, we have mapped the sites of photoincorporation of the cholinergic noncompetitive antagonist 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine (]125I]TID) in the presence and absence of 50 microM carbamylcholine. [125I]TID binds to the AChR with similar affinity under both these conditions, but agonist inhibits photoincorporation into all subunits by greater than 75% (White, B. H., Howard, S., Cohen, S. G., and Cohen, J. B. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 21595-21607). [125I]TID-labeled sites on the beta- and delta-subunits were identified by amino-terminal sequencing of both cyanogen bromide (CNBr) and tryptic fragments purified by Tricine sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. In the absence of agonist, [125I]TID specifically labels homologous aliphatic residues (beta L-257, delta L-265, beta V-261, and delta V-269) in the M2 region of both subunits. In the presence of agonist, labeling of these residues is reduced approximately 90%, and the distribution of labeled residues is broadened to include a homologous set of serine residues at the amino terminus of M2. In the beta-subunit residues beta S-250, beta S-254, beta L-257, and beta V-261 are all labeled in the presence of carbamylcholine. This pattern of labeling supports an alpha-helical model for M2 with the labeled face forming the ion channel lumen. The observed redistribution of label in the resting and desensitized states provides the first direct evidence for an agonist-dependent rearrangement of the M2 helices. The efficient labeling of the resting state channel in a region capable of structural change also suggests a plausible model for AChR gating in which the aliphatic residues labeled by [125I]TID form a permeability barrier to the passage of ions. We also report increased labeling of the M1 region of the delta

  2. Hypoxia increases pulmonary arterial thromboxane receptor internalization independent of receptor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Fediuk, J; Sikarwar, A S; Lizotte, P P; Hinton, M; Nolette, N; Dakshinamurti, S

    2015-02-01

    Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn (PPHN) is characterized by sustained vasospasm and an increased thromboxane:prostacyclin ratio. Thromboxane (TP) receptors signal via Gαq to mobilize IP3 and Ca(2+), causing pulmonary arterial constriction. We have previously reported increased TP internalization in hypoxic pulmonary arterial (PA) myocytes. Serum-deprived PA myocytes were grown in normoxia (NM) or hypoxia (HM) for 72 h. TP localization was visualized in agonist-naïve and -challenged NM and HM by immunocytochemistry. Pathways for agonist-induced TP receptor internalization were determined by inhibiting caveolin- or clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and caveolar fractionation. Roles of actin and tubulin in TP receptor internalization were assessed using inhibitors of tubulin, actin-stabilizing or -destabilizing agents. PKA, PKC or GRK activation and inhibition were used to determine the kinase responsible for post-agonist receptor internalization. Agonist-naïve HM had decreased cell surface TP, and greater TP internalization after agonist challenge. TP protein did not sort with caveolin-rich fractions. Inhibition of clathrin prevented TP internalization. Both actin-stabilizing and -destabilizing agents prevented TP endocytosis in NM, while normalizing TP internalization in HM. Velocity of TP internalization was unaffected by PKA activity, but PKC activation normalized TP receptor internalization in HM. GRK inhibition had no effect. We conclude that in hypoxic myocytes, TP is internalized faster and to a greater extent than in normoxic controls. Internalization of the agonist-challenged TP requires clathrin, dynamic actin and is sensitive to PKC activity. TP receptor trafficking and signaling in hypoxia are pivotal to understanding increased vasoconstrictor sensitivity.

  3. Intrinsic Relative Activities of Opioid Agonists in Activating Gα proteins and Internalizing Receptor: Differences between Human and Mouse Receptors

    PubMed Central

    DiMattio, Kelly M.; Ehlert, Frederick J.; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators recently identified biased opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi−G) and receptor internalization (RAi−I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi−G − Log RAi−I, RAi−G/RAi−I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1–17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed. PMID:26057692

  4. Histamine H2 receptor trafficking: role of arrestin, dynamin, and clathrin in histamine H2 receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Natalia; Monczor, Federico; Baldi, Alberto; Davio, Carlos; Shayo, Carina

    2008-10-01

    Agonist-induced internalization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been implicated in receptor desensitization, resensitization, and down-regulation. In the present study, we sought to establish whether the histamine H2 receptor (H2r) agonist amthamine, besides promoting receptor desensitization, induced H2r internalization. We further studied the mechanisms involved and its potential role in receptor resensitization. In COS7 transfected cells, amthamine induced H2r time-dependent internalization, showing 70% of receptor endocytosis after 60-min exposure to amthamine. Agonist removal led to the rapid recovery of resensitized receptors to the cell surface. Similar results were obtained in the presence of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. Treatment with okadaic acid, an inhibitor of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) family of phosphatases, reduced the recovery of both H2r membrane sites and cAMP response. Arrestin 3 but not arrestin 2 overexpression reduced both H2r membrane sites and H2r-evoked cAMP response. Receptor cotransfection with dominant-negative mutants for arrestin, dynamin, Eps15 (a component of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery), or RNA interference against arrestin 3 abolished both H2r internalization and resensitization. Similar results were obtained in U937 cells endogenously expressing H2r. Our findings suggest that amthamine-induced H2r internalization is crucial for H2r resensitization, processes independent of H2r de novo synthesis but dependent on PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation. Although we do not provide direct evidence for H2r interaction with beta-arrestin, dynamin, and/or clathrin, our results support their involvement in H2r endocytosis. The rapid receptor recycling to the cell surface and the specific involvement of arrestin 3 in receptor internalization further suggest that the H2r belongs to class A GPCRs.

  5. The GPRC6A Receptor displays Constitutive Internalization and Sorting to the Slow Recycling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Stine Engesgaard; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jansen, Anna Mai; Gether, Ulrik; Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-03-09

    The class C G protein-coupled receptor GPRC6A is a putative nutrient sensing receptor and represents a possible new drug target in metabolic disorders. However, the specific physiological role of this receptor has yet to be identified, and the mechanisms regulating its activity and cell surface availability also remain enigmatic. In the present study, we investigated the trafficking properties of GPRC6A by use of both a classical antibody feeding internalization assay in which cells were visualized using confocal microscopy and a novel internalization assay that is based on real-time measurements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Both assays revealed that GPRC6A predominantly undergoes constitutive internalization while the agonist-induced effects were imperceptible. Moreover, post-endocytic sorting was investigated by assessing the co-localization of internalized GPRC6A with selected Rab protein markers. Internalized GPRC6A was mainly co-localized with the early endosome marker Rab5 and the long loop recycling endosome marker Rab11 and to a much lesser extent with the late endosome marker Rab7. This suggests that upon agonist-independent internalization, GPRC6A is recycled via the Rab11-positive slow recycling pathway, which may be responsible for ensuring a persistent pool of GPRC6A receptors at the cell surface despite chronic agonist exposure. Distinct trafficking pathways have been reported for several of the class C receptors, and our results thus substantiate that non-canonical trafficking mechanisms are a common feature for the nutrient sensing class C family that ensure functional receptors in the cell membrane despite prolonged agonist exposure.

  6. Dopamine agonist-induced penile erection and yawning: differential role of D₂-like receptor subtypes and correlation with nitric oxide production in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of male rats.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Succu, Salvatora; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Argiolas, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    The dopamine D₃ preferring agonist pramipexole (50 ng) induced penile erection and yawning when injected into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of male rats, like the mixed D₁/D₂-like agonist apomorphine (50 ng), while the D₄ agonist PD 168,077 (100 ng), induced penile erection only. These responses lasted for 45-60 min and occurred with an increase of NO₂- and NO₃- concentrations in the dialysate obtained from the paraventricular nucleus by intracerebral microdialysis. Pramipexole and apomorphine responses were reduced by the D₂ preferring antagonist L-741,626 (5 μg), but not by the D₃ preferring antagonist SB-277011A (10 μg), or the D₄ preferring antagonist L-745,870 (5 μg), injected into the PVN before the dopamine agonist. In contrast, PD 168,077 responses were reduced by L-745,870, but not by L-741,626 or SB-277011A. Pramipexole, apomorphine and PD 168,077 effects were also reduced by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline (20 μg) and the N-type voltage-dependent Ca²⁺ channels blocker ω-conotoxin (5 ng), given into the paraventricular nucleus, and by the oxytocin antagonist d(CH₂)₅Tyr(Me)²-Orn⁸-vasotocin (2 μg), given intracerebroventricularly but not into the paraventricular nucleus before dopamine agonists. These results suggest that stimulation of D₂, but not D₃ or D₄ receptors, by pramipexole or apomorphine increases Ca²⁺ influx in cell bodies of oxytocinergic neurons. This increases the production of nitric oxide, which activates oxytocinergic neurotransmission in extra-hypothalamic brain areas and spinal cord, leading to penile erection and yawning. However, the stimulation of D₄ receptors by PD 168,077 also increases Ca²⁺ influx/nitric oxide production leading to penile erection, but not yawning.

  7. Agonist-induced activation releases peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta from its inhibition by palmitate-induced nuclear factor-kappaB in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mireia; Laguna, Juan C; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel

    2005-05-01

    The mechanisms by which elevated levels of free fatty acids cause insulin resistance are not well understood, but there is a strong correlation between insulin resistance and intramyocellular lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle. In addition, accumulating evidence suggests a link between inflammation and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this work was to study whether the exposure of skeletal muscle cells to palmitate affected peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) beta/delta activity. Here, we report that exposure of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells to 0.75 mM palmitate reduced (74%, P<0.01) the mRNA levels of the PPARbeta/delta-target gene pyruvatedehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK-4), which is involved in fatty acid utilization. This reduction was not observed in the presence of the PPARbeta/delta agonist L-165041. This drug prevented palmitate-induced nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation. Increased NF-kappaB activity after palmitate exposure was associated with enhanced protein-protein interaction between PPARbeta/delta and p65. Interestingly, treatment with the PPARbeta/delta agonist L-165041 completely abolished this interaction. These results indicate that palmitate may reduce fatty acid utilization in skeletal muscle cells by reducing PPARbeta/delta signaling through increased NF-kappaB activity.

  8. Whole blood stimulation with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7/8 and TLR-9 agonists induces interleukin-12p40 expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells in rhesus macaques but not in humans.

    PubMed

    Koopman, G; Beenhakker, N; Burm, S; Bouwhuis, O; Bajramovic, J; Sommandas, V; Mudde, G; Mooij, P; 't Hart, B A; Bogers, W M J M

    2013-10-01

    Macaques provide important animal models in biomedical research into infectious and chronic inflammatory disease. Therefore, a proper understanding of the similarities and differences in immune function between macaques and humans is needed for adequate interpretation of the data and translation to the human situation. Dendritic cells are important as key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Using a new whole blood assay we investigated functional characteristics of blood plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) and monocytes in rhesus macaques by studying induction of activation markers and cytokine expression upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. In a head-to-head comparison we observed that rhesus macaque venous blood contained relatively lower numbers of pDC than human venous blood, while mDC and monocytes were present at similar percentages. In contrast to humans, pDC in rhesus macaques expressed the interleukin (IL)-12p40 subunit in response to TLR-7/8 as well as TLR-9 stimulation. Expression of IL-12p40 was confirmed by using different monoclonal antibodies and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Both in humans and rhesus macaques, TLR-4 stimulation induced IL-12p40 expression in mDC and monocytes, but not in pDC. The data show that, in contrast to humans, pDC in macaques are able to express IL-12p40, which could have consequences for evaluation of human vaccine candidates and viral infection.

  9. Studies on the adrenomedullary dependence of kappa-opioid agonist-induced diuresis in conscious rats.

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, K. R.

    1989-01-01

    1. The dependence of kappa-opioid agonist-induced diuresis, upon an intact and functional adrenal medulla in conscious rats, was investigated in order to test the hypothesis that the diuresis is mediated by a blood-borne 'diuretic factor', of adrenomedullary origin, released by kappa-opioid receptor stimulation. 2. Confirming previous observations, adrenal demedullation significantly attenuated diuretic responses to the kappa-opioid agonists U50488H, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) and tifluadom, but did not affect basal urine output, furosemide-induced diuresis or the antidiuretic response to the mu-opioid agonist, buprenorphine. Naloxone abolished U50488H-induced diuresis, confirming an involvement of opioid receptors. 3. Transfusion studies established that blood, from intact rats treated with U50488H, induced diuresis in intact and demedullated recipient rats, whether or not the recipients had been pretreated with naloxone. However, blood from demedullated rats treated with U50448H was unable to induce diuresis when administered to intact or demedullated recipients. 4. It is concluded that kappa-opioid agonist-induced diuresis is dependent upon an intact and functional adrenal medulla and appears to be mediated by a blood-borne 'diuretic factor' of adrenomedullary origin. PMID:2558758

  10. Desensitization and internalization of the m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor are directed by independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pals-Rylaarsdam, R; Xu, Y; Witt-Enderby, P; Benovic, J L; Hosey, M M

    1995-12-01

    The phenomenon of acute desensitization of G-protein-coupled receptors has been associated with several events, including receptor phosphorylation, loss of high affinity agonist binding, receptor:G-protein uncoupling, and receptor internalization. However, the biochemical events underlying these processes are not fully understood, and their contributions to the loss of signaling remain correlative. In addition, the nature of the kinases and the receptor domains which are involved in modulation of activity have only begun to be investigated. In order to directly measure the role of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in the desensitization of the m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m2 mAChR), a dominant-negative allele of GRK2 was used to inhibit receptor phosphorylation by endogenous GRK activity in a human embryonic kidney cell line. The dominant-negative GRK2K220R reduced agonist-dependent phosphorylation of the m2 mAChR by approximately 50% and prevented acute desensitization of the receptor as measured by the ability of the m2 mAChR to attenuate adenylyl cyclase activity. In contrast, the agonist-induced internalization of the m2 mAChR was unaffected by the GRK2K220R construct. Further evidence linking receptor phosphorylation to acute receptor desensitization was obtained when two deletions of the third intracellular loop were made which created m2 mAChRs that did not become phosphorylated in an agonist-dependent manner and did not desensitize. However, the mutant mAChRs retained the ability to internalize. These data provide the first direct evidence that GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation is necessary for m2 mAChR desensitization; the likely sites of in vivo phosphorylation are in the central portion of the third intracellular loop (amino acids 282-323). These results also indicate that internalization of the m2 receptor is not a key event in desensitization and is mediated by mechanisms distinct from GRK phosphorylation of the receptor.

  11. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation Regulates Post-endocytic Trafficking of the D2 Dopamine Receptor*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Yoon; Dipace, Concetta; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Sibley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-mediated phosphorylation in agonist-induced desensitization, arrestin association, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking of the D2 dopamine receptor (DAR). Agonist activation of D2 DARs results in rapid and sustained receptor phosphorylation that is solely mediated by GRKs. A survey of GRKs revealed that only GRK2 or GRK3 promotes D2 DAR phosphorylation. Mutational analyses resulted in the identification of eight serine/threonine residues within the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor that are phosphorylated by GRK2/3. Simultaneous mutation of these eight residues results in a receptor construct, GRK(-), that is completely devoid of agonist-promoted GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation. We found that both wild-type (WT) and GRK(-) receptors underwent a similar degree of agonist-induced desensitization as assessed using [35S]GTPγS binding assays. Similarly, both receptor constructs internalized to the same extent in response to agonist treatment. Furthermore, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to directly assess receptor association with arrestin3, we found no differences between the WT and GRK(-) receptors. Thus, phosphorylation is not required for arrestin-receptor association or agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. In contrast, when we examined recycling of the D2 DARs to the cell surface, subsequent to agonist-induced endocytosis, the GRK(-) construct exhibited less recycling in comparison with the WT receptor. This impairment appears to be due to a greater propensity of the GRK(-) receptors to down-regulate once internalized. In contrast, if the receptor is highly phosphorylated, then receptor recycling is promoted. These results reveal a novel role for GRK-mediated phosphorylation in regulating the post-endocytic trafficking of a G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:19332542

  12. The role of TRPP2 in agonist-induced gallbladder smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xingguo; Fu, Jie; Song, Kai; Xue, Nairui; Gong, Renhua; Sun, Dengqun; Luo, Huilai; He, Wenzhu; Pan, Xiang; Shen, Bing; Du, Juan

    2016-04-01

    TRPP2 channel protein belongs to the superfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and is widely expressed in various tissues, including smooth muscle in digestive gut. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that TRPP2 can mediate Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+) stores. However, the functional role of TRPP2 in gallbladder smooth muscle contraction still remains unclear. In this study, we used Ca(2+) imaging and tension measurements to test agonist-induced intracellular Ca(2+) concentration increase and smooth muscle contraction of guinea pig gallbladder, respectively. When TRPP2 protein was knocked down in gallbladder muscle strips from guinea pig, carbachol (CCh)-evoked Ca(2+) release and extracellular Ca(2+) influx were reduced significantly, and gallbladder contractions induced by endothelin 1 and cholecystokinin were suppressed markedly as well. CCh-induced gallbladder contraction was markedly suppressed by pretreatment with U73122, which inhibits phospholipase C to terminate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3) production, and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2APB), which inhibits IP3 recepor (IP3R) to abolish IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release. To confirm the role of Ca(2+) release in CCh-induced gallbladder contraction, we used thapsigargin (TG)-to deplete Ca(2+) stores via inhibiting sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase and eliminate the role of store-operated Ca(2+) entry on the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction. Preincubation with 2 μmol L(-1) TG significantly decreased the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction. In addition, pretreatments with U73122, 2APB or TG abolished the difference of the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction between TRPP2 knockdown and control groups. We conclude that TRPP2 mediates Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores, and has an essential role in agonist-induced gallbladder muscle contraction.

  13. Palmitoylation of cysteine 415 of CB1 receptor affects ligand-stimulated internalization and selective interaction with membrane cholesterol and caveolin 1.

    PubMed

    Oddi, Sergio; Stepniewski, Tomasz Maciej; Totaro, Antonio; Selent, Jana; Scipioni, Lucia; Dufrusine, Beatrice; Fezza, Filomena; Dainese, Enrico; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2017-02-12

    We previously demonstrated that CB1 receptor is palmitoylated at cysteine 415, and that such a post-translational modification affects its biological activity. To assess the molecular mechanisms responsible for modulation of CB1 receptor function by S-palmitoylation, in this study biochemical and morphological approaches were paralleled with computational analyses. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that this acyl chain stabilizes helix 8 as well as the interaction of CB1 receptor with membrane cholesterol. In keeping with these in silico data, experimental results showed that the non-palmitoylated CB1 receptor was unable to interact efficaciously with caveolin 1, independently of its activation state. Moreover, in contrast with the wild-type receptor, the lack of S-palmitoylation in the helix 8 made the mutant CB1 receptor completely irresponsive to agonist-induced effects in terms of both lipid raft partitioning and receptor internalization. Overall, our results support the notion that palmitoylation of cysteine 415 modulates the conformational state of helix 8 and influences the interactions of CB1 receptor with cholesterol and caveolin 1, suggesting that the palmitoyl chain may serve as a functional interface for CB1 receptor localization and function.

  14. Differential requirements of arrestin-3 and clathrin for ligand-dependent and -independent internalization of human G protein-coupled receptor 40.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jing; Wu, Chun; Chen, Xiaopan; Li, Xiangmei; Ying, Guoyuan; Jin, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Li, Guo; Shi, Ying; Zhang, Guozheng; Zhou, Naiming

    2014-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) is believed to be an attractive target to enhance insulin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes. GPR40 has been found to couple to Gq protein, leading to the activation of phospholipase C and subsequent increases in the intracellular Ca(2+) level. However, the underlying mechanisms that regulate the internalization and desensitization of GPR40 remain to be elucidated. In the present study, a construct of GPR40 fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) at its C-terminus was constructed for direct imaging of the localization and internalization of GPR40 by confocal microscopy. In stably transfected HEK-293 cells, GPR40 receptors underwent rapid agonist-induced internalization and constitutive ligand-independent internalization. Our data demonstrated that the agonist-mediated internalization of GPR40 was significantly blocked by hypertonic sucrose treatment and by siRNA mediated depletion of the heavy chain of clathrin. In contrast, constitutive GPR40 internalization was not affected by hypertonic sucrose or by knock-down of clathrin expression, but it was affected by treatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and nystatin. Furthermore, our results using an arrestin-3-EGFP redistribution assay and siRNA-mediated knock-down of arrestin-3 and GRK2 expression revealed that arrestin-3 and GRK2 play an essential role in the regulation of agonist-mediated GPR40 internalization, but are not involved in the regulation of constitutive GPR40 internalization. Additionally, our observation showed that upon activation by agonist, the internalized GPR40 receptors were rapidly recycled back to the plasma membrane via Rab4/Rab5 positive endosomes, whereas the constitutively internalized GPR40 receptors were recycled back to the cell surface through Rab5 positive endosomes. Because FFA receptors exhibit a high level of homology, our observations could be applicable to other members of this family.

  15. Asymmetrical, agonist-induced fluctuations in local extracellular [Ca2+] in intact polarized epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Caroppo, Rosa; Gerbino, Andrea; Debellis, Lucantonio; Kifor, Olga; Soybel, David I.; Brown, Edward M.; Hofer, Aldebaran M.; Curci, Silvana

    2001-01-01

    We recently proposed that extracellular Ca2+ ions participate in a novel form of intercellular communication involving the extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR). Here, using Ca2+-selective microelectrodes, we directly measured the profile of agonist-induced [Ca2+]ext changes in restricted domains near the basolateral or luminal membranes of polarized gastric acid-secreting cells. The Ca2+-mobilizing agonist carbachol elicited a transient, La3+-sensitive decrease in basolateral [Ca2+] (average ≈250 µM, but as large as 530 µM). Conversely, carbachol evoked an HgCl2-sensitive increase in [Ca2+] (average ≈400 µM, but as large as 520 µM) in the lumen of single gastric glands. Both responses were significantly reduced by pre-treatment with sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) pump inhibitors or with the intracellular Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. Immunofluores cence experiments demonstrated an asymmetric localization of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase (PMCA), which appeared to be partially co-localized with CaR and the gastric H+/K+-ATPase in the apical membrane of the acid-secreting cells. Our data indicate that agonist stimulation results in local fluctuations in [Ca2+]ext that would be sufficient to modulate the activity of the CaR on neighboring cells. PMID:11707403

  16. nor-BNI Antagonism of Kappa Opioid Agonist-Induced Reinstatement of Ethanol-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harshberger, Erin; Gilson, Emily A.; Gillett, Kelli; Stone, Jasmine H.; El Amrani, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the dynorphin (DYN)/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system may be a key mediator in the behavioral effects of alcohol. The objective of the present study was to examine the ability of the KOR antagonist norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI) to attenuate relapse to ethanol seeking due to priming injections of the KOR agonist U50,488 at time points consistent with KOR selectivity. Male Wistar rats were trained to self-administer a 10% ethanol solution, and then responding was extinguished. Following extinction, rats were injected with U50,488 (0.1–10 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline and were tested for the reinstatement of ethanol seeking. Next, the ability of the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0 or 3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) and nor-BNI (0 or 20.0 mg/kg, i.p.) to block U50,488-induced reinstatement was examined. Priming injections U50,488 reinstated responding on the previously ethanol-associated lever. Pretreatment with naltrexone reduced the reinstatement of ethanol-seeking behavior. nor-BNI also attenuated KOR agonist-induced reinstatement, but to a lesser extent than naltrexone, when injected 24 hours prior to injections of U50,488, a time point that is consistent with KOR selectivity. While these results suggest that activation of KORs is a key mechanism in the regulation of ethanol-seeking behavior, U50,488-induced reinstatement may not be fully selective for KORs. PMID:27891289

  17. STING Agonists Induce an Innate Antiviral Immune Response against Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang; Zhao, Xuesen; Wang, Jianghua; Liu, Fei; Xu, Chunxiao; Wei, Lai; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Block, Timothy M.; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2014-01-01

    Chronicity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is due to the failure of a host to mount a sufficient immune response to clear the virus. The aim of this study was to identify small-molecular agonists of the pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-mediated innate immune response to control HBV infection. To achieve this goal, a coupled mouse macrophage and hepatocyte culture system mimicking the intrahepatic environment was established and used to screen small-molecular compounds that activate macrophages to produce cytokines, which in turn suppress HBV replication in a hepatocyte-derived stable cell line supporting HBV replication in a tetracycline-inducible manner. An agonist of the mouse stimulator of interferon (IFN) genes (STING), 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), was found to induce a robust cytokine response in macrophages that efficiently suppressed HBV replication in mouse hepatocytes by reducing the amount of cytoplasmic viral nucleocapsids. Profiling of cytokines induced by DMXAA and agonists of representative Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in mouse macrophages revealed that, unlike TLR agonists that induced a predominant inflammatory cytokine/chemokine response, the STING agonist induced a cytokine response dominated by type I IFNs. Moreover, as demonstrated in an HBV hydrodynamic mouse model, intraperitoneal administration of DMXAA significantly induced the expression of IFN-stimulated genes and reduced HBV DNA replication intermediates in the livers of mice. This study thus proves the concept that activation of the STING pathway induces an antiviral cytokine response against HBV and that the development of small-molecular human STING agonists as immunotherapeutic agents for treatment of chronic hepatitis B is warranted. PMID:25512416

  18. SERCA2a controls the mode of agonist-induced intracellular Ca2+ signal, transcription factor NFAT and proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bobe, Regis; Hadri, Lahouaria; Lopez, Jose J.; Sassi, Yassine; Atassi, Fabrice; Karakikes, Ioannis; Liang, Lifan; Limon, Isabelle; Lompré, Anne-Marie; Hatem, Stephane N.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Lipskaia, Larissa

    2011-01-01

    In blood vessels, tone is maintained by agonist-induced cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations of quiescent/contractile vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, in synthetic/proliferative VSMCs, Gq/phosphoinositide receptor-coupled agonists trigger a steady-state increase in cytosolic Ca2+ followed by a Store Operated Calcium Entry (SOCE) which translates into activation of the proliferation-associated transcription factor NFAT. Here, we report that in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs), the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase type 2a (SERCA2a) expressed in the contractile form of the hCASMCs, controls the nature of the agonist-induced Ca2+ transient and the resulting down-stream signaling pathway. Indeed, restoring SERCA2a expression by gene transfer in synthetic hCASMCs 1) increased Ca2+ storage capacity; 2) modified agonist-induced IP3R Ca2+ release from steady-state to oscillatory mode (the frequency of agonist-induced IP3R Ca2+ signal was 11.66 ± 1.40/100 sec in SERCA2a-expressing cells (n=39) vs 1.37 ± 0.20/100 sec in control cell (n=45), p<0.01); 3) suppressed SOCE by preventing interactions between SR calcium sensor STIM1 and pore forming unit ORAI1; 4) inhibited calcium regulated transcription factor NFAT and its down-stream physiological function such as proliferation and migration. This study provides evidence for the first time that oscillatory and steady-state patterns of Ca2+ transients have different effects on calcium-dependent physiological functions in smooth muscle cells. PMID:21195084

  19. RGS2 modulates the activity and internalization of dopamine D2 receptors in neuroblastoma N2A cells.

    PubMed

    Luessen, Deborah J; Hinshaw, Tyler P; Sun, Haiguo; Howlett, Allyn C; Marrs, Glen; McCool, Brian A; Chen, Rong

    2016-11-01

    Dysregulated expression and function of dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) are implicated in drug addiction, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. In the current study, we examined whether D2Rs are modulated by regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2), a member of the RGS family that regulates G protein signaling via acceleration of GTPase activity. Using neuroblastoma 2a (N2A) cells, we found that RGS2 was immunoprecipitated by aluminum fluoride-activated Gαi2 proteins. RGS2 siRNA knockdown enhanced membrane [(35)S] GTPγS binding to activated Gαi/o proteins, augmented inhibition of cAMP accumulation and increased ERK phosphorylation in the presence of a D2/D3R agonist quinpirole when compared to scrambled siRNA treatment. These data suggest that RGS2 is a negative modulator of D2R-mediated Gαi/o signaling. Moreover, RGS2 knockdown slightly increased constitutive D2R internalization and markedly abolished quinpirole-induced D2R internalization assessed by immunocytochemistry. RGS2 knockdown did not compromise agonist-induced β-arrestin membrane recruitment; however, it prevents β-arrestin dissociation from the membrane after prolonged quinpirole treatment during which time β-arrestin moved away from the membrane in control cells. Additionally, confocal microscopy analysis of β-arrestin post-endocytic fate revealed that quinpirole treatment caused β-arrestin to translocate to the early and the recycling endosome in a time-dependent manner in control cells whereas translocation of β-arrestin to these endosomes did not occur in RGS2 knockdown cells. The impaired β-arrestin translocation likely contributed to the abolishment of quinpirole-stimulated D2R internalization in RGS2 knockdown cells. Thus, RGS2 is integral for β-arrestin-mediated D2R internalization. The current study revealed a novel regulation of D2R signaling and internalization by RGS2 proteins.

  20. Intracerebroventricular administration of kappa-agonists induces convulsions in mice.

    PubMed

    Bansinath, M; Ramabadran, K; Turndorf, H; Shukla, V K

    1991-07-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of kappa-agonists (PD 117302, U-50488H and U-69593) induced convulsions in a dose-related manner in mice. The dose at which 50% of animals convulsed (CD50) was in nmol ranges for all opioids. Among the opioids used, PD 117302 was the most potent convulsant. ICV administration of either vehicle alone or U-53445E, a non-kappa-opioid (+) enantiomer of U-50488H did not induce convulsions. The convulsive response of kappa-agonists was differentially susceptible for antagonism by naloxone and/or MR 2266. Collectively, these findings support the view that convulsions induced by kappa-agonists in mice involve stereospecific opioid receptor mechanisms. Furthermore, the convulsant effect of kappa-agonists could not be modified by pretreatment with MK-801, ketamine, muscimol or baclofen. It is concluded that kappa-opioid but not NMDA or GABA receptor mechanisms are involved in convulsions induced by kappa-agonists. These results are the first experimental evidence implicating stereospecific kappa-receptor mechanisms in opioid-induced convulsions in mice.

  1. Functional selectivity of dopamine D1 receptor agonists in regulating the fate of internalized receptors *

    PubMed Central

    Ryman-Rasmussen, Jessica P.; Griffith, Adam; Oloff, Scott; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Brown, Justin T.; Goddard, William A.; Mailman, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that D1 agonists can cause functionally selective effects when the endpoints of receptor internalization and adenylate cyclase activation are compared. The present study was designed to probe the phenomenon of functional selectivity at the D1 receptor further by testing the hypothesis that structurally dissimilar agonists with efficacies at these endpoints that equal or exceed those of dopamine would differ in ability to influence receptor fate after internalization, a functional endpoint largely unexplored for the D1 receptor. We selected two novel agonists of therapeutic interest that meet these criteria (the isochroman A-77636, and the isoquinoline dinapsoline), and compared the fates of the D1 receptor after internalization in response to these two compounds with that of dopamine. We found that dopamine caused the receptor to be rapidly recycled to the cell surface within 1 h of removal. Conversely, A-77636 caused the receptor to be retained intracellularly up to 48 h after agonist removal. Most surprisingly, the D1 receptor recovered to the cell surface 48 h after removal of dinapsoline. Taken together, these data indicate that these agonists target the D1 receptor to different intracellular trafficking pathways, demonstrating that the phenomenon of functional selectivity at the D1 receptor is operative for cellular events that are temporally downstream of immediate receptor activation. We hypothesize that these differential effects result from interactions of the synthetic ligands with aspects of the D1 receptor that are distal from the ligand binding domain. PMID:17067639

  2. Quantifying GPCR internalization: a focus on the Kisspeptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Pampillo, Macarena; Babwah, Andy V

    2015-01-01

    GPCR internalization is a critical regulatory step in determining receptor activity. While internalization terminates G protein-coupled signaling, it might be required for G protein-independent signaling. A large number of clinical therapies are based on preventing or promoting GPCR internalization. Thus, for any given GPCR, it is important to characterize its internalization and understand the factors that regulate such internalization. Here we describe different experimental protocols to evaluate the internalization of any GPCR transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells. The protocols describe the use of immunofluorescence and imaging techniques as well as flow cytometry. The techniques described use the FLAG-tagged kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R) as an example but are equally applicable to any other GPCR.

  3. Structural basis for constitutive activity and agonist-induced activation of the enteroendocrine fat sensor GPR119

    PubMed Central

    Engelstoft, M S; Norn, C; Hauge, M; Holliday, N D; Elster, L; Lehmann, J; Jones, R M; Frimurer, T M; Schwartz, T W

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose GPR119 is a Gαs-coupled 7TM receptor activated by endogenous lipids such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and by the dietary triglyceride metabolite 2-monoacylglycerol. GPR119 stimulates enteroendocrine hormone and insulin secretion. But despite massive drug discovery efforts in the field, very little is known about the basic molecular pharmacology of GPR119. Experimental Approach GPR119 receptor signalling was studied in transfected cells. Mutational mapping (30 mutations in 23 positions) was performed on residues required for ligand-independent and agonist-induced GPR119 activation (AR231453 and OEA). Novel Rosetta-based receptor modelling was applied, using a composite template approach with segments from different X-ray structures and fully flexible ligand docking. Key Results The increased signalling induced by increasing the cell surface expression of GPR119 in the absence of agonist and the inhibitory effect of two synthetic inverse agonists demonstrated that GRP119 signals with a high degree of constitutive activity through the Gαs pathway. The mutational maps for AR231453 and OEA were very similar and, surprisingly, also similar to the mutational map for residues affecting the constitutive signalling – albeit with key differences. Surprisingly, almost all residues in extracellular loop-2b were important for the constitutive activity. The molecular modelling and docking demonstrated that AR231453 binds in a ‘vertical’ pocket in between mutational hits reaching from the centre of the receptor out to extracellular loop-2b. Conclusions and Implications The high constitutive activity of GPR119 should be taken into account in future drug discovery efforts, which can now be guided by the detailed knowledge of the physiochemical properties of the extended ligand-binding pocket. PMID:25117266

  4. Cell Surface Protein Detection to Assess Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Magdalena; Kitlinska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The migration of membrane receptors upon exposure to different stimulants/inhibitors is of great importance. Among others, the internalization of membrane receptors affects their accessibility to ligands and cell responsiveness to environmental cues. Experimentally, receptor internalization can be used as a measure of their activation. In our studies, we employed this approach to explore cross-talk between a seven transmembrane domain receptor for neuropeptide Y (NPY), Y5R, and a tyrosine kinase receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB. To this end, we measured the internalization of Y5R upon stimulation with the TrkB ligand, BDNF. Upon treatment with BDNF, the cells were exposed to a membrane impermeable, biotinylation reagent that selectively labels surface proteins. Subsequently, the biotinylated membrane proteins were affinity-purified on columns with avidin resins and analyzed by Western blot. Differences in the fraction of receptors present on the cell surface of control and ligand-treated cells served as a measure of their internalization and response to particular stimuli.

  5. Dynamics of Receptor-Mediated Nanoparticle Internalization into Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles offer a promising medical tool for targeted drug delivery, for example to treat inflamed endothelial cells during the development of atherosclerosis. To inform the design of such therapeutic strategies, we develop a computational model of nanoparticle internalization into endothelial cells, where internalization is driven by receptor-ligand binding and limited by the deformation of the cell membrane and cytoplasm. We specifically consider the case of nanoparticles targeted against ICAM-1 receptors, of relevance for treating atherosclerosis. The model computes the kinetics of the internalization process, the dynamics of binding, and the distribution of stresses exerted between the nanoparticle and the cell membrane. The model predicts the existence of an optimal nanoparticle size for fastest internalization, consistent with experimental observations, as well as the role of bond characteristics, local cell mechanical properties, and external forces in the nanoparticle internalization process. PMID:25901833

  6. Internalization of the chemokine receptor CCR4 can be evoked by orthosteric and allosteric receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ajram, Laura; Begg, Malcolm; Slack, Robert; Cryan, Jenni; Hall, David; Hodgson, Simon; Ford, Alison; Barnes, Ashley; Swieboda, Dawid; Mousnier, Aurelie; Solari, Roberto

    2014-04-15

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 has at least two natural agonist ligands, MDC (CCL22) and TARC (CCL17) which bind to the same orthosteric site with a similar affinity. Both ligands are known to evoke chemotaxis of CCR4-bearing T cells and also elicit CCR4 receptor internalization. A series of small molecule allosteric antagonists have been described which displace the agonist ligand, and inhibit chemotaxis. The aim of this study was to determine which cellular coupling pathways are involved in internalization, and if antagonists binding to the CCR4 receptor could themselves evoke receptor internalization. CCL22 binding coupled CCR4 efficiently to β-arrestin and stimulated GTPγS binding however CCL17 did not couple to β-arrestin and only partially stimulated GTPγS binding. CCL22 potently induced internalization of almost all cell surface CCR4, while CCL17 showed only weak effects. We describe four small molecule antagonists that were demonstrated to bind to two distinct allosteric sites on the CCR4 receptor, and while both classes inhibited agonist ligand binding and chemotaxis, one of the allosteric sites also evoked receptor internalization. Furthermore, we also characterize an N-terminally truncated version of CCL22 which acts as a competitive antagonist at the orthosteric site, and surprisingly also evokes receptor internalization without demonstrating any agonist activity. Collectively this study demonstrates that orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of the CCR4 receptor are capable of evoking receptor internalization, providing a novel strategy for drug discovery against this class of target.

  7. Opioid receptor internalization contributes to dermorphin-mediated antinociception

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Tara A.; Ingram, Susan L.; Bobeck, Erin N.; Hegarty, Deborah M.; Aicher, Sue A.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Morgan, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    Microinjection of opioids into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) produces antinociception in part by binding to mu-opioid receptors (MOPrs). Although both high and low efficacy agonists produce antinociception, low efficacy agonists such as morphine produce limited MOPr internalization suggesting that MOPr internalization and signaling leading to antinociception are independent. This hypothesis was tested in awake, behaving rats using DERM-A594, a fluorescently labeled dermorphin analog, and internalization blockers. Microinjection of DERM-A594 into the vlPAG produced both antinociception and internalization of DERM-A594. Administration of the irreversible opioid receptor antagonist beta-CNA prior to DERM-A594 microinjection reduced both the antinociceptive effect and the number of DERM-A594 labeled cells demonstrating that both effects are opioid receptor-mediated. Pretreatment with the internalization blockers dynamin dominant-negative inhibitory peptide (dynamin-DN) and concanavalinA (ConA) attenuated both DERM-A594 internalization and antinociception. Microinjection of dynamin-DN and ConA also decreased the antinociceptive potency of the unlabeled opioid agonist dermorphin when microinjected into the vlPAG as demonstrated by rightward shifts in the dose-response curves. In contrast, administration of dynamin-DN had no effect on the antinociceptive effect of microinjecting the GABAA antagonist bicuculline into the vlPAG. The finding that dermorphin-induced antinociception is attenuated by blocking receptor internalization indicates that key parts of opioid receptor-mediated signaling depend on internalization. PMID:20394808

  8. Relaxant effects of Schisandra chinensis and its major lignans on agonists-induced contraction in guinea pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia-Ming; Ip, Paul Siu Po; Che, Chun-Tao; Yeung, John H K

    2011-10-15

    In this study, the herbal extracts of Schisandra chinensis were demonstrated to inhibit the contractions induced by acetylcholine (ACh) and serotonin (5-HT) in guinea pig ileum, and the 95% ethanol extract was more effective than the aqueous extract. Analysis with High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) indicated that schisandrin, schisandrol B, schisandrin A and schisandrin B were the major lignans of Schisandra chinensis, and the ethanol extract contained higher amount of these lignans than the aqueous extract. All four lignans inhibited the contractile responses to ACh, with EC(20) values ranging from 2.2±0.4μM (schisandrin A) to 13.2±4.7μM (schisandrin). The effectiveness of these compounds in relaxing the 5-HT-induced contraction was observed with a similar magnitude. Receptor binding assay indicated that Schisandra lignans did not show significant antagonistic effect on muscarinic M3 receptor. In Ca(2+)-free preparations primed with ACh or KCl, schisandrin A (50μM) attenuated the contractile responses to cumulative addition of CaCl(2) by 37%. In addition, schisandrin A also concentration-dependently inhibited ACh-induced contractions in Ca(2+)-free buffer. This study demonstrates that Schisandra chinensis exhibited relaxant effects on agonist-induced contraction in guinea pig ileum, with schisandrin, schisandrol B, schisandrin A and schisandrin B being the major active ingredients. The antispasmodic action of schisandrin A involved inhibitions on both Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, rather than specific antagonism of cholinergic muscarinic receptors.

  9. Endothelium-Independent Effect of Fisetin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyun Dong; Sohn, Uy Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Fisetin, a natural flavonoid found in a variety of vegetables and fruits, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of fisetin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Fisetin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction suggesting as a possible anti-hypertensive on the agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, fisetin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels suggesting the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of fisetin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function. PMID:26759702

  10. The Inhibitory Effect of Shikonin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyun Dong; Kim, Hyeong-Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2015-01-01

    Shikonin, a natural flavonoid found in the roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of shikonin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Shikonin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction suggesting as a possible anti-hypertensive on the agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, shikonin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels suggesting the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and the inhibition of MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of shikonin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function. PMID:25995821

  11. Endothelium-Independent Effect of Fisetin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyun Dong; Sohn, Uy Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Fisetin, a natural flavonoid found in a variety of vegetables and fruits, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of fisetin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Fisetin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction suggesting as a possible anti-hypertensive on the agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, fisetin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels suggesting the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of fisetin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function.

  12. Targeting Insulin Receptor with a Novel Internalizing Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Iaboni, Margherita; Fontanella, Raffaela; Rienzo, Anna; Capuozzo, Maria; Nuzzo, Silvia; Santamaria, Gianluca; Catuogno, Silvia; Condorelli, Gerolama; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Esposito, Carla Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based aptamers are emerging as therapeutic antagonists of disease-associated proteins such as receptor tyrosine kinases. They are selected by an in vitro combinatorial chemistry approach, named Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX), and thanks to their small size and unique chemical characteristics, they possess several advantages over antibodies as diagnostics and therapeutics. In addition, aptamers that rapidly internalize into target cells hold as well great potential for their in vivo use as delivery tools of secondary therapeutic agents. Here, we describe a nuclease resistant RNA aptamer, named GL56, which specifically recognizes the insulin receptor (IR). Isolated by a cell-based SELEX method that allows enrichment for internalizing aptamers, GL56 rapidly internalizes into target cells and is able to discriminate IR from the highly homologous insulin-like growth factor receptor 1. Notably, when applied to IR expressing cancer cells, the aptamer inhibits IR dependent signaling. Given the growing interest in the insulin receptor as target for cancer treatment, GL56 reveals a novel molecule with great translational potential as inhibitor and delivery tool for IR-dependent cancers. PMID:27648925

  13. Recycling and Endosomal Sorting of Protease-activated Receptor-1 Is Distinctly Regulated by Rab11A and Rab11B Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Grimsey, Neil J.; Coronel, Luisa J.; Cordova, Isabel Canto; Trejo, JoAnn

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that undergoes proteolytic irreversible activation by coagulant and anti-coagulant proteases. Given the irreversible activation of PAR1, signaling by the receptor is tightly regulated through desensitization and intracellular trafficking. PAR1 displays both constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of PAR1 is important for generating an internal pool of naïve receptors that replenish the cell surface and facilitate resensitization, whereas agonist-induced internalization of PAR1 is critical for terminating G protein signaling. We showed that PAR1 constitutive internalization is mediated by the adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), whereas AP-2 and epsin control agonist-induced PAR1 internalization. However, the mechanisms that regulate PAR1 recycling are not known. In the present study we screened a siRNA library of 140 different membrane trafficking proteins to identify key regulators of PAR1 intracellular trafficking. In addition to known mediators of PAR1 endocytosis, we identified Rab11B as a critical regulator of PAR1 trafficking. We found that siRNA-mediated depletion of Rab11B and not Rab11A blocks PAR1 recycling, which enhanced receptor lysosomal degradation. Although Rab11A is not required for PAR1 recycling, depletion of Rab11A resulted in intracellular accumulation of PAR1 through disruption of basal lysosomal degradation of the receptor. Moreover, enhanced degradation of PAR1 observed in Rab11B-deficient cells is blocked by depletion of Rab11A and the autophagy related-5 protein, suggesting that PAR1 is shuttled to an autophagic degradation pathway in the absence of Rab11B recycling. Together these findings suggest that Rab11A and Rab11B differentially regulate intracellular trafficking of PAR1 through distinct endosomal sorting mechanisms. PMID:26635365

  14. Imaging LDL receptor oligomerization during endocytosis using a co-internalization assay

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Peng; Ting, Alice Y.

    2011-01-01

    Methods to probe receptor oligomerization are useful to understand the molecular mechanisms of receptor signaling. Here we report a fluorescence imaging method to determine receptor oligomerization state in living cells during endocytic internalization. The wild-type receptor is co-expressed with an internalization-defective mutant, and the internalization kinetics of each is independently monitored. If the receptor internalizes as an oligomer, then the wild-type and mutant isoforms will mutually influence each others' trafficking properties, causing co-internalization of the mutant, or co-retention of the wild-type at the cell surface. Using this approach, we found that the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor internalizes as an oligomer into cells, both in the presence and absence of LDL ligand. The internalization kinetics of the wild-type receptor is not changed by LDL binding. We also found that the oligomerization domain of the LDL receptor is located in its cytoplasmic tail. PMID:21194239

  15. Analysis of Chemokine Receptor Trafficking by Site-Specific Biotinylation

    PubMed Central

    Liebick, Marcel; Schläger, Christian; Oppermann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors undergo internalization and desensitization in response to ligand activation. Internalized receptors are either preferentially directed towards recycling pathways (e.g. CCR5) or sorted for proteasomal degradation (e.g. CXCR4). Here we describe a method for the analysis of receptor internalization and recycling based on specific Bir A-mediated biotinylation of an acceptor peptide coupled to the receptor, which allows a more detailed analysis of receptor trafficking compared to classical antibody-based detection methods. Studies on constitutive internalization of the chemokine receptors CXCR4 (12.1% ± 0.99% receptor internalization/h) and CCR5 (13.7% ± 0.68%/h) reveals modulation of these processes by inverse (TAK779; 10.9% ± 0.95%/h) or partial agonists (Met-CCL5; 15.6% ± 0.5%/h). These results suggest an actively driven internalization process. We also demonstrate the advantages of specific biotinylation compared to classical antibody detection during agonist-induced receptor internalization, which may be used for immunofluorescence analysis as well. Site-specific biotinylation may be applicable to studies on trafficking of transmembrane proteins, in general. PMID:27310579

  16. Angiotensin (1-7) induces MAS receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Gironacci, Mariela M; Adamo, Hugo P; Corradi, Gerardo; Santos, Robson A; Ortiz, Pablo; Carretero, Oscar A

    2011-08-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) (1-7) is the endogenous ligand for the G protein-coupled receptor Mas, a receptor associated with cardiac, renal, and cerebral protective responses. Physiological evidence suggests that Mas receptor (MasR) undergoes agonist-dependent desensitization, but the underlying molecular mechanism regulating receptor activity is unknown. We investigated the hypothesis that MasR desensitizes and internalizes on stimulation with Ang-(1-7). For this purpose, we generated a chimera between the MasR and the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP; MasR-YFP). MasR-YFP-transfected HEK 293T cells were incubated with Ang-(1-7), and the relative cellular distribution of MasR-YFP was observed by confocal microscopy. In resting cells, MasR-YFP was mostly localized to the cell membrane. Ang-(1-7) induced a redistribution of MasR-YFP to intracellular vesicles of various sizes after 5 minutes. Following the time course of [(125)I]Ang-(1-7) endocytosis, we observed that half of MasR-YFP underwent endocytosis after 10 minutes, and this was blocked by a MasR antagonist. MasR-YFP colocalized with Rab5, the early endosome antigen 1, and the adaptor protein complex 2, indicating that the R is internalized through a clathrin-mediated pathway and targeted to early endosomes after Ang-(1-7) stimulation. A fraction of MasR-YFP also colocalized with caveolin 1, suggesting that at some point MasR-YFP traverses caveolin 1-positive compartments. In conclusion, MasR undergoes endocytosis on stimulation with Ang-(1-7), and this event may explain the desensitization of MasR responsiveness. In this way, MasR activity and density may be tightly controlled by the cell.

  17. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the 1321N1 human astrocytoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The binding of muscarinic agonists, partial agonists and antagonists to muscarinic receptors of 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells was studied. Binding was studied in both intact cells and cell lysates. Partial agonists and antagonists exhibited similar apparent affinities in intact cell competition binding assays with either the lipophilic radioligand ({sup 3}H)QNB or the hydrophilic radioligand ({sup 3}H)NMS. In contrast, full agonists exhibited markedly lower apparent affinities in intact cells with ({sup 3}H)QNB than with ({sup 3}H)NMS. Treatment of cells with antimycin A to deplete intracellular ATP prevented agonist-induced internalization of muscarinic receptors as assessed by sucrose density gradient assays of receptor subcellular distribution. In ATP-depleted cells, the apparent affinities of full agonists vs ({sup 3}H)QNB were markedly higher. The apparent affinities of partial agonists and of antagonists were unaffected by ATP depletion. In other studies, the effects of the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) on muscarinic receptor downregulation and internalization in 1321N1 cells were determined. PMA alone did not induce muscarinic receptor downregulation but instead decreased both the rate and final extent of downregulation induced by the agonist carbachol. The specificity of other protein kinase C activators for inhibiting carbachol-induced downregulation indicated involvement of protein kinase C. Furthermore, the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine prevented the inhibitory effect of PMA on downregulation. However, staurosporine did not inhibit agonist-induced downregulation.

  18. Towards improved receptor targeting: anterograde transport, internalization and postendocytic trafficking of neuropeptide Y receptors.

    PubMed

    Babilon, Stefanie; Mörl, Karin; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2013-08-01

    The neuropeptide Y system is known to be involved in the regulation of many central physiological and pathophysiological processes, such as energy homeostasis, obesity, cancer, mood disorders and epilepsy. Four Y receptor subtypes have been cloned from human tissue (hY1, hY2, hY4 and hY5) that form a multiligand/multireceptor system together with their three peptidic agonists (NPY, PYY and PP). Addressing this system for medical application requires on the one hand detailed information about the receptor-ligand interaction to design subtype-selective compounds. On the other hand comprehensive knowledge about alternative receptor signaling, as well as desensitization, localization and downregulation is crucial to circumvent the development of undesired side-effects and drug resistance. By bringing such knowledge together, highly potent and long-lasting drugs with minimized side-effects can be engineered. Here, current knowledge about Y receptor export, internalization, recycling, and degradation is summarized, with a focus on the human Y receptor subtypes, and is discussed in terms of its impact on therapeutic application.

  19. Cutting edge: the "death" adaptor CRADD/RAIDD targets BCL10 and suppresses agonist-induced cytokine expression in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing; Liu, Yan; Moore, Daniel J; Elizer, Sydney K; Veach, Ruth A; Hawiger, Jacek; Ruley, H Earl

    2012-03-15

    The expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to TCR agonists is regulated by the caspase-recruitment domain membrane-associated guanylate kinase 1 (CARMA1) signalosome through the coordinated assembly of complexes containing the BCL10 adaptor protein. We describe a novel mechanism to negatively regulate the CARMA1 signalosome by the "death" adaptor protein caspase and receptor interacting protein adaptor with death domain (CRADD)/receptor interacting protein-associated ICH-1/CED-3 homologous protein with a death domain. We show that CRADD interacts with BCL10 through its caspase recruitment domain and suppresses interactions between BCL10 and CARMA1. TCR agonist-induced interaction between CRADD and BCL10 coincides with reduction of its complex formation with CARMA1 in wild-type, as compared with Cradd-deficient, primary cells. Finally, Cradd-deficient spleen cells, CD4(+) T cells, and mice respond to T cell agonists with strikingly higher production of proinflammatory mediators, including IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, and IL-17. These results define a novel role for CRADD as a negative regulator of the CARMA1 signalosome and suppressor of Th1- and Th17-mediated inflammatory responses.

  20. Clathrin-dependent internalization of the angiotensin II AT₁A receptor links receptor internalization to COX-2 protein expression in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Morinelli, Thomas A; Walker, Linda P; Velez, Juan Carlos Q; Ullian, Michael E

    2015-02-05

    The major effects of Angiotensin II (AngII) in vascular tissue are mediated by AngII AT1A receptor activation. Certain effects initiated by AT1A receptor activation require receptor internalization. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC), AngII stimulates cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. We have previously shown this is mediated by β-arrestin-dependent receptor internalization and NF-κB activation. In this study, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), pitstop-2, was used to test the hypothesis that clathrin-dependent internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates NF-κB activation and subsequent cyclooxygenase 2 expression. Radioligand binding assays, real time qt-PCR and immunoblotting were used to document the effects of pitstop-2 on AngII binding and signaling in RASMC. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to image pitstop-2׳s effects on AT1 receptor/GFP internalization in HEK-293 cells and p65 NF-κB nuclear localization in RASMC. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited internalization of AT1A receptor (44.7% ± 3.1% Control vs. 13.2% ± 8.3% Pitstop-2; n=3) as determined by radioligand binding studies in RASMC. Studies utilizing AT1A receptor/GFP expressed in HEK 293 cells and LSCM confirmed these findings. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited AngII-induced p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear localization, COX-2 message and protein expression in RASMC without altering activation of p42/44 ERK or TNFα signaling. Pitstop-2, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, confirms that internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates AngII activation of cyclooxygenase 2 expression in RASMC. These data provide support for additional intracellular signaling pathways activated through β-arrestin mediated internalization of G protein-coupled receptors, such as AT1A receptors.

  1. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  2. Requirement of cortical actin organization for bombesin, endothelin, and EGF receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Lunn, J A; Wong, H; Rozengurt, E; Walsh, J H

    2000-12-01

    The role of actin organization in occupancy-induced receptor internalization remains poorly defined. Here we report that treatment of mouse Swiss 3T3 cells with latrunculin A, a potent inhibitor of actin polymerization (including cortical actin), inhibited the internalization of the endogenous bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor, as judged by uptake of (125)I-labeled GRP or fluorescent Cy3-labeled bombesin. In contrast, cells pretreated with cytochalasin D showed minimal inhibition of bombesin/GRP receptor internalization. Similarly, pretreatment of Swiss 3T3 cells with the potent Rho-kinase inhibitor HA-1077, at concentrations (10-20 microM) that abrogated bombesin-mediated stress fiber formation, did not significantly alter receptor-mediated internalization of (125)I-GRP. These results indicate that bombesin/GRP receptor internalization depends on latrunculin A-sensitive cortical actin rather than on rapidly turning over actin stress fibers that are disrupted by either cytochalasin D or HA-1077. The rates and total levels of internalization of the endogenously expressed endothelin A receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor were also markedly reduced by latrunculin A in Swiss 3T3 cells. The potency of latrunculin A for inhibiting G protein-coupled receptor endocytosis was comparable to that for reducing internalization of the epidermal growth factor tyrosine kinase receptor. We conclude that cortical actin structures, disrupted by latrunculin A, are necessary for occupancy-induced receptor internalization in animal cells.

  3. Opiates modulate thermosensation by internalizing cold receptor TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Shapovalov, George; Gkika, Dimitra; Devilliers, Maily; Kondratskyi, Artem; Gordienko, Dmitri; Busserolles, Jerome; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Eschalier, Alain; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2013-08-15

    Stimulation of μ-opioid receptors (OPRMs) brings powerful pain relief, but it also leads to the development of tolerance and addiction. Ensuing withdrawal in abstinent patients manifests itself with severe symptoms, including cold hyperalgesia, often preventing addicted patients from successfully completing the rehabilitation. Unsurprisingly, OPRMs have been a central point of many studies. Nonetheless, a satisfactory understanding of the pathways leading to distorted sensory responses during opiate administration and abstinence is far from complete. Here, we present a mechanism that leads to modulation by OPRMs of one of the sensory responses, thermosensation. Activation of OPRM1 leads to internalization of a cold-sensor TRPM8, which can be reversed by a follow-up treatment with the inverse OPRM agonist naloxone. Knockout of TRPM8 protein leads to a decrease in morphine-induced cold analgesia. The proposed pathway represents a universal mechanism that is probably shared by regulatory pathways modulating general pain sensation in response to opioid treatment.

  4. Effects of intracellular alkalinization on resting and agonist-induced vascular tone.

    PubMed

    Danthuluri, N R; Deth, R C

    1989-03-01

    To evaluate the influence of intracellular alkalinization on basal and agonist-induced vascular tone, we studied the effect of NH4Cl on rat aorta. NH4Cl induced a gradually developing contraction in a dose-dependent manner. Although the contractile response to 20 mM NH4Cl was associated with a latent period (LP) of 23.4 +/- 2.8 min, intracellular pH (pHi) measurements in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells showed that NH4Cl-induced intracellular alkalinization was immediate and transient, returning to basal pHi levels in about 30-35 min. Agents that elevate Ca2+, such as A23187 and high KCl, significantly reduced the LP associated with 20 mM NH4Cl-induced contraction. NH4Cl-induced contractions were sensitive to extracellular Ca2+ removal and to the addition of forskolin (1 microM); however, NH4Cl by itself did not cause Ca2+-influx as shown by 45Ca-uptake studies. Addition of 20 mM NH4Cl to precontracted tissues resulted in a transient relaxation, which was complete in approximately 10 min, followed by a contraction above the original level of tone. NH4Cl pretreatment caused time-dependent alterations in both the rapid and slow phases of phenylephrine and angiotensin II contractions. Rapid-phase of phenylephrine and angiotensin II contractions. Rapid-phase responses were diminished at shorter NH4Cl incubation times (10 min), whereas slow-phase response was augmented after a longer incubation (20 min). Overall, the vasorelaxant and vasoconstrictor effects induced by NH4Cl suggest a complex relationship between intracellular alkalinization and arterial contractility.

  5. Activation, internalization, and recycling of the serotonin 2A receptor by dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Samarjit; Raote, Ishier; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Miledi, Ricardo; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2006-01-01

    Serotonergic and dopaminergic systems, and their functional interactions, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of various CNS disorders. Here, we use recombinant serotonin (5-HT) 2A (5-HT2A) receptors to further investigate direct interactions between dopamine and 5-HT receptors. Previous studies in Xenopus oocytes showed that dopamine, although not the cognate ligand for the 5-HT2A receptor, acts as a partial-efficacy agonist. At micromolar concentrations, dopamine also acts as a partial-efficacy agonist on 5-HT2A receptors in HEK293 cells. Like 5-HT, dopamine also induces receptor-internalization in these cells, although at significantly higher concentrations than 5-HT. Interestingly, if the receptors are first sensitized or “primed” by subthreshold concentrations of 5-HT, then dopamine-induced internalization occurs at concentrations ≈10-fold lower than when dopamine is used alone. Furthermore, unlike 5-HT-mediated internalization, dopamine-mediated receptor internalization, alone, or after sensitization by 5-HT, does not depend on PKC. Dopamine-internalized receptors recycle to the surface at rates similar to those of 5-HT-internalized receptors. Our results suggest a previously uncharacterized role for dopamine in the direct activation and internalization of 5-HT2A receptors that may have clinical relevance to the function of serotonergic systems in anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia and also to the treatment of these disorders. PMID:17005723

  6. Constitutive internalization and recycling of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5).

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Rishi Raj; Bhattacharyya, Samarjit

    2012-10-12

    Ligand-dependent and ligand-independent endocytic trafficking of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is critical for accurate receptor-mediated signaling and its regulation. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is a GPCR that plays a crucial role in circuit formation in the brain and also in various forms of synaptic plasticity including learning and memory. Outside the central nervous system this receptor also plays very important role in various other non-neuronal cells like heart cells, skin cells, hepatocytes, etc. Although the ligand-mediated endocytosis of mGluR5 has been studied in some detail, ligand-independent/constitutive endocytosis of the receptor has not been properly studied. Here, we have investigated the constitutive endocytosis of mGluR5 and also the sub-cellular fate of the receptor subsequent to internalization. We show here that mGluR5 undergoes constitutive internalization in HEK293 cells. Following endocytosis, the receptor enters the recycling compartment and no localization of the receptor was observed in the lysosome. In addition, we also report here that most of the receptors recycle to the cell surface subsequent to constitutive internalization. Thus, our data demonstrate that mGluR5 receptors internalize without the application of ligand and the internalized receptors recycle back to the cell surface following constitutive endocytosis.

  7. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na+ in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na+-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na+ sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na+ increased cell surface [3H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na+ by Cs+ or NH4+ inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na+ over Cs+. Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  8. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-05-03

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations.

