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  1. Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... or no real danger. There are many specific phobias. Acrophobia is a fear of heights. Agoraphobia is a fear of public places, and claustrophobia ... you could have a social phobia. Other common phobias involve tunnels, highway driving, water, flying, animals and ...

  2. Agoraphobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehony, Kathleen A.

    Agoraphobia is the most pervasive and serious phobic response seen by clinicians, accounting for approximately 50 to 60% of all phobic problems. The symptoms of agoraphobia, a condition in which an individual fears entering public areas, include fears of leaving home, fainting, entering open and closed spaces, shopping, entering social situations,…

  3. Social Phobia (Social Anxiety Disorder): Always Embarrassed

    MedlinePlus

    ... phobia? For More Information Share Social Phobia (Social Anxiety Disorder): Always Embarrassed Download PDF Download ePub Order ... If so, you may have a type of anxiety disorder called social phobia, also called social anxiety ...

  4. Agoraphobia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Panic disorder with agoraphobia References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  5. Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... of anxiety disorder. It is a strong, irrational fear of something that poses little or no real ... There are many specific phobias. Acrophobia is a fear of heights. Agoraphobia is a fear of public ...

  6. Social phobia and perceived friendship quality.

    PubMed

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L

    2009-10-01

    Although it is clear that people with social phobia have interpersonal impairment, evidence that social phobia (as opposed to other mental disorders) affects friendship in particular is lacking. Two large epidemiological datasets were used to test whether diagnosis of social phobia is related to perceived friendship quality above and beyond perceived family relationship quality, diagnosis of other mental disorders, and a variety of demographic variables. After Bonferroni correction, social phobia was the only diagnosis related to perceived friendship quality above and beyond other factors, such that people with social phobia reported more impaired friendship quality. Social phobia's effect was similar in magnitude to demographic characteristics in both samples. The current study demonstrates that social phobia is specifically related to perceived friendship quality, suggesting that this aspect of social phobia's effects is worthy of further study. PMID:19556099

  7. Understanding and Treating Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Russell C.; Kimball, Amy; Stroup, Erin L.

    2004-01-01

    Social phobia, a relatively obscure disorder, is receiving increased attention due to evidence suggesting that it is more prevalent and debilitative than once thought. The purpose of this article is to help counselors better understand the nature of and treatments for this disorder. Effective behavioral and pharmacological approaches are reviewed,…

  8. Toward an integrative understanding of social phobia.

    PubMed Central

    Li, D; Chokka, P; Tibbo, P

    2001-01-01

    Our objective was to examine the neurobiology of social phobia from the perspectives of basic sciences, genetics, immunology, neuroendocrinology, neurotransmission and neuroimaging and to provide an integrated understanding of social phobia in the framework of a hypothetical neural circuit. Family and twin studies provide evidence that social phobia is heritable with significant genetic influence, and molecular genetics offers possibilities in understanding the nature of the trait that is transmitted. The biologic distinctiveness of social phobia from anxiety disorders and physiological validation of differences between generalized and discrete social phobia subtypes have been implicated in genetic, naturalistic and chemical challenge studies. Evidence of specific dysfunction of dopaminergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic and GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) neurotransmitter systems has been presented in animal models, challenge studies and treatment investigations. Preliminary neuroimaging research supports previous studies suggesting striatal dopaminergic dysfunction in social phobia and suggests the importance of functional circuits. A neural circuit involving the striatum, thalamus, amygdala and cortical structures may provide a framework for integrating much of the current knowledge on the neurobiology of social phobia. PMID:11394189

  9. Working memory capacity in generalized social phobia.

    PubMed

    Amir, Nader; Bomyea, Jessica

    2011-05-01

    Research suggests that understanding complex social cues depends on the availability of cognitive resources (e.g., Phillips, Channon, Tunstall, Hedenstrom, & Lyons, 2008). In spite of evidence suggesting that executive control functioning may impact anxiety (e.g., Eysenck, Derakshan, Santos, & Calvo, 2007), relatively few studies have examined working memory in individuals with generalized social phobia. Moreover, few studies have examined the role of threat-relevant content in working memory performance in clinically anxious populations. To this end, the present study assessed working memory capacity (WMC) in individuals with generalized social phobia and nonanxious controls using an operation span task with threat-relevant and neutral stimuli. Results revealed that nonanxious individuals demonstrated better WMC than individuals with generalized social phobia for neutral words but not for social threat words. Individuals with generalized social phobia demonstrated better WMC performance for threat words relative to neutral words. These results suggest that individuals with generalized social phobia may have relatively enhanced working memory performance for salient, socially relevant information. This enhanced working memory capacity for threat-relevant information may be the result of practice with this information in generalized social phobia. PMID:21381805

  10. Blood-injury phobia.

    PubMed

    Ko, S M

    1994-04-01

    Blood-injury phobia is a unique and peculiar phobia. It is different from other phobias in that it evokes a diphasic cardiovascular response; it has a propensity to induce fainting and nausea more than fear and anxiety; and often there is a family history of a similar phobia. Although it may cause no great difficulty or social handicap in everyday life compared to social phobia, agoraphobia or other simple phobias, it can have grave implications and may even become life-threatening when it prevents essential medical procedures. Unfortunately, not many of its sufferers come for treatment until circumstances require urgent attention. Yet, it can be effectively treated behaviourally by modeling and exposure therapy. Two cases of this fascinating condition are described. PMID:7939819

  11. [Neurobiology and pharmacotherapy of social phobia].

    PubMed

    Aouizerate, B; Martin-Guehl, C; Tignol, J

    2004-01-01

    Social phobia (also known as social anxiety disorder) is still not clearly understood. It was not established as an authentic psychiatric entity until the diagnostic nomenclature of the American Psychiatric Association DSM III in 1980. In recent years, increasing attention among researchers has contributed to provide important information about the genetic, familial and temperamental bases of social phobia and its neurochemical, neuroendocrinological and neuroanatomical substrates, which remain to be further investigated. Up to date, there have been several findings about the possible influence of variables, including particularly genetic, socio-familial and early temperamental (eg behavioral inhibition) factors that represent risk for the later development of social phobia. Clinical neurobiological studies, based on the use of exogenous compounds such as lactate, CO2, caffeine, epinephrine, flumazenil or cholecystokinin/pentagastrin to reproduce naturally occurring phobic anxiety, have shown that patients with social phobia appear to exhibit an intermediate sensitivity between patients with panic disorder and control subjects. No difference in the rate of panic attacks in response to lactate, low concentrations of CO2 (5%), epinephrine or flumazenil was observed between patients with social phobia and normal healthy subjects, both being less reactive compared to patients with panic disorder. However, patients with social phobia had similar anxiety reactions to high concentrations of CO2 (35%), caffeine or cholecystokinin/pentagastrin than those seen in patients with panic disorder, both being more intensive than in controls. Several lines of evidence suggest specific neurotransmitter system alterations in social phobia, especially with regard to the serotoninergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems. Although no abnormality in platelet serotonin transporter density has been found, patients with social phobia appear to show an enhanced sensitivity of both post

  12. Social Phobia and Social Anxiety as Components of Shyness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carducci, Bernardo J.; Hutzel, Karen; Morrison, Erin; Weyer, Christina Y.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the conceptual nature of shyness by examining its relationship with social phobia and social anxiety in a non-clinical sample. The participants in the present study were 132 introductory psychology students who completed the Cheek-Buss Shyness Scale (CBSS), Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN), and Liebowitz…

  13. Sudden Gains during Therapy of Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Schultz, Stefan M.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Moscovitch, David A.; Suvak, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigated the phenomenon of sudden gains in 107 participants with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) who received either cognitive-behavioral group therapy or exposure group therapy without explicit cognitive interventions, which primarily used public speaking situations as exposure tasks. Twenty-two out of 967…

  14. Sensitivity of Outcome Measures for Treatments of Generalized Social Phobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven; Woody, Sheila; McLean, Peter D.; Koch, William J.

    1997-01-01

    The sensitivity of five measures of outcomes of treatment for generalized social phobia was studied with 60 people diagnosed with generalized social phobia. Outcome measures were completed before and after treatment and three months later, and effect sizes were computed. Results support the usefulness of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (S.…

  15. Sudden Gains During Therapy of Social Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Schulz, Stefan M.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Moscovitch, David A.; Suvak, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated the phenomenon of sudden gains in 107 participants with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) who received either cognitive–behavioral group therapy or exposure group therapy without explicit cognitive interventions, which primarily used public speaking situations as exposure tasks. Twenty-two out of 967 session-to-session intervals met criteria for sudden gains, which most frequently occurred in Session 5. Individuals with sudden gains showed similar improvements in the 2 treatment groups. Although cognitive–behavioral therapy was associated with more cognitive changes than exposure therapy, cognitive changes did not precede sudden gains. In general, the results of this study question the clinical significance of sudden gains in social phobia treatment. PMID:16881776

  16. Agoraphobia: Fear of Fear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musetto, Andrew P.

    1984-01-01

    Agoraphobia is a complex phobia in which individuals react with intense anxiety to certain stress situations. Basically, agoraphobics live in fear of becoming afraid. Describes the psychotherapeutic treatment that helps agoraphobics to become more self-sufficient and to face their fears by understanding themselves better. (CS)

  17. Working memory capacity in Generalized Social Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Nader; Bomyea, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that understanding complex social cues depends on the availability of cognitive resources (e.g., Phillips, Channon, Tunstall, Hedenstrom, & Lyons, 2008). In spite of evidence suggesting that executive control functioning may impact anxiety (e.g., Eysenck, Derakshan, Santos, & Calvo, 2007), relatively few studies have examined working memory in individuals with Generalized Social Phobia (GSP). Moreover, few studies have examined the role of threat-relevant content in working memory performance in clinically anxious populations. To this end, the present study assessed working memory capacity (WMC) in individuals with Generalized Social Phobia and non-anxious controls using an Operation Span task using threat relevant and neutral stimuli. Results revealed that non-anxious individuals demonstrated better WMC than individuals with GSP for neutral words, but not for social threat words. Individuals with GSP demonstrated better WMC performance for threat words relative to neutral words. These results suggest that individuals with GSP may have relatively enhanced working memory performance for salient, socially-relevant information. This enhanced working memory capacity for threat relevant information may be the result of practice with this information in GSP. PMID:21381805

  18. Social Phobia in College Students: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Donald W.; Mandrusiak, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We used the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) to identify self-reported social phobia symptoms in 59 students presenting for intake at our counseling center and 119 students meeting a course requirement for research participation. We expected that students presenting for clinical service would have higher scores than the students not seeking such…

  19. Parental Assessment of Childhood Social Phobia: Psychometric Properties of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children-Parent Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higa, Charmaine K.; Fernandez, Shantel N.; Nakamura, Brad J.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Daleiden, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    Validity and parent-child agreement of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children-Parent Report (SPAI-C-P) were examined in a racially diverse sample of 158 students in Grades 5 through 8 (87 girls; ages 10 to 14; M = 11.53) and their caregivers. Children completed the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C), and…

  20. Attentional mechanisms of social perception are biased in social phobia.

    PubMed

    Boll, Sabrina; Bartholomaeus, Marie; Peter, Ulrike; Lupke, Ulrike; Gamer, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies of social phobia have reported an increased vigilance to social threat cues but also an avoidance of socially relevant stimuli such as eye gaze. The primary aim of this study was to examine attentional mechanisms relevant for perceiving social cues by means of abnormalities in scanning of facial features in patients with social phobia. In two novel experimental paradigms, patients with social phobia and healthy controls matched on age, gender and education were compared regarding their gazing behavior towards facial cues. The first experiment was an emotion classification paradigm which allowed for differentiating reflexive attentional shifts from sustained attention towards diagnostically relevant facial features. In the second experiment, attentional orienting by gaze direction was assessed in a gaze-cueing paradigm in which non-predictive gaze cues shifted attention towards or away from subsequently presented targets. We found that patients as compared to controls reflexively oriented their attention more frequently towards the eyes of emotional faces in the emotion classification paradigm. This initial hypervigilance for the eye region was observed at very early attentional stages when faces were presented for 150ms, and persisted when facial stimuli were shown for 3s. Moreover, a delayed attentional orienting into the direction of eye gaze was observed in individuals with social phobia suggesting a differential time course of eye gaze processing in patients and controls. Our findings suggest that basic mechanisms of early attentional exploration of social cues are biased in social phobia and might contribute to the development and maintenance of the disorder. PMID:27131909

  1. Cognitive Correlates of Social Phobia among Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfano, Candice A.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.

    2006-01-01

    We examined different cognitive phenomena in relation to social phobia among children (aged 7 to 11) and adolescents (aged 12-16) separately. Fifty socially phobic youths were compared to 30 normal control children on measures of social anxiety, social expectation as well as self-and observer-rated performance during two social tasks involving a…

  2. Nonverbal expressive behaviour in schizophrenia and social phobia.

    PubMed

    Del-Monte, Jonathan; Raffard, Stéphane; Salesse, Robin N; Marin, Ludovic; Schmidt, Richard C; Varlet, Manuel; Bardy, Benoît G; Philippe Boulenger, Jean; Christine Gély-Nargeot, Marie; Capdevielle, Delphine

    2013-11-30

    Expressive behaviour plays a crucial role in the success of social interactions. Abnormality of expressive behaviour has been reported in interpersonal interactions of patients suffering from schizophrenia and social phobia, two debilitating mental disorders with important social deficits. However, no study has compared the expressive behaviour in these two disorders. Thirty schizophrenia patients, 21 social phobia patients and 30 healthy controls were evaluated and compared on expressive, cognitive and clinical dimensions. Expressive behaviour was assessed using the Motor Affective subscale of the Motor-Affective-Social-Scale (MASS). Covariables include the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the anxiety level Liebowitz-Social-Anxiety-Scale (LSAS) and cognitive tasks. After controlling for depression, schizophrenia and social phobia patients both exhibited significantly fewer expressive behaviours compared to healthy controls. Moreover, our results showed specific signatures: schizophrenia patients performed fewer spontaneous gestures (hand gestures and smiles) whereas social phobia patients had an impaired ability to produce voluntary smiles in comparison to healthy controls. Interestingly, poor social functioning was significantly correlated with a decrease of expressive behaviour for schizophrenia patients. Expressive behaviour is impaired in different ways in social phobia and schizophrenia and is associated in schizophrenia with poorer social functioning. The Motor Affective subscale of the MASS is an interesting tool for assessing the dysfunction of interpersonal expressive behaviour in mental disorders. PMID:23845416

  3. Cognitive Mediation of Treatment Change in Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2004-01-01

    Ninety individuals with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) participated in a randomized controlled trial and completed cognitive-behavioral group therapy, exposure group therapy without explicit cognitive interventions, or a wait-list control condition. Both treatments were superior to the wait-list group in reducing social anxiety but did…

  4. Covariation bias for ambiguous social stimuli in generalized social phobia.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Christiane; Ofer, Julia; Flor, Herta

    2004-11-01

    The authors investigated whether the negative interpretation bias in generalized social phobia (GSP) reflects and is maintained by illusory correlations. Participants were exposed to descriptions of ambiguous social events, situations involving fear-relevant animals and nature scenes that were randomly paired with negative, positive, or neutral emotional facial expressions. Prior to the experiment, the GSP participants overestimated the contingency social situations-negative outcome, whereas the controls judged negative outcomes as least likely. A posteriori, the GSP participants exhibited an illusory correlation specifically between social cues and negative outcomes. During the experiment, only the controls showed distorted outcome predictions for social situations. Hence, illusory correlations--possibly resulting from acquired associations between social cues and negative consequences--may contribute to a negative interpretation bias in GSP. PMID:15535796

  5. Social Phobia in Youth: The Diagnostic Utility of Feared Social Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puliafico, Anthony C.; Comer, Jonathan S.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the utility of parent- and child-reported social fears for reaching a diagnosis of social phobia in youth. The diagnostic utility of (a) the number of fears and (b) specific feared social situations was examined. The sample included 140 youth and their parents: youth diagnosed with social phobia (n = 50), youth…

  6. Differentiating High-Functioning Autism and Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Katherine E.; Cruess, Dean G.

    2012-01-01

    Both high-functioning autism (HFA) and social phobia (SP) involve profound social interaction deficits. Although these disorders share some similar symptoms, they are conceptualized as distinct. Because both HFA and SP are defined behaviorally, the degree of overlap between the two disorders may result in misinterpretation of symptoms. However,…

  7. Imagery Rescripting of Early Traumatic Memories in Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Jennifer; Clark, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Negative self-images appear to play a role in the maintenance of social phobia and research suggests they are often linked to earlier memories of socially traumatic events. Imagery rescripting is a clinical intervention that aims to update such unpleasant or traumatic memories, and is increasingly being incorporated in cognitive behavioral therapy…

  8. Restricted Autonomic Flexibility in Children with Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Julian; Kramer, Martina; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Heinrichs, Nina; Blechert, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Background: Psychophysiological hyperresponsiveness to social-evaluative stress plays a key role in current theories of social phobia (SP). Owing to the early onset of this disorder, the study of children with SP can help to improve etiological models. However, research to date has failed to clarify whether children with SP are physiologically…

  9. Post-Event Processing in Children with Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Julian; Kramer, Martina; Blechert, Jens; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of a distressing social event, adults with social phobia (SP) engage in a review of this event with a focus on its negative aspects. To date, little is known about this post-event processing (PEP) and its relationship with perceived performance in SP children. We measured PEP in SP children (n = 24) and healthy controls (HC; n =…

  10. [Clinical and therapeutic characteristics of social phobia in French psychiatry (Phoenix study)].

    PubMed

    Pélissolo, A; Huron, C; Fanget, F; Servant, D; Stiti, S; Richard-Berthe, C; Boyer, P

    2006-01-01

    Only few clinical epidemiologic studies have been conducted on social phobia in France to date. It is however a frequent disorder, with often severe alteration of social adaptation and quality of life, and for which effective treatments exist. Thus, it seems really important to further explore how these patients are nowadays identified and treated in psychiatry. It was the objective of the Phoenix study. In this observational multi-center study, 952 psychiatric in- or out-patients, with a primary diagnosis of social phobia according to DSM IV criteria, were included. Numerous diagnostic and psychometric evaluations were carried out, in order to evaluate the comorbidity (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), the intensity of social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale), and various aspects of the functional and emotional impact (Various Impact of Social Anxiety scale, Sheehan Disability Scale, SF-36, Positive and Negative Emotionality scale). The patients were in majority females (57.6%), with a mean age 37.5 years, and with a mean duration of social anxiety disorder 12.5 years. The mean scores of social anxiety on Liebowitz scale was 40.3 +/- 12.6 for the fear factor, and 38.3 +/- 13.6 for the avoidance factor. The generalized social anxiety subtype (anxiety in most social situations) was present in 67.8% of the patients. A major depressive disorder was found in 47.7% of the sample, and the prevalence of agoraphobia was even higher (49.2%). As known in clinical practice and in other studies, the prevalence rates of current alcohol dependence and substances abuse were also important in this population (respectively 10.6% and 12.7%). Mean scores of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) sub-scales were 13.9 +/-3.8 for anxiety and 9.1 +/-4.5 for depression. About 15% of the patients had a history of suicide attempt, and a suicidal risk was present in nearly 40% of the sample. The psychosocial impact and the

  11. Solution-Focused Therapy: Strength-Based Counseling for Children with Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Cindy M.

    2008-01-01

    Solution-focused therapy is proposed as an effective strength-based model for children with social phobia. Social phobia is described along with the etiology and prevailing treatment approaches. A case illustration demonstrates the application of solution-focused therapy with a child who experienced social phobia. Implications for counseling and…

  12. Shyness and Social Phobia: A Social Work Perspective on a Problem in Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Social phobia can be conceptualized from a social work perspective as an extreme shyness that can be overcome with cognitive learning and behavioral rehearsal. This article reviews the biopsychosocial causes of social phobia and presents a summary of cognitive and behavioral interventions with empirically demonstrated effectiveness. (Author)

  13. Conditioning experiences and phobias.

    PubMed

    Merckelbach, H; de Ruiter, C; van den Hout, M A; Hoekstra, R

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to examine the extent to which phobias are associated with a conditioning pathway to fear. The Phobic Origin Questionnaire (Ost and Hugdahl, Behav. Res. Ther. 19, 439-477, 1981) was administered to a sample of 91 phobic outpatients (patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia, social phobics, simple phobics). Results show clearly that conditioning experiences occur more frequently than either vicarious or informational, learning experiences, which confirms the findings previously reported by Rimm, Janda, Lancaster, Nahl and Dittmar (Behav. Res. Ther. 15, 231-238, 1977) and by Ost and Hugdahl (1981; Behav. Res. Ther. 21, 623-631, 1983). Yet, conditioning experiences consist mainly of panic attacks in confirmed environments. The findings also suggest that a considerable number of phobias are based on a combination of different pathways to fear. PMID:2610660

  14. The Effects of Maternal Social Phobia on Mother-Infant Interactions and Infant Social Responsiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Lynne; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Schofield, Elizabeth; Sack, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Background: Social phobia aggregates in families. The genetic contribution to intergenerational transmission is modest, and parenting is considered important. Research on the effects of social phobia on parenting has been subject to problems of small sample size, heterogeneity of samples and lack of specificity of observational frameworks. We…

  15. Screening for ADHD in an Adult Social Phobia Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortberg, Ewa; Tilfors, Kerstin; Bejerot, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies have suggested a link between a primary anxiety disorder and ADHD. Method: A total of 39 participants with a primary diagnosis of social phobia were compared with 178 patients with ADHD and 88 patients with other psychiatric disorders on measures for childhood and adult ADHD (the Wender Utah Rating Scale and the Adult…

  16. Exposure and Anxiety Management in the Treatment of Social Phobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Gillian; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of exposure treatment for social phobia, and whether anxiety management would increase the effects of exposure in 45 patients. Results showed both exposure treatments were effective, although the combination of exposure and anxiety management was even more effective. (JAC)

  17. Embarrassment and social phobia: the role of parasympathetic activation.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Alexander L; Wilhelm, Frank H; Roth, Walton T

    2003-01-01

    The few studies on the psychophysiology of embarrassment have suggested involvement of parasympathetic activation. However, blushing, the hallmark of embarrassment and a prominent symptom in social phobia, is more likely to be produced by cervical sympathetic outflow. Hitherto, there has been no evidence of parasympathetic innervation of the facial blood vessels. In this study, a group of social phobics and control participants watched, together with a 2-person audience, a previously made videotape of themselves singing a children's song. Self-report measures confirmed that this task induced embarrassment. While two measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) during the task did not indicate heightened parasympathetic tone, increased heart rate (HR) and skin conductance marked sympathetic activation. Thus, our data do not support the notion that an increase in parasympathetic activation plays a significant role in social phobia and embarrassment. Social anxiety and embarrassment both resulted in sympathetic activation. PMID:12614662

  18. Attempted suppression of social threat thoughts: differential effects for social phobia and healthy controls?

    PubMed

    Kingsep, Patrick; Page, Andrew

    2010-07-01

    Thought suppression research in the area of social phobia provides conflicting evidence regarding whether individuals demonstrate a general deficit or successful suppression. This paper reports the outcome of two studies using an online thought suppression paradigm measuring activation of target thoughts. Study 1 examined the effects of suppressing social threat stimuli with a healthy control group. Surprisingly, the results showed that participants demonstrated non-suppression of this stimuli class. Study 2 compared individuals with social phobia to a control group using the same stimuli as Study 1. Results revealed that following instructions to suppress social threat stimuli, individuals with social phobia demonstrated successful suppression, whilst the control group, as in Study 1, did not. The lack of suppression of social threat information by the control group may reflect functional impression-management of social threat stimuli. Whereas, successful suppression of these stimuli by individuals with social phobia, may contribute to diminished habituation to such information. PMID:20421097

  19. Quality of life impairments among adults with social phobia: the impact of subtype.

    PubMed

    Wong, Nina; Sarver, Dustin E; Beidel, Deborah C

    2012-01-01

    Social phobia is characterized by extreme fear in social or performance situations in which the individual may be exposed to embarrassment or scrutiny by others, which creates occupational, social and academic impairment. To date, there are few data examining the relationship of social phobia impairments to quality of life. In this investigation, we examined how demographic characteristics, comorbidity, and social competence are related to quality of life among patients with social phobia and normal controls. In addition, we examined the impact of social phobia subtype. Results indicated that individuals with generalized social phobia had significantly impaired quality of life when compared to individuals with no disorder or individuals with nongeneralized social phobia. Comorbid disorders decreased quality of life only for patients with nongeneralized social phobia. Hierarchical linear regression revealed that a diagnosis of social phobia and observer ratings of social effectiveness exerted strong and independent effects on quality of life scores. Results are discussed in terms of the role of social anxiety, social competence, and comorbidity on the quality of life for adults with social phobia. PMID:21964285

  20. SET-C versus Fluoxetine in the Treatment of Childhood Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.; Ammerman, Robert T.; Sallee, Floyd R.; Crosby, Lori A.; Pathak, Sanjeev

    2007-01-01

    A study examines the effectiveness of fluoxetine, pill placebo and Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C) for children and adolescents with social phobia. The results conclude that both fluoxetine and SET-C are effective for social phobia but SET-C is better for enhancing social skills.

  1. Psychophysiological correlates of face processing in social phobia.

    PubMed

    Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Miltner, Wolfgang H R

    2006-11-01

    Social phobia has been associated with abnormal processing of angry faces, which directly signal disapproval--a situation that social phobics fear. This study investigated the electrophysiological correlates of emotional face processing in socially phobic and non-phobic individuals. Subjects identified either the gender (modified emotional Stroop task) or the expression of angry, happy, or neutral faces. Social phobics showed no deviations from controls in reaction times, heart rates, P1, or P2 amplitudes in response to angry faces, although elevated FSS scores were associated with higher P1 amplitudes in social phobic persons. In addition, social phobic persons showed enhanced right temporo-parietal N170 amplitudes in response to angry faces in the emotion identification task. Furthermore, higher scores on the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) were associated as a trend with larger N170 amplitudes in response to angry faces in the emotion identification task. Thus, the present results suggest that social phobics show abnormalities in the early visual processing of angry faces, as reflected by the enhanced right-hemispheric N170 when the emotion of the angry face was the focus of attention, while behavioral responses and heart rates showed no evidence for preferred processing of angry facial expressions. PMID:16970928

  2. Rescripting Early Memories Linked to Negative Images in Social Phobia: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Jennifer; Hackmann, Ann; Clark, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Negative self-images are a maintaining factor in social phobia. A retrospective study (Hackmann, A., Clark, D.M., McManus, F. (2000). Recurrent images and early memories in social phobia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 38, 601-610) suggested that the images may be linked to early memories of unpleasant social experiences. This preliminary study…

  3. Performance Anxiety among African-American College Students: Racial Bias as a Factor in Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Aleta Bok

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the etiology of social phobia, and proposes that the sensitivity to self-scrutiny common to social phobics can be exacerbated by the effects of longstanding racial bias. The impact of racism on identity and the importance of context are explored as salient factors in the onset of a case of social phobia for an…

  4. Cognitive Restructuring in the Treatment of Social Phobia: Efficacy and Mode of Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven; Woody, Sheila; Koch, William J.; McLean, Peter; Paterson, Randy J.; Anderson, Kent W.

    1997-01-01

    Examines whether cognitive restructuring (CR) contributes to treatment efficacy and investigates its mode of action for therapeutic effects. Results, based on 60 persons with generalized social phobia, indicate that CR reduced social phobia and negative social cognitions and increased positive cognitions. CR did not enhance the effects of…

  5. Testing the Efficacy of Theoretically Derived Improvements in the Treatment of Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapee, Ronald M.; Gaston, Jonathan E.; Abbott, Maree J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent theoretical models of social phobia suggest that targeting several specific cognitive factors in treatment should enhance treatment efficacy over that of more traditional skills-based treatment programs. In the current study, 195 people with social phobia were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 treatments: standard cognitive restructuring plus in…

  6. Differentiating among singular and comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder and social phobia symptomology.

    PubMed

    Rudy, Brittany M; May, Anna C; Whiting, Sara E; Davis, Thompson E; Jenkins, Whitney S; Reuther, Erin T

    2014-01-01

    Social phobia is a frequent co-occurring diagnosis with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); however, co-occurring OCD in those with social phobia is less common. Genetic, environmental, and cognitive traits are common risk factors for anxiety disorders broadly. It is plausible that shared variables related to OCD and/or social phobia could provide insight into the co-occurrence of these two disorders. The current study explored differences in fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and perfectionism among four groups: those with (1) elevated social phobia symptoms, (2) elevated OCD symptoms, (3) elevated symptoms of OCD and social phobia, and those who were (4) asymptomatic as a control group. A non-clinical sample of 196 participants completed several online questionnaires about social phobia and OCD symptomology. Results identified three cognitive variables (i.e., FNE, total perfectionism, and concern over mistakes) as differential variables in comorbid symptom presentation of OCD and social phobia. A fourth variable (i.e., doubts about actions) was identified as a potential dual risk factor, and four subsequent variables (i.e., parental criticism, personal standards, parental expectations, and organization) were not implicated in differential symptom presentation. Given the different rates of OCD and social phobia co-occurrence, identification of differentiating variables could aid in better understanding of potential risk factors, which may enhance preventative and therapeutic techniques. Study implications, limitations, and future recommendations are discussed. PMID:24365129

  7. Social phobia: diagnosis and epidemiology, neurobiology and pharmacology, comorbidity and treatment.

    PubMed

    Brunello, N; den Boer, J A; Judd, L L; Kasper, S; Kelsey, J E; Lader, M; Lecrubier, Y; Lepine, J P; Lydiard, R B; Mendlewicz, J; Montgomery, S A; Racagni, G; Stein, M B; Wittchen, H U

    2000-10-01

    Social phobia is a common disorder associated with significant psychosocial impairment, representing a substantial public health problem largely determined by the high prevalence, and the lifelong chronicity. Social phobia starts in early childhood or adolescence and is often comorbid with depression, other anxiety disorders, alcohol and substance abuse or eating disorders. This cascade of comorbidity, usually secondary to social phobia, increases the disability associated with the condition. The possibility that social phobia may be a trigger for later developing comorbid disorders directs attention to the need for early effective treatment as a preventive measure. The most recent drug class to be investigated for the psychopharmacological treatment of social phobia is the SSRI group for which there is growing support. The other drug classes that have been evaluated are monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), benzodiazepines, and beta-blockers. The SSRIs represent a new and attractive therapeutic choice for patients with generalized social phobia. Recently the first, large scale, placebo-controlled study to assess the efficacy of drug treatment in generalized social phobia has been completed with paroxetine. Paroxetine was more effective in reducing the symptoms than placebo and was well tolerated. Many now regard SSRIs as the drugs of choice in social phobia because of their effectiveness and because they avoid the problems of treatment with benzodiazepines or classical MAOIs. PMID:10940449

  8. The Treatment of Social Phobia in a Young Boy with Asperger's Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleismann, Kelly D.; Gillis, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, including social phobia, occur often in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD; Gillott, Furniss, & Walter, 2001; Leyfer et al., 2006; Simonoff et al., 2008); however, little is known about the conceptualization and treatment of social phobia in this population. The current study presents the case of "James," a 6-year-old…

  9. Change Processes in Residential Cognitive and Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Social Phobia: A Process-Outcome Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffart, Asle; Borge, Finn-Magnus; Sexton, Harold; Clark, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test cognitive and interpersonal models for improving social phobia. Eighty patients with social phobia were randomized to 10-week residential cognitive (RCT) or residential interpersonal psychotherapy (RIPT). They completed process measures every Thursday and a sub-outcome measure every Monday. The ratings were…

  10. What Is the Core Fear in Social Phobia? A New Model to Facilitate Individualized Case Conceptualization and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovitch, David A.

    2009-01-01

    What, exactly, do individuals with social phobia fear? Whereas fear of anxiety-related bodily sensations characterizes and defines panic disorder, is there a fundamental focus of anxiety that unifies individuals under the diagnostic category of social phobia? Current conceptualizations of social phobia suggest several possible candidates,…

  11. Over-representation of Myers Briggs Type Indicator introversion in social phobia patients.

    PubMed

    Janowsky, D S; Morter, S; Tancer, M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to profile the personalities of patients with social phobia. Sixteen patients with social phobia were compared with a normative population of 55,971, and with 24 hospitalized Major Depressive Disorder inpatients, using the Myers Briggs Type Indicator. The Myers Briggs Type Indicator, a popular personality survey, divides individuals into eight categories: Extroverts versus Introverts, Sensors versus Intuitives, Thinkers versus Feelers, and Judgers versus Perceivers. Social phobia patients were significantly more often Introverts (93.7%) than were subjects in the normative population (46.2%). In addition, using continuous scores, the social phobia patients scored as significantly more introverted than did the patients with Major Depressive Disorder, who also scored as Introverted. Introversion is a major component of social phobia, and this observation may have both etiological and therapeutic significance. PMID:10875053

  12. Social Phobia as a Predictor of Social Competence Perceived by Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ates, Bünyamin

    2016-01-01

    In this research, it was analyzed to what extent the variables of social avoidance, concern for being criticized and sense of individual worthlessness as sub-dimensions of social phobia predicted the perceived social competence levels of teenagers. The study group of this study included totally 648 students including 301 (46.5%) female and 347…

  13. Neurofunctional correlates of expressed vocal affect in social phobia.

    PubMed

    Laukka, Petri; Ahs, Fredrik; Furmark, Tomas; Fredrikson, Mats

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the neural correlates of expressed vocal affect in patients with social phobia. A group of 36 patients performed an anxiogenic public-speaking task while regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was assessed using oxygen-15 positron emission tomography. The patients' speech was recorded and content masked using low-pass filtering (which obscures linguistic content but preserves nonverbal affective cues). The content-masked speech samples were then evaluated with regard to their level of vocally expressed nervousness. We hypothesized that activity in prefrontal and subcortical brain areas previously implicated in emotion regulation would be associated with the degree of expressed vocal affect. Regression analyses accordingly revealed significant negative correlations between expressed vocal affect and rCBF in inferior frontal gyrus, putamen, and hippocampus. Further, functional connectivity was revealed between inferior frontal gyrus and (a) anterior cingulate cortex and (b) amygdala and basal ganglia. We suggest that brain areas important for emotion regulation may also form part of a network associated with the modulation of affective prosody in social phobia. PMID:21509493

  14. Lack of Neuropsychological Deficits in Generalized Social Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Sutterby, Scott R.; Bedwell, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    There are relatively few existing studies examining neuropsychological functioning in social phobia (SP), which collectively yield mixed results. Interpretation of results is further complicated by a number of methodological inconsistencies across studies, including the examination of neuropsychological domains in relative isolation from one another. The present study utilized a broader collection of neuropsychological tests to assess nine domains of functioning in 25 individuals diagnosed with generalized SP and 25 nonpsychiatric controls (NC). A mixed ANOVA revealed neither a significant group by domain interaction, nor a significant main effect of group. Furthermore, no significant group differences emerged between the SP and NC groups within each specific neuropsychological domain. These findings suggest that underlying neuropsychological deficits are not likely to account for the information processing biases observed in the empirical literature, and appear to be consistent with current theoretical models which argue for the specificity of these biases to social information. PMID:22880078

  15. Quality of Life in College Students with and without Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaedi, Gholam Hossein; Tavoli, Azadeh; Bakhtiari, Maryam; Melyani, Mahdieh; Sahragard, Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies demonstrating quality of life impairment in phobia and anxiety disorders have relied upon epidemiological samples or clinical data. Using the same quality of life scale, the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), in Iranian college students allowed us to study the impact of social phobia (SP) on quality of life among the college…

  16. Subjective, Autonomic, and Endocrine Reactivity during Social Stress in Children with Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Martina; Seefeldt, Wiebke Lina; Heinrichs, Nina; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Schmitz, Julian; Wolf, Oliver Tobias; Blechert, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Reports of exaggerated anxiety and physiological hyperreactivity to social-evaluative situations are characteristic of childhood social phobia (SP). However, laboratory research on subjective, autonomic and endocrine functioning in childhood SP is scarce, inconsistent and limited by small sample sizes, limited breadth of measurements, and the use…

  17. [Self-esteem: a comparison study between eating disorders and social phobia].

    PubMed

    Eiber, R; Vera, L; Mirabel-Sarron, C; Guelfi, J-D

    2003-01-01

    Eating disorder patients evidenced very often a low self-esteem. Self-esteem in eating disorder patients is excessively based on body dissatisfaction. In eating disorders there seems to be a link between body image dissatisfaction and social anxiety. We hypothesised: self-esteem would be as low in eating disorder patients as in social phobia patients; self-esteem would be lower in eating disorder patients with social phobia than in patients with social phobia alone; self-esteem would be lower in eating disorder patients with depressive cognitions than in social phobia patients with depressive cognitions; self-esteem could have different characteristics in the two disorders; self-esteem would be as low in anorexia as in bulimia; 103 eating disorder patients (33 restrictive anorectics, 34 anorectics-bulimics, 36 bulimics) and 26 social phobia patients diagnosed according to DSM IV and ICD-10 criteria have been investigated by the Self-Esteem Inventory of Coopersmith, the Assertiveness Schedule of Rathus, the Fear Survey Schedule of Wolpe (FSS III) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Patients were free of medication and presented no episode of major depression according to DSM IV criteria. Evaluations took place before any psychotherapy. Self-esteem in eating disorder patients is reduced at the same level as in social phobia patients; 86.1% of the total sample and 84.5% of the eating disorder patients have a very low self-esteem (score 33 in the SEI). Eating disorder patients have significantly higher scores in the Social (p=0.016) and Professional (p=0.0225) sub-scales of the SEI than social phobia patients. Eating disorder patients show higher scores on the Assertiveness Schedule of Rathus (p=0.0013) than social phobia patients. Eating disorder patients disclose higher scores on the BDI (p=0.0003) but eating disorder patients with depressive cognitions do not differ from social phobia patients with depressive cognitions in the level of self-esteem. The FSS III

  18. Epidemiology, patterns of comorbidity, and associated disabilities of social phobia.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, H U; Fehm, L

    2001-12-01

    Social phobia is a common condition, with current prevalence estimates in the range of 4% to 6% and a lifetime risk of 7% to 13%. It has an early onset and, without appropriate intervention, it has a disproportionately higher risk for persistence compared with other anxiety disorders. Presentation differs between age groups; the disorder in teenagers and in those in their early 20s tends to look different in terms of types of problems and the associated distress to that expected in the 30s and 40s age groups, when these individuals have already endured 20 years of suffering and disability. There is an increased risk for depression and substance abuse disorders even in adolescence, in addition to an increased risk for psychosocial impairment and disability resembling that experienced by depressed outpatients. This finding is particularly true in cases affected by generalized SP, which might have slightly different etiologic pathways than the nongeneralized type. Social phobia is in itself a disabling disorder, and individuals who develop comorbid conditions have a more severe level of disability. Early recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of SP could minimize sufferers' problems throughout their subsequent lives, preventing the development of comorbidity and a worsened prognosis. Developing models for early recognition and treatment should improve the outcome for the patient, as well as reduce future demand on health care resources. Epidemiologic studies, with their methodologic strengths and unique methods, can be instrumental in this respect. They may, for example, provide time-efficient, simple screening tools for use by physicians or even patients, based on the existing diagnostic instruments used in epidemiologic surveys. They may provide further guidance in making treatment decisions and developing treatment algorithms by offering criteria, which with additional vulnerability and risk factors, will lead to more severe, chronic, and comorbid course in a given

  19. Face to face: visual scanpath evidence for abnormal processing of facial expressions in social phobia.

    PubMed

    Horley, Kaye; Williams, Leanne M; Gonsalvez, Craig; Gordon, Evian

    2004-06-30

    Cognitive models of social phobia propose that cognitive biases and fears regarding negative evaluation by others result in preferential attention to interpersonal sources of threat. These fears may account for the hypervigilance and avoidance of eye contact commonly reported by clinicians. This study provides the first objective examination of threat-related processing in social phobia. It was predicted that hyperscanning (hypervigilance) and eye avoidance would be most apparent in social phobia for overt expressions of threat. An infrared corneal reflection technique was used to record visual scanpaths in response to angry, sad, and happy vs. neutral facial expressions. Twenty-two subjects with social phobia were compared with age- and sex-matched normal controls. As predicted, social phobia subjects displayed hyperscanning, (increased scanpath length) and avoidance (reduced foveal fixations) of the eyes, particularly evident for angry faces. The results could not be explained by either medication or co-morbid depression. These findings are consistent with theories emphasising the role of information processing biases in social phobia, and show promise in the application to treatment evaluation in this disorder. PMID:15261704

  20. A comparison study of body dysmorphic disorder versus social phobia.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Megan M; Dalrymple, Kristy; Zimmerman, Mark; Phillips, Katharine A

    2013-01-30

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) shares many characteristics with social phobia (SP), including high levels of social anxiety and avoidance, but to our knowledge no studies have directly compared these disorders' demographic and clinical features. Demographic and clinical features were compared in individuals with BDD (n=172), SP (n=644), and comorbid BDD/SP (n=125). SP participants had a significantly earlier age of onset and lower educational attainment than BDD participants. BDD participants were significantly less likely to ever be married than SP participants, had a greater likelihood of ever being psychiatrically hospitalized, and had significantly lower mean GAF scores than SP participants. The two groups had different comorbidity patterns, which included a greater likelihood for BDD participants to have comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or an eating disorder, vs. a greater likelihood for SP participants to have a comorbid non-OCD anxiety disorder. The comorbid BDD/SP group had significantly greater morbidity across several domains than the SP only group, but not the BDD only group. In summary, although BDD and SP were similar across many demographic and clinical features, they had important differences. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings and address similarities and differences between these disorders across a broader range of variables. PMID:22999105

  1. Bruxism and oral parafunctional hyperactivity in social phobia outpatients.

    PubMed

    Hermesh, H; Schapir, L; Marom, S; Skopski, R; Barnea, E; Weizman, A; Winocur, E

    2015-02-01

    Anxiety and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered aggravating factors for bruxism. We examined the influence of anxiety, depression and SSRI on bruxism in social phobia (SP). Twenty-three drug naïve, 17 SSRI-treated SP patients and 33 healthy controls underwent a psychiatric assessment and completed Leibowitz Social Anxiety Scale and Beck Depression Inventory. Oral parafunctional activity (PF) was evaluated by TM-dental examination and by a questionnaire. Drug- naïve and SSRI-treated SP patients did not differ on demographic and clinical measures. Awake bruxism, 'JAW PLAY' and at least one PF were more prevalent in SP than in controls. Severity of SP predicted the presence of PF. SP, but not depression, was associated with higher risk of oral PF and awake bruxism. Chronic SSRI treatment of SP did not affect sleep and awake bruxism. Dental and anxiety screening may improve the prognosis psychiatric and dental patients. Effective treatment of SP may mitigate bruxism. PMID:25238249

  2. Do Pharmacological and Behavioral Interventions Differentially Affect Treatment Outcome for Children with Social Phobia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharfstein, Lindsay A.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Rendon Finnell, Laura; Distler, Aaron; Carter, Nathan T.

    2011-01-01

    In a randomized trial for children with social phobia (SP), Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C; a treatment consisting of exposure and social skills training) and fluoxetine were more effective than pill placebo in reducing social distress and behavioral avoidance, but only SET-C demonstrated significantly improved overall social…

  3. Mediation of Changes in Anxiety and Depression During Treatment of Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovitch, David A.; Stefan G. Hofmann, Michael K.; Suvak, Michael K.; In-Albon, Tina

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the interactive process of changes in social anxiety and depression during treatment, the authors assessed weekly symptoms in 66 adult outpatients with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) who participated in cognitive- behavioral group therapy. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed that improvements in social anxiety mediated…

  4. Parental predictors of pediatric panic disorder/agoraphobia: a controlled study in high-risk offspring.

    PubMed

    Biederman, Joseph; Petty, Carter; Faraone, Stephen V; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R; Henin, Aude; Dougherty, Meghan; Lebel, Teresa J; Pollack, Mark; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate parental risk factors for pediatric-onset panic disorder/agoraphobia (PD/AG) in offspring at high risk for PD/AG. Comparisons were made between parents with PD who had a child with PD or AG (N = 27) and parents with PD without children with PD or AG (N = 79). Comparisons were also made between the spouses of these parents with PD. Separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and bipolar disorder in the parents with PD and their spouses accounted for the risk for childhood onset PD/AG in the offspring. This risk was particularly high if both parents were affected with social phobia. These findings suggest that psychiatric comorbidity with other anxiety disorders and with bipolar disorder in parents with PD and their spouses confer a particularly high risk in their offspring to develop PD/AG in childhood. PMID:16193490

  5. The Social Phobia Inventory: screening and cross-cultural validation in Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lopez, Luis Joaquín; Bermejo, Rosa Ma; Hidalgo, Ma Dolores

    2010-11-01

    Availability of brief, self-report measures to be used as screening instruments is crucial to detect correctly youth with social anxiety disorder and therefore, reach those otherwise under-detected and under-treated. A previous study revealed that the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) was potentially an appropriate measure for screening social anxiety among US adolescents. However, there is a lack of information concerning its properties as a screening test in other cultures and languages. This is the main objective of this study, although further validity of the scale is provided as well. The sample consisted of 192 adolescents (a sample composed of 114 subjects with a principal diagnosis of social anxiety disorder; and a group consisting of 78 subjects with no diagnosis of social phobia). Results suggest that the Social Phobia Inventory has demonstrated good psychometric properties and indeed may be used as a screening tool in Spanish-speaking adolescents. PMID:20977044

  6. Heterogeneity among specific phobia types in DSM-IV.

    PubMed

    Antony, M M; Brown, T A; Barlow, D H

    1997-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that situational specific phobias (e.g., phobias of driving, flying, enclosed places) are more closely related to agoraphobia than are other specific phobia types. The present study investigated this hypothesis by examining heterogeneity among the four main DSM-IV specific phobia types, particularly with respect to variables believed to be associated with agoraphobia. Using interviews and behavioral testing, 60 patients with specific phobias of animals, heights, blood/injections, or driving were compared with respect to etiology, age of onset, physiological response, predictability of panic attacks, and focus of apprehension. Fifteen patients suffering from panic disorder with agoraphobia served as a comparison group for some measures. Relative to the other specific phobias, driving phobias were most strongly associated with a later age of onset, similar to that of individuals with agoraphobia. Height phobias were also associated with a late age of onset as well as a more internal focus of apprehension, relative to other groups. Finally, individuals in the blood/injection phobia group reported a more internal focus of apprehension than those in other groups and were the only group to report a history of fainting in the phobic situation. Overall, the results did not support the hypothesis that situational phobias are a variant of agoraphobia. In fact, on several of the variables for which groups did differ, individuals with height phobias (a phobia from the natural environment type) showed a pattern most similar to individuals with agoraphobia. The implications of these results for the classification of specific phobias are discussed. PMID:9465442

  7. Have we met before? Neural correlates of emotional learning in women with social phobia

    PubMed Central

    Laeger, Inga; Keuper, Kati; Heitmann, Carina; Kugel, Harald; Dobel, Christian; Eden, Annuschka; Arolt, Volker; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Dannlowski, Udo; Zwanzger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Altered memory processes are thought to be a key mechanism in the etiology of anxiety disorders, but little is known about the neural correlates of fear learning and memory biases in patients with social phobia. The present study therefore examined whether patients with social phobia exhibit different patterns of neural activation when confronted with recently acquired emotional stimuli. Methods Patients with social phobia and a group of healthy controls learned to associate pseudonames with pictures of persons displaying either a fearful or a neutral expression. The next day, participants read the pseudonames in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Afterwards, 2 memory tests were carried out. Results We enrolled 21 patients and 21 controls in our study. There were no group differences for learning performance, and results of the memory tests were mixed. On a neural level, patients showed weaker amygdala activation than controls for the contrast of names previously associated with fearful versus neutral faces. Social phobia severity was negatively related to amygdala activation. Moreover, a detailed psychophysiological interaction analysis revealed an inverse correlation between disorder severity and frontolimbic connectivity for the emotional > neutral pseudonames contrast. Limitations Our sample included only women. Conclusion Our results support the theory of a disturbed corticolimbic interplay, even for recently learned emotional stimuli. We discuss the findings with regard to the vigilance–avoidance theory and contrast them to results indicating an oversensitive limbic system in patients with social phobia. PMID:24758944

  8. Facial Emotion Recognition in Children with High Functioning Autism and Children with Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Nina; Beidel, Deborah C.; Sarver, Dustin E.; Sims, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing facial affect is essential for effective social functioning. This study examines emotion recognition abilities in children aged 7-13 years with High Functioning Autism (HFA = 19), Social Phobia (SP = 17), or typical development (TD = 21). Findings indicate that all children identified certain emotions more quickly (e.g., happy [less…

  9. Predicting Depression, Social Phobia, and Violence in Early Adulthood from Childhood Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, W. Alex; Kosterman, Rick; Hawkins, J. David; Herrenkohl, Todd I.; Lengua, Liliana J.; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study examined childhood behavior problems at ages 10 and 11 years as predictors of young adult depression, social phobia, and violence at age 21 years. Method: Data were collected as part of the Seattle Social Development Project, a longitudinal study of 808 elementary school students from high-crime neighborhoods of Seattle.…

  10. Attention Training in Individuals with Generalized Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Nader; Beard, Courtney; Taylor, Charles T.; Klumpp, Heide; Elias, Jason; Burns, Michelle; Chen, Xi

    2009-01-01

    The authors conducted a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial to examine the efficacy of an attention training procedure in reducing symptoms of social anxiety in 44 individuals diagnosed with generalized social phobia (GSP). Attention training comprised a probe detection task in which pictures of faces with either a threatening or…

  11. Pilot Study of Community-Based Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Adolescents with Social Phobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Susan; Garland, E. Jane

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral group therapy program for adolescents with social phobia, simplified both in terms of time and labor intensity from a previously studied program (Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children and Adolescents) to be more appropriate for a community outpatient psychiatric…

  12. Social Skills Deficits and Vocal Characteristics of Children with Social Phobia or Asperger's Disorder: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharfstein, Lindsay A.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Sims, Valerie K.; Finnell, Laura Rendon

    2011-01-01

    Social skills deficits are commonly reported among children with social phobia (SP) and children with Asperger's Disorder (AD); however, a lack of direct comparison makes it unclear whether these groups, both of which endorse the presence of social anxiety, have similar or unique skills deficits. In this investigation, the social behaviors of…

  13. Psychophysiological and subjective indicators of aversive pavlovian conditioning in generalized social phobia.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Christiane; Ziegler, Silvio; Birbaumer, Niels; Flor, Herta

    2002-08-15

    Aversive conditioning has been proposed as an important etiologic mechanism in social phobia; however, empirical evidence is scarce and has not relied on a detailed analysis of the acquisition and extinction of the conditioned emotional response. Fourteen men sustaining generalized social phobia and 19 healthy control subjects participated in differential aversive conditioning with two neutral faces as conditioned stimuli and an aversive odor as unconditioned stimulus. Subjective and peripheral physiological responses were obtained. Both groups were successfully conditioned as reflected by differential subjective (valence, arousal, subjective unconditioned stimulus expectancy) and peripheral physiological responses (skin conductance, startle response). There was no evidence for an enhanced conditionability in the social phobics; however, they showed an enhanced unconditioned stimulus expectancy, especially for the nonreinforced conditioned stimuli during acquisition, and a delayed extinction of the conditioned skin conductance response as well as a certain dissociation between subjective and physiological responses.The enhanced unconditioned stimulus expectancy during acquisition and the overall elevated subjective arousal suggest that, under threat, subjects with generalized social phobia may be more prone to associate neutral social cues and an aversive outcome. Furthermore, delayed extinction of the conditioned response seems to contribute to the etiology and maintenance of generalized social phobia. PMID:12208640

  14. Behavioral treatment of social phobia in youth: does parent education training improve the outcome?

    PubMed

    Öst, Lars-Göran; Cederlund, Rio; Reuterskiöld, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Social phobia is one of the most common anxiety disorders in children and adolescents, and it runs a fairly chronic course if left untreated. The goals of the present study were to evaluate if a parent education course would improve the outcome for children with a primary diagnosis of social phobia and if comorbidity at the start of treatment would impair the outcome of the social phobia. A total of 55 children, 8-14 years old, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: 1) Child is treated, 2) Child is treated and parent participates in the course, or 3) A wait-list for 12 weeks. The treatment consisted of individual exposure and group social skills training based on the Beidel, Turner, and Morris (2000) SET-C. Children and parents were assessed pre-, post-, and at one year follow-up with independent assessor ratings and self-report measures. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the two active treatments and both were better than the wait-list. The treatment effects were maintained or furthered at the follow-up. Comorbidity did not lead to worse outcome of social phobia. Comorbid disorders improved significantly from pre-to post-treatment and from post-to follow-up assessment without being targeted in therapy. PMID:25727679

  15. Cognitive Therapy Versus Exposure and Applied Relaxation in Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David M.; Ehlers, Anke; Hackmann, Ann; McManus, Freda; Fennell, Melanie; Grey, Nick; Waddington, Louise; Wild, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    A new cognitive therapy (CT) program was compared with an established behavioral treatment. Sixty-two patients meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) criteria for social phobia were randomly assigned to CT, exposure plus applied relaxation (EXP = AR), or wait-list (WAIT). CT…

  16. Cognition about Cognition: Metacognitive Therapy and Change in Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    Metacognitive theory and therapy views the persistence of negative beliefs and thoughts as a result of metacognitions controlling cognition. This paper describes, with reference to the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and social phobia, how metacognition contributes to cognitive stability and to change. Metacognitive therapy offers…

  17. Evidence Based Clinical Assessment of Child and Adolescent Social Phobia: A Critical Review of Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulbure, Bogdan T.; Szentagotai, Aurora; Dobrean, Anca; David, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the empirical support of various assessment instruments, the evidence based assessment approach expands the scientific basis of psychotherapy. Starting from Hunsley and Mash's evaluative framework, we critically reviewed the rating scales designed to measure social anxiety or phobia in youth. Thirteen of the most researched social…

  18. Evaluation of Children with Selective Mutism and Social Phobia: A Comparison of Psychological and Psychophysiological Arousal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Brennan J.; Bunnell, Brian E.; Beidel, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    Although children with social phobia (SP) and selective mutism (SM) present similarly in a clinical setting, it remains unclear whether children with SM are unable to speak due to overwhelming anxiety, or whether withholding speech functions as an avoidance mechanism. A total of 35 children (ages 5-12 years) with either SM (n = 10), SP (n = 11),…

  19. Social Phobia and Subtypes in the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement: Prevalence, Correlates, and Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Marcy; He, Jian-Ping; Kattan, Gabriela; Albano, Anne Marie; Avenevoli, Shelli; Merikangas, Kathleen R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Social phobia typically develops during the adolescent years, yet no nationally representative studies in the United States have examined the rates and features of this condition among youth in this age range. The objectives of this investigation were to: (1) present the lifetime prevalence, sociodemographic and clinical correlates, and…

  20. Recall of family factors in social phobia and panic disorder: comparison of mother and offspring reports.

    PubMed

    Rapee, R M; Melville, L F

    1997-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that adults with various anxiety disorders, especially social phobia, recall their parents as excessively protective and controlling and as low in socialization. However, it is not clear whether such results would be supported by parents. In the present study subjects with social phobia, panic disorder, and nonclinical subjects and their mothers were given parallel measures of maternal control, socialization, and offspring early introverted behaviors as well as several questions relating to two early major life events and family size. Anxious offspring reported the usual high maternal control and low paternal socialization and mother supported the data on socialization. On control, mothers provided mixed results, disagreeing on a more standard measure, but showing agreement on a more operationalized measure. The data were more consistent for social phobia than for panic disorder. In terms of early life factors, both anxiety disorders were associated with fewer friends and more introverted behaviors, while family size and two major life events did not differentiate groups. PMID:9250435

  1. Agoraphobia: A Situational Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, Austin; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Agoraphobia patients answered a questionnaire describing anxiety-producing situations. Home environment was associated with supportive company. Situations requiring patients to venture out alone were most anxiety-producing. The overriding importance of a significant other suggests treatment implications. (JAC)

  2. Childhood stress and symptoms of drug dependence in adolescence and early adulthood: social phobia as a mediator.

    PubMed

    DeWit, D J; MacDonald, K; Offord, D R

    1999-01-01

    Retrospective data from 7,871 individuals age 16 to 64 were used to investigate whether, among those diagnosed with lifetime social phobia, its symptoms serve to link life events and chronic strains in childhood with symptoms of drug dependence in adulthood. Findings suggest social phobia as a pathway through which early life events and chronic strains affect the development of drug-related problems. Implications for research and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:9990437

  3. [Validation of the portuguese version of the Mini-Social Phobia Inventory (Mini-SPIN)].