  9. In Vivo Techniques to Investigate the Internalization Profile of Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A.; Tawfik, Vivianne L.; Laboy, Alycia F.; Scherrer, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate a remarkable diversity of biological functions, and are thus often targeted for drug therapies. Receptor internalization is commonly observed following agonist binding and activation. Receptor trafficking events have been well characterized in cell systems, but the in vivo significance of GPCR internalization is still poorly understood. To address this issue, we have developed an innovative knock-in mouse model, where an opioid receptor is directly visible in vivo. These knockin mice express functional fluorescent delta opioid receptors (DOR-eGFP) in place of the endogenous receptor, and these receptors are expressed at physiological levels within their native environment. DOR-eGFP mice have proven to be an extraordinary tool in studying receptor neuroanatomy, real-time receptor trafficking in live neurons, and in vivo receptor internalization. We have used this animal model to determine the relationship between receptor trafficking in neurons and receptor function at a behavioral level. Here, we describe in detail the construction and characterization of this knockin mouse. We also outline how to use these mice to examine the behavioral consequences of agonist-specific trafficking at the delta opioid receptor. These techniques are potentially applicable to any GPCR, and highlight the powerful nature of this imaging tool. PMID:25293318

  10. GnRH-agonist induced depressive and anxiety symptoms during in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Miki; Azem, Foad; Aharonov, Inbar; Ben Avi, Irit; Yagil, Yaron; Schreiber, Shaul; Amit, Ami; Weizman, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether the use of a GnRH agonist inducing a hypogonadic state during IVF-ET cycles induces negative mood symptoms, we conducted a prospective randomized study in 108 women comparing two different controlled ovarian stimulation protocols. A significant phase effect was observed for depression and anxiety symptoms during IVF-ET cycles reflecting an increase in symptoms between the hypogonadal phase and the peak in gonadotropin stimulation; however, the hypogonadal phase induced by the GnRH agonist was not associated with a significant increase in any of the studied mood parameters.

  11. Characterization of the single transmembrane domain of human receptor activity-modifying protein 3 in adrenomedullin receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Nozaki, Naomi; Kato, Johji

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAMP3 mediates CLR internalization much less effectively than does RAMP2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RAMP3 TMD participates in the negative regulation of CLR/RAMP3 internalization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new strategy of promoting internalization and resensitization of the receptor was found. -- Abstract: Two receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP2 and RAMP3) enable calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) to function as two heterodimeric receptors (CLR/RAMP2 and CLR/RAMP3) for adrenomedullin (AM), a potent cardiovascular protective peptide. Following AM stimulation, both receptors undergo rapid internalization through a clathrin-dependent pathway, after which CLR/RAMP3, but not CLR/RAMP2, can be recycled to the cell surface for resensitization. However, human (h)RAMP3 mediates CLR internalization much less efficiently than does hRAMP2. Therefore, the molecular basis of the single transmembrane domain (TMD) and the intracellular domain of hRAMP3 during AM receptor internalization was investigated by transiently transfecting various RAMP chimeras and mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hCLR. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that substituting the RAMP3 TMD with that of RAMP2 markedly enhanced AM-induced internalization of CLR. However, this replacement did not enhance the cell surface expression of CLR, [{sup 125}I]AM binding affinity or AM-induced cAMP response. More detailed analyses showed that substituting the Thr{sup 130}-Val{sup 131} sequence in the RAMP3 TMD with the corresponding sequence (Ile{sup 157}-Pro{sup 158}) from RAMP2 significantly enhanced AM-mediated CLR internalization. In contrast, substituting the RAMP3 target sequence with Ala{sup 130}-Ala{sup 131} did not significantly affect CLR internalization. Thus, the RAMP3 TMD participates in the negative regulation of CLR/RAMP3 internalization, and the aforementioned introduction of the Ile-Pro sequence into the RAMP3 TMD may be a

  12. Endocytosis and membrane receptor internalization: implication of F-BAR protein Carom.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanjie; Xia, Jixiang; Liu, Suxuan; Stein, Sam; Ramon, Cueto; Xi, Hang; Wang, Luqiao; Xiong, Xinyu; Zhang, Lixiao; He, Dingwen; Yang, William; Zhao, Xianxian; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hong

    2017-03-01

    Endocytosis is a cellular process mostly responsible for membrane receptor internalization. Cell membrane receptors bind to their ligands and form a complex which can be internalized. We previously proposed that F-BAR protein initiates membrane curvature and mediates endocytosis via its binding partners. However, F-BAR protein partners involved in membrane receptor endocytosis and the regulatory mechanism remain unknown. In this study, we established database mining strategies to explore mechanisms underlying receptor-related endocytosis. We identified 34 endocytic membrane receptors and 10 regulating proteins in clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE), a major process of membrane receptor internalization. We found that F-BAR protein FCHSD2 (Carom) may facilitate endocytosis via 9 endocytic partners. Carom is highly expressed, along with highly expressed endocytic membrane receptors and partners, in endothelial cells and macrophages. We established 3 models of Carom-receptor complexes and their intracellular trafficking based on protein interaction and subcellular localization. We conclude that Carom may mediate receptor endocytosis and transport endocytic receptors to the cytoplasm for receptor signaling and lysosome/proteasome degradation, or to the nucleus for RNA processing, gene transcription and DNA repair.

  13. The Inhibitory Effect of Apigenin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility via Calcium Desensitization-Related Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyun Dong; Kim, Hyeong-Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2014-01-01

    Apigenin, a natural flavonoid found in a variety of vegetables and fruits, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of apigenin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Apigenin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2 mimetic- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction, which suggests that apigenin could be an anti-hypertensive that reduces agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, apigenin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels, which suggests the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase and MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of apigenin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function. PMID:24753814

  14. Phosphorylation and chronic agonist treatment atypically modulate GABAB receptor cell surface stability.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Pitcher, Julie A; Scott, Mark G H; Calver, Andrew R; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J; Couve, Andrés

    2004-03-26

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. The dynamic control of the cell surface stability of GABA(B) receptors is likely to be of fundamental importance in the modulation of receptor signaling. Presently, however, this process is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that GABA(B) receptors are remarkably stable at the plasma membrane showing little basal endocytosis in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. In addition, we show that exposure to baclofen, a well characterized GABA(B) receptor agonist, fails to enhance GABA(B) receptor endocytosis. Lack of receptor internalization in neurons correlates with an absence of agonist-induced phosphorylation and lack of arrestin recruitment in heterologous systems. We also demonstrate that chronic exposure to baclofen selectively promotes endocytosis-independent GABA(B) receptor degradation. The effect of baclofen can be attenuated by activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase or co-stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. Furthermore, we show that increased degradation rates are correlated with reduced receptor phosphorylation at serine 892 in GABA(B)R2. Our results support a model in which GABA(B)R2 phosphorylation specifically stabilizes surface GABA(B) receptors in neurons. We propose that signaling pathways that regulate cAMP levels in neurons may have profound effects on the tonic synaptic inhibition by modulating the availability of GABA(B) receptors.

  15. Heteromultimerization of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor and orexin OX(1) receptor generates a unique complex in which both protomers are regulated by orexin A.

    PubMed

    Ward, Richard J; Pediani, John D; Milligan, Graeme

    2011-10-28

    Agonist-induced internalization was observed for both inducible and constitutively expressed forms of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor. These were also internalized by the peptide orexin A, which has no direct affinity for the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor, but only when the orexin OX(1) receptor was co-expressed along with the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor. This effect of orexin A was concentration-dependent and blocked by OX(1) receptor antagonists. Moreover, the ability of orexin A to internalize the CB(1) receptor was also blocked by CB(1) receptor antagonists. Remarkably, orexin A was substantially more potent in producing internalization of the CB(1) receptor than in causing internalization of the bulk OX(1) receptor population, and this was true in cells in which the CB(1) receptor was maintained at a constant level, whereas levels of OX(1) could be varied and vice versa. Both co-immunoprecipitation and cell surface, homogenous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer based on covalent labeling of N-terminal "SNAP" and "CLIP" tags present in the extracellular N-terminal domain of the receptors confirmed the capacity of these two receptors to heteromultimerize. These studies confirm the capacity of the CB(1) and OX(1) receptors to interact directly and demonstrate that this complex has unique regulatory characteristics. The higher potency of the agonist orexin A to regulate the CB(1)-OX(1) heteromer compared with the OX(1)-OX(1) homomer present in the same cells and the effects of CB(1) receptor antagonists on the function of orexin A suggest an interplay between these two systems that may modulate appetite, feeding, and wakefulness.

  16. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor lowers PPARγ agonist-induced body weight gain by affecting food intake, fat mass, and beige/brown fat but not fluid retention

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takahiro; Fu, Yiling; Eguchi, Akiko; Czogalla, Jan; Rose, Michael A.; Kuczkowski, Alexander; Gerasimova, Maria; Feldstein, Ariel E.; Scadeng, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists like pioglitazone (PGZ) are effective antidiabetic drugs, but they induce fluid retention and body weight (BW) gain. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) inhibitors are antidiabetic drugs that enhance renal Na+ and fluid excretion. Therefore, we examined whether the DPP IV inhibitor alogliptin (ALG) ameliorates PGZ-induced BW gain. Male Sv129 mice were treated with vehicle (repelleted diet), PGZ (220 mg/kg diet), ALG (300 mg/kg diet), or a combination of PGZ and ALG (PGZ + ALG) for 14 days. PGZ + ALG prevented the increase in BW observed with PGZ but did not attenuate the increase in body fluid content determined by bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS). BIS revealed that ALG alone had no effect on fat mass (FM) but enhanced the FM-lowering effect of PGZ; MRI analysis confirmed the latter and showed reductions in visceral and inguinal subcutaneous (sc) white adipose tissue (WAT). ALG but not PGZ decreased food intake and plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Conversely, PGZ but not ALG increased mRNA expression of thermogenesis mediator uncoupling protein 1 in epididymal WAT. Adding ALG to PGZ treatment increased the abundance of multilocular cell islets in sc WAT, and PGZ + ALG increased the expression of brown-fat-like “beige” cell marker TMEM26 in sc WAT and interscapular brown adipose tissue and increased rectal temperature vs. vehicle. In summary, DPP IV inhibition did not attenuate PPARγ agonist-induced fluid retention but prevented BW gain by reducing FM. This involved ALG inhibition of food intake and was associated with food intake-independent synergistic effects of PPARγ agonism and DPP-IV inhibition on beige/brown fat cells and thermogenesis. PMID:24347054

  17. Visualizing clathrin-mediated IgE receptor internalization by electron and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Burns, Alan R; Oliver, Janet M; Pfeiffer, Janet R; Wilson, Bridget S

    2008-01-01

    A significant step in the immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor signaling pathway in mast cell membranes is receptor internalization by clathrin-coated vesicles. Visualization in native membrane sheets of the emerging clathrin lattice structures containing the IgE receptor and associated signaling partners has been accomplished with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). More recently, membrane sheets with labeled clathrin have also been characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescence imaging. We discuss here the procedure for creating fixed, native cell membrane sheets, labeling with immunogold or fluorescent labels, and utilization for TEM or AFM/fluorescence imaging of clathrin-mediated IgE internalization.

  18. Retromer terminates the generation of cAMP by internalized PTH-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Feinstein, Timothy N.; Wehbi, Vanessa L.; Ardura, Juan; Wheeler, David S.; Ferrandon, Sebastien; Gardella, Thomas J.; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Generation of cAMP by G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) and its termination is currently thought to occur exclusively at the plasma membrane of cells. Under existing models of receptor regulation, this signal is primarily restricted by desensitizationof the receptors through their binding to β-arrestins. However, this paradigm is not consistent with recent observations that the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTHR) continues to stimulate cAMP production even after receptor internalization, as β-arrestins are known to rapidly bind and internalize activated PTHR. Here we show that β-arrestin1 binding prolongs rather than terminates cAMP generation by PTHR, and that cAMP generation correlates with the persistence of arrestin-receptor complexes on endosomes. We found that PTHR signaling is instead turned-off by the retromer complex, which regulates traffic of internalized receptor from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus. Thus, binding by the retromer complex regulates sustained cAMP generation triggered by an internalized GPCR. PMID:21445058

  19. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  20. Direct visualization of the phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor during its internalization in A-431 cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) rapidly stimulates receptor autophosphorylation in A-431 cells. After 1 min the phosphorylated receptor can be identified at the plasma membrane using an anti- phosphotyrosine antibody. With further incubation at 37 degrees C, approximately 50% of the phosphorylated EGF receptor was internalized (t1/2 = 5 min) and associated with the tubulovesicular system and later with multivesicular bodies, but not the nucleus. During this period, there was no change in the extent or sites of phosphorylation. At all times the phosphotyrosine remained on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane, opposite to the EGF ligand identified by anti-EGF antibody. These data indicate that (a) the tyrosine-phosphorylated EGF receptor is internalized in its activated form providing a mechanism for translocation of the receptor kinase to substrates in the cell interior; (b) the internalized receptor remains intact for at least 60 min, does not associate with the nucleus, and does not generate any tyrosine-phosphorylated fragments; and (c) tyrosine phosphorylation alone is not the signal for receptor internalization. PMID:2447100

  1. Propranolol restricts the mobility of single EGF-receptors on the cell surface before their internalization.

    PubMed

    Otero, Carolina; Linke, Max; Sanchez, Paula; González, Alfonso; Schaap, Iwan A T

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in morphogenesis, proliferation and cell migration. Its up-regulation during tumorigenesis makes this receptor an interesting therapeutic target. In the absence of the ligand, the inhibition of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase activity by propranolol treatment leads to internalization of empty/inactive receptors. The molecular events involved in this endocytosis remain unknown. Here, we quantified the effects of propranolol on the mobility of single quantum-dot labelled receptors before the actual internalization took place. The single receptors showed a clear stop-and-go motion; their diffusive tracks were continuously interrupted by sub-second stalling events, presumably caused by transient clustering. In the presence of propranolol we found that: i) the diffusion rate reduced by 22 %, which indicates an increase in drag of the receptor. Atomic force microscopy measurements did not show an increase of the effective membrane tension, such that clustering of the receptor remains the likely mechanism for its reduced mobility. ii) The receptor got frequently stalled for longer periods of multiple seconds, which may signal the first step of the internalization process.

  2. Desensitization of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes is caused by their sequestration/internalization.

    PubMed

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-10-01

    Desensitization of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (hm2 receptors) stably expressed in chinese hamster ovary cells was measured as decreases in the carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity in membrane preparations after pre-treatment of cells with carbamylcholine. The extent of carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was found to decrease to 64% following pretreatment of cells with 10 microM carbamylcholine for 30 min, and under the same conditions 51-59% of hm2 receptors were sequestered/internalized as assessed by decreases in the [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity on the cell surface. A similar reduction in the carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was observed by pretreatment of cells with 5 nM propylbenzylylcholine mustard, which irreversibly bound to and inactivated 58% of the hm2 receptors. When the cells were pretreated with 10 microM carbamylcholine in the presence of 0.32 M sucrose, which is known to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis, no sequestration/internalization of hm2 receptors was observed, and the extent of carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity did not change. These results indicate that desensitization of hm2 receptors may be caused by reduction of receptor number on the cell surface through sequestration/internalization rather than by loss of the function of receptors.

  3. Propranolol Restricts the Mobility of Single EGF-Receptors on the Cell Surface before Their Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Carolina; Linke, Max; Sanchez, Paula; González, Alfonso; Schaap, Iwan A. T.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in morphogenesis, proliferation and cell migration. Its up-regulation during tumorigenesis makes this receptor an interesting therapeutic target. In the absence of the ligand, the inhibition of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase activity by propranolol treatment leads to internalization of empty/inactive receptors. The molecular events involved in this endocytosis remain unknown. Here, we quantified the effects of propranolol on the mobility of single quantum-dot labelled receptors before the actual internalization took place. The single receptors showed a clear stop-and-go motion; their diffusive tracks were continuously interrupted by sub-second stalling events, presumably caused by transient clustering. In the presence of propranolol we found that: i) the diffusion rate reduced by 22 %, which indicates an increase in drag of the receptor. Atomic force microscopy measurements did not show an increase of the effective membrane tension, such that clustering of the receptor remains the likely mechanism for its reduced mobility. ii) The receptor got frequently stalled for longer periods of multiple seconds, which may signal the first step of the internalization process. PMID:24349439

  4. Influence of cadmium on isolated peritoneal macrophage populations: cadmium inhibits Fc receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro experiments were performed to examine the effect of cadmium on adherent phagocytic cell populations. The authors were able to demonstrate, in vitro, a phagocytic defect that was originally observed in an in vivo system. Using in vitro methodologies, cadmium was found to inhibit opsonin-dependent but not opsonin-independent phagocytosis in two different populations of macrophages. The receptors through which the opsonized /sup 51/Cr-ElgG were internalized were characterized as Fc receptors. They were able to demonstrate that cadmium could reversibly inhibit internalization of Fc receptors. This mechanism, rather than an alteration of the receptors' binding capabilities, was responsible for the observed inhibition of Fc mediated (opsonin-dependent) phagocytosis in both populations of macrophages tested. The defect was not specific for cadmium per se. Zinc treatment caused a similar inhibition of Fc receptor mediated phagocytosis.

  5. K+ efflux agonists induce NLRP3 inflammasome activation independently of Ca2+ signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Katsnelson, Michael A.; Rucker, L. Graham; Russo, Hana M.; Dubyak, George R.

    2015-01-01

    Perturbation of intracellular ion homeostasis is a major cellular stress signal for activation of NLRP3 inflammasome signaling that results in caspase-1 mediated production of IL-1β and pyroptosis. However, the relative contributions of decreased cytosolic [K+] versus increased cytosolic [Ca2+] remain disputed and incompletely defined. We investigated roles for elevated cytosolic [Ca2+] in NLRP3 activation and downstream inflammasome signaling responses in primary murine dendritic cells and macrophages in response to two canonical NLRP3 agonists (ATP and nigericin) that facilitate primary K+ efflux by mechanistically distinct pathways or the lysosome-destabilizing agonist Leu-Leu-O-methyl ester (LLME). The study provides three major findings relevant to this unresolved area of NLRP3 regulation. First, increased cytosolic [Ca2+] was neither a necessary nor sufficient signal for the NLRP3 inflammasome cascade during activation by endogenous ATP-gated P2X7 receptor channels, the exogenous bacterial ionophore nigericin, or the lysosomotropic agent LLME. Second, agonists for three Ca2+-mobilizing G protein-coupled receptors (formyl peptide receptor/FPR; P2Y2 purinergic receptor/P2Y2R; calcium-sensing receptor/CaSR) expressed in murine dendritic cells were ineffective as activators of rapidly induced NLRP3 signaling when directly compared to the K+ efflux agonists. Third, the intracellular Ca2+ buffer, BAPTA, and the channel blocker, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), widely used reagents for disruption of Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways, strongly suppressed nigericin-induced NLRP3 inflammasome signaling via mechanisms dissociated from their canonical or expected effects on Ca2+ homeostasis. The results indicate that the ability of K+ efflux agonists to activate NLRP3 inflammasome signaling can be dissociated from changes in cytosolic [Ca2+] as a necessary or sufficient signal. PMID:25762778

  6. PICK1 and phosphorylation of the glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2) AMPA receptor subunit regulates GluR2 recycling after NMDA receptor-induced internalization.

    PubMed

    Lin, Da-Ting; Huganir, Richard L

    2007-12-12

    Changes in surface trafficking of AMPA receptors play an important role in synaptic plasticity. Phosphorylation of the C terminus of the AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunit glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2) and the binding of GluR2 to the PDZ [postsynaptic density-95/Discs large/zona occludens-1]-domain containing protein, protein interacting with protein kinase C (PICK1), have been proposed to play an important role in NMDA receptor dependent internalization of GluR2. However, the fate of internalized GluR2 after NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation is still unclear. Both recycling and degradation of GluR2 after the activation of NMDAR have been reported. Here, we used a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein variant, pHluorin, tagged to the N terminus of GluR2 (pH-GluR2) to study the dynamic internalization and recycling of GluR2 after NMDAR activation. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP), we directly demonstrate that internalized pH-GluR2 subunits recycle back to the cell surface after NMDAR activation. We further demonstrate that changing the phosphorylation state of the S880 residue at the C terminus of GluR2 does not affect NMDAR-dependent GluR2 internalization, but alters the recycling of GluR2 after NMDAR activation. In addition, mutation of the N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) binding site in the pH-GluR2 slows receptor recycling. Finally, neurons lacking PICK1 display normal NMDAR dependent GluR2 internalization compared with wild-type neurons, but demonstrate accelerated GluR2 recycling after NMDAR activation. These results indicate that phosphorylation of GluR2 S880 and NSF and PICK1 binding to GluR2 dynamically regulate GluR2 recycling.

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor is not required for receptor internalization: studies in 2,4-dinitrophenol-treated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Backer, J.M.; Kahn, C.R.; White, M.F.

    1989-05-01

    The relation between insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor and internalization of the receptor was studied in Fao rat hepatoma cells. Treatment of Fao cells with 2,4-dinitrophenol for 45 min depleted cellular ATP by 80% and equally inhibited insulin-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation, as determined by immunoprecipitation of surface-iodinated or (/sup 32/P)phosphate-labeled cells with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. In contrast, internalization of the insulin receptor and internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-labeled insulin by 2,4-dinitrophenol-treated cells were normal. These data show that autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor is not required for the receptor-mediated internalization of insulin in Fao cells and suggest that insulin receptor recycling is independent of autophosphorylation.

  8. Ligand-induced internalization of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor independent of recognized signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Cawston, Erin E; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Miller, Laurence J

    2012-02-01

    Receptor ligands, identified as antagonists, based on the absence of stimulation of signaling, can rarely stimulate receptor internalization. d-Tyr-Gly-[(Nle(28,31),d-Trp(30))CCK-26-32]-2-phenylethyl ester (d-Trp-OPE) is such a ligand that binds to the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor and stimulates internalization. Here, the molecular basis of this trafficking event is explored, with the assumption that ligand binding initiates conformational change, exposing an epitope to direct endocytosis. Ligand-stimulated internalization was studied morphologically using fluorescent CCK and d-Trp-OPE. d-Trp-OPE occupation of Chinese hamster ovary cell receptors stimulated internalization into the same region as CCK. Arrestin-biased action was ruled out using morphological translocation of fluorescent arrestin 2 and arrestin 3, moving to the membrane in response to CCK, but not d-Trp-OPE. Possible roles of the carboxyl terminus were studied using truncated receptor constructs, eliminating the proline-rich distal tail, the serine/threonine-rich midregion, and the remainder to the vicinal cysteines. None of these constructs disrupted d-Trp-OPE-stimulated internalization. Possible contributions of transmembrane segments were studied using competitive inhibition with peptides that also had no effect. Intracellular regions were studied with a similar strategy using coexpressing cell lines. Peptides corresponding to ends of each loop region were studied, with only the peptide at the carboxyl end of the third loop inhibiting d-Trp-OPE-stimulated internalization but having no effect on CCK-stimulated internalization. The region contributing to this effect was refined to peptide 309-323, located below the recognized G protein-association motif. While a receptor in which this segment was deleted did internalize in response to d-Trp-OPE, it exhibited abnormal ligand binding and did not signal in response to CCK, suggesting an abnormal conformation and possible mechanism of internalization

  9. Moesin Controls Clathrin-Mediated S1PR1 Internalization in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nomachi, Akira; Yoshinaga, Masanori; Liu, Jaron; Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Tohyama, Kiyoshi; Thumkeo, Dean; Watanabe, Takeshi; Narumiya, Shuh; Hirata, Takako

    2013-01-01

    The lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) regulates a wide range of cellular activities, including vascular maturation, angiogenesis, and immune-cell trafficking. Among the five known receptors for S1P (S1PR1-S1PR5), S1PR1 is a critical regulator of lymphocyte trafficking: its signaling is required for lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs, while its down-modulation by agonist-induced internalization is a prerequisite for lymphocyte entry into lymphoid organs from the bloodstream. Despite the importance of S1PR1 down-regulation in determining lymphocyte behavior, the molecular mechanism of its internalization in lymphocytes has not been defined. Here we show that agonist-induced S1PR1 internalization in T cells occurs via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is regulated by moesin, an ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family member. In S1P-stimulated T cells, S1PR1 relocalized within clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) and early endosomes, and S1PR1 internalization was blocked when clathrin was pharmacologically inhibited. Stimulating moesin-deficient T cells with S1P failed to induce S1PR1 internalization and CCV formation. Furthermore, treating moesin-deficient mice with FTY720, an S1P receptor agonist known to internalize S1PR1, caused delayed lymphopenia, and lymphocytes isolated from FTY720-treated moesin-deficient mice still responded to S1P ex vivo in chemotaxis assays. These results reveal a novel role for moesin in regulating clathrin-dependent S1PR1 internalization through CCV formation. PMID:24358210

  10. In vivo visualization of delta opioid receptors upon physiological activation uncovers a distinct internalization profile

    PubMed Central

    FAGET, Lauren; ERBS, Eric; LE MERRER, Julie; SCHERRER, Gregory; MATIFAS, Audrey; BENTURQUIA, Nadia; NOBLE, Florence; DECOSSAS, Marion; KOCH, Marc; KESSLER, Pascal; VONESCH, Jean-Luc; SCHWAB, Yannick; KIEFFER, Brigitte L.; MASSOTTE, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate numerous physiological functions and represent prime therapeutic targets. Receptor trafficking upon agonist stimulation is critical for GPCR function, but examining this process in vivo remains a true challenge. Using knock-in mice expressing functional fluorescent delta opioid receptors under the control of the endogenous promoter, we visualized in vivo internalization of this native GPCR upon physiological stimulation. We developed a paradigm in which animals were made dependent to morphine in a drug-paired context. When re-exposed to this context in a drug-free state, mice showed context-dependent withdrawal signs and activation of the hippocampus. Receptor internalization was transiently detected in a subset of CA1 neurons, uncovering regionally restricted opioid peptide release. Importantly, a pool of surface receptors always remained, which contrasts with the in vivo profile previously established for exogenous drug-induced internalization. Therefore, a distinct response is observed at the receptor level upon a physiological or pharmacological stimulation. Altogether, direct in vivo GPCR visualization enables mapping receptor stimulation promoted by a behavioral challenge, and represents a powerful approach to study endogenous GPCR physiology. PMID:22623675

  11. In vivo visualization of delta opioid receptors upon physiological activation uncovers a distinct internalization profile.

    PubMed

    Faget, Lauren; Erbs, Eric; Le Merrer, Julie; Scherrer, Gregory; Matifas, Audrey; Benturquia, Nadia; Noble, Florence; Decossas, Marion; Koch, Marc; Kessler, Pascal; Vonesch, Jean-Luc; Schwab, Yannick; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Massotte, Dominique

    2012-05-23

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate numerous physiological functions and represent prime therapeutic targets. Receptor trafficking upon agonist stimulation is critical for GPCR function, but examining this process in vivo remains a true challenge. Using knock-in mice expressing functional fluorescent delta opioid receptors under the control of the endogenous promoter, we visualized in vivo internalization of this native GPCR upon physiological stimulation. We developed a paradigm in which animals were made dependent on morphine in a drug-paired context. When re-exposed to this context in a drug-free state, mice showed context-dependent withdrawal signs and activation of the hippocampus. Receptor internalization was transiently detected in a subset of CA1 neurons, uncovering regionally restricted opioid peptide release. Importantly, a pool of surface receptors always remained, which contrasts with the in vivo profile previously established for exogenous drug-induced internalization. Therefore, a distinct response is observed at the receptor level upon a physiological or pharmacological stimulation. Altogether, direct in vivo GPCR visualization enables mapping receptor stimulation promoted by a behavioral challenge and represents a powerful approach to study endogenous GPCR physiology.

  12. Cardiac β2-Adrenergic Receptor Phosphorylation at Ser355/356 Regulates Receptor Internalization and Functional Resensitization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaofang; Gu, Xuejiang; Zhao, Ru; Zheng, Qingqing; Li, Lan; Yang, Wenbing; Ding, Lu; Xue, Feng; Fan, Junming; Gong, Yongsheng; Wang, Yongyu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that β2-adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) can be phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and protein kinase A (PKA), affecting β2AR internalization and desensitization. However, the exact physiological function of β2ARs in cardiomyocytes is unknown. In this study, we showed that neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes had different contraction and internalization responses to sustained or repeated, transient agonist stimulation. Specifically, short-time stimulation (10 min) with epinephrine or norepinephrine increased the cardiomyocyte contraction rate, reaching a maximum at 5 min, followed by a slow decline. When the agonist was re-added after a 60-min wash-out period, the increase in the cardiomyocyte contraction rate was similar to the initial response. In contrast, when cardiomyocytes were exposed continuously to epinephrine or norepinephrine for 60 min, the second agonist stimulation did not increase the contraction response. These results indicated that continuous β2AR stimulation caused functional desensitization. Phosphorylation of β2ARs at serine (Ser)355/356 GRK phosphorylation sites, but not at Ser345/346 PKA phosphorylation sites increased with continuous epinephrine stimulation for 60 min. Accordingly, β2AR internalization increased. Interestingly, β2AR internalization was blocked by mutations at the GRK phosphorylation sites, but not by mutations at the PKA phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, inhibition of β2AR dephosphorylation by okadaic acid, a phosphatase 2A inhibitor, impaired the recovery of internalized β2ARs and reduced the cardiomyocyte contraction rate in response to epinephrine. Finally, epinephrine treatment induced the physical interaction of β-arrestin with internalized β2ARs in cardiomyocytes. Together, these data revealed the essential role of the Ser355/356 phosphorylation status of β2ARs in regulating receptor internalization and physiological resensitization in neonatal

  13. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVIII. Histamine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Panula, Pertti; Chazot, Paul L; Cowart, Marlon; Gutzmer, Ralf; Leurs, Rob; Liu, Wai L S; Stark, Holger; Thurmond, Robin L; Haas, Helmut L

    2015-07-01

    Histamine is a developmentally highly conserved autacoid found in most vertebrate tissues. Its physiological functions are mediated by four 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (H1R, H2R, H3R, H4R) that are all targets of pharmacological intervention. The receptors display molecular heterogeneity and constitutive activity. H1R antagonists are long known antiallergic and sedating drugs, whereas the H2R was identified in the 1970s and led to the development of H2R-antagonists that revolutionized stomach ulcer treatment. The crystal structure of ligand-bound H1R has rendered it possible to design new ligands with novel properties. The H3R is an autoreceptor and heteroreceptor providing negative feedback on histaminergic and inhibition on other neurons. A block of these actions promotes waking. The H4R occurs on immuncompetent cells and the development of anti-inflammatory drugs is anticipated.

  14. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVIII. Histamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chazot, Paul L.; Cowart, Marlon; Gutzmer, Ralf; Leurs, Rob; Liu, Wai L. S.; Stark, Holger; Thurmond, Robin L.; Haas, Helmut L.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a developmentally highly conserved autacoid found in most vertebrate tissues. Its physiological functions are mediated by four 7-transmembrane G protein–coupled receptors (H1R, H2R, H3R, H4R) that are all targets of pharmacological intervention. The receptors display molecular heterogeneity and constitutive activity. H1R antagonists are long known antiallergic and sedating drugs, whereas the H2R was identified in the 1970s and led to the development of H2R-antagonists that revolutionized stomach ulcer treatment. The crystal structure of ligand-bound H1R has rendered it possible to design new ligands with novel properties. The H3R is an autoreceptor and heteroreceptor providing negative feedback on histaminergic and inhibition on other neurons. A block of these actions promotes waking. The H4R occurs on immuncompetent cells and the development of anti-inflammatory drugs is anticipated. PMID:26084539

  15. The F-BAR Protein PACSIN2 Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Anthony, Eloise C.; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling via growth factor receptors, including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, is key to various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell survival, and cell migration. In a variety of human diseases such as cancer, aberrant expression and activation of growth factor receptors can lead to disturbed signaling. Intracellular trafficking is crucial for proper signaling of growth factor receptors. As a result, the level of cell surface expression of growth factor receptors is an important determinant for the outcome of downstream signaling. BAR domain-containing proteins represent an important family of proteins that regulate membrane dynamics. In this study, we identify a novel role for the F-BAR protein PACSIN2 in the regulation of EGF receptor signaling. We show that internalized EGF as well as the (activated) EGF receptor translocated to PACSIN2-positive endosomes. Furthermore, loss of PACSIN2 increased plasma membrane expression of the EGF receptor in resting cells and increased EGF-induced phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. As a consequence, EGF-induced activation of Erk and Akt as well as cell proliferation were enhanced in PACSIN2-depleted cells. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel role for the F-BAR-domain protein PACSIN2 in regulating EGF receptor surface levels and EGF-induced downstream signaling. PMID:23129763

  16. Cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists induce gamma frequency activity in dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Christen; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Williams, D. Keith; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    The dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) is involved in generating two signs of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep: muscle atonia and ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves. We tested the hypothesis that single cell and/or population responses of SubCD neurons are capable of generating gamma frequency activity in response to intracellular stimulation or receptor agonist activation. Whole cell patch clamp recordings (immersion chamber) and population responses (interface chamber) were conducted on 9- to 20-day-old rat brain stem slices. All SubCD neurons (n = 103) fired at gamma frequency when subjected to depolarizing steps. Two statistically distinct populations of neurons were observed, which were distinguished by their high (>80 Hz, n = 24) versus low (35–80 Hz, n = 16) initial firing frequencies. Both cell types exhibited subthreshold oscillations in the gamma range (n = 43), which may underlie the gamma band firing properties of these neurons. The subthreshold oscillations were blocked by the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin (TTX, n = 21) extracellularly and N-(2,6-dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl)triethylammonium bromide (QX-314) intracellularly (n = 5), indicating they were sodium channel dependent. Gamma frequency subthreshold oscillations were observed in response to the nonspecific cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (CAR, n = 11, d = 1.08) and the glutamate receptor agonists N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA, n = 12, d = 1.09) and kainic acid (KA, n = 13, d = 0.96), indicating that cholinergic and glutamatergic inputs may be involved in the activation of these subthreshold currents. Gamma band activity also was observed in population responses following application of CAR (n = 4, P < 0.05), NMDA (n = 4, P < 0.05) and KA (n = 4, P < 0.05). Voltage-sensitive, sodium channel-dependent gamma band activity appears to be a part of the intrinsic membrane properties of SubCD neurons. PMID:21543743

  17. Agonist-induced restoration of hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive improvement in a model of cholinergic denervation.

    PubMed

    Van Kampen, Jackalina M; Eckman, Christopher B

    2010-05-01

    Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic innervation of the hippocampus and severe neuronal loss within the hippocampal CA1 region are early hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, and are strongly correlated with cognitive status. Various therapeutic approaches involve attempts to enhance neurotransmission or to provide some level of neuroprotection for remaining cells. An alternative approach may involve the generation of new cells to replace those lost in AD. Indeed, a simple shift in the balance between cell generation and cell loss may slow disease progression and possibly even reverse existing cognitive deficits. One potential neurogenic regulator might be acetylcholine, itself, which has been shown to play a critical role in hippocampal development. Here, we report the effects of various cholinergic compounds on indices of hippocampal neurogenesis, demonstrating a significant induction following pharmacological activation of muscarinic M1 receptors, located on hippocampal progenitors in the adult brain. This is the first report that a small-molecule agonist may induce neurogenesis in the hippocampal CA1 region. Furthermore, such treatment reversed deficits in markers of neurogenesis and spatial working memory triggered by cholinergic denervation in a rodent model. This study suggests the use of small molecule, receptor agonists may represent a novel means to trigger the restoration of specific neuronal populations lost to a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

  18. Rate of Homologous Desensitization and Internalization of the GLP-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Ghina; Oriowo, Mabayoje; Al-Sabah, Suleiman

    2016-12-26

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is an important target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of agonist stimulated desensitization and internalization of GLP-1R. To this end, an N-terminally myc-tagged GLP-1R was stably expressed in HEK-293 cells. Homologous desensitization was assessed by measuring the cAMP response to agonist stimulation following pre-incubation with agonist for up to 120 min. Receptor internalization was monitored using an indirect ELISA-based method and confocal microscopy. Pre-incubation with GLP-1 resulted in a time-dependent loss of response to a second stimulation. Washing cells following pre-incubation failed to bring cAMP levels back to basal. Taking this into account, two desensitization rates were calculated: "apparent" (t1/2 = 19.27 min) and "net" (t1/2 = 2.99 min). Incubation of cells with GLP-1 also resulted in a time-dependent loss of receptor cell surface expression (t1/2 = 2.05 min). Rapid agonist-stimulated internalization of GLP-1R was confirmed using confocal microscopy. Stimulation of GLP-1R with GLP-1 results in rapid desensitization and internalization of the receptor. Interestingly, the rate of "net" desensitization closely matches the rate of internalization. Our results suggest that agonist-bound GLP-1R continues to generate cAMP after it has been internalized.

  19. C-terminal motif of human neuropeptide Y4 receptor determines internalization and arrestin recruitment.

    PubMed

    Wanka, Lizzy; Babilon, Stefanie; Burkert, Kerstin; Mörl, Karin; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2017-01-01

    The human neuropeptide Y4 receptor is a rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), which contributes to anorexigenic signals. Thus, this receptor is a highly interesting target for metabolic diseases. As GPCR internalization and trafficking affect receptor signaling and vice versa, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of hY4R desensitization and endocytosis. The role of distinct segments of the hY4R carboxyl terminus was investigated by fluorescence microscopy, binding assays, inositol turnover experiments and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to examine the internalization behavior of hY4R and its interaction with arrestin-3. Based on results of C-terminal deletion mutants and substitution of single amino acids, the motif (7.78)EESEHLPLSTVHTEVSKGS(7.96) was identified, with glutamate, threonine and serine residues playing key roles, based on site-directed mutagenesis. Thus, we identified the internalization motif for the human neuropeptide Y4 receptor, which regulates arrestin-3 recruitment and receptor endocytosis.

  20. Microplate-compatible total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy for receptor pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghan; Zaytseva, Natalya V.; Wu, Qi; Li, Min; Fang, Ye

    2013-05-01

    We report the use of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for analyzing receptor pharmacology and the development of a microplate-compatible TIRF imaging system. Using stably expressed green fluorescence protein tagged β2-adrenergic receptor as the reporter, we found that the activation of different receptors results in distinct kinetic signatures of the TIRF intensity of cells. These TIRF signatures closely resemble the characteristics of their respective label-free dynamic mass redistribution signals in the same cells. This suggests that TIRF in microplate can be used for profiling and screening drugs.

  1. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  2. Internalization and recycling of 5-HT2A receptors activated by serotonin and protein kinase C-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Samarjit; Puri, Sapna; Miledi, Ricardo; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2002-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT), a major neurotransmitter, has a large number of G protein-coupled receptors in mammals. On activation by exposure to their ligand, 5-HT2 receptor subtypes increase IP3 levels and undergo desensitization and internalization. To visualize the receptor in cells during these processes, we have constructed a 5-HT2A-enhanced GFP (SR2-GFP) fusion receptor. We show that this fusion receptor undergoes internalization on exposure to its natural ligand, 5-HT. Because 5-HT2A receptors activate the phospholipase C pathway, we studied the effect of protein kinase C (PKC) on the internalization process and found that activation of PKC by its specific activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, in the absence of 5-HT, leads to internalization of the receptor. Moreover, inhibition of PKC by its inhibitor sphingosine in the presence of 5-HT prevents the internalization process, suggesting that activation of PKC is sufficient and necessary for the internalization of 5-HT2A receptors. We also show that SR2-GFP recycles back to the plasma membrane after 5-HT-dependent internalization, suggesting a mechanism for resensitization. In addition, receptors that have been internalized on addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in the absence of 5-HT also recycle to the surface, with a time course similar to that seen after activation of the receptors by 5-HT. Our study suggests that 5-HT2A receptors internalize and return to the surface after both serotonin- and PKC-mediated processes. This study reveals a role for PKC in receptor internalization and also shows that 5-HT2A receptors are recycled. PMID:12388782

  3. Internalization and recycling of receptor-bound gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in pituitary gonadotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Schvartz, I.; Hazum, E.

    1987-12-15

    The fate of cell surface gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors on pituitary cells was studied utilizing lysosomotropic agents and monensin. Labeling of pituitary cells with a photoreactive GnRH derivative, (azidobenzoyl-D-Lys6)GnRH, revealed a specific band of Mr = 60,000. When photoaffinity-labeled cells were exposed to trypsin immediately after completion of the binding, the radioactivity incorporated into the Mr = 60,000 band decreased, with a concomitant appearance of a proteolytic fragment (Mr = 45,000). This fragment reflects cell surface receptors. Following GnRH binding, the hormone-receptor complexes underwent internalization, partial degradation, and recycling. The process of hormone-receptor complex degradation was substantially prevented by lysosomotropic agents, such as chloroquine and methylamine, or the proton ionophore, monensin. Chloroquine and monensin, however, did not affect receptor recycling, since the tryptic fragment of Mr = 45,000 was evident after treatment with these agents. This suggests that recycling of GnRH receptors in gonadotropes occurs whether or not the internal environment is acidic. Based on these findings, we propose a model describing the intracellular pathway of GnRH receptors.

  4. Comparing analgesia and μ-opioid receptor internalization produced by intrathecal enkephalin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Song, Bingbing; Lao, Lijun; Pérez, Orlando A.; Kim, Woojae; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Opioid receptors in the spinal cord produce strong analgesia, but the mechanisms controlling their activation by endogenous opioids remain unclear. We have previously shown in spinal cord slices that peptidases preclude μ-opioid receptor (MOR) internalization by opioids. Our present goals were to investigate whether enkephalin-induced analgesia is also precluded by peptidases, and whether it is mediated by MORs or δ-opioid receptors (DORs). Tail-flick analgesia and MOR internalization were measured in rats injected intrathecally with Leu-enkephalin and peptidase inhibitors. Without peptidase inhibitors, Leu-enkephalin produced neither analgesia nor MOR internalization at doses up to 100 nmol, whereas with peptidase inhibitors it produced analgesia at 0.3 nmol and MOR internalization at 1 nmol. Leu-enkephalin was ten times more potent to produce analgesia than to produce MOR internalization, suggesting that DORs were involved. Selective MOR or DOR antagonists completely blocked the analgesia elicited by 0.3 nmol Leu-enkephalin (a dose that produced little MOR internalization), indicating that it involved these two receptors, possibly by an additive or synergistic interaction. The selective MOR agonist endomorphin-2 produced analgesia even in the presence of a DOR antagonist, but at doses substantially higher than Leu-enkephalin. Unlike Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2 had the same potencies to induce analgesia and MOR internalization. We concluded that low doses of enkephalins produce analgesia by activating both MORs and DORs. Analgesia can also be produced exclusively by MORs at higher agonist doses. Since peptidases prevent the activation of spinal opioid receptors by enkephalins, the coincident release of opioids and endogenous peptidase inhibitors may be required for analgesia. PMID:17845806

  5. Agonist-induced changes in Ca(2+) permeation through the nociceptor cation channel TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Karashima, Yuji; Prenen, Jean; Talavera, Karel; Janssens, Annelies; Voets, Thomas; Nilius, Bernd

    2010-03-03

    The Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel TRPA1 acts as an ionotropic receptor for various pungent compounds and as a noxious cold sensor in sensory neurons. It is unclear what proportion of the TRPA1-mediated current is carried by Ca(2+) ions and how the permeation pathway changes during stimulation. Here, based on the relative permeability of the nonstimulated channel to cations of different size, we estimated a pore diameter of approximately 11 A. Combined patch-clamp and Fura-2 fluorescence recordings revealed that with 2 mM extracellular Ca(2+), and at a membrane potential of -80 mV, approximately 17% of the inward TRPA1 current is carried by Ca(2+). Stimulation with mustard oil evoked an apparent dilatation of the pore of 3 A and an increase in divalent cation selectivity and fractional Ca(2+) current. Mutations in the putative pore that reduced the divalent permeability and fractional Ca(2+) current also prevented mustard-oil-induced increases in Ca(2+) permeation. It is interesting that fractional Ca(2+) currents for wild-type and mutant TRPA1 were consistently higher than values predicted based on biionic reversal potentials using the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation, suggesting that binding of Ca(2+) in the pore hinders monovalent cation permeation. We conclude that the pore of TRPA1 is dynamic and supports a surprisingly large Ca(2+) influx.

  6. An ERβ agonist induces browning of subcutaneous abdominal fat pad in obese female mice

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yi-fei; Su, Wen; Dai, Yu-bing; Wu, Wan-fu; Huang, Bo; Barros, Rodrigo P. A.; Nguyen, Hao; Maneix, Laure; Guan, You-fei; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen, via estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), exerts several beneficial effects on metabolism and energy homeostasis by controlling size, enzymatic activity and hormonal content of adipose tissue. The actions of estrogen on sympathetic ganglia, which are key players in the browning process, are less well known. In the present study we show that ERβ influences browning of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) via its actions both on sympathetic ganglia and on the SAT itself. A 3-day-treatment with a selective ERβ agonist, LY3201, induced browning of SAT in 1-year-old obese WT and ERα−/− female mice. Browning was associated with increased expression of ERβ in the nuclei of neurons in the sympathetic ganglia, increase in tyrosine hydroxylase in both nerve terminals in the SAT and sympathetic ganglia neurons and an increase of β3-adrenoceptor in the SAT. LY3201 had no effect on browning in young female or male mice. In the case of young females browning was already maximal while in males there was very little expression of ERβ in the SAT and very little expression of the β3-adrenoceptor. The increase in both sympathetic tone and responsiveness of adipocytes to catecholamines reveals a novel role for ERβ in controlling browning of adipose tissue. PMID:27922125

  7. α1 -AR agonist induced piloerection protects against the development of traction alopecia.

    PubMed

    Goren, Andy; Shapiro, Jerry; Sinclair, Rodney; Kovacevic, Maja; McCoy, John

    2016-05-01

    Traction alopecia is hair loss that occurs after persistent pulling (e.g., during cosmetic procedures) on the roots of hair over time. Unlike plucking, which is painful, persistent pulling may go unnoticed until a patient presents with either bald spots or diffuse telogen shedding. Each hair follicle in the scalp contains an arrector pili muscle that, when contracted, erects the hair. The smooth muscle in the arrector pili expresses α1 adrenergic receptors (α1 -AR). As such, we hypothesized that contraction of the arrector pili muscle via an α1 -AR agonist would increase the threshold of force required to pluck hair during cosmetic procedures. Female subjects, ages 18-40, were recruited to study the effect of topically applied phenylephrine, a selective α1 -AR agonist, on epilation force and hair shedding during cosmetic procedures. In our blinded study, 80% of subjects demonstrated reduced shedding on days using phenylephrine compared to days using a placebo solution. The average reduction in hair loss was approximately 42%. In addition, the force threshold required for epilation increased by approximately 172% following topical phenylephrine application. To our knowledge this is the first study demonstrating the utility of α1 -AR agonists in the treatment of traction alopecia and hair shedding during cosmetic procedures.

  8. Lacrimal gland PKC isoforms are differentially involved in agonist-induced protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Zoukhri, D; Hodges, R R; Sergheraert, C; Toker, A; Dartt, D A

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, we have synthesized and N-myristoylated peptides derived from the pseudosubstrate sequences of protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon [Myr-PKC-alpha-(15-28), Myr-PKC-delta-(142-153), and Myr-PKC-epsilon-(149-164)], three isoforms present in rat lacrimal gland, and a peptide derived from the sequence of the endogenous inhibitor of protein kinase A [Myr-PKI-(17-25)]. Lacrimal gland acini were preincubated for 60 min with the myristoylated peptides (10(-10) to 3 x 10(-7) M), then protein secretion was stimulated with a phorbol ester, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (10(-6) M); vasoactive intestinal peptide (10(-8) M); a cholinergic agonist, carbachol (10(-5) M); or an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (10(-4) M), for 20 min. In intact lacrimal gland acini, Myr-PKC-alpha-(15-28) inhibited phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate-induced protein secretion. This effect was not reproduced by the acetylated peptide or by the myristoylated PKI, which inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced protein secretion, a response mediated by protein kinase A. Carbachol-induced protein secretion was inhibited by all three peptides. In contrast, phenylephrine-induced protein secretion was inhibited only by Myr-PKC-epsilon-(149-164), whereas Myr-PKC-alpha-(15-28) and Myr-PKC-delta-(142-153) had a stimulatory effect. None of these myristoylated peptides affected the calcium increase evoked by cholinergic or alpha 1-adrenergic agonists. We concluded that phorbol ester- and receptor-induced protein secretion involve different PKC isoforms in lacrimal gland.

  9. CtBP1/BARS is an activator of phospholipase D1 necessary for agonist-induced macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yuki; Miwa, Noriko; Jahangeer, Saleem; Okada, Taro; Nakamura, Shun-ichi

    2009-05-06

    Vesicular trafficking such as macropinocytosis is a dynamic process that requires coordinated interactions between specialized proteins and lipids. A recent report suggests the involvement of CtBP1/BARS in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced macropinocytosis. Detailed mechanisms as to how lipid remodelling is regulated during macropinocytosis are still undefined. Here, we show that CtBP1/BARS is a physiological activator of PLD1 required in agonist-induced macropinocytosis. EGF-induced macropinocytosis was specifically blocked by 1-butanol but not by 2-butanol. In addition, stimulation of cells by serum or EGF resulted in the association of CtBP1/BARS with PLD1. Finally, CtBP1/BARS activated PLD1 in a synergistic manner with other PLD activators, including ADP-ribosylation factors as demonstrated by in vitro and intact cell systems. The present results shed light on the molecular basis of how the 'fission protein' CtBP1/BARS controls vesicular trafficking events including macropinocytosis.

  10. PPARγ agonist-induced fluid retention depends on αENaC expression in connecting tubules

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yiling; Gerasimova, Maria; Batz, Falk; Kuczkowski, Alexander; Alam, Yasaman; Sanders, Paul W.; Ronzaud, Caroline; Hummler, Edith; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Thiazolidinediones (TZDs, e.g. rosiglitazone (RGZ)) are peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists used to treat type 2 diabetes. Clinical limitations include TZD-induced fluid retention and body weight (BW) increase, which are inhibited by amiloride, an epithelial-sodium channel (ENaC) blocker. RGZ-induced fluid retention is maintained in mice with αENaC knockdown in the collecting duct (CD). Since ENaC in the connecting tubule (CNT) rather than in CD appears to be critical for normal NaCl retention, we aimed to further explore the role of ENaC in CNT in RGZ-induced fluid retention. Methods Mice with conditional inactivation of αENaC in both CNT and CD were used (αENaC lox/lox AQP2-Cre; “αENaC-CNT/CD-KO”) and compared with littermate controls (αENaC lox/lox mice; “WT”). BW was monitored, and total body water (TBW) and extracellular fluid volume (ECF) determined by bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) before and after RGZ (320 mg/kg diet for 10 days). Results On regular NaCl diet, αENaC-CNT/CD-KO had normal BW, TBW, ECF, hematocrit, and plasma Na+, K+, and creatinine, associated with an increase in plasma aldosterone compared with WT. Challenging αENaC-CNT/CD-KO with a low NaCl diet unmasked impaired NaCl and K homeostasis, consistent with effective knockdown of αENaC. In WT, RGZ increased BW (+6.1%), TBW (+8.4%) and ECF (+10%), consistent with fluid retention. These changes were significantly attenuated in αENaC-CNT/CD-KO (+3.4, 1.3, and 4.3%). Conclusion Together with previous studies, the current results are consistent with a role of αENaC in CNT in RGZ-induced fluid retention, which dovetails with the physiological relevance of ENaC in this segment. PMID:25531136

  11. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIII. The parathyroid hormone receptors--family B G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gardella, Thomas J; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The type-1 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR1) is a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the actions of two polypeptide ligands; parathyroid hormone (PTH), an endocrine hormone that regulates the levels of calcium and inorganic phosphate in the blood by acting on bone and kidney, and PTH-related protein (PTHrP), a paracrine-factor that regulates cell differentiation and proliferation programs in developing bone and other tissues. The type-2 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR2) binds a peptide ligand, called tuberoinfundibular peptide-39 (TIP39), and while the biologic role of the PTHR2/TIP39 system is not as defined as that of the PTHR1, it likely plays a role in the central nervous system as well as in spermatogenesis. Mechanisms of action at these receptors have been explored through a variety of pharmacological and biochemical approaches, and the data obtained support a basic "two-site" mode of ligand binding now thought to be used by each of the family B peptide hormone GPCRs. Recent crystallographic studies on the family B GPCRs are providing new insights that help to further refine the specifics of the overall receptor architecture and modes of ligand docking. One intriguing pharmacological finding for the PTHR1 is that it can form surprisingly stable complexes with certain PTH/PTHrP ligand analogs and thereby mediate markedly prolonged cell signaling responses that persist even when the bulk of the complexes are found in internalized vesicles. The PTHR1 thus appears to be able to activate the Gα(s)/cAMP pathway not only from the plasma membrane but also from the endosomal domain. The cumulative findings could have an impact on efforts to develop new drug therapies for the PTH receptors.

  12. Identification of human somatostatin receptor 2 domains involved in internalization and signaling in QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Cambiaghi, Valeria; Vitali, Eleonora; Morone, Diego; Peverelli, Erika; Spada, Anna; Mantovani, Giovanna; Lania, Andrea Gerardo

    2016-07-12

    Somatostatin exerts inhibitory effects on hormone secretion and cell proliferation via five receptor subtypes (SST1-SST5), whose internalization is regulated by β-arrestins. The receptor domains involved in these effects have been only partially elucidated. The aim of the study is to characterize the molecular mechanism and determinants responsible for somatostatin receptor 2 internalization and signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine QGP-1 cell line, focusing on the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminal domains. We demonstrated that in cells transfected with somatostatin receptor 2 third intracellular loop mutant, no differences in β-arrestins recruitment and receptor internalization were observed after somatostatin receptor 2 activation in comparison with cells bearing wild-type somatostatin receptor 2. Conversely, the truncated somatostatin receptor 2 failed to recruit β-arrestins and to internalize after somatostatin receptor 2 agonist (BIM23120) incubation. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of BIM23120 on cell proliferation, cyclin D1 expression, P-ERK1/2 levels, apoptosis and vascular endothelial growth factor secretion was completely lost in cells transfected with either third intracellular loop or carboxyl terminal mutants. In conclusion, we demonstrated that somatostatin receptor 2 internalization requires intact carboxyl terminal while the effects of SS on cell proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis mediated by somatostatin receptor 2 need the integrity of both third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminal.

  13. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXVII. Kisspeptin receptor nomenclature, distribution, and function.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Helen R; Maguire, Janet J; Colledge, William H; Davenport, Anthony P

    2010-12-01

    Kisspeptins are members of the Arg-Phe amide family of peptides, which have been identified as endogenous ligands for a G-protein-coupled receptor encoded by a gene originally called GPR54 (also known as AXOR12 or hOT7T175). After this pairing, the gene has been renamed KISS1R. The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification recommends that the official name for the receptor is the kisspeptin receptor to follow the convention of naming the receptor protein after the endogenous ligand. The endogenous ligand was initially called metastin, after its role as a metastasis suppressor, and is now referred to as kisspeptin-54 (KP-54), a C-terminally amidated 54-amino acid peptide cleaved from the 145-amino acid gene product. Shorter C-terminal cleavage fragments [KP-14, KP-13 and KP-10 (the smallest active fragment)] are also biologically active. Both receptor and peptide are widely expressed in human, rat, and mouse; the receptor sequence shares more than 80% homology in these species. Activation of the kisspeptin receptor by kisspeptin is via coupling to G(q/11) and the phospholipase C pathway, causing Ca(2+) mobilization. Mutations in the KISS1R gene result in hypogonadotropic hypogonadotropism, and targeted disruption of Kiss1r in mice reproduces this phenotype, which led to the discovery of the remarkable ability of the kisspeptin receptor to act as a molecular switch for puberty. In addition to regulating the reproductive axis, the kisspeptin receptor is also implicated in cancer, placentation, diabetes, and the cardiovascular system.

  14. Ryanodine receptors in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Rueda, Angélica

    2002-07-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of smooth muscle is endowed with two different types of Ca2+ release channels, i.e. inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In general, both release channels mobilize Ca2+ from the same internal store in smooth muscle. While the importance of IP3Rs in agonist-induced contraction is well established, the role of RyRs in excitation-contraction coupling of smooth muscle is not clear. The participation of smooth muscle RyRs in the amplification of Ca2+ transients induced by either opening of Ca2+-permeable channels or IP3-triggered Ca2+ release has been studied. The efficacy of both processes to activate RyRs by calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is highly variable and not widely present in smooth muscle. Although RyRs in smooth muscle generate Ca2+ sparks that are similar to those observed in striated muscles, the contribution of these local Ca2+ events to depolarization-induced global rise in [Ca2+]i is rather limited. Recent data suggest that RyRs are involved in regulating the luminal [Ca2+] of SR and also in smooth muscle relaxation. This review summarizes studies that were carried out mainly in muscle strips or in freshly isolated myocytes, and that were aimed to determine the physiological role of RyRs in smooth muscle.

  15. Ligand-induced EGF Receptor Oligomerization Is Kinase-dependent and Enhances Internalization*

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Erik G.; Bader, Arjen N.; Voortman, Jarno; van den Heuvel, Dave J.; Sigismund, Sara; Verkleij, Arie J.; Gerritsen, Hans C.; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.

    2010-01-01

    The current activation model of the EGF receptor (EGFR) predicts that binding of EGF results in dimerization and oligomerization of the EGFR, leading to the allosteric activation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase. Little is known about the regulatory mechanism of receptor oligomerization. In this study, we have employed FRET between identical fluorophores (homo-FRET) to monitor the dimerization and oligomerization state of the EGFR before and after receptor activation. Our data show that, in the absence of ligand, ∼40% of the EGFR molecules were present as inactive dimers or predimers. The monomer/predimer ratio was not affected by deletion of the intracellular domain. Ligand binding induced the formation of receptor oligomers, which were found in both the plasma membrane and intracellular structures. Ligand-induced oligomerization required tyrosine kinase activity and nine different tyrosine kinase substrate residues. This indicates that the binding of signaling molecules to activated EGFRs results in EGFR oligomerization. Induction of EGFR predimers or pre-oligomers using the EGFR fused to the FK506-binding protein did not affect signaling but was found to enhance EGF-induced receptor internalization. Our data show that EGFR oligomerization is the result of EGFR signaling and enhances EGFR internalization. PMID:20940297

  16. The 37kDa/67kDa Laminin Receptor acts as a receptor for Aβ42 internalization

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa Dias, Bianca; Jovanovic, Katarina; Gonsalves, Danielle; Moodley, Kiashanee; Reusch, Uwe; Knackmuss, Stefan; Weinberg, Marc S.; Little, Melvyn; Weiss, Stefan F. T.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal loss is a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The associations between soluble Aβ oligomers and cellular components cause this neurotoxicity. The 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) has recently been implicated in Aβ pathogenesis. In this study the mechanism underlying the pathological role of LRP/LR was elucidated. Försters Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) revealed that LRP/LR and Aβ form a biologically relevant interaction. The ability of LRP/LR to form stable associations with endogenously shed Aβ was confirmed by pull down assays and Aβ-ELISAs. Antibody blockade of this association significantly lowered Aβ42 induced apoptosis. Furthermore, antibody blockade and shRNA mediated downregulation of LRP/LR significantly hampered Aβ42 internalization. These results suggest that LRP/LR is a receptor for Aβ42 internalization, mediating its endocytosis and contributing to the cytotoxicity of the neuropeptide by facilitating intra-cellular Aβ42 accumulation. These findings recommend anti-LRP/LR specific antibodies and shRNAs as potential therapeutic tools for AD treatment. PMID:24990253

  17. Carboxyl-terminal multi-site phosphorylation regulates internalization and desensitization of the human sst2 somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Schütz, Dagmar; Nagel, Falko; Stumm, Ralf; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-04-25

    The somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2) is the pharmacological target of somatostatin analogs that are widely used in the diagnosis and treatment of human neuroendocrine tumors. We have recently shown that the stable somatostatin analogs octreotide and pasireotide (SOM230) stimulate distinct patterns of sst2 receptor phosphorylation and internalization. Like somatostatin, octreotide promotes the phosphorylation of at least six carboxyl-terminal serine and threonine residues namely S341, S343, T353, T354, T356 and T359, which in turn leads to a robust receptor endocytosis. Unlike somatostatin, pasireotide stimulates a selective phosphorylation of S341 and S343 of the human sst2 receptor followed by a partial receptor internalization. Here, we show that exchange of S341 and S343 by alanine is sufficient to block pasireotide-driven internalization, whereas mutation of T353, T354, T356 and T359 to alanine is required to strongly inhibited both octreotide- and somatostatin-induced internalization. Yet, combined mutation of T353, T354, T356 and T359 is not sufficient to prevent somatostatin-driven β-arrestin mobilization and receptor desensitization. Replacement of all fourteen carboxyl-terminal serine and threonine residues by alanine completely abrogates sst2 receptor internalization and β-arrestin mobilization in HEK293 cells. Together, our findings demonstrate for the first time that agonist-selective sst2 receptor internalization is regulated by multi-site phosphorylation of its carboxyl-terminal tail.