    PubMed

    D'El Rey, Gustavo José Fonseca; Matos, Cláudia Wilmor

    2009-01-01

    Social phobia (also known as social anxiety disorder) is a severe mental disorder that brings distress and disability. The aim of this study was validate to the Portuguese language the Mini-Social Phobia Inventory (Mini-SPIN) in a populational sample. We performed a discriminative validity study of the Mini-SPIN in a sample of 644 subjects (Mini-SPIN positive group: n = 218 and control/negative group: n = 426) of a study of anxiety disorders' prevalence in the city of Santo André-SP. The Portuguese version of the Mini-SPIN (with score of 6 points, suggested in the original English version) demonstrated a sensitivity of 95.0%, specificity of 80.3%, positive predictive value of 52.8%, negative predictive value of 98.6% and incorrect classification rate of 16.9%. With score of 7 points, was observed an increase in the specificity and positive predictive value (88.6% and 62.7%), while the sensitivity and negative predictive value (84.8% and 96.2%) remained high. The Portuguese version of the Mini-SPIN showed satisfactory psychometric qualities in terms of discriminative validity. In this study, the cut-off of 7, was considered to be the most suitable to screening of the generalized social phobia. PMID:19851580

  4. Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy versus Sertraline in Treatment of Social Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Nader-Mohammadi Moghadam, Mehryar; Atef-Vahid, Mohammad-Kazem; Asgharnejad-Farid, Ali-Asghar; Shabani, Amir; Lavasni, Fahimeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: A few studies on short-term psychodynamic approach have been conducted on social phobia. Objectives: In this study, the effectiveness of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy on the treatment of social phobia has been compared to the effectiveness of sertraline and waiting list. Materials and Methods: In this randomized-controlled trial study, 13 male students were treated with short-term dynamic psychotherapy (McCullough method) lasting 25 sessions, 11 students received sertraline for 12 weeks, and 14 students, as the waiting list, received no intervention for 8 weeks. Participants completed the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) as primary efficacy variable 4 times, and were rated with Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) as secondary efficacy variables. The data were analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA), analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), general linear model repeated measures analysis of variance and Fisher exact test. Results: ANCOVA showed significant differences between groups based on SPIN scores (F = 23.51, Sig. = 0.001) and Bonferroni test, as post hoc compression, showed means of both short-term dynamic therapy and sertraline therapy groups were significantly different from waiting list mean (STDP-WL: x̅dif = 15.76, Sig. = 0.001), (MED-WL: x̅ = 15.91, Sig. = 0.001). Mean of SPIN scores was not significantly different between short-term dynamic psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy groups. In both treatment groups, means of SPIN scores significantly decreased in posttest, but not in waiting. These results repeated with GAF and CGI scores. Conclusions: The results indicated that short-term dynamic psychotherapy sertraline are effective in decreasing social phobia symptoms and were superior to control group. PMID:26288643

  5. The Neuroanatomical Basis of Panic Disorder and Social Phobia in Schizophrenia: A Voxel Based Morphometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Picado, Marisol; Carmona, Susanna; Hoekzema, Elseline; Pailhez, Guillem; Bergé, Daniel; Mané, Anna; Fauquet, Jordi; Hilferty, Joseph; Moreno, Ana; Cortizo, Romina; Vilarroya, Oscar; Bulbena, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Objective It is known that there is a high prevalence of certain anxiety disorders among schizophrenic patients, especially panic disorder and social phobia. However, the neural underpinnings of the comorbidity of such anxiety disorders and schizophrenia remain unclear. Our study aims to determine the neuroanatomical basis of the co-occurrence of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia. Methods Voxel-based morphometry was used in order to examine brain structure and to measure between-group differences, comparing magnetic resonance images of 20 anxious patients, 20 schizophrenic patients, 20 schizophrenic patients with comorbid anxiety, and 20 healthy control subjects. Results Compared to the schizophrenic patients, we observed smaller grey-matter volume (GMV) decreases in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and precentral gyrus in the schizophrenic-anxiety group. Additionally, the schizophrenic group showed significantly reduced GMV in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, temporal gyrus and angular/inferior parietal gyrus when compared to the control group. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the comorbidity of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia might be characterized by specific neuroanatomical and clinical alterations that may be related to maladaptive emotion regulation related to anxiety. Even thought our findings need to be replicated, our study suggests that the identification of neural abnormalities involved in anxiety, schizophrenia and schizophrenia-anxiety may lead to an improved diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:25774979

  6. Optimal treatment of social phobia: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Canton, John; Scott, Kate M; Glue, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a number of recommendations for the treatment of generalized social phobia, based on a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. An optimal treatment regimen would include a combination of medication and psychotherapy, along with an assertive clinical management program. For medications, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and dual serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are first-line choices based on their efficacy and tolerability profiles. The nonselective monoamine oxidase inhibitor, phenelzine, may be more potent than these two drug classes, but because of its food and drug interaction liabilities, its use should be restricted to patients not responding to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. There are other medication classes with demonstrated efficacy in social phobia (benzodiazepines, antipsychotics, alpha-2-delta ligands), but due to limited published clinical trial data and the potential for dependence and withdrawal issues with benzodiazepines, it is unclear how best to incorporate these drugs into treatment regimens. There are very few clinical trials on the use of combined medications. Cognitive behavior therapy appears to be more effective than other evidence-based psychological techniques, and its effects appear to be more enduring than those of pharmacotherapy. There is some evidence, albeit limited to certain drug classes, that the combination of medication and cognitive behavior therapy may be more effective than either strategy used alone. Generalized social phobia is a chronic disorder, and many patients will require long-term support and treatment. PMID:22665997

  7. Associations between body weight and depression, social phobia, insomnia, and self-esteem among Taiwanese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jia-In; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this cross-sectional study were to examine the associations between body weight and mental health indicators including depression, social phobia, insomnia, and self-esteem among Taiwanese adolescents in Grades 7-12. The body mass index (BMI) of 5254 adolescents was calculated based on self-reported weight and height measurements. Body weight status was determined by the age- and gender-specific International Obesity Task Force reference tables. By using participants of average weight as the reference group, the association between body weight status (underweight, overweight, and obesity) and mental health indicators (depression, social phobia, insomnia, and self-esteem) were examined by using multiple regression analysis. The possible moderating effects of sociodemographic characteristics on the association were also examined. After controlling for the effects of sociodemographic characteristics, both overweight (p < 0.05) and obese adolescents (p < 0.001) had a lower level of self-esteem than did those of average weight; however, no significant differences in depression, social phobia, or insomnia were found between those who were overweight/obese and those of average weight. No significant differences in the four mental health indicators were found between those who were underweight and those of average weight. Sociodemographic characteristics had no moderating effect on the association between body weight and mental health indicators. In conclusion, mental health and school professionals must take the association between overweight/obesity and self-esteem into consideration when approaching the issue of mental health among adolescents. PMID:25476101

  8. Latent dimensions of social anxiety disorder: A re-evaluation of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN).

    PubMed

    Campbell-Sills, Laura; Espejo, Emmanuel; Ayers, Catherine R; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Stein, Murray B

    2015-12-01

    The Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN; Connor et al., 2000) is a well-validated instrument for assessing severity of social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, evaluations of its factor structure have produced inconsistent results and this aspect of the scale requires further study. Primary care patients with SAD (N=397) completed the SPIN as part of baseline assessment for the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management study (Roy-Byrne et al., 2010). These data were used for exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of the SPIN. A 3-factor model provided the best fit for the data and factors were interpreted as Fear of Negative Evaluation, Fear of Physical Symptoms, and Fear of Uncertainty in Social Situations. Tests of a second-order model showed that the three factors loaded strongly on a single higher-order factor that was labeled Social Anxiety. Findings are consistent with theories identifying Fear of Negative Evaluation as the core feature of SAD, and with evidence that anxiety sensitivity and intolerance of uncertainty further contribute to SAD severity. PMID:26454660

  9. The relationship among social phobia, objective and perceived physiological reactivity, and anxiety sensitivity in an adolescent population.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Emily R; Hope, Debra A

    2009-01-01

    Physiological theories may be important in the development and maintenance of social phobia in youth. A limited literature base indicates that youth with social phobia experience increases in objective physiological arousal during social-evaluative situations and are more aware of such increases compared to nonanxious youth. Recent research suggests that youth with social phobia also evidence heightened levels of anxiety sensitivity, which may lead to interpretation of physiological arousal as dangerous or distressing, and, as a result, in avoidance of situations which produce increased physiological arousal. The purpose of the current study was to examine interaction among objective physiological arousal, perceived physiological arousal, and anxiety sensitivity among adolescents diagnosed with social phobia. A sample of community adolescents participated in two anxiety-provoking tasks during which objective physiological arousal was monitored, and after which perceived physiological arousal and anxiety sensitivity were evaluated. Results from this study evidenced no differences between social phobic and nonanxious adolescents with regard to objective physiological arousal during either anxiety-provoking tasks. Adolescents with social phobia, however, were more aware of measured increases in physiological arousal, as well as more afraid of the potential social implications of that arousal compared to nonanxious adolescents. Implications for theory and treatment are discussed. PMID:18436426

  10. Hypnosis aided fixed role therapy for social phobia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alex; Iglesias, Adam

    2014-04-01

    This case study details how hypnosis aided fixed role therapy (HAFRT) was employed in the successful treatment of a case of social phobia with a history of refractory outcomes to previous therapy trials. The treatment consisted of 10 office sessions, scheduled every two weeks, of HAFRT along with twice a day self-hypnotic sessions where the patient performed multiple visualization rehearsals of the vignettes that were successfully mastered in hypnosis during office visits. The results indicated that this patient was able to engage in social and professional affairs that were impossible prior to treatment. The patient retained the therapy gains at follow up 6 months later. PMID:24938079

  11. Psychometric properties of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children in a Spanish sample.

    PubMed

    Olivares, José; Sánchez-García, Raquel; López-Pina, José Antonio; Rosa-Alcázar, Ana Isabel

    2010-11-01

    The objectives of the present study were to adapt and analyze the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C; Beidel, Turner, & Morris, 1995) in a Spanish population. The SPAI-C was applied to a sample of 1588 children and adolescents with ages ranging from 10 to 17 years. The confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed a four-factor structure: Public performance, Assertiveness, Fear and avoidance/escape in social encounters, and Cognitive and psychophysiological interferences. Internal consistency was high (.90) and test-retest reliability was moderate (.56). Significant differences were found in the variables sex and age, although the effect size was small in both variables and their interaction. Overall, the increase of the age value was inversely proportional to that of social anxiety measured with the SPAI-C; in participants of the same age, values were higher for girls than for boys. Results suggest that the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory For Children is a valid and reliable instrument to assess social anxiety in Spanish children and adolescents. PMID:20977043

  12. Facial emotion recognition in children with high functioning autism and children with social phobia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Nina; Beidel, Deborah C; Sarver, Dustin E; Sims, Valerie

    2012-10-01

    Recognizing facial affect is essential for effective social functioning. This study examines emotion recognition abilities in children aged 7-13 years with High Functioning Autism (HFA = 19), Social Phobia (SP = 17), or typical development (TD = 21). Findings indicate that all children identified certain emotions more quickly (e.g., happy < anger, disgust, sad < fear) and more accurately (happy) than other emotions (disgust). No evidence was found for negative interpretation biases in children with HFA or SP (i.e., all groups showed similar ability to discriminate neutral from non-neutral facial expressions). However, distinct between-group differences emerged when considering facial expression intensity. Specifically, children with HFA detected mild affective expressions less accurately than TD peers. Behavioral ratings of social effectiveness or social anxiety were uncorrelated with facial affect recognition abilities across children. Findings have implications for social skills treatment programs targeting youth with skill deficits. PMID:22528028

  13. Do pharmacological and behavioral interventions differentially affect treatment outcome for children with social phobia?

    PubMed

    Scharfstein, Lindsay A; Beidel, Deborah C; Finnell, Laura Rendon; Distler, Aaron; Carter, Nathan T

    2011-09-01

    In a randomized trial for children with social phobia (SP), Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C; a treatment consisting of exposure and social skills training) and fluoxetine were more effective than pill placebo in reducing social distress and behavioral avoidance, but only SET-C demonstrated significantly improved overall social skill and social competence. In the current study, the authors examined the specific social skills enhanced by SET-C using a recently developed coding schema. At posttreatment, children treated with SET-C displayed a more effective ability to manage the conversational topic (pragmatic social behaviors) and more appropriate motor movement, facial orientation, and posture (paralinguistic social behaviors) than children treated with fluoxetine or placebo. In contrast, children treated with fluoxetine displayed no more pragmatic or paralinguistic skill than children given a pill placebo. There were no group differences on ratings of voice volume and vocal inflection (speech and prosodic social behaviors). Furthermore, only children treated with SET-C improved from pre- to posttreatment on all three skill variables. Findings suggest that pharmacological interventions that only target reduction in anxious arousal may not have an impact on social skill deficits and may not be adequate to optimally treat SP. The relationship of social skill to social avoidance and the importance of social skills training to enhance social competence in the treatment of childhood SP are discussed. PMID:21586501

  14. Social Phobia: A Comparison of Behavior Therapy and Atenolol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Samuel M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Randomly assigned 72 social phobics to behavioral (flooding) or drug treatment with atenolol or placebo. Found that flooding consistently was superior to placebo, whereas atenolol was not. Flooding also was superior to atenolol on behavioral measures and composite indexes. Subjects who improved during treatment maintained gains at six-month…

  15. Virtual Environments Using Video Capture for Social Phobia with Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard; Clarke, Timothy; Turner, Ruth; Fowler, David

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A novel virtual environment (VE) system was developed and used as an adjunct to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with six socially anxious patients recovering from psychosis. The novel aspect of the VE system is that it uses video capture so the patients can see a life-size projection of themselves interacting with a specially scripted and digitally edited filmed environment played in real time on a screen in front of them. Within-session process outcomes (subjective units of distress and belief ratings on individual behavioral experiments), as well as patient feedback, generated the hypothesis that this type of virtual environment can potentially add value to CBT by helping patients understand the role of avoidance and safety behaviors in the maintenance of social anxiety and paranoia and by boosting their confidence to carry out “real-life” behavioral experiments. PMID:23659722

  16. Perception of Threat in Children with Social Phobia: Comparison to Nonsocially Anxious Children before and after Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cederlund, Rio; Ost, Lars-Goran

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated interpretation bias and reduced evidence for danger (RED) bias in 49 children with social phobia and 49 nonsocially anxious children between the ages of 8 and 14 years, using an ambiguous stories task. A posttreatment and follow-up measure was included for 26 of the socially phobic children to examine whether there…

  17. Testing the efficacy of theoretically derived improvements in the treatment of social phobia.

    PubMed

    Rapee, Ronald M; Gaston, Jonathan E; Abbott, Maree J

    2009-04-01

    Recent theoretical models of social phobia suggest that targeting several specific cognitive factors in treatment should enhance treatment efficacy over that of more traditional skills-based treatment programs. In the current study, 195 people with social phobia were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 treatments: standard cognitive restructuring plus in vivo exposure, an "enhanced" treatment that augmented the standard program with several additional treatment techniques (e.g., performance feedback, attention retraining), and a nonspecific (stress management) treatment. The enhanced treatment demonstrated significantly greater effects on diagnoses, diagnostic severity, and anxiety during a speech. The specific treatments failed to differ significantly on self-report measures of social anxiety symptoms and life interference, although they were both significantly better than the nonspecific treatment. The enhanced treatment also showed significantly greater effects than standard treatment on 2 putative process measures: cost of negative evaluation and negative views of one's skills and appearance. Changes on these process variables mediated differences between the treatments on changes in diagnostic severity. PMID:19309190

  18. Generalization of therapeutic changes in agoraphobia: the role of perceived self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Williams, S L; Kinney, P J; Falbo, J

    1989-06-01

    Investigated the extent and mechanisms of therapeutic generalization across distinct areas of agoraphobic dysfunction. Twenty-seven severe agoraphobics were each given performance-based treatment for some phobic areas while leaving their other phobias untreated. Behavioral tests revealed that (a) the treated phobias improved significantly more than the untreated (transfer) phobias, (b) the transfer phobias improved significantly more than control phobias, and (c) the transfer benefits were highly variable within and between subjects. Analyses of possible cognitive mechanisms revealed that perceived self-efficacy accurately predicted treatment and transfer effects even when alternative factors such as previous behavior, anticipated anxiety, anticipated panic, perceived danger, and subjective anxiety were held constant. In contrast, these alternative factors lost most or all predictive value when self-efficacy was held constant. Agoraphobia thus appears to be neither a unitary entity nor a mere collection of independent phobias, but a complexly patterned problem governed largely by self-perceptions of coping efficacy. PMID:2567745

  19. Prospective open-label pilot trial of mirtazapine in children and adolescents with social phobia.

    PubMed

    Mrakotsky, Christine; Masek, Bruce; Biederman, Joseph; Raches, Darcy; Hsin, Olivia; Forbes, Peter; de Moor, Carl; DeMaso, David Ray; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Mirtazapine is indicated for major depression and used for anxiety in adults; however, little is known about its application in pediatric populations. This is an 8-week open-label pilot study of mirtazapine in children with social phobia age 8-17 years. Primary outcomes were symptom improvement based on clinician rating and self-report, as well as tolerability based on rates of discontinuation due to adverse effects. Fifty-six percent (10/18) responded to treatment, 17% (3/18) achieved full remission. Social phobia symptoms improved significantly during the first 2 weeks of treatment, as did comorbid symptoms of depression and anxiety. Eleven patients (61%) did not complete all 8 weeks of treatment; four patients (22%) discontinued due to adverse effects including fatigue and irritability. The others discontinued due to study burden (28%), insufficient response (6%), or to pursue herbal treatment (6%). Significant weight gain was observed. Larger controlled trials are needed to further evaluate efficacy and safety. PMID:17419001

  20. The social phobia and anxiety inventory: problem of underlying medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Klieger, Douglas M; Johnson, Heather K

    2007-12-01

    The study investigated the possibility of score inflation in the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory due to underlying medical conditions in respondents. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders provides an exclusionary rule disallowing a diagnosis of social phobia when the fear is based on the presence of a medical condition. A computer-administered procedure, designed to simulate visually this paper-and-pencil inventory was created and compared to the original in a pilot study with r of .94 between the two procedures. Analysis indicates such medically based responding is common among college men and women (N= 127, M age = 19.0). Specifically, 50% of respondents reported 0 or 1 medical condition(s), while those in the fourth quartile averaged 43 medical bases for their responses. The most frequent self-reports of medical conditions were stuttering (2.8%), acne (2.4%), dry mouth (2.1%), obesity (.9%), and scars (.9%). Several possible solutions were discussed in view of the overall conclusion of a substantive basis for medical responding on this inventory. PMID:18232422

  1. Space phobia: syndrome or agoraphobic variant?

    PubMed

    Marks, I; Bebbington, P

    1976-08-01

    Four elderly women had intense fears of falling when there was no visible support at hand or on seeing space cues while driving. Two patients had cervical spondylosis. The mean age at onset of the fear was 54--thirty years later than that for agoraphobia. Fear of public places and of heights was not prominent, nor was depersonalisation or depression. These "space phobias" might be a hitherto unrecognised syndrome or an unusual variant of agoraphobia. The visuospatial reflexes involved might illuminate the pathogenesis of certain fears. PMID:947417

  2. Personality functioning in patients with avoidant personality disorder and social phobia.

    PubMed

    Eikenaes, Ingeborg; Hummelen, Benjamin; Abrahamsen, Gun; Andrea, Helene; Wilberg, Theresa

    2013-12-01

    Avoidant personality disorder (APD) and social phobia (SP) are closely related, such that they are suggested to represent different severity levels of one social anxiety disorder. This cross-sectional study aimed to compare patients with APD to patients with SP, with particular focus on personality dysfunction. Ninety-one adult patients were examined by diagnostic interviews and self-report measures, including the Index of Self-Esteem and the Severity Indices of Personality Problems. Patients were categorized in three groups; SP without APD (n = 20), APD without SP (n = 15), and APD with SP (n = 56). Compared to patients with SP without APD, patients with APD reported more symptom disorders, psychosocial problems, criteria of personality disorders, and personality dysfunction regarding self-esteem, identity and relational problems. These results indicate that APD involves more severe and broader areas of personality dysfunction than SP, supporting the conceptualization of APD as a personality disorder as proposed for DSM-5. PMID:23786266

  3. A New Model to Facilitate Individualized Case Conceptualization and Treatment of Social Phobia: An Examination and Reaction to Moscovitch's Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimberg, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Moscovitch's (2009) model of social phobia is put forth as an integration and extension of previous cognitive-behavioral models. The author asserts that his approach overcomes a number of shortcomings of previous models and will serve to better guide case conceptualization, treatment planning, and intervention implementation for clients with…

  4. An Open Study of Internet-Based Bibliotherapy with Minimal Therapist Contact via Email for Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlbring, Per; Furmark, Tomas; Steczko, Johan; Ekselius, Lisa; Andersson, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated a 9-week Internet-based self-help program for people suffering from social phobia. After confirming the diagnosis with a structured clinical interview for the "DSM-IV" (SCID) by telephone, 26 participants were treated with a multimodal treatment package based on cognitive behavioural therapy plus weekly therapist contact via…

  5. Associations between Peer Victimization, Self-Reported Depression and Social Phobia among Adolescents: The Role of Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranta, Klaus; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Marttunen, Mauri

    2009-01-01

    Associations of peer victimization with adolescent depression and social phobia (SP), while controlling for comorbidity between them, have not been sufficiently explored in earlier research. A total of 3156 Finnish adolescents aged 15-16 years participated in a survey study. Self-reported peer victimization, as well as self-reported depression…

  6. Social Phobia

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... something that isn't actually dangerous — although the body and mind react as if the danger is real. This ...

  7. Panic disorder and agoraphobia: an overview and commentary on DSM-5 changes.

    PubMed

    Asmundson, Gordon J G; Taylor, Steven; Smits, Jasper A J

    2014-06-01

    The recently published DSM-5 contains a number of changes pertinent to panic disorder and agoraphobia. These changes include separation of panic disorder and agoraphobia into separate diagnoses, the addition of criteria and guidelines for distinguishing agoraphobia from specific phobia, the addition of a 6-month duration requirement for agoraphobia, the addition of panic attacks as a specifier to any DSM-5 diagnosis, changes to descriptors of panic attack types, as well as various changes to the descriptive text. It is crucial that clinicians and researchers working with individuals presenting with panic attacks and panic-like symptoms understand these changes. The purpose of the current paper is to provide a summary of the main changes, to critique the changes in the context of available empirical evidence, and to highlight clinical implications and potential impact on mental health service utilization. Several of the changes have the potential to improve access to evidence-based treatment; yet, although certain changes appear justified in that they were based on converging evidence from different empirical sources, other changes appear questionable, at least based on the information presented in the DSM-5 text and related publications. Ongoing research of DSM-5 panic disorder and agoraphobia as well as application of the new diagnostic criteria in clinical contexts is needed to further inform the strengths and limitations of DSM-5 conceptualizations of panic disorder and agoraphobia. PMID:24865357

  8. Untangling genetic networks of panic, phobia, fear and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Villafuerte, Sandra; Burmeister, Margit

    2003-01-01

    As is the case for normal individual variation in anxiety levels, the conditions panic disorder, agoraphobia and other phobias have a significant genetic basis. Recent reports have started to untangle the genetic relationships between predispositions to anxiety and anxiety disorders. PMID:12914652

  9. A Cognitive-Behavior Therapy Applied to a Social Anxiety Disorder and a Specific Phobia, Case Study.

    PubMed

    Tsitsas, George D; Paschali, Antonia A

    2014-11-01

    George, a 23-year-old Greek student, was referred by a psychiatrist for treatment to a University Counseling Centre in Athens. He was diagnosed with social anxiety disorder and specific phobia situational type. He was complaining of panic attacks and severe symptoms of anxiety. These symptoms were triggered when in certain social situations and also when travelling by plane, driving a car and visiting tall buildings or high places. His symptoms lead him to avoid finding himself in such situations, to the point that it had affected his daily life. George was diagnosed with social anxiety disorder and with specific phobia, situational type (in this case acrophobia) and was given 20 individual sessions of cognitivebehavior therapy. Following therapy, and follow-up occurring one month post treatment, George no longer met the criteria for social phobia and symptoms leading to acrophobia were reduced. He demonstrated improvements in many areas including driving a car in and out of Athens and visiting tall buildings. PMID:26973946

  10. A Cognitive-Behavior Therapy Applied to a Social Anxiety Disorder and a Specific Phobia, Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsitsas, George D.; Paschali, Antonia A.

    2014-01-01

    George, a 23-year-old Greek student, was referred by a psychiatrist for treatment to a University Counseling Centre in Athens. He was diagnosed with social anxiety disorder and specific phobia situational type. He was complaining of panic attacks and severe symptoms of anxiety. These symptoms were triggered when in certain social situations and also when travelling by plane, driving a car and visiting tall buildings or high places. His symptoms lead him to avoid finding himself in such situations, to the point that it had affected his daily life. George was diagnosed with social anxiety disorder and with specific phobia, situational type (in this case acrophobia) and was given 20 individual sessions of cognitivebehavior therapy. Following therapy, and follow-up occurring one month post treatment, George no longer met the criteria for social phobia and symptoms leading to acrophobia were reduced. He demonstrated improvements in many areas including driving a car in and out of Athens and visiting tall buildings. PMID:26973946

  11. Factors affecting treatment efficacy in social phobia: the use of video feedback and individual vs. group formats.

    PubMed

    Aderka, Idan M

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis assessed two potential moderators of treatment efficacy in social phobia: video feedback, and treatment format (i.e., individual vs. group). Eighteen recent (2000-2006) trials including a total of 511 participants were sampled. Effect sizes (Cohen's d's) were calculated for each trial while correcting for measurement error. The Q statistic was used to test (a) heterogeneity across trials and (b) potential moderators. Results indicated that use of video feedback was not a moderator of treatment efficacy and did not significantly affect effect sizes. In contrast, treatment format was a moderator of treatment efficacy such that individual treatments reported larger effect sizes and lower attrition rates compared with group treatments. The results suggest that individual treatments in social phobia may be superior to group treatments irrespective of treatment type. PMID:18599263

  12. Social skills deficits and vocal characteristics of children with social phobia or Asperger's disorder: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Scharfstein, Lindsay A; Beidel, Deborah C; Sims, Valerie K; Rendon Finnell, Laura

    2011-08-01

    Social skills deficits are commonly reported among children with social phobia (SP) and children with Asperger's Disorder (AD); however, a lack of direct comparison makes it unclear whether these groups, both of which endorse the presence of social anxiety, have similar or unique skills deficits. In this investigation, the social behaviors of children with SP (n=30) or AD (n=30) were compared to a typically developing (TD) peer group (n=30) during structured role play interactions. Data were analyzed using blinded observers' ratings of overt behaviors and digital vocal analysis of verbal communication. Compared to children with AD and TD children, children with SP exhibited less overall social skill, an ineffective ability to manage the conversational topic (pragmatic social behavior), and deficient speech production (speech and prosodic social behavior). There were no differences in observer ratings between children with AD and TD children. However, using digital analysis of vocal characteristics (i.e., intensity, pitch), distinct vocal patterns emerged. Specifically, children with AD spoke more softly than TD children, and had lower vocal pitch and less vocal pitch variability than children with SP. This pattern may be subjectively heard as monotonic speech. Consistent with a vocal pattern associated with heightened anxiety, children with SP spoke more softly and had less voice volume variation than TD children, and had higher vocal pitch and more vocal pitch variability (jitteriness) than children with AD. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21399935

  13. Social Phobia and Educational and Interpersonal Impairments in Adolescence: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Ranta, Klaus; La Greca, Annette M; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Marttunen, Mauri

    2016-08-01

    We examined longitudinal associations between social phobia (SP) and educational and interpersonal impairments among Finnish adolescents. Participants were 3278 adolescents (9th grade; M age = 15.5 years) who completed measures of SP and depressive symptoms; 2070 participated in follow-up two years later. Indicators for educational and interpersonal functioning were assessed for each sex separately. Multivariate analyses, controlling for depression and relevant socioeconomic covariates, indicated that for boys, age 15 SP predicted slow academic progression, being without a close friend or not having a romantic relationship, and poor support from friends and significant others at age 17. However, for girls, age 15 SP only predicted not having been involved in a romantic relationship by age 17. In conclusion, we found striking sex differences for adolescent SP as a predictor for subsequent educational and interpersonal impairments in late adolescence. SP may have a more devastating effect on boys' social and academic functioning relative to that of girls. PMID:26514560

  14. Learning to change a way of being: An interpretative phenomenological perspective on cognitive therapy for social phobia

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Freda; Peerbhoy, Dawn; Larkin, Michael; Clark, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Social phobia (SP) is a common and disabling condition for which cognitive-behavioral treatments (CBT) have demonstrated efficacy. However, there remains room for improvement. Hence, further exploration of the means by which CBT helps patients with SP is warranted. Studies examining patients’ perspectives on which aspects of treatment were most or least helpful may augment other established methodologies for identifying the more or less effective components and thus help to increase the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of CBT for SP. The current study used interpretive phenomenological analysis to analyze the transcripts of interviews with eight patients who had completed cognitive therapy (CT) for SP. Four related themes were identified: (i) social phobia as a way of being; (ii) learning to challenge social phobia as a way of being: transformative mechanisms of therapy; (iii) challenges faced in the pursuit of change; (iv) a whole new world: new ways of being. This analysis of patients’ experiences of CT for SP confirmed that the factors hypothesized to be important in maintaining SP in cognitive-behavioral models of the disorder are evident in patients’ descriptions of the processes of change in CT for SP (e.g., reducing internal focus of attention and reducing safety behaviors and avoidance). Helpful components of CT for SP were identified as areas where the protocol could be enhanced. Recommendations for the way in which CT for SP is implemented are made. PMID:20413253

  15. School phobia.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, Maureen

    2005-06-01

    School phobia is a serious disorder affecting up to 5% of elementary and middle school children. Long-term consequences include academic failure, diminished peer relationships, parental conflict, and development of additional psychiatric disorders. Hiding behind such common physical symptoms as headaches, stomachaches, and fatigue, school phobia evades diagnosis with ease. Unraveling the problem of school phobia is challenging for the school nurse and is complicated by an overall lack of knowledge regarding the serious potential outcomes. The purpose of this article is to define school phobia, differentiate it from truancy, and highlight some interventions useful in the treatment of this increasingly common and potentially serious disorder. PMID:15898849

  16. Attentional bias and emotional reactivity as predictors and moderators of behavioral treatment for social phobia

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Andrea N.; Mesri, Bita; Burklund, Lisa J.; Lieberman, Matthew D.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a well-established treatment for anxiety disorders, and evidence is accruing for the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). Little is known about factors that relate to treatment outcome overall (predictors), or who will thrive in each treatment (moderators). The goal of the current project was to test attentional bias and negative emotional reactivity as moderators and predictors of treatment outcome in a randomized controlled trial comparing CBT and ACT for social phobia. Forty-six patients received 12 sessions of CBT or ACT and were assessed for self-reported and clinician-rated symptoms at baseline, post treatment, 6, and 12 months. Attentional bias significantly moderated the relationship between treatment group and outcome with patients slow to disengage from threatening stimuli showing greater clinician-rated symptom reduction in CBT than in ACT. Negative emotional reactivity, but not positive emotional reactivity, was a significant overall predictor with patients high in negative emotional reactivity showing the greatest self-reported symptom reduction. PMID:23933107

  17. Recognition bias for critical faces in social phobia: a replication and extension.

    PubMed

    Coles, Meredith E; Heimberg, Richard G

    2005-01-01

    Studies using linguistic stimuli have provided little support for explicit memory biases among individuals with social phobia (SP). However, using facial stimuli rated on their criticalness, Lundh and Ost (1996) found that individuals with SP recognized more critical than accepting faces, whereas non-anxious controls tended to show the opposite pattern. Since the publication of Lundh and Ost's findings, additional studies using a variety of facial stimuli have produced inconsistent findings (J. Anxiety Disord. 14 (2000) 501; Behav. Res. Ther. 39 (2001) 967). Unfortunately, these inconsistencies are difficult to reconcile given great variation in methods and stimuli. Therefore, we designed a study to replicate and extend the work of Lundh and Ost (Behav. Res. Ther. 34 (1996) 787). Similar to Lundh and Ost, individuals with SP identified a significantly higher proportion of old critical faces as old than did non-anxious controls. Further, extending the work of Lundh and Ost, signal detection analyses revealed group differences on response bias according to face type. Specifically, controls showed a response bias towards indicating that accepting faces were previously seen, whereas individuals with SP did not. Finally, signal detection analyses failed to reveal group differences in the accuracy of memory. PMID:15531356

  18. Altered emotion regulation capacity in social phobia as a function of comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Burklund, Lisa J; Craske, Michelle G; Taylor, Shelley E; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2015-02-01

    Social phobia (SP) has been associated with amygdala hyperreactivity to fear-relevant stimuli. However, little is known about the neural basis of SP individuals' capacity to downregulate their responses to such stimuli and how such regulation varies as a function of comorbid depression and anxiety. We completed an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study wherein SP participants without comorbidity (n = 30), with comorbid depression (n = 18) and with comorbid anxiety (n = 19) and healthy controls (n = 15) were scanned while completing an affect labeling emotion regulation task. Individuals with SP as a whole exhibited a reversal of the pattern observed in healthy controls in that they showed upregulation of amygdala activity during affect labeling. However, subsequent analyses revealed a more complex picture based on comorbidity type. Although none of the SP subgroups showed the normative pattern of amygdala downregulation, it was those with comorbid depression specifically who showed significant upregulation. Effects could not be attributed to differences in task performance, amygdala reactivity or right ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (RVLPFC) engagement, but may stem from dysfunctional communication between amygdala and RVLPFC. Furthermore, the particularly altered emotion regulation seen in those with comorbid depression could not be fully explained by symptom severity or state anxiety. Results reveal altered emotion regulation in SP, especially when comorbid with depression. PMID:24813437

  19. Avoidant Personality Disorder versus Social Phobia: The Significance of Childhood Neglect

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Avoidant personality disorder (AvPD) and social phobia (SP) are common disorders both in the community and in clinical settings. Whether the two disorders represent different severity levels of social anxiety disorder is currently in dispute. The relationship between AvPD and SP is probably more complex than previously assumed. Several environmental, temperamental, and constitutional factors may play a role in the etiology of AvPD and SP. Better knowledge about childhood experiences may shed light on similarities and differences between the two disorders. The aim of this study was to compare self-reported childhood experiences in AvPD and SP patients. Design This is a cross-sectional multi-site study of 91 adult patients with AvPD and/ or SP. We compared patients with AvPD with and without SP (AvPD group) to patients with SP without AvPD (SP group). Methods The patients were examined using structured diagnostic interviews and self-report measures, including Child Trauma Questionnaire, Parental Bonding Instrument, and Adult Temperament Questionnaire. Results Both AvPD and SP were associated with negative childhood experiences. AvPD patients reported more severe childhood neglect than patients with SP, most pronounced for physical neglect. The difference between the disorders in neglect remained significant after controlling for temperamental factors and concurrent abuse. Conclusions The study indicates that childhood neglect is a risk factor for AvPD and may be one contributing factor to phenomenological differences between AvPD and SP. PMID:25815817

  20. School Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltkamp, Lane J.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the etiology of school phobia and differentiates between chronic and acute phobia. Three treatment steps are recommended: 1) physician must rule out organic problems; 2) counseling must occur with the family with the goal of getting the child to school immediately; 3) school personnel must be reassured to keep the child in school.…

  1. Perfectionism, Emotion Regulation and Their Relationship to Negative Affect in Patients with Social Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Rukmini, Systla; Sudhir, Paulomi M.; Math, Suresh Bada

    2014-01-01

    Context: Research on the perfectionism and emotion regulation strategies in anxiety disorders has gained increased attention. These have an important implication for formulation of therapies. Aims: We examined perfectionism, emotion regulation were examined in 30 patients with social phobia (SP) and 30 community participants. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional design using a clinical and a community control sample was adopted in this exploratory study. Materials and Methods: Participants were assessed on The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Frost's-Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, Ruminative Response Scale of the response style questionnaire, cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire, Social Interaction Anxiety Scale and the Beck's Depression Inventory. Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed using independents samples t-test and Pearson's Product moment correlations and step-wise linear regression. Results: Individuals with SP had higher perfectionism (mean = 100.30, SD = ±17.73, t = 7.29, P < 0.001), rumination (mean = 61.47, SD = ±11.96, t = 6.71, P < 0.001) and lower levels of positive reappraisal (mean = 11.53, SD = ±3.85, t = 4.90, P < 0.001). Perfectionism was correlated with social anxiety (r = 0.44, P < 0.05) and rumination (r = 0.43, P < 0.05), but not with depression. Rumination was positively correlated with both social anxiety (r = 0.513, P < 0.01) and depression (r = 0.485, P < 0.01). Positive reappraisal was negatively correlated with depression (r = -0.396, P < 0.05) and anxiety (r = -0.335, P < 0.05). Acceptance was found to be significantly correlated only to the reflective pondering subscale of rumination. Parental criticism was a significant predictor of social anxiety (F = 11.11, P < 0.01) and brooding predicted depression (F = 10.49, P < 0.01). Conclusions: This study highlights the role of perfectionism as a maintaining factor in SP and the importance of adaptive forms of emotion regulation that need to be addressed

  2. Self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy with minimal therapist contact for social phobia: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Jonathan S; Moore, Elizabeth L; Braddock, Autumn E; Harrington, Diana L

    2009-03-01

    Due to treatment accessibility and cost issues, interest in self-help programs (e.g., bibliotherapy, telehealth) for common psychological disorders is growing. Research supporting the efficacy of such a program for social anxiety, however, is limited. The present study examined the efficacy of an 8-week self-directed cognitive behavioral treatment with minimal therapist involvement for social phobia based on a widely available self-help book. Twenty-one adults with social phobia initially received either treatment (i.e. assigned readings in the workbook with limited therapist contact) or were wait-listed. Wait-listed patients eventually received the same self-directed treatment. Results revealed that the self-help/minimal therapist contact treatment was superior to wait-list on most outcome measures. Across the entire sample, reductions in social anxiety, global severity, general anxiety, and depression were observed at posttest and 3-month follow-up. These findings provide preliminary support for using this self-help workbook for individuals with mild to moderate social anxiety in conjunction with infrequent therapist visits to reinforce the treatment principles. Study limitations and future directions are discussed. PMID:18514614

  3. Internet-Based Self-Help with Therapist Feedback and in Vivo Group Exposure for Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Holmstrom, Annelie; Sparthan, Elisabeth; Furmark, Tomas; Nilsson-Ihrfelt, Elisabeth; Buhrman, Monica; Ekselius, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Sixty-four individuals with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) were assigned to a multimodal cognitive-behavioral treatment package or to a waiting list control group. Treatment consisted of a 9-week, Internet-delivered, self-help program that was combined with 2 group exposure sessions in real life and minimal therapist contact via e-mail.…

  4. Screening for Specific Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Screening for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Screening for Social Anxiety Disorder Screening for Specific Phobias Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Children Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Family Member Self-Help Strategies: Webinars to Calm Anxious Minds "Triumph" E-News ...

  5. Dreams In Jungian Psychology: The use of Dreams as an Instrument For Research, Diagnosis and Treatment of Social Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Khodarahimi, Siamak

    2009-01-01

    Background: The significance of dreams has been explained in psychoanalysis, depth psychology and gestalt therapy. There are many guidelines in analytic psychology for dream interpretation and integration in clinical practice. The present study, based on the Jungian analytic model, incorporated dreams as an instrument for assessment of aetiology, the psychotherapy process and the outcome of treatment for social phobia within a clinical case study. Method: This case study describes the use of dream analysis in treating a female youth with social phobia. Results: The present findings supported the three stage paradigm efficiency in the Jungian model for dream working within a clinical setting, i.e. written details, reassembly with amplification and assimilation. It was indicated that childhood and infantile traumatic events, psychosexual development malfunctions, and inefficient coping skills for solving current life events were expressed in the patient’s dreams. Conclusion: Dreams can reflect a patient’s aetiology, needs, illness prognosis and psychotherapy outcome. Dreams are an instrument for the diagnosis, research and treatment of mental disturbances in a clinical setting. PMID:22135511

  6. The Utility of the PAI and the MMPI-2 for Discriminating PTSD, Depression, and Social Phobia in Trauma-Exposed College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E.; Weathers, Frank W.; Flood, Amanda M.; Eakin, David E.; Benson, Trisha A.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Revised (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) with regard to each instrument's utility for discriminating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from depression and social phobia in a sample…

  7. The context specificity of anxiety responses induced by chronic psychosocial stress in rats: a shift from anxiety to social phobia?

    PubMed

    Barsy, Boglárka; Leveleki, Csilla; Zelena, Dóra; Haller, József

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the anxiety-increasing effects of chronic psychosocial stress generalize to non-social (i.e. heterotypic) stressful situations. To investigate this issue, we repeatedly exposed rats to predictable or unpredictable psychosocial stress for 5 or 12 days and examined their anxiety in two markedly different contexts: the elevated plus maze and social interaction tests. Psychosocial stress and the social interaction test were administered under highly similar conditions, i.e. the two situations were homotypic. Psychosocial stress did not affect anxiety in the elevated plus-maze under any condition, but markedly increased anxiety in the social interaction test. In contrast, repeated restraint-a non-social stressor heterotypic to both the elevated plus maze and social interaction tests-increased plus-maze anxiety, demonstrating that anxiety in this test was sensitive to repeated restraint, and the effects were manifested in heterotypic situations. Thus, the anxiety-related effects of chronic psychosocial stress-unlike those of the chronic non-social stressor-were context-dependent. This is reminiscent of phobic anxiety, which manifests in specific situations only. In addition, behavior in the social interaction test showed changes that went beyond simple anxiogenesis. Socially stressed rats spent nearly 40% of total time in aggressive interactions. Based on recent data showing that social phobics are prone to violence under social pressure, and also based on the situation-dependent effects of the social stressor, we suggest that chronic psychosocial stress leads to a behavioral profile akin to social phobia. PMID:20392194

  8. School Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrrell, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    School phobia is a serious disorder affecting up to 5% of elementary and middle school children. Long-term consequences include academic failure, diminished peer relationships, parental conflict, and development of additional psychiatric disorders. Hiding behind such common physical symptoms as headaches, stomachaches, and fatigue, school phobia…

  9. Psychometric properties of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children using a non-American population-based sample.

    PubMed

    Aune, Tore; Stiles, Tore C; Svarva, Kyrre

    2008-08-01

    Although previous studies have examined the factor structure of the SPAI-C, adequate factor analytic methodology has not been employed. This study explored the psychometric properties of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C), using a non-American population-based sample of older children and young adolescents 11-14 years of age. Initially an exploratory factor analysis was conducted followed 1 year later by a confirmatory factor analysis. Five factors labeled Assertiveness, Public Performance, Physical/Cognitive Symptoms, Social Encounter, and Avoidance were retained and confirmed. The Public Performance and Assertiveness factors were the most stable and consistent factors or traits of social anxiety over a 1-year period. Results revealed adequate concurrent validity, internal consistency and moderate 12-month test-retest reliability of the SPAI-C total scale. The SPAI-C was found to assess levels of both social anxiety and social anxiety disorder according to DSM-IV criteria. Findings suggest that the SPAI-C is applicable in clinical treatment studies designed to assess sensitivity to change in various aspects of social anxiety disorder. PMID:18182274

  10. Randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy for social phobia: outcomes and moderators

    PubMed Central

    Craske, Michelle G; Niles, Andrea N.; Burklund, Lisa J.; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B.; Vilardaga, Jennifer C. Plumb; Arch, Joanna J.; Saxbe, Darby E.; Lieberman, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an empirically supported treatment for social phobia. However, not all individuals respond to treatment and many who show improvement do not maintain their gains over the long-term. Thus, alternative treatments are needed. Method The current study (N=87) was a 3-arm randomized clinical trial comparing CBT, Acceptance and Commitment therapy (ACT), and a waitlist control group (WL) in participants with a DSM-IV diagnosis of social phobia. Participants completed 12 sessions of CBT or ACT or a 12-week waiting period. All participants completed assessments at baseline and post-treatment, and participants assigned to CBT and ACT also completed assessments at 6 and 12 months following baseline. Assessments consisted of self-report measures, a public speaking task, and clinician ratings. Results Multilevel modeling was used to examine between-group differences on outcomes measures. Both treatment groups outperformed WL, with no differences observed between CBT and ACT on self-report, independent clinician, or public speaking outcomes. Lower self-reported psychological flexibility at baseline was associated with greater improvement by the 12-mo follow-up in CBT compared to ACT. Self-reported fear of negative evaluation significantly moderated outcomes as well, with trends for both extremes to be associated with superior outcomes from CBT and inferior outcomes from ACT. Across treatment groups, higher perceived control, and extraversion were associated with greater improvement, whereas comorbid depression was associated with poorer outcomes. Conclusions Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:24999670

  11. Latent growth curve analysis of fear during a speech task before and after treatment for social phobia.

    PubMed

    Price, Matthew; Anderson, Page L

    2011-11-01

    Models of social phobia highlight the importance of anticipatory anxiety in the experience of fear during a social situation. Anticipatory anxiety has been shown to be highly correlated with performance anxiety for a variety of social situations. A few studies show that average ratings of anxiety during the anticipation and performance phases of a social situation decline following treatment. Evidence also suggests that the point of confrontation with the feared stimulus is the peak level of fear. No study to date has evaluated the pattern of anxious responding across the anticipation, confrontation, and performance phases before and after treatment, which is the focus of the current study. Socially phobic individuals (N = 51) completed a behavioral avoidance task before and after two types of manualized cognitive behavioral therapy, and gave ratings of fear during the anticipation and performance phases. Results from latent growth curve analysis were the same for the two treatments and suggested that before treatment, anxiety sharply increased during the anticipation phase, was highly elevated at the confrontation, and gradually increased during the performance phase. After treatment, anxiety increased during the anticipation phase, although at a much slower rate than at pretreatment, peaked at confrontation, and declined during the performance phase. The findings suggest that anticipatory experiences are critical to the experience of fear for public speaking and should be incorporated into exposures. PMID:21907972

  12. The utility of the PAI and the MMPI-2 for discriminating PTSD, depression, and social phobia in trauma-exposed college students.

    PubMed

    McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E; Weathers, Frank W; Flood, Amanda M; Eakin, David E; Benson, Trisha A

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Revised (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) with regard to each instrument's utility for discriminating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from depression and social phobia in a sample of college students with mixed civilian trauma exposure. Participants were 90 trauma-exposed undergraduates (16 male, 74 female) classified into one of four groups: PTSD, depressive disorders, social phobia, and well-adjusted. For both the PAI and the MMPI-2, profile analysis revealed that the groups differed in the elevation and shape of their profiles. The PAI Traumatic Stress subscale demonstrated good discriminant validity. PMID:17504890

  13. [Workplace-related anxiety, workplace phobia and disorders of participation].

    PubMed

    Muschalla, B; Linden, M

    2009-06-01

    Work is an important domain of life. It is therefore clear that problems at the workplace and mental disorders will have negative interactions. Job-related anxieties are of special importance as any workplace causes or intensifies anxiety by its very nature. A common final pathway of mental disorders in general and workplace-related anxieties in particular is workplace phobia. Similarly to agoraphobia, it is characterised by panic when approaching or even thinking of the stimulus, in this case the workplace. Workplace phobia has serious negative consequences for the further course of illness. It impairs the ability to work, and can lead to sick leave and early retirement. It requires special therapeutic interventions. This paper describes workplace-related anxieties and workplace phobia and gives a conceptual framework for their understanding. PMID:19544717

  14. Psychometric properties of the mini-social phobia inventory (Mini-SPIN) in a large online treatment-seeking sample.

    PubMed

    Fogliati, Vincent J; Terides, Matthew D; Gandy, Milena; Staples, Lauren G; Johnston, Luke; Karin, Eyal; Rapee, Ronald M; Titov, Nickolai; Dear, Blake F

    2016-04-01

    The Mini-Social Phobia Inventory (Mini-SPIN) is a brief, three-item measure designed as a screening tool for social anxiety disorder (SAD). This study investigated the Mini-SPIN's psychometric properties in a series of trials of Internet-delivered treatment. Participants were 993 people seeking Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for a range of anxiety and mood disorders. Participants completed the Mini-SPIN, and were diagnosed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Version 5.0.0 (MINI). They also completed measures of depression, general anxiety, panic, neuroticism and general impairment. The Mini-SPIN's ability to discriminate between people with and without SAD, within a large sample of people seeking treatment for a range of psychological disorders, was assessed at initial assessment and three-month follow-up. The Mini-SPIN's criterion group validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity and responsiveness to treatment were also examined. Results demonstrated that the Mini-SPIN has an excellent ability to discriminate between those with and without SAD in a highly comorbid clinical sample, and also has good criterion group validity. The Mini-SPIN also exhibited excellent internal consistency, good test-retest reliability, and was responsive to treatment. These results highlight the Mini-SPIN's potential as an efficient and reliable measure of SAD in heterogenous populations. PMID:27046641

  15. Agoraphobia

    MedlinePlus

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, Va: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Taylor CT, Pollack MH, LeBeau RT, Simon NM. Anxiety disorders: panic, ...

  16. Agoraphobia Related to Unassertiveness in Panic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Levitan, Michelle Nigri; Simoes, Pedro; Sardinha, Aline G; Nardi, Antonio E

    2016-05-01

    Despite developments in panic disorder (PD) research, a significant percentage of patients do not benefit from conventional treatments. Interpersonal factors have been identified as potential predictors of treatment failures. We aimed to evaluate assertiveness in a sample of patients with PD and its implications for treatment. Forty-six symptomatic patients with PD and 46 college students responded to assessment scales regarding assertiveness and clinical data. Seventy-five percent of the patients had a secondary diagnosis of agoraphobia. We found that the PD group was characterized as nonassertive and slightly less assertive than control subjects. Furthermore, the deficit in the level of assertiveness correlated with the severity of the PD. The diagnosis of agoraphobia was correlated with unassertiveness (p < 0.05). Agoraphobia predisposes individuals to dependency and insecurity about their ability to overcome anxiogenic situations. These data demonstrate the importance of managing assertiveness in patients with PD accompanied by agoraphobia. PMID:26915016

  17. A meta-analysis of the cross-cultural psychometric properties of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C).

    PubMed

    Scaini, Simona; Battaglia, Marco; Beidel, Deborah C; Ogliari, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have found that the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C), an empirically derived self-report instrument to assess DSM-IV social phobia in childhood and adolescence, has good psychometric properties. While these findings were replicated across different cultures, the overall strength of the psychometric properties of the SPAI-C remains unknown. We assessed the validity of the SPAI-C by meta-analytic techniques across studies collected from PubMed, PsycInfo and Eric databases, conducted in different countries, among subjects of different age, and sex. A total of 21 articles were retained, predominantly from Europe and North America. We found that the psychometric properties based on Cronbach alpha, mean score differences between sexes, and construct validity, were robust for the SPAI-C scale. Girls scored significantly higher than boys, and geographical differences played a moderating effect on sex-related score differences. These results further support the SPAI-C as an instrument to identify Social Phobia in youth. PMID:22154123

  18. Of ‘Disgrace’ and ‘Pain’ – Corticolimbic Interaction Patterns for Disorder-Relevant and Emotional Words in Social Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Laeger, Inga; Dobel, Christian; Radenz, Britta; Kugel, Harald; Keuper, Kati; Eden, Annuschka; Arolt, Volker; Zwitserlood, Pienie

    2014-01-01

    Limbic hyperactivation and an impaired functional interplay between the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex are discussed to go along with, or even cause, pathological anxiety. Within the multi-faceted group of anxiety disorders, the highly prevalent social phobia (SP) is characterized by excessive fear of being negatively evaluated. Although there is widespread evidence for amygdala hypersensitivity to emotional faces in SP, verbal material has rarely been used in imaging studies, in particular with an eye on disorder-specificity. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a block design consisting of (1) overall negative, (2) social-phobia related, (3) positive, and (4) neutral words, we studied 25 female patients with social phobia and 25 healthy female control subjects (HC). Results demonstrated amygdala hyperactivation to disorder-relevant but not to generally negative words in SP patients, with a positive correlation to symptom severity. A functional connectivity analysis revealed a weaker coupling between the amygdala and the left middle frontal gyrus in patients. Symptom severity was negatively related to connectivity strength between the amygdala and the ventromedial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann Area 10 and 11). The findings clearly support the view of a hypersensitive threat-detection system, combined with disorder-related alterations in amygdala-prefrontal cortex connectivity in pathological anxiety. PMID:25396729

  19. Mediators and Moderators of Outcome in the Behavioral Treatment of Childhood Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfano, Candica A.; Pina, Armando A.; Villalta, Ian K.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Ammerman, Robert T.; Crosby, Lori E.

    2009-01-01

    Data from a study involving 88 youths who participated in one of two randomized controlled treatment trials of Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children reveals that loneliness scores and social effectiveness predicted changes in social anxiety and overall functioning after the treatment. Child-reported loneliness mediated changes in social…

  20. The Social Phobia Inventory: Validity and Reliability in an Adolescent Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Helena S.; Inderbitzen-Nolan, Heidi M.; Anderson, Emily R.

    2006-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder and social anxiety are highly prevalent psychological conditions in youth. Because of the known risks associated with the spectrum of social anxiety in youth, early detection with valid and reliable assessment measures is imperative. Self-report measures have become the most widely used method of assessment for child and…

  1. Decrease in self-esteem mediates the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression in middle adolescence in a sex-specific manner: a 2-year follow-up of a prospective population cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Social phobia and depression are common, highly comorbid disorders in middle adolescence. The mechanism underlying this comorbidity, however, is unclear. Decrease in self-esteem caused by the initial disorder might play a decisive role in the development of the subsequent disorder. The present study aimed to determine whether the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression is mediated by decrease in self-esteem in mid-adolescent girls and boys. Methods As a part of the prospective Adolescent Mental Health Cohort (AMCH), subjects of this study were 9th grade pupils (mean age, 15.5) responding to a survey conducted in 2002–2003 (T1) and to a 2-year follow-up survey in 2004–2005 (T2) (N = 2070, mean age 17.6 years, 54.5% girls). Results Symptoms of social phobia without symptoms of depression at age 15 and symptoms of depression at age 17 were associated only among boys, and this association was mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Symptoms of depression without symptoms of social phobia at age 15 and symptoms of social phobia at age 17 were associated only among girls, and this association was partially mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Conclusions Decrease in self-esteem plays a decisive role in the association between social phobia and depression. Self-esteem should be a key focus in interventions for adolescents suffering from social phobia or depression. Efficient intervention for the first disorder might help to prevent the decline in self-esteem and thus the incidence of the subsequent disorder. These findings are based on a sample of Finnish adolescents and should be confirmed in other jurisdictions or in more ethnically diverse samples. PMID:24641987

  2. Needle Phobia.

    PubMed

    Cook, Lynda S

    2016-01-01

    Venipuncture is generally associated with some degree of pain, discomfort, and/or apprehension. Yet most patients accept it with tolerance, even nonchalance. A few, not only pediatric patients, exhibit a higher degree of anxiety and face the procedure with tears, tension, and a variety of bargaining techniques (ie, stick on the count of 3; use only this vein). But for 1 group of people, venipuncture is associated with such fear that avoidance of the procedure is practiced. The end results are detrimental to the patient and may have an impact on society as well. These are patients the American Psychiatric Association classifies as needle phobic. What can a nurse with no training in psychiatry do to assist these patients? To form an appropriate professional response, it's beneficial for practitioners to recognize the different pathways that lead to needle phobia and the issues related to the disorder. PMID:27598066

  3. FAT PHOBIA IN MEXICAN NUTRITION STUDENTS.

    PubMed

    Bacardía Gascón, Montserrat; Jiménez-Cruz, Arturo; Castillo-Ruiz, Octelina; Bezares-Sarmiento, Vidalma Del Rosario; León-González, Juan Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Nutritionists play a major role in the prevention and treatment of obesity. Currently, fat phobia among nutrition students and health workers is resulting in health and social consequences. The aim of this study was to assess the fat phobia among nutrition college students of two schools from different regions in Mexico. Six hundred and thirty 18 to 25 yo nutrition students participated in the study. Fat phobia was assessed using the F-scale, containing 14 pairs of adjectives that described people with obesity. Participants achieved a mean F-scale score of 3.45, which could be considered a moderate amount of fat phobia. Only twelve per cent showed neutral or positive attitudes towards obesity (≤ 2.5), while negative attitude (≥ 2.5) was observed among 88% of all students showing a high prevalence of fat phobia towards obesity. PMID:26667758

  4. Threat processing in generalized social phobia: an investigation of interpretation biases in ambiguous facial affect.

    PubMed

    Jusyte, Aiste; Schönenberg, Michael

    2014-06-30

    Facial affect is one of the most important information sources during the course of social interactions, but it is susceptible to distortion due to the complex and dynamic nature. Socially anxious individuals have been shown to exhibit alterations in the processing of social information, such as an attentional and interpretative bias toward threatening information. This may be one of the key factors contributing to the development and maintenance of anxious psychopathology. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether a threat-related interpretation bias is evident for ambiguous facial stimuli in a population of individuals with a generalized Social Anxiety Disorder (gSAD) as compared to healthy controls. Participants judged ambiguous happy/fearful, angry/fearful and angry/happy blends varying in intensity and rated the predominant affective expression. The results obtained in this study do not indicate that gSAD is associated with a biased interpretation of ambiguous facial affect. PMID:24656896

  5. School Phobia: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, James E.; Sheperd, George

    1976-01-01

    This article discusses general features of school phobia and specific clinical and familial traits and characteristics. Included are overviews of theoretical explanations, types of school phobia, suggested methods of treatment, and their efficacy. (Author)

  6. Specific phobias.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Alfons O

    2009-09-01

    Exposure based treatments in which patients are systematically confronted with their feared objects of situations are highly effective in the treatment of specific phobias and produce stable improvement both in reported fear and behavioral avoidance. Exposure in reality is more effective in most cases than exposure in sensu. For situations that are difficult to realize, exposure in virtual environments has become increasingly valuable. Exposure in vivo is clearly superior to pharmacotherapy, although cognitive enhancers have been successfully used recently to increase the effect of exposure therapy. The induction of relaxation is not a necessary precondition for exposure therapy. Rather the current mechanisms of change focus on extinction learning as being the central mechanism both on a cognitive level namely that the feared object is no longer associated with severely threatening consequence but also on an affective level, meaning that feared cue is no longer capable to activate the fear circuit in the brain. Accordingly future diagnostic categorizations of phobic disorders in the DSM-V should rather focus on the pattern of the fear response that needs to be changed than on the eliciting cues or situations that are avoided. PMID:19716991

  7. Fears and phobias in people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Green, L; Feher, M; Catalan, J

    2000-01-01

    Phobic disorders are more common in people with diabetes than in the general population. The management of phobic disorders in patients with diabetes, particularly when associated with a fear of hypoglycaemia, is especially challenging and requires close collaboration between psychological medicine and diabetes teams. Difficulty in distinguishing symptoms of anxiety from those of hypoglycaemia, and the real dangers associated with hypoglycaemia, complicate the delivery of psychological interventions that are used routinely in the treatment of phobias. Avoidance of hypoglycaemia can lead to deterioration in diabetes control. This case report describes a man with Type 1 diabetes who developed agoraphobia with panic disorder, associated with fear of hypoglycaemia and deterioration in glycaemic control. The management of patients with diabetes and phobic disorders, with particular reference to those associated with fear of hypoglycaemia, is discussed. PMID:10934458

  8. Treatment of Severe Social Phobia: Effects of Guided Exposure with and without Cognitive Restructuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattick, Richard P.; Peters, Lorna

    1988-01-01

    Assigned social phobics with severe scrutiny fears to therapist-guided exposure without and including cognitive restructuring. Found the combined condition significantly more effective in endstate functioning, in increasing behavioral approach, and in decreasing self-rated avoidance. Treatment-induced changes in fear of negative evaluation,…

  9. Mediating effects of bullying involvement on the relationship of body mass index with social phobia, depression, suicidality, and self-esteem and sex differences in adolescents in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Tai-Ling; Ko, Chih-Hung; Wu, Yu-Yu; Cheng, Chung-Ping

    2014-03-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the mediating effect of bullying involvement on the relationships between body mass index (BMI) and mental health problems, including social phobia, depression, suicidality, and low self-esteem among adolescents in Taiwan. The moderation effect of sex on the mediating role of bullying involvement was also examined. Five thousand two hundred and fifty-two students of high schools completed the questionnaires. Victimization and perpetration of passive and active bullying were assessed using the Chinese version of the School Bullying Experience Questionnaire. BMI was calculated from self-reported weight and height measurements. The Social Phobia Inventory, the Mandarin Chinese version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, the suicidality-related questionnaire from the epidemiological version of the Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale were applied to assess social phobia, depression, suicidality, and low self-esteem, respectively. The mediating effect of bullying involvement on the associations between increased BMI and mental health problems was examined by the Sobel test. The moderation effect of sex on the mediating role of bullying involvement was tested by the multiple-group structural equation model. Victimization of passive and active bullying and perpetration of passive bullying, but not perpetration of active bullying, had a mediating effect on the relationships between increased BMI and all four mental health problems. Sex did not have a significant moderation effect on the mediating role of bullying involvement. Bullying involvement should be a target of prevention and intervention in developing a strategy to improve mental health among adolescents with increased BMI. PMID:24011767

  10. Out of Place: Narrative Insights into Agoraphobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capps, Lisa; Ochs, Elinor

    1995-01-01

    Explores how agoraphobia is realized through the activity of storytelling. Analyzes one agoraphobic woman's narrative to articulate the narrative structuring of a panic episode, the grammatical resources systematically recruited to portray panic as unaccountable and the protagonist as irrational and helpless, and a recurrent communicative dilemma…

  11. Does engagement with exposure yield better outcomes? Components of presence as a predictor of treatment response for virtual reality exposure therapy for social phobia

    PubMed Central

    Price, Matthew; Mehta, Natasha; Tone, Erin B.; Anderson, Page L.

    2012-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure (VRE) has been shown to be effective for treating a variety of anxiety disorders, including social phobia. Presence, or the level of connection an individual feels with the virtual environment, is widely discussed as a critical construct both for the experience of anxiety within a virtual environment and for a successful response to VRE. Two published studies show that whereas generalized presence relates to fear ratings during VRE, it does not relate to treatment response. However, presence has been conceptualized as multidimensional, with three primary factors (spatial presence, involvement, and realness). These factors can be linked to other research on the facilitation of fear during exposure, inhibitors of treatment response (e.g., distraction), and more recent theoretical discussions of the mechanisms of exposure therapy, such as Bouton’s description of expectancy violation. As such, one or more of these components of presence may be more strongly associated with the experience of fear during VRE and treatment response than the overarching construct. The current study (N = 41) evaluated relations between three theorized components of presence, fear ratings during VRE, and treatment response for VRE for social phobia. Results suggest that total presence and realness subscale scores were related to in-session peak fear ratings. However, only scores on the involvement subscale significantly predicted treatment response. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21515027

  12. Psychophysiological evidence for cortisol-induced reduction in early bias for implicit social threat in social phobia.

    PubMed

    van Peer, Jacobien M; Spinhoven, Philip; Roelofs, Karin

    2010-01-01

    The stress hormone cortisol is important for the regulation of social motivational processes. High cortisol levels have been associated with social fear and avoidance, which play an important role in social anxiety disorder (SAD), as does hypervigilant processing of social threat. However, causal effects of cortisol on threat processing in SAD remain unclear. In an event-related potential (ERP) study we investigated the effects of cortisol on task-irrelevant (implicit) processing of social threat in SAD, exploring the temporal dynamics as well as the role of symptom severity and stimulus awareness. Angry face processing was measured in participants with clinical SAD after double-blind, within-subject oral administration of cortisol (50mg) and placebo, using a masked and an unmasked emotional Stroop task. Both tasks showed significantly increased P2 midline ERP amplitudes for angry compared to neutral and happy faces in the placebo condition, reflecting an early attentional bias for social threat in SAD. Furthermore, cortisol administration significantly decreased P2 amplitudes for masked angry faces. This effect correlated with social anxiety, showing stronger decreases in patients with higher levels of social anxiety. These results indicate a highly specific effect of cortisol on early motivated attention to social threat and, together with previous findings, highlight the importance of motivational context (stimulus- or task-relevance) as well as symptom severity. PMID:19836898

  13. Phobia - simple/specific

    MedlinePlus

    ... phobias References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Calkins AW, Bui E, Taylor CT, Pollack ...

  14. Use of a religious hymn in remission of symptoms of social phobia (social anxiety disorder): a case study.

    PubMed

    Khouzam, Hani Raoul; Ghafoori, Bita; Nichols, Emma E A

    2005-04-01

    This case report described a veteran with social anxiety disorder who reported fears of negative evaluation by others, social avoidance, and accompanying physiological symptoms of heart palpitations, gastrointestinal discomfort, muscle tension and mental confusion. The symptoms of social anxiety disorder subsided with the use of a Christian hymn "Be Still My Soul" and its accompanying musical poem, in Finlandia. The veteran attributed the symptom remission to the feeling of stillness and surrender to God conveyed by the words and music of the hymn. Although previous studies have shown that both music and religious beliefs can affect mental health, the findings in this case cannot be generalized without conducting further prospective empirical studies. PMID:15941117

  15. Short Term Treatment Of Phobias

    PubMed Central

    O'Regan, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    A phobia is an irrational fear. Many people have phobias but they require treatment only if their symptoms interfere with their daily lives. Simple supportive psychotherapy may be effective for mild phobias. Chemotherapy, particularly with antidepressants, will relieve some severe phobic states. Systematic desensitization, a behavior therapy well suited to physicians with an interest in hypnosis, can cure many incapacitating phobias. PMID:20469246

  16. Agoraphobia and the Modern Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dron, Jon; Anderson, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Read/write social technologies enable rich pedagogies that centre on sharing and constructing content but have two notable weaknesses. Firstly, beyond the safe, nurturing environment of closed groups, students participating in more or less public network- or set-oriented communities may be insecure in their knowledge and skills, leading to…

  17. Agoraphobia in a Rehabilitation Medicine Setting: A Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Steven P.

    1987-01-01

    Agoraphobia is a pervasive constellation of fears and avoidance behaviors relating to open spaces, crowds, being alone, and other everyday situations. Presents the case of a client with agoraphobia on a medical rehabilitation unit. Outlines psychological interventions, giving discharge and follow-up status. Literature review focused on possible…

  18. Social anxiety disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Phobia - social; Anxiety disorder - social; Social phobia; SAD - social anxiety disorder ... People with social anxiety disorder fear and avoid situations in which they may be judged by others. It may begin in the teens ...

  19. Does the form or the amount of exposure make a difference in the cognitive-behavioral therapy treatment of social phobia?

    PubMed

    Borgeat, François; Stankovic, Miroslava; Khazaal, Yasser; Rouget, Beatrice Weber; Baumann, Marie-Claude; Riquier, Françoise; O'Connor, Kieron; Jermann, Françoise; Zullino, Daniele; Bondolfi, Guido

    2009-07-01

    Exposure is considered to be an essential ingredient of cognitive-behavioral therapy treatment of social phobia and of most anxiety disorders. To assess the impact of the amount of exposure on outcome, 30 social phobic patients were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 group treatments of 8 weekly sessions: Self-Focused Exposure Therapy which is based essentially on prolonged exposure to public speaking combined with positive feedback or a more standard cognitive and behavioral method encompassing psychoeducation, cognitive work, working through exposure hierarchies of feared situations for exposure within and outside the group. The results show that the 2 methods led to significant and equivalent symptomatic improvements which were maintained at 1-year follow-up. There was a more rapid and initially more pronounced decrease in negative cognitions with the Self-Focused Exposure Therapy, which included no formal cognitive work, than with the more standard approach in which approximately a third of the content was cognitive. In contrast, decrease in social avoidance was more persistent with standard cognitive-behavior therapy which involved less exposure. The results indicate that positive cognitive change can be achieved more rapidly with non cognitive methods while avoidance decreases more reliably with a standard approach rather than an approach with an exclusive focus on exposure. PMID:19597358

  20. Fears and phobias (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Common simple phobias are those involving animals or insects, a fear of high places, a fear of lightning, a fear of flying, or other fears. These are very common in young children, and do not represent an abnormality.

  1. Fears and Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... that thing or situation. Someone might develop a bee phobia after being stung during a particularly scary ... that person, looking at a photograph of a bee, seeing a bee from a distance, or even ...

  2. Transfer of manualized CBT for social phobia into clinical practice (SOPHO-PRAX): a study protocol for a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is generally known to be efficacious in the treatment of social phobia when applied in RCTs, namely when the treatment manual is based on the Clark-Wells approach. However, little is known about the efficacy of manualized treatments in routine clinical practice (Phase IV of psychotherapy research). The present study (SOPHO-PRAX) is a continuation of a large multicenter randomized clinical trial (SOPHO-NET) and analyzes the extent to which additional training practitioners in manualized procedures enhances treatment effect. Methods/design Thirty-six private practitioners will be included in three treatment centers and randomly designated to either training in manualized CBT or no specific training. The treatment effects of the therapies conducted by both groups of therapists will be compared. A total of 162 patients (n = 116 completers; n = 58 per condition) will be enrolled. Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) will serve as primary outcome measure. Remission from social phobia is defined as LSAS total ≤30 points. Data will be collected at treatment begin, after 8, 15, and 25 sessions (50 min each), at treatment completion, as well at 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Discussion The present CBT trial combines elements of randomized controlled trials and naturalistic studies in an innovative way. It will directly inform about the incremental effects of procedures established in a controlled trial into clinical practice. Study results are relevant to healthcare decisions and policy. They may serve to improve quality of treatment, and shorten the time frame between the development and widespread dissemination of effective methods, thereby reducing health cost expenditure. The results of this study will not only inform about the degree to which the new methods lead to an improvement of treatment course and outcome, but also about whether the effects of routine psychotherapeutic treatment are comparable to those

  3. Find Your Voice: Eliminate Classroom Phobias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    The academically underprepared community college student may also be psychosocially underprepared for college, a condition contributing to the development of classroom-specific social phobia and to the high attrition rate at community colleges. The "Find Your Voice Program" uses individual and group cognitive-behavioral techniques to develop…

  4. Virtual reality applications to agoraphobia: a protocol.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Georgina; Muñoz, Sandra; González, Maribel; Uribarren, Guillermo

    2006-04-01

    Recently, educators and instructional designers have focused on the development and implementation of virtual learning environments that effectively combine theoretical and applied knowledge to teach university students. One of the trusts of the Psychology Virtual Teaching Laboratory in collaboration with the IXTLI observatory is to develop dissemination programs to promote the insertion of virtual reality (VR) technologies applied to rehabilitation in their clinical practice. This paper describes the development of (1) agoraphobia VR learning objects to be use as a teaching support tools in class and (2) a multimedia teaching program that incorporate digital video and VR scenarios address to students in the field of mental health. Promotion among professors and students about the use of this technology will allow us to initiate research in our country as well as to validate contextualized applications for our culture, therefore contributing with new advances in this field. PMID:16640489

  5. Sequential combination of imipramine and self-directed exposure in the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Mavissakalian, M

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-eight patients who had panic disorder with agoraphobia completed 8 weeks of treatment with imipramine followed by 8 weeks of treatment with imipramine combined with behavior therapy consisting of self-directed exposure. Sixty-three percent (24) of the patients responded markedly to this cost-effective combined pharmacologic and behavioral approach. Results also revealed that most of the improvement in panic occurred during the first 8 weeks of treatment when imipramine treatment alone was used, whereas improvement in severity, anxiety, depression, and phobias, in particular, continued to be significant between midtreatment and end of study. Further analysis revealed that improvement in phobic anxiety and avoidance in the first 8 weeks of treatment, rather than improvement in panic, predicted final outcome. Implications of these findings on the complex issue of differential antipanic and antiphobic effects of imipramine are briefly discussed. PMID:2335493

  6. School Phobia Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leard, Hugh M.

    1972-01-01

    School phobia is the pronounced fear reaction of a child who is experiencing significant anxiety and suffering. A warm accepting teacher is required. He must be one who can set firm and consistent yet reasonable limits for the child. Therapy is recommended for the child and his parents. (Author)

  7. School Phobia in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Charles

    1977-01-01

    The symptoms of school phobia were found to be student withdrawal, unwillingness of the student to leave the mother, being either the oldest child of the family or the last one left at home, and having an impulsive, violent, sadistic philandering father. Five adolescents are examined in detail and a proposal is made that adolescence is a time…

  8. Cortisol-induced enhancement of emotional face processing in social phobia depends on symptom severity and motivational context.

    PubMed

    van Peer, Jacobien M; Spinhoven, Philip; van Dijk, J Gert; Roelofs, Karin

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the effects of cortisol administration on approach and avoidance tendencies in 20 patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured during a reaction time task, in which patients evaluated the emotional expression of photographs of happy and angry faces by making an approaching (flexion) or avoiding (extension) arm movement. Patients showed significant avoidance tendencies for angry but not for happy faces, both in the placebo and cortisol condition. Moreover, ERP analyses showed a significant interaction of condition by severity of social anxiety on early positive (P150) amplitudes during avoidance compared to approach, indicating that cortisol increases early processing of social stimuli (in particular angry faces) during avoidance. This result replicates previous findings from a non-clinical sample of high anxious individuals and demonstrates their relevance for clinical SAD. Apparently the cortisol-induced increase in processing of angry faces in SAD depends on symptom severity and motivational context. PMID:19428977

  9. [Phobia or fear in rural communities].

    PubMed

    Klemann, H; Kuda, M; Massing, A

    1975-01-01

    In the following paper an attempt is made to demonstrate by means of phobia that neurotic subjective experience can only be understood in its social environment. Patients with phobic symptoms far more frequently come from rural communities and small towns, i.e. from towns which have a ruraltype structure. To support this thesis, empirical-statistical results based on surveys at the Medicopsychological Advice Centre for Students at the University of Göttingen are cited. Further, it is shown that a meaningful integration of this statistical data with psychodynamic and sociological findings is possible. The resulting explanatory model illustrates the attempt to make as comprehensive a statement as possible about the structure of the phobia and its cohesion to social mechanisms. The phobia is not only interpreted as an intrapsychic occurence, but at the same time the boundaries to the respective social conditions are also demonstrated and reference is made to the parallelism of social-historical development and corresponding psychic structure. PMID:1224818

  10. An investigator-blinded, randomized study to compare the efficacy of combined CBT for alcohol use disorders and social anxiety disorder versus CBT focused on alcohol alone in adults with comorbid disorders: the Combined Alcohol Social Phobia (CASP) trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alcohol use disorders and social anxiety disorder are common and disabling conditions that frequently co-exist. Although there are efficacious treatments for each disorder, only two randomized controlled trials of interventions for these combined problems have been published. We developed a new integrated treatment for comorbid Social Anxiety Disorder and Alcohol Use Disorder based on established Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) interventions for the separate disorders. Compared to established MI/CBT for alcohol use disorders this new intervention is hypothesised to lead to greater reductions in symptoms of social anxiety and alcohol use disorder and to produce greater improvements in quality of life. Higher levels of alcohol dependence will result in relatively poorer outcomes for the new integrated treatment. Methods/design A randomised controlled trial comparing 9 sessions of individual integrated treatment for alcohol and social phobia with 9 sessions of treatment for alcohol use problems alone is proposed. Randomisation will be stratified for stable antidepressant use. Post treatment clinical assessments of alcohol consumption and diagnostic status at 3 and 6 month follow-up will be blind to allocation. Discussion The proposed trial addresses a serious gap in treatment evidence and could potentially define the appropriate treatment for a large proportion of adults affected by these problems. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12608000228381. PMID:23895258

  11. Needle phobia: etiology, adverse consequences, and patient management.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Chester J; Giovannitti, Joseph A; Boynes, Sean G

    2010-10-01

    Needle phobia has profound health, dental, societal, and legal implications, and severe psychological, social, and physiologic consequences. There is genetic evidence for the physiologic response to needle puncture, and a significant familial psychological component, showing evidence of inheritance. Needle phobia is also a learned behavior. The dental practitioner must recognize patients with needle phobia before the administration of local anesthetics to identify patients who are potentially reactive and to prevent untoward sequelae. Needle phobia is highly associated with avoidance behavior, and the dentist must exhibit compassion and respect. To avoid bradycardia, hypotension, unconsciousness, convulsions, and possibly asystole, oral premedication with benzodiazepines or other antianxiety agents must be considered for patients who are needle phobic. Management of needle phobiaeinduced syncope includes perioperative monitoring, oxygen administration, positioning, atropine, and vasopressors. PMID:20831935

  12. Subliminal cues bias perception of facial affect in patients with social phobia: evidence for enhanced unconscious threat processing.

    PubMed

    Jusyte, Aiste; Schönenberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Socially anxious individuals have been shown to exhibit altered processing of facial affect, especially expressions signaling threat. Enhanced unaware processing has been suggested an important mechanism which may give rise to anxious conscious cognition and behavior. This study investigated whether individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) are perceptually more vulnerable to the biasing effects of subliminal threat cues compared to healthy controls. In a perceptual judgment task, 23 SAD and 23 matched control participants were asked to rate the affective valence of parametrically manipulated affective expressions ranging from neutral to angry. Each trial was preceded by subliminal presentation of an angry/neutral cue. The SAD group tended to rate target faces as "angry" when the preceding subliminal stimulus was angry vs. neutral, while healthy participants were not biased by the subliminal stimulus presentation. The perceptual bias in SAD was also associated with higher reaction time latencies in the subliminal angry cue condition. The results provide further support for enhanced unconscious threat processing in SAD individuals. The implications for etiology, maintenance, and treatment of SAD are discussed. PMID:25136307

  13. Subliminal cues bias perception of facial affect in patients with social phobia: evidence for enhanced unconscious threat processing

    PubMed Central

    Jusyte, Aiste; Schönenberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Socially anxious individuals have been shown to exhibit altered processing of facial affect, especially expressions signaling threat. Enhanced unaware processing has been suggested an important mechanism which may give rise to anxious conscious cognition and behavior. This study investigated whether individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) are perceptually more vulnerable to the biasing effects of subliminal threat cues compared to healthy controls. In a perceptual judgment task, 23 SAD and 23 matched control participants were asked to rate the affective valence of parametrically manipulated affective expressions ranging from neutral to angry. Each trial was preceded by subliminal presentation of an angry/neutral cue. The SAD group tended to rate target faces as “angry” when the preceding subliminal stimulus was angry vs. neutral, while healthy participants were not biased by the subliminal stimulus presentation. The perceptual bias in SAD was also associated with higher reaction time latencies in the subliminal angry cue condition. The results provide further support for enhanced unconscious threat processing in SAD individuals. The implications for etiology, maintenance, and treatment of SAD are discussed. PMID:25136307

  14. Agoraphobia and Paradigm Strain: A Family Systems Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shean, Glenn; Rohrbaugh, Michael

    Agoraphobia is an increasingly common, often chronically incapacitating anxiety disorder. Both behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy can be effective in reducing the intensity of agoraphobic symptoms. There are promising new developments, however, from a family systems perspective. Researchers are finding that an agoraphobic's marriage and family…

  15. The Prevalence and Comorbidity of Specific Phobias in College Students and Their Interest in Receiving Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seim, Richard W.; Spates, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    While the prevalence of specific phobias and social phobias is believed to be high in the general adult population, little data exists regarding the prevalence of these fears among college students. This paper describes an epidemiological study that surveyed 813 college students regarding the severity of fears experienced toward 12 objects and…

  16. Determinants of public phobia about infectious diseases in South Korea: effect of health communication and gender difference.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo; Choi, Mankyu; Lee, Tae-Ro

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the individual and social determinants of the public's phobia of infectious diseases in South Korea, where collective action was recently fueled by the public phobia over mad cow disease (bovine spongiform encephalopathy [BSE]). Gender-specific multivariate regression was used to compare the public perception of BSE and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). The analysis results differentiated between the determinants of the phobia for the 2 diseases, BSE and HPAI (N = 1002). As with HIV/AIDS and leprosy, the public fear of HPAI was expressed as a disease phobia that seeks to ensure the social exclusion of infection sources, whereas the fear of BSE was influenced by social and communication factors. Therefore, BSE, unlike previous HPAI, can be rapidly amplified amid the growing distrust in health communication, in which case the social determinants of disease phobia are associated with communicator trust, social values, and political attitude toward diseases rather than disease perception. PMID:23430887

  17. [An ambulatory model for treatment of panic and agoraphobia].

    PubMed

    Martinsen, E W

    1990-11-30

    The article describes an 11-session outpatient treatment programme in groups for patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia. The main components are cognitive-behavioural therapy and use of tricyclic antidepressives. Preliminary results after the first year of this programme indicate that most patients were much improved after completing the programme, and most of them had maintained their gains at follow-up. PMID:2274947

  18. Acceptability of Virtual Reality Interoceptive Exposure for the Treatment of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quero, Soledad; Pérez-Ara, M. Ángeles; Bretón-López, Juana; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa M.; Botella, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Interoceptive exposure (IE) is a standard component of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for panic disorder and agoraphobia. The virtual reality (VR) program "Panic-Agoraphobia" has several virtual scenarios designed for applying exposure to agoraphobic situations; it can also simulate physical sensations. This work examines…

  19. Anxiety Sensitivity: A Missing Piece to the Agoraphobia-without-Panic Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Chris; Wilson, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the controversy surrounding the diagnosis of agoraphobia without panic attacks and proposes a key role for anxiety sensitivity in explaining agoraphobic avoidance among those who have never experienced panic. Although rare in clinical samples, agoraphobia without panic is commonly observed in population-based surveys,…

  20. Blood-Injury-Illness Phobia: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thyer, Bruce A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Surveys empirical literature pertaining to phobias of blood, injury, or illness (BII); defines BII phobia as selectively associated with vasovagal fainting response upon exposure to phobic stimuli. Presents clinical, demographic, and etiological information from 15 BII phobics and suggests that BII phobia warrants diagnostic category separate from…

  1. The Identification and Treatment of School Phobia. Publication No. 6503.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paige, Leslie Zeldin

    Chapter 1 of this document defines school phobia as an exaggerated and irrational fear of attending school. In this chapter, school phobia is distinguished from truancy, the incidence and consequences of school phobia are discussed, characteristics of school phobia are described, and types of school phobia are identified. The chapter concludes…

  2. A case of choking phobia: towards a conceptual approach.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Rui; Melo, Raquel; Curral, Rosário; Coelho, Rui; Roma-Torres, António

    2014-03-01

    Choking phobia, also known as phagophobia or swallowing phobia is an uncommon clinical entity that has been underappreciated and is included in the new DSM-5 and upcoming ICD-11 diagnostic category of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder. Phenomenologically distinct from other eating disorders, it is characterized by the phobic stimulus of swallowing that results in the avoidance of food or drinks, and ultimately to low weight, social withdrawal, anxiety and depression states. Its prevalence and long-term course on the general population still needs to be determined, probably reflecting years of indefiniteness regarding its nosology and by the absence of a clear set of diagnostic criteria. We present a clinical case of choking phobia in a 32-year-old male patient after an episode of choke when eating chicken. An early diagnosis and distinction from other eating disorders is important for proper treatment and fundamental for prognosis. We also make a thorough revision on literature in clinical features, differential diagnosis and treatment approaches, suggesting a conceptual approach for choking phobia as a clinical spectrum settled by different degrees of phobic subtypes, which may depend on a varied number of clinical variables. PMID:23888402

  3. [Social anxiety].

    PubMed

    Mirabel-Sarron, Christine

    2010-06-20

    Social anxiety disorders are various, frequent and invalidant. Social phobia is characterized by marked and persistent fear of social or performance situations in which embarrassment may occur including, for example, fear of public speaking. In clinical setting, the majority of social phobics report fears of more than one type of social situation. Social phobia tends to develop early in life, with a life time prevalence of 2-4%. Pharmacotherapy and behavioural and cognitive therapy are communly used. PMID:20623894

  4. Virtual reality treatment of flying phobia.

    PubMed

    Baños, Rosa M; Botella, Cristina; Perpiñá, Concepción; Alcañiz, Mariano; Lozano, Jose Antonio; Osma, Jorge; Gallardo, Myriam

    2002-09-01

    Flying phobia (FP) might become a very incapacitating and disturbing problem in a person's social, working, and private areas. Psychological interventions based on exposure therapy have proved to be effective, but given the particular nature of this disorder they bear important limitations. Exposure therapy for FP might be excessively costly in terms of time, money, and efforts. Virtual reality (VR) overcomes these difficulties as different significant environments might be created, where the patient can interact with what he or she fears while in a totally safe and protected environment-the therapist's consulting room. This paper intends, on one hand, to show the different scenarios designed by our team for the VR treatment of FP, and on the other, to present the first results supporting the effectiveness of this new tool for the treatment of FP in a multiple baseline study. PMID:12381036

  5. [Workplace related anxiety and phobia].

    PubMed

    Linden, M; Muschalla, B

    2007-01-01

    Work is an important aspect of life. Problems at the workplace must therefore have negative consequences on the mental status and mental problems will interfere with the working place. The relation between anxiety and the workplace is especially important because the workplace causes anxiety due to its very nature. A common final pathway of mental disorders in general, and work related anxieties in particular, are workplace phobias, with panic when approaching or even thinking of the workplace. This is a serious complication with negative consequences for the further course of illness. It makes special therapeutic intervention necessary. This paper describes the phenomenon of workplace related anxieties and phobia and provides a conceptual framework for their understanding. PMID:17106728

  6. Behavioral, Cognitive, and Pharmacological Treatments of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: Critique and Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Larry K.; Marchione, Karen

    1991-01-01

    Examines theoretical, methodologic, and research issues as well as strengths, limitations, and possible interactions pertaining to behavioral, cognitive, and pharmacological treatments of panic disorder with agoraphobia. Compares attrition, outcome, and maintenance effects and presents composite indices of significant improvement, endstate…

  7. Milnacipran in panic disorder with agoraphobia and major depressive disorder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Liou, Ying-Jay

    2011-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman had panic disorder with agoraphobia and major depressive disorder sequentially. The aforementioned symptoms subsided significantly after treatment with milnacipran, 125 mg, administered daily for 2 months. However, panic attacks with agoraphobia were noted frequently when she tapered down milnacipran to 50 mg daily. She consequently experienced depression that gradually increased in degree, with poor energy, poor sleep, thoughts of helplessness, and ideas of death. After administration of a daily dose of 125 mg of milnacipran for 1 month, her panic attacks with agoraphobia and depressed mood were again alleviated. The present report shows significant effects of milnacipran on the comorbidity of panic disorder with agoraphobia and major depressive disorder. PMID:21926486

  8. [School phobia or school refusal?].

    PubMed

    Le Heuzey, Marie-France

    2008-04-15

    The scope of the concept of school phobia, associated with anxiety disorders, is now broadened to include other underlying disorders such depression, conduct disorders and behaviors such as school truancy. The term "school refusal" is now preferred in the literature. This article reviews the main clinical and terapeutical dimensions of school refusal. Its aim is to increase practionners' awareness of this disorder and to describe a treatment plan centred on school attendance. PMID:18546645

  9. School Phobia: Understanding a Complex Behavioural Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitiyo, Morgan; Wheeler, John J.

    2006-01-01

    School phobia affects about 5% of the school-age population. If left untreated, school phobia can have devastating long-term consequences in children challenged by this condition. Various treatment approaches have been used to explore this complex behavioural response, major among them being the psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, pharmacological and…

  10. School Phobia: Etiology, Evaluation and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Charles P.

    School phobia is an irrational fear or anxiety about attending school. Definite distinctions can be made between the school phobic and the truant, both of whom miss school on a regular basis. It appears that the incidence of school phobia is evenly distributed between the sexes and among age levels from 5 through 15 years, and is not significantly…

  11. SCHOOL PHOBIA--A SYSTEMS APPROACH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOLMAN, WILLIAM M.

    THE SCHOOL PHOBIA SYNDROME PROVIDES AN EXAMPLE OF THE SCIENTIFIC DEVELOPMENT OF A CLINICAL SYNDROME. A REVIEW OF RELEVANT LITERATURE REVEALS THAT DETERMINANTS OF THIS PHOBIA ARE INTRAPSYCHIC, INTERPERSONAL, FAMILIAL, AND COMMUNITY FACTORS. WITH SO MANY FACTORS INVOLVED, AN EXTENSION OF THE CURRENT APPROACH TO THE PROBLEM WOULD INVOLVE FAR TOO MANY…

  12. Simple techniques to treat medical phobias.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, C. B.; Ferguson, J. M.; Wermuth, B. M.

    1977-01-01

    Participant modelling, a behaviourally-orientated treatment technique, is an effect method of treating phobias associated with minor medical procedures or apparatus such as needles or intravenous catheters. The steps in this technique are described and two cases of severe needle phobias successfully treated with participant modelling are presented to illustrate further its application. PMID:876910

  13. The Legend and Myth of School Phobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Christopher A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    "School phobia" has generally referred to children and adolescents avoidant of school due to overwhelming fearfulness. This paper outlines the historical development of school phobia, including its transition from syndrome to symptom. Given the questionable validity of the construct, recommendations are made regarding future classification,…

  14. The onset of driving phobias.

    PubMed

    Munjack, D J

    1984-12-01

    Thirty driving phobics who called the Psychiatry Outpatient Phobia Clinic (25 females and five males) were given a 20-min semi-standardized telephone interview during which they were asked about the circumstances of the onset of their driving fears. Twelve (40%) reported that their fears were precipitated by a panic attack on the freeway; six (20%) by a collision; and three (10%) by other frightening experiences in automobiles. Four (13.3%) related the onset to family stress or upheaval. Other modes of onset also occurred. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of existing theories of fear acquisition and treatment approaches. PMID:6526942

  15. Radiation: facts, fallacies and phobias.

    PubMed

    Wigg, D R

    2007-02-01

    There is frequent debate in the media and the scientific published reports about the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment, the benefits and risks of the nuclear industry, uranium mining and the storage of radioactive wastes. Driving this debate is increasing concern about reliance on fossil fuels for power generation for which alternatives are required. Unfortunately, there is generally a poor understanding of the relevant basic sciences compounded by widespread irrational fear of irradiation (radiation phobia). Radioactivity, with special reference to uranium and plutonium is simply described. How radiation affect tissues and the potential hazards to individuals and populations are explained. The origins of radiation phobia and its harmful consequences are examined. Whether we like it or not, Australia is heavily involved in the uranium industry by virtue of having one-third of the world's known reserves, exports of which are worth approximately $470m annually. As this paper has been written as simply as possible, it may also be of interest to readers who may have had little scientific training. It may be downloaded from the web using references provided in this article. It is concluded that ignorance and fear are major impediments to rational debate on radiation issues. PMID:17217485

  16. A dental phobia treatment within the Swedish National Health Insurance.

    PubMed

    Hägglin, Catharina; Boman, Ulla Wide

    2012-01-01

    Severe dental fear/phobia (DF) is a problem for both dental care providers and for patients who often suffer from impaired oral health and from social and emotional distress.The aim of this paper was to present the Swedish model for DF treatment within the National Health Insurance System, and to describe the dental phobia treatment and its outcome at The Dental Fear Research and Treatment Clinic (DFRTC) in Gothenburg. A literature review was made of relevant policy documents on dental phobia treatment from the National Health Insurance System and for Västra Götaland region on published outcome studies from DFRTC. The treatment manual of DFRTC was also used. In Sweden, adult patients with severe DF are able to undergo behavioral treatment within the National Health Insurance System if the patient and caregivers fulfil defined criteria that must be approved for each individual case. At DFRTC dental phobia behavioral treatment is given by psychologists and dentists in an integrated model. The goal is to refer patients for general dental care outside the DFRTC after completing treatment. The DF treatment at DFRTC has shown positive effects on dental fear, attendance and acceptance of dental treatment for 80% of patients. Follow-up after 2 and 10 years confirmed these results and showed improved oral health. In addition, positive psychosomatic and psychosocial side-effects were reported, and benefits also for society were evident in terms of reduced sick-leave. In conlusion, in Sweden a model has been developed within the National Health Insurance System helping individuals with DF. Behavioral treatment conducted at DFRTC has proven successful in helping patients cope with dental care, leading to regular attendance and better oral health. PMID:22876394

  17. Healthcare utilization following cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Pasquale; Marchand, André; Reinharz, Daniel; Cloutier, Karine; Mainguy, Nicole; Miller, Jean-Marc; Bégin, Jean; Turcotte, Julie

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the overall changes in healthcare services utilization after providing an empirically supported cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia. Data on healthcare utilization were collected for a total of 84 adults meeting DSM-IV criteria. Participants were completers of a cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia. Data on utilization of healthcare services and medication were obtained from semi-structured interviews from baseline to 1-year after treatment. Results of the Friedman non-parametric analysis reveal a significant decrease in overall and mental health-related costs following treatment. This study shows a significant reduction in healthcare costs following cognitive behavior therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia. More studies are needed to examine the potential long-term cost-offset effect of empirically supported treatments for panic disorder. PMID:15986784

  18. Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... nervous and have a panic attack. What's a Panic Attack Like? Panic attacks can be really scary and may make someone ... sweat, and breathe quickly. Some people who have panic attacks might have chest pains, feel dizzy, or feel ...