  18. The syndecan family of proteoglycans. Novel receptors mediating internalization of atherogenic lipoproteins in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fuki, I V; Kuhn, K M; Lomazov, I R; Rothman, V L; Tuszynski, G P; Iozzo, R V; Swenson, T L; Fisher, E A; Williams, K J

    1997-01-01

    Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been shown to participate in lipoprotein catabolism, but the roles of specific proteoglycan classes have not been examined previously. Here, we studied the involvement of the syndecan proteoglycan family. First, transfection of CHO cells with expression vectors for several syndecan core proteins produced parallel increases in the cell association and degradation of lipoproteins enriched in lipoprotein lipase, a heparan-binding protein. Second, a chimeric construct, FcR-Synd1, that consists of the ectodomain of the IgG Fc receptor Ia linked to the highly conserved transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of syndecan-1 directly mediated efficient internalization, in a process triggered by ligand clustering. Third, internalization of lipase-enriched lipoproteins via syndecan-1 and of clustered IgGs via the chimera showed identical kinetics (t1/2 = 1 h) and identical dose-response sensitivities to cytochalasin B, which disrupts microfilaments, and to genistein, which inhibits tyrosine kinases. In contrast, internalization of the receptor-associated protein, which proceeds via coated pits, showed a t1/2 < 15 min, limited sensitivity to cytochalasin B, and complete insensitivity to genistein. Thus, syndecan proteoglycans can directly mediate ligand catabolism through a pathway with characteristics distinct from coated pits, and might act as receptors for atherogenic lipoproteins and other ligands in vivo. PMID:9294130

  19. Effects of arachidonic acid on FFA4 receptor: Signaling, phosphorylation and internalization.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Comonfort, S; Takei, Y; Tsujimoto, G; Hirasawa, A; García-Sáinz, J A

    2017-02-01

    Arachidonic acid increased intracellular calcium, in cells expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged human FFA4 receptors, with an EC50 of ~40µM. This action was not blocked by cyclooxygenase or lipoxigenase inhibitors but it was inhibited by AH7614, a FFA4 antagonist. Arachidonic acid induced ERK activation accompanied by EGF receptor transactivation. However, EGF transactivation was not the major mechanism through which the fatty acid induced ERK phosphorylation, as evidenced by the inability of AG1478 to block it. Arachidonic acid increased FFA4 receptor phosphorylation that reached its maximum within 15min with an EC50 of ~30µM; inhibitors of protein kinase C partially diminish this effect and AH7614 blocked it. Arachidonic acid induced rapid and sustained Akt/PKB phosphorylation and FFA4 - β-arrestin interaction. Confocal microscopy evidenced that FFA4 receptor activation and phosphorylation were associated to internalization. In conclusion, arachidonic acid is a bona fide FFA4 receptor agonist.

  20. Quantitative measurement of cell membrane receptor internalization by the nanoluciferase reporter: Using the G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3 as a model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) is a newly developed small luciferase reporter with the brightest bioluminescence to date. In the present work, we developed NanoLuc as a sensitive bioluminescent reporter to measure quantitatively the internalization of cell membrane receptors, based on the pH dependence of the reporter activity. The G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3, the cognate receptor of relaxin-3/INSL7, was used as a model receptor. We first generated stable HEK293T cells that inducibly coexpressed a C-terminally NanoLuc-tagged human RXFP3 and a C-terminally enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged human RXFP3. The C-terminal EGFP-tag and NanoLuc-tag had no detrimental effects on the ligand-binding potency and intracellular trafficking of RXFP3. Based on the fluorescence of the tagged EGFP reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was visualized directly under a fluorescence microscope. Based on the bioluminescence of the tagged NanoLuc reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was measured quantitatively by a convenient bioluminescent assay. Coexpression of an EGFP-tagged inactive [E141R]RXFP3 had no detrimental effect on the ligand-binding potency and ligand-induced internalization of the NanoLuc-tagged wild-type RXFP3, suggesting that the mutant RXFP3 and wild-type RXFP3 worked independently. The present bioluminescent internalization assay could be extended to other G protein-coupled receptors and other cell membrane receptors to study ligand-receptor and receptor-receptor interactions.

  1. An Opioid Agonist that Does Not Induce μ-Opioid Receptor—Arrestin Interactions or Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Groer, C. E.; Tidgewell, K.; Moyer, R. A.; Harding, W. W.; Rothman, R. B.; Prisinzano, T. E.; Bohn, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor desensitization and trafficking are important regulators of opioid receptor signaling that can dictate overall drug responsiveness in vivo. Furthermore, different μ-opioid receptor (μOR) ligands can lead to varying degrees of receptor regulation, presumably because of distinct structural conformations conferred by agonist binding. For example, morphine binding produces a μOR with low affinity for β-arrestin proteins and limited receptor internalization, whereas enkephalin analogs promote robust trafficking of both β-arrestins and the receptors. Here, we evaluate μOR trafficking in response to activation by a novel μ-selective agonist derived from the naturally occurring plant product, salvinorin A. It is interesting that this compound, termed herkinorin, does not promote the recruitment of β-arrestin-2 to the μOR and does not lead to receptor internalization. Moreover, whereas G protein-coupled receptor kinase overexpression can promote morphine-induced β-arrestin interactions and μOR internalization, such manipulations do not promote herkinorin-induced trafficking. Studies in mice have shown that β-arrestin-2 plays an important role in the development of morphine-induced tolerance, constipation, and respiratory depression. Therefore, drugs that can activate the receptor without recruiting the arrestins may be a promising step in the development of opiate analgesics that distinguish between agonist activity and receptor regulation and may ultimately lead to therapeutics designed to provide pain relief without the adverse side effects normally associated with the opiate narcotics. PMID:17090705

  2. Agonist Binding and Desensitization of the μ-Opioid Receptor Is Modulated by Phosphorylation of the C-Terminal Tail Domain

    PubMed Central

    Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Bunzow, James R.; Williams, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Sustained activation of G protein–coupled receptors can lead to a rapid decline in signaling through acute receptor desensitization. In the case of the μ-opioid receptor (MOPr), this desensitization may play a role in the development of analgesic tolerance. It is understood that phosphorylation of MOPr promotes association with β-arrestin proteins, which then facilitates desensitization and receptor internalization. Agonists that induce acute desensitization have been shown to induce a noncanonical high-affinity agonist binding state in MOPr, conferring a persistent memory of prior receptor activation. In the current study, live-cell confocal imaging was used to investigate the role of receptor phosphorylation in agonist binding to MOPr. A phosphorylation cluster in the C-terminal tail of MOPr was identified as a mediator of agonist-induced affinity changes in MOPr. This site is unique from the primary phosphorylation cluster responsible for β-arrestin binding and internalization. Electrophysiologic measurements of receptor function suggest that both phosphorylation clusters may play a parallel role during acute receptor desensitization. Desensitization was unaffected by alanine mutation of either phosphorylation cluster, but was largely eliminated when both clusters were mutated. Overall, this work suggests that there are multiple effects of MOPr phosphorylation that appear to regulate MOPr function: one affecting β-arrestin binding and a second affecting agonist binding. PMID:25934731

  3. Unraveling a molecular determinant for clathrin-independent internalization of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Min; Zhang, Wenhua; Tian, Yangli; Xu, Chanjuan; Xu, Tao; Liu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Rongying

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis and postendocytic sorting of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is important for the regulation of both their cell surface density and signaling profile. Unlike the mechanisms of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE), the mechanisms underlying the control of GPCR signaling by clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) remain largely unknown. Among the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), the M4 mAChR undergoes CDE and recycling, whereas the M2 mAChR is internalized through CIE and targeted to lysosomes. Here we investigated the endocytosis and postendocytic trafficking of M2 mAChR based on a comparative analysis of the third cytoplasmic domain in M2 and M4 mAChRs. For the first time, we identified that the sequence 374KKKPPPS380 servers as a sorting signal for the clathrin-independent internalization of M2 mAChR. Switching 374KKKPPPS380 to the i3 loop of the M4 mAChR shifted the receptor into lysosomes through the CIE pathway; and therefore away from CDE and recycling. We also found another previously unidentified sequence that guides CDE of the M2 mAChR, 361VARKIVKMTKQPA373, which is normally masked in the presence of the downstream sequence 374KKKPPPS380. Taken together, our data indicate that endocytosis and postendocytic sorting of GPCRs that undergo CIE could be sequence-dependent. PMID:26094760

  4. Unraveling a molecular determinant for clathrin-independent internalization of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Wan, Min; Zhang, Wenhua; Tian, Yangli; Xu, Chanjuan; Xu, Tao; Liu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Rongying

    2015-06-22

    Endocytosis and postendocytic sorting of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is important for the regulation of both their cell surface density and signaling profile. Unlike the mechanisms of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE), the mechanisms underlying the control of GPCR signaling by clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) remain largely unknown. Among the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), the M4 mAChR undergoes CDE and recycling, whereas the M2 mAChR is internalized through CIE and targeted to lysosomes. Here we investigated the endocytosis and postendocytic trafficking of M2 mAChR based on a comparative analysis of the third cytoplasmic domain in M2 and M4 mAChRs. For the first time, we identified that the sequence (374)KKKPPPS(380) servers as a sorting signal for the clathrin-independent internalization of M2 mAChR. Switching (374)KKKPPPS(380) to the i3 loop of the M4 mAChR shifted the receptor into lysosomes through the CIE pathway; and therefore away from CDE and recycling. We also found another previously unidentified sequence that guides CDE of the M2 mAChR, (361)VARKIVKMTKQPA(373), which is normally masked in the presence of the downstream sequence (374)KKKPPPS(380). Taken together, our data indicate that endocytosis and postendocytic sorting of GPCRs that undergo CIE could be sequence-dependent.

  5. The insulin receptor juxtamembrane region contains two independent tyrosine/beta-turn internalization signals

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the role of tyrosine residues in the insulin receptor cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region (Tyr953 and Tyr960) during endocytosis. Analysis of the secondary structure of the juxtamembrane region by the Chou-Fasman algorithms predicts that both the sequences GPLY953 and NPEY960 form tyrosine-containing beta-turns. Similarly, analysis of model peptides by 1-D and 2-D NMR show that these sequences form beta-turns in solution, whereas replacement of the tyrosine residues with alanine destabilizes the beta-turn. CHO cell lines were prepared expressing mutant receptors in which each tyrosine was mutated to phenylalanine or alanine, and an additional mutant contained alanine at both positions. These mutations had no effect on insulin binding or receptor autophosphorylation. Replacements with phenylalanine had no effect on the rate of [125I]insulin endocytosis, whereas single substitutions with alanine reduced [125I]insulin endocytosis by 40-50%. Replacement of both tyrosines with alanine reduced internalization by 70%. These data suggest that the insulin receptor contains two tyrosine/beta-turns which contribute independently and additively to insulin-stimulated endocytosis. PMID:1500426

  6. Importance of a N-terminal aspartate in the internalization of the neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Parker, Steven L; Parker, Michael S; Wong, Ying Y; Sah, Renu; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Sallee, Floyd

    2008-10-10

    With human neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor expressed in the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, the Asp35Ala mutation, and especially the change of Pro34Asp35 to Ala34Ala35, decrease the compartmentalization and strongly accelerate internalization of the receptor. These changes are not associated with alterations in agonist affinity, G-protein interaction, dimerization, or level of expression of the mutated receptors relative to the wildtype receptor. The proline-flanked aspartate in the N-terminal extracellular segment of the neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor thus apparently has a large role in anchoring and compartmentalization of the receptor. However, the Pro34Ala mutation does not significantly affect the embedding and cycling of the receptor.

  7. Internalization of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is required to mediate intracellular responses.

    PubMed

    Sevillano, Natalia; Girón, María D; Salido, Mercedes; Vargas, Alberto M; Vilches, José; Salto, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    To dissect the rat receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) subcellular distribution and trafficking in eukaryotic cells, an expression system coding for a fusion protein between the RAGE and an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) has been used. The RAGE-EGFP protein is expressed at the plasma membrane of CHO-k1 and Neuro-2a (N2a) cells and retains the capacity to bind Texas Red-labelled advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs addition to the cell cultures induced a change in the subcellular distribution of the fluorescent RAGE-EGFP protein compatible with an internalization of the AGEs-RAGE complex. Furthermore, while N2a cells expressing the RAGE-EGFP showed an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and NF-kappaB DNA binding in response to AGEs, pre-incubation with dansyl-cadaverine or phenylarsine oxide, inhibitors of receptors internalization, blocked the activation of ERKs and other intracellular responses mediated by AGEs. These results suggest that internalization plays a key role in the signal transduction mediated by RAGE.

  8. [Differences in dynamics of insulin and insulin-like growth I (IGF-I) receptors internalization in isolated rat hepatocytes].

    PubMed

    Kolychev, A P; Ternovskaya, E E; Arsenieva, A V; Shapkina, E V

    2013-01-01

    Insulin and IGF-I are two related peptides performing in the mammalian body functionally different roles of the metabolic and growth hormones, respectively. Internalization of the insulin-receptor complex (IRC) is the most important chain of mechanism of the action of hormone. To elucidate differences in the main stages of internalization of the two related hormones, the internalization dynamics of 125I-insulin and 125I-IGF-I was traced in isolated rat hepatocytes at 37 and 12 degrees C. There were established marked differences in the process of internalization of labeled hormones, which is stimulated by insulin and IGF-I. At 37 degrees C the insulin-stimulated internalization, unlike the process initiated by IGF-I, did not reach the maximal level for 1 h of incubation. However, essential differences in the internalization course of these two related peptide were obvious at the temperature of 12 degrees C. The internalization level of insulin receptors at 12 degrees C decreased by one third in spite of a significant increase of the insulin receptor binding on the hepatocytes plasma membrane. At 12 degrees C a slight decrease of the proportion of intracellular 125I-IGF-I correlated with a decrease in the 125I-IGF-I binding to receptors on the cell membrane. Internalization of IGF-I receptors was not affected by low temperature, as neither its level, nor the rate changed at 12 degrees C. The paradoxical decrease of the insulin-stimulated internalization at low temperature seems to represent a peculiar "inhibition mechanism" of immersion of IRC into the cell, which leads to accumulation of the complexes on the cell surface and possibly to a readjustment of the insulin biological activity. The resistance of internalization of the IGF-I receptor to cold seems to be related to the more ancient origin of this mechanism in the poikilothermal vertebrates.

  9. Proteolytic activation of receptor-bound anthrax protective antigen on macrophages promotes its internalization.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, K E; Collier, R J; Swanson, J A

    2000-06-01

    Immunofluorescence and other methods have been used to probe the self-assembly and internalization of the binary toxin, anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx), in primary murine macrophages. Proteolytic activation of protective antigen (PA; 83 kDa, the B moiety of the toxin) by furin was the rate-limiting step in internalization of LeTx and promoted clearance of PA from the cell surface. A furin-resistant form of PA remained at the cell surface for at least 90 min. Oligomerization of receptor-bound PA63, the 63 kDa active fragment of PA, was manifested by its conversion to a pronase-resistant state, characteristic of the heptameric prepore form in solution. That oligomerization of PA63 triggers toxin internalization is supported by the observation that PA20, the complementary 20 kDa fragment of PA, inhibited clearance of nicked PA. The PA63 prepore, with or without lethal factor (LF), cleared slowly from the cell surface. These studies show that proteolytic cleavage of PA, in addition to permitting oligomerization and LF binding, also promotes internalization of the protein. The relatively long period of activation and internalization of PA at the cell surface may reflect adaptation of this binary toxin that maximizes self-assembly.

  10. Cryptococcus neoformans is internalized by receptor-mediated or 'triggered' phagocytosis, dependent on actin recruitment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both 'zipper' (receptor-mediated) and 'trigger' (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells.

  11. Dissociation and trafficking of rat GABAB receptor heterodimer upon chronic capsaicin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Laffray, Sophie; Tan, Kelly; Dulluc, Josette; Bouali-Benazzouz, Rabia; Calver, Andrew R; Nagy, Frédéric; Landry, Marc

    2007-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABAB) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate GABAergic inhibition in the brain. Their functional expression is dependent upon the formation of heterodimers between GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits, a process that occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the mechanisms that regulate GABAB receptor oligomerization at the plasma membrane remain largely unknown. We first characterized the functional cytoarchitecture of an organotypic co-culture model of rat dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord. Subsequently, we studied the interactions between GABAB subunits after chronic stimulation of sensory fibres with capsaicin. Surface labelling of recombinant proteins showed a decrease in subunit co-localization and GABAB2 labelling, after capsaicin treatment. In these conditions, fluorescence lifetime imaging measurements further demonstrated a loss of interactions between green fluorescent protein-GABAB1b and t-dimer discosoma sp red fluorescent protein-GABAB2 subunits. Finally, we established that the GABAB receptor undergoes clathrin-dependent internalization and rapid recycling to the plasma membrane following activation with baclofen, a GABAB agonist. However, in cultures chronically stimulated with capsaicin, the agonist-induced endocytosis was decreased, reflecting changes in the dimeric state of the receptor. Taken together, our results indicate that the chronic stimulation of sensory fibres can dissociate the GABAB heterodimer and alters its responsiveness to the endogenous ligand. Chronic stimulation thus modulates receptor oligomerization, providing additional levels of control of signalling.

  12. Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors correlates with the formation of a continuous internal water pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuguang; Filipek, Slawomir; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Vogel, Horst

    2014-09-09

    Recent crystal structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have revealed ordered internal water molecules, raising questions about the functional role of those waters for receptor activation that could not be answered by the static structures. Here, we used molecular dynamics simulations to monitor--at atomic and high temporal resolution--conformational changes of central importance for the activation of three prototypical GPCRs with known crystal structures: the adenosine A2A receptor, the β2-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin. Our simulations reveal that a hydrophobic layer of amino acid residues next to the characteristic NPxxY motif forms a gate that opens to form a continuous water channel only upon receptor activation. The highly conserved tyrosine residue Y(7.53) undergoes transitions between three distinct conformations representative of inactive, G-protein activated and GPCR metastates. Additional analysis of the available GPCR crystal structures reveals general principles governing the functional roles of internal waters in GPCRs.

  13. Cannabinoid receptor interacting protein suppresses agonist-driven CB1 receptor internalization and regulates receptor replenishment in an agonist-biased manner.

    PubMed

    Blume, Lawrence C; Leone-Kabler, Sandra; Luessen, Deborah J; Marrs, Glen S; Lyons, Erica; Bass, Caroline E; Chen, Rong; Selley, Dana E; Howlett, Allyn C

    2016-11-01

    Cannabinoid receptor interacting protein 1a (CRIP1a) is a CB1 receptor (CB1 R) distal C-terminus-associated protein that modulates CB1 R signaling via G proteins, and CB1 R down-regulation but not desensitization (Blume et al. [2015] Cell Signal., 27, 716-726; Smith et al. [2015] Mol. Pharmacol., 87, 747-765). In this study, we determined the involvement of CRIP1a in CB1 R plasma membrane trafficking. To follow the effects of agonists and antagonists on cell surface CB1 Rs, we utilized the genetically homogeneous cloned neuronal cell line N18TG2, which endogenously expresses both CB1 R and CRIP1a, and exhibits a well-characterized endocannabinoid signaling system. We developed stable CRIP1a-over-expressing and CRIP1a-siRNA-silenced knockdown clones to investigate gene dose effects of CRIP1a on CB1 R plasma membrane expression. Results indicate that CP55940 or WIN55212-2 (10 nM, 5 min) reduced cell surface CB1 R by a dynamin- and clathrin-dependent process, and this was attenuated by CRIP1a over-expression. CP55940-mediated cell surface CB1 R loss was followed by a cycloheximide-sensitive recovery of surface receptors (30-120 min), suggesting the requirement for new protein synthesis. In contrast, WIN55212-2-mediated cell surface CB1 Rs recovered only in CRIP1a knockdown cells. Changes in CRIP1a expression levels did not affect a transient rimonabant (10 nM)-mediated increase in cell surface CB1 Rs, which is postulated to be as a result of rimonabant effects on 'non-agonist-driven' internalization. These studies demonstrate a novel role for CRIP1a in agonist-driven CB1 R cell surface regulation postulated to occur by two mechanisms: 1) attenuating internalization that is agonist-mediated, but not that in the absence of exogenous agonists, and 2) biased agonist-dependent trafficking of de novo synthesized receptor to the cell surface.

  14. Evidence for phosphorylation-dependent internalization of recombinant human ρ1 GABAC receptors

    PubMed Central

    Filippova, Natalia; Dudley, Richard; Weiss, David S

    1999-01-01

    decrease in the amplitude of IGABA, the cell capacitance significantly decreased in the presence of ATP in the patch pipette. This decrease in capacitance was not observed in the absence of Mg-ATP. The decrease in the membrane surface area suggests that receptor internalization could be a potential mechanism for the observed inactivation.At 32 °C, compared with 22 °C, the rate and magnitude of the decline was increased dramatically. In contrast, at 16 °C, no significant change in IGABA was observed over the 20 min recording time. This marked temperature sensitivity is consistent with receptor internalization as a mechanism for the time-dependent decline in IGABA.The specificity of the decrease in IGABA was assessed by coexpressing the voltage-dependent potassium channel Kv1.4 along with the ρ1 receptor in HEK293 cells. The amplitude of the potassium current (IKv1.4) exhibited very little decrement in comparison to IGABA suggesting that the putative GABA receptor internalization was not the consequence of a non-specific membrane retrieval. PMID:10381587

  15. Regulation of membrane cholecystokinin-2 receptor by agonists enables classification of partial agonists as biased agonists.

    PubMed

    Magnan, Rémi; Masri, Bernard; Escrieut, Chantal; Foucaud, Magali; Cordelier, Pierre; Fourmy, Daniel

    2011-02-25

    Given the importance of G-protein-coupled receptors as pharmacological targets in medicine, efforts directed at understanding the molecular mechanism by which pharmacological compounds regulate their presence at the cell surface is of paramount importance. In this context, using confocal microscopy and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, we have investigated internalization and intracellular trafficking of the cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R) in response to both natural and synthetic ligands with different pharmacological features. We found that CCK and gastrin, which are full agonists on CCK2R-induced inositol phosphate production, rapidly and abundantly stimulate internalization. Internalized CCK2R did not rapidly recycle to plasma membrane but instead was directed to late endosomes/lysosomes. CCK2R endocytosis involves clathrin-coated pits and dynamin and high affinity and prolonged binding of β-arrestin1 or -2. Partial agonists and antagonists on CCK2R-induced inositol phosphate formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation did not stimulate CCK2R internalization or β-arrestin recruitment to the CCK2R but blocked full agonist-induced internalization and β-arrestin recruitment. The extreme C-terminal region of the CCK2R (and more precisely phosphorylatable residues Ser(437)-Xaa(438)-Thr(439)-Thr(440)-Xaa(441)-Ser(442)-Thr(443)) were critical for β-arrestin recruitment. However, this region and β-arrestins were dispensable for CCK2R internalization. In conclusion, this study allowed us to classify the human CCK2R as a member of class B G-protein-coupled receptors with regard to its endocytosis features and identified biased agonists of the CCK2R. These new important insights will allow us to investigate the role of internalized CCK2R·β-arrestin complexes in cancers expressing this receptor and to develop new diagnosis and therapeutic strategies targeting this receptor.

  16. Multivesicular endosomes containing internalized EGF-EGF receptor complexes mature and then fuse directly with lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have followed the transfer of EGF-EGF receptor (EGFR) complexes from endosomal vacuoles that contain transferrin receptors (TfR) to lysosome vacuoles identified by their content of HRP loaded as a 15-min pulse 4 h previously. We show that the HRP-loaded lysosomes are lysosomal- associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) positive, mannose-6-phosphate receptor (M6PR) negative. and contain active acid hydrolase. EGF-EGFR complexes are delivered to these lysosomes intact and are then rapidly degraded. Preactivating the HRP contained within the preloaded lysosomes inhibits the delivery of EGFR and degradation of EGF, and results in the accumulation of EGFR-containing multivesicular bodies (MVB). With time these accumulating MVB undergo a series of maturation changes that include the loss of TfR, the continued recruitment of EGFR, and the accumulation of internal vesicles, but they remain LAMP-1 and M6PR negative. The mature MVB are often seen to make direct contact with lysosomes containing preactivated HRP, but their perimeter membranes remain intact. Together our observations suggest that the transfer of EGF-EGFR complexes from the TfR-containing endosome compartment to the lysosomes that degrade them employs a single vacuolar intermediate, the maturing MVB, and can be achieved by a single heterotypic fusion step. PMID:8601581

  17. The Chemokine Receptor CCR1 Is Constitutively Active, Which Leads to G Protein-independent, β-Arrestin-mediated Internalization*

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, C. Taylor; Salanga, Catherina L.; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Trejo, JoAnn; Handel, Tracy M.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by their associated ligands has been extensively studied, and increasing structural information about the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand-dependent receptor activation is beginning to emerge with the recent expansion in GPCR crystal structures. However, some GPCRs are also able to adopt active conformations in the absence of agonist binding that result in the initiation of signal transduction and receptor down-modulation. In this report, we show that the CC-type chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) exhibits significant constitutive activity leading to a variety of cellular responses. CCR1 expression is sufficient to induce inhibition of cAMP formation, increased F-actin content, and basal migration of human and murine leukocytes. The constitutive activity leads to basal phosphorylation of the receptor, recruitment of β-arrestin-2, and subsequent receptor internalization. CCR1 concurrently engages Gαi and β-arrestin-2 in a multiprotein complex, which may be accommodated by homo-oligomerization or receptor clustering. The data suggest the presence of two functional states for CCR1; whereas receptor coupled to Gαi functions as a canonical GPCR, albeit with high constitutive activity, the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex is required for G protein-independent constitutive receptor internalization. The pertussis toxin-insensitive uptake of chemokine by the receptor suggests that the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex may be related to a potential scavenging function of the receptor, which may be important for maintenance of chemokine gradients and receptor responsiveness in complex fields of chemokines during inflammation. PMID:24056371

  18. Structural/functional relationships between internal and external MSH receptors: modulation of expression in Cloudman melanoma cells by UVB radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, A.K.; Orlow, S.J.; Bolognia, J.L.; Pawelek, J.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Expression of internal receptors for MSH is an important criterion for responsiveness to MSH by Cloudman melanoma cells. Here, we show that internal and external receptors for MSH are of identical molecular weights (50-53 kDa) and share common antigenic determinants, indicating a structural relationship between the 2 populations of molecules. The internal receptors co-purified with a sub-cellular fraction highly enriched for small vesicles, many of which were coated. Ultraviolet B light (UVB) acted synergistically with MSH to increase tyrosinase activity and melanin content of cultured Cloudman melanoma cells, consistent with previous findings in the skin of mice and guinea pigs. Preceding the rise in tyrosinase activity in cultured cells, UVB elicited a decrease in internal MSH binding sites and a concomitant increase in external sites. The time frame for the UVB effects on MSH receptors and melanogenesis, 48 hours, was similar to that for a response to solar radiation in humans. Together, the results indicate a key role for MSH receptors in the induction of melanogenesis by UVB and suggest a potential mechanism of action for UVB: redistribution of MSH receptors with a resultant increase in cellular responsiveness to MSH.

  19. Internalization of the TGF-β type I receptor into caveolin-1 and EEA1 double-positive early endosomes.

    PubMed

    He, Kangmin; Yan, Xiaohua; Li, Nan; Dang, Song; Xu, Li; Zhao, Bing; Li, Zijian; Lv, Zhizhen; Fang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Youyi; Chen, Ye-Guang

    2015-06-01

    Endocytosis and intracellular sorting of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) receptors play an important regulatory role in TGF-β signaling. Two major endocytic pathways, clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, have been reported to independently mediate the internalization of TGF-β receptors. In this study, we demonstrate that the clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytic pathways can converge during TGF-β receptor endocytic trafficking. By tracking the intracellular dynamics of fluorescently-labeled TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI), we found that after mediating TβRI internalization, certain clathrin-coated vesicles and caveolar vesicles are fused underneath the plasma membrane, forming a novel type of caveolin-1 and clathrin double-positive vesicles. Under the regulation of Rab5, the fused vesicles are targeted to early endosomes and thus deliver the internalized TβRI to the caveolin-1 and EEA1 double-positive early endosomes (caveolin-1-positive early endosomes). We further showed that the caveolin-1-positive early endosomes are positive for Smad3/SARA, Rab11 and Smad7/Smurf2, and may act as a multifunctional device for TGF-β signaling and TGF-β receptor recycling and degradation. Therefore, these findings uncover a novel scenario of endocytosis, the direct fusion of clathrin-coated and caveolae vesicles during TGF-β receptor endocytic trafficking, which leads to the formation of the multifunctional sorting device, caveolin-1-positive early endosomes, for TGF-β receptors.

  20. Morphine-induced internalization of the L83I mutant of the rat μ-opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, A E; Oldfield, S; Krasel, C; Mundell, S J; Henderson, G; Kelly, E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Naturally occurring single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within GPCRs can result in alterations in various pharmacological parameters. Understanding the regulation and function of endocytic trafficking of the μ-opioid receptor (MOP receptor) is of great importance given its implication in the development of opioid tolerance. This study has compared the agonist-dependent trafficking and signalling of L83I, the rat orthologue of a naturally occurring variant of the MOP receptor. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cell surface elisa, confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation assays were used to characterize the trafficking properties of the MOP-L83I variant in comparison with the wild-type receptor in HEK 293 cells. Functional assays were used to compare the ability of the L83I variant to signal to several downstream pathways. KEY RESULTS Morphine-induced internalization of the L83I MOP receptor was markedly increased in comparison with the wild-type receptor. The altered trafficking of this variant was found to be specific to morphine and was both G-protein receptor kinase- and dynamin-dependent. The enhanced internalization of L83I variant in response to morphine was not due to increased phosphorylation of serine 375, arrestin association or an increased ability to signal. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that morphine promotes a specific conformation of the L83I variant that makes it more liable to internalize in response to morphine, unlike the wild-type receptor that undergoes significantly less morphine-stimulated internalization, providing an example of a ligand-selective biased receptor. The presence of this SNP within an individual may consequently affect the development of tolerance and analgesic responses. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24697554

  1. Drosophila Sugar Receptors in Sweet Taste Perception, Olfaction and Internal Nutrient Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Slone, Jesse; Jagge, Christopher; Song, Xiangyu; Amrein, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification of nutritious compounds is dependent on expression of specific taste receptors in appropriate taste cell types [1]. In contrast to mammals, which rely on a single, broadly tuned heterodimeric sugar receptor [2], the Drosophila genome harbors a small subfamily of eight, closely related gustatory receptor (Gr) genes, Gr5a, Gr61a and Gr64a-f, of which three have been proposed to mediate sweet taste [3-6]. However, expression and function of several of these putative sugar Gr genes are not known. Here we present a comprehensive expression and functional analysis using GrLEXA/GAL4 alleles that were generated through homologous recombination. We show that sugar Gr genes are expressed in a combinatorial manner to yield at least eight sets of sweet sensing neurons. Behavioral investigations show that most sugar Gr mutations affect taste responses to only a small number of sugars and that effective detection of most sugars is dependent on more than one Gr gene. Surprisingly, Gr64a, one of three Gr genes previously proposed to play a major role in sweet taste [3, 4], is not expressed in labellar taste neurons, and Gr64a mutant flies exhibit normal sugar responses elicited from the labellum. Our analysis provides a molecular rationale for distinct tuning profiles of sweet taste neurons, and it favors a model whereby all sugar Grs contribute to sweet taste. Furthermore, expression in olfactory organs and the brain implies novel roles for sugar Gr genes in olfaction and internal nutrient sensing, respectively. Thus, sugar receptors may contribute to feeding behavior via multiple sensory systems. PMID:25702577

  2. Ligand-induced internalization, recycling, and resensitization of adrenomedullin receptors depend not on CLR or RAMP alone but on the receptor complex as a whole.

    PubMed

    Nag, Kakon; Sultana, Naznin; Kato, Akira; Dranik, Anna; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Kutsuzawa, Koichi; Hirose, Shigehisa; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2015-02-01

    Adrenomedullins (AM) is a multifaceted distinct subfamily of peptides that belongs to the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) superfamily. These peptides exert their functional activities via associations of calcitonin receptor-like receptors (CLRs) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) RAMP2 and RAMP3. Recent studies established that RAMPs and CLRs can modify biochemical properties such as trafficking and glycosylation of each other. However there is very little or no understanding regarding how RAMP or CLR influence ligand-induced events of AM-receptor complex. In this study, using pufferfish homologs of CLR (mfCLR1-3) and RAMP (mfRAMP2 and mfRAMP3), we revealed that all combinations of CLR and RAMP quickly underwent ligand-induced internalization; however, their recycling rates were different as follows: mfCLR1-mfRAMP3>mfCLR2-mfRAMP3>mfCLR3-mfRAMP3. Functional receptor assay confirmed that the recycled receptors were resensitized on the plasma membrane. In contrast, a negligible amount of mfCLR1-mfRAMP2 was recycled and reconstituted. Immunocytochemistry results indicated that the lower recovery rate of mfCLR3-mfRAMP3 and mfCLR1-mfRAMP2 was correlated with higher proportion of lysosomal localization of these receptor complexes compared to the other combinations. Collectively our results indicate, for the first time, that the ligand-induced internalization, recycling, and reconstitution properties of RAMP-CLR receptor complexes depend on the receptor-complex as a whole, and not on individual CLR or RAMP alone.

  3. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. [corrected]. LXXXIX. Update on the extended family of chemokine receptors and introducing a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M; Graham, Gerard J; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Murphy, Philip M; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145-176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human Genome

  4. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  5. Caveolae-dependent internalization and homologous desensitization of VIP/PACAP receptor, VPAC₂, in gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Sunila; Bhattacharya, Sayak; Kim, Jennnifer; Fayed, Sally; Al-Shboul, Othman; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2013-05-01

    The main membrane proteins of caveolae (caveolin-1, -2 and -3) oligomerize within lipid rich domains to form regular invaginations of smooth muscle plasma membrane and participate in receptor internalization and desensitization independent of clathrin-coated vesicle endocytosis. We have previously shown that Gs-coupled VIP/PACAP receptors, VPAC2, predominantly expressed in smooth muscle cells of the gut, are exclusively phosphorylated by GRK2 leading to receptor internalization and desensitization. Herein, we characterized the role of caveolin-1 in VPAC2 receptor internalization and desensitization in gastric smooth muscle using three approaches: (i) methyl β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) to deplete cholesterol and disrupt caveolae in dispersed muscle cells, (ii) caveolin-1 siRNA to suppress caveolin-1 expression in cultured muscle cells, and (iii) caveolin-1 knockout mice (caveolin-1(-/-)). Pretreatment of gastric muscle cells with VIP stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin-1, and induced VPAC2 receptor internalization (measured as decrease in (125)I-VIP binding after pretreatment) and desensitization (measured as decrease in VIP-induced cAMP formation after pretreatment). Caveolin-1 phosphorylation, and VPAC2 receptor internalization and desensitization were blocked by disruption of caveolae with MβCD, suppression of caveolin-1 with caveolin-1 siRNA or inhibition of Src kinase activity by PP2. Pretreatment with VIP significantly inhibited adenylyl cyclase activity and muscle relaxation in response to subsequent addition of VIP in freshly dispersed muscle cells and in muscle strips isolated from wild type and caveolin-1(-/-) mice; however, the inhibition was significantly attenuated in caveolin-1(-/-) mice. These results suggest that caveolin-1 plays an important role in VPAC2 receptor internalization and desensitization.

  6. Direct visualisation of internalization of the adenosine A3 receptor and localization with arrestin3 using a fluorescent agonist.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, Leigh A; Vernall, Andrea J; Briddon, Stephen J; Kellam, Barrie; Hill, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    Fluorescence based probes provide a novel way to study the dynamic internalization process of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Recent advances in the rational design of fluorescent ligands for GPCRs have been used here to generate new fluorescent agonists containing tripeptide linkers for the adenosine A3 receptor. The fluorescent agonist BY630-X-(D)-A-(D)-A-G-ABEA was found to be a highly potent agonist at the adenosine A3 receptor in both reporter gene (pEC50 = 8.48 ± 0.09) and internalization assays (pEC50 = 7.47 ± 0.11). Confocal imaging studies showed that BY630-X-(D)-A-(D)-A-G-ABEA was internalized with A3 linked to yellow fluorescent protein, which was blocked by the competitive antagonist MRS1220. Internalization of untagged adenosine A3 could also be visualized with BY630-X-(D)-A-(D)-A-G-ABEA treatment. Further, BY630-X-(D)-A-(D)-A-G-ABEA stimulated the formation of receptor-arrestin3 complexes and was found to localize with these intracellular complexes. This highly potent agonist with excellent imaging properties should be a valuable tool to study receptor internalization. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Fluorescent Tools in Neuropharmacology'.

  7. Beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonist-induced increases in lipolysis, metabolic rate, facial flushing, and reflex tachycardia in anesthetized rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hom, G J; Forrest, M J; Bach, T J; Brady, E; Candelore, M R; Cascieri, M A; Fletcher, D J; Fisher, M H; Iliff, S A; Mathvink, R; Metzger, J; Pecore, V; Saperstein, R; Shih, T; Weber, A E; Wyvratt, M; Zafian, P; MacIntyre, D E

    2001-04-01

    The effects of two beta(3)-adrenergic receptor agonists, (R)-4-[4-(3-cyclopentylpropyl)-4,5-dihydro-5-oxo-1H-tetrazol-1-yl]-N-[4-[2-[[2-hydroxy-2-(3-pyridinyl)ethyl]amino]ethyl]phenyl]benzenesulfonamide and (R)-N-[4-[2-[[2-hydroxy-2-(3-pyridinyl)- ethyl]amino]ethyl]phenyl]-1-(4-octylthiazol-2-yl)-5-indolinesulfonamide, on indices of metabolic and cardiovascular function were studied in anesthetized rhesus monkeys. Both compounds are potent and specific agonists at human and rhesus beta(3)-adrenergic receptors. Intravenous administration of either compound produced dose-dependent lipolysis, increase in metabolic rate, peripheral vasodilatation, and tachycardia with no effects on mean arterial pressure. The increase in heart rate in response to either compound was biphasic with an initial rapid component coincident with the evoked peripheral vasodilatation and a second more slowly developing phase contemporaneous with the evoked increase in metabolic rate. Because both compounds exhibited weak binding to and activation of rhesus beta(1)-adrenergic receptors in vitro, it was hypothesized that the increase in heart rate may be reflexogenic in origin and proximally mediated via release of endogenous norepinephrine acting at cardiac beta(1)-adrenergic receptors. This hypothesis was confirmed by determining that beta(3)-adrenergic receptor agonist-evoked tachycardia was attenuated in the presence of propranolol and in ganglion-blocked animals, under which conditions there was no reduction in the evoked vasodilatation, lipolysis, or increase in metabolic rate. It is not certain whether the beta(3)-adrenergic receptor-evoked vasodilatation is a direct effect of compounds at beta(3)-adrenergic receptors in the peripheral vasculature or is secondary to the release or generation of an endogenous vasodilator. Peripheral vasodilatation in response to beta(3)-adrenergic receptor agonist administration was not attenuated in animals administered mepyramine, indomethacin, or

  8. Methylation of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Promoter in Preschoolers: Links with Internalizing Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Parade, Stephanie H.; Ridout, Kathryn K.; Seifer, Ronald; Armstrong, David A.; Marsit, Carmen J.; McWilliams, Melissa A.; Tyrka, Audrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that early adversity is linked to methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor gene NR3C1, which is a key regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Yet no prior work has considered the contribution of methylation of NR3C1 to emerging behavior problems and psychopathology in childhood. The current study examined links between methylation of NR3C1 and behavior problems in preschoolers. Data were drawn from a sample of preschoolers with early adversity (n=171). Children ranged in age from 3 to 5 years, were racially and ethnically diverse, and nearly all qualified for public assistance. Seventy-one children had child welfare documentation of moderate-severe maltreatment in the past six months. Structured record review and interviews in the home were used to assess early adversity. Parents reported on child internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. Methylation of NR3C1 at exons 1D, 1F, and 1H were measured via sodium bisulfite pyrosequencing from saliva DNA. Methylation of NR3C1 at exons 1D and 1F was positively associated with internalizing (r = .21, p < .01 and r = .23, p < .01 respectively), but not externalizing, behavior problems. Furthermore, NR3C1 methylation mediated effects of early adversity on internalizing behavior problems. These results suggest that methylation of NR3C1 contributes to psychopathology in young children, and NR3C1 methylation from saliva DNA is salient to behavioral outcomes. PMID:26822445

  9. The Mechanism of Chemokine Receptor 9 Internalization Triggered by Interleukin 2 and Interleukin 4

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiaoling; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Li; Hu, Meng; Leng, Jun; Yu, Beibei; Zhou, Beibei; Hu, Yi; Zhang, Qiuping

    2009-01-01

    In previous study, we found that the chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) was highly expressed on CD4+ T cells from patients with T-cell lineage acute lymphocytic leukemia (T-ALL) and mediated leukemia cell infiltration and metastasis. Combined use of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-4 promoted the internalization of CCR9 and therefore attenuated leukemia cell infiltration and metastasis. In this study, we preliminarily investigated the mechanism of internalization of CCR9 on MOLT4 cell model (a human leukemia T-cell line, naturally expresses CCR9) and found that IL-2 upregulated the cell surface expression of IL-4Rα (CD124) greatly, whereas IL-4 had no significant influence on α (CD25) and β subunits (CD122) of IL-2R. Moreover, specific inhibitors, such as staurosporine, H89 and heparin, inhibited internalization of CCR9, which indicated a role of protein kinase C (PKC) and G protein-coupled kinase 2 (GRK2), respectively. Furthermore, GRK2 was upregulated and translocated to cell membrane in IL-2 and IL-4 treated cells which indicated that PKC could be a prerequisite for GRK2 activity. PMID:19567201

  10. Binding and cross-linking of recombinant mouse interferon-. gamma. to receptors in mouse leukemic L1210 cells; interferon-. gamma. internalization and receptor down-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wietzerbin, J.; Gaudelet, C.; Aguet, M.; Falcoff, E.

    1986-04-01

    Recombinant E. coli-derived murine IFN-..gamma.. (Mu-rIFN-..gamma..; 5 x 10/sup 7/ U/mg) was radiolabeled with /sup 125/I by the chloramine-T method without loss of its antiviral activity. The /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFN-..gamma.. showed specific binding to L1210 cells. Scatchard analysis indicates about 4000 binding sites per cell and an apparent Kd of 5 x 10/sup -10/ M. Binding of /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFn-..gamma.. to cells inhibited by both natural (glycosylated) and rIFN-..gamma.., but not by IFN-..gamma../..beta... Receptor-bound /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFN-..gamma.. was rapidly internalized when incubation temperature was raised from 4/sup 0/C to 37/sup 0/C. On internalization, almost no IFN-..gamma.. degradation was observed during 16 hr incubation. /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFN-..gamma.. binding capacity decreased in cells preincubated with low doses of unlabeled Mu-rIFN-..gamma.., but not with IFN-..cap alpha../..beta... This receptor down-regulation was dose-dependent: 90% reduction of /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFN-..gamma.. binding was observed after preincubation with 100 U/ml. After removal of IFN-..gamma.. from the culture medium, the binding capacity increased with time. However, reappearance of receptor was completely blocked by cycloheximide or tunicamycin, suggesting that re-expression of receptors is not due to recycling but to the synthesis of new receptors, and that the receptor is probably a glycoprotein. Cross-linking of /sup 125/I-Mu-rIFN-..gamma.. to surface L1210 cell proteins by using bifunctional agents yielded a predominant complex of m.w. 110,000 +/- 5000. Thus, assuming a bimolecular complex, the m.w. of the receptor or receptor subunit would be close to 95,000 +/- 5000.

  11. Effect of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US27 on CXCR4 receptor internalization measured by fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) biosensors.

    PubMed

    Boeck, Jordan M; Spencer, Juliet V

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen and a member of the Herpesviridae family. HCMV has a large genome that encodes many genes that are non-essential for virus replication but instead play roles in manipulation of the host immune environment. One of these is the US27 gene, which encodes a protein with homology to the chemokine receptor family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The US27 protein has no known chemokine ligands but can modulate the signaling activity of host receptor CXCR4. We investigated the mechanism for enhanced CXCR4 signaling in the presence of US27 using a novel biosensor system comprised of fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs). FAP-tagged CXCR4 and US27 were used to explore receptor internalization and recovery dynamics, and the results demonstrate that significantly more CXCR4 internalization was observed in the presence of US27 compared to CXCR4 alone upon stimulation with CXCL12. While ligand-induced endocytosis rates were higher, steady state internalization of CXCR4 was not affected by US27. Additionally, US27 underwent rapid endocytosis at a rate that was independent of either CXCR4 expression or CXCL12 stimulation. These results demonstrate that one mechanism by which US27 can enhance CXCR4 signaling is to alter receptor internalization dynamics, which could ultimately have the effect of promoting virus dissemination by increasing trafficking of HCMV-infected cells to tissues where CXCL12 is highly expressed.

  12. Effect of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US27 on CXCR4 receptor internalization measured by fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, Jordan M.; Spencer, Juliet V.

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen and a member of the Herpesviridae family. HCMV has a large genome that encodes many genes that are non-essential for virus replication but instead play roles in manipulation of the host immune environment. One of these is the US27 gene, which encodes a protein with homology to the chemokine receptor family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The US27 protein has no known chemokine ligands but can modulate the signaling activity of host receptor CXCR4. We investigated the mechanism for enhanced CXCR4 signaling in the presence of US27 using a novel biosensor system comprised of fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs). FAP-tagged CXCR4 and US27 were used to explore receptor internalization and recovery dynamics, and the results demonstrate that significantly more CXCR4 internalization was observed in the presence of US27 compared to CXCR4 alone upon stimulation with CXCL12. While ligand-induced endocytosis rates were higher, steady state internalization of CXCR4 was not affected by US27. Additionally, US27 underwent rapid endocytosis at a rate that was independent of either CXCR4 expression or CXCL12 stimulation. These results demonstrate that one mechanism by which US27 can enhance CXCR4 signaling is to alter receptor internalization dynamics, which could ultimately have the effect of promoting virus dissemination by increasing trafficking of HCMV-infected cells to tissues where CXCL12 is highly expressed. PMID:28207860

  13. Imaging the Insertion of Superecliptic pHluorin-Labeled Dopamine D2 Receptor Using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Daly, Kathryn M; Li, Yun; Lin, Da-Ting

    2015-01-05

    A better understanding of mechanisms governing receptor insertion to the plasma membrane (PM) requires an experimental approach with excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. Here we present a strategy that enables dynamic visualization of insertion events for dopamine D2 receptors into the PM. This approach includes tagging a pH-sensitive GFP, superecliptic pHluorin, to the extracellular domain of the receptor. By imaging pHluorin-tagged receptors under total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), we were able to directly visualize individual receptor insertion events into the PM in cultured neurons. This novel imaging approach can be applied to both secreted proteins and many membrane proteins with an extracellular domain labeled with superecliptic pHluorin, and will ultimately allow for detailed dissections of the key mechanisms governing secretion of soluble proteins or the insertion of different membrane proteins to the PM.

  14. Smoke carcinogens cause bone loss through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and induction of CYP1 enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Smoking is a major risk factor for osteoporosis and fracture. Here, we show that smoke toxins and environmental chemicals such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin (TCDD), and 3-methyl cholanthrene, which are well known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonists, induce osteocla...

  15. Peptide modifications differentially alter G protein-coupled receptor internalization and signaling bias.

    PubMed

    Mäde, Veronika; Babilon, Stefanie; Jolly, Navjeet; Wanka, Lizzy; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Diaz Gimenez, Luis E; Mörl, Karin; Cox, Helen M; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2014-09-15

    Although G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are targeted by more clinically used drugs than any other type of protein, their ligand development is particularly challenging. Humans have four neuropeptide Y receptors: hY1R and hY5R are orexigenic, while hY2R and hY4R are anorexigenic, and represent important anti-obesity drug targets. We show for the first time that PEGylation and lipidation, chemical modifications that prolong the plasma half-lives of peptides, confer additional benefits. Both modifications enhance pancreatic polypeptide preference for hY2R/hY4R over hY1R/hY5R. Lipidation biases the ligand towards arrestin recruitment and internalization, whereas PEGylation confers the opposite bias. These effects were independent of the cell system and modified residue. We thus provide novel insights into the mode of action of peptide modifications and open innovative venues for generating peptide agonists with extended therapeutic potential.

  16. Peptide Modifications Differentially Alter G Protein-Coupled Receptor Internalization and Signaling Bias**

    PubMed Central

    Mäde, Veronika; Babilon, Stefanie; Jolly, Navjeet; Wanka, Lizzy; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Diaz Gimenez, Luis E.; Mörl, Karin; Cox, Helen M.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.

    2016-01-01

    Although G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are targeted by more clinically used drugs than any other type of protein, their ligand development is particularly challenging. Humans have four neuropeptide Y receptors: hY1R and hY5R are orexigenic, while hY2R and hY4R are anorexigenic, and represent important anti-obesity drug targets. We show for the first time that PEGylation and lipidation, chemical modifications that prolong the plasma half-lives of peptides, confer additional benefits. Both modifications enhance pancreatic polypeptide preference for hY2R/hY4R over hY1R/hY5R. Lipidation biases the ligand towards arrestin recruitment and internalization, whereas PEGylation confers the opposite bias. These effects were independent of the cell system and modified residue. We thus provide novel insights into the mode of action of peptide modifications and open innovative venues for generating peptide agonists with extended therapeutic potential. PMID:25065900

  17. Receptor Crosslinking: A General Method to Trigger Internalization and Lysosomal Targeting of Therapeutic Receptor:Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Moody, Paul R; Sayers, Edward J; Magnusson, Johannes P; Alexander, Cameron; Borri, Paola; Watson, Peter; Jones, Arwyn T

    2015-12-01

    A major unmet clinical need is a universal method for subcellular targeting of bioactive molecules to lysosomes. Delivery to this organelle enables either degradation of oncogenic receptors that are overexpressed in cancers, or release of prodrugs from antibody-drug conjugates. Here, we describe a general method that uses receptor crosslinking to trigger endocytosis and subsequently redirect trafficking of receptor:cargo complexes from their expected route, to lysosomes. By incubation of plasma membrane receptors with biotinylated cargo and subsequent addition of streptavidin to crosslink receptor:cargo-biotin complexes, we achieved rapid and selective lysosomal targeting of transferrin, an anti-MHC class I antibody, and the clinically approved anti-Her2 antibody trastuzumab. These three protein ligands each target a receptor with a distinct cellular function and intracellular trafficking profile. Importantly, we confirmed that crosslinking of trastuzumab increased lysosomal degradation of its cognate oncogenic receptor Her2 in breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474. These data suggest that crosslinking could be exploited for a wide range of target receptors, for navigating therapeutics through the endolysosomal pathway, for significant therapeutic benefit.

  18. Receptor Crosslinking: A General Method to Trigger Internalization and Lysosomal Targeting of Therapeutic Receptor:Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Paul R; Sayers, Edward J; Magnusson, Johannes P; Alexander, Cameron; Borri, Paola; Watson, Peter; Jones, Arwyn T

    2015-01-01

    A major unmet clinical need is a universal method for subcellular targeting of bioactive molecules to lysosomes. Delivery to this organelle enables either degradation of oncogenic receptors that are overexpressed in cancers, or release of prodrugs from antibody–drug conjugates. Here, we describe a general method that uses receptor crosslinking to trigger endocytosis and subsequently redirect trafficking of receptor:cargo complexes from their expected route, to lysosomes. By incubation of plasma membrane receptors with biotinylated cargo and subsequent addition of streptavidin to crosslink receptor:cargo–biotin complexes, we achieved rapid and selective lysosomal targeting of transferrin, an anti-MHC class I antibody, and the clinically approved anti-Her2 antibody trastuzumab. These three protein ligands each target a receptor with a distinct cellular function and intracellular trafficking profile. Importantly, we confirmed that crosslinking of trastuzumab increased lysosomal degradation of its cognate oncogenic receptor Her2 in breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474. These data suggest that crosslinking could be exploited for a wide range of target receptors, for navigating therapeutics through the endolysosomal pathway, for significant therapeutic benefit. PMID:26412588

  19. Intranasally Administered Neuropeptide S (NPS) Exerts Anxiolytic Effects Following Internalization Into NPS Receptor-Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Irina A; Dine, Julien; Yen, Yi-Chun; Buell, Dominik R; Herrmann, Leonie; Holsboer, Florian; Eder, Matthias; Landgraf, Rainer; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Experiments in rodents revealed neuropeptide S (NPS) to constitute a potential novel treatment option for anxiety diseases such as panic and post-traumatic stress disorder. However, both its cerebral target sites and the molecular underpinnings of NPS-mediated effects still remain elusive. By administration of fluorophore-conjugated NPS, we pinpointed NPS target neurons in distinct regions throughout the entire brain. We demonstrated their functional relevance in the hippocampus. In the CA1 region, NPS modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. NPS is taken up into NPS receptor-expressing neurons by internalization of the receptor–ligand complex as we confirmed by subsequent cell culture studies. Furthermore, we tracked internalization of intranasally applied NPS at the single-neuron level and additionally demonstrate that it is delivered into the mouse brain without losing its anxiolytic properties. Finally, we show that NPS differentially modulates the expression of proteins of the glutamatergic system involved inter alia in synaptic plasticity. These results not only enlighten the path of NPS in the brain, but also establish a non-invasive method for NPS administration in mice, thus strongly encouraging translation into a novel therapeutic approach for pathological anxiety in humans. PMID:22278093

  20. Dopamine agonist-induced penile erection and yawning: a comparative study in outbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Corda, Maria Giuseppa; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Piludu, Maria Antonietta; Löber, Stefan; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter; Argiolas, Antonio; Giorgi, Osvaldo

    2013-08-01

    The effects on penile erection and yawning of subcutaneous (SC) injections of the mixed dopamine D1/D2-like agonist apomorphine (0.02-0.2 mg/kg) were studied in outbred Roman high- (RHA) and low-avoidance (RLA) male rats, two lines selectively bred for their respectively rapid versus poor acquisition of the active avoidance response in the shuttle-box, and compared with the effects observed in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Apomorphine dose-response curves were bell-shaped in all rat lines/strains. Notably, more penile erections and yawns were recorded mainly in the ascending part of these curves (e.g., apomorphine 0.02-0.08 mg/kg) in both RLA and RHA rats compared to SD rats, with RLA rats showing the higher response (especially for yawning) with respect to RHA rats. Similar results were found with PD-168,077 (0.02-0.2 mg/kg SC), a D4 receptor agonist, which induced penile erection but not yawning. In all rat lines/strains, apomorphine responses were markedly reduced by the D2 antagonist L-741,626, but not by the D3 antagonist, SB277011A, whereas the D4 antagonists L-745,870 and FAUC213 elicited a partial, yet statistically significant, inhibitory effect. In contrast, the pro-erectile effect of PD-168,077 was completely abolished by L-745,870 and FAUC213, as expected. The present study confirms and extends previously reported differences in dopamine transmission between RLA and RHA rats and between the SD strain and the Roman lines. Moreover, it confirms previous studies supporting the view that dopamine receptors of the D2 subtype play a predominant role in the pro-yawning and pro-erectile effect of apomorphine, and that the selective stimulation of D4 receptors induces penile erection.

  1. Two steps of insulin receptor internalization depend on different domains of the beta-subunit [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1993 Nov;123(4):1047

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The internalization of signaling receptors such as the insulin receptor is a complex, multi-step process. The aim of the present work was to determine the various steps in internalization of the insulin receptor and to establish which receptor domains are implicated in each of these by the use of receptors possessing in vitro mutations. We find that kinase activation and autophosphorylation of all three regulatory tyrosines 1146, 1150, and 1151, but not tyrosines 1316 and 1322 in the COOH-terminal domain, are required for the ligand-specific stage of the internalization process; i.e., the surface redistribution of the receptor from microvilli where initial binding occurs to the nonvillous domain of the cell. Early intracellular steps in insulin signal transduction involving the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase are not required for this redistribution. The second step of internalization consists in the anchoring of the receptors in clathrin- coated pits. In contrast to the first ligand specific step, this step is common to many receptors including those for transport proteins and occurs in the absence of kinase activation and receptor autophosphorylation, but requires a juxta-membrane cytoplasmic segment of the beta-subunit of the receptor including a NPXY sequence. Thus, there are two independent mechanisms controlling insulin receptor internalization which depend on different domains of the beta-subunit. PMID:8376461

  2. Internalization and Down-Regulation of the ALK Receptor in Neuroblastoma Cell Lines upon Monoclonal Antibodies Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mazot, Pierre; Cazes, Alex; Dingli, Florent; Degoutin, Joffrey; Irinopoulou, Théano; Boutterin, Marie-Claude; Lombard, Bérangère; Loew, Damarys; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth Helen; Delattre, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Recently, activating mutations of the full length ALK receptor, with two hot spots at positions F1174 and R1275, have been characterized in sporadic cases of neuroblastoma. Here, we report similar basal patterns of ALK phosphorylation between the neuroblastoma IMR-32 cell line, which expresses only the wild-type receptor (ALKWT), and the SH-SY5Y cell line, which exhibits a heterozygous ALK F1174L mutation and expresses both ALKWT and ALKF1174L receptors. We demonstrate that this lack of detectable increased phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells is a result of intracellular retention and proteasomal degradation of the mutated receptor. As a consequence, in SH-SY5Y cells, plasma membrane appears strongly enriched for ALKWT whereas both ALKWT and ALKF1174L were present in intracellular compartments. We further explored ALK receptor trafficking by investigating the effect of agonist and antagonist mAb (monoclonal antibodies) on ALK internalization and down-regulation, either in SH-SY5Y cells or in cells expressing only ALKWT. We observe that treatment with agonist mAbs resulted in ALK internalization and lysosomal targeting for receptor degradation. In contrast, antagonist mAb induced ALK internalization and recycling to the plasma membrane. Importantly, we correlate this differential trafficking of ALK in response to mAb with the recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl and ALK ubiquitylation only after agonist stimulation. This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms regulating ALK trafficking and degradation, showing that various ALK receptor pools are regulated by proteasome or lysosome pathways according to their intracellular localization. PMID:22479414

  3. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B.; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A.; Harty, Breanne L.; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C.; Monk, Kelly R.; Peeters, Miriam C.; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W.; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A.; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W.; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential. PMID:25713288

  4. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A; Harty, Breanne L; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C; Monk, Kelly R; Peeters, Miriam C; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential.

  5. The internalization signal and the phosphorylation site of transferrin receptor are distinct from the main basolateral sorting information.

    PubMed Central

    Dargemont, C; Le Bivic, A; Rothenberger, S; Iacopetta, B; Kühn, L C

    1993-01-01

    Wild-type human transferrin receptor (hTfR), like endogenous canine receptor, is expressed almost exclusively (97%) at the basolateral membrane of transfected Madin-Darbey canine kidney (MDCK) cells. We investigated the role of two distinct features of the hTfR cytoplasmic domain, namely the endocytic signal and the unique phosphorylation site, in polarized cell surface delivery. Basolateral location was not altered by point mutation of Ser24-->Ala24, indicating that phosphorylation is not involved in vectorial sorting of hTfR. The steady state distribution of hTfR was partially affected by a deletion of 36 cytoplasmic residues encompassing the internalization sequence. However, 80% of the receptors were still basolateral. As assessed by pulse-chase experiments in combination with biotinylation, newly synthesized wild-type and deletion mutant receptors were directly sorted to the domain of their steady state residency. Although both receptors could bind human transferrin, endocytosis of the deletion mutant was strongly impaired at either surface. These data indicate that the predominant basolateral targeting signal of hTfR is independent of the internalization sequence. Images PMID:8467813

  6. Flumazenil decreases surface expression of α4β2δ GABAA receptors by increasing the rate of receptor internalization

    PubMed Central

    Kuver, Aarti; Smith, Sheryl S.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in expression of α4βδ GABAA receptors (GABARs), triggered by fluctuations in the neurosteroid THP (3α-OH-5α[β]-pregnan-20-one), are associated with changes in mood and cognition. We tested whether α4βδ trafficking and surface expression would be altered by in vitro exposure to flumazenil, a benzodiazepine ligand which reduces α4βδ expression in vivo. We first determined that flumazenil (100 nM – 100 μM, IC50=~1 μM) acted as a negative modulator, reducing GABA (10 μM)-gated current in the presence of 100 nM THP (to increase receptor efficacy), assessed with whole cell patch clamp recordings of recombinant α4β2δ expressed in HEK-293 cells. Surface expression of recombinant α4β2δ receptors was detected using a 3XFLAG reporter at the C-terminus of α4 (α4F) using confocal immunocytochemical techniques following 48 h exposure of cells to GABA (10 μM) + THP (100 nM). Flumazenil (10 μM) decreased surface expression of α4F by ~60%, while increasing its intracellular accumulation, after 48 h. Reduced surface expression of α4β2δ after flumazenil treatment was confirmed by decreases in the current responses to 100 nM of the GABA agonist gaboxadol. Flumazenil-induced decreases in surface expression of α4β2δ were prevented by the dynamin blocker, dynasore, and by leupeptin, which blocks lysosomal enzymes, suggesting that flumazenil is acting to increase endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the receptor. Flumazenil increased the rate of receptor removal from the cell surface by 2-fold, assessed using botulinum toxin B to block insertion of new receptors. These findings may suggest new therapeutic strategies for regulation of α4β2δ expression using flumazenil. PMID:26592470

  7. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIX. Angiotensin Receptors: Interpreters of Pathophysiological Angiotensinergic Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Hamiyet; Kemp, Jacqueline R.; Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Eguchi, Satoru; Vanderheyden, Patrick M. L.; Thomas, Walter G.