  19. Topical corticosteroid addiction and phobia.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Aparajita; Sengupta, Sujata; Coondoo, Arijit; Jana, Amlan Kusum

    2014-09-01

    Corticosteroids, one of the most widely prescribed topical drugs, have been used for about six decades till date. However, rampant misuse and abuse down the years has given the drug a bad name. Topical steroid abuse may lead to two major problems which lie at the opposing ends of the psychosomatic spectrum. Topical steroid addiction, a phenomenon that came to be recognized about a decade after the introduction of the molecule is manifested as psychological distress and rebound phenomenon on stoppage of the drug. The rebound phenomenon, which can affect various parts of the body particularly the face and the genitalia has been reported by various names in the literature. TC phobia which lies at the opposite end of the psychiatric spectrum of steroid abuse has been reported particularly among parents of atopic children. Management of both conditions is difficult and frustrating. Psychological counseling and support can be of immense help in both the conditions. PMID:25284851

  20. Topical Corticosteroid Addiction and Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Aparajita; Sengupta, Sujata; Coondoo, Arijit; Jana, Amlan Kusum

    2014-01-01

    Corticosteroids, one of the most widely prescribed topical drugs, have been used for about six decades till date. However, rampant misuse and abuse down the years has given the drug a bad name. Topical steroid abuse may lead to two major problems which lie at the opposing ends of the psychosomatic spectrum. Topical steroid addiction, a phenomenon that came to be recognized about a decade after the introduction of the molecule is manifested as psychological distress and rebound phenomenon on stoppage of the drug. The rebound phenomenon, which can affect various parts of the body particularly the face and the genitalia has been reported by various names in the literature. TC phobia which lies at the opposite end of the psychiatric spectrum of steroid abuse has been reported particularly among parents of atopic children. Management of both conditions is difficult and frustrating. Psychological counseling and support can be of immense help in both the conditions. PMID:25284851

  1. School Phobia: The Importance of Prompt Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAnanly, Eileen

    1986-01-01

    The importance of prompt treatment of the school phobic child, and the need for good communication among those concerned, are addressed in this article. The manifestation of school phobia is described and intervention methods are reviewed. (Author/MT)

  2. School Phobia: A Babel of Tongues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Theodore; Jegede, R. Olukayode

    1973-01-01

    A review of the literature is presented with a focus on the historical trend from a broad conception of school avoidance toward a narrow conception of school phobia and back toward a systems analysis. (Author)

  3. School Phobia: The Going to School Sickness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangster, Dorothy

    1971-01-01

    This article reviews the two main causes of phobia and presents a series of case studies, from Toronto school files, which were satisfactorily handled by psychiatric help, either in or outside the school setting. (CJ)

  4. Primary anorexia nervosa (weight phobia) in males.

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, M. K.; Tibbetts, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Ten cases of primary anorexia nervosa (weight phobia) in males (as against 196 females) have been treated in the United Birmingham Hospitals over 19 years. A discrete syndromes appears to exist with much to support the view that it is the counterpart of primary anorexia nervosa in the female. Six illustrative case histories are described briefly. The heavy loading with consistent abnormalities of psychiatric interest makes it very probable that weight phobia is primarily a psychiatric disorder. PMID:870891

  5. Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrecque, Joane; Marchand, Andre; Dugas, Michel J.; Letarte, Andree

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for comorbid panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by combining treatment strategies for both disorders. A single-case, multiple-baseline design across participants was used. Three participants with primary PDA and secondary…

  6. Sensation-Focused Intensive Treatment for Panic Disorder with Moderate to Severe Agoraphobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morissette, Sandra Baker; Spiegel, David A.; Heinrichs, Nina

    2005-01-01

    The current article presents a detailed description of an intensive treatment program for panic disorder with moderate to severe levels of agoraphobia (PDA), called Sensation-Focused Intensive Treatment (SFIT). Although the efficacy of traditional CBT treatment programs has been well established for the treatment of PDA, patients with moderate to…

  7. Marital Therapy and Spouse Involvement in the Treatment of Depression, Agoraphobia, and Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Neil S.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examines literature on marital therapy and spouse involvement as treatments for major psychopathology, focusing on depression, agoraphobia, and alcoholism. For each disorder, examines relation between marital dynamics and disorder and discusses empirical efforts to evaluate impact of marital therapy or spouse involvement on disorder. Summarizes…

  8. Generalization of Therapeutic Changes in Agoraphobia: The Role of Perceived Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, S. Lloyd; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Investigated extent and mechanisms of therapeutic generalization across distinct areas of agoraphobic dysfunction among 27 severe agoraphobics. Analysis of possible cognitive mechanisms revealed that perceived self-efficacy accurately predicted treatment and transfer effects even when alternative factors were held constant. Agoraphobia appears to…

  9. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J.; Marchand, Andre; Letarte, Andree

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral treatment package for comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA). A single-case, multiple-baseline, across-subjects design was used with 3 primary GAD patients with secondary PDA. The efficacy of the treatment was evaluated with…

  10. Virtual Reality Exposure in the Treatment of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Helena Villa; Botella, Cristina; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Osma, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present a case example of the use of virtual reality exposure for the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia. The assessment protocol and procedure (including a baseline period) and the cognitive-behavioral treatment program are described. The clinical measures were categorized into target behaviors, panic and agoraphobia…

  11. Getting beyond "pandora-phobia".

    PubMed

    Cushman, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Clinicians, regardless of discipline, tend to prefer those areas of their practice in which they feel a sense of mastery, a confidence in their ability to manage the conditions being presented to them by their patients. In contrast, in clinical scenarios when the history and/or physical exam findings consist of vague and difficult-to-interpret elements, the resulting discordance may challenge some clinicians' sense of mastery. This common primary care scenario, the presentation of symptoms for which no "organic," pathologic, physical diagnosis can be discerned, is referred to as Medically Unexplained Symptoms. Clinical trainees experience "complicated" patients as particularly challenging, and may hesitate to ask about the patients' thoughts and feelings, resulting from a fear of getting entangled in a conversation from which the trainee cannot easily escape. The author refers to this as "Pandora-phobia," from Pandora in Greek mythology and the fear of opening Pandora's box. The task in the training environment is to help young clinicians gain experience in "lifting the lid" of Pandora's box. This is ideally achieved by trainees observing the role-modeling of accomplished mentors, and their working with capable, multidisciplinary teammates. This is the beauty of the collaborative, integrated care delivery team; there is a balanced set of skills and expertise brought by an expanded number of caring persons supporting those patients whose conditions most need a combination of biomedical and psychosocial expertise. PMID:24684159

  12. A case of spider phobia in a congenitally blind person.

    PubMed

    Musial, Frauke; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Sülzenbrück, Sandra; Miltner, Wolfgang H R

    2007-09-30

    Vision is the key sensory system in humans, leading to the implicit assumption that the acquisition of spider phobia is predominantly mediated through the visual pathway. We report on a congenitally blind person with spider phobia, showing that the acquisition of spider phobia does not necessarily depend on visual cues. PMID:17597227

  13. A Protocol for the Assessment and Treatment of School Phobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doll, Beth

    This paper addresses the problem of school phobia, one of the most common childhood anxiety disorders. It presents four case studies of preadolescent school phobia involving two girls and two boys in grades four through seven. Several features of effective strategies for the assessment and treatment of school phobia which have emerged from the…

  14. Edith Wharton's threshold phobia and two worlds.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Deanna; Kulish, Nancy

    2014-08-01

    The American novelist Edith Wharton suffered an unusual childhood neurotic symptom, a fear of crossing thresholds, a condition that might be called a "threshold phobia." This symptom is identified and examined in autobiographical material, letters, diaries, and selected literary fiction and nonfiction left by Wharton to arrive at a formulation not previously drawn together. A fascinating theme-living or being trapped between "two worlds"-runs through much of the writer's life and work. The phobia is related to this theme, and both can be linked more broadly to certain sexual conflicts in women. This understanding of Wharton's phobia, it is argued, throws new light on the developmental issues and conflicts related to the female "oedipal" or triadic phase, characterized by the need to negotiate the two worlds of mother and of father. PMID:25059543

  15. Does Maintenance CBT Contribute to Long-Term Treatment Response of Panic Disorder With or Without Agoraphobia? A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    White, Kamila S.; Payne, Laura A.; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott W.; Saksa, John R.; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the possibility that maintenance cognitive behavior therapy (M–CBT) may improve the likelihood of sustained improvement and reduced relapse in a multi-site randomized controlled clinical trial of patients who met criteria for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Method Participants were all patients (N = 379) who first began an open trial of acute-phase CBT. Patients completing and responding to acute-phase treatment were randomized to receive either nine monthly sessions of M-CBT (n = 79) or assessment only (n = 78) and were then followed for an additional 12 months without treatment. Results M–CBT produced significantly lower relapse rates (5.2%) and reduced work and social impairment compared to the assessment only condition (18.4%) at a 21-month follow-up (MFU). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models showed that residual symptoms of agoraphobia at the end of acute-phase treatment were independently predictive of time to relapse during 21-MFU (HR = 1.15, p < .01). Conclusions M–CBT aimed at reinforcing acute treatment gains to prevent relapse and offset disorder recurrence may improve long-term outcome in PD/A. PMID:23127290

  16. Demographics, clinical characteristics and quality of life of Brazilian women with driving phobia.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rafael T da; Carvalho, Marcele Regine de; Cantini, Jessye; Freire, Rafael Christophe da Rocha; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-02-01

    Driving phobia is associated with serious consequences such as restriction of freedom, career impairments and social embarrassment. The main objective of this paper is to compare clinical characteristics and quality of life between women with driving phobia and women without this phobia. These factors were assessed using structured interviews, semi-structured questionnaires, scales and inventories. We accessed diagnoses, depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, anxiety traits, driving cognitions and quality of life. There was no difference between groups with regard to demographic data and driving history. Both groups were also equivalent in the number of traumatic events and accidents experienced while driving or riding. The fear of driving group showed higher state and trait anxiety scores. A high frequency of cognitive distortions can explain why people with driving phobia often engage in maladaptive safety behaviors in an attempt to protect themselves from unpredicted dangers when driving. Regarding quality of life, the control group had slightly higher scores on all subscales, but significant differences were observed for only three scales: "functional capacity", "social aspects", and "mental health". More studies with larger samples more instruments and other contexts are needed to further investigate the clinical characteristics and personality traits of people who have a fear of driving. PMID:24238932

  17. School Phobia: A Family Systems Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerio, Jay

    1997-01-01

    Provides strategic and structural therapy concepts to use when addressing a child's school phobia. Describes how a family systems approach, which is solution-focused, employs family resources and fosters parental competencies. Offers a case study with a careful analysis of each session. Discusses implications for school counselors. (RJM)

  18. School Phobia and the Elementary Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, James D.

    1971-01-01

    The behavior oriented elementary school counselor can expand his role to include crisis problems once handled entirely by clinicians outside the school setting. A behavioral approach permits the counselor to treat problems such as school phobia as a function of environmental consequences. (Author)

  19. Genes, Fears, Phobias, and Phobic Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Gregory

    1990-01-01

    Surveyed literature on genetics and fears and phobias to determine what might be heritable. Found, for ordinary fears among the general population, heredity appears to contribute mainly to a trait of general fearfulness and may be a major reason for the strong intercorrelation among different fears. Found evidence of little environmental…

  20. Blood-Injection-Injury Phobia and Dog Phobia in Youth: Psychological Characteristics and Associated Features in a Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Oar, Ella L; Farrell, Lara J; Waters, Allison M; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2016-05-01

    Blood-Injection-Injury (BII) phobia is a particularly debilitating condition that has been largely ignored in the child literature. The present study examined the clinical phenomenology of BII phobia in 27 youths, relative to 25 youths with dog phobia-one of the most common and well-studied phobia subtypes in youth. Children were compared on measures of phobia severity, functional impairment, comorbidity, threat appraisals (danger expectancies and coping), focus of fear, and physiological responding, as well as vulnerability factors including disgust sensitivity and family history. Children and adolescents with BII phobia had greater diagnostic severity. In addition, they were more likely to have a comorbid diagnosis of a physical health condition, to report more exaggerated danger expectancies, and to report fears that focused more on physical symptoms (e.g., faintness and nausea) in comparison to youth with dog phobia. The present study advances knowledge relating to this poorly understood condition in youth. PMID:27157026

  1. Disorder-specific emotional imagery for differential and quantitative assessment of agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Engel, Kirsten-Rita; Bandelow, Borwin; Neumann, Charlott; Obst, Katrin; Wedekind, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Visual emotional stimulation is supposed to elicit psycho-vegetative reactions, which are similar to as the ones elicited by exposure to actual experience. Visual stimulation paradigms have been widely used in studies on agoraphobia with and without panic disorder. However, the applied imagery has hardly ever been disorder- and subject- specific. 51 patients with an ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnosis of agoraphobia with or without panic disorder (PDA) and matching healthy controls have been examined. Subjects were confronted with 146 picture showing characteristic agoraphobic situations (high places, narrow places, crowds, public transport facilities, or wide places) or pictures associated with acute physical emergency (panic) situations, which had been pre-selected by anxiety experts. Participants were asked to rate emotional arousal induced by the respective images on the Self- Assessment Manikin scale (SAM). Data on PDA severity (PAS) depressive symptoms (MADRS) and sociodemographic data were recorded. Saliva cortisol levels were measured before and after exposure in a second test applying the individually mostly feared stimuli combined with emotionally neutral pictures for every single patient. 117 of the PDA-specific images were rated significantly more fear-eliciting by patients than by healthy individuals. Sub-categorization into agoraphobia clusters showed differential effects of clusters with regard to gender distribution, severity of PDA and cortisol secretion during exposure. In this study disorder specific and individual characteristics of agoraphobia were assessed for use in future trials applying emotional imagery. It could be used for the differential assessment of PDA and associated neurobiological and psychological phenomena and in neuroimaging paradigms. PMID:22632470

  2. Noninvasive brain stimulation by radioelectric asymmetric conveyor in the treatment of agoraphobia: open-label, naturalistic study

    PubMed Central

    Mannu, Piero; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Fontani, Vania; Castagna, Alessandro; Margotti, Matteo Lotti

    2011-01-01

    Background Agoraphobia is considered to be the most serious complication of panic disorder. It involves progressive development of debilitating anxiety symptoms related to being in situations where one would be extremely embarrassed and could not be rescued in the case of a panic attack. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of noninvasive brain stimulation using a radioelectric asymmetric conveyor (REAC) for agoraphobia. Patients and methods Twenty-three patients (3 males and 20 females) suffering from agoraphobia and without a history of panic disorder were evaluated by a psychiatrist using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, and the Agoraphobia Scale (AS). The patients were subjected to two 18-session cycles of noninvasive brain stimulation with the REAC, according to an established therapeutic protocol called neuropsycho-physical optimization. Results Analyzing the anxiety and avoidance parameters of the AS after the first and second cycles of REAC treatment revealed variation in levels of response to treatment, including weak (AS item 7), moderate (AS items 10 and 13), and good responses (AS items 1–6, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 14–20). Conclusion These results highlight the potential of the REAC to treat complex clinical situations such as agoraphobia, which is typically resistant to pharmacologic treatments. Furthermore, these data show the advantages of REAC treatment, even compared with modern cognitive behavioral therapy, including a relatively rapid and “stable” clinical response (just over 6 months) and economic cost. PMID:22163156

  3. Social anxiety in late adolescence: the importance of early childhood language impairment.

    PubMed

    Voci, Sabrina C; Beitchman, Joseph H; Brownlie, E B; Wilson, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Social phobia is a common, highly comorbid, poorly understood and relatively understudied condition. The origins of social phobia share familial and biological features common with those of other anxiety disorders, but seldom have precursors of the fear of social communication been examined as a possible pathway to social phobia. Here we examine the role of early childhood language impairment as an antecedent to social phobia in late adolescence. Participants in a prospective longitudinal community study identified as having language impairment at age 5 and matched controls were followed up at age 19. Compared to normal language controls, individuals with a history of early language impairment had 2.7 times the odds of having a social phobia by age 19. Results suggest that early language impairment represents a distinct pathway to late adolescent social phobia. PMID:16503112

  4. Mechanisms of change in cognitive therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Hoffart, Asle; Sexton, Harold; Hedley, Liv M; Martinsen, Egil W

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the predictions of an integrated cognitive and behavioral model of agoraphobic avoidance in patients with chronic panic disorder and agoraphobia during the process of observed therapeutic change. Treatment was residential with the majority (n=165, 88%) receiving cognitive therapy, while the remaining 23 (12%) received guided mastery therapy. The results of latent variable path modeling of the changes occurring over the course of this treatment suggested that the anxiety elicited by bodily sensations influenced catastrophic beliefs, which, in turn, increased avoidance. Avoidance increased the anxiety elicited by bodily sensations. PMID:17727812

  5. Emotional Imagery and the Differential Diagnosis of Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Edwin W., III; And Others

    1988-01-01

    For 38 anxiety patients, exposure to phobic imagery resulted in significantly larger heart rate and skin conductance increases than control imagery. Results suggest that simple phobia is avoidance disposition, social phobia involves multiple problems of interpersonal dominance, and agoraphobia may be more similar to generalized anxiety disorder…

  6. Specific phobia: a disorder of fear conditioning and extinction.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J; Matsunaga, Hisato

    2006-04-01

    Specific phobia is the most prevalent of the anxiety disorders. Although there have been relatively few studies of its psychobiology and pharmacotherapy, there is a rich laboratory of literature on fear conditioning and extinction and a clear evolutionary perspective. Advances in the cognitive-affective neuroscience of fear processing may ultimately lead to new approaches to the clinical management of phobias. PMID:16641829

  7. Psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test.

    PubMed

    Frankl, My; Philips, Björn; Berggraf, Lene; Ulvenes, Pål; Johansson, Robert; Wennberg, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to make the first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test, using the Swedish translation - a test developed to screen the ability to experience, express and regulate emotions. Data was collected from a clinical sample (N = 82) of patients with depression and/or anxiety participating in randomized controlled trial of Internet-based affect-focused treatment, and a university student sample (N = 197). The internal consistency for the total score was satisfactory (Clinical sample α = 0.88/Student sample α = 0.84) as well as for all the affective domains, except Anger/Assertion (α = 0.44/0.36), Sadness/Grief (α = 0.24/0.46) and Attachment/Closeness (α = 0.67/0.69). Test retest reliability was satisfactory (ICC > 0.77) for the total score and for all the affective domains except for Sadness/Grief (ICC = 0.04). The exploratory factor analysis resulted in a six-factor solution and did only moderately match the test's original affective domains. An empirical cut-off between the clinical and the university student sample were calculated and yielded a cut-off of 72 points. As expected, the Affect Phobia test showed negative significant correlations in the clinical group with measures on depression (rxy  = -0.229; p < 0.01) and anxiety (rxy  = -0.315; p < 0.05). The conclusion is that the psychometric properties are satisfactory for the total score of the Affect Phobia Test but not for some of the test's affective domains. Consequently the domains should not be used as subscales. The test can discriminate between individuals who seek help for psychological problems and those who do not. PMID:27461917

  8. Experiential cognitive therapy in the treatment of panic disorders with agoraphobia: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Vincelli, F; Anolli, L; Bouchard, S; Wiederhold, B K; Zurloni, V; Riva, G

    2003-06-01

    The use of a multicomponent cognitive-behavioral treatment strategy for panic disorder with agoraphobia is actually one of the preferred therapeutic approaches for this disturbance. This method involves a mixture of cognitive and behavioral techniques that are intended to help patients identify and modify their dysfunctional anxiety-related thoughts, beliefs and behavior. The paper presents a new treatment protocol for Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia, named Experiential-Cognitive Therapy (ECT) that integrates the use of virtual reality (VR) in a multicomponent cognitive-behavioral treatment strategy. The VR software used for the trial is freely downloadable: www.cyberpsychology.info/try.htm. Moreover, the paper presents the result of a controlled study involving 12 consecutive patients aged 35-53. The selected subjects were randomly divided in three groups: ECT group, that experienced the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Virtual Reality assisted treatment (eight sessions), a CBT group that experienced the traditional Cognitive Behavioral approach (12 sessions) and a waiting list control group. The data showed that both CBT and ECT could significantly reduce the number of panic attacks, the level of depression and both state and trait anxiety. However, ECT procured these results using 33% fewer sessions than CBT. This datum suggests that ECT could be better than CBT in relation to the "cost of administration," justifying the added use of VR equipment in the treatment of panic disorders. PMID:12855090

  9. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia in a Multiethnic Urban Outpatient Clinic: Initial Presentation and Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Steven; Braunstein, Jeffrey W.; Halpern, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Few studies examine the effectiveness of panic control treatment across diverse ethnic groups. In this paper we present data on 40 patients (African American, n = 24; Caucasian, n = 16) with panic disorder and comorbid agoraphobia who presented at an anxiety disorder clinic in an inner-city area. On initial assessment both groups were similar on…

  10. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: A Randomized, Controlled Trial and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberge, Pasquale; Marchand, Andre; Reinharz, Daniel; Savard, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    A randomized, controlled trial was conducted to examine the cost-effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for panic disorder with agoraphobia. A total of 100 participants were randomly assigned to standard (n = 33), group (n = 35), and brief (n = 32) treatment conditions. Results show significant clinical and statistical improvement…

  11. Nausea in Specific Phobia of Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Höller, Yvonne; van Overveld, Mark; Jutglar, Heili; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-01-01

    Specific phobia of vomiting (SPOV) is a clinical condition with early onset, chronic course and substantial psychosocial impairment due to a rigorous avoidance behavior. A primary symptom which drives patients to consult a medical practitioner is nausea. In this study our aim was to further analyze this symptom of SPOV and examined its role in the development and manifestation of the phobia. We conducted an internet survey in the german SPOV-internet-forum. We calculated a nausea score and grouped participants in a high-and low-nausea group to examine the relationship between nausea and characteristics of the fear of vomiting. In this sample (N = 131), nausea was fairly common in most participants with fear of vomiting. Participants in the high-nausea group had significantly higher ratings of subjective fear and significantly longer duration of fear of vomiting. Additionally, the high-nausea group contained more participants with a body mass index below 19 than the low-nausea group. The present findings suggest that nausea is a core symptom in SPOV which is closely related to intensity of the fear, duration of the fear, and body weight. Future research should investigate if nausea-specific design of treatment could improve therapy outcome. PMID:25379248

  12. Nausea in specific phobia of vomiting.

    PubMed

    Höller, Yvonne; van Overveld, Mark; Jutglar, Heili; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-09-01

    Specific phobia of vomiting (SPOV) is a clinical condition with early onset, chronic course and substantial psychosocial impairment due to a rigorous avoidance behavior. A primary symptom which drives patients to consult a medical practitioner is nausea. In this study our aim was to further analyze this symptom of SPOV and examined its role in the development and manifestation of the phobia. We conducted an internet survey in the german SPOV-internet-forum. We calculated a nausea score and grouped participants in a high-and low-nausea group to examine the relationship between nausea and characteristics of the fear of vomiting. In this sample (N = 131), nausea was fairly common in most participants with fear of vomiting. Participants in the high-nausea group had significantly higher ratings of subjective fear and significantly longer duration of fear of vomiting. Additionally, the high-nausea group contained more participants with a body mass index below 19 than the low-nausea group. The present findings suggest that nausea is a core symptom in SPOV which is closely related to intensity of the fear, duration of the fear, and body weight. Future research should investigate if nausea-specific design of treatment could improve therapy outcome. PMID:25379248

  13. Thunderstorm phobia in dogs: an Internet survey of 69 cases.

    PubMed

    McCobb, E C; Brown, E A; Damiani, K; Dodman, N H

    2001-01-01

    To learn more about predispositions for, signs, and progression of canine thunderstorm phobia, a survey for owners was posted on the Internet. Questions addressed signalment, age of onset, behavior during storms, and treatments tried. Sixty-nine responses were received. Herding dogs and herding crossbreeds accounted for the majority of dogs. Seventeen of 41 dogs with a known age of onset began exhibiting thunderstorm phobia <1 year of age. Various characteristic responses of dogs to storms were described. Improved knowledge of the demographics of thunderstorm phobia, its development, and presentation will assist in understanding the genesis and progression of the condition. PMID:11450831

  14. Neuro-linguistic programming and application in treatment of phobias.

    PubMed

    Karunaratne, Mahishika

    2010-11-01

    Phobias are a prevalent and often debilitating mental health problem all over the world. This article aims to explore what is known about the use of Neuro-linguistic Programming (NLP) as a treatment for this condition. Whilst there is abundant experiential evidence from NLP practitioners attesting to the efficacy of this method as a treatment for phobias, experimental research in this area is somewhat limited. This paper reviews evidence available in literature produced in the UK and US and reveals that NLP is a successful treatment for phobias as well as being particularly efficient due to the relatively brief time period it takes to effect an improvement. PMID:20920803

  15. One Session Treatment for Specific Phobias: An Adaptation for Paediatric Blood-Injection-Injury Phobia in Youth.

    PubMed

    Oar, Ella L; Farrell, Lara J; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2015-12-01

    Blood-injection-injury (BII) phobia is a chronic and debilitating disorder, which has largely been neglected in the child literature. The present paper briefly reviews the aetiology of specific phobias with particular attention to BII and provides an integrated developmental model of this disorder in youth. Evidence-based treatments for child-specific phobias are discussed, and the development of a modified one session treatment (OST) approach to enhance treatment outcomes for BII phobia in children and adolescents is described. This approach is illustrated in two children with a primary diagnosis of BII phobia. The cases illustrate the unique challenges associated with treating BII in youth and the need for a modified intervention. Modifications included addressing the role of pain (e.g., psychoeducation, more graduated exposure steps) and disgust (e.g., disgust eliciting exposure tasks) in the expression of the phobia and fainting in the maintenance of this phobia. Moreover, it is recommended that parents be more actively involved throughout treatment (e.g., education session prior to OST, contingency management training, guidance regarding planning exposure tasks following treatment) and for families to participate in a structured e-therapy maintenance programme post-treatment. PMID:26374227

  16. Smoking and panic attacks, panic disorder, and agoraphobia: a review of the empirical literature.

    PubMed

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Feldner, Matthew T; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W; McLeish, Alison C

    2005-09-01

    The empirical literature regarding panic-spectrum problems (i.e., panic attacks, panic disorder, and agoraphobia) and cigarette smoking is reviewed. In the first section of the paper, empirical studies that document the prevalence of smoking and panic-related problems are presented and discussed. In the second section of the paper, studies pertaining to the role cigarette smoking may play in the onset and maintenance of panic-related problems are critically reviewed. In the third section of the paper, studies related to the association between panic vulnerability factors and the nature of smoking behavior are presented. In the fourth section of the paper, specific areas not otherwise covered in the review are presented to stimulate further development in these areas (e.g., specialized treatment development). PMID:15975699

  17. Panic attacks, panic disorder, and agoraphobia: associations with substance use, abuse, and dependence.

    PubMed

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Bernstein, Amit; Marshall, Erin C; Feldner, Matthew T

    2006-08-01

    Anxiety and substance use disorders frequently co-occur. Despite the clinical importance of this co-occurrence, theory and research addressing the relations between anxiety-substance use disorder comorbidity remain limited. The present commentary is intended to briefly review and summarize key aspects of this literature, with a specific focus on panic-spectrum psychopathology (panic attacks, panic disorder, and agoraphobia) and its associations with tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use, abuse, and dependence. A heuristic theoretical model for better understanding the panic-substance use relations also is offered. Extant data suggest clinically meaningful bidirectional associations are evident between panic problems and premorbid risk factors for such problems and various forms of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use. Key clinical implications and future directions are outlined based upon the review. PMID:16879791

  18. Insomnia Symptoms Following Treatment for Comorbid Panic Disorder With Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Héloïse; Marchand, André; Bouchard, Stéphane; Bélanger, Claude; Gosselin, Patrick; Langlois, Frédéric; Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J; Belleville, Geneviève

    2016-04-01

    Patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) frequently also suffer from insomnia. However, the impact of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders on insomnia has been understudied. Furthermore, comorbidity between anxiety disorders is common. Our main objective was to assess the impact of CBT for PDA or GAD on insomnia. In a quasi-experimental design, 86 participants with PDA and GAD received conventional CBT for their primary disorder or combined CBT for both disorders. Overall, CBTs had a significant impact on reducing insomnia symptoms (η = 0.58). However, among people with insomnia at pretest (67%), 33% still had an insomnia diagnosis, and the majority (63%) had clinically significant residual insomnia following treatment. In conclusion, the CBTs had a positive effect on the reduction of insomnia, but a significant proportion of participants still had insomnia problems following treatment. Clinicians should address insomnia during CBT for PDA and GAD. PMID:27019339

  19. Efficacy of telephone-administered behavioral therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Swinson, R P; Fergus, K D; Cox, B J; Wickwire, K

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a structured exposure-based behavior therapy program delivered by telephone to agoraphobic individuals who were isolated from specialized treatment centres. Forty-two individuals with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of panic disorder with agoraphobia who were living in rural areas of Ontario were assigned to either an eight-session telephone behavior therapy program or wait-list control condition. There were significant treatment x time interaction effects on several outcome variables. Patients originally in the wait-list group then received the same type of therapy and they also significantly improved. All treatment gains were maintained at three-month and six-month follow-up. Telephone behavior therapy appears to be a cost-effective and efficacious treatment for agoraphobics living in remote regions where specialized anxiety disorder services are not readily available. PMID:7755536

  20. Etizolam versus placebo in the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia: a double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Savoldi, F; Somenzini, G; Ecari, U

    1990-01-01

    Thirty out-patients suffering from panic disorders associated with agoraphobia were enrolled in a double-blind, controlled trial to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of etizolam and placebo. After a 1-week washout period on placebo, patients were allocated at random to receive twice daily doses of either 0.5 mg etizolam or placebo over a period of 4 weeks. Assessments, made at baseline and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment, used the Hamilton Rating Scales for Anxiety and for Depression, the Covi Anxiety Scale, and determination of the weekly panic crises frequency. The results showed that etizolam produced significant improvements in chronic anxiety, phobic ideas, associated depressive symptoms and episodic anxiety, and was significantly more effective than placebo. Etizolam treatment was generally well tolerated and was not significantly different from placebo in this respect. PMID:2272192

  1. School Phobia: A Review of Theory and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Eugene W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    This article outlines the critical variables of school phobia in terms of several different theoretical explanations, makes comparisons where appropriate, and describes the treatment modes that have resulted from theory and research. (Author)

  2. Instruments for the assessment of social anxiety disorder: Validation studies

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Flávia de Lima; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Loureiro, Sonia Regina

    2012-01-01

    Great progress has been observed in the literature over the last decade regarding the validation of instruments for the assessment of Social Anxiety Disorder in the Brazilian context. Particularly outstanding in this respect is the production of a group of Brazilian investigators regarding the psychometric study of the following instruments: Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, Social Phobia Inventory, Brief Social Phobia Scale, Disability Profile, Liebowitz Self-Rated Disability Scale, Social Phobia Safety Behaviors Scale and Self-Statements During Public Speaking Scale, which have proved to be appropriate and valid for use in the adult Brazilian population, representing resources for the assessment of social anxiety in clinical and experimental situations. PMID:24175172

  3. A Multivariate Genetic Analysis of Specific Phobia, Separation Anxiety and Social Phobia in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Thalia C.; Rijsdijk, Fruhling V.; Perrin, Sean; O'Connor, Thomas G.; Bolton, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity amongst anxiety disorders is very common in children as in adults and leads to considerable distress and impairment, yet is poorly understood. Multivariate genetic analyses can shed light on the origins of this comorbidity by revealing whether genetic or environmental risks for one disorder also influence another. We…

  4. Parental fever phobia and its correlates.

    PubMed

    Kramer, M S; Naimark, L; Leduc, D G

    1985-06-01

    Parents of 202 young febrile children were surveyed about their knowledge, attitudes, and fears concerning fever and its treatment. Forty-eight percent of the parents considered temperatures less than 38.0 degrees C to be "fevers", 43% felt that temperatures less than 40.0 degrees C could be dangerous to a child, 21% favored treatment for fevers less than 38.0 degrees C, and 15% believed that, left untreated, temperature could rise to 42.0 degrees C or higher. Fifty-three percent advocated waking a febrile child at night to administer antipyretic therapy. Young age of the child was associated with a preference for use of acetaminophen over aspirin and, unexpectedly, with a higher parental threshold for consideration of fever. The higher their child's temperature at the time they were questioned, the higher the minimum temperature that parents considered a cause for concern. Surprisingly, higher socioeconomic status was not associated with a lesser degree of fever phobia. In fact, parents of higher socioeconomic status were more concerned about the risks of brain damage or seizures as sequelae of fever than were parents of lower socioeconomic status. It is concluded that undue fear and overly aggressive treatment of fever are epidemic among parents of infants and young children, even among the highly educated and well-to-do. Considerable effort will be required on the part of pediatricians and other child health workers to reeducate these parents about the definition, consequences, and appropriate treatment of fever. PMID:4000786

  5. Pure animal phobia is more specific than other specific phobias: epidemiological evidence from the Zurich Study, the ZInEP and the PsyCoLaus.

    PubMed

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Rodgers, Stephanie; Müller, Mario; Hengartner, Michael P; Aleksandrowicz, Aleksandra; Kawohl, Wolfram; Heekeren, Karsten; Rössler, Wulf; Angst, Jules; Castelao, Enrique; Vandeleur, Caroline; Preisig, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Interest in subtypes of mental disorders is growing in parallel with continuing research progress in psychiatry. The aim of this study was to examine pure animal phobia in contrast to other specific phobias and a mixed subtype. Data from three representative Swiss community samples were analysed: PsyCoLaus (n = 3720), the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey (n = 1500) and the Zurich Study (n = 591). Pure animal phobia and mixed animal/other specific phobias consistently displayed a low age at onset of first symptoms (8-12 years) and clear preponderance of females (OR > 3). Meanwhile, other specific phobias started up to 10 years later and displayed almost a balanced sex ratio. Pure animal phobia showed no associations with any included risk factors and comorbid disorders, in contrast to numerous associations found in the mixed subtype and in other specific phobias. Across the whole range of epidemiological parameters examined in three different samples, pure animal phobia seems to represent a different entity compared to other specific phobias. The etiopathogenetic mechanisms and risk factors associated with pure animal phobias appear less clear than ever. PMID:27001383

  6. The Successful Treatment of Specific Phobia in a College Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Jonathan M.; Cook-Nobles, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Specific phobias are highly prevalent among college students and can be quite debilitating. However, students often do not present for treatment for phobias and, when they do, often do not receive effective treatment. This article will present a case study of the effective treatment of specific phobia using cognitive-behavioral therapy with an…

  7. Empirically supported treatments for panic disorder with agoraphobia in a Spanish psychology clinic.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Francisco; Labrador, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia (PD/Ag), as well as the characteristics of the treatment and its results and cost in a University Psychology Clinic. Fifty patients demanded psychological assistance for PD/Ag; 80% were women, with an average age of 29.22 years (SD = 9.03). Mean number of evaluation sessions was 3.26 (SD = 1.03), and of treatment sessions, 13.39 (SD = 9.237). Of the patients, 83.33% were discharged (that is, questionnaire scores were below the cut-off point indicated by the authors, and no PD/Ag was observed at readministration of the semistructured interview), 5.5% refused treatment, and 11% were dropouts. The average number of treatment sessions of patients who achieved therapeutic success was 15.13 (SD = 8.98). Effect sizes (d) greater than 1 were obtained in all the scales. Changes in all scales were significant (p < .05). The estimated cost of treatment for patients who achieved therapeutic success was 945.12€. The treatment results are at least similar to those of studies of efficacy and effectiveness for PD/Ag. The utility of generalizing treatments developed in research settings to a welfare clinic is discussed. PMID:26054491

  8. The use of former phobics in the treatment of phobias.

    PubMed

    Ross, J

    1980-06-01

    The author describes the role of the phobia therapist, usually a former phobic or a mental health worker. The therapist works with a psychiatrist as part of an overall psychiatric treatment program that provides an effective, low-cost approach to the treatment of phobias. Case studies illustrate how the supported-exposure approach, whereby patients are confronted gradually with the fearful situation in a real-life setting, enables phobics to learn how to deal with their phobic symptoms while they are occurring. PMID:7377393

  9. Pharmacotherapy for social anxiety disorder: an update.

    PubMed

    Van Ameringen, Michael; Mancini, Catherine; Patterson, Beth; Simpson, William

    2009-01-01

    Since the emergence of social phobia into the diagnostic nomenclature, we have seen an exponential expansion in our knowledge regarding effective treatment of this disorder. The literature clearly supports the use of SSRIs and the SNRI venlafaxine ER as first line pharmacological agents in the treatment of GSAD. In this article, treatment studies of pharmacotherapy of social phobia are summarized. Additional issues such as comparative efficacy, treatment resistance and relapse-prevention are reviewed. PMID:19728573

  10. Computer-Assisted Exposure Treatment for Flight Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortella-Feliu, Miguel; Bornas, Xavier; Llabres, Jordi

    2008-01-01

    This review introduces the state of the art in computer-assisted treatment for behavioural disorders. The core of the paper is devoted to describe one of these interventions providing computer-assisted exposure for flight phobia treatment, the Computer-Assisted Fear of Flying Treatment (CAFFT). The rationale, contents and structure of the CAFFT…

  11. Special Educators and Mathematics Phobia: An Initial Qualitative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, Michael; Hourcade, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Special educators are uniquely challenged to be content experts in all curricular areas, including mathematics, because students in their caseloads may require academic instruction in any area. However, special educators with math phobia may be limited in their ability to provide effective instruction to their students with mathematical deficits…

  12. Treating School Phobia Using Behavioral Consultation: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank M.; Nagle, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    This case study illustrates how behavioral consultation can be integrated by the school psychologist using a modification and expansion of Kennedy's "rapid treatment procedure" in eliminating school phobia. The importance of including teachers, parents, and administrators as consultees and participants in the decision-making process is…

  13. School Phobia and Separation Anxiety: Diagnostic and Treatment Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, LeAdelle; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Notes that substantial confusion exists regarding comparative diagnostic criteria and treatment implications for school phobia and separation anxiety. Literature survey demonstrates tendency of school personnel to put all students exhibiting these disorders into group of "school refusers." Sees treatment issues handled similarly despite evidence…

  14. Brain activity associated with illusory correlations in animal phobia.

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Julian; Schulz, Stefan M; Reicherts, Philipp; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Andreatta, Marta; Pauli, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorder patients were repeatedly found to overestimate the association between disorder-relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes despite random contingencies. Such an illusory correlation (IC) might play an important role in the return of fear after extinction learning; yet, little is known about how this cognitive bias emerges in the brain. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 female patients with spider phobia and 18 healthy controls were exposed to pictures of spiders, mushrooms and puppies followed randomly by either a painful electrical shock or nothing. In advance, both patients and healthy controls expected more shocks after spider pictures. Importantly, only patients with spider phobia continued to overestimate this association after the experiment. The strength of this IC was predicted by increased outcome aversiveness ratings and primary sensory motor cortex activity in response to the shock after spider pictures. Moreover, increased activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) to spider pictures predicted the IC. These results support the theory that phobia-relevant stimuli amplify unpleasantness and sensory motor representations of aversive stimuli, which in turn may promote their overestimation. Hyper-activity in dlPFC possibly reflects a pre-occupation of executive resources with phobia-relevant stimuli, thus complicating the accurate monitoring of objective contingencies and the unlearning of fear. PMID:25411452

  15. Brain activity associated with illusory correlations in animal phobia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemer, Julian; Schulz, Stefan M.; Reicherts, Philipp; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Andreatta, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorder patients were repeatedly found to overestimate the association between disorder-relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes despite random contingencies. Such an illusory correlation (IC) might play an important role in the return of fear after extinction learning; yet, little is known about how this cognitive bias emerges in the brain. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 female patients with spider phobia and 18 healthy controls were exposed to pictures of spiders, mushrooms and puppies followed randomly by either a painful electrical shock or nothing. In advance, both patients and healthy controls expected more shocks after spider pictures. Importantly, only patients with spider phobia continued to overestimate this association after the experiment. The strength of this IC was predicted by increased outcome aversiveness ratings and primary sensory motor cortex activity in response to the shock after spider pictures. Moreover, increased activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) to spider pictures predicted the IC. These results support the theory that phobia-relevant stimuli amplify unpleasantness and sensory motor representations of aversive stimuli, which in turn may promote their overestimation. Hyper-activity in dlPFC possibly reflects a pre-occupation of executive resources with phobia-relevant stimuli, thus complicating the accurate monitoring of objective contingencies and the unlearning of fear. PMID:25411452

  16. Ambulatory Assessment in Panic Disorder and Specific Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpers, Georg W.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental disorders. In panic disorder, panic attacks often occur at unpredictable times, making it difficult to study these episodes in the laboratory. In specific phobias, symptoms occur in very circumscribed situations and specific triggers are sometimes difficult to reproduce in the laboratory.…

  17. [Chronic knee pain and specific heat phobia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Pepke, W; Neubauer, E; Schiltenwolf, M

    2013-02-01

    This case report presents the medical history of a patient suffering from chronic knee pain with specific heat phobia who had a long history of sick certificates. Using multimodal pain therapy and biofeedback therapy the acquired anxiety disorder could be solved. Long-term working ability could be achieved. PMID:23321701

  18. Treatment of tunnel phobia: an experimental field study.

    PubMed

    Gotestam, K Gunnar; Svebak, Sven

    2009-01-01

    The opening of the deepest undersea tunnel in the world (264 m below sea level, 5600 m in length) replaced the ferry from the island of Hitra to the mainland in Norway. This event provoked phobic anxiety for traveling through the undersea tunnel in a number of individuals in the area. A treatment program for tunnel phobia was designed to test whether such a phobia could be mitigated by procedures previously proven effective in the treatment of other phobias. The program was presented to 18 persons with a specific phobia for tunnels and included a general discussion on the construction of undersea tunnels, given by an engineer from the tunnel construction company, and on phobic anxiety. It further consisted of gradual exposure to the tunnel in situ. Treatment effects were strong. All patients were able to travel on their own by car through the tunnel after the treatment. Their somatic complaints and phobic thoughts related to the tunnel were substantially reduced, and their mastery of tunnel driving was convincingly increased compared with the wait-list reference group. PMID:19440895

  19. The Behavioral Treatment of School Phobia: A Critical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trueman, David

    1984-01-01

    Presents a critical review of the studies that have applied behavioral techniques in the treatment of school phobia. Notes the conspicuous absences of any studies designed to assess either the relative efficacy of behavior therapy in comparison to other types of therapy or the different effects of various behavioral treatments. (JAC)

  20. Effect of Subject Control and Graduated Exposure on Snake Phobias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepner, Alain; Cauthen, Nelson R.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of two of the variables in Leitenberg's graduated exposure technique for treating phobias, graduated exposure and subject control of the exposure time, was investigated using 15 snake-phobic subjects. Subjective fear significantly decreased from pretesting to posttesting. (Author)

  1. Structural and Strategic Approach to School Phobia/School Refusal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsia, Heidi

    1984-01-01

    Describes school phobia and school refusal as two ends of a continuum from involuntary symptoms to willful refusal. A treatment case is reported to demonstrate the strategies of reestablishing the proper parent-child hierarchy, as well as the principles of effective case management. (JAC)

  2. Predictors of comorbid personality disorders in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Latas, M; Starcevic, V; Trajkovic, G; Bogojevic, G

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain predictors of comorbid personality disorders in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDAG). Sixty consecutive outpatients with PDAG were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II) for the purpose of diagnosing personality disorders. Logistic regressions were used to identify predictors of any comorbid personality disorder, any DSM-IV cluster A, cluster B, and cluster C personality disorder. Independent variables in these regressions were gender, age, duration of panic disorder (PD), severity of PDAG, and scores on self-report instruments that assess the patient's perception of their parents, childhood separation anxiety, and traumatic experiences. High levels of parental protection on the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), indicating a perception of the parents as overprotective and controlling, emerged as the only statistically significant predictor of any comorbid personality disorder. This finding was attributed to the association between parental overprotection and cluster B personality disorders, particularly borderline personality disorder. The duration of PD was a significant predictor of any cluster B and any cluster C personality disorder, suggesting that some of the cluster B and cluster C personality disorders may be a consequence of the long-lasting PDAG. Any cluster B personality disorder was also associated with younger age. In conclusion, despite a generally nonspecific nature of the relationship between parental overprotection in childhood and adult psychopathology, the findings of this study suggest some specificity for the association between parental overprotection in childhood and personality disturbance in PDAG patients, particularly cluster B personality disorders. PMID:10646616

  3. Cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia: a randomized, controlled trial and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Pasquale; Marchand, André; Reinharz, Daniel; Savard, Pierre

    2008-05-01

    A randomized, controlled trial was conducted to examine the cost-effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for panic disorder with agoraphobia. A total of 100 participants were randomly assigned to standard (n = 33), group (n = 35), and brief (n = 32) treatment conditions. Results show significant clinical and statistical improvement on standard symptom measures and quality of life from baseline to posttreatment and 3-month follow-up, with no significant differences between treatment conditions. Compared with standard CBT, brief and group CBT incurred lower treatment costs and had a superior cost-effectiveness ratio, suggesting the potential of these alternative treatment conditions in increasing access to effective treatment. PMID:18391051

  4. Reexperiencing symptoms, dissociation, and avoidance behaviors in daily life of patients with PTSD and patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Pfaltz, Monique C; Michael, Tanja; Meyer, Andrea H; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2013-08-01

    Panic attacks are frequently perceived as life threatening. Panic disorder (PD) patients may therefore experience symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The authors explored this in 28 healthy controls, 17 PTSD patients, and 24 PD patients with agoraphobia who completed electronic diaries 36 times during 1 week. Patient groups frequently reported dissociation as well as thoughts, memories, and reliving of their trauma or panic attacks. PTSD patients reported more trauma/panic attack thoughts (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 2.9) and memories (IRR = 2.8) than PD patients. Patient groups relived their trauma or panic attacks equally frequently, and reported comparable bodily reactions and distress associated with trauma or panic attack memories. Clinical groups avoided trauma or panic attack reminders more often than healthy controls (avoidance of trauma- or panic attack-related thoughts (IRR = 8.0); avoidance of things associated with the trauma or panic attack (IRR = 40.7). PD patients avoided trauma or panic attack reminders less often than PTSD patients (avoidance of trauma- or panic attack-related thoughts [IRR = 2.5]; avoidance of things associated with the trauma or panic attack [IRR = 4.1]), yet these differences were nonsignificant when controlling for functional impairment. In conclusion, trauma-like symptoms are common in PD with agoraphobia and panic attacks may be processed similarly as trauma in PTSD. PMID:23893375

  5. Is internet-based CBT for panic disorder and agoraphobia as effective as face-to-face CBT?

    PubMed

    Kiropoulos, Litza A; Klein, Britt; Austin, David W; Gilson, Kathryn; Pier, Ciaran; Mitchell, Joanna; Ciechomski, Lisa

    2008-12-01

    This study compared Panic Online (PO), an internet-based CBT intervention, to best-practice face-to-face CBT for people with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Eighty-six people with a primary diagnosis of panic disorder were recruited from Victoria, Australia. Participants were randomly assigned to either PO (n=46) or best practice face-to-face CBT (n=40). Effects of the internet-based CBT program were found to be comparable to those of face-to-face CBT. Both interventions produced significant reductions in panic disorder and agoraphobia clinician severity ratings, self reported panic disorder severity and panic attack frequency, measures of depression, anxiety, stress and panic related cognitions, and displayed improvements in quality of life. Participants rated both treatment conditions as equally credible and satisfying. Participants in the face-to-face CBT treatment group cited higher enjoyment with communicating with their therapist. Consistent with this, therapists' ratings for compliance to treatment and understanding of the CBT material was higher in the face-to-face CBT treatment group. PO required significantly less therapist time than the face-to-face CBT condition. PMID:18289829

  6. Agoraphobia With and Without Panic Disorder: A 20-Year Follow-up of Integrated Exposure and Psychodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoffart, Asle; Hedley, Liv M; Svanøe, Karol; Langkaas, Tomas Formo; Sexton, Harold

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare the 20-year outcome in panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD with AG) and agoraphobia without panic disorder (AG without PD) patients after inpatient psychological treatment. Of 53 eligible patients having completed a medication-free integrated exposure and psychodynamic treatment, 38 (71.7%)-25 PD with AG and 13 AG without PD patients-attended 20-year follow-up. AG without PD patients improved less than PD with AG patients did on primary outcome measures. In the PD with AG group, there were large uncontrolled effect sizes (<-2.30). More of the AG without PD patients had avoidant personality disorder at pretreatment, but the presence of this disorder did not predict outcome. The follow-up results support that PD with AG and AG without PD are two different disorders. The results also suggest that the very long-term outcome in PD with AG patients is excellent for this integrated treatment. PMID:26588081

  7. A Pilot Study of Sensation-Focused Intensive Treatment for Panic Disorder with Moderate to Severe Agoraphobia: Preliminary Outcome and Benchmarking Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitran, Stella; Morissette, Sandra B.; Spiegel, David A.; Barlow, David H.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents results of a treatment for panic disorder with moderate to severe agoraphobia (PDA-MS) called sensation-focused intensive treatment (SFIT). SFIT is an 8-day intensive treatment that combines features of cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder, such as interoceptive exposure and cognitive restructuring with ungraded…

  8. Psychological Treatment for Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Examine the Role of Therapist-Guided Exposure in situ in CBT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloster, Andrew T.; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Einsle, Franziska; Lang, Thomas; Helbig-Lang, Sylvia; Fydrich, Thomas; Fehm, Lydia; Hamm, Alfons O.; Richter, Jan; Alpers, George W.; Gerlach, Alexander L.; Strohle, Andreas; Kircher, Tilo; Deckert, Jurgen; Zwanzger, Peter; Hofler, Michael; Arolt, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG). Nevertheless, an understanding of its mechanisms and particularly the role of therapist-guided exposure is lacking. This study was aimed to evaluate whether therapist-guided exposure in situ is associated with more pervasive and…

  9. Does Maintenance CBT Contribute to Long-Term Treatment Response of Panic Disorder with or without Agoraphobia? A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kamila S.; Payne, Laura A.; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott W.; Saksa, John R.; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We examined the possibility that maintenance cognitive behavior therapy (M-CBT) may improve the likelihood of sustained improvement and reduced relapse in a multi-site randomized controlled clinical trial of patients who met criteria for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Method: Participants were all patients (N = 379) who…

  10. [Case report: patient with needle phobia for caesarean section - not quite as in a textbook …].

    PubMed

    Hillermann, Thomas; Breitenstein, Chantal; Soll, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    In a 20-year old parturient general anesthesia is induced by inhalation and without venous access because of severe needle phobia. This article discusses risks associated with inhalational induction of anesthesia in this special situation. It deals with needle phobia, an anxiety disorder belonging to the group of blood-injury-injection phobia. This psychic illness can cause severe problems for the anaesthetic management in acute or in elective situations. PMID:26147408

  11. A 35% carbon dioxide challenge in simple phobias.

    PubMed

    Verburg, C; Griez, E; Meijer, J

    1994-12-01

    Twenty-eight subjects meeting the DSM-III-R criteria for simple phobia and 30 normal controls were subjected to a 35% carbon dioxide panic provocation challenge. Simple phobics were subdivided into two groups, animal phobics and situational or natural phenomena phobics. Animal phobics were not more vulnerable to carbon dioxide than normal controls. However, situational or natural phenomena phobics reacted significantly more strongly to the challenge than normal controls. The increase in anxiety in this group was comparable to the increase of anxiety of panic disorder patients from previous studies. Our results suggest the existence of a constitutional predisposition that may not only lead to panic disorder but also to the development of certain specific phobias. PMID:7892773

  12. The impact of dental phobia on patient consent.

    PubMed

    Muschik, S; Kallow, J

    2015-08-28

    Dental anxiety is prevalent across a broad spectrum of the population. Dental phobia is extreme dental fear, which interferes with normal functioning. For any dental treatment, it is an ethical, legal and professional duty of dentists to obtain valid informed consent from their patients. The question arises as to how dental phobia impacts on patients' ability to give valid informed consent. Extreme fear may impair patient ability to understand information about the procedure, their capacity to make balanced decisions, and to make these decisions voluntarily. A trusting rapport between dentist and patient, supporting patient understanding by providing useful information material, and keeping regular appointments, may help overcome these obstacles. Other factors impacting on the informed consent process are institutional in nature. Implementing ways to overcome these is part of the dentist's duty to obtain valid consent. PMID:26315183

  13. The therapeutic lamp: treating small-animal phobias.

    PubMed

    Wrzesien, Maja; Alcañiz, Mariano; Botella, Cristina; Burkhardt, Jean-Marie; Bretón-López, Juana; Ortega, Mario; Brotons, Daniel Beneito

    2013-01-01

    We all have an irrational fear or two. Some of us get scared by an unexpected visit from a spider in our house; others get nervous when they look down from a high building. Fear is an evolutionary and adaptive function that can promote self-preservation and help us deal with the feared object or situation. However, when this state becomes excessive, it might develop into psychological disorders such as phobias, producing high anxiety and affecting everyday life. The Therapeutic Lamp is an interactive projection-based augmented-reality system for treating small-animal phobias. It aims to increase patient-therapist communication, promote more natural interaction, and improve the patient's engagement in the therapy. PMID:24807885

  14. Selective Mutism and Social Anxiety Disorder: All in the Family?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavira, Denise A.; Shipon-Blum, Elisa; Hitchcock, Carla; Cohan, Sharon; Stein, Murray B.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between a history of lifetime psychiatric disorders of parents with selective mutism (SM) in their children is examined. The results support earlier findings of a familial relationship between generalized social phobia and SM.

  15. Fear the serpent: A psychometric study of snake phobia.

    PubMed

    Polák, Jakub; Sedláčková, Kristýna; Nácar, David; Landová, Eva; Frynta, Daniel

    2016-08-30

    Millions of people worldwide suffer from specific phobias. Almost any stimulus may trigger a phobic reaction, but snakes are among the most feared objects. Half of the population feel anxious about snakes and 2-3% meet the diagnostic criteria for snake phobia. Despite such a high ratio, only one instrument is commonly used, the Snake Questionnaire (SNAQ). The aim of this study was to develop a standardized Czech translation, describe its psychometric properties and analyze the distribution of snake fears. In a counter-balanced design 755 respondents were asked to complete the English and Czech SNAQ (first or last) with a 2-3 month delay; 300 of them completed both instruments. We found excellent test-retest reliability (0.94), although the total scores differed significantly when the English version was administered first. The mean score was 5.80 and Generalized Linear Models revealed significant effects of sex and field of study (women and people with no biology education scored higher than men and biologists). A cut-off point for snake phobia as derived from a previous study identified 2.6% of the subjects as phobic. Finally, the score distribution was similar to other countries supporting the view that fear of snakes is universal. PMID:27280527

  16. Brain systems underlying encounter expectancy bias in spider phobia.

    PubMed

    Aue, Tatjana; Hoeppli, Marie-Eve; Piguet, Camille; Hofstetter, Christoph; Rieger, Sebastian W; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2015-06-01

    Spider-phobic individuals are characterized by exaggerated expectancies to be faced with spiders (so-called encounter expectancy bias). Whereas phobic responses have been linked to brain systems mediating fear, little is known about how the recruitment of these systems relates to exaggerated expectancies of threat. We used fMRI to examine spider-phobic and control participants while they imagined visiting different locations in a forest after having received background information about the likelihood of encountering different animals (spiders, snakes, and birds) at these locations. Critically, imagined encounter expectancies modulated brain responses differently in phobics as compared with controls. Phobics displayed stronger negative modulation of activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus, and visual cortex by encounter expectancies for spiders, relative to snakes or birds (within-participants analysis); these effects were not seen in controls. Between-participants correlation analyses within the phobic group further corroborated the hypothesis that these phobia-specific modulations may underlie irrationality in encounter expectancies (deviations of encounter expectancies from objective background information) in spider phobia; the greater the negative modulation a phobic participant displayed in the lateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus, and visual cortex, the stronger was her bias in encounter expectancies for spiders. Interestingly, irrationality in expectancies reflected in frontal areas relied on right rather than left hemispheric deactivations. Our data accord with the idea that expectancy biases in spider phobia may reflect deficiencies in cognitive control and contextual integration that are mediated by right frontal and parietal areas. PMID:25694215

  17. Therapist effects and the outcome—alliance correlation in cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, David H.; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Although the alliance–outcome correlation is well established, no published studies to date have separated between therapists’ and patients’ contributions while controlling for early symptom change. In this study, we examined therapist effects in two trials of CBT for panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and the impact of therapists’ and patients’ contribution to the alliance on outcome and attrition in one trial. Alliance ratings were obtained from patients and therapists early and late in treatment (n = 133). Data were analyzed using multi-level modeling controlling for early symptom change. No therapist effects were found. The patients’ contribution to the alliance predicted outcome (in both panic severity and anxiety sensitivity) and attrition. The therapists’ contribution to the alliance predicted attrition but not outcome. Results suggest that the patient's contribution to the alliance plays an important role in CBT for PDA and that including common factors into research on CBT may help elucidate treatment processes. PMID:24275067

  18. Cognitive Therapy of Anxiety Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.; Gillis, Martha M.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews studies of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder with and without agoraphobia, and social phobia. Sees CBT as consistently more effective than waiting-list and placebo control groups. Notes that cognitive change may be strong predictor of treatment outcome but that such change may be produced…

  19. School Phobia: How Home-School Collaboration Can Tame This Frightful Dragon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenni, Catherine B.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that the escalation of differences in the home-school system contributes to the chronicity of school phobias. Discusses the etiology of school phobia, adult mental health implications, some common treatment recommendations, and treatment in the school setting through home-school collaboration. Provides a model for home-school collaboration.…

  20. Assessing Pre-Service Teachers' Computer Phobia Levels in Terms of Gender and Experience, Turkish Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ursavas, Omer Faruk; Karal, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    In this study it is aimed to determine the level of pre-service teachers' computer phobia. Whether or not computer phobia meaningfully varies statistically according to gender and computer experience has been tested in the study. The study was performed on 430 pre-service teachers at the Education Faculty in Rize/Turkey. Data in the study were…

  1. Evidence-Based Behavioral Treatment of Dog Phobia with Young Children: Two Case Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Anna C.; Rudy, Brittany M.; Davis, Thompson E., III; Matson, Johnny L.

    2013-01-01

    Specific phobias are among the most common anxiety disorders, especially in children. Unfortunately, a paucity of literature exists regarding the treatment of specific phobia in young children, despite the knowledge that traditional techniques (i.e., cognitive-behavioral therapy [CBT]) may not be practical. Therefore, the purpose of this article…

  2. A review and meta-analysis of the heritability of specific phobia subtypes and corresponding fears.

    PubMed

    Van Houtem, C M H H; Laine, M L; Boomsma, D I; Ligthart, L; van Wijk, A J; De Jongh, A

    2013-05-01

    Evidence from twin studies suggests that genetic factors contribute to the risk of developing a fear or a phobia. The aim of the present study was to review the current literature regarding twin studies describing the genetic basis of specific phobias and their corresponding fears. The analysis included five twin studies on fears and ten twin studies on specific phobias. Heritability estimates of fear subtypes and specific phobia subtypes both varied widely, even within the subtypes. A meta-analysis performed on the twin study results indicated that fears and specific phobias are moderately heritable. The highest mean heritability (±SEM) among fear subtypes was found for animal fear (45%±0.004), and among specific phobias for the blood-injury-injection phobia (33%±0.06). For most phenotypes, variance could be explained solely by additive genetic and unique environmental effects. Given the dearth of independent data on the heritability of specific phobias and fears, additional research is needed. PMID:23774007

  3. Developmentally Sensitive Assessment of Social Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Tracy L.; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Henin, Aude; Storch, Eric A.

    2004-01-01

    Social anxiety affects children across the developmental spectrum. Early-onset social phobia may be particularly impairing because of its disruptive effects on social and academic functioning during a child's formative years and because of the elevated risks of childhood adversity in anxious individuals. Unfortunately, little attention has been…

  4. Physical, Mental, and Social Catastrophic Cognitions as Prognostic Factors in Cognitive-Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatments for Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Thomas V.; Leitenberg, Harold; Barlow, David H.; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, Katherine M.; Woods, Scott W.

    2005-01-01

    The authors explored the prognostic value of 3 different types of catastrophic cognitions in the treatment of panic disorder with and without mild-to-moderate agoraphobia using a sample of 143 participants who received either cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or imipramine in a randomized controlled trial. Stronger fears of social catastrophes…

  5. Color obsessions and phobias in autism spectrum disorders: the case of J.G.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Amanda K; Heaton, Pamela; Hill, Elisabeth; Franklin, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The current study is the first investigation of color 'obsessions' and 'phobias' in ASD. We investigate the color perception and cognition of J.G., a boy with ASD who has a strong obsession with blue, and a strong phobia of other colors. J.G.'s performance on a series of color tasks (color-entity association; chromatic discrimination; color classification) is compared to 13 children with and without autism who do not have color obsessions or phobias. The findings lead to the formalization of two hypotheses: (i) color obsessions and phobias in individuals with ASD are related to an unusually strong ability to associate colors with entities; (ii) color obsessions are related to hyposensitivity, and color phobias to hypersensitivity, in the affected regions of color space. PMID:23547979

  6. Hypnotherapy: the salutogenic solution to dealing with phobias.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Maria; Gregory, Colette

    2015-05-01

    Evidence suggests that around a quarter of women can suffer from an intense fear of giving birth (tocophobia). This can be costly to these women in terms of enduring negative effects of the increased use of medical interventions associated with tocophobia. Other phobias, such as white coat hypertension, can also be problematic in pregnancy. This article describes the establishment of a hypnotherapy service within the antenatal day assessment unit at East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust and recounts a recent case study in which the use of hypnotherapy was employed to help Rebecca, a white coat hypertension sufferer, to successfully manage her condition. PMID:26336786

  7. Social Skills Training Augments the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, James D.; Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Rheingold, Alyssa A.; Myers, Valerie H.; Dalrymple, Kristy; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy (CBGT) is the most widely researched intervention program for social anxiety disorder (SAD, also known as social phobia), with a number of studies demonstrating its effectiveness. Another common treatment, social skills training (SST), has also been shown to be efficacious for SAD. The present study compared the…

  8. Panic disorder with agoraphobia from a behavioral neuroscience perspective: Applying the research principles formulated by the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Alfons O; Richter, Jan; Pané-Farré, Christiane; Westphal, Dorte; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anna N; Gerlach, Alexander L; Gloster, Andrew T; Ströhle, Andreas; Lang, Thomas; Kircher, Tilo; Gerdes, Antje B M; Alpers, Georg W; Reif, Andreas; Deckert, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    In the current review, we reconceptualize a categorical diagnosis-panic disorder and agoraphobia-in terms of two constructs within the domain "negative valence systems" suggested by the Research Domain Criteria initiative. Panic attacks are considered as abrupt and intense fear responses to acute threat arising from inside the body, while anxious apprehension refers to anxiety responses to potential harm and more distant or uncertain threat. Taking a dimensional view, panic disorder with agoraphobia is defined with the threat-imminence model stating that defensive responses are dynamically organized along the dimension of the proximity of the threat. We tested this model within a large group of patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia (N = 369 and N = 124 in a replication sample) and found evidence that panic attacks are indeed instances of circa strike defense. This component of the defensive reactivity was related to genetic modulators within the serotonergic system. In contrast, anxious apprehension-characterized by attentive freezing during postencounter defense-was related to general distress and depressive mood, as well as to genetic modulations within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Patients with a strong behavioral tendency for active and passive avoidance responded better to exposure treatment if the therapist guides the patient through the exposure exercises. PMID:26877119

  9. Phobias of attachment-related inner states in the psychotherapy of adult survivors of childhood complex trauma.

    PubMed

    Liotti, Giovanni

    2013-11-01

    The clinical case described in this article illustrates the value of taking into account the dynamics of disorganized attachment in the assessment of attachment-related phobias (phobia of attachment and phobia of attachment loss) during the psychotherapy of chronically traumatized patients. These seemingly opposite phobias typically coexist in the same patient, appear as phobias of both inner states (affect phobias) and relational experiences, and are linked to dissociated representations of self-with-other. Theory and research on attachment disorganization provide a clinician-friendly conceptual framework for capturing both the intrapsychic (e.g., intrusive and nonintegrated mental states) and the relational (e.g., dramatic unsolvable dilemmas in interpersonal exchanges) aspects of the attachment-related phobias. The therapeutic strategy and the key interventions that logically follow from a case formulation based on this conceptual framework are examined. PMID:24037602

  10. Specific phobia is a frequent non-motor feature in stiff man syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Henningsen, P; Meinck, H

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate systematically the rate and type of phobia in stiff man syndrome and its variants, and to compare patients with stiff man syndrome with and without phobia for sociodemographic and neurological characteristics. Methods: 43 consecutive patients with stiff man syndrome referred to a university department of neurology were assessed using the anxiety disorders interview schedule, revised (ADIS-R), a structured diagnostic interview for anxiety disorders, in addition to a full clinical neurological and psychiatric assessment. Results: 19 patients (44.2%) developed task specific phobia—that is, fear and avoidance of situations difficult to master owing to the motor symptoms of stiff man syndrome (such as crossing streets). Three further patients (7%) had subthreshold phobia—that is, phobic anxiety without avoidance. There were no significant differences between patients with and without phobia in terms of age, illness duration, type of stiff man syndrome, antibody status, or frequency of falls. Patients with phobia were more likely to present with exaggerated startle responses and to have an initial misdiagnosis of psychogenic movement disorder. Conclusions: Specific phobia is a frequent non-motor symptom of stiff man syndrome. Early recognition is an important aid to correct diagnosis. The aetiology of phobia in stiff man syndrome is unknown. There is no evidence of a direct pathogenic role of autoantibodies directed against glutamic acid decarboxylase in the development of phobia. PMID:12640064

  11. Topical Corticosteroid Phobia among Parents of Children with Atopic Eczema in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Yong; Kim, Chul Woo; Kim, Sang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Background Topical corticosteroids (TCS) are the first-line agents for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, a vague phobia concerning the use of TCS exists among parents of children with AD because of misinformation, and studies on the subject are insufficient. Objective To assess the current state of steroid phobia among parents of atopic children in Korea and to investigate the importance of education in its reduction. Methods By using a structured questionnaire, 126 parents of children with AD (22.2% fathers, 77.8% mothers) were interviewed. After the questionnaire administration, all participants were educated about TCS use. Results Overall, 67.5% of the parents showed steroid phobia. A statistical correlation was found between steroid phobia and knowledge of potential adverse events, experience of TCS use, and adherence to treatment (p<0.05). Adherence to treatment tended to be lower among parents with steroid phobia. The most recognized adverse effects of TCS were skin atrophy and thinning (71.9%). The most prevalent information source leading to steroid phobia was the Internet (49.2%). The risk factors for steroid phobia were AD severity (odds ratio [OR]=5.332 [moderate], 9.040 [severe] vs. mild; p=0.001) and the knowledge of potential adverse events (OR=2.658; p=0.021). Conclusion We found a high prevalence of steroid phobia among parents of patients with AD, and here show the impact of this phobia on treatment adherence. We emphasize the important role of dermatologists as providers of accurate information and appropriate education about the use of TCS. PMID:26512163

  12. Efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy to treat driving phobia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wald, J; Taylor, S

    2000-01-01

    An AB case design was used to examine the efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) in treating driving phobia. After a one week baseline, the patient received three treatment sessions over a ten day period. Treatment included practice of four VR driving scenarios. Peak anxiety decreased within and across sessions. Ratings of anxiety and avoidance declined from pre-treatment and post-treatment, with gains maintained at seven month followup. Phobia-related interference in daily functioning similarly decreased. The results suggest that it would be useful to further evaluate the efficacy of VRET for driving phobia in controlled clinical trials. PMID:11494960

  13. The role of treatment delivery factors in exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Weck, Florian; Grikscheit, Florian; Höfling, Volkmar; Kordt, Anne; Hamm, Alfons O; Gerlach, Alexander L; Alpers, Georg W; Arolt, Volker; Kircher, Tilo; Pauli, Paul; Rief, Winfried; Lang, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Treatment delivery factors (i.e., therapist adherence, therapist competence, and therapeutic alliance) are considered to be important for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder and agoraphobia (PD/AG). In the current study, four independent raters conducted process evaluations based on 168 two-hour videotapes of 84 patients with PD/AG treated with exposure-based CBT. Two raters evaluated patients' interpersonal behavior in Session 1. Two raters evaluated treatment delivery factors in Session 6, in which therapists provided the rationale for conducting exposure exercises. At the 6-month follow-up, therapists' adherence (r=0.54) and therapeutic alliance (r=0.31) were significant predictors of changes in agoraphobic avoidance behavior; therapist competence was not associated with treatment outcomes. Patients' interpersonal behavior in Session 1 was a significant predictor of the therapeutic alliance in Session 6 (r=0.17). The findings demonstrate that treatment delivery factors, particularly therapist adherence, are relevant to the long-term success of CBT for PD/AG. PMID:27235836

  14. Acquisition of blood, injury, and needle fears and phobias.

    PubMed

    Kleinknecht, R A

    1994-11-01

    The origins of fear and phobia of blood, injury, and injections were investigated in a sample of 128 fearful university students. Based on Mutilation Questionnaire scores, subjects were designated as common fear, high fear, or phobic. Ss reports of their onset experiences obtained from structured interviews were categorized into one or more acquisition pathways of conditioning, vicarious observation, and information. Of the 73% of Ss who recalled one or more onset experiences, 76% reported conditioning-like events as the primary pathway with the majority reporting fear-related UCSs. Vicarious experiences were reported as primary by 20% and 3% reported information as being primary in their fear onset. Severity of fear was unrelated to the pathway by which it was acquired, to whether the onset was recalled, and if recalled, whether it was due to a single or to multiple traumatic events. Results are discussed in terms of methodological problems of memory issues and means by which data are collected. PMID:7993325

  15. Ambulatory assessment in panic disorder and specific phobia.

    PubMed

    Alpers, Georg W

    2009-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental disorders. In panic disorder, panic attacks often occur at unpredictable times, making it difficult to study these episodes in the laboratory. In specific phobias, symptoms occur in very circumscribed situations and specific triggers are sometimes difficult to reproduce in the laboratory. Ambulatory assessment, or ecological momentary assessment, can further the understanding of the natural course and scope of symptoms under ecologically valid circumstances. Because bodily symptoms are integral to the diagnosis of anxiety disorders, the objective assessment of physiological responses in the patients' natural environment is particularly important. On the one hand, research has highlighted intriguing discrepancies between the experience of symptoms and physiology during panic attacks. On the other hand, it has validated symptom reporting during therapeutic exposure to phobic situations. Therefore, ambulatory assessment can yield useful information about the psychopathology of anxiety disorders, and it can be used to monitor change during clinical interventions. PMID:19947782

  16. Driving phobia in the city of Houston: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mathew, R J; Weinman, M L; Semchuk, K M; Levin, B L

    1982-08-01

    To study the fear of driving phenomenon the authors contacted 48 subjects who, in response to a newspaper article, had expressed an intense fear of driving in the city of Houston and compared them with an age- and sex-matched control group. The information elicited from the subjects suggested the existence of a driving phobia. No significant differences emerged between the phobic subjects and the controls on relevant driving history and background. Although the phobic subjects reported significantly higher levels of anxiety while driving in normal and difficult situations, most of them reported anxiety of phobic intensity only about difficult driving situations, such as driving on freeways and in congested traffic. PMID:7091430

  17. School Phobia: Identification of Subtypes as a Prerequisite to Treatment Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paccione-Dyszlewski, Margaret R.; Contessa-Kislus, Marie Ann

    1987-01-01

    Focuses on the differentiation between acute and chronic school-phobic adolescents. Discusses incidence, classification systems, case descriptions, and distinctive features of acute and chronic school phobia. Identification of appropriate treatment strategies is stressed. (Author)

  18. Processes Contributing to the Maintenance of Flying Phobia: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Gavin I.; Rock, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Flying phobia is a highly prevalent anxiety disorder, which causes sufferers significant distress and life interference. The processes which maintain flying phobia remain poorly understood. A systematic search of the literature was performed to identify what research has been conducted into the processes which may be involved in the fear of flying and whether processes which are believed to maintain other anxiety disorder diagnoses have been investigated in flying phobia. The results of the literature review are presented and related to existing cognitive behavioral theory and research. The results indicate that little research has been conducted into a number of areas considered important in the wider cognitive behavioral literature on anxiety disorders: namely attention, mental imagery, memory, worry, and safety-seeking behaviors. The review proposes a hypothetical model, derived from cognitive behavioral theory, for the processes which may be involved in maintaining flying phobia, and considers a number of areas for future research. PMID:27313550

  19. Cardiovascular activity in blood-injection-injury phobia during exposure: evidence for diphasic response patterns?

    PubMed

    Ritz, Thomas; Meuret, Alicia E; Simon, Erica

    2013-08-01

    Exposure to feared stimuli in blood-injection-injury (BII)-phobia is thought to elicit a diphasic response pattern, with an initial fight-flight-like cardiovascular activation followed by a marked deactivation and possible fainting (vasovagal syncope). However, studies have remained equivocal on the importance of such patterns. We therefore sought to determine the prevalence and clinical relevance of diphasic responses using criteria that require a true diphasic response to exceed cardiovascular activation of an emotional episode of a negative valence and to exceed deactivation of an emotionally neutral episode. Sixty BII-phobia participants and 20 healthy controls were exposed to surgery, anger and neutral films while measuring heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory pattern, and end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (as indicator of hyperventilation). Diphasic response patterns were observed in up to 20% of BII-phobia participants and 26.6% of healthy controls for individual cardiovascular parameters. BII-phobia participants with diphasic patterns across multiple parameters showed more fear of injections and blood draws, reported the strongest physical symptoms during the surgery film, and showed the strongest tendency to hyperventilate. Thus, although only a minority of individuals with BII phobia shows diphasic responses, their occurrence indicates significant distress. Respiratory training may add to the treatment of BII phobia patients that show diphasic response patterns. PMID:23747585

  20. Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children: Five Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.; Young, Brennan J.

    2006-01-01

    Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C) is a comprehensive behavioral treatment combining social skills training, peer generalization experiences, and individualized in vivo exposure for the treatment of social phobia in youth. SET-C results in positive treatment outcome and its effects are maintained at least 3 years later. In this…

  1. Impact of rumination versus distraction on anxiety and maladaptive self-beliefs in socially anxious individuals.

    PubMed

    Wong, Quincy J J; Moulds, Michelle L

    2009-10-01

    A large body of experimental evidence has demonstrated the adverse effects of rumination on depressive mood and cognitions. In contrast, while prominent models of social phobia (Clark & Wells, 1995; Rapee & Heimberg, 1997) have proposed rumination as a key maintaining factor, the effects of rumination in social anxiety have not been extensively explored. In a sample of (N = 93) undergraduates, this study investigated the impact of rumination versus distraction following a social-evaluative task on anxiety and another key component of social phobia: maladaptive self-beliefs. Relative to distraction, rumination maintained anxiety in both high and low socially anxious individuals, and maintained unconditional beliefs in high socially anxious individuals. The results support models of social phobia and also suggest important theoretical extensions. Implications for the treatment of social anxiety are discussed. PMID:19608157

  2. Intergenerational Transmission of Social Anxiety: The Role of Social Referencing Processes in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Lynne; de Rosnay, Marc; Pearson, Joanna; Bergeron, Caroline; Schofield, Elizabeth; Royal-Lawson, Melanie; Cooper, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Responses to an unfamiliar adult were examined in infants of mothers with social phobia (N = 79) and infants of nonanxious comparison mothers (N = 77) at 10 and 14 months in a social referencing paradigm. On each occasion, a female stranger first interacted with the mother and then approached and interacted with the infant. Over time, infants of…

  3. Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children: Three-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.; Young, Brennan; Paulson, Autumn

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the results of a 3-year follow-up assessment of children and adolescents diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (social phobia) and treated with Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C), a comprehensive behavioral treatment program combining social skills training, peer generalization, and individualized exposure. Among…

  4. Monitoring physiology and behavior using Android in phobias.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Telmo; Brás, Susana; Soares, Sandra C; Fernandes, José Maria

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present an Android-based system Application - AWARE - for the assessment of the person's physiology and behavior outside of the laboratory. To accomplish this purpose, AWARE delivers context dependent audio-visual stimuli, embedded into the subject's real-world perception, via marker/vision-based augmented reality (AR) technology. In addition, it employs external measuring resources connected via Bluetooth, as well as the smartphone's integrated resources. It synchronously acquires the experiment's video (camera input with AR overlay), physiologic responses (with a dedicated ECG measuring device) and behavior (through movement and location, with accelerometer/gyroscope and GPS, respectively). Psychological assessment is heavily based on laboratory procedures, even though it is known that these settings disturb the subjects' natural reactions and condition. The major idea of this application is to evaluate the participant condition, mimicking his/her real life conditions. Given that phobias are rather context specific, they represent the ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of a mobile system application. AWARE allowed presenting AR stimuli (e.g., 3D spiders) and quantifying the subjects' reactions non-intrusively (e.g., heart rate variation) - more emphatic in the phobic volunteer when presented with spider vs non phobic stimulus. Although still a proof of concept, AWARE proved to be flexible, and straightforward to setup, with the potential to support ecologically valid monitoring experiments. PMID:26737106

  5. Neuroimaging correlates of pharmacological and psychological treatments for specific phobia.

    PubMed

    Linares, Ila M; Chags, Marcos H N; Machado-de-Sousa, João P; Crippa, José A S; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2014-01-01

    Specific phobia is an anxiety disorder characterized by irrational fear and avoidance of specific things or situations, interfering significantly with the patients' daily life. Treatment for the disorder consists of both pharmacological and psychological approaches, mainly cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Neuroimaging techniques have been used in an attempt to improve our understanding of the neurobiology of SP and of the effects of treatment options available. This review describes the design and results of eight articles investigating the neuroimaging correlates of pharmacological and psychological treatments for SP. The studies show that CBT is effective in SP, leading to a reduction of anxiety symptoms that is accompanied by functional alterations in the brain. The results of pharmacological interventions for SP are less uniform, but suggest that the partial agonist of the NMDA (N-methyl D-aspartate) receptor DCS (D-cycloserine) can be used in combination with psychotherapy techniques for the achievement of quicker treatment response and that DCS modulates the function of structures implicated in the neurobiology of SP. Further research should explore the augmentation of CBT treatment with DCS in controlled trials. PMID:24923351

  6. Blood or needle phobia as a defence under the Road Traffic Act 1988.

    PubMed

    Rix, K J

    1996-12-01

    A man was charged with driving over the prescribed alcohol limit. Both specimens of breath contained less than 50 micrograms of alcohol per 100 ml and he refused to submit to a blood test. His defence was that he had a phobia of blood and that he should have been allowed to claim to replace the breath specimens with a specimen of urine. Evidence that he had a phobia was accepted by the prosecution. A woman was arrested on suspicion of driving whilst unfit through drink or drugs. She was charged with refusing to provide a specimen of blood. It was her defence that she had a phobia of needles. Evidence that she had a phobia was not accepted by the prosecution. In both cases the court was asked to decide whether or not the forensic medical examiner had been seriously wrong in deciding that there was no medical reason for refusing a specimen of blood. The man was acquitted and the woman was found guilty. These cases are used to describe the law relating to blood or needle phobias and to suggest how such cases should be approached by the police and forensic medical examiners. PMID:15335604

  7. Posttraumatic dental-care anxiety (PTDA): Is "dental phobia" a misnomer?

    PubMed

    Bracha, H Stefan; Vega, Edward M; Vega, Carrie B

    2006-01-01

    In this brief review article, we suggest that the term "dental phobia" may be a misnomer. The problem with using the term "phobia" in a dental-care context is as follows: by definition, phobias involve a fear that is "excessive or unreasonable," which the individual recognizes as such, and in which the anxiety, panic attacks and phobic avoidance are not better accounted for by another disorder, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In our experience, most individuals with dental "phobia" do not recognize their symptoms as "excessive or unreasonable" and in that sense, resemble individuals with PTSD. Our review of the dental-care literature suggests that true (innate) dental phobias (akin to unreasonable fear at the sight of blood or a syringe) probably account for a smaller percentage of cases, and that the vast majority of dental-care anxiety (DA) cases stem from aversive dental experiences. Research has documented that individuals who reported having experienced painful dental treatments and perceived a lack of control in the dental situation were approximately 14 times more likely to also report higher dental fear, and approximately 16 times more likely to report being less willing to return to the dental treatment. Therefore, we propose that this psychological condition should be conceptualized as Posttraumatic Dental-Care Anxiety (PTDA), and should be classified as part of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) spectrum in the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-V). PMID:17152624

  8. Disgust sensitivity and psychopathological symptoms in non-clinical children.

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter; van der Heiden, Simone; Rassin, Eric

    2008-06-01

    There is clear evidence in the adult literature that disgust sensitivity is implicated in various psychopathological syndromes. The current study examined the link between disgust sensitivity and psychopathological symptoms in youths. In a sample of non-clinical children aged 9-13 years, disgust sensitivity was assessed by two self-report questionnaires (i.e., the Disgust Scale and the Disgust Sensitivity Questionnaire) and a behavioural test. Furthermore, children completed scales for measuring the personality trait of neuroticism and various types of psychopathological symptoms. Results showed that disgust measures had sufficient to good convergent validity. Further, significant positive correlations were found between disgust sensitivity and symptoms of specific phobias (i.e., spider phobia, blood-injection phobia, small-animal phobia), social phobia, agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and eating problems, and these links were not attenuated when controlling for neuroticism. The possible role of disgust sensitivity in the aetiology of child psychopathology is discussed. PMID:17433251

  9. 'Nonspecific' rather than 'nonassociative' pathways to phobias: a commentary on Poulton and Menzies.

    PubMed

    Davey, Graham C L

    2002-02-01

    This commentary attempts to clarify the nature of contemporary associative accounts of phobias, and to describe how they might contribute to the explanation of the diversity of phobic aetiologies. It is argued that conditioning-equivalent associations underpin all phobic conditions, and that the role of experimental psychopathology research is to determine how these associations are acquired. The commentary then proceeds to discuss some of the theoretical problems with the nonassociative account of phobias as it is currently described by Poulton and Menzies, and to suggest that some interpretations of their retrospective and prospective data may not be incompatible with contemporary associative accounts. The outcome of this is that it may be more suitable to describe the fourth pathway to phobia acquisition described by Poulton and Menzies as a 'nonspecific' rather than a 'nonassociative' pathway. PMID:11820225

  10. I-95 phobia treated with hypnotic systematic desensitization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alex; Iglesias, Alex; Iglesias, Adam

    2013-10-01

    Systematic desensitization and hypnosis mediated therapy share empirical evidence of efficacy in the treatment of specific phobias. However, a review of the literature indicated there is limited documentation in the employment of these modalities for treating driving related phobias (DRP). This article reports on the use of hypnosis aided systematic desensitization (HASD) in the successful treatment of a case of non-accident related driving phobia, specifically manifested on Interstate 95 (I-95). The treatment consisted of 6 office sessions of HASD along with 14 in-vivo sessions where the patient performed multiple exposures/rehearsals of the behaviors that had been successfully mastered at the office visits. The results indicated that this patient with case of (DRP) was able to resume travel on I-95 at conclusion of treatment. The patient was symptom free at follow up 6 months later. PMID:24665816

  11. Stimulus Fading and Differential Reinforcement for the Treatment of Needle Phobia in a Youth with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Daniel B; Fisher, Wayne W

    2006-01-01

    Stimulus fading in the form of gradually increased exposure to a fear-evoking stimulus, often combined with differential reinforcement, has been used to treat phobias in children who are otherwise normal and in children with autism. In this investigation, we applied stimulus fading plus differential reinforcement with an adolescent with autism and diabetes whose needle phobia had prevented medical monitoring of his blood glucose levels for over 2 years. Results showed that the treatment was successful in obtaining daily blood samples for measuring glucose levels. PMID:17236343

  12. The developmental psychopathology of social anxiety in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Chris; Wilson, Kimberly A; Lagle, Kristy; Kraemer, Helena C; Killen, Joel D; Taylor, C Barr

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a developmental psychopathology approach for understanding adolescent social anxiety, parent-reported predictors of social anxiety were examined in a nonclinical sample of adolescents. Structured diagnostic interviews were obtained from biological parents of 770 participants. Potential risk factors assessed included child characteristics: negative affect, shyness, separation anxiety disorder, and childhood chronic illness, as well as parent characteristics: major depression, panic disorder, and agoraphobia. Adolescent social anxiety was measured multiple times during high school. Findings indicate stability in social anxiety symptoms across time. Parent-reported, childhood negative affect, shyness, and chronic illness as well as parental panic disorder or agoraphobia were associated with adolescent social anxiety. Interactions were observed between parent-reported childhood shyness and gender and between parent-reported childhood shyness and parent-reported childhood chronic illness in the prediction of social anxiety. Parent-reported childhood shyness was a stronger predictor of adolescent social anxiety in females compared to males. The combined effect of subjects being positive for both parent-reported childhood shyness and parent-reported childhood chronic illness was greater than would be expected based on additive effects. This study provides support for a multifactorial and developmentally informed understanding of adolescent social anxiety. PMID:17348001

  13. Biased Perception and Interpretation of Bodily Anxiety Symptoms in Childhood Social Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Julian; Blechert, Jens; Kramer, Martina; Asbrand, Julia; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive models of social phobia (SP) and empirical evidence in adults suggest that affected individuals overestimate arousal symptoms such as heart rate (HR) during social stress and worry about their visibility in public. To date, little is known about these aspects in childhood social anxiety, an important precursor of the disorder. We…

  14. Private and public self-awareness in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    George, Lindsay; Stopa, Lusia

    2008-03-01

    Clark and Wells' [(1995). A cognitive model of social phobia. In R.G. Heimberg, M. Liebowitz, D.A. Hope, & F. Schneier (Eds.). Social phobia: Diagnosis, assessment and treatment. New York: Guildford Press] cognitive model of social phobia proposes that self-focused attention and construction of the self as a social object maintain anxiety. This study examines the effect of two different self-focus manipulations (mirror and video) on public and private self-awareness, perspective taking, anxiety, and attributions. Thirty one high socially anxious participants (26 female, 5 male) with a mean age of 19.58 (SD=1.89) and 32 low socially anxious participants (21 female, 11 male) with a mean age of 20.47 (SD=3.69) took part in a conversation with a stooge. Public self-awareness increased in both groups but was higher overall in the high socially anxious group. Private self-awareness decreased for the low socially anxious group, but did not change for the high socially anxious group. High socially anxious participants were also more aware of their surroundings than low socially anxious participants. High socially anxious participants used the field perspective less, and experienced more anxiety. High socially anxious participants also made fewer internal attributions for the conversation going well and more for the conversation going badly than low socially anxious participants who did the opposite. The implications of the results for the cognitive model are discussed. PMID:17214960

  15. A randomized, controlled clinical trial of standard, group and brief cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia: a two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Marchand, André; Roberge, Pasquale; Primiano, Sandra; Germain, Vanessa

    2009-12-01

    A randomized controlled clinical trial with a wait-list control group was conducted to examine the effectiveness of three modalities (brief, group, and standard) of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for panic disorder with agoraphobia. A total of 100 participants meeting DSM-IV criteria were randomly assigned to each treatment condition: a 14-session standard CBT (n=33), a 14-session group CBT (n=35) and a 7-session brief CBT (n=32). Participants received a self-study manual and were assigned weekly readings and exercises. The results indicate that regardless of the treatment condition, CBT for moderate to severe PDA is beneficial in medium and long term. To this effect, all three-treatment conditions significantly reduced the intensity of symptoms, increased participants' quality of life, offered high effect sizes, superior maintenance of gains over time, and lower rates of relapse, compared to the wait-list control. PMID:19709851

  16. [Analysis of the cost and the effectiveness of a psychotherapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) versus a treatment combining pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Marchand, André; Germain, Vanessa; Reinharz, Daniel; Mainguy, Nicole; Landry, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are efficient treatments for Panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) yet they remain expensive. This study aims to compare the cost/effectiveness ratio of a CBT for PDA versus a combined treatment of CBT and pharmacotherapy. Eighty-four people followed a CBT either alone or combined with medication. They have been evaluated before treatment, immediately after, as well as one and two years later. The therapy efficacy is calculated at each assessment according to a "Global Functioning Index". Direct and indirect costs are calculated with the "Health Cost Interview". Results suggest that both treatments are equally effective. However, CBT alone is less expensive than CBT with pharmacotherapy. Thus, it offers a better cost-effectiveness ratio that even increases in the long term. PMID:15928793

  17. Shaping Approach Responses as Intervention for Specific Phobia in a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricciardi, Joseph N.; Luiselli, James K.; Camare, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated contact desensitization (reinforcing approach responses) as intervention for specific phobia with a child diagnosed with autism. During hospital-based intervention, the boy was able to encounter previously avoided stimuli. Parental report suggested that results were maintained postdischarge. (Contains 1 figure.)

  18. One-Session Treatment of Specific Phobias: A Detailed Description and Review of Treatment Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zlomke, Kimberly; Davis, Thompson E., III

    2008-01-01

    One-Session Treatment (OST) is a form of massed exposure therapy for the treatment of specific phobias. OST combines exposure, participant modeling, cognitive challenges, and reinforcement in a single session, maximized to three hours. Clients are gradually exposed to steps of their fear hierarchy using therapist-directed behavioral experiments.…

  19. Play Therapy Applied by Parents for Children with Darkness Phobia: Comparison of Two Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santacruz, Isabel; Mendez, Francisco J.; Sanchez-Meca, Julio

    2006-01-01

    Two play therapies applied by parents for darkness phobia in young children are compared. Seventy-eight children between the ages of 4 and 8 were recruited from twenty-seven schools. The participants were randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: bibliotherapy and games, emotive performances, and no treatment. The treatments were applied…

  20. Sex differences in the functional and structural neuroanatomy of dental phobia.

    PubMed

    Schienle, Anne; Scharmüller, Wilfried; Leutgeb, Verena; Schäfer, Axel; Stark, Rudolf

    2013-05-01

    Although dental phobia is a common mental disorder, which afflicts both men and women, little is known about sex differences at the neural level. Patients suffering from dental phobia (20 men, 25 women) and healthy controls (18 men, 23 women) participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment. They were shown pictures depicting dental treatment, generally fear-eliciting, disgust-eliciting and neutral contents. After the fMRI experiment, the participants rated the affective value of the pictures. Additionally, grey matter volume (GMV) was compared between patients and controls, as well as between the sexes. Male and female patients responded differently to the phobogenic pictures. Women showed greater activation of the caudate nucleus, whereas men exhibited enhanced dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) involvement. Their DLPFC activation was negatively correlated with experienced arousal. Dentophobic females were characterized by a greater caudate volume relative to phobic males. The GMV of this structure was positively correlated with experienced arousal during exposure and symptom severity, only in female patients. This study provides first evidence of sex-specific brain activation and structure in patients suffering from dental phobia. The neural pattern during symptom provocation as well as the brain structural specificity might mirror different attention and self-control strategies of both sexes. The consideration of such differences could contribute to greater effectiveness in treating dental phobia. PMID:22644919

  1. School-Based Intervention Strategies for School Phobia--A Ten-Step "Common Sense" Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Want, Jerome H.

    1983-01-01

    Characteristic behaviors and personality features of school phobia (anxiety, willfulness, dependency, depression, and unrealistic self image) are described, and 10 steps in a school-based intervention approach are listed (including assessing the family constellation, preparing teachers for the student's return to school, and encouraging therapy…

  2. School Phobia: A Critical Analysis of the Separation Anxiety Theory and an Alternative Conceptualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkington, Cynthia L.; Piersel, Wayne C.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews literature on school phobia which reveals predominant view concerning its etiology is separation anxiety theory. Critically analyzes theory on three grounds: methodological problems, lack of generalizability concerning pathological mother-child relationships, and lack of emphasis on external etiological variables. Recommends reexamining…

  3. Internal sensations as a source of fear: exploring a link between hypoxia and flight phobia.

    PubMed

    Vanden Bogaerde, Anouk; De Raedt, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    Although flight phobia is very common in the general population, knowledge of the underlying mechanisms is limited. The aim of the current study is to determine whether hypoxia is selectively associated with flight anxiety. We wanted to explore levels of oxygen saturation (SpO2) and the associated subjective somatic sensations in flight phobics and controls. The data collected in this study were obtained from 103 participants: 54 had flight phobia, 49 were controls. SpO2 as well as a subjective report of somatic sensations and anxiety were measured during short haul flights, both at ground level and at cruising altitude. Results indicated that both flight phobics and controls showed a comparable clinical significant decrease in SpO2 from sea level to cruising altitude. Next, at ground level the flight phobic group reported more somatic sensations, most likely due to the elevated levels of anxiety at that point. However, at cruising altitude the flight phobic group still reported more somatic sensations while the level of anxiety was no longer significantly different from controls. This finding points to altered symptom perception in flight phobia and stresses the importance of somatic sensations in this particular phobia. PMID:22574671

  4. Measures to Combat Research Phobia among Undergraduates for Knowledge Creation in Imo State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihebereme, Chioma I.

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the measures to combat research phobia among undergraduates in order to achieve knowledge creation. The study used Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education Owerri in Imo State as case study. An 11-item four point Likert-type scale of Agreed (A) = 4 points, Strongly Agreed (SA) = 3 points, Disagreed (D) = 2 points and Strongly…

  5. Comparative Effectiveness of Guided Mastery and Exposure Treatments for Intractable Phobias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, S. Lloyd; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared two models of phobia treatment. Severe height and driving phobics (N=32) were assigned to either mastery-oriented treatment based on self-efficacy theory, exposure treatment, or no treatment. Mastery treatment proved to be significantly more effective. Results indicated that treatments effect behavioral change through their intervening…

  6. Preliminary research on the efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy to treat driving phobia.

    PubMed

    Wald, Jaye; Taylor, Steven

    2003-10-01

    This article presents a review of preliminary research of two studies of the efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) to treat driving phobia. Study 1 describes a case study of a patient who completed a 7-day baseline followed by three sessions of VRET. Her peak anxiety decreased within and across sessions. At the post-treatment assessment, her phobic-related symptoms had diminished and she no longer met diagnostic criteria for driving phobia. Clinical improvement was maintained at 1-, 3-, and 7-month follow-up. In study 2, a multiple baseline across-subjects design was used to treat five patients over eight weekly VRET sessions. Visual and statistical analyses showed clear improvement in driving anxiety and avoidance in three patients between pre- and post-treatment assessments, and they no longer met criteria for driving phobia. There was marginal improvement in one patient, and the remaining individual showed no treatment gains. There was negligible change in actual driving frequency for any of the patients. Some gains were lost at the follow-up, particularly for the two individuals with poorer treatment responses. The results from these preliminary studies suggest that VRET may be a promising intervention for treating driving phobia. Avenues for improving treatment outcome are discussed. PMID:14583121

  7. Stimulus Fading and Differential Reinforcement for the Treatment of Needle Phobia in a Youth with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shabani, Daniel B.; Fisher, Wayne W.

    2006-01-01

    Stimulus fading in the form of gradually increased exposure to a fear-evoking stimulus, often combined with differential reinforcement, has been used to treat phobias in children who are otherwise normal and in children with autism. In this investigation, we applied stimulus fading plus differential reinforcement with an adolescent with autism and…

  8. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Sawchuk, Craig N.; Moretz, Melanie W.; David, Bieke; Armstrong, Thomas; Ciesielski, Bethany G.

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety (IPS-Anx). Principal components analysis of IPS-Anx items in Study 1 (n = 498) revealed a 2-factor structure consisting of Distal Fear and Contact Fear. However, CFA results in Study 2 (n = 567) suggest that a 1-factor…

  9. Elementary EFL Teachers' Computer Phobia and Computer Self-Efficacy in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Kate Tzuching

    2012-01-01

    The advent and application of computer and information technology has increased the overall success of EFL teaching; however, such success is hard to assess, and teachers prone to computer avoidance face negative consequences. Two major obstacles are high computer phobia and low computer self-efficacy. However, little research has been carried out…

  10. Neural correlation of successful cognitive behaviour therapy for spider phobia: a magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Wright, Barry; Alderson-Day, Ben; Prendergast, Garreth; Kennedy, Juliette; Bennett, Sophie; Docherty, Mary; Whitton, Clare; Manea, Laura; Gouws, Andre; Tomlinson, Heather; Green, Gary

    2013-12-30

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can be an effective treatment for spider phobia, but the underlying neural correlates of therapeutic change are yet to be specified. The present study used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study responses within the first half second, to phobogenic stimuli in a group of individuals with spider phobia prior to treatment (n=12) and then in nine of them following successful CBT (where they could touch and manage live large common house spiders) at least 9 months later. We also compared responses to a group of age-matched healthy control participants (n=11). Participants viewed static photographs of real spiders, other fear-inducing images (e.g. snakes, sharks) and neutral stimuli (e.g. kittens). Beamforming methods were used to localise sources of significant power changes in response to stimuli. Prior to treatment, participants with spider phobia showed a significant maximum response in the right frontal pole when viewing images of real spiders specifically. No significant frontal response was observed for either control participants or participants with spider phobia post-treatment. In addition, participants' subjective ratings of spider stimuli significantly predicted peak responses in right frontal regions. The implications for understanding brain-based effects of cognitive therapies are discussed. PMID:24139305

  11. Emotive Imagery in the Behavioral Management of Adolescent School Phobia: A Case Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Lenore A.

    1980-01-01

    A case is described in which a school psychologist treated a high school boy of 16 for school phobia, using a behavioral contract and two weeks of daily 30-minute sessions in which mental images were evoked of school situations that had been the cause of severe anxiety. (CTM)

  12. Measuring Social Anxiety in College Students: A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of the SPAI-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schry, Amie R.; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; White, Susan W.

    2012-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is 1 of the most prevalent psychological disorders, and among college students in particular, social anxiety has been associated with other problems such as substance use problems and increased vulnerability to other psychiatric disorders. The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory-23 (SPAI-23; Roberson-Nay, Strong, Nay,…

  13. Reducing Specific Phobia/Fear in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) through a Virtual Reality Environment Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Maskey, Morag; Lowry, Jessica; Rodgers, Jacqui; McConachie, Helen; Parr, Jeremy R.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is common in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), with specific fears and phobias one of the most frequent subtypes. Specific fears and phobias can have a serious impact on young people with ASD and their families. In this study we developed and evaluated a unique treatment combining cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) with graduated exposure in a virtual reality environment (VRE). Nine verbally fluent boys with an ASD diagnosis and no reported learning disability, aged 7 to 13 years old, were recruited. Each had anxiety around a specific situation (e.g. crowded buses) or stimulus (e.g. pigeons). An individualised scene was recreated in our ‘wrap-around’ VRE. In the VRE participants were coached by a psychologist in cognitive and behavioural techniques (e.g. relaxation and breathing exercises) while the exposure to the phobia/fear stimulus was gradually increased as the child felt ready. Each child received four 20–30 minute sessions. After participating in the study, eight of the nine children were able to tackle their phobia situation. Four of the participants completely overcame their phobia. Treatment effects were maintained at 12 months. These results provide evidence that CBT with VRE can be a highly effective treatment for specific phobia/fear for some young people with ASD. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN58483069. PMID:24987957

  14. A modern conceptualization of phobia in al-Balkhi's 9th century treatise: Sustenance of the Body and Soul.

    PubMed

    Awaad, Rania; Ali, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Morbid fears and phobias have been mentioned in religious, philosophical and medical manuscripts since ancient times. Despite early insights by the Greeks, phobias did not appear as a separate clinical phenomenon in Western medicine until the 17th century and has evolved substantially since. However, robust investigations attempting to decipher the clinical nature of phobias emerged in pre-modern times during the oft-overlooked Islamic Golden Era (9th-12th centuries); which overlapped with Europe's medieval period. An innovative attempt was made by the 9th century Muslim scholar, Abu Zayd al-Balkhi, in his medical manuscript "Sustenance of the Body and Soul," to define phobias as a separate diagnostic entity. Al-Balkhi was one of the earliest to cluster psychological and physical symptoms of phobias under one category, "al-Fazaá", and outline a specific management plan. We analyze al-Balkhi's description of phobias, according to the modern understanding of psychiatric classifications and symptomatology as described in the DSM-5. PMID:26741063

  15. Social Anxiety in Parents of High-Functioning Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuusikko-Gauffin, Sanna; Pollock-Wurman, Rachel; Mattila, Marja-Leena; Jussila, Katja; Ebeling, Hanna; Pauls, David; Moilanen, Irma

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated social anxiety (SA) symptoms in parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs; N = 131) and community parents (N = 597) using the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI). SA was significantly more common in ASD than control mothers (15.6 vs. 6.7 %) and more equal between the ASD and control fathers (3.3 vs. 4.8 %). The…

  16. An Online Self-Administered Social Skills Training for Young Adults: Results from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehenbauer, Mario; Kothgassner, Oswald D.; Kryspin-Exner, Ilse; Stetina, Birgit U.

    2013-01-01

    Up to 95% of teens and young adults in western societies are online, and research shows striking evidence that users suffering from social fears use the Internet more frequently. Social phobia (SP) is one of the most common anxiety disorders, characterized by early onset and more frequent histories of childhood and adolescent shyness. SP is often…

  17. An Evaluation of the Applicability of the Tripartite Constructs to Social Anxiety in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Emily R.; Veed, Glen J.; Inderbitzen-Nolan, Heidi M.; Hansen, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the tripartite model of anxiety and depression in relation to social phobia in a nonclinical sample of adolescents (ages 13-17). Adolescent/parent dyads participated in a semistructured interview and completed self-report measures of the tripartite constructs and social anxiety. Adolescents gave an impromptu speech, and…

  18. Born to fear: non-associative vs associative factors in the etiology of phobias.

    PubMed

    Mineka, Susan; Ohman, Arne

    2002-02-01

    Poulton and Menzies (Behaviour Research & Therapy 40 (2001) 127-149) review two lines of evidence as supporting a non-associative pathway to the origins of "evolutionary relevant phobias". First, in retrospective studies of mode of onset some recall they have always had this fear. We review here solid evidence that retrospective recall is notoriously unreliable. Second, they note as many nonphobics recall relevant associative learning experiences as do phobics. We argue such studies are very inconclusive because they fail to consider many experiential and personality vulnerability (and invulnerability) factors that strongly impact the outcome of any putative learning experience. Their argument also does not explain the transition from developmental fears to phobias that is central to their thesis. Overall, we call for major methodological improvements in this area, in the context of theoretical developments pointing to interacting vulnerability and invulnerability factors. PMID:11814181

  19. Psychophysiological effects of an iTBS modulated virtual reality challenge including participants with spider phobia.