    2015-01-01

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) produced hormone peptides regulate many vital body functions. Dysfunctional signaling by receptors for RAS peptides leads to pathologic states. Nearly half of humanity today would likely benefit from modern drugs targeting these receptors. The receptors for RAS peptides consist of three G-protein–coupled receptors—the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor), the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2 receptor), the MAS receptor—and a type II trans-membrane zinc protein—the candidate angiotensin IV receptor (AngIV binding site). The prorenin receptor is a relatively new contender for consideration, but is not included here because the role of prorenin receptor as an independent endocrine mediator is presently unclear. The full spectrum of biologic characteristics of these receptors is still evolving, but there is evidence establishing unique roles of each receptor in cardiovascular, hemodynamic, neurologic, renal, and endothelial functions, as well as in cell proliferation, survival, matrix-cell interaction, and inflammation. Therapeutic agents targeted to these receptors are either in active use in clinical intervention of major common diseases or under evaluation for repurposing in many other disorders. Broad-spectrum influence these receptors produce in complex pathophysiological context in our body highlights their role as precise interpreters of distinctive angiotensinergic peptide cues. This review article summarizes findings published in the last 15 years on the structure, pharmacology, signaling, physiology, and disease states related to angiotensin receptors. We also discuss the challenges the pharmacologist presently faces in formally accepting newer members as established angiotensin receptors and emphasize necessary future developments. PMID:26315714

  8. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor: A Key Bridging Molecule of External and Internal Chemical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jijing; Feng, Yu; Fu, Hualing; Xie, Heidi Qunhui; Jiang, Joy Xiaosong; Zhao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a highly evolutionary conserved, ligand-activated transcription factor that is best known to mediate the toxicities of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. Phenotype of AhR-null mice, together with the recent discovery of a variety of endogenous and plant-derived ligands, point to the integral roles of AhR in normal cell physiology, in addition to its roles in sensing the environmental chemicals. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about AhR signaling pathways, its ligands and AhR-mediated effects on cell specialization, host defense and detoxification. AhR-mediated health effects particularly in liver, immune, and nervous systems, as well as in tumorgenesis are discussed. Dioxin-initiated embryotoxicity and immunosuppressive effects in fish and birds are reviewed. Recent data demonstrate that AhR is a convergence point of multiple signaling pathways that inform the cell of its external and internal environments. As such, AhR pathway is a promising potential target for therapeutics targeting nervous, liver, and autoimmune diseases through AhR ligand-mediated interventions and other perturbations of AhR signaling. Additionally, using available laboratory data obtained on animal models, AhR-centered adverse outcome pathway analysis is useful in reexamining known and potential adverse outcomes of specific or mixed compounds on wildlife. PMID:26079192

  9. Involvement of PRMT1 in hnRNPQ activation and internalization of insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Hiroaki

    2008-07-25

    Insulin signaling in skeletal L6 myotubes is known to be affected by arginine methylation catalyzed by protein N-arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1), however, the mechanism by which this occurs has not yet been defined. This study aimed to determine the exact substrate involved in the methylation and regulating insulin signaling in cells. Insulin enhanced arginine methylation of a 66-kDa protein (p66) concomitant with translocation of PRMT1 to the membrane fraction. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified p66 as a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, hnRNPQ that was bound to and methylated by PRMT1. Pharmacological inhibition of methylation (MTA) and small interfering RNA against PRMT1 (PRMT1-siRNA) attenuated insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of hnRNPQ and insulin receptor (IR), and the interaction between hnRNPQ and IR. MTA, PRMT1-siRNA, and hnRNPQ-siRNA inhibited internalization of IR in the same manner. These data suggest that the PRMT1-mediated methylation of hnRNPQ is implicated in IR trafficking and insulin signaling in skeletal L6 myotubes.

  10. MIF interacts with CXCR7 to promote receptor internalization, ERK1/2 and ZAP-70 signaling, and lymphocyte chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Alampour-Rajabi, Setareh; El Bounkari, Omar; Rot, Antal; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Bachelerie, Françoise; Gawaz, Meinrad; Weber, Christian; Schober, Andreas; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    Macrophage migration-inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine with chemokine-like functions and is a mediator in numerous inflammatory conditions. Depending on the context, MIF signals through 1 or more of its receptors cluster of differentiation (CD)74, CXC-motif chemokine receptor (CXCR)2, and CXCR4. In addition, heteromeric receptor complexes have been identified. We characterized the atypical chemokine receptor CXCR7 as a novel receptor for MIF. MIF promoted human CXCR7 internalization up to 40%, peaking at 50-400 nM and 30 min, but CXCR7 internalization by MIF was not dependent on CXCR4. Yet, by coimmunoprecipitation, fluorescence microscopy, and a proximity ligation assay, CXCR7 was found to engage in MIF receptor complexes with CXCR4 and CD74, both after ectopic overexpression and in endogenous conditions in a human B-cell line. Receptor competition binding and coimmunoprecipitation studies combined with sulfo-SBED-biotin-transfer provided evidence for a direct interaction between MIF and CXCR7. Finally, we demonstrated MIF/CXCR7-mediated functional responses. Blockade of CXCR7 suppressed MIF-mediated ERK- and zeta-chain-associated protein kinase (ZAP)-70 activation (from 2.1- to 1.2-fold and from 2.5- to 1.6-fold, respectively) and fully abrogated primary murine B-cell chemotaxis triggered by MIF, but not by CXCL12. B cells from Cxcr7(-/-) mice exhibited an ablated transmigration response to MIF, indicating that CXCR7 is essential for MIF-promoted B-cell migration. Our findings provide biochemical and functional evidence that MIF is an alternative ligand of CXCR7 and suggest a functional role of the MIF-CXCR7 axis in B-lymphocyte migration.

  11. N-formyl peptide receptors in human neutrophils display distinct membrane distribution and lateral mobility when labeled with agonist and antagonist

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Receptors for bacterial N-formyl peptides are instrumental for neutrophil chemotactic locomotion and activation at sites of infection. As regulatory mechanisms for signal transduction, both rapid coupling of the occupied receptor to cytoskeletal components, and receptor lateral redistribution, have been suggested (Jesaitis et al., 1986, 1989). To compare the distribution and lateral diffusion of the nonactivated and activated neutrophil N-formyl-peptide receptor, before internalization, we used a new fluorescent N-formyl-peptide receptor antagonist, tertbutyloxycarbonyl-Phe(D)-Leu-Phe(D)-Leu-Phe-OH (Boc- FLFLF, 0.1-1 microM), and the fluorescent receptor agonist formyl-Nle- Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys (fnLLFnLYK, 0.1-1 microM). Fluorescent Boc-FLFLF did not elicit an oxidative burst in the neutrophil at 37 degrees C, as assessed by chemiluminescence and reduction of p-nitroblue tetrazolium chloride, but competed efficiently both with formyl-methionyl-leucyl- phenylalanine (fMLF) and fnLLFnLYK. It was not internalized, as evidenced by confocal microscopy and acid elution of surface bound ligand. The lateral mobility characteristics of the neutrophil fMLF receptor were investigated with the technique of FRAP. The diffusion coefficient (D) was similar for antagonist- and agonist-labeled receptors (D approximately 5 x 10(-10) cm2/s), but the fraction of mobile receptors was significantly lower in agonist- compared to antagonist-labeled cells, approximately 40% in contrast to approximately 60%. This reduction in receptor mobile fraction was slightly counteracted, albeit not significantly, by dihydrocytochalasin B (dhcB, 5 microM). To block internalization of agonist-labeled receptors, receptor mobility measurements were done at 14 degrees C. At this temperature, confocal microscopy revealed clustering of receptors in response to agonist binding, compared to a more uniform receptor distribution in antagonist-labeled cells. The pattern of agonist- induced receptor clustering was

  12. Role of internalization of M2 muscarinic receptor via clathrin-coated vesicles in desensitization of the muscarinic K+ current in heart.

    PubMed

    Yamanushi, T T; Shui, Z; Leach, R N; Dobrzynski, H; Claydon, T W; Boyett, M R

    2007-04-01

    In the heart, ACh activates the ACh-activated K(+) current (I(K,ACh)) via the M(2) muscarinic receptor. The relationship between desensitization of I(K,ACh) and internalization of the M(2) receptor has been studied in rat atrial cells. On application of the stable muscarinic agonist carbachol for 2 h, I(K,ACh) declined by approximately 62% with time constants of 1.5 and 26.9 min, whereas approximately 83% of the M(2) receptor was internalized from the cell membrane with time constants of 2.9 and 51.6 min. Transfection of the cells with beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (G protein-receptor kinase 2) and beta-arrestin 2 significantly increased I(K,ACh) desensitization and M(2) receptor internalization during a 3-min application of agonist. Internalized M(2) receptor in cells exposed to carbachol for 2 h was colocalized with clathrin and not caveolin. It is concluded that a G protein-receptor kinase 2- and beta-arrestin 2-dependent internalization of the M(2) receptor into clathrin-coated vesicles could play a major role in I(K,ACh) desensitization.

  13. Establishment of the first WHO International Standard for etanercept, a TNF receptor II Fc fusion protein: Report of an international collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Meenu; Bird, Chris; Dilger, Paula; Rigsby, Peter; Jia, Haiyan; Gross, Marie Emmanuelle Behr

    2017-03-10

    Etanercept, a recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor Fc fusion protein is an effective treatment option in adults with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis or plaque psoriasis and paediatrics with juvenile idiotypic arthritis and plaque psoriasis. Patent expiration in Europe and intense development of various etanercept products worldwide triggered a need for an international reference standard to facilitate determination of biological activity. Therefore, three candidate preparations of etanercept were lyophilized and evaluated in a multi-centre collaborative study comprising twenty eight laboratories from 15 countries for their suitability to serve as an international standard for the bioactivity of TNF receptor II Fc fusion proteins (international nonproprietary name, Etanercept). The preparations were tested for neutralization activity against the third TNF-α international standard (IS) in different in vitro cell-based assays, e.g., cytotoxicity, apoptosis and reporter gene methods. Regardless of the assay and the amount of TNF-α IS used, potency estimates for the different preparations were very similar. An indication of the inhibitory activity of etanercept in terms of the biological activity of the TNF-α IS based on ED50 data derived from a limited number of laboratories using a cytotoxicity assay was also derived. Results indicated that the candidate preparation coded 13/204 was stable and suitable to serve as an international standard for the biological activity of etanercept. Therefore, the preparation coded 13/204 was established by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS) in 2015 as the WHO first International Standard for TNF receptor II Fc fusion protein (INN, etanercept) with an assigned in vitro bioactivity of 10,000IU per ampoule. It should be noted that this first-in-class international standard for a Fc fusion protein, available from the National Institute for Biological

  14. Comparative analysis of the internalization of the macrophage receptor sialoadhesin in human and mouse primary macrophages and cell lines.

    PubMed

    De Schryver, Marjorie; Leemans, Annelies; Pintelon, Isabel; Cappoen, Davie; Maes, Louis; Caljon, Guy; Cos, Paul; Delputte, Peter L

    2016-11-21

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a surface receptor expressed on resident macrophages with the ability to bind with sialic acids. During inflammation, an upregulation of Sn is observed. Upon binding of monoclonal antibodies to Sn, the receptor becomes internalized and this has been observed in multiple species. The latter characteristic, combined with the strong upregulation of Sn on inflammatory macrophages and the fact that Sn-positive macrophages contribute to certain inflammatory diseases, makes Sn an interesting entry portal for phenotype-modulating or cytotoxic drugs. Such drugs or toxins can be linked to Sn-specific antibodies which should enable their targeted uptake by macrophages. However, the activity of such drugs depends not only on their internalization but also on the intracellular trafficking and final fate in the endolysosomal system. Although information is available for porcine Sn, the detailed mechanisms of human and mouse Sn internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking are currently unknown. To allow development of Sn-targeted therapies, differences across species and cellular background need to be characterized in more detail. In the current report, we show that internalization of human and mouse Sn is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, both in primary macrophages and CHO cell lines expressing a recombinant Sn. In primary macrophages, internalized Sn-specific F(ab')2 fragments are located mostly in the early endosomes. With Fc containing Sn-specific antibodies, there is a slight shift towards lysosomal localization in mouse macrophages, possibly because of an interaction with Fc receptors. Surprisingly, in CHO cell lines expressing Sn, there is a predominant lysosomal localization. Our results show that the mechanism of Sn internalization and intracellular trafficking is concurrent in the tested species. The cellular background in which Sn is expressed and the type of antibody used can affect the intracellular fate, which in turn can

  15. Functional analysis of free fatty acid receptor GPR120 in human eosinophils: implications in metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yasunori; Ueki, Shigeharu; Takeda, Masahide; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Tamaki, Mami; Moritoki, Yuki; Oyamada, Hajime; Itoga, Masamichi; Kayaba, Hiroyuki; Omokawa, Ayumi; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that eosinophils play an important role in metabolic homeostasis through Th2 cytokine production. GPR120 (FFA4) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for long-chain fatty acids that functions as a regulator of physiological energy metabolism. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether human eosinophils express GPR120 and, if present, whether it possesses a functional capacity on eosinophils. Eosinophils isolated from peripheral venous blood expressed GPR120 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with a synthetic GPR120 agonist, GW9508, induced rapid down-regulation of cell surface expression of GPR120, suggesting ligand-dependent receptor internalization. Although GPR120 activation did not induce eosinophil chemotactic response and degranulation, we found that GW9508 inhibited eosinophil spontaneous apoptosis and Fas receptor expression. The anti-apoptotic effect was attenuated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors and was associated with inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Eosinophil response investigated using ELISpot assay indicated that stimulation with a GPR120 agonist induced IL-4 secretion. These findings demonstrate the novel functional properties of fatty acid sensor GPR120 on human eosinophils and indicate the previously unrecognized link between nutrient metabolism and the immune system.

  16. Sustained Receptor Stimulation Leads to Sequestration of Recycling Endosomes in a Classical Protein Kinase C- and Phospholipase D-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak-Baldys, Jolanta; Baldys, Aleksander; Raymond, John R.; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable insight has been garnered on initial mechanisms of endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins and their subsequent trafficking through the endosomal compartment. It is also well established that ligand stimulation of many plasma membrane receptors leads to their internalization. However, stimulus-induced regulation of endosomal trafficking has not received much attention. In previous studies, we showed that sustained stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) with phorbol esters led to sequestration of recycling endosomes in a juxtanuclear region. In this study, we investigated whether G-protein-coupled receptors that activate PKC exerted effects on endosomal trafficking. Stimulation of cells with serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) led to sequestration of the 5-HT receptor (5-HT2AR) into a Rab11-positive juxtanuclear compartment. This sequestration coincided with translocation of PKC as shown by confocal microscopy. Mechanistically the observed sequestration of 5-HT2AR was shown to require continuous PKC activity because it was inhibited by pretreatment with classical PKC inhibitor Gö6976 and could be reversed by posttreatment with this inhibitor. In addition, classical PKC autophosphorylation was necessary for receptor sequestration. Moreover inhibition of phospholipase D (PLD) activity and inhibition of PLD1 and PLD2 using dominant negative constructs also prevented this process. Functionally this sequestration did not affect receptor desensitization or resensitization as measured by intracellular calcium increase. However, the PKC- and PLD-dependent sequestration of receptors resulted in co-sequestration of other plasma membrane proteins and receptors as shown for epidermal growth factor receptor and protease activated receptor-1. This led to heterologous desensitization of those receptors and diverted their cellular fate by protecting them from agonist-induced degradation. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel role for sustained receptor

  17. P2X7 Receptor Regulates Internalization of Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 by Human Macrophages That Promotes Intracellular Pathogen Clearance.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao; Basavarajappa, Devaraj; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Wan, Min

    2015-08-01

    Bioactive peptide LL-37/hCAP18, the only human member of the cathelicidin family, plays important roles in killing various pathogens, as well as in immune modulation. We demonstrate that LL-37 is internalized by human macrophages in a time-, dose-, temperature-, and peptide sequence-dependent endocytotic process. Both clathrin- and caveolae/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis pathways are involved in LL-37 internalization. We find that the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays an important role in LL-37 internalization by human macrophages because significantly less internalized LL-37 was detected in macrophages pretreated with P2X7R antagonists or, more specifically, in differentiated THP-1 cells in which the P2X7R gene had been silenced. Furthermore, this P2X7R-mediated LL-37 internalization is primarily connected to the clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. In addition, our results demonstrate that internalized LL-37 traffics to endosomes and lysosomes and contributes to intracellular clearance of bacteria by human macrophages, coinciding with increased reactive oxygen species and lysosome formation. Finally, we show that human macrophages have the potential to import LL-37 released from activated human neutrophils. In conclusion, our study unveils a novel mechanism by which human macrophages internalize antimicrobial peptides to improve their intracellular pathogen clearance.

  18. Ligand- and cell-dependent determinants of internalization and cAMP modulation by delta opioid receptor (DOR) agonists.

    PubMed

    Charfi, Iness; Nagi, Karim; Mnie-Filali, Ouissame; Thibault, Dominic; Balboni, Gianfranco; Schiller, Peter W; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Pineyro, Graciela

    2014-04-01

    Signaling bias refers to G protein-coupled receptor ligand ability to preferentially activate one type of signal over another. Bias to evoke signaling as opposed to sequestration has been proposed as a predictor of opioid ligand potential for generating tolerance. Here we measured whether delta opioid receptor agonists preferentially inhibited cyclase activity over internalization in HEK cells. Efficacy (τ) and affinity (KA) values were estimated from functional data and bias was calculated from efficiency coefficients (log τ/KA). This approach better represented the data as compared to alternative methods that estimate bias exclusively from τ values. Log (τ/KA) coefficients indicated that SNC-80 and UFP-512 promoted cyclase inhibition more efficiently than DOR internalization as compared to DPDPE (bias factor for SNC-80: 50 and for UFP-512: 132). Molecular determinants of internalization were different in HEK293 cells and neurons with βarrs contributing to internalization in both cell types, while PKC and GRK2 activities were only involved in neurons. Rank orders of ligand ability to engage different internalization mechanisms in neurons were compared to rank order of E max values for cyclase assays in HEK cells. Comparison revealed a significant reversal in rank order for cyclase E max values and βarr-dependent internalization in neurons, indicating that these responses were ligand-specific. Despite this evidence, and because kinases involved in internalization were not the same across cellular backgrounds, it is not possible to assert if the magnitude and nature of bias revealed by rank orders of maximal responses is the same as the one measured in HEK cells.

  19. Synergistic regulation of m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor desensitization and sequestration by G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 and beta-arrestin-1.

    PubMed

    Schlador, M L; Nathanson, N M

    1997-07-25

    The m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m2 mAChR) belongs to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors and is regulated by many processes that attenuate signaling following prolonged stimulation by agonist. We used a heterologous expression system to examine the ability of G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) and beta-arrestin-1 to regulate the phosphorylation state and to promote desensitization and sequestration of the m2 mAChR. Treatment of JEG-3 cells transiently expressing the m2 mAChR with a muscarinic agonist induced an approximately 4- or 8-fold increase in receptor phosphorylation in the absence or presence of cotransfected GRK2, respectively, compared with untreated cells transfected with receptor alone. Using the expression of a cAMP-regulated reporter gene to measure receptor function, we found that transiently transfected m2 mAChRs underwent functional desensitization following exposure to agonist. Transfected GRK2 enhanced agonist-induced functional desensitization in a manner that was synergistically enhanced by cotransfection of beta-arrestin-1, which had no effect on m2 mAChR function when coexpressed in the absence of GRK2. Finally, GRK2 and beta-arrestin-1 synergistically enhanced both the rate and extent of agonist-induced m2 mAChR sequestration. These results are the first to demonstrate that agonist-induced desensitization and sequestration of the m2 mAChR in the intact cell can be enhanced by the presence of GRK2 and beta-arrestin-1 and show that these molecules have multiple actions on the m2 mAChR.

  20. Statins and PPAR{alpha} agonists induce myotoxicity in differentiated rat skeletal muscle cultures but do not exhibit synergy with co-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy E. . E-mail: Timothy_Johnson@merck.com; Zhang, Xiaohua; Shi, Shu; Umbenhauer, Diane R.

    2005-11-01

    Statins and fibrates (weak PPAR{alpha} agonists) are prescribed for the treatment of lipid disorders. Both drugs cause myopathy, but with a low incidence, 0.1-0.5%. However, combined statin and fibrate therapy can enhance myopathy risk. We tested the myotoxic potential of PPAR subtype selective agonists alone and in combination with statins in a differentiated rat myotube model. A pharmacologically potent experimental PPAR{alpha} agonist, Compound A, induced myotoxicity as assessed by TUNEL staining at a minimum concentration of 1 nM, while other weaker PPAR{alpha} compounds, for example, WY-14643, Gemfibrozil and Bezafibrate increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, the PPAR{gamma} agonist Rosiglitazone caused little or no cell death at up to 10 {mu}M and the PPAR{delta} ligand GW-501516 exhibited comparatively less myotoxicity than that seen with Compound A. An experimental statin (Compound B) and Atorvastatin also increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei and co-treatment with WY-14643, Gemfibrozil or Bezafibrate had less than a full additive effect on statin-induced cell killing. The mechanism of PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced cell death was different from that of statins. Unlike statins, Compound A and WY-14643 did not activate caspase 3/7. In addition, mevalonate and geranylgeraniol reversed the toxicity caused by statins, but did not prevent the cell killing induced by WY-14643. Furthermore, unlike statins, Compound A did not inhibit the isoprenylation of rab4 or rap1a. Interestingly, Compound A and Compound B had differential effects on ATP levels. Taken together, these observations support the hypothesis that in rat myotube cultures, PPAR{alpha} agonism mediates in part the toxicity response to PPAR{alpha} compounds. Furthermore, PPAR{alpha} agonists and statins cause myotoxicity through distinct and independent pathways.

  1. Thymol, a dietary monoterpene phenol abrogates mitochondrial dysfunction in β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarcted rats by inhibiting oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nagoor Meeran, M F; Jagadeesh, G S; Selvaraj, P

    2016-01-25

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested to be one of the important pathological events in isoproterenol (ISO), a synthetic catecholamine and β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarction (MI). In this context, we have evaluated the impact of thymol against ISO induced oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction involved in the pathology of mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pre and co-treated with thymol (7.5 mg/kg body weight) daily for 7 days. Isoproterenol (100 mg/kg body weight) was subcutaneously injected into rats on 6th and 7th day to induce MI. To explore the extent of cardiac mitochondrial damage, the activities/levels of cardiac marker enzymes, mitochondrial lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants, lipids, calcium, adenosine triphosphate and multi marker enzymes were evaluated. Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats showed a significant increase in the activities of cardiac diagnostic markers, heart mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, lipids, calcium, and a significant decrease in the activities/levels of heart mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, isocitrate, malate, α-ketoglutarate and NADH-dehydrogenases, cytochrome-C-oxidase, and adenosine triphosphate. Thymol pre and co-treatment showed near normalized effects on all the biochemical parameters studied. Transmission electron microscopic findings and mitochondrial swelling studies confirmed our biochemical findings. The in vitro study also revealed the potent free-radical scavenging activity of thymol. Thus, thymol attenuates the involvement of ISO against oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in rats.

  2. Chronic treatment in vivo with β-adrenoceptor agonists induces dysfunction of airway β2-adrenoceptors and exacerbates lung inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rui; Degan, Simone; Theriot, Barbara S; Fischer, Bernard M; Strachan, Ryan T; Liang, Jiurong; Pierce, Richard A; Sunday, Mary E; Noble, Paul W; Kraft, Monica; Brody, Arnold R; Walker, Julia KL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inhalation of a β-adrenoceptor agonist (β-agonist) is first-line asthma therapy, used for both prophylaxis against, and acute relief of, bronchoconstriction. However, repeated clinical use of β-agonists leads to impaired bronchoprotection and, in some cases, adverse patient outcomes. Mechanisms underlying this β2-adrenoceptor dysfunction are not well understood, due largely to the lack of a comprehensive animal model and the uncertainty as to whether or not bronchorelaxation in mice is mediated by β2-adrenoceptors. Thus, we aimed to develop a mouse model that demonstrated functional β-agonist-induced β2-adrenoceptor desensitization in the context of allergic inflammatory airway disease. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We combined chronic allergen exposure with repeated β-agonist inhalation in allergen-treated BALB/C mice and examined the contribution of β2-adrenoceptors to albuterol-induced bronchoprotection using FVB/NJ mice with genetic deletion of β2-adrenoceptors (KO). Associated inflammatory changes – cytokines (ELISA), cells in bronchoalevolar lavage and airway remodelling (histology) and β2-adrenoceptor density (radioligand binding) – were also measured. KEY RESULTS β2-Adrenoceptors mediated albuterol-induced bronchoprotection in mice. Chronic treatment with albuterol induced loss of bronchoprotection, associated with exacerbation of the inflammatory components of the asthma phenotype. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This animal model reproduced salient features of human asthma and linked loss of bronchoprotection with airway pathobiology. Accordingly, the model offers an advanced tool for understanding the mechanisms of the effects of chronic β- agonist treatment on β-adrenoceptor function in asthma. Such information may guide the clinical use of β-agonists and provide insight into development of novel β-adrenoceptor ligands for the treatment of asthma. PMID:22013997

  3. Different amounts of ejaculatory activity, a natural rewarding behavior, induce differential mu and delta opioid receptor internalization in the rat's ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Garduño-Gutiérrez, René; León-Olea, Martha; Rodríguez-Manzo, Gabriela

    2013-12-06

    Opioid receptors internalize upon specific agonist stimulation. The in vivo significance of receptor internalization is not well established, partly due to the limited in vivo models used to study this phenomenon. Ejaculation promotes endogenous opioid release which activates opioid receptors at the brain, including the mesolimbic system and medial preoptic area. The objective of the present work was to analyze if there was a correlation between the degree of in vivo mu (MOR) and delta opioid receptor (DOR) internalization in the ventral tegmental area and the execution of different amounts of ejaculatory behavior of male rats. To this aim, we analyzed the brains of rats that ejaculated once or six successive times and of sexually exhausted rats with an established sexual inhibition, using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results showed that MOR and DOR internalization increased as a consequence of ejaculation. There was a relationship between the amount of sexual activity executed and the degree of internalization for MOR, but not for DOR. MOR internalization was larger in rats that ejaculated repeatedly than in animals ejaculating only once. Significant DOR internalization was found only in animals ejaculating once. Changes in MOR, DOR and beta arrestin2 detection, associated to sexual activity, were also found. It is suggested that copulation to satiety might be useful as a model system to study the biological significance of receptor internalization.

  4. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIII. The Parathyroid Hormone Receptors—Family B G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The type-1 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR1) is a family B G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the actions of two polypeptide ligands; parathyroid hormone (PTH), an endocrine hormone that regulates the levels of calcium and inorganic phosphate in the blood by acting on bone and kidney, and PTH-related protein (PTHrP), a paracrine-factor that regulates cell differentiation and proliferation programs in developing bone and other tissues. The type-2 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR2) binds a peptide ligand, called tuberoinfundibular peptide-39 (TIP39), and while the biologic role of the PTHR2/TIP39 system is not as defined as that of the PTHR1, it likely plays a role in the central nervous system as well as in spermatogenesis. Mechanisms of action at these receptors have been explored through a variety of pharmacological and biochemical approaches, and the data obtained support a basic “two-site” mode of ligand binding now thought to be used by each of the family B peptide hormone GPCRs. Recent crystallographic studies on the family B GPCRs are providing new insights that help to further refine the specifics of the overall receptor architecture and modes of ligand docking. One intriguing pharmacological finding for the PTHR1 is that it can form surprisingly stable complexes with certain PTH/PTHrP ligand analogs and thereby mediate markedly prolonged cell signaling responses that persist even when the bulk of the complexes are found in internalized vesicles. The PTHR1 thus appears to be able to activate the Gαs/cAMP pathway not only from the plasma membrane but also from the endosomal domain. The cumulative findings could have an impact on efforts to develop new drug therapies for the PTH receptors. PMID:25713287

  5. Monoclonal antibody-induced ErbB3 receptor internalization and degradation inhibits growth and migration of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Belleudi, Francesca; Marra, Emanuele; Mazzetta, Francesca; Fattore, Luigi; Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria; Mancini, Rita; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2012-04-01

    Members of the ErbB receptor family are targets of a growing numbers of small molecules and monoclonal antibodies inhibitors currently under development for the treatment of cancer. Although historical efforts have been directed against ErbB1 (EGFR) and ErbB2 (HER2/neu), emerging evidences have pointed to ErbB3 as a key node in the activation of proliferation/survival pathways from the ErbB receptor family and have fueled enthusiasm toward the clinical development of anti-ErbB3 agents. In this study, we have evaluated the potential therapeutic efficacy of a set of three recently generated anti-human ErbB3 monoclonals, A2, A3 and A4, in human primary melanoma cells. We show that in melanoma cells expressing ErbB1, ErbB3 and ErbB4 but not ErbB2 receptor ligands activate the PI3K/AKT pathway, and this leads to increased cell proliferation and migration. While antibodies A3 and A4 are able to potently inhibit ligand-induced signaling, proliferation and migration, antibody A2 is unable to exert this effect. In attempt to understand the mechanism of action and the basis of this different behavior, we demonstrate, through a series of combined approaches, that antibody efficacy strongly correlates with antibody-induced receptor internalization, degradation and inhibition of receptor recycling to the cell surface. Finally, fine epitope mapping studies through a peptide array show that inhibiting vs. non-inhibiting antibodies have a dramatically different mode of binding to the to the receptor extracellular domain. Our study confirms the key role of ErbB3 and points to exploitation of novel combination therapies for treatment of malignant melanoma.

  6. Cryptococcus neoformans Is Internalized by Receptor-Mediated or ‘Triggered’ Phagocytosis, Dependent on Actin Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both ‘zipper’ (receptor-mediated) and ‘trigger’ (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  7. Epidermal growth factor receptors destined for the nucleus are internalized via a clathrin-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    De Angelis Campos, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Andrade, Carolina de; Miranda de Goes, Alfredo; Nathanson, Michael H.; Gomes, Dawidson A.

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} EGF and its receptor translocates to the nucleus in liver cells. {yields} Real time imaging shows that EGF moves to the nucleus. {yields} EGF moves with its receptor to the nucleus. {yields} Dynamin and clathrin are necessary for EGFR nuclear translocation. -- Abstract: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) transduces its actions via the EGF receptor (EGFR), which can traffic from the plasma membrane to either the cytoplasm or the nucleus. However, the mechanism by which EGFR reaches the nucleus is unclear. To investigate these questions, liver cells were analyzed by immunoblot of cell fractions, confocal immunofluorescence and real time confocal imaging. Cell fractionation studies showed that EGFR was detectable in the nucleus after EGF stimulation with a peak in nuclear receptor after 10 min. Movement of EGFR to the nucleus was confirmed by confocal immunofluorescence and labeled EGF moved with the receptor to the nucleus. Small interference RNA (siRNA) was used to knockdown clathrin in order to assess the first endocytic steps of EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells. A mutant dynamin (dynamin K44A) was also used to determine the pathways for this traffic. Movement of labeled EGF or EGFR to the nucleus depended upon dynamin and clathrin. This identifies the pathway that mediates the first steps for EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells.

  8. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXII: Nomenclature and Classification of Hydroxy-carboxylic Acid Receptors (GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B).

    PubMed

    Offermanns, Stefan; Colletti, Steven L; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Semple, Graeme; Wise, Alan; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2011-06-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptors GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B share significant sequence homology and form a small group of receptors, each of which is encoded by clustered genes. In recent years, endogenous ligands for all three receptors have been described. These endogenous ligands have in common that they are hydroxy-carboxylic acid metabolites, and we therefore have proposed that this receptor family be named hydroxy-carboxylic acid (HCA) receptors. The HCA(1) receptor (GPR81) is activated by 2-hydroxy-propanoic acid (lactate), the HCA(2) receptor (GPR109A) is a receptor for the ketone body 3-hydroxy-butyric acid, and the HCA(3) receptor (GPR109B) is activated by the β-oxidation intermediate 3-hydroxy-octanoic acid. HCA(1) and HCA(2) receptors are found in most mammalian species, whereas the HCA(3) receptor is present only in higher primates. The three receptors have in common that they are expressed in adipocytes and are coupled to G(i)-type G-proteins mediating antilipolytic effects in fat cells. HCA(2) and HCA(3) receptors are also expressed in a variety of immune cells. HCA(2) is a receptor for the antidyslipidemic drug nicotinic acid (niacin) and related compounds, and there is an increasing number of synthetic ligands mainly targeted at HCA(2) and HCA(3) receptors. The aim of this article is to give an overview on the discovery and pharmacological characterization of HCAs, and to introduce an International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR)-recommended nomenclature. We will also discuss open questions regarding this receptor family as well as their physiological role and therapeutic potential.

  9. Regulation of human melanocortin 1 receptor signaling and trafficking by Thr-308 and Ser-316 and its alteration in variant alleles associated with red hair and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Laorden, Berta L; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José C

    2007-02-02

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase, is a key regulator of melanocyte proliferation and differentiation and a determinant of pigmentation, skin phototype, and skin cancer risk. MC1R activation stimulates melanogenesis and increases the ratio of black, strongly photoprotective eumelanins to yellowish and poorly photoprotective pheomelanin pigments. Desensitization and internalization are key regulatory mechanisms of GPCR signaling. Agonist-induced desensitization usually depends on phosphorylation by a GPCR kinase (GRK) followed by receptor internalization in endocytic vesicles. We have shown that MC1R desensitization is mediated by two GRKs expressed in melanocytes and melanoma cells, GRK2 and GRK6. Here we show that in contrast with this dual specificity for desensitization, GRK6 but not GRK2 mediated MC1R internalization. Mutagenesis studies suggested that the targets of GRK6 are two residues located in the MC1R cytosolic C terminus, Thr-308 and Ser-316. A T308D/S316D mutant mimicking their phosphorylated state was constitutively desensitized and associated with endosomes, whereas a T308A/S316A mutant was resistant to desensitization and internalization. We studied the desensitization and internalization of three variant MC1R forms associated with red hair and increased skin cancer risk: R151C, R160W, and D294H. These variants showed a less efficient desensitization. Moreover, D294H was resistant to internalization, thus accounting for its abnormally high surface expression. Co-expression of variant and wild type MC1R modified its desensitization and internalization behavior. These data suggest that MC1R might be regulated by novel mechanisms including differential effects of GRKs and altered desensitization rates of certain allelic combinations.

  10. [TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS IN COSMONAUT'S PERIPHERAL BLOOD CELLS AFTER LONG-DURATION MISSIONS TO THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION].

    PubMed

    Berendeeva, T A; Ponomarev, S A; Antropova, E N; Rykova, M P

    2015-01-01

    Studies of Toll-like receptors (TLR) in 20 cosmonauts-members of long-duration (124-199-day) missions to the International space station evidenced changes in relative and absolute counts of peripheral blood monocytes with TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 on the surface, expression of TLR2 and TLR6 genes, and genes of molecules involved in the TLR signaling pathway and TLR-related NF-KB-, JNK/p38- and IRF pathways on the day of return to Earth. The observed changes displayed individual variability.

  11. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and large conductance calcium-sensitive potassium channels inhibit the release of opioid peptides that induce mu-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Song, B; Marvizón, J C G

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the mu-opioid receptor, we measured mu-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced mu-opioid receptor internalization in half of the mu-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-D-aspartate (IC50=2 microM), and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. mu-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-D-aspartate did not affect mu-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-D-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase mu-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-D-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked mu-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since mu-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  12. N-METHYL-d-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS AND LARGE CONDUCTANCE CALCIUM-SENSITIVE POTASSIUM CHANNELS INHIBIT THE RELEASE OF OPIOID PEPTIDES THAT INDUCE μ-OPIOID RECEPTOR INTERNALIZATION IN THE RAT SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    SONG, B.; MARVIZÓN, J. C. G.

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the μ-opioid receptor, we measured μ-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced μ-opioid receptor internalization in half of the μ-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-d-aspartate (IC50=2 μM), and N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. μ-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-d-aspartate did not affect μ-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-d-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase μ-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-d-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked μ-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since μ-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  13. Differential regulation of muscarinic M2 and M3 receptor signaling in gastrointestinal smooth muscle by caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sayak; Mahavadi, Sunila; Al-Shboul, Othman; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2013-08-01

    Caveolae act as scaffolding proteins for several G protein-coupled receptor signaling molecules to regulate their activity. Caveolin-1, the predominant isoform in smooth muscle, drives the formation of caveolae. The precise role of caveolin-1 and caveolae as scaffolds for G protein-coupled receptor signaling and contraction in gastrointestinal muscle is unclear. Thus the aim of this study was to examine the role of caveolin-1 in the regulation of Gq- and Gi-coupled receptor signaling. RT-PCR, Western blot, and radioligand-binding studies demonstrated the selective expression of M2 and M3 receptors in gastric smooth muscle cells. Carbachol (CCh) stimulated phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis, Rho kinase and zipper-interacting protein (ZIP) kinase activity, induced myosin phosphatase 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation (at Thr(696)) and 20-kDa myosin light chain (MLC20) phosphorylation (at Ser(19)) and muscle contraction, and inhibited cAMP formation. Stimulation of PI hydrolysis, Rho kinase, and ZIP kinase activity, phosphorylation of MYPT1 and MLC20, and muscle contraction in response to CCh were attenuated by methyl β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) or caveolin-1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Similar inhibition of PI hydrolysis, Rho kinase, and ZIP kinase activity and muscle contraction in response to CCh and gastric emptying in vivo was obtained in caveolin-1-knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. Agonist-induced internalization of M2, but not M3, receptors was blocked by MβCD or caveolin-1 siRNA. Stimulation of PI hydrolysis, Rho kinase, and ZIP kinase activities in response to other Gq-coupled receptor agonists such as histamine and substance P was also attenuated by MβCD or caveolin-1 siRNA. Taken together, these results suggest that caveolin-1 facilitates signaling by Gq-coupled receptors and contributes to enhanced smooth muscle function.

  14. Short-term or long-term treatments with a phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor result in opposing agonist-induced Ca2+ responses in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Toimil, M; Keravis, T; Orallo, F; Takeda, K; Lugnier, C

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: We previously reported that agonist-induced rises in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were inhibited after a short-term (2 min) pre-treatment with cAMP-elevating agents. The aim of this work was to study the effects of longer term (8 h) pre-treatment with dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) or rolipram, a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), on [Ca2+]i, cAMP levels and PDE activity and expression in HUVEC. Experimental approach: [Ca2+]i changes were measured in isolated HUVEC by Fura-2 imaging. Intracellular cAMP levels and PDE4 activity were assessed by enzyme-immunoassay and radio-enzymatic assay, respectively. PDE expression was measured by northern and western blot analysis. Key results: Long-term pre-treatment of HUVEC with rolipram or db-cAMP significantly increased ATP-, histamine- and thrombin-induced [Ca2+]i rises. Short-term pre-treatment with rolipram was associated with an increase in cAMP, whereas long-term pre-treatment was associated with a decrease in cAMP. Long-term pre-treatment with rolipram or db-cAMP induced a significant increase in PDE4 activity and the expression of 74 kDa-PDE4A and 73 kDa-PDE4B was specifically enhanced. All these effects were suppressed by cycloheximide. Conclusions and implications: Our data suggest that sustained inhibition of PDE4 by rolipram induced an increase in PDE4 activity, possibly as a compensatory mechanism to accelerate cAMP degradation and that PDE4A and PDE4B were implicated in the regulation of [Ca2+]i. Thus, isozyme-specific PDE4 inhibitors might be useful as therapeutic agents in diseases where [Ca2+]i handling is altered, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension and tolerance to β-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:18311187

  15. The receptor and transporter for internalization of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin into HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Atsushi; Uotsu, Nobuo; Arimitsu, Hideyuki; Lee, Jae-Chul; Miura, Yutaka; Fujinaga, Yukako; Nakada, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Sakano, Yoshiyuki; Oguma, Keiji

    2004-06-25

    Orally ingested botulinum toxin enters the circulatory system and eventually reaches the peripheral nerves, where it elicits a response of neurological dysfunction. In this study, we report the important findings concerning the mechanism of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin (C16S) endocytic mechanism. C16S toxin bound to high molecular weight proteins on the surface of human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells and was internalized, but not if the cells were pretreated with neuraminidase. Benzyl-GalNAc which inhibited O-glycosylation of glycoproteins also interfered in the toxin's ability to bind the cell surface. On the other hand, the toxin was internalized in spite of pretreatment of the cells with PPMP, an inhibitor of ganglioside synthesis. These results suggest that the glycoproteins, like mucin, fulfill the important roles of receptor and transporter of C16S toxin.

  16. Internalization of Met requires the co-receptor CD44v6 and its link to ERM proteins.

    PubMed

    Hasenauer, Susanne; Malinger, Dieter; Koschut, David; Pace, Giuseppina; Matzke, Alexandra; von Au, Anja; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) are involved in many cellular processes and play a major role in the control of cell fate. For these reasons, RTK activation is maintained under tight control. Met is an essential RTK that induces proliferation, differentiation, migration, survival and branching morphogenesis. Deregulation of Met by overexpression, amplification or lack of effective degradation leads to cancer and metastasis. We have shown that Met relies on CD44v6 for its activation and for signaling in several cancer cell lines and also in primary cells. In this paper, we show that internalization of Met is dependent on CD44v6 and the binding of Ezrin to the CD44v6 cytoplasmic domain. Both CD44v6 and Met are co-internalized upon Hepatocyte Growth Factor induction suggesting that Met-induced signaling from the endosomes relies on its collaboration with CD44v6 and the link to the cytoskeleton provided by ERM proteins.

  17. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface.

  18. Internalization and down-regulation of mu opioid receptors by endomorphins and morphine in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kristen A; Zadina, James E

    2004-12-03

    The human neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y, was used to examine the effects of morphine and the endogenous opioid peptides, endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2), on mu opioid receptor (MOR) internalization and down-regulation. Treatment for 24 h with EM-1, EM-2 or morphine at 100 nM, 1 microM and 10 microM resulted in a dose-dependent down-regulation of mu receptors. Exposure of cells to 10 microM EM-1 for 2.5, 5 and 24 h resulted in a time-dependent down-regulation of mu receptors. Down-regulation of mu receptors by morphine and EM-1 was blocked by treatment with hypertonic sucrose, consistent with an endocytosis-dependent mechanism. Sensitive cell-surface binding studies with a radiolabeled mu antagonist revealed that morphine was able to induce internalization of mu receptors naturally expressed in SH-SY5Y cells. EM-1 produced a more rapid internalization of mu receptors than morphine, but hypertonic sucrose blocked the internalization induced by each of these agonists. This study demonstrates that, like morphine, the endomorphins down-regulate mu opioid receptors in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This study also demonstrates that morphine, as well as EM-1, can induce rapid, endocytosis-dependent internalization of mu opioid receptors in SH-SY5Y cells. These results may help elucidate the ability of mu agonists to regulate the number and responsiveness of their receptors.

  19. Functional properties of internalization-deficient P2X4 receptors reveal a novel mechanism of ligand-gated channel facilitation by ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Toulmé, Estelle; Soto, Florentina; Garret, Maurice; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2006-02-01

    Although P2X receptors within the central nervous system mediate excitatory ATP synaptic transmission, the identity of central ATP-gated channels has not yet been elucidated. P2X(4), the most widely expressed subunit in the brain, was previously shown to undergo clathrin-dependent constitutive internalization by direct interaction between activator protein (AP)2 adaptors and a tyrosine-based sorting signal specifically present in the cytosolic C-terminal tail of mammalian P2X(4) sequences. In this study, we first used internalization-deficient P2X(4) receptor mutants to show that suppression of the endocytosis motif significantly increased the apparent sensitivity to ATP and the ionic permeability of P2X(4) channels. These unique properties, observed at low channel density, suggest that interactions with AP2 complexes may modulate the function of P2X(4) receptors. In addition, ivermectin, an allosteric modulator of several receptor channels, including mammalian P2X(4), did not potentiate the maximal current of internalization-deficient rat or human P2X(4) receptors. We demonstrated that binding of ivermectin onto wild-type P2X(4) channels increased the fraction of plasma membrane P2X(4) receptors, whereas surface expression of internalization-deficient P2X(4) receptors remained unchanged. Disruption of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis with the dominant-negative mutants Eps15 or AP-50 abolished the ivermectin potentiation of wild-type P2X(4) channel currents. Likewise, ivermectin increased the membrane fraction of nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine (nalpha7ACh) receptors and the potentiation of acetylcholine current by ivermectin was suppressed when the same dominant-negative mutants were expressed. These data showed that potentiation by ivermectin of both P2X(4) and nalpha7ACh receptors was primarily caused by an increase in the number of cell surface receptors resulting from a mechanism dependent on clathrin/AP2-mediated endocytosis.

  20. Investigating the molecular mechanisms through which FTY720-P causes persistent S1P1 receptor internalization

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, David A; Riddy, Darren M; Stamp, Craig; Bradley, Michelle E; McGuiness, Neil; Sattikar, Afrah; Guerini, Danilo; Rodrigues, Ines; Glaenzel, Albrecht; Dowling, Mark R; Mullershausen, Florian; Charlton, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The molecular mechanism underlying the clinical efficacy of FTY720-P is thought to involve persistent internalization and enhanced degradation of the S1P1 receptor subtype (S1P1R). We have investigated whether receptor binding kinetics and β-arrestin recruitment could play a role in the persistent internalization of the S1P1R by FTY720-P. Experimental Approach [3H]-FTY720-P and [33P]-S1P were used to label CHO-S1P1/3Rs for binding studies. Ligand efficacy was assessed through [35S]-GTPγS binding and β-arrestin recruitment. Metabolic stability was evaluated using a bioassay measuring intracellular Ca2+ release. CHO-S1P1/3R numbers were determined, following FTY720-P treatment using flow cytometry. Key Results The kinetic off-rate of [3H]-FTY720-P from the S1P1R was sixfold slower than from the S1P3R, and comparable to [33P]-S1P dissociation from S1P1/3Rs. S1P and FTY720-P stimulated [35S]-GTPγS incorporation to similar degrees, but FTY720-P was over 30-fold less potent at S1P3Rs. FTY720-P stimulated a higher level of β-arrestin recruitment at S1P1Rs, 132% of the total recruited by S1P. In contrast, FTY720-P was a weak partial agonist at S1P3R, stimulating just 29% of the total β-arrestin recruited by S1P. Internalization experiments confirmed that cell surface expression of the S1P1R but not the S1P3R was reduced following a pulse exposure to FTY720-P, which is metabolically stable unlike S1P. Conclusions and Implications FTY720-P and S1P activation of the S1P1R results in receptor internalization as a consequence of an efficient recruitment of β-arrestin. The combination of slow off-rate, efficacious β-arrestin recruitment and metabolic stability all contribute to FTY720-P's ability to promote prolonged S1P1R internalization and may be critical factors in its efficacy in the clinic. PMID:24641481

  1. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXVIII. G Protein-Coupled Receptor List: Recommendations for New Pairings with Cognate Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen P. H.; Sharman, Joanna L.; Pawson, Adam J.; Benson, Helen E.; Monaghan, Amy E.; Liew, Wen Chiy; Mpamhanga, Chidochangu P.; Bonner, Tom I.; Neubig, Richard R.; Pin, Jean Philippe; Spedding, Michael; Harmar, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR) published a catalog of all of the human gene sequences known or predicted to encode G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), excluding sensory receptors. This review updates the list of orphan GPCRs and describes the criteria used by NC-IUPHAR to recommend the pairing of an orphan receptor with its cognate ligand(s). The following recommendations are made for new receptor names based on 11 pairings for class A GPCRs: hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors [HCA1 (GPR81) with lactate, HCA2 (GPR109A) with 3-hydroxybutyric acid, HCA3 (GPR109B) with 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid]; lysophosphatidic acid receptors [LPA4 (GPR23), LPA5 (GPR92), LPA6 (P2Y5)]; free fatty acid receptors [FFA4 (GPR120) with omega-3 fatty acids]; chemerin receptor (CMKLR1; ChemR23) with chemerin; CXCR7 (CMKOR1) with chemokines CXCL12 (SDF-1) and CXCL11 (ITAC); succinate receptor (SUCNR1) with succinate; and oxoglutarate receptor [OXGR1 with 2-oxoglutarate]. Pairings are highlighted for an additional 30 receptors in class A where further input is needed from the scientific community to validate these findings. Fifty-seven human class A receptors (excluding pseudogenes) are still considered orphans; information has been provided where there is a significant phenotype in genetically modified animals. In class B, six pairings have been reported by a single publication, with 28 (excluding pseudogenes) still classified as orphans. Seven orphan receptors remain in class C, with one pairing described by a single paper. The objective is to stimulate research into confirming pairings of orphan receptors where there is currently limited information and to identify cognate ligands for the remaining GPCRs. Further information can be found on the IUPHAR Database website (http://www.iuphar-db.org). PMID:23686350

  2. Methylation of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Promoter in Preschoolers: Links with Internalizing Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parade, Stephanie H.; Ridout, Kathryn K.; Seifer, Ronald; Armstrong, David A.; Marsit, Carmen J.; McWilliams, Melissa A.; Tyrka, Audrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that early adversity is linked to methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene, "NR3C1," which is a key regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Yet no prior work has considered the contribution of methylation of "NR3C1" to emerging behavior problems and psychopathology in…

  3. A Broad G Protein-Coupled Receptor Internalization Assay that Combines SNAP-Tag Labeling, Diffusion-Enhanced Resonance Energy Transfer, and a Highly Emissive Terbium Cryptate

    PubMed Central

    Levoye, Angélique; Zwier, Jurriaan M.; Jaracz-Ros, Agnieszka; Klipfel, Laurence; Cottet, Martin; Maurel, Damien; Bdioui, Sara; Balabanian, Karl; Prézeau, Laurent; Trinquet, Eric; Durroux, Thierry; Bachelerie, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization has long been considered as a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the diversity of GPCR-dependent signaling, and its dynamics and quantification in living cells has generated considerable interest. We developed a robust and sensitive assay to follow and quantify ligand-induced and constitutive-induced GPCR internalization but also receptor recycling in living cells. This assay is based on diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer (DERET) between cell surface GPCRs labeled with a luminescent terbium cryptate donor and a fluorescein acceptor present in the culture medium. GPCR internalization results in a quantifiable reduction of energy transfer. This method yields a high signal-to-noise ratio due to time-resolved measurements. For various GPCRs belonging to different classes, we demonstrated that constitutive and ligand-induced internalization could be monitored as a function of time and ligand concentration, thus allowing accurate quantitative determination of kinetics of receptor internalization but also half-maximal effective or inhibitory concentrations of compounds. In addition to its selectivity and sensitivity, we provided evidence that DERET-based internalization assay is particularly suitable for characterizing biased ligands. Furthermore, the determination of a Z′-factor value of 0.45 indicates the quality and suitability of DERET-based internalization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compounds that may modulate GPCRs internalization. PMID:26617570

  4. A Broad G Protein-Coupled Receptor Internalization Assay that Combines SNAP-Tag Labeling, Diffusion-Enhanced Resonance Energy Transfer, and a Highly Emissive Terbium Cryptate.

    PubMed

    Levoye, Angélique; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Jaracz-Ros, Agnieszka; Klipfel, Laurence; Cottet, Martin; Maurel, Damien; Bdioui, Sara; Balabanian, Karl; Prézeau, Laurent; Trinquet, Eric; Durroux, Thierry; Bachelerie, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization has long been considered as a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the diversity of GPCR-dependent signaling, and its dynamics and quantification in living cells has generated considerable interest. We developed a robust and sensitive assay to follow and quantify ligand-induced and constitutive-induced GPCR internalization but also receptor recycling in living cells. This assay is based on diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer (DERET) between cell surface GPCRs labeled with a luminescent terbium cryptate donor and a fluorescein acceptor present in the culture medium. GPCR internalization results in a quantifiable reduction of energy transfer. This method yields a high signal-to-noise ratio due to time-resolved measurements. For various GPCRs belonging to different classes, we demonstrated that constitutive and ligand-induced internalization could be monitored as a function of time and ligand concentration, thus allowing accurate quantitative determination of kinetics of receptor internalization but also half-maximal effective or inhibitory concentrations of compounds. In addition to its selectivity and sensitivity, we provided evidence that DERET-based internalization assay is particularly suitable for characterizing biased ligands. Furthermore, the determination of a Z'-factor value of 0.45 indicates the quality and suitability of DERET-based internalization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compounds that may modulate GPCRs internalization.

  5. Mechanisms of modulation by internal protons of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels cloned from sensory receptor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gavazzo, P; Picco, C; Menini, A

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the modulation by internal protons of cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels cloned from bovine olfactory receptor cells and retinal rods. CNG channels were studied in excised inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus laevis oocytes previously injected with the mRNA encoding for the subunit 1 of olfactory or rod channels. Channels were activated by cGMP or cAMP, and currents as a function of cyclic nucleotide concentrations were measured as pHi varied between 7.6 and 5.0. Increasing internal proton concentrations caused a partial blockage of the single-channel current, consistent with protonation of a single acidic site with a pK1 of 4.5-4.7, both in rod and in olfactory CNG channels. Channel gating properties were also affected by internal protons. The open probability at low cyclic nucleotide concentrations was greatly increased by lowering pHi, and the increase was larger when channels were activated by cAMP than by cGMP. Therefore, internal protons affected both channel permeation and gating properties, causing a reduction in single-channel current and an increase in open probability. These effects are likely to be caused by different titratable groups on the channel. PMID:9308192

  6. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVI. Pattern recognition receptors in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Clare E; Orr, Selinda; Ferguson, Brian; Symmons, Martyn F; Boyle, Joseph P; Monie, Tom P

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Toll, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, as the first described pattern recognition receptor (PRR) in 1996, many families of these receptors have been discovered and characterized. PRRs play critically important roles in pathogen recognition to initiate innate immune responses that ultimately link to the generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of PRRs leads to the induction of immune and inflammatory genes, including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. It is increasingly clear that many PRRs are linked to a range of inflammatory, infectious, immune, and chronic degenerative diseases. Several drugs to modulate PRR activity are already in clinical trials and many more are likely to appear in the near future. Here, we review the different families of mammalian PRRs, the ligands they recognize, the mechanisms of activation, their role in disease, and the potential of targeting these proteins to develop the anti-inflammatory therapeutics of the future.

  7. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVI. Pattern Recognition Receptors in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Selinda; Ferguson, Brian; Symmons, Martyn F.; Boyle, Joseph P.; Monie, Tom P.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Toll, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, as the first described pattern recognition receptor (PRR) in 1996, many families of these receptors have been discovered and characterized. PRRs play critically important roles in pathogen recognition to initiate innate immune responses that ultimately link to the generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of PRRs leads to the induction of immune and inflammatory genes, including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. It is increasingly clear that many PRRs are linked to a range of inflammatory, infectious, immune, and chronic degenerative diseases. Several drugs to modulate PRR activity are already in clinical trials and many more are likely to appear in the near future. Here, we review the different families of mammalian PRRs, the ligands they recognize, the mechanisms of activation, their role in disease, and the potential of targeting these proteins to develop the anti-inflammatory therapeutics of the future. PMID:25829385

  8. International Union of Pharmacology LVIII: update on the P2Y G protein-coupled nucleotide receptors: from molecular mechanisms and pathophysiology to therapy.

    PubMed

    Abbracchio, Maria P; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie; Barnard, Eric A; Boyer, José L; Kennedy, Charles; Knight, Gillian E; Fumagalli, Marta; Gachet, Christian; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Weisman, Gary A

    2006-09-01

    There have been many advances in our knowledge about different aspects of P2Y receptor signaling since the last review published by our International Union of Pharmacology subcommittee. More receptor subtypes have been cloned and characterized and most orphan receptors de-orphanized, so that it is now possible to provide a basis for a future subdivision of P2Y receptor subtypes. More is known about the functional elements of the P2Y receptor molecules and the signaling pathways involved, including interactions with ion channels. There have been substantial developments in the design of selective agonists and antagonists to some of the P2Y receptor subtypes. There are new findings about the mechanisms underlying nucleotide release and ectoenzymatic nucleotide breakdown. Interactions between P2Y receptors and receptors to other signaling molecules have been explored as well as P2Y-mediated control of gene transcription. The distribution and roles of P2Y receptor subtypes in many different cell types are better understood and P2Y receptor-related compounds are being explored for therapeutic purposes. These and other advances are discussed in the present review.

  9. Regulation of µ-Opioid Receptors: Desensitization, Phosphorylation, Internalization, and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John T.; Ingram, Susan L.; Henderson, Graeme; Chavkin, Charles; von Zastrow, Mark; Schulz, Stefan; Koch, Thomas; Evans, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Morphine and related µ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists remain among the most effective drugs known for acute relief of severe pain. A major problem in treating painful conditions is that tolerance limits the long-term utility of opioid agonists. Considerable effort has been expended on developing an understanding of the molecular and cellular processes that underlie acute MOR signaling, short-term receptor regulation, and the progression of events that lead to tolerance for different MOR agonists. Although great progress has been made in the past decade, many points of contention and controversy cloud the realization of this progress. This review attempts to clarify some confusion by clearly defining terms, such as desensitization and tolerance, and addressing optimal pharmacological analyses for discerning relative importance of these cellular mechanisms. Cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating MOR function by phosphorylation relative to receptor desensitization and endocytosis are comprehensively reviewed, with an emphasis on agonist-biased regulation and areas where knowledge is lacking or controversial. The implications of these mechanisms for understanding the substantial contribution of MOR signaling to opioid tolerance are then considered in detail. While some functional MOR regulatory mechanisms contributing to tolerance are clearly understood, there are large gaps in understanding the molecular processes responsible for loss of MOR function after chronic exposure to opioids. Further elucidation of the cellular mechanisms that are regulated by opioids will be necessary for the successful development of MOR-based approaches to new pain therapeutics that limit the development of tolerance. PMID:23321159

  10. Internalization and activation of the rat liver insulin receptor kinase in vivo.

    PubMed

    Khan, M N; Baquiran, G; Brule, C; Burgess, J; Foster, B; Bergeron, J J; Posner, B I

    1989-08-05

    The preparation of clearly delineated plasmalemma (PM) and endosomal subcellular fractions from rat liver has allowed us to compare insulin receptor (IR) kinase activity at the cell surface and in hepatic endosomes (ENs) as a function of dose and time after injected insulin. Tyrosine kinase activity in PM and ENs was measured, after solubilization and partial purification by wheat germ agglutinin chromatography (lectin-purified), using poly(Glu:Tyr) as substrate. Following the injection of a subsaturating dose of insulin (1.5 micrograms/100 g body weight), lectin-purified receptor showed peak activation at 30 s in PM and at 2 min in ENs. As observed previously (Khan, M. N., Savoie, S., Bergeron, J. J. M., and Posner, B. I. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 8462-8472) autophosphorylation activity was also augmented following insulin injection. In a pattern virtually identical to that of exogenous kinase activity, autophosphorylation attained peak activity at 30 s in PM and at 2 min in ENs. The time course of IR autophosphorylation in intact membranes was very similar to that observed for lectin purified receptors and was seen with an injected insulin dose as low as 150 ng/100 g body weight. Phosphatase treatment of the solubilized endosomal receptor abolished its enhanced activity. Hence, insulin treatment led to in vivo receptor phosphorylation which was reflected in the enhancement of both tyrosine kinase and autophosphorylation activities. Significant differences in the phosphorylation activities of PM and ENs were observed. Phosphoamino acid analyses revealed that the activated IR of intact PM was autophosphorylated in vitro, at both serine (55%) and tyrosine (45%) residues; whereas the activated IR of intact ENs was phosphorylated in vitro exclusively on tyrosine autophosphorylation specific activity for the activated IR of ENs was 3- to 4-fold that of the IR of PM. This was observed for the lectin purified IRs as well as for IRs of intact cell fractions. The reduced

  11. The carboxy-terminal tail or the intracellular loop 3 is required for β-arrestin-dependent internalization of a mammalian type II GnRH receptor.

    PubMed

    Madziva, Michael T; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N; Flanagan, Colleen A; Katz, Arieh A

    2015-08-15

    The type II GnRH receptor (GnRH-R2) in contrast to mammalian type I GnRH receptor (GnRH-R1) has a cytosolic carboxy-terminal tail. We investigated the role of β-arrestin 1 in GnRH-R2-mediated signalling and mapped the regions in GnRH-R2 required for recruitment of β-arrestin, employing internalization assays. We show that GnRH-R2 activation of ERK is dependent on β-arrestin and protein kinase C. Appending the tail of GnRH-R2 to GnRH-R1 enabled GRK- and β-arrestin-dependent internalization of the chimaeric receptor. Surprisingly, carboxy-terminally truncated GnRH-R2 retained β-arrestin and GRK-dependent internalization, suggesting that β-arrestin interacts with additional elements of GnRH-R2. Mutating serine and threonine or basic residues of intracellular loop 3 did not abolish β-arrestin 1-dependent internalization but a receptor lacking these basic residues and the carboxy-terminus showed no β-arrestin 1-dependent internalization. Our results suggest that basic residues at the amino-terminal end of intracellular loop 3 or the carboxy-terminal tail are required for β-arrestin dependent internalization.