    PubMed

    Notzon, S; Deppermann, S; Fallgatter, A; Diemer, J; Kroczek, A; Domschke, K; Zwanzger, P; Ehlis, A-C

    2015-12-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests beneficial effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on anxiety. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) as a form of TMS on acute anxiety provoked by a virtual reality (VR) scenario. Participants with spider phobia (n=41) and healthy controls (n=42) were exposed to a spider scenario in VR after one session of iTBS over the prefrontal cortex or sham treatment. Participants with spider phobia reacted with more anxiety compared to healthy controls. Their heart rate and skin conductance increased compared to baseline. Contrary to expectations, iTBS did not influence these reactions, but modulated heart rate variability (HRV). Sympathetic influence on HRV showed an increase in the active iTBS group only. This study does not support the idea of beneficial effects of a single session of iTBS on anxiety, although other protocols or repeated sessions might be effective. PMID:26476332

  20. The management of blood phobia and a hypersensitive gag reflex by hypnotherapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Noble, Suzanne

    2002-03-01

    Coping with a hypersensitive gag reflex can be a cause for concern for both the patient and the operator. This report describes a case of blood phobia directed solely towards the oral cavity, linked with the inability to tolerate dentures due to a hypersensitive gag reflex. Management by hypnotherapy using a systematic desensitization technique allowed for extraction of teeth and permanent elimination of the gagging problem. PMID:11928343

  1. Usefulness of a trauma-focused treatment approach for travel phobia.

    PubMed

    de Jongh, Ad; Holmshaw, Manda; Carswell, Wilson; van Wijk, Arjen

    2011-01-01

    Despite its prevalence and potential impact on functioning, there are surprisingly little data regarding the treatment responsiveness of travel phobia. The purpose of this non-randomized study was to evaluate the usefulness of a trauma-focused treatment approach for travel phobia, or milder travel anxiety arising as a result of a road traffic accident. Trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (TF-CBT), and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing were used to treat a sample of 184 patients, who were referred to a psychological rehabilitation provider. Patients in both treatment groups were encouraged to encounter their feared objects and situations between sessions. Specific (i.e., travel) phobia was diagnosed in 57% of cases. Patients in both treatment conditions showed equally large, and clinically significant, decreases in symptoms as indexed by three validated measures (Impact of Event Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and General Health Questionnaire), therapist ratings of treatment outcome, and a return to driving or travelling by car or motorbike. These improvements were obtained within an average course of 7.3 sessions of 1 hour each. Patients with travel phobia responded with a greater reduction of anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms than those with milder travel anxiety. Passengers reported higher levels of trauma symptoms than drivers, but no difference in effectiveness of treatment was found between these groups. The results suggest that trauma-focused psychological interventions can be a treatment alternative for patients with travel anxiety. Given the seriousness of the clinical problems related to road traffic accidents more rigorous outcome research is warranted and needed. PMID:20146201

  2. Augmenting one-session treatment of children's specific phobias with attention training to positive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Waters, Allison M; Farrell, Lara J; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Milliner, Ella; Tiralongo, Evelin; Donovan, Caroline L; McConnell, Harry; Bradley, Brendan P; Mogg, Karin; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the efficacy of combining two promising approaches to treating children's specific phobias, namely attention training and one 3-h session of exposure therapy ('one-session treatment', OST). Attention training towards positive stimuli (ATP) and OST (ATP+OST) was expected to have more positive effects on implicit and explicit cognitive mechanisms and clinical outcome measures than an attention training control (ATC) condition plus OST (ATC+OST). Thirty-seven children (6-17 years) with a specific phobia were randomly assigned to ATP+OST or ATC+OST. In ATP+OST, children completed 160 trials of attention training responding to a probe that always followed the happy face in happy-angry face pairs. In ATC+OST, the probe appeared equally often after angry and happy faces. In the same session, children completed OST targeting their phobic situation/object. Clinical outcomes included clinician, parent and child report measures. Cognitive outcomes were assessed in terms of change in attention bias to happy and angry faces and in danger and coping expectancies. Assessments were completed before and after treatment and three-months later. Compared to ATC+OST, the ATP+OST condition produced (a) significantly greater reductions in children's danger expectancies about their feared situations/object during the OST and at three-month follow-up, and (b) significantly improved attention bias towards positive stimuli at post-treatment, which in turn, predicted a lower level of clinician-rated phobia diagnostic severity three-months after treatment. There were no significant differences between ATP+OST and ATC+OST conditions in clinician, parent, or child-rated clinical outcomes. Training children with phobias to focus on positive stimuli is effective in increasing attention towards positive stimuli and reducing danger expectancy biases. Studies with larger sample sizes and a stronger 'dose' of ATP prior to the OST may reveal promising outcomes on clinical measures

  3. Parents' Perceptions of Novel Treatments for Child and Adolescent Specific Phobia and Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Carly L; Farrell, Lara J; Waters, Allison M; Oar, Ella L; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to examine parents' perceptions of established treatments, including cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), relative to novel treatments of D-cycloserine (DCS) and attention bias modification (ABM) augmented CBT to determine if novel treatments are perceived as more or less favorable than established treatments. Participants included parents of children with a specific phobia, enrolled in one of two randomized controlled trials of either one-session augmented DCS (n = 38, Gold Coast) or ABM augmented one-session treatment (n = 34, Brisbane), as well as parents from a community sample (n = 38). Parents of children with a specific phobia perceived CBT most favorably. There was no difference between the sites on perceptions of ABM. However, parents of children enrolled in the DCS trial perceived DCS more favorably than parents of children enrolled in the ABM trial and the community sample. These results demonstrate parents' greater acceptance of psychological treatments over pharmacological treatments for the treatment of childhood phobias, highlighting the importance of educating parents to novel treatments. PMID:26349600

  4. Evaluating Perceived Probability of Threat-Relevant Outcomes and Temporal Orientation in Flying Phobia.

    PubMed

    Mavromoustakos, Elena; Clark, Gavin I; Rock, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    Probability bias regarding threat-relevant outcomes has been demonstrated across anxiety disorders but has not been investigated in flying phobia. Individual temporal orientation (time perspective) may be hypothesised to influence estimates of negative outcomes occurring. The present study investigated whether probability bias could be demonstrated in flying phobia and whether probability estimates of negative flying events was predicted by time perspective. Sixty flying phobic and fifty-five non-flying-phobic adults were recruited to complete an online questionnaire. Participants completed the Flight Anxiety Scale, Probability Scale (measuring perceived probability of flying-negative events, general-negative and general positive events) and the Past-Negative, Future and Present-Hedonistic subscales of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (variables argued to predict mental travel forward and backward in time). The flying phobic group estimated the probability of flying negative and general negative events occurring as significantly higher than non-flying phobics. Past-Negative scores (positively) and Present-Hedonistic scores (negatively) predicted probability estimates of flying negative events. The Future Orientation subscale did not significantly predict probability estimates. This study is the first to demonstrate probability bias for threat-relevant outcomes in flying phobia. Results suggest that time perspective may influence perceived probability of threat-relevant outcomes but the nature of this relationship remains to be determined. PMID:27557054

  5. Nice Doggie! Contact Desensitization Plus Reinforcement Decreases Dog Phobias for Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Tyner, Shannon; Brewer, Adam; Helman, Meghan; Leon, Yanerys; Pritchard, Joshua; Schlund, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Dog phobias are common in individuals with autism; however, evidence supporting behavioral interventions is limited. The current study evaluated the efficacy of contact desensitization plus reinforcement on dog phobic behavior exhibited by three children diagnosed with autism. The treatment package improved contact with dogs in analog and naturalistic settings and the improvements were maintained at follow-up and in generalization tests. Parents/caregivers also provided high consumer satisfaction reports.Approximately 30 % of individuals diagnosed with autism also receive a comorbid diagnosis of a clinical phobia.Research has shown that behavioral treatment for dog phobias in individuals with intellectual disabilities is contact desensitization plus reinforcement using two hierarchies: size of the dog and distance to the dog; no escape extinction was necessary.The current systematic replication shows that this treatment package was effective for children with autism using only a single hierarchy composed of distance to the dog.Future practitioners may wish to examine whether this treatment package also produces changes in supplemental physiological measures such as pupil dilation, heart rate, galvanic skin responses, and respiration. PMID:27606239

  6. A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Small Animals’ Phobia Using Virtual Reality as a Stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Beatriz; Rodriguez-Pujadas, Aina; Breton-Lopez, Juani; Barros-Loscertales, Alfonso; Baños, Rosa M; Botella, Cristina; Alcañiz, Mariano; Avila, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, still images or videos of real animals have been used in functional magnetic resonance imaging protocols to evaluate the brain activations associated with small animals’ phobia. Objective The objective of our study was to evaluate the brain activations associated with small animals’ phobia through the use of virtual environments. This context will have the added benefit of allowing the subject to move and interact with the environment, giving the subject the illusion of being there. Methods We have analyzed the brain activation in a group of phobic people while they navigated in a virtual environment that included the small animals that were the object of their phobia. Results We have found brain activation mainly in the left occipital inferior lobe (P<.05 corrected, cluster size=36), related to the enhanced visual attention to the phobic stimuli; and in the superior frontal gyrus (P<.005 uncorrected, cluster size=13), which is an area that has been previously related to the feeling of self-awareness. Conclusions In our opinion, these results demonstrate that virtual stimulus can enhance brain activations consistent with previous studies with still images, but in an environment closer to the real situation the subject would face in their daily lives. PMID:25654753

  7. BeMonitored: Monitoring psychophysiology and behavior using Android in phobias.

    PubMed

    Brás, Susana; Soares, Sandra C; Moreira, Ricardo; Fernandes, José M

    2016-09-01

    It is of the utmost importance that researchers can recreate, as accurately as possible, real-life conditions in psychological studies. However, that is not always possible. Given that phobias are rather context-specific, their study is the ideal candidate to assess the feasibility of using a mobile and wearable device for obtaining physiological and behavioral data. In this article, we propose BeMonitored, a smartphone-based solution to support more ecologically valid monitoring of psychological experiments. BeMonitored delivers customizable, specific context-dependent audiovisual stimuli and uses external resources connected via Bluetooth or a smartphone's own resources, while capturing the participant's behavior, physiology, and environment. We used BeMonitored in a spider phobia case study and showed that spider phobics differed from control participants in face motion, captured by the smartphone camera. Moreover, our results also revealed heart rate differences between spider and neutral stimuli in phobic participants. The presented results emphasize the usefulness of smartphones for phobia monitoring. Considering their intrinsic characteristics, smartphones may constitute the natural evolution from the lab to more realistic contexts. PMID:26174715

  8. Efficacy of a trauma-focused treatment approach for dental phobia: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Doering, Stephan; Ohlmeier, Marie-Christin; de Jongh, Ad; Hofmann, Arne; Bisping, Vanessa

    2013-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that treatment specifically focused on resolving memories of negative dental events might be efficacious for the alleviation of anxiety in patients with dental phobia. Thirty-one medication-free patients who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) criteria of dental phobia were randomly assigned to either Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) or a waitlist control condition. Dental anxiety was assessed using the Dental Anxiety Questionnaire (DAS), the Dental Fear Survey (DFS), a behavior test, and dental attendance at 1-yr of follow up. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing was associated with significant reductions of dental anxiety and avoidance behavior as well as in symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The effect sizes for the primary outcome measures were d = 2.52 (DAS) and d = 1.87 (DFS). These effects were still significant 3 months (d = 3.28 and d = 2.28, respectively) and 12 months (d = 3.75 and d = 1.79, respectively) after treatment. After 1 yr, 83.3% of the patients were in regular dental treatment (d = 3.20). The findings suggest that therapy aimed at processing memories of past dental events can be helpful for patients with dental phobia. PMID:24206075

  9. Evaluating Perceived Probability of Threat-Relevant Outcomes and Temporal Orientation in Flying Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Mavromoustakos, Elena; Clark, Gavin I.; Rock, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Probability bias regarding threat-relevant outcomes has been demonstrated across anxiety disorders but has not been investigated in flying phobia. Individual temporal orientation (time perspective) may be hypothesised to influence estimates of negative outcomes occurring. The present study investigated whether probability bias could be demonstrated in flying phobia and whether probability estimates of negative flying events was predicted by time perspective. Sixty flying phobic and fifty-five non-flying-phobic adults were recruited to complete an online questionnaire. Participants completed the Flight Anxiety Scale, Probability Scale (measuring perceived probability of flying-negative events, general-negative and general positive events) and the Past-Negative, Future and Present-Hedonistic subscales of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (variables argued to predict mental travel forward and backward in time). The flying phobic group estimated the probability of flying negative and general negative events occurring as significantly higher than non-flying phobics. Past-Negative scores (positively) and Present-Hedonistic scores (negatively) predicted probability estimates of flying negative events. The Future Orientation subscale did not significantly predict probability estimates. This study is the first to demonstrate probability bias for threat-relevant outcomes in flying phobia. Results suggest that time perspective may influence perceived probability of threat-relevant outcomes but the nature of this relationship remains to be determined. PMID:27557054

  10. Can Autism Spectrum Disorders and Social Anxiety Disorders Be Differentiated by the Social Responsiveness Scale in Children and Adolescents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cholemkery, Hannah; Mojica, Laura; Rohrmann, Sonja; Gensthaler, Angelika; Freitag, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as well as social phobia (SP), and selective mutism (SM) are characterised by impaired social interaction. We assessed the validity of the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) to differentiate between ASD, and SP/SM. Raw scores were compared in 6-18 year old individuals with ASD (N = 60), SP (N = 38), SM (N = 43), and…

  11. Effects of Modeling and Desensitation in Reducing Dentist Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, David W.; Thoresen, Carl E.

    1974-01-01

    Many persons avoid dentists and dental work. The present study explored the effects of systematic desensitization and social-modeling treatments with placebo and assessment control groups. Modeling was more effective than desensitization as shown by the number of subjects who went to a dentist. (Author)

  12. Emotive Performances: A Treatment Package for Children's Phobias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Francisco J.; Garcia, Maria J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the emotive performances treatment package, which combines in vivo desensitization through games, participant modeling, and social and material reinforcement of approach responses. Carried out eight treatment sessions of 20 minutes duration with 15 children who were afraid of the dark and of loud noises. Results show significant…

  13. Personality, Emotions, and the Emotional Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Watson, David; Naragon-Gainey, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    We examined symptom-level relations between the emotional disorders and general traits within the five-factor model of personality. Neuroticism correlated strongly with the general distress/negative affectivity symptoms (depressed mood, anxious mood, worry) that are central to these disorders; more moderately with symptoms of social phobia, affective lability, panic, posttraumatic stress disorder, lassitude, checking, and obsessive intrusions; and more modestly with agoraphobia, specific phobia, and other symptoms of depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Extraversion was negatively correlated with symptoms of social anxiety/social phobia and was positively related to scales assessing expansive positive mood and increased social engagement in bipolar disorder. Conscientiousness, agreeableness, and openness showed weaker associations and generally added little to the prediction of these symptoms. It is noteworthy, moreover, that our key findings replicated well across (a) self-rated versus (b) interview-based symptom measures. We conclude by discussing the diagnostic and assessment implications of these data. PMID:25815243

  14. Doll Play Narratives about Starting School in Children of Socially Anxious Mothers, and Their Relation to Subsequent Child School-Based Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pass, Laura; Arteche, Adriane; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Murray, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Child social anxiety is common, and predicts later emotional and academic impairment. Offspring of socially anxious mothers are at increased risk. It is important to establish whether individual vulnerability to disorder can be identified in young children. The responses of 4.5 year-old children of mothers with social phobia (N = 62) and…

  15. Animal models of social anxiety disorder and their validity criteria.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; Abelaira, Helena M; Quevedo, João

    2014-09-26

    Anxiety disorders pose one of the largest threats to global mental health, and they predominantly emerge early in life. Social anxiety disorder, also known as social phobia, is the most common of all anxiety disorders. Moreover, it has severe consequences and is a disabling disorder that can cause an individual to be unable to perform the tasks of daily life. Social anxiety disorder is associated with the subsequent development of major depression and other mental diseases, as well as increased substance abuse. Although some neurobiological alterations have been found to be associated with social anxiety disorder, little is known about this disorder. Animal models are useful tools for the investigation of this disorder, as well as for finding new pharmacological targets for treatment. Thus, this review will highlight the main animal models of anxiety associated with social phobia. PMID:25132362

  16. The role of safety behaviors in exposure-based treatment for panic disorder and agoraphobia: associations to symptom severity, treatment course, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Helbig-Lang, Sylvia; Richter, Jan; Lang, Thomas; Gerlach, Alexander L; Fehm, Lydia; Alpers, Georg W; Ströhle, Andreas; Kircher, Tilo; Deckert, Jürgen; Gloster, Andrew T; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    The potentially detrimental effects of safety behaviors during exposure therapy are still subject to debate. Empirical findings are inconsistent, and few studies have investigated effects of idiosyncratic safety behavior manifestations during exposure or in everyday life. These limitations might be due to a lack of appropriate measures that address individual safety behaviors. We examined psychometric properties and predictive value of the Texas Safety Maneuver Scale (TSMS), a questionnaire specifically targeting safety behaviors in panic disorder and agoraphobia. Effects of safety behavior use, both during everyday life and during therapy, were examined using data from a multicenter RCT of N=268 patients that aimed at evaluating efficacy and mechanisms of action of two variants of an exposure-based therapy. The TSMS total score demonstrated good internal consistency (α=0.89), and it showed significant correlations with selected measures of baseline anxiety and impairment. The proposed factor structure could not be replicated. Frequent safety behavior use at baseline was associated with actual safety behavior during exposure exercises. Pronounced in-situ safety behavior, but not baseline safety behavior was associated to detrimental treatment outcome. The results underline the relevance of a rigorous safety behavior assessment in therapy. The actual relationship between safety behavior use and treatment outcome is yet to determine. PMID:25445073

  17. Validation of the Self-Beliefs Related to Social Anxiety Scale

    PubMed Central

    Moulds, Michelle L.; Rapee, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of self-beliefs in prominent models of social phobia has led to the development of measures that tap this cognitive construct. The Self-Beliefs Related to Social Anxiety (SBSA) Scale is one such measure and taps the three maladaptive belief types proposed in Clark and Wells’s model of social phobia. This study aimed to replicate and extend previous research on the psychometric properties of the SBSA. Replicating previous research, in an (undiagnosed) undergraduate sample (n = 235), the SBSA was found to have a correlated three-factor structure using confirmatory factor analyses, and the SBSA and its subscales demonstrated good internal consistency and test–retest reliability. The SBSA and its subscales also had unique relationships with social anxiety and depression, the majority of which replicated previous research. Extending previous research, the SBSA and its subscales showed good incremental validity in the undergraduate sample and good discriminative validity using the undergraduate sample and a sample of individuals with social phobia (n = 33). The SBSA’s strong theoretical basis and the findings of this study suggest that the SBSA is an ideal research and clinical tool to assess the cognitions characteristic of social phobia. PMID:23575344

  18. Social anxiety and self-concept in children with epilepsy: A pilot intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jana E.; Blocher, Jacquelyn B.; Jackson, Daren C.; Sung, Connie; Fujikawa, Mayu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) anxiety intervention on social phobia, social skill development, and self-concept. Method Fifteen children with epilepsy and a primary anxiety disorder participated in a CBT intervention for 12 weeks plus a 3-month follow-up visit. Children were assessed at baseline, week 7, week 12, and 3 months post treatment to measure changes in social phobia using the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED). Self-concept was also assessed by using the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale II (Piers-Harris 2). Results There was a significant reduction in symptoms of social phobia and improved self-concept at the end of the 12-week intervention and at the 3 month follow-up. Repeated measures ANOVA's of child ratings revealed significant change over time on the SCARED-Social Phobia/Social Anxiety subscale score (p = 0.024). In terms of self-concept, significant change over time was detected on the Piers-Harris 2-Total score (p = 0.015) and several subscale scores of Piers-Harris 2, including: Physical Appearance and Attributes (p = 0.016), Freedom from Anxiety (p = 0.005), and Popularity (p = 0.003). Conclusion This pilot investigation utilized an evidenced based CBT intervention to reduce symptoms of social phobia, which in turn provided a vehicle to address specific social skills improving self-concept in children with epilepsy. PMID:25053153

  19. Predictors of Response to an Attention Modification Program in Generalized Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Nader; Taylor, Charles T.; Donohue, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: At least 3 randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind studies have supported the efficacy of computerized attention modification programs (AMPs) in reducing symptoms of anxiety in patients diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. In this study we examined patient characteristics that predicted response to AMP in a large sample of…

  20. An Acceptance and Mindfulness-Based Approach to Social Phobia: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Victoria Popick; Whitman, Sarah M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, there has been a proliferation of theoretical discussions and empirical research on the use of acceptance and mindfulness-based therapies to treat anxiety disorders. Because these treatment approaches are in their infancy, many clinicians may still be uncertain about how to apply such treatments in their work with clients.…

  1. Effects of Stress and Social Phobia on Medical Students' Specialty Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onady, Alice A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Medical students at Wright State University School of Medicine were asked to rate specialties as most and least stressful, to indicate whether they considered stress to be favorable or unfavorable, and to complete instruments measuring stress. There was no significant association among high stress and choice of least stressful specialties.…

  2. Strategies to manage patients with dental anxiety and dental phobia: literature review.

    PubMed

    Appukuttan, Deva Priya

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety and phobia result in avoidance of dental care. It is a frequently encountered problem in dental offices. Formulating acceptable evidence-based therapies for such patients is essential, or else they can be a considerable source of stress for the dentist. These patients need to be identified at the earliest opportunity and their concerns addressed. The initial interaction between the dentist and the patient can reveal the presence of anxiety, fear, and phobia. In such situations, subjective evaluation by interviews and self-reporting on fear and anxiety scales and objective assessment of blood pressure, pulse rate, pulse oximetry, finger temperature, and galvanic skin response can greatly enhance the diagnosis and enable categorization of these individuals as mildly, moderately, or highly anxious or dental phobics. Broadly, dental anxiety can be managed by psychotherapeutic interventions, pharmacological interventions, or a combination of both, depending on the level of dental anxiety, patient characteristics, and clinical situations. Psychotherapeutic interventions are either behaviorally or cognitively oriented. Pharmacologically, these patients can be managed using either sedation or general anesthesia. Behavior-modification therapies aim to change unacceptable behaviors through learning, and involve muscle relaxation and relaxation breathing, along with guided imagery and physiological monitoring using biofeedback, hypnosis, acupuncture, distraction, positive reinforcement, stop-signaling, and exposure-based treatments, such as systematic desensitization, "tell-show-do", and modeling. Cognitive strategies aim to alter and restructure the content of negative cognitions and enhance control over the negative thoughts. Cognitive behavior therapy is a combination of behavior therapy and cognitive therapy, and is currently the most accepted and successful psychological treatment for anxiety and phobia. In certain situations, where the patient is not able

  3. Strategies to manage patients with dental anxiety and dental phobia: literature review

    PubMed Central

    Appukuttan, Deva Priya

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety and phobia result in avoidance of dental care. It is a frequently encountered problem in dental offices. Formulating acceptable evidence-based therapies for such patients is essential, or else they can be a considerable source of stress for the dentist. These patients need to be identified at the earliest opportunity and their concerns addressed. The initial interaction between the dentist and the patient can reveal the presence of anxiety, fear, and phobia. In such situations, subjective evaluation by interviews and self-reporting on fear and anxiety scales and objective assessment of blood pressure, pulse rate, pulse oximetry, finger temperature, and galvanic skin response can greatly enhance the diagnosis and enable categorization of these individuals as mildly, moderately, or highly anxious or dental phobics. Broadly, dental anxiety can be managed by psychotherapeutic interventions, pharmacological interventions, or a combination of both, depending on the level of dental anxiety, patient characteristics, and clinical situations. Psychotherapeutic interventions are either behaviorally or cognitively oriented. Pharmacologically, these patients can be managed using either sedation or general anesthesia. Behavior-modification therapies aim to change unacceptable behaviors through learning, and involve muscle relaxation and relaxation breathing, along with guided imagery and physiological monitoring using biofeedback, hypnosis, acupuncture, distraction, positive reinforcement, stop-signaling, and exposure-based treatments, such as systematic desensitization, “tell-show-do”, and modeling. Cognitive strategies aim to alter and restructure the content of negative cognitions and enhance control over the negative thoughts. Cognitive behavior therapy is a combination of behavior therapy and cognitive therapy, and is currently the most accepted and successful psychological treatment for anxiety and phobia. In certain situations, where the patient is not

  4. A case study of behavioral assessment and treatment of insect phobia.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K M; Friman, P C

    1999-01-01

    We assessed the academic performance of a 14-year-old boy with insect phobia in the context of feared stimuli. The dependent measure was math calculation rate across three conditions that varied therapist statements about the presence of crickets and the actual presence of live crickets. Subsequent treatment consisted of graduated exposure and contingent rewards for math problem completion. Assessment results indicated that the boy's performance was consistently low in the presence of live crickets but not when he was spuriously informed that crickets were present (the primary referral concern). Treatment results indicated no effect from exposure alone and a dramatic effect when exposure was combined with contingent rewards. PMID:10201105

  5. Integrating science, practice and reflexivity--cognitive therapy with driving phobia.

    PubMed

    Townend, M; Grant, A

    2006-10-01

    The scientist-practitioner model has long been espoused within cognitive behavioural psychotherapy. The study includes an evaluation of the efficacy of cognitive therapy for driving phobia. Assessment, formulation and practical treatment of this common problem are also reported. Self-report measures evaluated results. Eight of the 10 consecutive cases improved significantly and reported that the intervention was acceptable. A reflexive analysis of the research findings and the influences on the first author's practice as a researcher and practitioner are also explored. Recommendations for future research are also made. PMID:16965474

  6. In vivo desensitization of a severe driving phobia through radio contact with telemonitoring of neurophysiological reactions.

    PubMed

    Rovetto, F M

    1983-03-01

    A 34 year-old man with a severe driving phobia was treated by in vivo desensitization. A radio transceiver was used to provide the anxiety inhibiting effects of voice contact during exposure to phobic driving experiences. Transceivers were linked to a Telemonitor apparatus programmed to broadcast heartbeat and GSR readings automatically every 15 minutes or on demand, each of 10 seconds duration. The therapist was therefore in touch with the subjective and physiological arousal of the patient from distances up to 7 miles. This allowed him to conduct more efficiently a program of in vivo graduated exposure. Treatment effects were maintained at a 9-month follow-up. PMID:6134757

  7. Evaluating the Efficacy of Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy for Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder with Blushing Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Súarez, Claudio; Palacios, Estela; Palacios, Fernanda; Matus, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: No study has yet compared the efficacy of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for treating facial blushing with other treatment or no treatment. We conducted a prospective, observational, open-label, clinical study to compare endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for blushing with generalized social anxiety disorder versus sertraline treatment and no treatment. Method: Three-hundred and thirty consecutive patients seeking treatment for their blushing were assessed by psychiatric interview and patient-rated scales. The Brief Social Phobia Scale was the primary outcome measure. Patients meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for generalized social anxiety disorder, scoring 20 points or more in the Brief Social Phobia Scale and 19 points or more in the Social Phobia Inventory were considered eligible and followed up for a mean of 11 months (range 1–64) after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy or initiation of sertraline. Results: At baseline, 97 percent of the endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy-treated group, 87 percent of the sertraline-treated group, and 78 percent of the nontreated group rated their blushing as being “severe” or “extreme.” At follow up, 16 percent of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy-treated patients, 32 percent of sertraline-treated patients, and 57 percent of untreated patients reported this degree of blushing. At endpoint, Brief Social Phobia Scale total scores exhibited a greater decline with either treatment than with no treatment. Nonetheless, in comparison to no treatment, only the results obtained with endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy achieved statistical significance (p=0.003). Compensatory sweating occurred in 99 percent of patients who underwent endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. High degrees of satisfaction with treatment were reported by 89 percent of patients undergoing endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy and by 59 percent of patients taking medication. Conclusion

  8. One session treatment for pediatric blood-injection-injury phobia: A controlled multiple baseline trial.

    PubMed

    Oar, Ella L; Farrell, Lara J; Waters, Allison M; Conlon, Elizabeth G; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a modified One Session Treatment (OST), which included an e-therapy homework maintenance program over 4 weeks for Blood-Injection-Injury (BII) phobia in children and adolescents. Using a single case, non-concurrent multiple-baseline design, 24 children and adolescents (8-18 years; 7 males, 17 females) with a primary diagnosis of BII phobia were randomly assigned to a one, two or three week baseline prior to receiving OST. Primary outcome measures included diagnostic severity, diagnostic status, and child and parent fear ratings. Secondary outcome measures included avoidance during behavioural avoidance tasks (BAT), global functioning and self and parent reported anxiety, fear and depression. Efficacy was assessed at post-treatment, 1-month, and 3-month follow-up. BII symptoms and diagnostic severity remained relatively stable during the baseline periods and then significantly improved following implementation of the intervention. Treatment response was supported by changes across multiple measures, including child, parent and independent clinician ratings. At post-treatment 8 of the 24 (33.33%) children were BII diagnosis free. Treatment gains improved at follow-ups with 14 (58.33%) children diagnosis free at 1-month follow-up and 15 (62.5%) diagnosis free at 3-month follow-up. Preliminary findings support the effectiveness of a modified OST approach for BII phobic youth with treatment outcomes improving over follow-up intervals. PMID:26313620

  9. Neural substrates of defensive reactivity in two subtypes of specific phobia

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Kevin; Stolyar, Veronika; Maslowski, Nina I.; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Depending on threat proximity, different defensive behaviours are mediated by a descending neural network involving forebrain (distal threat) vs midbrain areas (proximal threat). Compared to healthy subjects, it can be assumed that phobics are characterized by shortened defensive distances on a behavioural and neural level. This study aimed at characterizing defensive reactivity in two subtypes of specific phobia [snake (SP) and dental phobics (DP)]. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), n = 39 subjects (13 healthy controls, HC; 13 SP; 13 DP) underwent an event-related fMRI task employing an anticipation (5–10 s) and immediate perception phase (phobic pictures and matched neutral stimuli; 1250 ms) to modulate defensive distance. Although no differential brain activity in any comparisons was observed in DP, areas associated with defensive behaviours (e.g. amygdala, hippocampus, midbrain) were activated in SP. Decreasing defensive distance in SP was characterized by a shift to midbrain activity. Present findings substantiate differences between phobia types in their physiological and neural organization that can be expanded to early stages of defensive behaviours. Findings may contribute to a better understanding of the dynamic organization of defensive reactivity in different types of phobic fear. PMID:24174207

  10. A randomized, controlled clinical trial of in virtuo and in vivo exposure for spider phobia.

    PubMed

    Michaliszyn, David; Marchand, André; Bouchard, Stéphane; Martel, Marc-Olivier; Poirier-Bisson, Joannie

    2010-12-01

    The present study compared the efficacy of virtual reality (VR) in virtuo exposure and in vivo exposure in the treatment of spider phobia. Two treatment conditions were compared to a waiting-list condition. A 3-month follow-up evaluation was conducted in order to assess the durability of the treatment effects. Participants were randomly assigned to the treatment groups. A total of 16 participants received the in virtuo treatment, and 16 received the in vivo treatment. The waiting-list condition included 11 participants. Participants received eight 1.5-hour treatment sessions. Efficacy was measured with the Fear of Spiders Questionnaire, the Spider Beliefs Questionnaire (SBQ-F), and a Behavioral Avoidance Test (BAT). In addition, a clinician administered the Structured Interview for DSM-IV to assess DSM-IV's criteria for specific phobia and severity. Clinical and statistically significant improvements were found for both groups. Differences in treatment groups were found on one of five measures of fear: greater improvement on the SBQ-F beliefs subscale was associated with in vivo exposure. PMID:21142994

  11. Influence of ethnocentrism and neo-phobia on ethnic food consumption in Spain.

    PubMed

    Camarena, Dena M; Sanjuán, Ana I; Philippidis, George

    2011-08-01

    Over the last decade, a strong upsurge in Spanish immigration has fostered a thriving ethnic food market. To examine indigenous consumer predilections toward ethnic foods, a carefully designed choice experiment is employed, with particular focus on ethnocentricity and food neo-phobia traits on potential purchase decisions. Employing a two level nested logit model, consumers choose to accept/reject ethnic foods, with a positive response met by a further series of different ethnic cuisine and consumption scenario alternatives. Bivariate tests reveal that higher ethnocentric and neo-phobic segments possess common socio-demographic characteristics, whilst neo-phobia plays a significantly stronger role in determining the probability of rejection. Further tests reveal culturally similar Mexican food as the preferred ethnic food across all consumption scenarios. Moreover, the 'restaurant' is the favoured format of consumption, whilst there is evidence of a strong association between specific ethnic food types and consumption formats. The implications of our research suggest that in the short to medium turn, price is a strong strategic variable, whilst marketing strategies must successfully isolate and exploit specific 'ethnic food/consumption scenario' mixes. Finally, stronger messages emphasizing quality and convenience factors are seen as key to bolstering the underrepresented 'home preparation' ethnic food market in Spain. PMID:21513751

  12. Assessment and Treatment of Socially Phobic Children: A Cross Cultural Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Courtney B.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we examined the psychopathology and behavioral treatment of White and African American preadolescent children with social phobia. The comprehensive assessment strategy, including semistructured diagnostic interviews, clinician ratings of impairment, behavioral observations, parental ratings, and self-report inventories, did not…

  13. Treating Self-Injection Phobia in Patients Prescribed Injectable Medications: A Case Example Illustrating a Six-Session Treatment Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Darcy; Mohr, David C.; Epstein, Lucy

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a case description of a patient with multiple sclerosis prescribed interferon beta-1a (IFN[beta]-1a), a weekly intramuscular injection, who met "DSM-IV" criteria for specific phobia, blood/injection type. This patient successfully completed a 6-week manualized cognitive-behavioral treatment for self-injection anxiety. Issues…

  14. In Vivo versus Augmented Reality Exposure in the Treatment of Small Animal Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Botella, Cristina; Pérez-Ara, M Ángeles; Bretón-López, Juana; Quero, Soledad; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    Although in vivo exposure is the treatment of choice for specific phobias, some acceptability problems have been associated with it. Virtual Reality exposure has been shown to be as effective as in vivo exposure, and it is widely accepted for the treatment of specific phobias, but only preliminary data are available in the literature about the efficacy of Augmented Reality. The purpose of the present study was to examine the efficacy and acceptance of two treatment conditions for specific phobias in which the exposure component was applied in different ways: In vivo exposure (N = 31) versus an Augmented Reality system (N = 32) in a randomized controlled trial. "One-session treatment" guidelines were followed. Participants in the Augmented Reality condition significantly improved on all the outcome measures at post-treatment and follow-ups. When the two treatment conditions were compared, some differences were found at post-treatment, favoring the participants who received in vivo exposure. However, these differences disappeared at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Regarding participants' expectations and satisfaction with the treatment, very positive ratings were reported in both conditions. In addition, participants from in vivo exposure condition considered the treatment more useful for their problem whereas participants from Augmented Reality exposure considered the treatment less aversive. Results obtained in this study indicate that Augmented Reality exposure is an effective treatment for specific phobias and well accepted by the participants. PMID:26886423

  15. A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Model: Integrating Anxiety and Phobia Coping Strategies into Fundamentals of Public Speaking College Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oumano, Elena

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effectiveness of the "Fear and Loathing of Speaking Out in Public" program. The program, a personal initiative, adapts primary features of the treatment offered by Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for clients suffering from fears and phobias. CBT strategies include progressive desensitization, identifying…

  16. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Specific Phobias with a Child Demonstrating Severe Problem Behavior and Developmental Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Thompson E., III; Kurtz, Patricia F.; Gardner, Andrew W.; Carman, Nicole B.

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral treatments (CBTs) are widely used for anxiety disorders in typically developing children; however, there has been no previous attempt to administer CBT for specific phobia (in this case study, one-session treatment) to developmentally or intellectually disabled children. This case study integrates both cognitive-behavioral and…

  17. An Evaluation of Multi-Component Exposure Treatment of Needle Phobia in an Adult with Autism and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Jason J.; Symons, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fear of medical procedures in general and needles in particular can be a difficult clinical challenge to providing effective health care for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Methods: A changing criterion design was used to examine graduated exposure treatment for blood-injury-injection phobia in an adult…

  18. One-Session Treatment of Specific Phobias in Youth: A Randomized Clinical Trial in the United States and Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollendick, Thomas H.; Ost, Lars-Goran; Reuterskiold, Lena; Costa, Natalie; Cederlund, Rio; Sirbu, Cristian; Davis, Thompson E., III; Jarrett, Matthew A.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred and ninety-six youth, ages 7-16, who fulfilled "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.) criteria for various specific phobias were randomized to a one-session exposure treatment, education support treatment, or a wait list control group. After the waiting period, the wait list participants were offered…

  19. The scientific legacy of Little Hans and Little Albert: future directions for research on specific phobias in youth.

    PubMed

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Muris, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We review issues associated with the phenomenology, etiology, assessment, and treatment of specific phobias in children and adolescents and provide suggestions for future research and clinical practice. In doing so, we highlight the early case studies of Little Hans and Little Albert and the advances that have been made following the publication of these seminal cases. In recent years, we have witnessed a deeper understanding of the etiology of specific phobias and developed a rich array of evidence-based assessments and treatments with which to address specific phobias in youth. Although much has been accomplished in this area of inquiry, we also note that much remains to be done before we can advance more fully our understanding, assessment, and treatment of specific phobias in youth. It will be important for future work to build more firmly on these developments and to better determine the moderators and mediators of change with our evidence-based treatments and to more vigorously pursue their dissemination in real-word settings. PMID:25864566

  20. In Vivo versus Augmented Reality Exposure in the Treatment of Small Animal Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Botella, Cristina; Pérez-Ara, M. Ángeles; Bretón-López, Juana; Quero, Soledad; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    Although in vivo exposure is the treatment of choice for specific phobias, some acceptability problems have been associated with it. Virtual Reality exposure has been shown to be as effective as in vivo exposure, and it is widely accepted for the treatment of specific phobias, but only preliminary data are available in the literature about the efficacy of Augmented Reality. The purpose of the present study was to examine the efficacy and acceptance of two treatment conditions for specific phobias in which the exposure component was applied in different ways: In vivo exposure (N = 31) versus an Augmented Reality system (N = 32) in a randomized controlled trial. “One-session treatment” guidelines were followed. Participants in the Augmented Reality condition significantly improved on all the outcome measures at post-treatment and follow-ups. When the two treatment conditions were compared, some differences were found at post-treatment, favoring the participants who received in vivo exposure. However, these differences disappeared at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Regarding participants’ expectations and satisfaction with the treatment, very positive ratings were reported in both conditions. In addition, participants from in vivo exposure condition considered the treatment more useful for their problem whereas participants from Augmented Reality exposure considered the treatment less aversive. Results obtained in this study indicate that Augmented Reality exposure is an effective treatment for specific phobias and well accepted by the participants. PMID:26886423

  1. Social Anxiety in High-Functioning Children and Adolescents with Autism and Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuusikko, Sanna; Pollock-Wurman, Rachel; Jussila, Katja; Carter, Alice S.; Mattila, Marja-Leena; Ebeling, Hanna; Pauls, David L.; Moilanen, Irma

    2008-01-01

    We examined social anxiety and internalizing symptoms using the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C), the Social Anxiety Scale for Children -Revised (SASC-R), and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) in a sample of fifty-four high-functioning subjects with autism or Asperger syndrome (HFA/AS) (M = 11.2 plus or minus 1.7 years)…

  2. Relationship between ADIS clinician's severity rating and self-report measures among social phobics.

    PubMed

    Hope, D A; Laguna, L B; Heimberg, R G; Barlow, D H

    Although global clinical rating scales have been a mainstay of clinical research, little is known about the relationship between these measures and other assessment modalities. The present study examined the Clinician's Severity Rating (CSR) from the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule in a sample of 186 social phobics. It was hypothesized that the CSR would be related to higher fear of negative evaluation, behavioral avoidance, social anxiety, and dysphoria, and that four self-report measures reflecting each of these common features of social phobia would contribute individually to predict clinicians' judgments of clinical severity using the CSR. Multiple regression analyses supported these hypotheses, accounting for nearly 33% of the variance in the CSR. The role of subtype of social phobia was also investigated. Overall, these results support the utility of the CSR for use with social phobics, but the relatively low proportion of variance accounted for raises further questions. Directions for future research are also discussed. PMID:9166640

  3. Specific Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... to get treatment. It also includes a self-test to help you decide whether you should see your doctor. Connect with other organizations American Psychological Association American Psychological Association Anxiety Disorders Association of ...

  4. Use of mobile phones in the behavioral treatment of driving phobias.

    PubMed

    Flynn, T M; Taylor, P; Pollard, C A

    1992-12-01

    Results of two case studies are presented to illustrate the use of mobile phones with in vivo exposure treatment of refractory driving phobias. Number of miles driven and subjective ratings of anxiety were recorded during a baseline phase and 8 weeks of treatment involving a total of 24 driving practices. One subject's use of a mobile phone increased the number of miles driven alone, but the second subject made little progress and regressed following removal of the phone. These two cases and our experience with other patients suggest that mobile phones can benefit many individuals whose therapeutic progress is impeded by a fear of driving alone, but that phones are counterproductive for certain patients. The potential benefits and disadvantages of using mobile phones are discussed. PMID:1363820

  5. Utilization approaches and psychodynamic psychotherapy in a case of hospital phobia: an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Handler, L

    1989-04-01

    Milton Erickson's approaches, including utilization techniques, were integrated with psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy in the treatment of a woman with a hospital phobia. The patient was a 28-year-old married woman who met the criteria for both Somatoform Disorder and Dependent Personality Disorder, and who had a variety of obsessive and compulsive personality traits. In trance the patient was given permission to replace many aspects of the hospital setting (e.g., driving to the hospital, checking in, talking with nurses, etc.) with interactions with certain emotionally meaningful people from her past. The outcome was that the hospital experience was quite pleasurable, as have been subsequent hospitalizations. Two years later, the patient discussed her hypnotic experience and reported an increase in positive transference and also an increase in her ability to cope with other difficult aspects of her life. PMID:2712011

  6. Relationship between paw preference strength and noise phobia in Canis familiaris.

    PubMed

    Branson, N J; Rogers, L J

    2006-08-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between degree of lateralization and noise phobia in 48 domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) by scoring paw preference to hold a food object and relating it to reactivity to the sounds of thunderstorms and fireworks, measured by playback and a questionnaire. The dogs without a significant paw preference were significantly more reactive to the sounds than the dogs with either a left-paw or right-paw preference. Intense reactivity, therefore, is associated with a weaker strength of cerebral lateralization. The authors note the similarity between their finding and the weaker hand preferences shown in humans suffering extreme levels of anxiety and suggest neural mechanisms that may be involved. PMID:16893254

  7. Intergenerational transmission of risk for social inhibition: the interplay between parental responsiveness and genetic influences.

    PubMed

    Natsuaki, Misaki N; Leve, Leslie D; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Shaw, Daniel S; Scaramella, Laura V; Ge, Xiaojia; Reiss, David

    2013-02-01

    To better understand mechanisms underlying the intergenerational transmission of social anxiety, we used a prospective adoption design to examine the roles of genetic influences (inferred from birth mothers' social phobia) and rearing environment (adoptive mothers' and fathers' responsiveness) on the development of socially inhibited, anxious behaviors in children between 18 and 27 months of age. The sample consisted of 275 adoption-linked families, each including an adopted child, adoptive parents, and a birth mother. Results indicated that children whose birth mothers met criteria for the diagnosis of social phobia showed elevated levels of observed behavioral inhibition in a social situation at 27 months of age if their adoptive mothers provided less emotionally and verbally responsive rearing environments at 18 months of age. Conversely, in the context of higher levels of maternal responsiveness, children of birth mothers with a history of social phobia did not show elevated levels of behavioral inhibition. These findings on maternal responsiveness were replicated in a model predicting parent reports of child social anxiety. The findings are discussed in terms of gene-environment interactions in the intergenerational transmission of social anxiety. PMID:23398764

  8. Intergenerational Transmission of Risk for Social Inhibition: the Interplay between Parental Responsiveness and Genetic Influences

    PubMed Central

    Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Leve, Leslie D.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Ge, Xiaojia; Reiss, David

    2013-01-01

    To better understand mechanisms underlying the intergenerational transmission of social anxiety, we used a prospective adoption design to examine the roles of genetic influences (inferred from birth mothers’ social phobia) and rearing environment (adoptive mothers’ and fathers’ responsiveness) on the development of socially inhibited, anxious behaviors in children between 18 and 27 months of age. The sample consisted of 275 adoption-linked families, each including an adopted child, adoptive parents, and a birth mother. Results indicated that children whose birth mothers met criteria for the diagnosis of social phobia showed elevated levels of observed behavioral inhibition in a social situation at 27 months of age if their adoptive mothers provided less emotionally and verbally responsive rearing environments at 18 months of age. Conversely, in the context of higher levels of maternal responsiveness, children of birth mothers with a history of social phobia did not show elevated levels of behavioral inhibition. These findings on maternal responsiveness were replicated in a model predicting parent reports of child social anxiety. The findings are discussed in terms of genotype × environment interactions in the intergenerational transmission of social anxiety. PMID:23398764

  9. Enhanced Discriminative Fear Learning of Phobia-Irrelevant Stimuli in Spider-Fearful Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, Carina; Merz, Christian J.; Mohr, Cornelia; Adolph, Dirk; Wolf, Oliver T.; Schneider, Silvia; Margraf, Jürgen; Zlomuzica, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Avoidance is considered as a central hallmark of all anxiety disorders. The acquisition and expression of avoidance, which leads to the maintenance and exacerbation of pathological fear is closely linked to Pavlovian and operant conditioning processes. Changes in conditionability might represent a key feature of all anxiety disorders but the exact nature of these alterations might vary across different disorders. To date, no information is available on specific changes in conditionability for disorder-irrelevant stimuli in specific phobia (SP). The first aim of this study was to investigate changes in fear acquisition and extinction in spider-fearful individuals as compared to non-fearful participants by using the de novo fear conditioning paradigm. Secondly, we aimed to determine whether differences in the magnitude of context-dependent fear retrieval exist between spider-fearful and non-fearful individuals. Our findings point to an enhanced fear discrimination in spider-fearful individuals as compared to non-fearful individuals at both the physiological and subjective level. The enhanced fear discrimination in spider-fearful individuals was neither mediated by increased state anxiety, depression, nor stress tension. Spider-fearful individuals displayed no changes in extinction learning and/or fear retrieval. Surprisingly, we found no evidence for context-dependent modulation of fear retrieval in either group. Here, we provide first evidence that spider-fearful individuals show an enhanced discriminative fear learning of phobia-irrelevant (de novo) stimuli. Our findings provide novel insights into the role of fear acquisition and expression for the development and maintenance of maladaptive responses in the course of SP. PMID:25324745

  10. Agoraphobia and Melancholia: Thoughts on Milrod's "Emptiness in Agoraphobia Patients".

    PubMed

    Yates, Sheena

    2015-08-01

    Milrod (2007) identifies persistent emptiness in agoraphobic patients whose symptoms of anxiety and avoidance have remitted. To this important identification, a number of critical considerations may be raised regarding the meanings of emptiness in the psychoanalytic clinic. Milrod's admonishment to distinguish between an emptiness that indicates a deficit in the structure and stability of self-representation, and an emptiness that is strictly defensive, is a case in point. While much of the literature supports an interpretation of emptiness as a defense against overwhelming rage, these patients' assertions and experiences of emptiness can be better explained by the presence of traumatic, unmourned losses. Several explanations are offered as to why agoraphobic patients, in particular, defend unconsciously against mourning. PMID:26263925

  11. Source localization of late electrocortical positivity during symptom provocation in spider phobia: an sLORETA study.

    PubMed

    Scharmüller, Wilfried; Leutgeb, Verena; Schäfer, Axel; Köchel, Angelika; Schienle, Anne

    2011-06-23

    This symptom provocation study on spider phobia investigated sources of late event-related potentials (ERPs) using sLORETA (standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography). Twenty-five phobic female patients and 20 non-phobic controls were confronted with phobia-relevant, generally fear-inducing, disgust-inducing and affectively neutral pictures while an electroencephalogram was recorded. Mean amplitudes of ERPs were extracted in the time windows 340-500 ms (P300) and 550-770 ms (late positive potential, LPP). Phobics showed enhanced P300 and LPP amplitudes in response to spider pictures relative to controls. Sources were mainly located in areas engaged in visuo-attentional processing (occipital and parietal regions, ventral visual pathway). Moreover, there were sources in areas which are crucial for emotional processing and the representations of aversive bodily states (cingulate cortex, insula). Further sources were located in premotor areas reflecting the priming of flight behaviour. Our findings are in good accordance with existing brain imaging studies and underline that source localization is a useful alternative for identifying phobia-relevant cortical regions. PMID:21600565

  12. [The way to proceed in psychotherapy--focusing on the framework of phobias and obsessive-compulsive stories].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Ryoji

    2012-01-01

    Compulsion becomes long-term when treatment is commenced with very severe resistance. Patients showing emotional changes are rare compared to those with conversion and phobic disorders. However, most people improve when careful treatment is carried out. Although there are those in whom drug treatment is effective, drug treatment and psychotherapy are concomitantly used in most cases. In this lecture, the characteristics of compulsion were psychodynamically investigated regarding: 1. Central conflict, 2. Defense mechanisms, 3. Condition of love life (including sex life), 4. Growth history, by comparing with phobias. When the life of the inner-self protrudes, obsessive-compulsive patients try to contradict and deny this. The symptoms sometimes directly represent the mental conflict of the person, and sometimes the symptom formation process may be understood to some extent. It is said that such cases are suitable for psychotherapy. Psychodynamic psychotherapy involves regaining the continuity of emotional life divided due to defenses such as negation, reaction formation, and isolation. Meanwhile, the real nature of phobias is avoidance and escape. Therefore, the trick in proceeding with interviews is to lead the phobia patient to areas which they avoid during interviews and areas which they avoid in daily life, and to have the patient enter these fields at times by encouraging them. PMID:23367844

  13. Scared to lose control? General and health locus of control in females with a phobia of vomiting.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Angela L; Boyle, Christopher; Lauchlan, Fraser

    2008-01-01

    The term emetophobia (i.e., a fear of vomiting) exists as rather an elusive predicament, often eluding conventional treatment. The present study involved 149 participants, consisting of 51 emetophobics, 48 phobic controls (i.e. those who suffered from a different phobia), and 50 nonphobic controls. Participants were administered the Rotter (1966) Locus of Control Scale and the Health Locus of Control Scale by B.S. Wallston, Wallston, Kaplan, and Maides (1976). Significant differences were found among the three groups; specifically, that emetophobics had a significantly higher internal Locus of Control Scale score with regard to both general and health-related issues than did the two control groups. It is suggested that vomiting phobics may have a fear of losing control, and that their vomiting phobia is reflective of this alternative, underlying problem. More research is required to explore the association between emetophobia and issues surrounding control; however, the current study suggests that it may be helpful for therapists to consider this aspect when treating a patient with vomiting phobia. PMID:18161045

  14. Social anxiety and the shame of psychosis: a study in first episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Birchwood, Max; Trower, Peter; Brunet, Kat; Gilbert, Paul; Iqbal, Zaffer; Jackson, Chris

    2007-05-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SaD) or social phobia is a co-morbid affective disorder in schizophrenia, present in up to one in three individuals. We employ 'social rank' theory to predict that one pathway to social anxiety in schizophrenia is triggered by the anticipation of a catastrophic loss of social status that the stigma of schizophrenia can entail. A group of 79 people with a first episode of psychosis were assessed for social anxiety: hypotheses were tested comparing 23 socially anxious and 56 non-anxious patients on measures of cognitive appraisals of shame/stigma of psychosis and perceived social status, controlling for depression, psychotic symptoms and general psychopathology. Participants with social anxiety experienced greater shame attached to their diagnosis and felt that the diagnosis placed them apart from others, i.e., socially marginalised them and incurred low social status. We propose a stigma model of social anxiety that makes testable predictions about how the shame beliefs may contaminate social interaction and thereby exacerbate and maintain social phobia. PMID:17005158

  15. Controversies in autism: is a broader model of social disorders needed?

    PubMed

    Hrdlicka, Michal; Dudova, Iva

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the most significant, contradictory evidence pertaining to autism. The first section of the article includes reports of recovery from autism, data obtained from studies involving oxytocin, early deprivation, autism in preterm children, late-onset autism, and symptom overlap among ASD, social phobias and personality disorders. In the second section of the article, we offer a model that better incorporates current findings and address controversies that continue to surround ASD. We propose an umbrella term "social inhibition disorders" which integrates autism spectrum disorders and social phobias, as well as schizoid, schizotypal, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders. It would also include "quasi-autism," which has been found in early deprivation studies, autism in preterm children, and cases of late-onset autism presenting after herpes encephalitis infection. Finally, we discuss suggestions for further research and clinical perspectives. PMID:23506384

  16. Interpretative bias in spider phobia: Perception and information processing of ambiguous schematic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Haberkamp, Anke; Schmidt, Filipp

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the interpretative bias in spider phobia with respect to rapid visuomotor processing. We compared perception, evaluation, and visuomotor processing of ambiguous schematic stimuli between spider-fearful and control participants. Stimuli were produced by gradually morphing schematic flowers into spiders. Participants rated these stimuli related to their perceptual appearance and to their feelings of valence, disgust, and arousal. Also, they responded to the same stimuli within a response priming paradigm that measures rapid motor activation. Spider-fearful individuals showed an interpretative bias (i.e., ambiguous stimuli were perceived as more similar to spiders) and rated spider-like stimuli as more unpleasant, disgusting, and arousing. However, we observed no differences between spider-fearful and control participants in priming effects for ambiguous stimuli. For non-ambiguous stimuli, we observed a similar enhancement for phobic pictures as has been reported previously for natural images. We discuss our findings with respect to the visual representation of morphed stimuli and to perceptual learning processes. PMID:26276153

  17. Social phobics do not misinterpret facial expression of emotion.

    PubMed

    Philippot, Pierre; Douilliez, Céline

    2005-05-01

    Attentional biases in the processing of threatening facial expressions in social anxiety are well documented. It is generally assumed that these attentional biases originate in an evaluative bias: socially threatening information would be evaluated more negatively by socially anxious individuals. However, three studies have failed to evidence a negative evaluative bias in the processing of emotional facial expression (EFE) in socially anxious individuals. These studies however suffer from several methodological limitations that the present study has attempted to overcome. Twenty-one out-patients diagnosed with generalized social phobia have been compared to 20 out-patients diagnosed with another anxiety disorder and with 39 normal controls matched for gender, age and level of education. They had to decode on seven emotion intensity scales a set of 40 EFE whose intensity and emotional nature were manipulated. Although sufficient statistical power was ensured, no differences among groups could be found in terms of decoding accuracy, attributed emotion intensity, or reported difficulty of the task. Based on these findings as well as on other evidences, we propose that, if they exist, evaluative biases in social anxiety should be implicit and automatic and that they might be determined by the relevance of the stimulus to the person's concern rather than by the stimulus valence. The implications of these findings for the interpersonal processes involved in social phobia are discussed. PMID:15865918

  18. Perception of arousal in social anxiety: Effects of false feedback during a social interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Jennifer; Clark, David M.; Ehlers, Anke; McManus, Freda

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive models suggest that during social interactions, socially anxious individuals direct their attention to internal cues of arousal and use this information to erroneously infer how they appear to others. High (N=36) and low (N=36) socially anxious adults had a conversation with a stooge, and were led to believe by false feedback that they were experiencing either an increase or decrease in arousal, or evaluating the comfort level of the feedback equipment. Compared to the other groups, participants who believed their arousal had increased, reported greater anxiety, poorer perceived performance, more physical cues of anxiety, and greater underestimation of their performance and overestimation of the visibility of their anxiety. The effects were not specific to participants with high social anxiety. Observers rated the behaviour of participants who believed that their arousal had decreased most favourably. The results have implications for the treatment of social phobia. PMID:17223072

  19. Social anxiety and training in neurolinguistic programming.

    PubMed

    Konefal, J; Duncan, R C

    1998-12-01

    The Liebowitz Social Phobia Scale measured the effect of training on social anxiety responses of 28 adults prior to and following a 21-day residential training, and at 6 mo. follow-up. Significant reductions posttraining and at follow-up were evident in the mean self-reported global scale scores on fear and avoidance behavior in social situations. The item scores, aggregated to reflect the situational domains of formal and informal speaking, being observed by others, and assertion, showed significant and continuing reduction from posttraining through follow-up. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that this training may be associated with reduced responses to social anxiety, but as there was no formal control group, pretest scores from another study were used. Interpretation is limited. PMID:9923190

  20. Visual avoidance in phobia: particularities in neural activity, autonomic responding, and cognitive risk evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Aue, Tatjana; Hoeppli, Marie-Eve; Piguet, Camille; Sterpenich, Virginie; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the neural mechanisms and the autonomic and cognitive responses associated with visual avoidance behavior in spider phobia. Spider phobic and control participants imagined visiting different forest locations with the possibility of encountering spiders, snakes, or birds (neutral reference category). In each experimental trial, participants saw a picture of a forest location followed by a picture of a spider, snake, or bird, and then rated their personal risk of encountering these animals in this context, as well as their fear. The greater the visual avoidance of spiders that a phobic participant demonstrated (as measured by eye tracking), the higher were her autonomic arousal and neural activity in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and precuneus at picture onset. Visual avoidance of spiders in phobics also went hand in hand with subsequently reduced cognitive risk of encounters. Control participants, in contrast, displayed a positive relationship between gaze duration toward spiders, on the one hand, and autonomic responding, as well as OFC, ACC, and precuneus activity, on the other hand. In addition, they showed reduced encounter risk estimates when they looked longer at the animal pictures. Our data are consistent with the idea that one reason for phobics to avoid phobic information may be grounded in heightened activity in the fear circuit, which signals potential threat. Because of the absence of alternative efficient regulation strategies, visual avoidance may then function to down-regulate cognitive risk evaluations for threatening information about the phobic stimuli. Control participants, in contrast, may be characterized by a different coping style, whereby paying visual attention to potentially threatening information may help them to actively down-regulate cognitive evaluations of risk. PMID:23754994

  1. Cortical thinning of the right anterior cingulate cortex in spider phobia: a magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Linares, I M P; Jackowski, A P; Trzesniak, C M F; Arrais, K C; Chagas, M H N; Sato, J R; Santos, A C; Hallak, J E C; Zuardi, A W; Nardi, A E; Coimbra, N C; Crippa, J A S

    2014-08-12

    There a lack of consistent neuroimaging data on specific phobia (SP) and a need to assess volumetric and metabolic differences in structures implicated in this condition. The aim of this study is investigate possible metabolic (via (1)H MRS) and cortical thickness abnormalities in spider-phobic patients compared to healthy volunteers. Participants were recruited via public advertisement and underwent clinical evaluations and MRI scans. The study started in 2010 and the investigators involved were not blind in respect to patient groupings. The study was conducted at the Ribeirão Preto Medical School University Hospital of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. Patients with spider phobia (n=19) were matched to 17 healthy volunteers with respect to age, education and socio-economic status. The spider SP group fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for spider phobia according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. None of the participants had a history of neurological, psychiatric or other relevant organic diseases, use of prescribed psychotropic medication or substance abuse. All imaging and spectroscopy data were collected with a 3 T MRI scanner equipped with 25 mT gradient coils in 30-minute scans. The Freesurfer image analysis package and LC Model software were used to analyze data. The hypothesis being tested was formulated before the data collection (neural correlates of SP would include the amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate gyrus and others). The results indicated the absence of metabolic alterations, but thinning of the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in the SP group when compared to the healthy control group (mean cortical thickness±SD: SP=2.11±0.45 mm; HC=2.16±0.42 mm; t (34)=3.19, p=0.001 [-35.45, 71.00, -23.82]). In spectroscopy, the ratios between N-acetylaspartate and creatine and choline levels were measured. No significant effect or correlation was found between MRS metabolites and scores in the Spider Phobia Questionnaire and Beck

  2. Clinically significant avoidance of public transport following the London bombings: travel phobia or subthreshold posttraumatic stress disorder?