  12. International Validation of Two Human Recombinant Estrogen Receptor (ERa) Binding Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    An international validation study has been successfully completed for 2 competitive binding assays using human recombinant ERa. Assays evaluated included the Freyberger-Wilson (FW) assay using a full length human ER, and the Chemical Evaluation and Research Institute (CERI) assay...

  13. Primary Macrophage Chemotaxis Induced by Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Agonists Occurs Independently of the CB2 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lewis; Christou, Ivy; Kapellos, Theodore S; Buchan, Alice; Brodermann, Maximillian H; Gianella-Borradori, Matteo; Russell, Angela; Iqbal, Asif J; Greaves, David R

    2015-06-02

    Activation of CB2 has been demonstrated to induce directed immune cell migration. However, the ability of CB2 to act as a chemoattractant receptor in macrophages remains largely unexplored. Using a real-time chemotaxis assay and a panel of chemically diverse and widely used CB2 agonists, we set out to examine whether CB2 modulates primary murine macrophage chemotaxis. We report that of 12 agonists tested, only JWH133, HU308, L-759,656 and L-759,633 acted as macrophage chemoattractants. Surprisingly, neither pharmacological inhibition nor genetic ablation of CB2 had any effect on CB2 agonist-induced macrophage chemotaxis. As chemotaxis was pertussis toxin sensitive in both WT and CB2(-/-) macrophages, we concluded that a non-CB1/CB2, Gi/o-coupled GPCR must be responsible for CB2 agonist-induced macrophage migration. The obvious candidate receptors GPR18 and GPR55 could not mediate JWH133 or HU308-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement or JWH133-induced β-arrestin recruitment in cells transfected with either receptor, demonstrating that neither are the unidentified GPCR. Taken together our results conclusively demonstrate that CB2 is not a chemoattractant receptor for murine macrophages. Furthermore we show for the first time that JWH133, HU308, L-759,656 and L-759,633 have off-target effects of functional consequence in primary cells and we believe that our findings have wide ranging implications for the entire cannabinoid field.

  14. Primary Macrophage Chemotaxis Induced by Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Agonists Occurs Independently of the CB2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lewis; Christou, Ivy; Kapellos, Theodore S.; Buchan, Alice; Brodermann, Maximillian H.; Gianella-Borradori, Matteo; Russell, Angela; Iqbal, Asif J.; Greaves, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CB2 has been demonstrated to induce directed immune cell migration. However, the ability of CB2 to act as a chemoattractant receptor in macrophages remains largely unexplored. Using a real-time chemotaxis assay and a panel of chemically diverse and widely used CB2 agonists, we set out to examine whether CB2 modulates primary murine macrophage chemotaxis. We report that of 12 agonists tested, only JWH133, HU308, L-759,656 and L-759,633 acted as macrophage chemoattractants. Surprisingly, neither pharmacological inhibition nor genetic ablation of CB2 had any effect on CB2 agonist-induced macrophage chemotaxis. As chemotaxis was pertussis toxin sensitive in both WT and CB2-/- macrophages, we concluded that a non-CB1/CB2, Gi/o-coupled GPCR must be responsible for CB2 agonist-induced macrophage migration. The obvious candidate receptors GPR18 and GPR55 could not mediate JWH133 or HU308-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement or JWH133-induced β-arrestin recruitment in cells transfected with either receptor, demonstrating that neither are the unidentified GPCR. Taken together our results conclusively demonstrate that CB2 is not a chemoattractant receptor for murine macrophages. Furthermore we show for the first time that JWH133, HU308, L-759,656 and L-759,633 have off-target effects of functional consequence in primary cells and we believe that our findings have wide ranging implications for the entire cannabinoid field. PMID:26033291

  15. The modular adaptor protein ARH is required for low density lipoprotein (LDL) binding and internalization but not for LDL receptor clustering in coated pits.

    PubMed

    Michaely, Peter; Li, Wei-Ping; Anderson, Richard G W; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H

    2004-08-06

    ARH is an adaptor protein required for efficient endocytosis of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors (LDLRs) in selected tissues. Individuals lacking ARH (ARH-/-) have severe hypercholesterolemia due to impaired hepatic clearance of LDL. Immortalized lymphocytes, but not fibroblasts, from ARH-deficient subjects fail to internalize LDL. To further define the role of ARH in LDLR function, we compared the subcellular distribution of the LDLR in lymphocytes from normal and ARH-/- subjects. In normal lymphocytes LDLRs were predominantly located in intracellular compartments, whereas in ARH-/- cells the receptors were almost exclusively on the plasma membrane. Biochemical assays and quantification of LDLR by electron microscopy indicated that ARH-/- lymphocytes had >20-fold more LDLR on the cell surface and a approximately 27-fold excess of LDLR outside of coated pits. The accumulation of LDLR on the cell surface was not due to failure of receptors to localize in coated pits since the number of LDLRs in coated pits was similar in ARH-/- and normal cells. Despite the dramatic increase in cell surface receptors, LDL binding was only 2-fold higher in the ARH-/- lymphocytes. These findings indicate that ARH is required not only for internalization of the LDL.LDLR complex but also for efficient binding of LDL to the receptor and suggest that ARH stabilizes the associations of the receptor with LDL and with the invaginating portion of the budding pit, thereby increasing the efficiency of LDL internalization.

  16. Unit Title: Imaging the Insertion of Superecliptic pHluorin Labeled Dopamine D2 Receptor Using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kathryn M.; Li, Yun; Lin, Da-Ting

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of mechanisms governing receptor insertion to the plasma membrane (PM) requires an experimental approach with excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. Here we present a strategy that enables dynamic visualization of insertion events for dopamine D2 receptors into the PM. This approach includes tagging a pH-sensitive GFP, superecliptic pHluorin, to the extracellular domain of the receptor. By imaging pHluorin-tagged receptors under total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), we were able to directly visualize individual receptor insertion events into the PM in cultured neurons. This novel imaging approach can be applied to both secreted proteins and many membrane proteins with an extracellular domain labeled with superecliptic pHluorin, and will ultimately allow for detailed dissections of the key mechanisms governing secretion of soluble proteins or the insertion of different membrane proteins to the PM. PMID:25559003

  17. Angiotensin-II mediates ACE2 Internalization and Degradation through an Angiotensin-II type I receptor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lazartigues, Eric; Filipeanu, Catalin M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) is a pivotal component of the renin-angiotensin system, promoting the conversion of Angiotensin (Ang)-II to Ang-(1-7). We previously reported that decreased ACE2 expression and activity contribute to the development of Ang-II-mediated hypertension in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in ACE2 down-regulation during neurogenic hypertension. In ACE2-transfected Neuro-2A cells, Ang-II treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of ACE2 enzymatic activity. Examination of the subcellular localization of ACE2 revealed that Ang-II treatment leads to ACE2 internalization and degradation into lysosomes. These effects were prevented by both the Ang-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan and the lysosomal inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, in HEK293T cells, which lack endogenous AT1R, Ang-II failed to promote ACE2 internalization. Moreover, this effect could be induced after AT1R transfection. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AT1R and ACE2 form complexes and these interactions were decreased by Ang-II treatment, which also enhanced ACE2 ubiquitination. In contrast, ACE2 activity was not changed by transfection of AT2 or Mas receptors. In vivo, Ang-II-mediated hypertension was blunted by chronic infusion of leupeptin in wildtype C57Bl/6, but not in ACE2 knockout mice. Overall, this is the first demonstration that elevated Ang-II levels reduce ACE2 expression and activity by stimulation of lysosomal degradation through an AT1R-dependent mechanism. PMID:25225202

  18. Glycan-independent binding and internalization of human IgM to FCMR, its cognate cellular receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Katy A.; Wang, Jiabin; Urban, Britta C.; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Pleass, Richard J.

    2017-02-01

    IgM is the first antibody to be produced in immune responses and plays an important role in the neutralization of bacteria and viruses. Human IgM is heavily glycosylated, featuring five N-linked glycan sites on the μ chain and one on the J-chain. Glycosylation of IgG is known to modulate the effector functions of Fcγ receptors. In contrast, little is known about the effect of glycosylation on IgM binding to the human Fcμ receptor (hFCMR). In this study, we identify the Cμ4 domain of IgM as the target of hFCMR, and show that binding and internalization of IgM by hFCMR is glycan-independent. We generated a homology-based structure for hFCMR and used molecular dynamic simulations to show how this interaction with IgM may occur. Finally, we reveal an inhibitory function for IgM in the proliferation of T cells.

  19. Glycan-independent binding and internalization of human IgM to FCMR, its cognate cellular receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Katy A.; Wang, Jiabin; Urban, Britta C.; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Pleass, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    IgM is the first antibody to be produced in immune responses and plays an important role in the neutralization of bacteria and viruses. Human IgM is heavily glycosylated, featuring five N-linked glycan sites on the μ chain and one on the J-chain. Glycosylation of IgG is known to modulate the effector functions of Fcγ receptors. In contrast, little is known about the effect of glycosylation on IgM binding to the human Fcμ receptor (hFCMR). In this study, we identify the Cμ4 domain of IgM as the target of hFCMR, and show that binding and internalization of IgM by hFCMR is glycan-independent. We generated a homology-based structure for hFCMR and used molecular dynamic simulations to show how this interaction with IgM may occur. Finally, we reveal an inhibitory function for IgM in the proliferation of T cells. PMID:28230186

  20. Human circulating monocytes internalize 125I-insulin in a similar fashion to rat hepatocytes: relevance to receptor regulation in target and nontarget tissues.

    PubMed

    Grunberger, G; Robert, A; Carpentier, J L; Dayer, J M; Roth, A; Stevenson, H C; Orci, L; Gorden, P

    1985-08-01

    Circulating monocytes bind 125I-insulin in a specific fashion and have been used to analyze the ambient receptor status in humans. When freshly isolated circulating monocytes are incubated with 125I-insulin and examined by electron microscopic autoradiography, approximately 18% of the labeled material is internalized after 15 minutes at 37 degrees C. By 2 hours at 37 degrees C, approximately one half of the 125I-insulin is internalized. Internalization occurs also at 15 degrees C but at a slower rate. Furthermore, the monocytes bind and internalize 125I-insulin in a manner that mirrors that of major target tissues, such as rat hepatocytes. These data suggest that the insulin receptor of the circulating monocyte might be regulated by adsorptive endocytosis in a manner analogous to that of target tissue, such as the liver.

  1. Electrophysiological properties of AMPA receptors are differentially modulated depending on the associated member of the TARP family.

    PubMed

    Kott, Sabine; Werner, Markus; Körber, Christoph; Hollmann, Michael

    2007-04-04

    The family of AMPA receptors is encoded by four genes that are differentially spliced to result in the flip or flop versions of the four subunits GluR1 to GluR4. GluR2 is further modified at the so-called Q/R site by posttranscriptional RNA editing. Delivery of AMPA receptors to the plasma membrane and synaptic trafficking are controlled by transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs). Additionally, TARPs influence essential electrophysiological properties of AMPA receptor channels such as desensitization and agonist efficacies. Here, we compare the influence of all known TARPs (gamma2, gamma3, gamma4, and gamma8) on agonist-induced currents of the four AMPA receptor subunits, including flip and flop splice variants and editing variants. We show that, although agonist-induced currents of all homomeric AMPA receptor subunits as well as all heteromeric combinations tested are significantly potentiated when coexpressed with members of the TARP family in Xenopus laevis oocytes, the extent of TARP-mediated increase in agonist-induced responses is highly dependent on both the AMPA receptor subunit and the coexpressed TARP. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splice variant of the AMPA receptor plays a key role in determining the modulation of electrophysiological properties by associated TARPs. We furthermore present evidence that individual TARP-AMPA receptor interactions control the degree of desensitization of AMPA receptors. Consequently, because of their subunit-specific impact on the electrophysiological properties, TARPs play a major role as modulatory subunits of AMPA receptors and thus contribute to the functional diversity of AMPA receptors encountered in the CNS.

  2. Total saponins of Panax ginseng induces K562 cell differentiation by promoting internalization of the erythropoietin receptor.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Guowei; Guan, Tao; Chen, Dilong; Li, Chunli; Jiang, Rong; Luo, Chunyan; Hu, Xiaoshu; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Jianwei

    2009-01-01

    Ginseng is a commonly used herbal medicine with a wide range of therapeutic benefits. Total saponins of Panax ginseng (TSPG) is one of the main effective components of ginseng. Our previous studies have shown that TSPG could promote the production of normal blood cells and inhibition of the leukemia cell proliferation. However, whether ginseng can induce the differentiation of leukemia cells is still unclear. This study was to examine the effect of TSPG or the combination of erythropoietin (EPO) and TSPG on the erythroid differentiation of K562 cells, and their corresponding mechanisms regarding erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression. Under light and electron microscopes, the TSPG- or TSPG + EPO-treated K562 cells showed a tendency to undergo erythroid differentiation; early and intermediate erythroblast-like cells were observed. Hemoglobin and HIR2 expressions were significantly increased. As determined by Western blotting analysis, the EPOR protein level in the K562 cytoplasmic membrane was significantly decreased after TSPG treatment, while its cytoplasm level increased in a dose-dependent manner. However, the total cellular EPOR level was unchanged. These results indicate that TSPG-induced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells may be accompanied by the internalization of EPOR. Thus, our study suggests that treatment with a combination of TSPG and EPO may induce erythroid differentiation of K562 cells at least in part through induction of EPOR internalization.

  3. Identification and Quantification of a New Family of Peptide Endocannabinoids (Pepcans) Showing Negative Allosteric Modulation at CB1 Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Mark; Chicca, Andrea; Tamborrini, Marco; Eisen, David; Lerner, Raissa; Lutz, Beat; Poetz, Oliver; Pluschke, Gerd; Gertsch, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    The α-hemoglobin-derived dodecapeptide RVD-hemopressin (RVDPVNFKLLSH) has been proposed to be an endogenous agonist for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). To study this peptide, we have raised mAbs against its C-terminal part. Using an immunoaffinity mass spectrometry approach, a whole family of N-terminally extended peptides in addition to RVD-Hpα were identified in rodent brain extracts and human and mouse plasma. We designated these peptides Pepcan-12 (RVDPVNFKLLSH) to Pepcan-23 (SALSDLHAHKLRVDPVNFKLLSH), referring to peptide length. The most abundant Pepcans found in the brain were tested for CB1 receptor binding. In the classical radioligand displacement assay, Pepcan-12 was the most efficacious ligand but only partially displaced both [3H]CP55,940 and [3H]WIN55,212-2. The data were fitted with the allosteric ternary complex model, revealing a cooperativity factor value α < 1, thus indicating a negative allosteric modulation. Dissociation kinetic studies of [3H]CP55,940 in the absence and presence of Pepcan-12 confirmed these results by showing increased dissociation rate constants induced by Pepcan-12. A fluorescently labeled Pepcan-12 analog was synthesized to investigate the binding to CB1 receptors. Competition binding studies revealed Ki values of several Pepcans in the nanomolar range. Accordingly, using competitive ELISA, we found low nanomolar concentrations of Pepcans in human plasma and ∼100 pmol/g in mouse brain. Surprisingly, Pepcan-12 exhibited potent negative allosteric modulation of the orthosteric agonist-induced cAMP accumulation, [35S]GTPγS binding, and CB1 receptor internalization. Pepcans are the first endogenous allosteric modulators identified for CB1 receptors. Given their abundance in the brain, Pepcans could play an important physiological role in modulating endocannabinoid signaling. PMID:22952224

  4. Single-domain antibodies that compete with the natural ligand fibroblast growth factor block the internalization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Veggiani, Gianluca; Ossolengo, Giuseppe; Aliprandi, Marisa; Cavallaro, Ugo; Marco, Ario de

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Recombinant antibodies for FGFR1 were isolated from a llama naive library in VHH format. {yields} These antibodies compete with the natural ligand FGF-2 for the same epitope on FGFR1. {yields} The antibody competition inhibits the FGF-2-dependent internalization of FGFR1. -- Abstract: Single-domain antibodies in VHH format specific for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) were isolated from a phage-display llama naive library. In particular, phage elution in the presence of the natural receptor ligand fibroblast growth factor (FGF) allowed for the identification of recombinant antibodies that compete with FGF for the same region on the receptor surface. These antibodies posses a relatively low affinity for FGFR1 and were never identified when unspecific elution conditions favoring highly affine binders were applied to panning procedures. Two populations of competitive antibodies were identified that labeled specifically the receptor-expressing cells in immunofluorescence and recognize distinct epitopes. Antibodies from both populations effectively prevented FGF-dependent internalization and nuclear accumulation of the receptor in cultured cells. This achievement indicates that these antibodies have a capacity to modulate the receptor physiology and, therefore, constitute powerful reagents for basic research and a potential lead for therapeutic applications.

  5. Functional selectivity and time-dependence of μ-opioid receptor desensitization at nerve terminals in the mouse ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, J D; Bailey, C P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The majority of studies examining desensitization of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) have examined those located at cell bodies. However, MORs are extensively expressed at nerve terminals throughout the mammalian nervous system. This study is designed to investigate agonist-induced MOR desensitization at nerve terminals in the mouse ventral tegmental area (VTA). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH MOR function was measured in mature mouse brain slices containing the VTA using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Presynaptic MOR function was isolated from postsynaptic function and the functional selectivity, time-dependence and mechanisms of agonist-induced MOR desensitization were examined. KEY RESULTS MORs located at GABAergic nerve terminals in the VTA were completely resistant to rapid desensitization induced by the high-efficacy agonists DAMGO and Met-enkephalin. MORs located postsynaptically on GABAergic cell bodies readily underwent rapid desensitization in response to DAMGO. However, after prolonged (>7 h) treatment with Met-enkephalin, profound homologous MOR desensitization was observed. Morphine could induce rapid MOR desensitization at nerve terminals when PKC was activated. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Agonist-induced MOR desensitization in GABAergic neurons in the VTA is compartment-selective as well as agonist-selective. When MORs are located at cell bodies, higher-efficacy agonists induce greater levels of rapid desensitization than lower-efficacy agonists. However, the converse is true at nerve terminals where agonists that induce MOR desensitization via PKC are capable of rapid agonist-induced desensitization while higher-efficacy agonists are not. MOR desensitization induced by higher-efficacy agonists at nerve terminals only takes place after prolonged receptor activation. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http

  6. Induction of the Alternative NF-κB Pathway by Lymphotoxin αβ (LTαβ) Relies on Internalization of LTβ Receptor ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ganeff, Corinne; Remouchamps, Caroline; Boutaffala, Layla; Benezech, Cécile; Galopin, Géraldine; Vandepaer, Sarah; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Ormenese, Sandra; Chariot, Alain; Schneider, Pascal; Caamaño, Jorge; Piette, Jacques; Dejardin, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Several tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family members activate both the classical and the alternative NF-κB pathways. However, how a single receptor engages these two distinct pathways is still poorly understood. Using lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) as a prototype, we showed that activation of the alternative, but not the classical, NF-κB pathway relied on internalization of the receptor. Further molecular analyses revealed a specific cytosolic region of LTβR essential for its internalization, TRAF3 recruitment, and p100 processing. Interestingly, we found that dynamin-dependent, but clathrin-independent, internalization of LTβR appeared to be required for the activation of the alternative, but not the classical, NF-κB pathway. In vivo, ligand-induced internalization of LTβR in mesenteric lymph node stromal cells correlated with induction of alternative NF-κB target genes. Thus, our data shed light on LTβR cellular trafficking as a process required for specific biological functions of NF-κB. PMID:21896778

  7. Induction of the alternative NF-κB pathway by lymphotoxin αβ (LTαβ) relies on internalization of LTβ receptor.

    PubMed

    Ganeff, Corinne; Remouchamps, Caroline; Boutaffala, Layla; Benezech, Cécile; Galopin, Géraldine; Vandepaer, Sarah; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Ormenese, Sandra; Chariot, Alain; Schneider, Pascal; Caamaño, Jorge; Piette, Jacques; Dejardin, Emmanuel

    2011-11-01

    Several tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family members activate both the classical and the alternative NF-κB pathways. However, how a single receptor engages these two distinct pathways is still poorly understood. Using lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) as a prototype, we showed that activation of the alternative, but not the classical, NF-κB pathway relied on internalization of the receptor. Further molecular analyses revealed a specific cytosolic region of LTβR essential for its internalization, TRAF3 recruitment, and p100 processing. Interestingly, we found that dynamin-dependent, but clathrin-independent, internalization of LTβR appeared to be required for the activation of the alternative, but not the classical, NF-κB pathway. In vivo, ligand-induced internalization of LTβR in mesenteric lymph node stromal cells correlated with induction of alternative NF-κB target genes. Thus, our data shed light on LTβR cellular trafficking as a process required for specific biological functions of NF-κB.

  8. Calcium modulates calmodulin/α-actinin 1 interaction with and agonist-dependent internalization of the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Piirainen, Henni; Taura, Jaume; Kursula, Petri; Ciruela, Francisco; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2017-04-01

    Adenosine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that sense extracellular adenosine to transmit intracellular signals. One of the four adenosine receptor subtypes, the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), has an exceptionally long intracellular C terminus (A2AR-ct) that mediates interactions with a large array of proteins, including calmodulin and α-actinin. Here, we aimed to ascertain the α-actinin 1/calmodulin interplay whilst binding to A2AR and the role of Ca(2+) in this process. First, we studied the A2AR-α-actinin 1 interaction by means of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance, using purified recombinant proteins. α-Actinin 1 binds the A2AR-ct through its distal calmodulin-like domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner with a dissociation constant of 5-12μM, thus showing an ~100 times lower affinity compared to the A2AR-calmodulin/Ca(2+) complex. Importantly, calmodulin displaced α-actinin 1 from the A2AR-ct in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, disrupting the A2AR-α-actinin 1 complex. Finally, we assessed the impact of Ca(2+) on A2AR internalization in living cells, a function operated by the A2AR-α-actinin 1 complex. Interestingly, while Ca(2+) influx did not affect constitutive A2AR endocytosis, it abolished agonist-dependent internalization. In addition, we demonstrated that the A2AR/α-actinin interaction plays a pivotal role in receptor internalization and function. Overall, our results suggest that the interplay of A2AR with calmodulin and α-actinin 1 is fine-tuned by Ca(2+), a fact that might power agonist-mediated receptor internalization and function.

  9. Cannabinoid 2 receptor- and beta Arrestin 2-dependent upregulation of serotonin 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Franklin, J M; Vasiljevik, T; Prisinzano, T E; Carrasco, G A

    2013-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that cannabinoid receptor agonists may regulate serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor neurotransmission in the brain, although no molecular mechanism has been identified. Here, we present experimental evidence that sustained treatment with a non-selective cannabinoid agonist (CP55,940) or selective CB2 receptor agonists (JWH133 or GP1a) upregulate 5-HT(2A) receptors in a neuronal cell line. Furthermore, this cannabinoid receptor agonist-induced upregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors was prevented in cells stably transfected with either CB2 or β-Arrestin 2 shRNA lentiviral particles. Additionally, inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis also prevented the cannabinoid receptor-induced upregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors. Our results indicate that cannabinoid agonists might upregulate 5-HT(2A) receptors by a mechanism that requires CB2 receptors and β-Arrestin 2 in cells that express both CB2 and 5-HT(2A) receptors. 5-HT(2A) receptors have been associated with several physiological functions and neuropsychiatric disorders such as stress response, anxiety and depression, and schizophrenia. Therefore, these results might provide a molecular mechanism by which activation of cannabinoid receptors might be relevant to some cognitive and mood disorders in humans.

  10. OXYTOCIN INDUCES SOCIAL COMMUNICATION BY ACTIVATING ARGININEVASOPRESSIN V1A RECEPTORS AND NOT OXYTOCIN RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    SONG, Zhimin; MCCANN, Katharine E.; MCNEILL, John K.; LARKIN, Tony E.; HUHMAN, Kim L.; ALBERS, H. Elliott

    2014-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) and their receptors are very similar in structure. As a result, at least some of the effects of these peptides may be the result of crosstalk between their canonical receptors. The present study investigated this hypothesis by determining whether the induction of flank marking, a form of social communication in Syrian hamsters, by OT is mediated by the OT receptor or the AVP V1a receptor. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of OT or AVP induced flank marking in a dose-dependent manner although the effects of AVP were approximately 100 times greater than those of OT. Injections of highly selective V1a receptor agonists but not OT receptor agonists induced flank marking, and V1a receptor antagonists but not OT receptor antagonists significantly inhibited the ability of OT to induce flank marking. Lastly, injection of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), a peptide that stimulates OT but not AVP release, significantly increased odor-induced flank marking, and these effects were blocked by a V1a receptor antagonist. These data demonstrate that OT induces flank marking by activating AVP V1a and not OT receptors, suggesting that the V1a receptor should be considered to be an OT receptor as well as an AVP receptor. PMID:25173438

  11. Internalization and desensitization of the human glucose-dependent-insulinotropic receptor is affected by N-terminal acetylation of the agonist.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Sadek; Dubois-Vedrenne, Ingrid; Laval, Marie; Tikhonova, Irina G; D'Angelo, Romina; Sanchez, Claire; Clerc, Pascal; Gherardi, Marie-Julie; Gigoux, Véronique; Magnan, Remi; Fourmy, Daniel

    2015-10-15

    How incretins regulate presence of their receptors at the cell surface and their activity is of paramount importance for the development of therapeutic strategies targeting these receptors. We have studied internalization of the human Glucose-Insulinotropic Polypeptide receptor (GIPR). GIP stimulated rapid robust internalization of the GIPR, the major part being directed to lysosomes. GIPR internalization involved mainly clathrin-coated pits, AP-2 and dynamin. However, neither GIPR C-terminal region nor β-arrestin1/2 was required. Finally, N-acetyl-GIP recognized as a dipeptidyl-IV resistant analogue, fully stimulated cAMP production with a ∼15-fold lower potency than GIP and weakly stimulated GIPR internalization and desensitization of cAMP response. Furthermore, docking N-acetyl-GIP in the binding site of modeled GIPR showed slighter interactions with residues of helices 6 and 7 of GIPR compared to GIP. Therefore, incomplete or partial activity of N-acetyl-GIP on signaling involved in GIPR desensitization and internalization contributes to the enhanced incretin activity of this peptide.

  12. Permeation and block of rat GluR6 glutamate receptor channels by internal and external polyamines.

    PubMed Central

    Bähring, R; Bowie, D; Benveniste, M; Mayer, M L

    1997-01-01

    1. Polyamine block of rat GluR6(Q) glutamate receptor channels was studied in outside-out patches from transiently transfected HEK 293 cells. With symmetrical 150 mM Na+ and 30 microM internal spermine there was biphasic voltage dependence with 95% block at +40 mV but only 20% block at +140 mV. Dose-inhibition analysis for external spermine also revealed biphasic block; the Kd at +40 mV (54 microM) was lower than at +80 (167 microM) and -80 mV (78 microM). 2. For internal polyamines relief from block was most pronounced for spermine, weaker for N-(4-hydroxyphenylpropanoyl)-spermine (PPS), and virtually absent for philanthotoxin 343 (PhTX 343), suggesting that permeation of polyamines varies with cross-sectional width (spermine, 0.44 nm; PPS, 0.70 nm; PhTX 343, 0.75 nm). 3. With putrescine, spermidine, or spermine as sole external cations, inward currents at -120 mV confirmed permeation of polyamines. For bi-ionic conditions with 90 mM polyamine and 150 mM Na+i, reversal potentials were -12.4 mV for putrescine (permeability ratio relative to Na+, PPut/PNa = 0.42) and -32.7 mV for spermidine (PSpd/PNa = 0.07). Currents carried by spermine were too small to analyse accurately in the majority of patches. 4. Increasing [Na+]i from 44 to 330 mM had no effect on the potential for 50% block (V1/2) by 30 microM internal spermine; however, relief from block at positive membrane potentials increased with [Na+]i. In contrast, raising [Na+]o from 44 to 330 mM resulted in a depolarizing shift in V1/2, indicating a strong interaction between internal polyamines and external permeant ions. 5. The Woodhull infinite barrier model of ion channel block adequately described the action of spermine at membrane potentials insufficient to produce relief from block. For 30 microM internal spermine such analysis gave Kd(O) = 2.5 microM, z theta = 1.97; block by 30 microM external spermine was weaker and less voltage dependent (Kd(O) = 37.8 microM and z delta = 0.55); delta and theta are

  13. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIX. Cannabinoid Receptors and Their Ligands: Beyond CB1 and CB2

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, A. C.; Abood, M. E.; Alexander, S. P. H.; Di Marzo, V.; Elphick, M. R.; Greasley, P. J.; Hansen, H. S.; Kunos, G.; Mackie, K.; Mechoulam, R.; Ross, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    There are at least two types of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). Ligands activating these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) include the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, numerous synthetic compounds, and endogenous compounds known as endocannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists have also been developed. Some of these ligands activate or block one type of cannabinoid receptor more potently than the other type. This review summarizes current data indicating the extent to which cannabinoid receptor ligands undergo orthosteric or allosteric interactions with non-CB1, non-CB2 established GPCRs, deorphanized receptors such as GPR55, ligand-gated ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and other ion channels or peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors. From these data, it is clear that some ligands that interact similarly with CB1 and/or CB2 receptors are likely to display significantly different pharmacological profiles. The review also lists some criteria that any novel “CB3” cannabinoid receptor or channel should fulfil and concludes that these criteria are not currently met by any non-CB1, non-CB2 pharmacological receptor or channel. However, it does identify certain pharmacological targets that should be investigated further as potential CB3 receptors or channels. These include TRP vanilloid 1, which possibly functions as an ionotropic cannabinoid receptor under physiological and/or pathological conditions, and some deorphanized GPCRs. Also discussed are 1) the ability of CB1 receptors to form heteromeric complexes with certain other GPCRs, 2) phylogenetic relationships that exist between CB1/CB2 receptors and other GPCRs, 3) evidence for the existence of several as-yet-uncharacterized non-CB1, non-CB2 cannabinoid receptors; and 4) current cannabinoid receptor nomenclature. PMID:21079038

  14. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIX. Cannabinoid receptors and their ligands: beyond CB₁ and CB₂.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, R G; Howlett, A C; Abood, M E; Alexander, S P H; Di Marzo, V; Elphick, M R; Greasley, P J; Hansen, H S; Kunos, G; Mackie, K; Mechoulam, R; Ross, R A

    2010-12-01

    There are at least two types of cannabinoid receptors (CB(1) and CB(2)). Ligands activating these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) include the phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, numerous synthetic compounds, and endogenous compounds known as endocannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists have also been developed. Some of these ligands activate or block one type of cannabinoid receptor more potently than the other type. This review summarizes current data indicating the extent to which cannabinoid receptor ligands undergo orthosteric or allosteric interactions with non-CB(1), non-CB(2) established GPCRs, deorphanized receptors such as GPR55, ligand-gated ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and other ion channels or peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors. From these data, it is clear that some ligands that interact similarly with CB(1) and/or CB(2) receptors are likely to display significantly different pharmacological profiles. The review also lists some criteria that any novel "CB(3)" cannabinoid receptor or channel should fulfil and concludes that these criteria are not currently met by any non-CB(1), non-CB(2) pharmacological receptor or channel. However, it does identify certain pharmacological targets that should be investigated further as potential CB(3) receptors or channels. These include TRP vanilloid 1, which possibly functions as an ionotropic cannabinoid receptor under physiological and/or pathological conditions, and some deorphanized GPCRs. Also discussed are 1) the ability of CB(1) receptors to form heteromeric complexes with certain other GPCRs, 2) phylogenetic relationships that exist between CB(1)/CB(2) receptors and other GPCRs, 3) evidence for the existence of several as-yet-uncharacterized non-CB(1), non-CB(2) cannabinoid receptors; and 4) current cannabinoid receptor nomenclature.

  15. Delta opioid receptor analgesia: recent contributions from pharmacology and molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte Lina

    2012-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors represent a promising target for the development of novel analgesics. A number of tools have been developed recently that have significantly improved our knowledge of delta receptor function in pain control. These include several novel delta agonists with potent analgesic properties, as well as genetic mouse models with targeted mutations in the delta opioid receptor gene. Also, recent findings have further documented the regulation of delta receptor function at cellular level, which impacts on the pain-reducing activity of the receptor. These regulatory mechanisms occur at transcriptional and post-translational levels, along agonist-induced receptor activation, signaling and trafficking, or in interaction with other receptors and neuromodulatory systems. All these tools for in vivo research, as well as proposed mechanisms at molecular level, have tremendously increased our understanding of delta receptor physiology, and contribute to designing innovative strategies for the treatment of chronic pain and other diseases such as mood disorders. PMID:21836459

  16. Scribbled Optimizes BMP Signaling through Its Receptor Internalization to the Rab5 Endosome and Promote Robust Epithelial Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gui, Jinghua; Huang, Yunxian; Shimmi, Osamu

    2016-11-01

    Epithelial cells are characterized by apical-basal polarity. Intrinsic factors underlying apical-basal polarity are crucial for tissue homeostasis and have often been identified to be tumor suppressors. Patterning and differentiation of epithelia are key processes of epithelial morphogenesis and are frequently regulated by highly conserved extrinsic factors. However, due to the complexity of morphogenesis, the mechanisms of precise interpretation of signal transduction as well as spatiotemporal control of extrinsic cues during dynamic morphogenesis remain poorly understood. Wing posterior crossvein (PCV) formation in Drosophila serves as a unique model to address how epithelial morphogenesis is regulated by secreted growth factors. Decapentaplegic (Dpp), a conserved bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-type ligand, is directionally trafficked from longitudinal veins (LVs) into the PCV region for patterning and differentiation. Our data reveal that the basolateral determinant Scribbled (Scrib) is required for PCV formation through optimizing BMP signaling. Scrib regulates BMP-type I receptor Thickveins (Tkv) localization at the basolateral region of PCV cells and subsequently facilitates Tkv internalization to Rab5 endosomes, where Tkv is active. BMP signaling also up-regulates scrib transcription in the pupal wing to form a positive feedback loop. Our data reveal a unique mechanism in which intrinsic polarity genes and extrinsic cues are coupled to promote robust morphogenesis.

  17. Transient receptor potential TRPA1 channel desensitization in sensory neurons is agonist dependent and regulated by TRPV1-directed internalization.

    PubMed

    Akopian, Armen N; Ruparel, Nikita B; Jeske, Nathaniel A; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2007-08-15

    The pharmacological desensitization of receptors is a fundamental mechanism for regulating the activity of neuronal systems. The TRPA1 channel plays a key role in the processing of noxious information and can undergo functional desensitization by unknown mechanisms. Here we show that TRPA1 is desensitized by homologous (mustard oil; a TRPA1 agonist) and heterologous (capsaicin; a TRPV1 agonist) agonists via Ca2+-independent and Ca2+-dependent pathways, respectively, in sensory neurons. The pharmacological desensitization of TRPA1 by capsaicin and mustard oil is not influenced by activation of protein phosphatase 2B. However, it is regulated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate depletion after capsaicin, but not mustard oil, application. Using a biosensor, we establish that capsaicin, unlike mustard oil, consistently activates phospholipase C in sensory neurons. We next demonstrate that TRPA1 desensitization is regulated by TRPV1, and it appears that mustard oil-induced TRPA1 internalization is prevented by coexpression with TRPV1 in a heterologous expression system and in sensory neurons. In conclusion, we propose novel mechanisms whereby TRPA1 activity undergoes pharmacological desensitization through multiple cellular pathways that are agonist dependent and modulated by TRPV1.

  18. Scribbled Optimizes BMP Signaling through Its Receptor Internalization to the Rab5 Endosome and Promote Robust Epithelial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are characterized by apical-basal polarity. Intrinsic factors underlying apical-basal polarity are crucial for tissue homeostasis and have often been identified to be tumor suppressors. Patterning and differentiation of epithelia are key processes of epithelial morphogenesis and are frequently regulated by highly conserved extrinsic factors. However, due to the complexity of morphogenesis, the mechanisms of precise interpretation of signal transduction as well as spatiotemporal control of extrinsic cues during dynamic morphogenesis remain poorly understood. Wing posterior crossvein (PCV) formation in Drosophila serves as a unique model to address how epithelial morphogenesis is regulated by secreted growth factors. Decapentaplegic (Dpp), a conserved bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-type ligand, is directionally trafficked from longitudinal veins (LVs) into the PCV region for patterning and differentiation. Our data reveal that the basolateral determinant Scribbled (Scrib) is required for PCV formation through optimizing BMP signaling. Scrib regulates BMP-type I receptor Thickveins (Tkv) localization at the basolateral region of PCV cells and subsequently facilitates Tkv internalization to Rab5 endosomes, where Tkv is active. BMP signaling also up-regulates scrib transcription in the pupal wing to form a positive feedback loop. Our data reveal a unique mechanism in which intrinsic polarity genes and extrinsic cues are coupled to promote robust morphogenesis. PMID:27814354

  19. Phenylarsine oxide-induced increase in alveolar macrophage surface receptors: evidence for fusion of internal receptor pools with the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages which were treated at 0 degrees C with phenylarsine oxide and then incubated at 37 degrees C for 10 min exhibited a two- to threefold increase in surface receptor activity for macroglobulin.protease complexes, diferric transferrin, and mannose- terminal glycoproteins. Analysis of the concentration-dependence of ligand binding indicated that changes in ligand-binding activity were due to changes in receptor number rather than alterations in ligand- receptor affinity. Surface receptor number could also be increased by treatment of cells with three other sulfhydryl reagents, N- ethylmaleimide, p-chloromercurobenzoate, and iodoacetic acid. The increase in receptor activity was maximal after 10 min and decreased over the next hour. This decrease in cell-associated receptor activity was due to the release of large membrane vesicles which demonstrated a uniform buoyant density by isopycnic sucrose gradient centrifugation. Treatment of cells with phenylarsine oxide did not decrease the cellular content of lactate dehydrogenase or beta-galactosidase, indicating that cell integrity was maintained and lysosomal enzyme release did not occur. Our studies indicate that phenylarsine oxide treatment in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ results in the fusion of receptor-containing vesicles with the cell surface. PMID:2409094

  20. CB(1) receptor allosteric modulators display both agonist and signaling pathway specificity.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Gemma L; Horswill, James G; Anavi-Goffer, Sharon; Reggio, Patricia H; Bolognini, Daniele; Abood, Mary E; McAllister, Sean; Strange, Phillip G; Stephens, Gary J; Pertwee, Roger G; Ross, Ruth A

    2013-02-01

    We have previously identified allosteric modulators of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor (Org 27569, PSNCBAM-1) that display a contradictory pharmacological profile: increasing the specific binding of the CB(1) receptor agonist [(3)H]CP55940 but producing a decrease in CB(1) receptor agonist efficacy. Here we investigated the effect one or both compounds in a broad range of signaling endpoints linked to CB(1) receptor activation. We assessed the effect of these compounds on CB(1) receptor agonist-induced [(35)S]GTPγS binding, inhibition, and stimulation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and β-arrestin recruitment. We also investigated the effect of these allosteric modulators on CB(1) agonist binding kinetics. Both compounds display ligand dependence, being significantly more potent as modulators of CP55940 signaling as compared with WIN55212 and having little effect on [(3)H]WIN55212 binding. Org 27569 displays biased antagonism whereby it inhibits: agonist-induced guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding, simulation (Gα(s)-mediated), and inhibition (Gα(i)-mediated) of cAMP production and β-arrestin recruitment. In contrast, it acts as an enhancer of agonist-induced ERK phosphorylation. Alone, the compound can act also as an allosteric agonist, increasing cAMP production and ERK phosphorylation. We find that in both saturation and kinetic-binding experiments, the Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1 appeared to influence only orthosteric ligand maximum occupancy rather than affinity. The data indicate that the allosteric modulators share a common mechanism whereby they increase available high-affinity CB(1) agonist binding sites. The receptor conformation stabilized by the allosterics appears to induce signaling and also selectively traffics orthosteric agonist signaling via the ERK phosphorylation pathway.

  1. Interruption of the ionic lock in the bradykinin B2 receptor results in constitutive internalization and turns several antagonists into strong agonists.

    PubMed

    Leschner, Jasmin; Wennerberg, Goeran; Feierler, Jens; Bermudez, Marcel; Welte, Benjamin; Kalatskaya, Irina; Wolber, Gerhard; Faussner, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The DRY motif with the highly conserved R3.50 is a hallmark of family A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The crystal structure of rhodopsin revealed a salt bridge between R135(3.50) and another conserved residue, E247(6.30), in helix 6. This ionic lock was shown to maintain rhodopsin in its inactive state. Thus far, little information is available on how interruption of this ionic bond affects signaling properties of nonrhodopsin GPCRs, because the focus has been on mutations of R3.50, although this residue is indispensable for G protein activation. To investigate the importance of an ionic lock for overall receptor activity in a nonrhodopsin GPCR, we mutated R128(3.50) and E238(6.30) in the bradykinin (BK) B(2) receptor (B(2)R) and stably expressed the constructs in HEK293 cells. As expected, mutation of R3.50 resulted in lack of G protein activation. In addition, this mutation led to considerable constitutive receptor internalization. Mutation of E6.30 (mutants E6.30A and E6.30R) also caused strong constitutive internalization. Most intriguingly, however, although the two E6.30 mutants displayed no increased basal phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis, they gave a response to three different B(2)R antagonists that was almost comparable to that obtained with BK. In contrast, swapping of R3.50 and E6.30, thus allowing the formation of an inverse ionic bond, resulted in rescue of the wild type phenotype. These findings demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that interruption of the ionic lock in a family A GPCR can have distinctly different effects on receptor internalization and G protein stimulation, shedding new light on its role in the activation process.

  2. Noxious mechanical stimulation evokes the segmental release of opioid peptides that induce μ-opioid receptor internalization in the presence of peptidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Lijun; Song, Bingbing; Chen, Wenling; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2008-01-01

    The internalization of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides an ideal way to locate areas of opioid peptide release. We used this method to study opioid release in the spinal cord evoked by noxious stimuli in anesthetized rats. Previous studies have shown that opioids released in the spinal cord produce MOR internalization only when they are protected from peptidase degradation. Accordingly, rats were implanted with chronic intrathecal catheters that were used to inject a mixture of peptidase inhibitors (amastatin, captopril and phosphoramidon) onto the lumbar spinal cord. Five minutes later, a noxious stimulus was delivered to the paw. Lumbar spinal segments were double-stained with antibodies against MORs and neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1Rs) using immunofluorescence. Mechanical stimulation of the hindpaw consisted of repeated 10 sec clamps with a hemostat for 10 min. In the ipsilateral dorsal horn, the stimulus produced abundant NK1R internalization in segments L3–L6, and a more modest but significant MOR internalization in segments L5 and L6. In the contralateral dorsal horn, NK1R was substantially lower and MOR internalization was negligible. The same mechanical stimulus applied to a forepaw did not produce NK1R or MOR internalization in the lumbar spinal cord. Thermal stimulation consisted of immersing a hindpaw in water at 52 °C for 2 min. It produced substantial NK1R internalization ipsilaterally in segment L6, but no MOR internalization. These results show that mechanical stimulation induces segmental opioid release, i.e., in the dorsal horn receiving the noxious signals and not in other spinal segments. PMID:18207137

  3. Stabilizing effects of G protein on the active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor differ depending on G protein type.

    PubMed

    Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-05

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) trigger various cellular and physiological responses upon the ligand binding. The ligand binding induces conformational change in GPCRs which allows G protein to interact with the receptor. The interaction of G protein also affects the active conformation of GPCRs. In this study, we have investigated the effects of Gαi1, Gαo and chimeric Gαqi5 on the active conformation of the adenosine A1 receptor, as each Gα showed difference in the interaction with adenosine A1 receptor. The conformational changes in the adenosine A1 receptor were detected as the agonist-induced decreases in efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins (FPs) fused at the two intracellular domains of the adenosine A1 receptor. Amplitudes of the agonist-induced FRET decreases were subtle when the FP-tagged adenosine A1 receptor was expressed alone, whereas they were significantly enhanced when co-expressed with Gαi1Gβ1Gγ22 (Gi1) or Gαqi5Gβ1Gγ22 (Gqi5) but not with GαοGβ1Gγ22 (Go). The enhancement of the agonist-induced FRET decrease in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly larger than that of Gi1. Furthermore, the FRET recovery upon the agonist removal in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly slower than that of Gi1. From these results it was revealed that the agonist-bound active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor is unstable without the binding of G protein and that the stabilizing effects of G protein differ depending on the types of G protein.

  4. Role of Cysteine Residues in the Carboxyl-Terminus of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Intracellular Traffic and Postendocytic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Nava, Brenda; Casas-González, Patricia; Pérez-Solís, Marco A.; Castillo-Badillo, Jean; Maravillas-Montero, José L.; Jardón-Valadez, Eduardo; Zariñán, Teresa; Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo; Gallay, Nathalie; Reiter, Eric; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications occurring during the biosynthesis of G protein-coupled receptors include glycosylation and palmitoylation at conserved cysteine residues located in the carboxyl-terminus of the receptor. In a number of these receptors, these modifications play an important role in receptor function and particularly, in intracellular trafficking. In the present study, the three cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the human FSHR were replaced with glycine by site-directed mutagenesis. Wild-type and mutant (Cys627/629/655Gly) FSHRs were then transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells and analyzed for cell-surface plasma membrane expression, agonist-stimulated signaling and internalization, and postendocytic processing in the absence and presence of lysosome and/or proteasome inhibitors. Compared with the wild-type FSHR, the triple mutant FSHR exhibited ~70% reduction in plasma membrane expression as well as a profound attenuation in agonist-stimulated cAMP production and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Incubation of HEK-293 cells expressing the wild-type FSHR with 2-bromopalmitate (palmitoylation inhibitor) for 6 h, decreased plasma membrane expression of the receptor by ~30%. The internalization kinetics and β-arrestin 1 and 2 recruitment were similar between the wild-type and triple mutant FSHR as disclosed by assays performed in non-equilibrium binding conditions and by confocal microscopy. Cells expressing the mutant FSHR recycled the internalized FSHR back to the plasma membrane less efficiently than those expressing the wild-type FSHR, an effect that was counteracted by proteasome but not by lysosome inhibition. These results indicate that replacement of the cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the FSHR, impairs receptor trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane and its recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface following agonist-induced internalization. Since in the FSHR these

  5. Estrogen Receptor Alpha Is Expressed in Mesenteric Mesothelial Cells and Is Internalized in Caveolae upon Freund's Adjuvant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Petra; Szabó, Arnold; Katz, Sándor; Likó, István; Patócs, Attila; L.Kiss, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Transformation of epithelial cells into connective tissue cells (epithelial-mesenchymal transition, EMT) is a complex mechanism involved in tumor metastasis, and in normal embryogenesis, while type II EMT is mainly associated with inflammatory events and tissue regenaration. In this study we examined type II EMT at the ultrastructural and molecular level during the inflammatory process induced by Freund's adjuvant treatment in rat mesenteric mesothelial cells. We found that upon the inflammatory stimulus mesothelial cells lost contact with the basal lamina and with each other, and were transformed into spindle-shaped cells. These morphological changes were accompanied by release of interleukins IL-1alpha, -1beta and IL-6 and by secretion of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) into the peritoneal cavity. Mesothelial cells also expressed estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) as shown by immunolabeling at the light and electron microscopical levels, as well as by quantitative RT-PCR. The mRNA level of ER-α showed an inverse correlation with the secretion of TGF-β. At the cellular and subcellular levels ER-α was colocalized with the coat protein caveolin-1 and was found in the plasma membrane of mesothelial cells, in caveolae close to multivesicular bodies (MVBs) or in the membrane of these organelles, suggesting that ER-α is internalized via caveola-mediated endocytosis during inflammation. We found asymmetric, thickened, electron dense areas on the limiting membrane of MVBs (MVB plaques) indicating that these sites may serve as platforms for collecting and organizing regulatory proteins. Our morphological observations and biochemical data can contribute to form a potential model whereby ER-α and its caveola-mediated endocytosis might play role in TGF-β induced type II EMT in vivo. PMID:24244516

  6. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: upregulation, age-related effects and associations with drug use

    PubMed Central

    Melroy-Greif, W. E.; Stitzel, J. A.; Ehringer, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that exogenously bind nicotine. Nicotine produces rewarding effects by interacting with these receptors in the brain’s reward system. Unlike other receptors, chronic stimulation by an agonist induces an upregulation of receptor number that is not due to increased gene expression in adults; while upregulation also occurs during development and adolescence there have been some opposing findings regarding a change in corresponding gene expression. These receptors have also been well studied with regard to human genetic associations and, based on evidence suggesting shared genetic liabilities between substance use disorders, numerous studies have pointed to a role for this system in comorbid drug use. This review will focus on upregulation of these receptors in adulthood, adolescence and development, as well as the findings from human genetic association studies which point to different roles for these receptors in risk for initiation and continuation of drug use. PMID:26351737

  7. Stabilin-1 and Stabilin-2 are specific receptors for the cellular internalization of phosphorothioate-modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Colton M.; Donner, Aaron J.; Blank, Emma E.; Egger, Andrew W.; Kellar, Brianna M.; Østergaard, Michael E.; Seth, Punit P.; Harris, Edward N.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorothioate (PS)-modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been extensively investigated over the past three decades as pharmacological and therapeutic agents. One second generation ASO, Kynamro™, was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and over 35 second generation PS ASOs are at various stages of clinical development. In this report, we show that the Stabilin class of scavenger receptors, which were not previously thought to bind DNA, do bind and internalize PS ASOs. With the use of primary cells from mouse and rat livers and recombinant cell lines each expressing Stabilin-1 and each isoform of Stabilin-2 (315-HARE and 190-HARE), we have determined that PS ASOs bind with high affinity and these receptors are responsible for bulk, clathrin-mediated endocytosis within the cell. Binding is primarily dependent on salt-bridge formation and correct folding of the intact protein receptor. Increased internalization rates also enhanced ASO potency for reducing expression of the non-coding RNA Malat-1, in Stabilin-expressing cell lines. A more thorough understanding of mechanisms by which ASOs are internalized in cells and their intracellular trafficking pathways will aid in the design of next generation antisense agents with improved therapeutic properties. PMID:26908652

  8. Focal adhesion kinase-mediated activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β regulates IL-33 receptor internalization and IL-33 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Bowser, Rachel K; Traister, Russell S; Fan, Ming-Hui; Zhao, Yutong

    2015-01-15

    IL-33, a relatively new member of the IL-1 cytokine family, plays a crucial role in allergic inflammation and acute lung injury. Long form ST2 (ST2L), the receptor for IL-33, is expressed on immune effector cells and lung epithelia and plays a critical role in triggering inflammation. We have previously shown that ST2L stability is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system; however, its upstream internalization has not been studied. In this study, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) regulates ST2L internalization and IL-33 signaling. IL-33 treatment induced ST2L internalization, and an effect was attenuated by inhibition or downregulation of GSK3β. GSK3β was found to interact with ST2L on serine residue 446 in response to IL-33 treatment. GSK3β binding site mutant (ST2L(S446A)) and phosphorylation site mutant (ST2L(S442A)) are resistant to IL-33-induced ST2L internalization. We also found that IL-33 activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK impaired IL-33-induced GSK3β activation and ST2L internalization. Furthermore, inhibition of ST2L internalization enhanced IL-33-induced cytokine release in lung epithelial cells. These results suggest that modulation of the ST2L internalization by FAK/GSK3β might serve as a unique strategy to lessen pulmonary inflammation.

  9. Intracellular localization of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor through clathrin-dependent constitutive internalization is mediated by a C-terminal tryptophan-based motif.

    PubMed

    Uwada, Junsuke; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Masuoka, Takayoshi; Nishio, Matomo; Muramatsu, Ikunobu

    2014-07-15

    The M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1-mAChR, encoded by CHRM1) is a G-protein-coupled membrane receptor that is activated by extracellular cholinergic stimuli. Recent investigations have revealed the intracellular localization of M1-mAChR. In this study, we observed constitutive internalization of M1-mAChR in mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells without agonist stimulation. Constitutive internalization depended on dynamin, clathrin and the adaptor protein-2 (AP-2) complex. A WxxI motif in the M1-mAChR C-terminus is essential for its constitutive internalization, given that replacement of W(442) or I(445) with alanine residues abolished constitutive internalization. This WxxI motif resembles YxxΦ, which is the canonical binding motif for the μ2 subunit of the AP-2 complex. The M1-mAChR C-terminal WxxI motif interacted with AP-2 μ2. W442A and I445A mutants of the M1-mAChR C-terminal sequence lost AP-2-μ2-binding activity, whereas the W442Y mutant bound more effectively than wild type. Consistent with these results, W442A and I445A M1-mAChR mutants selectively localized to the cell surface. By contrast, the W442Y receptor mutant was found only at intracellular sites. Our data indicate that the cellular distribution of M1-mAChR is governed by the C-terminal tryptophan-based motif, which mediates constitutive internalization.

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways promote low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated internalization of beta-amyloid protein in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Na; Ma, Kai-Ge; Qian, Yi-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Shui; Feng, Gai-Feng; Shi, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Zhao-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by the intraneuronal accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (Aβ). Reuptake of extracellular Aβ is believed to contribute significantly to the intraneuronal Aβ pool in the early stages of AD. Published reports have claimed that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) mediates Aβ1-42 uptake and lysosomal trafficking in GT1-7 neuronal cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast non-neuronal cells. However, there is no direct evidence supporting the role of LRP1 in Aβ internalization in primary neurons. Our recent study indicated that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways are involved in regulating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-mediated Aβ1-42 uptake in SH-SY5Y cells. This study was designed to explore the regulation of MAPK signaling pathways on LRP1-mediated Aβ internalization in neurons. We found that extracellular Aβ1-42 oligomers could be internalized into endosomes/lysosomes and mitochondria in cortical neurons. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were also found co-localized in neurons during Aβ1-42 internalization, and they could form Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex. Knockdown of LRP1 expression significantly decreased neuronal Aβ1-42 internalization. Finally, we identified that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways regulated the internalization of Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Therefore, these results demonstrated that LRP1, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 mediated the internalization of Aβ1-42 in neurons and provided evidence that blockade of LRP1 or inhibitions of MAPK signaling pathways might be a potential approach to lowering brain Aβ levels and served a potential therapeutic target for AD.

  11. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVII. G Protein–Coupled Estrogen Receptor and Its Pharmacologic Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are critical mediators of multiple and diverse physiologic effects throughout the body in both sexes, including the reproductive, cardiovascular, endocrine, nervous, and immune systems. As such, alterations in estrogen function play important roles in many diseases and pathophysiological conditions (including cancer), exemplified by the lower prevalence of many diseases in premenopausal women. Estrogens mediate their effects through multiple cellular receptors, including the nuclear receptor family (ERα and ERβ) and the G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) family (GPR30/G protein–coupled estrogen receptor [GPER]). Although both receptor families can initiate rapid cell signaling and transcriptional regulation, the nuclear receptors are traditionally associated with regulating gene expression, whereas GPCRs are recognized as mediating rapid cellular signaling. Estrogen-activated pathways are not only the target of multiple therapeutic agents (e.g., tamoxifen, fulvestrant, raloxifene, and aromatase inhibitors) but are also affected by a plethora of phyto- and xeno-estrogens (e.g., genistein, coumestrol, bisphenol A, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). Because of the existence of multiple estrogen receptors with overlapping ligand specificities, expression patterns, and signaling pathways, the roles of the individual receptors with respect to the diverse array of endogenous and exogenous ligands have been challenging to ascertain. The identification of GPER-selective ligands however has led to a much greater understanding of the roles of this receptor in normal physiology and disease as well as its interactions with the classic estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ and their signaling pathways. In this review, we describe the history and characterization of GPER over the past 15 years focusing on the pharmacology of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds that have been employed to unravel the biology of this most recently recognized estrogen receptor. PMID

  12. Characterization of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) Variant Activation by Coal Fly Ash Particles and Associations with Altered Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) Expression and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Stockmann, Chris; Romero, Erin G; Lu, Zhenyu; Shapiro, Darien; Stone, Bryan L; Fassl, Bernhard; Nkoy, Flory; Uchida, Derek A; Ward, Robert M; Veranth, John M; Reilly, Christopher A

    2016-11-25

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are activated by environmental particulate materials. We hypothesized that polymorphic variants of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) would be uniquely responsive to insoluble coal fly ash compared with the prototypical soluble agonist capsaicin. Furthermore, these changes would manifest as differences in lung cell responses to these agonists and perhaps correlate with changes in asthma symptom control. The TRPV1-I315M and -T469I variants were more responsive to capsaicin and coal fly ash. The I585V variant was less responsive to coal fly ash particles due to reduced translation of protein and an apparent role for Ile-585 in activation by particles. In HEK-293 cells, I585V had an inhibitory effect on wild-type TRPV1 expression, activation, and internalization/agonist-induced desensitization. In normal human bronchial epithelial cells, IL-8 secretion in response to coal fly ash treatment was reduced for cells heterozygous for TRPV1-I585V. Finally, both the I315M and I585V variants were associated with worse asthma symptom control with the effects of I315M manifesting in mild asthma and those of the I585V variant manifesting in severe, steroid-insensitive individuals. This effect may be due in part to increased transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) expression by lung epithelial cells expressing the TRPV1-I585V variant. These findings suggest that specific molecular interactions control TRPV1 activation by particles, differential activation, and desensitization of TRPV1 by particles and/or other agonists, and cellular changes in the expression of TRPA1 as a result of I585V expression could contribute to variations in asthma symptom control.

  13. Stimulation of glutamate receptors in the ventral tegmental area is necessary for serotonin-2 receptor-induced increases in mesocortical dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Pehek, E.A.; Hernan, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Modulation of dopamine (DA) released by serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptors has been implicated in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. The mesocortical DA system has been implicated particularly in the cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. Agonism at 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex is associated with increases in cortical DA release. Evidence indicates that 5-HT2A receptors in the cortex regulate mesocortical DA release through stimulation of a “long-loop” feedback system from the PFC to the VTA and back. However, a causal role for VTA glutamate in the 5-HT2-induced increases in PFC DA has not been established. The present study does so by measuring 5-HT2 agonist-induced DA release in the cortex after infusions of glutamate antagonists into the VTA. Infusions of a combination of a NMDA (AP-5: 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid) and an AMPA/kainate (CNQX: 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) receptor antagonist into the VTA blocked the increases in cortical DA produced by administration of the 5-HT2 agonist DOI [(±)-2,5-Dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine] (2.5 mg/kg s.c.). These results demonstrate that stimulation of glutamate receptors in the VTA is necessary for 5-HT2 agonist-induced increases in cortical DA. PMID:25637799

  14. Dopamine receptor oligomerization visualized in living cells.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, Brian F; Ji, Xiaodong; Alijaniaram, Mohammad; Rajaram, Ryan D; Kong, Michael M C; Rashid, Asim; Nguyen, Tuan; George, Susan R

    2005-11-04

    G protein-coupled receptors occur as dimers within arrays of oligomers. We visualized ensembles of dopamine receptor oligomers in living cells and evaluated the contributions of receptor conformation to the dynamics of oligomer association and dissociation, using a strategy of trafficking a receptor to another cellular compartment. We incorporated a nuclear localization sequence into the D1 dopamine receptor, which translocated from the cell surface to the nucleus. Receptor inverse agonists blocked this translocation, retaining the modified receptor, D1-nuclear localization signal (NLS), at the cell surface. D1 co-translocated with D1-NLS to the nucleus, indicating formation of homooligomers. (+)-Butaclamol retained both receptors at the cell surface, and removal of the drug allowed translocation of both receptors to the nucleus. Agonist-nonbinding D1(S198A/S199A)-NLS, containing two substituted serine residues in transmembrane 5 also oligomerized with D1, and both were retained on the cell surface by (+)-butaclamol. Drug removal disrupted these oligomerized receptors so that D1 remained at the cell surface while D1(S198A/S199A)-NLS trafficked to the nucleus. Thus, receptor conformational differences permitted oligomer disruption and showed that ligand-binding pocket occupancy by the inverse agonist induced a conformational change. We demonstrated robust heterooligomerization between the D2 dopamine receptor and the D1 receptor. The heterooligomers could not be disrupted by inverse agonists targeting either one of the receptor constituents. However, D2 did not heterooligomerize with the structurally modified D1(S198A/S199A), indicating an impaired interface for their interaction. Thus, we describe a novel method showing that a homogeneous receptor conformation maintains the structural integrity of oligomers, whereas conformational heterogeneity disrupts it.

  15. Behavioral effects of dopamine receptor inactivation during the adolescent period: age-dependent changes in dorsal striatal D2High receptors

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Sanders A.; Valentine, Joseph M.; Gonzalez, Ashley E.; Humphrey, Danielle E.; Widarma, Crystal B.; Crawford, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Dopamine (DA) receptor inactivation produces opposing behavioral effects across ontogeny. For example, inactivating DA receptors in the dorsal striatum attenuates DA agonist-induced behaviors of adult rats, while potentiating the locomotor activity of preweanling rats. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if DA receptor inactivation potentiates the DA agonist-induced locomotor activity of adolescent rats, and whether alterations in D2High receptors are responsible for this effect. Methods In the behavioral experiment, the irreversible receptor antagonist N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) or its vehicle (100% dimethylsulphoxide, DMSO) were bilaterally infused into the dorsal striatum on postnatal day (PD) 39. On PD 40, adolescent rats were given intrastriatal infusions of the DA agonist R(−)-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) or vehicle and locomotor activity was measured for 40 min. In the receptor binding experiment, rats received IP injections of EEDQ or DMSO (1:1 (v/v) in distilled water) on PD 17, PD 39, or PD 84. One day later, striatal samples were taken and subsequently assayed for D2 specific binding and D2High receptors using [3H]-domperidone. Results Unlike what is observed during the preweanling period, EEDQ attenuated the NPA-induced locomotor activity of adolescent rats. EEDQ reduced D2 receptor levels in the dorsal striatum of all age groups, while increasing the proportion of D2High receptors. Regardless of pretreatment condition (i.e., DMSO or EEDQ), preweanling rats had a greater percentage of D2High receptors than adolescent or adult rats. Conclusions DA receptor inactivation affects the behaviors of preweanling and older rats differently. The DA supersensitivity exhibited by EEDQ-treated preweanling rats may result from an excess of D2High receptors. PMID:24287603

  16. Infection of epithelial cells with Chlamydia trachomatis inhibits TNF-induced apoptosis at the level of receptor internalization while leaving non-apoptotic TNF-signalling intact.

    PubMed

    Waguia Kontchou, Collins; Tzivelekidis, Tina; Gentle, Ian E; Häcker, Georg

    2016-11-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen of medical importance. C. trachomatis develops inside a membranous vacuole in the cytosol of epithelial cells but manipulates the host cell in numerous ways. One prominent effect of chlamydial infection is the inhibition of apoptosis in the host cell, but molecular aspects of this inhibition are unclear. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a cytokine with important roles in immunity, which is produced by immune cells in chlamydial infection and which can have pro-apoptotic and non-apoptotic signalling activity. We here analysed the signalling through TNF in cells infected with C. trachomatis. The pro-apoptotic signal of TNF involves the activation of caspase-8 and is controlled by inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. We found that in C. trachomatis-infected cells, TNF-induced apoptosis was blocked upstream of caspase-8 activation even when inhibitor of apoptosis proteins were inhibited or the inhibitor of caspase-8 activation, cFLIP, was targeted by RNAi. However, when caspase-8 was directly activated by experimental over-expression of its upstream adapter Fas-associated protein with death domain, C. trachomatis was unable to inhibit apoptosis. Non-apoptotic TNF-signalling, particularly the activation of NF-κB, initiates at the plasma membrane, while the activation of caspase-8 and pro-apoptotic signalling occur subsequently to internalization of TNF receptor and the formation of a cytosolic signalling complex. In C. trachomatis-infected cells, NF-κB activation through TNF was unaffected, while the internalization of the TNF-TNF-receptor complex was blocked, explaining the lack of caspase-8 activation. These results identify a dichotomy of TNF signalling in C. trachomatis-infected cells: Apoptosis is blocked at the internalization of the TNF receptor, but non-apoptotic signalling through this receptor remains intact, permitting a response to this cytokine at sites of infection.

  17. Human decay-accelerating factor and CEACAM receptor-mediated internalization and intracellular lifestyle of Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Guignot, Julie; Hudault, Sylvie; Kansau, Imad; Chau, Ingrid; Servin, Alain L

    2009-01-01

    We used transfected epithelial CHO-B2 cells as a model to identify the mechanism mediating internalization of Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli. We provide evidence that neither the alpha5 or beta1 integrin subunits nor alpha5beta1 integrin functioned as a receptor mediating the adhesion and/or internalization of Dr or Afa-III fimbria-positive bacteria. We also demonstrated that (i) whether or not the AfaD or DraD invasin subunits were present, there was no difference in the cell association and entry of bacteria and that (ii) DraE or AfaE-III adhesin subunits are necessary and sufficient to promote the receptor-mediated bacterial internalization into epithelial cells expressing human decay-accelerating factor (DAF), CEACAM1, CEA, or CEACAM6. Internalization of Dr fimbria-positive E. coli within CHO-DAF, CHO-CEACAM1, CHO-CEA, or CHO-CEACAM6 cells occurs through a microfilament-independent, microtubule-dependent, and lipid raft-dependent mechanism. Wild-type Dr fimbria-positive bacteria survived better within cells expressing DAF than bacteria internalized within CHO-CEACAM1, CHO-CEA, or CHO-CEACAM6 cells. In DAF-positive cells, internalized Dr fimbria-positive bacteria were located in vacuoles that contained more than one bacterium, displaying some of the features of late endosomes, including the presence of Lamp-1 and Lamp-2, and some of the features of CD63 proteins, but not of cathepsin D, and were acidic. No interaction between Dr fimbria-positive-bacterium-containing vacuoles and the autophagic pathway was observed.

  18. Unexpected antipsychotic-like activity with the muscarinic receptor ligand (5R,6R)6-(3-propylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane .

    PubMed

    Bymaster, F P; Shannon, H E; Rasmussen, K; Delapp, N W; Mitch, C H; Ward, J S; Calligaro, D O; Ludvigsen, T S; Sheardown, M J; Olesen, P H; Swedberg, M D; Sauerberg, P; Fink-Jensen, A

    1998-09-04

    (5R,6R)6-(3-propylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3 .2.1]octane (PTAC) is a potent muscarinic receptor ligand with high affinity for central muscarinic receptors and no or substantially less affinity for a large number of other receptors or binding sites including dopamine receptors. The ligand exhibits partial agonist effects at muscarinic M2 and M4 receptors and antagonist effects at muscarinic M1, M3 and M5 receptors. PTAC inhibited conditioned avoidance responding, dopamine receptor agonist-induced behavior and D-amphetamine-induced FOS protein M5 expression in the nucleus accumbens without inducing catalepsy, tremor or salivation at pharmacologically relevant doses. The effect of PTAC on conditioned avoidance responding and dopamine receptor agonist-induced behavior was antagonized by the acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine. The compound selectively inhibited dopamine cell firing (acute administration) as well as the number of spontaneously active dopamine cells (chronic administration) in the limbic ventral tegmental area (A10) relative to the non-limbic substantia nigra, pars compacta (A9). The results demonstrate that PTAC exhibits functional dopamine receptor antagonism despite its lack of affinity for the dopamine receptors and indicate that muscarinic receptor partial agonists may be an important new approach in the medical treatment of schizophrenia.

  19. Systemic treatment with a 5HT1a agonist induces anti-oxidant protection and preserves the retina from mitochondrial oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Manas R; Ahmed, Chulbul M; Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Han, Pingyang; Li, Hong; Jivanji, Hiral; Mao, Haoyu; Lewin, Alfred S

    2015-11-01

    Chronic oxidative stress contributes to age related diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD). Earlier work showed that the 5-hydroxy-tryptamine 1a (5HT1a) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) protects retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells from hydrogen peroxide treatment and mouse retinas from oxidative insults including light injury. In our current experiments, RPE derived cells subjected to mitochondrial oxidative stress were protected from cell death by the up-regulation of anti-oxidant enzymes and of the metal ion chaperone metallothionein. Differentiated RPE cells were resistant to oxidative stress, and the expression of genes for protective proteins was highly increased by oxidative stress plus drug treatment. In mice treated with 8-OH-DPAT, the same genes (MT1, HO1, NqO1, Cat, Sod1) were induced in the neural retina, but the drug did not affect the expression of Sod2, the gene for manganese superoxide dismutase. We used a mouse strain deleted for Sod2 in the RPE to accelerate age-related oxidative stress in the retina and to test the impact of 8-OH-DPAT on the photoreceptor and RPE degeneration developed in these mice. Treatment of mice with daily injections of the drug led to increased electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes in dark-adapted mice and to a slight improvement in visual acuity. Most strikingly, in mice treated with a high dose of the drug (5 mg/kg) the structure of the RPE and Bruch's membrane and the normal architecture of photoreceptor outer segments were preserved. These results suggest that systemic treatment with this class of drugs may be useful in preventing geographic atrophy, the advanced form of dry AMD, which is characterized by RPE degeneration.

  20. Regulation of FcϵRI Signaling in Mast Cells by G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 and Its RH Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Hariharan; Gupta, Kshitij; Parameswaran, Narayanan; Ali, Hydar

    2014-01-01

    Agonist-induced phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by GPCR kinases (GRKs) promotes their desensitization and internalization. Here, we sought to determine the role of GRK2 on FcϵRI signaling and mediator release in mast cells. The strategies utilized included lentiviral shRNA-mediated GRK2 knockdown, GRK2 gene deletion (GRK2flox/flox/cre recombinase) and overexpression of GRK2 and its regulator of G protein signaling homology (RH) domain (GRK2-RH). We found that silencing GRK2 expression caused ∼50% decrease in antigen-induced Ca2+ mobilization and degranulation but resulted in ablation of cytokine (IL-6 and IL-13) generation. The effect of GRK2 on cytokine generation does not require its catalytic activity but is mediated via the phosphorylation of p38 and Akt. Overexpression of GRK2 or its RH domain (GRK2-RH) enhanced antigen-induced mast cell degranulation and cytokine generation without affecting the expression levels of any of the FcϵRI subunits (α, β, and γ). GRK2 or GRK2-RH had no effect on antigen-induced phosphorylation of FcϵRIγ or Src but enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk. These data demonstrate that GRK2 modulates FcϵRI signaling in mast cells via at least two mechanisms. One involves GRK2-RH and modulates tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, and the other is mediated via the phosphorylation of p38 and Akt. PMID:24904059

  1. Inhibition of calcium channels by neurokinin receptor and signal transduction in hamster submandibular ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Endoh, T; Suzuki, T

    1999-04-16

    Both substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) are known as neurotransmitters of the submandibular ganglion (SMG) neurons. SP released from collaterals of the sensory nerves also regulates the excitability of SMG neurons. It has recently been shown that neurokinins (NK) inhibit calcium channels in various neurons. In this study, the effects of NK on voltage-dependent calcium channel current (I(Ca)) in SMG cells were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp recording method. NK-1 receptor agonist and SP caused inhibition of I(Ca) in SMG cells in a dose-dependent manner. NK-1 receptor agonist inhibited L-, N- and P/Q-type I(Ca) components. GDP-beta-S included in the pipette solution reduced the NK-1 receptor agonist-induced inhibition of I(Ca). In addition, NK-1 receptor agonist-induced inhibition of I(Ca) was reduced by stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) but not cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The results provided evidence for a signal transduction pathway in which calcium channel inhibition by NK receptors required activation of G-protein and PKC-affected step phosphorylation in SMG neurons.

  2. Cholesterol oxidation switches the internalization pathway of endothelin receptor type A from caveolae to clathrin-coated pits in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Y; Ninomiya, H; Miwa, S; Masaki, T

    2000-03-03

    We investigated the mechanism of endothelin receptor type A (ETA) internalization in Chinese hamster ovary cells using two assays; flow cytometric quantification of cell surface myc-ETA and in situ localization of Cy5-labeled ET-1. In both assays, agonist-dependent internalization of myc-ETA was inhibited by nystatin and filipin, both of which disrupt internalization via caveolae, whereas it was barely affected by chlorpromazine and hypertonic sucrose, both of which disrupt internalization via clathrin-coated pits. In addition to myc-ETA, ET-1 caused intracellular translocation of caveolin-1 and this translocation was also blocked by nystatin but not by chlorpromazine. These results strongly argue that ETA is internalized via caveolae but not clathrin-coated pits. Treatment of the cells with cholesterol oxidase reduced cellular cholesterol and caused intracellular translocation of caveolin-1 but did not affect cell surface localization of myc-ETA. In cholesterol oxidase-treated cells, however, both chlorpromazine and hypertonic sucrose effectively blocked ET-1-induced myc-ETA internalization and nystatin was less effective than in untreated cells. Accordingly, expression of a dominant negative form of beta-arrestin blocked myc-ETA internalization in cholesterol oxidase-treated cells but not in untreated cells. These results suggest that, in Chinese hamster ovary cells, 1) agonist-occupied ETA can be internalized either via caveolae or clathrin-coated pits; 2) of the two, the former is the default pathway; and 3) the oxidative state of cell surface cholesterol is one of the factors involved in the pathway selection.

  3. Internalization of Tissue Factor-Rich Microvesicles by Platelets Occurs Independently of GPIIb-IIIa, and Involves CD36 Receptor, Serotonin Transporter and Cytoskeletal Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; Galan, Ana M; Roque, Merce; Caballo, Carolina; Molina, Patricia; White, James G; Escolar, Gines

    2016-02-01

    Platelets are important in hemostasis, but also detect particles and pathogens in the circulation. Phagocytic and endocytic activities of platelets are widely recognized; however, receptors and mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that platelets internalize and store phospholipid microvesicles enriched in human tissue factor (TF+MVs) and that platelet-associated TF enhances thrombus formation at sites of vascular damage. Here, we investigate the mechanisms implied in the interactions of TF+MVs with platelets and the effects of specific inhibitory strategies. Aggregometry and electron microscopy were used to assess platelet activation and TF+MVs uptake. Cytoskeletal assembly and activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and RhoA were analyzed by western blot and ELISA. Exposure of platelets to TF+MVs caused reversible platelet aggregation, actin polymerization and association of contractile proteins to the cytoskeleton being maximal at 1 min. The same kinetics were observed for activation of PI3K and translocation of RhoA to the cytoskeleton. Inhibitory strategies to block glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GPIIb-IIIa), scavenger receptor CD36, serotonin transporter (SERT) and PI3K, fully prevented platelet aggregation by TF+MVs. Ultrastructural techniques revealed that uptake of TF+MVs was efficiently prevented by anti-CD36 and SERT inhibitor, but only moderately interfered by GPIIb-IIIa blockade. We conclude that internalization of TF+MVs by platelets occurs independently of receptors related to their main hemostatic function (GPIIb-IIIa), involves the scavenger receptor CD36, SERT and engages PI3-Kinase activation and cytoskeletal assembly. CD36 and SERT appear as potential therapeutic targets to interfere with the association of TF+MVs with platelets and possibly downregulate their prothrombotic phenotype.

  4. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXV. Nomenclature, Classification, and Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Melatonin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Delagrange, Philippe; Krause, Diana N.; Sugden, David; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Olcese, James

    2010-01-01

    The hormone melatonin (5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine) is synthesized primarily in the pineal gland and retina, and in several peripheral tissues and organs. In the circulation, the concentration of melatonin follows a circadian rhythm, with high levels at night providing timing cues to target tissues endowed with melatonin receptors. Melatonin receptors receive and translate melatonin's message to influence daily and seasonal rhythms of physiology and behavior. The melatonin message is translated through activation of two G protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2, that are potential therapeutic targets in disorders ranging from insomnia and circadian sleep disorders to depression, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. This review summarizes the steps taken since melatonin's discovery by Aaron Lerner in 1958 to functionally characterize, clone, and localize receptors in mammalian tissues. The pharmacological and molecular properties of the receptors are described as well as current efforts to discover and develop ligands for treatment of a number of illnesses, including sleep disorders, depression, and cancer. PMID:20605968

  5. Role of specific muscarinic receptor subtypes in cholinergic parasympathomimetic responses, in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and pilocarpine-induced seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Bymaster, Frank P; Carter, Petra A; Yamada, Masahisa; Gomeza, Jesus; Wess, Jürgen; Hamilton, Susan E; Nathanson, Neil M; McKinzie, David L; Felder, Christian C

    2003-04-01

    Muscarinic agonist-induced parasympathomimetic effects, in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis and seizures were evaluated in wild-type and muscarinic M1-M5 receptor knockout mice. The muscarinic agonist oxotremorine induced marked hypothermia in all the knockout mice, but the hypothermia was reduced in M2 and to a lesser extent in M3 knockout mice. Oxotremorine-induced tremor was abolished only in the M2 knockout mice. Muscarinic agonist-induced salivation was reduced to the greatest extent in M3 knockout mice, to a lesser degree in M1 and M4 knockout mice, and was not altered in M2 and M5 knockout mice. Pupil diameter under basal conditions was increased only in the M3 knockout mice. Pilocarpine-induced increases in in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis were completely absent in hippocampus and cortex of M1 knockout mice, but in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis was unaltered in the M2-M5 knockout mice. A high dose of pilocarpine (300 mg/kg) caused seizures and lethality in wild-type and M2-M5 knockout mice, but produced neither effect in the M1 knockout mice. These data demonstrate a major role for M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in mediating parasympathomimetic effects. Muscarinic M1 receptors activate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in cortex and hippocampus of mice, consistent with the role of M1 receptors in cognition. Muscarinic M1 receptors appear to be the only muscarinic receptor subtype mediating seizures.

  6. Effects of agonist efficacy on desensitization of phosphoinositide hydrolysis mediated by m1 and m3 muscarinic receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.; Wang, S.Z.; el-Fakahany, E.E. )

    1991-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor agonist-induced desensitization of phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and loss of receptors were studied in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with the m1 and m3 muscarinic receptor genes. Long-term exposure to the full agonist carbamylcholine (CBC) resulted in a time-dependent attenuation of the maximal PI response and a decrease in agonist potency. This desensitization was accompanied by a parallel loss of maximal ligand binding without an alteration of the binding affinity. The time course of both receptor desensitization and down-regulation was similar in m1 and m3 CHO cells. The PI response to the partial agonist McN-A-343 (McN) in m1 cells was more sensitive to desensitization by CBC than the response to the latter agonist, and this desensitization was faster than receptor down-regulation. Desensitization of the PI response to McN was reflected as a decrease in the maximal response without a marked change in potency. McN induced slow desensitization of the PI response to CBC but a much faster desensitization of its own response. Our data provide evidence that although muscarinic agonist-induced desensitization of PI hydrolysis in CHO cells is due mainly to loss of receptors, there are other important factors which play a role in this process, e.g., receptor-effector uncoupling. The relative contribution of these different mechanisms depends on the efficacy of the agonists used for the receptor desensitization and activation steps.

  7. The GR127935-sensitive 5-HT1 receptors mediating canine internal carotid vasoconstriction: resemblance to the 5-HT1B, but not to the 5-HT1D or 5-ht1F, receptor subtype

    PubMed Central

    Centurión, David; Sánchez-López, Araceli; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R; Villalón, Carlos M

    2001-01-01

    This study has further investigated the pharmacological profile of the GR127935-sensitive 5-HT1 receptors mediating vasoconstriction in the internal carotid bed of anaesthetized vagosympathectomized dogs. One-minute intracarotid infusions of the agonists 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 0.1–10 μg min−1; endogenous ligand) and sumatriptan (0.3–10 μg min−1; 5-HT1B/1D), but not PNU-142633 (1–1000 μg min−1; 5-HT1D) or LY344864 (1–1000 μg min−1; 5-ht1F), produced dose-dependent decreases in internal carotid blood flow without changing blood pressure or heart rate. The responses to 5-HT were apparently resistant to blockade by i.v. administration of the antagonists SB224289 (300 μg kg−1; 5-HT1B), BRL15572 (300 μg kg−1; 5-HT1D) or ritanserin (100 μg kg−1; 5-HT2). In contrast, the responses to sumatriptan were antagonized by SB224289, but not by BRL15572. In the animals receiving SB224289, but not those receiving BRL15572, the subsequent administration of ritanserin abolished the 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction and unmasked a vasodilator component. Similarly, in ritanserin-treated animals, the subsequent administration of SB224289, but not BRL15572, completely blocked the 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction, revealing vasodilatation. In animals receiving initially BRL15572, the subsequent administration of SB224289 did not affect (except at 10 μg min−1) the vasoconstrictor responses to 5-HT. Notably, in animals pretreated with 1000 μg kg−1 of mesulergine, a 5-HT2/7 receptor antagonist, 5-HT produced a dose-dependent vasoconstriction, which was practically abolished by SB224289. After BRL15572, no further blockade was produced and the subsequent administration of ritanserin was similarly inactive. These results suggest that the GR127935-sensitive 5-HT1 receptors mediating canine internal carotid vasoconstriction resemble the 5-HT1B but not the 5-HT1D or 5-ht1F, receptor subtype. PMID:11226129

  8. Cyclization of the Urokinase Receptor-Derived Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg-Tyr Peptide Generates a Potent Inhibitor of Trans-Endothelial Migration of Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bifulco, Katia; Ingangi, Vincenzo; Di Carluccio, Gioconda; Merlino, Francesco; Motti, Maria Letizia; Grieco, Paolo; Carriero, Maria Vincenza

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) is a widely recognized master regulator of cell migration and uPAR88-92 is the minimal sequence required to induce cell motility. We and others have previously documented that the uPAR88-92 sequence, even in the form of synthetic linear peptide (SRSRY), interacts with the formyl peptide receptor type 1 (FPR1), henceforth inducing cell migration of several cell lines, including monocytes. FPR1 is mainly expressed by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and plays a crucial role in chemotaxis. In this study, we present evidence that the cyclization of the SRSRY sequence generates a new potent and stable inhibitor of monocyte trafficking. In rat basophilic leukaemia RBL-2H3/ETFR cells expressing high levels of constitutively activated FPR1, the cyclic SRSRY peptide ([SRSRY]) blocks FPR1 mediated cell migration by interfering with both internalization and ligand-uptake of FPR1. Similarly to RBL-2H3/ETFR cells, [SRSRY] competes with fMLF for binding to FPR1 and prevents agonist-induced FPR1 internalization in human monocyte THP-1 cells. Unlike scramble [RSSYR], [SRSRY] inhibits fMLF-directed migration of monocytes in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 0.01 nM. PMA-differentiated THP-1 cell exposure to fMLF gradient causes a marked cytoskeletal re-organization with the formation of F-actin rich pseudopodia that are prevented by the addition of [SRSRY]. Furthermore, [SRSRY] prevents migration of human primary monocytes and trans-endothelial migration of monocytes. Our findings indicate that [SRSRY] is a new FPR1 inhibitor which may suggest the development of new drugs for treating pathological conditions sustained by increased motility of monocytes, such as chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25938482

  9. Cysteine 27 Variant of the δ-Opioid Receptor Affects Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing through Altered Endocytic Trafficking ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sarajärvi, Timo; Tuusa, Jussi T.; Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Lackman, Jarkko J.; Sormunen, Raija; Helisalmi, Seppo; Roehr, Johannes T.; Parrado, Antonio R.; Mäkinen, Petra; Bertram, Lars; Soininen, Hilkka; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Petäjä-Repo, Ulla E.; Hiltunen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Agonist-induced activation of the δ-opioid receptor (δOR) was recently shown to augment β- and γ-secretase activities, which increased the production of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), known to accumulate in the brain tissues of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Previously, the δOR variant with a phenylalanine at position 27 (δOR-Phe27) exhibited more efficient receptor maturation and higher stability at the cell surface than did the less common cysteine (δOR-Cys27) variant. For this study, we expressed these variants in human SH-SY5Y and HEK293 cells expressing exogenous or endogenous amyloid precursor protein (APP) and assessed the effects on APP processing. Expression of δOR-Cys27, but not δOR-Phe27, resulted in a robust accumulation of the APP C83 C-terminal fragment and the APP intracellular domain, while the total soluble APP and, particularly, the β-amyloid 40 levels were decreased. These changes upon δOR-Cys27 expression coincided with decreased localization of APP C-terminal fragments in late endosomes and lysosomes. Importantly, a long-term treatment with a subset of δOR-specific ligands or a c-Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor suppressed the δOR-Cys27-induced APP phenotype. These data suggest that an increased constitutive internalization and/or concurrent signaling of the δOR-Cys27 variant affects APP processing through altered endocytic trafficking of APP. PMID:21464208

  10. PAF-receptor is preferentially expressed in a distinct synthetic phenotype of smooth muscle cells cloned from human internal thoracic artery: Functional implications in cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Stengel, Dominique; O'Neil, Caroline; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Karabina, Sonia-Athina; Durand, Herve; Caplice, Noel M.; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Ninio, Ewa . E-mail: ninio@chups.jussieu.fr

    2006-08-04

    Platelet-activating-Factor (PAF) and its structural analogues formed upon low density lipoprotein oxidation are involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and may signal through PAF-receptor (PAF-R) expressed in human macrophages and in certain smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media, but rarely in the intima of human plaques. Our aim was to determine which SMC phenotype expresses PAF-R and whether this receptor is functional in cell migration. Circulating SMC progenitors and two phenotypically distinct clones of proliferative, epithelioid phenotype vs contractile, spindle-shaped SMCs from the media of adult internal thoracic artery were studied for the presence of PAF-receptor (PAF-R). The levels of specific mRNA were obtained by reverse transcription/real-time PCR, the protein expression was deduced from immunohistochemistry staining, and the functional transmigration assay was performed by Boyden chamber-type chemotaxis assay. Only SMCs of spindle-shape and synthetic phenotype expressed both mRNA and PAF-R protein and in the functional test migrated at low concentrations of PAF. Two unrelated, specific PAF-R antagonists inhibited PAF-induced migration, but did not modify the migration initiated by PDGF. The presence of functional PAF-R in arterial spindle-shaped SMCs of synthetic phenotype may be important for their migration from the media into the intima and atherosclerotic plaques formation.

  11. Caffeine, Through Adenosine A3 Receptor-Mediated Actions, Suppresses Amyloid-β Protein Precursor Internalization and Amyloid-β Generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Geiger, Nicholas H; Soliman, Mahmoud L; Hui, Liang; Geiger, Jonathan D; Chen, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation and extracellular deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein continues to be implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), be it familial in origin or sporadic in nature. Aβ is generated intracellularly following endocytosis of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), and, consequently, factors that suppress AβPP internalization may decrease amyloidogenic processing of AβPP. Here we tested the hypothesis that caffeine decreases Aβ generation by suppressing AβPP internalization in primary cultured neurons. Caffeine concentration-dependently blocked low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol internalization and a specific adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) antagonist as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs mimicked the effects of caffeine on neuronal internalization of LDL cholesterol. Further implicating A3Rs were findings that a specific A3R agonist increased neuronal internalization of LDL cholesterol. In addition, caffeine as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs blocked the ability of LDL cholesterol to increase Aβ levels. Furthermore, caffeine blocked LDL cholesterol-induced decreases in AβPP protein levels in neuronal plasma membranes, increased surface expression of AβPP on neurons, and the A3R antagonist as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs mimicked the effects of caffeine on AβPP surface expression. Moreover, the A3R agonist decreased neuronal surface expression of AβPP. Our findings suggest that caffeine exerts protective effects against amyloidogenic processing of AβPP at least in part by suppressing A3R-mediated internalization of AβPP.

  12. Agonist-induced changes in the phosphorylation of the myosin- binding subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase and CPI17, two regulatory factors of myosin light chain phosphatase, in smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Niiro, Naohisa; Koga, Yasuhiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    The inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) enhances smooth muscle contraction at a constant [Ca2+]. There are two components, myosin-binding subunit of MLCP (MBS) and CPI17, thought to be responsible for the inhibition of MLCP by external stimuli. The phosphorylation of MBS at Thr-641 and of CPI17 at Thr-38 inhibits the MLCP activity in vitro. Here we determined the changes in the phosphorylation of MBS and CPI17 after agonist stimulation in intact as well as permeabilized smooth muscle strips using phosphorylation-site-specific antibodies as probes. The CPI17 phosphorylation transiently increased after agonist stimulation in both alpha-toxin skinned and intact fibres. The time course of the increase in CPI17 phosphorylation after stimulation correlated with the increase in myosin regulatory light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. The increase in CPI17 phosphorylation was significantly diminished by Y27632, a Rho kinase inhibitor, and GF109203x, a protein kinase C inhibitor, suggesting that both the protein kinase C and Rho kinase pathways influence the change in CPI17 phosphorylation. On the other hand, a significant level of MBS phosphorylation at Thr-641, an inhibitory site, was observed in the resting state for both skinned and intact fibres and the agonist stimulation did not significantly alter the MBS phosphorylation level at Thr-641. While the removal of the agonist markedly decreased MLC phosphorylation and induced relaxation, the phosphorylation of MBS was unchanged, while CPI17 phosphorylation markedly diminished. These results strongly suggest that the phosphorylation of CPI17 plays a more significant role in the agonist-induced increase in myosin phosphorylation and contraction of smooth muscle than MBS phosphorylation in the Ca2+-independent activation mechanism of smooth muscle contraction. PMID:12296769

  13. B cell receptor-mediated internalization of salmonella: a novel pathway for autonomous B cell activation and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Souwer, Yuri; Griekspoor, Alexander; Jorritsma, Tineke; de Wit, Jelle; Janssen, Hans; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S Marieke

    2009-06-15

    The present paradigm is that primary B cells are nonphagocytosing cells. In this study, we demonstrate that human primary B cells are able to internalize bacteria when the bacteria are recognized by the BCR. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella typhimurium results in B cell differentiation and secretion of anti-Salmonella Ab by the Salmonella-specific B cells. In addition, BCR-mediated internalization leads to efficient Ag delivery to the MHC class II Ag-loading compartments, even though Salmonella remains vital intracellularly in primary B cells. Consequently, BCR-mediated bacterial uptake induces efficient CD4(+) T cell help, which boosts Salmonella-specific Ab production. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella by B cells is superior over extracellular Ag extraction to induce rapid and specific humoral immune responses and efficiently combat infection.

  14. DOPAMINE RECEPTOR INACTIVATION IN THE CAUDATE-PUTAMEN DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS THE BEHAVIOR OF PREWEANLING AND ADULT RATS

    PubMed Central

    DER-GHAZARIAN, T.; GUTIERREZ, A.; VARELA, F. A.; HERBERT, M. S.; AMODEO, L. R.; CHARNTIKOV, S.; CRAWFORD, C. A.; MCDOUGALL, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    The irreversible receptor antagonist N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) has been used to study the ontogeny of dopamine (DA) receptor functioning in the young and adult rat. Most notably, systemic administration of EEDQ blocks the DA agonist-induced behaviors of adult rats, while leaving the behavior of preweanling rats unaffected. The purpose of the present study was to: (a) determine whether the age-dependent actions of EEDQ involve receptors located in the dorsal caudate-putamen (CPu) and (b) confirm that EEDQ's behavioral effects result from the inactivation of DA receptors rather than some other receptor type. In Experiment 1, EEDQ or DMSO were bilaterally infused into the CPu on PD 17 or PD 84. After 24 h, rats were given bilateral microinjections of the full DA agonist R(–)-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) or vehicle into the dorsal CPu and behavior was assessed for 40 min. In Experiment 2, preweanling rats were treated as just described, except that DA receptors were protected from EEDQ-induced alkylation by administering systemic injections of D1 (SCH23390) and D2 (sulpiride) receptor antagonists. As predicted, microinjecting EEDQ into the dorsal CPu attenuated the NPA-induced locomotor activity and stereotypy of adult rats. In contrast, rats given bilateral EEDQ infusions on PD 17 exhibited a potentiated locomotor response when treated with NPA. Experiment 2 showed that DA receptor inactivation was responsible for NPA's actions. A likely explanation for these results is that EEDQ inactivates a sizable percentage of DA receptors on PD 17, but leaves the remaining receptors in a supersensitive state. This receptor supersensitivity, which probably involves alterations in G protein coupling, could account for NPA-induced locomotor potentiation. Either adult rats do not show a similar EEDQ-induced change in receptor dynamics or DA receptor inactivation was more complete in older animals and effectively eliminated the expression of DA agonist-induced

  15. Heteromers of μ-δ opioid receptors: new pharmacology and novel therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Wakako; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that heteromerization between μ (MOP) and δ (DOP) opioid receptors modulates the signalling properties of the individual receptors. For example, whereas activation of MOP receptors by an agonist induces G protein-mediated signalling, the same agonist induces β-arrestin-mediated signalling in the context of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer. Moreover, heteromer-mediated signalling is allosterically modulated by a combination of MOP and DOP receptor ligands. This has implications in analgesia given that morphine-induced antinociception can be potentiated by DOP receptor ligands. Recently reagents selectively targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer such as bivalent ligands, antibodies or membrane permeable peptides have been generated; these reagents are enabling studies to elucidate the contribution of endogenously expressed heteromers to analgesia as well as to the development of side-effects associated with chronic opioid use. Recent advances in drug screening technology have led to the identification of a MOP-DOP receptor heteromer-biased agonist that activates both G protein-mediated and β-arrestin-mediated signalling. Moreover, this heteromer-biased agonist exhibits potent antinociceptive activity but with reduced side-effects, suggesting that ligands targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer form a basis for the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of pain. In this review, we summarize findings regarding the biological and functional characteristics of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer and the in vitro and in vivo properties of heteromer-selective ligands. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24571499

  16. YTRF is the conserved internalization signal of the transferrin receptor, and a second YTRF signal at position 31-34 enhances endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Collawn, J F; Lai, A; Domingo, D; Fitch, M; Hatton, S; Trowbridge, I S

    1993-10-15

    By functional analysis of mutant human transferrin receptors (TR) expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts, we previously identified a tetrapeptide sequence, Y20TRF23, within the 61-residue cytoplasmic tail as the signal for high-efficiency endocytosis (Collawn, J. F., Stangel, M., Kuhn, L. A., Esekogwu, V., Jing, S., Trowbridge, I.S., and Tainer, J.A. (1990) Cell 63, 1061-1072). It has been inferred from other studies, however, that the TR internalization signal was localized to a much larger region, residues 7 through 26 (Girones, N., Alvarez, E., Seth, A., Lin, I-M., Latour, D.A., and Davis, R.J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 19006-19012). Additionally, Tyr20 was reported to not be conserved in the Chinese hamster cytoplasmic tail sequence (Alvarez, E., Girones, N., and Davis, R.J. (1990) Biochem. J. 267, 31-35). In the studies reported here, we examined the effect of insertion of an extra copy of a YTRF sequence at three different locations within the human TR cytoplasmic domain and show that the insertion of another YTRF signal at position 31-34 in the wild-type TR, but not the other two locations, increases the rate of endocytosis 2-fold. Furthermore, introduction of YTRF at position 31-34 in an internalization-defective mutant receptor restores endocytosis to wild-type levels, indicating that YTRF signals at either positions 20-23 or 31-34 are necessary and sufficient to promote TR internalization and function in an independent and additive manner. We also report the complete primary structure of the Chinese hamster TR deduced from its cDNA sequence and show that the Tyr20 as well as the complete YTRF motif is conserved.

  17. Prophylactic Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Vaccines Adjuvanted with Stable Emulsion and Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist Induce a Robust HSV-2-Specific Cell-Mediated Immune Response, Protect against Symptomatic Disease, and Reduce the Latent Viral Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Michael T; Marshall, Jason D; Dorwart, Michael R; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Tummala, Padmaja; Yu, Li; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Sloan, Derek D

    2017-02-22

    Several prophylactic vaccines targeting HSV-2 have failed in the clinic to demonstrate a sustained depression in viral shedding or protection from recurrences. Although these vaccines have generated high titers of neutralizing antibodies, their induction of robust CD8 T cells has largely been unreported, even though evidence for the importance of HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cells is mounting in animal models and in translational studies involving subjects with active HSV-2-specific immune responses. We developed a subunit vaccine composed of the neutralizing antibody (nAb) targets gD and gB, the novel T cell antigen and tegument protein UL40, and we compared this to a whole-inactivated virus vaccine (FI-HSV-2). We evaluated different formulations in combination with several Th1-inducing TLR agonists in vivo. In mice, the TLR9 agonist cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotide formulated in a squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion promoted the most robust, functional HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cell responses and high neutralizing antibodies, demonstrating superiority to vaccines adjuvanted by monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL)/alum. We further established that FI-HSV-2 alone or in combination with adjuvants as well as adjuvanted subunit vaccines were successful in the induction of nAbs and T cell responses in guinea pigs. These immunological responses were coincident with a suppression of vaginal HSV-2 shedding, low lesion scores, and a reduction in latent HSV-2 DNA in dorsal root ganglia to undetectable levels. These data support the further preclinical and clinical development of prophylactic HSV-2 vaccines that contain appropriate antigen and adjuvant components responsible for programming elevated CD8 T cell responses.IMPORTANCE Millions of people worldwide are infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and to date, an efficacious prophylactic vaccine has not met the rigors of clinical trials. Attempts to develop a vaccine have focused primarily on glycoproteins necessary for HSV-2 viral entry as target antigens, and to which the dominant neutralizing antibody response is directed during natural infection. Individuals with asymptomatic infection have exhibited T-cell responses against specific HSV-2 antigens not observed in symptomatic individuals. We describe for the first time the immunogenicity profile in animal models of UL40, a novel HSV-2 T-cell antigen that has been correlated with asymptomatic HSV-2 disease. Additionally, vaccine candidates adjuvanted by a robust formulation of CpG oligonucleotide delivered in emulsion were superior to unadjuvanted or MPL/alum-adjuvanted formulations at eliciting a robust cell mediated immune response and blocking establishment of a latent viral reservoir in the guinea pig challenge model of HSV-2 infection.

  18. Class A scavenger receptor-mediated dsRNA internalization is independent of innate antiviral signaling and does not require PI3K activity1

    PubMed Central

    Nellimarla, Srinivas; Baid, Kaushal; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Bowdish, Dawn M.; Mossman, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA is a potent trigger of innate immune signaling, eliciting effects within virally infected cells and following release from dying cells. Given its inherent stability, extracellular dsRNA induces both local and systemic effects. Although the class A scavenger receptors (SR-As)3 mediate dsRNA entry, it is unknown if they contribute to signaling beyond ligand internalization. Here, we investigated if SR-As contribute to innate immune signaling independent of the classic TLR and RLR pathways. We generated a stable A549 human epithelial cell line with inducible expression of the Hepatitis C virus protease NS3/4A, which efficiently cleaves TRIF and IPS-1, adaptors for TLR3 and the RLRs respectively. Cells expressing NS3/4A as well as TLR3/MDA5/IPS-1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts completely lacked antiviral activity to extracellular dsRNA relative to control cells, suggesting that SR-As do not possess signaling capacity independent of TLR3 or the RLRs. Previous studies implicated PI3K signaling in SR-A-mediated activities and in downstream production of type I interferon. We found that SR-A-mediated dsRNA internalization occurs independent of PI3K activation, while downstream signaling leading to interferon production was partially dependent on PI3K activity. Overall, these findings suggest that SR-A-mediated dsRNA internalization is independent of innate antiviral signaling. PMID:26363049

  19. Metabolic flux-driven sialylation alters internalization, recycling, and drug sensitivity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in SW1990 pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Mohit P.; Tan, Elaine; Saeui, Christopher T.; Bovonratwet, Patawut; Sklar, Samuel; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Yarema, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    In prior work we reported that advanced stage, drug-resistant pancreatic cancer cells (the SW1990 line) can be sensitized to the EGFR-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib and gefitinib by treatment with 1,3,4-O-Bu3ManNAc (Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. (2015) 25(6):1223-7). Here we provide mechanistic insights into how this compound inhibits EGFR activity and provides synergy with TKI drugs. First, we showed that the sialylation of the EGFR receptor was at most only modestly enhanced (by ∼20 to 30%) compared to overall ∼2-fold increase in cell surface levels of this sugar. Second, flux-driven sialylation did not alter EGFR dimerization as has been reported for cancer cell lines that experience increased sialylation due to spontaneous mutations. Instead, we present evidence that 1,3,4-O-Bu3ManNAc treatment weakens the galectin lattice, increases the internalization of EGFR, and shifts endosomal trafficking towards non-clathrin mediated (NCM) endocytosis. Finally, by evaluating downstream targets of EGFR signaling, we linked synergy between 1,3,4-O-Bu3ManNAc and existing TKI drugs to a shift from clathrin-coated endocytosis (which allows EGFR signaling to continue after internalization) towards NCM endocytosis, which targets internalized moieties for degradation and thereby rapidly diminishes signaling. PMID:27613843

  20. An internally modulated, thermostable, pH-sensitive Cys loop receptor from the hydrothermal vent worm Alvinella pompejana.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Puneet; Horlacher, Reinhold; Bertrand, Daniel; Krause, Ryoko; Marger, Fabrice; Welte, Wolfram

    2014-05-23

    Cys loop receptors (CLRs) are commonly known as ligand-gated channels that transiently open upon binding of neurotransmitters to modify the membrane potential. However, a class of cation-selective bacterial homologues of CLRs have been found to open upon a sudden pH drop, suggesting further ligands and more functions of the homologues in prokaryotes. Here we report an anion-selective CLR from the hydrothermal vent annelid worm Alvinella pompejana that opens at low pH. A. pompejana expressed sequence tag databases were explored by us, and two full-length CLR sequences were identified, synthesized, cloned, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and studied by two-electrode voltage clamp. One channel, named Alv-a1-pHCl, yielded functional receptors and opened upon a sudden pH drop but not by other known agonists. Sequence comparison showed that both CLR proteins share conserved characteristics with eukaryotic CLRs, such as an N-terminal helix, a cysteine loop motif, and an intracellular loop intermediate in length between the long loops of other eukaryotic CLRs and those of prokaryotic CLRs. Both full-length Alv-a1-pHCl and a truncated form, termed tAlv-a1-pHCl, lacking 37 amino-terminal residues that precede the N-terminal helix, formed functional channels in oocytes. After pH activation, tAlv-a1-pHCl showed desensitization and was not modulated by ivermectin. In contrast, pH-activated, full-length Alv-a1-pHCl showed a marked rebound current and was modulated significantly by ivermectin. A thermostability assay indicated that purified tAlv-a1-pHCl expressed in Sf9 cells denatured at a higher temperature than the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica.

  1. Evidence for 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A receptors mediating constriction of the canine internal carotid circulation

    PubMed Central

    Centurión, David; Ortiz, Mario I; Sánchez-López, Araceli; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R; Villalón, Carlos M

    2001-01-01

    The present study has investigated the preliminary pharmacological profile of the receptors mediating vasoconstriction to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the internal carotid bed of vagosympathectomised dogs. One minute intracarotid infusions of the agonists 5-HT (0.1–10 μg min−1), sumatriptan (0.3–10 μg min−1; 5-HT1B/1D), 5-methoxytryptamine (1–100 μg min−1; 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT4, 5-ht6 and 5-HT7) or DOI (0.31–10 μg min−1; 5-HT2), but not 5-carboxamidotryptamine (0.01–0.3 μg min−1; 5-HT1, 5-ht5A and 5-HT7), 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (mCPBG; 1–1000 μg min−1; 5-HT3) or cisapride (1–1000 μg min−1; 5-HT4), resulted in dose-dependent decreases in internal carotid blood flow, without changing blood pressure or heart rate. The vasoconstrictor responses to 5-HT, which remained unaffected after saline, were resistant to blockade by i.v. administration of the antagonists ritanserin (100 μg kg−1; 5-HT2A/2B/2C) in combination with tropisetron (3000 μg kg−1; 5-HT3/4) or the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (5000 μg kg−1), but were abolished by the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR127935 (30 μg kg−1). Interestingly, after administration of GR127935, the subsequent administration of ritanserin unmasked a dose-dependent vasodilator component. GR127935 or saline did not practically modify the vasoconstrictor effects of 5-MeO-T. In animals receiving GR127935, the subsequent administration of ritanserin abolished the vasoconstrictor responses to 5-MeO-T unmasking a dose-dependent vasodilator component. The vasoconstriction induced by sumatriptan was antagonized by GR127935, but not by ritanserin. Furthermore, ritanserin (100 μg kg−1) or ketanserin (100 μg kg−1; 5-HT2A), but not GR127935, abolished DOI-induced vasoconstrictor responses. The above results suggest that 5-HT-induced internal carotid vasoconstriction is predominantly mediated by 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A receptors

  2. Calcyon is Necessary for Activity Dependent AMPA Receptor Internalization and LTD in CA1 Neurons of Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Heather Trantham; Xiao, Jiping; Dai, Rujuan; Bergson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Calcyon is a single transmembrane endocytic protein that regulates clathrin assembly and clathrin mediated endocytosis in brain. Ultrastructural studies indicate that calcyon localizes to spines, but whether it regulates glutamate neurotransmission is not known. Here, we show that deletion of the calcyon gene in mice inhibits agonist stimulated endocytosis of AMPA receptors, without altering basal surface levels of the GluR1 or GluR2 subunits. Whole cell patch clamp studies of hippocampal neurons in culture and CA1 synapses in slices revealed that knockout of calcyon abolishes long term synaptic depression (LTD) whereas mini-analysis in slices indicated basal transmission in hippocampus is unaffected by the deletion. Further, transfection of GFP-tagged calcyon rescued the ability of knockout cultures to undergo LTD. In contrast, intracellular dialysis of a fusion protein containing the clathrin light chain binding domain of calcyon blocked the induction of LTD in wild type hippocampal slices. Taken together, the present studies involving biochemical, immunological and electrophysiological analyses raise the possibility that calcyon plays a specialized role in regulating activity-dependent removal of synaptic AMPA receptors. PMID:19120439

  3. Serotonin Receptors in the Medulla Oblongata of the Human Fetus and Infant: The Analytic Approach of the International Safe Passage Study

    PubMed Central

    Folkerth, Rebecca D.; Paterson, David S.; Broadbelt, Kevin G.; Dan Zaharie, S.; Hewlett, Richard H.; Dempers, Johan J.; Burger, Elsie; Wadee, Shabbir; Schubert, Pawel; Wright, Colleen; Sens, Mary Ann; Nelsen, Laura; Randall, Bradley B.; Tran, Hoa; Geldenhuys, Elaine; Elliott, Amy J.; Odendaal, Hein J.; Kinney, Hannah C.

    2016-01-01

    The Safe Passage Study is an international, prospective study of approximately 12 000 pregnancies to determine the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) upon stillbirth and the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). A key objective of the study is to elucidate adverse effects of PAE upon binding to serotonin (5-HT) 1A receptors in brainstem homeostatic networks postulated to be abnormal in unexplained stillbirth and/or SIDS. We undertook a feasibility assessment of 5-HT1A receptor binding using autoradiography in the medulla oblongata (6 nuclei in 27 cases). 5-HT1A binding was compared to a reference dataset from the San Diego medical examiner’s system. There was no adverse effect of postmortem interval ≤100 h. The distribution and quantitated values of 5-HT1A binding in Safe Passage Study cases were essentially identical to those in the reference dataset, and virtually identical between stillbirths and live born fetal cases in grossly non-macerated tissues. The pattern of binding was present at mid-gestation with dramatic changes in binding levels in the medullary 5-HT nuclei over the second half of gestation; there was a plateau at lower levels in the neonatal period and into infancy. This study demonstrates feasibility of 5-HT1A binding analysis in the medulla in the Safe Passage Study. PMID:27634962

  4. Alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity by opiates and the subsequent effect of this alteration on opiate tolerance and dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether there is an alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity following opiate administration, and whether this alteration has any influence on the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Behavioral hypersensitivity to direct-acting dopamine agonists was observed in mice following acute or chronic morphine administration. Acute levorphanol administration also resulted in potentiation of dopamine agonist-induced behaviors. An increase in density of dopamine receptors, as measured by (/sup 3/H)butyrophenone binding accompanied the development of behavioral hypersensitivity. This increase was localized to the striatum, an area important in the mediation of dopamine-agonist induced behaviors. Naloxone or LiCl coadministered with the opiates prevented the development of hypersensitivity and the increase in density of dopamine receptors. Coadministration of lithium enhanced the development of acute and chronic tolerance. Lithium enhanced the development of dependence as determined by naloxone-induced hypothermia in chronically morphine-treated mice. Apomorphine enhanced naloxone-induced withdrawal in acutely dependent mice. This enhancement was blocked by coadministration of lithium with the opiates. These results suggest that dopamine receptor supersensitivity influences the degree of tolerance and dependence.

  5. Three major haplotypes of the β2 adrenergic receptor define psychological profile, blood pressure, and the risk for development of a common musculoskeletal pain disorder

    PubMed Central

    Diatchenko, Luda; Anderson, Amy D.; Slade, Gary D.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Higgins, Tomas; Sama, Swetha; Belfer, Inna; Goldman, David; Max, Mitchell B.; Weir, Bruce S.; Maixner, William

    2008-01-01

    Adrenergic receptor β2 (ADRB2) is a primary target for epinephrine. It plays a critical role in mediating physiological and psychological responses to environmental stressors. Thus, functional genetic variants of ADRB2 will be associated with a complex array of psychological and physiological phenotypes. These genetic variants should also interact with environmental factors such as physical or emotional stress to produce a phenotype vulnerable to pathological states. In this study, we determined whether common genetic variants of ADRB2 contribute to the development of a common chronic pain condition that is associated with increased levels of psychological distress and low blood pressure, factors which are strongly influenced by the adrenergic system. We genotyped 202 female subjects and examined the relationships between three major ADRB2 haplotypes and psychological factors, resting blood pressure, and the risk of developing a chronic musculoskeletal pain condition - Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD). We propose that the first haplotype codes for lower levels of ADRB2 expression, the second haplotype codes for higher ADRB2 expression, and the third haplotype codes for higher receptor expression and rapid agonist-induced internalization. Individuals who carried one haplotype coding for high and one coding for low ADRB2 expression displayed the highest positive psychological traits, had higher levels of resting arterial pressure, and were about 10 times less likely to develop TMD. Thus, our data suggest that either positive or negative imbalances in ADRB2 function increase the vulnerability to chronic pain conditions such as TMD through different etiological pathways that imply the need for tailored treatment options. PMID:16741943

  6. Roles of fragile X mental retardation protein in dopaminergic stimulation-induced synapse-associated protein synthesis and subsequent alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hansen; Kim, Susan S; Zhuo, Min

    2010-07-09

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation, is caused by the absence of the RNA-binding protein fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP regulates local protein synthesis in dendritic spines. Dopamine (DA) is involved in the modulation of synaptic plasticity. Activation of DA receptors can regulate higher brain functions in a protein synthesis-dependent manner. Our recent study has shown that FMRP acts as a key messenger for DA modulation in forebrain neurons. Here, we demonstrate that FMRP is critical for DA D1 receptor-mediated synthesis of synapse-associated protein 90/PSD-95-associated protein 3 (SAPAP3) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). DA D1 receptor stimulation induced dynamic changes of FMRP phosphorylation. The changes in FMRP phosphorylation temporally correspond with the expression of SAPAP3 after D1 receptor stimulation. Protein phosphatase 2A, ribosomal protein S6 kinase, and mammalian target of rapamycin are the key signaling molecules for FMRP linking DA D1 receptors to SAPAP3. Knockdown of SAPAP3 did not affect surface expression of alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) GluR1 receptors induced by D1 receptor activation but impaired their subsequent internalization in cultured PFC neurons; the subsequent internalization of GluR1 was also impaired in Fmr1 knock-out PFC neurons, suggesting that FMRP may be involved in subsequent internalization of GluR1 through regulating the abundance of SAPAP3 after DA D1 receptor stimulation. Our study thus provides further insights into FMRP involvement in DA modulation and may help to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying impaired learning and memory in fragile X syndrome.

  7. Morphine drives internal ribosome entry site-mediated hnRNP K translation in neurons through opioid receptor-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pin-Tse; Chao, Po-Kuan; Ou, Li-Chin; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Lin, Yen-Chang; Chen, Shu-Chun; Chang, Hsiao-Fu; Law, Ping-Yee; Loh, Horace H; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Su, Tsung-Ping; Yeh, Shiu-Hwa

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) binds to the promoter region of mu-opioid receptor (MOR) to regulate its transcriptional activity. How hnRNP K contributes to the analgesic effects of morphine, however, is largely unknown. We provide evidence that morphine increases hnRNP K protein expression via MOR activation in rat primary cortical neurons and HEK-293 cells expressing MORs, without increasing mRNA levels. Using the bicistronic reporter assay, we examined whether morphine-mediated accumulation of hnRNP K resulted from translational control. We identified potential internal ribosome entry site elements located in the 5' untranslated regions of hnRNP K transcripts that were regulated by morphine. This finding suggests that internal translation contributes to the morphine-induced accumulation of hnRNP K protein in regions of the central nervous system correlated with nociceptive and antinociceptive modulatory systems in mice. Finally, we found that down-regulation of hnRNP K mediated by siRNA attenuated morphine-induced hyperpolarization of membrane potential in AtT20 cells. Silencing hnRNP K expression in the spinal cord increased nociceptive sensitivity in wild-type mice, but not in MOR-knockout mice. Thus, our findings identify the role of translational control of hnRNP K in morphine-induced analgesia through activation of MOR.

  8. Subcellular redistribution of trimeric G-proteins--potential mechanism of desensitization of hormone response: internalization, solubilization, down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Drastichová, Z; Bourová, L; Lisý, V; Hejnová, L; Rudajev, V; Stöhr, J; Durchánková, D; Ostasov, P; Teisinger, J; Soukup, T; Novotný, J; Svoboda, P

    2008-01-01

    Agonist-induced subcellular redistribution of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) and of trimeric guanine-nucleotide binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) represent mechanisms of desensitization of hormone response, which have been studied in our laboratory since 1989. This review brings a short summary of these results and also presents information about related literature data covering at least small part of research carried out in this area. We have also mentioned sodium plus potassium dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na, K-ATPase) and 3H-ouabain binding as useful reference standard of plasma membrane purity in the brain.

  9. Disabled-2 is a negative immune regulator of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated Toll-like receptor 4 internalization and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Wei-Shan; Ling, Pin; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a pivotal role in the host response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we elucidated whether the endocytic adaptor protein Disabled-2 (Dab2), which is abundantly expressed in macrophages, plays a role in LPS-stimulated TLR4 signaling and trafficking. Molecular analysis and transcriptome profiling of RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells expressing short-hairpin RNA of Dab2 revealed that Dab2 regulated the TLR4/TRIF pathway upon LPS stimulation. Knockdown of Dab2 augmented TRIF-dependent interferon regulatory factor 3 activation and the expression of subsets of inflammatory cytokines and interferon-inducible genes. Dab2 acted as a clathrin sponge and sequestered clathrin from TLR4 in the resting stage of macrophages. Upon LPS stimulation, clathrin was released from Dab2 to facilitate endocytosis of TLR4 for triggering the TRIF-mediated pathway. Dab2 functions as a negative immune regulator of TLR4 endocytosis and signaling, supporting a novel role for a Dab2-associated regulatory circuit in controlling the inflammatory response of macrophages to endotoxin. PMID:27748405

  10. Calcyon is necessary for activity-dependent AMPA receptor internalization and LTD in CA1 neurons of hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Heather Trantham; Xiao, Jiping; Dai, Rujuan; Bergson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Calcyon is a single transmembrane endocytic protein that regulates clathrin assembly and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in the brain. Ultrastructural studies indicate that calcyon localizes to spines, but whether it regulates glutamate neurotransmission is not known. Here, we show that deletion of the calcyon gene in mice inhibits agonist-stimulated endocytosis of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs), without altering basal surface levels of the GluR1 or GluR2 subunits. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies of hippocampal neurons in culture and CA1 synapses in slices revealed that knockout (KO) of calcyon abolishes long-term synaptic depression (LTD), whereas mini-analysis in slices indicated basal transmission in the hippocampus is unaffected by the deletion. Further, transfection of green fluorescent protein-tagged calcyon rescued the ability of KO cultures to undergo LTD. In contrast, intracellular dialysis of a fusion protein containing the clathrin light-chain-binding domain of calcyon blocked the induction of LTD in wild-type hippocampal slices. Taken together, the present studies involving biochemical, immunological and electrophysiological analyses raise the possibility that calcyon plays a specialized role in regulating activity-dependent removal of synaptic AMPARs.

  11. The mu-opioid receptor gene-dose dependent reductions in G-protein activation in the pons/medulla and antinociception induced by endomorphins in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Narita, M; Oji, D E; Suganuma, C; Nagase, H; Sora, I; Uhl, G R; Cheng, E Y; Tseng, L F

    1999-01-01

    There appear to be different relationships between mu-opioid receptor densities and the acute and neuroadaptive mu-opioid agonist-induced responses of the multiple opioid neuronal systems, including important pons/medulla circuits. The recent success in creating mu-opioid receptor knockout mice allows studies of mu-opioid agonist-induced pharmacological and physiological effects in animals that express no, one or two copies of the mu-opioid receptor gene. We now report that the binding of mu-opioid receptor ligand, [3H][D-Ala2,NHPhe4,Gly-ol]enkephalin to membrane preparations of the pons/medulla was reduced by half in heterozygous mu-opioid receptor knockout mice and eliminated in homozygous mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. The endogenous mu-opioid agonist peptides endomorphin-1 and -2 activate G-proteins in the pons/medulla from wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent fashion, as assessed using [35S]guanosine-5'-o-(3-thio)triphosphate binding. This stimulation was reduced to half of the wild-type levels in heterozygous mice and eliminated in homozygous knockout mice. The intracerebroventricular injection of either endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2 produced marked antinociception in the hot-plate and tail-flick tests in wild-type mice. These antinociceptive actions were significantly reduced in heterozygous mu-opioid receptor knockout mice, and virtually abolished in homozygous knockout mice. The mu-opioid receptors are the principal molecular targets for endomorphin-induced G-protein activation in the pons/medulla and the antinociception caused by the intracerebroventricular administration of mu-opioid agonists. These data support the notion that there are limited physiological mu-opioid receptor reserves for inducing G-protein activation in the pons/medulla and for the nociceptive modulation induced by the central administration of endomorphin-1 and -2.

  12. Sperm Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Mediates α7 Acetylcholine Receptor (AChR) Activation to Promote Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Jaldety, Yael; Glick, Yair; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ickowicz, Debby; Gerber, Doron; Breitbart, Haim

    2012-01-01

    To attain fertilization the spermatozoon binds to the egg zona pellucida (ZP) via sperm receptor(s) and undergoes an acrosome reaction (AR). Several sperm receptors have been described in the literature; however, the identity of this receptor is not yet certain. In this study, we suggest that the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) might be a sperm receptor activated by ZP to induce epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated AR. We found that isolated ZP or α7 agonists induced the AR in sperm from WT but not α7-null spermatozoa, and the induced AR was inhibited by α7 or EGFR antagonists. Moreover, α7-null sperm showed very little binding to the egg, and microfluidic affinity in vitro assay clearly showed that α7nAChR, as well as EGFR, interacted with ZP3. Induction of EGFR activation and the AR by an α7 agonist was inhibited by a Src family kinase (SFK) inhibitor. In conclusion we suggest that activation of α7 by ZP leads to SFK-dependent EGFR activation, Ca2+ influx, and the acrosome reaction. PMID:22577141

  13. PDGF-induced receptor phosphorylation and phosphoinositide hydrolysis are unaffected by protein kinase C activation in mouse swiss 3T3 and human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sturani, E.; Vicentini, L.M.; Zippel, R.; Toschi, L.; Pandiella-Alonso, A.; Comoglio, P.M.; Meldolesi, J.

    1986-05-29

    Short (1-10 min) pretreatment of intact cells with activators of protein kinase C (e.g. phorbol-12 myristate, 13-acetate, PMA) affects the activity of a variety of surface receptors (for growth factors, hormones and neurotransmitters), with inhibition of transmembrane signal generation. In two types of fibroblasts it is demonstrated that the PDGF receptor is unaffected by PMA. Exposure to PMA at concentrations up to 100 nM for 10 min failed to inhibit either one of the agonist-induced, receptor-coupled responses of PDGF: the autophosphorylation of receptor molecules at tyrosine residues, and the hydrolysis of membrane polyphosphoinositides. In contrast, the EGF receptor autophosphorylation (in A 431 cells) and the bombesin-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis were readily inhibited by PMA.