    PubMed

    Handley, Rachel V; Salkovskis, Paul M; Scragg, Peter; Ehlers, Anke

    2009-12-01

    Following the London bombings of 7 July 2005 a "screen and treat" program was set up with the aim of providing rapid treatment for psychological responses in individuals directly affected. The present study found that 45% of the 596 respondents to the screening program reported phobic fear of public transport in a screening questionnaire. The screening program identified 255 bombing survivors who needed treatment for a psychological disorder. Of these, 20 (8%) suffered from clinically significant travel phobia. However, many of these individuals also reported symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]. Comparisons between the travel phobia group and a sex-matched group of bombing survivors with PTSD showed that the travel phobic group reported fewer re-experiencing and arousal symptoms on the Trauma Screening Questionnaire (Brewin et al., 2002). The only PTSD symptoms that differentiated the groups were anger problems and feeling upset by reminders of the bombings. There was no difference between the groups in the reported severity of trauma or in presence of daily transport difficulties. Implications of these results for future trauma response are discussed. PMID:19765946

  3. The Neuropeptide Oxytocin Facilitates Pro-Social Behavior and Prevents Social Avoidance in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Michael; Toth, Iulia; Reber, Stefan O; Slattery, David A; Veenema, Alexa H; Neumann, Inga D

    2011-01-01

    Social avoidance and social phobia are core symptoms of various psychopathologies but their underlying etiology remains poorly understood. Therefore, this study aims to reveal pro-social effects of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT), under both basal and stress-induced social avoidance conditions in rodents using a social preference paradigm. We initially show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) application of an OT receptor antagonist (OTR-A) in naïve male rats (0.75 μg/5 μl), or mice (20 μg/2 μl), reduced social exploration of a novel con-specific indicative of attenuated social preference. Previous exposure of male rats to a single social defeat resulted in loss of their social preference and social avoidance, which could be restored by i.c.v. infusion of synthetic OT (0.1 μg/5 μl) 20 min before the social preference test. Although the amygdala has been implicated in both social and OT-mediated actions, bilateral OTR-A (0.1 μg/1 μl) or OT (0.01 μg/1 μl) administration into various subnuclei of the amygdala did not affect basal or stress-induced social preference behavior, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the social specificity of these OT-mediated effects by showing that neither an arginine vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist (0.75 μg/5 μl, i.c.v.) nor the anxiogenic drug pentylenetetrazol (15 mg/kg, i.p.) altered social preference, with OTR-A not affecting non-social anxiety on the elevated plus-maze. Overall, the data indicate that the basal activity of the endogenous brain OT system is sufficient to promote natural occurring social preference in rodents while synthetic OT shows potential to reverse stress-induced social avoidance and might thus be of use for treating social phobia and social dysfunction in humans. PMID:21677650

  4. Representation of Patients’ Hand Modulates Fear Reactions of Patients with Spider Phobia in Virtual Reality

    PubMed Central

    Peperkorn, Henrik M.; Diemer, Julia E.; Alpers, Georg W.; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment (i.e., the involvement of a bodily representation) is thought to be relevant in emotional experiences. Virtual reality (VR) is a capable means of activating phobic fear in patients. The representation of the patient’s body (e.g., the right hand) in VR enhances immersion and increases presence, but its effect on phobic fear is still unknown. We analyzed the influence of the presentation of the participant’s hand in VR on presence and fear responses in 32 women with spider phobia and 32 matched controls. Participants sat in front of a table with an acrylic glass container within reaching distance. During the experiment this setup was concealed by a head-mounted display (HMD). The VR scenario presented via HMD showed the same setup, i.e., a table with an acrylic glass container. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups. In one group, fear responses were triggered by fear-relevant visual input in VR (virtual spider in the virtual acrylic glass container), while information about a real but unseen neutral control animal (living snake in the acrylic glass container) was given. The second group received fear-relevant information of the real but unseen situation (living spider in the acrylic glass container), but visual input was kept neutral VR (virtual snake in the virtual acrylic glass container). Participants were instructed to touch the acrylic glass container with their right hand in 20 consecutive trials. Visibility of the hand was varied randomly in a within-subjects design. We found for all participants that visibility of the participant’s hand increased presence independently of the fear trigger. However, in patients, the influence of the virtual hand on fear depended on the fear trigger. When fear was triggered perceptually, i.e., by a virtual spider, the virtual hand increased fear. When fear was triggered by information about a real spider, the virtual hand had no effect on fear. Our results shed light on the

  5. Representation of Patients' Hand Modulates Fear Reactions of Patients with Spider Phobia in Virtual Reality.

    PubMed

    Peperkorn, Henrik M; Diemer, Julia E; Alpers, Georg W; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment (i.e., the involvement of a bodily representation) is thought to be relevant in emotional experiences. Virtual reality (VR) is a capable means of activating phobic fear in patients. The representation of the patient's body (e.g., the right hand) in VR enhances immersion and increases presence, but its effect on phobic fear is still unknown. We analyzed the influence of the presentation of the participant's hand in VR on presence and fear responses in 32 women with spider phobia and 32 matched controls. Participants sat in front of a table with an acrylic glass container within reaching distance. During the experiment this setup was concealed by a head-mounted display (HMD). The VR scenario presented via HMD showed the same setup, i.e., a table with an acrylic glass container. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups. In one group, fear responses were triggered by fear-relevant visual input in VR (virtual spider in the virtual acrylic glass container), while information about a real but unseen neutral control animal (living snake in the acrylic glass container) was given. The second group received fear-relevant information of the real but unseen situation (living spider in the acrylic glass container), but visual input was kept neutral VR (virtual snake in the virtual acrylic glass container). Participants were instructed to touch the acrylic glass container with their right hand in 20 consecutive trials. Visibility of the hand was varied randomly in a within-subjects design. We found for all participants that visibility of the participant's hand increased presence independently of the fear trigger. However, in patients, the influence of the virtual hand on fear depended on the fear trigger. When fear was triggered perceptually, i.e., by a virtual spider, the virtual hand increased fear. When fear was triggered by information about a real spider, the virtual hand had no effect on fear. Our results shed light on the

  6. The Fears, Phobias and Anxieties of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Down Syndrome: Comparisons with Developmentally and Chronologically Age Matched Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, David W.; Canavera, Kristin; Kleinpeter, F. Lee; Maccubbin, Elise; Taga, Ken

    2005-01-01

    This study compared the fears and behavior problems of 25 children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), 43 children with Down syndrome (DS), 45 mental age (MA) matched children, and 37 chronologically age (CA) matched children. Children's fears, phobias, anxieties and behavioral problems were assessed using parent reports. Significant…

  7. Do Cognitive Models Help in Predicting the Severity of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Phobia, and Depression after Motor Vehicle Accidents? A Prospective Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehring, Thomas; Ehlers, Anke; Glucksman, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated the power of theoretically derived cognitive variables to predict posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), travel phobia, and depression following injury in a motor vehicle accident (MVA). MVA survivors (N = 147) were assessed at the emergency department on the day of their accident and 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months…

  8. Social anxiety disorder in DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Heimberg, Richard G; Hofmann, Stefan G; Liebowitz, Michael R; Schneier, Franklin R; Smits, Jasper A J; Stein, Murray B; Hinton, Devon E; Craske, Michelle G

    2014-06-01

    With the publication of DSM-5, the diagnostic criteria for social anxiety disorder (SAD, also known as social phobia) have undergone several changes, which have important conceptual and clinical implications. In this paper, we first provide a brief history of the diagnosis. We then review a number of these changes, including (1) the primary name of the disorder, (2) the increased emphasis on fear of negative evaluation, (3) the importance of sociocultural context in determining whether an anxious response to a social situation is out of proportion to the actual threat, (4) the diagnosis of SAD in the context of a medical condition, and (5) the way in which we think about variations in the presentation of SAD (the specifier issue). We then consider the clinical implications of changes in DSM-5 related to these issues. PMID:24395386

  9. Social anxiety disorder: psychobiological and evolutionary underpinnings.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J; Vythilingum, Bavanisha

    2007-11-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) also know as social phobia is increasingly recognized as a highly prevalent and disabling psychiatric disorder. SAD patients demonstrate cognitive-affective distortions in relation to social situations and abnormal activation patterns in limbic structures during functional imaging. Behavioral inhibition is an endophenotype that may be useful in understanding vulnerability to SAD, and that has specific imaging and genetic correlates. From an evolutionary perspective, it has been speculated that SAD represents a false appeasement alarm. It is notable that SAD responds to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and monoamine oxidase inhibitors, but not to most tricyclic antidepressants; this finding is consistent with the importance of serotonin and dopamine in mediating this disorder. PMID:17984853

  10. The Relations among Measurements of Informant Discrepancies within a Multisite Trial of Treatments for Childhood Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Alfano, Candice A.; Beidel, Deborah C.

    2010-01-01

    Discrepancies between informants' reports of children's behavior are robustly observed in clinical child research and have important implications for interpreting the outcomes of controlled treatment trials. However, little is known about the basic psychometric properties of these discrepancies. This study examined the relation between…

  11. [The role of shame in development of the mental disorders II. Measurement of shame and relationship].

    PubMed

    Vizin, Gabriella; Unoka, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Our review is an overview of research literature aimed at evaluating the differential association of shame with various mental disorders. In the first part of this review, we present questionnaire and experimental methods applied in clinical trials for measuring shame. In the second part of our review, we review research that investigated the association between shame, and shame induced behavioral and emotional reactions, as well as the following mental disorders: anxiety disorders (social phobia, PTSD, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobias, OCD), mood disorders (unipolar depression, bipolar disorder), suicide attempts, self-harm behavior, eating disorders, somatization, personality disorders, aggression, addictions, autism and paranoia. The results of the reviewed studies suggest that this excessive emotional state associated with negative self-esteem on global self plays a central role in mental disorders, although shame is very rarely applied as diagnostic criterion in DSM. PMID:26471030

  12. The overlap between anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Guy M.

    2015-01-01

    The anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder. In addition to the specific symptoms of these disorders, there may be a common experience of anxiety and even dysphoria across the conditions, and of course recourse to the same drug or choice of drugs for treatment. This overlap probably occurs because of universal dimensions of distress or negative affectivity, a shared genetic predisposition, and a common neurobiology Evidence of shared genes is still based mainly on twin studies, but the shared neurobiology can be investigated directly by the investigation of emotional or cognitive bias either behaviorally or using functional brain imaging. This intermediate phenotype can then provide a substrate for understanding and developing medicines and psychological treatments. PMID:26487806

  13. Anxiety and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: Developmental Issues and Implications for DSM-V

    PubMed Central

    Beesdo, Katja; Knappe, Susanne; Pine, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes findings on the epidemiology and etiology of anxiety disorders among children and adolescents including separation anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder, also highlighting critical aspects of diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Childhood and adolescence is the core risk phase for the development of anxiety symptoms and syndromes, ranging from transient mild symptoms to full-blown anxiety disorders. This article critically reviews epidemiological evidence covering prevalence, incidence, course, and risk factors. The core challenge in this age span is the derivation of developmentally more sensitive assessment methods. Identification of characteristics that could serve as solid predictors for onset, course, and outcome will require prospective designs that assess a wide range of putative vulnerability and risk factors. This type of information is important for improved early recognition and differential diagnosis as well as prevention and treatment in this age span. PMID:19716988

  14. The overlap between anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Guy M

    2015-09-01

    The anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder. In addition to the specific symptoms of these disorders, there may be a common experience of anxiety and even dysphoria across the conditions, and of course recourse to the same drug or choice of drugs for treatment. This overlap probably occurs because of universal dimensions of distress or negative affectivity, a shared genetic predisposition, and a common neurobiology Evidence of shared genes is still based mainly on twin studies, but the shared neurobiology can be investigated directly by the investigation of emotional or cognitive bias either behaviorally or using functional brain imaging. This intermediate phenotype can then provide a substrate for understanding and developing medicines and psychological treatments. PMID:26487806

  15. [Social Anxiety Disorder].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is not a rare psychiatric disorder, and the recent World Mental Health Japan Survey, Second (WMHJ2) reported the possibility that the twelve-month prevalence of SAD has increased from 0.7 to 2.3% over the last ten years. However, ten years have already passed since selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) were approved for the treatment of SAD in Japan, and not only laypersons but also mental health professionals still misunderstand SAD as public speech phobia. As a result, the boundary between normal shyness and SAD and threshold to start pharmacotherapy have been debated. Participants in most double-blind studies of SSRI were limited to those with a generalized subtype of SAD. While benzodiazepine led to a significantly more favorable response and symptom improvement and the effect size of benzodiazepine was larger than those of SSRI, it did not lead to a "cure" and is sometimes deleterious for atypical SAD patients. To sum up, a psychotherapeutic approach including cognitive behavioral therapy is suggested as first-line treatment for non-generalized SAD according to the NICE guidelines. On the other hand, patients with generalized SAD and secondary depression are still misunderstood (and under-recognized) as those with "treatment-resistant depression", and they suffer from severe impairment of the psycho-social function, including absences or withdrawal from working or schooling. They need more effective combination treatment of SSRI and cognitive behavioral therapy as generalized SAD patients. PMID:26524840

  16. Oxytocin receptor gene methylation: converging multilevel evidence for a role in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Christiane; Dannlowski, Udo; Bräuer, David; Stevens, Stephan; Laeger, Inga; Wittmann, Hannah; Kugel, Harald; Dobel, Christian; Hurlemann, René; Reif, Andreas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Heindel, Walter; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Arolt, Volker; Gerlach, Alexander L; Hoyer, Jürgen; Deckert, Jürgen; Zwanzger, Peter; Domschke, Katharina

    2015-05-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a commonly occurring and highly disabling disorder. The neuropeptide oxytocin and its receptor (OXTR) have been implicated in social cognition and behavior. This study-for the first time applying a multilevel epigenetic approach-investigates the role of OXTR gene methylation in categorical, dimensional, and intermediate neuroendocrinological/neural network phenotypes of social anxiety. A total of 110 unmedicated patients with SAD and matched 110 controls were analyzed for OXTR methylation by direct sequencing of sodium bisulfite-converted DNA extracted from whole blood. Furthermore, OXTR methylation was investigated regarding SAD-related traits (Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS)), salivary cortisol response during the Trier social stress test (TSST), and amygdala responsiveness to social phobia related verbal stimuli using fMRI. Significantly decreased OXTR methylation particularly at CpG Chr3: 8 809 437 was associated with (1) the categorical phenotype of SAD (p<0.001, Cohen's d=0.535), (2) increased SPS and SIAS scores (p<0.001), (3) increased cortisol response to the TSST (p=0.02), and (4) increased amygdala responsiveness during social phobia-related word processing (right: p(corr)<0.001; left: p(corr)=0.005). Assuming that decreased OXTR methylation confers increased OXTR expression, the present finding may reflect a compensatory upregulation for pathologically reduced oxytocin levels or a causally relevant increased OXTR activation in SAD and related traits. OXTR methylation patterns might thus serve as peripheral surrogates of oxytocin tone and aid in establishing accessible biomarkers of SAD risk allowing for indicated preventive interventions and personalized treatment approaches targeting the oxytocin system. PMID:25563749

  17. Oxytocin Receptor Gene Methylation: Converging Multilevel Evidence for a Role in Social Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Christiane; Dannlowski, Udo; Bräuer, David; Stevens, Stephan; Laeger, Inga; Wittmann, Hannah; Kugel, Harald; Dobel, Christian; Hurlemann, René; Reif, Andreas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Heindel, Walter; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Arolt, Volker; Gerlach, Alexander L; Hoyer, Jürgen; Deckert, Jürgen; Zwanzger, Peter; Domschke, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a commonly occurring and highly disabling disorder. The neuropeptide oxytocin and its receptor (OXTR) have been implicated in social cognition and behavior. This study—for the first time applying a multilevel epigenetic approach—investigates the role of OXTR gene methylation in categorical, dimensional, and intermediate neuroendocrinological/neural network phenotypes of social anxiety. A total of 110 unmedicated patients with SAD and matched 110 controls were analyzed for OXTR methylation by direct sequencing of sodium bisulfite-converted DNA extracted from whole blood. Furthermore, OXTR methylation was investigated regarding SAD-related traits (Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS)), salivary cortisol response during the Trier social stress test (TSST), and amygdala responsiveness to social phobia related verbal stimuli using fMRI. Significantly decreased OXTR methylation particularly at CpG Chr3: 8 809 437 was associated with (1) the categorical phenotype of SAD (p<0.001, Cohen's d=0.535), (2) increased SPS and SIAS scores (p<0.001), (3) increased cortisol response to the TSST (p=0.02), and (4) increased amygdala responsiveness during social phobia-related word processing (right: pcorr<0.001; left: pcorr=0.005). Assuming that decreased OXTR methylation confers increased OXTR expression, the present finding may reflect a compensatory upregulation for pathologically reduced oxytocin levels or a causally relevant increased OXTR activation in SAD and related traits. OXTR methylation patterns might thus serve as peripheral surrogates of oxytocin tone and aid in establishing accessible biomarkers of SAD risk allowing for indicated preventive interventions and personalized treatment approaches targeting the oxytocin system. PMID:25563749

  18. Information Omitted From Analyses.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    In the Original Article titled “Higher- Order Genetic and Environmental Structure of Prevalent Forms of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology” published in the February 2011 issue of JAMA Psychiatry (then Archives of General Psychiatry) (2011;68[2]:181-189), there were 2 errors. Although the article stated that the dimensions of psychopathology were measured using parent informants for inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and oppositional defiant disorder, and a combination of parent and youth informants for conduct disorder, major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, all dimensional scores used in the reported analyses were actually based on parent reports of symptoms; youth reports were not used. In addition, whereas the article stated that each symptom dimension was residualized on age, sex, age-squared, and age by sex, the dimensions actually were only residualized on age, sex, and age-squared. All analyses were repeated using parent informants for inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and oppositional defiant disorder, and a combination of parent and youth informants for conduct disorder,major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder; these dimensional scores were residualized on age, age-squared, sex, sex by age, and sex by age-squared. The results of the new analyses were qualitatively the same as those reported in the article, with no substantial changes in conclusions. The only notable small difference was that major depression and generalized anxiety disorder dimensions had small but significant loadings on the internalizing factor in addition to their substantial loadings on the general factor in the analyses of both genetic and non-shared covariances in the selected models in the new analyses. Corrections were made to the

  19. The epidemiology of anxiety disorders: a review

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and an important cause of functional impairment; they constitute the most frequent menial disorders in the community. Phobias are the most common with the highest rates for simple phobia and agoraphobia. Panic disorder (PD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are less frequent (2% lifetime prevalence), and there are discordant results for social phobia (SP) (2%-16%) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) (3%-30%). These studies underline the importance of an accurate definition of disorders using unambiguous diagnostic and assessment criteria. The boundaries between anxiety disorders are often ill defined and cases may vary widely according to the definition applied. Simple phobia, agoraphobia, and GAD are more common in vmrnen, while there is no gender différence for SP, PD, and OCD, Anxiety disorders are more common in separated, divorced, and widowed subjects; their prevalence is highest in subjects aged 25 to 44 years and lowest in subjects aged >65 years. The age of onset of the different types of anxiety disorders varies widely: phobic disorders begin early in life, whereas PD occurs in young adulthood. Clinical - rather than epidemiological - studies have examined risk factors such as life events, childhood experiences, and familial factors. Anxiety disorders have a chronic and persistent course, and are frequently comorbid with other anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, and substance abuse. Anxiety disorders most frequently precede depressive disorders or substance abuse, Comorbid diagnoses may influence risk factors like functional impairment and quality of life. It remains unclear whether certain anxiety disorders (eg, PD) are risk factors for suicide. The comorbidity of anxiety disorders has important implications for assessment and treatment and the risk factors should be explored. The etiology, natural history, and outcome of these disorders need to be further addressed

  20. Impact of anticipatory processing versus distraction on multiple indices of anxiety in socially anxious individuals.

    PubMed

    Wong, Quincy J J; Moulds, Michelle L

    2011-10-01

    In models of social phobia, anticipatory processing before a social-evaluative event is a key maintaining factor for the disorder. This study investigated the impact of anticipatory processing versus distraction before a social-evaluative task on affective (self-reported anxiety), psychophysiological (skin conductance), cognitive (self-reported maladaptive self-beliefs) and behavioural (in-situation performance) responses of participants. High and low socially anxious undergraduates were randomly allocated to either an anticipatory processing or distraction condition, and then completed an impromptu speech task. Relative to distraction, anticipatory processing increased self-reported anxiety in all participants, and increased skin conductance and the strength of conditional and high standard beliefs in the high (but not low) socially anxious participants. Unconditional beliefs were not affected. For high socially anxious individuals, anticipatory processing was also indirectly associated with poorer speech performance by increasing self-reported anxiety. Anticipatory processing appears to have multiple adverse effects in socially anxious individuals. PMID:21821231

  1. Predictors of outcome in outpatients with anxiety disorders: the Leiden routine outcome monitoring study.

    PubMed

    Schat, A; van Noorden, M S; Noom, M J; Giltay, E J; van der Wee, N J A; Vermeiren, R R J M; Zitman, F G

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the predictors of outcome in anxiety disorders in naturalistic outpatient settings. We analyzed 2-year follow-up data collected through Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) in a naturalistic sample of 917 outpatients in psychiatric specialty care in order to identify factors predicting outcome. We included patients with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, agoraphobia without panic, social phobia, or generalized anxiety disorder. Main findings from Cox regression analyses demonstrated that several socio-demographic variables (having a non-Dutch ethnicity [HR = 0.71)], not having a daily occupation [HR = 0.76]) and clinical factors (having a diagnosis of agoraphobia [HR = 0.67], high affective lability [HR = 0.80] and behavior problems [HR = 0.84]) decreased chances of response (defined as 50% reduction of anxiety severity) over the period of two years. Living with family had a protective predictive value [HR = 1.41]. These results may imply that factors that could be thought to limit societal participation, are associated with elevated risk of poor outcome. A comprehensive ROM screening process at intake may aid clinicians in the identification of patients at risk of chronicity. PMID:24074517

  2. The many faces of social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, H U

    2000-07-01

    Social anxiety disorder, also known as social phobia, is one of the most prevalent anxiety disorders, affecting 7-13% of subjects in the community at some time in their lives. Despite being eminently treatable, it remains largely under-recognised and, therefore, undertreated. The disorder is characterized by a fear of scrutiny by others, with sufferers experiencing excessive anxiety in social and performance situations. This excessive anxiety usually leads to avoidance behaviour that can severely affect normal daily living. With onset commonly occurring during childhood or adolescence, social anxiety disorder may disrupt normal patterns of development of social and personal relationships, often having a long-term impact on emotional stability in social or working life. If left untreated, the course of social anxiety disorder is frequently complicated with comorbid conditions, particularly major depression or substance abuse. This review assesses the size of the clinical problem by evaluating current and lifetime prevalence estimates, age of onset, risk factors and evolution of the clinical course; thereby providing the rationale for early recognition and prompt treatment. PMID:10994677

  3. Familial correlates of social anxiety in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bögels, S M; van Oosten, A; Muris, P; Smulders, D

    2001-03-01

    Retrospective studies suggest a relationship between parental rearing practices and social phobia. The present study investigated whether socially anxious children perceive their current parental rearing as rejecting, overprotective, and lacking emotional warmth, and as emphasizing the importance of other's opinion, and de-emphasizing social initiatives and family sociability. Furthermore, we examined whether parents of socially anxious children report to rely on such rearing practices, and suffer themselves from social fears. A regression analysis as well as extreme group comparisons were applied. Little support was found for the presumed role of the assessed family rearing aspects in the development of social anxiety in children. Solely family sociability (children's and mothers' report) and children's perception of overprotection of the mother predicted social anxiety in the regression analysis. Given the influence of the mentioned rearing practices, social anxiety of the mother still significantly predicted social anxiety of the child. In the extreme group comparisons, differences in the expected direction were found between socially anxious and normal children on parental rejection, emotional warmth, and family sociability. However, the lack of differences between socially anxious and clinical control children suggests that these variables do not form a specific pathway to social fears. PMID:11227809

  4. Propranolol for the treatment of anxiety disorders: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Steenen, Serge A; van Wijk, Arjen J; van der Heijden, Geert JMG; van Westrhenen, Roos; de Lange, Jan; de Jongh, Ad

    2016-01-01

    The effects of propranolol in the treatment of anxiety disorders have not been systematically evaluated previously. The aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials, addressing the efficacy of oral propranolol versus placebo or other medication as a treatment for alleviating either state or trait anxiety in patients suffering from anxiety disorders. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. These studies concerned panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (four studies, total n = 130), specific phobia (two studies, total n = 37), social phobia (one study, n = 16), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (one study, n = 19). Three out of four panic disorder trials qualified for pooled analyses. These meta-analyses found no statistically significant differences between the efficacy of propranolol and benzodiazepines regarding the short-term treatment of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Also, no evidence was found for effects of propranolol on PTSD symptom severity through inhibition of memory reconsolidation. In conclusion, the quality of evidence for the efficacy of propranolol at present is insufficient to support the routine use of propranolol in the treatment of any of the anxiety disorders. PMID:26487439

  5. Propranolol for the treatment of anxiety disorders: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Steenen, Serge A; van Wijk, Arjen J; van der Heijden, Geert J M G; van Westrhenen, Roos; de Lange, Jan; de Jongh, Ad

    2016-02-01

    The effects of propranolol in the treatment of anxiety disorders have not been systematically evaluated previously. The aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials, addressing the efficacy of oral propranolol versus placebo or other medication as a treatment for alleviating either state or trait anxiety in patients suffering from anxiety disorders. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. These studies concerned panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (four studies, total n = 130), specific phobia (two studies, total n = 37), social phobia (one study, n = 16), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (one study, n = 19). Three out of four panic disorder trials qualified for pooled analyses. These meta-analyses found no statistically significant differences between the efficacy of propranolol and benzodiazepines regarding the short-term treatment of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Also, no evidence was found for effects of propranolol on PTSD symptom severity through inhibition of memory reconsolidation. In conclusion, the quality of evidence for the efficacy of propranolol at present is insufficient to support the routine use of propranolol in the treatment of any of the anxiety disorders. PMID:26487439

  6. The emetophobia questionnaire (EmetQ-13): psychometric validation of a measure of specific phobia of vomiting (emetophobia).

    PubMed

    Boschen, Mark J; Veale, David; Ellison, Nell; Reddell, Tamara

    2013-10-01

    This study reports on the development and psychometric evaluation of a self-report assessment of the severity of symptoms of emetophobia. Using a sample of 95 individuals with emetophobia, and a matched sample of 90 control participants, a 13-items inventory was developed that showed a clear three-factor structure. The EmetQ-13 had good internal consistency (α=.82 in the clinical sample, and α=.85 in the control sample), and one-week test-retest reliability (rxx=.76). The EmetQ-13 showed significant correlations with another measure of emetophobia symptoms, the Specific Phobia of Vomiting Inventory, and related constructs such as disgust sensitivity. The measure showed excellent ability to classify emetophobic and non-emetophobic individuals, with correct assignment in 96.2% of cases. The EmetQ-13 also correlated significantly with a behavioural approach test using a vomit-like stimulus. The initial evaluation of the EmetQ-13 suggests that it is a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of emetophobia. PMID:24080612

  7. The Prevalence, Comorbidity, and Age of Onset of Social Anxiety Disorder among U.S. Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Antonio; Alegría, Margarita; Chen, Chih-Nan; Blanco, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Objective Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is increasingly being recognized as a prevalent, unremitting, and highly comorbid disorder1 yet studies focusing on this disorder among U.S. Latinos and immigrant populations are not available. This article evaluates ethnic differences in the prevalence, comorbidity, and age of onset of SAD. Cultural and contextual factors associated with risk of SAD are also examined within the Latino population. Method Data are analyzed using the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) and the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication (NCS-R). Both studies utilized the World Mental Health – Composite International Diagnostic Interview, which estimates the prevalence of lifetime and 12-month psychiatric disorders according to DSM-IV criteria. Results Latinos (LAT) reported lower lifetime and 12-month SAD prevalence and a later age of onset than U.S.-born non-Latino Whites (NLW). On the other hand, LAT diagnosed with 12-month SAD reported higher impairment across home, work, and relationship domains than their NLW counterparts. Overall, high SAD comorbidity was found with depressive, anxiety, and substance-related disorders among both ethnic groups. However, relative to NLW, LAT who entered the U.S. after the age of 21 were less likely to have lifetime SAD comorbidity with drug abuse and dependence and more likely to report lifetime SAD comorbidity with agoraphobia. Conclusion Varied trajectories of SAD risk are present across ethnicity and nativity groups. Clinicians must consider how culture and ethnicity shape these different presentations and determine treatment options accordingly. Outreach efforts are needed to reach immigrant Latinos, and those with comorbid SAD and Agoraphobia in particular. PMID:21899817

  8. The multiple dimensions of the social anxiety spectrum in mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Jay C; Cyranowski, Jill M; Rucci, Paola; Cassano, Giovanni B; Frank, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    Major depressive disorder and bipolar spectrum disorders are debilitating conditions associated with severe impairment. The presence of co-occurring social phobia can make the clinical course of these disorders even more challenging. To better understand the nature of social anxiety in the context of ongoing mood disorders, we report the results of exploratory factor analyses of the Social Phobia Spectrum Self-Report Instrument (SHY), a 162-item measure designed to capture the full spectrum of manifestations and features associated with social anxiety experienced across the lifespan. We examined data from 359 adult outpatients diagnosed with major depressive disorder and 403 outpatients diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder. The measure was divided into its two components: the SHY-General (SHY-G), reflecting general social anxiety features, and the SHY-Specific (SHY-S), reflecting anxiety in specific situations. Exploratory factor analyses were conducted for each using tetrachoric correlation matrices and an unweighted least squares estimator. Item invariance was evaluated for important patient subgroups. Five factors were identified for the SHY-G, representing general features of social anxiety: Fear of Social Disapproval, Childhood Social Anxiety, Somatic Social Anxiety, Excessive Agreeableness, and Behavioral Submission. Seven specific-situation factors were identified from the SHY-S: Writing in Public, Dating, Public Speaking, Eating in Public, Shopping Fears, Using Public Restrooms, and Unstructured Social Interactions. The identified dimensions provide clinically valuable information about the nature of the social fears experienced by individuals diagnosed with mood disorders and could help guide the development of tailored treatment strategies for individuals with co-occurring mood disorders and social anxiety. PMID:22771202

  9. Can autism spectrum disorders and social anxiety disorders be differentiated by the social responsiveness scale in children and adolescents?

    PubMed

    Cholemkery, Hannah; Mojica, Laura; Rohrmann, Sonja; Gensthaler, Angelika; Freitag, Christine M

    2014-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as well as social phobia (SP), and selective mutism (SM) are characterised by impaired social interaction. We assessed the validity of the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) to differentiate between ASD, and SP/SM. Raw scores were compared in 6-18 year old individuals with ASD (N = 60), SP (N = 38), SM (N = 43), and typically developed (N = 42). Sensitivity and specificity were examined. The three disorders showed overlapping SRS scores. Especially in boys with SM (ROC-AUC = .81), presence of ASD was overestimated by the SRS. A combination of three disorder specific questionnaires resulted in marginally improved diagnostic accuracy. For the clinically very relevant differential diagnosis of SP/SM, SRS results must be interpreted with caution. PMID:24682652

  10. Dimensional assessment of DSM-5 social anxiety symptoms among university students and its relationship with functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Liliana; Abelli, Marianna; Pini, Stefano; Carlini, Marina; Carpita, Barbara; Macchi, Elisabetta; Gorrasi, Federica; Mengali, Francesco; Tognetti, Rosalba; Massimetti, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder is a common condition often associated with severe impairment in educational career. The aim of this paper was to evaluate prevalence rates and correlates of mild, moderate, and severe forms of social anxiety spectrum in a large sample of university students. Overall, 717 university students were assessed with the Social Anxiety Spectrum Self-Report questionnaire. Using two cut-off scores, 61.4% of subjects were classified as low scorers, 10% as medium scorers, and 28.6% as high scorers. Both high and medium scorers reported fears related to social situations. Interpersonal sensitivity and specific phobias were more common among women with low scores. Childhood/adolescence social anxiety features were more common among males with medium scores. Behavioral inhibition was more common among males with high scores. Functional impairment was severe among high scorers and, to a lesser extent, among medium scorers. Social anxiety spectrum is largely represented among university students. Future studies should investigate whether sufferers of social phobia underachieve or end their professional objectives prematurely. PMID:25075191

  11. Cognitive processes as mediators of the relation between mindfulness and change in social anxiety symptoms following cognitive behavioral treatment

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jessica R.; Price, Matthew; Schmertz, Stefan K.; Johnson, Suzanne B.; Masuda, Akihiko; Calamaras, Martha; Anderson, Page L.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined whether pretreatment mindfulness exerts an indirect effect on outcomes following cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Cognitive processes of probability and cost bias (i.e., overestimations of the likelihood that negative social events will occur, and that these events will have negative consequences when they do occur) were explored as potential mediators of the relation between mindfulness and social anxiety symptom change. People with higher levels of mindfulness may be better able to benefit from treatments that reduce biases because mindfulness may aid in regulation of attention. Sixty-seven individuals with a primary diagnosis of social phobia identifying public speaking as their greatest fear received eight sessions of one of two types of exposure-based CBT delivered according to treatment manuals. Participants completed self-report measures of mindfulness, probability bias, cost bias, and social anxiety symptoms. Mediation hypotheses were assessed by a bootstrapped regression using treatment outcome data. Pretreatment mindfulness was not related to change in social anxiety symptoms from pre- to posttreatment. However, mindfulness had an indirect effect on treatment outcome via its association with probability bias, but not cost bias, at midtreatment. These findings were consistent across three metrics of social anxiety symptoms. Mindfulness may play a role in response to CBT among individuals with social phobia through its relation with probability bias – even when the treatment does not target mindfulness. PMID:24147809

  12. Cognitive processes as mediators of the relation between mindfulness and change in social anxiety symptoms following cognitive behavioral treatment.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jessica R; Price, Matthew; Schmertz, Stefan K; Johnson, Suzanne B; Masuda, Akihiko; Calamaras, Martha; Anderson, Page L

    2014-05-01

    The present study examined whether pretreatment mindfulness exerts an indirect effect on outcomes following cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Cognitive processes of probability and cost bias (i.e., overestimations of the likelihood that negative social events will occur, and that these events will have negative consequences when they do occur) were explored as potential mediators of the relation between mindfulness and social anxiety symptom change. People with higher levels of mindfulness may be better able to benefit from treatments that reduce biases because mindfulness may aid in regulation of attention. Sixty-seven individuals with a primary diagnosis of social phobia identifying public speaking as their greatest fear received eight sessions of one of two types of exposure-based CBT delivered according to treatment manuals. Participants completed self-report measures of mindfulness, probability bias, cost bias, and social anxiety symptoms. Mediation hypotheses were assessed by a bootstrapped regression using treatment outcome data. Pretreatment mindfulness was not related to change in social anxiety symptoms from pre- to posttreatment. However, mindfulness had an indirect effect on treatment outcome via its association with probability bias, but not cost bias, at midtreatment. These findings were consistent across three metrics of social anxiety symptoms. Mindfulness may play a role in response to CBT among individuals with social phobia through its relation with probability bias--even when the treatment does not target mindfulness. PMID:24147809

  13. Childhood Language Disorder and Social Anxiety in Early Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Brownlie, E B; Bao, Lin; Beitchman, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Language disorder is associated with anxiety and with social problems in childhood and adolescence. However, the relation between language disorder and adult social anxiety is not well known. This study examines social anxiety in early adulthood in a 26-year prospective longitudinal study following individuals identified with a communication disorder at age 5 and a control group. Social anxiety diagnoses and subthreshold symptoms were examined at ages 19, 25, and 31 using a structured diagnostic interview; social anxiety symptoms related to social interaction and social performance were also assessed dimensionally at age 31. Multiple imputation was used to address attrition. Compared to controls, participants with childhood language disorder had higher rates of subthreshold social phobia at ages 19 and 25 and endorsed higher levels of social interaction anxiety symptoms at age 31, with particular difficulty talking to others and asserting their perspectives. Childhood language disorder is a specific risk factor for a circumscribed set of social anxiety symptoms in adulthood, which are likely associated with communication challenges. PMID:26530522

  14. The medicalisation of shyness: from social misfits to social fitness.

    PubMed

    Scott, Susie

    2006-03-01

    Shyness has become an 'unhealthy' state of mind for individuals living in contemporary Western societies. Insofar as its behavioural 'symptoms' imply a failure to achieve certain cultural values, such as assertiveness, self-expression and loquacious vocality, shyness is increasingly defined as a problem for which people can, and should, be treated. This paper first critically discusses the idea that we are witnessing a new 'cultural epidemic' of shyness, as evidenced by increasing rates of diagnosis for Social Phobia, Social Anxiety Disorder and Avoidant Personality Disorder. It then examines three main dimensions of the medicalisation of shyness: biomedical and genetic approaches, the therapeutic interventions of cognitive-behaviour therapy and 'shyness clinics', and the disciplinary regimes imposed by self-help books and websites. Within a cultural climate of pervasive anxiety and privatised risk, the medicalisation of shyness suggests a powerful new way of defining and managing certain kinds of deviant identities, but we can also find some evidence of resistance to this approach. PMID:16509950

  15. Social fears during adolescence: is there an increase in distress and avoidance?

    PubMed

    Sumter, S R; Bokhorst, C L; Westenberg, P M

    2009-10-01

    Mid-adolescence is considered as the time of onset for social phobia and is assumed to be related to a normative increase of social fears. People diagnosed with social phobia, however, do not only experience high levels of fear or distress, but also report avoidance behavior. Little attention has been paid to the development of avoidance behavior during adolescence. In the current study, a community sample with 9-17 year olds (n=260) completed a questionnaire derived from the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children (ADIS-C) [Silverman, W. K., & Albano, A. M. (1996). Anxiety disorders interview schedule for DSM-IV child version, child interview schedule. San Antonio: The Psychological Corporation]. They rated their levels of distress and avoidance in a variety of social situations. The results showed an age related increase for formal speaking and interaction situations in both avoidance and distress, with a stronger increase in avoidance than in distress. The same pattern was found for girls for situations regarding observation by others. No effects were observed for informal speaking and interaction situations. PMID:19553078

  16. Taijin Kyofusho and Social Anxiety and Their Clinical Relevance in Indonesia and Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Vriends, N.; Pfaltz, M. C.; Novianti, P.; Hadiyono, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Taijin Kyofusho Scale (TKS) is an interpersonal fear to offend others and is defined by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) as a culturally bound syndrome that occurs in Japan and Korea. Recently, cases with TKS have also been recognized in other cultures. The present questionnaire study investigated self-report TKS symptoms and social anxiety symptoms, and their clinical relevance in an Indonesian and Swiss sample. It also investigated whether self-construal is associated with TKS and social anxiety, and if self-construal is a mediator of the expected association between cultural background and social anxiety and TKS symptoms. Method: 311 Indonesian and 349 Swiss university students filled out the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, the Taijin Kyofusho Scale, the Self-Construal Scale, self-report social phobia DSM-IV criteria, and rated their wish for professional help to deal with social fears. Results: TKS and social anxiety symptoms were higher in the Indonesian than the Swiss sample. TKS symptoms were associated with clinical relevance in Indonesia, whereas in Switzerland only social anxiety symptoms were associated with clinical relevance. Independent self-construal was negatively associated and interdependent self-construal was positively associated with TKS and social anxiety symptoms. Interdependent self-construal mediated the association between cultural background and these symptoms. Discussion: TKS might be a clinically relevant syndrome in all individuals or cultures with an interdependent self-construal or less independent self-construal. The proposal to include the fear of offending others in the DSM-V criteria of social phobia is supported by the present findings. PMID:23382720

  17. S-R Associations, Their Extinction, and Recovery in an Animal Model of Anxiety: A New Associative Account of Phobias Without Recall of Original Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    Associative accounts of the etiology of phobias have been criticized because of numerous cases of phobias in which the client does not remember a relevant traumatic event (i.e., Pavlovian conditioning trial), instructions, or vicarious experience with the phobic object. In three lick suppression experiments with rats as subjects, we modeled an associative account of such fears. Experiment 1 assessed stimulus-response (S-R) associations in first-order fear conditioning. After behaviorally complete devaluation of the unconditioned stimulus, the target stimulus still produced strong conditioned responses, suggesting that an S-R association had been formed and that this association was not significantly affected when the outcome was devalued through unsignaled presentations of the unconditioned stimulus. Experiments 2 and 3 examined extinction and recovery of S-R associations. Experiment 2 showed that extinguished S-R associations returned when testing occurred outside of the extinction context (i.e., renewal) and Experiment 3 found that a long delay between extinction and testing also produced a return of the extinguished S-R associations (i.e., spontaneous recovery). These experiments suggest that fears for which people cannot recall a cause are explicable in an associative framework, and indicate that those fears are susceptible to relapse after extinction treatment just like stimulus-outcome (S-O) associations. PMID:21496503

  18. S-R associations, their extinction, and recovery in an animal model of anxiety: a new associative account of phobias without recall of original trauma.

    PubMed

    Laborda, Mario A; Miller, Ralph R

    2011-06-01

    Associative accounts of the etiology of phobias have been criticized because of numerous cases of phobias in which the client does not remember a relevant traumatic event (i.e., Pavlovian conditioning trial), instructions, or vicarious experience with the phobic object. In three lick suppression experiments with rats as subjects, we modeled an associative account of such fears. Experiment 1 assessed stimulus-response (S-R) associations in first-order fear conditioning. After behaviorally complete devaluation of the unconditioned stimulus, the target stimulus still produced strong conditioned responses, suggesting that an S-R association had been formed and that this association was not significantly affected when the outcome was devalued through unsignaled presentations of the unconditioned stimulus. Experiments 2 and 3 examined extinction and recovery of S-R associations. Experiment 2 showed that extinguished S-R associations returned when testing occurred outside of the extinction context (i.e., renewal) and Experiment 3 found that a long delay between extinction and testing also produced a return of the extinguished S-R associations (i.e., spontaneous recovery). These experiments suggest that fears for which people cannot recall a cause are explicable in an associative framework, and indicate that those fears are susceptible to relapse after extinction treatment just like stimulus-outcome (S-O) associations. PMID:21496503

  19. Efficacy of three treatment protocols for adolescents with social anxiety disorder: a 5-year follow-up assessment.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lopez, Luis-Joaquin; Olivares, Jose; Beidel, Deborah; Albano, Anne-Marie; Turner, Samuel; Rosa, Ana I

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have reported long-term follow-up data in adults and even fewer in adolescents. The purpose of this work is to report on the longest follow-up assessment in the literature on treatments for adolescents with social phobia. A 5-year follow-up assessment was conducted with subjects who originally received either Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Adolescents (CBGT-A), Social Effectiveness Therapy for Adolescents--Spanish version (SET-Asv), or Intervención en Adolescentes con Fobia Social--Treatment for Adolescents with Social Phobia (IAFS) in a controlled clinical trial. Twenty-three subjects completing the treatment conditions were available for the 5-year follow-up. Results demonstrate that subjects treated either with CBGT-A, SET-Asv and IAFS continued to maintain their gains after treatments were terminated. Either the CBGT-A, SET-Asv and IAFS can provide lasting effects to the majority of adolescents with social anxiety. Issues that may contribute to future research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:16464703

  20. Psychometric properties of an innovative self-report measure: The Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults

    PubMed Central

    Caballo, Vicente E.; Arias, Benito; Salazar, Isabel C.; Irurtia, María Jesús; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the psychometric properties of a new measure of social anxiety, the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for adults (SAQ), composed of 30 items that were developed based on participants from 16 Latin American countries, Spain, and Portugal. Two groups of participants were included in the study: a non-clinical group involving 18,133 persons and a clinical group comprising 334 patients with a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (social phobia). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a 5-factor structure of the questionnaire. The factors were labeled: 1) Interactions with strangers, 2) Speaking in public/talking with people in authority, 3) Interactions with the opposite sex, 4) Criticism and embarrassment, and 5) Assertive expression of annoyance, disgust or displeasure. Psychometric evidence supported the internal consistency, convergent validity, and measurement invariance of the SAQ. To facilitate clinical applications, a ROC analysis identified cut scores for men and women for each factor and for the global score. PMID:25774643

  1. Twelve-month and lifetime prevalence and lifetime morbid risk of anxiety and mood disorders in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Ronald C; Petukhova, Maria; Sampson, Nancy A; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Wittchen, Hans-Ullrich

    2012-09-01

    Estimates of 12-month and lifetime prevalence and of lifetime morbid risk (LMR) of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) anxiety and mood disorders are presented based on US epidemiological surveys among people aged 13+. The presentation is designed for use in the upcoming DSM-5 manual to provide more coherent estimates than would otherwise be available. Prevalence estimates are presented for the age groups proposed by DSM-5 workgroups as the most useful to consider for policy planning purposes. The LMR/12-month prevalence estimates ranked by frequency are as follows: major depressive episode: 29.9%/8.6%; specific phobia: 18.4/12.1%; social phobia: 13.0/7.4%; post-traumatic stress disorder: 10.1/3.7%; generalized anxiety disorder: 9.0/2.0%; separation anxiety disorder: 8.7/1.2%; panic disorder: 6.8%/2.4%; bipolar disorder: 4.1/1.8%; agoraphobia: 3.7/1.7%; obsessive-compulsive disorder: 2.7/1.2. Four broad patterns of results are most noteworthy: first, that the most common (lifetime prevalence/morbid risk) lifetime anxiety-mood disorders in the United States are major depression (16.6/29.9%), specific phobia (15.6/18.4%), and social phobia (10.7/13.0%) and the least common are agoraphobia (2.5/3.7%) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (2.3/2.7%); second, that the anxiety-mood disorders with the earlier median ages-of-onset are phobias and separation anxiety disorder (ages 15-17) and those with the latest are panic disorder, major depression, and generalized anxiety disorder (ages 23-30); third, that LMR is considerably higher than lifetime prevalence for most anxiety-mood disorders, although the magnitude of this difference is much higher for disorders with later than earlier ages-of-onset; and fourth, that the ratio of 12-month to lifetime prevalence, roughly characterizing persistence, varies meaningfully in ways consistent with independent evidence about differential persistence of these disorders

  2. Case report of visual hallucinations in anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Ankur, SACHDEVA; Ankit, SAXENA; Manish, KANDPAL

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hallucinations rarely occur in individuals with anxiety disorders. This case report describes a 36-year-old male with Social Phobia and Agoraphobia with Panic Attacks who had prominent visual hallucinations that were both distressing and incapacitating. Treatment with sertraline 200 mg/d, clonazepam 1 mg/d, and propranolol 20 mg/day for one month completely resolved both his anxiety and the hallucinations, after which he was able to return to his social and occupational life. The report underscores the fact that visual hallucinations are not always indicators of a psychotic disorder, they may be present across a spectrum of mental disorders. In cases where hallucinations occur in nonpsychotic disorders, treatment of the underlying condition usually simultaneously resolves the associated hallucinations without the need to resort to the use of antipsychotic medication. Detailed analyses of such unusual cases can help improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of psychotic-like symptoms. PMID:26120264

  3. A polymorphic genomic duplication on human chromosome 15 is a susceptibility factor for panic and phobic disorders.

    PubMed

    Gratacòs, M; Nadal, M; Martín-Santos, R; Pujana, M A; Gago, J; Peral, B; Armengol, L; Ponsa, I; Miró, R; Bulbena, A; Estivill, X

    2001-08-10

    Anxiety disorders are complex and common psychiatric illnesses associated with considerable morbidity and social cost. We have studied the molecular basis of the cooccurrence of panic and phobic disorders with joint laxity. We have identified an interstitial duplication of human chromosome 15q24-26 (named DUP25), which is significantly associated with panic/agoraphobia/social phobia/joint laxity in families, and with panic disorder in nonfamilial cases. Mosaicism, different forms of DUP25 within the same family, and absence of segregation of 15q24-26 markers with DUP25 and the psychiatric phenotypes suggest a non-Mendelian mechanism of disease-causing mutation. We propose that DUP25, which is present in 7% control subjects, is a susceptibility factor for a clinical phenotype that includes panic and phobic disorders and joint laxity. PMID:11509185

  4. Case report of visual hallucinations in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ankur, Sachdeva; Ankit, Saxena; Manish, Kandpal

    2015-04-25

    Hallucinations rarely occur in individuals with anxiety disorders. This case report describes a 36-year-old male with Social Phobia and Agoraphobia with Panic Attacks who had prominent visual hallucinations that were both distressing and incapacitating. Treatment with sertraline 200 mg/d, clonazepam 1 mg/d, and propranolol 20 mg/day for one month completely resolved both his anxiety and the hallucinations, after which he was able to return to his social and occupational life. The report underscores the fact that visual hallucinations are not always indicators of a psychotic disorder, they may be present across a spectrum of mental disorders. In cases where hallucinations occur in nonpsychotic disorders, treatment of the underlying condition usually simultaneously resolves the associated hallucinations without the need to resort to the use of antipsychotic medication. Detailed analyses of such unusual cases can help improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of psychotic-like symptoms. PMID:26120264

  5. Biases in probabilistic category learning in relation to social anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Anna; Hermann, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Instrumental learning paradigms are rarely employed to investigate the mechanisms underlying acquired fear responses in social anxiety. Here, we adapted a probabilistic category learning paradigm to assess information processing biases as a function of the degree of social anxiety traits in a sample of healthy individuals without a diagnosis of social phobia. Participants were presented with three pairs of neutral faces with differing probabilistic accuracy contingencies (A/B: 80/20, C/D: 70/30, E/F: 60/40). Upon making their choice, negative and positive feedback was conveyed using angry and happy faces, respectively. The highly socially anxious group showed a strong tendency to be more accurate at learning the probability contingency associated with the most ambiguous stimulus pair (E/F: 60/40). Moreover, when pairing the most positively reinforced stimulus or the most negatively reinforced stimulus with all the other stimuli in a test phase, the highly socially anxious group avoided the most negatively reinforced stimulus significantly more than the control group. The results are discussed with reference to avoidance learning and hypersensitivity to negative socially evaluative information associated with social anxiety. PMID:26347685

  6. Selective mutism: more than social anxiety?

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Robin; Beidel, Deborah C; Turner, Samuel M

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between selective mutism (SM), social phobia (SP), oppositionality, and parenting styles. Twenty-one children with SP, 21 children with SM and SP, and 21 normal children ages 7-15, and the mother of each child, participated in an assessment of psychopathological factors potentially related to SM. Children with SM did not endorse higher levels of social anxiety than did children with SP, although clinicians gave higher severity ratings to those who had both disorders. In addition, although a dimensional measure of oppositionality (Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory) did not reveal group differences, there were significantly more diagnoses of oppositional defiant disorder among children with SM (29%) in comparison to children with SP alone (5%). With respect to parenting styles, there were no significant differences among parents of children with SM and the other groups, except that children with SP reported significantly less warmth/acceptance from parents than normal children. These data replicate previous findings that children with SM do not report greater social anxiety than other children with a SP diagnosis. Furthermore, they suggest that oppositional behaviors may be part of the clinical presentation of a subset of children with SM. PMID:16421889

  7. Phobia - simple/specific

    MedlinePlus

    ... person may feel extremely anxious or has a panic attack when exposed to the object of fear. Specific ... behavioral therapy, including learning to recognize and replace ... include: Getting regular exercise Getting enough sleep Reducing ...