  14. Purine receptor mediated actin cytoskeleton remodeling of human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Nanna; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Langevin, Helene; Nedergaard, Maiken; Takano, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that activation of adenosine A1 receptors on peripheral pain fibers contributes to acupuncture-induced suppression of painful input. In addition to adenosine, acupuncture triggers the release of other purines, including ATP and ADP that may bind to purine receptors on nearby fibroblasts. We here show that purine agonists trigger increase in cytosolic Ca 2+ signaling in a cultured human fibroblasts cell line. The profile of agonist-induced Ca2+ increases indicates that the cells express functional P2yR2 and P2yR4 receptors, as well as P2yR1 and P2xR7 receptors. Unexpectedly, purine-induced Ca2+ signaling was associated with a remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. ATP induced a transient loss in F-actin stress fiber. The changes of actin cytoskeleton occurred slowly and peaked at 10 min after agonist exposure. Inhibition of ATP-induced increases in Ca2+ by cyclopiazonic acid blocked receptor-mediated cytoskeleton remodeling. The Ca2+ ionophore failed to induce cytoskeletal remodeling despite triggering robust increases in cytosolic Ca2+. These observations indicate that purine signaling induces transient changes in fibroblast cytoarchitecture that could be related to the beneficial effects of acupuncture. PMID:23462235

  15. Pharmacological and kinetic properties of alpha 4 beta 2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Charnet, P; Labarca, C; Cohen, B N; Davidson, N; Lester, H A; Pilar, G

    1992-01-01

    1. Co-injection of RNA synthesized from cloned neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits (alpha 4 and beta 2) in Xenopus oocytes produced functional receptors. In macroscopic voltage-clamp experiments, the agonist-induced current exhibited a strong inward rectification. 2. Voltage jumps from +50 mV to more negative potentials produced relaxations of the agonist-induced current with a single exponential time course. The relaxation rate constant was only weakly voltage dependent. 3. At the single-channel level, three conductances were recorded of 12, 22 and 34 pS. Their burst durations were similar and varied only weakly with voltage (e-fold for 120 to 370 mV), consistent with the poorly voltage-dependent relaxation rate constants. However, the burst durations were less than 10 ms, or less than 1/5 the value expected from voltage-jump relaxations. 4. Hexamethonium (Hex, 0.5 to 8 microM) inhibited the agonist-induced current and produced voltage-jump relaxations characterized by a rapid conductance increase and a slower conductance decrease. Analysis of these relaxations suggested that the Hex-receptor interaction is open-channel blockade characterized by a forward binding rate of 1 x 10(7) M-1 s-1 and a dissociation rate constant of about 25 s-1. 5. For the relaxations produced by QX222, the slowest phase was a conductance increase, suggesting that the dissociation rate constant for QX222 is 10-30-fold greater than for Hex. 6. Hex but not QX222 produced an additional use-dependent blockade that was manifest during repetitive hyperpolarizing pulses. 7. With mouse muscle ACh receptors expressed in oocytes, the blockade by Hex did not depend strongly on voltage. Neither Hex nor QX222 produced appreciable use-dependent block on muscle ACh receptors. 8. Of the four conditions studied (neuronal and muscle receptors, Hex and QX222), only the blockade of the neuronal AChR by Hex is characterized by a residence time longer than the normal open time. 9. It is concluded

  16. P2X-mediated AMPA receptor internalization and synaptic depression is controlled by two CaMKII phosphorylation sites on GluA1 in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pougnet, Johan-Till; Compans, Benjamin; Martinez, Audrey; Choquet, Daniel; Hosy, Eric; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity at excitatory synapses can be induced either by synaptic release of glutamate or the release of gliotransmitters such as ATP. Recently, we showed that postsynaptic P2X2 receptors activated by ATP released from astrocytes downregulate synaptic AMPAR, providing a novel mechanism by which glial cells modulate synaptic activity. ATP- and lNMDA-induced depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus are additive, suggesting distinct molecular pathways. AMPARs are homo-or hetero-tetramers composed of GluA1-A4. Here, we first show that P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition is dependent on the subunit composition of AMPAR. GluA3 homomers are insensitive and their presence in heteromers alters P2X-mediated inhibition. Using a mutational approach, we demonstrate that the two CaMKII phosphorylation sites S567 and S831 located in the cytoplasmic Loop1 and C-terminal tail of GluA1 subunits, respectively, are critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition recorded from co-expressing Xenopus oocytes and removal of surface AMPAR at synapses of hippocampal neurons imaged by the super-resolution dSTORM technique. Finally, using phosphorylation site-specific antibodies, we show that P2X-induced depression in hippocampal slices produces a dephosphorylation of the GluA1 subunit at S567, contrary to NMDAR-mediated LTD. These findings indicate that GluA1 phosphorylation of S567 and S831 is critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR internalization and ATP-driven synaptic depression. PMID:27624155

  17. Down-regulation of the A3 adenosine receptor in human mast cells upregulates mediators of angiogenesis and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Rudich, Noam; Dekel, Ornit; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2015-05-01

    Adenosine activated mast cells have been long implicated in allergic asthma and studies in rodent mast cells have assigned the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R) a primary role in mediating adenosine responses. Here we analyzed the functional impact of A3R activation on genes that are implicated in tissue remodeling in severe asthma in the human mast cell line HMC-1 that shares similarities with lung derived human mast cells. Quantitative real time PCR demonstrated upregulation of IL6, IL8, VEGF, amphiregulin and osteopontin. Moreover, further upregulation of these genes was noted upon the addition of dexamethasone. Unexpectedly, activated A3R down regulated its own expression and knockdown of the receptor replicated the pattern of agonist induced gene upregulation. This study therefore identifies the human mast cell A3R as regulator of tissue remodeling gene expression in human mast cells and demonstrates a heretofore-unrecognized mode of feedback regulation that is exerted by this receptor.

  18. Phosphorylation of histone H3 is functionally linked to retinoic acid receptor β promoter activation

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Bruno; Ozato, Keiko; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    Ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) is a multistep process culminating in the formation of a multimeric co-activator complex on regulated promoters. Several co-activator complexes harbor an acetyl transferase activity, which is required for retinoid-induced transcription of reporter genes. Using murine P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, we examined the relationship between histone post-translational modifications and activation of the endogenous RARβ2 promoter, which is under the control of a canonical retinoic acid response element and rapidly induced upon retinoid treatment. While histones H3 and H4 were constitutively acetylated at this promoter, retinoid agonists induced a rapid phosphorylation at Ser10 of histone H3. A retinoid antagonist, whose activity was independent of co-repressor binding to RAR, could oppose this agonist-induced H3 phosphorylation. Since such post-translational modifications were not observed at several other promoters, we conclude that histone H3 phosphorylation may be a molecular signature of the activated, retinoid-controlled mRARβ2 gene promoter. PMID:11897660

  19. An elevation in physical coupling of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors to transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) channels constricts mesenteric arteries in genetic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Adebiyi, Adebowale; Thomas-Gatewood, Candice M; Leo, M Dennis; Kidd, Michael W; Neeb, Zachary P; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2012-11-01

    Hypertension is associated with an elevation in agonist-induced vasoconstriction, but mechanisms involved require further investigation. Many vasoconstrictors bind to phospholipase C-coupled receptors, leading to an elevation in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) that activates sarcoplasmic reticulum IP(3) receptors. In cerebral artery myocytes, IP(3) receptors release sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and can physically couple to canonical transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) channels in a caveolin-1-containing macromolecular complex, leading to cation current activation that stimulates vasoconstriction. Here, we investigated mechanisms by which IP(3) receptors control vascular contractility in systemic arteries and IP(3)R involvement in elevated agonist-induced vasoconstriction during hypertension. Total and plasma membrane-localized TRPC3 protein was ≈2.7- and 2-fold higher in mesenteric arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) than in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat controls, respectively. In contrast, IP(3)R1, TRPC1, TRPC6, and caveolin-1 expression was similar. TRPC3 expression was also similar in arteries of pre-SHRs and WKY rats. Control, IP(3)-induced and endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer between IP3R1 and TRPC3 was higher in SHR than WKY myocytes. IP3-induced cation current was ≈3-fold larger in SHR myocytes. Pyr3, a selective TRPC3 channel blocker, and calmodulin and IP(3) receptor binding domain peptide, an IP(3)R-TRP physical coupling inhibitor, reduced IP(3)-induced cation current and ET-1-induced vasoconstriction more in SHR than WKY myocytes and arteries. Thapsigargin, a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase blocker, did not alter ET-1-stimulated vasoconstriction in SHR or WKY arteries. These data indicate that ET-1 stimulates physical coupling of IP(3)R1 to TRPC3 channels in mesenteric artery myocytes, leading to vasoconstriction. Furthermore, an elevation in IP(3)R1 to TRPC3 channel molecular coupling augments

  20. Neuropilin-1 is a receptor for extracellular miRNA and AGO2/miRNA complexes and mediates the internalization of miRNAs that modulate cell function

    PubMed Central

    Prud'homme, Gerald J.; Glinka, Yelena; Lichner, Zsuzsanna; Yousef, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular miRNAs are increasingly studied as markers for specific diseases. They are released in biological fluids in a remarkably stable form, and may play a role in intercellular communication. They are thought to be protected against degradation by either encapsulation within microparticles, or by binding to proteins (mostly AGO2). The particulate forms may be internalized by endocytosis or membrane fusion, but the protein-bound forms require a receptor mechanism for their uptake. A major question is whether there are natural cell-membrane receptors that capture and internalize protein-bound functional miRNAs. We examined neuropilin-1 (NRP1), in view of its properties as a receptor for many ligands, including growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and efficiency at mediating ligand internalization. It is expressed by endothelial cells, many other normal cell types, and cancer cells. Here, we report that NRP1 binds miRNAs with high affinity, and promotes their entry into the cell. Furthermore, the internalized miRNAs remain functional, as they specifically regulate proliferation and migration of cancer cells, as well as tube formation by human endothelial cells. Anti-NRP1 antibodies or NRP1 siRNA knockdown block miRNA effects, further confirming NRP1-mediated uptake. VEGF does not compete with miRNAs for binding to NRP1. In addition, NRP1 binds extracellular AGO2 (carrying miRNA or not), and internalizes AGO2/miRNA complexes. Because miRNA bound to AGO2 appears to the most abundant form in body fluids, this may have important physiological and pathological effects. PMID:27486976

  1. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Luis E; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2014-07-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor.

  2. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Luis E.; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor. PMID:24686081

  3. The atypical dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 83959 induces striatal Fos expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Wirtshafter, David; Osborn, Catherine V

    2005-12-28

    The effects of dopamine D1 receptor agonists are often presumed to result from an activation of adenylyl cyclase, but dopamine D1 receptors may also be linked to other signal transduction cascades and the relative importance of these various pathways is currently unclear. SKF 83959 is an agonist at dopamine D1 receptors linked to phospholipase C, but has been reported to be an antagonist at receptors linked to adenylyl cyclase. The current report demonstrates that SKF 83959 induces pronounced, nonpatchy, expression of the immediate-early gene product Fos in the striatum of intact rats which can be converted to a patchy pattern by pretreatment with the dopamine D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole. In rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions SKF 83959 induces strong behavioral rotation and a greatly potentiated Fos response. All of the responses to SKF 83959, in both intact and dopamine-depleted animals, can be blocked by pretreatment with the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390. In intact subjects, SKF 83959 induced Fos expression less potently than the standard dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 82958, but the two drugs were approximately equipotent in deinnervated animals. These results demonstrate for the first time that possession of full efficacy at dopamine D1 receptors linked to adenylyl cyclase is not a necessary requirement for the induction of striatal Fos expression in intact animals and suggest that alternative signal transduction pathways may play a role in dopamine agonist induced Fos expression, especially in dopamine-depleted subjects.

  4. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na/sup +/ channel interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-12

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na/sup +/ channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) (G-protein(s)). These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxin to Na/sup +/ channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na/sup +/ channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na/sup +/channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na/sup +/ channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na/sup +/ channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues.

  5. Presenilin mediates neuroprotective functions of ephrinB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and regulates ligand-induced internalization and metabolism of EphB2 and TrkB receptors.

    PubMed

    Barthet, Gael; Dunys, Julie; Shao, Zhiping; Xuan, Zhao; Ren, Yimin; Xu, Jindong; Arbez, Nicolas; Mauger, Gweltas; Bruban, Julien; Georgakopoulos, Anastasios; Shioi, Junichi; Robakis, Nikolaos K

    2013-02-01

    Activation of EphB receptors by ephrinB (efnB) ligands on neuronal cell surface regulates important functions, including neurite outgrowth, axonal guidance, and synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that efnB rescues primary cortical neuronal cultures from necrotic cell death induced by glutamate excitotoxicity and that this function depends on EphB receptors. Importantly, the neuroprotective function of the efnB/EphB system depends on presenilin 1 (PS1), a protein that plays crucial roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) neurodegeneration. Furthermore, absence of one PS1 allele results in significantly decreased neuroprotection, indicating that both PS1 alleles are necessary for full expression of the neuroprotective activity of the efnB/EphB system. We also show that the ability of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to protect neuronal cultures from glutamate-induced cell death depends on PS1. Neuroprotective functions of both efnB and BDNF, however, were independent of γ-secretase activity. Absence of PS1 decreases cell surface expression of neuronal TrkB and EphB2 without affecting total cellular levels of the receptors. Furthermore, PS1-knockout neurons show defective ligand-dependent internalization and decreased ligand-induced degradation of TrkB and Eph receptors. Our data show that PS1 mediates the neuroprotective activities of efnB and BDNF against excitotoxicity and regulates surface expression and ligand-induced metabolism of their cognate receptors. Together, our observations indicate that PS1 promotes neuronal survival by regulating neuroprotective functions of ligand-receptor systems.

  6. Nootropic alpha7 nicotinic receptor allosteric modulator derived from GABAA receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Ng, Herman J; Whittemore, Edward R; Tran, Minhtam B; Hogenkamp, Derk J; Broide, Ron S; Johnstone, Timothy B; Zheng, Lijun; Stevens, Karen E; Gee, Kelvin W

    2007-05-08

    Activation of brain alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7 nAChRs) has broad therapeutic potential in CNS diseases related to cognitive dysfunction, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. In contrast to direct agonist activation, positive allosteric modulation of alpha7 nAChRs would deliver the clinically validated benefits of allosterism to these indications. We have generated a selective alpha7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator (PAM) from a library of GABAA receptor PAMs. Compound 6 (N-(4-chlorophenyl)-alpha-[[(4-chloro-phenyl)amino]methylene]-3-methyl-5-isoxazoleacet-amide) evokes robust positive modulation of agonist-induced currents at alpha7 nAChRs, while preserving the rapid native characteristics of desensitization, and has little to no efficacy at other ligand-gated ion channels. In rodent models, it corrects sensory-gating deficits and improves working memory, effects consistent with cognitive enhancement. Compound 6 represents a chemotype for allosteric activation of alpha7 nAChRs, with therapeutic potential in CNS diseases with cognitive dysfunction.

  7. Growth regulation of primary human keratinocytes by prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP3 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Konger, R L; Malaviya, R; Pentland, A P

    1998-02-04

    We examined the contribution of specific EP receptors in regulating cell growth. By RT-PCR and northern hybridization, adult human keratinocytes express mRNA for three PGE2 receptor subtypes associated with cAMP signaling (EP2, EP3, and small amounts of EP4). In actively growing, non-confluent primary keratinocyte cultures, the EP2 and EP4 selective agonists, 11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1, caused complete reversal of indomethacin-induced growth inhibition. The EP3/EP2 agonist (misoprostol), and the EP1/EP2 agonist (17-phenyl trinor PGE2), showed less activity. Similar results were obtained with agonist-induced cAMP formation. The ability of exogenous dibutyryl cAMP to completely reverse indomethacin-induced growth inhibition support the conclusion that growth stimulation occurs via an EP2 and/or EP4 receptor-adenylyl cyclase coupled response. In contrast, activation of EP3 receptors by sulprostone, which is virtually devoid of agonist activity at EP2 or EP4 receptors, inhibited bromodeoxyuridine uptake in indomethacin-treated cells up to 30%. Although human EP3 receptor variants have been shown in other cell types to markedly inhibit cAMP formation via a pertussis toxin sensitive mechanisms, EP3 receptor activation and presumably growth inhibition was independent of adenylyl cyclase, suggesting activation of other signaling pathways.

  8. Inhibition of Estrogen Receptor-DNA Binding by the "Pure" Antiestrogen ICI 164,384 Appears to be Mediated by Impaired Receptor Dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawell, Stephen E.; White, Roger; Hoare, Susan; Sydenham, Mark; Page, Martin; Parker, Malcolm G.

    1990-09-01

    Many estrogen-antagonist and -agonist ligands have been synthesized, some of which have proved clinically important in the treatment of hormone-dependent breast tumors and endocrine disorders. Here we show that the "pure" antiestrogen ICI 164,384 inhibits mouse estrogen receptor-DNA binding in vitro. The effects of this steroid on DNA binding can be overcome by addition of an anti-receptor antibody whose epitope lies N-terminal to the receptor DNA-binding domain. Since this antibody is also capable of restoring DNA-binding activity to receptor mutants that either lack the dimerization domain or bear deleterious mutations within it, we propose that ICI 164,384 reduces DNA binding by interfering with receptor dimerization. In contrast, when complexed with the antagonist/partial agonist tamoxifen, the estrogen receptor is capable of binding to DNA in vitro, but tamoxifen does not promote the agonist-induced conformational change obtained with estradiol. The implications of these data are discussed in relation to the in vivo properties of these drugs.

  9. Inhibition of estrogen receptor-DNA binding by the "pure" antiestrogen ICI 164,384 appears to be mediated by impaired receptor dimerization.

    PubMed

    Fawell, S E; White, R; Hoare, S; Sydenham, M; Page, M; Parker, M G

    1990-09-01

    Many estrogen-antagonist and -agonist ligands have been synthesized, some of which have proved clinically important in the treatment of hormone-dependent breast tumors and endocrine disorders. Here we show that the "pure" antiestrogen ICI 164,384 inhibits mouse estrogen receptor-DNA binding in vitro. The effects of this steroid on DNA binding can be overcome by addition of anti-receptor antibody whose epitope lies N-terminal to the receptor DNA-binding domain. Since this antibody is also capable of restoring DNA-binding activity to receptor mutants that either lack the dimerization domain or bear deleterious mutations within it, we propose that ICI 164,384 reduces DNA binding by interfering with receptor dimerization. In contrast, when complexed with the antagonist/partial agonist tamoxifen, the estrogen receptor is capable of binding to DNA in vitro, but tamoxifen does not promote the agonist-induced conformational change obtained with estradiol. The implications of these data are discussed in relation to the in vivo properties of these drugs.

  10. Inhibition of estrogen receptor-DNA binding by the "pure" antiestrogen ICI 164,384 appears to be mediated by impaired receptor dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Fawell, S E; White, R; Hoare, S; Sydenham, M; Page, M; Parker, M G

    1990-01-01

    Many estrogen-antagonist and -agonist ligands have been synthesized, some of which have proved clinically important in the treatment of hormone-dependent breast tumors and endocrine disorders. Here we show that the "pure" antiestrogen ICI 164,384 inhibits mouse estrogen receptor-DNA binding in vitro. The effects of this steroid on DNA binding can be overcome by addition of anti-receptor antibody whose epitope lies N-terminal to the receptor DNA-binding domain. Since this antibody is also capable of restoring DNA-binding activity to receptor mutants that either lack the dimerization domain or bear deleterious mutations within it, we propose that ICI 164,384 reduces DNA binding by interfering with receptor dimerization. In contrast, when complexed with the antagonist/partial agonist tamoxifen, the estrogen receptor is capable of binding to DNA in vitro, but tamoxifen does not promote the agonist-induced conformational change obtained with estradiol. The implications of these data are discussed in relation to the in vivo properties of these drugs. Images PMID:2395882

  11. Cholesterol reduction by methyl-β-cyclodextrin attenuates the delta opioid receptor-mediated signaling in neuronal cells but enhances it in non-neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Xu, Wei; Yoon, Su-In; Chen, Chongguang; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been shown to be located in and regulated by lipid rafts/caveolae in caveolin-rich non-neuronal cells. Here, we found that caveolin-1 level was very low in rat brain and undetectable in NG108-15 cells, which endogenously express delta opioid receptors (DOR). Rat caudate putamen (CPu) membranes, NG108-15 cells and CHO cells stably transfected with FLAG-mouse-DOR (CHO-FLAG-mDOR) were homogenized, sonicated in a detergent-free 0.5 M Na2CO3 buffer and fractionated through discontinuous or continuous sucrose density gradients. About 70% of opioid receptors in CPu and DOR in both cell lines were present in low-density (5-20% sucrose) membrane-domains enriched in cholesterol and ganglioside M1 (GM1), characteristics of lipid rafts in plasma membranes. In both cells, stimulation with permeable or non-permeable full agonists, but not with partial or inverse agonists, for 30 min shifted ∼25% of DORs out of rafts, by a naloxone-reversible and pertussis toxin-insensitive mechanism, which may undergo internalization. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) treatment greatly reduced cholesterol and shifted DOR to higher-density fractions and decreased DPDPE affinities. MCD treatment attenuated DPDPE-induced [35S]GTPγS binding in CPu and NG108-15 cells, but enhanced it in CHO-FLAG-mDOR cells. In CHO-FLAG-mDOR cells, Gαi co-immunoprecipitated with caveolin-1, which was shown to inhibit Gαi/o, and MCD treatment dramatically reduced the association leading to disinhibition. Thus, although localization in rafts and agonist-induced shift of DOR are independent of caveolin-1, lipid rafts sustain DOR-mediated signaling in caveolin-deficient neuronal cells, but appear to inhibit it in caveolin-enriched non-neuronal cells. Cholesterol-dependent association of caveolin-1 with and the resulting inhibition of G proteins may be a contributing factor. PMID:17141202

  12. The autoimmunity-associated gene PTPN22 potentiates toll-like receptor-driven, type 1 interferon-dependent immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaya; Shaked, Iftach; Stanford, Stephanie M; Zhou, Wenbo; Curtsinger, Julie M; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Shaheen, Zachary R; Cheng, Genhong; Sawatzke, Kristy; Campbell, Amanda M; Auger, Jennifer L; Bilgic, Hatice; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Schmeling, David O; Balfour, Henry H; Hasegawa, Kiminori; Chan, Andrew C; Corbett, John A; Binstadt, Bryce A; Mescher, Matthew F; Ley, Klaus; Bottini, Nunzio; Peterson, Erik J

    2013-07-25

    Immune cells sense microbial products through Toll-like receptors (TLR), which trigger host defense responses including type 1 interferons (IFNs) secretion. A coding polymorphism in the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene is a susceptibility allele for human autoimmune and infectious disease. We report that Ptpn22 selectively regulated type 1 IFN production after TLR engagement in myeloid cells. Ptpn22 promoted host antiviral responses and was critical for TLR agonist-induced, type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of inflammation in colitis and arthritis. PTPN22 directly associated with TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and promotes TRAF3 lysine 63-linked ubiquitination. The disease-associated PTPN22W variant failed to promote TRAF3 ubiquitination, type 1 IFN upregulation, and type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of arthritis. The findings establish a candidate innate immune mechanism of action for a human autoimmunity "risk" gene in the regulation of host defense and inflammation.

  13. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  14. Neonatal co-lesion by DSP-4 and 5,7-DHT produces adulthood behavioral sensitization to dopamine D(2) receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Przemysław; Nitka, Dariusz; Kwieciński, Adam; Jośko, Jadwiga; Drab, Jacek; Pojda-Wilczek, Dorota; Kasperski, Jacek; Kostrzewa, Richard M; Brus, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    To assess the possible modulatory effects of noradrenergic and serotoninergic neurons on dopaminergic neuronal activity, the noradrenergic and serotoninergic neurotoxins DSP-4 N-(2-chlorethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (50.0 mg/kg, sc) and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) (37.5 microg icv, half in each lateral ventricle), respectively, were administered toWistar rats on the first and third days of postnatal ontogeny, and dopamine (DA) agonist-induced behaviors were assessed in adulthood. At eight weeks, using an HPLC/ED technique, DSP-4 treatment was associated with a reduction in NE content of the corpus striatum (> 60%), hippocampus (95%), and frontal cortex (> 85%), while 5,7-DHT was associated with an 80-90% serotonin reduction in the same brain regions. DA content was unaltered in the striatum and the cortex. In the group lesioned with both DSP-4 and 5,7-DHT, quinpirole-induced (DA D(2) agonist) yawning, 7-hydroxy-DPAT-induced (DA D(3) agonist) yawning, and apomorphine-induced (non-selective DA agonist) stereotypies were enhanced. However, SKF 38393-induced (DA D(1) agonist) oral activity was reduced in the DSP-4 + 5,7-DHT group. These findings demonstrate that DA D(2)- and D(3)-agonist-induced behaviors are enhanced while DA D(1)-agonist-induced behaviors are suppressed in adult rats in which brain noradrenergic and serotoninergic innervation of the brain has largely been destroyed. This study indicates that noradrenergic and serotoninergic neurons have a great impact on the development of DA receptor reactivity (sensitivity).

  15. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in regulating low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated β-amyloid protein internalization in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai-Ge; Lv, Jia; Hu, Xiao-Dan; Shi, Li-Li; Chang, Ke-Wei; Chen, Xin-Lin; Qian, Yi-Hua; Yang, Wei-Na; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that intracellular β-amyloid protein (Aβ) alone plays a pivotal role in the progression of AD. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway and proteins that control Aβ internalization may provide new insight for regulating Aβ levels. In the present study, the regulation of Aβ internalization by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) was analyzed in vivo. The data derived from this investigation revealed that Aβ1-42 were internalized by neurons and astrocytes in mouse brain, and were largely deposited in mitochondria and lysosomes, with some also being found in the endoplasmic reticulum. Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex was formed during Aβ1-42 internalization, and the p38 MAPK signaling pathway was activated by Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were co- localized in the cells of parietal cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, the level of LRP1-mRNA and LRP1 protein involved in Aβ1-42 internalization in mouse brain. The results of this investigation demonstrated that Aβ1-42 induced an LRP1-dependent pathway that related to the activation of p38 MAPK resulting in internalization of Aβ1-42. These results provide evidence supporting a key role for the p38 MAPK signaling pathway which is involved in the regulation of Aβ1-42 internalization in the parietal cortex and hippocampus of mouse through LRP1 in vivo.

  16. Actions of octocoral and tobacco cembranoids on nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferchmin, P A; Pagán, Oné R; Ulrich, Henning; Szeto, Ada C; Hann, Richard M; Eterović, Vesna A

    2009-12-15

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are pentameric proteins that form agonist-gated cation channels through the plasma membrane. AChR agonists and antagonists are potential candidates for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Cembranoids are naturally occurring diterpenoids that contain a 14-carbon ring. These diterpenoids interact with AChRs in complex ways: as irreversible inhibitors at the agonist sites, as noncompetitive inhibitors, or as positive modulators, but no cembranoid was ever shown to have agonistic activity on AChRs. The cembranoid eupalmerin acetate displays positive modulation of agonist-induced currents in the muscle-type AChR and in the related gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor. Moreover, cembranoids display important biological effects, many of them mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cembranoids from tobacco are neuroprotective through a nicotinic anti-apoptotic mechanism preventing excitotoxic neuronal death which in part could result from anti-inflammatory properties of cembranoids. Moreover, tobacco cembranoids also have anti-inflammatory properties which could enhance their neuroprotective properties. Cembranoids from tobacco affect nicotine-related behavior: they increase the transient initial ataxia caused by first nicotine injection into naive rats and inhibit the expression of locomotor sensitization to repeated injections of nicotine. In addition, cembranoids are known to act as anti-tumor compounds. In conclusion, cembranoids provide a promising source of lead drugs for many clinical areas, including neuroprotection, smoking-cessation, and anti-cancer therapies.

  17. Does the kappa opioid receptor system contribute to pain aversion?

    PubMed

    Cahill, Catherine M; Taylor, Anna M W; Cook, Christopher; Ong, Edmund; Morón, Jose A; Evans, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the endogenous peptide-ligand dynorphin have received significant attention due the involvement in mediating a variety of behavioral and neurophysiological responses, including opposing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse including opioids. Accumulating evidence indicates this system is involved in regulating states of motivation and emotion. Acute activation of the KOR produces an increase in motivational behavior to escape a threat, however, KOR activation associated with chronic stress leads to the expression of symptoms indicative of mood disorders. It is well accepted that KOR can produce analgesia and is engaged in chronic pain states including neuropathic pain. Spinal studies have revealed KOR-induced analgesia in reversing pain hypersensitivities associated with peripheral nerve injury. While systemic administration of KOR agonists attenuates nociceptive sensory transmission, this effect appears to be a stress-induced effect as anxiolytic agents, including delta opioid receptor agonists, mitigate KOR agonist-induced analgesia. Additionally, while the role of KOR and dynorphin in driving the dysphoric and aversive components of stress and drug withdrawal has been well characterized, how this system mediates the negative emotional states associated with chronic pain is relatively unexplored. This review provides evidence that dynorphin and the KOR system contribute to the negative affective component of pain and that this receptor system likely contributes to the high comorbidity of mood disorders associated with chronic neuropathic pain.

  18. Revisiting the endocytosis of the m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Ockenga, Wymke; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2015-05-12

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles.

  19. Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ockenga, Wymke; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2015-01-01

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles. PMID:25985102

  20. Does the kappa opioid receptor system contribute to pain aversion?

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Catherine M.; Taylor, Anna M. W.; Cook, Christopher; Ong, Edmund; Morón, Jose A.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the endogenous peptide-ligand dynorphin have received significant attention due the involvement in mediating a variety of behavioral and neurophysiological responses, including opposing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse including opioids. Accumulating evidence indicates this system is involved in regulating states of motivation and emotion. Acute activation of the KOR produces an increase in motivational behavior to escape a threat, however, KOR activation associated with chronic stress leads to the expression of symptoms indicative of mood disorders. It is well accepted that KOR can produce analgesia and is engaged in chronic pain states including neuropathic pain. Spinal studies have revealed KOR-induced analgesia in reversing pain hypersensitivities associated with peripheral nerve injury. While systemic administration of KOR agonists attenuates nociceptive sensory transmission, this effect appears to be a stress-induced effect as anxiolytic agents, including delta opioid receptor agonists, mitigate KOR agonist-induced analgesia. Additionally, while the role of KOR and dynorphin in driving the dysphoric and aversive components of stress and drug withdrawal has been well characterized, how this system mediates the negative emotional states associated with chronic pain is relatively unexplored. This review provides evidence that dynorphin and the KOR system contribute to the negative affective component of pain and that this receptor system likely contributes to the high comorbidity of mood disorders associated with chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:25452729

  1. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Subtypes of Muscarinic Receptors (5th), Held in Newport Beach, California, October 22-24, 1992.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-22

    blocking ml receptors in the brains of laboratory animals , so that some idea of the behavioral effects of such blockade can be established. Use of nil...Perhaps the use of nil-toxin in whole animals will yield this answer. References 1. A.I. LEVEY. C.A. KFFn. W.F. SIMONDS, D.L. PRICE and M.R. BRANN...novel approach with exquisite sensitivity and specificity for delineating the distribution of mI-m5 receptors in animal and human tissues. Molecular

  2. D1 and D2 dopamine receptors differentially increase Fos-like immunoreactivity in accumbal projections to the ventral pallidum and midbrain.

    PubMed

    Robertson, G S; Jian, M

    1995-02-01

    Alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission have profound effects on neuronal expression of the putative activity marker, Fos, in both the dorsal and ventral striatum. Stimulants such as D-amphetamine and cocaine increase Fos-like immunoreactivity by enhancing the activation of D1 dopamine receptors. In contrast, neuroleptics such as haloperidol and raclopride increase Fos-like immunoreactivity by blocking striatal D2 dopamine receptors. In the dorsal striatum, D1 receptor stimulation elevates Fos-like immunoreactivity predominantly in neurons projecting to the midbrain (substantia nigra), whereas D2 receptor antagonism enhances Fos-like immunoreactivity principally in neurons projecting to the pallidum (globus pallidus). These findings are consistent with the proposal that D1 receptors are located chiefly on striatonigral neurons, whereas D2 receptors reside mainly on striatopallidal neurons. Since the nucleus accumbens (largest component of the ventral striatum) also sends projections to the midbrain (ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra) and pallidum (ventral pallidum), the present study utilized retrograde tract-tracing techniques to determine if there was a similar segregation of D1 agonist- and D2 antagonist-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in these accumbal projections. In addition, we examined whether these relationships were the same in the core and shell regions of the nucleus accumbens. Like the dorsal striatum, D1 agonists (D-amphetamine and CY 208-243), but not D2 antagonists (haloperidol and clozapine), increased Fos-like immunoreactivity in accumbal neurons projecting to the midbrain (ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra). Also like the dorsal striatum, D2 antagonist-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity was located preferentially in accumbal neurons projecting to the pallidum (ventral pallidum). However, unlike the dorsal striatum, where the vast majority of neurons which display D1 agonist-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity project to

  3. Two affinities for a single antagonist at the neuronal NK1 tachykinin receptor: evidence from quantitation of receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, Karl M; Southwell, Bridget R; Furness, John B

    1999-01-01

    In smooth muscle contractility assays, many NK1 receptor (NK1r) antagonists inhibit responses to the neurotransmitter, substance P (SP), and its analogue, septide, with markedly different potency, leading to the proposal that there is a septide-preferring receptor related to the NK1r.We used fluorescence immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy to visualize agonist-induced NK1r endocytosis and analyse agonist/antagonist interactions at native NK1r in neurons of the myenteric plexus of guinea-pig ileum.SP and septide gave sigmoid log concentration-response curves and were equipotent in inducing NK1r endocytosis.The NK1r antagonists, CP-99994 (2S,3S)-3-(2-methoxybenzyl)amino-2-phenylpiperidine dihydrochloride and MEN-10581, cyclo(Leuψ[CH2NH]Lys(benzyloxycarbonyl)-Gln-Trp-Phe-βAla) were both more potent in inhibiting endocytosis (50× and 8× greater respectively) against septide than against SP.The results suggest that SP and septide interact differently with the NK1r, and that a single antagonist can exhibit different affinities at a single NK1r population, depending on the agonist with which it competes. Thus it may not be necessary to posit a separate septide-preferring tachykinin receptor. PMID:10051129

  4. Importance of extracellular loop one of the Neuropeptide S receptor for biogenesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Stewart D.; Tran, Ha T.; Zeng, Joanne; Reinscheid, Rainer K.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is the endogenous ligand of a formerly orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The NPS receptor (NPSR) belongs to the subfamily of peptide GPCRs and is widely expressed in the brain. NPS promotes arousal and induces anxiolytic-like effects after central administration in rodents. Previously, we have reported that the N107I polymorphism in the human NPS receptor results in a gain-of-function characterized by an increase in agonist potency without changing agonist binding affinity. We have extended our findings by investigating pharmacological and biochemical consequences of mutations in the vicinity of position 107. Alanine substitutions were made for D105 and N101, and stable clones were analyzed for agonist-induced changes of intracellular Ca2+. Receptor protein expression was monitored by Western blot and flow cytometry. The mutation D105A produced receptors that have a ∼200-fold higher EC50 despite elevated total receptor protein and surface expression compared to cell lines expressing the parental receptor NPSR-N107. The mutation N101A resulted in slightly reduced agonist potency without affecting the ability of the protein to form functional receptors. Stable NPSR-A101 clones show little expression of the fully glycosylated form. However, NPSR-A101 receptors are expressed on the cell surface and are functional, suggesting that full glycosylation is not required for receptor function. Our studies suggest that N-linked glycosylation is not important for receptor biogenesis or function, and that residue D105 might be critical for receptor binding. PMID:19874863

  5. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  6. Rate constants of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors in rat brain medulla. Evaluation by competition kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, G.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1985-07-25

    The method of competition kinetics, which measures the binding kinetics of an unlabeled ligand through its effect on the binding kinetics of a labeled ligand, was employed to investigate the kinetics of muscarinic agonist binding to rat brain medulla pons homogenates. The agonists studied were acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and oxotremorine, with N-methyl-4-(TH)piperidyl benzilate employed as the radiolabeled ligand. Our results suggested that the binding of muscarinic agonists to the high affinity sites is characterized by dissociation rate constants higher by 2 orders of magnitude than those of antagonists, with rather similar association rate constants. Our findings also suggest that isomerization of the muscarinic receptors following ligand binding is significant in the case of antagonists, but not of agonists. Moreover, it is demonstrated that in the medulla pons preparation, agonist-induced interconversion between high and low affinity bindings sites does not occur to an appreciable extent.

  7. Molecular determinants for drug-receptor interactions. 8. Anisotropic and internal motions in morphine, nalorphine, oxymorphone, naloxone and naltrexone in aqueous solution by carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.

    1989-02-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) were measured for morphine, oxymorphone, nalorphine, naloxone and naltrexone as hydrochloride salts in 2H 2O solution. The data refer to the molecules in the N-equatorial configuration. The experimental T1 values were interpreted using a model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body with superimposed internal motions of the flexible N-methyl, N-methyl-allyl and N-methyl-cyclopropyl fragments. The calculated internal motional rates were found to markedly decrease on passing from agonists to mixed (nalorphine) and pure (naloxone, naltrexone) antagonists. For these latter the observed trend of the internal flexibility about NC and CC bonds of the N-substituents is discussed in terms of a correlation with their relative antagonistic potencies. In fact, such an evidence of decreasing internal conformational dynamics in the order nalorphine, naloxone, naltrexone, appeared interestingly in line with the "two-state" model of opiate receptor operation mode proposed by Snyder.

  8. Estimation of the receptor-state affinity constants of ligands in functional studies using wild type and constitutively active mutant receptors: Implications for estimation of agonist bias.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Frederick J; Stein, Richard S L

    We describe a method for estimating the affinities of ligands for active and inactive states of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Our protocol involves measuring agonist-induced signaling responses of a wild type GPCR and a constitutively active mutant of it under control conditions and after partial receptor inactivation or reduced receptor expression. Our subsequent analysis is based on the assumption that the activating mutation increases receptor isomerization into the active state without affecting the affinities of ligands for receptor states. A means of confirming this assumption is provided. Global nonlinear regression analysis yields estimates of 1) the active (Kact) and inactive (Kinact) receptor-state affinity constants, 2) the isomerization constant of the unoccupied receptor (Kq-obs), and 3) the sensitivity constant of the signaling pathway (KE-obs). The latter two parameters define the output response of the receptor, and hence, their ratio (Kq-obs/KE) is a useful measure of system bias. If the cellular system is reasonably stable and the Kq-obs and KE-obs values of the signaling pathway are known, the Kact and Kinact values of additional agonists can be estimated in subsequent experiments on cells expressing the wild type receptor. We validated our method through computer simulation, an analytical proof, and analysis of previously published data. Our approach provides 1) a more meaningful analysis of structure-activity relationships, 2) a means of validating in silico docking experiments on active and inactive receptor structures and 3) an absolute, in contrast to relative, measure of agonist bias.

  9. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCV. Recent advances in the understanding of the pharmacology and biological roles of relaxin family peptide receptors 1-4, the receptors for relaxin family peptides.

    PubMed

    Halls, Michelle L; Bathgate, Ross A D; Sutton, Steve W; Dschietzig, Thomas B; Summers, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin, insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), relaxin-3, and INSL5 are the cognate ligands for the relaxin family peptide (RXFP) receptors 1-4, respectively. RXFP1 activates pleiotropic signaling pathways including the signalosome protein complex that facilitates high-sensitivity signaling; coupling to Gα(s), Gα(i), and Gα(o) proteins; interaction with glucocorticoid receptors; and the formation of hetero-oligomers with distinctive pharmacological properties. In addition to relaxin-related ligands, RXFP1 is activated by Clq-tumor necrosis factor-related protein 8 and by small-molecular-weight agonists, such as ML290 [2-isopropoxy-N-(2-(3-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl)benzamide], that act allosterically. RXFP2 activates only the Gα(s)- and Gα(o)-coupled pathways. Relaxin-3 is primarily a neuropeptide, and its cognate receptor RXFP3 is a target for the treatment of depression, anxiety, and autism. A variety of peptide agonists, antagonists, biased agonists, and an allosteric modulator target RXFP3. Both RXFP3 and the related RXFP4 couple to Gα(i)/Gα(o) proteins. INSL5 has the properties of an incretin; it is secreted from the gut and is orexigenic. The expression of RXFP4 in gut, adipose tissue, and β-islets together with compromised glucose tolerance in INSL5 or RXFP4 knockout mice suggests a metabolic role. This review focuses on the many advances in our understanding of RXFP receptors in the last 5 years, their signal transduction mechanisms, the development of novel compounds that target RXFP1-4, the challenges facing the field, and current prospects for new therapeutics.

  10. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCV. Recent Advances in the Understanding of the Pharmacology and Biological Roles of Relaxin Family Peptide Receptors 1–4, the Receptors for Relaxin Family Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Halls, Michelle L.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Sutton, Steve W.; Dschietzig, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin, insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), relaxin-3, and INSL5 are the cognate ligands for the relaxin family peptide (RXFP) receptors 1–4, respectively. RXFP1 activates pleiotropic signaling pathways including the signalosome protein complex that facilitates high-sensitivity signaling; coupling to Gαs, Gαi, and Gαo proteins; interaction with glucocorticoid receptors; and the formation of hetero-oligomers with distinctive pharmacological properties. In addition to relaxin-related ligands, RXFP1 is activated by Clq-tumor necrosis factor-related protein 8 and by small-molecular-weight agonists, such as ML290 [2-isopropoxy-N-(2-(3-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl)benzamide], that act allosterically. RXFP2 activates only the Gαs- and Gαo-coupled pathways. Relaxin-3 is primarily a neuropeptide, and its cognate receptor RXFP3 is a target for the treatment of depression, anxiety, and autism. A variety of peptide agonists, antagonists, biased agonists, and an allosteric modulator target RXFP3. Both RXFP3 and the related RXFP4 couple to Gαi/Gαo proteins. INSL5 has the properties of an incretin; it is secreted from the gut and is orexigenic. The expression of RXFP4 in gut, adipose tissue, and β-islets together with compromised glucose tolerance in INSL5 or RXFP4 knockout mice suggests a metabolic role. This review focuses on the many advances in our understanding of RXFP receptors in the last 5 years, their signal transduction mechanisms, the development of novel compounds that target RXFP1–4, the challenges facing the field, and current prospects for new therapeutics. PMID:25761609

  11. Activatory and inhibitory Fcγ receptors augment rituximab-mediated internalization of CD20 independent of signaling via the cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Andrew T; Chan, Claude H T; Klein, Christian; Glennie, Martin J; Beers, Stephen A; Cragg, Mark S

    2015-02-27

    Type I anti-CD20 mAb such as rituximab and ofatumumab engage with the inhibitory FcγR, FcγRIIb on the surface of B cells, resulting in immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) phosphorylation. Internalization of the CD20·mAb·FcγRIIb complex follows, the rate of which correlates with FcγRIIb expression. In contrast, although type II anti-CD20 mAb such as tositumomab and obinutuzumab also interact with and activate FcγRIIb, this interaction fails to augment the rate of CD20·mAb internalization, raising the question of whether ITIM phosphorylation plays any role in this process. We have assessed the molecular requirements for the internalization process and demonstrate that in contrast to internalization of IgG immune complexes, FcγRIIb-augmented internalization of rituximab-ligated CD20 occurs independently of the FcγRIIb ITIM, indicating that signaling downstream of FcγRIIb is not required. In transfected cells, activatory FcγRI, FcγRIIa, and FcγRIIIa augmented internalization of rituximab-ligated CD20 in a similar manner. However, FcγRIIa mediated a slower rate of internalization than cells expressing equivalent levels of the highly homologous FcγRIIb. The difference was maintained in cells expressing FcγRIIa and FcγRIIb lacking cytoplasmic domains and in which the transmembrane domains had been exchanged. This difference may be due to increased degradation of FcγRIIa, which traffics to lysosomes independently of rituximab. We conclude that the cytoplasmic domain of FcγR is not required for promoting internalization of rituximab-ligated CD20. Instead, we propose that FcγR provides a structural role in augmenting endocytosis that differs from that employed during the endocytosis of immune complexes.

  12. Desensitization of functional µ-opioid receptors increases agonist off-rate.

    PubMed

    Williams, John T

    2014-07-01

    Desensitization of µ-opioid receptors (MORs) develops over 5-15 minutes after the application of some, but not all, opioid agonists and lasts for tens of minutes after agonist removal. The decrease in function is receptor selective (homologous) and could result from 1) a reduction in receptor number or 2) a decrease in receptor coupling. The present investigation used photolysis of two caged opioid ligands to examine the kinetics of MOR-induced potassium conductance before and after MOR desensitization. Photolysis of a caged antagonist, carboxynitroveratryl-naloxone (caged naloxone), blocked the current induced by a series of agonists, and the time constant of decline was significantly decreased after desensitization. The increase in the rate of current decay was not observed after partial blockade of receptors with the irreversible antagonist, β-chlornaltrexamine (β-CNA). The time constant of current decay after desensitization was never more rapid than 1 second, suggesting an increased agonist off-rate rather than an increase in the rate of channel closure downstream of the receptor. The rate of G protein-coupled K(+) channel (GIRK) current activation was examined using photolysis of a caged agonist, carboxynitrobenzyl-tyrosine-[Leu(5)]-enkephalin. After acute desensitization or partial irreversible block of MORs with β-CNA, there was an increase in the time it took to reach a peak current. The decrease in the rate of agonist-induced GIRK conductance was receptor selective and dependent on receptor number. The results indicate that opioid receptor desensitization reduced the number of functional receptor and that the remaining active receptors have a reduced agonist affinity.

  13. Role of Prostaglandin D2 and DP1 Receptor on Japanese Cedar Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoshiyuki; Kidani, Yujiro; Goto, Kumiko; Furue, Shingo; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Inagaki, Naoki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Shichijo, Michitaka

    2016-05-01

    Although we previously demonstrated the contribution of the DP1receptor in nasal obstruction using animals sensitized with ovalbumin in the presence of adjuvant, the contribution of the DP1receptor in sneezing is unclear. Here, we developed a mouse model of Japanese cedar (JC:Cryptomeria japonica) pollinosis to evaluate the symptoms of sneezing. To achieve this, we used JC pollen crude extract in the absence of adjuvant to sensitize mice to develop a model closer to the pathophysiology of human JC pollinosis. The immunologic and pharmacologic features of this model are highly similar to those observed in JC pollinosis in humans. Using this model, we found that DP1receptor antagonists suppressed JC pollen extract-induced sneezing and that a DP1receptor agonist induced sneezing. Moreover, JC pollen extract-induced sneezing was diminished in DP1receptor knockout mice. In conclusion, we developed a novel mouse model of allergic rhinitis that closely mimics human JC pollinosis. A strong contribution of DP1receptor signaling to sneezing was demonstrated using this model, suggesting that DP1receptor antagonists could suppress sneezing and nasal obstruction, and therefore these agents could be a new therapeutic option for allergic rhinitis.

  14. Endocannabinoid-mediated modulation of Gq/11 protein-coupled receptor signaling-induced vasoconstriction and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, Mária; Nádasy, György L; Turu, Gábor; Soltész-Katona, Eszter; Benyó, Zoltán; Offermanns, Stefan; Ruisanchez, Éva; Szabó, Eszter; Takáts, Zoltán; Bátkai, Sándor; Tóth, Zsuzsanna E; Hunyady, László

    2015-03-05

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can induce vasoconstriction via calcium signal-mediated and Rho-dependent pathways. Earlier reports have shown that diacylglycerol produced during calcium signal generation can be converted to an endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Our aim was to provide evidence that GPCR signaling-induced 2-AG production and activation of vascular type1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) is capable of reducing agonist-induced vasoconstriction and hypertension. Rat and mouse aortic rings were examined by myography. Vascular expression of CB1R was demonstrated with immunohistochemistry. Rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultured for calcium measurements and 2-AG-determination. Inhibition or genetic loss of CB1Rs enhanced vasoconstriction induced by angiotensin II (AngII) or phenylephrine (Phe), but not by prostaglandin(PG)F2α. AngII-induced vasoconstriction was augmented by inhibition of diacylglycerol lipase (tetrahydrolipstatin) and was attenuated by inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase (JZL184) suggesting a functionally relevant role for endogenously produced 2-AG. In Gαq/11-deficient mice vasoconstriction was absent to AngII or Phe, which activate Gq/11-coupled receptors, but was maintained in response to PGF2α. In VSMCs, AngII-stimulated 2-AG-formation was inhibited by tetrahydrolipstatin and potentiated by JZL184. CB1R inhibition increased the sustained phase of AngII-induced calcium signal. Pharmacological or genetic loss of CB1R function augmented AngII-induced blood pressure rise in mice. These data demonstrate that vasoconstrictor effect of GPCR agonists is attenuated via Gq/11-mediated vascular endocannabinoid formation. Agonist-induced endocannabinoid-mediated CB1R activation is a significant physiological modulator of vascular tone. Thus, the selective modulation of GPCR signaling-induced endocannabinoid release has a therapeutic potential in case of increased vascular tone and hypertension.

  15. 17-Cyclopropylmethyl-3,14β-dihydroxy-4,5α-epoxy-6β-(4'-pyridylcarboxamido)morphinan (NAP) Modulating the Mu Opioid Receptor in a Biased Fashion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Williams, Dwight A; Zaidi, Saheem A; Yuan, Yunyun; Braithwaite, Amanda; Bilsky, Edward J; Dewey, William L; Akbarali, Hamid I; Streicher, John M; Selley, Dana E

    2016-03-16

    Mounting evidence has suggested that G protein-coupled receptors can be stabilized in multiple conformations in response to distinct ligands, which exert discrete functions through selective activation of various downstream signaling events. In accordance with this concept, we report biased signaling of one C6-heterocyclic substituted naltrexamine derivative, namely, 17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14β-dihydroxy-4,5α-epoxy-6β-(4'-pyridylcarboxamido)morphinan (NAP) at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). NAP acted as a low efficacy MOR partial agonist in the G protein-mediated [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay, whereas it did not significantly induce calcium flux or β-arrestin2 recruitment. In contrast, it potently blocked MOR full agonist-induced β-arrestin2 recruitment and translocation. Additionally, NAP dose-dependently antagonized MOR full agonist-induced intracellular calcium flux and β-arrestin2 recruitment. Further results in an isolated organ bath preparation confirmed that NAP reversed the morphine-induced reduction in colon motility. Ligand docking and dynamics simulation studies of NAP at the MOR provided more supporting evidence for biased signaling of NAP at an atomic level. Due to the fact that NAP is MOR selective and preferentially distributed peripherally upon systemic administration while β-arrestin2 is reportedly required for impairment of intestinal motility by morphine, biased antagonism of β-arrestin2 recruitment by NAP further supports its utility as a treatment for opioid-induced constipation.

  16. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Subtypes of Muscarinic Receptors (4th), Held in Wiesbaden (Germany, F.R.) on 20-22 July 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-15

    32, 91-99 receptors. It is thus possible to demonstrate differences 8 Freedman, S B., Beer, S.B. and Harley , E A. (1988) Eur J. in the way a given...with a phoinositide hydrolysis rather than inhibition of aden- mixture of nick -translated probes encoding the mam- ylate cyclase activity. malian ml and... Harley , L.L. the Asp to indicate that, although the protonated amine Iversen, A. MacLeod, K. Merchant, S. Patel, G.A.5-Z function is electrostatically

  17. Spinal 5-HT7 receptor activation induces long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M S; Mitchell, G S

    2011-03-15

    Acute intermittent hypoxia elicits a form of serotonin-dependent respiratory plasticity known as phrenic long term facilitation (pLTF). Episodic spinal serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptor activation on or near phrenic motor neurons is necessary for pLTF. A hallmark of pLTF is the requirement for serotonin-dependent synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and activation of its high affinity receptor, TrkB. Activation of spinal Gs protein-coupled adenosine 2A receptors (GsPCRs) elicits a unique form of long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation (PMF), but via unique mechanisms (BDNF independent TrkB trans-activation).We hypothesized that other GsPCRs elicit PMF, specifically serotonin-7 (5-HT7) receptors, which are expressed in phrenic motor neurons. Cervical spinal (C4) injections of a selective 5-HT7 receptor agonist, AS-19 (10 μM, 5 μl; 3 × 5 min), in anaesthetized, vagotomized and ventilated male Sprague-Dawley rats elicited long-lasting PMF (>120 min), an effect prevented by pretreatment with a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (SB 269970; 5mM, 7 μl).GsPCR activation 'trans-activates'TrkB by increasing synthesis of an immature TrkB isoform. Spinal injection of a TrkB inhibitor (k252a) and siRNAs that prevent TrkB (but not BDNF) mRNA translation both blocked 5-HT7 agonist-induced PMF, confirming a requirement for TrkB synthesis and activity. k252a affected late PMF (≥ 90 min) only. Spinal inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway blocked 5-HT7 agonist-induced PMF, whereas MEK/ERK inhibition delayed, but did not block, PMF. An understanding of signalling mechanisms giving rise to PMF may guide development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat ventilatory control disorders associated with respiratory insufficiency, such as spinal injury and motor neuron disease.

  18. Histamine receptors in isolated bovine oviductal arteries.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A C; Novella, S; Raposo, R; Recio, P; Labadía, A; Costa, G; Garcia-Sacristán, A; Benedito, S

    1997-05-20

    The present in vitro study was designed to evaluate the effect of histamine on isolated rings of bovine oviductal artery and to characterize the histamine receptors involved in the histamine-induced response. Endothelial dependence of the response was also investigated. Cumulative addition of histamine and 2-pyridylethylamine (histamine H receptor agonist) induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in intact arterial segments precontracted with noradrenaline. The histamine H1 receptor antagonist mepyramine showed non-competitive antagonism in the histamine-induced concentration-response curve. However, when the response to histamine was evaluated in the presence of mepyramine and histamine H1 and H3 receptors were blocked, Schild analysis yielded a line with a slope of 1.10 and a pA2 value of 8.91, indicating simple competitive antagonism of mepyramine at histamine H1 receptor sites. The histamine H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit, caused marked dilatation only at high doses. Cimetidine, propranolol and mepyramine failed to inhibit this relaxant effect. In precontracted oviductal arteries, cimetidine did not modify the histamine-induced concentration-response curves. Combined treatment with histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists did not induce an additional displacement with respect to the isolated effect of mepyramine thus excluding activation of histamine H2 receptors. Histamine and (R)-alpha-methylhistamine, a selective histamine H3 receptor agonist, produced a moderate contractile effect on the resting tone of preparations. Pretreatment with the selective histamine H1 receptor antagonist decreased the (R)-alpha-methylhistamine response but increased the maximal relaxant effect and abolished the contractile effect of histamine, suggesting the presence of a limited population of contractile histamine H3 receptors. Removal of the endothelium or pretreatment with methylene blue produced a significant inhibition of the relaxant response to histamine. Remaining

  19. Decreased Degradation of Internalized Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Caused by Mutation of Aspartic Acid 6.30550 in a Protein Kinase-CK2 Consensus Sequence in the Third Intracellular Loop of Human Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor1

    PubMed Central

    Kluetzman, Kerri S.; Thomas, Richard M.; Nechamen, Cheryl A.; Dias, James A.

    2011-01-01

    A naturally occurring mutation in follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene has been reported: an amino acid change to glycine occurs at a conserved aspartic acid 550 (D550, D567, D6.30567). This residue is contained in a protein kinase-CK2 consensus site present in human FSHR (hFSHR) intracellular loop 3 (iL3). Because CK2 has been reported to play a role in trafficking of some receptors, the potential roles for CK2 and D550 in FSHR function were evaluated by generating a D550A mutation in the hFSHR. The hFSHR-D550A binds hormone similarly to WT-hFSHR when expressed in HEK293T cells. Western blot analyses showed lower levels of mature hFSHR-D550A. Maximal cAMP production of both hFSHR-D550A as well as the naturally occurring mutation hFSHR-D550G was diminished, but constitutive activity was not observed. Unexpectedly, when 125I-hFSH bound to hFSHR-D550A or hFSHR-D550G, intracellular accumulation of radiolabeled FSH was observed. Both sucrose and dominant-negative dynamin blocked internalization of radiolabeled FSH and its commensurate intracellular accumulation. Accumulation of radiolabeled FSH in cells transfected with hFSHR-D550A is due to a defect in degradation of hFSH as measured in pulse chase studies, and confocal microscopy imaging revealed that FSH accumulated in large intracellular structures. CK2 kinase activity is not required for proper degradation of internalized FSH because inhibition of CK2 kinase activity in cells expressing hFSHR did not uncouple degradation of internalized radiolabeled FSH. Additionally, the CK2 consensus site in FSHR iL3 is not required for binding because CK2alpha coimmunoprecipitated with hFSHR-D550A. Thus, mutation of D550 uncouples the link between internalization and degradation of hFSH. PMID:21270425

  20. The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 reduces cocaine self-administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Reddy, India A; Weikop, Pia; Graham, Devon L; Stanwood, Gregg D; Wortwein, Gitta; Galli, Aurelio; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The ability of the GLP-1 system to decrease food intake in rodents has been well described and parallels results from clinical trials. GLP-1 receptors are expressed in the brain, including within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Dopaminergic neurons in the VTA project to the NAc, and these neurons play a pivotal role in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. Based on the anatomical distribution of GLP-1 receptors in the brain and the well-established effects of GLP-1 on food reward, we decided to investigate the effect of the GLP-1 analogue exendin-4 on cocaine- and dopamine D1-receptor agonist-induced hyperlocomotion, on acute and chronic cocaine self-administration, on cocaine-induced striatal dopamine release in mice and on cocaine-induced c-fos activation. Here, we report that GLP-1 receptor stimulation reduces acute and chronic cocaine self-administration and attenuates cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. In addition, we show that peripheral administration of exendin-4 reduces cocaine-induced elevation of striatal dopamine levels and striatal c-fos expression implicating central GLP-1 receptors in these responses. The present results demonstrate that the GLP-1 system modulates cocaine's effects on behavior and dopamine homeostasis, indicating that the GLP-1 receptor may be a novel target for the pharmacological treatment of drug addiction.

  1. Activation of GABA(A) receptors in subthalamic neurons in vitro: properties of native receptors and inhibition mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baufreton, J; Garret, M; Dovero, S; Dufy, B; Bioulac, B; Taupignon, A

    2001-07-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) influences the output of the basal ganglia, thereby interfering with motor behavior. The main inputs to the STN are GABAergic. We characterized the GABA(A) receptors expressed in the STN and investigated the response of subthalamic neurons to the activation of GABA(A) receptors. Cell-attached and whole cell recordings were made from rat brain slices using the patch-clamp technique. The newly identified epsilon subunit confers atypical pharmacological properties on recombinant receptors, which are insensitive to barbiturates and benzodiazepines. We tested the hypothesis that native subthalamic GABA(A) receptors contain epsilon proteins. Applications of increasing concentrations of muscimol, a selective GABA(A) agonist, induced Cl(-) and HCO currents with an EC(50) of 5 microM. Currents induced by muscimol were fully blocked by the GABA(A) receptor antagonists, bicuculline and picrotoxin. They were strongly potentiated by the barbiturate, pentobarbital (+190%), and by the benzodiazepines, diazepam (+197%) and flunitrazepam (+199%). Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents were also significantly enhanced by flunitrazepam. Furthermore, immunohistological experiments with an epsilon subunit-specific antibody showed that the epsilon protein was not expressed within the STN. Native subthalamic GABA(A) receptors did not, therefore, display pharmacological or structural properties consistent with receptors comprising epsilon. Burst firing is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease. Half of the subthalamic neurons have the intrinsic capacity of switching from regular-firing to burst-firing mode when hyperpolarized by current injection. This raises the possibility that activation of GABA(A) receptors might trigger the switch. Statistical analysis of spiking activity established that 90% of intact neurons in vitro were in single-spike firing mode, whereas 10% were in burst-firing mode. Muscimol reversibly stopped recurrent electrical activity in

  2. Impaired surface expression of PAF receptors on human neutrophils is dependent upon cell activation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Javors, M A; Olson, M S

    1994-02-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils to bind PAF was rapidly diminished upon cell stimulation with both physiological agonists (N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), leukotriene B4 (LTB4)) and pharmacologic agonists (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), A23187). As a consequence, PAF responses in neutrophils were blunted, as monitored by an inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Downregulation of the PAF receptor in neutrophils by diverse agonists was temperature-sensitive and required intact cells. Scatchard analysis of binding data revealed that PAF binding sites were lost without an appreciable change in the affinity of the ligand for the receptor. The binding of the PAF receptor antagonist WEB2086 to neutrophils decreased in parallel with PAF binding. PMA-induced PAF receptor downregulation was staurosporine-sensitive while PAF receptor downregulation by A23187, FMLP, or LTB4 was staurosporine-resistant. Both neutrophil aggregation (a form of intercellular adhesion) and PAF receptor downregulation occurred only at high concentrations of agonists while other signaling processes such as the increase in [Ca2+]i, PKC activation, and PAF synthesis were stimulated at low concentrations of agonists. Furthermore, agonist-induced PAF receptor downregulation was observed only under conditions in which the activated neutrophils were stirred (or shaken) and were allowed to aggregate. Additionally, chelation of extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA minimized cell aggregation and also inhibited PAF receptor downregulation. While the nature of the biochemical signal or the physical changes in the plasma membrane associated with aggregation or that follow aggregation remain to be elucidated it is clear that full expression of cell activation (i.e., neutrophil aggregation) is required for PAF receptor downregulation.

  3. Nitric oxide is a mediator of tachykinin NK3 receptor-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, A.; Takano, Y.; Honda, K.; Saito, R.; Matsumoto, T.; Kamiya, H.