  8. Screening for Specific Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anxiety Disorder Treating Anxiety Disorders: Educational Videos Clinical Practice Review for Major Depressive Disorder Meetings & Events Mental Health Apps Announcements Awards Alies Muskin Career Development ...

  9. Lack of a Benign Interpretation Bias in Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Nader; Prouvost, Caroline; Kuckertz, Jennie M.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive models of social anxiety posit that recurrent interpretation of ambiguous information as threatening maintains symptoms (e.g. Clark & Wells, 1995, pp. 69–93, Social phobia: Diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. New York: Guilford Press; Rapee & Heimberg, 1997, pp. 741–756, Behavior Research and Therapy, 35). However, biased interpretation may also be represented as a failure to make a benign interpretation of the ambiguous event. Furthermore, interpretation bias can be characterized by both an online (automatic) component and an offline (effortful) component (Hirsch & Clark, 2004, pp. 799–825, Clinical Psychology Review, 24). To measure both benign and threat biases, as well as examine the effect of social anxiety on offline versus online interpretations, Beard and Amir (2009, pp. 1135–1141, Behaviour Research and Therapy, 46) developed the Word Sentence Association Paradigm (WSAP). In the current study, we administered the WSAP to a group of participants diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (SAD) as well as to a group of non-anxious control (NAC) participants. We found that participants with SAD demonstrated a lack of benign online bias, but not an online threat bias when compared to NACs. However, when examining offline biases, SAD patients endorsed social threat interpretations and rejected benign social interpretations to a greater degree than non-anxious individuals. Our results, when taken together, clearly implicate the role of reduced bias toward benign information in SAD. PMID:22545788

  10. Looking on the bright side in social anxiety: the potential benefit of promoting positive mental imagery.

    PubMed

    Pictet, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Current cognitive models of social phobia converge on the view that negative imagery is a key factor in the development and maintenance of the disorder. Research to date has predominantly focussed on the detrimental impact of negative imagery on cognitive bias and anxiety symptoms, while the potential benefit of promoting positive imagery has been relatively unexplored. Emerging evidence suggests however that positive imagery could have multiple benefits such as improving positive affect, self-esteem and positive interpretation bias, and enhancing social performance. The present article defends the view that combining bias induction with a repeated practice in generating positive imagery in a cognitive bias modification procedure could represent a promising area for future research and clinical innovation in social anxiety disorder. PMID:24550815

  11. To be sure, to be sure: intolerance of uncertainty mediates symptoms of various anxiety disorders and depression.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Peter M; Mahoney, Alison E J

    2012-09-01

    The Intolerance of Uncertainty Model was initially developed as an explanation for worry within the context of generalized anxiety disorder. However, recent research has identified intolerance of uncertainty (IU) as a possible transdiagnostic maintaining factor across the anxiety disorders and depression. The aim of this study was to determine whether IU mediated the relationship between neuroticism and symptoms related to various anxiety disorders and depression in a treatment-seeking sample (N=328). Consistent with previous research, IU was significantly associated with neuroticism as well as with symptoms of social phobia, panic disorder and agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and depression. Moreover, IU explained unique variance in these symptom measures when controlling for neuroticism. Mediational analyses showed that IU was a significant partial mediator between neuroticism and all symptom measures, even when controlling for symptoms of other disorders. More specifically, anxiety in anticipation of future uncertainty (prospective anxiety) partially mediated the relationship between neuroticism and symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (i.e. worry) and obsessive-compulsive disorder, whereas inaction in the face of uncertainty (inhibitory anxiety) partially mediated the relationship between neuroticism and symptoms of social anxiety, panic disorder and agoraphobia, and depression. Sobel's test demonstrated that all hypothesized meditational pathways were associated with significant indirect effects, although the mediation effect was stronger for worry than other symptoms. Potential implications of these findings for the treatment of anxiety disorders and depression are discussed. PMID:22697442

  12. Vasopressin needs an audience: neuropeptide elicited stress responses are contingent upon perceived social evaluative threats.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Idan; Israel, Salomon; Uzefovsky, Florina; Gritsenko, Inga; Kaitz, Marsha; Ebstein, Richard P

    2011-06-01

    The nonapeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays an important role in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation and also functions as a social hormone in a wide variety of species, from voles to humans. In the current report we use a variety of stress inducing tasks, including the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and intranasal administration of AVP to show that intranasal administration of this neuropeptide leads to a significant increase in salivary cortisol and pulse rate, specifically in conditions where subjects perform tasks in the presence of a social evaluative threat (task performance could be negatively judged by others). In contrast, in conditions without a social evaluative threat (no task condition, modified TSST without audience and bike ergometry), subjects receiving AVP did not differ from subjects receiving placebo. Thus exogenous AVP's influence is contingent upon a circumscribed set of initial conditions that constitute a direct threat to the maintenance of our social selves. Stress evoked by social threat is an integral part of social life and is related to self-esteem and in extreme forms, to poor mental health (e.g., social phobia). Our findings suggest that AVP is a key component in the circuit that interlaces stress and social threat and findings offer inroads to our understanding of individual differences in sociability and in stress response elicited in threatening social situations. PMID:21554881

  13. Facilitating a benign interpretation bias in a high socially anxious population.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Rebecca; Hirsch, Colette R; Mathews, Andrew; Smith, Keren; Clark, David M

    2007-07-01

    Previous research has shown that high socially anxious individuals lack the benign interpretation bias present in people without social anxiety. The tendency of high socially anxious people to generate more negative interpretations may lead to anticipated anxiety about future social situations. If so, developing a more benign interpretation bias could lead to a reduction in this anxiety. The current study showed that a benign interpretation bias could be facilitated (or 'trained') in a high socially anxious population. Participants in the benign training groups had repeated practice in accessing benign (positive or non-negative) interpretations of potentially threatening social scenarios. Participants in the control condition were presented with the same social scenarios but without their outcomes being specified. In a later recognition task, participants who received benign interpretation training generated more benign, and less negative, interpretations of new ambiguous social situations compared to the control group. Participants who received benign training also predicted that they would be significantly less anxious in a future social situation than those in the control group. Possible implications of the findings for therapeutic interventions in social phobia are discussed. PMID:17349970

  14. Assessment and management of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Cathy; Waite, Polly; Cooper, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Anxiety disorders in childhood and adolescence are extremely common and are often associated with lifelong psychiatric disturbance. Consistent with DSM-5 and the extant literature, this review concerns the assessment and treatment of specific phobias, separation anxiety disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder and agoraphobia. Evidence-based psychological treatments (cognitive behaviour therapy; CBT) for these disorders have been developed and investigated, and in recent years promising low-intensity versions of CBT interventions have been proposed that offer a means to increase access to evidence-based treatments. There is some evidence of effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders in children and young people, however, routine prescription is not recommended due to concerns about potential harm. PMID:24636957

  15. Epidemiology of anxiety disorders in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Bandelow, Borwin; Michaelis, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobias, and separation anxiety disorder, are the most prevalent mental disorders and are associated with immense health care costs and a high burden of disease. According to large population-based surveys, up to 33.7% of the population are affected by an anxiety disorder during their lifetime. Substantial underrecognition and undertreatment of these disorders have been demonstrated. There is no evidence that the prevalence rates of anxiety disorders have changed in the past years. In cross-cultural comparisons, prevalence rates are highly variable. It is more likely that this heterogeneity is due to differences in methodology than to cultural influences. Anxiety disorders follow a chronic course; however, there is a natural decrease in prevalence rates with older age. Anxiety disorders are highly comorbid with other anxiety disorders and other mental disorders. PMID:26487813

  16. Epidemiology of anxiety disorders in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Bandelow, Borwin; Michaelis, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobias, and separation anxiety disorder, are the most prevalent mental disorders and are associated with immense health care costs and a high burden of disease. According to large population-based surveys, up to 33.7% of the population are affected by an anxiety disorder during their lifetime. Substantial underrecognition and undertreatment of these disorders have been demonstrated. There is no evidence that the prevalence rates of anxiety disorders have changed in the past years. In cross-cultural comparisons, prevalence rates are highly variable. It is more likely that this heterogeneity is due to differences in methodology than to cultural influences. Anxiety disorders follow a chronic course; however, there is a natural decrease in prevalence rates with older age. Anxiety disorders are highly comorbid with other anxiety disorders and other mental disorders. PMID:26487813

  17. Autistic traits in couple dyads as a predictor of anxiety spectrum symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lau, Winnie Yu-Pow; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Wu, Yu-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The link between parental autistic tendency and anxiety symptoms was studied in 491 Taiwanese couples raising biological children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Parental autistic tendency as measured by Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) was associated with anxiety symptoms across all domains. Large effect sizes were found in social phobia and post traumatic stress disorders for both parents, and in general anxiety disorder and agoraphobia for mothers. These associations were irrespective of child's autistic tendency, spouse's AQ scores and the couples' compatibility in their autistic tendency. Perceived family support and parental education moderated the link but not child's autistic severity. Research and clinical implications regarding psychiatric vulnerability of parents of children with ASD were drawn and discussed. PMID:24907095

  18. Psychotherapy for Anxiety in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-22

    Autism Spectrum Disorders; Autism; Asperger's Syndrome; Pervasive Developmental Disability - Not Otherwise Specified; Obsessive-compulsive Disorder; Social Phobia; Generalized Anxiety Disorder; Specific Phobia; Separation Anxiety Disorder

  19. Psychotherapy for Anxiety in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Autism Spectrum Disorders; Autism; Asperger's Syndrome; Pervasive Developmental Disability - Not Otherwise Specified; Obsessive-compulsive Disorder; Social Phobia; Generalized Anxiety Disorder; Specific Phobia; Separation Anxiety Disorder

  20. Exposure-Focused Family-Based CBT for Youth With ASD and Comorbid Anxiety

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Autism; Asperger's Syndrome; Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified; Generalized Anxiety Disorder; Social Phobia; Separation Anxiety Disorder; Obsessive-compulsive Disorder; Specific Phobia

  1. Anxiety symptoms in young people with autism spectrum disorder attending special schools: Associations with gender, adaptive functioning and autism symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Magiati, Iliana; Ong, Clarissa; Lim, Xin Yi; Tan, Julianne Wen-Li; Ong, Amily Yi Lin; Patrycia, Ferninda; Fung, Daniel Shuen Sheng; Sung, Min; Poon, Kenneth K; Howlin, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Anxiety-related problems are among the most frequently reported mental health difficulties in autism spectrum disorder. As most research has focused on clinical samples or high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder, less is known about the factors associated with anxiety in community samples across the ability range. This cross-sectional study examined the association of gender, age, adaptive functioning and autism symptom severity with different caregiver-reported anxiety symptoms. Participants were caregivers of 241 children (6-18 years old) with autism spectrum disorder attending special schools in Singapore. Measures included the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale and assessments of overall emotional, behavioural and adaptive functioning. Caregivers reported more anxiety symptoms in total, but fewer social anxiety symptoms, than Spence Children's Anxiety Scale Australian/Dutch norms. There were no gender differences. Variance in total anxiety scores was best explained by severity of repetitive speech/stereotyped behaviour symptoms, followed by adaptive functioning. Severity of repetitive speech/behaviour symptoms was a significant predictor of separation anxiety, generalized anxiety, panic/agoraphobia and obsessive-compulsive subscale symptoms, but not of social phobia and physical injury fears. Adaptive functioning and chronological age predicted social phobia and generalized anxiety symptoms only. Severity of social/communication autism symptoms did not explain any anxiety symptoms, when the other variables were controlled for. Findings are discussed in relation to the existing literature. Limitations and possible implications for prevention, assessment and intervention are also discussed. PMID:25916865

  2. Examining a dimensional representation of depression and anxiety disorders' comorbidity in psychiatric outpatients with item response modeling.

    PubMed

    McGlinchey, Joseph B; Zimmerman, Mark

    2007-08-01

    The current study replicated, in a sample of 2,300 outpatients seeking psychiatric treatment, a previous study (R. F. Krueger & M. S. Finger, 2001) that implemented an item response theory approach for modeling the comorbidity of common mood and anxiety disorders as indicators along the continuum of a shared latent factor (internalizing). The 5 disorders examined were major depressive disorder, social phobia, panic disorder/agoraphobia, specific phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder. The findings were consistent with the prior research. First, a confirmatory factor analysis yielded sufficient evidence for a nonspecific factor underlying the 5 diagnostic indicators. Second, a 2-parameter logistic item response model showed that the diagnoses were represented in the upper half of the internalizing continuum, and each was a strongly discriminating indicator of the factor. Third, the internalizing factor was significantly associated with 3 indexes of social burden: poorer social functioning, time missed from work, and lifetime hospitalizations. Rather than the categorical system of presumably discrete disorders presented in DSM-IV, these 5 mood and anxiety disorders may be alternatively viewed as higher end indicators of a common factor associated with social cost. PMID:17696702

  3. Treating Anxiety Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Phobias and Anxiety Disorders Treating Anxiety Disorders Past Issues / ... such as worry, they're most helpful for phobias, particularly social phobia and performance anxiety. Commonly prescribed: ...

  4. A Lifetime Prevalence of Comorbidity Between Bipolar Affective Disorder and Anxiety Disorders: A Meta-analysis of 52 Interview-based Studies of Psychiatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Behrouz; Mitchell, Alex J.; Nutt, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Bipolar affective disorder has a high rate of comorbidity with a multitude of psychiatric disorders and medical conditions. Among all the potential comorbidities, co-existing anxiety disorders stand out due to their high prevalence. Aims To determine the lifetime prevalence of comorbid anxiety disorders in bipolar affective disorder under the care of psychiatric services through systematic review and meta-analysis. Method Random effects meta-analyses were used to calculate the lifetime prevalence of comorbid generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobia, agoraphobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder in bipolar affective disorder. Results 52 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The rate of lifetime comorbidity was as follows: panic disorder 16.8% (95% CI 13.7–20.1), generalised anxiety disorder 14.4% (95% CI 10.8–18.3), social anxiety disorder13.3% (95% CI 10.1–16.9), post-traumatic stress disorder 10.8% (95% CI 7.3–14.9), specific phobia 10.8% (95% CI 8.2–13.7), obsessive compulsive disorder 10.7% (95% CI 8.7–13.0) and agoraphobia 7.8% (95% CI 5.2–11.0). The lifetime prevalence of any anxiety disorders in bipolar disorder was 42.7%. Conclusions Our results suggest a high rate of lifetime concurrent anxiety disorders in bipolar disorder. The diagnostic issues at the interface are particularly difficult because of the substantial symptom overlap. The treatment of co-existing conditions has clinically remained challenging. PMID:26629535

  5. Social consequences of substance abuse: the impact of comorbid psychiatric disorders. A prospective study of a nation-wide sample of treatment-seeking patients.

    PubMed

    Tómasson, K; Vaglum, P

    1998-03-01

    This is both a retrospective and a 16 and 28 months prospective study of the association between psychiatric comorbidity and social consequences (accidents, fights, broken relationships, drunken driving arrest, and reduced employment) related to alcohol in a nation-wide sample (n = 351) of substance abusers seeking inpatient treatment. Psychiatric comorbidity was evaluated with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, while drinking history and social consequences were assessed with a structured questionnaire. The social consequences had a high rate of re-occurrence. Controlled for alcohol consumption, polysubstance abuse predicted accidents (OR = 2.9) and fights (OR = 3.9) among men, while among pure alcoholics of both sexes phobia (OR = 4.3) and antisocial personality disorder (OR = 3.0) predicted fights. Only level of abuse predicted broken relationships. Antisocials had most drunken driving arrests. Attempts to reduce these social consequences should aim at treating polysubstance abuse, phobia, and antisocial personality disorder. However, the overriding aim should be the promotion of abstinence. PMID:9526766

  6. Social anxiety in parents of high-functioning children with autism and Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuusikko-Gauffin, Sanna; Pollock-Wurman, Rachel; Mattila, Marja-Leena; Jussila, Katja; Ebeling, Hanna; Pauls, David; Moilanen, Irma

    2013-03-01

    We evaluated social anxiety (SA) symptoms in parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs; N = 131) and community parents (N = 597) using the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI). SA was significantly more common in ASD than control mothers (15.6 vs. 6.7 %) and more equal between the ASD and control fathers (3.3 vs. 4.8 %). The ASD mothers scored significantly higher than control mothers on all SPAI scales. ASD fathers scored significantly higher than control fathers on the somatic, cognitive, avoidance and agoraphobic symptoms of SA. It is of clinical import to support ASD parents' well-being as their psychiatric features may contribute greatly to their children's emotional development and the well-being of the whole family. PMID:22733299

  7. Manualized Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD), also known as social phobia, is one of the most common anxiety disorders and has been shown to be effectively treated using cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Recently, a manualized CBT treatment for SAD has been developed (Hope, Heimberg, & Turk, 2006), with research demonstrating superior treatment outcomes with CBT relative to alternatives (e.g., psychotropic medication). The current case study of Henry, a 26-year old Caucasian male with SAD, implemented this manualized CBT for SAD. Treatment consisted of 15 individual sessions, with follow-ups occurring 2 and 8 months post-treatment. Henry showed marked reductions in SAD symptoms throughout the course of treatment, resulting in complete remission of SAD at the end of formal treatment. His SAD continued to be in remission at the 2-and 8-month follow-up sessions. This case study demonstrates the usefulness of a manualized, individual CBT treatment for SAD. PMID:22745596

  8. The Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project-Phase II (HARP-II): rationale, methods, and features of the sample at intake.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Risa B; Beard, Courtney; Dyck, Ingrid; Keller, Martin B

    2012-05-01

    We describe the rationale, method, and intake demographic and clinical findings of the Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project-Phase II (HARP-II). HARP-II is the first prospective, observational, longitudinal study to describe the characteristics and course of anxiety in African American, Latino, and Non-Latino White individuals. Participants met criteria for at least one of the following disorders: Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia, Panic Disorder with or without Agoraphobia, Agoraphobia without history of Panic Disorder, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. Initial intake data, collected between 2004 and 2011, are presented for 165 African American, 150 Latino, and 172 Non-Latino White participants. Participants evidenced substantial psychiatric comorbidity (mean number of Axis I disorders=3.4), and moderate to severe symptoms and functional impairment. HARP-II will examine clinical course, in the context of potential socio-cultural and individual moderators (e.g., discrimination, acculturation, negative affect). Results should lead to improved understanding, prognostics, and treatment of anxiety in diverse populations. PMID:22410095

  9. Brief Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder: A Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Pinjarkar, Ravikant G; Sudhir, Paulomi M; Math, Suresh Bada

    2015-01-01

    Context: Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice in anxiety disorders. However, there is little evidence for the effectiveness brief CBT in social anxiety. Aims: We examined the effectiveness of a brief CBT of six sessions in patients with social anxiety disorder. Settings and Design: A single case design study baseline; post and 1 month follow-up was adopted. Materials and Methods: Seven patients with a DSM IV diagnosis of social anxiety underwent 6 weekly sessions of brief CBT. Their diagnosis was confirmed using structured diagnostic interviews. They were assessed at baseline, post and 1-month follow-up on CGI- Severity, Leibowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), Social Phobia Rating Scale, Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation, and Beck's Depression Inventory. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using the method of clinical significance. Results: Results indicated that brief CBT was effective in reducing social anxiety in all patients. Brief CBT was also effective in reducing social avoidance and self consciousness. However, brief CBT was not effective in reducing fear of negative evaluation in all patients, suggesting the need for longer duration for cognitive changes in some dysfunctional beliefs. Conclusions: This preliminary case series indicates that brief CBT may be a promising and a cost and time effective approach to managing for social anxiety. PMID:25722507

  10. Social Indicators and Social Forecasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Denis F.

    The paper identifies major types of social indicators and explains how they can be used in social forecasting. Social indicators are defined as statistical measures relating to major areas of social concern and/or individual well being. Examples of social indicators are projections, forecasts, outlook statements, time-series statistics, and…

  11. Specific Phobias in Youth: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing One-Session Treatment to a Parent-Augmented One-Session Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ollendick, Thomas H.; Halldorsdottir, Thorhildur; Fraire, Maria G; Austin, Kristin E.; Noguchi, Ryoichi J. P.; Lewis, Krystal M.; Jarrett, Matthew A.; Cunningham, Natoshia R.; Canavera, Kristin; Allen, Kristy B.; Whitmore, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Examine the efficacy of a parent-augmented One Session Treatment (A-OST) in treating specific phobias (SP) in youth by comparing this novel treatment to child-focused OST, a well-established treatment. Method A total of 97 youth (ages 6–15, 51.5% female, 84.5% white) who fulfilled diagnostic criteria for SP were randomized to either A-OST or OST. SPs were assessed with semi-structured diagnostic interviews, clinician improvement ratings, and parent and child improvement ratings. In addition, measures of treatment satisfaction and parental self-efficacy were obtained. Blind assessments were completed pretreatment, post-treatment, and 1-month and 6-months following treatment. Analyses were undertaken using mixed models. In addition, gender, age, internalizing/externalizing problems, parent overprotection, and parent anxiety were examined as potential predictors and moderators of treatment outcome. Results Both treatment conditions produced similar outcomes with approximately 50% of youth in both treatments diagnosis free and judged to be much or very much improved at post-treatment and 1-month follow up. At 6-month follow up, however, the treatments diverged with OST resulting in marginally superior outcomes to A-OST, contrary to predictions. Only age of child predicted treatment outcome across the two treatments (older children did better); unexpectedly, none of the variables moderated treatment outcomes. Conclusions Parent augmentation of OST produced no appreciable gains in treatment outcomes. Directions for future research are highlighted. PMID:25645164

  12. Relations of Anxiety Sensitivity, Control Beliefs, and Maternal Over-Control to Fears in Clinic-Referred Children with Specific Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Elisabeth J; Braunstein, Kara; Ollendick, Thomas H.; Muris, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The relations of fear to anxiety sensitivity, control beliefs, and maternal overprotection were examined in 126 7- to 13-year-old clinically referred children with specific phobias. Results indicated that anxiety sensitivity and control beliefs were significant predictors of children’s fear levels, accounting for approximately 48% of the total variance. Unexpectedly, age, gender, and maternal overprotection did not emerge as significant predictors of fear in the overall sample. In subsequent analyses, anxiety sensitivity was found to be a consistent, significant predictor for both girls and boys, for both younger and older children, and for children with and without an additional anxiety disorder diagnosis. Control beliefs were only a significant predictor for girls, younger children, and children with an additional anxiety diagnosis. Maternal overprotection was not a significant predictor for any group. Children with an additional anxiety disorder diagnosis had higher levels of fear, anxiety sensitivity, and maternal overprotection, as well as lower levels of control beliefs than the non-additional anxiety disorder subgroup. Future directions and clinical implications are explored. PMID:26273182

  13. Therapists' and patients' stress responses during graduated versus flooding in vivo exposure in the treatment of specific phobia: A preliminary observational study.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Sarah; Miller, Robert; Fehm, Lydia; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Fydrich, Thomas; Ströhle, Andreas

    2015-12-15

    Exposure therapy is considered an effective treatment strategy for phobic anxiety, however, it is rarely applied in clinical practice. The under-usage might be due to various factors of which heightened stress levels not only in patients but also in therapists are presumed to be of particular relevance. The present study aimed to investigate whether different forms of exposure might lead to varying physiological and psychological stress responses in therapists and phobic patients. 25 patients with specific phobia underwent individual cognitive behavioural therapy, performed by 25 psychotherapist trainees, applying exposure sessions in graduated form or the flooding technique. Patients and therapists provided subjective evaluations of stress and five saliva samples for analysis of salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase either during two graduated exposure sessions or during one flooding session, while a regular therapy session served as control condition. Therapists displayed heightened salivary alpha-amylase release during exposure of the flooding, but not the graduated, type. Patients showed elevated salivary cortisol during flooding exposure numerically, however, not on a statistically significant level. Therapists reported more pronounced subjective stress during flooding compared to graduated exposure. Elevated stress levels should be addressed in clinical training in order to improve application of exposure in routine practice. PMID:26545614

  14. Social Change, Social Responsibility and Social Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin

    1986-01-01

    The implications of recent social changes for the social responsibility of higher education institutions are examined, and it is argued that institutions should initiate change rather than have it forced on them, but must find a balance between social responsibility and educational values. (MSE)

  15. Relations between emotional and social functioning in children with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Marni L; Suveg, Cynthia; Whitehead, Monica R

    2014-10-01

    The current study investigated concurrent relations between emotional and social functioning in youth with anxiety disorders using a multi-reporter (i.e., children, parents, teachers) assessment strategy. Ninety youth (M age = 8.98 years, SD = 1.68) with a primary diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, and/or separation anxiety disorder, and a parent participated. Regression analyses indicated that positive affect and emotion regulation coping were related to adaptive measures of social functioning, whereas positive affect, negative affect, reluctance to share emotional experiences with peers, and lability/negativity were related to maladaptive measures of social functioning in the expected directions. For youth high in lability/negativity and low in emotion regulation coping, the relationship between diagnostic severity and social problems was exacerbated. This research contributes to our understanding of the interplay of social and emotional variables and suggests that efforts to facilitate child emotional functioning may improve social functioning for anxious youth, or vice versa. PMID:24258408

  16. Social Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slover-Linett, Cheryl; Stoner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Earlier this year, CASE formed a social media task force to explore what educational institutions are trying to achieve with social media presence and learn about social media engagements at member institutions. CASE, in partnership with mStoner and Slover Linett Strategies, in June launched a benchmarking survey on social media in advancement by…

  17. [Social anxiety disorder: current status and future directions].

    PubMed

    Asakura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD; also known as social phobia) is characterized by fear of social situations involving performance or interaction. This disorder has been formally recognized as a distinct anxiety disorder since DSM-III was published in 1980. In Japan, a number of psychopathological and psychotherapeutic studies have been performed since the 1930s on a pathological condition similar to SAD, known as Taijin-kyofu (TK). TK, especially the convinced subtype of TK (c-TK; also known as the offensive subtype of TK), is described as a culture-bound syndrome similar to SAD. In proposed DSM-5 draft, it is suggested to add "offending others" to fear of being humiliating or embarrassing which were indicated in DSM-IV. It is interesting that fearing of making another person uncomfortable or "offending others" is consistent with symptom which has been investigated through c-TK in particular. The relation between SAD and TK will become clear in examination by new diagnostic criteria (DSM-5) more in future. PMID:23198595

  18. Measuring Negative Attitudes towards Overweight and Obesity in the German Population – Psychometric Properties and Reference Values for the German Short Version of the Fat Phobia Scale (FPS)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Janine; Luppa, Melanie; Ruzanska, Ulrike; Sikorski, Claudia; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obesity is one of the leading public health problems worldwide. Obese individuals are often stigmatized and the psychosocial consequences of overweight and obesity are the subject of current research. To detect stigmatizing attitudes towards obese people, the Fat Phobia Scale (FPS) was developed in the USA in the early nineties. In addition, the 14-item short form of the FPS was constructed. The FPS belongs to the most commonly used instruments for measuring negative attitudes towards obese people because of its good psychometric properties. For the recently developed German short form of the FPS, however, the comprehensive investigation of the psychometric properties and the determination of reference values are still pending. Thus, the main objectives of this study were the evaluation of the psychometric quality of the scale as well as the calculation of reference values. Methods The study was based on a representative survey in the German general population. A sample of 1,657 subjects (18–94 years) was assessed via structured telephone interviews including the 14-item German version of the FPS. Descriptive statistics and inference-statistical analyses were conducted. Reference values in terms of percentage ranks were calculated. Results Substantial evidence for the reliability and validity of the German short version of the FPS was found. This study, for the first time in Germany, provides age-specific reference values for the German short form of the FPS allowing the interpretation of individual test scores. Conclusion Facing the far-reaching consequences of experienced stigmatization of obese individuals, these study results provide an important basis for further studies aiming at the investigation of negative attitudes towards overweight and obesity. PMID:25474195

  19. Acute anxiolytic effects of quetiapine during virtual reality exposure--a double-blind placebo-controlled trial in patients with specific phobia.

    PubMed

    Diemer, Julia; Domschke, Katharina; Mühlberger, Andreas; Winter, Bernward; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Notzon, Swantje; Silling, Karen; Arolt, Volker; Zwanzger, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most frequent psychiatric disorders. With regard to pharmacological treatment, antidepressants, the calcium modulator pregabalin and benzodiazepines are recommended according to current treatment guidelines. With regard to acute states of anxiety, so far practically only benzodiazepines provide an immediate anxiolytic effect. However, the risk of tolerance and dependency limits the use of this class of medication. Therefore, there is still a need for alternative pharmacologic strategies. Increasing evidence points towards anxiety-reducing properties of atypical antipsychotics, particularly quetiapine. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the putative acute anxiolytic effects of this compound, choosing the induction of acute anxiety in patients with specific phobia as a model for the evaluation of ad-hoc anxiolytic properties in a proof-of-concept approach. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 58 patients with arachnophobia were treated with a single dose of quetiapine XR or placebo prior to a virtual reality spider challenge procedure. Treatment effects were monitored using rating scales for acute anxiety as well as measurements of heart rate and skin conductance. Overall, quetiapine showed significant anxiolytic effects compared to placebo. However, effects were not seen on the primary outcome measure (VAS Anxiety), but were limited to somatic anxiety symptoms. Additionally, a significant reduction of skin conductance was observed. Further exploratory analyses hint towards a mediating role of the (COMT) val158met genotype on treatment response. The present results thus suggest a possible suitability of quetiapine in the acute treatment of anxiety, particularly with regard to somatic symptoms. PMID:23375006

  20. Fearfulness moderates the link between childhood social withdrawal and adolescent reward response.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Judith K; Shaw, Daniel S; Forbes, Erika E

    2015-06-01

    Withdrawal from peers during childhood may reflect disruptions in reward functioning that heighten vulnerability to affective disorders during adolescence. The association between socially withdrawn behavior and reward functioning may depend on traits that influence this withdrawal, such as fearfulness or unsociability. In a study of 129 boys, we evaluated how boys' fearfulness and sociability at age 5 and social withdrawal at school at ages 6 to 10 and during a summer camp at age 9/10 were associated with their neural response to reward at age 20. Greater social withdrawal during childhood was associated with heightened striatal and mPFC activation when anticipating rewards at age 20. Fearfulness moderated this effect to indicate that social withdrawal was associated with heightened reward-related response in the striatum for boys high on fearfulness. Altered striatal response associated with social withdrawal and fearfulness predicted greater likelihood to have a lifetime history of depression and social phobia at age 20. These findings add greater specificity to previous findings that children high in traits related to fear of novelty show altered reward responses, by identifying fearfulness (but not low levels of sociability) as a potential underlying mechanism that contributes to reward alterations in withdrawn children. PMID:25193948

  1. Social Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veroff, Joseph

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes different types of social motivation that have interested social psychologists within a developmental paradigm. Currently, cognition is a central aspect of motivational psychology. Individuals' motive patterns are seen to change over the life cycle. (Author/AV)

  2. [Diagnosis and Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder].

    PubMed

    Asakura, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Many studies of social anxiety disorder (SAD) have been conducted because diagnostic criteria are defined as social phobia in DSM-III in the West. In Japan, several studies have examined pathological conditions similar to SAD, known as taijin-kyofu (TK). This highly remarkable disorder involves a convincing fear of giving another person discomfort from one's physical faults (e.g. feeling that neighboring people detect an unpleasant smell from one's body, "jikoshu-kyofu", or feeling that neighboring people feel unpleasant because of one's appearance,"shukei-kyofu") termed "convinced subtype of TK" (c-TK; also known as offensive subtype of TK). In DSM-5, the definitions of feeling rejection and offense of others are added to a fear of humiliating or embarrassing oneself. Moreover, TK is a sufficient criterion for SAD. However, it is confusing that body dysmorphic disorder is not in category of somatoform disorders but in that of obsessive-compulsive disorder and related disorders and that the Japanese terms of "jikoshu-kyofu" and "shubo-kyofu" are categorized as other specified obsessive-compulsive disorder and related disorders. The efficacy and tolerability of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for the treatment of SAD has been reported in many controlled studies. Recently, SSRIs are regarded as first line pharmacotherapy for SAD. Cognitive behavioral therapy is also effective for SAD treatment. High rates of co-occurring SAD and other psychiatric disorders can be found in clinical samples and in the general population. Additional research must be conducted for these patients and for the management of treatment-refractory SAD patients. PMID:26524867

  3. Street Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinnecker, Jurgen

    1980-01-01

    Recommends that social scientists undertake research on the role of the street as an institution of youth education and socialization. Discusses related literature and presents information on a project undertaken on street socialization in some of the old town quarters of Wiesbaden, Germany from 1975-1978. (DB)

  4. Social Individualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornille, Thomas A.; Harrigan, John

    Relationships between individuals and society have often been presented from the perspective of the social institution. Social psychology has addressed the variables that affect the individual in relationships with larger groups. Social individualism is a conceptual framework that explores the relationship of the individual and society from the…

  5. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS ASSOCIATED WITH FXTAS

    PubMed Central

    Seritan, Andreea L.; Ortigas, Melina; Seritan, Stefan; Bourgeois, James A.; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2015-01-01

    Carriers of the FMR1 premutation (with 55-200 CGG repeats) may present with multiple medical and psychiatric disorders. Middle-aged carriers (males more often than females) may suffer from fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). FXTAS is a newly discovered neurodegenerative disease characterized by intention tremor and ataxia, along with several other neurological features. Psychiatric manifestations are common in premutation carriers of both genders and include attention deficits, anxiety, depression, irritability, impulse dyscontrol, and substance abuse or dependence. Major depressive disorder, panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, and specific phobia are among the psychiatric diagnoses often encountered in premutation carriers, including those with FXTAS. Later in the course of the illness, cognitive deficits (including dementia) may occur. In this paper, we discuss common psychiatric phenotypes in FXTAS, based on a thorough review of the literature, as well as our own research experience. Symptomatic pharmacologic treatments are available, although disease modifying agents have not yet been developed. PMID:25620899

  6. Delayed reaction to trauma in an aging woman.

    PubMed

    Ladson, Darnell; Bienenfeld, David

    2007-06-01

    Events of later life may awaken long-suppressed memories and feelings and yield emotional or behavioral problems that are evidence of an early traumatic experience. It is believed that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-like symptoms are more prevalent in the younger general population, but the lack of data supporting PTSD in the elderly may be due to the complicated presentation. The elderly often present to psychotherapy with comorbid diagnoses and may underreport their symptoms, or the symptoms may be masked by other diagnoses. PTSD is associated with increased rates of major depressive disorder, substance-related disorders, panic disorder, agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, and bipolar disorder. Most of the literature on PTSD in the elderly stems from research on Holocaust or World War II survivors. In this paper, we will explore this particular dimension of late-life onset mental disorder with attention to the relevance of old trauma in performing psychodynamic psychotherapy. PMID:20711335

  7. Social Indicators and Social Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parke, Robert; Seidman, David

    1978-01-01

    Describes the several research traditions which combine to form the social indicators movement. All the traditions share concern for measurement, analysis, and reporting of aspects of social conditions to a general audience. Journal available from: American Academy of Political and Social Science, 3937 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania…

  8. Paranoid Thoughts in Adolescents with Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Pisano, S; Catone, G; Pascotto, A; Iuliano, R; Tiano, C; Milone, A; Masi, G; Gritti, A

    2016-10-01

    Recently, social anxiety disorder (SAD) and paranoia have been demonstrated to be closely related. However, data were primarily drawn from adult community samples or patients with schizophrenia. The present study used a cross-sectional design to evaluate a sample of adolescents with SAD (n = 30, mean age 15.3 ± 0.9 years) compared with an age- and sex-matched group of healthy controls (n = 26, mean age 15.9 ± 1.6 years). The SAD group displayed more frequent and intense paranoid thoughts than the control group (t = 4.16, p < 0.001). The level of paranoid thoughts was significantly predicted by the degree of social phobia, even after adjusting for sex and other anxiety disorders, although adjusting for depression slightly reduced the extent and significance of the prediction. A lack of awareness about the association between SAD and paranoia may lead to incorrect diagnoses (e.g. misdiagnosis of psychotic disorders), or it may negatively influence the (psycho)therapeutic process and patient outcomes. PMID:26658937

  9. A study of poor insight in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Paula; de Menezes, Gabriela B; Harrison, Ben J; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2014-11-30

    We investigated levels of insight among patients with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) as compared to patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and evaluated whether levels of insight in SAD were related to specific sociodemographic and/or clinical features. Thirty-seven SAD patients and 51 OCD patients attending a tertiary obsessive-compulsive and anxiety disorders clinic were assessed with a sociodemographic and clinical questionnaire, a structured diagnostic interview, the Brown Assessment of Beliefs Scale (BABS), the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), and the Treatment Adherence Survey-patient version (TAS-P). According to the BABS, SAD patients exhibited insight levels that were as low as those exhibited by OCD patients, with up to 29.7% of them being described as "poor insight" SAD. Although poor insight SAD patients were more frequently married, less depressed and displayed a statistical trend towards greater rates of early drop-out from cognitive-behavioral therapy, their insight levels were not associated with other variables of interest, including sex, age, employment, age at onset, duration of illness, associated psychiatric disorders, SPIN and SDS scores. Patients with poor insight SAD might perceive their symptoms as being less distressful and thus report fewer depressive symptoms and high rates of treatment non-adherence. PMID:24972547

  10. [Impact of DSM-5: Application and Problems Based on Clinical and Research Viewpoints on Anxiety Disorders].

    PubMed

    Shioiri, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    of fears from two or more agoraphobia-related situations is now required, because this is a robust means for distinguishing agoraphobia from specific phobias. Also, the criteria for agoraphobia are now extended to be consistent with criteria sets for other anxiety disorders (e.g., a clinician's judgment of the fears as being out of proportion to the actual danger in the situation, with a typical duration of 6 months or more). From the above, these changes from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 in anxiety disorders make our judgments faster and more efficient in clinical practice, and DSM-5 is more useful to elucidate the pathology. In this manuscript, we discuss the application and problems based on clinical and research viewpoints regarding anxiety disorders in DSM-5. PMID:26827411

  11. Heterocentric language in commonly used measures of social anxiety: recommended alternate wording.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Brandon J; Hope, Debra A; Capozzoli, Michelle C

    2013-03-01

    A number of self-report measures of social anxiety contain language that appears to assume heterosexuality. It is unclear how such items should be answered by individuals who are not exclusively heterosexual, which may lead to inaccurate measurement of symptoms, perpetuation of stigma, and alienation of respondents. More specific wording could improve measurement accuracy for sexual minorities as well as heterosexual respondents. Gender-neutral wording was developed for items containing the phrase "opposite sex" in commonly used self-report measures of social anxiety (Interaction Anxiousness Scale [Leary, 1983], Social Avoidance and Distress Scale [Watson & Friend, 1969], Social Interaction Anxiety Scale [Mattick & Clarke, 1998], and Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory [Turner, Beidel, Dancu, & Stanley, 1989]). Undergraduate college students (N=405; mean age=19.88, SD=2.05) completed measures containing original and revised items. Overall, results indicated that the alternate-worded items demonstrated equivalent or slightly stronger psychometric properties compared to original items. Select alternate-worded items are recommended for clinical and research use, and directions for future research are recommended. PMID:23312422

  12. Direct and indirect predictors of social anxiety: The role of anxiety sensitivity, behavioral inhibition, experiential avoidance and self-consciousness.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Georgia; Karekla, Maria; Panayiotou, Margarita

    2014-11-01

    Using mediated and moderated regression, this study examined the hypothesis that anxiety sensitivity, the tendency to be concerned about anxiety symptoms, and behavioral inhibition, the tendency to withdraw from novel and potentially dangerous stimuli, predict social anxiety indirectly through experiential avoidance as measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II and self-consciousness, as measured by the Self-Consciousness Scale. Behavioral inhibition and anxiety sensitivity are operationalized as temperamental traits, while experiential avoidance and self-consciousness are seen as learned emotion regulation strategies. Study 1 included college student groups from Cyprus scoring high and low on social anxiety (N=64 and N=63) as measured by the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory. Study 2 examined a random community sample aged 18-65 (N=324) treating variables as continuous and using the Psychiatric Disorders Screening Questionnaire to screen for social anxiety. Results suggest that experiential avoidance, but not self-consciousness mediates the effects of anxiety sensitivity on predicting social anxiety status, but that behavioral inhibition predicts social anxiety directly and not through the proposed mediators. Moderation effects were not supported. Overall, the study finds that social anxiety symptomatology is predicted not only by behavioral inhibition, but also anxiety sensitivity, when individuals take actions to avoid anxious experiences. Modifying such avoidant coping approaches may be more beneficial for psychological treatments than attempts to change long-standing, temperamental personality traits. PMID:25214373

  13. Peer social interaction is facilitated in juvenile rhesus monkeys treated with fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Bulleri, Alicia M

    2016-06-01

    Fluoxetine improves social interactions in children with autism, social anxiety and social phobia. It is not known whether this effect is mediated directly or indirectly by correcting the underlying pathology. Genetics may also influence the drug effect. Polymorphisms of the MAOA (monoamine oxidase A) gene interact with fluoxetine to influence metabolic profiles in juvenile monkeys. Juvenile nonhuman primates provide an appropriate model for studying fluoxetine effects and drug*gene interactions in children. Male rhesus monkeys 1-3 years of age living in permanent social pairs were treated daily with a therapeutic dose of fluoxetine or vehicle (n = 16/group). Both members of each social pair were assigned to the same treatment group. They were observed for social interactions with their familiar cagemate over a 2-year dosing period. Subjects were genotyped for MAOA variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphisms categorized for high or low transcription rates (hi-MAOA, low-MAOA). Fluoxetine-treated animals spent 30% more time in social interaction than vehicle controls. Fluoxetine significantly increased the duration of quiet interactions, the most common type of interaction, and also of immature sexual behavior typical of rhesus in this age group. Specific behaviors affected depended on MAOA genotype of the animal and its social partner. When given fluoxetine, hi-MOAO monkeys had more social invitation and initiation behaviors and low-MAOA subjects with low-MAOA partners had more grooming and an increased frequency of some facial and vocal expressive behaviors. Fluoxetine may facilitate social interaction in children independent of remediation of psychopathology. Common genetic variants may modify this effect. PMID:26905291

  14. Symptoms: Personal snapshots of anxiety disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Phobias and Anxiety Disorders Symptoms: Personal snapshots of anxiety ... And it was scary.” Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia): "In any social situation, I felt fear. I ...

  15. Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Cam, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on social studies instruction and technology: (1) "Waking the Sleeping Giant: Social Studies Teacher Educators Collaborate To Integrate Technology into Methods' Courses" (Cheryl Mason, Marsha Alibrandi, Michael Berson, Kara Dawson, Rich Diem, Tony Dralle, David Hicks, Tim Keiper, and John Lee); (2)…

  16. Social cognition.

    PubMed

    Patin, Alexandra; Hurlemann, René

    2015-01-01

    Social cognition is a major problem underlying deficiencies in interpersonal relationships in several psychiatric populations. And yet there is currently no gold standard for pharmacological treatment of psychiatric illness that directly targets these social cognitive areas. This chapter serves to illustrate some of the most innovative attempts at pharmacological modulation of social cognition in psychiatric illnesses including schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder, autism spectrum disorders, antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy, social anxiety disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Pharmacological modulation includes studies administering oxytocin, ecstasy (MDMA), modafinil, methylphenidate, and D-cycloserine. Furthermore, some background on social cognition research in healthy individuals, which could be helpful in developing future treatments, is provided as well as the potential for each drug as a long-term treatment option. PMID:25977087

  17. A randomized controlled trial of attention bias modification training for socially anxious adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Amanda; Rawdon, Caroline; Dooley, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    The current study aimed to examine the efficacy of attention bias modification (ABM) training to reduce social anxiety in a community-based sample of adolescents 15-18 years. The study used a single-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial design (Clinical Trials ID: NCT02270671). Participants were screened in second-level schools using a social anxiety questionnaire. 130 participants scoring ≥24 on the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C) were randomized to the ABM training (n = 66)/placebo (n = 64) group, 120 of which completed pre-, post-, and 12-week follow-up data collection including threat bias, anxiety, and depression measures. The ABM intervention included 4 weekly training sessions using a dot-probe task designed to reduce attention bias to threatening stimuli. ABM training did not alter the primary outcomes of attention bias to threat or social anxiety symptoms raising questions about the efficacy of ABM as an intervention for adolescents. PMID:27379745

  18. Social Anxiety Modulates Risk Sensitivity through Activity in the Anterior Insula

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Grace S.; van den Bos, Wouter; Andrade, Eduardo B.; McClure, Samuel M.

    2012-01-01

    Decision neuroscience offers the potential for decomposing differences in behavior across individuals into components of valuation intimately tied to brain function. One application of this approach lies in novel conceptualizations of behavioral attributes that are aberrant in psychiatric disorders. We investigated the relationship between social anxiety and behavior in a novel socially determined risk task. Behaviorally, higher scores on a social phobia inventory (SPIN) among healthy participants were associated with an increase in risky responses. Furthermore, activity in a region of the dorsal anterior insula (dAI) scaled in proportion to SPIN score in risky versus non-risky choices. This region of the insula was functionally connected to areas in the intraparietal sulcus and anterior cingulate cortex that were related to decision-making across all participants. Overall, social anxiety was associated with decreased risk aversion in our task, consistent with previous results investigating risk taking in many everyday behaviors. Moreover, this difference was linked to the anterior insula, a region commonly implicated in risk attitudes and socio-emotional processes. PMID:22319462

  19. Coping behavior in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kumiko; Fujii, Isao; Akiyoshi, Jotaro; Nagayama, Haruo

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to investigate the role of coping behavior in patients with panic disorder (PD). This was done by evaluating three items of coping behavior (seeking of social support, wishful thinking and avoidance) in the Ways of Coping Checklist. The subjects consisted of 30 patients with PD (26 with agoraphobia). Coping behavior and the severity of PD was investigated at baseline and at 24 months (the final outcome). At baseline there were no gender differences in coping behavior. The severity of panic attacks significantly correlated with that of agoraphobia. The baseline severity of PD (panic attacks and agoraphobia) did not correlate with coping behavior. At the outcome assessment there was no significant correlation between the severity of panic attack and coping behavior. The severity of agoraphobia at final outcome and the coping behavior (seeking of social support) at baseline were significantly correlated. In the group that had remission in agoraphobia (the good outcome group), the severity of agoraphobia at baseline was significantly lower and the seeking of social support coping behavior was significantly higher than that of the poor outcome group. No significant difference in panic attack severity was noted between the good and poor outcome groups. Discriminant analysis revealed that seeking of social support coping behavior was a significant discriminant factor of agoraphobia. Although these are preliminary data, special coping behavior might be related to improvement of agoraphobia in patients with PD. PMID:15009823

  20. THE ANXIETY SPECTRUM AND THE REFLEX PHYSIOLOGY OF DEFENSE: FROM CIRCUMSCRIBED FEAR TO BROAD DISTRESS

    PubMed Central

    McTeague, Lisa M.; Lang, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Guided by the diagnostic nosology, anxiety patients are expected to show defensive hyperarousal during affective challenge, irrespective of the principal phenotype. In the current study, patients representing the whole spectrum of anxiety disorders (i.e., specific phobia, social phobia, panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), posttraumatic stress disorder(PTSD)), and healthy community control participants, completed an imagery-based fear elicitation paradigm paralleling conventional intervention techniques. Participants imagined threatening and neutral narratives as physiological responses were recorded. Clear evidence emerged for exaggerated reactivity to clinically relevant imagery—most pronounced in startle reflex responding. However, defensive propensity varied across principal anxiety disorders. Disorders characterized by focal fear and impairment (e.g., specific phobia) showed robust fear potentiation. Conversely, for disorders of long-enduring, pervasive apprehension and avoidance with broad anxiety and depression comorbidity (e.g., PTSD secondary to cumulative trauma, GAD), startle responses were paradoxically diminished to all aversive contents. Patients whose expressed symptom profiles were intermediate between focal fearfulness and broad anxious-misery in both severity and chronicity exhibited a still heightened but more generalized physiological propensity to respond defensively. Importantly, this defensive physiological gradient—the inverse of self-reported distress—was evident not only between but also within disorders. These results highlight that fear circuitry could be dysregulated in chronic, pervasive anxiety, and preliminary functional neuroimaging findings suggest that deficient amygdala recruitment could underlie attenuated reflex responding. In summary, adaptive defensive engagement during imagery may be compromised by long-term dysphoria and stress—a phenomenon