    1995-01-01

    1. The mechanism of vasodilatation induced by tachykinin peptides was studied in isolated mesenteric arteries of rats. 2. Senktide, a selective NK3 agonist, elicited potent endothelium-dependent relaxation of arteries precontracted with phenylephrine (10(-5) M), but an NK1 agonist did not. 3. A non-peptide NK3 antagonist, SR 142801, inhibited senktide-induced relaxation. However, a non-peptide NK1 antagonist, CP-96,345, and a peptide-based NK2 antagonist, L-659,877, had no effect on senktide-induced relaxation. 4. N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), a nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor, markedly attenuated the relaxant response to senktide. 5. These results suggest that the endothelium of rat mesenteric arteries possesses tachykinin NK3 receptors, and that NK3 agonist-induced vasodilatation is mediated by release of nitric oxide (NO) from the endothelium. PMID:8680725

  4. Mixed nicotinic and muscarinic features of cholinergic receptor coupled to secretion in bovine chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, M.H.; Pollard, H.B.; Heldman, E. )

    1991-06-01

    Acetylcholine evokes release from cultured bovine chromaffin cells by a mechanism that is believed to be classically nicotinic. However, the authors found that the full muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-M (Oxo-M) induced a robust catecholamine (CA) secretion. By contrast, muscarine, pilocarpine, bethanechol, and McN-A-343 did not elicit any secretory response. Desensitization of the response to nicotine by Oxo-M and desensitization of the response to Oxo-M by nicotine suggest that both nicotine and Oxo-M were acting at the same receptor. Additional experiments supporting this conclusion show that nicotine-induced secretion and Oxo-M-induced secretion were similarly blocked by various muscarinic and nicotinic antagonists. Moreover, secretion induced by nicotine and Oxo-M were Ca{sup 2+} dependent, and both agonists induced {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake. Equilibrium binding studies showed that ({sup 3}H)Oxo-M bound to chromaffin cell membranes with a K{sub d} value of 3.08 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M and a Hill coefficient of 1.00, suggesting one binding site for this ligand. Nicotine inhibited Oxo-M binding in a noncompetitive manner, suggesting that both ligands bind at two different sites on the same receptor. They propose that the receptor on bovine chromaffin cells that is coupled to secretion represents an unusual cholinergic receptor that has both nicotinic and muscarinic features.

  5. Fluorescent knock-in mice to decipher the physiopathological role of G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ceredig, Rhian A.; Massotte, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate most physiological functions but are also critically involved in numerous pathological states. Approximately a third of marketed drugs target GPCRs, which places this family of receptors in the main arena of pharmacological pre-clinical and clinical research. The complexity of GPCR function demands comprehensive appraisal in native environment to collect in-depth knowledge of receptor physiopathological roles and assess the potential of therapeutic molecules. Identifying neurons expressing endogenous GPCRs is therefore essential to locate them within functional circuits whereas GPCR visualization with subcellular resolution is required to get insight into agonist-induced trafficking. Both remain frequently poorly investigated because direct visualization of endogenous receptors is often hampered by the lack of appropriate tools. Also, monitoring intracellular trafficking requires real-time visualization to gather in-depth knowledge. In this context, knock-in mice expressing a fluorescent protein or a fluorescent version of a GPCR under the control of the endogenous promoter not only help to decipher neuroanatomical circuits but also enable real-time monitoring with subcellular resolution thus providing invaluable information on their trafficking in response to a physiological or a pharmacological challenge. This review will present the animal models and discuss their contribution to the understanding of the physiopathological role of GPCRs. We will also address the drawbacks associated with this methodological approach and browse future directions. PMID:25610398

  6. The internal region leucine-rich repeat 6 of decorin interacts with low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1, modulates transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-dependent signaling, and inhibits TGF-β-dependent fibrotic response in skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Santander, Cristian; Cofré, Catalina; Acuña, Maria José; Melo, Francisco; Brandan, Enrique

    2012-02-24

    Decorin is a small proteoglycan, composed of 12 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) that modulates the activity of transforming growth factor type β (TGF-β) and other growth factors, and thereby influences proliferation and differentiation in a wide array of physiological and pathological processes, such as fibrosis, in several tissues and organs. Previously we described two novel modulators of the TGF-β-dependent signaling pathway: LDL receptor-related protein (LRP-1) and decorin. Here we have determined the regions in decorin that are responsible for interaction with LRP-1 and are involved in TGF-β-dependent binding and signaling. Specifically, we used decorin deletion mutants, as well as peptides derived from internal LRR regions, to determine the LRRs responsible for these decorin functions. Our results indicate that LRR6 and LRR5 participate in the interaction with LRP-1 and TGF-β as well as in its dependent signaling. Furthermore, the internal region (LRR6i), composed of 11 amino acids, is responsible for decorin binding to LRP-1 and subsequent TGF-β-dependent signaling. Furthermore, using an in vivo approach, we also demonstrate that the LRR6 region of decorin can inhibit TGF-β mediated action in response to skeletal muscle injury.

  7. The Internal Region Leucine-rich Repeat 6 of Decorin Interacts with Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein-1, Modulates Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β-dependent Signaling, and Inhibits TGF-β-dependent Fibrotic Response in Skeletal Muscles*

    PubMed Central

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Santander, Cristian; Cofré, Catalina; Acuña, Maria José; Melo, Francisco; Brandan, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Decorin is a small proteoglycan, composed of 12 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) that modulates the activity of transforming growth factor type β (TGF-β) and other growth factors, and thereby influences proliferation and differentiation in a wide array of physiological and pathological processes, such as fibrosis, in several tissues and organs. Previously we described two novel modulators of the TGF-β-dependent signaling pathway: LDL receptor-related protein (LRP-1) and decorin. Here we have determined the regions in decorin that are responsible for interaction with LRP-1 and are involved in TGF-β-dependent binding and signaling. Specifically, we used decorin deletion mutants, as well as peptides derived from internal LRR regions, to determine the LRRs responsible for these decorin functions. Our results indicate that LRR6 and LRR5 participate in the interaction with LRP-1 and TGF-β as well as in its dependent signaling. Furthermore, the internal region (LRR6i), composed of 11 amino acids, is responsible for decorin binding to LRP-1 and subsequent TGF-β-dependent signaling. Furthermore, using an in vivo approach, we also demonstrate that the LRR6 region of decorin can inhibit TGF-β mediated action in response to skeletal muscle injury. PMID:22203668

  8. [The LDL receptor family].

    PubMed

    Meilinger, Melinda

    2002-12-29

    The members of the LDL receptor family are structurally related endocytic receptors. Our view on these receptors has considerably changed in recent years. Not only have new members of the family been identified, but also several interesting observations have been published concerning the biological function of these molecules. The LDL receptor family members are able to bind and internalize a plethora of ligands; as a consequence, they play important roles in diverse physiological processes. These receptors are key players in the lipoprotein metabolism, vitamin homeostasis, Ca2+ homeostasis, cell migration, and embryonic development. Until recently, LDL receptor family members were thought to be classic endocytic receptors that provide cells with metabolites on one hand, while regulating the concentration of their ligands in the extracellular fluids on the other hand. However, recent findings indicate that in addition to their cargo transport function, LDL receptor family members can act as signal transducers, playing important roles in the development of the central nervous system or the skeleton. Better understanding of physiological and pathophysiological functions of these molecules may open new avenues for the treatment or prevention of many disorders.

  9. The central cannabinoid CB1 receptor is required for diet-induced obesity and rimonabant's antiobesity effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhen; Wu, Nancy N; Zhao, Weiguang; Chain, David C; Schaffer, Erica; Zhang, Xin; Yamdagni, Preeti; Palejwala, Vaseem A; Fan, Chunpeng; Favara, Sarah G; Dressler, Holly M; Economides, Kyriakos D; Weinstock, Daniel; Cavallo, Jean S; Naimi, Souad; Galzin, Anne-Marie; Guillot, Etienne; Pruniaux, Marie-Pierre; Tocci, Michael J; Polites, H Greg

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid receptor CB1 is expressed abundantly in the brain and presumably in the peripheral tissues responsible for energy metabolism. It is unclear if the antiobesity effects of rimonabant, a CB1 antagonist, are mediated through the central or the peripheral CB1 receptors. To address this question, we generated transgenic mice with central nervous system (CNS)-specific knockdown (KD) of CB1, by expressing an artificial microRNA (AMIR) under the control of the neuronal Thy1.2 promoter. In the mutant mice, CB1 expression was reduced in the brain and spinal cord, whereas no change was observed in the superior cervical ganglia (SCG), sympathetic trunk, enteric nervous system, and pancreatic ganglia. In contrast to the neuronal tissues, CB1 was undetectable in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) or the liver. Consistent with the selective loss of central CB1, agonist-induced hypothermia was attenuated in the mutant mice, but the agonist-induced delay of gastrointestinal transit (GIT), a primarily peripheral nervous system-mediated effect, was not. Compared to wild-type (WT) littermates, the mutant mice displayed reduced body weight (BW), adiposity, and feeding efficiency, and when fed a high-fat diet (HFD), showed decreased plasma insulin, leptin, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, and elevated adiponectin levels. Furthermore, the therapeutic effects of rimonabant on food intake (FI), BW, and serum parameters were markedly reduced and correlated with the degree of CB1 KD. Thus, KD of CB1 in the CNS recapitulates the metabolic phenotype of CB1 knockout (KO) mice and diminishes rimonabant's efficacy, indicating that blockade of central CB1 is required for rimonabant's antiobesity actions.

  10. alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and modulation of gabaergic synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Alkondon, M; Braga, M F; Pereira, E F; Maelicke, A; Albuquerque, E X

    2000-03-30

    The present report provides new findings regarding modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission by alpha7 nicotinic receptor activity in CA1 interneurons of rat hippocampal slices. Recordings were obtained from tight-seal cell-attached patches of the CA1 interneurons, and agonists were delivered to the neurons via a modified U-tube. Application for 6 s of the alpha7 nicotinic receptor-selective agonist choline (> or =1 mM) to all CA1 interneurons tested triggered action potentials that were detected as fast current transients. The activity triggered by choline terminated well before the end of the agonist pulse, was blocked by the alpha7 nicotinic receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine (50 nM) and was concentration dependent; the higher the concentration of choline the higher the frequency of events and the shorter the delay for detection of the first event. In 40% of the neurons tested, choline-triggered action potentials decreased in amplitude progressively until no more events could be detected despite the presence of the agonist. Primarily, this finding could be explained by Na(+)-channel inactivation associated with membrane depolarization induced by alpha7 nicotinic receptor activation. In 60% of the neurons, the amplitude of choline-induced action potentials was sustained at the intial level, but again the activity did not last as long as the agonist pulse, in this case apparently because of agonist-induced receptor desensitization. These results altogether demonstrate that agonists interacting with alpha7 nicotinic receptors, including the natural transmitter acetylcholine and its metabolite choline, influence GABAergic transmission, not only by activating these receptors, but also by controlling the rate of Na(+)-channel inactivation and/or by inducing receptor desensitization.

  11. Overexpression of the dopamine D3 receptor in the rat dorsal striatum induces dyskinetic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Cote, Samantha R; Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Bleickardt, Carina; Sapru, Hreday N; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2014-04-15

    L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID) are motor side effects associated with treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). The etiology of LID is not clear; however, studies have shown that the dopamine D3 receptor is upregulated in the basal ganglia of mice, rats and non-human primate models of LID. It is not known if the upregulation of D3 receptor is a cause or result of LID. In this paper we tested the hypothesis that overexpression of the dopamine D3 receptor in dorsal striatum, in the absence of dopamine depletion, will elicit LID. Replication-deficient recombinant adeno-associated virus-2 expressing the D3 receptor or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were stereotaxically injected, unilaterally, into the dorsal striatum of adult rats. Post-hoc immunohistochemical analysis revealed that ectopic expression of the D3 receptor was limited to neurons near the injection sites in the dorsal striatum. Following a 3-week recovery period, rats were administered saline, 6 mg/kg L-DOPA, 0.1 mg/kg PD128907 or 10 mg/kg ES609, i.p., and motor behaviors scored. Rats overexpressing the D3 receptor specifically exhibited contralateral axial abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) following administration of L-DOPA and PD128907 but not saline or the novel agonist ES609. Daily injection of 6 mg/kg L-DOPA to the rats overexpressing the D3 receptor also caused increased vacuous chewing behavior. These results suggest that overexpression of the D3 receptor in the dorsal striatum results in the acute expression of agonist-induced axial AIMs and chronic L-DOPA-induced vacuous chewing behavior. Agonists such as ES609 might provide a novel therapeutic approach to treat dyskinesia.

  12. The EP1 subtype of Prostaglandin E2 Receptor: Role in Keratinocyte Differentiation and Expression in Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Konger, R. L.; Billings, S. D.; Prall, N. C.; Katona, T. M.; DaSilva, S. C.; Kennedy, C. R. J.; Badve, S.; Perkins, S. M.; LaCelle, P. T.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We have previously demonstrated that the EP1 subtype of PGE2 receptor is expressed in the differentiated compartment of normal human epidermis and is coupled to intracellular calcium mobilization. We therefore hypothesized that the EP1 receptor is coupled to keratinocyte differentiation. In in vitro studies, radioligand binding, RT-PCR, immunoblot and receptor agonist-induced second messenger studies demonstrate that the EP1 receptor is up-regulated by high cell density in human keratinocytes and this up-regulation precedes corneocyte formation. Moreover, two different EP1 receptor antagonists, SC51322 and AH6809, both inhibited corneocyte formation. SC51322 also inhibited the induction of differentiation-specific proteins, cytokeratin K10 and epidermal transglutaminase. We next examined the immunolocalization of the EP1 receptor in non-melanoma skin cancer in humans. Well differentiated SCCs exhibited significantly greater membrane staining, while spindle cell carcinomas and BCCs had significantly decreased membrane staining compared with normal epidermis. This data supports a role for the EP1 receptor in regulating keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:19625175

  13. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  14. Trafficking of alpha4* nicotinic receptors revealed by superecliptic phluorin: effects of a beta4 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated mutation and chronic exposure to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher I; Srinivasan, Rahul; Xiao, Cheng; Mackey, Elisha D W; Miwa, Julie M; Lester, Henry A

    2011-09-09

    We employed a pH-sensitive GFP analog, superecliptic phluorin, to observe aspects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) trafficking to the plasma membrane (PM) in cultured mouse cortical neurons. The experiments exploit differences in the pH among endoplasmic reticulum (ER), trafficking vesicles, and the extracellular solution. The data confirm that few α4β4 nAChRs, but many α4β2 nAChRs, remain in neutral intracellular compartments, mostly the ER. We observed fusion events between nAChR-containing vesicles and PM; these could be quantified in the dendritic processes. We also studied the β4R348C polymorphism, linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This mutation depressed fusion rates of α4β4 receptor-containing vesicles with the PM by ∼2-fold, with only a small decrease in the number of nAChRs per vesicle. The mutation also decreased the number of ER exit sites, showing that the reduced receptor insertion results from a change at an early stage in trafficking. We confirm the previous report that the mutation leads to reduced agonist-induced currents; in the cortical neurons studied, the reduction amounts to 2-3-fold. Therefore, the reduced agonist-induced currents are caused by the reduced number of α4β4-containing vesicles reaching the membrane. Chronic nicotine exposure (0.2 μM) did not alter the PM insertion frequency or trafficking behavior of α4β4-laden vesicles. In contrast, chronic nicotine substantially increased the number of α4β2-containing vesicle fusions at the PM; this stage in α4β2 nAChR up-regulation is presumably downstream from increased ER exit. Superecliptic phluorin provides a tool to monitor trafficking dynamics of nAChRs in disease and addiction.

  15. Characterization of histamine receptors in isolated pig basilar artery by functional and radioligand binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Atsushi; Nishio, Akira )

    1993-01-01

    Histamine receptors in pig basilar arteries were investigated in vitro by radioligand binding assays and by measuring the contractile and relaxant responses to histamine. Histamine and 2-pyridyethylamine (H[sub 1]-agonist) induced concentration-dependent contractions, whereas impromidine (H[sub 2]-agonist) induced concentration-dependent relaxations. These responses were independent of the presence of endothelial cells. Diphenhydramine (H[sub 1]-antagonist) partially reversed the histamine-induced contractions to relaxations. Cimetidine (H[alpha][sub 2]-antagonist) potentiated the contraction in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of cimetidine, the pEC[sub 50] value of histamine for the contraction was 6.30, and diphenhydramine competitively antagonized the histamine-induced contractions (pA[sub 2], 7.77). In the presence of diphenhydramine, the pEC[sub 50] value of histamine for the relaxation was 5.93, and cimetidine competitively antagonized the histamine-induced relaxations (pA[sub 2], 6.62). In the binding studies, the K[sub d] value of [[sup 3]H]mepyramine was 2.1 nM and the B[sub max] value was 95.6 fmol/mg protein. A competition experiment with diphenhydramine showed that the pK[sub i] value (7.51) was similar to the pA[sub 2] value. The K[sub d] value for [[sup 3]H]cimetidine was 126.0 nM and the B[sub max] value was 459.8 fmol/mg protein. The pK[sub d] (6.90) for [[sup 3]H]cimetidine was similar to the pA[sub 2] for cimetidine. The Hill coefficients for these experiments were not significantly different from unity. The present findings indicate that the number of H[sub 1]-receptors, in terms of the B[sub max] value for [[sup 3]H]mepyramine, is smaller than that of H[sub 2]-receptors, in terms of the B[sub max] value for [[sup 3]H]cimetidine. However, the contractile response to histamine is predominantly mediated through stimulation of H[sub 1]-receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells in pig basilar artery.

  16. Syndecan-2 Exerts Antifibrotic Effects by Promoting Caveolin-1–mediated Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor I Internalization and Inhibiting Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Gochuico, Bernadette R.; Yu, Guoying; Tang, Xiaomeng; Osorio, Juan C.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Risquez, Cristobal F.; Patel, Avignat S.; Shi, Ying; Wathelet, Marc G.; Goodwin, Andrew J.; Haspel, Jeffrey A.; Ryter, Stefan W.; Billings, Eric M.; Kaminski, Naftali; Morse, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Alveolar transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signaling and expression of TGF-β1 target genes are increased in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and in animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. Internalization and degradation of TGF-β receptor TβRI inhibits TGF-β signaling and could attenuate development of experimental lung fibrosis. Objectives: To demonstrate that after experimental lung injury, human syndecan-2 confers antifibrotic effects by inhibiting TGF-β1 signaling in alveolar epithelial cells. Methods: Microarray assays were performed to identify genes differentially expressed in alveolar macrophages of patients with IPF versus control subjects. Transgenic mice that constitutively overexpress human syndecan-2 in macrophages were developed to test the antifibrotic properties of syndecan-2. In vitro assays were performed to determine syndecan-2–dependent changes in epithelial cell TGF-β1 signaling, TGF-β1, and TβRI internalization and apoptosis. Wild-type mice were treated with recombinant human syndecan-2 during the fibrotic phase of bleomycin-induced lung injury. Measurements and Main Results: We observed significant increases in alveolar macrophage syndecan-2 levels in patients with IPF. Macrophage-specific overexpression of human syndecan-2 in transgenic mice conferred antifibrotic effects after lung injury by inhibiting TGF-β1 signaling and downstream expression of TGF-β1 target genes, reducing extracellular matrix production and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis. In vitro, syndecan-2 promoted caveolin-1–dependent internalization of TGF-β1 and TβRI in alveolar epithelial cells, which inhibited TGF-β1 signaling and epithelial cell apoptosis. Therapeutic administration of human syndecan-2 abrogated lung fibrosis in mice. Conclusions: Alveolar macrophage syndecan-2 exerts antifibrotic effects by promoting caveolin-1–dependent TGF-β1 and TβRI internalization and inhibiting TGF-β1 signaling in alveolar epithelial

  17. Yawning and locomotor behavior induced by dopamine receptor agonists in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Min; Collins, Gregory T; Paul, Noel M; Grundt, Peter; Newman, Amy H; Xu, Ming; Grandy, David K; Woods, James H; Katz, Jonathan L

    2010-05-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) agonist-induced yawning in rats seems to be mediated by DA D3 receptors, and low doses of several DA agonists decrease locomotor activity, an effect attributed to presynaptic D2 receptors. Effects of several DA agonists on yawning and locomotor activity were examined in rats and mice. Yawning was reliably produced in rats, and by the cholinergic agonist, physostigmine, in both the species. However, DA agonists were ineffective in producing yawning in Swiss-Webster or DA D2R and DA D3R knockout or wild-type mice. The drugs significantly decreased locomotor activity in rats at one or two low doses, with activity returning to control levels at higher doses. In mice, the drugs decreased locomotion across a 1000-10 000-fold range of doses, with activity at control levels (U-91356A) or above control levels [(+/-)-7-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin HBr, quinpirole] at the highest doses. Low doses of agonists decreased locomotion in all mice except the DA D2R knockout mice, but were not antagonized by DA D2R or D3R antagonists (L-741 626, BP 897, or PG01037). Yawning does not provide a selective in-vivo indicator of DA D3R agonist activity in mice. Decreases in mouse locomotor activity by the DA agonists seem to be mediated by D2 DA receptors.

  18. Opioid desensitization: interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors in the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, C D; Williams, J T

    1996-02-15

    In rat locus coeruleus (LC) neurons, alpha 2 adrenoceptors, mu-opioid and somatostatin receptors all activate the same potassium conductance. Chronic treatment with morphine causes a loss of sensitivity that is specific to the mu-opioid response, with no change in the alpha 2 adrenoceptor-mediated response. Acute desensitization induced by opioid, somatostatin, and alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists was studied in brain slices of rat LC using intracellular recording. A supramaximal concentration of the opioid agonist Met5-enkephalin induced a profound homologous desensitization but little heterologous desensitization to an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist (UK 14304) or somatostatin. All desensitized currents showed partial recovery. A supramaximal concentration of UK14304 caused a relatively small amount of desensitization. Although little interaction was observed among inhibitory G-protein-coupled receptors, activation of an excitatory receptor had marked effects on inhibitory responses. Muscarinic agonists, which produce an inward current in LC neurons, reduced the magnitude of agonist-induced outward currents and increased both the rate and amount of opioid desensitization. Muscarinic activation did not alter desensitization of alpha 2-adrenoceptor responses. Acute desensitization shares several characteristics with the tolerance induced by chronic morphine treatment of animals.

  19. Structural Determinants for the Binding of Morphinan Agonists to the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaojing; Campomanes, Pablo; Kless, Achim; Schapitz, Inga; Wagener, Markus; Koch, Thomas; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic descriptions of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) noncovalently binding with two of its prototypical morphinan agonists, morphine (MOP) and hydromorphone (HMP), are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Subtle differences between the binding modes and hydration properties of MOP and HMP emerge from the calculations. Alchemical free energy perturbation calculations show qualitative agreement with in vitro experiments performed in this work: indeed, the binding free energy difference between MOP and HMP computed by forward and backward alchemical transformation is 1.2±1.1 and 0.8±0.8 kcal/mol, respectively, to be compared with 0.4±0.3 kcal/mol from experiment. Comparison with an MD simulation of μOR covalently bound with the antagonist β-funaltrexamine hints to agonist-induced conformational changes associated with an early event of the receptor's activation: a shift of the transmembrane helix 6 relative to the transmembrane helix 3 and a consequent loss of the key R165-T279 interhelical hydrogen bond. This finding is consistent with a previous proposal suggesting that the R165-T279 hydrogen bond between these two helices indicates an inactive receptor conformation.

  20. X-ray structures of AMPA receptor-cone snail toxin complexes illuminate activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Dürr, Katharina L; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-08-29

    AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors are crucial to the structural and dynamic properties of the brain, to the development and function of the central nervous system, and to the treatment of neurological conditions from depression to cognitive impairment. However, the molecular principles underlying AMPA receptor activation have remained elusive. We determined multiple x-ray crystal structures of the GluA2 AMPA receptor in complex with a Conus striatus cone snail toxin, a positive allosteric modulator, and orthosteric agonists, at 3.8 to 4.1 angstrom resolution. We show how the toxin acts like a straightjacket on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) "gating ring," restraining the domains via both intra- and interdimer cross-links such that agonist-induced closure of the LBD "clamshells" is transduced into an irislike expansion of the gating ring. By structural analysis of activation-enhancing mutants, we show how the expansion of the LBD gating ring results in pulling forces on the M3 helices that, in turn, are coupled to ion channel gating.

  1. Stoichiometry for α-bungarotoxin block of α7 acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    daCosta, Corrie J. B.; Free, Chris R.; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    α-Bungarotoxin (α-Btx) binds to the five agonist binding sites on the homopentameric α7-acetylcholine receptor, yet the number of bound α-Btx molecules required to prevent agonist-induced channel opening remains unknown. To determine the stoichiometry for α-Btx blockade, we generate receptors comprised of wild-type and α-Btx-resistant subunits, tag one of the subunit types with conductance mutations to report subunit stoichiometry, and following incubation with α-Btx, monitor opening of individual receptor channels with defined subunit stoichiometry. We find that a single α-Btx-sensitive subunit confers nearly maximal suppression of channel opening, despite four binding sites remaining unoccupied by α-Btx and accessible to the agonist. Given structural evidence that α-Btx locks the agonist binding site in an inactive conformation, we conclude that the dominant mechanism of antagonism is non-competitive, originating from conformational arrest of the binding sites, and that the five α7 subunits are interdependent and maintain conformational symmetry in the open channel state. PMID:26282895

  2. Effects of chronic alcohol drinking on receptor-binding, internalization, and degradation of human immunodeficiency virus 1 envelope protein gp120 in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashok K; Jiang, Yin; Gupta, Shveta

    2007-12-01

    Although alcohol drinking increases susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, possible mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol are not yet known. Since the HIV envelope protein gp120 plays a key role in progression of HIV infection, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the toxicity and degradation of gp120 in hepatocytes isolated from liver of alcohol-preferring rats drinking either 15% ethanol in water or pure water for 70 days. The hypothesis was that alcohol drinking augmented the toxicity, but suppressed degradation of gp120. Hepatocytes from water-drinking rats (C-cells) or ethanol-drinking rats (Et-cells) were treated with laptacystin, anti-CD4 antibodies, CCR5 antagonist, or mannose, followed by [(125)I]gp120 or native gp120. At predetermined intervals, control (C) and ethanol exposed (Et) cells were analyzed for toxicity and degradation of gp120. In C-cells, [(125)I]gp120 binding and internalization peaked within 5-45 min and remained elevated for up to 10h and then decreased gradually. In Et-cells, [(125)I]gp120 binding peaked comparably to C-cells, but the binding remained to the peak level throughout the experimental period. C-cells exhibited the lysosomal/ubiquitin-mediated degradation of intracellular gp120, resulting in released gp120 fragments into the incubation medium that suppressed gp120-CD4 binding, improved cell viability, and inhibited gp120-induced apoptosis. Ethanol drinking suppressed gp120 degradation in and release of gp120 fragments from hepatocytes. The incubation medium of Et-cells did not suppress gp120-CD4 binding or the gp120-mediated apoptosis in hepatocytes. Thus, chronic alcohol drinking augmented the adverse effects of gp120 possibly by suppressing its degradation in hepatocytes. The present observation also suggests that a number of CCR5 or ubiquitin-based therapeutic drugs may not be effective in suppressing HIV infection in alcohol-drinking subjects.

  3. Mauthner cell-initiated electromotor behavior is mediated via NMDA and metabotropic glutamatergic receptors on medullary pacemaker neurons in a gymnotid fish.

    PubMed

    Curti, S; Falconi, A; Morales, F R; Borde, M

    1999-10-15

    Weakly electric fish generate meaningful electromotor behaviors by specific modulations of the discharge of their medullary pacemaker nucleus from which the rhythmic command for each electric organ discharge (EOD) arises. Certain electromotor behaviors seem to involve the activation of specific neurotransmitter receptors on particular target cells within the nucleus, i.e., on pacemaker or on relay cells. This paper deals with the neural basis of the electromotor behavior elicited by activation of Mauthner cells in Gymnotus carapo. This behavior consists of an abrupt and prolonged increase in the rate of the EOD. The effects of specific glutamate agonists and antagonists on basal EOD frequency and on EOD accelerations induced by Mauthner cell activation were assessed. Injections of both ionotropic (AMPA, kainate, and NMDA) and metabotropic (trans-(+/-)-1-amino-1,3-cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid) glutamate agonists induced increases in EOD rate that were maximal when performed close to the soma of pacemaker cells. In contrast, injections in the proximity of relay cells were ineffective. Therefore, pacemaker neurons are probably endowed with diverse glutamate receptor subtypes, whereas relay cells are probably not. The Mauthner cell-evoked electromotor behavior was suppressed by injections of AP-5 and (+/-)-amino-4-carboxy-methyl-phenylacetic acid, NMDA receptor and metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, respectively. Thus, this electromotor behavior relies on the activation of the NMDA and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes of pacemaker cells. Our study gives evidence for the synergistic effects of NMDA and metabotropic receptor activation and shows how a simple circuit can produce specific electromotor outputs.

  4. Synergistic Induction of Interferon α through TLR-3 and TLR-9 Agonists Identifies CD21 as Interferon α Receptor for the B Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dhohyung; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Maternal antibodies inhibit seroconversion and the generation of measles virus (MeV)-specific antibodies (both neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies) after vaccination whereas T cell responses are usually unaffected. The lack of seroconversion leaves individuals susceptible to vaccine-preventable infections. Inhibition of antibody secretion is due to the inhibition of B cells through a cross-link of the B cell receptor with the inhibitory FcγIIB receptor (CD32) by maternal antibody/vaccine complexes. Here, we demonstrate that a combination of TLR-3 and TLR-9 agonists induces synergistically higher levels of type I interferon in vitro and in vivo than either agonist alone. The synergistic action of TLR-3 and TLR-9 agonists is based on a feedback loop through the interferon receptor. Finally, we have identified CD21 as a potential receptor for interferon α on B cells which contributes to interferon α-mediated activation of B cells in the presence of maternal antibodies. The combination leads to complete restoration of B cell and antibody responses after immunization in the presence of inhibitory MeV-specific IgG. The strong stimulatory action of type I interferon is due to the fact that type I interferon uses not only the interferon receptor but also CD21 as a functional receptor for B cell activation. PMID:23516365

  5. Peripheral Adenosine A3 Receptor Activation Causes Regulated Hypothermia in Mice That Is Dependent on Central Histamine H1 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Piñol, Ramón A; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela; Gavrilova, Oksana; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Reitman, Marc L

    2016-02-01

    Adenosine can induce hypothermia, as previously demonstrated for adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists. Here we use the potent, specific A3AR agonists MRS5698, MRS5841, and MRS5980 to show that adenosine also induces hypothermia via the A3AR. The hypothermic effect of A3AR agonists is independent of A1AR activation, as the effect was fully intact in mice lacking A1AR but abolished in mice lacking A3AR. A3AR agonist-induced hypothermia was attenuated by mast cell granule depletion, demonstrating that the A3AR hypothermia is mediated, at least in part, via mast cells. Central agonist dosing had no clear hypothermic effect, whereas peripheral dosing of a non-brain-penetrant agonist caused hypothermia, suggesting that peripheral A3AR-expressing cells drive the hypothermia. Mast cells release histamine, and blocking central histamine H1 (but not H2 or H4) receptors prevented the hypothermia. The hypothermia was preceded by hypometabolism and mice with hypothermia preferred a cooler environmental temperature, demonstrating that the hypothermic state is a coordinated physiologic response with a reduced body temperature set point. Importantly, hypothermia is not required for the analgesic effects of A3AR agonists, which occur with lower agonist doses. These results support a mechanistic model for hypothermia in which A3AR agonists act on peripheral mast cells, causing histamine release, which stimulates central histamine H1 receptors to induce hypothermia. This mechanism suggests that A3AR agonists will probably not be useful for clinical induction of hypothermia.

  6. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 and Protein Kinase C Phosphorylate the Distal C-Terminal Tail of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 and Mediate Recruitment of Beta-Arrestin.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiansong; Busillo, John M; Stumm, Ralf; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2017-03-22

    Phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a key event for cell signaling and regulation of receptor function. Previously, using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified two phosphorylation sites at the distal C-terminal tail of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, but were unable to determine which specific residues were phosphorylated. Here, we demonstrate that serines 346 and/or 347 (Ser-346/7) of CXCR4 are phosphorylated upon stimulation with the agonist CXCL12 as well as a CXCR4 pepducin, ATI-2341. ATI-2341, a Gi-biased CXCR4 agonist, induced more robust phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 compared to CXCL12. Knockdown of GRK2, GRK3 or GRK6 reduced CXCL12-induced phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 with GRK3 knockdown having the strongest effect, while inhibition of the conventional PKC isoforms reduced phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 induced by either CXCL12 or ATI-2341. The loss of GRK3- or PKC-mediated phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 impaired the recruitment of β-arrestin to CXCR4. We also found that a pseudo-substrate peptide inhibitor for PKCζ effectively inhibited CXCR4 phosphorylation and signaling, most likely by functioning as a non-specific CXCR4 antagonist. Together, these studies demonstrate the role Ser-346/7 plays in arrestin recruitment and initiation of the process of receptor desensitization and provide insight into the dysregulation of CXCR4 observed in patients with various forms of WHIM syndrome.

  7. EndothelinA-endothelinB receptor cross-talk in rat basilar artery in situ.

    PubMed

    Yoon, SeongHun; Zuccarello, Mario; Rapoport, Robert M

    2012-04-01

    The rationale for the therapeutic use of dual as opposed to selective endothelin (ET) receptor antagonists stems in part from cross-talk between the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors. However, whether ET(A)-ET(B) receptor cross-talk is present in the cerebral vasculature is difficult to discern since findings of cross-talk contrast even among the few reports available. Thus, this study tested whether ET(A)-ET(B) receptor cross-talk is present in the rat basilar artery. In an in situ cranial window, 0.1 μM sarafotoxin S6c, an ET(B) receptor agonist, relaxed basilar artery basal tone by 54%. ET-1 (3 nM) in the absence and presence of 10 μM BQ123, an ET(A) receptor agonist, induced 13% contraction and 15% relaxation, respectively. In contrast, the 3-nM ET-1 plateau contraction was relaxed by only ∼50% by 3-10 μM BQ123 and 10 μM BQ610, ET(A) receptor antagonists. N(ω)-nitro-L: -arginine, an NO synthase inhibitor, did not enhance contraction to 3 nM ET-1, suggesting that the partial relaxation of the ET-1 plateau contraction did not involve unmasked endothelial ET(B) receptor-mediated relaxation. The ∼50% ET-1 contraction that remained following ET(A) receptor antagonist was relaxed by 3-10 μM BQ788, consistent with an ET(B) receptor-mediated component of contraction. However, 10 μM BQ788 in the absence of prior ET(A) receptor antagonist did not cause relaxation. Subsequent BQ123 addition in the presence of BQ788 completely relaxed the ET-1 contraction. PD145065 (1 μM), an ET(A/B) receptor antagonist, completely relaxed 3-nM ET-1 contracted vessels in both the absence and presence of BQ123. These findings suggest that the inability of ET(A) receptor antagonist to completely relax the ET-1 plateau contraction in rat basilar artery is due to ET(A)-ET(B) receptor cross-talk.

  8. Genetics of Taste Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Bosak, Natalia P.; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R.; Nelson, Theodore M.

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical “tastes” as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  9. Allosteric equilibrium model explains steady-state coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Ugur, O; Onaran, H O

    1997-05-01

    We used a simple experimental approach to clarify some contradictory predictions of the collision coupling and equilibrium models (e.g. ternary complex, two-state ternary complex or quinternary complex), which describe G-protein-mediated beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in essentially different manners. Analysis of the steady-state coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes showed that: (1) in the absence of an agonist, Gpp(NH)p (a hydrolysis-resistant analogue of GTP) can activate adenylate cyclase very slowly; (2) this activity reaches a steady state in approx. 5 h, the extent of activity depending on the concentration of the nucleotide; (3) isoprenaline-activated steady-state adenylate cyclase can be inactivated by propranolol (a competitive antagonist that relaxes the receptor activation), in the presence of Gpp(NH)p (which provides a virtual absence of GTPase) and millimolar concentrations of Mg2+ (the rate of this inactivation is relatively fast); (4) increasing the concentration of Gpp(NH)p can saturate the steady-state activity of adenylate cyclase. The saturated enzyme activity was lower than that induced by isoprenaline under the same conditions. This additional agonist-induced activation was reversible. In the light of these results, we conclude that agonist can also activate the guanine nucleotide-saturated system in the absence of GTPase by a mechanism other than guanine nucleotide exchange. We explain these phenomena in the framework of a quinternary complex model as an agonist-induced and receptor-mediated dissociation of guanine nucleotide-saturated residual heterotrimer, the equilibrium concentration of which is not necessarily zero. These results, which suggest a continuous interaction between receptor and G-protein, can hardly be accommodated by the collision coupling model that was originally suggested for the present experimental system and then applied to many other G-protein systems. Therefore we

  10. Identification of an extracellular segment of the oxytocin receptor providing agonist-specific binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Hawtin, S R; Howard, H C; Wheatley, M

    2001-03-01

    The effects of the peptide hormone oxytocin are mediated by oxytocin receptors (OTRs) expressed by the target tissue. The OTR is a member of the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Defining differences between the interaction of agonists and antagonists with the OTR at the molecular level is of fundamental importance, and is addressed in this study. Using truncated and chimaeric receptor constructs, we establish that a small 12-residue segment in the distal portion of the N-terminus of the human OTR provides important epitopes which are required for agonist binding. In contrast, this segment does not contribute to the binding site for antagonists, whether peptide or non-peptide. It does, however, have a role in agonist-induced OTR signalling. Oxytocin is also an agonist at the vasopressin V(1a) receptor (V(1a)R). A chimaeric receptor (V(1a)R(N)-OTR) was engineered in which the N-terminus of the OTR was substituted by the corresponding, but unrelated, sequence from the N-terminus of the V(1a)R. We show that the V(1a)R N-terminus present in V(1a)R(N)-OTR fully restored both agonist binding and intracellular signalling to a dysfunctional truncated OTR construct. The N-terminal segment does not, however, contribute to receptor-selective agonism between the OTR and the V(1a)R. Our data establish a key role for the distal N-terminus of the OTR in providing agonist-specific binding epitopes.

  11. Prostanoid receptors mediating contraction in rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Root, James A; Davey, Dorren A; Af Forselles, Kerry J

    2015-12-15

    Selective prostaglandin EP1 antagonists have been suggested for the treatment of bladder dysfunction. This study assessed the contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes in human and non-human bladder in vitro. Classical tissue bath studies were conducted using bladder strips exposed to prostanoid agonists and antagonists. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contracted rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle strips (pEC50 7.91±0.06 (n=7), 6.40±0.13 (n=7), and 6.07±0.11 (n=5), respectively). The EP1 receptor antagonist, PF2907617 (300nM), caused a rightward shift of the PGE2 concentration-response curve in the rat bladder only (pKB 8.40±0.15, n=3). PGE2 responses in rat and macaque bladders, but not human, were antagonised by the EP3 antagonist CJ24979 (1µM). Sulprostone, a mixed EP1/EP3/FP receptor agonist, induced potent contractions of rat bladder muscle (pEC50 7.94±0.31, n=6). The FP receptor agonist, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), induced bladder contraction in all species tested, but with a lower potency in rat. The selective FP receptor agonist latanoprost caused potent contractions of macaque and human bladder strips only. SQ29548, a selective TP antagonist, and GW848687X, a mixed EP1/TP antagonist caused rightward shifts of the concentration-response curves to the selective TP agonist, U46619 (pKB estimates 8.53±0.07 and 7.56±0.06, n=3, respectively). Responses to U46619 were absent in rat preparations. These data suggest significant species differences exist in bladder contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes. We conclude that the EP1 subtype does not represent the best approach to the clinical treatment of bladder disorders targeting inhibition of smooth muscle contraction.

  12. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders.

  13. Up-regulation of M1 muscarinic receptors expressed in CHOm1 cells by panaxynol via cAMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wang; Xing-Jun, Wu; Yong-Yao, Cui; Liang, Zhu; Yang, Lu; Hong-Zhuan, Chen

    Loss of cholinergic neurons along with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in cerebral cortex and hippocampus is closely associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent drug development for AD treatment focuses heavily on identifying M(1) receptor agonists. However, mAChRs undergo down-regulation in response to agonist-induced sustained activation. Therefore, therapeutic effectiveness wanes during continuous use. Thus, another potentially effective approach, which overcomes this drawback is to develop compounds, which instead up-regulate M(1) receptor expression. In the present study, we took this alternative approach and contrasted in Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with human m(1) subtype gene (CHOm(1) cells) changes of M(1) receptor expression levels caused by muscarinic agonists and upregulators of its expression. The muscarinic agonists carbachol and pilocarpine reduced M(1) receptor number in CHOm(1) cells by 29 and 46%, respectively, at 100muM, whereas panaxynol, a polyacetylene compound isolated from the lipophilic fraction of Panax notoginseng, concentration-dependently up-regulated the M(1) receptor number after pre-incubation with CHOm(1) cells for 48 h, reaching a plateau at 1 microM, and was accompanied by enhanced M(1) mRNA levels. Moreover, the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor RP-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic mono-phosphoro-thioate triethylamine salt (RP-cAMPs) 5 microM completely prevented panaxynol-induced up-regulation of M(1) receptors. Panaxynol (1muM) caused a significant and consistent stimulation of cAMP accumulation (27% increase above basal at 40 min). These results suggest that in CHOm(1) cells panaxynol up-regulates M(1) receptor number through cAMP pathway-mediated stimulation of gene transcription.

  14. Behavioral sensitization to cocaine in rats: Evidence for temporal differences in dopamine D3 and D2 receptor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Gregory T.; Truong, Yen Nhu-Thi; Levant, Beth; Chen, Jianyong; Wang, Shaomeng; Woods, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Cocaine-induced changes in D2 receptors have been implicated in the expression of sensitized behavioral responses and addiction-like behaviors, however, the influence of D3 receptors is less clear. Objectives To characterize the effects of repeated cocaine administration on the sensitivity of rats to D2- and D3-mediated behaviors, as well as the binding properties of ventral striatal D2-like and D3 receptors. Methods Pramipexole was used to assess the sensitivity of rats to D3/D2 agonist-induced yawning, hypothermia, and locomotor activity, 24h, 72h, 10d, 21d and 42d after repeated cocaine or saline administration. The locomotor effects of cocaine (42d), and the binding properties of ventral striatal D2-like and D3 receptors (24h and 42d) were also evaluated. Results Cocaine-treated rats displayed an enhanced locomotor response to cocaine, as well as a progressive and persistent leftward/upward shift of the ascending limb (72h-42d), and leftward shift of the descending limb (42d) of the pramipexole-induced yawning dose-response curve. Cocaine treatment also decreased Bmax and Kd for D2-like receptors, and increased D3 receptor binding at 42d. Cocaine treatment did not change pramipexole-induced hypothermia or locomotor activity, or yawning induced by cholinergic or serotonergic agonists. Conclusions These studies suggest that temporal differences exist in the development of cocaine-induced sensitization of D3 and D2 receptors, with enhancements of D3-mediated behavioral effects observed within 72h, and enhancements of D2-mediated behavioral effects apparent 42d after cocaine. These findings highlight the need to consider changes in D3 receptor function when thinking about the behavioral plasticity that occurs during abstinence from cocaine use. PMID:21207013

  15. Could the 5-HT1B receptor inverse agonism affect learning consolidation?

    PubMed

    Meneses, A

    2001-03-01

    Diverse evidence indicates that, the 5-HT system might play a role in learning and memory, since it occurs in brain areas mediating such processes and 5-HT drugs modulate them. Hence in this work, in order to explore further 5-HT involvement on learning and memory 5-HT1B receptors' role is investigated. Evidence indicates that SB-224289 (a 5-HT1B receptor inverse agonist) post-training injection facilitated learning consolidation in an associative autoshaping learning task, this effect was partially reversed by GR 127935 (a 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist), but unaffected by MDL 100907 (a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist) or ketanserin (a 5-HT1D/2A/7 receptor antagonist) at low doses. Moreover, SB-224289 antagonized the learning deficit produced by TFMPP (a 5-HT1A/1B/1D/2A/2C receptor agonist), GR 46611 (a 5-HT1A/1B/1D receptor agonist), mCPP (a 5-HT2A/2C/3/7 receptor agonist/antagonist) or GR 127935 (at low dose). SB-224289 did not alter the 8-OH-DPAT (a 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist) learning facilitatory effect. SB-224289 eliminated the deficit learning produced by the anticholinergic muscarinic scopolamine or the glutamatergic antagonist dizocilpine. Administration of both, GR 127935 (5mg/kg) plus ketanserin (0.01 mg/kg) did not modify learning consolidation; nevertheless, when ketanserin dose was increased (0.1-1.0mg/kg) and SB-224289 dose was maintained constant, a learning facilitation effect was observed. Notably, SB-224289 at 1.0mg/kg potentiated a subeffective dose of the 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonist/antagonist mixed GR 127935, which facilitated learning consolidation and this effect was abolished by ketanserin at a higher dose. Collectively, the data confirm and extend the earlier findings with GR 127935 and the effects of non-selective 5-HT(1B) receptor agonists. Clearly 5-HT1B agonists induced a learning deficit which can be reversed with SB-224289. Perhaps more importantly, SB-224289 enhances learning consolidation when given alone and can reverse the deficits

  16. Characteristics of muscarinic receptors that selectively couple to inhibition of adenylate cyclase or stimulation of phospholipase C on NG108-15 and 1321N1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to establish whether different muscarinic receptor proteins selectively couple to different second messenger response system. Although both second messenger response systems are fully functional in both cell lines, activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors only results in inhibition of adenylate cyclase in NG108-15 neuroblastoma {times} glioma cells and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell types were covalently labeled with ({sup 3}H)Propylbenzilylcholine mustard (({sup 3}H)PBCM) and the mobilities of the ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species of both cells were compared by SDS-PAGE. 1321N1 and NG108-15 cells each primarily expressed a single ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species with an apparent size of approximately 92,000 and 66,000 Da, respectively. ({sup 3}H)PBCM labelling was completely inhibited by 1 {mu}M atropine or by down-regulation of muscarinic receptors by an overnight incubation with carbachol. The apparent size of the ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species of both cell lines was not altered by treatment with a series of protease inhibitors or by treatment with dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide. Another approach for determining differences in the muscarinic receptors of 2 cells lines was to study agonist-induced alteration of muscarinic receptor number. Exposure of both cell types to agonists resulted in rapid loss of muscarinic receptors from cell surface without change of total cellular muscarinic receptors followed by subsequently loss of receptors from cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell lines were regulated by agonist with similar properties.

  17. Gβ promotes pheromone receptor polarization and yeast chemotropism by inhibiting receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Amber; Tian, Wei; Waszczak, Nicholas; Wang, Xin; Cao, Youfang; Suchkov, Dmitry; Bar, Eli; Metodiev, Metodi V; Liang, Jie; Arkowitz, Robert A; Stone, David E

    2016-04-12

    Gradient-directed cell migration (chemotaxis) and growth (chemotropism) are processes that are essential to the development and life cycles of all species. Cells use surface receptors to sense the shallow chemical gradients that elicit chemotaxis and chemotropism. Slight asymmetries in receptor activation are amplified by downstream signaling systems, which ultimately induce dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. During the mating response of budding yeast, a model chemotropic system, the pheromone receptors on the plasma membrane polarize to the side of the cell closest to the stimulus. Although receptor polarization occurs before and independently of actin cable-dependent delivery of vesicles to the plasma membrane (directed secretion), it requires receptor internalization. Phosphorylation of pheromone receptors by yeast casein kinase 1 or 2 (Yck1/2) stimulates their internalization. We showed that the pheromone-responsive Gβγ dimer promotes the polarization of the pheromone receptor by interacting with Yck1/2 and locally inhibiting receptor phosphorylation. We also found that receptor phosphorylation is essential for chemotropism, independently of its role in inducing receptor internalization. A mathematical model supports the idea that the interaction between Gβγ and Yck1/2 results in differential phosphorylation and internalization of the pheromone receptor and accounts for its polarization before the initiation of directed secretion.

  18. Gβ promotes pheromone receptor polarization and yeast chemotropism by inhibiting receptor phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ismael, Amber; Tian, Wei; Waszczak, Nicholas; Wang, Xin; Cao, Youfang; Suchkov, Dmitry; Bar, Eli; Metodiev, Metodi V.; Liang, Jie; Arkowitz, Robert; Stone, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Gradient-directed cell migration (chemotaxis) and growth (chemotropism) are universal processes, which are essential to the development and life cycles of all species. Cells use surface receptors to sense the shallow chemical gradients that elicit chemotaxis and chemotropism. Slight asymmetries in receptor activation are amplified by downstream signaling systems, which ultimately induce dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. During the mating response of budding yeast, a model chemotropic system, the pheromone receptor on the plasma membrane polarizes to the side of the cell closest to the stimulus. Although receptor polarization occurs before and independently of actin-cable dependent vesicle delivery (directed secretion), it requires receptor internalization. Phosphorylation of pheromone receptors by yeast casein kinase 1 or 2 (Yck1/2) stimulates their internalization. We showed that the pheromone-responsive Gβγ dimer promotes the polarization of the pheromone receptor by interacting with Yck1/2 and locally inhibiting receptor phosphorylation. We also found that receptor phosphorylation is essential for chemotropism, independent of its role in inducing receptor internalization. A mathematical model supports the idea that the interaction between Gβγ and Yck1/2 results in differential phosphorylation and internalization of the pheromone receptor and accounts for its polarization before the initiation of directed secretion. PMID:27072657

  19. HuR's post-transcriptional regulation of Death Receptor 5 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Danielle M; Rittenhouse, David W; Valley, Christopher C; Cozzitorto, Joseph A; Burkhart, Richard A; Leiby, Benjamin; Winter, Jordan M; Weber, Matthew C; Londin, Eric R; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Yeo, Charles J; Gorospe, Myriam; Witkiewicz, Agnieska K; Sachs, Jonathan N; Brody, Jonathan R

    2012-08-01

    Apoptosis is one of the core signaling pathways disrupted in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Death receptor 5 (DR5) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor superfamily that is expressed in cancer cells. Binding of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to DR5 is a potent trigger of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, and numerous clinical trials are based on DR5-targeted therapies for cancer, including PDA. Human antigen R (HuR), an RNA-binding protein, regulates a select number of transcripts under stress conditions. Here we report that HuR translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of PDA cells upon treatment with a DR5 agonist. High doses of DR5 agonist induce cleavage of both HuR and caspase 8. HuR binds to DR5 mRNA at the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) in PDA cells in response to different cancer-associated stressors and subsequently represses DR5 protein expression; silencing HuR augments DR5 protein production by enabling its translation and thus enhances apoptosis. In PDA specimens (n = 53), negative HuR cytoplasmic expression correlated with elevated DR5 expression (odds ratio 16.1, p < 0.0001). Together, these data demonstrate a feedback mechanism elicited by HuR-mediated repression of the key apoptotic membrane protein DR5.

  20. Computational Prediction and Biochemical Analyses of New Inverse Agonists for the CB1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) G-protein coupled receptor is a potential therapeutic target for obesity. The previously predicted and experimentally validated ensemble of ligand-free conformations of CB1 [Scott, C. E. et al. Protein Sci.2013, 22, 101−11323184890; Ahn, K. H. et al. Proteins2013, 81, 1304–131723408552] are used here to predict the binding sites for known CB1-selective inverse agonists including rimonabant and its seven known derivatives. This binding pocket, which differs significantly from previously published models, is used to identify 16 novel compounds expected to be CB1 inverse agonists by exploiting potential new interactions. We show experimentally that two of these compounds exhibit inverse agonist properties including inhibition of basal and agonist-induced G-protein coupling activity, as well as an enhanced level of CB1 cell surface localization. This demonstrates the utility of using the predicted binding sites for an ensemble of CB1 receptor structures for designing new CB1 inverse agonists. PMID:26633590

  1. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonists activate CFTR in intestinal organoids and subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vijftigschild, Lodewijk A W; Berkers, Gitte; Dekkers, Johanna F; Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D; Matthes, Elizabeth; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; Hensen, Chantal E; Heida-Michel, Sabine; Geerdink, Margot; Janssens, Hettie M; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Bronsveld, Inez; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Jonge, Hugo R; Hanrahan, John W; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that people with cystic fibrosis (CF) who express CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene mutations associated with residual function may benefit from G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-targeting drugs that can activate and enhance CFTR function.We used intestinal organoids to screen a GPCR-modulating compound library and identified β2-adrenergic receptor agonists as the most potent inducers of CFTR function.β2-Agonist-induced organoid swelling correlated with the CFTR genotype, and could be induced in homozygous CFTR-F508del organoids and highly differentiated primary CF airway epithelial cells after rescue of CFTR trafficking by small molecules. The in vivo response to treatment with an oral or inhaled β2-agonist (salbutamol) in CF patients with residual CFTR function was evaluated in a pilot study. 10 subjects with a R117H or A455E mutation were included and showed changes in the nasal potential difference measurement after treatment with oral salbutamol, including a significant improvement of the baseline potential difference of the nasal mucosa (+6.35 mV, p<0.05), suggesting that this treatment might be effective in vivo Furthermore, plasma that was collected after oral salbutamol treatment induced CFTR activation when administered ex vivo to organoids.This proof-of-concept study suggests that organoids can be used to identify drugs that activate CFTR function in vivo and to select route of administration.

  2. The contribution of serotonin 5-HT2C and melanocortin-4 receptors to the satiety signaling of glucagon-like peptide 1 and liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, in mice.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Suzuki, Marina; Sanuki, Marin; Wakameda, Mamoru; Tamari, Tomohiro

    2011-07-29

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an insulinotropic gastrointestinal peptide produced mainly from intestinal endocrine L-cells, and liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, induce satiety. The serotonin 5-HT2C receptor (5-HT2CR) and melanoroctin-4 receptor (MC4R) are involved in the regulation of food intake. Here we show that systemic administration of GLP-1 (50 and 200μg/kg)-induced anorexia was blunted in mice with a 5HT2CR null mutation, and was attenuated in mice with a heterozygous MC4R mutation. On the other hand, systemic administration of liraglutide (50 and 100μg/kg) suppressed food intake in mice lacking 5-HT2CR, mice with a heterozygous mutation of MC4R and wild-type mice matched for age. Moreover, once-daily consecutive intraperitoneal administration of liraglutide (100μg/kg) over 3days significantly suppressed daily food intake and body weight in mice with a heterozygous mutation of MC4R as well as wild-type mice. These findings suggest that GLP-1 and liraglutide induce anorexia via different central pathways.

  3. Identification of a Novel Non-retinoid Pan Inverse Agonist of the Retinoic Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Scott A.; Kumar, Naresh; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Istrate, Monica A.; Conkright, Juliana J.; Wang, Yongjun; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Cameron, Michael D.; Roush, William R.; Burris, Thomas P.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2011-01-01

    Retinoids are potent forms of vitamin A and are involved in a broad range of physiological processes and the pharmacological effects of retinoids are primarily mediated by the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Several natural and synthetic RAR modulators have proven to be clinically useful for a number of therapeutic indications including cancer, psoriasis, and diabetes. Unfortunately, these agents lead to a number of significant side effects. Most synthetic retinoid ligands are based on the retinoid scaffold and thus have similarities to the natural ligand with all previously disclosed RAR ligands having a carboxylic acid that makes a critical ionic bridge within the ligand binding domain of the receptors. The potential therapeutic value offered from RAR modulation provides the impetus to identify novel ligands based on unique scaffolds that may offer improved toxicity and pharmacokinetic profiles. Here we describe the identification of an atypical RAR inverse agonist that represents the first non-acid, non-retinoid direct modulator of RAR receptor subfamily. SR-0065 functions as a pan-RAR inverse agonist suppressing the basal activity of RARα, RARβ, and RARγ as well as inhibiting agonist induced RAR activity. SR-0065 treatment enhanced receptor interaction with a peptide representative of the corepressor SMRT and in cells SR-0065 enhances recruitment of SMRT to RARγ. The acid form of SR-0065, SR-1758, was inactive in all assays. Thus, SR-0065 represents a new class of non-acid, non-retinoid RAR modulator that may be used as a point to initiate development of improved RAR-targeted drugs. PMID:21381756

  4. Benzodiazepine-dependent stabilization of GABA(A) receptors at synapses.

    PubMed

    Gouzer, Géraldine; Specht, Christian G; Allain, Laure; Shinoe, Toru; Triller, Antoine

    2014-11-01

    GABA(A) receptors constitutively enter and exit synapses by lateral diffusion in the plane of the neuronal membrane. They are trapped at synapses through their interactions with gephyrin, the main scaffolding protein at inhibitory post-synaptic densities. Previous work has shown that the synaptic accumulation and diffusion dynamics of GABA(A)Rs are controlled via excitatory synaptic activity. However, it remains unknown whether GABA(A)R activity can itself impact the surface trafficking of the receptors. Here we report the effects of GABA(A)R agonists, antagonists and allosteric modulators on the receptor's surface dynamics. Using immunocytochemistry and single particle tracking experiments on mouse hippocampal neurons, we show that the agonist muscimol decreases GABA(A)R and gephyrin levels at synapses and accelerates the receptor's lateral diffusion within 30–120 min of treatment. In contrast, the GABA(A)R antagonist gabazine increased GABA(A)R amounts and slowed down GABA(A)R diffusion at synapses. The response to GABA(A)R activation or inhibition appears to be an adaptative regulation of GABAergic synapses. Surprisingly, the positive allosteric modulator diazepam abolished the regulation induced by muscimol, and this effect was observed on α1, α2, α5 and γ2 GABA(A)R subunits. Altogether these results indicate that diazepam stabilizes synaptic GABA(A)Rs and thus prevents the agonist-induced regulation of GABA(A)R levels at synapses. This occurred independently of neuronal activity and intracellular calcium and involved GABA(A)R–gephyrin interactions, suggesting that the changes in GABA(A)R diffusion depend on conformational changes of the receptor. Our study provides a new molecular mechanism involved in the adaptative response to changes in GABA(A)R activity and benzodiazepine treatments.

  5. Uridine Triphosphate Thio Analogues Inhibit Platelet P2Y12 Receptor and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Gündüz, Dursun; Tanislav, Christian; Sedding, Daniel; Parahuleva, Mariana; Santoso, Sentot; Troidl, Christian; Hamm, Christian W.; Aslam, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Platelet P2Y12 is an important adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor that is involved in agonist-induced platelet aggregation and is a valuable target for the development of anti-platelet drugs. Here we characterise the effects of thio analogues of uridine triphosphate (UTP) on ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Using human platelet-rich plasma, we demonstrate that UTP inhibits P2Y12 but not P2Y1 receptors and antagonises 10 µM ADP-induced platelet aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of ~250 µM. An eight-fold higher platelet inhibitory activity was observed with a 2-thio analogue of UTP (2S-UTP), with an IC50 of 30 µM. The 4-thio analogue (4S-UTP) with an IC50 of 7.5 µM was 33-fold more effective. A three-fold decrease in inhibitory activity, however, was observed by introducing an isobutyl group at the 4S- position. A complete loss of inhibition was observed with thio-modification of the γ phosphate of the sugar moiety, which yields an enzymatically stable analogue. The interaction of UTP analogues with P2Y12 receptor was verified by P2Y12 receptor binding and cyclic AMP (cAMP) assays. These novel data demonstrate for the first time that 2- and 4-thio analogues of UTP are potent P2Y12 receptor antagonists that may be useful for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28146050

  6. [Interceptors:--"silent" chemokine receptors].

    PubMed

    Grodecka, Magdalena; Waśniowska, Kazimiera

    2007-01-01

    The physiological effect caused by chemokines is regulated by interactions with a group of rodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors share a number of common features: the polypeptide chain is a 7-transmembrane ?-helix (7 TMD motif) and the region involved in G-protein interaction (the DRYLAIV sequence) is located in the second transmembrane loop. So far, 19 chemokine receptors have been identified. Three of them (Duffy glycoprotein, D6, and CCX-CKR proteins), although structurally related to other GPCRs, lack the ability of G-protein signal transduction. Instead, they efficiently internalize their cognate ligands, regulating chemokine levels in various body compartments. These three proteins are suggested to form a distinct chemokine receptor family, designated "interceptors" or "silent" chemokine receptors.

  7. Receptor-recognized alpha 2-macroglobulin-methylamine elevates intracellular calcium, inositol phosphates and cyclic AMP in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, U K; Chu, C T; Rubenstein, D S; Gawdi, G; Pizzo, S V

    1993-01-01

    Human plasma alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) is a tetrameric proteinase inhibitor, which undergoes a conformational change upon reaction with either a proteinase or methylamine. As a result, a receptor recognition site is exposed on each subunit of the molecule enabling it to bind to its receptors on macrophages. We have used Fura-2-loaded murine peritoneal macrophages and digital video fluorescence microscopy to examine the effects of receptor binding on second messenger levels. alpha 2M-methylamine caused a rapid 2-4-fold increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) within 5 s of binding to receptors. The agonists induced a focal increase in [Ca2+]i that spread out to other areas of the cell. The increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on the alpha 2M-methylamine concentration and on the extracellular [Ca2+]. Both sinusoidal and transitory oscillations were observed, which varied from cell to cell. Neither alpha 2M nor boiled alpha 2M-methylamine, forms that are not recognized by the receptor, affected [Ca2+]i in peritoneal macrophages under identical conditions of incubation. The alpha 2M-methylamine-induced rise in [Ca2+]i was accompanied by a rapid and transient increase in macrophage inositol phosphates, including inositol tris- and tetrakis-phosphates. Native alpha 2M did not stimulate a rise in inositol phosphates. Finally, binding of alpha 2M-methylamine to macrophages increased cyclic AMP transiently. Thus receptor-recognized alpha-macroglobulins behave as agonists whose receptor binding causes stimulation of signal transduction pathways. Images Figure 2 PMID:7681282